WorldWideScience

Sample records for prostate tumor targeting

  1. Characterization of Heterogeneous Prostate Tumors in Targeted Pten Knockout Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanneke Korsten

    Full Text Available Previously, we generated a preclinical mouse prostate tumor model based on PSA-Cre driven inactivation of Pten. In this model homogeneous hyperplastic prostates (4-5m developed at older age (>10m into tumors. Here, we describe the molecular and histological characterization of the tumors in order to better understand the processes that are associated with prostate tumorigenesis in this targeted mouse Pten knockout model. The morphologies of the tumors that developed were very heterogeneous. Different histopathological growth patterns could be identified, including intraductal carcinoma (IDC, adenocarcinoma and undifferentiated carcinoma, all strongly positive for the epithelial cell marker Cytokeratin (CK, and carcinosarcomas, which were negative for CK. IDC pattern was already detected in prostates of 7-8 month old mice, indicating that it could be a precursor stage. At more than 10 months IDC and carcinosarcoma were most frequently observed. Gene expression profiling discriminated essentially two molecular subtypes, denoted tumor class 1 (TC1 and tumor class 2 (TC2. TC1 tumors were characterized by high expression of epithelial markers like Cytokeratin 8 and E-Cadherin whereas TC2 tumors showed high expression of mesenchyme/stroma markers such as Snail and Fibronectin. These molecular subtypes corresponded with histological growth patterns: where TC1 tumors mainly represented adenocarcinoma/intraductal carcinoma, in TC2 tumors carcinosarcoma was the dominant growth pattern. Further molecular characterization of the prostate tumors revealed an increased expression of genes associated with the inflammatory response. Moreover, functional markers for senescence, proliferation, angiogenesis and apoptosis were higher expressed in tumors compared to hyperplasia. The highest expression of proliferation and angiogenesis markers was detected in TC2 tumors. Our data clearly showed that in the genetically well-defined PSA-Cre;Pten-loxP/loxP prostate tumor

  2. Tumor-specific RNA interference targeting Pokemon suppresses tumor growth and induces apoptosis in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yining; Xu, Shuxiong; Wang, Xiangwei; Shi, Hua; Sun, Zhaolin; Yang, Zhao

    2013-02-01

    To explore the exact mechanism of Pokemon in prostate cancer. Pokemon is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Its main function is suppression of the p14ARF (alternate reading frame) tumor suppressor gene. Although Pokemon expression has been found to be increased in various types of lymphoma, the exact mechanism of the gene in prostate cancer is not clear. In the present study, prostate cancer cells were transfected with the specific short hairpin ribonucleic acid (RNA) expression vector targeting Pokemon. The expression of Pokemon messenger RNA and its protein was detected by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. The cell growth and cell apoptosis were also examined using the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and flow cytometry. The results demonstrated that specific RNA interference (RNAi) could decrease the expression levels of Pokemon gene messenger RNA and protein in prostate cancer cells. In addition, that specific RNAi significantly inhibited the cell proliferation and increased the apoptotic rate. In vivo experiments showed that specific RNAi inhibited the tumorigenicity of prostate cancer cells and significantly suppressed tumor growth. Therefore, an RNAi-targeted Pokemon gene strategy could be a potential approach to prostate cancer therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0163 TITLE: Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer ...Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Feng Yang, Ph.D. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER E-Mail: fyang@bcm.edu...W81XWH-13-1-0163 " Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer " Introduction AR signaling

  4. Targeting receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) expression induces apoptosis and inhibits prostate tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elangovan, Indira; Thirugnanam, Sivasakthivel; Chen, Aoshuang; Zheng, Guoxing; Bosland, Maarten C.; Kajdacsy-Balla, André; Gnanasekar, Munirathinam

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Targeting RAGE by RNAi induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. ► Silencing RAGE expression abrogates rHMGB1 mediated cell proliferation. ► Down regulation of RAGE by RNAi inhibits PSA secretion of prostate cancer cells. ► Knock down of RAGE abrogates prostate tumor growth in vivo. ► Disruption of RAGE expression in prostate tumor activates death receptors. -- Abstract: Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays a key role in the progression of prostate cancer. However, the therapeutic potential of targeting RAGE expression in prostate cancer is not yet evaluated. Therefore in this study, we have investigated the effects of silencing the expression of RAGE by RNAi approach both in vitro and in vivo. The results of this study showed that down regulation of RAGE expression by RNAi inhibited the cell proliferation of androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (DU-145) prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, targeting RAGE expression resulted in apoptotic elimination of these prostate cancer cells by activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 death signaling. Of note, the levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) were also reduced in LNCaP cells transfected with RAGE RNAi constructs. Importantly, the RAGE RNAi constructs when administered in nude mice bearing prostate tumors, inhibited the tumor growth by targeting the expression of RAGE, and its physiological ligand, HMGB1 and by up regulating death receptors DR4 and DR5 expression. Collectively, the results of this study for the first time show that targeting RAGE by RNAi may be a promising alternative therapeutic strategy for treating prostate cancer.

  5. Targeting Tumor Oct4 to Deplete Prostate Tumor and Metastasis Initiating Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    is associated with androgen receptor (AR). We detected Oct4 protein expression in prostate cancer cells as well as in tumor tissue specimens...unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Identification of genes driving prostate carcinogenesis will lead to new cancer treatment. The human...a pseudogene of embryonic Oct4 (POU5F1). A recent study found that tumor Oct4 found in prostate cancer cells is due to the gene expression of POU5F1B

  6. Targeting MEK5 Enhances Radiosensitivity of Human Prostate Cancer and Impairs Tumor-Associated Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    analysis of tumor necrosis factor - alpha resistant human breast cancer cells reveals a MEK5/Erk5-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition phenotype...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0296 TITLE: Targeting MEK5 Enhances Radiosensitivity of Human Prostate Cancer and Impairs Tumor - Associated...Cancer and Impairs Tumor -Associated Angiogenesis 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0296 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  7. A comparison of prostate tumor targeting strategies using magnetic resonance imaging-targeted, transrectal ultrasound-guided fusion biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Peter R; Cool, Derek W; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D

    2018-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy aims to reduce the 21-47% false-negative rate of clinical two-dimensional (2D) TRUS-guided systematic biopsy, but continues to yield false-negative results. This may be improved via needle target optimization, accounting for guidance system errors and image registration errors. As an initial step toward the goal of optimized prostate biopsy targeting, we investigated how needle delivery error impacts tumor sampling probability for two targeting strategies. We obtained MRI and 3D TRUS images from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident assessed these MR images and contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding tumor surfaces that were registered to 3D TRUS. The biopsy system's root-mean-squared needle delivery error (RMSE) and systematic error were modeled using an isotropic 3D Gaussian distribution. We investigated two different prostate tumor-targeting strategies using (a) the tumor's centroid and (b) a ring in the lateral-elevational plane. For each simulation, targets were spaced at equal arc lengths on a ring with radius equal to the systematic error magnitude. A total of 1000 biopsy simulations were conducted for each tumor, with RMSE and systematic error magnitudes ranging from 1 to 6 mm. The difference in median tumor sampling probability and probability of obtaining a 50% core involvement was determined for ring vs centroid targeting. Our simulation results indicate that ring targeting outperformed centroid targeting in situations where systematic error exceeds RMSE. In these instances, we observed statistically significant differences showing 1-32% improvement in sampling probability due to ring targeting. Likewise, we observed statistically significant differences showing 1-39% improvement in 50% core involvement probability due to ring targeting. Our results suggest that the optimal targeting scheme for prostate biopsy depends on

  8. Understanding and Targeting Tumor Microenvironment in Prostate Cancer to Inhibit Tumor Progression and Castration Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    cancer-secreted chemokine to attract Cxcr2-expressing MDSCs and, correspondingly, pharmacological inhibition of Cxcr2 impeded tumor progression...impact of pharmacological inhibition of Cxcl5 and Cxcr2 on MDSCs using the transwell migration assay 26 . First, anti-Cxcl5 neutralizing antibody...and MRI . (B) Generation of the CPPSML chimera model. (C) Fluorescence microscopy and H&E image of snap frozen prostate tumor from chimera showing that

  9. BMI-1 targeting interferes with patient-derived tumor-initiating cell survival and tumor growth in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuff, Shamila; Davis, Stephani; Flaherty, Kathleen; Huselid, Eric; Patrizii, Michele; Jones, Daniel; Cao, Liangxian; Sydorenko, Nadiya; Moon, Young-Choon; Zhong, Hua; Medina, Daniel J.; Kerrigan, John; Stein, Mark N.; Kim, Isaac Y.; Davis, Thomas W.; DiPaola, Robert S.; Bertino, Joseph R.; Sabaawy, Hatem E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Current prostate cancer (PCa) management calls for identifying novel and more effective therapies. Self-renewing tumor-initiating cells (TICs) hold intrinsic therapy-resistance and account for tumor relapse and progression. As BMI-1 regulates stem cell self-renewal, impairing BMI-1 function for TICs-tailored therapies appears to be a promising approach. Experimental design We have previously developed a combined immunophenotypic and time-of-adherence assay to identify CD49bhiCD29hiCD44hi cells as human prostate TICs. We utilized this assay with patient derived prostate cancer cells and xenograft models to characterize the effects of pharmacological inhibitors of BMI-1. Results We demonstrate that in cell lines and patient-derived TICs, BMI-1 expression is upregulated and associated with stem cell-like traits. From a screened library, we identified a number of post-transcriptional small molecules that target BMI-1 in prostate TICs. Pharmacological inhibition of BMI-1 in patient-derived cells significantly decreased colony formation in vitro and attenuated tumor initiation in vivo, thereby functionally diminishing the frequency of TICs, particularly in cells resistant to proliferation- and androgen receptor (AR)-directed therapies, without toxic effects on normal tissues. Conclusions Our data offer a paradigm for targeting TICs and support the development of BMI-1-targeting therapy for a more effective PCa treatment. PMID:27307599

  10. PSMA-targeted polyinosine/polycytosine vector induces prostate tumor regression and invokes an antitumor immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langut, Yael; Talhami, Alaa; Mamidi, Samarasimhareddy; Shir, Alexei; Zigler, Maya; Joubran, Salim; Sagalov, Anna; Flashner-Abramson, Efrat; Edinger, Nufar; Klein, Shoshana; Levitzki, Alexander

    2017-12-26

    There is an urgent need for an effective treatment for metastatic prostate cancer (PC). Prostate tumors invariably overexpress prostate surface membrane antigen (PSMA). We designed a nonviral vector, PEI-PEG-DUPA (PPD), comprising polyethylenimine-polyethyleneglycol (PEI-PEG) tethered to the PSMA ligand, 2-[3-(1, 3-dicarboxy propyl)ureido] pentanedioic acid (DUPA), to treat PC. The purpose of PEI is to bind polyinosinic/polycytosinic acid (polyIC) and allow endosomal release, while DUPA targets PC cells. PolyIC activates multiple pathways that lead to tumor cell death and to the activation of bystander effects that harness the immune system against the tumor, attacking nontargeted neighboring tumor cells and reducing the probability of acquired resistance and disease recurrence. Targeting polyIC directly to tumor cells avoids the toxicity associated with systemic delivery. PPD selectively delivered polyIC into PSMA-overexpressing PC cells, inducing apoptosis, cytokine secretion, and the recruitment of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). PSMA-overexpressing tumors in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice with partially reconstituted immune systems were significantly shrunken following PPD/polyIC treatment, in all cases. Half of the tumors showed complete regression. PPD/polyIC invokes antitumor immunity, but unlike many immunotherapies does not need to be personalized for each patient. The potent antitumor effects of PPD/polyIC should spur its development for clinical use.

  11. Co-stimulatory signaling determines tumor antigen sensitivity and persistence of CAR T cells targeting PSCA+ metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priceman, Saul J; Gerdts, Ethan A; Tilakawardane, Dileshni; Kennewick, Kelly T; Murad, John P; Park, Anthony K; Jeang, Brook; Yamaguchi, Yukiko; Yang, Xin; Urak, Ryan; Weng, Lihong; Chang, Wen-Chung; Wright, Sarah; Pal, Sumanta; Reiter, Robert E; Wu, Anna M; Brown, Christine E; Forman, Stephen J

    2018-01-01

    Advancing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered adoptive T cells for the treatment of solid cancers is a major focus in the field of immunotherapy, given impressive recent clinical responses in hematological malignancies. Prostate cancer may be amenable to T cell-based immunotherapy since several tumor antigens, including prostate stem-cell antigen (PSCA), are widely over-expressed in metastatic disease. While antigen selectivity of CARs for solid cancers is crucial, it is problematic due to the absence of truly restricted tumor antigen expression and potential safety concerns with "on-target off-tumor" activity. Here, we show that the intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain can determine a CAR's sensitivity for tumor antigen expression. A 4-1BB intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain in PSCA-CARs confers improved selectivity for higher tumor antigen density, reduced T cell exhaustion phenotype, and equivalent tumor killing ability compared to PSCA-CARs containing the CD28 co-stimulatory signaling domain. PSCA-CARs exhibit robust in vivo anti-tumor activity in patient-derived bone-metastatic prostate cancer xenograft models, and 4-1BB-containing CARs show superior T cell persistence and control of disease compared with CD28-containing CARs. Our study demonstrates the importance of co-stimulation in defining an optimal CAR T cell, and also highlights the significance of clinically relevant models in developing solid cancer CAR T cell therapies.

  12. Co-stimulatory signaling determines tumor antigen sensitivity and persistence of CAR T cells targeting PSCA+ metastatic prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priceman, Saul J.; Gerdts, Ethan A.; Tilakawardane, Dileshni; Kennewick, Kelly T.; Murad, John P.; Park, Anthony K.; Jeang, Brook; Yamaguchi, Yukiko; Urak, Ryan; Weng, Lihong; Chang, Wen-Chung; Wright, Sarah; Pal, Sumanta; Reiter, Robert E.; Brown, Christine E.; Forman, Stephen J.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Advancing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered adoptive T cells for the treatment of solid cancers is a major focus in the field of immunotherapy, given impressive recent clinical responses in hematological malignancies. Prostate cancer may be amenable to T cell-based immunotherapy since several tumor antigens, including prostate stem-cell antigen (PSCA), are widely over-expressed in metastatic disease. While antigen selectivity of CARs for solid cancers is crucial, it is problematic due to the absence of truly restricted tumor antigen expression and potential safety concerns with “on-target off-tumor” activity. Here, we show that the intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain can determine a CAR's sensitivity for tumor antigen expression. A 4-1BB intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain in PSCA-CARs confers improved selectivity for higher tumor antigen density, reduced T cell exhaustion phenotype, and equivalent tumor killing ability compared to PSCA-CARs containing the CD28 co-stimulatory signaling domain. PSCA-CARs exhibit robust in vivo anti-tumor activity in patient-derived bone-metastatic prostate cancer xenograft models, and 4-1BB-containing CARs show superior T cell persistence and control of disease compared with CD28-containing CARs. Our study demonstrates the importance of co-stimulation in defining an optimal CAR T cell, and also highlights the significance of clinically relevant models in developing solid cancer CAR T cell therapies. PMID:29308300

  13. A RNA-DNA Hybrid Aptamer for Nanoparticle-Based Prostate Tumor Targeted Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Leach

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The side effects of radio- and chemo-therapy pose long-term challenges on a cancer patient’s health. It is, therefore, highly desirable to develop more effective therapies that can specifically target carcinoma cells without damaging normal and healthy cells. Tremendous efforts have been made in the past to develop targeted drug delivery systems for solid cancer treatment. In this study, a new aptamer, A10-3-J1, which recognizes the extracellular domain of the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA, was designed. A super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-aptamer-doxorubicin (SPIO-Apt-Dox was fabricated and employed as a targeted drug delivery platform for cancer therapy. This DNA RNA hybridized aptamer antitumor agent was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of targeted cells while minimizing collateral damage to non-targeted cells. This SPIO-Apt-Dox nanoparticle has specificity to PSMA+ prostate cancer cells. Aptamer inhibited nonspecific uptake of membrane-permeable doxorubic to the non-target cells, leading to reduced untargeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake while enhancing targeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake. The experimental results indicate that the drug delivery platform can yield statistically significant effectiveness being more cytotoxic to the targeted cells as opposed to the non-targeted cells.

  14. Vascular targeted therapy with anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen monoclonal antibody J591 in advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milowsky, Matthew I; Nanus, David M; Kostakoglu, Lale; Sheehan, Christine E; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Goldsmith, Stanley J; Ross, Jeffrey S; Bander, Neil H

    2007-02-10

    Based on prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression on the vasculature of solid tumors, we performed a phase I trial of antibody J591, targeting the extracellular domain of PSMA, in patients with advanced solid tumor malignancies. This was a proof-of-principle evaluation of PSMA as a potential neovascular target. The primary end points were targeting,toxicity, maximum-tolerated dose, pharmacokinetics (PK), and human antihuman antibody (HAHA) response. Patients had advanced solid tumors previously shown to express PSMA on the neovasculature. They received 111Indium (111ln)-J591 for scintigraphy and PK, followed 2 weeks later by J591 with a reduced amount of 111In for additional PK measurements. J591 dose levels were 5, 10, 20, 40, and 80 mg. The protocol was amended for six weekly administrations of unchelated J591. Patients with a response or stable disease were eligible for re-treatment. Immunohistochemistry assessed PSMA expression in tumor tissues. Twenty-seven patients received monoclonal antibody (mAb) J591. Treatment was well tolerated. Twenty (74%) of 27 patients had at least one area of known metastatic disease targeted by 111In-J591, with positive imaging seen in patients with kidney, bladder, lung, breast, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers, and melanoma. Seven of 10 patient specimens available for immunohistochemical assessment of PSMA expression in tumor-associated vasculature demonstrated PSMA staining. No HAHA response was seen. Three patients of 27 with stable disease received re-treatment. Acceptable toxicity and excellent targeting of known sites of metastases were demonstrated in patients with multiple solid tumor types, highlighting a potential role for the anti-PSMA antibody J591 as a vascular-targeting agent.

  15. miR-503 suppresses tumor cell proliferation and metastasis by directly targeting RNF31 in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Jia; Liu, Xiuheng; Wang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Microarray data analyses were performed to search for metastasis-associated oncogenes in prostate cancer (PCa). RNF31 mRNA expressions in tumor tissues and benign prostate tissues were evaluated. The RNF31 protein expression levels were also analyzed by western blot and immunohistochemistry. Luciferase reporter assays were used to identify miRNAs that can regulate RNF31. The effect of RNF31 on PCa progression was studied in vitro and in vivo. We found that RNF31 was significantly increased in PCa and its expression level was highly correlated with seminal vesicle invasion, clinical stage, prostate specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score, and BCR. Silence of RNF31 suppressed PCa cell proliferation and metastasis in vitro and in vivo. miR-503 can directly regulate RNF31. Enforced expression of miR-503 inhibited the expression of RNF31 significantly and the restoration of RNF31 expression reversed the inhibitory effects of miR-503 on PCa cell proliferation and metastasis. These findings collectively indicated an oncogene role of RNF31 in PCa progression which can be regulated by miR-503, suggesting that RNF31 could serve as a potential prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for PCa. - Highlights: • RNF31 is a potential metastasis associated gene and is associated with prostate cancer progression. • Silence of RNF31 inhibits PCa cell colony formation, migration and invasion. • RNF31 as a direct target of miR-503. • miR-503 can regulate cell proliferation, invasion and migration by targeting RNF31. • RNF31 plays an important role in PCa growth and metastasis in vivo

  16. miR-503 suppresses tumor cell proliferation and metastasis by directly targeting RNF31 in prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jia; Liu, Xiuheng, E-mail: l_xiuheng@163.com; Wang, Min

    2015-09-04

    Microarray data analyses were performed to search for metastasis-associated oncogenes in prostate cancer (PCa). RNF31 mRNA expressions in tumor tissues and benign prostate tissues were evaluated. The RNF31 protein expression levels were also analyzed by western blot and immunohistochemistry. Luciferase reporter assays were used to identify miRNAs that can regulate RNF31. The effect of RNF31 on PCa progression was studied in vitro and in vivo. We found that RNF31 was significantly increased in PCa and its expression level was highly correlated with seminal vesicle invasion, clinical stage, prostate specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score, and BCR. Silence of RNF31 suppressed PCa cell proliferation and metastasis in vitro and in vivo. miR-503 can directly regulate RNF31. Enforced expression of miR-503 inhibited the expression of RNF31 significantly and the restoration of RNF31 expression reversed the inhibitory effects of miR-503 on PCa cell proliferation and metastasis. These findings collectively indicated an oncogene role of RNF31 in PCa progression which can be regulated by miR-503, suggesting that RNF31 could serve as a potential prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for PCa. - Highlights: • RNF31 is a potential metastasis associated gene and is associated with prostate cancer progression. • Silence of RNF31 inhibits PCa cell colony formation, migration and invasion. • RNF31 as a direct target of miR-503. • miR-503 can regulate cell proliferation, invasion and migration by targeting RNF31. • RNF31 plays an important role in PCa growth and metastasis in vivo.

  17. Prostate Tumor Growth Can Be Modulated by Dietarily Targeting the 15-Lipoxygenase-1 and Cyclooxygenase-2 Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uddhav P. Kelavkar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of our study were to determine the bioavailability of omega-3 (ω-3 to the tumor, to understand its mechanisms, and to determine the feasibility of targeting the ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs metabolizing 15-lipoxygenase-1 (15-LO-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 pathways. Nude mice injected subcutaneously with LAPC-4 prostate cancer cells were randomly divided into three different isocaloric (and same percent [%] of total fat diet groups: high ω-6 linoleic acid (LA, high ω-3 stearidonic acid (SDA PUFAs, and normal (control diets. Tumor growth and apoptosis were examined as end points after administration of short-term (5 weeks ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acid diets. Tumor tissue membranes were examined for growth, lipids, enzyme activities, apoptosis, and proliferation. Tumors from the LA diet-fed mice exhibited the most rapid growth compared with tumors from the control and SDA diet-fed mice. Moreover, a diet switch from LA to SDA caused a dramatic decrease in the growth of tumors in 5 weeks, whereas tumors grew more aggressively when mice were switched from an SDA to an LA diet. Evaluating tumor proliferation (Ki-67 and apoptosis (caspase-3 in mice fed the LA and SDA diets suggested increased percentage proliferation index from the ω-6 diet-fed mice compared with the tumors from the ω-3 SDA-fed mice. Further, increased apoptosis was observed in tumors from ω-3 SDA diet-fed mice versus tumors from ω-6 diet-fed mice. Levels of membrane phospholipids of red blood cells reflected dietary changes and correlated with the levels observed in tumors. Linoleic or arachidonic acid and metabolites (eicosanoid/prostaglandins were analyzed for 15-LO-1 and COX-2 activities by high-performance liquid chromatography. We also examined the percent unsaturated or saturated fatty acids in the total phospholipids, PUFA ω-6/ω-3 ratios, and other major enzymes (elongase, Delta [Δ]-5-desaturase, and Δ-6-desaturase of ω-6 catabolic

  18. 3D Porous Chitosan-Alginate Scaffolds as an In Vitro Model for Evaluating Nanoparticle-Mediated Tumor Targeting and Gene Delivery to Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui; Kievit, Forrest M; Florczyk, Stephen J; Stephen, Zachary R; Zhang, Miqin

    2015-10-12

    Cationic nanoparticles (NPs) for targeted gene delivery are conventionally evaluated using 2D in vitro cultures. However, this does not translate well to corresponding in vivo studies because of the marked difference in NP behavior in the presence of the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we investigated whether prostate cancer (PCa) cells cultured in three-dimensional (3D) chitosan-alginate (CA) porous scaffolds could model cationic NP-mediated gene targeted delivery to tumors in vitro. We assessed in vitro tumor cell proliferation, formation of tumor spheroids, and expression of marker genes that promote tumor malignancy in CA scaffolds. The efficacy of NP-targeted gene delivery was evaluated in PCa cells in 2D cultures, PCa tumor spheroids grown in CA scaffolds, and PCa tumors in a mouse TRAMP-C2 flank tumor model. PCa cells cultured in CA scaffolds grew into tumor spheroids and displayed characteristics of higher malignancy as compared to those in 2D cultures. Significantly, targeted gene delivery was only observed in cells cultured in CA scaffolds, whereas cells cultured on 2D plates showed no difference in gene delivery between targeted and nontarget control NPs. In vivo NP evaluation confirmed targeted gene delivery, indicating that only CA scaffolds correctly modeled NP-mediated targeted delivery in vivo. These findings suggest that CA scaffolds serve as a better in vitro platform than 2D cultures for evaluation of NP-mediated targeted gene delivery to PCa.

  19. PSA-selective activation of cytotoxic human serine proteases within the tumor microenvironment as a therapeutic strategy to target prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Oliver C; Anthony, Lizamma; Rosen, D Marc; Brennen, W Nathaniel; Denmeade, Samuel R

    2018-04-27

    Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in American men. While localized therapy is highly curative, treatments for metastatic prostate cancer are largely palliative. Thus, new innovative therapies are needed to target metastatic tumors. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) is a chymotrypsin-like protease with a unique substrate specificity that is secreted by both normal and malignant prostate epithelial cells. Previous studies demonstrated the presence of high levels (μM-mM) of enzymatically active PSA is present in the extracellular fluid of the prostate cancer microenvironment. Because of this, PSA is an attractive target for a protease activated pro-toxin therapeutic strategy. Because prostate cancers typically grow very slowly, a strategy employing a proliferation-independent cytotoxic payload is preferred. Recently, it was shown that the human protease Granzyme B (GZMB), at low micromolar concentrations in the extracellular space, can cleave an array of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins thus perturbing cell growth, signaling, motility, and integrity. It is also well established that other human proteases such as trypsin can induce similar effects. Because both enzymes require N-terminal proteolytic activation, we propose to convert these proteins into PSA-activated cytotoxins. In this study, we examine the enzymatic and cell targeting parameters of these PSA-activated cytotoxic serine proteases. These pro-enzymes were activated robustly by PSA and induced ECM damage that led to the death of prostate cancer cells in vitro thus supporting the potential use of this strategy as means to target metastatic prostate cancers.

  20. Targeting Quiescence in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0413 TITLE: Targeting Quiescence in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Laura Buttitta CONTRACTING...Quiescence in Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting uiescence in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0413 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT A major problem in prostate cancer is finding and eliminating the non-proliferating or “quiescent” cancer cells. This is because early

  1. Target definition in prostate, head, and neck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasch, Coen; Steenbakkers, Roel; van Herk, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    Target definition is a major source of errors in both prostate and head and neck external-beam radiation treatment. Delineation errors remain constant during the course of radiation and therefore have a large impact on the dose to the tumor. Major sources of delineation variation are visibility of

  2. Inhibition of prostate cancer osteoblastic progression with VEGF121/rGel, a single agent targeting osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and tumor neovasculature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamedali, Khalid A.; Li, Zhi Gang; Starbuck, Michael W.; Wan, Xinhai; Yang, Jun; Kim, Sehoon; Zhang, Wendy; Rosenblum, Michael G.; Navone, Nora M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A hallmark of prostate cancer (PCa) progression is the development of osteoblastic bone metastases, which respond poorly to available therapies. We previously reported that VEGF121/rGel targets osteoclast precursors and tumor neovasculature. Here we tested the hypothesis that targeting non-tumor cells expressing these receptors can inhibit tumor progression in a clinically relevant model of osteoblastic PCa. Experimental Design Cells from MDA PCa 118b, a PCa xenograft obtained from a bone metastasis in a patient with castrate-resistant PCa, were injected into the femurs of mice. Osteoblastic progression was monitored following systemic administration of VEGF121/rGel. Results VEGF121/rGel was cytotoxic in vitro to osteoblast precursor cells. This cytotoxicity was specific as VEGF121/rGel internalization into osteoblasts was VEGF121 receptor driven. Furthermore, VEGF121/rGel significantly inhibited PCa-induced bone formation in a mouse calvaria culture assay. In vivo, VEGF121/rGel significantly inhibited the osteoblastic progression of PCa cells in the femurs of nude mice. Microcomputed tomography analysis revealed that VEGF121/rGel restored the bone volume fraction of tumor-bearing femurs to values similar to those of the contralateral (non–tumor bearing) femurs. VEGF121/rGel significantly reduced the number of tumor-associated osteoclasts but did not change the numbers of peritumoral osteoblasts. Importantly, VEGF121/rGel-treated mice had significantly less tumor burden than control mice. Our results thus indicate that VEGF121/rGel inhibits osteoblastic tumor progression by targeting angiogenesis, osteoclastogenesis, and bone formation. Conclusions Targeting VEGFR-1 – or VEGFR-2–expressing cells is effective in controlling the osteoblastic progression of PCa in bone. These findings provide the basis for an effective multitargeted approach for metastatic PCa. PMID:21343372

  3. Inhibition of prostate cancer osteoblastic progression with VEGF121/rGel, a single agent targeting osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and tumor neovasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamedali, Khalid A; Li, Zhi Gang; Starbuck, Michael W; Wan, Xinhai; Yang, Jun; Kim, Sehoon; Zhang, Wendy; Rosenblum, Michael G; Navone, Nora M

    2011-04-15

    A hallmark of prostate cancer (PCa) progression is the development of osteoblastic bone metastases, which respond poorly to available therapies. We previously reported that VEGF(121)/rGel targets osteoclast precursors and tumor neovasculature. Here we tested the hypothesis that targeting nontumor cells expressing these receptors can inhibit tumor progression in a clinically relevant model of osteoblastic PCa. Cells from MDA PCa 118b, a PCa xenograft obtained from a bone metastasis in a patient with castrate-resistant PCa, were injected into the femurs of mice. Osteoblastic progression was monitored following systemic administration of VEGF(121)/rGel. VEGF(121)/rGel was cytotoxic in vitro to osteoblast precursor cells. This cytotoxicity was specific as VEGF(121)/rGel internalization into osteoblasts was VEGF(121) receptor driven. Furthermore, VEGF(121)/rGel significantly inhibited PCa-induced bone formation in a mouse calvaria culture assay. In vivo, VEGF(121)/rGel significantly inhibited the osteoblastic progression of PCa cells in the femurs of nude mice. Microcomputed tomographic analysis revealed that VEGF(121)/rGel restored the bone volume fraction of tumor-bearing femurs to values similar to those of the contralateral (non-tumor-bearing) femurs. VEGF(121)/rGel significantly reduced the number of tumor-associated osteoclasts but did not change the numbers of peritumoral osteoblasts. Importantly, VEGF(121)/rGel-treated mice had significantly less tumor burden than control mice. Our results thus indicate that VEGF(121)/rGel inhibits osteoblastic tumor progression by targeting angiogenesis, osteoclastogenesis, and bone formation. Targeting VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-1- or VEGFR-2-expressing cells is effective in controlling the osteoblastic progression of PCa in bone. These findings provide the basis for an effective multitargeted approach for metastatic PCa. ©2011 AACR.

  4. PROSTVAC® targeted immunotherapy candidate for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Neal D

    2014-01-01

    Targeted immunotherapies represent a valid strategy for the treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. A randomized, double-blind, Phase II clinical trial of PROSTVAC® demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in overall survival and a large, global, Phase III trial with overall survival as the primary end point is ongoing. PROSTVAC immunotherapy contains the transgenes for prostate-specific antigen and three costimulatory molecules (designated TRICOM). Research suggests that PROSTVAC not only targets prostate-specific antigen, but also other tumor antigens via antigen cascade. PROSTVAC is well tolerated and has been safely combined with other cancer therapies, including hormonal therapy, radiotherapy, another immunotherapy and chemotherapy. Even greater benefits of PROSTVAC may be recognized in earlier-stage disease and low-disease burden settings where immunotherapy can trigger a long-lasting immune response.

  5. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and review the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.

  6. MAIN MOLECULAR TARGETS FOR PROSTATE CANCER THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Krasnov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Androgenic pathway plays a pivotal role in the development of benign and malignant prostate tumors. Most of the prostate neoplasms are hormone-dependent at the time of diagnosis. Therapeutic interventions aimed at reducing the level of testosterone in the blood allow to stop progression of the disease. But over time, the tumor almost inevitably starts to progress, moving in the castration-resistant state (CRPC, representing a serious problem of oncourology. In recent years, the possibility of CRRPC therapy increased significantly – there was developed a number of new drugs that effectively inhibit the development of castration-resistant tumors and significantly push back the start of chemotherapy. This review describes the major drug targets and mechanisms of action of abiraterone, enzalutamide, galeterone, VT-464 and other approved and promising CRPC therapies.

  7. Oncolytic targeting of androgen-sensitive prostate tumor by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV): consequences of deficient interferon-dependent antiviral defense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Chang, Te-Hung; Sabbah, Ahmed; Bakri, Imad; Ikeno, Yuji; Hubbard, Gene B; Chatterjee, Bandana; Bose, Santanu

    2011-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy for cancer treatment utilizes viruses for selective infection and death of cancer cells without any adverse effect on normal cells. We previously reported that the human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a novel oncolytic virus against androgen-independent PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. The present study extends the result to androgen-dependent prostate cancer, and explores the underlying mechanism that triggers RSV-induced oncolysis of prostate cancer cells. The oncolytic effect of RSV on androgen-sensitive LNCaP human prostate cancer cells and on androgen-independent RM1 murine prostate cancer cells was studied in vitro in culture and in vivo in a xenograft or allograft tumor model. In vitro, cell viability, infectivity and apoptosis were monitored by MTT assay, viral plaque assay and annexin V staining, respectively. In vivo studies involved virus administration to prostate tumors grown in immune compromised nude mice and in syngeneic immune competent C57BL/6J mice. Anti-tumorogenic oncolytic activity was monitored by measuring tumor volume, imaging bioluminescent tumors in live animals and performing histopathological analysis and TUNEL assay with tumors We show that RSV imposes a potent oncolytic effect on LNCaP prostate cancer cells. RSV infectivity was markedly higher in LNCaP cells compared to the non-tumorigenic RWPE-1 human prostate cells. The enhanced viral burden led to LNCaP cell apoptosis and growth inhibition of LNCaP xenograft tumors in nude mice. A functional host immune response did not interfere with RSV-induced oncolysis, since growth of xenograft tumors in syngeneic C57BL/6J mice from murine RM1 cells was inhibited upon RSV administration. LNCaP cells failed to activate the type-I interferon (IFNα/β)-induced transcription factor STAT-1, which is required for antiviral gene expression, although these cells could produce IFN in response to RSV infection. The essential role of IFN in restricting infection was further

  8. Targeting Splicing in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Effrosyni Antonopoulou; Michael Ladomery

    2018-01-01

    Over 95% of human genes are alternatively spliced, expressing splice isoforms that often exhibit antagonistic functions. We describe genes whose alternative splicing has been linked to prostate cancer; namely VEGFA, KLF6, BCL2L2, ERG, and AR. We discuss opportunities to develop novel therapies that target specific splice isoforms, or that target the machinery of splicing. Therapeutic approaches include the development of small molecule inhibitors of splice factor kinases, splice isoform speci...

  9. Metformin inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition in prostate cancer cells: Involvement of the tumor suppressor miR30a and its target gene SOX4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jing; Shen, Chengwu; Wang, Lin; Ma, Quanping; Xia, Pingtian; Qi, Mei; Yang, Muyi; Han, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Metformin inhibits TGF-β-induced EMT in prostate cancer (PCa) cells. • Metformin upregulates tumor suppressor miR30a and downregulates SOX4 in PCa cells. • SOX4 is a target gene of miR30a. - Abstract: Tumor metastasis is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity of prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in cancer progression and metastasis. Recent evidence suggested that diabetic patients treated with metformin have lower PCa risk and better prognosis. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of metformin on EMT in PCa cells and the possible microRNA (miRNA)-based mechanisms. MiRNAs have been shown to regulate various processes of cancer metastasis. We herein showed that metformin significantly inhibits proliferation of Vcap and PC-3 cells, induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibits invasiveness and motility capacity of Vcap cells. Metformin could inhibit TGF-β-induced EMT in Vcap cells, as manifested by inhibition of the increase of N-cadherin (p = 0.013), Vimentin (p = 0.002) and the decrease of E-cadherin (p = 0.0023) and β-catenin (p = 0.034) at mRNA and protein levels. Notably, we demonstrated significant upregulation of miR30a levels by metformin (P < 0.05) and further experiments indicated that miR30a significantly inhibits proliferation and EMT process of Vcap cells. Interestingly, we identified that SOX4, a previously reported oncogenic transcriptional factor and modulator of EMT, is a direct target gene of miR30a. Finally, we screened the expression of miR30a and SOX4 in 84 PCa cases with radical prostatectomy. Of note, SOX4 overexpression is significantly associated with decreased levels of miR30a in PCa cases. In all, our study suggested that inhibition of EMT by metformin in PCa cells may involve upregulation of miR30a and downregulation of SOX4

  10. Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0226 TITLE: Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Rafael Fridman...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0226 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...response to collagen in prostate cancer. The project’s goal is to define the expression and therapeutic potential of DDRs in prostate cancer. During

  11. Circulating Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Brian; Rochefort, Holly; Goldkorn, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can provide a non-invasive, repeatable snapshot of an individual patient’s tumor. In prostate cancer, CTC enumeration has been extensively studied and validated as a prognostic tool and has received FDA clearance for use in monitoring advanced disease. More recently, CTC analysis has been shifting from enumeration to more sophisticated molecular characterization of captured cells, which serve as a “liquid biopsy” of the tumor, reflecting molecular changes in an individual’s malignancy over time. Here we will review the main CTC studies in advanced and localized prostate cancer, highlighting the important gains as well as the challenges posed by various approaches, and their implications for advancing prostate cancer management

  12. Tumor-Associated Antigens for Specific Immunotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiessling, Andrea [Biologics Safety and Disposition, Preclinical Safety, Translational Sciences, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Novartis Pharma AG, Werk Klybeck, Klybeckstraße 141, Basel CH-4057 (Switzerland); Wehner, Rebekka [Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Füssel, Susanne [Department of Urology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Bachmann, Michael [Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Wirth, Manfred P. [Department of Urology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Schmitz, Marc, E-mail: marc.schmitz@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany)

    2012-02-22

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common noncutaneous cancer diagnosis and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. Effective treatment modalities for advanced metastatic PCa are limited. Immunotherapeutic strategies based on T cells and antibodies represent interesting approaches to prevent progression from localized to advanced PCa and to improve survival outcomes for patients with advanced disease. CD8{sup +} cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) efficiently recognize and destroy tumor cells. CD4{sup +} T cells augment the antigen-presenting capacity of dendritic cells and promote the expansion of tumor-reactive CTLs. Antibodies mediate their antitumor effects via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, activation of the complement system, improving the uptake of coated tumor cells by phagocytes, and the functional interference of biological pathways essential for tumor growth. Consequently, several tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have been identified that represent promising targets for T cell- or antibody-based immunotherapy. These TAAs comprise proteins preferentially expressed in normal and malignant prostate tissues and molecules which are not predominantly restricted to the prostate, but are overexpressed in various tumor entities including PCa. Clinical trials provide evidence that specific immunotherapeutic strategies using such TAAs represent safe and feasible concepts for the induction of immunological and clinical responses in PCa patients. However, further improvement of the current approaches is required which may be achieved by combining T cell- and/or antibody-based strategies with radio-, hormone-, chemo- or antiangiogenic therapy.

  13. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  14. Targeting fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling inhibits prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shu; Shao, Longjiang; Yu, Wendong; Gavine, Paul; Ittmann, Michael

    2012-07-15

    Extensive correlative studies in human prostate cancer as well as studies in vitro and in mouse models indicate that fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling plays an important role in prostate cancer progression. In this study, we used a probe compound for an FGFR inhibitor, which potently inhibits FGFR-1-3 and significantly inhibits FGFR-4. The purpose of this study is to determine whether targeting FGFR signaling from all four FGFRs will have in vitro activities consistent with inhibition of tumor progression and will inhibit tumor progression in vivo. Effects of AZ8010 on FGFR signaling and invasion were analyzed using immortalized normal prostate epithelial (PNT1a) cells and PNT1a overexpressing FGFR-1 or FGFR-4. The effect of AZ8010 on invasion and proliferation in vitro was also evaluated in prostate cancer cell lines. Finally, the impact of AZ8010 on tumor progression in vivo was evaluated using a VCaP xenograft model. AZ8010 completely inhibits FGFR-1 and significantly inhibits FGFR-4 signaling at 100 nmol/L, which is an achievable in vivo concentration. This results in marked inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and invasion in PNT1a cells expressing FGFR-1 and FGFR-4 and all prostate cancer cell lines tested. Treatment in vivo completely inhibited VCaP tumor growth and significantly inhibited angiogenesis and proliferation and increased cell death in treated tumors. This was associated with marked inhibition of ERK phosphorylation in treated tumors. Targeting FGFR signaling is a promising new approach to treating aggressive prostate cancer.

  15. Biological evaluation of 177Lu-labeled DOTA-Ala(SO3H)-Aminooctanoyl-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-N methyl Gly-His-Statine-Leu-NH2 for gastrin-releasing peptide receptor-positive prostate tumor targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Jae Cheong; Cho, Eun Ha; Kim, Jin Joo; Choi, Sang Mu; Lee, So young; Nam, Sung Soo; Park, Ul Jae; Park, Soo Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Bombesin binds with selectivity and high affinity to a Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR), which is highly overexpressed in prostate cancer cells. The present study describes the in vitro and in vivo biological characteristics of DOTA-Ala(SO 3 H)-Aminooctanoyl-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-N methyl Gly-His-Statine-Leu-NH 2 (DOTA-sBBNA), an antagonist analogue of bombesin peptide for the targeting of GRPR. DOTA-sBBNA was synthesized and labeled with 177 Lu as previously published. A saturation assay on PC-3 human prostate cancer cells revealed that the Kd value of the radiolabeled peptide was 1.88 nM with a maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of 289.3 fmol/10 6 cells. The radio-peptide slowly internalized, and 24.4 ± 0.5% of the total binding was internalized in 4 hr. Biodistribution studies were conducted in healthy and PC-3 xenografted balb/c mice, which showed high uptake and retention of tumor-associated radioactivity in PC-3 xenografted mice. The tumor-to-blood ratio was 126.02 ± 9.36 at 1.5 hr p.i., and was increased to 216.33 ± 61.58 at 24 hr p.i., which means that the radiolabeled peptide was highly accumulated in a tumor and rapidly cleared from the blood pool. The GRPR is also over-expressed in Korean prostate cancer patients. These results suggest that this 177 Lu-labeled peptide has promising characteristics for application in nuclear medicine, namely for the diagnosis and treatment of GRPR over-expressing prostate tumors

  16. Hedgehog pathway activity in the LADY prostate tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Susan

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Robust Hedgehog (Hh signaling has been implicated as a common feature of human prostate cancer and an important stimulus of tumor growth. The role of Hh signaling has been studied in several xenograft tumor models, however, the role of Hh in tumor development in a transgenic prostate cancer model has never been examined. Results We analyzed expression of Hh pathway components and conserved Hh target genes along with progenitor cell markers and selected markers of epithelial differentiation during tumor development in the LADY transgenic mouse model. Tumor development was associated with a selective increase in Ihh expression. In contrast Shh expression was decreased. Expression of the Hh target Patched (Ptc was significantly decreased while Gli1 expression was not significantly altered. A survey of other relevant genes revealed significant increases in expression of Notch-1 and Nestin together with decreased expression of HNF3a/FoxA1, NPDC-1 and probasin. Conclusion Our study shows no evidence for a generalized increase in Hh signaling during tumor development in the LADY mouse. It does reveal a selective increase in Ihh expression that is associated with increased expression of progenitor cell markers and decreased expression of terminal differentiation markers. These data suggest that Ihh expression may be a feature of a progenitor cell population that is involved in tumor development.

  17. Comparison of two peptide radiotracers for prostate carcinoma targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bluma Linkowski Faintuch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Scintigraphy is generally not the first choice treatment for prostate cancer, although successful studies using bombesin analog radiopeptides have been performed. Recently, a novel peptide obtained using a phage display library demonstrated an affinity for prostate tumor cells. The aim of this study was to compare the use of a bombesin analog to that of a phage display library peptide (DUP-1 radiolabeled with technetium-99m for the treatment of prostate carcinoma. The peptides were first conjugated to S-acetyl-MAG3 with a 6-carbon spacer, namely aminohexanoic acid. METHODS: The technetium-99m labeling required a sodium tartrate buffer. Radiochemical evaluation was performed using ITLC and was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography. The coefficient partition was determined, and in vitro studies were performed using human prostate tumor cells. Biodistribution was evaluated in healthy animals at various time points and also in mice bearing tumors. RESULTS: The radiochemical purity of both radiotracers was greater than 95%. The DUP-1 tracer was more hydrophilic (log P = -2.41 than the bombesin tracer (log P = -0.39. The biodistribution evaluation confirmed this hydrophilicity by revealing the greater kidney uptake of DUP-1. The bombesin concentration in the pancreas was greater than that of DUP-1 due to specific gastrin-releasing peptide receptors. Bombesin internalization occurred for 78.32% of the total binding in tumor cells. The DUP-1 tracer showed very low binding to tumor cells during the in vitro evaluation, although tumor uptake for both tracers was similar. The tumors were primarily blocked by DUP1 and the bombesin radiotracer primarily targeted the pancreas. CONCLUSION: Further studies with the radiolabeled DUP-1 peptide are recommended. With further structural changes, this molecule could become an efficient alternative tracer for prostate tumor diagnosis.

  18. Targeted α-Therapy of Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer with 225Ac-PSMA-617: Swimmer-Plot Analysis Suggests Efficacy Regarding Duration of Tumor Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochwil, Clemens; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Rathke, Hendrik; Hohenfellner, Markus; Giesel, Frederik L; Haberkorn, Uwe; Morgenstern, Alfred

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this evaluation was to identify the first indicators of efficacy for 225 Ac-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-617 therapy in a retrospectively analyzed group of patients. Methods: Forty patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer were selected for treatment with three 100 kBq/kg cycles of 225 Ac-PSMA-617 at 2-mo intervals. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and blood cell count were measured every 4 wk. PSMA PET/CT or PSMA SPECT/CT were used for baseline staging and imaging follow-up at month 6. Follow-up included the duration of PSA response and radiologic progression-free survival at month 6. Patient histories were reviewed for the duration of previous treatment lines, and a swimmer plot was used to intraindividually compare the duration of tumor control by PSMA therapy versus prior treatment modalities. Results: Thirty-one of 40 patients were treated per protocol. Five patients discontinued treatment because of nonresponse, and 4 because of xerostomia. Of the 38 patients surviving at least 8 wk, 24 (63%) had a PSA decline of more than 50%, and 33 (87%) had a PSA response of any degree. The median duration of tumor control under 225 Ac-PSMA-617 last-line therapy was 9.0 mo; 5 patients had an enduring response of more than 2 y. Because all patients had advanced disease, this result compares favorably with the tumor control rates associated with earlier-phase disease; the most common preceding first-, second-, third-, and fourth-line therapies were abiraterone (median duration 10.0 mo), docetaxel (6.5 mo), enzalutamide (6.5 mo), and cabazitaxel (6.0 mo), respectively. Conclusion: A positive response for surrogate parameters demonstrates remarkable antitumor activity for 225 Ac-PSMA-617. Swimmer-plot analysis indicates a promising duration of tumor control, especially considering the unfavorable prognostic profile of the selected advanced-stage patients. Xerostomia was the main reason patients discontinued therapy or refused

  19. Dutasteride and enzalutamide synergistically suppress prostate tumor cell proliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamid, A.R.; Verhaegh, G.W.C.T.; Smit, F.P.; RIjt-van de Westerlo, C.; Armandari, I.; Brandt, A.; Sweep, F.C.; Sedelaar, J.P.M.; Schalken, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Dihydrotestosterone is the main active androgen in the prostate and it has a role in prostate cancer progression. After androgen deprivation therapy androgen receptor signaling is still active in tumor cells. Persistent intratumor steroidogenesis and androgen receptor changes are

  20. Targeting Stromal Recruitment by Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Ensinger, C., Tumer , Z., Tommerup, N. et al.: Hedgehog signaling in small-cell lung cancer : frequent in vivo but a rare event in vitro. Lung Cancer , 52...W81XWH-04-1-0157 TITLE: Targeting Stromal Recruitment by Prostate Cancer Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jingxian Zhang, Ph.D...DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 Feb 2004 – 14 Feb 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting Stromal Recruitment by Prostate Cancer

  1. The miRNA Pull Out Assay as a Method to Validate the miR-28-5p Targets Identified in Other Tumor Contexts in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Rizzo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available miR-28-5p is an intragenic miRNA which is underexpressed in several tumor types showing a tumor suppressor (TS activity. Routinely, the known miR-28-5p targets are validated in specific tumor contexts but it is unclear whether these targets are also being regulated in other tumor types. To this end, we adopted the miRNA pull out assay to capture the miR-28-5p targets in DU-145 prostate cancer (PCa cells. Firstly, we demonstrated that miR-28-5p acts as a TS-miRNA in PCa, affecting cell proliferation, survival, and apoptosis. Secondly, we evaluated the enrichment of the 10 validated miR-28-5p targets in the pull out sample. We showed that E2F6, TEX-261, MAPK1, MPL, N4BP1, and RAP1B but not BAG1, OTUB1, MAD2L1, and p21 were significantly enriched, suggesting that not all the miR-28-5p targets are regulated by this miRNA in PCa. We then verified whether the miR-28-5p-interacting targets were regulated by this miRNA. We selected E2F6, the most enriched target in the pull out sample, and demonstrated that miR-28-5p downregulated E2F6 at the protein level suggesting that our approach was effective. In general terms, these findings support the miRNA pull out assay as a useful method to identify context-specific miRNA targets.

  2. Molecular imaging of tumor blood vessels in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilki, Derya; Seitz, Michael; Singer, Bernhard B; Irmak, Ster; Stief, Christian G; Reich, Oliver; Ergün, Süleyman

    2009-05-01

    In the past three decades many efforts have been undertaken to understand the mechanisms of tumor angiogenesis. The introduction of anti-angiogenic drugs in tumor therapy during the last few years necessitates the establishment of new techniques enabling molecular imaging of tumor vascular remodelling. The determination of tumor size as commonly used is not appropriate since the extended necrosis under anti-angiogenic therapy does not necessarily result in the reduction of tumor diameter. The basis for the molecular imaging of tumor blood vessels is the remodelling of the tumor vessels under anti-angiogenic therapy which obviously occurs at an early stage and seems to be a convincing parameter. Beside the enormous progress in this field during the last few years the resolution is still not high enough to evaluate the remodelling of the micro tumor vessels. New imaging approaches combining specific molecular markers for tumor vessels with the different imaging techniques are needed to overcome this issue as exemplarily discussed for prostate cancer in this review. Molecular contrast agents targeting the vasculature will allow clinicians the visualization of vascular remodelling processes taking place under anti-angiogenic therapy and improve tumor diagnosis and follow-up.

  3. Tumor targeted gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of molecular mechanisms governing malignant transformation brings new opportunities for therapeutic intervention against cancer using novel approaches. One of them is gene therapy based on the transfer of genetic material to an organism with the aim of correcting a disease. The application of gene therapy to the cancer treatment had led to the development of new experimental approaches such as suicidal gene therapy, inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a prodrug into a toxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and cytosine deaminase (CD). Especially, physicians and scientists of nuclear medicine field take an interest in suicidal gene therapy because they can monitor the location and magnitude, and duration of expression of HSV1-tk and CD by PET scanner

  4. Targeting TMPRSS2-ERG in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0212 TITLE: Targeting TMPRSS2-ERG in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David Takeda CONTRACTING...ORGANIZATION: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Boston, MA 02215 REPORT DATE: November 2017 TYPE OF REPORT: Final PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research...Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0212 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) David Takeda 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  5. Estrogen receptor signaling in prostate cancer: Implications for carcinogenesis and tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonkhoff, Helmut

    2018-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is the classical target for prostate cancer prevention and treatment, but more recently estrogens and their receptors have also been implicated in prostate cancer development and tumor progression. Recent experimental and clinical data were reviewed to elucidate pathogenetic mechanisms how estrogens and their receptors may affect prostate carcinogenesis and tumor progression. The estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) is the most prevalent ER in the human prostate, while the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is restricted to basal cells of the prostatic epithelium and stromal cells. In high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), the ERα is up-regulated and most likely mediates carcinogenic effects of estradiol as demonstrated in animal models. The partial loss of the ERβ in HGPIN indicates that the ERβ acts as a tumor suppressor. The tumor promoting function of the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, a major driver of prostate carcinogenesis, is triggered by the ERα and repressed by the ERβ. The ERβ is generally retained in hormone naïve and metastatic prostate cancer, but is partially lost in castration resistant disease. The progressive emergence of the ERα and ERα-regulated genes (eg, progesterone receptor (PR), PS2, TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, and NEAT1) during prostate cancer progression and hormone refractory disease suggests that these tumors can bypass the AR by using estrogens and progestins for their growth. In addition, nongenomic estrogen signaling pathways mediated by orphan receptors (eg, GPR30 and ERRα) has also been implicated in prostate cancer progression. Increasing evidences demonstrate that local estrogen signaling mechanisms are required for prostate carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Despite the recent progress in this research topic, the translation of the current information into potential therapeutic applications remains highly challenging and clearly warrants further investigation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Step-and-Shoot versus Compensator-based IMRT: Calculation and Comparison of Integral Dose in Non-tumoral and Target Organs in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Shirani Tak Abi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT is becoming an increasingly routine treatment method. IMRT can be delivered by use of conventional Multileaf Collimators (MLCs and/or physical compensators. One of the most important factors in selecting an appropriate IMRT technique is integral dose. Integral dose is equal to the mean energy deposited in the total irradiated volume of the patient. The aim of the present study was to calculate and compare the integral dose in normal and target organs in two different procedures of IMRT: Step-and-Shoot (SAS and compensator-based IMRT. Materials and Methods In this comparative study, five patients with prostate cancer were selected. Module Integrated Radiotherapy System was applied, using three energy ranges. In both treatment planning methods, the integral dose dramatically decreased by increasing energy. Results Comparison of two treatment methods showed that on average, the integral dose of body in SAS radiation therapy was about 1.62% lower than that reported in compensator-based IMRT. In planning target volume, rectum, bladder, and left and right femoral heads, the integral doses for SAS method were 1.01%, 1.02%, 1.11%, 1.47%, and 1.40% lower than compensator-based IMRT, respectively. Conclusion Considering the treatment conditions, the definition of dose volume constraints for healthy tissues, and the equal volume of organs in both treatment methods, SAS radiation therapy by providing a lower integral dose seems to be more advantageous and efficient for prostate cancer treatment, compared to compensator-based IMRT.

  7. Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Targeted Bio-orthogonal Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0595 TITLE: Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Targeted Bio -orthogonal Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer...Sep 2016 - 14 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Targeted Bio -orthogonal Therapy for Metastatic Prostate

  8. Targeting epigenetics for the treatment of prostate cancer: recent progress and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jianqing; Wang, Chenguang; Kelly, Wm Kevin

    2013-06-01

    Epigenetic aberrations contribute to prostate cancer carcinogenesis and disease progression. Efforts have been made to target DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylases (HDACs) in prostate cancer and other solid tumors but have not had the success that was seen in the hematologic malignancies. Oral, less toxic, and more specific agents are being developed in solid tumors including prostate cancer. Combinations of epigenetic agents alone or with a targeted agent such as androgen receptor signaling inhibitors are promising approaches and will be discussed further. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Tumor clone dynamics in lethal prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, Suzanne; Romanel, Alessandro; Goodall, Jane; Grist, Emily; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Miranda, Susana; Prandi, Davide; Lorente, David; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Pezaro, Carmel; Omlin, Aurelius; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Flohr, Penelope; Tunariu, Nina; S de Bono, Johann; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2014-09-17

    It is unclear whether a single clone metastasizes and remains dominant over the course of lethal prostate cancer. We describe the clonal architectural heterogeneity at different stages of disease progression by sequencing serial plasma and tumor samples from 16 ERG-positive patients. By characterizing the clonality of commonly occurring deletions at 21q22, 8p21, and 10q23, we identified multiple independent clones in metastatic disease that are differentially represented in tissue and circulation. To exemplify the clinical utility of our studies, we then showed a temporal association between clinical progression and emergence of androgen receptor (AR) mutations activated by glucocorticoids in about 20% of patients progressing on abiraterone and prednisolone or dexamethasone. Resistant clones showed a complex dynamic with temporal and spatial heterogeneity, suggesting distinct mechanisms of resistance at different sites that emerged and regressed depending on treatment selection pressure. This introduces a management paradigm requiring sequential monitoring of advanced prostate cancer patients with plasma and tumor biopsies to ensure early discontinuation of agents when they become potential disease drivers. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Stromal Activation Associated with Development of Prostate Cancer in Prostate-Targeted Fibroblast Growth Factor 8b Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa D. Elo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Expression of fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8 is commonly increased in prostate cancer. Experimental studies have provided evidence that it plays a role in prostate tumorigenesis and tumor progression. To study how increased FGF-8 affects the prostate, we generated and analyzed transgenic (TG mice expressing FGF-8b under the probasin promoter that targets expression to prostate epithelium. Prostates of the TG mice showed an increased size and changes in stromal and epithelialmorphology progressing fromatypia and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mouse PIN, mPIN lesions to tumors with highly variable phenotype bearing features of adenocarcinoma, carcinosarcoma, and sarcoma. The development of mPIN lesions was preceded by formation of activated stroma containing increased proportion of fibroblastic cells, rich vasculature, and inflammation. The association between advancing stromal and epithelial alterations was statistically significant. Microarray analysis and validation with quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that expression of osteopontin and connective tissue growth factor was markedly upregulated in TG mouse prostates compared with wild type prostates. Androgen receptor staining was decreased in transformed epithelium and in hypercellular stroma but strongly increased in the sarcoma-like lesions. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that disruption of FGF signaling pathways by increased epithelial production of FGF-8b leads to strongly activated and atypical stroma, which precedes development of mPIN lesions and prostate cancer with mixed features of adenocarcinoma and sarcoma in the prostates of TG mice. The results suggest that increased FGF-8 in human prostate may also contribute to prostate tumorigenesis by stromal activation.

  11. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Targeted Therapy of Prostate Cancer Using a DUPA-Paclitaxel Conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qingzhi; Yang, Jincheng; Zhang, Ruoshi; Yang, Zimeng; Yang, Zhengtao; Wang, Yongjun; Xu, Youjun; He, Zhonggui

    2018-05-07

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most prevalent cancer among men in the United States and remains the second-leading cause of cancer mortality in men. Paclitaxel (PTX) is the first line chemotherapy for PCa treatment, but its therapeutic efficacy is greatly restricted by the nonspecific distribution in vivo. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is overexpressed on the surface of most PCa cells, and its expression level increases with cancer aggressiveness, while being present at low levels in normal cells. The high expression level of PSMA in PCa cells offers an opportunity for target delivery of nonspecific cytotoxic drugs to PCa cells, thus improving therapeutic efficacy and reducing toxicity. PSMA has high affinity for DUPA, a glutamate urea ligand. Herein, a novel DUPA-PTX conjugate is developed using DUPA as the targeting ligand to deliver PTX specifically for treatment of PSMA expressing PCa. The targeting ligand DUPA enhances the transport capability and selectivity of PTX to tumor cells via PSMA mediated endocytosis. Besides, DUPA is conjugated with PTX via a disulfide bond, which facilitates the rapid and differential drug release in tumor cells. The DUPA-PTX conjugate exhibits potent cytotoxicity in PSMA expressing cell lines and induces a complete cessation of tumor growth with no obvious toxicity. Our findings give new insight into the PSMA-targeted delivery of chemotherapeutics and provide an opportunity for the development of novel active targeting drug delivery systems for PCa therapy.

  12. Building a high-resolution T2-weighted MR-based probabilistic model of tumor occurrence in the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B; Raman, Steven S; Lo, Pechin; Lin, Wei-Chan; Khoshnoodi, Pooria; Sayre, James W; Ramakrishna, Bharath; Ahuja, Preeti; Huang, Jiaoti; Margolis, Daniel J A; Lu, David S K; Reiter, Robert E; Goldin, Jonathan G; Brown, Matthew S; Enzmann, Dieter R

    2018-02-19

    We present a method for generating a T2 MR-based probabilistic model of tumor occurrence in the prostate to guide the selection of anatomical sites for targeted biopsies and serve as a diagnostic tool to aid radiological evaluation of prostate cancer. In our study, the prostate and any radiological findings within were segmented retrospectively on 3D T2-weighted MR images of 266 subjects who underwent radical prostatectomy. Subsequent histopathological analysis determined both the ground truth and the Gleason grade of the tumors. A randomly chosen subset of 19 subjects was used to generate a multi-subject-derived prostate template. Subsequently, a cascading registration algorithm involving both affine and non-rigid B-spline transforms was used to register the prostate of every subject to the template. Corresponding transformation of radiological findings yielded a population-based probabilistic model of tumor occurrence. The quality of our probabilistic model building approach was statistically evaluated by measuring the proportion of correct placements of tumors in the prostate template, i.e., the number of tumors that maintained their anatomical location within the prostate after their transformation into the prostate template space. Probabilistic model built with tumors deemed clinically significant demonstrated a heterogeneous distribution of tumors, with higher likelihood of tumor occurrence at the mid-gland anterior transition zone and the base-to-mid-gland posterior peripheral zones. Of 250 MR lesions analyzed, 248 maintained their original anatomical location with respect to the prostate zones after transformation to the prostate. We present a robust method for generating a probabilistic model of tumor occurrence in the prostate that could aid clinical decision making, such as selection of anatomical sites for MR-guided prostate biopsies.

  13. Prostatic Adenocarcinoma with Concurrent Sertoli Cell Tumor in a Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, C. W.

    1981-01-01

    A case of metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma with concurrent Sertoli cell tumor is presented in an old, miniature Schnauzer dog. The prostatic neoplasm was highly anaplastic and had metastasized widely. Clinical signs were compatible with increased estrogen production. It is interesting to note that the prostatic carcinoma, usually considered to be androgen dependent, developed and metastasized, despite the presence of apparently increased estrogen levels. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:7340923

  14. Calcium-Sensing Receptor Tumor Expression and Lethal Prostate Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, Thomas U; Tchrakian, Nairi; Wilson, Kathryn M; Lis, Rosina; Nuttall, Elizabeth; Sesso, Howard D; Loda, Massimo; Giovannucci, Edward; Mucci, Lorelei A; Finn, Stephen; Shui, Irene M

    2016-06-01

    Prostate cancer metastases preferentially target bone, and the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) may play a role in promoting this metastatic progression. We evaluated the association of prostate tumor CaSR expression with lethal prostate cancer. A validated CaSR immunohistochemistry assay was performed on tumor tissue microarrays. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression and phosphatase and tensin homolog tumor status were previously assessed in a subset of cases by immunohistochemistry. Cox proportional hazards models adjusting for age and body mass index at diagnosis, Gleason grade, and pathological tumor node metastasis stage were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association of CaSR expression with lethal prostate cancer. The investigation was conducted in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and Physicians' Health Study. We studied 1241 incident prostate cancer cases diagnosed between 1983 and 2009. Participants were followed up or cancer-specific mortality or development of metastatic disease. On average, men were followed up 13.6 years, during which there were 83 lethal events. High CaSR expression was associated with lethal prostate cancer independent of clinical and pathological variables (HR 2.0; 95% CI 1.2-3.3). Additionally, there was evidence of effect modification by VDR expression; CaSR was associated with lethal progression among men with low tumor VDR expression (HR 3.2; 95% CI 1.4-7.3) but not in cases with high tumor VDR expression (HR 0.8; 95% CI 0.2-3.0). Tumor CaSR expression is associated with an increased risk of lethal prostate cancer, particularly in tumors with low VDR expression. These results support further investigating the mechanism linking CaSR with metastases.

  15. Brain tumor-targeted drug delivery strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Wei

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the application of aggressive surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy in clinics, brain tumors are still a difficult health challenge due to their fast development and poor prognosis. Brain tumor-targeted drug delivery systems, which increase drug accumulation in the tumor region and reduce toxicity in normal brain and peripheral tissue, are a promising new approach to brain tumor treatments. Since brain tumors exhibit many distinctive characteristics relative to tumors growing in peripheral tissues, potential targets based on continuously changing vascular characteristics and the microenvironment can be utilized to facilitate effective brain tumor-targeted drug delivery. In this review, we briefly describe the physiological characteristics of brain tumors, including blood–brain/brain tumor barriers, the tumor microenvironment, and tumor stem cells. We also review targeted delivery strategies and introduce a systematic targeted drug delivery strategy to overcome the challenges.

  16. Molecular differences in transition zone and peripheral zone prostate tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnott, Jennifer A.; Rider, Jennifer R.; Carlsson, Jessica; Gerke, Travis; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Penney, Kathryn L.; Sesso, Howard D.; Loda, Massimo; Fall, Katja; Stampfer, Meir J.; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Pawitan, Yudi; Andersson, Sven-Olof; Andrén, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Prostate tumors arise primarily in the peripheral zone (PZ) of the prostate, but 20–30% arise in the transition zone (TZ). Zone of origin may have prognostic value or reflect distinct molecular subtypes; however, it can be difficult to determine in practice. Using whole-genome gene expression, we built a signature of zone using normal tissue from five individuals and found that it successfully classified nine tumors of known zone. Hypothesizing that this signature captures tumor zone of origin, we assessed its relationship with clinical factors among 369 tumors of unknown zone from radical prostatectomies (RPs) and found that tumors that molecularly resembled TZ tumors showed lower mortality (P = 0.09) that was explained by lower Gleason scores (P = 0.009). We further applied the signature to an earlier study of 88 RP and 333 transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) tumor samples, also of unknown zone, with gene expression on ~6000 genes. We had observed previously substantial expression differences between RP and TURP specimens, and hypothesized that this might be because RPs capture primarily PZ tumors, whereas TURPs capture more TZ tumors. Our signature distinguished these two groups, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 87% (P zones. Zone of origin may be important to consider in prostate tumor biomarker research. PMID:25870172

  17. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Targeted Gold Nanoparticles for Theranostics of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangadlao, Joey Dacula; Wang, Xinning; McCleese, Christopher; Escamilla, Maria; Ramamurthy, Gopalakrishnan; Wang, Ziying; Govande, Mukul; Basilion, James P; Burda, Clemens

    2018-04-24

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers and among the leading causes of cancer deaths in the United States. Men diagnosed with the disease typically undergo radical prostatectomy, which often results in incontinence and impotence. Recurrence of the disease is often experienced by most patients with incomplete prostatectomy during surgery. Hence, the development of a technique that will enable surgeons to achieve a more precise prostatectomy remains an open challenge. In this contribution, we report a theranostic agent (AuNP-5kPEG-PSMA-1-Pc4) based on prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA-1)-targeted gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) loaded with a fluorescent photodynamic therapy (PDT) drug, Pc4. The fabricated nanoparticles are well-characterized by spectroscopic and imaging techniques and are found to be stable over a wide range of solvents, buffers, and media. In vitro cellular uptake experiments demonstrated significantly higher nanoparticle uptake in PSMA-positive PC3pip cells than in PSMA-negative PC3flu cells. Further, more complete cell killing was observed in Pc3pip than in PC3flu cells upon exposure to light at different doses, demonstrating active targeting followed by Pc4 delivery. Likewise, in vivo studies showed remission on PSMA-expressing tumors 14 days post-PDT. Atomic absorption spectroscopy revealed that targeted AuNPs accumulate 4-fold higher in PC3pip than in PC3flu tumors. The nanoparticle system described herein is envisioned to provide surgical guidance for prostate tumor resection and therapeutic intervention when surgery is insufficient.

  18. Preclinical Study on GRPR-Targeted (68)Ga-Probes for PET Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Yao; Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) targeted positron emission tomography (PET) is a highly promising approach for imaging of prostate cancer (PCa) in small animal models and patients. Developing a GRPR-targeted PET probe with excellent in vivo performance such as high tumor uptake, high...

  19. Breaking bad habits: Targeting MDSCs to alleviate immunosuppression in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sumanta K; Kortylewski, Marcin

    2016-02-01

    The myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) contribute to tumor immune evasion and still remain an elusive therapeutic target. Our study identified granulocytic MDSCs accumulating in prostate cancer patients during disease progression. We demonstrate the feasibility of using STAT3siRNA-based strategy for targeting MDSCs to alleviate arginase-dependent suppression of T cell activity.

  20. Postoperative Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer: The Case of the Missing Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croke, Jennifer; Malone, Shawn; Roustan Delatour, Nicolas; Belanger, Eric; Avruch, Leonard; Morash, Christopher; Kayser, Cathleen; Underhill, Kathryn; Spaans, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy (XRT) increases survival in high-risk prostate cancer patients. Approximately 50% of patients on long-term follow-up relapse despite adjuvant XRT and the predominant site of failure remains local. Four consensus guidelines define postoperative clinical target volume (CTV) in prostate cancer. We explore the possibility that inadequate CTV coverage is an important cause of local failure. This study evaluates the utility of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in defining prostate bed CTV. Methods and Materials: Twenty prostate cancer patients treated with postoperative XRT who also had preoperative staging MRI were included. The four guidelines were applied and the CTVs were expanded to create planning target volumes (PTVs). Preoperative MRIs were fused with postoperative planning CT scans. MRI-based prostate and gross visible tumors were contoured. Three-dimensional (3D) conformal four- and six-field XRT plans were developed and dose–volume histograms analyzed. Subtraction analysis was conducted to assess the adequacy of prostate/gross tumor coverage. Results: Gross tumor was visible in 18 cases. In all 20 cases, the consensus CTVs did not fully cover the MRI-defined prostate. On average, 35% of the prostate volume and 32% of the gross tumor volume were missed using six-field 3D treatment plans. The entire MRI-defined gross tumor volume was completely covered in only two cases (six-field plans). The expanded PTVs did not cover the entire prostate bed in 50% of cases. Prostate base and mid-zones were the predominant site of inadequate coverage. Conclusions: Current postoperative CTV guidelines do not adequately cover the prostate bed and/or gross tumor based on preoperative MRI imaging. Additionally, expanded PTVs do not fully cover the prostate bed in 50% of cases. Inadequate CTV definition is likely a major contributing factor for the high risk of relapse despite adjuvant XRT. Preoperative imaging may lead to more

  1. Dendritic cell based PSMA immunotherapy for prostate cancer using a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briana Jill Williams

    Full Text Available Human prostate tumor vaccine and gene therapy trials using ex vivo methods to prime dendritic cells (DCs with prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA have been somewhat successful, but to date the lengthy ex vivo manipulation of DCs has limited the widespread clinical utility of this approach. Our goal was to improve upon cancer vaccination with tumor antigens by delivering PSMA via a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector directly to DCs as an efficient means for activation and antigen presentation to T-cells. To test this approach, we developed a mouse model of prostate cancer by generating clonal derivatives of the mouse RM-1 prostate cancer cell line expressing human PSMA (RM-1-PSMA cells. To maximize antigen presentation in target cells, both MHC class I and TAP protein expression was induced in RM-1 cells by transduction with an Ad vector expressing interferon-gamma (Ad5-IFNγ. Administering DCs infected ex vivo with CD40-targeted Ad5-huPSMA, as well as direct intraperitoneal injection of the vector, resulted in high levels of tumor-specific CTL responses against RM-1-PSMA cells pretreated with Ad5-IFNγ as target cells. CD40 targeting significantly improved the therapeutic antitumor efficacy of Ad5-huPSMA encoding PSMA when combined with Ad5-IFNγ in the RM-1-PSMA model. These results suggest that a CD-targeted adenovirus delivering PSMA may be effective clinically for prostate cancer immunotherapy.

  2. Identification and Reconstruction of Prostate Tumor-Suppressing Exosomes for Therapeutic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    to the altered contents of exosomes , those from prostate cancer cells (tumor exosomes ) no longer have tumor suppressive functions. If this... cancer . To develop this concept, exosomes will be isolated from normal prostate epithelial cells by differential centrifugations or affinity...purifications and evaluated for tumor suppressing activities against various prostate cancer cells (Aim 1). Then the components of the tumor suppressing exosomes

  3. Spacer length impacts the efficacy of targeted docetaxel conjugates in prostate-specific membrane antigen expressing prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zheng-Hong; Sima, Monika; Salama, Mohamed E; Kopečková, Pavla; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2013-12-01

    Combination of targeted delivery and controlled release is a powerful technique for cancer treatment. In this paper, we describe the design, synthesis, structure validation and biological properties of targeted and non-targeted N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer-docetaxel conjugates. Docetaxel (DTX) was conjugated to HPMA copolymer via a tetrapeptide spacer (-GFLG-). 3-(1,3-dicarboxypropyl)-ureido]pentanedioic acid (DUPA) was used as the targeting moiety to actively deliver DTX for treatment of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) expressing prostate cancer. Short and long spacer DUPA monomers were prepared, and four HPMA copolymer--DTX conjugates (non-targeted, two targeted with short spacer of different molecular weight and targeted with long spacer) were prepared via Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) copolymerization. Following confirmation of PSMA expression on C4-2 cell line, the DTX conjugates' in vitro cytotoxicity was tested against C4-2 tumor cells and their anticancer efficacies were assessed in nude mice bearing s.c. human prostate adenocarcinoma C4-2 xenografts. The in vivo results show that the spacer length between targeting moieties and HPMA copolymer backbone can significantly affect the treatment efficacy of DTX conjugates against C4-2 tumor bearing nu/nu mice. Moreover, histological analysis indicated that the DUPA-targeted DTX conjugate with longer spacer had no toxicity in major organs of treated mice.

  4. Carbohydrate plasma expanders for passive tumor targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Stefan; Caysa, Henrike; Kuntsche, Judith

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the suitability of carbohydrate plasma volume expanders as a novel polymer platform for tumor targeting. Many synthetic polymers have already been synthesized for targeted tumor therapy, but potential advantages of these carbohydrates include inexpen...... was characterized in human colon carcinoma xenograft bearing nude mice. A tumor specific accumulation of HES 450 was observed, which proves it’s potential as carrier for passive tumor targeting....

  5. Prostate-specific membrane antigen-directed nanoparticle targeting for extreme nearfield ablation of prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung S; Roche, Philip Jr; Giannopoulos, Paresa N; Mitmaker, Elliot J; Tamilia, Michael; Paliouras, Miltiadis; Trifiro, Mark A

    2017-03-01

    Almost all biological therapeutic interventions cannot overcome neoplastic heterogeneity. Physical ablation therapy is immune to tumor heterogeneity, but nearby tissue damage is the limiting factor in delivering lethal doses. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes offer a number of unique properties: chemical stability, photonic properties including efficient light absorption, thermal conductivity, and extensive surface area availability for covalent chemical ligation. When combined together with a targeting moiety such as an antibody or small molecule, one can deliver highly localized temperature increases and cause extensive cellular damage. We have functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes by conjugating an antibody against prostate-specific membrane antigen. In our in vitro studies using prostate-specific membrane antigen-positive LNCaP prostate cancer cells, we have effectively demonstrated cell ablation of >80% with a single 30-s exposure to a 2.7-W, 532-nm laser for the first time without bulk heating. We also confirmed the specificity and selectivity of prostate-specific membrane antigen targeting by assessing prostate-specific membrane antigen-null PC3 cell lines under the same conditions (<10% cell ablation). This suggests that we can achieve an extreme nearfield cell ablation effect, thus restricting potential tissue damage when transferred to in vivo clinical applications. Developing this new platform will introduce novel approaches toward current therapeutic modalities and will usher in a new age of effective cancer treatment squarely addressing tumoral heterogeneity.

  6. Prostate Cancer Clinical Consortium Clinical Research Site: Targeted Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    prostate cancer . Cancer Res 70: 7992-8002, 2010 8. Nelson PS: Molecular states underlying an- drogen receptor activation: A framework for thera- peutics...targeting androgen signaling in prostate cancer . J Clin Oncol 30:644-646, 2012 9. Thadani-Mulero M, Nanus DM, Giannakakou P: Androgen receptor on the... prostate cancer . Clin Cancer Res 21:795-807, 2015 17. van Soest RJ, de Morrée ES, Kweldam CF, et al: Targeting the androgen receptor confers in vivo

  7. Transcriptome sequencing in prostate cancer identifies inter-tumor heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Mendonca

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Given the dearth of gene mutations in prostate cancer, [1] ,[2] it is likely that genomic rearrangements play a significant role in the evolution of prostate cancer. However, in the search for recurrent genomic alterations, "private alterations" have received less attention. Such alterations may provide insights into the evolution, behavior, and clinical outcome of an individual tumor. In a recent report in "Genome Biology" Wyatt et al. [3] defines unique alterations in a cohort of high-risk prostate cancer patient with a lethal phenotype. Utilizing a transcriptome sequencing approach they observe high inter-tumor heterogeneity; however, the genes altered distill into three distinct cancer-relevant pathways. Their analysis reveals the presence of several non-ETS fusions, which may contribute to the phenotype of individual tumors, and have significance for disease progression.

  8. Naked DNA Immunization for Prevention of Prostate Cancer in a Dunning Rat Prostate Tumor Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mincheff, Milcho

    2003-01-01

    ...: H-PSMA-T, R-"PSMA"-T, H-PSA, H-PSA-T, H-PAP-T and R"PSMA"-S. Preliminary studies using the Copenhagen rat tumor prostate model showed uniform tumor development in rats that were injected subcutaneously with 100 000 AT3B-lPSMA,PSA cells...

  9. MicroRNA-613 represses prostate cancer cell proliferation and invasion through targeting Frizzled7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Wei [Medical College of Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi' an 710061 (China); Department of Urology, Shaanxi Provincial People' s Hospital, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710068 (China); Li, Chan [Department of Ophthalmology, Shaanxi Provincial People' s Hospital, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710068 (China); Duan, Wanli; Du, Shuangkuan; Yang, Fan; Zhou, Jiancheng [Department of Urology, Shaanxi Provincial People' s Hospital, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710068 (China); Xing, Junping, E-mail: junpingxing@163.com [Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710061 (China)

    2016-01-15

    A growing number of studies have indicated that microRNAs (miRNAs) are critical regulators of carcinogenesis and cancer progression and may serve as potential therapeutic tools for cancer therapy. Frizzled7 (Fzd7), the most important receptor of the Wnt signaling pathway, is extensively involved in cancer development and progression. However, the role of Fzd7 in prostate cancer remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to explore the expression of Fzd7 in prostate cancer and test whether modulating Fzd7 expression by miR-613 would have an impact on prostate cancer cell proliferation and invasion. We found that Fzd7 was highly expressed in prostate cancer cell lines. Through bioinformatics analysis, Fzd7 was predicted as a target gene of miR-613, which was validated by dual-luciferase reporter assays, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. By gain of function experiments, we showed that overexpression of miR-613 significantly suppressed prostate cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Furthermore, miR-613 overexpression markedly downregulated the Wnt signaling pathway. Through a rescue experiment, we showed that overexpression of Fzd7 could abrogate the inhibitory effect of miR-613 on cell proliferation and invasion as well as Wnt signaling. Additionally, these results were further strengthened by data showing that miR-613 was significantly downregulated in prostate cancer tissues, exhibiting an inverse correlation with Fzd7 expression. In conclusion, our study suggests that miR-613 functions as a tumor suppressor, partially through targeting Fzd7, and is a potential therapeutic target for prostate cancer. - Highlights: • Fzd7 was highly expressed in prostate cancer. • Fzd7 was predicted as a target gene of miR-613. • MiR-613 negatively regulated prostate cancer by Fzd7. • MiR-613 inversely correlated with Fzd7 in prostate cancer.

  10. MicroRNA-613 represses prostate cancer cell proliferation and invasion through targeting Frizzled7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Wei; Li, Chan; Duan, Wanli; Du, Shuangkuan; Yang, Fan; Zhou, Jiancheng; Xing, Junping

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of studies have indicated that microRNAs (miRNAs) are critical regulators of carcinogenesis and cancer progression and may serve as potential therapeutic tools for cancer therapy. Frizzled7 (Fzd7), the most important receptor of the Wnt signaling pathway, is extensively involved in cancer development and progression. However, the role of Fzd7 in prostate cancer remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to explore the expression of Fzd7 in prostate cancer and test whether modulating Fzd7 expression by miR-613 would have an impact on prostate cancer cell proliferation and invasion. We found that Fzd7 was highly expressed in prostate cancer cell lines. Through bioinformatics analysis, Fzd7 was predicted as a target gene of miR-613, which was validated by dual-luciferase reporter assays, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. By gain of function experiments, we showed that overexpression of miR-613 significantly suppressed prostate cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Furthermore, miR-613 overexpression markedly downregulated the Wnt signaling pathway. Through a rescue experiment, we showed that overexpression of Fzd7 could abrogate the inhibitory effect of miR-613 on cell proliferation and invasion as well as Wnt signaling. Additionally, these results were further strengthened by data showing that miR-613 was significantly downregulated in prostate cancer tissues, exhibiting an inverse correlation with Fzd7 expression. In conclusion, our study suggests that miR-613 functions as a tumor suppressor, partially through targeting Fzd7, and is a potential therapeutic target for prostate cancer. - Highlights: • Fzd7 was highly expressed in prostate cancer. • Fzd7 was predicted as a target gene of miR-613. • MiR-613 negatively regulated prostate cancer by Fzd7. • MiR-613 inversely correlated with Fzd7 in prostate cancer.

  11. Selective tumor cell targeting by the disaccharide moiety of bleomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiqiang; Schmaltz, Ryan M; Bozeman, Trevor C; Paul, Rakesh; Rishel, Michael J; Tsosie, Krystal S; Hecht, Sidney M

    2013-02-27

    In a recent study, the well-documented tumor targeting properties of the antitumor agent bleomycin (BLM) were studied in cell culture using microbubbles that had been derivatized with multiple copies of BLM. It was shown that BLM selectively targeted MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells but not the "normal" breast cell line MCF-10A. Furthermore, it was found that the BLM analogue deglycobleomycin, which lacks the disaccharide moiety of BLM, did not target either cell line, indicating that the BLM disaccharide moiety is necessary for tumor selectivity. Not resolved in the earlier study were the issues of whether the BLM disaccharide moiety alone is sufficient for tumor cell targeting and the possible cellular uptake of the disaccharide. In the present study, we conjugated BLM, deglycoBLM, and BLM disaccharide to the cyanine dye Cy5**. It was found that the BLM and BLM disaccharide conjugates, but not the deglycoBLM conjugate, bound selectively to MCF-7 cells and were internalized. The same was also true for the prostate cancer cell line DU-145 (but not for normal PZ-HPV-7 prostate cells) and for the pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC-3 (but not for normal SVR A221a pancreas cells). The targeting efficiency of the disaccharide was only slightly less than that of BLM in MCF-7 and DU-145 cells and comparable to that of BLM in BxPC-3 cells. These results establish that the BLM disaccharide is both necessary and sufficient for tumor cell targeting, a finding with obvious implications for the design of novel tumor imaging and therapeutic agents.

  12. Tumor-targeting peptides from combinatorial libraries*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruiwu; Li, Xiaocen; Xiao, Wenwu; Lam, Kit S.

    2018-01-01

    Cancer is one of the major and leading causes of death worldwide. Two of the greatest challenges infighting cancer are early detection and effective treatments with no or minimum side effects. Widespread use of targeted therapies and molecular imaging in clinics requires high affinity, tumor-specific agents as effective targeting vehicles to deliver therapeutics and imaging probes to the primary or metastatic tumor sites. Combinatorial libraries such as phage-display and one-bead one-compound (OBOC) peptide libraries are powerful approaches in discovering tumor-targeting peptides. This review gives an overview of different combinatorial library technologies that have been used for the discovery of tumor-targeting peptides. Examples of tumor-targeting peptides identified from each combinatorial library method will be discussed. Published tumor-targeting peptide ligands and their applications will also be summarized by the combinatorial library methods and their corresponding binding receptors. PMID:27210583

  13. On complex preparation for radiotherapy of prostatic tumor patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachev, S.I.

    1980-01-01

    An experience with the treatment of 62 patients with prostatic gland tumor has contributed to the elaboration of some approaches to the utilization of modern diagnostic facilities in order to define the spread of neoplastic process and select therapeutic tactics. A sequence of methods to be used has been described, including clinical and X-ray, radioisotope and ultrasonic methods of examination. The matter of particular attention is a newly developed method of the prostatic gland cranio-caudal size determination. The latter together with ultrasonic data enable one to detect the size of the tumor and select an adequate physico-technical regime of irradiation for each individual patient

  14. Periostin: a promising target of therapeutical intervention for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Weihong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In our recent study, Periostin was up-regulated in prostate cancer(PCa compared with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH by proteomics analysis of prostate biopsies. We investigated the effect of sliencing Periostin by RNA interference (RNAi on the proliferation and migration of PCa LNCap cell line. Methods All the prostate biopsies from PCa, BPH and BPH with local prostatic intraepithelial neoplasm(PIN were analyzed by iTRAQ(Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification technology. Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining were used to verify Periostin expression in the tissues of PCa. Periostin expression in different PCa cell lines was determined by immunofluorescence staining, western blotting and reverse transcription PCR(RT-PCR. The LNCap cells with Periostin expression were used for transfecting shRNA-Periostin lentiviral particles. The efficancy of transfecting shRNA lentiviral particles was evaluated by immunofluorescence, western blotting and Real-time PCR. The effect of silencing Periostin expression by RNAi on proliferation of LNCap cells was determined by MTT assay and tumor xenografts. The tissue slices from theses xenografts were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin(HE staining. The expression of Periostin in the xenografts was deteminned by Immunohistochemical staining and western blotting. The migration of LNCap cells after silencing Periostin gene expression were analyzed in vitro. Results Periostin as the protein of interest was shown 9.12 fold up-regulation in PCa compared with BPH. The overexpression of Periostin in the stroma of PCa was confirmed by western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. Periostin was only expressed in PCa LNCap cell line. Our results indicated that the transfection ratio was more than 90%. As was expected, both the protein level and mRNA level of Periostin in the stably expressing shRNA-Periostin LNCap cells were significantly reduced. The stably expressing sh

  15. Co-Targeting Prostate Cancer Epithelium and Bone Stroma by Human Osteonectin-Promoter-Mediated Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Inhibits Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shian-Ying Sung

    Full Text Available Stromal-epithelial interaction has been shown to promote local tumor growth and distant metastasis. We sought to create a promising gene therapy approach that co-targets cancer and its supporting stromal cells for combating castration-resistant prostate tumors. Herein, we demonstrated that human osteonectin is overexpressed in the prostate cancer epithelium and tumor stroma in comparison with their normal counterpart. We designed a novel human osteonectin promoter (hON-522E containing positive transcriptional regulatory elements identified in both the promoter and exon 1 region of the human osteonectin gene. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the hON-522E promoter is highly active in androgen receptor negative and metastatic prostate cancer and bone stromal cells compared to androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells. Moreover, in vivo prostate-tumor-promoting activity of the hON-522E promoter was confirmed by intravenous administration of an adenoviral vector containing the hON-522E promoter-driven luciferase gene (Ad-522E-Luc into mice bearing orthotopic human prostate tumor xenografts. In addition, an adenoviral vector with the hON-522E-promoter-driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (Ad-522E-TK was highly effective against the growth of androgen-independent human prostate cancer PC3M and bone stromal cell line in vitro and in pre-established PC3M tumors in vivo upon addition of the prodrug ganciclovir. Because of the heterogeneity of human prostate tumors, hON-522E promoter-mediated gene therapy has the potential for the treatment of hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancers.

  16. Engineering a prostate-specific membrane antigen-activated tumor endothelial cell prodrug for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denmeade, Samuel R; Mhaka, Annastasiah M; Rosen, D Marc

    2012-01-01

    adenosine triphosphatase (SERCA) pump, whose proper function is required by all cell types for viability. To achieve targeted inhibition, we took advantage of the unique expression of the carboxypeptidase prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) by tumor endothelial cells within the microenvironment...... of solid tumors. We generated a prodrug, G202, consisting of a PSMA-specific peptide coupled to an analog of the potent SERCA pump inhibitor thapsigargin. G202 produced substantial tumor regression against a panel of human cancer xenografts in vivo at doses that were minimally toxic to the host...

  17. The epigenome as a therapeutic target in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Antoinette S; Watson, R William G; Lawler, Mark; Hollywood, Donal

    2010-12-01

    During cancer development and progression, tumor cells undergo abnormal epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, histone deacetylation and nucleosome remodeling. Collectively, these aberrations promote genomic instability and lead to silencing of tumor-suppressor genes and reactivation of oncogenic retroviruses. Epigenetic modifications, therefore, provide exciting new avenues for prostate cancer research. Promoter hypermethylation is widespread during neoplastic transformation of prostate cells, which suggests that restoration of a 'normal' epigenome through treatment with inhibitors of the enzymes involved could be clinically beneficial. Global patterns of histone modifications are also being defined and have been associated with clinical and pathologic predictors of prostate cancer outcome. Although treatment for localized prostate cancer can be curative, the development of successful therapies for the management of castration-resistant metastatic disease is urgently needed. Reactivation of tumor-suppressor genes by demethylating agents and histone deacetylase inhibitors could be a potential treatment option for patients with advanced disease.

  18. Gold nanorod-mediated hyperthermia enhances the efficacy of HPMA copolymer-90Y conjugates in treatment of prostate tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckway, Brandon; Frazier, Nick; Gormley, Adam J.; Ray, Abhijit; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The treatment of prostate cancer using a radiotherapeutic 90 Y labeled N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer can be enhanced with localized tumor hyperthermia. An 111 In labeled HPMA copolymer system for single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) was developed to observe the biodistribution changes associated with hyperthermia. Efficacy studies were conducted in prostate tumor bearing mice using the 90 Y HPMA copolymer with hyperthermia. Methods: HPMA copolymers containing 1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) were synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation transfer (RAFT) copolymerization and subsequently labeled with either 111 In for imaging or 90 Y for efficacy studies. Radiolabel stability was characterized in vitro with mouse serum. Imaging and efficacy studies were conducted in DU145 prostate tumor bearing mice. Imaging was performed using single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). Localized mild tumor hyperthermia was achieved by plasmonic photothermal therapy using gold nanorods. Results: HPMA copolymer-DOTA conjugates demonstrated efficient labeling and stability for both radionuclides. Imaging analysis showed a marked increase of radiolabeled copolymer within the hyperthermia treated prostate tumors, with no significant accumulation in non-targeted tissues. The greatest reduction in tumor growth was observed in the hyperthermia treated tumors with 90 Y HPMA copolymer conjugates. Histological analysis confirmed treatment efficacy and safety. Conclusion: HPMA copolymer-DOTA conjugates radiolabeled with both the imaging and treatment radioisotopes, when combined with hyperthermia can serve as an image guided approach for efficacious treatment of prostate tumors

  19. Engineering a prostate-specific membrane antigen-activated tumor endothelial cell prodrug for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denmeade, Samuel R; Mhaka, Annastasiah M; Rosen, D Marc; Brennen, W Nathaniel; Dalrymple, Susan; Dach, Ingrid; Olesen, Claus; Gurel, Bora; Demarzo, Angelo M; Wilding, George; Carducci, Michael A; Dionne, Craig A; Møller, Jesper V; Nissen, Poul; Christensen, S Brøgger; Isaacs, John T

    2012-06-27

    Heterogeneous expression of drug target proteins within tumor sites is a major mechanism of resistance to anticancer therapies. We describe a strategy to selectively inhibit, within tumor sites, the function of a critical intracellular protein, the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase (SERCA) pump, whose proper function is required by all cell types for viability. To achieve targeted inhibition, we took advantage of the unique expression of the carboxypeptidase prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) by tumor endothelial cells within the microenvironment of solid tumors. We generated a prodrug, G202, consisting of a PSMA-specific peptide coupled to an analog of the potent SERCA pump inhibitor thapsigargin. G202 produced substantial tumor regression against a panel of human cancer xenografts in vivo at doses that were minimally toxic to the host. On the basis of these data, a phase 1 dose-escalation clinical trial has been initiated with G202 in patients with advanced cancer.

  20. Targeting Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    deprivation therapy (ADT) or androgen receptor (AR) pathway inhibition (ARPI) but eventually develops into lethal castration resistance prostate cancer ...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0553 TITLE: Targeting Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Martin Gleave...Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0553 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Martin Gleave 5d

  1. Retrotransposon Targeting of Tumor Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Dongdong; DeVaux, George

    2005-01-01

    .... Cancer gene therapy techniques include oncogene inactivation, tumor suppressor gene replacement, inhibition of angiogenesis, immunopotentiation, molecular chemotherapy, and transfer of drug resistance genes...

  2. Development of a Combination Therapy for Prostate Cancer by Targeting Stat3 and HIF-1alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    inflammation-induced cancer, making it an attractive target (25-27). A3. Innovation 1. TEL03 is a novel anti-cancer agent from Chinese herbal medicine ...agents from Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) that targets HIF-1α /2α for prostate cancer therapy. Hypoxia orchestrated by HIF-1αis crucial for tumor...Stat3 for treatment of prostate and other cancers. TEL03, which is a novel anti-cancer agent derived from Chinese herbal medicine (CHM: Hypocrella

  3. Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG inhibits progression of LuCaP35 xenograft prostate tumors to castration resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Katherine J; Langmann, Gabrielle; Ai, Junkui; Ramos-Garcia, Raquel; Vessella, Robert L; Wang, Zhou

    2012-07-01

    Advanced prostate cancer is currently treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). ADT initially results in tumor regression; however, all patients eventually relapse with castration-resistant prostate cancer. New approaches to delay the progression of prostate cancer to castration resistance are in desperate need. This study addresses whether targeting Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) regulation of androgen receptor (AR) can inhibit prostate cancer progression to castration resistance. The HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG was injected intraperitoneally into nude mice bearing LuCaP35 xenograft tumors to determine the effect of HSP90 inhibition on prostate cancer progression to castration resistance and host survival. Administration of 17-AAG maintained androgen-sensitivity, delayed the progression of LuCaP35 xenograft tumors to castration resistance, and prolonged the survival of host. In addition, 17-AAG prevented nuclear localization of endogenous AR in LuCaP35 xenograft tumors in castrated nude mice. Targeting Hsp90 or the mechanism by which HSP90 regulates androgen-independent AR nuclear localization and activation may lead to new approaches to prevent and/or treat castration-resistant prostate cancer. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Quantification of tumor extension in prostate biopsies: importance in the identification of confined tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite Kátia R.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the importance of quantifying the adenocarcinoma in prostate biopsies when determining the tumor's final stage in patients who undergo radical prostatectomy. To identify the best methodology for obtaining such data. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Prostate biopsies from 132 patients were examined, with determination of Gleason histological grade and tumor volume in number of involved fragments, tumor extent of the fragment mostly affected by the tumor and the total percentage of tumor in the specimen. Theses parameters were statistically correlated with the neoplasia's final stage following the evaluation of radical prostatectomy specimens. RESULTS: An average of 12 and a median of 14 biopsy fragments were evaluated per patient. In the univariate analysis the Gleason histological grade, the largest tumor extent in one fragment and the total percentage of tumor in the specimen were correlated with tumor stage of the surgical specimen. In the multivariate analysis, the Gleason histological grade and the total percentage of tumor were strongly correlated with the neoplasia's final stage. The risk of the tumor not being confined was 3 for Gleason 7 tumors and 10.6 for Gleason 8 tumors or above. In cases where the tumor involved more than 60% of the specimen, the risk of non-confined disease was 4.4 times. Among 19 patients with unfavorable histological parameters, Gleason > 7 and extension greater than 60% the tumor final stage was pT3 in 95%. CONCLUSION: When associated to the Gleason histological grade, tumor quantification in prostate biopsies is an important factor for determining organ-confined disease, and among the methods, total percentage of tumor is the most informative one. Such data should be included in the pathological report and must be incorporated in future nomograms.

  5. Bispecific small molecule-antibody conjugate targeting prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan Hyuk; Axup, Jun Y; Lawson, Brian R; Yun, Hwayoung; Tardif, Virginie; Choi, Sei Hyun; Zhou, Quan; Dubrovska, Anna; Biroc, Sandra L; Marsden, Robin; Pinstaff, Jason; Smider, Vaughn V; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-10-29

    Bispecific antibodies, which simultaneously target CD3 on T cells and tumor-associated antigens to recruit cytotoxic T cells to cancer cells, are a promising new approach to the treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Here we report a site-specific, semisynthetic method for the production of bispecific antibody-like therapeutics in which a derivative of the prostate-specific membrane antigen-binding small molecule DUPA was selectively conjugated to a mutant αCD3 Fab containing the unnatural amino acid, p-acetylphenylalanine, at a defined site. Homogeneous conjugates were generated in excellent yields and had good solubility. The efficacy of the conjugate was optimized by modifying the linker structure, relative binding orientation, and stoichiometry of the ligand. The optimized conjugate showed potent and selective in vitro activity (EC50 ~ 100 pM), good serum half-life, and potent in vivo activity in prophylactic and treatment xenograft mouse models. This semisynthetic approach is likely to be applicable to the generation of additional bispecific agents using drug-like ligands selective for other cell-surface receptors.

  6. Bispecific small molecule–antibody conjugate targeting prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan Hyuk; Axup, Jun Y.; Lawson, Brian R.; Yun, Hwayoung; Tardif, Virginie; Choi, Sei Hyun; Zhou, Quan; Dubrovska, Anna; Biroc, Sandra L.; Marsden, Robin; Pinstaff, Jason; Smider, Vaughn V.; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies, which simultaneously target CD3 on T cells and tumor-associated antigens to recruit cytotoxic T cells to cancer cells, are a promising new approach to the treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Here we report a site-specific, semisynthetic method for the production of bispecific antibody-like therapeutics in which a derivative of the prostate-specific membrane antigen-binding small molecule DUPA was selectively conjugated to a mutant αCD3 Fab containing the unnatural amino acid, p-acetylphenylalanine, at a defined site. Homogeneous conjugates were generated in excellent yields and had good solubility. The efficacy of the conjugate was optimized by modifying the linker structure, relative binding orientation, and stoichiometry of the ligand. The optimized conjugate showed potent and selective in vitro activity (EC50 ∼100 pM), good serum half-life, and potent in vivo activity in prophylactic and treatment xenograft mouse models. This semisynthetic approach is likely to be applicable to the generation of additional bispecific agents using drug-like ligands selective for other cell-surface receptors. PMID:24127589

  7. Targeting the interleukin-11 receptor α in metastatic prostate cancer: A first-in-man study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Renata; Millikan, Randall E; Christianson, Dawn R; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Driessen, Wouter H P; Giordano, Ricardo J; Hajitou, Amin; Hoang, Anh G; Wen, Sijin; Barnhart, Kirstin F; Baze, Wallace B; Marcott, Valerie D; Hawke, David H; Do, Kim-Anh; Navone, Nora M; Efstathiou, Eleni; Troncoso, Patricia; Lobb, Roy R; Logothetis, Christopher J; Arap, Wadih

    2015-07-15

    Receptors in tumor blood vessels are attractive targets for ligand-directed drug discovery and development. The authors have worked systematically to map human endothelial receptors ("vascular zip codes") within tumors through direct peptide library selection in cancer patients. Previously, they selected a ligand-binding motif to the interleukin-11 receptor alpha (IL-11Rα) in the human vasculature. The authors generated a ligand-directed, peptidomimetic drug (bone metastasis-targeting peptidomimetic-11 [BMTP-11]) for IL-11Rα-based human tumor vascular targeting. Preclinical studies (efficacy/toxicity) included evaluating BMTP-11 in prostate cancer xenograft models, drug localization, targeted apoptotic effects, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analyses, and dose-range determination, including formal (good laboratory practice) toxicity across rodent and nonhuman primate species. The initial BMTP-11 clinical development also is reported based on a single-institution, open-label, first-in-class, first-in-man trial (National Clinical Trials number NCT00872157) in patients with metastatic, castrate-resistant prostate cancer. BMTP-11 was preclinically promising and, thus, was chosen for clinical development in patients. Limited numbers of patients who had castrate-resistant prostate cancer with osteoblastic bone metastases were enrolled into a phase 0 trial with biology-driven endpoints. The authors demonstrated biopsy-verified localization of BMTP-11 to tumors in the bone marrow and drug-induced apoptosis in all patients. Moreover, the maximum tolerated dose was identified on a weekly schedule (20-30 mg/m(2) ). Finally, a renal dose-limiting toxicity was determined, namely, dose-dependent, reversible nephrotoxicity with proteinuria and casts involving increased serum creatinine. These biologic endpoints establish BMTP-11 as a targeted drug candidate in metastatic, castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Within a larger discovery context, the current findings indicate that

  8. Cancer Patient T Cells Genetically Targeted to Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Specifically Lyse Prostate Cancer Cells and Release Cytokines in Response to Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. Gong

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The expression of immunoglobulin-based artificial receptors in normal T lymphocytes provides a means to target lymphocytes to cell surface antigens independently of major histocompatibility complex restriction. Such artificial receptors have been previously shown to confer antigen-specific tumoricidal properties in murine T cells. We constructed a novel ζ chain fusion receptor specific for prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA termed Pz-1. PSMA is a cell-surface glycoprotein expressed on prostate cancer cells and the neovascular endothelium of multiple carcinomas. We show that primary T cells harvested from five of five patients with different stages of prostate cancer and transduced with the Pz-1 receptor readily lyse prostate cancer cells. Having established a culture system using fibroblasts that express PSMA, we next show that T cells expressing the Pz-1 receptor release cytokines in response to cell-bound PSMA. Furthermore, we show that the cytokine release is greatly augmented by B7.1-mediated costimulation. Thus, our findings support the feasibility of adoptive cell therapy by using genetically engineered T cells in prostate cancer patients and suggest that both CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte functions can be synergistically targeted against tumor cells.

  9. The gastrin/cholecystokinin-B receptor on prostate cells--a novel target for bifunctional prostate cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturzu, Alexander; Klose, Uwe; Sheikh, Sumbla; Echner, Hartmut; Kalbacher, Hubert; Deeg, Martin; Nägele, Thomas; Schwentner, Christian; Ernemann, Ulrike; Heckl, Stefan

    2014-02-14

    The means of identifying prostate carcinoma and its metastases are limited. The contrast agents used in magnetic resonance imaging clinical diagnostics are not taken up into the tumor cells, but only accumulate in the interstitial space of the highly vasculated tumor. We examined the gastrin/cholecystokinin-B receptor as a possible target for prostate-specific detection using the C-terminal seven amino acid sequence of the gastrin peptide hormone. The correct sequence and a scrambled control sequence were coupled to the fluorescent dye rhodamine and the magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent gadolinium (Gd)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). Expression analysis of the gastrin receptor mRNA was performed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction on PC3 prostate carcinoma cells, U373 glioma, U2OS osteosarcoma and Colo205 colon carcinoma cells. After having confirmed elevated expression of gastrin receptor in PC3 cells and very low expression of the receptor in Colo205 cells, these two cell lines were used to create tumor xenografts on nude mice for in vivo experiments. Confocal lasers scanning microscopy and magnetic resonance imaging showed a high specificity of the correct conjugate for the PC3 xenografts. Staining of the PC3 xenografts was much weaker with the scrambled conjugate while the Colo205 xenografts showed no marked staining with any of the conjugates. In vitro experiments comparing the correct and scrambled conjugates on PC3 cells by magnetic resonance relaxometry and fluorescence-activated cell sorting confirmed markedly higher specificity of the correct conjugate. The investigations show that the gastrin receptor is a promising tumor cell surface target for future prostate-cancer-specific imaging applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Forced LIGHT expression in prostate tumors overcomes Treg mediated immunosuppression and synergizes with a prostate tumor therapeutic vaccine by recruiting effector T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lisa; Da Silva, Diane M; Verma, Bhavna; Gray, Andrew; Brand, Heike E; Skeate, Joseph G; Porras, Tania B; Kanodia, Shreya; Kast, W Martin

    2015-02-15

    LIGHT, a ligand for lymphotoxin-β receptor (LTβR) and herpes virus entry mediator, is predominantly expressed on activated immune cells and LTβR signaling leads to the recruitment of lymphocytes. The interaction between LIGHT and LTβR has been previously shown to activate immune cells and result in tumor regression in a virally-induced tumor model, but the role of LIGHT in tumor immunosuppression or in a prostate cancer setting, where self antigens exist, has not been explored. We hypothesized that forced expression of LIGHT in prostate tumors would shift the pattern of immune cell infiltration toward an anti-tumoral milieu, would inhibit T regulatory cells (Tregs) and would induce prostate cancer tumor associated antigen (TAA) specific T cells that would eradicate tumors. Real Time PCR was used to evaluate expression of forced LIGHT and other immunoregulatory genes in prostate tumors samples. For in vivo studies, adenovirus encoding murine LIGHT was injected intratumorally into TRAMP-C2 prostate cancer cell tumor bearing mice. Chemokine and cytokine concentrations were determined by multiplex ELISA. Flow cytometry was used to phenotype tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and expression of LIGHT on the tumor cell surface. Tumor-specific lymphocytes were quantified via ELISpot assay. Treg induction and Treg suppression assays determined Treg functionality after LIGHT treatment. LIGHT in combination with a therapeutic vaccine, PSCA TriVax, reduced tumor burden. LIGHT expression peaked within 48 hr of infection, recruited effector T cells that recognized mouse prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) into the tumor microenvironment, and inhibited infiltration of Tregs. Tregs isolated from tumor draining lymph nodes had impaired suppressive capability after LIGHT treatment. Forced LIGHT treatment combined with PSCA TriVax therapeutic vaccination delays prostate cancer progression in mice by recruiting effector T lymphocytes to the tumor and inhibiting Treg mediated

  11. Tumor Suppressor Activity of the EphB2 Receptor in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pasquale, Elena B

    2007-01-01

    Mutations have been recently identified in the EphB2 receptor gene in prostate cancer suggesting that EphB2, a member of the large Eph receptor tyrosine kinase family, is a tumor suppressor in prostate cancer...

  12. Tumor Suppressor Activity of the EphB2 Receptor in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pasquale, Elena B

    2006-01-01

    Mutations have been recently identified in the EphB2 receptor gene in prostate cancer suggesting that EphB2, a member of the large Eph receptor tyrosine kinase family, is a tumor suppressor in prostate cancer...

  13. Bone-targeted cabazitaxel nanoparticles for metastatic prostate cancer skeletal lesions and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gdowski, Andrew S; Ranjan, Amalendu; Sarker, Marjana R; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a novel cabazitaxel bone targeted nanoparticle (NP) system for improved drug delivery to the bone microenvironment. Nanoparticles were developed using poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) and cabazitaxel as the core with amino-bisphosphonate surface conjugation. Optimization of nanoparticle physiochemical properties, in vitro evaluation in prostate cancer cell lines and in vivo testing in an intraosseous model of metastatic prostate cancer was performed. This bone targeted cabazitaxel nanocarrier system showed significant reduction in tumor burden, while at the same time maintaining bone structure integrity and reducing pain in the mouse tumor limb. This bone microenvironment targeted nanoparticle system and clinically relevant approach of evaluation represents a promising advancement for treating bone metastatic cancer.

  14. The Effect of Tumor-Prostate Ratio on Biochemical Recurrence after Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Yong Cho

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Prostate tumor volume calculated after surgery using pathologic tissue has been shown to be an independent risk factor for biochemical recurrence. Nonetheless, prostate size varies among individuals, regardless of the presence or absence of cancer. We assumed to be lower margin positive rate in the surgical operation, when the prostate volume is larger and the tumor lesion is same. Thus, we defined the tumor-prostate ratio in the ratio of tumor volume to prostate volume. In order to compensate the prostate tumor volume, the effect of tumor-prostate ratio on biochemical recurrence was examined. Materials and Methods: This study included 251 patients who underwent open retropubic radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer in a single hospital. We analyzed the effects of tumor volume and tumor-prostate ratio, as well as the effects of known risk factors for biochemical recurrence, on the duration of disease-free survival. Results: In the univariate analysis, the risk factors that significantly impacted disease-free survival time were found to be a prostate-specific antigen level ≥10 ng/mL, a tumor volume ≥5 mL, tumor-prostate ratio ≥10%, tumor capsular invasion, lymph node invasion, positive surgical margins, and seminal vesicle invasion. In the multivariate analysis performed to evaluate the risk factors found to be significant in the univariate analysis, positive surgical margins (hazard ratio=3.066 and a tumor density ≥10% (hazard ratio=1.991 were shown to be significant risk factors for biochemical recurrence. Conclusions: Tumor-prostate ratio, rather than tumor volume, should be regarded as a significant risk factor for biochemical recurrence.

  15. Apoptosis and Tumor Progressionin Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tenniswood, Martin P

    2005-01-01

    ... (as measured by BrdU incorporation) and apoptosis as measured by TUNEL staining. We have standardized an efficient methodologies for isolating cells from primary tumors expressing REP by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS...

  16. Correlation of radiation response with tumor oxygenation in the Dunning prostate R3327-AT1 tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, Vincent A.; Zhao Dawen; Gilio, Joseph; Chang, C.-H.; Jiang Lan; Hahn, Eric W.; Mason, Ralph P.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the application of pretreatment oxygenation to the AT1 subline of the Dunning R3327 prostate tumor, which is more hypoxic and faster growing than the H1 subline previously studied. Methods and Materials: Dunning prostate R3327-AT1 tumors growing on Copenhagen rats were administered 30 Gy of X-ray radiation either with or without oxygen inhalation. Tumor oxygenation was sampled by 19 F nuclear magnetic resonance echo planar imaging relaxometry of the reporter molecule hexafluorobenzene, no more than 24 h before irradiation. Results: Large tumors (>3.0 cm 3 ) exhibited significantly greater hypoxic fractions and lower mean partial pressure of oxygen (pO 2 ) than their smaller counterparts ( 3 ). However, unlike the R3327-HI subline, large AT1 tumors generally did not respond to oxygen inhalation in terms of altered hypoxic fraction or response to irradiation. Although the tumors did not respond to oxygen inhalation, each tumor had a different pO 2 , and there was a clear trend between level of oxygenation at time of irradiation and tumor growth delay, with considerably better outcome when mean pO 2 > 10 mm Hg. The comparatively small baseline hypoxic fraction in the group of small tumors was virtually eliminated by breathing oxygen, and the growth rate was significantly reduced for tumors on rats breathing oxygen during irradiation. Conclusions: These results further validate the usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance oximetry as a predictor of response to radiation therapy

  17. Osteopontin is a tumor autoantigen in prostate cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    TILLI, TATIANA M.; SILVA, ELOÍSIO A.; MATOS, LÍVIA C.; FAGET, DOUGLAS V.; DIAS, BIANCA F.P.; VASCONCELOS, JULIANA S.P.; YOKOSAKI, YASUYUKI; GIMBA, ETEL R.P.

    2011-01-01

    Anti-tumor antibodies act as biomarkers for the early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). Osteopontin (OPN) is overexpressed in PCa cells and contributes to the progression of the disease. This study aimed to evaluate whether OPN evokes a humoral immune response in PCa patients and whether the reactivity levels of anti-OPN antibodies may be used to better differentiate PCa from benign and healthy donor plasma samples. Plasma samples from biopsy-proven PCa patients (29), benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) (18) and control healthy donors (HD) (30) were tested by immunoblots using the recombinant human OPN. The frequency of anti-OPN antibodies was significantly higher in PCa (66%) plasma samples as compared to BPH (33%) and HD controls (10%). Anti-OPN antibodies were detected in a high proportion of plasma samples from patients with a Gleason score of less than 6 (57%), prostate-specific antigen levels lower than 10 ng/ml (67%) and pT2 organ-confined disease (70%), suggesting that anti-OPN antibodies may be used as an early serum marker for PCa. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of OPN as a tumor autoantigen and one of the most reactive individual autoantigens described thus far. These data support the inclusion of OPN in a multiplex of tumor antigens in order to perform antibody profiling in PCa as well as in other malignancies overexpressing OPN. PMID:22870138

  18. Targeting DNA Methyltranferases in Urological Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângela Marques-Magalhães

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Urological cancers are a heterogeneous group of malignancies accounting for a considerable proportion of cancer-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. Aberrant epigenetic traits, especially altered DNA methylation patterns constitute a hallmark of these tumors. Nonetheless, these alterations are reversible, and several efforts have been carried out to design and test several epigenetic compounds that might reprogram tumor cell phenotype back to a normal state. Indeed, several DNMT inhibitors are currently under evaluation for therapeutic efficacy in clinical trials. This review highlights the critical role of DNA methylation in urological cancers and summarizes the available data on pre-clinical assays and clinical trials with DNMT inhibitors in bladder, kidney, prostate, and testicular germ cell cancers.

  19. S6Ks isoforms contribute to viability, migration, docetaxel resistance and tumor formation of prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, Camila L.; Freitas, Lidia B.; Tamura, Rodrigo E.; Tavares, Mariana R.; Pavan, Isadora C. B.; Bajgelman, Marcio C.; Simabuco, Fernando M.

    2016-01-01

    The S6 Kinase (S6K) proteins are some of the main downstream effectors of the mammalian Target Of Rapamycin (mTOR) and act as key regulators of protein synthesis and cell growth. S6K is overexpressed in a variety of human tumors and is correlated to poor prognosis in prostate cancer. Due to the current urgency to identify factors involved in prostate cancer progression, we aimed to reveal the cellular functions of three S6K isoforms–p70-S6K1, p85-S6K1 and p54-S6K2–in prostate cancer, as well as their potential as therapeutic targets. In this study we performed S6K knockdown and overexpression and investigated its role in prostate cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, viability, migration and resistance to docetaxel treatment. In addition, we measured tumor growth in Nude mice injected with PC3 cells overexpressing S6K isoforms and tested the efficacy of a new available S6K1 inhibitor in vitro. S6Ks overexpression enhanced PC3-luc cell line viability, migration, resistance to docetaxel and tumor formation in Nude mice. Only S6K2 knockdown rendered prostate cancer cells more sensitive to docetaxel. S6K1 inhibitor PF-4708671 was particularly effective for reducing migration and proliferation of PC3 cell line. These findings demonstrate that S6Ks play an important role in prostate cancer progression, enhancing cell viability, migration and chemotherapy resistance, and place both S6K1 and S6K2 as a potential targets in advanced prostate cancer. We also provide evidence that S6K1 inhibitor PF-4708671 may be considered as a potential drug for prostate cancer treatment. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2629-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  20. High efficiency diffusion molecular retention tumor targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan Guo

    Full Text Available Here we introduce diffusion molecular retention (DMR tumor targeting, a technique that employs PEG-fluorochrome shielded probes that, after a peritumoral (PT injection, undergo slow vascular uptake and extensive interstitial diffusion, with tumor retention only through integrin molecular recognition. To demonstrate DMR, RGD (integrin binding and RAD (control probes were synthesized bearing DOTA (for (111 In(3+, a NIR fluorochrome, and 5 kDa PEG that endows probes with a protein-like volume of 25 kDa and decreases non-specific interactions. With a GFP-BT-20 breast carcinoma model, tumor targeting by the DMR or i.v. methods was assessed by surface fluorescence, biodistribution of [(111In] RGD and [(111In] RAD probes, and whole animal SPECT. After a PT injection, both probes rapidly diffused through the normal and tumor interstitium, with retention of the RGD probe due to integrin interactions. With PT injection and the [(111In] RGD probe, SPECT indicated a highly tumor specific uptake at 24 h post injection, with 352%ID/g tumor obtained by DMR (vs 4.14%ID/g by i.v.. The high efficiency molecular targeting of DMR employed low probe doses (e.g. 25 ng as RGD peptide, which minimizes toxicity risks and facilitates clinical translation. DMR applications include the delivery of fluorochromes for intraoperative tumor margin delineation, the delivery of radioisotopes (e.g. toxic, short range alpha emitters for radiotherapy, or the delivery of photosensitizers to tumors accessible to light.

  1. Identification of novel androgen receptor target genes in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald William L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The androgen receptor (AR plays critical roles in both androgen-dependent and castrate-resistant prostate cancer (PCa. However, little is known about AR target genes that mediate the receptor's roles in disease progression. Results Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP Display, we discovered 19 novel loci occupied by the AR in castrate resistant C4-2B PCa cells. Only four of the 19 AR-occupied regions were within 10-kb 5'-flanking regulatory sequences. Three were located up to 4-kb 3' of the nearest gene, eight were intragenic and four were in gene deserts. Whereas the AR occupied the same loci in C4-2B (castrate resistant and LNCaP (androgen-dependent PCa cells, differences between the two cell lines were observed in the response of nearby genes to androgens. Among the genes strongly stimulated by DHT in C4-2B cells – D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT, Protein kinase C delta (PRKCD, Glutathione S- transferase theta 2 (GSTT2, Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 3 (TRPV3, and Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 (PYCR1 – most were less strongly or hardly stimulated in LNCaP cells. Another AR target gene, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT, was AR-stimulated in a ligand-independent manner, since it was repressed by AR siRNA knockdown, but not stimulated by DHT. We also present evidence for in vivo AR-mediated regulation of several genes identified by ChIP Display. For example, PRKCD and PYCR1, which may contribute to PCa cell growth and survival, are expressed in PCa biopsies from primary tumors before and after ablation and in metastatic lesions in a manner consistent with AR-mediated stimulation. Conclusion AR genomic occupancy is similar between LNCaP and C4-2B cells and is not biased towards 5' gene flanking sequences. The AR transcriptionally regulates less than half the genes nearby AR-occupied regions, usually but not always, in a ligand-dependent manner. Most are stimulated and a few are

  2. Perioperative Search for Circulating Tumor Cells in Patients Undergoing Prostate Brachytherapy for Clinically Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyasu Tsumura

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the absence of local prostate cancer recurrence, some patients develop distant metastases after prostate brachytherapy. We evaluate whether prostate brachytherapy procedures have a potential risk for hematogenous spillage of prostate cancer cells. Fifty-nine patients who were undergoing high-dose-rate (HDR or low-dose-rate (LDR brachytherapy participated in this prospective study. Thirty patients with high-risk or locally advanced cancer were treated with HDR brachytherapy after neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. Twenty-nine patients with clinically localized cancer were treated with LDR brachytherapy without neoadjuvant ADT. Samples of peripheral blood were drawn in the operating room before insertion of needles (preoperative and again immediately after the surgical manipulation (intraoperative. Blood samples of 7.5 mL were analyzed for circulating tumor cells (CTCs using the CellSearch System. While no preoperative samples showed CTCs (0%, they were detected in intraoperative samples in 7 of the 59 patients (11.8%; preoperative vs. intraoperative, p = 0.012. Positive CTC status did not correlate with perioperative variables, including prostate-specific antigen (PSA at diagnosis, use of neoadjuvant ADT, type of brachytherapy, Gleason score, and biopsy positive core rate. We detected CTCs from samples immediately after the surgical manipulation. Further study is needed to evaluate whether those CTCs actually can survive and proliferate at distant sites.

  3. Prostate-specific membrane antigen targeted imaging and therapy of prostate cancer using a PSMA inhibitor as a homing ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kularatne, Sumith A; Wang, Kevin; Santhapuram, Hari-Krishna R; Low, Philip S

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in Western society today. Current methods for detecting PCa are limited, leaving most early malignancies undiagnosed and sites of metastasis in advanced disease undetected. Major deficiencies also exist in the treatment of PCa, especially metastatic disease. In an effort to improve both detection and therapy of PCa, we have developed a PSMA-targeted ligand that delivers attached imaging and therapeutic agents selectively to PCa cells without targeting normal cells. The PSMA-targeted radioimaging agent (DUPA-(99m)Tc) was found to bind PSMA-positive human PCa cells (LNCaP cell line) with nanomolar affinity (K(D) = 14 nM). Imaging and biodistribution studies revealed that DUPA-(99m)Tc localizes primarily to LNCaP cell tumor xenografts in nu/nu mice (% injected dose/gram = 11.3 at 4 h postinjection; tumor-to-muscle ratio = 75:1). Two PSMA-targeted optical imaging agents (DUPA-FITC and DUPA-rhodamine B) were also shown to efficiently label PCa cells and to internalize and traffic to intracellular endosomes. A PSMA-targeted chemotherapeutic agent (DUPA-TubH) was demonstrated to kill PSMA-positive LNCaP cells in culture (IC(50) = 3 nM) and to eliminate established tumor xenografts in nu/nu mice with no detectable weight loss. Blockade of tumor targeting upon administration of excess PSMA inhibitor (PMPA) and the absence of targeting to PSMA-negative tumors confirmed the specificity of each of the above targeted reagents for PSMA. Tandem use of the imaging and therapeutic agents targeted to the same receptor could allow detection, staging, monitoring, and treatment of PCa with improved accuracy and efficacy.

  4. Eph receptor A10 has a potential as a target for a prostate cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, Kazuya; Yamashita, Takuya; Inoue, Masaki; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Abe, Yasuhiro; Mukai, Yohei; Kamada, Haruhiko

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • EphA10 mRNA is overexpressed in breast, prostate and colon cancer cell lines. • EphA10 is overexpressed in clinical prostate tumors at mRNA and protein levels. • Anti-EphA10 antibodies were cytotoxic on EphA10-positive prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: We recently identified Eph receptor A10 (EphA10) as a novel breast cancer-specific protein. Moreover, we also showed that an in-house developed anti-EphA10 monoclonal antibody (mAb) significantly inhibited proliferation of breast cancer cells, suggesting EphA10 as a promising target for breast cancer therapy. However, the only other known report for EphA10 was its expression in the testis at the mRNA level. Therefore, the potency of EphA10 as a drug target against cancers other than the breast is not known. The expression of EphA10 in a wide variety of cancer cells was studied and the potential of EphA10 as a drug target was evaluated. Screening of EphA10 mRNA expression showed that EphA10 was overexpressed in breast cancer cell lines as well as in prostate and colon cancer cell lines. Thus, we focused on prostate cancers in which EphA10 expression was equivalent to that in breast cancers. As a result, EphA10 expression was clearly shown in clinical prostate tumor tissues as well as in cell lines at the mRNA and protein levels. In order to evaluate the potential of EphA10 as a drug target, we analyzed complement-dependent cytotoxicity effects of anti-EphA10 mAb and found that significant cytotoxicity was mediated by the expression of EphA10. Therefore, the idea was conceived that the overexpression of EphA10 in prostate cancers might have a potential as a target for prostate cancer therapy, and formed the basis for the studies reported here

  5. Targeting the androgen receptor pathway in castration-resistant prostate cancer: progresses and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraldeschi, R; Welti, J; Luo, J; Attard, G; de Bono, JS

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling is a critical pathway for prostate cancer cells, and androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) remains the principal treatment for patients with locally advanced and metastatic disease. However, over time, most tumors become resistant to ADT. The view of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has changed dramatically in the last several years. Progress in understanding the disease biology and mechanisms of castration resistance led to significant advancements and to paradigm shift in the treatment. Accumulating evidence showed that prostate cancers develop adaptive mechanisms for maintaining AR signaling to allow for survival and further evolution. The aim of this review is to summarize molecular mechanisms of castration resistance and provide an update in the development of novel agents and strategies to more effectively target the AR signaling pathway. PMID:24837363

  6. 18F-DCFBC Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen-Targeted PET/CT Imaging in Localized Prostate Cancer: Correlation With Multiparametric MRI and Histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkbey, Baris; Mena, Esther; Lindenberg, Liza; Adler, Stephen; Bednarova, Sandra; Berman, Rose; Ton, Anita T; McKinney, Yolanda; Eclarinal, Philip; Hill, Craig; Afari, George; Bhattacharyya, Sibaprasad; Mease, Ronnie C; Merino, Maria J; Jacobs, Paula M; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A; Pomper, Martin G; Choyke, Peter L

    2017-10-01

    To assess the ability of (N-[N-[(S)-1,3-dicarboxypropyl]carbamoyl]-4-F-fluorobenzyl-L-cysteine) (F-DCFBC), a prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeted PET agent, to detect localized prostate cancer lesions in correlation with multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) and histopathology. This Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996-compliant, prospective, institutional review board-approved study included 13 evaluable patients with localized prostate cancer (median age, 62.8 years [range, 51-74 years]; median prostate-specific antigen, 37.5 ng/dL [range, 3.26-216 ng/dL]). Patients underwent mpMRI and F-DCFBC PET/CT within a 3 months' window. Lesions seen on mpMRI were biopsied under transrectal ultrasound/MRI fusion-guided biopsy, or a radical prostatectomy was performed. F-DCFBC PET/CT and mpMRI were evaluated blinded and separately for tumor detection on a lesion basis. For PET image analysis, MRI and F-DCFBC PET images were fused by using software registration; imaging findings were correlated with histology, and uptake of F-DCFBC in tumors was compared with uptake in benign prostatic hyperplasia nodules and normal peripheral zone tissue using the 80% threshold SUVmax. A total of 25 tumor foci (mean size, 1.8 cm; median size, 1.5 cm; range, 0.6-4.7 cm) were histopathologically identified in 13 patients. Sensitivity rates of F-DCFBC PET/CT and mpMRI were 36% and 96%, respectively, for all tumors. For index lesions, the largest tumor with highest Gleason score, sensitivity rates of F-DCFBC PET/CT and mpMRI were 61.5% and 92%, respectively. The average SUVmax for primary prostate cancer was higher (5.8 ± 4.4) than that of benign prostatic hyperplasia nodules (2.1 ± 0.3) or that of normal prostate tissue (2.1 ± 0.4) at 1 hour postinjection (P = 0.0033). The majority of index prostate cancers are detected with F-DCFBC PET/CT, and this may be a prognostic indicator based on uptake and staging. However, for detecting prostate cancer with high sensitivity, it

  7. Conformal treatment of prostate cancer with improved targeting: superior prostate-specific antigen response compared to standard treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corn, Benjamin W; Hanks, Gerald E; Schultheiss, Timothy E; Hunt, Margie A; Lee, W Robert; Coia, Lawrence R

    1995-05-15

    Purpose: Conformal radiation therapy (CRT) decreases the morbidity of prostate cancer treatment, but no published data attest to the improved ability of CRT to control disease. Therefore, we compared Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) response at 1 year among similarly staged patients treated by conformal techniques to those treated with conventional approaches, looking for an early indicator of tumor response. Method and Materials: Patients with locally advanced disease were treated by pelvic fields followed by prostate field conedowns; those with early stage/low grade disease received only prostate field irradiation. Between October, 1987 and November, 1991, conventional treatments used rectangular beams with or without corner blocks. Neither urethrography nor immobilization casts were used for conventionally treated patients. Between April, 1989 and December, 1992, conformal treatments have used rigid immobilization and Computed Tomography-based, beams-eye-view field design. As such, our conformal approach allowed improved targeting. Median prescribed doses (minimal doses to the Planning Target Volume) were 70 Gy (66-73 Gy) and 70.2 Gy (64.8-75 Gy) for conventionally and conformally treated patients, respectively. Median daily fraction size was 1.8 Gy for conventional treatment and 2.0 Gy for conformal therapy. Baseline PSA data were available on 170 consecutive patients treated conformally and 90 consecutive patients treated conventionally. Results: Among those receiving only prostatic field irradiation, 12-month PSA values returned to normal in 96% and 85% of conformally and conventionally treated patients, respectively, when normalization was defined as {<=} 4 ng/ml (p < 0.03) and in 76% vs. 55% of patients when PSA normalization was defined as {<=} 1.5 ng/ml (p < 0.02). Among those receiving pelvic irradiation prior to prostatic conedown, PSA normalization ({<=} 4 ng/ml) occurred in 82% and 61% (p < 0.01) of conformally and conventionally treated patients

  8. FOXP3+ regulatory T cells in normal prostate tissue, postatrophic hyperplasia, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and tumor histological lesions in men with and without prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsson, Sabina; Andren, Ove; Ohlson, Anna-Lena; Carlsson, Jessica; Andersson, Swen-Olof; Giunchi, Francesca; Rider, Jennifer R; Fiorentino, Michelangelo

    2018-01-01

    The tumor promoting or counteracting effects of the immune response to cancer development are thought to be mediated to some extent by the infiltration of regulatory T cells (T regs ). In the present study we evaluated the prevalence of T reg populations in stromal and epithelial compartments of normal, post atrophic hyperplasia (PAH), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), and tumor lesions in men with and without prostate cancer. Study subjects were 102 men consecutively diagnosed with localized prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy and 38 men diagnosed with bladder cancer undergoing cystoprostatectomy without prostate cancer at the pathological examination. Whole mount sections from all patients were evaluated for the epithelial and stromal expression of CD4 + T regs and CD8 + T regs in normal, PAH, PIN, and tumor lesions. A Friedmańs test was used to investigate differences in the mean number of T regs across histological lesions. Logistic regression was used to estimate crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR) for prostate cancer for each histological area. In men with prostate cancer, similarly high numbers of stromal CD4 + T regs were identified in PAH and tumor, but CD4 + T regs were less common in PIN. Greater numbers of epithelial CD4+ T regs in normal prostatic tissue were positively associated with both Gleason score and pT-stage. We observed a fourfold increased risk of prostate cancer in men with epithelial CD4 + T regs in the normal prostatic tissue counterpart. Our results may suggest a possible pathway through which PAH develops directly into prostate cancer in the presence of CD4 + T regs and indicate that transformation of the anti-tumor immune response may be initiated even before the primary tumor is established. © 2017 The Authors. The Prostate Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc.

  9. Tumor-targeted nanomedicines for cancer theranostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Twan; Shi, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic drugs have multiple drawbacks, including severe side effects and suboptimal therapeutic efficacy. Nanomedicines assist in improving the biodistribution and the target accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs, and are therefore able to enhance the balance between efficacy and toxicity. Multiple different types of nanomedicines have been evaluated over the years, including liposomes, polymer-drug conjugates and polymeric micelles, which rely on strategies such as passive targeting, active targeting and triggered release for improved tumor-directed drug delivery. Based on the notion that tumors and metastases are highly heterogeneous, it is important to integrate imaging properties in nanomedicine formulations in order to enable non-invasive and quantitative assessment of targeting efficiency. By allowing for patient pre-selection, such next generation nanotheranostics are useful for facilitating clinical translation and personalizing nanomedicine treatments. PMID:27865762

  10. MicroRNA-21 directly targets MARCKS and promotes apoptosis resistance and invasion in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tao; Li, Dong; Sha, Jianjun; Sun, Peng; Huang, Yiran

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignant cancers in men. Recent studies have shown that microRNA-21 (miR-21) is overexpressed in various types of cancers including prostate cancer. Studies on glioma, colon cancer cells, hepatocellular cancer cells and breast cancer cells have indicated that miR-21 is involved in tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. However, the roles of miR-21 in prostate cancer are poorly understood. In this study, the effects of miR-21 on prostate cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis, and invasion were examined. In addition, the targets of miR-21 were identified by a reported RISC-coimmunoprecipitation-based biochemical method. Inactivation of miR-21 by antisense oligonucleotides in androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC-3 resulted in sensitivity to apoptosis and inhibition of cell motility and invasion, whereas cell proliferation were not affected. We identified myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase c substrate (MARCKS), which plays key roles in cell motility, as a new target in prostate cancer cells. Our data suggested that miR-21 could promote apoptosis resistance, motility, and invasion in prostate cancer cells and these effects of miR-21 may be partly due to its regulation of PDCD4, TPM1, and MARCKS. Gene therapy using miR-21 inhibition strategy may therefore be useful as a prostate cancer therapy.

  11. ERF is a Potential ERK Modulated Tumor Suppressor in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    6/27/2016 - 6/27/2019 1.20 calendar Prostate Cancer Foundation (formerly CaP CURE) $ 75,000 Epigenetic ...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0277 TITLE: ERF is a Potential ERK-Modulated Tumor Suppressor in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Rohit...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ERF is a Potential ERK-Modulated Tumor Suppressor in Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0277

  12. Racial Variations in Prostate Cancer Molecular Subtypes and Androgen Receptor Signaling Reflect Anatomic Tumor Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Farzana A; Sundi, Debasish; Tosoian, Jeffrey J; Choeurng, Voleak; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Ross, Ashley E; Klein, Eric; Den, Robert; Dicker, Adam; Erho, Nicholas; Davicioni, Elai; Lotan, Tamara L; Schaeffer, Edward M

    2016-07-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) subtypes based on ETS gene expression have been described. Recent studies suggest there are racial differences in tumor location, with PCa located anteriorly more often among African-American (AA) compared to Caucasian-American (CA) men. In this retrospective analysis of a multi-institutional cohort treated by radical prostatectomy (179 CA, 121 AA), we evaluated associations among molecular subtype, race, anatomic tumor location, and androgen receptor (AR) signaling. Subtype (m-ERG(+), m-ETS(+), m-SPINK1(+), or triple-negative) was determined using distribution-based outlier analysis. AR signaling was investigated using gene expression profiling of canonical AR targets. m-ERG(+) was more common in CA than AA men (47% vs 22%, pprostate cancer molecular subtypes, and tumor location. Location-specific differences in androgen regulation may further underlie these relationships. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Correlation of radiation response with tumor oxygenation in the Dunning prostate R3327-AT1 tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourke, Vincent A [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Dawen, Zhao [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Gilio, Joseph [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Chang, C -H [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Lan, Jiang [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Hahn, Eric W [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Mason, Ralph P [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the application of pretreatment oxygenation to the AT1 subline of the Dunning R3327 prostate tumor, which is more hypoxic and faster growing than the H1 subline previously studied. Methods and Materials: Dunning prostate R3327-AT1 tumors growing on Copenhagen rats were administered 30 Gy of X-ray radiation either with or without oxygen inhalation. Tumor oxygenation was sampled by {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance echo planar imaging relaxometry of the reporter molecule hexafluorobenzene, no more than 24 h before irradiation. Results: Large tumors (>3.0 cm{sup 3}) exhibited significantly greater hypoxic fractions and lower mean partial pressure of oxygen (pO{sub 2}) than their smaller counterparts (<1.5 cm{sup 3}). However, unlike the R3327-HI subline, large AT1 tumors generally did not respond to oxygen inhalation in terms of altered hypoxic fraction or response to irradiation. Although the tumors did not respond to oxygen inhalation, each tumor had a different pO{sub 2}, and there was a clear trend between level of oxygenation at time of irradiation and tumor growth delay, with considerably better outcome when mean pO{sub 2} > 10 mm Hg. The comparatively small baseline hypoxic fraction in the group of small tumors was virtually eliminated by breathing oxygen, and the growth rate was significantly reduced for tumors on rats breathing oxygen during irradiation. Conclusions: These results further validate the usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance oximetry as a predictor of response to radiation therapy.

  14. Choline Kinase Alpha as an Androgen Receptor Chaperone and Prostate Cancer Therapeutic Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asim, Mohammad; Massie, Charles E.; Orafidiya, Folake; Pértega-Gomes, Nelma; Warren, Anne Y.; Esmaeili, Mohsen; Selth, Luke A.; Zecchini, Heather I.; Luko, Katarina; Qureshi, Arham; Baridi, Ajoeb; Menon, Suraj; Madhu, Basetti; Escriu, Carlos; Lyons, Scott; Vowler, Sarah L.; Zecchini, Vincent R.; Shaw, Greg; Hessenkemper, Wiebke; Russell, Roslin; Mohammed, Hisham; Stefanos, Niki; Lynch, Andy G.; Grigorenko, Elena; D’Santos, Clive; Taylor, Chris; Lamb, Alastair; Sriranjan, Rouchelle; Yang, Jiali; Stark, Rory; Dehm, Scott M.; Rennie, Paul S.; Carroll, Jason S.; Griffiths, John R.; Tavaré, Simon; Mills, Ian G.; McEwan, Iain J.; Baniahmad, Aria; Tilley, Wayne D.; Neal, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The androgen receptor (AR) is a major drug target in prostate cancer (PCa). We profiled the AR-regulated kinome to identify clinically relevant and druggable effectors of AR signaling. Methods: Using genome-wide approaches, we interrogated all AR regulated kinases. Among these, choline kinase alpha (CHKA) expression was evaluated in benign (n = 195), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) (n = 153) and prostate cancer (PCa) lesions (n = 359). We interrogated how CHKA regulates AR signaling using biochemical assays and investigated androgen regulation of CHKA expression in men with PCa, both untreated (n = 20) and treated with an androgen biosynthesis inhibitor degarelix (n = 27). We studied the effect of CHKA inhibition on the PCa transcriptome using RNA sequencing and tested the effect of CHKA inhibition on cell growth, clonogenic survival and invasion. Tumor xenografts (n = 6 per group) were generated in mice using genetically engineered prostate cancer cells with inducible CHKA knockdown. Data were analyzed with χ2 tests, Cox regression analysis, and Kaplan-Meier methods. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: CHKA expression was shown to be androgen regulated in cell lines, xenografts, and human tissue (log fold change from 6.75 to 6.59, P = .002) and was positively associated with tumor stage. CHKA binds directly to the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of AR, enhancing its stability. As such, CHKA is the first kinase identified as an AR chaperone. Inhibition of CHKA repressed the AR transcriptional program including pathways enriched for regulation of protein folding, decreased AR protein levels, and inhibited the growth of PCa cell lines, human PCa explants, and tumor xenografts. Conclusions: CHKA can act as an AR chaperone, providing, to our knowledge, the first evidence for kinases as molecular chaperones, making CHKA both a marker of tumor progression and a potential therapeutic target for PCa. PMID:26657335

  15. Chimeric Amino Acid Rearrangements as Immune Targets in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Chimeric Amino Acid Rearrangements as Immune Targets in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...that result from gene rearrangements given their high frequency relative to somatic point mutations. Gene rearrangements can yield novel chimeric

  16. Tumor targeting using liposomal antineoplastic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Huwyler

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Jörg Huwyler1, Jürgen Drewe2, Stephan Krähenbühl21University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, Institute of Pharma Technology, Muttenz, Switzerland; 2Department of Research and Division of Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, SwitzerlandAbstract: During the last years, liposomes (microparticulate phospholipid vesicles have beenused with growing success as pharmaceutical carriers for antineoplastic drugs. Fields of application include lipid-based formulations to enhance the solubility of poorly soluble antitumordrugs, the use of pegylated liposomes for passive targeting of solid tumors as well as vector-conjugated liposomal carriers for active targeting of tumor tissue. Such formulation and drug targeting strategies enhance the effectiveness of anticancer chemotherapy and reduce at the same time the risk of toxic side-effects. The present article reviews the principles of different liposomal technologies and discusses current trends in this field of research.Keywords: tumor targeting, antineoplastic drugs, liposomes, pegylation, steric stabilization, immunoliposomes

  17. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Early Vascular Response in Prostate Tumors Irradiated with Carbon Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Palmowski

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Individualized treatments with combination of radiotherapy and targeted drugs require knowledge about the behavior of molecular targets after irradiation. Angiogenic marker expression has been studied after conventional radiotherapy, but little is known about marker response to charged particles. For the very first time, we used molecular ultrasound imaging to intraindividually track changes in angiogenic marker expression after carbon ion irradiation in experimental tumors. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and of αvβ3-integrin in subcutaneous AT-1 prostate cancers in rats treated with carbon ions (16 Gy was studied using molecular ultrasound and immunohistochemistry. For this purpose, cyanoacrylate microbubbles were synthesized and linked to specific ligands. The accumulation of targeted microbubbles in tumors was quantified before and 36 hours after irradiation. In addition, tumor vascularization was analyzed using volumetric Doppler ultrasound. In tumors, the accumulation of targeted microbubbles was significantly higher than in nonspecific ones and could be inhibited competitively. Before irradiation, no difference in binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific or ICAM-1-specific microbubbles was observed in treated and untreated animals. After irradiation, however, treated animals showed a significantly higher binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific microbubbles and an enhanced binding of ICAM-1-specific microbubbles than untreated controls. In both groups, a decrease in vascularization occurred during tumor growth, but no significant difference was observed between irradiated and nonirradiated tumors. In conclusion, carbon ion irradiation upregulates ICAM-1 and αvβ3-integrin expression in tumor neovasculature. Molecular ultrasound can indicate the regulation of these markers and thus may help to identify the optimal drugs and time points in individualized therapy regimens.

  18. Inhibition of microRNA-500 has anti-cancer effect through its conditional downstream target of TFPI in human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Bing; Chen, Wei; Pan, Yue; Chen, Hongde; Zhang, Yirong; Weng, Zhiliang; Li, Yeping

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the prognostic potential and regulatory mechanism of microRNA-500 (miR-500), and human gene of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) in prostate cancer. MiR-500 expression was assessed by qRT-PCR in prostate cancer cell lines and primary tumors. Cancer patients' clinicopathological factors and overall survival were analyzed according to endogenous miR-500 level. MiR-500 was downregulated in DU145 and VCaP cells. Its effect on prostate cancer proliferation, invasion in vitro, and tumorigenicity in vivo, were probed. Possible downstream target of miR-500, TFPI was assessed by luciferase assay and qRT-PCR in prostate cancer cells. In miR-500-downregulated DU145 and VCaP cells, TFPI was silenced to see whether it was directly involved in the regulation of miR-500 in prostate cancer. TFPI alone was either upregulated or downregulated in DU145 and VCaP cells. Their effect on prostate cancer development was further evaluated. MiR-500 is upregulated in both prostate cancer cells and primary tumors. In prostate cancer patients, high miR-500 expression is associated with poor prognosis and overall survival. In DU145 and VCaP cells, miR-500 downregulation inhibited cancer proliferation, invasion in vitro, and explant growth in vivo. TFPI was verified to be associated with miR-500 in prostate cancer. Downregulation of TFPI reversed anti-cancer effects of miR-500 downregulation in prostate cancer cells. However, neither TFPI upregulation nor downregulation alone had any functional impact on prostate cancer development. MiR-500 may be a potential biomarker and molecular target in prostate cancer. TFPI may conditionally regulate prostate cancer in miR-500-downregualted prostate cancer cells. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Tumor-stroma metabolic relationship based on lactate shuttle can sustain prostate cancer progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanità, Patrizia; Capulli, Mattia; Teti, Anna; Galatioto, Giuseppe Paradiso; Vicentini, Carlo; Chiarugi, Paola; Bologna, Mauro; Angelucci, Adriano

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cell adopts peculiar metabolic strategies aimed to sustain the continuous proliferation in an environment characterized by relevant fluctuations in oxygen and nutrient levels. Monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4 can drive such adaptation permitting the transport across plasma membrane of different monocarboxylic acids involved in energy metabolism. Role of MCTs in tumor-stroma metabolic relationship was investigated in vitro and in vivo using transformed prostate epithelial cells, carcinoma cell lines and normal fibroblasts. Moreover prostate tissues from carcinoma and benign hypertrophy cases were analyzed for individuating clinical-pathological implications of MCT1 and MCT4 expression. Transformed prostate epithelial (TPE) and prostate cancer (PCa) cells express both MCT1 and MCT4 and demonstrated variable dependence on aerobic glycolysis for maintaining their proliferative rate. In glucose-restriction the presence of L-lactate determined, after 24 h of treatment, in PCa cells the up-regulation of MCT1 and of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COX1), and reduced the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase respect to untreated cells. The blockade of MCT1 function, performed by si RNA silencing, determined an appreciable antiproliferative effect when L-lactate was utilized as energetic fuel. Accordingly L-lactate released by high glycolytic human diploid fibroblasts WI-38 sustained survival and growth of TPE and PCa cells in low glucose culture medium. In parallel, the treatment with conditioned medium from PCa cells was sufficient to induce glycolytic metabolism in WI-38 cells, with upregulation of HIF-1a and MCT4. Co-injection of PCa cells with high glycolytic WI-38 fibroblasts determined an impressive increase in tumor growth rate in a xenograft model that was abrogated by MCT1 silencing in PCa cells. The possible interplay based on L-lactate shuttle between tumor and stroma was confirmed also in human PCa tissue where we observed a positive

  20. ETS transcription factors control transcription of EZH2 and epigenetic silencing of the tumor suppressor gene Nkx3.1 in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Kunderfranco

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available ETS transcription factors regulate important signaling pathways involved in cell differentiation and development in many tissues and have emerged as important players in prostate cancer. However, the biological impact of ETS factors in prostate tumorigenesis is still debated.We performed an analysis of the ETS gene family using microarray data and real-time PCR in normal and tumor tissues along with functional studies in normal and cancer cell lines to understand the impact in prostate tumorigenesis and identify key targets of these transcription factors. We found frequent dysregulation of ETS genes with oncogenic (i.e., ERG and ESE1 and tumor suppressor (i.e., ESE3 properties in prostate tumors compared to normal prostate. Tumor subgroups (i.e., ERG(high, ESE1(high, ESE3(low and NoETS tumors were identified on the basis of their ETS expression status and showed distinct transcriptional and biological features. ERG(high and ESE3(low tumors had the most robust gene signatures with both distinct and overlapping features. Integrating genomic data with functional studies in multiple cell lines, we demonstrated that ERG and ESE3 controlled in opposite direction transcription of the Polycomb Group protein EZH2, a key gene in development, differentiation, stem cell biology and tumorigenesis. We further demonstrated that the prostate-specific tumor suppressor gene Nkx3.1 was controlled by ERG and ESE3 both directly and through induction of EZH2.These findings provide new insights into the role of the ETS transcriptional network in prostate tumorigenesis and uncover previously unrecognized links between aberrant expression of ETS factors, deregulation of epigenetic effectors and silencing of tumor suppressor genes. The link between aberrant ETS activity and epigenetic gene silencing may be relevant for the clinical management of prostate cancer and design of new therapeutic strategies.

  1. Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Prostate: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Moureau-Zabotto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT, usually described in the pleura, is exceedingly rare in the prostate. We report a 60-year-old man with prostatic SFT revealed by obstructive urinary symptoms, and detected by ultrasonography. Computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging suggested a prostatic origin. CT-guided tumor biopsy diagnosed a SFT. A cystoprostatectomy was performed. Pathologic examination showed a 15-cm tumor arising from the prostate and showing histological criteria suggestive of aggressiveness. The surgical resection margins were tumor-free. The patient was then regularly monitored and is still alive in complete remission, 28 months after surgery. In conclusion, we report a new exceptional case of prostatic SFT. We review the literature and discuss the challenging issues of misdiagnosis, prognosis and treatment.

  2. Solitary fibrous tumor of the prostate: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moureau-Zabotto, Laurence; Chetaille, Bruno; Bladou, Franck; Dauvergne, Pierre-Yves; Marcy, Myriam; Perrot, Delphine; Guiramand, Jérôme; Sarran, Anthony; Bertucci, François

    2012-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT), usually described in the pleura, is exceedingly rare in the prostate. We report a 60-year-old man with prostatic SFT revealed by obstructive urinary symptoms, and detected by ultrasonography. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging suggested a prostatic origin. CT-guided tumor biopsy diagnosed a SFT. A cystoprostatectomy was performed. Pathologic examination showed a 15-cm tumor arising from the prostate and showing histological criteria suggestive of aggressiveness. The surgical resection margins were tumor-free. The patient was then regularly monitored and is still alive in complete remission, 28 months after surgery. In conclusion, we report a new exceptional case of prostatic SFT. We review the literature and discuss the challenging issues of misdiagnosis, prognosis and treatment.

  3. BMP7 Induces Dormancy of Prostatic Tumor Stem Cell in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    of NDRG1 is correlated with tumor progression and poor prog- nosis in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Dis. Esophagus . 19:454–458...Dormancy of Prostatic Tumor Stem Cell in Bone PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Fei Xing, Ph.D...BMP7 Induces Dormancy of Prostatic Tumor Stem Cell in Bone 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0666 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Fei

  4. ONC201 Targets AR and AR-V7 Signaling, Reduces PSA, and Synergizes with Everolimus in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Avital; Lulla, Amriti R; Ross, Brian C; Ralff, Marie D; Makhov, Petr B; Dicker, David T; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2018-05-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling plays a key role in prostate cancer progression, and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is a mainstay clinical treatment regimen for patients with advanced disease. Unfortunately, most prostate cancers eventually become androgen-independent and resistant to ADT with patients progressing to metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Constitutively activated AR variants (AR-V) have emerged as mediators of resistance to AR-targeted therapy and the progression of mCRPC, and they represent an important therapeutic target. Out of at least 15 AR-Vs described thus far, AR-V7 is the most abundant, and its expression correlates with ADT resistance. ONC201/TIC10 is the founding member of the imipridone class of small molecules and has shown anticancer activity in a broad range of tumor types. ONC201 is currently being tested in phase I/II clinical trials for advanced solid tumors, including mCRPC, and hematologic malignancies. There has been promising activity observed in patients in early clinical testing. This study demonstrates preclinical single-agent efficacy of ONC201 using in vitro and in vivo models of prostate cancer. ONC201 has potent antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in both castration-resistant and -sensitive prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, the data demonstrate that ONC201 downregulates the expression of key drivers of prostate cancer such as AR-V7 and downstream target genes including the clinically used biomarker PSA (KLK3). Finally, the data also provide a preclinical rationale for combination of ONC201 with approved therapeutics for prostate cancer such as enzalutamide, everolimus (mTOR inhibitor), or docetaxel. Implications: The preclinical efficacy of ONC201 as a single agent or in combination, in hormone-sensitive or castration-resistant prostate cancer, suggests the potential for immediate clinical translation. Mol Cancer Res; 16(5); 754-66. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer

  5. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bey, P.; Beckendorf, V.; Stines, J.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation therapy of prostate carcinoma with a curative intent implies to treat the whole prostate at high dose (at least 66 Gy). According to clinical stage, PSA level, Gleason's score, the clinical target volume may include seminal vesicles and less often pelvic lymph nodes. Microscopic extra-capsular extension is found in 15 to 60% of T1-T2 operated on, specially in apex tumors. On contrary, cancers developing from the transitional zone may stay limited to the prostate even with a big volume and with a high PSA level. Zonal anatomy of the prostate identifies internal prostate, including the transitional zone (5% of the prostate in young people). External prostate includes central and peripheral zones. The inferior limit of the prostate is not lower than the inferior border of the pubic symphysis. Clinical and radiological examination: ultrasonography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), CT-scan identify prognostic factors as tumor volume, capsule effraction, seminal vesicles invasion and lymph node extension. The identification of the clinical target volume is now done mainly by CT-Scan which identifies prostate and seminal vesicles. NMR could be helpful to identify more precisely prostate apex. The definition of margins around the clinical target volume has to take in account daily reproducibility and organ motion and of course the maximum tolerable dose for organs at risk. (authors)

  6. Extratumoral Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1 Expressing Macrophages Likely Promote Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Halin Bergström

    Full Text Available Aggressive tumors induce tumor-supporting changes in the benign parts of the prostate. One factor that has increased expression outside prostate tumors is hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1. To investigate HO-1 expression in more detail, we analyzed samples of tumor tissue and peritumoral normal prostate tissue from rats carrying cancers with different metastatic capacity, and human prostate cancer tissue samples from primary tumors and bone metastases. In rat prostate tumor samples, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR showed that the main site of HO-1 synthesis was HO-1+ macrophages that accumulated in the tumor-bearing organ, and at the tumor-invasive front. Small metastatic tumors were considerably more effective in attracting HO-1+ macrophages than larger non-metastatic ones. In clinical samples, accumulation of HO-1+ macrophages was seen at the tumor invasive front, almost exclusively in high-grade tumors, and it correlated with the presence of bone metastases. HO-1+ macrophages, located at the tumor invasive front, were more abundant in bone metastases than in primary tumors. HO-1 expression in bone metastases was variable, and positively correlated with the expression of macrophage markers but negatively correlated with androgen receptor expression, suggesting that elevated HO-1 could be a marker for a subgroup of bone metastases. Together with another recent observation showing that selective knockout of HO-1 in macrophages reduced prostate tumor growth and metastatic capacity in animals, the results of this study suggest that extratumoral HO-1+ macrophages may have an important role in prostate cancer.

  7. Skeletal metastases of carcinomas of prostate in dependence on tumor size and tumor differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, U.

    1981-01-01

    153 patients with carcinoma of the prostate underwent holebody skeletal scintiscanning. It resulted that the tendency to the development of skeletal metastases increases with increasing dedifferentiation of the tumor. Also the tumor size correlated with the metastase identification. The tumor dedifferentiation also increased with the tumor size. The findings proved that the early diagnosis of a carcinoma of the prostate is a necessary prerequisite, because a radical total removal can only be curative when any metastases are absent. The comparative evaluation of the diagnostic methods proved the superiority of the nuclear medical examination. In 68% of the cases the roentgenologic examination led to correctly positive results. This investigation showed with 98% a high diagnostic specificity and therefore it should be applied in addition to scintiscanning in order to obtain supplementary information. The alkaline and the acid phosphatase offering an almost identical informative value resulted to be not useful for establishing an early diagnosis of skeletal metastases. It was found that the determination of the blood sedimentation rate and of the lactate dehydrogenase do also not render possible the early diagnosis of skeletal metastases. (orig./MG) [de

  8. Chemotherapy synergizes with radioimmunotherapy targeting La autoantigen in tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fares Al-Ejeh

    Full Text Available To date, inefficient delivery of therapeutic doses of radionuclides to solid tumors limits the clinical utility of radioimmunotherapy. We aim to test the therapeutic utility of Yttrium-90 ((90Y-radio-conjugates of a monoclonal antibody, which we showed previously to bind specifically to the abundant intracellular La ribonucleoprotein revealed in dead tumor cells after DNA-damaging treatment.Immunoconjugates of the DAB4 clone of the La-specific monoclonal antibody, APOMAB, were prepared using the metal chelator, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA, and then radiolabeled with (90Y. Mice bearing established subcutaneous tumors were treated with (90Y-DOTA-DAB4 alone or after chemotherapy. Non-radiosensitizing cyclophosphamide/etoposide chemotherapy was used for the syngeneic EL4 lymphoma model. Radiosensitizing cisplatin/gemcitabine chemotherapy was used for the syngeneic Lewis Lung carcinoma (LL2 model, and for the xenograft models of LNCaP prostatic carcinoma and Panc-1 pancreatic carcinoma. We demonstrate the safety, specificity, and efficacy of (90Y-DOTA-DAB4-radioimmunotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy. EL4 lymphoma-bearing mice either were cured at higher doses of radioimmunotherapy alone or lower doses of radioimmunotherapy in synergy with chemotherapy. Radioimmunotherapy alone was less effective in chemo- and radio-resistant carcinoma models. However, radioimmunotherapy synergized with radiosensitizing chemotherapy to retard significantly tumor regrowth and so prolong the survival of mice bearing LL2, LNCaP, or Panc-1 subcutaneous tumor implants.We report proof-of-concept data supporting a unique form of radioimmunotherapy, which delivers bystander killing to viable cancer cells after targeting the universal cancer antigen, La, created by DNA-damaging treatment in neighboring dead cancer cells. Subsequently we propose that DAB4-targeted ionizing radiation induces additional cycles of tumor cell death

  9. Carcinoid tumor of the verumontanum (colliculus seminalis of the prostatic urethra with a coexisting prostatic adenocarcinoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werahera Priya N

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Urethral carcinoid tumors are very rare tumors with only four cases described in the literature. Case presentation We present the case of a 61-year-old man with a primary carcinoid tumor of the verumontanum (colliculis seminalis portion of the prostatic urethra with a coexisting prostatic adenocarcinoma. In addition to whole mount hematoxylin and eosin staining, special immunoperoxidase staining specific for chromogranin A, neuron specific enolase, synaptophysin, pan-cytokeratin and PSA, and a special combined staining for racemase (α-methyl CoA antigen and p63 antigen were performed. A review of the literature is included. A single focus of invasive prostatic adenocarcinoma was identified in the periphery of the mid-left, posterior quadrant of the prostate. Approximately 17 mm from this adenocarcinoma, within the verumontanum of the prostatic urethra, there was a 3 mm maximal dimension carcinoid tumor. Conclusion Based on different histological features and antigenic profiles, we concluded that the two tumors were distinct.

  10. Targeting Radiation Therapy for Developing Dendritic Cell Based Immunotherapy of Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chakravarty, Prabir K

    2006-01-01

    .... The hypothesis was tested using a murine prostate cancer model, RM-1. The study showed that irradiation induces apoptosis and the irradiated tumor cells were able to activate dendritic cells and stimulate tumor specific immune response in vitro...

  11. Prostate Stem Cell Antigen: A Prospective Therapeutic and Diagnostic Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Adam B.; Gray, Andrew; Kast, W. Martin

    2009-01-01

    The development of novel clinical tools to combat cancer is an intense field of research and recent efforts have been directed at the identification of proteins that may provide diagnostic, prognostic and/or therapeutic applications due to their restricted expression. To date, a number of protein candidates have emerged as potential clinical tools in the treatment of prostate cancer. Discovered over ten year ago, prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is a cell surface antigen that belongs to the Ly-6/Thy-1 family of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins. PSCA is highly overexpressed in human prostate cancer, with limited expression in normal tissues, making it an ideal target for both diagnosis and therapy. Several studies have now clearly correlated the expression of PSCA with relevant clinical benchmarks, such as Gleason score and metastasis, while others have demonstrated the efficacy of PSCA targeting in treatment through various modalities. The purpose of this review is to present the current body of knowledge about PSCA and its potential role in the treatment of human prostate cancer. PMID:18838214

  12. Simultaneous targeting of prostate stem cell antigen and prostate-specific membrane antigen improves the killing of prostate cancer cells using a novel modular T cell-retargeting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Claudia; Feldmann, Anja; Koristka, Stefanie; Cartellieri, Marc; Dimmel, Maria; Ehninger, Armin; Ehninger, Gerhard; Bachmann, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Recently, we described a novel modular platform technology in which T cell-recruitment and tumor-targeting domains of conventional bispecific antibodies are split to independent components, a universal effector module (EM) and replaceable monospecific/monovalent target modules (TMs) that form highly efficient T cell-retargeting complexes. Theoretically, our unique strategy should allow us to simultaneously retarget T cells to different tumor antigens by combining the EM with two or more different monovalent/monospecific TMs or even with bivalent/bispecific TMs, thereby overcoming limitations of a monospecific treatment such as the selection of target-negative tumor escape variants. In order to advance our recently introduced prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA)-specific modular system for a dual-targeting of prostate cancer cells, two additional TMs were constructed: a monovalent/monospecific TM directed against the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) and a bivalent/bispecific TM (bsTM) with specificity for PSMA and PSCA. The functionality of the novel dual-targeting strategies was analyzed by performing T cell activation and chromium release assays. Similar to the PSCA-specific modular system, the novel PSMA-specific modular system mediates an efficient target-dependent and -specific tumor cell lysis at low E:T ratios and picomolar Ab concentrations. Moreover, by combination of the EM with either the bispecific TM directed to PSMA and PSCA or both monospecifc TMs directed to either PSCA or PSMA, dual-specific targeting complexes were formed which allowed us to kill potential escape variants expressing only one or the other target antigen. Overall, the novel modular system represents a promising tool for multiple tumor targeting. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    showed an apparent reduced tumor burden in the treated mice using bioluminescence. However, several mice suffered bone fractures , which compromised...metastases remains a challenge due to the limited arsenal of effective therapeutic drugs that reduce disease progression. Therefore, a major goal in PCa...blinded in relation to patient identification, as required. An IRB (exempt) was approved by Wayne State University for the use of this TMA as requested

  14. Molecular Subtyping of Primary Prostate Cancer Reveals Specific and Shared Target Genes of Different ETS Rearrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Paulo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to evaluate whether ETS transcription factors frequently involved in rearrangements in prostate carcinomas (PCa, namely ERG and ETV1, regulate specific or shared target genes. We performed differential expression analysis on nine normal prostate tissues and 50 PCa enriched for different ETS rearrangements using exon-level expression microarrays, followed by in vitro validation using cell line models. We found specific deregulation of 57 genes in ERG-positive PCa and 15 genes in ETV1-positive PCa, whereas deregulation of 27 genes was shared in both tumor subtypes. We further showed that the expression of seven tumor-associated ERG target genes (PLA1A, CACNA1D, ATP8A2, HLA-DMB, PDE3B, TDRD1, and TMBIM1 and two tumor-associated ETV1 target genes (FKBP10 and GLYATL2 was significantly affected by specific ETS silencing in VCaP and LNCaP cell line models, respectively, whereas the expression of three candidate ERG and ETV1 shared targets (GRPR, KCNH8, and TMEM45B was significantly affected by silencing of either ETS. Interestingly, we demonstrate that the expression of TDRD1, the topmost overexpressed gene of our list of ERG-specific candidate targets, is inversely correlated with the methylation levels of a CpG island found at -66 bp of the transcription start site in PCa and that TDRD1 expression is regulated by direct binding of ERG to the CpG island in VCaP cells. We conclude that ETS transcription factors regulate specific and shared target genes and that TDRD1, FKBP10, and GRPR are promising therapeutic targets and can serve as diagnostic markers for molecular subtypes of PCa harboring specific fusion gene rearrangements.

  15. Maximum tumor diameter is not an independent prognostic factor in high-risk localized prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, van I.M.; Witjes, J.A.; Kok, D.E.G.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that maximum tumor diameter (MTD) is a predictor of recurrence in prostate cancer (PC). This study investigates the prognostic value of MTD for biochemical recurrence (BCR) in patients with PC, after radical prostatectomy (RP), with emphasis on high-risk localized prostate

  16. Targeting Malignant Brain Tumors with Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rok Razpotnik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies have been shown to be a potent therapeutic tool. However, their use for targeting brain diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and brain cancers, has been limited, particularly because the blood–brain barrier (BBB makes brain tissue hard to access by conventional antibody-targeting strategies. In this review, we summarize new antibody therapeutic approaches to target brain tumors, especially malignant gliomas, as well as their potential drawbacks. Many different brain delivery platforms for antibodies have been studied such as liposomes, nanoparticle-based systems, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs, and cell-based approaches. We have already shown the successful delivery of single-chain fragment variable (scFv with CPP as a linker between two variable domains in the brain. Antibodies normally face poor penetration through the BBB, with some variants sufficiently passing the barrier on their own. A “Trojan horse” method allows passage of biomolecules, such as antibodies, through the BBB by receptor-mediated transcytosis (RMT. Such examples of therapeutic antibodies are the bispecific antibodies where one binding specificity recognizes and binds a BBB receptor, enabling RMT and where a second binding specificity recognizes an antigen as a therapeutic target. On the other hand, cell-based systems such as stem cells (SCs are a promising delivery system because of their tumor tropism and ability to cross the BBB. Genetically engineered SCs can be used in gene therapy, where they express anti-tumor drugs, including antibodies. Different types and sources of SCs have been studied for the delivery of therapeutics to the brain; both mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and neural stem cells (NSCs show great potential. Following the success in treatment of leukemias and lymphomas, the adoptive T-cell therapies, especially the chimeric antigen receptor-T cells (CAR-Ts, are making their way into glioma treatment as another type of cell

  17. Epigenetically altered miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaukoniemi, Kirsi M; Rauhala, Hanna E; Scaravilli, Mauro; Latonen, Leena; Annala, Matti; Vessella, Robert L; Nykter, Matti; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Visakorpi, Tapio

    2015-01-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRNA) are important regulators of gene expression and often differentially expressed in cancer and other diseases. We have previously shown that miR-193b is hypermethylated in prostate cancer (PC) and suppresses cell growth. It has been suggested that miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in several malignancies. Here, our aim was to determine if miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in prostate cancer. Our data show that miR-193b is commonly methylated in PC samples compared to benign prostate hyperplasia. We found reduced miR-193b expression (P < 0.05) in stage pT3 tumors compared to pT2 tumors in a cohort of prostatectomy specimens. In 22Rv1 PC cells with low endogenous miR-193b expression, the overexpression of miR-193b reduced CCND1mRNA levels and cyclin D1 protein levels. In addition, the exogenous expression of miR-193b decreased the phosphorylation level of RB, a target of the cyclin D1-CDK4/6 pathway. Moreover, according to a reporter assay, miR-193b targeted the 3’UTR of CCND1 in PC cells and the CCND1 activity was rescued by expressing CCND1 lacking its 3’UTR. Immunohistochemical analysis of cyclin D1 showed that castration-resistant prostate cancers have significantly (P = 0.0237) higher expression of cyclin D1 compared to hormone-naïve cases. Furthermore, the PC cell lines 22Rv1 and VCaP, which express low levels of miR-193b and high levels of CCND1, showed significant growth retardation when treated with a CDK4/6 inhibitor. In contrast, the inhibitor had no effect on the growth of PC-3 and DU145 cells with high miR-193b and low CCND1 expression. Taken together, our data demonstrate that miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in prostate cancer

  18. Impact of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control after permanent interstitial brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe (Jay); Roberts, Kenneth; Decker, Roy; Pathare, Pradip; Rockwell, Sara; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the procedure-induced prostate edema during permanent interstitial brachytherapy (PIB) can cause significant variations in the dose delivered to the prostate gland. Because the clinical impact of edema-induced dose variations depends strongly on the magnitude of the edema, the temporal pattern of its resolution and its interplay with the decay of radioactivity and the underlying biological processes of tumor cells (such as tumor potential doubling time), we investigated the impact of edema-induced dose variations on the tumor cell survival and tumor control probability after PIB with the 131Cs, 125I and 103Pd sources used in current clinical practice. The exponential edema resolution model reported by Waterman et al. (Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 41, 1069–1077–1998) was used to characterize the edema evolutions observed previously during clinical PIB for prostate cancer. The concept of biologically effective dose (BED), taking into account tumor cell proliferation and sublethal damage repair during dose delivery, was used to characterize the effects of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control probability. Our calculation indicated that prostate edema, if not taken into account appropriately, can increase the cell survival and decrease the probability of local control of PIB. The edema-induced increase in cell survival increased with increasing edema severity, decreasing half-life for radioactive decay and decreasing energy of the photons energy emitted by the source. At the doses currently prescribed for PIB and for prostate cancer cells characterized by nominal radiobiology parameters recommended by AAPM TG-137, PIB using 125I sources was less affected by edema than PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd sources due to the long radioactive decay half-life of 125I. The effect of edema on PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd was similar. The effect of edema on 103Pd PIB was slightly greater, even though the decay half-life of 103Pd (17 days

  19. The impact of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control after permanent interstitial brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhe; Roberts, Kenneth; Decker, Roy; Pathare, Pradip; Rockwell, Sara; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that procedure-induced prostate edema during permanent interstitial brachytherapy (PIB) can cause significant variations in the dose delivered to the prostate gland. Because the clinical impact of edema-induced dose variations strongly depends on the magnitude of the edema, the temporal pattern of its resolution and its interplay with the decay of radioactivity and the underlying biological processes of tumor cells (such as tumor potential doubling time), we investigated the impact of edema-induced dose variations on the tumor cell survival and tumor control probability after PIB with the 131 Cs, 125 I and 103 Pd sources used in current clinical practice. The exponential edema resolution model reported by Waterman et al (1998 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 41 1069-77) was used to characterize the edema evolutions previously observed during clinical PIB for prostate cancer. The concept of biologically effective dose, taking into account tumor cell proliferation and sublethal damage repair during dose delivery, was used to characterize the effects of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control probability. Our calculation indicated that prostate edema, if not appropriately taken into account, can increase the cell survival and decrease the probability of local control of PIB. The magnitude of an edema-induced increase in cell survival increased with increasing edema severity, decreasing half-life of radioactive decay and decreasing photon energy emitted by the source. At the doses currently prescribed for PIB and for prostate cancer cells characterized by nominal radiobiology parameters recommended by AAPM TG-137, PIB using 125 I sources was less affected by edema than PIB using 131 Cs or 103 Pd sources due to the long radioactive decay half-life of 125 I. The effect of edema on PIB using 131 Cs or 103 Pd was similar. The effect of edema on 103 Pd PIB was slightly greater, even though the decay half-life of 103 Pd (17 days) is

  20. Development of tumor-targeted near infrared probes for fluorescence guided surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelderhouse, Lindsay E; Chelvam, Venkatesh; Wayua, Charity; Mahalingam, Sakkarapalayam; Poh, Scott; Kularatne, Sumith A; Low, Philip S

    2013-06-19

    Complete surgical resection of malignant disease is the only reliable method to cure cancer. Unfortunately, quantitative tumor resection is often limited by a surgeon's ability to locate all malignant disease and distinguish it from healthy tissue. Fluorescence-guided surgery has emerged as a tool to aid surgeons in the identification and removal of malignant lesions. While nontargeted fluorescent dyes have been shown to passively accumulate in some tumors, the resulting tumor-to-background ratios are often poor, and the boundaries between malignant and healthy tissues can be difficult to define. To circumvent these problems, our laboratory has developed high affinity tumor targeting ligands that bind to receptors that are overexpressed on cancer cells and deliver attached molecules selectively into these cells. In this study, we explore the use of two tumor-specific targeting ligands (i.e., folic acid that targets the folate receptor (FR) and DUPA that targets prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA)) to deliver near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dyes specifically to FR and PSMA expressing cancers, thereby rendering only the malignant cells highly fluorescent. We report here that all FR- and PSMA-targeted NIR probes examined bind cultured cancer cells in the low nanomolar range. Moreover, upon intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice with metastatic disease, these same ligand-NIR dye conjugates render receptor-expressing tumor tissues fluorescent, enabling their facile resection with minimal contamination from healthy tissues.

  1. An RNA-Based Digital Circulating Tumor Cell Signature Is Predictive of Drug Response and Early Dissemination in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, David T; Lee, Richard J; Kalinich, Mark; LiCausi, Joseph A; Zheng, Yu; Chen, Tianqi; Milner, John D; Emmons, Erin; Ho, Uyen; Broderick, Katherine; Silva, Erin; Javaid, Sarah; Kwan, Tanya Todorova; Hong, Xin; Dahl, Douglas M; McGovern, Francis J; Efstathiou, Jason A; Smith, Matthew R; Sequist, Lecia V; Kapur, Ravi; Wu, Chin-Lee; Stott, Shannon L; Ting, David T; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Toner, Mehmet; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A

    2018-03-01

    Blood-based biomarkers are critical in metastatic prostate cancer, where characteristic bone metastases are not readily sampled, and they may enable risk stratification in localized disease. We established a sensitive and high-throughput strategy for analyzing prostate circulating tumor cells (CTC) using microfluidic cell enrichment followed by digital quantitation of prostate-derived transcripts. In a prospective study of 27 patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with first-line abiraterone, pretreatment elevation of the digital CTC M score identifies a high-risk population with poor overall survival (HR = 6.0; P = 0.01) and short radiographic progression-free survival (HR = 3.2; P = 0.046). Expression of HOXB13 in CTCs identifies 6 of 6 patients with ≤12-month survival, with a subset also expressing the ARV7 splice variant. In a second cohort of 34 men with localized prostate cancer, an elevated preoperative CTC L score predicts microscopic dissemination to seminal vesicles and/or lymph nodes ( P digital quantitation of CTC-specific transcripts enables noninvasive monitoring that may guide treatment selection in both metastatic and localized prostate cancer. Significance: There is an unmet need for biomarkers to guide prostate cancer therapies, for curative treatment of localized cancer and for application of molecularly targeted agents in metastatic disease. Digital quantitation of prostate CTC-derived transcripts in blood specimens is predictive of abiraterone response in metastatic cancer and of early dissemination in localized cancer. Cancer Discov; 8(3); 288-303. ©2018 AACR. See related commentary by Heitzer and Speicher, p. 269 This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 253 . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. ERF is a Potential ERK-Modulated Tumor Suppressor in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0277 TITLE: ERF is a Potential ERK-Modulated Tumor Suppressor in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr...Rohit Bose CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research New York NY 10065 REPORT DATE: October 2017 TYPE OF REPORT...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ERF is a Potential ERK-Modulated Tumor Suppressor in Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0277 5c

  3. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy and Near Infrared Imaging for Prostate Cancer Detection: Receptor-targeted and Native Biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yang

    Optical spectroscopy and imaging using near-infrared (NIR) light provides powerful tools for non-invasive detection of cancer in tissue. Optical techniques are capable of quantitative reconstructions maps of tissue absorption and scattering properties, thus can map in vivo the differences in the content of certain marker chromophores and/or fluorophores in normal and cancerous tissues (for example: water, tryptophan, collagen and NADH contents). Potential clinical applications of optical spectroscopy and imaging include functional tumor detection and photothermal therapeutics. Optical spectroscopy and imaging apply contrasts from intrinsic tissue chromophores such as water, collagen and NADH, and extrinsic optical contrast agents such as Indocyanine Green (ICG) to distinguish disease tissue from the normal one. Fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging also gives high sensitivity and specificity for biomedical diagnosis. Recent developments on specific-targeting fluorophores such as small receptor-targeted dye-peptide conjugate contrast agent offer high contrast between normal and cancerous tissues hence provide promising future for early tumour detection. This thesis focus on a study to distinguish the cancerous prostate tissue from the normal prostate tissues with enhancement of specific receptor-targeted prostate cancer contrast agents using optical spectroscopy and imaging techniques. The scattering and absorption coefficients, and anisotropy factor of cancerous and normal prostate tissues were investigated first as the basis for the biomedical diagnostic and optical imaging. Understanding the receptors over-expressed prostate cancer cells and molecular target mechanism of ligand, two small ICG-derivative dye-peptides, namely Cypate-Bombesin Peptide Analogue Conjugate (Cybesin) and Cypate-Octreotate Peptide Conjugate (Cytate), were applied to study their clinical potential for human prostate cancer detection. In this work, the steady-state and time

  4. Targeting TMPRSS2 ERG in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    kinome library, using physiologic cell based assays of ERG activity. We made lentivirus expressing multiple shRNAs targeting each candidate 9...MDV3100 reverses the effect of R1881 (compare columns 2 and 3). Interestingly, PKCi inhibited a subset of androgen induced genes ( column 4...expenditures Nothing to report. Significant changes in use or care of human subjects, vertebrate animals, biohazards, and/or select agents Nothing to

  5. Synergistic co-targeting of prostate-specific membrane antigen and androgen receptor in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murga, Jose D; Moorji, Sameer M; Han, Amy Q; Magargal, Wells W; DiPippo, Vincent A; Olson, William C

    2015-02-15

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are an emerging class of cancer therapies that have demonstrated favorable activity both as single agents and as components of combination regimens. Phase 2 testing of an ADC targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) in advanced prostate cancer has shown antitumor activity. The present study examined PSMA ADC used in combination with potent antiandrogens (enzalutamide and abiraterone) and other compounds. Antiproliferative activity and expression of PSMA, prostate-specific antigen and androgen receptor were evaluated in the prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and C4-2. Cells were tested for susceptibility to antiandrogens or other inhibitors, used alone and in combination with PSMA ADC. Potential drug synergy or antagonism was evaluated using the Bliss independence method. Enzalutamide and abiraterone demonstrated robust, statistically significant synergy when combined with PSMA ADC. Largely additive activity was observed between the antiandrogens and the individual components of the ADC (free drug and unmodified antibody). Rapamycin also synergized with PSMA ADC in certain settings. Synergy was linked in part to upregulation of PSMA expression. In androgen-dependent LNCaP cells, enzalutamide and abiraterone each inhibited proliferation, upregulated PSMA expression, and synergized with PSMA ADC. In androgen-independent C4-2 cells, enzalutamide and abiraterone showed no measurable antiproliferative activity on their own but increased PSMA expression and synergized with PSMA ADC nonetheless. PSMA expression increased progressively over 3 weeks with enzalutamide and returned to baseline levels 1 week after enzalutamide removal. The findings support exploration of clinical treatment regimens that combine potent antiandrogens and PSMA-targeted therapies for prostate cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Design, synthesis and validation of integrin α2β1-targeted probe for microPET imaging of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chiun-Wei; Li, Zibo; Cai, Hancheng; Chen, Kai; Shahinian, Tony; Conti, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of PET to aid in the diagnosis and management of recurrent and/or disseminated metastatic prostate cancer may be enhanced by the development of novel prognostic imaging probes. Accumulating experimental evidence indicates that overexpression of integrin α 2 β 1 may correlate with progression in human prostate cancer. In this study, 64 Cu-labeled integrin α 2 β 1 -targeted PET probes were designed and evaluated for the imaging of prostate cancer. DGEA peptides conjugated with a bifunctional chelator (BFC) were developed to image integrin α 2 β 1 expression with PET in a subcutaneous PC-3 xenograft model. The microPET images were reconstructed by a two-dimensional ordered subsets expectation maximum algorithm. The average radioactivity accumulation within a tumor or an organ was quantified from the multiple region of interest volumes. The PET tracer demonstrated prominent tumor uptake in the PC-3 xenograft (integrin α 2 β 1 -positive). The receptor specificity was confirmed in a blocking experiment. Moreover, the low tracer uptake in a CWR-22 tumor model (negative control) further confirmed the receptor specificity. The sarcophagine-conjugated DGEA peptide allows noninvasive imaging of tumor-associated α 2 β 1 expression, which may be a useful PET probe for evaluating the metastatic potential of prostate cancer. (orig.)

  7. FOXA1 promotes tumor progression in prostate cancer and represents a novel hallmark of castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Josefine; Montani, Matteo; Wild, Peter; Beer, Marc; Huber, Fabian; Hermanns, Thomas; Müntener, Michael; Kristiansen, Glen

    2012-02-01

    Forkhead box protein A1 (FOXA1) modulates the transactivation of steroid hormone receptors and thus may influence tumor growth and hormone responsiveness in prostate cancer. We therefore investigated the correlation of FOXA1 expression with clinical parameters, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse-free survival, and hormone receptor expression in a large cohort of prostate cancer patients at different disease stages. FOXA1 expression did not differ significantly between benign glands from the peripheral zone and primary peripheral zone prostate carcinomas. However, FOXA1 was overexpressed in metastases and particularly in castration-resistant cases, but was expressed at lower levels in both normal and neoplastic transitional zone tissues. FOXA1 levels correlated with higher pT stages and Gleason scores, as well as with androgen (AR) and estrogen receptor expression. Moreover, FOXA1 overexpression was associated with faster biochemical disease progression, which was pronounced in patients with low AR levels. Finally, siRNA-based knockdown of FOXA1 induced decreased cell proliferation and migration. Moreover, in vitro tumorigenicity was inducible by ARs only in the presence of FOXA1, substantiating a functional cooperation between FOXA1 and AR. In conclusion, FOXA1 expression is associated with tumor progression, dedifferentiation of prostate cancer cells, and poorer prognosis, as well as with cellular proliferation and migration and with AR signaling. These findings suggest FOXA1 overexpression as a novel mechanism inducing castration resistance in prostate cancer. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of Androgen Receptor and Beta-Catenin Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Anderson A, Yang GY, Arbeit JM, and Auborn KJ. Indole- 3-carbinol prevents cervical cancer in human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV16) transgenic mice...signaling is prevalent in many cancers, most notably colorectal cancer; however their role in prostate cancer is becoming increasingly appreciated...condition 2 gives no background bands. F) Schematic of human PSA promoter and or β-catenin binding sites (TBE). G-H) Target specific PCR for PSA (G) or

  9. The study of irradiation combined with targeted suicide gene therapy for prostate cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xueguan; Milas, L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study whether RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV, one of suicide gene therapy targeting to Integrin αv, can enhance radiotherapeutic effect for DU145 prostate cancer xenografts or not. Methods: When the diameter of tumor in 48 nude mice bearing DU145 prostate cancer in the right leg attained 6.0 mm (5.8-6.3 mm), the mice were entered into the experiment. There were 6 experimental groups (8 mice per group), including the control, radiotherapy only (RT), RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV only (Targeted, RGD-4C), AAVP HSV-TK/GCV (Non-targeted, non RGD-4C ), radiotherapy plus RGD- 4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV(XRT + RGD-4C) and radiotherapy plus AAVP HSV-TK/GCV group (XRT + Non RGD-4C). The effect of treatment was assessed by tumor growth delay ( the time required when tumor grew from 6.0 mm to 12.0 mm) and tumor cure. Results: Five mice died during the treatment course. There were 6 mice without tumor after treatment, including 1 in RT group, 1 in RGD-4C group, 1 in non RGD-4C group and 3 in XRT + RGD-4C group, respectively. For tumor growth delay analysis in 37 mice, the absolute growth delay (AGD) for RGD-4C, non RGD-4C and RT group was 24.4 ± 9.0, 22.6±11.3 and 28.3 ±5.5 days, respectively. When RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV or AAVP HSV-TK/GCV combined with radiotherapy, their AGD was 64.7±23.8 and 35.4±9.6 days, and nominal growth delay (NGD) was 40.3 ± 23.8 and 12.8 ± 9.6 days, respectively. The enhancement factor of RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV and AAVP HSV-TK/GCV for radiotherapy were 1.42 and 0.45. Conclusion: RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV can enhance radiotherapeutic effect for DU145 prostate cancer xenografts. Further study is needed. (authors)

  10. Correlation of bone scintigraphy findings and tumor markers during follow-up prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Taku

    1996-01-01

    In the last 9 years, 217 patients with prostate cancer were treated at our department. Of these patients 153 cases treated by estrogen therapy were followed up by bone scintigraphy and tumor marker examinations (prostate specific antigen [PSA], prostate acid phosphatase [PAP], gamma-seminoprotein [γ-SM) . The correlation between changes on bone scintigrams and synchronous changes in tumor markers was evaluated retrospectively. In cases in which bone metastasis was not recognized on bone scintigrams before treatment, changes of tumor markers corresponded with subsequent changes on bone scintigrams in more than 90%. However, in cases with bone metastasis on bone scintigrams before treatment, changes of bone scintigrams and changes of tumor markers corresponded in only 55% of cases. Changes of bone scintigrams do not always correspond with changes of tumor markers. However, by taking into consideration physical examination parameters such as bone pain, in addition to changes of tumor markers, most changes on bone scintigrams can be anticipated. The reasons for lack of correspondence between changes of bone scintigrams and changes of tumor markers may be, changes of tumor markers are more rapid than the changes on bone scintigram, some poorly differentiated cancers do not have increased tumor marker levels and bone scintigrams do not demonstrate soft tissue involvement. In the follow-up of patients with prostate cancer, it is not necessary to perform bone scintigraphy regularly at 3-month intervals. Bone scintigraphy should only be performed when serum levels of tumor markers increase or bone pain appears. (author)

  11. Epigenetic targets in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugesan Manoharan

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is one of leading cause of cancer related deaths in men. Various aspects of cancer epigenetics are rapidly evolving and the role of 2 major epigenetic changes including DNA methylation and histone modifications in prostate cancer is being studied widely. The epigenetic changes are early event in the cancer development and are reversible. Novel epigenetic markers are being studied, which have the potential as sensitive diagnostic and prognostic marker. Variety of drugs targeting epigenetic changes are being studied, which can be effective individually or in combination with other conventional drugs in PC treatment. In this review, we discuss epigenetic changes associated with PC and their potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications including future areas of research.

  12. Prostate tumor DNA methylation is associated with cigarette smoking and adverse prostate cancer outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Irene M; Wong, Chao-Jen; Zhao, Shanshan; Kolb, Suzanne; Ebot, Ericka M; Geybels, Milan S; Rubicz, Rohina; Wright, Jonathan L; Lin, Daniel W; Klotzle, Brandy; Bibikova, Marina; Fan, Jian-Bing; Ostrander, Elaine A; Feng, Ziding; Stanford, Janet L

    2016-07-15

    DNA methylation has been hypothesized as a mechanism for explaining the association between smoking and adverse prostate cancer (PCa) outcomes. This study was aimed at assessing whether smoking is associated with prostate tumor DNA methylation and whether these alterations may explain in part the association of smoking with PCa recurrence and mortality. A total of 523 men had radical prostatectomy as their primary treatment, detailed smoking history data, long-term follow-up for PCa outcomes, and tumor tissue profiled for DNA methylation. Ninety percent of the men also had matched tumor gene expression data. A methylome-wide analysis was conducted to identify differentially methylated regions (DMRs) by smoking status. To select potential functionally relevant DMRs, their correlation with the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of corresponding genes was evaluated. Finally, a smoking-related methylation score based on the top-ranked DMRs was created to assess its association with PCa outcomes. Forty DMRs were associated with smoking status, and 10 of these were strongly correlated with mRNA expression (aldehyde oxidase 1 [AOX1], claudin 5 [CLDN5], early B-cell factor 1 [EBF1], homeobox A7 [HOXA7], lectin galactoside-binding soluble 3 [LGALS3], microtubule-associated protein τ [MAPT], protocadherin γ A [PCDHGA]/protocadherin γ B [PCDHGB], paraoxonase 3 [PON3], synaptonemal complex protein 2 like [SYCP2L], and zinc finger and SCAN domain containing 12 [ZSCAN12]). Men who were in the highest tertile for the smoking-methylation score derived from these DMRs had a higher risk of recurrence (odds ratio [OR], 2.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.42-3.72) and lethal disease (OR, 4.21; 95% CI, 1.65-11.78) in comparison with men in the lower 2 tertiles. This integrative molecular epidemiology study supports the hypothesis that smoking-associated tumor DNA methylation changes may explain at least part of the association between smoking and adverse PCa outcomes. Future studies

  13. Quantification of mutant SPOP proteins in prostate cancer using mass spectrometry-based targeted proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hui; Barbieri, Christopher E.; He, Jintang; Gao, Yuqian; Shi, Tujin; Wu, Chaochao; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Chae, Sung-Suk; Huang, Dennis; Mosquera, Juan Miguel; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.; Srivastava, Sudhir; Kagan, Jacob; Camp, David G.; Rodland, Karin D.; Rubin, Mark A.; Liu, Tao

    2017-08-15

    Speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase adaptor protein that functions as a potential tumor suppressor, and SPOP mutations have been identified in ~10% of human prostate cancers. However, it remains unclear if mutant SPOP proteins can be utilized as biomarkers for early detection, diagnosis, prognosis or targeted therapy of prostate cancer. Moreover, the SPOP mutation sites are distributed in a relatively short region where multiple lysine residues, posing significant challenges for bottom-up proteomics analysis of the SPOP mutations. To address this issue, PRISM (high-pressure, high-resolution separations coupled with intelligent selection and multiplexing)-SRM (selected reaction monitoring) mass spectrometry assays have been developed for quantifying wild-type SPOP protein and 11 prostate cancer-derived SPOP mutations. Despite inherent limitations due to amino acid sequence constraints, all the PRISM-SRM assays developed using Arg-C digestion showed a linear dynamic range of at least two orders of magnitude, with limits of quantification range from 0.1 to 1 fmol/μg of total protein in the cell lysate. Applying these SRM assays to analyze HEK293T cells with and without expression of the three most frequent SPOP mutations in prostate cancer (Y87N, F102C or F133V) led to confident detection of all three SPOP mutations in corresponding positive cell lines but not in the negative cell lines. Expression of the F133V mutation and wild-type SPOP was at much lower levels compared to that of F102C and Y87N mutations; however, at present it is unknown if this also affects the activity of the SPOP protein. In summary, PRISM-SRM enables multiplexed, isoform-specific detection of mutant SPOP proteins in cell lysates, which holds great potential in biomarker development for prostate cancer.

  14. The Target of 5-Lipoxygenase is a Novel Strategy over Human Urological Tumors than the Target of Cyclooxygenase-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahide Matsuyama

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The metabolism of arachidonic acid by either the cyclooxygenase (COX or lipoxygenase (LOX pathway generates eicosanoids, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of human diseases, including cancer. It is now considered that they play important roles in tumor promotion, progression, and metastasis, also, the involvement of COX and LOX expression and function in tumor growth and metastasis has been reported in human tumor cell lines. In this study, we examined the expression of COX and LOX in human urological tumors (renal cell carcinoma, bladder tumor, prostate cancer, testicular cancer by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR, and we also examined the effects of COX and LOX (5- and 12-LOX inhibitors in those cells by MTT assay, hoechest staining, and flow cytometry. COX-2, 5-LOX and 12-LOX expressions were significantly more extensive and intense in malignant tissues than in normal tissues. Furthermore, 5-LOX inhibitor induced the reduction of malignant cell viability through early apoptosis. These results demonstrated COX-2 and LOX were induced in urological tumors, and 5-LOX inhibitor may mediate potent antiproliferative effects against urological tumors cells. Thus, 5-LOX may become a new target in the treatment of urological tumors.

  15. DEPDC1 promotes cell proliferation and tumor growth via activation of E2F signaling in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin; Chen, Keng; Cai, Zhao-Peng; Chen, Fu-Chao; Shen, Hui-Yong; Zhao, Wei-Hua; Yang, Song-Jie; Chen, Xu-Biao; Tang, Guo-Xue; Lin, Xi

    2017-08-26

    DEP domain containing 1 (DEPDC1) is recently reported to be overexpressed in several types of human cancer; however the role of DEPDC1 in prostate cancer remains to be investigated. Herein, we identified that the DEPDC1 mRNA and protein expression levels were dramatically increased in prostate cancer tissues and cell lines. Overexpression of DEPDC1 promoted, but depletion of DEPDC1 inhibited cell proliferation by regulating the G1-S phase cell cycle transition. Importantly, we found that DEPDC1 was essential for the tumor growth and formation of bone metastases of prostate cancer cells in vivo. Finally, we demonstrated that DEPDC1 interacted with E2F1 and increased its transcriptional activity, leading to hyper-activation of E2F signaling in prostate cancer cells. Our findings reveal an oncogenic role of DEPDC1 in prostate cancer progression via activation of E2F signaling, and suggest DEPDC1 might be a potential therapeutic target against the disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Harnessing naturally occurring tumor immunity: a clinical vaccine trial in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayu O Frank

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies of patients with paraneoplastic neurologic disorders (PND have revealed that apoptotic tumor serves as a potential potent trigger for the initiation of naturally occurring tumor immunity. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, safety, and immunogenicity of an apoptotic tumor-autologous dendritic cell (DC vaccine.We have modeled PND tumor immunity in a clinical trial in which apoptotic allogeneic prostate tumor cells were used to generate an apoptotic tumor-autologous dendritic cell vaccine. Twenty-four prostate cancer patients were immunized in a Phase I, randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled study to assess the safety and immunogenicity of this vaccine. Vaccinations were safe and well tolerated. Importantly, we also found that the vaccine was immunogenic, inducing delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH responses and CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation, with no effect on FoxP3+ regulatory T cells. A statistically significant increase in T cell proliferation responses to prostate tumor cells in vitro (p = 0.002, decrease in prostate specific antigen (PSA slope (p = 0.016, and a two-fold increase in PSA doubling time (p = 0.003 were identified when we compared data before and after vaccination.An apoptotic cancer cell vaccine modeled on naturally occurring tumor immune responses in PND patients provides a safe and immunogenic tumor vaccine.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00289341.

  17. Daily targeting of intrahepatic tumors for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balter, James M.; Brock, Kristy K.; Litzenberg, Dale W.; McShan, Daniel L.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Haken, Randall Ten; McGinn, Cornelius J.; Lam, Kwok L.; Dawson, Laura A.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: A system has been developed for daily targeting of intrahepatic tumors using a combination of ventilatory immobilization, in-room diagnostic imaging, and on-line setup adjustment. By reducing geometric position uncertainty, as well as organ movement, this system permits reduction of margins and thus potentially higher treatment doses. This paper reports our initial experience treating 8 patients with focal liver tumors using this system. Methods and Materials: The system includes diagnostic X-ray tubes mounted on the wall and ceiling of a treatment room, an active matrix flat panel imager, in-room control for image acquisition and setup adjustment, and a ventilatory immobilization system via active breathing control (ABC). Eight patients participated in the study, two using an early prototype ABC unit, and the remaining six with a commercial ABC system and improved setup measurement tools. Treatment margins were reduced, and dose consequently increased because of increased confidence in target position under this protocol. After daily setup via skin marks, orthogonal radiographs were acquired at suspended ventilation. The images were aligned to the CT model using the diaphragm for inferior-superior (IS) alignment, and the skeleton for left-right (LR) and anterior-posterior (AP) alignment. Adjustments were made for positioning errors greater than a threshold (3 or 5 mm). After treatment, retrospective analysis determined the final setup accuracy, as well as the error in initial setup measurement performed before setup adjustment. Results: Two hundred sixty-two treatment fractions were delivered on eight patients, with 171 treatments requiring repositioning. Typical treatment times were 25-30 min. Patients were able to tolerate ABC throughout the course of treatment. Breath holds up to 35 s long were used for treatment. The use of on-line imaging and setup adjustment reduced setup errors (σ) from 4.0 mm (LR), 6.7 mm (IS), and 3.8 mm (AP) to 2.1 mm (LR

  18. The MCT4 Gene: A Novel, Potential Target for Therapy of Advanced Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Stephen Yiu Chuen; Xue, Hui; Wu, Rebecca; Fazli, Ladan; Lin, Dong; Collins, Colin C; Gleave, Martin E; Gout, Peter W; Wang, Yuzhuo

    2016-06-01

    The management of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a major challenge in the clinic. Androgen receptor signaling-directed strategies are not curative in CRPC therapy, and new strategies targeting alternative, key cancer properties are needed. Using reprogrammed glucose metabolism (aerobic glycolysis), cancer cells typically secrete excessive amounts of lactic acid into their microenvironment, promoting cancer development, survival, and progression. Cellular lactic acid secretion is thought to be predominantly mediated by MCT4, a plasma membrane transporter protein. As such, the MCT4 gene provides a unique, potential therapeutic target for cancer. A tissue microarray of various Gleason grade human prostate cancers was stained for MCT4 protein. Specific, MCT4-targeting antisense oligonucleotides (MCT4 ASO) were designed and candidate MCT4 ASOs checked for effects on (i) MCT4 expression, lactic acid secretion/content, glucose consumption, glycolytic gene expression, and proliferation of human CRPC cells and (ii) growth of PC-3 tumors in nude mice. Elevated MCT4 expression was associated with human CRPC and an earlier time to relapse. The treatment of PC-3, DU145, and C4-2 CRPC cultures with candidate MCT4 ASOs led to marked inhibition of MCT4 expression, lactic acid secretion, to increased intracellular lactic acid levels, and markedly reduced aerobic glycolysis and cell proliferation. Treatment of PC-3 tumor-bearing nude mice with the MCT4 ASOs markedly inhibited tumor growth without inducing major host toxicity. MCT4-targeting ASOs that inhibit lactic acid secretion may be useful for therapy of CRPC and other cancers, as they can interfere with reprogrammed energy metabolism of cancers, an emerging hallmark of cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 22(11); 2721-33. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. The Integrin-Regulated Kinase PYK-2: A Therapeutic Target for Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edlund, Magnus

    2001-01-01

    ...) . A number of promising therapeutic targets for androgen-independent and metastatic prostate cancers are contained within the signaling cascades downstream of the ECM-binding Integrin molecules...

  20. In Vivo Imaging of Prostate Cancer Tumors and Metastasis Using Non-Specific Fluorescent Nanoparticles in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralie Genevois

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available With the growing interest in the use of nanoparticles (NPs in nanomedicine, there is a crucial need for imaging and targeted therapies to determine NP distribution in the body after systemic administration, and to achieve strong accumulation in tumors with low background in other tissues. Accumulation of NPs in tumors results from different mechanisms, and appears extremely heterogeneous in mice models and rather limited in humans. Developing new tumor models in mice, with their low spontaneous NP accumulation, is thus necessary for screening imaging probes and for testing new targeting strategies. In the present work, accumulation of LipImageTM 815, a non-specific nanosized fluorescent imaging agent, was compared in subcutaneous, orthotopic and metastatic tumors of RM1 cells (murine prostate cancer cell line by in vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging techniques. LipImageTM 815 mainly accumulated in liver at 24 h but also in orthotopic tumors. Limited accumulation occurred in subcutaneous tumors, and very low fluorescence was detected in metastasis. Altogether, these different tumor models in mice offered a wide range of NP accumulation levels, and a panel of in vivo models that may be useful to further challenge NP targeting properties.

  1. Interleukin-30: A novel microenvironmental hallmark of prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Carlo, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death in men worldwide. We have recently discovered that IL-30 shapes the microenvironment of prostate cancer and tumor-draining lymph nodes to favor tumor progression. IL-30 supports tumor growth in vitro, and IL-30 expression in prostate cancer patients is associated with high tumor grade and metastatic stage of disease. Thus, IL-30 may constitute a valuable target for modern therapeutic approaches to hamper prostate cancer progression.

  2. Preclinical Evaluation of a Novel 177Lu- Radiopharmaceutical Based on Bombesin Structure for Prostate Tumor Diagnosis and Radionuclide Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujatti, P.B.; Santos, J.S.; Mengatti, J.; Araujo, E.B. de; Suzuki, M.F.; Soares, C.R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men in Brazil. Treatment options have varied, but once the tumor has metastasized, treatment become less effective and the cancer can progresses to a hormone refractory state characterized by high morbidity and mortality. Bombesin (BBN) receptors - in particular, the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptor - have been shown to be massively overexpressed in several human tumors types, including prostate cancer, and could be an alternative as target for its treatment by radionuclide therapy (RNT). A large number of BBN analogs had already been synthesized for this purpose and have shown to reduce tumor growth in mice. Nevertheless, most of the studied analogs exhibit high abdominal accumulation, especially in pancreas. This abdominal accumulation may represent a problem in clinical use of radiolabeled bombesin analogs probably due to serious side effects to patients. The goal of the present work was to radiolabel a novel peptide based on bombesin structure - DOTA-X-BBN(6-14), where X is a spacer of six aminoacids. - with lutetium-177, a β- emitter with optimal physical characteristics for RNT of small tumors and metastases, and to evaluate its in vitro and in vivo properties in Balb-c and Nude mice bearing prostate tumor (PC-3) xenografts. Preliminary studies were done to determine the best labeling conditions of BBNp6 and both ITLC and HPLC were applied to evaluate the radiochemical purity of the preparations. The stability of the radiolabeled peptide was assayed either after storing at 4 o C or incubation in human plasma at 37 deg. C. Biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, whole body and scintigraphic studies were performed in both healthy Balb-c and xenografted Nude mice, in order to characterize the biological properties of labeled peptide. In addition, the specificity of labeled bombesin derivative targeting to PC-3 tumor cells was analysed by in vivo competition assays. In vitro studies involved the

  3. Glycan Markers as Potential Immunological Targets in Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Denong; Wu, Lisa; Liu, Xiaohe

    2017-01-01

    We present here an experimental approach for exploring a new class of tumor biomarkers that are overexpressed by circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and are likely targetable in immunotherapy against tumor metastasis. Using carbohydrate microarrays, anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were scanned against a large panel of carbohydrate antigens to identify potential tumor glycan markers. Subsequently, flow cytometry and fiber-optic array scanning technology (FAST) were applied to determine whether the identified targets are tumor-specific cell-surface markers and are, therefore, likely suitable for targeted immunotherapy. Finally, the tumor glycan-specific antibodies identified were validated using cancer patients' blood samples for their performance in CTC-detection and immunotyping analysis. In this article, identifying breast CTC-specific glycan markers and targeting mAbs serve as examples to illustrate this tumor biomarker discovery strategy.

  4. Hypoxia-Independent Downregulation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Targets by Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragnum, Harald Bull; Røe, Kathrine; Holm, Ruth; Vlatkovic, Ljiljana; Nesland, Jahn Marthin; Aarnes, Eva-Katrine; Ree, Anne Hansen; Flatmark, Kjersti; Seierstad, Therese; Lilleby, Wolfgang; Lyng, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We explored changes in hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) signaling during androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) of androgen-sensitive prostate cancer xenografts under conditions in which no significant change in immunostaining of the hypoxia marker pimonidazole had occurred. Methods and Materials: Gene expression profiles of volume-matched androgen-exposed and androgen-deprived CWR22 xenografts, with similar pimonidazole-positive fractions, were compared. Direct targets of androgen receptor (AR) and HIF1 transcription factors were identified among the differentially expressed genes by using published lists. Biological processes affected by ADT were determined by gene ontology analysis. HIF1α protein expression in xenografts and biopsy samples from 35 patients receiving neoadjuvant ADT was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: A total of 1344 genes showed more than 2-fold change in expression by ADT, including 35 downregulated and 5 upregulated HIF1 targets. Six genes were shared HIF1 and AR targets, and their downregulation was confirmed with quantitative RT-PCR. Significant suppression of the biological processes proliferation, metabolism, and stress response in androgen-deprived xenografts was found, consistent with tumor regression. Nineteen downregulated HIF1 targets were involved in those significant biological processes, most of them in metabolism. Four of these were shared AR and HIF1 targets, including genes encoding the regulatory glycolytic proteins HK2, PFKFB3, and SLC2A1. Most of the downregulated HIF1 targets were induced by hypoxia in androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines, confirming their role as hypoxia-responsive HIF1 targets in prostate cancer. Downregulation of HIF1 targets was consistent with the absence of HIF1α protein in xenografts and downregulation in patients by ADT (P<.001). Conclusions: AR repression by ADT may lead to downregulation of HIF1 signaling independently of hypoxic fraction, and this may contribute to

  5. Hypoxia-Independent Downregulation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Targets by Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragnum, Harald Bull [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Røe, Kathrine [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Division of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog (Norway); Holm, Ruth; Vlatkovic, Ljiljana [Department of Pathology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Nesland, Jahn Marthin [Department of Pathology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Aarnes, Eva-Katrine [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Ree, Anne Hansen [Division of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog (Norway); Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Flatmark, Kjersti [Department of Tumor Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Seierstad, Therese [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud University College, Drammen (Norway); Lilleby, Wolfgang [Department of Oncology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Lyng, Heidi, E-mail: heidi.lyng@rr-research.no [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: We explored changes in hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) signaling during androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) of androgen-sensitive prostate cancer xenografts under conditions in which no significant change in immunostaining of the hypoxia marker pimonidazole had occurred. Methods and Materials: Gene expression profiles of volume-matched androgen-exposed and androgen-deprived CWR22 xenografts, with similar pimonidazole-positive fractions, were compared. Direct targets of androgen receptor (AR) and HIF1 transcription factors were identified among the differentially expressed genes by using published lists. Biological processes affected by ADT were determined by gene ontology analysis. HIF1α protein expression in xenografts and biopsy samples from 35 patients receiving neoadjuvant ADT was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: A total of 1344 genes showed more than 2-fold change in expression by ADT, including 35 downregulated and 5 upregulated HIF1 targets. Six genes were shared HIF1 and AR targets, and their downregulation was confirmed with quantitative RT-PCR. Significant suppression of the biological processes proliferation, metabolism, and stress response in androgen-deprived xenografts was found, consistent with tumor regression. Nineteen downregulated HIF1 targets were involved in those significant biological processes, most of them in metabolism. Four of these were shared AR and HIF1 targets, including genes encoding the regulatory glycolytic proteins HK2, PFKFB3, and SLC2A1. Most of the downregulated HIF1 targets were induced by hypoxia in androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines, confirming their role as hypoxia-responsive HIF1 targets in prostate cancer. Downregulation of HIF1 targets was consistent with the absence of HIF1α protein in xenografts and downregulation in patients by ADT (P<.001). Conclusions: AR repression by ADT may lead to downregulation of HIF1 signaling independently of hypoxic fraction, and this may contribute to

  6. Evaluation of Tumor Heterogeneity of Prostate Carcinoma by Flow- and Image DNA Cytometry and Histopathological Grading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naining Wang

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Heterogeneity of prostate carcinoma is one of the reasons for pretreatment underestimation of tumor aggressiveness. We studied tumor heterogeneity and the probability of finding the highest tumor grade and DNA aneuploidy with relation to the number of biopsies. Material and methods. Specimens simulating core biopsies from five randomly selected tumor areas from each of 16 Böcking’s grade II and 23 grade III prostate carcinomas were analyzed for tumor grade and DNA ploidy by flow‐ and fluorescence image cytometry (FCM, FICM. Cell cycle composition was measured by FCM. Results. By determination of ploidy and cell cycle composition, morphologically defined tumors can further be subdivided. Heterogeneity of tumor grade and DNA ploidy (FCM was 54% and 50%. Coexistence of diploid tumor cells in aneuploid specimens represents another form of tumor heterogeneity. The proportion of diploid tumor cells decreased significantly with tumor grade and with increase in the fraction of proliferating cell of the aneuploid tumor part. The probability of estimating the highest tumor grade or aneuploidy increased from 40% for one biopsy to 95% for 5 biopsies studied. By combining the tumor grade with DNA ploidy, the probability of detecting a highly aggressive tumor increased from 40% to 70% and 90% for one and two biopsies, respectively. Conclusion. Specimens of the size of core biopsies can be used for evaluation of DNA ploidy and cell cycle composition. Underestimation of aggressiveness of prostate carcinoma due to tumor heterogeneity is minimized by simultaneous study of the tumor grade and DNA ploidy more than by increasing the number of biopsies. The biological significance of coexistent diploid tumor cell in aneuploid lesions remains to be evaluated.

  7. Genistein up-regulates tumor suppressor microRNA-574-3p in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Chiyomaru

    Full Text Available Genistein has been shown to inhibit cancers both in vitro and in vivo, by altering the expression of several microRNAs (miRNAs. In this study, we focused on tumor suppressor miRNAs regulated by genistein and investigated their function in prostate cancer (PCa and target pathways. Using miRNA microarray analysis and real-time RT-PCR we observed that miR-574-3p was significantly up-regulated in PCa cells treated with genistein compared with vehicle control. The expression of miR-574-3p was significantly lower in PCa cell lines and clinical PCa tissues compared with normal prostate cells (RWPE-1 and adjacent normal tissues. Low expression level of miR-574-3p was correlated with advanced tumor stage and higher Gleason score in PCa specimens. Re-expression of miR-574-3p in PCa cells significantly inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo. miR-574-3p restoration induced apoptosis through reducing Bcl-xL and activating caspase-9 and caspase-3. Using GeneCodis software analysis, several pathways affected by miR-574-3p were identified, such as 'Pathways in cancer', 'Jak-STAT signaling pathway', and 'Wnt signaling pathway'. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that miR-574-3p directly binds to the 3' UTR of several target genes (such as RAC1, EGFR and EP300 that are components of 'Pathways in cancer'. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western analysis showed that the mRNA and protein expression levels of the three target genes in PCa cells were markedly down-regulated with miR-574-3p. Loss-of-function studies demonstrated that the three target genes significantly affect cell proliferation, migration and invasion in PCa cell lines. Our results show that genistein up-regulates tumor suppressor miR-574-3p expression targeting several cell signaling pathways. These findings enhance understanding of how genistein regulates with miRNA in PCa.

  8. Rare incidence of tumor lysis syndrome in metastatic prostate cancer following treatment with docetaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Sharonlin; Varma, Seema

    2018-03-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome is a serious and sometimes lethal complication of cancer treatment that is comprised of a set of metabolic disturbances along with clinical manifestations. Initiating chemotherapy in bulky, rapidly proliferating tumors causes rapid cell turnover that in turn releases metabolites into circulation that give rise to metabolic derangements that can be dangerous. This syndrome is usually seen in high-grade hematological malignancies. Less commonly, tumor lysis syndrome can present in solid tumors and even rarely in genitourinary tumors. In this report, the authors describe a specific case of tumor lysis syndrome in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer following treatment with docetaxel.

  9. A critical evaluation of the planning target volume for 3-d conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinger, Alfred; Michalski, Jeff M.; Cheng, Abel; Low, Daniel A.; Zhu, Ron; Bosch, Walter R.; Purdy, James A.; Perez, Carlos A.

    1996-01-01

    displacement ± the standard deviation was 0.5 ± 3.4 mm in the LR, 1.7 ± 3.3 mm in the AP, and -0.4 ± 2.4 mm in the SI directions, respectively. The total uncertainty, which includes organ position and set-up uncertainty, for the prostate was 3.5 mm, 4.3 mm, and 4.2 mm in the LR, AP, and SI directions, respectively. For the seminal vesicles, the total uncertainty was 3.7 mm, 5.3 mm, and 3.3 mm in the LR, AP, and SI directions, respectively. The percent change in rectal volume correlated with motion of the prostate in the AP direction and with motion of the seminal vesicles in the SI direction. To account for the uncertainties with a 95% or 99% probability, PTV margins equal to two times or three times the total uncertainties are required (10 - 16 mm), respectively. Conclusions: PTV margins of 10 - 16 mm are required to encompass all (99%) possible positions of the prostate or seminal vesicles during 3D CRT. PTV margins of 7 - 11 mm will encompass the measured uncertainties with a 95% probability. PTV margins as small as 5 mm may not adequately cover the target volume. Clinicians and investigators are using 5 - 10 mm as a range for PTV margins in a current 3D CRT dose escalation protocol for prostate cancer (RTOG 94-06). Results from this trial will determine whether toxicity and local tumor control are acceptable

  10. [The development of novel tumor targeting delivery strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui-le; Jiang, Xin-guo

    2016-02-01

    Tumor is one of the most serious threats for human being. Although many anti-tumor drugs are approved for clinical use, the treatment outcome is still modest because of the poor tumor targeting efficiency and low accumulation in tumor. Therefore, it is important to deliver anti-tumor drug into tumor efficiently, elevate drug concentration in tumor tissues and reduce the drug distribution in normal tissues. And it has been one of the most attractive directions of pharmaceutical academy and industry. Many kinds of strategies, especially various nanoparticulated drug delivery systems, have been developed to address the critical points of complex tumor microenvironment, which are partially or mostly satisfied for tumor treatment. In this paper, we carefully reviewed the novel targeting delivery strategies developed in recent years. The most powerful method is passive targeting delivery based on the enhanced permeability and retention(EPR) effect, and most commercial nanomedicines are based on the EPR effect. However, the high permeability and retention require different particle sizes, thus several kinds of size-changeable nanoparticles are developed, such as size reducible particles and assemble particles, to satisfy the controversial requirement for particle size and enhance both tumor retention and penetration. Surface charge reversible nanoparticles also shows a high efficiency because the anionic charge in blood circulation and normal organs decrease the unintended internalization. The charge can change into positive in tumor microenvironment, facilitating drug uptake by tumor cells. Additionally, tumor microenvironment responsive drug release is important to decrease drug side effect, and many strategies are developed, such as p H sensitive release and enzyme sensitive release. Except the responsive nanoparticles, shaping tumor microenvironment could attenuate the barriers in drug delivery, for example, decreasing tumor collagen intensity and normalizing tumor

  11. Myristoylation of Src kinase mediates Src-induced and high-fat diet-accelerated prostate tumor progression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungjin; Yang, Xiangkun; Li, Qianjin; Wu, Meng; Costyn, Leah; Beharry, Zanna; Bartlett, Michael G; Cai, Houjian

    2017-11-10

    Exogenous fatty acids provide substrates for energy production and biogenesis of the cytoplasmic membrane, but they also enhance cellular signaling during cancer cell proliferation. However, it remains controversial whether dietary fatty acids are correlated with tumor progression. In this study, we demonstrate that increased Src kinase activity is associated with high-fat diet-accelerated progression of prostate tumors and that Src kinases mediate this pathological process. Moreover, in the in vivo prostate regeneration assay, host SCID mice carrying Src(Y529F)-transduced regeneration tissues were fed a low-fat diet or a high-fat diet and treated with vehicle or dasatinib. The high-fat diet not only accelerated Src-induced prostate tumorigenesis in mice but also compromised the inhibitory effect of the anticancer drug dasatinib on Src kinase oncogenic potential in vivo We further show that myristoylation of Src kinase is essential to facilitate Src-induced and high-fat diet-accelerated tumor progression. Mechanistically, metabolism of exogenous myristic acid increased the biosynthesis of myristoyl CoA and myristoylated Src and promoted Src kinase-mediated oncogenic signaling in human cells. Of the fatty acids tested, only exogenous myristic acid contributed to increased intracellular myristoyl CoA levels. Our results suggest that targeting Src kinase myristoylation, which is required for Src kinase association at the cellular membrane, blocks dietary fat-accelerated tumorigenesis in vivo Our findings uncover the molecular basis of how the metabolism of myristic acid stimulates high-fat diet-mediated prostate tumor progression. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Differential splicing of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in African and Caucasian American populations: contributing factor in prostate cancer disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    populations: contributing factor in prostate cancer disparities? PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Norman H Lee, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: George Washington...splicing of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in African and Caucasian American populations: contributing factor in prostate cancer disparities? 5b...American (AA) versus Caucasian American (CA) prostate cancer (PCa). We focused our efforts on two oncogenes, phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3

  13. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  14. Prostate-specific membrane antigen targeted protein contrast agents for molecular imaging of prostate cancer by MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Fan; Salarian, Mani; Xue, Shenghui; Qiao, Jingjuan; Feng, Jie; Tan, Shanshan; Patel, Anvi; Li, Xin; Mamouni, Kenza; Hekmatyar, Khan; Zou, Juan; Wu, Daqing; Yang, Jenny J.

    2016-06-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one of the most specific cell surface markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and targeted treatment. However, achieving molecular imaging using non-invasive MRI with high resolution has yet to be achieved due to the lack of contrast agents with significantly improved relaxivity for sensitivity, targeting capabilities and metal selectivity. We have previously reported our creation of a novel class of protein Gd3+ contrast agents, ProCA32, which displayed significantly improved relaxivity while exhibiting strong Gd3+ binding selectivity over physiological metal ions. In this study, we report our effort in further developing biomarker-targeted protein MRI contrast agents for molecular imaging of PSMA. Among three PSMA targeted contrast agents engineered with addition of different molecular recognition sequences, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits a binding affinity of 1.1 +/- 0.1 μM for PSMA while the metal binding affinity is maintained at 0.9 +/- 0.1 × 10-22 M. In addition, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits r1 of 27.6 mM-1 s-1 and r2 of 37.9 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (55.2 and 75.8 mM-1 s-1 per molecule r1 and r2, respectively) at 1.4 T. At 7 T, ProCA32.PSMA also has r2 of 94.0 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (188.0 mM-1 s-1 per molecule) and r1 of 18.6 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (37.2 mM-1 s-1 per molecule). This contrast capability enables the first MRI enhancement dependent on PSMA expression levels in tumor bearing mice using both T1 and T2-weighted MRI at 7 T. Further development of these PSMA-targeted contrast agents are expected to be used for the precision imaging of prostate cancer at an early stage and to monitor disease progression and staging, as well as determine the effect of therapeutic treatment by non-invasive evaluation of the PSMA level using MRI.Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one of the most specific cell surface markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and targeted treatment. However, achieving molecular imaging using non-invasive MRI with high

  15. Cellular Angiofibroma of the Prostate: A Rare Tumor in an Unusual Location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inez Wyn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the unusual occurrence of a cellular angiofibroma in prostatic tissue. In this case, a 84-year-old man presented in the emergency room with urinary retention. Ultrasound revealed an enlarged prostate, which was suggestive for benign prostatic hyperplasia. The patient was treated with a Millin retropubic prostatectomy. Macroscopically the prostate contained multiple circumscribed nodules. Microscopic examination of the tumor showed the appearance of cellular angiofibroma, consisting of bland spindle cells and prominent, hyalinized vessels. The diagnosis was supported by FISH, which revealed monoallelic loss of RB1/13q14 region, as seen in spindle cell lipoma, (extra- mammary myofibroblastoma, and cellular angiofibroma. Cellular angiofibromas are rare, benign soft tissue tumours and were never reported in the prostatic gland.

  16. Targeting cytokine signaling checkpoint CIS activates NK cells to protect from tumor initiation and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, Eva M.; Guillerey, Camille; Kos, Kevin; Stannard, Kimberley; Miles, Kim; Delconte, Rebecca B.; Nicholson, Sandra E.; Huntington, Nicholas D.; Smyth, Mark J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cytokine-induced SH2-containing protein CIS belongs to the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) protein family. Here, we show the critical role of CIS in suppressing natural killer (NK) cell control of tumor initiation and metastasis. Cish-deficient mice were highly resistant to methylcholanthrene-induced sarcoma formation and protected from lung metastasis of B16F10 melanoma and RM-1 prostate carcinoma cells. In contrast, the growth of primary subcutaneous tumors, including those expressing the foreign antigen OVA, was unchanged in Cish-deficient mice. The combination of Cish deficiency and relevant targeted and immuno-therapies such as combined BRAF and MEK inhibitors, immune checkpoint blockade antibodies, IL-2 and type I interferon revealed further improved control of metastasis. The data clearly indicate that targeting CIS promotes NK cell antitumor functions and CIS holds great promise as a novel target in NK cell immunotherapy. PMID:28344878

  17. Investigating Steroid Receptor Coactivator 3 (SRC3) as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Treating Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    different kinases including MAPK, IKK, GSK3a , GSK3b , and CK1d. SRC-3 is also a target of ABL tyrosine kinase which can be activated by estrogen and...differentiated as evidenced by higher levels of Fkbp5, an AR-responsive gene that inhibits Akt signaling. These tumors also had lower levels of some...34 castrationCresistant" prostate" cancer,"we" found" that" although" androgen" deprivation" shrunk" the" size" of" the"tumor,"the"reduced" level "of"testosterone

  18. Detection of Tumor Markers in Prostate Cancer and Comparison of Sensitivity between Real Time and Nested PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuoka, Takayuki; Shigemura, Katsumi; Yamamichi, Fukashi; Fujisawa, Masato; Kawabata, Masato; Shirakawa, Toshiro

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate and compare the sensitivity in conventional PCR, quantitative real time PCR, nested PCR and western blots for detection of prostate cancer tumor markers using prostate cancer (PCa) cells. We performed conventional PCR, quantitative real time PCR, nested PCR, and western blots using 5 kinds of PCa cells. Prostate specific antigen (PSA), prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), and androgen receptor (AR) were compared for their detection sensitivi...

  19. Antigen specific T-cell responses against tumor antigens are controlled by regulatory T cells in patients with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadaschik, Boris; Su, Yun; Huter, Eva; Ge, Yingzi; Hohenfellner, Markus; Beckhove, Philipp

    2012-04-01

    Immunotherapy is a promising approach in an effort to control castration resistant prostate cancer. We characterized tumor antigen reactive T cells in patients with prostate cancer and analyzed the suppression of antitumor responses by regulatory T cells. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 57 patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer, 8 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and 16 healthy donors. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and antigen specific interferon-γ secretion of isolated T cells was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunospot assay. T cells were functionally characterized and T-cell responses before and after regulatory T-cell depletion were compared. As test tumor antigens, a panel of 11 long synthetic peptides derived from a total of 8 tumor antigens was used, including prostate specific antigen and prostatic acid phosphatase. In patients with prostate cancer we noted a 74.5% effector T-cell response rate compared with only 25% in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and 31% in healthy donors. In most patients 2 or 3 tumor antigens were recognized. Comparing various disease stages there was a clear increase in the immune response against prostate specific antigens from intermediate to high risk tumors and castration resistant disease. Regulatory T-cell depletion led to a significant boost in effector T-cell responses against prostate specific antigen and prostatic acid phosphatase. Tumor specific effector T cells were detected in most patients with prostate cancer, especially those with castration resistant prostate cancer. Since effector T-cell responses against prostate specific antigens strongly increased after regulatory T-cell depletion, our results indicate that immunotherapy efficacy could be enhanced by decreasing regulatory T cells. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Targeted MRI-guided prostate biopsy: are two biopsy cores per MRI-lesion required?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schimmoeller, L.; Quentin, M.; Blondin, D.; Dietzel, F.; Schleich, C.; Thomas, C.; Antoch, G. [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Hiester, A.; Rabenalt, R.; Albers, P.; Arsov, C. [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Urology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Gabbert, H.E. [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Pathology, Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    This study evaluates the feasibility of performing less than two core biopsies per MRI-lesion when performing targeted MR-guided in-bore prostate biopsy. Retrospectively evaluated were 1545 biopsy cores of 774 intraprostatic lesions (two cores per lesion) in 290 patients (66 ± 7.8 years; median PSA 8.2 ng/ml) regarding prostate cancer (PCa) detection, Gleason score, and tumor infiltration of the first (FBC) compared to the second biopsy core (SBC). Biopsies were acquired under in-bore MR-guidance. For the biopsy cores, 491 were PCa positive, 239 of 774 (31 %) were FBC and 252 of 771 (33 %) were SBC (p = 0.4). Patient PCa detection rate based on the FBC vs. SBC were 46 % vs. 48 % (p = 0.6). For clinically significant PCa (Gleason score ≥4 + 3 = 7) the detection rate was 18 % for both, FBC and SBC (p = 0.9). Six hundred and eighty-seven SBC (89 %) showed no histologic difference. On the lesion level, 40 SBC detected PCa with negative FBC (7.5 %). Twenty SBC showed a Gleason upgrade from 3 + 3 = 6 to ≥3 + 4 = 7 (2.6 %) and 4 to ≥4 + 3 = 7 (0.5 %). The benefit of a second targeted biopsy core per suspicious MRI-lesion is likely minor, especially regarding PCa detection rate and significant Gleason upgrading. Therefore, a further reduction of biopsy cores is reasonable when performing a targeted MR-guided in-bore prostate biopsy. (orig.)

  1. Targeted MRI-guided prostate biopsy: are two biopsy cores per MRI-lesion required?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmoeller, L.; Quentin, M.; Blondin, D.; Dietzel, F.; Schleich, C.; Thomas, C.; Antoch, G.; Hiester, A.; Rabenalt, R.; Albers, P.; Arsov, C.; Gabbert, H.E.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the feasibility of performing less than two core biopsies per MRI-lesion when performing targeted MR-guided in-bore prostate biopsy. Retrospectively evaluated were 1545 biopsy cores of 774 intraprostatic lesions (two cores per lesion) in 290 patients (66 ± 7.8 years; median PSA 8.2 ng/ml) regarding prostate cancer (PCa) detection, Gleason score, and tumor infiltration of the first (FBC) compared to the second biopsy core (SBC). Biopsies were acquired under in-bore MR-guidance. For the biopsy cores, 491 were PCa positive, 239 of 774 (31 %) were FBC and 252 of 771 (33 %) were SBC (p = 0.4). Patient PCa detection rate based on the FBC vs. SBC were 46 % vs. 48 % (p = 0.6). For clinically significant PCa (Gleason score ≥4 + 3 = 7) the detection rate was 18 % for both, FBC and SBC (p = 0.9). Six hundred and eighty-seven SBC (89 %) showed no histologic difference. On the lesion level, 40 SBC detected PCa with negative FBC (7.5 %). Twenty SBC showed a Gleason upgrade from 3 + 3 = 6 to ≥3 + 4 = 7 (2.6 %) and 4 to ≥4 + 3 = 7 (0.5 %). The benefit of a second targeted biopsy core per suspicious MRI-lesion is likely minor, especially regarding PCa detection rate and significant Gleason upgrading. Therefore, a further reduction of biopsy cores is reasonable when performing a targeted MR-guided in-bore prostate biopsy. (orig.)

  2. Multicriteria plan optimization in the hands of physicians: a pilot study in prostate cancer and brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Birgit S; Shih, Helen A; Efstathiou, Jason A; Bortfeld, Thomas; Craft, David

    2017-11-06

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of physician driven planning in intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with a multicriteria optimization (MCO) treatment planning system and template based plan optimization. Exploiting the full planning potential of MCO navigation, this alternative planning approach intends to improve planning efficiency and individual plan quality. Planning was retrospectively performed on 12 brain tumor and 10 post-prostatectomy prostate patients previously treated with MCO-IMRT. For each patient, physicians were provided with a template-based generated Pareto surface of optimal plans to navigate, using the beam angles from the original clinical plans. We compared physician generated plans to clinically delivered plans (created by dosimetrists) in terms of dosimetric differences, physician preferences and planning times. Plan qualities were similar, however physician generated and clinical plans differed in the prioritization of clinical goals. Physician derived prostate plans showed significantly better sparing of the high dose rectum and bladder regions (p(D1) plans indicated higher doses for targets and brainstem (p(D1) plan comparisons physicians preferred the clinical plans more often (brain: 6:3 out of 12, prostate: 2:6 out of 10) (not statistically significant). While times of physician involvement were comparable for prostate planning, the new workflow reduced the average involved time for brain cases by 30%. Planner times were reduced for all cases. Subjective benefits, such as a better understanding of planning situations, were observed by clinicians through the insight into plan optimization and experiencing dosimetric trade-offs. We introduce physician driven planning with MCO for brain and prostate tumors as a feasible planning workflow. The proposed approach standardizes the planning process by utilizing site specific templates and integrates physicians more tightly into treatment planning. Physicians

  3. Uncertainces in tumor target definition using PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirov, A.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: PET entered into the clinics for radiation therapy as a means of displaying the metabolically active part of the tumor. However this advantage, PET has a number of shortcomings that prevent its use for precise determination of the tumor boundaries. What you will learn: The aim of the lecture is to present: the requirements for the accuracy of the determination of tumor boundaries in radiation therapy; the main phenomena which bring uncertainty using PET and a brief overview of methods for segmentation of tumors and their problems

  4. MR-CBCT image-guided system for radiotherapy of orthotopic rat prostate tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Tsuicheng D; Arai, Tatsuya J; Campbell Iii, James; Jiang, Steve B; Mason, Ralph P; Stojadinovic, Strahinja

    2018-01-01

    Multi-modality image-guided radiotherapy is the standard of care in contemporary cancer management; however, it is not common in preclinical settings due to both hardware and software limitations. Soft tissue lesions, such as orthotopic prostate tumors, are difficult to identify using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging alone. In this study, we characterized a research magnetic resonance (MR) scanner for preclinical studies and created a protocol for combined MR-CBCT image-guided small animal radiotherapy. Two in-house dual-modality, MR and CBCT compatible, phantoms were designed and manufactured using 3D printing technology. The phantoms were used for quality assurance tests and to facilitate end-to-end testing for combined preclinical MR and CBCT based treatment planning. MR and CBCT images of the phantoms were acquired utilizing a Varian 4.7 T scanner and XRad-225Cx irradiator, respectively. The geometry distortion was assessed by comparing MR images to phantom blueprints and CBCT. The corrected MR scans were co-registered with CBCT and subsequently used for treatment planning. The fidelity of 3D printed phantoms compared to the blueprint design yielded favorable agreement as verified with the CBCT measurements. The geometric distortion, which varied between -5% and 11% throughout the scanning volume, was substantially reduced to within 0.4% after correction. The distortion free MR images were co-registered with the corresponding CBCT images and imported into a commercial treatment planning software SmART Plan. The planning target volume (PTV) was on average 19% smaller when contoured on the corrected MR-CBCT images relative to raw images without distortion correction. An MR-CBCT based preclinical workflow was successfully designed and implemented for small animal radiotherapy. Combined MR-CBCT image-guided radiotherapy for preclinical research potentially delivers enhanced relevance to human radiotherapy for various disease sites. This novel protocol

  5. Targeting Nanomedicine to Brain Tumors: Latest Progress and Achievements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van't Root, Moniek; Lowik, Clemens; Mezzanotte, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Targeting nanomedicine to brain tumors is hampered by the heterogeneity of brain tumors and the blood brain barrier. These represent the main reasons of unsuccessful treatments. Nanomedicine based approaches hold promise for improved brain tissue distribution of drugs and delivery of combination therapies. In this review, we describe the recent advancements and latest achievements in the use of nanocarriers, virus and cell-derived nanoparticles for targeted therapy of brain tumors. We provide successful examples of nanomedicine based approaches for direct targeting of receptors expressed in brain tumor cells or modulation of pathways involved in cell survival as well as approaches for indirect targeting of cells in the tumor stroma and immunotherapies. Although the field is at its infancy, clinical trials involving nanomedicine based approaches for brain tumors are ongoing and many others will start in the near future. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Androgen receptor regulated microRNA miR-182-5p promotes prostate cancer progression by targeting the ARRDC3/ITGB4 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Jingjing [Department of Urology, Shanghai Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Xu, Chen [Research Center of Developmental Biology, Second Military Medical University, 800th Xiangyin Road, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Department of Orthopedics, Changzheng Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, 415th Feng Yang Road, Shanghai, 200003 (China); Fang, Ziyu; Li, Yaoming [Department of Urology, Shanghai Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Liu, Houqi; Wang, Yue [Research Center of Developmental Biology, Second Military Medical University, 800th Xiangyin Road, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Translational Medicine Center, Second Military Medical University, 800th Xiangyin Road, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Xu, Chuanliang [Department of Urology, Shanghai Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Sun, Yinghao, E-mail: sunyh@medmail.com.cn [Department of Urology, Shanghai Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 200433 (China)

    2016-05-20

    Abstracts: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important endogenous gene regulators that play key roles in prostate cancer development and metastasis. However, specific miRNA expression patterns in prostate cancer tissues from Chinese patients remain largely unknown. In this study, we compared miRNA expression patterns in 65 pairs of prostate cancer and para-cancer tissues by RNA sequencing and found that miR-182-5p was the most up-regulated miRNA in prostate cancer tissues. The result was validated using realtime PCR in 18 pairs of prostate cancer and para-cancer tissues. In in vitro analysis, it was confirmed that miR-182-5p promotes prostate cancer cell proliferation, invasion and migration and inhibit apoptosis. In addition, the androgen receptor directly regulated the transcription of miR-182-5p, which could target to the 3′UTR of ARRDC3 mRNA and affect the expression of ARRDC3 and its downstream gene ITGB4. For the in vivo experiment, miR-182-5p overexpression also promoted the growth and progression of prostate cancer tumors. In this regard, we suggest that miR-182-5p may be a key androgen receptor-regulated factor that contributes to the development and metastasis of Chinese prostate cancers and may be a potential target for the early diagnosis and therapeutic studies of prostate cancer. -- Highlights: •miR-182-5p is the mostly up-regulated miRNA in Chinese prostate cancer. •miR-182-5p is regulated by androgen receptor. •miR-182-5p promotes prostate cancer progression. •miR-182-5p regulates ARRDC3/ITGB4 pathway.

  7. Androgen receptor regulated microRNA miR-182-5p promotes prostate cancer progression by targeting the ARRDC3/ITGB4 pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Jingjing; Xu, Chen; Fang, Ziyu; Li, Yaoming; Liu, Houqi; Wang, Yue; Xu, Chuanliang; Sun, Yinghao

    2016-01-01

    Abstracts: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important endogenous gene regulators that play key roles in prostate cancer development and metastasis. However, specific miRNA expression patterns in prostate cancer tissues from Chinese patients remain largely unknown. In this study, we compared miRNA expression patterns in 65 pairs of prostate cancer and para-cancer tissues by RNA sequencing and found that miR-182-5p was the most up-regulated miRNA in prostate cancer tissues. The result was validated using realtime PCR in 18 pairs of prostate cancer and para-cancer tissues. In in vitro analysis, it was confirmed that miR-182-5p promotes prostate cancer cell proliferation, invasion and migration and inhibit apoptosis. In addition, the androgen receptor directly regulated the transcription of miR-182-5p, which could target to the 3′UTR of ARRDC3 mRNA and affect the expression of ARRDC3 and its downstream gene ITGB4. For the in vivo experiment, miR-182-5p overexpression also promoted the growth and progression of prostate cancer tumors. In this regard, we suggest that miR-182-5p may be a key androgen receptor-regulated factor that contributes to the development and metastasis of Chinese prostate cancers and may be a potential target for the early diagnosis and therapeutic studies of prostate cancer. -- Highlights: •miR-182-5p is the mostly up-regulated miRNA in Chinese prostate cancer. •miR-182-5p is regulated by androgen receptor. •miR-182-5p promotes prostate cancer progression. •miR-182-5p regulates ARRDC3/ITGB4 pathway.

  8. Tumor and target delineation: current research and future challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin-Seymour, Mary; Chen, George T.Y.; Rosenman, Julian; Michalski, Jeff; Lindsley, Karen; Goitein, Michael

    1995-01-01

    In the past decade, significant progress has been made in the imaging of tumors, three dimensional (3D) treatment planning, and radiation treatment delivery. At this time one of the greatest challenges for conformal radiation therapy is the accurate delineation of tumor and target volumes. The physician encounters many uncertainties in the process of defining both tumor and target. The sources of these uncertainties are discussed, as well as the issues requiring study to reduce these uncertainties

  9. Differential Patterns of Large Tumor Antigen-Specific Immune Responsiveness in Patients with BK Polyomavirus-Positive Prostate Cancer or Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sais, Giovanni; Wyler, Stephen; Hudolin, Tvrtko; Banzola, Irina; Mengus, Chantal; Bubendorf, Lukas; Wild, Peter J.; Hirsch, Hans H.; Sulser, Tullio; Spagnoli, Giulio C.

    2012-01-01

    The role of the polyomavirus BK (BKV) large tumor antigen (L-Tag) as a target of immune response in patients with prostate cancer (PCa) has not been investigated thus far. In this study, we comparatively analyzed humoral and cellular L-Tag-specific responsiveness in age-matched patients bearing PCa or benign prostatic hyperplasia, expressing or not expressing BKV L-Tag-specific sequences in their tissue specimens, and in non-age-matched healthy individuals. Furthermore, results from patients with PCa were correlated to 5-year follow-up clinical data focusing on evidence of biochemical recurrence (BR) after surgery (prostate specific antigen level of ≥0.2 ng/ml). In peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with PCa with evidence of BR and BKV L-Tag-positive tumors, stimulation with peptides derived from the BKV L-Tag but not those derived from Epstein-Barr virus, influenza virus, or cytomegalovirus induced a peculiar cytokine gene expression profile, characterized by high expression of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor β1 and low expression of gamma interferon genes. This pattern was confirmed by protein secretion data and correlated with high levels of anti-BKV L-Tag IgG. Furthermore, in PBMC from these PCa-bearing patients, L-Tag-derived peptides significantly expanded an IL-10-secreting CD4+ CD25+(high) CD127− FoxP3+ T cell population with an effector memory phenotype (CD103+) capable of inhibiting proliferation of autologous anti-CD3/CD28-triggered CD4+ CD25− T cells. Collectively, our findings indicate that potentially tolerogenic features of L-Tag-specific immune response are significantly associated with tumor progression in patients with BKV+ PCa. PMID:22647697

  10. Identification of Different Classes of Luminal Progenitor Cells within Prostate Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreet Agarwal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary prostate cancer almost always has a luminal phenotype. However, little is known about the stem/progenitor properties of transformed cells within tumors. Using the aggressive Pten/Tp53-null mouse model of prostate cancer, we show that two classes of luminal progenitors exist within a tumor. Not only did tumors contain previously described multipotent progenitors, but also a major population of committed luminal progenitors. Luminal cells, sorted directly from tumors or grown as organoids, initiated tumors of adenocarcinoma or multilineage histological phenotypes, which is consistent with luminal and multipotent differentiation potentials, respectively. Moreover, using organoids we show that the ability of luminal-committed progenitors to self-renew is a tumor-specific property, absent in benign luminal cells. Finally, a significant fraction of luminal progenitors survived in vivo castration. In all, these data reveal two luminal tumor populations with different stem/progenitor cell capacities, providing insight into prostate cancer cells that initiate tumors and can influence treatment response.

  11. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of fast neutrons with the Dunning rat prostate tumor R3327-HI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, F.; Lohr, F.; Peschke, P.; Wolber, G.; Hoever, K.H.; Hahn, E.W.

    1993-01-01

    Human prostate tumors are known to be good candidates for neutron therapy. The Dunning rat prostate tumor system R3327 was found in many studies to be an excellent model for human prostate tumors. There is still a paucity of studies on the response of the Dunning tumors to fast neutrons. Tumors of the R3327-HI subline are moderately well differentiated and mucin producing. They show one euploid cell population, a bromodeoxyuridine labelling index of 5%, a potential doubling time of 8.9 days, a volume doubling time of about ten days and a cell loss rate of 10%. Tumors were transplanted s.c. in the distal thigh of Copenhagen rats and treated with 60 Co-photons (10, 20, 30, 40 Gy, 45 cGy/min) and 14-MeV-neutrons (8, 10, 12 Gy, 7 to 11 cGy/min). Tumor volumes were measured twice weekly. Growth delay was defined as time in days until the tumors reached twice their treatment volume. Linear regressions on the median growth delays of the different treatment groups were calculated. The ratio of the neutron- and photon-slopes yielded an RBE of 3.1±0.3. Additionally isoeffect-RBE values between 2.3 and 2.6 were graphically estimated. (orig.) [de

  12. CDK5 as a Therapeutic Target in Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelkin, Barry D

    2008-01-01

    We have recently found that CDK5 is active in prostate cancer cell lines and in almost all human metastatic prostate cancers, and inhibition of CDK5 activity resulted in reduction of spontaneous metastases by 79...

  13. CDK5 as a Therapeutic Target in Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelkin, Barry

    2007-01-01

    We have recently found that CDK5 is active in prostate cancer cell lines and in almost all human metastatic prostate cancers, and inhibition of CDK5 activity resulted in reduction of spontaneous metastases by 79...

  14. Possible application of tumor marker radioimmunoassay in diagnosis of testicular and prostatic carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kausitz, J

    1988-10-01

    Determinations of alpha fetoprotein and chorionic gonadotropin levels by radioimmunoassay in 340 patients with germ cell tumors of the testes have confirmed that tumor markers are suitable prognostic parameters, facilitate assessment of the clinical stage, are sensitive parameters of the efficacy of chemotherapy and enable early detection of relapses. In a group of 71 patients with prostate cancer, systematic determination of prostate specific antigen levels proved to be a reliable method of monitoring and a sensitive method of detecting remote metastases. (author). 5 figs., 13 tabs., 23 refs.

  15. F-18 labelled PSMA-1007: biodistribution, radiation dosimetry and histopathological validation of tumor lesions in prostate cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giesel, Frederik L.; Vinsensia, M.; Mier, W.; Haberkorn, U.; Kratochwil, C. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Hadaschik, B.; Radtke, J.; Kesch, C. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Cardinale, J.; Schaefer, M.; Neels, O.C.; Kopka, K. [German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Lehnert, W. [ABX-CRO, Dresden (Germany); Tolstov, Y.; Singer, S. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Section of Molecular Urooncology, Department of Urology, Medical Faculty Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Grabe, N. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Institute of Pathology, Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Medical Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); University of Heidelberg, Hamamatsu Tissue Imaging and Analysis Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Duensing, S. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Section of Molecular Urooncology, Department of Urology, Medical Faculty Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) targeted positron-emitting-tomography (PET) tracer {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 shows great promise in the detection of prostate cancer. However, {sup 68}Ga has several shortcomings as a radiolabel including short half-life and non-ideal energies, and this has motivated consideration of {sup 18}F-labelled analogs. {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007 was selected among several {sup 18}F-PSMA-ligand candidate compounds because it demonstrated high labelling yields, outstanding tumor uptake and fast, non-urinary background clearance. Here, we describe the properties of {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007 in human volunteers and patients. Radiation dosimetry of {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007 was determined in three healthy volunteers who underwent whole-body PET-scans and concomitant blood and urine sampling. Following this, ten patients with high-risk prostate cancer underwent {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007 PET/CT (1 h and 3 h p.i.) and normal organ biodistribution and tumor uptakes were examined. Eight patients underwent prostatectomy with extended pelvic lymphadenectomy. Uptake in intra-prostatic lesions and lymph node metastases were correlated with final histopathology, including PSMA immunostaining. With an effective dose of approximately 4.4-5.5 mSv per 200-250 MBq examination, {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007 behaves similar to other PSMA-PET agents as well as to other {sup 18}F-labelled PET-tracers. In comparison to other PSMA-targeting PET-tracers, {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007 has reduced urinary clearance enabling excellent assessment of the prostate. Similar to {sup 18}F-DCFPyL and with slightly slower clearance kinetics than PSMA-11, favorable tumor-to-background ratios are observed 2-3 h after injection. In eight patients, diagnostic findings were successfully validated by histopathology. {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007 PET/CT detected 18 of 19 lymph node metastases in the pelvis, including nodes as small as 1 mm in diameter. {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007 performs at least comparably to {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11, but its

  16. Prostatic stromal tumor with fatal outcome in a young man: histopathological and immunohistochemical case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piergiuseppe Colombo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Stromal tumors of the prostate are rare and only a few cases have been described in the literature, including exceptional cases of stromal tumors with unknown malignant potential (STUMP and a fatal outcome in young patients. Morphologically distinguishing a STUMP from a stromal sarcoma of the prostate (PSS is still a challenge. We describe the histopathological and immunohistochemical findings in a 34-year-old man with a malignant specialized cell stromal tumor of the prostate that was diagnosed initially as STUMP, and he developed lung metastases within a few months. The patient attended our hospital because of lower urinary tract symptoms, after having excreted tissue through the urethra a few months before. Ultrasonography and urethrocystoscopy examinations showed a mass arising from the verumontanum, and a transurethral resection (TUR revealed a high-grade spindle cell sarcoma reminiscent of a phyllode tumor of the breast. The tumor cells were immunoreactive for vimentin, progesterone receptor and, focally, CD34. The preliminary histo­logical findings were subsequently confirmed after radical prostatectomy. The patient developed bilateral lung metastases and died 25 months after the initial diagnosis. Although rare in young patients, the challenging differential diagnosis of STUMP and PSS means that a prostate STUMP diagnosis made on the basis of biopsy or TUR specimens also requires urethrocystoscopic monitoring for the early detection of any progression to PSS. Radical prostatectomy should also be carefully considered.

  17. Antibody Responses to Prostate-Associated Antigens in Patients with Prostatitis and Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricque, Brett B.; Eickhoff, Jens C.; McNeel, Douglas G.

    2010-01-01

    Background An important focus of tumor immunotherapy has been the identification of appropriate antigenic targets. Serum-based screening approaches have led to the discovery of hundreds of tumor-associated antigens recognized by IgG. Our efforts to identify immunologically recognized proteins in prostate cancer have yielded a multitude of antigens, however prioritizing these antigens as targets for evaluation in immunotherapies has been challenging. In this report, we set out to determine whether the evaluation of multiple antigenic targets would allow the identification of a subset of antigens that are common immunologic targets in patients with prostate cancer. Methods Using a phage immunoblot approach, we evaluated IgG responses in patients with prostate cancer (n=126), patients with chronic prostatitis (n=45), and men without prostate disease (n=53). Results We found that patients with prostate cancer or prostatitis have IgG specific for multiple common antigens. A subset of 23 proteins was identified to which IgG were detected in 38% of patients with prostate cancer and 33% patients with prostatitis versus 6% of controls (pprostate and prostate cancer, and suggest that IgG responses to a panel of commonly recognized prostate antigens could be potentially used in the identification of patients at risk for prostate cancer or as a tool to identify immune responses elicited to prostate tissue. PMID:20632317

  18. Novel epigenetic target therapy for prostate cancer: a preclinical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Naldi

    Full Text Available Epigenetic events are critical contributors to the pathogenesis of cancer, and targeting epigenetic mechanisms represents a novel strategy in anticancer therapy. Classic demethylating agents, such as 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Decitabine, hold the potential for reprograming somatic cancer cells demonstrating high therapeutic efficacy in haematological malignancies. On the other hand, epigenetic treatment of solid tumours often gives rise to undesired cytotoxic side effects. Appropriate delivery systems able to enrich Decitabine at the site of action and improve its bioavailability would reduce the incidence of toxicity on healthy tissues. In this work we provide preclinical evidences of a safe, versatile and efficient targeted epigenetic therapy to treat hormone sensitive (LNCap and hormone refractory (DU145 prostate cancers. A novel Decitabine formulation, based on the use of engineered erythrocyte (Erythro-Magneto-Hemagglutinin Virosomes, EMHVs drug delivery system (DDS carrying this drug, has been refined. Inside the EMHVs, the drug was shielded from the environment and phosphorylated in its active form. The novel magnetic EMHV DDS, endowed with fusogenic protein, improved the stability of the carried drug and exhibited a high efficiency in confining its delivery at the site of action in vivo by applying an external static magnetic field. Here we show that Decitabine loaded into EMHVs induces a significant tumour mass reduction in prostate cancer xenograft models at a concentration, which is seven hundred times lower than the therapeutic dose, suggesting an improved pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of drug. These results are relevant for and discussed in light of developing personalised autologous therapies and innovative clinical approach for the treatment of solid tumours.

  19. Novel epigenetic target therapy for prostate cancer: a preclinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naldi, Ilaria; Taranta, Monia; Gherardini, Lisa; Pelosi, Gualtiero; Viglione, Federica; Grimaldi, Settimio; Pani, Luca; Cinti, Caterina

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic events are critical contributors to the pathogenesis of cancer, and targeting epigenetic mechanisms represents a novel strategy in anticancer therapy. Classic demethylating agents, such as 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Decitabine), hold the potential for reprograming somatic cancer cells demonstrating high therapeutic efficacy in haematological malignancies. On the other hand, epigenetic treatment of solid tumours often gives rise to undesired cytotoxic side effects. Appropriate delivery systems able to enrich Decitabine at the site of action and improve its bioavailability would reduce the incidence of toxicity on healthy tissues. In this work we provide preclinical evidences of a safe, versatile and efficient targeted epigenetic therapy to treat hormone sensitive (LNCap) and hormone refractory (DU145) prostate cancers. A novel Decitabine formulation, based on the use of engineered erythrocyte (Erythro-Magneto-Hemagglutinin Virosomes, EMHVs) drug delivery system (DDS) carrying this drug, has been refined. Inside the EMHVs, the drug was shielded from the environment and phosphorylated in its active form. The novel magnetic EMHV DDS, endowed with fusogenic protein, improved the stability of the carried drug and exhibited a high efficiency in confining its delivery at the site of action in vivo by applying an external static magnetic field. Here we show that Decitabine loaded into EMHVs induces a significant tumour mass reduction in prostate cancer xenograft models at a concentration, which is seven hundred times lower than the therapeutic dose, suggesting an improved pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of drug. These results are relevant for and discussed in light of developing personalised autologous therapies and innovative clinical approach for the treatment of solid tumours.

  20. In vivo Photoacoustic Imaging of Prostate Cancer Using Targeted Contrast Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0242 TITLE: In Vivo Photoacoustic Imaging of Prostate Cancer Using Targeted Contrast Agent PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE In vivo Photoacoustic Imaging of Prostate Cancer Using T argeted Contrast Agent 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0242 5b. GRANT...diagnose prostate cancer based on the near-infrared optical absorption of either endogenous tissue constituents or exogenous contrast agents . Although

  1. Monitoring Prostate Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Ni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (CaP is the most commonly diagnosed and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males in USA. Prostate orthotopic mouse model has been widely used to study human CaP in preclinical settings. Measurement of changes in tumor size obtained from noninvasive diagnostic images is a standard method for monitoring responses to anticancer modalities. This article reports for the first time the usage of a three-dimensional (3D ultrasound system equipped with photoacoustic (PA imaging in monitoring longitudinal prostate tumor growth in a PC-3 orthotopic NODSCID mouse model (n = 8. Two-dimensional and 3D modes of ultrasound show great ability in accurately depicting the size and shape of prostate tumors. PA function on two-dimensional and 3D images showed average oxygen saturation and average hemoglobin concentration of the tumor. Results showed a good fit in representative exponential tumor growth curves (n = 3; r2 = 0.948, 0.955, and 0.953, respectively and a good correlation of tumor volume measurements performed in vivo with autopsy (n = 8, r = 0.95, P < .001. The application of 3D ultrasound imaging proved to be a useful imaging modality in monitoring tumor growth in an orthotopic mouse model, with advantages such as high contrast, uncomplicated protocols, economical equipment, and nonharmfulness to animals. PA mode also enabled display of blood oxygenation surrounding the tumor and tumor vasculature and angiogenesis, making 3D ultrasound imaging an ideal tool for preclinical cancer research.

  2. The miRNA Pull Out Assay as a Method to Validate the miR-28-5p Targets Identified in Other Tumor Contexts in Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzo, Milena; Berti, Gabriele; Russo, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    targets in the pull out sample. We showed that E2F6, TEX-261, MAPK1, MPL, N4BP1, and RAP1B but not BAG1, OTUB1, MAD2L1, and p21 were significantly enriched, suggesting that not all the miR-28-5p targets are regulated by this miRNA in PCa. We then verified whether the miR-28-5p-interacting targets were...

  3. Inhibition of prostate cancer growth using doxorubicin assisted by ultrasound-targeted nanobubble destruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan X

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Xiaozhou Fan,1,* Luofu Wang,2,* Yanli Guo,1 Xingyu Xiong,1 Lianhua Zhu,1 Kejing Fang1 1Department of Ultrasound, Southwest Hospital, 2Department of Urology, Daping Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Ultrasound (US-targeted microbubble destruction has been widely used as an effective drug-delivery system. However, nanobubbles (NBs have better stability and stronger penetration than microbubbles, and drug delivery assisted by US-targeted NB destruction (UTND still needs to be investigated. Our aim was to investigate the effect of doxorubicin (DOX on the inhibition of prostate cancer growth under UTND. Contrast-enhanced US imaging of transplanted PC3 prostate cancer in mice showed that under a combination of 1 W/cm2 US power and a 100 Hz intermittent pulse with a “5 seconds on, 5 seconds off” mode, NBs with an average size of (485.7±33 nm were effectively destroyed within 15 minutes in the tumor location. PC3 cells and 20 tumor-bearing mice were divided into four groups: a DOX group, a DOX + NB group, a DOX + US group, and a DOX + NB + US group. The cell growth-inhibition rate and DOX concentration of xenografts in the DOX + NB + US group were highest. Based on another control group and these four groups, another 25 tumor-bearing mice were used to observe the treatment effect of nine DOX injections under UTND. The xenografts in the DOX + NB + US group decreased more obviously and had more cellular apoptosis than other groups. Finally, electron microscopy was used to estimate the cavitation effect of NBs under US irradiation in the control group, NB group, US group, and NB + US group. The results of scanning electron microscopy showed that PC3 cells in the DOX + NB + US group had more holes and significantly increased cell-surface folds. Meanwhile, transmission electric microscopy confirmed that more lanthanum nitrate particles entered

  4. Differential requirements of androgen receptor in luminal progenitors during prostate regeneration and tumor initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Chee Wai; Epsi, Nusrat J; Leung, Eva Y; Xuan, Shouhong; Lei, Ming; Li, Bo I; Bergren, Sarah K; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Mitrofanova, Antonina

    2018-01-01

    Master regulatory genes of tissue specification play key roles in stem/progenitor cells and are often important in cancer. In the prostate, androgen receptor (AR) is a master regulator essential for development and tumorigenesis, but its specific functions in prostate stem/progenitor cells have not been elucidated. We have investigated AR function in CARNs (CAstration-Resistant Nkx3.1-expressing cells), a luminal stem/progenitor cell that functions in prostate regeneration. Using genetically--engineered mouse models and novel prostate epithelial cell lines, we find that progenitor properties of CARNs are largely unaffected by AR deletion, apart from decreased proliferation in vivo. Furthermore, AR loss suppresses tumor formation after deletion of the Pten tumor suppressor in CARNs; however, combined Pten deletion and activation of oncogenic Kras in AR-deleted CARNs result in tumors with focal neuroendocrine differentiation. Our findings show that AR modulates specific progenitor properties of CARNs, including their ability to serve as a cell of origin for prostate cancer. PMID:29334357

  5. Polymeric micelles as a drug carrier for tumor targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha M Dand

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric micelle can be targeted to tumor site by passive and active mechanism. Some inherent properties of polymeric micelle such as size in nanorange, stability in plasma, longevity in vivo, and pathological characteristics of tumor make polymeric micelles to be targeted at the tumor site by passive mechanism called enhanced permeability and retention effect. Polymeric micelle formed from the amphiphilic block copolymer is suitable for encapsulation of poorly water soluble, hydrophobic anticancer drugs. Other characteristics of polymeric micelles such as separated functionality at the outer shell are useful for targeting the anticancer drug to tumor by active mechanisms. Polymeric micelles can be conjugated with many ligands such as antibodies fragments, epidermal growth factors, α2 -glycoprotein, transferrine, and folate to target micelles to cancer cells. Application of heat and ultrasound are the alternative methods to enhance drug accumulation in tumoral cells. Targeting using micelles can also be done to tumor angiogenesis which is the potentially promising target for anticancer drugs. This review summarizes about recently available information regarding targeting the anticancer drug to the tumor site using polymeric micelles.

  6. Interaction between tumor cell surface receptor RAGE and proteinase 3 mediates prostate cancer metastasis to bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolonin, Mikhail G.; Sergeeva, Anna; Staquicini, Daniela I.; Smith, Tracey L.; Tarleton, Christy A.; Molldrem, Jeffrey J.; Sidman, Richard L.; Marchiò, Serena; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2017-01-01

    Human prostate cancer often metastasizes to bone, but the biological basis for such site-specific tropism remains largely unresolved. Recent work led us to hypothesize that this tropism may reflect pathogenic interactions between RAGE, a cell surface receptor expressed on malignant cells in advanced prostate cancer, and proteinase 3 (PR3), a serine protease present in inflammatory neutrophils and hematopoietic cells within the bone marrow microenvironment. In this study, we establish that RAGE-PR3 interaction mediates homing of prostate cancer cells to the bone marrow. PR3 bound to RAGE on the surface of prostate cancer cells in vitro, inducing tumor cell motility through a non-proteolytic signal transduction cascade involving activation and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK1. In preclinical models of experimental metastasis, ectopic expression of RAGE on human prostate cancer cells was sufficient to promote bone marrow homing within a short time frame. Our findings demonstrate how RAGE-PR3 interactions between human prostate cancer cells and the bone marrow microenvironment mediate bone metastasis during prostate cancer progression, with potential implications for prognosis and therapeutic intervention. PMID:28428279

  7. Tumor target amplification: Implications for nano drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidi, Khaled; Neubauer, Heidi A; Moriggl, Richard; Jahanban-Esfahlan, Rana; Javaheri, Tahereh

    2018-04-10

    Tumor cells overexpress surface markers which are absent from normal cells. These tumor-restricted antigenic signatures are a fundamental basis for distinguishing on-target from off-target cells for ligand-directed targeting of cancer cells. Unfortunately, tumor heterogeneity impedes the establishment of a solid expression pattern for a given target marker, leading to drastic changes in quality (availability) and quantity (number) of the target. Consequently, a subset of cancer cells remains untargeted during the course of treatment, which subsequently promotes drug-resistance and cancer relapse. Since target inefficiency is only problematic for cancer treatment and not for treatment of other pathological conditions such as viral/bacterial infections, target amplification or the generation of novel targets is key to providing eligible antigenic markers for effective targeted therapy. This review summarizes the limitations of current ligand-directed targeting strategies and provides a comprehensive overview of tumor target amplification strategies, including self-amplifying systems, dual targeting, artificial markers and peptide modification. We also discuss the therapeutic and diagnostic potential of these approaches, the underlying mechanism(s) and established methodologies, mostly in the context of different nanodelivery systems, to facilitate more effective ligand-directed cancer cell monitoring and targeting. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Trading in your spindles for blebs: the amoeboid tumor cell phenotype in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Morley

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa remains a principal cause of mortality in developed countries. Because no clinical interventions overcome resistance to androgen ablation therapy, management of castration resistance and metastatic disease remains largely untreatable. Metastasis is a multistep process in which tumor cells lose cell-cell contacts, egress from the primary tumor, intravasate, survive shear stress within the vasculature and extravasate into tissues to colonize ectopic sites. Tumor cells reestablish migratory behaviors employed during nonneoplastic processes such as embryonic development, leukocyte trafficking and wound healing. While mesenchymal motility is an established paradigm of dissemination, an alternate, 'amoeboid' phenotype is increasingly appreciated as relevant to human cancer. Here we discuss characteristics and pathways underlying the phenotype, and highlight our findings that the cytoskeletal regulator DIAPH3 governs the mesenchymal-amoeboid transition. We also describe our identification of a new class of tumor-derived microvesicles, large oncosomes, produced by amoeboid cells and with potential clinical utility in prostate and other cancers.

  9. Evaluation of the effect of prostate volume change on tumor control probability in LDR brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Knaup

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study evaluates low dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR prostate plans to determine the biological effectof dose degradation due to prostate volume changes. Material and methods: In this study, 39 patients were evaluated. Pre-implant prostate volume was determinedusing ultrasound. These images were used with the treatment planning system (Nucletron Spot Pro 3.1® to create treatmentplans using 103Pd seeds. Following the implant, patients were imaged using CT for post-implant dosimetry. Fromthe pre and post-implant DVHs, the biologically equivalent dose and the tumor control probability (TCP were determinedusing the biologically effective uniform dose. The model used RBE = 1.75 and α/β = 2 Gy. Results: The prostate volume changed between pre and post implant image sets ranged from –8% to 110%. TCP andthe mean dose were reduced up to 21% and 56%, respectively. TCP is observed to decrease as the mean dose decreasesto the prostate. The post-implant tumor dose was generally observed to decrease, compared to the planned dose.A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was established. Below this dose, TCP begins to fall-off. It was also determined thatpatients with a small prostates were more likely to suffer TCP decrease. Conclusions: The biological effect of post operative prostate growth due to operative trauma in LDR was evaluatedusing the concept. The post-implant dose was lower than the planned dose due to an increase of prostate volumepost-implant. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was determined, below which TCP begun to decline.

  10. Evaluation of the effect of prostate volume change on tumor control probability in LDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaup, Courtney; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Stathakis, Sotirios; Smith, Mark; Swanson, Gregory; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluates low dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR) prostate plans to determine the biological effect of dose degradation due to prostate volume changes. In this study, 39 patients were evaluated. Pre-implant prostate volume was determined using ultrasound. These images were used with the treatment planning system (Nucletron Spot Pro 3.1(®)) to create treatment plans using (103)Pd seeds. Following the implant, patients were imaged using CT for post-implant dosimetry. From the pre and post-implant DVHs, the biologically equivalent dose and the tumor control probability (TCP) were determined using the biologically effective uniform dose. The model used RBE = 1.75 and α/β = 2 Gy. The prostate volume changed between pre and post implant image sets ranged from -8% to 110%. TCP and the mean dose were reduced up to 21% and 56%, respectively. TCP is observed to decrease as the mean dose decreases to the prostate. The post-implant tumor dose was generally observed to decrease, compared to the planned dose. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was established. Below this dose, TCP begins to fall-off. It was also determined that patients with a small prostates were more likely to suffer TCP decrease. The biological effect of post operative prostate growth due to operative trauma in LDR was evaluated using the concept. The post-implant dose was lower than the planned dose due to an increase of prostate volume post-implant. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was determined, below which TCP begun to decline.

  11. Prostatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostatitis Overview Prostatitis is swelling and inflammation of the prostate gland, a walnut-sized gland situated directly below the bladder in ... produces fluid (semen) that nourishes and transports sperm. Prostatitis often causes painful or difficult urination. Other symptoms ...

  12. Pterostilbene acts through metastasis-associated protein 1 to inhibit tumor growth, progression and metastasis in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Li

    Full Text Available The development of natural product agents with targeted strategies holds promise for enhanced anticancer therapy with reduced drug-associated side effects. Resveratrol found in red wine, has anticancer activity in various tumor types. We reported earlier on a new molecular target of resveratrol, the metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1, which is a part of nucleosome remodeling and deacetylation (NuRD co-repressor complex that mediates gene silencing. We identified resveratrol as a regulator of MTA1/NuRD complex and re-activator of p53 acetylation in prostate cancer (PCa. In the current study, we addressed whether resveratrol analogues also possess the ability to inhibit MTA1 and to reverse p53 deacetylation. We demonstrated that pterostilbene (PTER, found in blueberries, had greater increase in MTA1-mediated p53 acetylation, confirming superior potency over resveratrol as dietary epigenetic agent. In orthotopic PCa xenografts, resveratrol and PTER significantly inhibited tumor growth, progression, local invasion and spontaneous metastasis. Furthermore, MTA1-knockdown sensitized cells to these agents resulting in additional reduction of tumor progression and metastasis. The reduction was dependent on MTA1 signaling showing increased p53 acetylation, higher apoptotic index and less angiogenesis in vivo in all xenografts treated with the compounds, and particularly with PTER. Altogether, our results indicate MTA1 as a major contributor in prostate tumor malignant progression, and support the use of strategies targeting MTA1. Our strong pre-clinical data indicate PTER as a potent, selective and pharmacologically safe natural product that may be tested in advanced PCa.

  13. Drug targeting to tumors: principles, pitfalls and (pre-) clinical progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria; Kiessling, F.; Hennink, W.E.; Storm, Gerrit

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Many different systems and strategies have been evaluated for drug targeting to tumors over the years. Routinely used systems include liposomes, polymers, micelles, nanoparticles and antibodies, and examples of strategies are passive drug targeting, active drug targeting to cancer cells,

  14. A novel IgE antibody targeting the prostate-specific antigen as a potential prostate cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels-Wells, Tracy R; Nicodemus, Christopher F; Penichet, Manuel L; Helguera, Gustavo; Leuchter, Richard K; Quintero, Rafaela; Kozman, Maggie; Rodríguez, José A; Ortiz-Sánchez, Elizabeth; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Schultes, Birgit C

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men in the United States. The prostate-specific antigen (PSA), often found at high levels in the serum of PCa patients, has been used as a marker for PCa detection and as a target of immunotherapy. The murine IgG1 monoclonal antibody AR47.47, specific for human PSA, has been shown to enhance antigen presentation by human dendritic cells and induce both CD4 and CD8 T-cell activation when complexed with PSA. In this study, we explored the properties of a novel mouse/human chimeric anti-PSA IgE containing the variable regions of AR47.47 as a potential therapy for PCa. Our goal was to take advantage of the unique properties of IgE in order to trigger immune activation against PCa. Binding characteristics of the antibody were determined by ELISA and flow cytometry. In vitro degranulation was determined by the release of β-hexosaminidase from effector cells. In vivo degranulation was monitored in human FcεRIα transgenic mice using the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis assay. These mice were also used for a vaccination study to determine the in vivo anti-cancer effects of this antibody. Significant differences in survival were determined using the Log Rank test. In vitro T-cell activation was studied using human dendritic cells and autologous T cells. The anti-PSA IgE, expressed in murine myeloma cells, is properly assembled and secreted, and binds the antigen and FcεRI. In addition, this antibody is capable of triggering effector cell degranulation in vitro and in vivo when artificially cross-linked, but not in the presence of the natural soluble antigen, suggesting that such an interaction will not trigger systemic anaphylaxis. Importantly, the anti-PSA IgE combined with PSA also triggers immune activation in vitro and in vivo and significantly prolongs the survival of human FcεRIα transgenic mice challenged with PSA-expressing tumors in a prophylactic vaccination setting. The anti-PSA IgE exhibits

  15. Integrated nanotechnology platform for tumor-targeted multimodal imaging and therapeutic cargo release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Hitomi; Dobroff, Andrey S; Driessen, Wouter H P; Cristini, Vittorio; Brinker, Lina M; Staquicini, Fernanda I; Cardó-Vila, Marina; D'Angelo, Sara; Ferrara, Fortunato; Proneth, Bettina; Lin, Yu-Shen; Dunphy, Darren R; Dogra, Prashant; Melancon, Marites P; Stafford, R Jason; Miyazono, Kohei; Gelovani, Juri G; Kataoka, Kazunori; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Sidman, Richard L; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2016-02-16

    A major challenge of targeted molecular imaging and drug delivery in cancer is establishing a functional combination of ligand-directed cargo with a triggered release system. Here we develop a hydrogel-based nanotechnology platform that integrates tumor targeting, photon-to-heat conversion, and triggered drug delivery within a single nanostructure to enable multimodal imaging and controlled release of therapeutic cargo. In proof-of-concept experiments, we show a broad range of ligand peptide-based applications with phage particles, heat-sensitive liposomes, or mesoporous silica nanoparticles that self-assemble into a hydrogel for tumor-targeted drug delivery. Because nanoparticles pack densely within the nanocarrier, their surface plasmon resonance shifts to near-infrared, thereby enabling a laser-mediated photothermal mechanism of cargo release. We demonstrate both noninvasive imaging and targeted drug delivery in preclinical mouse models of breast and prostate cancer. Finally, we applied mathematical modeling to predict and confirm tumor targeting and drug delivery. These results are meaningful steps toward the design and initial translation of an enabling nanotechnology platform with potential for broad clinical applications.

  16. 1H-MRSI of prostate cancer: The relationship between metabolite ratio and tumor proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xizhen; Wang Bin; Gao Zhiqin; Liu Jingang; Liu Zuoqin; Niu Qingliang; Sun Zhenkui; Yuan Yuxiao

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether 1H-MRSI can be used to predict the proliferative activity of prostate cancer. Materials and methods: Thirty-eight patients with prostate cancer (PCa) and thirty-three patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) were included in this study. Patients were examined in supine position using a 1.5 T superconducting magnetic scanner equipped with a pelvic phased-array multi-coil and CSI-3D-PROSTATE sequence. Commercial software was used to acquire and process MR spectroscopic imaging data. Mean (Cho + Cr)/Cit ratios of PCa, BPH, and peripheral zone (PZ) were calculated. Cellularity of PCa was recorded based on hematoxylin and eosin staining. PCNA was detected using immunohistochemical techniques. Results: The mean (Cho + Cr)/Cit ratio of the peripheral zone (0.38 ± 0.09) was lower than that of BPH (0.51 ± 0.19) (P < 0.05). The average value of (Cho + Cr)/Cit ratio of prostate cancer was 3.98 ± 0.12. The (Cho + Cr)/Cit ratio of prostate cancer was higher than that of the peripheral zone and BPH (P < 0.05). The cellularity and PCNA LI of prostate cancer were 12.90 ± 4.07% and 72.1 ± 19.01%, respectively. The (Cho + Cr)/Cit ratio of prostate cancer positively correlated with tumor cellularity (r = 0.582, P = 0.027) and PCNA LI (r = 0.495, P = 0.022). Conclusion: The (Cho + Cr)/Cit ratio of PCa can reveal the differences in proliferative activity between PCa and BPH. MRSIs are therefore able to predict the proliferative rate of variously differentiated prostate cancers.

  17. Molecular assays for the detection of prostate tumor derived nucleic acids in peripheral blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinnunen Martin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in American men. Although serum PSA testing is widely used for early detection, more specific prognostic tests are needed to guide treatment decisions. Recently, the enumeration of circulating prostate epithelial cells has been shown to correlate with disease recurrence and metastasis following definitive treatment. The purpose of our study was to investigate an immunomagnetic fractionation procedure to enrich circulating prostate tumor cells (CTCs from peripheral blood specimens, and to apply amplified molecular assays for the detection of prostate-specific markers (PSA, PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusion mRNAs. Results As few as five prostate cancer cells were detected per 5 mL of whole blood in model system experiments using anti-EpCAM magnetic particles alone or in combination with anti-PSMA magnetic particles. In our experiments, anti-EpCAM magnetic particles alone exhibited equivalent or better analytical performance with patient samples compared to a combination of anti-EpCAM + anti-PSMA magnetic particles. Up to 39% of men with advanced prostate cancer tested positive with one or more of the molecular assays tested, whereas control samples from men with benign prostate hyperplasia gave consistently negative results as expected. Interestingly, for the vast majority of men who tested positive for PSA mRNA following CTC enrichment, their matched plasma samples also tested positive, although CTC enrichment gave higher overall mRNA copy numbers. Conclusion CTCs were successfully enriched and detected in men with advanced prostate cancer using an immunomagnetic enrichment procedure coupled with amplified molecular assays for PSA, PCA3, and TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusion mRNAs. Our results indicate that men who test positive following CTC enrichment also exhibit higher detectable levels of non-cellular, circulating prostate-specific mRNAs.

  18. The novel tumor-suppressor Mel-18 in prostate cancer: its functional polymorphism, expression and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yuasa, Takeshi; Tsuchiya, Norihiko; Ma, Zhiyong; Maita, Shinya; Narita, Shintaro; Kumazawa, Teruaki; Inoue, Takamitsu; Tsuruta, Hiroshi; Horikawa, Yohei; Saito, Mitsuru; Hu, Weilie; Ogawa, Osamu; Habuchi, Tomonori

    2009-12-15

    Mel-18 is a member of the polycomb group (PcG) proteins, which are chromatin regulatory factors and play important roles in development and oncogenesis. This study was designed to investigate the clinical and prognostic significance of Mel-18 in patients with prostate cancer. A total of 539 native Japanese subjects consisting of 393 prostate cancer patients and 146 controls were enrolled in this study. Mel-18 genotyping was analyzed using a PCR-RFLP method and an automated sequencer using the GENESCAN software. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Mel-18 expression was diminished in high grade and high stage prostate cancers. Moreover, patients with positive Mel-18 expression had significantly longer PSA recurrence-free survival than patients negative for Mel-18 expression (p=0.038). A Mel-18 1805A/G SNP was located in the 3' untranslated region and was predicted to alter the secondary structure of the mRNA. Mel-18 mRNA expression of the 1805A allele was clearly higher than expression of the 1805G allele by allele specific quantitative RT-PCR. In multivariate analysis, a homozygous G allele genotype and negative Mel-18 expression were independent risk factors predicting high PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy, with HRs of 2.757 (p=0.022) and 2.271 (p=0.045), respectively. Moreover, the G allele was also an independent predictor of poor cancer-specific survival with an HR of 4.658 (p=0.019) for patients with stage D2 prostate cancer. This is the first study to provide important evidence demonstrating that Mel-18 is a tumor suppressor and possible therapeutic target, as well as a diagnostic marker for poor prognosis in prostate cancer patients. Copyright (c) 2009 UICC.

  19. RNAi-mediated knockdown of pituitary tumor-transforming gene-1 (PTTG1) suppresses the proliferation and invasive potential of PC3 human prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, S.Q.; Liao, Q.J.; Wang, X.W.; Xin, D.Q.; Chen, S.X.; Wu, Q.J.; Ye, G.

    2012-01-01

    Pituitary tumor-transforming gene-1 (PTTG1) is a proto-oncogene that promotes tumorigenesis and metastasis in numerous cell types and is overexpressed in a variety of human tumors. We have demonstrated that PTTG1 expression was up-regulated in both human prostate cancer specimens and prostate cancer cell lines. For a more direct assessment of the function of PTTG1 in prostate tumorigenesis, RNAi-mediated knockdown was used to selectively decrease PTTG1 expression in PC3 human prostate tumor cells. After three weeks of selection, colonies stably transfected with PTTG1-targeted RNAi (the knockdown PC3 cell line) or empty vector (the control PC3 cell line) were selected and expanded to investigate the role of PTTG1 expression in PC3 cell growth and invasion. Cell proliferation rate was significantly slower (28%) in the PTTG1 knockdown line after 6 days of growth as indicated by an MTT cell viability assay (P < 0.05). Similarly, a soft agar colony formation assay revealed significantly fewer (66.7%) PTTG1 knockdown PC3 cell colonies than control colonies after three weeks of growth. In addition, PTTG1 knockdown resulted in cell cycle arrest at G1 as indicated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The PTTG1 knockdown PC3 cell line also exhibited significantly reduced migration through Matrigel in a transwell assay of invasive potential, and down-regulation of PTTG1 could lead to increased sensitivity of these prostate cancer cells to a commonly used anticancer drug, taxol. Thus, PTTG1 expression is crucial for PC3 cell proliferation and invasion, and could be a promising new target for prostate cancer therapy

  20. Progress of radiolabelled bombesin in diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Yan; Zhao Jihua

    2010-01-01

    Studies show that high expression of bombesin exist in the face of many kind of tumors such as prostate cancer, so bombesin and its receptor can be used as target in radionuclide receptor imaging and targeted therapy of tumor, and become the focus of prostate cancer research. This article reviews the progress of radiolabelled bombesin in prostate cancer imaging and therapy. (authors)

  1. In silico mining identifies IGFBP3 as a novel target of methylation in prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Perry, A S

    2007-05-21

    Promoter hypermethylation is central in deregulating gene expression in cancer. Identification of novel methylation targets in specific cancers provides a basis for their use as biomarkers of disease occurrence and progression. We developed an in silico strategy to globally identify potential targets of promoter hypermethylation in prostate cancer by screening for 5\\' CpG islands in 631 genes that were reported as downregulated in prostate cancer. A virtual archive of 338 potential targets of methylation was produced. One candidate, IGFBP3, was selected for investigation, along with glutathione-S-transferase pi (GSTP1), a well-known methylation target in prostate cancer. Methylation of IGFBP3 was detected by quantitative methylation-specific PCR in 49\\/79 primary prostate adenocarcinoma and 7\\/14 adjacent preinvasive high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, but in only 5\\/37 benign prostatic hyperplasia (P < 0.0001) and in 0\\/39 histologically normal adjacent prostate tissue, which implies that methylation of IGFBP3 may be involved in the early stages of prostate cancer development. Hypermethylation of IGFBP3 was only detected in samples that also demonstrated methylation of GSTP1 and was also correlated with Gleason score > or =7 (P=0.01), indicating that it has potential as a prognostic marker. In addition, pharmacological demethylation induced strong expression of IGFBP3 in LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Our concept of a methylation candidate gene bank was successful in identifying a novel target of frequent hypermethylation in early-stage prostate cancer. Evaluation of further relevant genes could contribute towards a methylation signature of this disease.

  2. Increasing Early Detection of Prostate Cancer in African American Men through a Culturally Targeted Print Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    and brittle bones . 8 INFORM YOUR DOCTOR Certain activities, conditions, and substances can also affect PSA levels, including: • medicines (such as...Growth rates for this type of cancer can vary. Studies have shown that prostate tumors grow at different rates in different people . While some...This is one reason why early detection may be important. • When the cancer spreads beyond the prostate, it becomes more difficult to manage and the

  3. Drug targeting to tumors: principles, pitfalls and (pre-) clinical progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Twan; Kiessling, Fabian; Hennink, Wim E; Storm, Gert

    2012-07-20

    Many different systems and strategies have been evaluated for drug targeting to tumors over the years. Routinely used systems include liposomes, polymers, micelles, nanoparticles and antibodies, and examples of strategies are passive drug targeting, active drug targeting to cancer cells, active drug targeting to endothelial cells and triggered drug delivery. Significant progress has been made in this area of research both at the preclinical and at the clinical level, and a number of (primarily passively tumor-targeted) nanomedicine formulations have been approved for clinical use. Significant progress has also been made with regard to better understanding the (patho-) physiological principles of drug targeting to tumors. This has led to the identification of several important pitfalls in tumor-targeted drug delivery, including I) overinterpretation of the EPR effect; II) poor tumor and tissue penetration of nanomedicines; III) misunderstanding of the potential usefulness of active drug targeting; IV) irrational formulation design, based on materials which are too complex and not broadly applicable; V) insufficient incorporation of nanomedicine formulations in clinically relevant combination regimens; VI) negligence of the notion that the highest medical need relates to metastasis, and not to solid tumor treatment; VII) insufficient integration of non-invasive imaging techniques and theranostics, which could be used to personalize nanomedicine-based therapeutic interventions; and VIII) lack of (efficacy analyses in) proper animal models, which are physiologically more relevant and more predictive for the clinical situation. These insights strongly suggest that besides making ever more nanomedicine formulations, future efforts should also address some of the conceptual drawbacks of drug targeting to tumors, and that strategies should be developed to overcome these shortcomings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Prostate stem cell antigen-targeted nanoparticles with dual functional properties: in vivo imaging and cancer chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao X

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Xin Gao,1,* Yun Luo,1,* Yuanyuan Wang,1,* Jun Pang,1 Chengde Liao,2 Hanlun Lu,3 Youqiang Fang11Department of Urology, The Third Affiliated Hospital, 2Department of Radiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, 3Materials Science Institute of Zhongshan University, Guangzhou, China*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: We designed dual-functional nanoparticles for in vivo application using a modified electrostatic and covalent layer-by-layer assembly strategy to address the challenge of assessment and treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer.Methods: Core-shell nanoparticles were formulated by integrating three distinct functional components, ie, a core constituted by poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid, docetaxel, and hydrophobic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals (SPIONs, a multilayer shell formed by poly(allylamine hydrochloride and two different sized poly(ethylene glycol molecules, and a single-chain prostate stem cell antigen antibody conjugated to the nanoparticle surface for targeted delivery.Results: Drug release profiles indicated that the dual-function nanoparticles had a sustained release pattern over 764 hours, and SPIONs could facilitate the controlled release of the drug in vitro. The nanoparticles showed increased antitumor efficiency and enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in vitro through targeted delivery of docetaxel and SPIONs to PC3M cells. Moreover, in nude mice bearing PC3M xenografts, the nanoparticles provided MRI negative contrast enhancement, as well as halting and even reversing tumor growth during the 76-day study duration, and without significant systemic toxicity. The lifespan of the mice treated with these targeted dual-function nanoparticles was significantly increased (Chi-square = 22.514, P < 0.0001.Conclusion: This dual-function nanomedical platform may be a promising candidate for tumor imaging and targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents in vivo

  5. Untapped Therapeutic Targets in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    that harbors the resistant cancer cells is simultaneously targeted. Since activated carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) have a prominent role in...epithelial cells (IOSE) or HEYA8 epithelial ovarian cancer cells (EOC) using a Transwell membrane. Inverse -log2 values of the Robust Multi-array Average...barrier for drug transport. Thus, simultaneous targeting of CAFs and cancer cells may be necessary for chemotherapeutic accessibility. To identify

  6. Expression of immunosuppresive B7-H3 ligand by hormone-treated prostate cancer tumors and metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavin, Grant; Sheinin, Yuri; Crispen, Paul L; Boorjian, Stephen A; Roth, Timothy J; Rangel, Laureano; Blute, Michael L; Sebo, Thomas J; Tindall, Don J; Kwon, Eugene D; Karnes, R Jeffrey

    2009-03-15

    Prostate cancer cells uniformly express the immune cell inhibitory B7-H3 ligand. Enhanced B7-H3 expression correlates with increased disease progression and cancer-specific death after radical prostatectomy (RP). To further assess whether B7-H3 expression is hormone regulated and persists as a viable target during (or after) androgen-ablative therapy, we examined B7-H3 ligand expression within primary and metastatic cancer lesions in response to neoadjuvant hormone therapy (NHT) or palliative hormone deprivation. Tumor B7-H3 in RP specimens from men treated with >/=3 months of NHT was compared with B7-H3 in tumors from matched patients who received no therapy before RP. Hormone-treated and untreated metastatic lesions involving bone were also compared for levels of B7-H3 expression. Of 165 consecutive RP specimens in each cohort studied, sufficient tissues were available for 148 patients (89.7%) treated with NHT versus 127 patients (77.0%) treated with surgery alone. B7-H3 was expressed in 142 (95.9%) tumors from NHT patients compared with 122 (96.0%) tumors from patients treated with surgery alone (P = 0.91). B7-H3 expression intensity in RP specimens was not affected by NHT (P = 0.12). Bone metastases from 11 (32.4%) untreated and 23 (67.6%) androgen-ablated patients revealed that B7-H3 expression increased in response to hormone therapy (P = 0.04) relative to untreated lesions. Taken together, B7-H3 expression seems to remain stable (or may even increase) in response to hormone therapy. As such, B7-H3 may represent an attractive target to improve treatment of men with high-risk hormone-treated or refractory prostate cancer.

  7. Elemental mapping by synchrotron radiation X-Ray microfluorescence in cellular spheroid of prostate tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, R.G.; Anjos, M.J.; Lopes, R.T., E-mail: roberta@lin.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Santos, C.A.N. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia; Palumbo Junior, A.; Souza, P.A.V.R.; Nasciutti, L.E. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas; Pereira, G.R. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ensaios Nao Destrutivos, Corrosao e Soldagem

    2013-08-15

    Prostate cancer is the sixth most common type of cancer and the third most common in males in Western industrialized countries. Cellular spheroid serves as excellent physiologic tumor models as they mimic avascular tumors and micrometastases. Trace elements play a significant role in biological processes. They are capable of affecting human health by competing with essential elements for available binding sites and by the activation or inhibition of reactions between metabolic enzymes. It is well known that zinc levels in the peripheral zone of dorsal and lateral lobes of the prostate are almost 10 times higher than in other soft tissues. Prostate tumor cells were isolated of the prostate tissue samples that were collected from patients submitted to surgery. The measurements were performed in XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (LNLS) in Campinas, Brazil. The results showed that all elements were heterogeneously distributed in different areas of the spheroids analyzed. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed while K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution. In all spheroids analyzed, Zn presented more intense distributions in the central region of the spheroid. The relationship between the function of Zn in the secretory epithelial cells and the carcinogenic process suggests that more studies on elemental mapping in spheroids are necessary. (author)

  8. Origin of Androgen-Insensitive Poorly Differentiated Tumors in the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy J. Huss

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Following castration, the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP model demonstrates rapid development of SV40-Tag-driven poorly differentiated tumors that express neuroendocrine cell markers. The cell population dynamics within the prostates of castrated TRAMP mice were characterized by analyzing the incorporation of 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd and the expression of SV40-Tag, synaptophysin, and androgen receptor (AR. Fourteen days postcastration, the remaining epithelial cells and adenocarcinoma cells were nonproliferative and lacked detectable SV40-Tag or synaptophysin expression. In contrast, morphologically distinct intraglandular foci were identified which expressed SV40-Tag, synaptophysin, and Ki67, but that lacked AR expression. These proliferative SV40-Tag and synaptophysin-expressing intraglandular foci were associated with the rare BrdUrd-retaining cells. These foci expanded rapidly in the postcastration prostate environment, in contrast to the AR- and SV40-Tag-expressing adenocarcinoma cells that lost SV40-Tag expression and underwent apoptosis after castration. Intraglandular foci of synaptophysin-expressing cells were also observed in the prostates of intact TRAMP mice at a comparable frequency; however, they did not progress to rapidly expanding tumors until much later in the life of the mice. This suggests that the foci of neuroendocrine-like cells that express SV40-Tag and synaptophysin, but lack AR, arise independent of androgen-deprivation and represent the source of the poorly differentiated tumors that are the lethal phenotype in the TRAMP model.

  9. Elemental mapping by synchrotron radiation X-Ray microfluorescence in cellular spheroid of prostate tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitao, R.G.; Anjos, M.J.; Lopes, R.T.; Santos, C.A.N.; Palumbo Junior, A.; Souza, P.A.V.R.; Nasciutti, L.E.; Pereira, G.R.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the sixth most common type of cancer and the third most common in males in Western industrialized countries. Cellular spheroid serves as excellent physiologic tumor models as they mimic avascular tumors and micrometastases. Trace elements play a significant role in biological processes. They are capable of affecting human health by competing with essential elements for available binding sites and by the activation or inhibition of reactions between metabolic enzymes. It is well known that zinc levels in the peripheral zone of dorsal and lateral lobes of the prostate are almost 10 times higher than in other soft tissues. Prostate tumor cells were isolated of the prostate tissue samples that were collected from patients submitted to surgery. The measurements were performed in XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (LNLS) in Campinas, Brazil. The results showed that all elements were heterogeneously distributed in different areas of the spheroids analyzed. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed while K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution. In all spheroids analyzed, Zn presented more intense distributions in the central region of the spheroid. The relationship between the function of Zn in the secretory epithelial cells and the carcinogenic process suggests that more studies on elemental mapping in spheroids are necessary. (author)

  10. Beyond Seed and Soil: Understanding and Targeting Metastatic Prostate Cancer; Report From the 2016 Coffey-Holden Prostate Cancer Academy Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahira, Andrea K; Roychowdhury, Sameek; Goswami, Sangeeta; Ippolito, Joseph E; Priceman, Saul J; Pritchard, Colin C; Sfanos, Karen S; Subudhi, Sumit K; Simons, Jonathan W; Pienta, Kenneth J; Soule, Howard R

    2017-02-01

    The 2016 Coffey-Holden Prostate Cancer Academy (CHPCA) Meeting, "Beyond Seed and Soil: Understanding and Targeting Metastatic Prostate Cancer," was held from June 23 to June 26, 2016, in Coronado, California. For the 4th year in a row, the Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) hosted the CHPCA Meeting, a think tank-structured scientific conference, which focuses on a specific topic of critical unmet need on the biology and treatment of advanced prostate cancer. The 2016 CHPCA Meeting was attended by 71 investigators from prostate cancer and other fields, who discussed the biology, study methodologies, treatment strategies, and critical unmet needs concerning metastatic prostate cancer, with the ultimate goal of advancing strategies to treat and eliminate this disease. The major topics of discussion included: the molecular landscape and molecular heterogeneity of metastatic prostate cancer, the role of the metastatic microenvironment, optimizing immunotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer, learning from exceptional responders and non-responders, targeting DNA repair deficiency in advanced prostate cancer, developing and applying novel biomarkers and imaging techniques, and potential roles for the microbiome in prostate cancer. This article reviews the topics presented and discussions held at the CHPCA Meeting, with a focus on the unknowns and next steps needed to advance our understanding of the biology and most effective treatment strategies for metastatic prostate cancer. Prostate 77:123-144, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Cannabinoid Receptors: A Novel Target for Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mukhtar, Hasan; Afaq, Farrukh; Sarfaraz, Sami

    2008-01-01

    We have shown that the expression levels of both cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 are higher in human prostate cancer cells than in normal prostate epithelial cells and treatment of LNCaP cells with WIN-55,212-2 (WIN...

  12. Cannabinoid Receptors: A Novel Target for Treating Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mukhtar, Hasan; Afaq, Farrukh; Sarfaraz, Sami

    2006-01-01

    Recently we have shown that expression levels of both cannabinoid receptors CB and CB12 are higher in human prostate cancer cells than in normal prostate epithelial cells and treatment of LNCaP cells with WIN-55,212-2...

  13. Cannabinoid Receptors: A Novel Target for Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mukhtar, Hasan; Afaq, Farrukh; Sarfaraz, Sami

    2007-01-01

    .... We have shown that the expression levels of both cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 are higher in human prostate cancer cells than in normal prostate epithelial cells and treatment of LNCaP cells with WIN-55,212-2 (WIN...

  14. Cannabinoid Receptors: A Novel Target for Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mukhtar, Hasan; Afaq, Farrukh; Sarfaraz, Sami

    2005-01-01

    .... Here we show that expression levels of both cannabinoid receptors CB(sub 1) and CB(sub 2) are significantly higher in CA-HPV-10 and other human prostate cells LNCaP, DUI45, PC3, and CWR22RV1 than in human prostate epithelial and PZ-HPV-7 cells...

  15. Suggestion for the prostatic fossa clinical target volume in adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy after a radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jun Su; Park, Won; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Park, Byung Kwan; Park, Sung Yoon; Choi, Han Yong; Lee, Hyun Moo; Jeon, Seong Soo; Seo, Seong Il; Jeong, Byong Chang; Jeon, Hwang Gyun

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: To assess the location of recurrent tumors and suggest the optimal target volume in adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy (RT) after a radical prostatectomy (RP). Material and methods: From January 2000 to December 2012, 113 patients had been diagnosed with suspected recurrent prostate cancer by MRI scan and received salvage RT in the Samsung Medical Center. This study assessed the location of the suspected tumor recurrences and used the inferior border of the pubic symphysis as a point of reference. Results: There were 118 suspect tumor recurrences. The most common site of recurrence was the anastomotic site (78.8%), followed by the bladder neck (15.3%) and retrovesical area (5.9%). In the cranial direction, 106 (87.3%) lesions were located within 30 mm of the reference point. In the caudal direction, 12 lesions (10.2%) were located below the reference point. In the transverse plane, 112 lesions (94.9%) were located within 10 mm of the midline. Conclusions: A MRI scan acquired before salvage RT is useful for the localization of recurrent tumors and the delineation of the target volume. We suggest the optimal target volume in adjuvant or salvage RT after RP, which includes 97% of suspected tumor recurrences

  16. [Epigenetics of prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiao-Ming; Zhou, Wen-Quan

    2010-07-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in males, and its etiology and pathogenesis remain unclear. Epigenesis is involved in prostate cancer at all stages of the process, and closely related with its growth and metastasis. DNA methylation and histone modification are the most important manifestations of epigenetics in prostate cancer. The mechanisms of carcinogenesis of DNA methylation include whole-genome hypomethylation, aberrant local hypermethylation of promoters and genomic instability. DNA methylation is closely related to the process of prostate cancer, as in DNA damage repair, hormone response, tumor cell invasion/metastasis, cell cycle regulation, and so on. Histone modification causes corresponding changes in chromosome structure and the level of gene transcription, and it may affect the cycle, differentiation and apoptosis of cells, resulting in prostate cancer. Some therapies have been developed targeting the epigenetic changes in prostate cancer, including DNA methyltransferases and histone deacetylase inhibitors, and have achieved certain desirable results.

  17. Molecular Targets for Radiation Oncology in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Tao; Languino, Lucia R.; Lian, Jane; Stein, Gary; Blute, Michael; FitzGerald, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Recent selected developments of the molecular science of prostate cancer (PrCa) biology and radiation oncology are reviewed. We present potential targets for molecular integration treatment strategies with radiation therapy (RT), and highlight potential strategies for molecular treatment in combination with RT for patient care. We provide a synopsis of the information to date regarding molecular biology of PrCa, and potential integrated research strategy for improved treatment of PrCa. Many patients with early-stage disease at presentation can be treated effectively with androgen ablation treatment, surgery, or RT. However, a significant portion of men are diagnosed with advanced stage/high-risk disease and these patients progress despite curative therapeutic intervention. Unfortunately, management options for these patients are limited and are not always successful including treatment for hormone refractory disease. In this review, we focus on molecules of extracellular matrix component, apoptosis, androgen receptor, RUNX, and DNA methylation. Expanding our knowledge of the molecular biology of PrCa will permit the development of novel treatment strategies integrated with RT to improve patient outcome

  18. Growth and Progression of TRAMP Prostate Tumors in Relationship to Diet and Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa J. L. Bonorden

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To clarify effects of diet and body weight on prostate cancer development, three studies were undertaken using the TRAMP mouse model of this disease. In the first experiment, obesity was induced by injection of gold thioglucose (GTG. Age of prostate tumor detection (~33 wk and death (~43 wk was not significantly different among the groups. In the second study, TRAMP-C2 cells were injected into syngeneic C57BL6 mice and tumor progression was evaluated in mice fed either high-fat or low-fat diets. The high fat fed mice had larger tumors than did the low-fat fed mice. In the third study, tumor development was followed in TRAMP mice fed a high fat diet from 6 weeks of age. There were no significant effects of body weight status or diet on tumor development among the groups. When the tumors were examined for the neuroendocrine marker synaptophysin, there was no correlation with either body weight or diet. However, there was a significant correlation of the expression of synaptophysin with earlier age to tumor detection and death. In summary, TRAMP-C2 cells grew faster when the mice were fed a high-fat diet. Further synaptophysin may be a marker of poor prognosis independent of weight and diet.

  19. Phenotypic characterization of telomerase-immortalized primary non-malignant and malignant tumor-derived human prostate epithelial cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Yongpeng; Li Hongzhen; Miki, Jun; Kim, Kee-Hong; Furusato, Bungo; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Chu, Wei-Sing; McLeod, David G.; Srivastava, Shiv; Ewing, Charles M.; Isaacs, William B.; Rhim, Johng S.

    2006-01-01

    In vitro human prostate cell culture models are critical for clarifying the mechanism of prostate cancer progression and for testing preventive and therapeutic agents. Cell lines ideal for the study of human primary prostate tumors would be those derived from spontaneously immortalized tumor cells; unfortunately, explanted primary prostate cells survive only short-term in culture, and rarely immortalize spontaneously. Therefore, we recently have generated five immortal human prostate epithelial cell cultures derived from both the benign and malignant tissues of prostate cancer patients with telomerase, a gene that prevents cellular senescence. Examination of these cell lines for their morphologies and proliferative capacities, their abilities to grow in low serum, to respond to androgen stimulation, to grow above the agar layer, to form tumors in SCID mice, suggests that they may serve as valid, useful tools for the elucidation of early events in prostate tumorigenesis. Furthermore, the chromosome alterations observed in these immortalized cell lines expressing aspects of the malignant phenotypes imply that these cell lines accurately recapitulate the genetic composition of primary tumors. These novel in vitro models may offer unique models for the study of prostate carcinogenesis and also provide the means for testing both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents

  20. Active targeting of tumor cells using light emitting bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Sung Min; Min, Jung Joon; Hong, Yeong Jin; Kim, Hyun Ju; Le, Uuenchi N.; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Song, Ho Chun; Heo, Young Jun; Bom, Hee Seung; Choy, Hyon E

    2004-01-01

    The presence of bacteria and viruses in human tumors has been recognized for more than 50 years. Today, with the discovery of bacterial strains that specifically target tumors, and aided by genomic sequencing and genetic engineering, there is new interest in the use of bacteria as tumor vectors. Here, we show that bacteria injected intravenously into live animals entered and replicated in solid tumors and metastases using the novel imaging technology of biophotonics. Bioluminescence operon (LuxCDABE) or fluorescence protein, GFP) has been cloned into pUC19 plasmid to engineer pUC19lux or pUC19gfp. Engineered plasmid was transformed into different kinds of wild type (MG1655) or mutant E. coli (DH5, ppGpp, fnr, purE, crpA, flagella, etc.) strains to construct light emitting bacteria. Xenograft tumor model has been established using CT26 colon cancer cell line. Light emitting bacteria was injected via tail vein into tumor bearing mouse. In vivo bioluminescence imaging has been done after 20 min to 14 days of bacterial injection. We observed localization of tumors by light-emitting E. coli in tumor (CT-26) bearing mice. We confirmed the presence of light-emitting bacteria under the fluorescence microscope with E. coli expressing GFP. Althoug varying mutants strain with deficient invading function has been found in tumor tissues, mutant strains of movement (flagella) couldn't show any light signal from the tumor tissue under the cooled CCD camera, indicating bacteria may actively target the tumor cells. Based on their 'tumor-finding' nature, bacteria may be designed to carry multiple genes or drugs for detection and treatment of cancer, such as prodrug-converting enzymes, toxins, angiogenesis inhibitors and cytokines

  1. Tasquinimod (ABR-215050, a quinoline-3-carboxamide anti-angiogenic agent, modulates the expression of thrombospondin-1 in human prostate tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaacs John T

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The orally active quinoline-3-carboxamide tasquinimod [ABR-215050; CAS number 254964-60-8, which currently is in a phase II-clinical trial in patients against metastatic prostate cancer, exhibits anti-tumor activity via inhibition of tumor angiogenesis in human and rodent tumors. To further explore the mode of action of tasquinimod, in vitro and in vivo experiments with gene microarray analysis were performed using LNCaP prostate tumor cells. The array data were validated by real-time semiquantitative reversed transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (sqRT-PCR and protein expression techniques. Results One of the most significant differentially expressed genes both in vitro and in vivo after exposure to tasquinimod, was thrombospondin-1 (TSP1. The up-regulation of TSP1 mRNA in LNCaP tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo correlated with an increased expression and extra cellular secretion of TSP1 protein. When nude mice bearing CWR-22RH human prostate tumors were treated with oral tasquinimod, there was a profound growth inhibition, associated with an up-regulation of TSP1 and a down- regulation of HIF-1 alpha protein, androgen receptor protein (AR and glucose transporter-1 protein within the tumor tissue. Changes in TSP1 expression were paralleled by an anti-angiogenic response, as documented by decreased or unchanged tumor tissue levels of VEGF (a HIF-1 alpha down stream target in the tumors from tasquinimod treated mice. Conclusions We conclude that tasquinimod-induced up-regulation of TSP1 is part of a mechanism involving down-regulation of HIF1α and VEGF, which in turn leads to reduced angiogenesis via inhibition of the "angiogenic switch", that could explain tasquinimods therapeutic potential.

  2. MR-CBCT image-guided system for radiotherapy of orthotopic rat prostate tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuicheng D Chiu

    Full Text Available Multi-modality image-guided radiotherapy is the standard of care in contemporary cancer management; however, it is not common in preclinical settings due to both hardware and software limitations. Soft tissue lesions, such as orthotopic prostate tumors, are difficult to identify using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT imaging alone. In this study, we characterized a research magnetic resonance (MR scanner for preclinical studies and created a protocol for combined MR-CBCT image-guided small animal radiotherapy. Two in-house dual-modality, MR and CBCT compatible, phantoms were designed and manufactured using 3D printing technology. The phantoms were used for quality assurance tests and to facilitate end-to-end testing for combined preclinical MR and CBCT based treatment planning. MR and CBCT images of the phantoms were acquired utilizing a Varian 4.7 T scanner and XRad-225Cx irradiator, respectively. The geometry distortion was assessed by comparing MR images to phantom blueprints and CBCT. The corrected MR scans were co-registered with CBCT and subsequently used for treatment planning. The fidelity of 3D printed phantoms compared to the blueprint design yielded favorable agreement as verified with the CBCT measurements. The geometric distortion, which varied between -5% and 11% throughout the scanning volume, was substantially reduced to within 0.4% after correction. The distortion free MR images were co-registered with the corresponding CBCT images and imported into a commercial treatment planning software SmART Plan. The planning target volume (PTV was on average 19% smaller when contoured on the corrected MR-CBCT images relative to raw images without distortion correction. An MR-CBCT based preclinical workflow was successfully designed and implemented for small animal radiotherapy. Combined MR-CBCT image-guided radiotherapy for preclinical research potentially delivers enhanced relevance to human radiotherapy for various disease sites. This

  3. Targeting Killing of Breast Tumor Stem Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Si-Yi

    2005-01-01

    .... Toward the goal, we have prepared HA molecules from human umbilical cord hyaluronic acid by hydrolysed by Bee venom. However, we have encountered the technical difficulty to produce CD44-targeted liposomes that are incorporated with HA molecules. Due to the technical problems, this proposed study has been extended for additional one year.

  4. Profilin 1 as a Target for Cathepsin X Activity in Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pečar Fonović, Urša; Jevnikar, Zala; Rojnik, Matija; Doljak, Bojan; Fonović, Marko; Jamnik, Polona; Kos, Janko

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsin X has been reported to be a tumor promotion factor in various types of cancer; however, the molecular mechanisms linking its activity with malignant processes are not understood. Here we present profilin 1, a known tumor suppressor, as a target for cathepsin X carboxypeptidase activity in prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Profilin 1 co-localizes strongly with cathepsin X intracellularly in the perinuclear area as well as at the plasma membrane. Selective cleavage of C-terminal amino acids was demonstrated on a synthetic octapeptide representing the profilin C-terminal region, and on recombinant profilin 1. Further, intact profilin 1 binds its poly-L-proline ligand clathrin significantly better than it does the truncated one, as shown using cathepsin X specific inhibitor AMS-36 and immunoprecipitation of the profilin 1/clathrin complex. Moreover, the polymerization of actin, which depends also on the binding of poly-L-proline ligands to profilin 1, was promoted by AMS-36 treatment of cells and by siRNA cathepsin X silencing. Our results demonstrate that increased adhesion, migration and invasiveness of tumor cells depend on the inactivation of the tumor suppressive function of profilin 1 by cathepsin X. The latter is thus designated as a target for development of new antitumor strategies. PMID:23326535

  5. Profilin 1 as a target for cathepsin X activity in tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urša Pečar Fonović

    Full Text Available Cathepsin X has been reported to be a tumor promotion factor in various types of cancer; however, the molecular mechanisms linking its activity with malignant processes are not understood. Here we present profilin 1, a known tumor suppressor, as a target for cathepsin X carboxypeptidase activity in prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Profilin 1 co-localizes strongly with cathepsin X intracellularly in the perinuclear area as well as at the plasma membrane. Selective cleavage of C-terminal amino acids was demonstrated on a synthetic octapeptide representing the profilin C-terminal region, and on recombinant profilin 1. Further, intact profilin 1 binds its poly-L-proline ligand clathrin significantly better than it does the truncated one, as shown using cathepsin X specific inhibitor AMS-36 and immunoprecipitation of the profilin 1/clathrin complex. Moreover, the polymerization of actin, which depends also on the binding of poly-L-proline ligands to profilin 1, was promoted by AMS-36 treatment of cells and by siRNA cathepsin X silencing. Our results demonstrate that increased adhesion, migration and invasiveness of tumor cells depend on the inactivation of the tumor suppressive function of profilin 1 by cathepsin X. The latter is thus designated as a target for development of new antitumor strategies.

  6. Response of rat prostate and lung tumors to ionizing radiation combined with the angiogenesis inhibitor AMCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kal, H.B. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Medical Centre Utrecht (Netherlands); Struikmans, H. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Medical Centre Utrecht (Netherlands); Dept. of Radiotherapy, Medical Centre Haaglanden, Westeinde Hospital, The Hague (Netherlands); Gebbink, M.F.B.G.; Voest, E.E. [Dept. of Medical Oncology, Univ. Medical Centre Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2004-12-01

    Aim: to determine whether radiation combined with Trans-4-AminoMethyl cyclohexane carboxylic acid (AMCA, or tranexamic acid, Cyklokapron registered) results in a better tumor response than radiation alone. Materials and methods: we evaluated the responses of the L44 lung tumor in BN rats and R3327-MATLyLu (MLL) prostate tumor in Copenhagen rats, to single and fractionated X-ray doses with and without AMCA (1.5 g/kg). Tumors were grown subcutaneously in the flank of the animal. AMCA was administered subcutaneously twice daily for at least 2 weeks. Response to treatment was evaluated according to excess growth delay and specific growth delay. Results: L44 and MLL tumors treated with AMCA only experienced a non-significant growth delay. L44 tumors treated with 4 daily dose fractions of 2.5 Gy had a significant excess and specific growth delay when treated with AMCA, the enhancement ratio was 1.6-1.7. The enhancement ratio based on the calculated excess biologically effective dose of the linear-quadratic concept was 1.4-1.5. MLL tumors treated with a single dose of 20 Gy and AMCA had no significant excess growth delay. Conclusion: the enhancement ratio of 1.4-1.7 for the L44 tumor, but not for the MLL tumor, due to AMCA treatment, indicates that AMCA may potentiate the anti-tumor effect of ionizing radiation in distinct tumor types. (orig.)

  7. Response of rat prostate and lung tumors to ionizing radiation combined with the angiogenesis inhibitor AMCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kal, H.B.; Struikmans, H.; Gebbink, M.F.B.G.; Voest, E.E.

    2004-01-01

    Aim: to determine whether radiation combined with Trans-4-AminoMethyl cyclohexane carboxylic acid (AMCA, or tranexamic acid, Cyklokapron registered) results in a better tumor response than radiation alone. Materials and methods: we evaluated the responses of the L44 lung tumor in BN rats and R3327-MATLyLu (MLL) prostate tumor in Copenhagen rats, to single and fractionated X-ray doses with and without AMCA (1.5 g/kg). Tumors were grown subcutaneously in the flank of the animal. AMCA was administered subcutaneously twice daily for at least 2 weeks. Response to treatment was evaluated according to excess growth delay and specific growth delay. Results: L44 and MLL tumors treated with AMCA only experienced a non-significant growth delay. L44 tumors treated with 4 daily dose fractions of 2.5 Gy had a significant excess and specific growth delay when treated with AMCA, the enhancement ratio was 1.6-1.7. The enhancement ratio based on the calculated excess biologically effective dose of the linear-quadratic concept was 1.4-1.5. MLL tumors treated with a single dose of 20 Gy and AMCA had no significant excess growth delay. Conclusion: the enhancement ratio of 1.4-1.7 for the L44 tumor, but not for the MLL tumor, due to AMCA treatment, indicates that AMCA may potentiate the anti-tumor effect of ionizing radiation in distinct tumor types. (orig.)

  8. Concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression defines a subset of locally advanced prostate cancer: Potential opportunities for synergistic targeted therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udager, Aaron M; DeMarzo, Angelo M; Shi, Yang; Hicks, Jessica L; Cao, Xuhong; Siddiqui, Javed; Jiang, Hui; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Mehra, Rohit

    2016-06-01

    targeted therapeutics in ERG-positive/MYC high tumors. Prostate 76:845-853, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Role of miRNA Let-7 and Its Major Targets in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried Wagner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is worldwide the sixth leading cause of cancer related death in men thus early detection and successful treatment are still of major interest. The commonly performed screening of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA is controversially discussed, as in many patients the prostate-specific antigen levels are chronically elevated in the absence of cancer. Due to the unsatisfying efficiency of available prostate cancer screening markers and the current treatment outcome of the aggressive hormone refractory prostate cancer, the evaluation of novel molecular markers and targets is considered an issue of high importance. MicroRNAs are relatively stable in body fluids orchestrating simultaneously the expression of many genes. These molecules are currently discussed to bear a greater diagnostic potential than protein-coding genes, being additionally promising therapeutic drugs and/or targets. Herein we review the potential impact of the microRNA let-7 family on prostate cancer and show how deregulation of several of its target genes could influence the cellular equilibrium in the prostate gland, promoting cancer development as they do in a variety of other human malignant neoplasias.

  10. Selenite Treatment Inhibits LAPC-4 Tumor Growth and Prostate-Specific Antigen Secretion in a Xenograft Model of Human Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, Rumi S.; Husbeck, Bryan; Feldman, David; Knox, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Selenium compounds have known chemopreventive effects on prostate cancer. However selenite, an inorganic form of selenium, has not been extensively studied as a treatment option for prostate cancer. Our previous studies have demonstrated the inhibition of androgen receptor expression and androgen stimulated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression by selenite in human prostate cancer cell lines. In this study, we investigated the in vivo effects of selenite as a therapy to treat mice with established LAPC-4 tumors. Methods and Materials: Male mice harboring androgen-dependent LAPC-4 xenograft tumors were treated with selenite (2 mg/kg intraperitoneally three times per week) or vehicle for 42 days. In addition, androgen-independent LAPC-4 xenograft tumors were generated in female mice over 4 to 6 months. Once established, androgen-independent LAPC-4 tumor fragments were passaged into female mice and were treated with selenite or vehicle for 42 days. Changes in tumor volume and serum PSA levels were assessed. Results: Selenite significantly decreased androgen-dependent LAPC-4 tumor growth in male mice over 42 days (p < 0.001). Relative tumor volume was decreased by 41% in selenite-treated animals compared with vehicle-treated animals. The inhibition of LAPC-4 tumor growth corresponded to a marked decrease in serum PSA levels (p < 0.01). In the androgen-independent LAPC-4 tumors in female mice, selenite treatment decreased tumor volume by 58% after 42 days of treatment (p < 0.001). Conclusions: These results suggest that selenite may have potential as a novel therapeutic agent to treat both androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate cancer

  11. CDK2 and mTOR are direct molecular targets of isoangustone A in the suppression of human prostate cancer cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eunjung; Son, Joe Eun; Byun, Sanguine; Lee, Seung Joon; Kim, Yeong A [WCU Biomodulation Major, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Center for Food and Bioconvergence, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Liu, Kangdong [The Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota, 801 16th Avenue NE, Austin, MN 55912 (United States); Kim, Jiyoung [WCU Biomodulation Major, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Center for Food and Bioconvergence, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Soon Sung; Park, Jung Han Yoon [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Natural Science, Hallym University, Chuncheon, 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Zigang [The Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota, 801 16th Avenue NE, Austin, MN 55912 (United States); Lee, Ki Won, E-mail: kiwon@snu.ac.kr [WCU Biomodulation Major, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Center for Food and Bioconvergence, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyong Joo, E-mail: leehyjo@snu.ac.kr [WCU Biomodulation Major, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Center for Food and Bioconvergence, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-01

    Licorice extract which is used as a natural sweetener has been shown to possess inhibitory effects against prostate cancer, but the mechanisms responsible are poorly understood. Here, we report a compound, isoangustone A (IAA) in licorice that potently suppresses the growth of aggressive prostate cancer and sought to clarify its mechanism of action. We analyzed its inhibitory effects on the growth of PTEN-deleted human prostate cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. Administration of IAA significantly attenuated the growth of prostate cancer cell cultures and xenograft tumors. These effects were found to be attributable to inhibition of the G1/S phase cell cycle transition and the accumulation of p27{sup kip1}. The elevated p27{sup kip1} expression levels were concurrent with the decrease of its phosphorylation at threonine 187 through suppression of CDK2 kinase activity and the reduced phosphorylation of Akt at Serine 473 by diminishing the kinase activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Further analysis using recombinant proteins and immunoprecipitated cell lysates determined that IAA exerts suppressive effects against CDK2 and mTOR kinase activity by direct binding with both proteins. These findings suggested that the licorice compound IAA is a potent molecular inhibitor of CDK2 and mTOR, with strong implications for the treatment of prostate cancer. Thus, licorice-derived extracts with high IAA content warrant further clinical investigation for nutritional sources for prostate cancer patients. - Highlights: • Isoangustone A suppresses growth of PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. • Administration of isoangustone A inhibits tumor growth in mice. • Treatment of isoangustone A induces cell cycle arrest and accumulation of p27{sup kip1}. • Isoangustone A inhibits CDK2 and mTOR activity. • Isoangustone A directly binds with CDK2 and mTOR complex in prostate cancer cells.

  12. Inhibition of Androgen Receptor Nuclear Localization and Castration-Resistant Prostate Tumor Growth by Pyrroloimidazole-based Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoodi, Khalid Z; Xu, Yadong; Dar, Javid A; Eisermann, Kurtis; Pascal, Laura E; Parrinello, Erica; Ai, Junkui; Johnston, Paul A; Nelson, Joel B; Wipf, Peter; Wang, Zhou

    2017-10-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that controls the expression of androgen-responsive genes. A key step in androgen action, which is amplified in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), is AR nuclear translocation. Small molecules capable of inhibiting AR nuclear localization could be developed as novel therapeutics for CRPC. We developed a high-throughput screen and identified two structurally-related pyrroloimidazoles that could block AR nuclear localization in CRPC cells. We show that these two small molecules, 3-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-6,7-dihydro-5 H -pyrrolo[1,2- a ]imidazole (EPPI) and 3-(4-chlorophenyl)-6,7-dihydro-5 H -pyrrolo[1,2- a ]imidazole (CPPI) can inhibit the nuclear localization and transcriptional activity of AR and reduce the proliferation of AR-positive but not AR-negative prostate cancer cell lines. EPPI and CPPI did not inhibit nuclear localization of the glucocorticoid receptor or the estrogen receptor, suggesting they selectively target AR. In LNCaP tumor xenografts, CPPI inhibited the proliferation of relapsed LNCaP tumors. These findings suggest that EPPI and CPPI could serve as lead structures for the development of therapeutic agents for CRPC. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(10); 2120-9. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Hypoxia-Induced Signaling Promotes Prostate Cancer Progression: Exosomes Role as Messenger of Hypoxic Response in Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deep, Gagan; Panigrahi, Gati K.

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) is the leading malignancy in men and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Hypoxia (low O2 condition) is considered an early event in prostate carcinogenesis associated with an aggressive phenotype. In fact, clinically, hypoxia and hypoxia-related biomarkers are associated with treatment failure and disease progression. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is the key factor that is activated under hypoxia, and mediates adaptation of cells to hypoxic conditions through regulating the expression of genes associated with angiogenesis, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), metastasis, survival, proliferation, metabolism, stemness, hormone-refractory progression, and therapeutic resistance. Besides HIF-1, several other signaling pathways including PI3K/Akt/mTOR, NADPH oxidase (NOX), Wnt/β-catenin, and Hedgehog are activated in cancer cells under hypoxic conditions, and also contribute in hypoxia-induced biological effects in HIF-1-dependent and -independent manners. Hypoxic cancer cells cause extensive changes in the tumor microenvironment both local and distant, and recent studies have provided ample evidence supporting the crucial role of nanosized vesicles “exosomes” in mediating hypoxia-induced tumor microenvironment remodeling. Exosomes’ role has been reported in hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, stemness, activation of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), and EMT. Together, existing literature suggests that hypoxia plays a predominant role in PCA growth and progression, and PCA could be effectively prevented and treated via targeting hypoxia/hypoxia-related signaling pathways. PMID:27279239

  14. CDK5 as a Therapeutic Target in Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelkin, Barry

    2007-01-01

    .... We also proposed to examine the role of CDK5 activity in growth of prostate cancer metastatic to bone, using PC3 based bioluminescent cell clones, and to explore the potential for CDK5 inhibition...

  15. Assessment of nucleosides as putative tumor biomarkers in prostate cancer screening by CE-UV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzatto, Adriana Zardini; de Oliveira Silva, Mariana; Poppi, Ronei Jesus; Simionato, Ana Valéria Colnaghi

    2017-05-01

    Cancer is responsible for millions of deaths worldwide, but most base diseases may be cured if detected early. Screening tests may be used to identify early-stage malignant neoplasms. However, the major screening tool for prostate cancer, the prostate-specific antigen test, has unsuitable sensitivity. Since cancer cells may affect the pattern of consumption and excretion of nucleosides, such biomolecules are putative biomarkers that can be used for diagnosis and treatment evaluation. Using a previously validated method for the analysis of nucleosides in blood serum by capillary electrophoresis with UV-vis spectroscopy detection, we investigated 60 samples from healthy individuals and 42 samples from prostate cancer patients. The concentrations of nucleosides in both groups were compared and a multivariate partial least squares-discriminant analysis classification model was optimized for prediction of prostate cancer. The validation of the model with an independent sample set resulted in the correct classification of 82.4% of the samples, with sensitivity of 90.5% and specificity of 76.7%. A significant downregulation of 5-methyluridine and inosine was observed, which can be indicative of the carcinogenic process. Therefore, such analytes are potential candidates for prostate cancer screening. Graphical Abstract Separation of the studied nucleosides and the internal standard 8-Bromoguanosine by CE-UV (a); classification of the external validation samples (30 from healthy volunteers and 21 from prostate cancer patients) by the developed Partial Least Square - Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) model with accuracy of 82.4% (b); Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve (c); and Variable Importance in the Projection (VIP) values for the studied nucleosides (d). A significant down-regulation of 5- methyluridine (5mU) and inosine (I) was observed, which can be indicative of the presence of prostate tumors.

  16. Quantitation of circulating tumor cells in blood samples from ovarian and prostate cancer patients using tumor-specific fluorescent ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Kularatne, Sumith A; Kalli, Kimberly R; Prendergast, Franklyn G; Amato, Robert J; Klee, George G; Hartmann, Lynn C; Low, Philip S

    2008-10-15

    Quantitation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can provide information on the stage of a malignancy, onset of disease progression and response to therapy. In an effort to more accurately quantitate CTCs, we have synthesized fluorescent conjugates of 2 high-affinity tumor-specific ligands (folate-AlexaFluor 488 and DUPA-FITC) that bind tumor cells >20-fold more efficiently than fluorescent antibodies. Here we determine whether these tumor-specific dyes can be exploited for quantitation of CTCs in peripheral blood samples from cancer patients. A CTC-enriched fraction was isolated from the peripheral blood of ovarian and prostate cancer patients by an optimized density gradient centrifugation protocol and labeled with the aforementioned fluorescent ligands. CTCs were then quantitated by flow cytometry. CTCs were detected in 18 of 20 ovarian cancer patients (mean 222 CTCs/ml; median 15 CTCs/ml; maximum 3,118 CTCs/ml), whereas CTC numbers in 16 gender-matched normal volunteers were negligible (mean 0.4 CTCs/ml; median 0.3 CTCs/ml; maximum 1.5 CTCs/ml; p < 0.001, chi(2)). CTCs were also detected in 10 of 13 prostate cancer patients (mean 26 CTCs/ml, median 14 CTCs/ml, maximum 94 CTCs/ml) but not in 18 gender-matched healthy donors (mean 0.8 CTCs/ml, median 1, maximum 3 CTC/ml; p < 0.0026, chi(2)). Tumor-specific fluorescent antibodies were much less efficient in quantitating CTCs because of their lower CTC labeling efficiency. Use of tumor-specific fluorescent ligands to label CTCs in peripheral blood can provide a simple, accurate and sensitive method for determining the number of cancer cells circulating in the bloodstream.

  17. Pan-Cancer Analysis of the Mediator Complex Transcriptome Identifies CDK19 and CDK8 as Therapeutic Targets in Advanced Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brägelmann, Johannes; Klümper, Niklas; Offermann, Anne; von Mässenhausen, Anne; Böhm, Diana; Deng, Mario; Queisser, Angela; Sanders, Christine; Syring, Isabella; Merseburger, Axel S; Vogel, Wenzel; Sievers, Elisabeth; Vlasic, Ignacija; Carlsson, Jessica; Andrén, Ove; Brossart, Peter; Duensing, Stefan; Svensson, Maria A; Shaikhibrahim, Zaki; Kirfel, Jutta; Perner, Sven

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: The Mediator complex is a multiprotein assembly, which serves as a hub for diverse signaling pathways to regulate gene expression. Because gene expression is frequently altered in cancer, a systematic understanding of the Mediator complex in malignancies could foster the development of novel targeted therapeutic approaches. Experimental Design: We performed a systematic deconvolution of the Mediator subunit expression profiles across 23 cancer entities ( n = 8,568) using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Prostate cancer-specific findings were validated in two publicly available gene expression cohorts and a large cohort of primary and advanced prostate cancer ( n = 622) stained by immunohistochemistry. The role of CDK19 and CDK8 was evaluated by siRNA-mediated gene knockdown and inhibitor treatment in prostate cancer cell lines with functional assays and gene expression analysis by RNAseq. Results: Cluster analysis of TCGA expression data segregated tumor entities, indicating tumor-type-specific Mediator complex compositions. Only prostate cancer was marked by high expression of CDK19 In primary prostate cancer, CDK19 was associated with increased aggressiveness and shorter disease-free survival. During cancer progression, highest levels of CDK19 and of its paralog CDK8 were present in metastases. In vitro , inhibition of CDK19 and CDK8 by knockdown or treatment with a selective CDK8/CDK19 inhibitor significantly decreased migration and invasion. Conclusions: Our analysis revealed distinct transcriptional expression profiles of the Mediator complex across cancer entities indicating differential modes of transcriptional regulation. Moreover, it identified CDK19 and CDK8 to be specifically overexpressed during prostate cancer progression, highlighting their potential as novel therapeutic targets in advanced prostate cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 23(7); 1829-40. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Selective Killing of Prostate Tumor Cells by Cytocidal Viruses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lyles, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    .... The novelty in our approach is our ability to enhance the selectivity of killing of tumor cells versus normal cells by manipulating the viral genes that control the antiviral interferon response...

  19. Selective Killing of Prostate Tumor Cells by Cytocidal Viruses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lyles, Douglas

    2004-01-01

    .... The novelty in our approach is our ability to enhance the selectivity of killing of tumor cells versus normal cells by manipulating the viral genes that control the antiviral interferon response...

  20. Selective Killing of Prostate Tumor Cells by Cytocidal Viruses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lyles, Douglas S

    2005-01-01

    ...). The novelty in our approach is our ability to enhance the selectivity of VSV-induced killing of tumor cells versus normal cells by manipulating the viral genes that control the antiviral interferon response...

  1. Targeting Prostate Cancer with Bifunctional Modulators of the Androgen Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Wittmann, B.; Dwyer, M.; Cui, H.; Dye, D.; McDonnell, D.; Norris , J. Inhibition of prostate cancer cell growth by second-site androgen receptor antagonists...Wittmann, B.; Dwyer, M.; Cui, H.; Dye, D.; McDonnell, D.; Norris , J. Inhibition of prostate cancer cell growth by second-site androgen receptor...important clin- ical problem in diseases such as asthma (51, 52), ne- phrotic syndrome (53), and malignancies such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (54

  2. Cannabinoid Receptors: A Novel Target for Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    study could be to develop nonhabit-forming cannabi - noid agonist (s) for the management of prostate cancer . REFERENCES 1. Jemal, A., Siegel, R.W...for Therapy of Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Prof. Hasan Mukhtar, Ph.D (PI) Dr. Farrukh Afaq, Ph.D (Co-Investigator...REPORT DATE: February 2007 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command

  3. TPD52: A Novel Vaccine Target for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Chinnaiyan AM and Rubin MA. (2006). Defining aggressive prostate cancer using a 12- gene model. Neoplasia 8: 59-68. 12. Scanlan MJ, Gout I, Gordon CM...prostate cancer cells, isolated from patients undergoing radical prostatectomy, using differential gene expression analysis of our novel paired...sera from breast cancer patients to screen a library of expressed genes from breast cancers, demonstrating that TPD52 is capable of inducing IgG

  4. Targeting Tim-1 to Circumvent Immune Tolerance in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    responses to PSA self- antigen in transgenic mice. Prostate 70:1002. 7. Koh, Y. T., A. Gray, S. A. Higgins, B. Hubby, and W. M. Kast . 2009. Androgen...15766662] 14. Koh YT, Gray A, Higgins SA, Hubby B, Kast WM. Androgen ablation augments prostate cancer vaccine immunogenicity only when applied after...Mercader M, Bodner BK, Moser MT, Kwon PS, Park ES, Manecke RG, Ellis TM, Wojcik EM, Yang D, Flanigan RC, Waters WB, Kast WM, Kwon ED. T cell

  5. Real-time virtual sonography for navigation during targeted prostate biopsy using magnetic resonance imaging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagawa, Tomoaki; Ishikawa, Satoru; Kimura, Tomokazu; Suetomi, Takahiro; Tsutsumi, Masakazu; Irie, Toshiyuki; Kondoh, Masanao; Mitake, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the medical navigation technique, namely, Real-time Virtual Sonography (RVS), for targeted prostate biopsy. Eighty-five patients with suspected prostate cancer lesions using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were included in this study. All selected patients had at least one negative result on the previous transrectal biopsies. The acquired MRI volume data were loaded onto a personal computer installed with RVS software, which registers the volumes between MRI and real-time ultrasound data for real-time display. The registered MRI images were displayed adjacent to the ultrasonographic sagittal image on the same computer monitor. The suspected lesions on T2-weighted images were marked with a red circle. At first suspected lesions were biopsied transperineally under real-time navigation with RVS and then followed by the conventional transrectal and transperineal biopsy under spinal anesthesia. The median age of the patients was 69 years (56-84 years), and the prostate-specific antigen level and prostate volume were 9.9 ng/mL (4.0-34.2) and 37.2 mL (18-141), respectively. Prostate cancer was detected in 52 patients (61%). The biopsy specimens obtained using RVS revealed 45/52 patients (87%) positive for prostate cancer. A total of 192 biopsy cores were obtained using RVS. Sixty-two of these (32%) were positive for prostate cancer, whereas conventional random biopsy revealed cancer only in 75/833 (9%) cores (P<0.01). Targeted prostate biopsy with RVS is very effective to diagnose lesions detected with MRI. This technique only requires additional computer and RVS software and thus is cost-effective. Therefore, RVS-guided prostate biopsy has great potential for better management of prostate cancer patients. (author)

  6. Scoparone exerts anti-tumor activity against DU145 prostate cancer cells via inhibition of STAT3 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Kook Kim

    Full Text Available Scoparone, a natural compound isolated from Artemisia capillaris, has been used in Chinese herbal medicine to treat neonatal jaundice. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 contributes to the growth and survival of many human tumors. This study was undertaken to investigate the anti-tumor activity of scoparone against DU145 prostate cancer cells and to determine whether its effects are mediated by inhibition of STAT3 activity. Scoparone inhibited proliferation of DU145 cells via cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. Transient transfection assays showed that scoparone repressed both constitutive and IL-6-induced transcriptional activity of STAT3. Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR analyses demonstrated that scoparone suppressed the transcription of STAT3 target genes such as cyclin D1, c-Myc, survivin, Bcl-2, and Socs3. Consistent with this, scoparone decreased phosphorylation and nuclear accumulation of STAT3, but did not reduce phosphorylation of janus kinase 2 (JAK2 or Src, the major upstream kinases responsible for STAT3 activation. Moreover, transcriptional activity of a constitutively active mutant of STAT3 (STAT3C was inhibited by scoparone, but not by AG490, a JAK2 inhibitor. Furthermore, scoparone treatment suppressed anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and tumor growth of DU145 xenografts in nude mice, concomitant with a reduction in STAT3 phosphorylation. Computational modeling suggested that scoparone might bind the SH2 domain of STAT3. Our findings suggest that scoparone elicits an anti-tumor effect against DU145 prostate cancer cells in part through inhibition of STAT3 activity.

  7. Targeting Stromal Androgen Receptor Suppresses Prolactin-Driven Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kuo-Pao; Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Fang, Lei-Ya; Izumi, Kouji; Lo, Chi-Wen; Wood, Ronald; Kindblom, Jon; Yeh, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Stromal-epithelial interaction plays a pivotal role to mediate the normal prostate growth, the pathogenesis of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate cancer development. Until now, the stromal androgen receptor (AR) functions in the BPH development, and the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we used a genetic knockout approach to ablate stromal fibromuscular (fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells) AR in a probasin promoter-driven prolactin transgenic mouse model (Pb-PRL tg mice) that could spontaneously develop prostate hyperplasia to partially mimic human BPH development. We found Pb-PRL tg mice lacking stromal fibromuscular AR developed smaller prostates, with more marked changes in the dorsolateral prostate lobes with less proliferation index. Mechanistically, prolactin mediated hyperplastic prostate growth involved epithelial-stromal interaction through epithelial prolactin/prolactin receptor signals to regulate granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor expression to facilitate stromal cell growth via sustaining signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 activity. Importantly, the stromal fibromuscular AR could modulate such epithelial-stromal interacting signals. Targeting stromal fibromuscular AR with the AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9®, led to the reduction of prostate size, which could be used in future therapy. PMID:23893956

  8. MicroPET assessment of androgenic control of glucose and acetate uptake in the rat prostate and a prostate cancer tumor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Nobuyuki; Kim, Joonyoung; Jones, Lynne A.; Mercer, Nicole M.; Engelbach, John A.; Sharp, Terry L.; Welch, Michael J. E-mail: welchm@mir.wustl.edu

    2002-11-01

    PET has been used to monitor changes in tumor metabolism in breast cancer following hormonal therapy. This study was undertaken to determine whether PET imaging could evaluate early metabolic changes in prostate tumor following androgen ablation therapy. Studies were performed comparing two positron-emitting tracers, {sup 18}F-FDG and {sup 11}C-acetate, in Sprague-Dawley male rats to monitor metabolic changes in normal prostate tissue. Additional studies were performed in nude mice bearing the CWR22 androgen-dependent human prostate tumor to evaluate metabolic changes in prostate tumor. In rats, for the androgen ablation pretreatment, 1 mg diethylstilbestrol (DES) was injected subcutaneously 3 and 24 hours before tracer injection. For androgen pretreatment, 500 {mu}g dihydrotestosterone (DHT) was injected intraperitoneally 2 and 6 hours before tracer injection. The rats were divided into three groups, Group A (no-DES, no-DHT, n = 18), Group B (DES, no-DHT, n = 18) and Group C (DES, DHT, n = 18). In each group, 10 animals received {sup 18}F-FDG, whereas the remaining eight animals were administered {sup 11}C-acetate. Rats were sacrificed at 120 min post-injection of {sup 18}F-FDG or 30 min post-injection of {sup 11}C-acetate. Pretreatment of the mouse model using DHT (200 {mu}g of DHT in 0.1 mL of sunflower seed oil) or DES (200 {mu}g of DES in 0.1 mL of sunflower seed oil) was conducted every 2 days for one week. Mice were imaged with both tracers in the microPET scanner (Concorde Microsystems Inc.). DES treatment caused a decrease in acetate and glucose metabolism in the rat prostate. Co-treatment with DHT maintained the glucose metabolism levels at baseline values. In the tumor bearing mice, similar effects were seen in {sup 18}F-FDG study, while there was no significant difference in {sup 11}C-acetate uptake. These results indicate that changes in serum testosterone levels influence {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the prostate gland, which is closely tied to glucose

  9. Tumor Cells and Tumor-Associated Macrophages: Secreted Proteins as Potential Targets for Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baay, Marc; Brouwer, Anja; Pauwels, Patrick; Peeters, Marc; Lardon, Filip

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory pathways, meant to defend the organism against infection and injury, as a byproduct, can promote an environment which favors tumor growth and metastasis. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), which constitute a significant part of the tumor-infiltrating immune cells, have been linked to the growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis of a variety of cancers, most likely through polarization of TAMs to the M2 (alternative) phenotype. The interaction between tumor cells and macrophages provides opportunities for therapy. This paper will discuss secreted proteins as targets for intervention. PMID:22162712

  10. Tumor Cells and Tumor-Associated Macrophages: Secreted Proteins as Potential Targets for Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Baay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory pathways, meant to defend the organism against infection and injury, as a byproduct, can promote an environment which favors tumor growth and metastasis. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs, which constitute a significant part of the tumor-infiltrating immune cells, have been linked to the growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis of a variety of cancers, most likely through polarization of TAMs to the M2 (alternative phenotype. The interaction between tumor cells and macrophages provides opportunities for therapy. This paper will discuss secreted proteins as targets for intervention.

  11. Targeted Delivery of siRNA Therapeutics to Malignant Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qixin Leng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 20 years, a diverse group of ligands targeting surface biomarkers or receptors has been identified with several investigated to target siRNA to tumors. Many approaches to developing tumor-homing peptides, RNA and DNA aptamers, and single-chain variable fragment antibodies by using phage display, in vitro evolution, and recombinant antibody methods could not have been imagined by researchers in the 1980s. Despite these many scientific advances, there is no reason to expect that the ligand field will not continue to evolve. From development of ligands based on novel or existing biomarkers to linking ligands to drugs and gene and antisense delivery systems, several fields have coalesced to facilitate ligand-directed siRNA therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the major categories of ligand-targeted siRNA therapeutics for tumors, as well as the different strategies to identify new ligands.

  12. Targeting Autophagy in the Tumor Microenvironment: New Challenges and Opportunities for Regulating Tumor Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassam Janji

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells evolve in the tumor microenvironment, which is now well established as an integral part of the tumor and a determinant player in cancer cell adaptation and resistance to anti-cancer therapies. Despite the remarkable and fairly rapid progress over the past two decades regarding our understanding of the role of the tumor microenvironment in cancer development, its precise contribution to cancer resistance is still fragmented. This is mainly related to the complexity of the “tumor ecosystem” and the diversity of the stromal cell types that constitute the tumor microenvironment. Emerging data indicate that several factors, such as hypoxic stress, activate a plethora of resistance mechanisms, including autophagy, in tumor cells. Hypoxia-induced autophagy in the tumor microenvironment also activates several tumor escape mechanisms, which effectively counteract anti-tumor immune responses mediated by natural killer and cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Therefore, strategies aiming at targeting autophagy in cancer cells in combination with other therapeutic strategies have inspired significant interest to overcome immunological tolerance and promote tumor regression. However, a number of obstacles still hamper the application of autophagy inhibitors in clinics. First, the lack of selectivity of the current pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy makes difficult to draw a clear statement about its effective contribution in cancer. Second, autophagy has been also described as an important mechanism in tumor cells involved in presentation of antigens to T cells. Third, there is a circumstantial evidence that autophagy activation in some innate immune cells may support the maturation of these cells, and it is required for their anti-tumor activity. In this review, we will address these aspects and discuss our current knowledge on the benefits and the drawbacks of targeting autophagy in the context of anti-tumor immunity. We believe that it is

  13. Metabolomic profiling of lung and prostate tumor tissues by capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kami, Kenjiro; Fujimori, Tamaki; Sato, Hajime; Sato, Mutsuko; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Ishihama, Yasushi; Onozuka, Hiroko; Ochiai, Atsushi; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru

    2013-04-01

    Metabolic microenvironment of tumor cells is influenced by oncogenic signaling and tissue-specific metabolic demands, blood supply, and enzyme expression. To elucidate tumor-specific metabolism, we compared the metabolomics of normal and tumor tissues surgically resected pairwise from nine lung and seven prostate cancer patients, using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOFMS). Phosphorylation levels of enzymes involved in central carbon metabolism were also quantified. Metabolomic profiles of lung and prostate tissues comprised 114 and 86 metabolites, respectively, and the profiles not only well distinguished tumor from normal tissues, but also squamous cell carcinoma from the other tumor types in lung cancer and poorly differentiated tumors from moderately differentiated tumors in prostate cancer. Concentrations of most amino acids, especially branched-chain amino acids, were significantly higher in tumor tissues, independent of organ type, but of essential amino acids were particularly higher in poorly differentiated than moderately differentiated prostate cancers. Organ-dependent differences were prominent at the levels of glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and associated energy status. Significantly high lactate concentrations and elevated activating phosphorylation levels of phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase in lung tumors confirmed hyperactive glycolysis. We highlighted the potential of CE-TOFMS-based metabolomics combined with phosphorylated enzyme analysis for understanding tissue-specific tumor microenvironments, which may lead to the development of more effective and specific anticancer therapeutics.

  14. Probing Androgen Receptor Signaling in Circulating Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    2010). Toxicity and outcomes after chemoradiation for esophageal cancer in patients age 75 or older. Diseases of the Esophagus , 23:316-23. Epub 2009...Circulating Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David T. Miyamoto, M.D., Ph.D... Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0153 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER David T. Miyamoto, M.D., Ph.D. 5e

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound-guided fusion biopsy for prostate cancer: Quantifying the impact of needle delivery error on diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Peter R., E-mail: pmarti46@uwo.ca [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Cool, Derek W. [Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7, Canada and Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Romagnoli, Cesare [Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Fenster, Aaron [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Ward, Aaron D. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided “fusion” prostate biopsy intends to reduce the ∼23% false negative rate of clinical two-dimensional TRUS-guided sextant biopsy. Although it has been reported to double the positive yield, MRI-targeted biopsies continue to yield false negatives. Therefore, the authors propose to investigate how biopsy system needle delivery error affects the probability of sampling each tumor, by accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system error, image registration error, and irregular tumor shapes. Methods: T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, and diffusion-weighted prostate MRI and 3D TRUS images were obtained from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding 3D tumor surfaces that were registered to the 3D TRUS images using an iterative closest point prostate surface-based method to yield 3D binary images of the suspicious regions in the TRUS context. The probabilityP of obtaining a sample of tumor tissue in one biopsy core was calculated by integrating a 3D Gaussian distribution over each suspicious region domain. Next, the authors performed an exhaustive search to determine the maximum root mean squared error (RMSE, in mm) of a biopsy system that gives P ≥ 95% for each tumor sample, and then repeated this procedure for equal-volume spheres corresponding to each tumor sample. Finally, the authors investigated the effect of probe-axis-direction error on measured tumor burden by studying the relationship between the error and estimated percentage of core involvement. Results: Given a 3.5 mm RMSE for contemporary fusion biopsy systems,P ≥ 95% for 21 out of 81 tumors. The authors determined that for a biopsy system with 3.5 mm RMSE, one cannot expect to sample tumors of approximately 1 cm{sup 3} or smaller with 95% probability with only one biopsy core. The predicted maximum RMSE giving P ≥ 95% for each

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound-guided fusion biopsy for prostate cancer: Quantifying the impact of needle delivery error on diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Peter R; Cool, Derek W; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided "fusion" prostate biopsy intends to reduce the ∼23% false negative rate of clinical two-dimensional TRUS-guided sextant biopsy. Although it has been reported to double the positive yield, MRI-targeted biopsies continue to yield false negatives. Therefore, the authors propose to investigate how biopsy system needle delivery error affects the probability of sampling each tumor, by accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system error, image registration error, and irregular tumor shapes. T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, and diffusion-weighted prostate MRI and 3D TRUS images were obtained from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding 3D tumor surfaces that were registered to the 3D TRUS images using an iterative closest point prostate surface-based method to yield 3D binary images of the suspicious regions in the TRUS context. The probabilityP of obtaining a sample of tumor tissue in one biopsy core was calculated by integrating a 3D Gaussian distribution over each suspicious region domain. Next, the authors performed an exhaustive search to determine the maximum root mean squared error (RMSE, in mm) of a biopsy system that gives P ≥ 95% for each tumor sample, and then repeated this procedure for equal-volume spheres corresponding to each tumor sample. Finally, the authors investigated the effect of probe-axis-direction error on measured tumor burden by studying the relationship between the error and estimated percentage of core involvement. Given a 3.5 mm RMSE for contemporary fusion biopsy systems,P ≥ 95% for 21 out of 81 tumors. The authors determined that for a biopsy system with 3.5 mm RMSE, one cannot expect to sample tumors of approximately 1 cm(3) or smaller with 95% probability with only one biopsy core. The predicted maximum RMSE giving P ≥ 95% for each tumor was consistently greater when using

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound-guided fusion biopsy for prostate cancer: Quantifying the impact of needle delivery error on diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Peter R.; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided “fusion” prostate biopsy intends to reduce the ∼23% false negative rate of clinical two-dimensional TRUS-guided sextant biopsy. Although it has been reported to double the positive yield, MRI-targeted biopsies continue to yield false negatives. Therefore, the authors propose to investigate how biopsy system needle delivery error affects the probability of sampling each tumor, by accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system error, image registration error, and irregular tumor shapes. Methods: T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, and diffusion-weighted prostate MRI and 3D TRUS images were obtained from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding 3D tumor surfaces that were registered to the 3D TRUS images using an iterative closest point prostate surface-based method to yield 3D binary images of the suspicious regions in the TRUS context. The probabilityP of obtaining a sample of tumor tissue in one biopsy core was calculated by integrating a 3D Gaussian distribution over each suspicious region domain. Next, the authors performed an exhaustive search to determine the maximum root mean squared error (RMSE, in mm) of a biopsy system that gives P ≥ 95% for each tumor sample, and then repeated this procedure for equal-volume spheres corresponding to each tumor sample. Finally, the authors investigated the effect of probe-axis-direction error on measured tumor burden by studying the relationship between the error and estimated percentage of core involvement. Results: Given a 3.5 mm RMSE for contemporary fusion biopsy systems,P ≥ 95% for 21 out of 81 tumors. The authors determined that for a biopsy system with 3.5 mm RMSE, one cannot expect to sample tumors of approximately 1 cm 3 or smaller with 95% probability with only one biopsy core. The predicted maximum RMSE giving P ≥ 95% for each tumor was

  18. Targeting a Novel Androgen Receptor-Repressed Pathway in Prostate Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    receptor; TNF, tumor necrosis factor; TGN, trans-Golgi network; EMT, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition; MMP, matrix metalloprotease; HDAC, histone...such as bioactive peptides [31], lipids [32], growth factors [33], tumor necrosis factor (TNF) [34], chemo- kines, and many of which act through...of prostate cancer [91]. It has also been shown that vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) promote cell proliferation and migration via PKD

  19. LINE-1 methylation status in prostate cancer and non-neoplastic tissue adjacent to tumor in association with mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiano, Valentina; Zugna, Daniela; Grasso, Chiara; Trevisan, Morena; Delsedime, Luisa; Molinaro, Luca; Gillio-Tos, Anna; Merletti, Franco; Richiardi, Lorenzo

    2017-01-02

    Aberrant DNA methylation seems to be associated with prostate cancer behavior. We investigated LINE-1 methylation in prostate cancer and non-neoplastic tissue adjacent to tumor (NTAT) in association with mortality from prostate cancer. We selected 157 prostate cancer patients with available NTAT from 2 cohorts of patients diagnosed between 1982-1988 and 1993-1996, followed up until 2010. An association between LINE-1 hypomethylation and prostate cancer mortality in tumor was suggested [hazard ratio per 5% decrease in LINE-1 methylation levels: 1.40, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.95-2.01]. After stratification of the patients for Gleason score, the association was present only for those with a Gleason score of at least 8. Among these, low (80%) LINE-1 methylation was associated with a hazard ratio of 4.68 (95% CI: 1.03-21.34). LINE-1 methylation in the NTAT was not associated with prostate cancer mortality. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that tumor tissue global hypomethylation may be a late event in prostate cancerogenesis and is associated with tumor progression.

  20. Arctigenin inhibits prostate tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Piwen; Solorzano, Walter; Diaz, Tanya; Magyar, Clara E; Henning, Susanne M; Vadgama, Jaydutt V

    2017-06-01

    The low bioavailability of most phytochemicals limits their translation to humans. We investigated whether arctigenin, a novel anti-inflammatory lignan from the seeds of Arctium lappa , has favorable bioavailability/potency against prostate cancer. The anticarcinogenic activity of arctigenin was investigated both in vitro using the androgen-sensitive LNCaP and LAPC-4 human prostate cancer cells and pre-malignant WPE1-NA22 cells, and in vivo using xenograft mouse models. Arctigenin at lower doses (arctigenin at 50mg/kg (LD) or 100mg/kg (HD) b.w. daily or vehicle control by oral gavage. After 6 weeks, tumor growth was inhibited by 50% (LD) and 70% (HD) compared to control. A stronger tumor inhibitory effect was observed in a second experiment where arctigenin intervention started two weeks prior to tumor implantation. Arc was detectable in blood and tumors in Arc groups, with a mean value up to 2.0 μM in blood, and 8.3 nmol/g tissue in tumors. Tumor levels of proliferation marker Ki67, total and nuclear androgen receptor, and growth factors including VEGF, EGF, and FGF-β were significantly decreased by Arc, along with an increase in apoptosis marker of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Genes responsive to arctigenin were identified including TIMP3 and ZNF185, and microRNAs including miR-126-5p, and miR-21-5p. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of the strong anticancer activity of arctigenin in prostate cancer. The effective dose of arctigenin in vitro is physiologically achievable in vivo , which provides a high promise in its translation to human application.

  1. 13C and 31P NMR [Nuclear Magnetic Resonance] studies of prostate tumor metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sillerud, L.O.; Halliday, K.R.; Freyer, J.P; Griffey, R.H.; Fenoglio-Preiser, C.

    1989-01-01

    The current research on prostate cancer by NMR spectroscopy and microscopy will most significantly contribute to tumor diagnosis and characterization only if sound biochemical models of tumor metabolism are established and tested. Prior searches focused on universal markers of malignancy, have to date, revealed no universal markers by any method. It is unlikely that NMRS will succeed where other methods have failed, however, NMR spectroscopy does provide a non-invasive means to analyze multiple compounds simultaneously in vivo. In order to fully evaluate the ability of NMRS to differentiate non-malignant from malignant tissues it is necessary to determine sufficient multiple parameters from specific, well-diagnosed, histological tumor types that, in comparison to normal tissue and non-neoplastic, non-normal pathologies from which the given neoplasm must be differentiated, one has enough degrees of freedom to make a mathematically and statistically significant determination. Confounding factors may consist of tumor heterogeneity arising from regional variations in differentiation, ischemia, necrosis, hemorrhage, inflammation and the presence of intermingled normal tissue. One related aspect of our work is the development of { 13 C}- 1 H metabolic imaging of 13 C for metabolic characterization, with enhanced spatial localization (46). This should markedly extend the range of potential clinical NMR uses because the spatial variation in prostate metabolism may prove to be just as important in tumor diagnoses as bulk (volume-averaged) properties themselves. It is our hope that NMRS and spectroscopic imaging will reveal a sound correlation between prostate metabolism and tumor properties that will be clinically straightforward and useful for diagnosis

  2. Prostate specific membrane antigen- a target for imaging and therapy with radionuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Choyke, Peter L; Capala, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer continues to represent a major health problem, and yet there is no effective treatment available for advanced metastatic disease. Thus, there is an urgent need for the development of more effective treatment modalities that could improve the outcome. Because prostate specific...... membrane antigen (PSMA), a transmembrane protein, is expressed by virtually all prostate cancers, and its expression is further increased in poorly differentiated, metastatic, and hormone-refractory carcinomas, it is a very attractive target. Molecules targeting PSMA can be labelled with radionuclides...... to become both diagnostic and/or therapeutic agents. The use of PSMA binding agents, labelled with diagnostic and therapeutic radio-isotopes, opens up the potential for a new era of personalized management of metastatic prostate cancer....

  3. PET Imaging of 64Cu-DOTA-scFv-Anti-PSMA Lipid Nanoparticles (LNPs): Enhanced Tumor Targeting over Anti-PSMA scFv or Untargeted LNPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Patty; Li, Lin; Chea, Junie; Delgado, Melissa K.; Crow, Desiree; Poku, Erasmus; Szpikowska, Barbara; Bowles, Nicole; Channappa, Divya; Colcher, David; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.; Shively, John E.; Yazaki, Paul J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Single chain (scFv) antibodies are ideal targeting ligands due to their modular structure, high antigen specificity and affinity. These monovalent ligands display rapid tumor targeting but have limitations due to their fast urinary clearance. Methods An anti-prostate membrane antigen (PSMA) scFv with a site-specific cysteine was expressed and evaluated in a prostate cancer xenograft model by Cu-64 PET imaging. To enhance tumor accumulation, the scFv-cys was conjugated to the co-polymer DSPE-PEG-maleimide that spontaneously assembled into a homogeneous multivalent lipid nanoparticle (LNP). Results The targeted LNP exhibited a 2-fold increase in tumor uptake compared to the scFv alone using two different thiol ester chemistries. The anti-PSMA scFv-LNP exhibited a 1.6 fold increase in tumor targeting over the untargeted LNP. Conclusions The targeted anti-PSMA scFv-LNP showed enhanced tumor accumulation over the scFv alone or the untargeted DOTA-micelle providing evidence for the development of this system for drug delivery. Advances in Knowledge and implications for patient care Anti-tumor scFv antibody fragments have not achieved their therapeutic potential due to their fast blood clearance. Conjugation to a LNP enables multivalency to the tumor antigen as well as increased molecular size for chemotherapy drug delivery. PMID:28126683

  4. PET imaging of 64Cu-DOTA-scFv-anti-PSMA lipid nanoparticles (LNPs): Enhanced tumor targeting over anti-PSMA scFv or untargeted LNPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Patty; Li, Lin; Chea, Junie; Delgado, Melissa K.; Crow, Desiree; Poku, Erasmus; Szpikowska, Barbara; Bowles, Nicole; Channappa, Divya; Colcher, David; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.; Shively, John E.; Yazaki, Paul J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Single chain (scFv) antibodies are ideal targeting ligands due to their modular structure, high antigen specificity and affinity. These monovalent ligands display rapid tumor targeting but have limitations due to their fast urinary clearance. Methods: An anti-prostate membrane antigen (PSMA) scFv with a site-specific cysteine was expressed and evaluated in a prostate cancer xenograft model by Cu-64 PET imaging. To enhance tumor accumulation, the scFv-cys was conjugated to the co-polymer DSPE-PEG-maleimide that spontaneously assembled into a homogeneous multivalent lipid nanoparticle (LNP). Results: The targeted LNP exhibited a 2-fold increase in tumor uptake compared to the scFv alone using two different thiol ester chemistries. The anti-PSMA scFv-LNP exhibited a 1.6 fold increase in tumor targeting over the untargeted LNP. Conclusions: The targeted anti-PSMA scFv-LNP showed enhanced tumor accumulation over the scFv alone or the untargeted DOTA-micelle providing evidence for the development of this system for drug delivery. Advances in knowledge and implications for patient care: Anti-tumor scFv antibody fragments have not achieved their therapeutic potential due to their fast blood clearance. Conjugation to an LNP enables multivalency to the tumor antigen as well as increased molecular size for chemotherapy drug delivery.

  5. TU-F-BRF-02: MR-US Prostate Registration Using Patient-Specific Tissue Elasticity Property Prior for MR-Targeted, TRUS-Guided HDR Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X; Rossi, P; Ogunleye, T; Jani, A; Curran, W; Liu, T

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has become a popular treatment modality for prostate cancer. Conventional transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate HDR brachytherapy could benefit significantly from MR-targeted, TRUS-guided procedure where the tumor locations, acquired from the multiparametric MRI, are incorporated into the treatment planning. In order to enable this integration, we have developed a MR-TRUS registration with a patient-specific biomechanical elasticity prior. Methods: The proposed method used a biomechanical elasticity prior to guide the prostate volumetric B-spline deformation in the MRI and TRUS registration. The patient-specific biomechanical elasticity prior was generated using ultrasound elastography, where two 3D TRUS prostate images were acquired under different probe-induced pressures during the HDR procedure, which takes 2-4 minutes. These two 3D TRUS images were used to calculate the local displacement (elasticity map) of two prostate volumes. The B-spline transformation was calculated by minimizing the Euclidean distance between the normalized attribute vectors of the prostate surface landmarks on the MR and TRUS. This technique was evaluated through two studies: a prostate-phantom study and a pilot study with 5 patients undergoing prostate HDR treatment. The accuracy of our approach was assessed through the locations of several landmarks in the post-registration and TRUS images; our registration results were compared with the surface-based method. Results: For the phantom study, the mean landmark displacement of the proposed method was 1.29±0.11 mm. For the 5 patients, the mean landmark displacement of the surface-based method was 3.25±0.51 mm; our method, 1.71±0.25 mm. Therefore, our proposed method of prostate registration outperformed the surfaced-based registration significantly. Conclusion: We have developed a novel MR-TRUS prostate registration approach based on patient-specific biomechanical elasticity prior

  6. Targeting the Adipocyte Tumor Cell Interaction in Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    sensing pathways engage anabolism and storage, whereas scarcity triggers homeostatic mechanisms, such as the mobilization of internal stores through...mTORC1 activation in response to amino acids, which were both rescued by the ectopic expression of MEKK3 (Figure 2G ). Similar results were obtained with...p38d in an in vitro kinase assay and found that p38d directly phosphorylated p62 at T269/S272 (Fig- ure 3G ). To confirm that these residues account

  7. Prostate-specific antigen-activated thapsigargin prodrug as targeted therapy for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denmeade, Samuel R; Jakobsen, Carsten M; Janssen, Samuel

    2003-01-01

    Standard anti-proliferative chemotherapy is relatively ineffective against slowly proliferating androgen-independent prostate cancer cells within metastatic sites. In contrast, the lipophilic cytotoxin thapsigargin, which causes apoptosis by disrupting intracellular free Ca2+ levels, is effective...... against both proliferative and quiescent (i.e., G0-arrested) cells. However, thapsigargin's mechanism of action indicates that it is unlikely to be selective for cancer cells or prostate cells....

  8. Diagnostic Accuracy of Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Fusion Guided Targeted Biopsy Evaluated by Transperineal Template Saturation Prostate Biopsy for the Detection and Characterization of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortezavi, Ashkan; Märzendorfer, Olivia; Donati, Olivio F; Rizzi, Gianluca; Rupp, Niels J; Wettstein, Marian S; Gross, Oliver; Sulser, Tullio; Hermanns, Thomas; Eberli, Daniel

    2018-02-21

    We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging/transrectal ultrasound fusion guided targeted biopsy against that of transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy to detect prostate cancer. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 415 men who consecutively presented for prostate biopsy between November 2014 and September 2016 at our tertiary care center. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging was performed using a 3 Tesla device without an endorectal coil, followed by transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy with the BiopSee® fusion system. Additional fusion guided targeted biopsy was done in men with a suspicious lesion on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, defined as Likert score 3 to 5. Any Gleason pattern 4 was defined as clinically significant prostate cancer. The detection rates of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and fusion guided targeted biopsy were compared with the detection rate of transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy using the McNemar test. We obtained a median of 40 (range 30 to 55) and 3 (range 2 to 4) transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy and fusion guided targeted biopsy cores, respectively. Of the 124 patients (29.9%) without a suspicious lesion on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging 32 (25.8%) were found to have clinically significant prostate cancer on transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy. Of the 291 patients (70.1%) with a Likert score of 3 to 5 clinically significant prostate cancer was detected in 129 (44.3%) by multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging fusion guided targeted biopsy, in 176 (60.5%) by transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy and in 187 (64.3%) by the combined approach. Overall 58 cases (19.9%) of clinically significant prostate cancer would have been missed if fusion guided targeted biopsy had been performed exclusively. The sensitivity of

  9. Cytosolic Phospholipase A2-α: A Potential Therapeutic Target for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish I.; Singh, Jaskirat; Niknami, Marzieh; Kurek, Caroline; Yao, Mu; Lu, Sasa; Maclean, Fiona; King, Nicholas J.C.; Gelb, Michael H.; Scott, Kieran F.; Russell, Pamela J.; Boulas, John; Dong., Qihan

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Cytosolic Phospholipase A2-α (cPLA2-α) provides intracellular arachidonic acid to supply both cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways. We aim to determine the expression and activation of cPLA2-α in prostate cancer (PC) cell line and tissue and the effect of targeting cPLA2-α in-vitro and in-vivo. Experimental Design The expression of cPLA2-α was determined in PC cells by RT-PCR, Western blot and immunocytochemistry. Growth inhibition, apoptosis and cPLA2-α activity were determined after inhibition with cPLA2-α siRNA or inhibitor (Wyeth-1). cPLA2-α inhibitor or vehicle was also administered to PC xenograft mouse models. Finally the expression of phospho-cPLA2-α was determined by immunohistochemistry in human normal, androgen sensitive and insensitive PC specimens. Results cPLA2-α is present in all PC cells lines, but increased in androgen insensitive cells. Inhibition with siRNA or Wyeth-1 results in significant reductions in PC cell numbers, as a result of reduced proliferation as well as increased apoptosis and this was also associated with a reduction in cPLA2-α activity. Expression of cyclin D1 and phosphorylation of Akt were also observed to decrease. Wyeth-1 inhibited PC3 xenograft growth by approximately 33% and again, also reduced cyclin D1. Immunohistochemistry of human prostate tissue revealed that phospho-cPLA2-α is increased when hormone refractory is reached. Conclusions cPLA2-α expression and activation is increased in the androgen insensitive cancer cell line and tissue. Inhibition of cPLA2-α results in cells and xenograft tumor growth inhibition and serves as a potentially effective therapy for hormone refractory PC. PMID:19088022

  10. Variation of clinical target volume definition in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valicenti, Richard K.; Sweet, John W.; Hauck, Walter W.; Hudes, Richard S.; Lee, Tony; Dicker, Adam P.; Waterman, Frank M.; Anne, Pramila R.; Corn, Benjamin W.; Galvin, James M.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Currently, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) planning relies on the interpretation of computed tomography (CT) axial images for defining the clinical target volume (CTV). This study investigates the variation among multiple observers to define the CTV used in 3D-CRT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Seven observers independently delineated the CTVs (prostate ± seminal vesicles [SV]) from the CT simulation data of 10 prostate cancer patients undergoing 3D-CRT. Six patients underwent CT simulation without the use of contrast material and serve as a control group. The other 4 had urethral and bladder opacification with contrast medium. To determine interobserver variation, we evaluated the derived volume, the maximum dimensions, and the isocenter for each examination of CTV. We assessed the reliability in the CTVs among the observers by correlating the variation for each class of measurements. This was estimated by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), with 1.00 defining absolute correlation. Results: For the prostate volumes, the ICC was 0.80 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.56-0.96). This changed to 0.92 (95% CI: 0.75-0.99) with the use of contrast material. Similarly, the maximal prostatic dimensions were reliable and improved. There was poor agreement in defining the SV. For this structure, the ICC never exceeded 0.28. The reliability of the isocenter was excellent, with the ICC exceeding 0.83 and 0.90 for the prostate ± SV, respectively. Conclusions: In 3D-CRT for prostate cancer, there was excellent agreement among multiple observers to define the prostate target volume but poor agreement to define the SV. The use of urethral and bladder contrast improved the reliability of localizing the prostate. For all CTVs, the isocenter was very reliable and should be used to compare the variation in 3D dosimetry among multiple observers

  11. Role of choline PET/CT in guiding target volume delineation for irradiation of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzenboeck, S.M.; Kurth, J. [University Medical Centre Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Gocke, C.; Kuhnt, T.; Hildebrandt, G. [University Medical Centre Rostock, Department of Radiotherapy, Rostock (Germany); Krause, B.J. [University Medical Centre Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Universitaet Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Universitaetsmedizin Rostock, Rostock (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Choline PET/CT has shown limitations for the detection of primary prostate cancer and nodal metastatic disease, mainly due to limited sensitivity and specificity. Conversely in the restaging of prostate cancer recurrence, choline PET/CT is a promising imaging modality for the detection of local regional and nodal recurrence with an impact on therapy management. This review highlights current literature on choline PET/CT for radiation treatment planning in primary and recurrent prostate cancer. Due to limited sensitivity and specificity in differentiating between benign and malignant prostatic tissues in primary prostate cancer, there is little enthusiasm for target volume delineation based on choline PET/CT. Irradiation planning for the treatment of single lymph node metastases on the basis of choline PET/CT is controversial due to its limited lesion-based sensitivity in primary nodal staging. In high-risk prostate cancer, choline PET/CT might diagnose lymph node metastases, which potentially can be included in the conventional irradiation field. Prior to radiation treatment of recurrent prostate cancer, choline PET/CT may prove useful for patient stratification by excluding distant disease which would require systemic therapy. In patients with local recurrence, choline PET/CT can be used to delineate local sites of recurrence within the prostatic resection bed allowing a boost to PET-positive sites. In patients with lymph node metastases outside the prostatic fossa and regional metastatic lymph nodes, choline PET/CT might influence radiation treatment planning by enabling extension of the target volume to lymphatic drainage sites with or without a boost to PET-positive lymph nodes. Further clinical randomized trials are required to assess treatment outcomes following choline-based biological radiation treatment planning in comparison with conventional radiation treatment planning. (orig.)

  12. A nonlinear competitive model of the prostate tumor growth under intermittent androgen suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Zhao, Tong-Jun; Yuan, Chang-Qing; Xie, Jing-Hui; Hao, Fang-Fang

    2016-09-07

    Hormone suppression has been the primary modality of treatment for prostate cancer. However long-term androgen deprivation may induce androgen-independent (AI) recurrence. Intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) is a potential way to delay or avoid the AI relapse. Mathematical models of tumor growth and treatment are simple while they are capable of capturing the essence of complicated interactions. Game theory models have analyzed that tumor cells can enhance their fitness by adopting genetically determined survival strategies. In this paper, we consider the survival strategies as the competitive advantage of tumor cells and propose a new model to mimic the prostate tumor growth in IAS therapy. Then we investigate the competition effect in tumor development by numerical simulations. The results indicate that successfully IAS-controlled states can be achieved even though the net growth rate of AI cells is positive for any androgen level. There is crucial difference between the previous models and the new one in the phase diagram of successful and unsuccessful tumor control by IAS administration, which means that the suggestions from the models for medication can be different. Furthermore we introduce quadratic logistic terms to the competition model to simulate the tumor growth in the environment with a finite carrying capacity considering the nutrients or inhibitors. The simulations show that the tumor growth can reach an equilibrium state or an oscillatory state with the net growth rate of AI cells being androgen independent. Our results suggest that the competition and the restraint of a limited environment can enhance the possibility of relapse prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Engineering of magnetic DNA nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Chen Yiru; He Wenjie; Hong Poda; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Domb, Abraham J.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to engineer novel targeted delivery system composed of magnetic DNA nanoparticles to be effective as an efficient targeted gene therapy vehicle for tumor therapy. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of plasmid DNA-encoded NK4 that acts as an HGF-antagonist and anti-angiogenic regulator for inhibitions of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Spermine (Sm) was chemically introduced to the hydroxyl groups of dextran to obtain dextran-Sm. When Fe 2+ solution was added to the mixture of dextran-Sm and a plasmid DNA, homogenous DNA nanoparticles were formed via chemical metal coordination bonding with average size of 230 nm. Characterization of DNA nanoparticles was performed via dynamic light scattering measurement, electrophoretic light scattering measurement, as well as transmission electron microscope. DNA nanoparticles effectively condensed plasmid DNA into nanoparticles and enhanced the stability of DNA, while significantly improved transfection efficiency in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo. In addition, magnetic DNA nanoparticles exhibited high efficiency in antitumor therapy with regards to tumor growth as well as survival of animals evaluated in the presence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the magnetic properties of these DNA nanoparticles would enhance the tracking of non-viral gene delivery systems when administrated in vivo in a test model. These findings suggest that DNA nanoparticles effectively deliver DNA to tumor and thereby inhibiting tumor growth.

  14. Engineering of magnetic DNA nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein, E-mail: hosseinkhani@yahoo.com [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Chen Yiru [National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Engineering (China); He Wenjie; Hong Poda [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Yu, Dah-Shyong [Nanomedicine Research Center, National Defense Medical Center (China); Domb, Abraham J. [Institute of Drug Research, The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2013-01-15

    This study aims to engineer novel targeted delivery system composed of magnetic DNA nanoparticles to be effective as an efficient targeted gene therapy vehicle for tumor therapy. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of plasmid DNA-encoded NK4 that acts as an HGF-antagonist and anti-angiogenic regulator for inhibitions of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Spermine (Sm) was chemically introduced to the hydroxyl groups of dextran to obtain dextran-Sm. When Fe{sup 2+} solution was added to the mixture of dextran-Sm and a plasmid DNA, homogenous DNA nanoparticles were formed via chemical metal coordination bonding with average size of 230 nm. Characterization of DNA nanoparticles was performed via dynamic light scattering measurement, electrophoretic light scattering measurement, as well as transmission electron microscope. DNA nanoparticles effectively condensed plasmid DNA into nanoparticles and enhanced the stability of DNA, while significantly improved transfection efficiency in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo. In addition, magnetic DNA nanoparticles exhibited high efficiency in antitumor therapy with regards to tumor growth as well as survival of animals evaluated in the presence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the magnetic properties of these DNA nanoparticles would enhance the tracking of non-viral gene delivery systems when administrated in vivo in a test model. These findings suggest that DNA nanoparticles effectively deliver DNA to tumor and thereby inhibiting tumor growth.

  15. Co-targeting androgen receptor and DNA for imaging and molecular radiotherapy of prostate cancer: in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guang; Kortylewicz, Zbigniew P; Enke, Thomas; Baranowska-Kortylewicz, Janina

    2014-12-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) axis, the key growth and survival pathway in prostate cancer, remains a prime target for drug development. 5-Radioiodo-3'-O-(17β-succinyl-5α-androstan-3-one)-2'-deoxyuridin-5'-yl phosphate (RISAD-P) is the AR-seeking reagent developed for noninvasive assessment of AR and proliferative status, and for molecular radiotherapy of prostate cancer with Auger electron-emitting radionuclides. RISAD-P radiolabeled with 123I, 124I, and 125I were synthesized using a common stannylated precursor. The cellular uptake, subcellular distribution, and radiotoxicity of 123I-, 124I-, and (125) IRISAD-P were measured in LNCaP, DU145, and PC-3 cell lines expressing various levels of AR. The uptake of RISAD-P by prostate cancer cells is proportional to AR levels and independent of the radionuclide. The intracellular accumulation of radioactivity is directly proportional to the extracellular concentration of RISAD-P and the duration of exposure. Initially, RISAD-P is trapped in the cytoplasm. Within 24 hr, radioactivity is associated exclusively with DNA. The RISAD-P radiotoxicity is determined by the radionuclide; however, the cellular responses are directly proportional to the AR expression levels. LNCaP cells expressing high levels of AR are killed at the rate of up to 60% per day after a brief 1 hr RISAD-P treatment. For the first time, the AR expression in PC-3 and DU 145 cells, generally reported as AR-negative, was quantitated by the ultra sensitive RISAD-P-based method. RISAD-P is a theranostic drug, which targets AR. Its subcellular metabolite participates in DNA synthesis. RISAD-P is a promising candidate for imaging of the AR expression and tumor proliferation as well as molecular radiotherapy of prostate cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Tumor targeted delivery of doxorubicin in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A B Madhankumar

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve sheath tumors are benign tumors that have the potential to transform into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs. Interleukin-13 receptor alpha 2 (IL13Rα2 is a cancer associated receptor expressed in glioblastoma and other invasive cancers. We analyzed IL13Rα2 expression in several MPNST cell lines including the STS26T cell line, as well as in several peripheral nerve sheath tumors to utilize the IL13Rα2 receptor as a target for therapy. In our studies, we demonstrated the selective expression of IL13Rα2 in several peripheral nerve sheath tumors by immunohistochemistry (IHC and immunoblots. We established a sciatic nerve MPNST mouse model in NIH III nude mice using a luciferase transfected STS26T MPNST cell line. Similarly, analysis of the mouse sciatic nerves after tumor induction revealed significant expression of IL13Rα2 by IHC when compared to a normal sciatic nerve. IL13 conjugated liposomal doxorubicin was formulated and shown to bind and internalized in the MPNST cell culture model demonstrating cytotoxic effect. Our subsequent in vivo investigation in the STS26T MPNST sciatic nerve tumor model indicated that IL13 conjugated liposomal doxorubicin (IL13LIPDXR was more effective in inhibiting tumor progression compared to unconjugated liposomal doxorubicin (LIPDXR. This further supports that IL13 receptor targeted nanoliposomes is a potential approach for treating MPNSTs.

  17. MRI-Targeted or Standard Biopsy for Prostate-Cancer Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasivisvanathan, Veeru; Rannikko, Antti S; Borghi, Marcelo; Panebianco, Valeria; Mynderse, Lance A; Vaarala, Markku H; Briganti, Alberto; Budäus, Lars; Hellawell, Giles; Hindley, Richard G; Roobol, Monique J; Eggener, Scott; Ghei, Maneesh; Villers, Arnauld; Bladou, Franck; Villeirs, Geert M; Virdi, Jaspal; Boxler, Silvan; Robert, Grégoire; Singh, Paras B; Venderink, Wulphert; Hadaschik, Boris A; Ruffion, Alain; Hu, Jim C; Margolis, Daniel; Crouzet, Sébastien; Klotz, Laurence; Taneja, Samir S; Pinto, Peter; Gill, Inderbir; Allen, Clare; Giganti, Francesco; Freeman, Alex; Morris, Stephen; Punwani, Shonit; Williams, Norman R; Brew-Graves, Chris; Deeks, Jonathan; Takwoingi, Yemisi; Emberton, Mark; Moore, Caroline M

    2018-05-10

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with or without targeted biopsy, is an alternative to standard transrectal ultrasonography-guided biopsy for prostate-cancer detection in men with a raised prostate-specific antigen level who have not undergone biopsy. However, comparative evidence is limited. In a multicenter, randomized, noninferiority trial, we assigned men with a clinical suspicion of prostate cancer who had not undergone biopsy previously to undergo MRI, with or without targeted biopsy, or standard transrectal ultrasonography-guided biopsy. Men in the MRI-targeted biopsy group underwent a targeted biopsy (without standard biopsy cores) if the MRI was suggestive of prostate cancer; men whose MRI results were not suggestive of prostate cancer were not offered biopsy. Standard biopsy was a 10-to-12-core, transrectal ultrasonography-guided biopsy. The primary outcome was the proportion of men who received a diagnosis of clinically significant cancer. Secondary outcomes included the proportion of men who received a diagnosis of clinically insignificant cancer. A total of 500 men underwent randomization. In the MRI-targeted biopsy group, 71 of 252 men (28%) had MRI results that were not suggestive of prostate cancer, so they did not undergo biopsy. Clinically significant cancer was detected in 95 men (38%) in the MRI-targeted biopsy group, as compared with 64 of 248 (26%) in the standard-biopsy group (adjusted difference, 12 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4 to 20; P=0.005). MRI, with or without targeted biopsy, was noninferior to standard biopsy, and the 95% confidence interval indicated the superiority of this strategy over standard biopsy. Fewer men in the MRI-targeted biopsy group than in the standard-biopsy group received a diagnosis of clinically insignificant cancer (adjusted difference, -13 percentage points; 95% CI, -19 to -7; Pprostate cancer who had not undergone biopsy previously. (Funded by the National Institute for

  18. Arctigenin inhibits prostate tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Piwen; Solorzano, Walter; Diaz, Tanya; Magyar, Clara E.; Henning, Susanne M.; Vadgama, Jaydutt V.

    2017-01-01

    The low bioavailability of most phytochemicals limits their translation to humans. We investigated whether arctigenin, a novel anti-inflammatory lignan from the seeds of Arctium lappa, has favorable bioavailability/potency against prostate cancer. The anticarcinogenic activity of arctigenin was investigated both in vitro using the androgen-sensitive LNCaP and LAPC-4 human prostate cancer cells and pre-malignant WPE1-NA22 cells, and in vivo using xenograft mouse models. Arctigenin at lower doses (< 2μM) significantly inhibited the proliferation of LNCaP and LAPC-4 cells by 30-50% at 48h compared to control, and inhibited WPE1-NA22 cells by 75%, while did not affect normal prostate epithelial cells. Male severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were implanted subcutaneously with LAPC-4 cells for in vivo studies. In one experiment, the intervention started one week after tumor implantation. Mice received arctigenin at 50mg/kg (LD) or 100mg/kg (HD) b.w. daily or vehicle control by oral gavage. After 6 weeks, tumor growth was inhibited by 50% (LD) and 70% (HD) compared to control. A stronger tumor inhibitory effect was observed in a second experiment where arctigenin intervention started two weeks prior to tumor implantation. Arc was detectable in blood and tumors in Arc groups, with a mean value up to 2.0 μM in blood, and 8.3 nmol/g tissue in tumors. Tumor levels of proliferation marker Ki67, total and nuclear androgen receptor, and growth factors including VEGF, EGF, and FGF-β were significantly decreased by Arc, along with an increase in apoptosis marker of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Genes responsive to arctigenin were identified including TIMP3 and ZNF185, and microRNAs including miR-126-5p, and miR-21-5p. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of the strong anticancer activity of arctigenin in prostate cancer. The effective dose of arctigenin in vitro is physiologically achievable in vivo, which provides a high promise in its translation to human application

  19. Arctigenin inhibits prostate tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piwen Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The low bioavailability of most phytochemicals limits their translation to humans. We investigated whether arctigenin, a novel anti-inflammatory lignan from the seeds of Arctium lappa, has favorable bioavailability/potency against prostate cancer. The anticarcinogenic activity of arctigenin was investigated both in vitro using the androgen-sensitive LNCaP and LAPC-4 human prostate cancer cells and pre-malignant WPE1-NA22 cells, and in vivo using xenograft mouse models. Arctigenin at lower doses (<2 μM significantly inhibited the proliferation of LNCaP and LAPC-4 cells by 30–50% at 48 h compared to control, and inhibited WPE1-NA22 cells by 75%, while did not affect normal prostate epithelial cells. Male severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice were implanted subcutaneously with LAPC-4 cells for in vivo studies. In one experiment, the intervention started one week after tumor implantation. Mice received arctigenin at 50 mg/kg (LD or 100 mg/kg (HD b.w. daily or vehicle control by oral gavage. After 6 weeks, tumor growth was inhibited by 50% (LD and 70% (HD compared to control. A stronger tumor inhibitory effect was observed in a second experiment where arctigenin intervention started two weeks prior to tumor implantation. Arc was detectable in blood and tumors in Arc groups, with a mean value up to 2.0 μM in blood, and 8.3 nmol/g tissue in tumors. Tumor levels of proliferation marker Ki67, total and nuclear androgen receptor, and growth factors including VEGF, EGF, and FGF-β were significantly decreased by Arc, along with an increase in apoptosis marker of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Genes responsive to arctigenin were identified including TIMP3 and ZNF185, and microRNAs including miR-126-5p, and miR-21-5p. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of the strong anticancer activity of arctigenin in prostate cancer. The effective dose of arctigenin in vitro is physiologically achievable in vivo, which provides a high promise in its

  20. Rapid ex vivo imaging of PAIII prostate to bone tumor with SWIFT-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhach, Ihor; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Lynch, Conor C; Corum, Curt; Martinez, Gary V; Garwood, Michael; Gillies, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    The limiting factor for MRI of skeletal/mineralized tissue is fast transverse relaxation. A recent advancement in MRI technology, SWIFT (Sweep Imaging with Fourier Transform), is emerging as a new approach to overcome this difficulty. Among other techniques like UTE, ZTE, and WASPI, the application of SWIFT technology has the strong potential to impact preclinical and clinical imaging, particularly in the context of primary or metastatic bone cancers because it has the added advantage of imaging water in mineralized tissues of bone allowing MRI images to be obtained of tissues previously visible only with modalities such as computed tomography (CT). The goal of the current study is to examine the feasibility of SWIFT for the assessment of the prostate cancer induced changes in bone formation (osteogenesis) and destruction (osteolysis) in ex vivo specimens. A luciferase expressing prostate cancer cell line (PAIII) or saline control was inoculated directly into the tibia of 6-week-old immunocompromised male mice. Tumor growth was assessed weekly for 3 weeks before euthanasia and dissection of the tumor bearing and sham tibias. The ex vivo mouse tibia specimens were imaged with a 9.4 Tesla (T) and 7T MRI systems. SWIFT images are compared with traditional gradient-echo and spin-echo MRI images as well as CT and histological sections. SWIFT images with nominal resolution of 78 μm are obtained with the tumor and different bone structures identified. Prostate cancer induced changes in the bone microstructure are visible in SWIFT images, which is supported by spin-echo, high resolution CT and histological analysis. SWIFT MRI is capable of high-quality high-resolution ex vivo imaging of bone tumor and surrounding bone and soft tissues. Furthermore, SWIFT MRI shows promise for in vivo bone tumor imaging, with the added benefits of nonexposure to ionizing radiation, quietness, and speed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Glucosylated polyethylenimine as a tumor-targeting gene carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In-Kyu; Cook, Seung-Eun; Kim, You-Kyoung; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Cho, Myung-Haing; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong; Kim, Eun-Mi; Nah, Jae-Woon; Bom, Hee-Seung; Cho, Chong-Su

    2005-11-01

    Glucosylated polyethylenimine (GPEI) was synthesized as a tumor-targeting gene carrier through facilitative glucose metabolism by tumor glucose transporter. Particle sizes of GPEI/DNA complex increased in proportion to glucose content of GPEI, whereas surface charge of the complex was not dependent on glucosylation, partially due to inefficient shielding of the short hydrophilic group introduced. GPEI with higher glucosylation (36 mol-%) had no cytotoxic effect on cells even at polymer concentrations higher than 200 microg/mL. Compared to unglucosylated PEI, glucosylation induced less than one-order decrease of transfection efficiency. Transfection of GPEI/DNA complex into tumor cells possibly occurred through specific interaction between glucose-related cell receptors and glucose moiety of GPEI. Gamma imaging technique revealed GPEI/DNA complex was distributed in liver, spleen, and tumors.

  2. Development of Antibody-Based Vaccines Targeting the Tumor Vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiaodong; Bicknell, Roy

    2016-01-01

    A functional vasculature is essential for tumor progression and malignant cell metastasis. Endothelial cells lining blood vessels in the tumor are exposed to a unique microenvironment, which in turn induces expression of specific proteins designated as tumor endothelial markers (TEMs). TEMs either localized at the plasma membrane or secreted into the extracellular matrix are accessible for antibody targeting, which can be either infused or generated de novo via vaccination. Recent studies have demonstrated vaccines against several TEMs can induce a strong antibody response accompanied by a potent antitumor effect in animal models. These findings present an exciting field for novel anticancer therapy development. As most of the TEMs are self-antigens, breaking tolerance is necessary for a successful vaccine. This chapter describes approaches to efficiently induce a robust antibody response against the tumor vasculature.

  3. Specific targeting for the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefnagel, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    For the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors three ways of specific targeting of radionuclides prevail: by 131 I-meta-iodo-benzyl-guanidine (MIBG), which is taken up by an active uptake-1 mechanism and stored in neurosecretory granules of neural crest tumor cells, by radiolabeled peptides, in particular the somatostatin analogs octreotide and lanreotide, targeting the peptide receptors, and by radiolabeled antibodies, which target tumor cell surface antigens. The choice depends on the indication, the results of diagnostic imaging using tracer amounts of these agents, the availability and feasibility of radionuclide therapy and of other treatment modalities. The applications, clinical results and developments for the major indications are reviewed. 131 I-MIBG therapy has a cumulative response rate of 50%, associated with little toxicity, in metastatic pheochromocytoma, paraganglioma and neuroblastoma, whereas its role is primarily palliative in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma and carcinoid tumors. Treatment using 90 Y- or 177 Lu-labeled octreotide/lanreotide is mostly used in neuroendocrine gastro-entero-pancreatic (GEP) tumors and paraganglioma, attaining stabilization of disease anti-palliation in the majority of patients. As this treatment is specific for the receptor rather than for the tumor type, it may also be applicable to other, non-neuroendocrine tumors. Radioimmunotherapy is applied in medullary thyroid carcinoma, in which a phase I/II study using bi-specific anti-DTPA/anti-CEA immuno-conjugates followed by 131 I-hapten has proven some degree of success, and may be used in neuroblastoma more effectively than before, once chimeric and humanized monoclonal antibodies become available for therapy. Integration of these specific and noninvasive therapies at an optimal moment into the treatment protocols of these diseases may enhance their effectiveness and acceptance. (author)

  4. BONE TUMOR ENVIRONMENT AS POTENTIAL THERAPEUTIC TARGET IN EWING SARCOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise eREDINI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ewing sarcoma is the second most common pediatric bone tumor, with three cases per million worldwide. In clinical terms, ES is an aggressive, rapidly fatal malignancy that mainly develops in osseous sites (85%, but also in extraskeletal soft tissue. It spreads naturally to the lungs, bones and bone marrow with poor prognosis in the two latter cases. Bone lesions from primary or secondary (metastases tumors are characterized by extensive bone remodeling, more often due to osteolysis. Osteoclast activation and subsequent bone resorption is responsible for the clinical features of bone tumors including pain, vertebral collapse and spinal cord compression. Based on the vicious cycle concept of tumor cells and bone resorbing cells, drugs which target osteoclasts may be promising agents as adjuvant setting for treating bone tumors, including Ewing sarcoma. There is also increasing evidence that cellular and molecular protagonists present in the bone microenvironment play a part in establishing a favorable niche for tumor initiation and progression. The purpose of this review is to discuss the potential therapeutic value of drugs targeting the bone tumor microenvironment in Ewing Sarcoma. The first part of the review will focus on targeting the bone resorbing function of osteoclasts by means of bisphosphonates (BPs or drugs blocking the pro-resorbing cytokine Receptor Activator of NF-kappa B Ligand (RANKL. Second, the role of this peculiar hypoxic microenvironment will be discussed in the context of resistance to chemotherapy, escape from the immune system, or neo-angiogenesis. Therapeutic interventions based on these specificities could be then proposed in the context of Ewing sarcoma.

  5. Chemotherapeutic drug delivery by tumoral extracellular matrix targeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raavé , R.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Daamen, W.F.

    2018-01-01

    Systemic chemotherapy is a primary strategy in the treatment of cancer, but comes with a number of limitations such as toxicity and unfavorable biodistribution. To overcome these issues, numerous targeting systems for specific delivery of chemotherapeutics to tumor cells have been designed and

  6. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagan, Jonathan, E-mail: jdpagan@uams.edu; Przybyla, Beata; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Gupta, Kalpna [Vascular Biology Center and Division of Hematology-Oncology Transplantation, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, MN 72223 (United States); Griffin, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2013-02-18

    Endothelial cell precursors from human peripheral blood have been shown to home to areas of neovascularization and may assist tumor growth by increasing or fortifying blood vessel growth. In the present study, the influence of these cells on tumor growth and physiology was investigated and the role of these cells as a therapeutic target or in determining treatment sensitivity was tested. After isolation from human blood and expansion in vitro, actively growing cells with verified endothelial phenotype (Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cell, BOEC) were injected i.v. into tumor bearing mice for three consecutive days. The growth rate was significantly enhanced in relatively small RERF human lung tumors (i.e., less than 150 mm{sup 3}) grown in immunocompromised mice by an average of 1.5-fold while it had no effect when injections were given to animals bearing larger tumors. There were no signs of toxicity or unwanted systemic effects. We also observed evidence of increased perfusion, vessel number, response to 15 Gy radiation and oxygenation in RERF tumors of animals injected with BOECs compared to control tumors. In addition, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma tumors were found to grow faster upon injection of BOECs. When FSaII tumors were subjected to a partial thermal ablation treatment using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) there was consistently elevated detection of fluorescently labeled and i.v. injected endothelial precursors in the tumor when analyzed with optical imaging and/or histological preparations. Importantly, we also observed that BOECs treated with the novel anti-angiogenic peptide anginex in-vitro, show decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to radiation. In vivo, the normal increase in FSaII tumor growth induced by injected BOECs was blunted by the addition of anginex treatment. It appears that endothelial precursors may significantly contribute to tumor vessel growth, tumor progression and/or repair of tumor damage and may improve the

  7. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagan, Jonathan; Przybyla, Beata; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Gupta, Kalpna; Griffin, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cell precursors from human peripheral blood have been shown to home to areas of neovascularization and may assist tumor growth by increasing or fortifying blood vessel growth. In the present study, the influence of these cells on tumor growth and physiology was investigated and the role of these cells as a therapeutic target or in determining treatment sensitivity was tested. After isolation from human blood and expansion in vitro, actively growing cells with verified endothelial phenotype (Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cell, BOEC) were injected i.v. into tumor bearing mice for three consecutive days. The growth rate was significantly enhanced in relatively small RERF human lung tumors (i.e., less than 150 mm 3 ) grown in immunocompromised mice by an average of 1.5-fold while it had no effect when injections were given to animals bearing larger tumors. There were no signs of toxicity or unwanted systemic effects. We also observed evidence of increased perfusion, vessel number, response to 15 Gy radiation and oxygenation in RERF tumors of animals injected with BOECs compared to control tumors. In addition, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma tumors were found to grow faster upon injection of BOECs. When FSaII tumors were subjected to a partial thermal ablation treatment using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) there was consistently elevated detection of fluorescently labeled and i.v. injected endothelial precursors in the tumor when analyzed with optical imaging and/or histological preparations. Importantly, we also observed that BOECs treated with the novel anti-angiogenic peptide anginex in-vitro, show decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to radiation. In vivo, the normal increase in FSaII tumor growth induced by injected BOECs was blunted by the addition of anginex treatment. It appears that endothelial precursors may significantly contribute to tumor vessel growth, tumor progression and/or repair of tumor damage and may improve the

  8. Inhibiting Vimentin or beta 1-integrin Reverts Prostate Tumor Cells in IrECM and Reduces Tumor Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xueping; Fournier, Marcia V.; Ware, Joy L.; Bissell, Mina J.; Zehner, Zendra E.

    2009-07-27

    Prostate epithelial cells grown embedded in laminin-rich extracellular matrix (lrECM) undergo morphological changes that closely resemble their architecture in vivo. In this study, growth characteristics of three human prostate epithelial sublines derived from the same cellular lineage, but displaying different tumorigenic and metastatic properties in vivo, were assessed in three-dimensional (3D) lrECM gels. M12, a highly tumorigenic and metastatic subline, was derived from the parental prostate epithelial P69 cell line by selection in nude mice and found to contain a deletion of 19p-q13.1. The stable reintroduction of an intact human chromosome 19 into M12 resulted in a poorly tumorigenic subline, designated F6. When embedded in lrECM gels, the nontumorigenic P69 line produced acini with clearly defined lumena. Immunostaining with antibodies to {beta}-catenin, E-cadherin or {alpha}6-, {beta}4- and {beta}1-integrins showed polarization typical of glandular epithelium. In contrast, the metastatic M12 subline produced highly disorganized cells with no evidence of polarization. The F6 subline reverted to acini-like structures exhibiting basal polarity marked with integrins. Reducing either vimentin levels via siRNA interference or {beta}1-integrin expression by the addition of the blocking antibody, AIIB2, reorganized the M12 subline into forming polarized acini. The loss of vimentin significantly reduced M12-Vim tumor growth when assessed by subcutaneous injection in athymic mice. Thus, tumorigenicity in vivo correlated with disorganized growth in 3D lrECM gels. These studies suggest that the levels of vimentin and {beta}1-integrin play a key role in the homeostasis of the normal acini in prostate and that their dysregulation may lead to tumorigenesis.

  9. Targeted prostate cancer screening in men with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 detects aggressive prostate cancer: preliminary analysis of the results of the IMPACT study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, Anita V; Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Barbachano, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    mutations were offered annual prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing, and those with PSA >3 ng/mL, were offered a prostate biopsy. Controls were men age-matched (± 5 years) who were negative for the familial mutation. RESULTS: In total, 300 men were recruited (205 mutation carriers; 89 BRCA1, 116 BRCA2......Study Type - Diagnostic (validating cohort)
Level of Evidence 1b OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the role of targeted prostate cancer screening in men with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, an international study, IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening...... in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and controls), was established. This is the first multicentre screening study targeted at men with a known genetic predisposition to prostate cancer. A preliminary analysis of the data is reported. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Men aged 40-69 years from families with BRCA1 or BRCA2...

  10. Increased aPKC Expression Correlates with Prostatic Adenocarcinoma Gleason Score and Tumor Stage in the Japanese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony S. Perry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Levels of the protein kinase aPKC have been previously correlated with prostate cancer prognosis in a British cohort. However, prostate cancer incidence and progression rates, as well as genetic changes in this disease, show strong ethnic variance, particularly in Asian populations. Objective. The aim of this study was to validate association of aPKC expression with prostatic adenocarcinoma stages in a Japanese cohort. Methods. Tissue microarrays consisting of 142 malignant prostate cancer cases and 21 benign prostate tissues were subject to immunohistological staining for aPKC. aPKC staining intensity was scored by three independent pathologists and categorized as absent (0, dim (1+, intermediate (2+, and bright (3+. aPKC staining intensities were correlated with Gleason score and tumor stage. Results. Increased aPKC staining was observed in malignant prostate cancer, in comparison to benign tissue. Additionally, aPKC staining levels correlated with Gleason score and tumor stage. Our results extend the association of aPKC with prostate cancer to a Japanese population and establish the suitability of aPKC as a universal prostate cancer biomarker that performs consistently across ethnicities.

  11. The p75NTR tumor suppressor induces cell cycle arrest facilitating caspase mediated apoptosis in prostate tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khwaja, Fatima; Tabassum, Arshia; Allen, Jeff; Djakiew, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75 NTR ) is a death receptor which belongs to the tumor necrosis factor receptor super-family of membrane proteins. This study shows that p75 NTR retarded cell cycle progression by induced accumulation of cells in G0/G1 and a reduction in the S phase of the cell cycle. The rescue of tumor cells from cell cycle progression by a death domain deleted (ΔDD) dominant-negative antagonist of p75 NTR showed that the death domain transduced anti-proliferative activity in a ligand-independent manner. Conversely, addition of NGF ligand rescued retardation of cell cycle progression with commensurate changes in components of the cyclin/cdk holoenzyme complex. In the absence of ligand, p75 NTR -dependent cell cycle arrest facilitated an increase in apoptotic nuclear fragmentation of the prostate cancer cells. Apoptosis of p75 NTR expressing cells occurred via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway leading to a sequential caspase-9 and -7 cascade. Since the death domain deleted dominant-negative antagonist of p75 NTR rescued intrinsic caspase associated apoptosis in PC-3 cells, this shows p75 NTR was integral to ligand independent induction of apoptosis. Moreover, the ability of ligand to ameliorate the p75 NTR -dependent intrinsic apoptotic cascade indicates that NGF functioned as a survival factor for p75 NTR expressing prostate cancer cells

  12. The p75{sup NTR} tumor suppressor induces cell cycle arrest facilitating caspase mediated apoptosis in prostate tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khwaja, Fatima [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20057-1436 (United States); Tabassum, Arshia [Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, ON, M5T258 (Canada); Allen, Jeff [National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, N.I.H., Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Djakiew, Daniel [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20057-1436 (United States) and Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20057-1436 (United States)

    2006-03-24

    The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75{sup NTR}) is a death receptor which belongs to the tumor necrosis factor receptor super-family of membrane proteins. This study shows that p75{sup NTR} retarded cell cycle progression by induced accumulation of cells in G0/G1 and a reduction in the S phase of the cell cycle. The rescue of tumor cells from cell cycle progression by a death domain deleted ({delta}DD) dominant-negative antagonist of p75{sup NTR} showed that the death domain transduced anti-proliferative activity in a ligand-independent manner. Conversely, addition of NGF ligand rescued retardation of cell cycle progression with commensurate changes in components of the cyclin/cdk holoenzyme complex. In the absence of ligand, p75{sup NTR}-dependent cell cycle arrest facilitated an increase in apoptotic nuclear fragmentation of the prostate cancer cells. Apoptosis of p75{sup NTR} expressing cells occurred via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway leading to a sequential caspase-9 and -7 cascade. Since the death domain deleted dominant-negative antagonist of p75{sup NTR} rescued intrinsic caspase associated apoptosis in PC-3 cells, this shows p75{sup NTR} was integral to ligand independent induction of apoptosis. Moreover, the ability of ligand to ameliorate the p75{sup NTR}-dependent intrinsic apoptotic cascade indicates that NGF functioned as a survival factor for p75{sup NTR} expressing prostate cancer cells.

  13. Targeting solid tumors with non-pathogenic obligate anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Shun'ichiro; Fujimori, Minoru; Sasaki, Takayuki; Tsutsui, Hiroko; Shimatani, Yuko; Seki, Keiichi; Amano, Jun

    2010-09-01

    Molecular-targeting drugs with fewer severe adverse effects are attracting great attention as the next wave of cancer treatment. There exist, however, populations of cancer cells resistant to these drugs that stem from the instability of tumor cells and/or the existence of cancer stem cells, and thus specific toxicity is required to destroy them. If such selectivity is not available, these targets may be sought out not by the cancer cell types themselves, but rather in their adjacent cancer microenvironments by means of hypoxia, low pH, and so on. The anaerobic conditions present in malignant tumor tissues have previously been regarded as a source of resistance in cancer cells against conventional therapy. However, there now appears to be a way to make use of these limiting factors as a selective target. In this review, we will refer to several trials, including our own, to direct attention to the utilizable anaerobic conditions present in malignant tumor tissues and the use of bacteria as carriers to target them. Specifically, we have been developing a method to attack solid cancers using the non-pathogenic obligate anaerobic bacterium Bifidobacterium longum as a vehicle to selectively recognize and target the anaerobic conditions in solid cancer tissues. We will also discuss the existence of low oxygen pressure in tumor masses in spite of generally enhanced angiogenesis, overview current cancer therapies, especially the history and present situation of bacterial utility to treat solid tumors, and discuss the rationality and future possibilities of this novel mode of cancer treatment. © 2010 Japanese Cancer Association.

  14. IκBα mediates prostate cancer cell death induced by combinatorial targeting of the androgen receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, Sarah Louise; Centenera, Margaret Mary; Tilley, Wayne Desmond; Selth, Luke Ashton; Butler, Lisa Maree

    2016-01-01

    Combining different clinical agents to target multiple pathways in prostate cancer cells, including androgen receptor (AR) signaling, is potentially an effective strategy to improve outcomes for men with metastatic disease. We have previously demonstrated that sub-effective concentrations of an AR antagonist, bicalutamide, and the histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, act synergistically when combined to cause death of AR-dependent prostate cancer cells. In this study, expression profiling of human prostate cancer cells treated with bicalutamide or vorinostat, alone or in combination, was employed to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying this synergistic action. Cell viability assays and quantitative real time PCR were used to validate identified candidate genes. A substantial proportion of the genes modulated by the combination of bicalutamide and vorinostat were androgen regulated. Independent pathway analysis identified further pathways and genes, most notably NFKBIA (encoding IκBα, an inhibitor of NF-κB and p53 signaling), as targets of this combinatorial treatment. Depletion of IκBα by siRNA knockdown enhanced apoptosis of prostate cancer cells, while ectopic overexpression of IκBα markedly suppressed cell death induced by the combination of bicalutamide and vorinostat. These findings implicate IκBα as a key mediator of the apoptotic action of this combinatorial AR targeting strategy and a promising new therapeutic target for prostate cancer. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2188-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  15. Development of lutetium-labeled bombesin derivates: relationship between structure and diagnostic-therapeutic activity for prostate tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujatti, Priscilla Brunelli

    2009-01-01

    Bombesin (BBN) receptors - in particular, the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptor peptide - have been shown to be massively over expressed in several human tumors types, including prostate cancer, and could be an alternative as target for its treatment by radionuclide therapy (RNT). A large number of BBN analogs had already been synthesized for this purpose and have shown to reduce tumor growth in mice. Nevertheless, most of the studied analogs exhibit high abdominal accumulation, especially in pancreas. This abdominal accumulation may represent a problem in clinical use of radiolabeled bombesin analogs probably due to serious side effects to patients. The goal of the present work was to radiolabel a novel series of bombesin derivatives with lutetium-177 and to evaluate the relationship between their structure and diagnostic-therapeutic activity for prostate tumor. The generic structure of studied peptides is DOTA-Phe-(Gly) n -BBN(6-14), where DOTA is the chelator, n is the number of glycine amino acids of Phe-(Gly) n spacer and BBN(6-14) is the bombesin sequence from the amino acid 6 to the amino acid 14. Preliminary studies were done to establish the ideal labeling conditions for obtaining the highest yield of labeled bombesin derivatives, determined by instant thin layer chromatography (ITLC-SG) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The stability of the preparations was evaluated either after storing at 2-8 degree C or incubation in human serum at 37 degree C and the partition coefficient was determined in n:octanol:water. In vivo studies were performed in both healthy Balb-c and Nude mice bearing PC-3 xenografts, in order to characterize the biological properties of labeled peptides. In vitro studies involved the evaluation of cold bombesin derivatives effect in PC-3 cells proliferation. Bombesin derivatives were successfully labeled with high yield at optimized conditions and exhibited high stability at 4 degree C. The analysis of the

  16. Targeted Imaging of Tumor-Associated Macrophages by Cyanine 7-Labeled Mannose in Xenograft Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Jiang MD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mannose receptor is considered as a hallmark of M2-oriented tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs, but its utility in TAMs was rarely reported. Therefore, deoxymannose (DM, a high-affinity ligand of mannose receptor, was labeled with near-infrared dye cyanine 7 (Cy7, and its feasibility of targeted imaging on TAMs was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The Cy7-DM was synthesized, and its binding affinity with induced TAMs in vitro, whole-body imaging in xenograft tumor mouse model in vivo, and the cellular localization in dissected tissues were evaluated. We demonstrated a high uptake of Cy7-DM by induced M2 macrophages and TAMs in tumor tissues. In vivo near-infrared live imaging visualized abundant TAMs in tumor lesions instead of inflammatory sites by Cy7-DM imaging, and the quantity of Cy7-DM signals in tumors was significantly higher than that shown in inflammatory sites from 1 to 8 hours of imaging. Our results suggest that mannose could rapidly and specifically target TAMs and is a promising candidate for targeted diagnosis of tumor with rich TAMs.

  17. Targeted prostate cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Page, Elizabeth C; Castro, Elena

    2014-01-01

    AND PARTICIPANTS: We recruited men aged 40-69 yr with germline BRCA1/2 mutations and a control group of men who have tested negative for a pathogenic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation known to be present in their families. All men underwent prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing at enrollment, and those men with PSA >3 ng......BACKGROUND: Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening....../ml were offered prostate biopsy. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: PSA levels, PCa incidence, and tumour characteristics were evaluated. The Fisher exact test was used to compare the number of PCa cases among groups and the differences among disease types. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: We...

  18. Inhibitor of differentiation 4 (Id4) is a potential tumor suppressor in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, Jason PW; Asirvatham, Ananthi J; Galm, Oliver; Ghogomu, Tandeih A; Chaudhary, Jaideep

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitor of differentiation 4 (Id4), a member of the Id gene family is also a dominant negative regulator of basic helix loop helix (bHLH) transcription factors. Some of the functions of Id4 appear to be unique as compared to its other family members Id1, Id2 and Id3. Loss of Id4 gene expression in many cancers in association with promoter hypermethylation has led to the proposal that Id4 may act as a tumor suppressor. In this study we provide functional evidence that Id4 indeed acts as a tumor suppressor and is part of a cancer associated epigenetic re-programming. Data mining was used to demonstrate Id4 expression in prostate cancer. Methylation specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) analysis was performed to understand molecular mechanisms associated with Id4 expression in prostate cancer cell lines. The effect of ectopic Id4 expression in DU145 cells was determined by cell cycle analysis (3H thymidine incorporation and FACS), expression of androgen receptor, p53 and cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 and p21 by a combination of RT-PCR, real time-PCR, western blot and immuno-cytochemical analysis. Id4 expression was down-regulated in prostate cancer. Id4 expression was also down-regulated in prostate cancer line DU145 due to promoter hyper-methylation. Ectopic Id4 expression in DU145 prostate cancer cell line led to increased apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation due in part by an S-phase arrest. In addition to S-phase arrest, ectopic Id4 expression in PC3 cells also resulted in prolonged G2/M phase. At the molecular level these changes were associated with increased androgen receptor (AR), p21, p27 and p53 expression in DU145 cells. The results suggest that Id4 acts directly as a tumor suppressor by influencing a hierarchy of cellular processes at multiple levels that leads to a decreased cell proliferation and change in morphology that is possibly mediated through induction of previously silenced tumor suppressors

  19. Inhibitor of differentiation 4 (Id4 is a potential tumor suppressor in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey Jason PW

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhibitor of differentiation 4 (Id4, a member of the Id gene family is also a dominant negative regulator of basic helix loop helix (bHLH transcription factors. Some of the functions of Id4 appear to be unique as compared to its other family members Id1, Id2 and Id3. Loss of Id4 gene expression in many cancers in association with promoter hypermethylation has led to the proposal that Id4 may act as a tumor suppressor. In this study we provide functional evidence that Id4 indeed acts as a tumor suppressor and is part of a cancer associated epigenetic re-programming. Methods Data mining was used to demonstrate Id4 expression in prostate cancer. Methylation specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP analysis was performed to understand molecular mechanisms associated with Id4 expression in prostate cancer cell lines. The effect of ectopic Id4 expression in DU145 cells was determined by cell cycle analysis (3H thymidine incorporation and FACS, expression of androgen receptor, p53 and cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 and p21 by a combination of RT-PCR, real time-PCR, western blot and immuno-cytochemical analysis. Results Id4 expression was down-regulated in prostate cancer. Id4 expression was also down-regulated in prostate cancer line DU145 due to promoter hyper-methylation. Ectopic Id4 expression in DU145 prostate cancer cell line led to increased apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation due in part by an S-phase arrest. In addition to S-phase arrest, ectopic Id4 expression in PC3 cells also resulted in prolonged G2/M phase. At the molecular level these changes were associated with increased androgen receptor (AR, p21, p27 and p53 expression in DU145 cells. Conclusion The results suggest that Id4 acts directly as a tumor suppressor by influencing a hierarchy of cellular processes at multiple levels that leads to a decreased cell proliferation and change in morphology that is possibly mediated through induction of previously

  20. Tumor Targeting and Drug Delivery by Anthrax Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Bachran

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax toxin is a potent tripartite protein toxin from Bacillus anthracis. It is one of the two virulence factors and causes the disease anthrax. The receptor-binding component of the toxin, protective antigen, needs to be cleaved by furin-like proteases to be activated and to deliver the enzymatic moieties lethal factor and edema factor to the cytosol of cells. Alteration of the protease cleavage site allows the activation of the toxin selectively in response to the presence of tumor-associated proteases. This initial idea of re-targeting anthrax toxin to tumor cells was further elaborated in recent years and resulted in the design of many modifications of anthrax toxin, which resulted in successful tumor therapy in animal models. These modifications include the combination of different toxin variants that require activation by two different tumor-associated proteases for increased specificity of toxin activation. The anthrax toxin system has proved to be a versatile system for drug delivery of several enzymatic moieties into cells. This highly efficient delivery system has recently been further modified by introducing ubiquitin as a cytosolic cleavage site into lethal factor fusion proteins. This review article describes the latest developments in this field of tumor targeting and drug delivery.

  1. Tumor Targeting and Drug Delivery by Anthrax Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachran, Christopher; Leppla, Stephen H

    2016-07-01

    Anthrax toxin is a potent tripartite protein toxin from Bacillus anthracis. It is one of the two virulence factors and causes the disease anthrax. The receptor-binding component of the toxin, protective antigen, needs to be cleaved by furin-like proteases to be activated and to deliver the enzymatic moieties lethal factor and edema factor to the cytosol of cells. Alteration of the protease cleavage site allows the activation of the toxin selectively in response to the presence of tumor-associated proteases. This initial idea of re-targeting anthrax toxin to tumor cells was further elaborated in recent years and resulted in the design of many modifications of anthrax toxin, which resulted in successful tumor therapy in animal models. These modifications include the combination of different toxin variants that require activation by two different tumor-associated proteases for increased specificity of toxin activation. The anthrax toxin system has proved to be a versatile system for drug delivery of several enzymatic moieties into cells. This highly efficient delivery system has recently been further modified by introducing ubiquitin as a cytosolic cleavage site into lethal factor fusion proteins. This review article describes the latest developments in this field of tumor targeting and drug delivery.

  2. Targeted radionuclide therapy for solid tumors: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Nardo, Sally J.; De Nardo, Gerald L.

    2006-01-01

    Although radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has been effective in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) as a single agent, solid tumors have shown less clinically significant therapeutic response to RIT alone. The clinical impact of RIT or other forms of targeted radionuclide therapy for solid tumors depends on the development of a high therapeutic index (TI) for the tumor vs. normal tissue effect, and the implementation of RIT as part of synergistic combined modality therapy (CMRIT). Preclinical and clinical studies have provided a wealth of information, and new prototypes or paradigms have shed light on future possibilities in many instances. Evidence suggests that combination and sequencing of RIT in CMRIT appropriately can provide effective treatment for many solid tumors. Vascular targets provide RIT enhancement opportunities and nanoparticles may prove to be effective carriers for RIT combined with intracellular drug delivery or alternating magnetic frequency (AMF) induced thermal tumor necrosis. The sequence and timing of combined modality treatments will be of critical importance to achieve synergy for therapy while minimizing toxicity. Fortunately, the radionuclide used for RIT also provides a signal useful for nondestructive quantitation of the influence of sequence and timing of CMRIT on events in animals and patients. This can be readily accomplished clinically using quantitative high-resolution imaging (e.g., positron emission tomography [PET])

  3. Targeting androgen receptor to suppress macrophage-induced EMT and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tianjing; Lin, Wen-Jye; Izumi, Kouji; Wang, Xiaohai; Xu, Defeng; Fang, Lei-Ya; Li, Lei; Jiang, Qi; Jin, Jie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2012-10-01

    Early studies suggested macrophages might play roles in inflammation-associated benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) development, yet the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we first showed that CD68(+) macrophages were identified in both epithelium and the stromal area of human BPH tissues. We then established an in vitro co-culture model with prostate epithelial and macrophage cell lines to study the potential impacts of infiltrating macrophages in the BPH development and found that co-culturing prostate epithelial cells with macrophages promoted migration of macrophages. In a three-dimensional culture system, the sphere diameter of BPH-1 prostate cells was significantly increased during coculture with THP-1 macrophage cells. Mechanism dissection suggested that expression levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers, such as N-cadherin, Snail, and TGF-β2, were increased, and administration of anti-TGF-β2 neutralizing antibody during co-culture suppressed the EMT and THP-1-mediated growth of BPH-1 cells, suggesting THP-1 might go through EMT to influence the BPH development and progression. Importantly, we found that modulation of androgen receptor (AR) in BPH-1 and mPrE cells significantly increased THP-1 and RAW264.7 cell migration, respectively, and enhanced expression levels of EMT markers, suggesting that AR in prostate epithelial cells might play a role in promoting macrophage-mediated EMT in prostate epithelial cells. Silencing AR function via an AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9, decreased the macrophage migration to BPH-1 cells and suppressed EMT marker expression. Together, these results provide the first evidence to demonstrate that prostate epithelial AR function is important for macrophage-mediated EMT and proliferation of prostate epithelial cells, which represents a previously unrecognized role of AR in the cross-talk between macrophages and prostate epithelial cells. These results may provide new insights for a new therapeutic

  4. Oligometastatic prostate cancer: shaping the definition with molecular imaging and an improved understanding of tumor biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joice, Gregory A; Rowe, Steven P; Pienta, Kenneth J; Gorin, Michael A

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss how novel imaging modalities and molecular markers are shaping the definition of oligometastatic prostate cancer. To effectively classify a patient as having oligometastatic prostate cancer, diagnostic tests must be sensitive enough to detect subtle sites of metastatic disease. Conventional imaging modalities can readily detect widespread polymetastatic disease but do not have the sensitivity necessary to reliably classify patients as oligometastatic. Molecular imaging using both metabolic- and molecularly-targeted radiotracers has demonstrated great promise in aiding in our ability to define the oligometastatic state. Perhaps the most promising data to date have been generated with radiotracers targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen. In addition, early studies are beginning to define biologic markers in the oligometastatic state that may be indicative of disease with minimal metastatic potential. Recent developments in molecular imaging have allowed for improved detection of metastatic prostate cancer allowing for more accurate staging of patients with oligometastatic disease. Future development of biologic markers may assist in defining the oligometastatic state and determining prognosis.

  5. Photoacoustic imaging to assess pixel-based sO2 distributions in experimental prostate tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendinger, Alina L; Glowa, Christin; Peter, Jörg; Karger, Christian P

    2018-03-01

    A protocol for photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has been developed to assess pixel-based oxygen saturation (sO2) distributions of experimental tumor models. The protocol was applied to evaluate the dependence of PAI results on measurement settings, reproducibility of PAI, and for the characterization of the oxygenation status of experimental prostate tumor sublines (Dunning R3327-H, -HI, -AT1) implanted subcutaneously in male Copenhagen rats. The three-dimensional (3-D) PA data employing two wavelengths were used to estimate sO2 distributions. If the PA signal was sufficiently strong, the distributions were independent from signal gain, threshold, and positioning of animals. Reproducibility of sO2 distributions with respect to shape and median values was demonstrated over several days. The three tumor sublines were characterized by the shapes of their sO2 distributions and their temporal response after external changes of the oxygen supply (100% O2 or air breathing and clamping of tumor-supplying artery). The established protocol showed to be suitable for detecting temporal changes in tumor oxygenation as well as differences in oxygenation between tumor sublines. PA results were in accordance with histology for hypoxia, perfusion, and vasculature. The presented protocol for the assessment of pixel-based sO2 distributions provides more detailed information as compared to conventional region-of-interest-based analysis of PAI, especially with respect to the detection of temporal changes and tumor heterogeneity. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  6. Photoacoustic imaging to assess pixel-based sO2 distributions in experimental prostate tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendinger, Alina L.; Glowa, Christin; Peter, Jörg; Karger, Christian P.

    2018-03-01

    A protocol for photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has been developed to assess pixel-based oxygen saturation (sO2) distributions of experimental tumor models. The protocol was applied to evaluate the dependence of PAI results on measurement settings, reproducibility of PAI, and for the characterization of the oxygenation status of experimental prostate tumor sublines (Dunning R3327-H, -HI, -AT1) implanted subcutaneously in male Copenhagen rats. The three-dimensional (3-D) PA data employing two wavelengths were used to estimate sO2 distributions. If the PA signal was sufficiently strong, the distributions were independent from signal gain, threshold, and positioning of animals. Reproducibility of sO2 distributions with respect to shape and median values was demonstrated over several days. The three tumor sublines were characterized by the shapes of their sO2 distributions and their temporal response after external changes of the oxygen supply (100% O2 or air breathing and clamping of tumor-supplying artery). The established protocol showed to be suitable for detecting temporal changes in tumor oxygenation as well as differences in oxygenation between tumor sublines. PA results were in accordance with histology for hypoxia, perfusion, and vasculature. The presented protocol for the assessment of pixel-based sO2 distributions provides more detailed information as compared to conventional region-of-interest-based analysis of PAI, especially with respect to the detection of temporal changes and tumor heterogeneity.

  7. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen

    2015-01-01

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice

  8. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen, E-mail: srrshurology@163.com

    2015-08-14

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice.

  9. Hydrogel-based 3D model of patient-derived prostate xenograft tumors suitable for drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Eliza L S; Martinez, Mariane; Yang, Jun; Mikos, Antonios G; Navone, Nora M; Harrington, Daniel A; Farach-Carson, Mary C

    2014-07-07

    The lack of effective therapies for bone metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) underscores the need for accurate models of the disease to enable the discovery of new therapeutic targets and to test drug sensitivities of individual tumors. To this end, the patient-derived xenograft (PDX) PCa model using immunocompromised mice was established to model the disease with greater fidelity than is possible with currently employed cell lines grown on tissue culture plastic. However, poorly adherent PDX tumor cells exhibit low viability in standard culture, making it difficult to manipulate these cells for subsequent controlled mechanistic studies. To overcome this challenge, we encapsulated PDX tumor cells within a three-dimensional hyaluronan-based hydrogel and demonstrated that the hydrogel maintains PDX cell viability with continued native androgen receptor expression. Furthermore, a differential sensitivity to docetaxel, a chemotherapeutic drug, was observed as compared to a traditional PCa cell line. These findings underscore the potential impact of this novel 3D PDX PCa model as a diagnostic platform for rapid drug evaluation and ultimately push personalized medicine toward clinical reality.

  10. Overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor C increases growth and alters the metastatic pattern of orthotopic PC-3 prostate tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuomela, Johanna; Valta, Maija; Seppänen, Jani; Tarkkonen, Kati; Väänänen, H Kalervo; Härkönen, Pirkko

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer metastasizes to regional lymph nodes and distant sites but the roles of lymphatic and hematogenous pathways in metastasis are not fully understood. We studied the roles of VEGF-C and VEGFR3 in prostate cancer metastasis by blocking VEGFR3 using intravenous adenovirus-delivered VEGFR3-Ig fusion protein (VEGFR3-Ig) and by ectopic expression of VEGF-C in PC-3 prostate tumors in nude mice. VEGFR3-Ig decreased the density of lymphatic capillaries in orthotopic PC-3 tumors (p < 0.05) and inhibited metastasis to iliac and sacral lymph nodes. In addition, tumor volumes were smaller in the VEGFR3-Ig-treated group compared with the control group (p < 0.05). Transfection of PC-3 cells with the VEGF-C gene led to a high level of 29/31 kD VEGF-C expression in PC-3 cells. The size of orthotopic and subcutaneous PC-3/VEGF-C tumors was significantly greater than that of PC-3/mock tumors (both p < 0.001). Interestingly, while most orthotopic PC-3 and PC-3/mock tumors grown for 4 weeks metastasized to prostate-draining lymph nodes, orthotopic PC-3/VEGF-C tumors primarily metastasized to the lungs. PC-3/VEGF-C tumors showed highly angiogenic morphology with an increased density of blood capillaries compared with PC-3/mock tumors (p < 0.001). The data suggest that even though VEGF-C/VEGFR3 pathway is primarily required for lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis, an increased level of VEGF-C can also stimulate angiogenesis, which is associated with growth of orthotopic prostate tumors and a switch from a primary pattern of lymph node metastasis to an increased proportion of metastases at distant sites

  11. Non-invasive pre-clinical MR imaging of prostate tumor hypoxia for radiation therapy prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek White

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the usefulness of Oxygen-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (OE-MRI changes in signal intensity related to oxygen challenge for predicting tumor response to radiation therapy.Methods: Dynamic MR signal changes were acquired using Varian 4.7T small animal MR scanner prior to image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT of small (n = 6 and large subcutaneous (n = 5 prostate tumors in adult male rats. An interleaved blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD and tissue-oxygen level dependent (TOLD data acquisition or (IBT was performed using a baseline of medical air as positive control and using medical oxygen as a breathing challenge. BOLD used a 2-D multi-slice spoiled gradient-echo with multi-echo sequence. TOLD used a 2-D multi-slice spoiled gradient-echo sequence. Voxel changes in signal intensity were determined by a correlation coefficient mapping technique. Irradiation technique planned consisted of 1F × 15 Gy AP/PA or 2F × 7.5 Gy AP/PA to the gross tumor volume (GTV. Tumor growth measurements were recorded over time to assess the response to IGRT.Results: BOLD and TOLD signals variously illustrated positive or negative impulse responses in the tumor ROI due to inhaling medical oxygen. Correlation coefficient mapping demonstrated heterogeneity in tumors after inhaling medical oxygen. BOLD and TOLD signals exhibited increased changes in signal intensities after the first fraction of dose. Multi-fractionation had minimum effect until the second fraction of dose was applied. Tumor growth delays were observed when inhaling medical oxygen during IGRT.Conclusion: OE-MRI is a non-invasive imaging modality that can provide insight to the oxygen status of tumors. Observed increase percent changes in BOLD and TOLD signal intensities after the first fraction of dose suggest tumors experienced reoxygenation. OE-MRI could be used for predicting tumor response to IGRT when using medical oxygen for increasing GTV radiosensitivity, suggesting

  12. Metalloproteinase 11, potential marker and molecular target in advanced and castration-resistant prostate cancer. Culture study of peritumoral fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Gomez, J M; Eiro, N; García-Rodríguez, J J; Quintás-Blanco, A; Gonzalez-Ruiz de León, C; Perez de Haro, M L; Vizoso-Piñero, F

    To analyze the expression of metalloprotein 11 (MMP11) in cultured fibroblasts obtained from human prostate tumors with different clinical and pathological characteristics. For this study we analyzed samples of transrectal prostate biopsies from tumors with different characteristics, treated with or whithout androgen deprivation (AD). After optimization of the culture method, fibroblasts were isolated and cultured to perform the study (PCR) of MMP11 mRNA. Finally, 37 cases were studied: 5 samples of benign prostatic hyperplasia, 14 cases with localized neoplasms (7 high-risk according to the D'Amico classification), 5 with metastasic tumors (bone metastases), and 13 treated with AD therapy, of which 6 fulfilled the requirements to be defined as resistant to castration. In tumors without AD therapy, MMP11 expression was significantly higher (P=.001) in fibroblasts of higher grade tumors. A significant (P=.001) correlation was found between PSA and expression of MMP11 in fibroblast s and a significant increase of MMP11 expression in metastatic tumors. In tumors with AD therapy, a significantly greater expression of MMP11 was observed in resistant to castration patients than in those sensitive to castration (P=.003). In advanced prostate tumors or in stages of increased tumor aggressiveness, the production of MMP11 by fibroblasts is significantly greater than in non-metastatic tumors or in AD sensitive tumors. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. CCR 20th Anniversary Commentary: Circulating Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Niven; Zafeiriou, Zafeiris; Lorente, David; Terstappen, Leon W M M; de Bono, Johann S

    2015-11-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) have substantial promise for multipurpose biomarker studies in prostate cancer. The IMMC-38 trial conducted by de Bono and colleagues, which was published in the October 1, 2008, issue of Clinical Cancer Research, demonstrated for the first time that CTCs are the most accurate and independent predictor of overall survival in metastatic prostate cancer. Since the publication of prospective trials demonstrating prognostic utility, CTCs have been utilized for nucleic acid analyses, for protein analyses, and in intermediate endpoint studies. CTC studies are also now facilitating the analysis of intrapatient heterogeneity. See related article by de Bono et al., Clin Cancer Res 2008;14(19) October 1, 2008;6302-9. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. A novel 111In-labeled anti-PSMA nanobody for targeted SPECT/CT imaging of prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatalic, K.L.S.; Veldhoven-Zweistra, J.; Bolkestein, M.; Hoeben, S.; Koning, G.A.; Boerman, O.C.; Jong, M. de; Weerden, W.M. van

    2015-01-01

    Prostate-specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) is overexpressed in prostate cancer (PCa) and a promising target for molecular imaging and therapy. Nanobodies (single domain antibodies, VHH) are the smallest antibody-based fragments possessing ideal molecular imaging properties, such as high target

  15. Preventing Prostate Cancer Metastasis by Targeting Exosome Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    extensive and painful metastasis of the bone. We proposed compare the impact of exosomes derived from advanced stage prostate cancer on bone stromal cells...The revised report including additional figures, tables, and text, is attached below. 1. INTRODUCTION Bone metastasis is a painful and often lethal...protein interacting protein 2 X*** BG PABPC1 poly (A) binding protein, cytoplasmic 1 X X Inf X PABPC3 poly (A) binding protein, cytoplasmic 3 X

  16. Imaging of Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor-Expressing Prostate Tumor using a {sup 68}Ga-Labeled Bombesin Analog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jae Cheong; Dho, So Hee; Cho, Eun Ha; Lee, So Young; Kim, Soo Yong [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Although the transmissivity of cold neutrons are low comparing that of thermal neutrons, the slower neutrons are more apt to be absorbed in a target, and can increase the prompt gamma emission rate. Also the flux of both thermal and cold neutron beam is high enough to activate thick target. If the neutron beam is irradiated on the front and the reverse side of gold bar, all insides of it can be detected. The imaging efficacy of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-gluBBN was evaluated in the PC-3- peritoneal metastasized model. These results suggest that {sup 68}Ga-labeled bombesin derivative has promising characteristics as a novel nuclear medicine, especially for the imaging of GRPR over-expressing prostate tumors. A target for irradiation was produced using 99% Ni-62 metal power concentrate. Ni-62 target of 1 g was irradiated in MARIA reactor operated in Poland for 470 hours at neutron flux of 2.5 x 10{sup 14}n/cm{sup 2}s, and estimated production of Ni-63 was calculated. Irradiated Ni-63 pellets were dissolved in HCl solution, and Ni-63 coatings were deposited by DC electroplating at current density of 20 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  17. A Paracrine Role for IL6 in Prostate Cancer Patients: Lack of Production by Primary or Metastatic Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shu-Han; Zheng, Qizhi; Esopi, David; Macgregor-Das, Anne; Luo, Jun; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Drake, Charles G.; Vessella, Robert; Morrissey, Colm; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Sfanos, Karen S.

    2015-01-01

    Correlative human studies suggest that the pleiotropic cytokine interleukin-6 (IL6) contributes to the development and/or progression of prostate cancer. However, the source of IL6 production in the prostate microenvironment in patients has yet to be determined. The cellular origin of IL6 in primary and metastatic prostate cancer was examined in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues using a highly sensitive and specific chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) assay that underwent extensive analytical validation. Quantitative RT-PCR (q-RT-PCR) showed that benign prostate tissues often had higher expression of IL6 mRNA than matched tumor specimens. CISH analysis further indicated that both primary and metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma cells do not express IL6 mRNA. IL6 expression was highly heterogeneous across specimens and was nearly exclusively restricted to the prostate stromal compartment – including endothelial cells and macrophages among other cell types. The number of IL6-expressing cells correlated positively with the presence of acute inflammation. In metastatic disease, tumor cells were negative in all lesions examined and IL6 expression was restricted to endothelial cells within the vasculature of bone metastases. Finally, IL6 was not detected in any cells in soft tissue metastases. These data suggest that, in prostate cancer patients, paracrine rather than autocrine IL6 production is likely associated with any role for the cytokine in disease progression. PMID:26048576

  18. Germline Variants in Targeted Tumor Sequencing Using Matched Normal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Kasmintan A; Cheng, Donavan T; Joseph, Vijai; Prasad, Meera; Walsh, Michael; Zehir, Ahmet; Ni, Ai; Thomas, Tinu; Benayed, Ryma; Ashraf, Asad; Lincoln, Annie; Arcila, Maria; Stadler, Zsofia; Solit, David; Hyman, David M; Hyman, David; Zhang, Liying; Klimstra, David; Ladanyi, Marc; Offit, Kenneth; Berger, Michael; Robson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Tumor genetic sequencing identifies potentially targetable genetic alterations with therapeutic implications. Analysis has concentrated on detecting tumor-specific variants, but recognition of germline variants may prove valuable as well. To estimate the burden of germline variants identified through routine clinical tumor sequencing. Patients with advanced cancer diagnoses eligible for studies of targeted agents at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center are offered tumor-normal sequencing with MSK-IMPACT, a 341-gene panel. We surveyed the germline variants seen in 187 overlapping genes with Mendelian disease associations in 1566 patients who had undergone tumor profiling between March and October 2014. The number of presumed pathogenic germline variants (PPGVs) and variants of uncertain significance per person in 187 genes associated with single-gene disorders and the proportions of individuals with PPGVs in clinically relevant gene subsets, in genes consistent with known tumor phenotypes, and in genes with evidence of second somatic hits in their tumors. The mean age of the 1566 patients was 58 years, and 54% were women. Presumed pathogenic germline variants in known Mendelian disease-associated genes were identified in 246 of 1566 patients (15.7%; 95% CI, 14.0%-17.6%), including 198 individuals with mutations in genes associated with cancer susceptibility. Germline findings in cancer susceptibility genes were concordant with the individual's cancer type in only 81 of 198 cases (40.9%; 95% CI, 34.3%-47.9%). In individuals with PPGVs retained in the tumor, somatic alteration of the other allele was seen in 39 of 182 cases (21.4%; 95% CI, 16.1%-28.0%), of which 13 cases did not show a known correlation of the germline mutation and a known syndrome. Mutations in non-cancer-related Mendelian disease genes were seen in 55 of 1566 cases (3.5%; 95% CI, 27.1%-45.4%). Almost every individual had more than 1 variant of uncertain significance (1565 of 1566 patients; 99

  19. Detection of high GS risk group prostate tumors by diffusion tensor imaging and logistic regression modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertas, Gokhan

    2018-07-01

    To assess the value of joint evaluation of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures by using logistic regression modelling to detect high GS risk group prostate tumors. Fifty tumors imaged using DTI on a 3 T MRI device were analyzed. Regions of interests focusing on the center of tumor foci and noncancerous tissue on the maps of mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) were used to extract the minimum, the maximum and the mean measures. Measure ratio was computed by dividing tumor measure by noncancerous tissue measure. Logistic regression models were fitted for all possible pair combinations of the measures using 5-fold cross validation. Systematic differences are present for all MD measures and also for all FA measures in distinguishing the high risk tumors [GS ≥ 7(4 + 3)] from the low risk tumors [GS ≤ 7(3 + 4)] (P Logistic regression modelling provides a favorable solution for the joint evaluations easily adoptable in clinical practice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. New Insights into the Androgen-Targeted Therapies and Epigenetic Therapies in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit M. Godbole

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the United States, and it is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in American men. The androgen receptor (AR, a receptor of nuclear family and a transcription factor, is the most important target in this disease. While most efforts in the clinic are currently directed at lowering levels of androgens that activate AR, resistance to androgen deprivation eventually develops. Most prostate cancer deaths are attributable to this castration-resistant form of prostate cancer (CRPC. Recent work has shed light on the importance of epigenetic events including facilitation of AR signaling by histone-modifying enzymes, posttranslational modifications of AR such as sumoylation. Herein, we provide an overview of the structure of human AR and its key structural domains that can be used as targets to develop novel antiandrogens. We also summarize recent findings about the antiandrogens and the epigenetic factors that modulate the action of AR.

  1. Advancing theranostics with tumor-targeting peptides for precision otolaryngology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadwick L. Wright

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, about 600,000 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC are detected annually, many of which involve high risk human papilloma virus (HPV. Surgery is the primary and desired first treatment option. Following surgery, the existence of cancer cells at the surgical margin is strongly associated with eventual recurrence of cancer and a poor outcome. Despite improved surgical methods (robotics, microsurgery, endoscopic/laparoscopic, and external imaging, surgeons rely only on their vision and touch to locate tumors during surgery. Diagnostic imaging systems like computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and positron-emission tomography (PET are too large, slow and costly to use efficiently during most surgeries and, ultrasound imaging, while fast and portable, is not cancer specific. This purpose of this article is to review the fundamental technologies that will radically advance Precision Otolaryngology practices to the benefit of patients with HNSCC. In particular, this article will address the potential for tumor-targeting peptides to enable more precise diagnostic imaging while simultaneously advancing new therapeutic paradigms for next generation image-guided surgery, tumor-specific chemotherapeutic delivery and tumor-selective targeted radiotherapy (i.e., theranostic. Keywords: Squamous cell carcinoma, Peptide, Optical surgical navigation, Diagnostic imaging, Theranostic

  2. Targeting Mitochondrial Function to Treat Quiescent Tumor Cells in Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaonan Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The disorganized nature of tumor vasculature results in the generation of microenvironments characterized by nutrient starvation, hypoxia and accumulation of acidic metabolites. Tumor cell populations in such areas are often slowly proliferating and thus refractory to chemotherapeutical drugs that are dependent on an active cell cycle. There is an urgent need for alternative therapeutic interventions that circumvent growth dependency. The screening of drug libraries using multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS or glucose-starved tumor cells has led to the identification of several compounds with promising therapeutic potential and that display activity on quiescent tumor cells. Interestingly, a common theme of these drug screens is the recurrent identification of agents that affect mitochondrial function. Such data suggest that, contrary to the classical Warburg view, tumor cells in nutritionally-compromised microenvironments are dependent on mitochondrial function for energy metabolism and survival. These findings suggest that mitochondria may represent an “Achilles heel” for the survival of slowly-proliferating tumor cells and suggest strategies for the development of therapy to target these cell populations.

  3. A murine model of targeted infusion for intracranial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minhyung; Barone, Tara A; Fedtsova, Natalia; Gleiberman, Anatoli; Wilfong, Chandler D; Alosi, Julie A; Plunkett, Robert J; Gudkov, Andrei; Skitzki, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Historically, intra-arterial (IA) drug administration for malignant brain tumors including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was performed as an attempt to improve drug delivery. With the advent of percutaneous neuorovascular techniques and modern microcatheters, intracranial drug delivery is readily feasible; however, the question remains whether IA administration is safe and more effective compared to other delivery modalities such as intravenous (IV) or oral administrations. Preclinical large animal models allow for comparisons between treatment routes and to test novel agents, but can be expensive and difficult to generate large numbers and rapid results. Accordingly, we developed a murine model of IA drug delivery for GBM that is reproducible with clear readouts of tumor response and neurotoxicities. Herein, we describe a novel mouse model of IA drug delivery accessing the internal carotid artery to treat ipsilateral implanted GBM tumors that is consistent and reproducible with minimal experience. The intent of establishing this unique platform is to efficiently interrogate targeted anti-tumor agents that may be designed to take advantage of a directed, regional therapy approach for brain tumors.

  4. Tungsten Targets the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, Alicia M.; Sabourin, Valérie; Molina, Manuel Flores; Police, Alice M.; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Plourde, Dany; Lemaire, Maryse; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Mann, Koren K.

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals exposed to high levels of tungsten is increasing, yet there is limited knowledge of the potential human health risks. Recently, a cohort of breast cancer patients was left with tungsten in their breasts following testing of a tungsten-based shield during intraoperative radiotherapy. While monitoring tungsten levels in the blood and urine of these patients, we utilized the 66Cl4 cell model, in vitro and in mice to study the effects of tungsten exposure on mammary tumor growth and metastasis. We still detect tungsten in the urine of patients’ years after surgery (mean urinary tungsten concentration at least 20 months post-surgery = 1.76 ng/ml), even in those who have opted for mastectomy, indicating that tungsten does not remain in the breast. In addition, standard chelation therapy was ineffective at mobilizing tungsten. In the mouse model, tungsten slightly delayed primary tumor growth, but significantly enhanced lung metastasis. In vitro, tungsten did not enhance 66Cl4 proliferation or invasion, suggesting that tungsten was not directly acting on 66Cl4 primary tumor cells to enhance invasion. In contrast, tungsten changed the tumor microenvironment, enhancing parameters known to be important for cell invasion and metastasis including activated fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We show, for the first time, that tungsten enhances metastasis in an animal model of breast cancer by targeting the microenvironment. Importantly, all these tumor microenvironmental changes are associated with a poor prognosis in humans. PMID:25324207

  5. A Novel ¹¹¹In-Labeled Anti-Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Nanobody for Targeted SPECT/CT Imaging of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatalic, Kristell L S; Veldhoven-Zweistra, Joke; Bolkestein, Michiel; Hoeben, Sander; Koning, Gerben A; Boerman, Otto C; de Jong, Marion; van Weerden, Wytske M

    2015-07-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is overexpressed in prostate cancer (PCa) and a promising target for molecular imaging and therapy. Nanobodies (single-domain antibodies, VHH) are the smallest antibody-based fragments possessing ideal molecular imaging properties, such as high target specificity and rapid background clearance. We developed a novel anti-PSMA Nanobody (JVZ-007) for targeted imaging and therapy of PCa. Here, we report on the application of the (111)In-radiolabeled Nanobody for SPECT/CT imaging of PCa. A Nanobody library was generated by immunization of a llama with 4 human PCa cell lines. Anti-PSMA Nanobodies were captured by biopanning on PSMA-overexpressing cells. JVZ-007 was selected for evaluation as an imaging probe. JVZ-007 was initially produced with a c-myc-hexahistidine (his) tag allowing purification and detection. The c-myc-his tag was subsequently replaced by a single cysteine at the C terminus, allowing site-specific conjugation of chelates for radiolabeling. JVZ-007-c-myc-his was conjugated to 2-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (p-SCN-DTPA) via the lysines, whereas JVZ-007-cys was conjugated to maleimide-DTPA via the C-terminal cysteine. PSMA targeting was analyzed in vitro by cell-binding experiments using flow cytometry, autoradiography, and internalization assays with various PCa cell lines and patient-derived xenografts (PDXs). The targeting properties of radiolabeled Nanobodies were evaluated in vivo in biodistribution and SPECT/CT imaging experiments, using nude mice bearing PSMA-positive PC-310 and PSMA-negative PC-3 tumors. JVZ-007 was successfully conjugated to DTPA for radiolabeling with (111)In at room temperature. (111)In-JVZ007-c-myc-his and (111)In-JVZ007-cys internalized in LNCaP cells and bound to PSMA-expressing PDXs and, importantly, not to PSMA-negative PDXs and human kidneys. Good tumor targeting and fast blood clearance were observed for (111)In-JVZ-007-c-myc-his and (111)In

  6. Applications of polymeric micelles with tumor targeted in chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Hui; Wang Xiaojun; Zhang Song; Liu Xinli

    2012-01-01

    Polymeric micelles (PMs) have gained more progress as a carrier system with the quick development of biological and nanoparticle techniques. In particular, PMs with smart targeting can deliver anti-cancer drugs directly into tumor cells at a sustained rate. PMs with core–shell structure (with diameters of 10 ∼ 100 nm) have been prepared by a variety of biodegradable and biocompatible polymers via a self-assembly process. The preparation of polymeric micelles with stimuli-responsive block copolymers or modification of target molecules on polymeric micelles’ surface are able to significantly improve the efficiency of drug delivery. Polymeric micelles, which have been considered as a novel promising drug carrier for cancer therapeutics, are rapidly evolving and being introduced in an attempt to overcome several limitations of traditional chemotherapeutics, including water solubility, tumor-specific accumulation, anti-tumor efficacy, and non-specific toxicity. This review describes the preparation of polymeric micelles and the targeted modification which greatly enhance the effects of chemotherapeutic agents.

  7. In vivo targeting of ADAM9 gene expression using lentivirus-delivered shRNA suppresses prostate cancer growth by regulating REG4 dependent cell cycle progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Ming Liu

    Full Text Available Cancer cells respond to stress by activating a variety of survival signaling pathways. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM 9 is upregulated during cancer progression and hormone therapy, functioning in part through an increase in reactive oxygen species. Here, we present in vitro and in vivo evidence that therapeutic targeting of ADAM9 gene expression by lentivirus-delivered small hairpin RNA (shRNA significantly inhibited proliferation of human prostate cancer cell lines and blocked tumor growth in a murine model of prostate cancer bone metastasis. Cell cycle studies confirmed an increase in the G1-phase and decrease in the S-phase population of cancer cells under starvation stress conditions, which correlated with elevated intracellular superoxide levels. Microarray data showed significantly decreased levels of regenerating islet-derived family member 4 (REG4 expression in prostate cancer cells with knockdown of ADAM9 gene expression. This REG4 downregulation also resulted in induction of expression of p21(Cip1/WAF1, which negatively regulates cyclin D1 and blocks the G1/S transition. Our data reveal a novel molecular mechanism of ADAM9 in the regulation of prostate cancer cell proliferation, and suggests a combined modality of ADAM9 shRNA gene therapy and cytotoxic agents for hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancer.

  8. Near-Infrared Neodymium Tag for Quantifying Targeted Biomarker and Counting Its Host Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunlan; Lu, Shu; Yang, Limin; Chen, Peijie; Bai, Peiming; Wang, Qiuquan

    2017-09-05

    Quantitative information on a targeted analyte in a complex biological system is the most basic premise for understanding its involved mechanisms, and thus precise diagnosis of a disease if it is a so-called biomarker. Here, we designed and synthesized a neodymium (Nd)-cored tag [1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-trisacetic acid (DOTA)-Nd complex together with a light-harvesting antenna aminofluorescein (AMF, λ ex/em = 494/520 nm), AMF-DOTA-Nd] with duplex signals, second near-infrared (NIR) window luminescence (λ em = 1065 nm, 2.5 μs), and stable isotopic mass ( 142 Nd). AMF-DOTA-Nd covalently linked with a urea-based peptidomimetic targeting group, 2-[3-(1,3-dicarboxypropyl)-ureido]pentanedioic acid (DUPA)-8-Aoc-Phe-Phe-Cys (DUPAaFFC) (DUPAaFFC-AMF-DOTA-Nd), allowing us to detect and quantify prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) and its splice variants (total PSMA, tPSMA), which was set as an example of targeted biomarkers in this study, using NIR and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) with the limit of detection (LOD) (3σ) of 0.3 ng/mL. When it was applied to the analysis of 80 blood samples from prostate cancer (PCa) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients as well as healthy volunteers, we found that 320 and 600 ng/mL tPSMA could be recommended as the threshold values to differentiate BPH from PCa and for the diagnosis of PCa. Moreover, PSMA-positive circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were counted using ICPMS being from 134 to 773 CTCs in the PCa blood samples of the Gleason score from 6 to 9 when the cell membrane-spanning mPSMA was tagged. Such a methodology developed could be expected to be applicable to other clinic-meaningful biomolecules and their host CTCs in liquid biopsy, when other specific targeting groups are modified to the NIR Nd tag.

  9. Klf5 deletion promotes Pten deletion-initiated luminal-type mouse prostate tumors through multiple oncogenic signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Changsheng; Ci, Xinpei; Sun, Xiaodong; Fu, Xiaoying; Zhang, Zhiqian; Dong, Eric N; Hao, Zhao-Zhe; Dong, Jin-Tang

    2014-11-01

    Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5) regulates multiple biologic processes. Its function in tumorigenesis appears contradictory though, showing both tumor suppressor and tumor promoting activities. In this study, we examined whether and how Klf5 functions in prostatic tumorigenesis using mice with prostate-specific deletion of Klf5 and phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten), both of which are frequently inactivated in human prostate cancer. Histologic analysis demonstrated that when one Pten allele was deleted, which causes mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPIN), Klf5 deletion accelerated the emergence and progression of mPIN. When both Pten alleles were deleted, which causes prostate cancer, Klf5 deletion promoted tumor growth, increased cell proliferation, and caused more severe morphologic and molecular alterations. Homozygous deletion of Klf5 was more effective than hemizygous deletion. Unexpectedly, while Pten deletion alone expanded basal cell population in a tumor as reported, Klf5 deletion in the Pten-null background clearly reduced basal cell population while expanding luminal cell population. Global gene expression profiling, pathway analysis, and experimental validation indicate that multiple mechanisms could mediate the tumor-promoting effect of Klf5 deletion, including the up-regulation of epidermal growth factor and its downstream signaling molecules AKT and ERK and the inactivation of the p15 cell cycle inhibitor. KLF5 also appears to cooperate with several transcription factors, including CREB1, Sp1, Myc, ER and AR, to regulate gene expression. These findings validate the tumor suppressor function of KLF5. They also yield a mouse model that shares two common genetic alterations with human prostate cancer-mutation/deletion of Pten and deletion of Klf5.

  10. Understanding PSA and its derivatives in prediction of tumor volume: Addressing health disparities in prostate cancer risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinea, Felix M; Lyapichev, Kirill; Epstein, Jonathan I; Kwon, Deukwoo; Smith, Paul Taylor; Pollack, Alan; Cote, Richard J; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N

    2017-03-28

    To address health disparities in risk stratification of U.S. Hispanic/Latino men by characterizing influences of prostate weight, body mass index, and race/ethnicity on the correlation of PSA derivatives with Gleason score 6 (Grade Group 1) tumor volume in a diverse cohort. Using published PSA density and PSA mass density cutoff values, men with higher body mass indices and prostate weights were less likely to have a tumor volume PSA derivatives when predicting for tumor volume. In receiver operator characteristic analysis, area under the curve values for all PSA derivatives varied across race/ethnicity with lower optimal cutoff values for Hispanic/Latino (PSA=2.79, PSA density=0.06, PSA mass=0.37, PSA mass density=0.011) and Non-Hispanic Black (PSA=3.75, PSA density=0.07, PSA mass=0.46, PSA mass density=0.008) compared to Non-Hispanic White men (PSA=4.20, PSA density=0.11 PSA mass=0.53, PSA mass density=0.014). We retrospectively analyzed 589 patients with low-risk prostate cancer at radical prostatectomy. Pre-operative PSA, patient height, body weight, and prostate weight were used to calculate all PSA derivatives. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed for each PSA derivative per racial/ethnic group to establish optimal cutoff values predicting for tumor volume ≥0.5 cm3. Increasing prostate weight and body mass index negatively influence PSA derivatives for predicting tumor volume. PSA derivatives' ability to predict tumor volume varies significantly across race/ethnicity. Hispanic/Latino and Non-Hispanic Black men have lower optimal cutoff values for all PSA derivatives, which may impact risk assessment for prostate cancer.

  11. Cannabinoid Receptors: A Novel Target for Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    experiments, the long term implications of our study could be to develop nonhabit-forming cannabi - noid agonist (s) for the management of prostate cancer ...Corbacho, C., Velasco, G., Galve-Roperh, I., Huffman, J. W., Ramon, y ., Cajal. S., and Guzman, M. (2001) Cancer Res. 61, 5784–5789 7. Casanova,M. L...Nithipatikom, K., Endsley, M. P., Isbell, M. A., Falck, J. R., Iwamoto, Y ., Hillard, C. J., and Campbell, W. B. (2004) Cancer Res. 64, 8826–8830 29. Bisogno, T

  12. Genetic variation in IL-16 miRNA target site and time to prostate cancer diagnosis in African American men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Lucinda; Ruth, Karen; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Giri, Veda N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Men with a family history of prostate cancer and African American men are at high risk for prostate cancer and in need of personalized risk estimates to inform screening decisions. This study evaluated genetic variants in genes encoding microRNA (miRNA) binding sites for informing of time to prostate cancer diagnosis among ethnically-diverse, high-risk men undergoing prostate cancer screening. Methods The Prostate Cancer Risk Assessment Program (PRAP) is a longitudinal screening program for high-risk men. Eligibility includes men ages 35-69 with a family history of prostate cancer or African descent. Participants with ≥ 1 follow-up visit were included in the analyses (n=477). Genetic variants in regions encoding miRNA binding sites in four target genes (ALOX15, IL-16, IL-18, and RAF1) previously implicated in prostate cancer development were evaluated. Genotyping methods included Taqman® SNP Genotyping Assay (Applied Biosystems) or pyrosequencing. Cox models were used to assess time to prostate cancer diagnosis by risk genotype. Results Among 256 African Americans with ≥ one follow-up visit, the TT genotype at rs1131445 in IL-16 was significantly associated with earlier time to prostate cancer diagnosis vs. the CC/CT genotypes (p=0.013), with a suggestive association after correction for false-discovery (p=0.065). Hazard ratio after controlling for age and PSA for TT vs. CC/CT among African Americans was 3.0 (95% CI 1.26-7.12). No association to time to diagnosis was detected among Caucasians by IL-16 genotype. No association to time to prostate cancer diagnosis was found for the other miRNA target genotypes. Conclusions Genetic variation in IL-16 encoding miRNA target site may be informative of time to prostate cancer diagnosis among African American men enrolled in prostate cancer risk assessment, which may inform individualized prostate cancer screening strategies in the future. PMID:24061634

  13. High-intensity interstitial ultrasound for thermal ablation of focal cancer targets in prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Scott, Serena; Kurhanewicz, John; Diederich, Chris J.

    2017-03-01

    Recent advances in image based techniques such as multi-parametric MRI (MP-MRI) can provide precise targeting of focal disease in the prostate. Thermal ablation of such cancer targets while avoiding rectum, urethra, neurovascular bundles (NVB) and sphincter is clinically challenging. The approach described here employs multi-element ultrasound linear arrays designed for transperineal placement within prostate. They consist of independently powered sectored tubular transducers (6.5 - 8.0 MHz) that provide spatial control of energy deposition in angle and length. Volumetric ablation strategies were investigated through patient-specific biothermal models based on Pennes bioheat transfer equation. The acoustic and heat transfer models used here have been validated in several previous simulation and experimental studies. Focal disease sites in prostate were identified through multi-parametric MR images of representative patient cases (n=3). Focal cancer lesions and critical anatomy (prostate, urethra, rectum, bladder, seminal vesicles) were manually segmented (Mimics, Materialise) and converted to 3D finite element meshes (3-Matic, Materialise). The chosen test cases consisted of patients with medium and large sized glands and models of bulk tissue ablation covered volumes in a single quadrant in posterior prostate, hemi-gland targets and "hockey-stick" targets (lesions in three quadrants). Ultrasound applicator placement was determined such that devices were positioned along the prostate periphery while avoiding surrounding anatomy. Transducer sector angles were chosen based on applicator location within limits of fabrication practicability. Thermal models were numerically solved using finite element methods (FEM) in COMSOL Multiphysics. Temperature and thermal dose distributions were calculated to determine treated volumes (> 240 CEM43C, >52 °C) and safety profiles (<10 CEM43C, <45 °C) for nerve, rectal and urethral sparing. Modeling studies indicated that focal

  14. Selenium, but not lycopene or vitamin E, decreases growth of transplantable dunning R3327-H rat prostate tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian L Lindshield

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lycopene, selenium, and vitamin E are three micronutrients commonly consumed and supplemented by men diagnosed with prostate cancer. However, it is not clear whether consumption of these compounds, alone or in combination, results in improved outcomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated the effects of dietary lycopene (250 mg/kg diet, selenium (methylselenocysteine, 1 mg/kg diet, and vitamin E (gamma-tocopherol, 200 mg/kg diet alone and in combination on the growth of androgen-dependent Dunning R3327-H rat prostate adenocarcinomas in male, Copenhagen rats. AIN-93G diets containing these micronutrients were prefed for 4 to 6 weeks prior to tumor implantation by subcutaneous injection. Tumors were allowed to grow for approximately 18 weeks. Across diet groups, methylselenocysteine consumption decreased final tumor area (P = 0.003, tumor weight (P = 0.003, and the tumor weight/body weight ratio (P = 0.003, but lycopene and gamma-tocopherol consumption intake did not alter any of these measures. There were no significant interactions among nutrient combinations on tumor growth. Methylselenocysteine consumption also led to small, but significant decreases in body weight (P = 0.007, food intake (P = 0.012, and body weight gain/food intake ratio (P = 0.022. However, neither body weight nor gain/food intake ratio was correlated with tumor weight. Methylselenocysteine, lycopene, and gamma-tocopherol consumed alone and in combination did not alter serum testosterone or dihydrotestosterone concentrations; tumor proliferation or apoptosis rates. In addition, the diets also did not alter tumor or prostate androgen receptor, probasin, selenoprotein 15, selenoprotein P, or selenium binding protein 2 mRNA expression. However, using castration and finasteride-treated tissues from a previous study, we found that androgen ablation altered expression of these selenium-associated proteins. CONCLUSIONS: Of the three micronutrients tested, only

  15. Analysis of biopsy outcome after three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy of prostate cancer using dose-distribution variables and tumor control probability models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levegruen, Sabine; Jackson, Andrew; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Venkatraman, Ennapadam S.; Skwarchuk, Mark W.; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Fuks, Zvi; Leibel, Steven A.; Ling, C. Clifton

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate tumor control following three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) of prostate cancer and to identify dose-distribution variables that correlate with local control assessed through posttreatment prostate biopsies. Methods and Material: Data from 132 patients, treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), who had a prostate biopsy 2.5 years or more after 3D-CRT for T1c-T3 prostate cancer with prescription doses of 64.8-81 Gy were analyzed. Variables derived from the dose distribution in the PTV included: minimum dose (Dmin), maximum dose (Dmax), mean dose (Dmean), dose to n% of the PTV (Dn), where n = 1%, ..., 99%. The concept of the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) was evaluated for different values of the surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF 2 ). Four tumor control probability (TCP) models (one phenomenologic model using a logistic function and three Poisson cell kill models) were investigated using two sets of input parameters, one for low and one for high T-stage tumors. Application of both sets to all patients was also investigated. In addition, several tumor-related prognostic variables were examined (including T-stage, Gleason score). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. The ability of the logistic regression models (univariate and multivariate) to predict the biopsy result correctly was tested by performing cross-validation analyses and evaluating the results in terms of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results: In univariate analysis, prescription dose (Dprescr), Dmax, Dmean, dose to n% of the PTV with n of 70% or less correlate with outcome (p 2 : EUD correlates significantly with outcome for SF 2 of 0.4 or more, but not for lower SF 2 values. Using either of the two input parameters sets, all TCP models correlate with outcome (p 2 , is limited because the low dose region may not coincide with the tumor location. Instead, for MSKCC prostate cancer patients with their

  16. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 is an enhancer of tumor angiogenesis in human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván González-Chavarría

    Full Text Available Altered expression and function of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1 has been associated with several diseases such as endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and obesity. In these pathologies, oxLDL/LOX-1 activates signaling pathways that promote cell proliferation, cell motility and angiogenesis. Recent studies have indicated that olr1 mRNA is over-expressed in stage III and IV of human prostatic adenocarcinomas. However, the function of LOX-1 in prostate cancer angiogenesis remains to be determined. Our aim was to analyze the contribution of oxLDL and LOX-1 to tumor angiogenesis using C4-2 prostate cancer cells. We analyzed the expression of pro-angiogenic molecules and angiogenesis on prostate cancer tumor xenografts, using prostate cancer cell models with overexpression or knockdown of LOX-1 receptor. Our results demonstrate that the activation of LOX-1 using oxLDL increases cell proliferation, and the expression of the pro-angiogenic molecules VEGF, MMP-2, and MMP-9 in a dose-dependent manner. Noticeably, these effects were prevented in the C4-2 prostate cancer model when LOX-1 expression was knocked down. The angiogenic effect of LOX-1 activated with oxLDL was further demonstrated using the aortic ring assay and the xenograft model of tumor growth on chorioallantoic membrane of chicken embryos. Consequently, we propose that LOX-1 activation by oxLDL is an important event that enhances tumor angiogenesis in human prostate cancer cells.

  17. Imaging of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turgut, A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The main role of imaging in prostatic diseases is for prostate cancer. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the most commonly used imaging tools used for the diagnosis of the diseases of the prostate gland. The main indications for TRUS is the evaluation for prostate cancer and guidance for prostate biopsy. On TRUS, the transition zone with a hypoechoic appearance can be differentiated from the peripheral zone, which appears relatively echogenic and homogenous in echotexture. Prostate cancer mainly involves the peripheral zone, though one fifth of the disease can be detected in the transition zone, which is the major site for hyperplastic changes in older men. Color Doppler ultrasound may be helpful for the differentiation of low-risk, hypovascular tumors from high-risk, hypervascular tumors, as the latter group is associated with higher Gleason tumor grades consistent with higher risk for extraprostatic spread. Nevertheless, targeted prostate biopsy solely based on high-frequency color or power Doppler imaging is not recommended, as the technique has inherent risk of missing a significant number of cancers. Although power Doppler ultrasound can enable the operator to perform more accurate sampling of the prostate by determining sites of focal hypervascularity, it has not been found to be superior to color Doppler ultrasound. It has been reported to be useful only for targeted biopsies with limited number of biopsy cores. Microbubble contrast agents may enable better visualization of prostatic microvasculature and cancerous prostate tissue. By means of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), the number of cores may be decreased by performing targeted biopsies. Importantly, the detection of the signals reflected by the microbubbles can be enhanced by the phase inversion (pulse-inversion) technology. Prostate cancer appears as a dark zone on elastography representing limited elasticity or compressibility. By means of the

  18. Targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor in solid tumor malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Mette K; Hedegaard, Chris J; Poulsen, Hans S

    2012-01-01

    been proposed as valid targets in many cancer therapy settings. Different strategies have been developed in order to either inhibit EGFR/EGFRvIII activity or to ablate EGFR/EGFRvIII-positive tumor cells. Drugs that inhibit these receptors include monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind...... to the extracellular part of EGFR, blocking the binding sites for the EGFR ligands, and intracellular tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) that block the ATP binding site of the tyrosine kinase domain. Besides an EGFRvIII-targeted vaccine, conjugated anti-EGFR mAbs have been used in different settings to deliver lethal...... agents to the EGFR/EGFRvIII-positive cells; among these are radio-labelled mAbs and immunotoxins. This article reviews the current status and efficacy of EGFR/EGFRvIII-targeted therapies....

  19. Targeting sarcoma tumor-initiating cells through differentiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Han

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-I down-regulation has been reported in many human cancers to be associated with poor clinical outcome. However, its connection to tumor-initiating cells (TICs remains unknown. In this study, we report that HLA-I is down-regulated in a subpopulation of cells that have high tumor initiating capacity in different types of human sarcomas. Detailed characterization revealed their distinct molecular profiles regarding proliferation, apoptosis and stemness programs. Notably, these TICs can be induced to differentiate along distinct mesenchymal lineages, including the osteogenic pathway. The retinoic acid receptor signaling pathway is overexpressed in HLA-1 negative TICs. All-trans retinoic acid treatment successfully induced osteogenic differentiation of this subpopulation, in vitro and in vivo, resulting in significantly decreased tumor formation. Thus, our findings indicate down-regulated HLA-I is a shared feature of TICs in a variety of human sarcomas, and differentiation therapy strategies may specifically target undifferentiated TICs and inhibit tumor formation.

  20. Targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for tumor imaging and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Hong Peng

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Xiang-Hong Peng1,4, Ximei Qian2,4, Hui Mao3,4, Andrew Y Wang5, Zhuo (Georgia Chen1,4, Shuming Nie2,4, Dong M Shin1,4*1Department of Medical Oncology/Hematology; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering; 3Department of Radiology; 4Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 5Ocean Nanotech, LLC, Fayetteville, AR, USAAbstract: Magnetic iron oxide (IO nanoparticles with a long blood retention time, biodegradability and low toxicity have emerged as one of the primary nanomaterials for biomedical applications in vitro and in vivo. IO nanoparticles have a large surface area and can be engineered to provide a large number of functional groups for cross-linking to tumor-targeting ligands such as monoclonal antibodies, peptides, or small molecules for diagnostic imaging or delivery of therapeutic agents. IO nanoparticles possess unique paramagnetic properties, which generate significant susceptibility effects resulting in strong T2 and T*2 contrast, as well as T1 effects at very low concentrations for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, which is widely used for clinical oncology imaging. We review recent advances in the development of targeted IO nanoparticles for tumor imaging and therapy.Keywords: iron oxide nanoparticles, tumor imaging, MRI, therapy

  1. The retinoblastoma protein regulates hypoxia-inducible genetic programs, tumor cell invasiveness and neuroendocrine differentiation in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Mark P.; Takhar, Mandeep K.; Nason, Rebecca; Santacruz, Stephanie; Tam, Kevin J.; Massah, Shabnam; Haegert, Anne; Bell, Robert H.; Altamirano-Dimas, Manuel; Collins, Colin C.; Lee, Frank J.S.; Prefontaine, Gratien G.; Cox, Michael E.; Beischlag, Timothy V.

    2016-01-01

    Loss of tumor suppressor proteins, such as the retinoblastoma protein (Rb), results in tumor progression and metastasis. Metastasis is facilitated by low oxygen availability within the tumor that is detected by hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). The HIF1 complex, HIF1α and dimerization partner the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), is the master regulator of the hypoxic response. Previously, we demonstrated that Rb represses the transcriptional response to hypoxia by virtue of its association with HIF1. In this report, we further characterized the role Rb plays in mediating hypoxia-regulated genetic programs by stably ablating Rb expression with retrovirally-introduced short hairpin RNA in LNCaP and 22Rv1 human prostate cancer cells. DNA microarray analysis revealed that loss of Rb in conjunction with hypoxia leads to aberrant expression of hypoxia-regulated genetic programs that increase cell invasion and promote neuroendocrine differentiation. For the first time, we have established a direct link between hypoxic tumor environments, Rb inactivation and progression to late stage metastatic neuroendocrine prostate cancer. Understanding the molecular pathways responsible for progression of benign prostate tumors to metastasized and lethal forms will aid in the development of more effective prostate cancer therapies. PMID:27015368

  2. Targeting tumor-associated macrophages by anti-tumor Chinese materia medica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Wei-Ling; Sun, Li-Kang; Gao, Xiu-Mei; Rüegg, Curzio; Cuendet, Muriel; Hottiger, Micheal O; Zhou, Kun; Miao, Lin; Zhang, Yun-Sha; Gebauer, Margaret

    2017-10-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play a key role in all stages of tumorigenesis and tumor progression. TAMs secrete different kinds of cytokines, chemokines, and enzymes to affect the progression, metastasis, and resistance to therapy depending on their state of reprogramming. Therapeutic benefit in targeting TAMs suggests that macrophages are attractive targets for cancer treatment. Chinese materia medica (CMM) is an important approach for treating cancer in China and in the Asian region. According to the theory of Chinese medicine (CM) and its practice, some prescriptions of CM regulate the body's internal environment possibly including the remodeling the tumor microenvironment (TME). Here we briefly summarize the pivotal effects of TAMs in shaping the TME and promoting tumorigenesis, invasion, metastasis and immunosuppression. Furthermore, we illustrate the effects and mechanisms of CMM targeting TAMs in antitumor therapy. Finally, we reveal the CMM's dual-regulatory and multi-targeting functions on regulating TAMs, and hopefully, provide the theoretical basis for CMM clinical practice related to cancer therapy.

  3. [Fluorine-18 labeled androgens and progestins; imaging agents for tumors of prostate and breast]: Technical progress report, February 1, 1987-January 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katzenellenbogen, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    This project develops fluorine-18 labeled steroids that possess high binding affinity and selectivity for androgen and progesterone receptors and can be used as positron-emission tomographic imaging agents for prostate tumors and breast tumors, respectively. These novel diagnostic agents may enable an accurate estimation of tumor dissemination, such as metastasis of prostate cancer and lymph node involvement of breast cancer, and an in vivo determination of the endocrine responsiveness of these tumors. They will provide essential information for the selection of alternative therapies thereby improving the management of prostate and breast cancer patients. 14 refs., 1 tab

  4. Ultrasonic Nanobubbles Carrying Anti-PSMA Nanobody: Construction and Application in Prostate Cancer-Targeted Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhou Fan

    Full Text Available To facilitate prostate cancer imaging using targeted molecules, we constructed ultrasonic nanobubbles coupled with specific anti-PSMA (prostate specific membrane antigen nanobodies, and evaluated their in vitro binding capacity and in vivo imaging efficacy. The "targeted" nanobubbles, which were constructed via a biotin-streptavidin system, had an average diameter of 487.60 ± 33.55 nm and carried the anti-PSMA nanobody as demonstrated by immunofluorescence. Microscopy revealed targeted binding of nanobubbles in vitro to PSMA-positive cells. Additionally, ultrasonography indicators of nanobubble imaging (including arrival time, peak time, peak intensity and enhanced duration were evaluated for the ultrasound imaging in three kinds of animal xenografts (LNCaP, C4-2 and MKN45, and showed that these four indicators of targeted nanobubbles exhibited significant differences from blank nanobubbles. Therefore, this study not only presents a novel approach to target prostate cancer ultrasonography, but also provides the basis and methods for constructing small-sized and high-efficient targeted ultrasound nanobubbles.

  5. FOXM1: A novel drug target in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briest, Franziska; Berg, Erika; Grass, Irina; Freitag, Helma; Kaemmerer, Daniel; Lewens, Florentine; Christen, Friederike; Arsenic, Ruza; Altendorf-Hofmann, Annelore; Kunze, Almut; Sänger, Jörg; Knösel, Thomas; Siegmund, Britta; Hummel, Michael; Grabowski, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs) are heterogeneous tumors that need to be molecularly defined to obtain novel therapeutic options. Forkheadbox protein M1 (FOXM1) is a crucial transcription factor in neoplastic cells and has been associated with differentiation and proliferation. We found that FOXM1 is strongly associated with tumor differentiation and occurrence of metastases in gastrointestinal NENs. In vitro inhibition by the FOXM1 inhibitor siomycin A led to down-regulation of mitotic proteins and resulted in a strong inhibitory effect. Siomycin A decreased mitosis rate, induced apoptosis in GEP-NEN cell lines and exerts synergistic effects with chemotherapy. FOXM1 is associated with clinical outcome and FOXM1 inhibition impairs survival in vitro. We therefore propose FOXM1 as novel therapeutic target in GEP-NENs. PMID:25797272

  6. 99mTc-labeled PSMA inhibitor: Biokinetics and radiation dosimetry in healthy subjects and imaging of prostate cancer tumors in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Cuevas, Clara; Davanzo, Jenny; Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; García-Pérez, Francisco O; Ocampo-García, Blanca; Ignacio-Alvarez, Eleazar; Gómez-Argumosa, Edgar; Pedraza-López, Martha

    2017-09-01

    The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is expressed in epithelial cells of the prostate and highly overexpressed in 95% of advanced prostate cancers. The aims of this study was to estimate the biokinetics and dosimetry of 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-iPSMA ( 99m Tc-labeled PSMA inhibitor) in eight healthy subjects and evaluate its usefulness as a tumor-imaging agent in eight prostate cancer patients. 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-iPSMA was obtained from a lyophilized formulation with radiochemical purities >98%, determined by reversed-phase HPLC and ITLC-SG analyses. Whole-body images from eight healthy subjects were acquired at 20min, and at 2, 6 and 24h after 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-iPSMA administration. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around the source organs on each time frame. Each ROI was corrected by background, attenuation, scattered radiation and physical decay. The image sequence was used to extrapolate the 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-iPSMA time-activity curves of each organ to adjust the biokinetic model and calculate the total number of disintegrations (N) that occurred in the source regions. N data were the input for the OLINDA/EXM code to calculate internal radiation doses. In eight prostate cancer patients with histologically confirmed cancer, whole-body SPECT/CT images were obtained at 3h. The blood activity showed a half-life value of 4.98min for the fast component (T 1/2 α=ln2/8.34), 2.49h for the first slow component (T 1/2 β=ln2/0.278), and 9.24h for the second slow component (T 1/2 γ=ln2/0.076). Images from patients showed an average tumor/background ratio of 8.99±3.27 at 3h. The average equivalent doses calculated for a study using 740MBq were 3.80, 7.06, 9.69, 10.70, and 28.80mSv for the breast, spleen, salivary glands, liver, and kidneys respectively, with an effective dose of 3.42±0.78mSv. All the absorbed doses were comparable to those known for most of the 99m Tc studies. 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-iPSMA obtained from kit formulations showed high tumor uptake in

  7. Potential prostate cancer drug target: bioactivation of androstanediol by conversion to dihydrotestosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, James L; Titus, Mark A; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2011-09-15

    High-affinity binding of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) to the androgen receptor (AR) initiates androgen-dependent gene activation, required for normal male sex development in utero, and contributes to prostate cancer development and progression in men. Under normal physiologic conditions, DHT is synthesized predominantly by 5α-reduction of testosterone, the major circulating androgen produced by the testis. During androgen deprivation therapy, intratumoral androgen production is sufficient for AR activation and prostate cancer growth, even though circulating testicular androgen levels are low. Recent studies indicate that the metabolism of 5α-androstane-3α, 17β-diol by 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 6 in benign prostate and prostate cancer cells is a major biosynthetic pathway for intratumoral synthesis of DHT, which binds AR and initiates transactivation to promote prostate cancer growth during androgen deprivation therapy. Drugs that target the so-called backdoor pathway of DHT synthesis provide an opportunity to enhance clinical response to luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists or antagonists, AR antagonists, and inhibitors of 5α-reductase enzymes (finasteride or dutasteride), and other steroid metabolism enzyme inhibitors (ketoconazole or the recently available abiraterone acetate). ©2011 AACR.

  8. Contemporary analysis of erectile, voiding, and oncologic outcomes following primary targeted cryoablation of the prostate for clinically localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Diblasio

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate erectile function (EF and voiding function following primary targeted cryoablation of the prostate (TCAP for clinically localized prostate cancer (CaP in a contemporary cohort. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all patients treated between 2/2000-5/2006 with primary TCAP. Variables included age, Gleason sum, pre-TCAP prostate specific antigen (PSA, prostate volume, clinical stage, pre-TCAP hormonal ablation, pre-TCAP EF and American Urologic Association Symptom Score (AUASS. EF was recorded as follows: 1 = potent; 2 = sufficient for intercourse; 3 = partial/insufficient; 4 = minimal/insufficient; 5 = none. Voiding function was analyzed by comparing pre/post-TCAP AUASS. Statistical analysis utilized SAS software with p < 0.05 considered significant. RESULTS: After exclusions, 78 consecutive patients were analyzed with a mean age of 69.2 years and follow-up 39.8 months. Thirty-five (44.9% men reported pre-TCAP EF level of 1-2. Post-TCAP, 9 of 35 (25.7% regained EF of level 1-2 while 1 (2.9% achieved level 3 EF. Median pre-TCAP AUASS was 8.75 versus 7.50 postoperatively (p = 0.39. Six patients (7.7% experienced post-TCAP urinary incontinence. Lower pre-TCAP PSA (p = 0.008 and higher Gleason sum (p = 0.002 were associated with higher post-TCAP AUASS while prostate volume demonstrated a trend (p = 0.07. Post-TCAP EF and stable AUASS were not associated with increased disease-recurrence (p = 0.24 and p = 0.67, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Stable voiding function was observed post-TCAP, with an overall incontinence rate of 7.7%. Further, though erectile dysfunction is common following TCAP, 25.7% of previously potent patients demonstrated erections suitable for intercourse. While long-term data is requisite, consideration should be made for prospective evaluation of penile rehabilitation following primary TCAP.

  9. The folate receptor as a molecular target for tumor-selective radionuclide delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke, C.-Y.; Mathias, Carla J.; Green, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    The cell-membrane folate receptor is a potential molecular target for tumor-selective drug delivery, including radiolabeled folate-chelate conjugates for diagnostic imaging. We review here some background on the folate receptor as tumor-associated molecular target for drug delivery, and briefly survey the literature on tumor-targeting with radiolabeled folate-chelate conjugates

  10. Registration accuracy and possible migration of internal fiducial gold marker implanted in prostate and liver treated with real-time tumor-tracking radiation therapy (RTRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Kei; Shirato, Hiroki; Shimizu, Shinichi; Shinohara, Nobuo; Harabayashi, Toru; Shimizu, Tadashi; Kodama, Yoshihisa; Endo, Hideho; Onimaru, Rikiya; Nishioka, Seiko; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Tsuchiya, Kazuhiko; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2002-01-01

    Background and purpose: We have developed a linear accelerator synchronized with a fluoroscopic real-time tumor-tracking system to reduce errors due to setup and organ motion. In the real-time tumor-tracking radiation therapy (RTRT) system, the accuracy of tumor tracking depends on the registration of the marker's coordinates. The registration accuracy and possible migration of the internal fiducial gold marker implanted into prostate and liver was investigated. Materials and methods: Internal fiducial gold markers were implanted in 14 patients with prostate cancer and four patients with liver tumors. Computed tomography (CT) was carried out as a part of treatment planning in the 18 patients. A total of 72 follow-up CT scans were taken. We calculated the relative relationship between the coordinates of the center of mass (CM) of the organs and those of the marker. The discrepancy in the CM coordinates during a follow-up CT compared to those recorded during the planning CT was used to study possible marker migration. Results: The standard deviation (SD) of interobserver variations in the CM coordinates was within 2.0 and 0.4 mm for the organ and the marker, respectively, in seven observers. Assuming that organs do not shrink, grow, or rotate, the maximum SD of migration error in each direction was estimated to be less than 2.5 and 2.0 mm for liver and prostate, respectively. There was no correlation between the marker position and the time after implantation. Conclusion: The degree of possible migration of the internal fiducial marker was within the limits of accuracy of the CT measurement. Most of the marker movement can be attributed to the measurement uncertainty, which also influences registration in actual treatment planning. Thus, even with the gold marker and RTRT system, a planning target volume margin should be used to account for registration uncertainty

  11. Influence of Simultaneous Targeting of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein Pathway and RANK-RANKL Axis in Osteolytic Prostate Cancer Lesion in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virk, Mandeep S.; Petrigliano, Frank A.; Liu, Nancy Q.; Chatziioannou, Arion F.; Stout, David; Kang, Christine O.; Dougall, William C.; Lieberman, Jay R.

    2009-01-01

    Metastasis to bone is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in advanced prostate cancer patients. Considering the complex reciprocal interactions between the tumor cells and the bone microenvironment, there is increasing interest in developing combination therapies targeting both the tumor growth and the bone microenvironment. In this study, we investigated the effect of simultaneous blockade of BMP pathway and RANK-RANKL axis in an osteolytic prostate cancer lesion in bone. We used a retroviral vector encoding noggin (Retronoggin) to antagonize the effect of BMPs and RANK: Fc, which is a recombinant RANKL antagonist was used to inhibit RANK-RANKL axis. The tumor growth and bone loss were evaluated using plain radiographs, hind limb tumor measurements, micro PET-CT (18F- fluorodeoxyglucose [FDG] and 18F-fluoride tracer), and histology. Tibias implanted with PC-3 cells developed pure osteolytic lesions at 2 weeks with progressive increase in cortical bone destruction at successive time points. Tibias implanted with PC-3 cells over expressing noggin (Retronoggin) resulted in reduced tumor size and decreased bone loss compared to the implanted tibias in untreated control animals. RANK: Fc administration inhibited the formation of osteoclasts, delayed the development of osteolytic lesions, decreased bone loss and reduced tumor size in tibias implanted with PC-3 cells. The combination therapy with RANK: Fc and noggin over expression effectively delayed the radiographic development of osteolytic lesions, and decreased the bone loss and tumor burden compared to implanted tibias treated with noggin over expression alone. Furthermore, the animals treated with the combination strategy exhibited decreased bone loss (micro CT) and lower tumor burden (FDG micro PET) compared to animals treated with RANK: Fc alone. Combined blockade of RANK-RANKL axis and BMP pathway resulted in reduced tumor burden and decreased bone loss compared to inhibition of either individual

  12. HER2-Targeted Polyinosine/Polycytosine Therapy Inhibits Tumor Growth and Modulates the Tumor Immune Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigler, Maya; Shir, Alexei; Joubran, Salim; Sagalov, Anna; Klein, Shoshana; Edinger, Nufar; Lau, Jeffrey; Yu, Shang-Fan; Mizraji, Gabriel; Globerson Levin, Anat; Sliwkowski, Mark X; Levitzki, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The development of targeted therapies that affect multiple signaling pathways and stimulate antitumor immunity is greatly needed. About 20% of patients with breast cancer overexpress HER2. Small molecules and antibodies targeting HER2 convey some survival benefits; however, patients with advanced disease succumb to the disease under these treatment regimens, possibly because HER2 is not completely necessary for the survival of the targeted cancer cells. In the present study, we show that a polyinosine/polycytosine (pIC) HER2-homing chemical vector induced the demise of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells, including trastuzumab-resistant cells. Targeting pIC to the tumor evoked a number of cell-killing mechanisms, as well as strong bystander effects. These bystander mechanisms included type I IFN induction, immune cell recruitment, and activation. The HER2-targeted pIC strongly inhibited the growth of HER2-overexpressing tumors in immunocompetent mice. The data presented here could open additional avenues in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(8); 688-97. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Tumor Penetrating Theranostic Nanoparticles for Enhancement of Targeted and Image-guided Drug Delivery into Peritoneal Tumors following Intraperitoneal Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ning; Bozeman, Erica N; Qian, Weiping; Wang, Liya; Chen, Hongyu; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Staley, Charles A; Wang, Y Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2017-01-01

    The major obstacles in intraperitoneal (i.p.) chemotherapy of peritoneal tumors are fast absorption of drugs into the blood circulation, local and systemic toxicities, inadequate drug penetration into large tumors, and drug resistance. Targeted theranostic nanoparticles offer an opportunity to enhance the efficacy of i.p. therapy by increasing intratumoral drug delivery to overcome resistance, mediating image-guided drug delivery, and reducing systemic toxicity. Herein we report that i.p. delivery of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) led to intratumoral accumulation of 17% of total injected nanoparticles in an orthotopic mouse pancreatic cancer model, which was three-fold higher compared with intravenous delivery. Targeted delivery of near infrared dye labeled IONPs into orthotopic tumors could be detected by non-invasive optical and magnetic resonance imaging. Histological analysis revealed that a high level of uPAR targeted, PEGylated IONPs efficiently penetrated into both the peripheral and central tumor areas in the primary tumor as well as peritoneal metastatic tumor. Improved theranostic IONP delivery into the tumor center was not mediated by nonspecific macrophage uptake and was independent from tumor blood vessel locations. Importantly, i.p. delivery of uPAR targeted theranostic IONPs carrying chemotherapeutics, cisplatin or doxorubicin, significantly inhibited the growth of pancreatic tumors without apparent systemic toxicity. The levels of proliferating tumor cells and tumor vessels in tumors treated with the above theranostic IONPs were also markedly decreased. The detection of strong optical signals in residual tumors following i.p. therapy suggested the feasibility of image-guided surgery to remove drug-resistant tumors. Therefore, our results support the translational development of i.p. delivery of uPAR-targeted theranostic IONPs for image-guided treatment of peritoneal tumors.

  14. Inorganic Arsenic?Related Changes in the Stromal Tumor Microenvironment in a Prostate Cancer Cell?Conditioned Media Model

    OpenAIRE

    Shearer, Joseph J.; Wold, Eric A.; Umbaugh, Charles S.; Lichti, Cheryl F.; Nilsson, Carol L.; Figueiredo, Marxa L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The tumor microenvironment plays an important role in the progression of cancer by mediating stromal?epithelial paracrine signaling, which can aberrantly modulate cellular proliferation and tumorigenesis. Exposure to environmental toxicants, such as inorganic arsenic (iAs), has also been implicated in the progression of prostate cancer. Objective: The role of iAs exposure in stromal signaling in the tumor microenvironment has been largely unexplored. Our objective was to elucidate...

  15. Radiologic-pathologic findings of solitary fibrous tumor of the prostate presenting as a large mass with delayed filling-in on MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Puneet; Lee, Jean Hwa; Gupta, Saurabh; Seyal, Adeel Rahim; Vakar-Lopez, Funda; Moshiri, Mariam; Dighe, Manjiri Kiran

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a solitary fibrous tumor of prostate presenting with urinary retention and a large prostate mass. We describe the clinical presentation, magnetic resonance imaging findings, and histopathology of this rare, benign tumor. Although clinical and radiologic appearances embrace various differential diagnoses including sarcoma, this mass was confirmed by histologic analysis following surgical resection. We report this rare, benign tumor to help the radiologist suggest the diagnosis when presented with a similar case.

  16. Epigenetics in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albany, Costantine; Alva, Ajjai S; Aparicio, Ana M; Singal, Rakesh; Yellapragada, Sarvari; Sonpavde, Guru; Hahn, Noah M

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most commonly diagnosed nonskin malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death among men in the United States. Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in gene expression caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequences. Two common epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation and histone modification, have demonstrated critical roles in prostate cancer growth and metastasis. DNA hypermethylation of cytosine-guanine (CpG) rich sequence islands within gene promoter regions is widespread during neoplastic transformation of prostate cells, suggesting that treatment-induced restoration of a "normal" epigenome could be clinically beneficial. Histone modification leads to altered tumor gene function by changing chromosome structure and the level of gene transcription. The reversibility of epigenetic aberrations and restoration of tumor suppression gene function have made them attractive targets for prostate cancer treatment with modulators that demethylate DNA and inhibit histone deacetylases.

  17. Epigenetics in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costantine Albany

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the most commonly diagnosed nonskin malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death among men in the United States. Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in gene expression caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequences. Two common epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation and histone modification, have demonstrated critical roles in prostate cancer growth and metastasis. DNA hypermethylation of cytosine-guanine (CpG rich sequence islands within gene promoter regions is widespread during neoplastic transformation of prostate cells, suggesting that treatment-induced restoration of a “normal” epigenome could be clinically beneficial. Histone modification leads to altered tumor gene function by changing chromosome structure and the level of gene transcription. The reversibility of epigenetic aberrations and restoration of tumor suppression gene function have made them attractive targets for prostate cancer treatment with modulators that demethylate DNA and inhibit histone deacetylases.

  18. Potential downstream target genes of aberrant ETS transcription factors are differentially affected in Ewing's sarcoma and prostate carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J Camões

    Full Text Available FLI1 and ERG, the major ETS transcription factors involved in rearrangements in the Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT and in prostate carcinomas (PCa, respectively, belong to the same subfamily, having 98% sequence identity in the DNA binding domain. We therefore decided to investigate whether the aberrant transcription factors in both malignancies have some common downstream targets. We crossed a publicly available list of all putative EWSR1-FLI1 target genes in ESFT with our microarray expression data on 24 PCa and 6 non-malignant prostate tissues (NPT and choose four genes among the top-most differentially expressed between PCa with (PCa ERG+ and without (PCa ETS- ETS fusion genes (HIST1H4L, KCNN2, ECRG4 and LDOC1, as well as four well-validated direct targets of the EWSR1-FLI1 chimeric protein in ESFT (NR0B1, CAV1, IGFBP3 and TGFBR2. Using quantitative expression analysis in 16 ESFT and seven alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas (ARMS, we were able to validate the four genes previously described as direct targets of the EWSR1-FLI1 oncoprotein, showing overexpression of CAV1 and NR0B1 and underexpression of IGFBP3 and TGFBR2 in ESFT as compared to ARMS. Although none of these four genes showed significant expression differences between PCa ERG+ and PCa ETS-, CAV1, IGFBP3 and TGFBR2 were less expressed in PCa in an independent series of 56 PCa and 15 NPT, as also observed for ECRG4 and LDOC1, suggesting a role in prostate carcinogenesis in general. On the other hand, we demonstrate for the first time that both HIST1H4L and KCNN2 are significantly overexpressed in PCa ERG+ and that ERG binds to the promoter of these genes. Conversely, KCNN2 was found underexpressed in ESFT relative to ARMS, suggesting that the EWSR1-ETS oncoprotein may have the opposite effect of ERG rearrangements in PCa. We conclude that aberrant ETS transcription factors modulate target genes differently in ESFT and PCa.

  19. MRI Fusion-Targeted Transrectal Prostate Biopsy and the Role of Prostate-Specific Antigen Density and Prostate Health Index for the Detection of Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer in Southeast Asian Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Teck Wei; Png, Keng Siang; Lee, Chau Hung; Yuwono, Arianto; Yeow, Yuyi; Chong, Kian Tai; Lee, Yee Mun; Tan, Cher Heng; Tan, Yung Khan

    2017-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that targeted biopsy has a higher detection rate for clinically significant prostate cancer (csPCa) than systematic biopsy. We defined csPCa as any Gleason sum ≥7 cancer. In patients with Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) 3 lesions, to determine if factors, such as prostate-specific antigen density (PSAD) and prostate health index (PHI), can predict csPCa and help select patients for biopsy. We report the first series of targeted biopsies in Southeast Asian men, with comparison against systematic biopsy. Consecutive patients were registered into a prospective institutional review board-approved database in our institution. We reviewed patients who underwent biopsy from May 2016 to June 2017. Inclusion criteria for our study were patients with at least one PI-RADS ≥3, and who underwent both targeted and systematic biopsies in the same sitting. There were 115 patients in the study, of whom 74 (64.3%) had a previous negative systematic biopsy. Targeted biopsies detected significantly less Gleason 6 cancers than systematic biopsies (p < 0.01), and demonstrated significantly higher sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value (NPV) for the detection of csPCa. For patients with PI-RADS 3 lesions, PHI and PSAD were found to be the best predictors for csPCa. PSAD <0.10 ng/mL/mL had an NPV of 93% and sensitivity of 92%, while allowing 20% of patients to avoid biopsy. PHI cutoff of <27 would allow 34% of patients to avoid biopsy, with both sensitivity and NPV of 100%. Targeted prostate biopsies were found to be significantly superior to systematic biopsies for the detection of csPCa, while detecting less Gleason 6 cancer. Usage of PSAD and PHI cutoff levels in patients with PI-RADS 3 lesions may enable a number of patients to avoid unnecessary biopsy.

  20. Development of an immunotherapeutic adenovirus targeting hormone-independent prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim JS

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Jae Sik Kim,1 Sang Don Lee,2 Sang Jin Lee,3 Moon Kee Chung21Department of Urology, The Catholic University of Korea Incheon St Mary's Hospital, Incheon, 2Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital and Research Institute for Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Yangsan, 3Genitourinary Cancer Branch, National Cancer Center, Goyang, KoreaBackground: To develop a targeting therapy for hormone-independent prostate cancer, we constructed and characterized conditionally replicating oncolytic adenovirus (Ad equipped with mRFP(monomeric red fluorescence protein/ttk (modified herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase This construct was then further modified to express both mRFP/ttk and a soluble form of cytokine FLT3L (fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand simultaneously.Methods: To construct the recombinant oncolytic adenovirus, E1a and E4 genes, which are necessary for adenovirus replication, were controlled by the prostate-specific enhancer sequence (PSES targeting prostate cancer cells expressing prostate-specific antigen (PSA and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA. Simultaneously, it expressed the mRFP/ttk fusion protein in order to be able to elicit the cytotoxic effect.Results: The Ad5/35PSES.mRFP/ttk chimeric recombinant adenovirus was generated successfully. When replication of Ad5/35PSES.mRFP/ttk was evaluated in prostate cancer cell lines under fluorescence microscopy, red fluorescence intensity increased more in LNCaP cells, suggesting that the mRFP/ttk fusion protein was folded functionally. In addition, the replication assay including wild-type adenovirus as a positive control showed that PSES-positive cells (LNCaP and CWR22rv permitted virus replication but not PSES-negative cells (DU145 and PC3. Next, we evaluated the killing activity of this recombinant adenovirus. The Ad5/35PSES.mRFP/ttk killed LNCaP and CWR22rv more effectively. Unlike PSES-positive cells, DU145 and PC3 were resistant to killing by this recombinant

  1. Precision medicine for advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullane, Stephanie A; Van Allen, Eliezer M

    2016-05-01

    Precision cancer medicine, the use of genomic profiling of patient tumors at the point-of-care to inform treatment decisions, is rapidly changing treatment strategies across cancer types. Precision medicine for advanced prostate cancer may identify new treatment strategies and change clinical practice. In this review, we discuss the potential and challenges of precision medicine in advanced prostate cancer. Although primary prostate cancers do not harbor highly recurrent targetable genomic alterations, recent reports on the genomics of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer has shown multiple targetable alterations in castration-resistant prostate cancer metastatic biopsies. Therapeutic implications include targeting prevalent DNA repair pathway alterations with PARP-1 inhibition in genomically defined subsets of patients, among other genomically stratified targets. In addition, multiple recent efforts have demonstrated the promise of liquid tumor profiling (e.g., profiling circulating tumor cells or cell-free tumor DNA) and highlighted the necessary steps to scale these approaches in prostate cancer. Although still in the initial phase of precision medicine for prostate cancer, there is extraordinary potential for clinical impact. Efforts to overcome current scientific and clinical barriers will enable widespread use of precision medicine approaches for advanced prostate cancer patients.

  2. Pericentriolar Targeting of the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus GAG Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangzhi Zhang

    Full Text Available The Gag protein of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV is the chief determinant of subcellular targeting. Electron microscopy studies show that MMTV Gag forms capsids within the cytoplasm and assembles as immature particles with MMTV RNA and the Y box binding protein-1, required for centrosome maturation. Other betaretroviruses, such as Mason-Pfizer monkey retrovirus (M-PMV, assemble adjacent to the pericentriolar region because of a cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal in the Matrix protein. Previous studies suggest that the MMTV Matrix protein may also harbor a similar cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal. Herein, we show that a substantial fraction of MMTV Gag localizes to the pericentriolar region. This was observed in HEK293T, HeLa human cell lines and the mouse derived NMuMG mammary gland cells. Moreover, MMTV capsids were observed adjacent to centrioles when expressed from plasmids encoding either MMTV Gag alone, Gag-Pro-Pol or full-length virus. We found that the cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal in the MMTV Matrix protein was sufficient for pericentriolar targeting, whereas mutation of the glutamine to alanine at position 56 (D56/A resulted in plasma membrane localization, similar to previous observations from mutational studies of M-PMV Gag. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy studies showed that MMTV capsids accumulate around centrioles suggesting that, similar to M-PMV, the pericentriolar region may be a site for MMTV assembly. Together, the data imply that MMTV Gag targets the pericentriolar region as a result of the MMTV cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal, possibly aided by the Y box protein-1 required for the assembly of centrosomal microtubules.

  3. The Role of Seminal Vesicle Motion in Target Margin Assessment for Online Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Jian; Wu Qiuwen; Yan Di

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: For patients with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer, the seminal vesicles (SVs) are included in the clinical target volume (CTV). The purposes of this study are to investigate interfraction motion characteristics of the SVs and determine proper margins for online computed tomography image guidance. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients, each with 16 daily helical computed tomography scans, were included in this study. A binary image mask was used for image registration to determine daily organ motion. Two online image-guided radiotherapy strategies (prostate only and prostate + SVs) were simulated in a hypofractionated scheme. Three margin designs were studied for both three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). In prostate-only guidance, Margin A was uniformly applied to the whole CTV, and Margin B was applied to the SVs with a fixed 3-mm prostate margin. In prostate plus SV guidance, Margin C was uniformly applied to the CTV. The minimum margins were sought to satisfy the criterion that minimum cumulative CTV dose be more than those of the planning target volume in the plan for greater than 95% of patients. Results: The prostate and SVs move significantly more in the anterior-posterior and superior-inferior than right-left directions. The anterior-posterior motion of the prostate and SVs correlated (R 2 = 0.7). The SVs move significantly more than the prostate. The minimum margins found were 2.5 mm for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and 4.5, 4.5, and 3.0 mm for Margins A, B, and C for IMRT, respectively. Margins for IMRT were larger, but the irradiated volume and doses to critical structures were smaller. Minimum margins of 4.5 mm to the SVs and 3 mm to the prostate are recommended for IMRT with prostate-only guidance. Conclusions: The SVs move independently from the prostate gland, and additional margins are necessary for image-guided radiotherapy

  4. Role of endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging in defining treatable intraprostatic tumor foci in prostate cancer: Quantitative analysis of imaging contour compared to whole-mount histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, Mekhail; Westphalen, Antonio C.; Jung, Adam J.; Noworolski, Susan M.; Simko, Jeffry P.; Kurhanewicz, John; Roach, Mack; Carroll, Peter R.; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging in defining the contour of treatable intraprostatic tumor foci in prostate cancer, since targeted therapy requires accurate target volume definition. Materials and methods: We retrospectively identified 20 patients with prostate cancer who underwent endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging prior to radical prostatectomy and subsequent creation of detailed histopathological tumor maps from whole-mount step sections. Two experienced radiologists independently reviewed all MR images and electronically contoured all suspected treatable (⩾0.5 cm 3 ) tumor foci. Deformable co-registration in MATLAB was used to calculate the margin of error between imaging and histopathological contours at both capsular and non-capsular surfaces and the treatment margin required to ensure at least 95% tumor coverage. Results: Histopathology showed 17 treatable tumor foci in 16 patients, of which 8 were correctly identified by both readers and an additional 2 were correctly identified by reader 2. For all correctly identified lesions, both readers accurately identified that tumor contacted the prostatic capsule, with no error in contour identification. On the non-capsular border, the median distance between the imaging and histopathological contour was 1.4 mm (range, 0–12). Expanding the contour by 5 mm at the non-capsular margin included 95% of tumor volume not initially covered within the MR contour. Conclusions: Endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging can be used to accurately contour treatable intraprostatic tumor foci; adequate tumor coverage is achieved by expanding the treatment contour at the non-capsular margin by 5 mm

  5. Targeting Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden to...compound SBI-852 treated groups. Comparison on SIAH2 protein levels among the vehicle and 130B3-treated groups suggested that the compound SBI-852 didn’t...133B3 dose we found no difference in tumor size when combined with castration or castration+enzalutamide (n = 8). However, the histologic interrogation

  6. Abhydrolase domain containing 2, an androgen target gene, promotes prostate cancer cell proliferation and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obinata, Daisuke; Takada, Shogo; Takayama, Ken-ichi; Urano, Tomohiko; Ito, Akiko; Ashikari, Daisaku; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Yamada, Yuta; Murata, Taro; Kumagai, Jinpei; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Homma, Yukio; Takahashi, Satoru; Inoue, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a key role in the development of prostate cancer. AR signalling mediates the expression of androgen-responsive genes, which are involved in prostate cancer development and progression. Our previous chromatin immunoprecipitation study showed that the region of abhydrolase domain containing 2 (ABHD2) includes a functional androgen receptor binding site. In this study, we demonstrated that ABHD2 is a novel androgen-responsive gene that is overexpressed in human prostate cancer tissues. The expression levels of ABHD2 in androgen-sensitive cells were evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western-blot analyses. LNCaP and VCaP cells with ABHD2 overexpression or short interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown were used for functional analyses. ABHD2 expression was examined in clinical samples of prostate cancer by immunohistochemistry. We showed that ABHD2 expression is increased by androgen in LNCaP and VCaP cells. This androgen-induced ABHD2 expression was diminished by bicalutamide. While stable expression of ABHD2 affected the enhancement of LNCaP cell proliferation and migration, siRNA-mediated ABHD2 knockdown suppressed cell proliferation and migration. In addition, the siRNA treatment significantly repressed the tumour growth derived from LNCaP cells in athymic mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of ABHD2 expression in tumour specimens showed a positive correlation of ABHD2 immunoreactivity with high Gleason score and pathological N stage. Moreover, patients with high immunoreactivity of ABHD2 showed low cancer-specific survival rates and a resistance to docetaxel-based chemotherapy. ABHD2 is a novel androgen-regulated gene that can promote prostate cancer growth and resistance to chemotherapy, and is a novel target for diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of oxidized protein hydrolase as a potential prodrug target in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGoldrick, Christopher A; Jiang, Yu-Lin; Paromov, Victor; Brannon, Marianne; Krishnan, Koyamangalath; Stone, William L

    2014-01-01

    Esterases are often overexpressed in cancer cells and can have chiral specificities different from that of the corresponding normal tissues. For this reason, ester prodrugs could be a promising approach in chemotherapy. In this study, we focused on the identification and characterization of differentially expressed esterases between non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic prostate epithelial cells. Cellular lysates from LNCaP, DU 145, and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines, tumorigenic RWPE-2 prostate epithelial cells, and non-tumorigenic RWPE-1 prostate epithelial cells were separated by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (n-PAGE) and the esterase activity bands visualized using α-naphthyl acetate or α-naphthyl-N-acetylalaninate (ANAA) chiral esters and Fast Blue RR salt. The esterases were identified using nanospray LC/MS-MS tandem mass spectrometry and confirmed by Western blotting, native electroblotting, inhibition assays, and activity towards a known specific substrate. The serine protease/esterase oxidized protein hydrolase (OPH) was overexpressed in COS-7 cells to verify our results. The major esterase observed with the ANAA substrates within the n-PAGE activity bands was identified as OPH. OPH (EC 3.4.19.1) is a serine protease/esterase and a member of the prolyl oligopeptidase family. We found that LNCaP lysates contained approximately 40% more OPH compared to RWPE-1 lysates. RWPE-2, DU145 and PC3 cell lysates had similar levels of OPH activity. OPH within all of the cell lysates tested had a chiral preference for the S-isomer of ANAA. LNCaP cells were stained more intensely with ANAA substrates than RWPE-1 cells and COS-7 cells overexpressing OPH were found to have a higher activity towards the ANAA and AcApNA than parent COS-7 cells. These data suggest that prodrug derivatives of ANAA and AcApNA could have potential as chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of prostate cancer tumors that overexpress OPH

  8. Targeting the Prostate Cancer Microenvironment to Improve Therapeutic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, respectively. B. Torok-Strorb, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, provided HS5 and HS27A HPV E6 / E7 immortalized...BCR-ABLþ, Arf-null lymphoblastic leukemia. Genes Dev 2007;21:2283–7. 13. Yamamoto-SugitaniM, Kuroda J, Ashihara E,Nagoshi H, Kobayashi T, Matsumoto Y ...xenografts compring PCa cells (PC3/VCaP) with PSC27 fibroblasts and examine tumor responses to single agent or combination therapy. ( y 1/m 1-6) 1

  9. Targeting Alternative Sites on the Androgen Receptor to Treat Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S. Rennie

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent, metastatic prostate cancer continues to be a leading cause of cancer-death in men. The androgen receptor (AR is a modular, ligand-inducible transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes that can drive the progression of this disease, and as a consequence, this receptor is a key therapeutic target for controlling prostate cancer. The current drugs designed to directly inhibit the AR are called anti-androgens, and all act by competing with androgens for binding to the androgen/ligand binding site. Unfortunately, with the inevitable progression of the cancer to castration resistance, many of these drugs become ineffective. However, there are numerous other regulatory sites on this protein that have not been exploited therapeutically. The regulation of AR activity involves a cascade of complex interactions with numerous chaperones, co-factors and co-regulatory proteins, leading ultimately to direct binding of AR dimers to specific DNA androgen response elements within the promoter and enhancers of androgen-regulated genes. As part of the family of nuclear receptors, the AR is organized into modular structural and functional domains with specialized roles in facilitating their inter-molecular interactions. These regions of the AR present attractive, yet largely unexploited, drug target sites for reducing or eliminating androgen signaling in prostate cancers. The design of small molecule inhibitors targeting these specific AR domains is only now being realized and is the culmination of decades of work, including crystallographic and biochemistry approaches to map the shape and accessibility of the AR surfaces and cavities. Here, we review the structure of the AR protein and describe recent advancements in inhibiting its activity with small molecules specifically designed to target areas distinct from the receptor’s androgen binding site. It is anticipated that these new classes of anti-AR drugs will provide an additional

  10. PSMA ligand conjugated PCL-PEG polymeric micelles targeted to prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Jin

    Full Text Available In this content, a small molecular ligand of prostate specific membrane antigen (SMLP conjugated poly (caprolactone (PCL-b-poly (ethylene glycol (PEG copolymers with different block lengths were synthesized to construct a satisfactory drug delivery system. Four different docetaxel-loaded polymeric micelles (DTX-PMs were prepared by dialysis with particle sizes less than 60 nm as characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS and transmission electron microscope (TEM. Optimization of the prepared micelles was conducted based on short-term stability and drug-loading content. The results showed that optimized systems were able to remain stable over 7 days. Compared with Taxotere, DTX-PMs with the same ratio of hydrophilic/hydrophobic chain length displayed similar sustained release behaviors. The cytotoxicity of the optimized targeted DTX-PCL12K-PEG5K-SMLP micelles (DTX-PMs2 and non-targeted DTX-PCL12K-mPEG5K micelles (DTX-PMs1 were evaluated by MTT assays using prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA positive prostate adenocarcinoma cells (LNCaP. The results showed that the targeted micelles had a much lower IC50 than their non-targeted counterparts (48 h: 0.87 ± 0.27 vs 13.48 ± 1.03 µg/ml; 72 h: 0.02 ± 0.008 vs 1.35 ± 0.54 µg/ml. In vitro cellular uptake of PMs2 showed 5-fold higher fluorescence intensity than that of PMs1 after 4 h incubation. According to these results, the novel nano-sized drug delivery system based on DTX-PCL-PEG-SMLP offers great promise for the treatment of prostatic cancer.

  11. A PCA3 gene-based transcriptional amplification system targeting primary prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Neveu, Bertrand; Jain, Pallavi; T?tu, Bernard; Wu, Lily; Fradet, Yves; Pouliot, Fr?d?ric

    2015-01-01

    Targeting specifically primary prostate cancer (PCa) cells for immune therapy, gene therapy or molecular imaging is of high importance. The PCA3 long non-coding RNA is a unique PCa biomarker and oncogene that has been widely studied. This gene has been mainly exploited as an accurate diagnostic urine biomarker for PCa detection. In this study, the PCA3 promoter was introduced into a new transcriptional amplification system named the 3-Step Transcriptional Amplification System (PCA3-3STA) and ...

  12. Blocking Blood Flow to Solid Tumors by Destabilizing Tubulin: An Approach to Targeting Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, María-Jesús; Priego, Eva-María; Bueno, Oskía; Martins, Maria Solange; Canela, María-Dolores; Liekens, Sandra

    2016-10-13

    The unique characteristics of the tumor vasculature offer the possibility to selectively target tumor growth and vascularization using tubulin-destabilizing agents. Evidence accumulated with combretastatin A-4 (CA-4) and its prodrug CA-4P support the therapeutic value of compounds sharing this mechanism of action. However, the chemical instability and poor solubility of CA-4 demand alternative compounds that are able to surmount these limitations. This Perspective illustrates the different classes of compounds that behave similar to CA-4, analyzes their binding mode to αβ-tubulin according to recently available structural complexes, and includes described approaches to improve their delivery. In addition, dissecting the mechanism of action of CA-4 and analogues allows a closer insight into the advantages and drawbacks associated with these tubulin-destabilizing agents that behave as vascular disrupting agents (VDAs).

  13. Metformin anti-tumor effect via disruption of the MID1 translational regulator complex and AR downregulation in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demir, Ummuhan; Koehler, Andrea; Schneider, Rainer; Schweiger, Susann; Klocker, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Metformin is an approved drug prescribed for diabetes. Its role as an anti-cancer agent has drawn significant attention because of its minimal side effects and low cost. However, its mechanism of anti-tumour action has not yet been fully clarified. The effect on cell growth was assessed by cell counting. Western blot was used for analysis of protein levels, Boyden chamber assays for analyses of cell migration and co-immunoprecipitation (CoIP) followed by western blot, PCR or qPCR for analysis of protein-protein and protein-mRNA interactions. Metformin showed an anti-proliferative effect on a wide range of prostate cancer cells. It disrupted the AR translational MID1 regulator complex leading to release of the associated AR mRNA and subsequently to downregulation of AR protein in AR positive cell lines. Inhibition of AR positive and negative prostate cancer cells by metformin suggests involvement of additional targets. The inhibitory effect of metformin was mimicked by disruption of the MID1-α4/PP2A protein complex by siRNA knockdown of MID1 or α4 whereas AMPK activation was not required. Findings reported herein uncover a mechanism for the anti-tumor activity of metformin in prostate cancer, which is independent of its anti-diabetic effects. These data provide a rationale for the use of metformin in the treatment of hormone naïve and castration-resistant prostate cancer and suggest AR is an important indirect target of metformin

  14. Toward Prostate Cancer Contouring Guidelines on Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Dominant Lesion Gross and Clinical Target Volume Coverage Via Accurate Histology Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, Eli; Bauman, Glenn S.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Cool, Derek W.; Bastian-Jordan, Matthew; Kassam, Zahra; Gaed, Mena; Moussa, Madeleine; Gómez, José A.; Pautler, Stephen E.; Chin, Joseph L.; Crukley, Cathie; Haider, Masoom A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Defining prostate cancer (PCa) lesion clinical target volumes (CTVs) for multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) could support focal boosting or treatment to improve outcomes or lower morbidity, necessitating appropriate CTV margins for mpMRI-defined gross tumor volumes (GTVs). This study aimed to identify CTV margins yielding 95% coverage of PCa tumors for prospective cases with high likelihood. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five men with biopsy-confirmed clinical stage T1 or T2 PCa underwent pre-prostatectomy mpMRI, yielding T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced, and apparent diffusion coefficient images. Digitized whole-mount histology was contoured and registered to mpMRI scans (error ≤2 mm). Four observers contoured lesion GTVs on each mpMRI scan. CTVs were defined by isotropic and anisotropic expansion from these GTVs and from multiparametric (unioned) GTVs from 2 to 3 scans. Histologic coverage (proportions of tumor area on co-registered histology inside the CTV, measured for Gleason scores [GSs] ≥6 and ≥7) and prostate sparing (proportions of prostate volume outside the CTV) were measured. Nonparametric histologic-coverage prediction intervals defined minimal margins yielding 95% coverage for prospective cases with 78% to 92% likelihood. Results: On analysis of 72 true-positive tumor detections, 95% coverage margins were 9 to 11 mm (GS ≥ 6) and 8 to 10 mm (GS ≥ 7) for single-sequence GTVs and were 8 mm (GS ≥ 6) and 6 mm (GS ≥ 7) for 3-sequence GTVs, yielding CTVs that spared 47% to 81% of prostate tissue for the majority of tumors. Inclusion of T2-weighted contours increased sparing for multiparametric CTVs with 95% coverage margins for GS ≥6, and inclusion of dynamic contrast-enhanced contours increased sparing for GS ≥7. Anisotropic 95% coverage margins increased the sparing proportions to 71% to 86%. Conclusions: Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging–defined GTVs expanded by appropriate margins

  15. Toward Prostate Cancer Contouring Guidelines on Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Dominant Lesion Gross and Clinical Target Volume Coverage Via Accurate Histology Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, Eli [Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Biomedical Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bauman, Glenn S., E-mail: glenn.bauman@lhsc.on.ca [Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Romagnoli, Cesare; Cool, Derek W. [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Bastian-Jordan, Matthew [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Queensland Health, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Kassam, Zahra [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Gaed, Mena [Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Department of Pathology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Moussa, Madeleine; Gómez, José A. [Department of Pathology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Pautler, Stephen E.; Chin, Joseph L. [Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada); Department of Urology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Crukley, Cathie [Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada); Haider, Masoom A. [Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); and others

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: Defining prostate cancer (PCa) lesion clinical target volumes (CTVs) for multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) could support focal boosting or treatment to improve outcomes or lower morbidity, necessitating appropriate CTV margins for mpMRI-defined gross tumor volumes (GTVs). This study aimed to identify CTV margins yielding 95% coverage of PCa tumors for prospective cases with high likelihood. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five men with biopsy-confirmed clinical stage T1 or T2 PCa underwent pre-prostatectomy mpMRI, yielding T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced, and apparent diffusion coefficient images. Digitized whole-mount histology was contoured and registered to mpMRI scans (error ≤2 mm). Four observers contoured lesion GTVs on each mpMRI scan. CTVs were defined by isotropic and anisotropic expansion from these GTVs and from multiparametric (unioned) GTVs from 2 to 3 scans. Histologic coverage (proportions of tumor area on co-registered histology inside the CTV, measured for Gleason scores [GSs] ≥6 and ≥7) and prostate sparing (proportions of prostate volume outside the CTV) were measured. Nonparametric histologic-coverage prediction intervals defined minimal margins yielding 95% coverage for prospective cases with 78% to 92% likelihood. Results: On analysis of 72 true-positive tumor detections, 95% coverage margins were 9 to 11 mm (GS ≥ 6) and 8 to 10 mm (GS ≥ 7) for single-sequence GTVs and were 8 mm (GS ≥ 6) and 6 mm (GS ≥ 7) for 3-sequence GTVs, yielding CTVs that spared 47% to 81% of prostate tissue for the majority of tumors. Inclusion of T2-weighted contours increased sparing for multiparametric CTVs with 95% coverage margins for GS ≥6, and inclusion of dynamic contrast-enhanced contours increased sparing for GS ≥7. Anisotropic 95% coverage margins increased the sparing proportions to 71% to 86%. Conclusions: Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging–defined GTVs expanded by appropriate margins

  16. Molecular biology of castration-resistant prostate cancer: basis for the novel therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado, Begoña; Marin Aguilera, Mercedes; Pereira, Maria Veronica

    2013-06-01

    Prostate cancer cells express the androgen receptor (AR) and need the presence of androgens to survive. Androgen suppression is the gold standard first-line therapy for metastatic disease. Almost all prostate cancer patients initially respond to hormonal therapy, but most of them gradually develop castration-resistant progression. Recent evidence has shown that progression at the castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) stage is often mediated by AR signalling. Importantly, subsequent AR androgen inhibition, by abiraterone acetate or enzalutamide, has shown to improve patients' survival. Several mechanisms that enhance AR signalling in an androgen-depleted environment have been elucidated:(1) AR mutations that allow activation by low androgen levels or by other endogenous steroids, (2) AR amplification and/or overexpression,(3)increased local intracrine synthesis of androgens, (4) changes in AR cofactors and (5) cross-talk with cytokines and growth factors. Today, there are under development a number of novel agents targeting the AR signaling pathway. This article reviews the postulated mechanisms of AR-driven resistance to androgen suppression that have contributed to the development of new hormonal therapeutic strategies in prostate cancer.

  17. Detection of tumor markers in prostate cancer and comparison of sensitivity between real time and nested PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Takayuki; Shigemura, Katsumi; Yamamichi, Fukashi; Fujisawa, Masato; Kawabata, Masato; Shirakawa, Toshiro

    2012-06-27

    The objective of this study is to investigate and compare the sensitivity in conventional PCR, quantitative real time PCR, nested PCR and western blots for detection of prostate cancer tumor markers using prostate cancer (PCa) cells. We performed conventional PCR, quantitative real time PCR, nested PCR, and western blots using 5 kinds of PCa cells. Prostate specific antigen (PSA), prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), and androgen receptor (AR) were compared for their detection sensitivity by real time PCR and nested PCR. In real time PCR, there was a significant correlation between cell number and the RNA concentration obtained (R(2)=0.9944) for PSA, PSMA, and AR. We found it possible to detect these markers from a single LNCaP cell in both real time and nested PCR. By comparison, nested PCR reached a linear curve in fewer PCR cycles than real time PCR, suggesting that nested PCR may offer PCR results more quickly than real time PCR. In conclusion, nested PCR may offer tumor maker detection in PCa cells more quickly (with fewer PCR cycles) with the same high sensitivity as real time PCR. Further study is necessary to establish and evaluate the best tool for PCa tumor marker detection.

  18. Phenylalanine-coupled solid lipid nanoparticles for brain tumor targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharya, Parul; Jain, Ashish; Gulbake, Arvind; Shilpi, Satish; Jain, Ankit; Hurkat, Pooja [Dr. Hari Singh Gour University, Pharmaceutical Research Projects Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India); Majumdar, Subrata [Bose Institute, Division of Molecular Medicine (India); Jain, Sanjay K., E-mail: drskjainin@yahoo.com [Dr. Hari Singh Gour University, Pharmaceutical Research Projects Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India)

    2013-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the targeting potential of amino acid (phenylalanine)-coupled solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) loaded with ionically complexed doxorubicin HCl (Dox). Ionic complexation was used to enhance the loading efficiency and release characteristics of water soluble form of Dox. l-Type amino acid transporters (LAT1) are highly expressed on blood brain barrier as well as on many brain cancer cells, thus targeting LAT1 using phenylalanine improved anticancer activity of prepared nanocarrier. The phenylalanine-coupled SLN were characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy, particle size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency and in vitro release. The particle size of the resulting SLN was found to be in the range of 163.3 ± 5.2 to 113.0 ± 2.6 nm, with a slightly negative surface charge. In ex vivo study on C6 glioma cell lines, the cellular cytotoxicity of the SLN was highly increased when coupled with phenylalanine. In addition, stealthing sheath of PEG present on the surface of the SLN enhanced the cellular uptake of the SLN on C6 glioma cell line. Results of biodistribution and fluorescence studies clearly revealed that phenylalanine-coupled SLN could deliver high amount of drug into the brain tumor cells and showed the brain-targeting potential.

  19. Overexpression of prostate tumor overexpressed 1 correlates with tumor progression and predicts poor prognosis in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Fangyong; Zhang, Longjuan; Li, Xinghua; Lin, Xi; Wu, Shu; Li, Fengyan; Liu, Junling

    2014-01-01

    Prostate tumor overexpressed 1 (PTOV1) was demonstrated to play an important role in cancer progression and was correlated with unfavorable clinical outcome. However, the clinical role of PTOV1 in cancer remains largely unknown. This study aimed to investigate the expression and clinicopathological significance of PTOV1 in breast cancer. The mRNA and protein expression levels of PTOV1 were analyzed in 12 breast cancer cell lines and eight paired breast cancer tumors by semi-quantitative real time-PCR and western blotting, respectively. Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess PTOV1 protein expression in 169 paraffin-embedded, archived breast cancer samples. Survival analysis and Cox regression analysis were performed to investigate the clinicopathological significance of PTOV1 expression. Our data revealed that PTOV1 was frequently overexpressed in breast cancer cell lines compared to normal human breast epithelial cells and in primary breast cancer samples compared to adjacent noncancerous breast tissues, at both the mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, high expression of PTOV1 in breast cancer is strongly associated with clinicopathological characteristics and estrogen receptor expression status (P = 0.003). Breast cancer patients with higher PTOV1 expression had substantially shorter survival times than patients with lower PTOV1 expression (P < 0.001). Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that PTOV1 might be an independent prognostic factor for breast cancer patients (P = 0.005). Our study showed that PTOV1 is upregulated in breast cancer cell lines and clinical samples, and its expression was positively associated with progression and aggressiveness of breast cancer, suggesting that PTOV1 could serve as an independent prognostic marker

  20. mRNA-Seq of single prostate cancer circulating tumor cells reveals recapitulation of gene expression and pathways found in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon M Cann

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTC mediate metastatic spread of many solid tumors and enumeration of CTCs is currently used as a prognostic indicator of survival in metastatic prostate cancer patients. Some evidence suggests that it is possible to derive additional information about tumors from expression analysis of CTCs, but the technical difficulty of isolating and analyzing individual CTCs has limited progress in this area. To assess the ability of a new generation of MagSweeper to isolate intact CTCs for downstream analysis, we performed mRNA-Seq on single CTCs isolated from the blood of patients with metastatic prostate cancer and on single prostate cancer cell line LNCaP cells spiked into the blood of healthy donors. We found that the MagSweeper effectively isolated CTCs with a capture efficiency that matched the CellSearch platform. However, unlike CellSearch, the MagSweeper facilitates isolation of individual live CTCs without contaminating leukocytes. Importantly, mRNA-Seq analysis showed that the MagSweeper isolation process did not have a discernible impact on the transcriptional profile of single LNCaPs isolated from spiked human blood, suggesting that any perturbations caused by the MagSweeper process on the transcriptional signature of isolated cells are modest. Although the RNA from patient CTCs showed signs of significant degradation, consistent with reports of short half-lives and apoptosis amongst CTCs, transcriptional signatures of prostate tissue and of cancer were readily detectable with single CTC mRNA-Seq. These results demonstrate that the MagSweeper provides access to intact CTCs and that these CTCs can potentially supply clinically relevant information.

  1. mRNA-Seq of single prostate cancer circulating tumor cells reveals recapitulation of gene expression and pathways found in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, Gordon M; Gulzar, Zulfiqar G; Cooper, Samantha; Li, Robin; Luo, Shujun; Tat, Mai; Stuart, Sarah; Schroth, Gary; Srinivas, Sandhya; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Brooks, James D; Talasaz, Amirali H

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) mediate metastatic spread of many solid tumors and enumeration of CTCs is currently used as a prognostic indicator of survival in metastatic prostate cancer patients. Some evidence suggests that it is possible to derive additional information about tumors from expression analysis of CTCs, but the technical difficulty of isolating and analyzing individual CTCs has limited progress in this area. To assess the ability of a new generation of MagSweeper to isolate intact CTCs for downstream analysis, we performed mRNA-Seq on single CTCs isolated from the blood of patients with metastatic prostate cancer and on single prostate cancer cell line LNCaP cells spiked into the blood of healthy donors. We found that the MagSweeper effectively isolated CTCs with a capture efficiency that matched the CellSearch platform. However, unlike CellSearch, the MagSweeper facilitates isolation of individual live CTCs without contaminating leukocytes. Importantly, mRNA-Seq analysis showed that the MagSweeper isolation process did not have a discernible impact on the transcriptional profile of single LNCaPs isolated from spiked human blood, suggesting that any perturbations caused by the MagSweeper process on the transcriptional signature of isolated cells are modest. Although the RNA from patient CTCs showed signs of significant degradation, consistent with reports of short half-lives and apoptosis amongst CTCs, transcriptional signatures of prostate tissue and of cancer were readily detectable with single CTC mRNA-Seq. These results demonstrate that the MagSweeper provides access to intact CTCs and that these CTCs can potentially supply clinically relevant information.

  2. Erratum: Epigenetic silencing of miR-34a in human prostate cancer cells and tumor tissue specimens can be reversed by BR-DIM treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, D; Heath, E; Chen, W; Cher, M; Powell, I; Heilbrun, L; Li, Y; Ali, S; Sethi, S; Hassan, O; Hwang, C; Gupta, N; Chitale, D; Sakr, Wa; Menon, M; Sarkar, Fh

    2013-01-01

    Androgen Receptor (AR) signaling is critically important during the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). The AR signaling is also important in the development of castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) where AR is functional even after androgen deprivation therapy (ADT); however, little is known regarding the transcriptional and functional regulation of AR in PCa. Moreover, treatment options for primary PCa for preventing the occurrence of CRPC is limited; therefore, novel strategy for direct inactivation of AR is urgently needed. In this study, we found loss of miR-34a, which targets AR, in PCa tissue specimens, especially in patients with higher Gleason grade tumors, consistent with increased expression of AR. Forced over-expression of miR-34a in PCa cell lines led to decreased expression of AR and prostate specific antigen (PSA) as well as the expression of Notch-1, another important target of miR-34a. Most importantly, BR-DIM intervention in PCa patients prior to radical prostatectomy showed reexpression of miR-34a, which was consistent with decreased expression of AR, PSA and Notch-1 in PCa tissue specimens. Moreover, BR-DIM intervention led to nuclear exclusion both in PCa cell lines and in tumor tissues. PCa cells treated with BR-DIM and 5-aza-dC resulted in the demethylation of miR-34a promoter concomitant with inhibition of AR and PSA expression in LNCaP and C4-2B cells. These results suggest, for the first time, epigenetic silencing of miR-34a in PCa, which could be reversed by BR-DIM treatment and, thus BR-DIM could be useful for the inactivation of AR in the treatment of PCa.[This corrects the article on p. 14 in vol. 4.].

  3. Artificial Chemical Reporter Targeting Strategy Using Bioorthogonal Click Reaction for Improving Active-Targeting Efficiency of Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hong Yeol; Shin, Min Lee; Shim, Man Kyu; Lee, Sangmin; Na, Jin Hee; Koo, Heebeom; Lee, Hyukjin; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lee, Kuen Yong; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan

    2017-05-01

    Biological ligands such as aptamer, antibody, glucose, and peptide have been widely used to bind specific surface molecules or receptors in tumor cells or subcellular structures to improve tumor-targeting efficiency of nanoparticles. However, this active-targeting strategy has limitations for tumor targeting due to inter- and intraheterogeneity of tumors. In this study, we demonstrated an alternative active-targeting strategy using metabolic engineering and bioorthogonal click reaction to improve tumor-targeting efficiency of nanoparticles. We observed that azide-containing chemical reporters were successfully generated onto surface glycans of various tumor cells such as lung cancer (A549), brain cancer (U87), and breast cancer (BT-474, MDA-MB231, MCF-7) via metabolic engineering in vitro. In addition, we compared tumor targeting of artificial azide reporter with bicyclononyne (BCN)-conjugated glycol chitosan nanoparticles (BCN-CNPs) and integrin α v β 3 with cyclic RGD-conjugated CNPs (cRGD-CNPs) in vitro and in vivo. Fluorescence intensity of azide-reporter-targeted BCN-CNPs in tumor tissues was 1.6-fold higher and with a more uniform distribution compared to that of cRGD-CNPs. Moreover, even in the isolated heterogeneous U87 cells, BCN-CNPs could bind artificial azide reporters on tumor cells more uniformly (∼92.9%) compared to cRGD-CNPs. Therefore, the artificial azide-reporter-targeting strategy can be utilized for targeting heterogeneous tumor cells via bioorthogonal click reaction and may provide an alternative method of tumor targeting for further investigation in cancer therapy.

  4. Differences in microRNA expression during tumor development in the transition and peripheral zones of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, Jessica; Helenius, Gisela; Karlsson, Mats G; Andrén, Ove; Klinga-Levan, Karin; Olsson, Björn

    2013-01-01

    The prostate is divided into three glandular zones, the peripheral zone (PZ), the transition zone (TZ), and the central zone. Most prostate tumors arise in the peripheral zone (70-75%) and in the transition zone (20-25%) while only 10% arise in the central zone. The aim of this study was to investigate if differences in miRNA expression could be a possible explanation for the difference in propensity of tumors in the zones of the prostate. Patients with prostate cancer were included in the study if they had a tumor with Gleason grade 3 in the PZ, the TZ, or both (n=16). Normal prostate tissue was collected from men undergoing cystoprostatectomy (n=20). The expression of 667 unique miRNAs was investigated using TaqMan low density arrays for miRNAs. Student’s t-test was used in order to identify differentially expressed miRNAs, followed by hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis (PCA) to study the separation of the tissues. The ADtree algorithm was used to identify markers for classification of tissues and a cross-validation procedure was used to test the generality of the identified miRNA-based classifiers. The t-tests revealed that the major differences in miRNA expression are found between normal and malignant tissues. Hierarchical clustering and PCA based on differentially expressed miRNAs between normal and malignant tissues showed perfect separation between samples, while the corresponding analyses based on differentially expressed miRNAs between the two zones showed several misplaced samples. A classification and cross-validation procedure confirmed these results and several potential miRNA markers were identified. The results of this study indicate that the major differences in the transcription program are those arising during tumor development, rather than during normal tissue development. In addition, tumors arising in the TZ have more unique differentially expressed miRNAs compared to the PZ. The results also indicate that separate mi

  5. Imaging small human prostate cancer xenografts after pretargeting with bispecific bombesin-antibody complexes and targeting with high specific radioactivity labeled polymer-drug conjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, Vishwesh; Gada, Keyur; Panwar, Rajiv; Ferris, Craig; Khaw, Ban-An; Varvarigou, Alexandra; Majewski, Stan; Weisenberger, Andrew; Tekabe, Yared

    2012-01-01

    Pretargeting with bispecific monoclonal antibodies (bsMAb) for tumor imaging was developed to enhance target to background activity ratios. Visualization of tumors was achieved by the delivery of mono- and divalent radiolabeled haptens. To improve the ability to image tumors with bsMAb, we have combined the pretargeting approach with targeting of high specific activity radiotracer labeled negatively charged polymers. The tumor antigen-specific antibody was replaced with bombesin (Bom), a ligand that binds specifically to the growth receptors that are overexpressed by many tumors including prostate cancer. Bom-anti-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) bispecific antibody complexes were used to demonstrate pretargeting and imaging of very small human prostate cancer xenografts targeted with high specific activity 111 In- or 99m Tc-labeled negatively charged polymers. Bispecific antibody complexes consisting of intact anti-DTPA antibody or Fab' linked to Bom via thioether bonds (Bom-bsCx or Bom-bsFCx, respectively) were used to pretarget PC-3 human prostate cancer xenografts in SCID mice. Negative control mice were pretargeted with Bom or anti-DTPA Ab. 111 In-Labeled DTPA-succinyl polylysine (DSPL) was injected intravenously at 24 h (7.03 ± 1.74 or 6.88 ± 1.89 MBq 111 In-DSPL) after Bom-bsCx or 50 ± 5.34 MBq of 99m Tc-DSPL after Bom-bsFCx pretargeting, respectively. Planar or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT gamma images were obtained for up to 3 h and only planar images at 24 h. After imaging, all mice were killed and biodistribution of 111 In or 99m Tc activities were determined by scintillation counting. Both planar and SPECT/CT imaging enabled detection of PC-3 prostate cancer lesions less than 1-2 mm in diameter in 1-3 h post 111 In-DSPL injection. No lesions were visualized in Bom or anti-DTPA Ab pretargeted controls. 111 In-DSPL activity in Bom-bsCx pretargeted tumors (1.21 ± 0.36%ID/g) was 5.4 times that in tumors pretargeted with

  6. Targeting Androgen Receptor by Lysosomal Degradation in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Preparation of the Lysosomes A673 cells were treated with 100 pM chloroquine for 12 h or left untreated. Lysosomes were prepared using the Lysosome...were treated with 100 JlM chloroquine fur 12 h or left tmtreated, and the luciferase activity was determined using the same arnotmt of protein...TFEB levels or by activating TFEB using mTORC1 kinase inhibitor, torin 1. Additionally, we determined that the same approach can be used to target

  7. Targeted histology sampling from atypical small acinar proliferation area detected by repeat transrectal prostate biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Karman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Оbjective: to define the approach to the management of patients with the detected ASAP area.Materials and methods. In the time period from 2012 through 2015, 494 patients with previously negative biopsy and remaining suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa were examined. The patients underwent repeat 24-core multifocal prostate biopsy with taking additional tissue samples from suspicious areas detected by multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal ultrasound. An isolated ASAP area was found in 127 (25. 7 % of the 494 examined men. All of them were offered to perform repeat target transrectal biopsy of this area. Targeted transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy of the ASAP area was performed in 56 (44.1 % of the 127 patients, 53 of them being included in the final analysis.Results. PCa was diagnosed in 14 (26.4 % of the 53 patients, their mean age being 64.4 ± 6.9 years. The average level of prostate-specific antigen (PSA in PCa patients was 6.8 ± 3.0 ng/ml, in those with benign lesions – 9.3 ± 6.5 ng/ml; the percentage ratio of free/total PSA with PCa was 16.2 ± 7,8 %, with benign lesions – 23.3 ± 7.7 %; PSA density in PCa patients was 0.14 ± 0.07 ng/ml/cm3, in those with benign lesions – 0.15 ± 0.12 ng/ml/cm3. Therefore, with ASAP area being detected in repeat prostate biopsy samples, it is advisable that targeted extended biopsy of this area be performed. 

  8. DUPA conjugation of a cytotoxic indenoisoquinoline topoisomerase I inhibitor for selective prostate cancer cell targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Jyoti; Nguyen, Trung Xuan; Kanduluru, Ananda Kumar; Venkatesh, Chelvam; Lv, Wei; Reddy, P V Narasimha; Low, Philip S; Cushman, Mark

    2015-04-09

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is overexpressed in most prostate cancer cells while being present at low or undetectable levels in normal cells. This difference provides an opportunity to selectively deliver cytotoxic drugs to prostate cancer cells while sparing normal cells that lack PSMA, thus improving potencies and reducing toxicities. PSMA has high affinity for 2-[3-(1,3-dicarboxypropyl)ureido]pentanedioic acid (DUPA) (Ki = 8 nM). After binding to a DUPA-drug conjugate, PSMA internalizes, unloads the conjugate, and returns to the surface. In the present studies, an indenoisoquinoline topoisomerase I inhibitor was conjugated to DUPA via a peptide linker and a drug-release segment that facilitates intracellular cleavage to liberate the drug cargo. The DUPA-indenoisoquinoline conjugate exhibited an IC50 in the low nanomolar range in 22RV1 cell cultures and induced a complete cessation of tumor growth with no toxicity, as determined by loss of body weight and death of treated mice.

  9. Walnuts lower TRAMP prostate tumor growth by altering IGF-1, energy and cholesterol metabolism and is not due to their fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary changes could potentially reduce prostate cancer morbidity and mortality. Prostate tumor size, gene expression, metabolite and plasma responses to a 100 g of fat/kg diet (whole walnuts, walnut oil and other oils; balanced for macronutrients, tocopherols (a-and ' ) for 18 weeks were assessed ...

  10. Recent progress in the development of protein-protein interaction inhibitors targeting androgen receptor-coactivator binding in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biron, Eric; Bédard, François

    2016-07-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a key regulator for the growth, differentiation and survival of prostate cancer cells. Identified as a primary target for the treatment of prostate cancer, many therapeutic strategies have been developed to attenuate AR signaling in prostate cancer cells. While frontline androgen-deprivation therapies targeting either the production or action of androgens usually yield favorable responses in prostate cancer patients, a significant number acquire treatment resistance. Known as the castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), the treatment options are limited for this advanced stage. It has been shown that AR signaling is restored in CRPC due to many aberrant mechanisms such as AR mutations, amplification or expression of constitutively active splice-variants. Coregulator recruitment is a crucial regulatory step in AR signaling and the direct blockade of coactivator binding to AR offers the opportunity to develop therapeutic agents that would remain effective in prostate cancer cells resistant to conventional endocrine therapies. Structural analyses of the AR have identified key surfaces involved in protein-protein interaction with coregulators that have been recently used to design and develop promising AR-coactivator binding inhibitors. In this review we will discuss the design and development of small-molecule inhibitors targeting the AR-coactivator interactions for the treatment of prostate cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Targeting the PD-1 pathway in pediatric solid tumors and brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner LM

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Lars M Wagner,1 Val R Adams2 1Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, 2Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA Abstract: While remarkable advances have been made in the treatment of pediatric leukemia over the past decades, new therapies are needed for children with advanced solid tumors and high-grade brain tumors who fail standard chemotherapy regimens. Immunotherapy with immune checkpoint inhibitors acting through the programmed cell death-1 (PD-1 pathway has shown efficacy in some chemotherapy-resistant adult cancers, generating interest that these agents may also be helpful to treat certain refractory pediatric malignancies. In this manuscript we review current strategies for targeting the PD-1 pathway, highlighting putative biomarkers and the rationale for investigation of these drugs to treat common pediatric tumors such as sarcoma, neuroblastoma, and high-grade glioma. We summarize the completed and ongoing clinical trial data available, and suggest potential applications for further study. Keywords: PD-1, nivolumab, pembrolizumab, pediatric, sarcoma, neuroblastoma, glioma

  12. Prostate cancer diagnosis: Efficacy of a simple electromagnetic MRI-TRUS fusion method to target biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelidi, Amina; Ohana, Mickael; Labani, Aïssam; Alemann, Guillaume; Lang, Herve; Roy, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A very simple electromagnetic device for fusion with MRI examination during TRUS guided biopsies increases the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer. • This device has advantages: a short time for the fusion registration, no additional cumbersome material and no intense training to be fluent with. • Low or intermediate suspicious area for prostate carcinoma on mpMRI can be due to benign histological abnormalities or high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. - Abstract: Objective: To assess that transrectal ultrasound guidance (TRUS) targeted biopsies (TB) aimed with an easy to use electronic real-time fusion registration device have a higher rate of prostate cancer (PC) detection than standard biopsies (SB). Material and methods: This prospective study included 130 patients referred for TRUS biopsies after suspicious MRI. They underwent 16-core SB and 2 to 3 cores in each MRI suspicious area, using a fusion software. We noted SB and TB positivity for PC and Gleason score (GS). We used the McNemar test to compare SB and TB, with a statistical significance p < 0.05. Results: Among 130 patients, 68.5% had PC. Additional time due to the fusion registration was 3.3 min. One hundred fifteen patients (88.4%) had pathological findings on the histological analysis (prostate cancer n = 89, others n = 26). TB diagnosed PC in 75 patients with negative SB. Positivity rate for PC was significantly higher for TB than SB (p = 0.03). Among highly suspicious MRI lesions, detection rate of histological abnormalities using SB and TB was 96% with 79.7% of PC. Most PC that TB diagnosed alone were clinically significant (86.3%). Conclusion: TRUS biopsies performed with a simple MRI and US electronic fusion is an unrestrainedly method to increase PC diagnosis.

  13. Anatomic Boundaries of the Clinical Target Volume (Prostate Bed) After Radical Prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiltshire, Kirsty L.; Brock, Kristy K.; Haider, Masoom A.; Zwahlen, Daniel; Kong, Vickie; Chan, Elisa; Moseley, Joanne; Bayley, Andrew; Catton, Charles; Chung, Peter W.M.; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Milosevic, Michael; Kneebone, Andrew; Warde, Padraig; Menard, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to derive and validate an interdisciplinary consensus definition for the anatomic boundaries of the postoperative clinical target volume (CTV, prostate bed). Methods and Materials: Thirty one patients who had planned for radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy were enrolled and underwent computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) simulation prior to radiotherapy. Through an iterative process of consultation and discussion, an interdisciplinary consensus definition was derived based on a review of published data, patterns of local failure, surgical practice, and radiologic anatomy. In validation, we analyzed the distribution of surgical clips in reference to the consensus CTV and measured spatial uncertainties in delineating the CTV and vesicourethral anastomosis. Clinical radiotherapy plans were retrospectively evaluated against the consensus CTV (prostate bed). Results: Anatomic boundaries of the consensus CTV (prostate bed) are described. Surgical clips (n = 339) were well distributed throughout the CTV. The vesicourethral anastomosis was accurately localized using central sagittal computed tomography reconstruction, with a mean ± standard deviation uncertainty of 1.8 ± 2.5 mm. Delineation uncertainties were small for both MRI and computed tomography (mean reproducibility, 0-3.8 mm; standard deviation, 1.0-2.3); they were most pronounced in the anteroposterior and superoinferior dimensions and at the superior/posterior-most aspect of the CTV. Retrospectively, the mean ± standard deviation CTV (prostate bed) percentage of volume receiving 100% of prescribed dose was only 77% ± 26%. Conclusions: We propose anatomic boundaries for the CTV (prostate bed) and present evidence supporting its validity. In the absence of gross recurrence, the role of MRI in delineating the CTV remains to be confirmed. The CTV is larger than historically practiced at our institution and should be encompassed by a microscopic tumoricidal dose

  14. Prostate cancer characteristics associated with response to pre-receptor targeting of the androgen axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe A Mostaghel

    Full Text Available Factors influencing differential responses of prostate tumors to androgen receptor (AR axis-directed therapeutics are poorly understood, and predictors of treatment efficacy are needed. We hypothesized that the efficacy of inhibiting DHT ligand synthesis would associate with intra-tumoral androgen ratios indicative of relative dependence on DHT-mediated growth.We characterized two androgen-sensitive prostate cancer xenograft models after androgen suppression by castration in combination with the SRD5A inhibitor, dutasteride, as well as a panel of castration resistant metastases obtained via rapid autopsy.In LuCaP35 tumors (intra-tumoral T:DHT ratio 2:1 dutasteride suppressed DHT to 0.02 ng/gm and prolonged survival vs. castration alone (337 vs.152 days, HR 2.8, p = 0.0015. In LuCaP96 tumors (T:DHT 10:1, survival was not improved despite similar DHT reduction (0.02 ng/gm. LuCaP35 demonstrated higher expression of steroid biosynthetic enzymes maintaining DHT levels (5-fold higher SRD5A1, 41 fold higher, 99-fold higher RL-HSD, p<0.0001 for both, reconstitution of intra-tumoral DHT (to ∼30% of untreated tumors, and ∼2 fold increased expression of full length AR. In contrast, LuCaP96 demonstrated higher levels of steroid catabolizing enzymes (6.9-fold higher AKR1C2, 3000-fold higher UGT2B15, p = 0.002 and p<0.0001 respectively, persistent suppression of intra-tumoral DHT, and 6-8 fold induction of full length AR and the ligand independent V7 AR splice variant. Human metastases demonstrated bio-active androgen levels and AR full length and AR splice-variant expression consistent with the range observed in xenografts.Intrinsic differences in basal steroidogenesis, as well as variable expression of full length and splice-variant AR, associate with response and resistance to pre-receptor AR ligand suppression. Expression of steroidogenic enzymes and AR isoforms may serve as potential biomarkers of sensitivity to potent AR-axis inhibition and

  15. Peptide-Mediated Liposomal Drug Delivery System Targeting Tumor Blood Vessels in Anticancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Chung Wu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid tumors are known to recruit new blood vessels to support their growth. Therefore, unique molecules expressed on tumor endothelial cells can function as targets for the antiangiogenic therapy of cancer. Current efforts are focusing on developing therapeutic agents capable of specifically targeting cancer cells and tumor-associated microenvironments including tumor blood vessels. These therapies hold the promise of high efficacy and low toxicity. One recognized strategy for improving the therapeutic effectiveness of conventional chemotherapeutics is to encapsulate anticancer drugs into targeting liposomes that bind to the cell surface receptors expressed on tumor-associated endothelial cells. These anti-angiogenic drug delivery systems could be used to target both tumor blood vessels as well as the tumor cells, themselves. This article reviews the mechanisms and advantages of various present and potential methods using peptide-conjugated liposomes to specifically destroy tumor blood vessels in anticancer therapy.

  16. Sparing Healthy Tissue and Increasing Tumor Dose Using Bayesian Modeling of Geometric Uncertainties for Planning Target Volume Personalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herschtal, Alan; Te Marvelde, Luc; Mengersen, Kerrie; Foroudi, Farshad; Eade, Thomas; Pham, Daniel; Caine, Hannah; Kron, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To develop a mathematical tool that can update a patient's planning target volume (PTV) partway through a course of radiation therapy to more precisely target the tumor for the remainder of treatment and reduce dose to surrounding healthy tissue. Methods and Materials: Daily on-board imaging was used to collect large datasets of displacements for patients undergoing external beam radiation therapy for solid tumors. Bayesian statistical modeling of these geometric uncertainties was used to optimally trade off between displacement data collected from previously treated patients and the progressively accumulating data from a patient currently partway through treatment, to optimally predict future displacements for that patient. These predictions were used to update the PTV position and margin width for the remainder of treatment, such that the clinical target volume (CTV) was more precisely targeted. Results: Software simulation of dose to CTV and normal tissue for 2 real prostate displacement datasets consisting of 146 and 290 patients treated with a minimum of 30 fractions each showed that re-evaluating the PTV position and margin width after 8 treatment fractions reduced healthy tissue dose by 19% and 17%, respectively, while maintaining CTV dose. Conclusion: Incorporating patient-specific displacement patterns from early in a course of treatment allows PTV adaptation for the remainder of treatment. This substantially reduces the dose to healthy tissues and thus can reduce radiation therapy–induced toxicities, improving patient outcomes

  17. Sparing Healthy Tissue and Increasing Tumor Dose Using Bayesian Modeling of Geometric Uncertainties for Planning Target Volume Personalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herschtal, Alan, E-mail: Alan.Herschtal@petermac.org [Department of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne (Australia); Te Marvelde, Luc [Department of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Mengersen, Kerrie [School of Mathematical Sciences, Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia); Foroudi, Farshad [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Eade, Thomas [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Radiation Oncology Department, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, Sydney (Australia); Northern Clinical School, University of Sydney (Australia); Pham, Daniel [Department of Radiation Therapy, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Caine, Hannah [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Radiation Oncology Department, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, Sydney (Australia); Kron, Tomas [The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-06-01

    Objective: To develop a mathematical tool that can update a patient's planning target volume (PTV) partway through a course of radiation therapy to more precisely target the tumor for the remainder of treatment and reduce dose to surrounding healthy tissue. Methods and Materials: Daily on-board imaging was used to collect large datasets of displacements for patients undergoing external beam radiation therapy for solid tumors. Bayesian statistical modeling of these geometric uncertainties was used to optimally trade off between displacement data collected from previously treated patients and the progressively accumulating data from a patient currently partway through treatment, to optimally predict future displacements for that patient. These predictions were used to update the PTV position and margin width for the remainder of treatment, such that the clinical target volume (CTV) was more precisely targeted. Results: Software simulation of dose to CTV and normal tissue for 2 real prostate displacement datasets consisting of 146 and 290 patients treated with a minimum of 30 fractions each showed that re-evaluating the PTV position and margin width after 8 treatment fractions reduced healthy tissue dose by 19% and 17%, respectively, while maintaining CTV dose. Conclusion: Incorporating patient-specific displacement patterns from early in a course of treatment allows PTV adaptation for the remainder of treatment. This substantially reduces the dose to healthy tissues and thus can reduce radiation therapy–induced toxicities, improving patient outcomes.

  18. Targeting Th17-IL-17 Pathway in Prevention of Micro-Invasive Prostate Cancer in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Ge, Dongxia; Cunningham, David M; Huang, Feng; Ma, Lin; Burris, Thomas P; You, Zongbing

    2017-06-01

    Chronic inflammation has been associated with the development and progression of human cancers including prostate cancer. The exact role of the inflammatory Th17-IL-17 pathway in prostate cancer remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to determine the importance of Th17 cells and IL-17 in a Pten-null prostate cancer mouse model. The Pten-null mice were treated by Th17 inhibitor SR1001 or anti-mouse IL-17 monoclonal antibody from 6 weeks of age up to 12 weeks of age. For SR1001 treatment, the mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) twice a day with vehicle or SR1001, which was dissolved in a dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution. All mice were euthanized for necropsy at 12 weeks of age. For IL-17 antibody treatment, the mice were injected intravenously (i.v.) once every two weeks with control IgG or rat anti-mouse IL-17 monoclonal antibody, which was dissolved in PBS. The injection time points were at 6, 8, and 10 weeks old. All mice were analyzed for the prostate phenotypes at 12 weeks of age. We found that either SR1001 or anti-IL-17 antibody treatment decreased the formation of micro-invasive prostate cancer in Pten-null mice. The SR1001 or anti-IL-17 antibody treated mouse prostates had reduced proliferation, increased apoptosis, and reduced angiogenesis, as well as reduced inflammatory cell infiltration. By assessing the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers, we found that SR1001 or anti-IL-17 antibody treated prostate tissues had weaker EMT phenotype compared to the control treated prostates. These results demonstrated that Th17-IL-17 pathway plays a key role in prostate cancer progression in Pten-null mice. Targeting Th17-IL-17 pathway could prevent micro-invasive prostate cancer formation in mice. Prostate 77:888-899, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A strategy to correct for intrafraction target translation in conformal prostate radiotherapy: Simulation results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keall, P. J.; Lauve, A. D.; Hagan, M. P.; Siebers, J. V.

    2007-01-01

    A strategy is proposed in which intrafraction internal target translation is corrected for by repositioning the multileaf collimator position aperture to conform to the new target pose in the beam projection, and the beam monitor units are adjusted to account for the change in the geometric relationship between the target and the beam. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric stability of the prostate and critical structures in the presence of internal target translation using the dynamic compensation strategy. Twenty-five previously treated prostate cancer patients were replanned using a four-field conformal technique to deliver 72 Gy to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV). Internal translation was introduced by displacing the prostate PTV (no rotation or deformation was considered). Thirty-six randomly selected isotropic displacements of magnitude 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 cm were sampled for each patient, for a total of 3600 errors. Due to their anatomic relation to the prostate, the rectum and bladder contours were also moved with the same magnitude and direction as the prostate. The dynamic compensation strategy was used to correct each of these errors by conforming the beam apertures to the new target pose and adjusting the monitor units using inverse-square and off-axis factor corrections. The dynamic compensation strategy plans were then compared to the original treatment plans via dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Changes of more than 5% of the prescription dose (3.6 Gy) were deemed clinically significant. Compared to the original treatment plans, the dynamic compensation strategy produced small discrepancies in isodose distributions and DVH analyses for all structures considered apart from the femoral heads. These differences increased with the magnitude of the internal motion. Coverage of the PTV was excellent: D 5 , D 95 , and D mean were not increased or decreased by more than 5% of the prescription dose for any of the 3600

  20. Pristimerin Inhibits Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis by Targeting PC-3 Stem Cell Characteristics and VEGF-Induced Vasculogenesis of BM-EPCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Huang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Prostate cancer (PCa is one of the most common malignant cancers and a major leading cause of cancer deaths in men. Cancer stem-like cells are shown to be highly tumorigenic, pro-angiogenic and can significantly contribute to tumor new vessel formation and bone marrow derived-EPCs (BM-EPCs are shown to recruit to the angiogenic switch in tumor growth and metastatic progression, suggesting the importance of targeting cancer stem cells (CSCs and EPCs for novel tumor therapies. Pristimerin, an active component isolated from Celastraceae and Hippocrateaceae, has shown anti-tumor effects in some cell lines in previous studies. However, the effect and mechanism of Pristimerin on CSCs and EPCs in PCa bone metastasis are not well studied. Methods: The effect of Pristimerin on PC-3 stem cell characteristics and metastasis were detected by spheroid formation, CD133 and CD44 protein expression, matrix-gel invasive assay and colony-formation assay in vitro, VEGF and pro-inflammatory cytokines expression by ELISA assay, and tumor tumorigenicity by X-ray and MR in NOD-SCID mice model in vivo. In addition, we also detected the effect of Pristimerin on VEGF-induced vasculogenesis and protein expression of BM-EPCs. Results: Pristimerin could significantly inhibit spheroid formation and protein expression of CD133 and CD44, reduce VEGF and pro-inflammation cytokines expression of PC-3 cell, and prevent the xenografted PC-3 tumor growth in the bone of nude mice. The present data also showed that Pristimerin significantly inhibited VEGF-induced vasculogenesis of BM-EPCs by suppressing the EPCs functions including proliferation, adhesion, migration, tube formation and inactivation the phosphorylation of VEGFR-2, Akt and eNOS. Conclusion: These data provide evidence that Pristimerin has strong potential for development as a novel agent against prostate bone metastasis by suppressing PC-3 stem cell characteristics and VEGF-induced vasculogenesis of BM-EPCs.

  1. Planning magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer intensity-modulated radiation therapy: Impact on target volumes, radiotherapy dose and androgen deprivation administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsley, Patrick J; Aherne, Noel J; Edwards, Grace V; Benjamin, Linus C; Wilcox, Shea W; McLachlan, Craig S; Assareh, Hassan; Welshman, Richard; McKay, Michael J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are increasingly utilized for radiotherapy planning to contour the primary tumors of patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). These scans may also demonstrate cancer extent and may affect the treatment plan. We assessed the impact of planning MRI detection of extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, or adjacent organ invasion on the staging, target volume delineation, doses, and hormonal therapy of patients with prostate cancer undergoing IMRT. The records of 509 consecutive patients with planning MRI scans being treated with IMRT for prostate cancer between January 2010 and July 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Tumor staging and treatment plans before and after MRI were compared. Of the 509 patients, 103 (20%) were upstaged and 44 (9%) were migrated to a higher risk category as a result of findings at MRI. In 94 of 509 patients (18%), the MRI findings altered management. Ninety-four of 509 patients (18%) had a change to their clinical target volume (CTV) or treatment technique, and in 41 of 509 patients (8%) the duration of hormone therapy was changed because of MRI findings. The use of radiotherapy planning MRI altered CTV design, dose and/or duration of androgen deprivation in 18% of patients in this large, single institution series of men planned for dose-escalated prostate IMRT. This has substantial implications for radiotherapy target volumes and doses, as well as duration of androgen deprivation. Further research is required to investigate whether newer MRI techniques can simultaneously fulfill staging and radiotherapy contouring roles. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. A Single Missense Mutation in 77% of Prostate Cancer Bone Metastases: Novel Opportunity for Genetic Biomarker and Novel Therapeutic Mitochondrial Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    goal of this application is to identify targets for the treatment of androgen receptor null castration-resistant prostate cancer in in vitro and pre...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0584 TITLE : A Single Missense Mutation in 77% of Prostate Cancer Bone Metastases: Novel Opportunity for Genetic...Missense Mutation in 77% of Prostate Cancer Bone Metastases: 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Single Missense Mutation in 77% of Prostate Cancer Bone Metastases

  3. Comparison of 2D and 3D algorithms for adding a margin to the gross tumor volume in the conformal radiotherapy planning of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoo, V.S.; Bedford, J.L.; Webb, S.; Dearnaley, D.P.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the adequacy of tumor volume coverage using a three dimensional (3D) margin growing algorithm compared to a two dimensional (2D) margin growing algorithm in the conformal radiotherapy planning of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Two gross tumor volumes (GTV) were segmented in each of ten patients with localized prostate cancer: prostate gland only (PO) and prostate with seminal vesicles (PSV). A margin of 10 mm was applied to these two groups (PO and PSV) using both the 2D and 3D margin growing algorithms. The true planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the region delineated by the 3D algorithm. Adequacy of geometric coverage of the GTV with the two algorithms was examined throughout the target volume. Discrepancies between the two margin methods were measured in the transaxial plane. Results: The 2D algorithm underestimated the PTV by 17% (range 12-20) in the PO group and by 20% (range 13-28) for the PSV group when compared to the 3D algorithm. For both the PO and PSV groups, the inferior coverage of the PTV was consistently underestimated by the 2D margin algorithm when compared to the 3D margins with a mean radial distance of 4.8 mm (range 0-10). In the central region of the prostate gland, the anterior, posterior, and lateral PTV borders were underestimated with the 2D margin in both the PO and PSV groups by a mean of 3.6 mm (range 0-9), 2.1 mm (range 0-8), and 1.8 (range 0-9) respectively. The PTV coverage of the PO group superiorly was radially underestimated by 4.5mm (range 0-14) when comparing the 2D margins to the 3D margins. For the PSV group, the junction region between the prostate and the seminal vesicles was underestimated by the 2D margin by a mean transaxial distance of 18.1 mm in the anterior PTV border (range 4-30), 7.2 mm posteriorly (range 0-20), and 3.7 mm laterally (range 0-14). The superior region of the seminal vesicles in the PSV group was also consistently underestimated with a radial discrepancy of 3.3 mm

  4. SU-E-J-57: First Development of Adapting to Intrafraction Relative Motion Between Prostate and Pelvic Lymph Nodes Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Y; Colvill, E; O’Brien, R; Keall, P [Radiation Physics Laboratory, University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Booth, J [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Large intrafraction relative motion of multiple targets is common in advanced head and neck, lung, abdominal, gynaecological and urological cancer, jeopardizing the treatment outcomes. The objective of this study is to develop a real-time adaptation strategy, for the first time, to accurately correct for the relative motion of multiple targets by reshaping the treatment field using the multi-leaf collimator (MLC). Methods The principle of tracking the simultaneously treated but differentially moving tumor targets is to determine the new aperture shape that conforms to the shifted targets. Three dimensional volumes representing the individual targets are projected to the beam’s eye view. The leaf openings falling inside each 2D projection will be shifted according to the measured motion of each target to form the new aperture shape. Based on the updated beam shape, new leaf positions will be determined with optimized trade-off between the target underdose and healthy tissue overdose, and considerations of the physical constraints of the MLC. Taking a prostate cancer patient with pelvic lymph node involvement as an example, a preliminary dosimetric study was conducted to demonstrate the potential treatment improvement compared to the state-of- art adaptation technique which shifts the whole beam to track only one target. Results The world-first intrafraction adaptation system capable of reshaping the beam to correct for the relative motion of multiple targets has been developed. The dose in the static nodes and small bowel are closer to the planned distribution and the V45 of small bowel is decreased from 110cc to 75cc, corresponding to a 30% reduction by this technique compared to the state-of-art adaptation technique. Conclusion The developed adaptation system to correct for intrafraction relative motion of multiple targets will guarantee the tumour coverage and thus enable PTV margin reduction to minimize the high target dose to the adjacent organs

  5. Comparison of 2D and 3D algorithms for adding a margin to the gross tumor volume in the conformal radiotherapy planning of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoo, Vincent S.; Bedford, James L.; Webb, Steve; Dearnaley, David P.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the adequacy of tumor volume coverage using a three-dimensional (3D) margin-growing algorithm compared to a two-dimensional (2D) margin-growing algorithm in the conformal radiotherapy planning of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Two gross tumor volumes (GTV) were segmented in each of 10 patients with localized prostate cancer; prostate gland only (PO) and prostate with seminal vesicles (PSV). A predetermined margin of 10 mm was applied to these two groups (PO and PSV) using both 2D and 3D margin-growing algorithms. The 2D algorithm added a transaxial margin to each GTV slice, whereas the 3D algorithm added a volumetric margin all around the GTV. The true planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the region delineated by the 3D algorithm. The adequacy of geometric coverage of the GTV by the two algorithms was examined in a series of transaxial planes throughout the target volume. Results: The 2D margin-growing algorithm underestimated the PTV by 17% (range 12-20) in the PO group and by 20% (range 13-28) for the PSV group when compared to the 3D-margin algorithm. For the PO group, the mean transaxial difference between the 2D and 3D algorithm was 3.8 mm inferiorly (range 0-20), 1.8 mm centrally (range 0-9), and 4.4 mm superiorly (range 0-22). Considering all of these regions, the mean discrepancy anteriorly was 5.1 mm (range 0-22), posteriorly 2.2 (range 0-20), right border 2.8 mm (range 0-14), and left border 3.1 mm (range 0-12). For the PSV group, the mean discrepancy in the inferior region was 3.8 mm (range 0-20), central region of the prostate was 1.8 mm ( range 0-9), the junction region of the prostate and the seminal vesicles was 5.5 mm (range 0-30), and the superior region of the seminal vesicles was 4.2 mm (range 0-55). When the different borders were considered in the PSV group, the mean discrepancies for the anterior, posterior, right, and left borders were 6.4 mm (range 0-55), 2.5 mm (range 0-20), 2.6 mm (range 0-14), and 3

  6. Quantitative PET Imaging with Novel HER3 Targeted Peptides Selected by Phage Display to Predict Androgen Independent Prostate Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Independent Prostate Cancer Progression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Benjamin Larimer, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Massachusetts General Hospital Boston...3. DATES COVERED 1 Aug 2016 – 31 July 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Cancer Progression 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Quantitative PET Imaging with Novel HER3...Targeted Peptides Selected by Phage Display to Predict Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Progression 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0447 5c