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Sample records for prostate conformal irradiation

  1. A method of analyzing rectal surface area irradiated and rectal complications in prostate conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yong; Song, Paul Y.; Li Shidong; Spelbring, Danny R.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Haraf, Daniel J.; Chen, George T.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method of analyzing rectal surface area irradiated and rectal complications in prostate conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Dose-surface histograms of the rectum, which state the rectal surface area irradiated to any given dose, were calculated for a group of 27 patients treated with a four-field box technique to a total (tumor minimum) dose ranging from 68 to 70 Gy. Occurrences of rectal toxicities as defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) were recorded and examined in terms of dose and rectal surface area irradiated. For a specified end point of rectal complication, the complication probability was analyzed as a function of dose irradiated to a fixed rectal area, and as a function of area receiving a fixed dose. Lyman's model of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) was used to fit the data. Results: The observed occurrences of rectal complications appear to depend on the rectal surface area irradiated to a given dose level. The patient distribution of each toxicity grade exhibits a maximum as a function of percentage surface area irradiated, and the maximum moves to higher values of percentage surface area as the toxicity grade increases. The dependence of the NTCP for the specified end point on dose and percentage surface area irradiated was fitted to Lyman's NTCP model with a set of parameters. The curvature of the NTCP as a function of the surface area suggests that the rectum is a parallel structured organ. Conclusions: The described method of analyzing rectal surface area irradiated yields interesting insight into understanding rectal complications in prostate conformal radiotherapy. Application of the method to a larger patient data set has the potential to facilitate the construction of a full dose-surface-complication relationship, which would be most useful in guiding clinical practice

  2. Conformal Brachytherapy Boost To External Beam Irradiation For Clinically Localized High Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, Michael J.; Wasserman, Stuart G.; Koval, John M.; Sorace, Richard A.; Cash, Jennifer; Wallner, Kent E.

    1995-01-01

    -rectal fistula. 2 patients required TURP 2-3 months after the implant, 6 underwent TUIP in the immediate post-operative period. One patient developed low volume stress incontinence after he had undergone both TUIP and TURP. Of 45 patients who were sexually potent prior to implant, the actuarial potency rate at 3 years after implantation was 77%. Conclusion: This approach is extremely well tolerated and the results compare favorably to other modalities including 3D conformal EBRT. A higher total dose can be delivered with prostatic brachytherapy and the operator can better correct for prostatic motion/displacement. As expected patients having Gleason score ≥ 7, elevated SPAP or PSA ≥ 20 are at increased risk for failure

  3. Conformal Brachytherapy Boost To External Beam Irradiation For Clinically Localized High Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattoli, Michael J; Wasserman, Stuart G; Koval, John M; Sorace, Richard A; Cash, Jennifer; Wallner, Kent E

    1995-07-01

    -rectal fistula. 2 patients required TURP 2-3 months after the implant, 6 underwent TUIP in the immediate post-operative period. One patient developed low volume stress incontinence after he had undergone both TUIP and TURP. Of 45 patients who were sexually potent prior to implant, the actuarial potency rate at 3 years after implantation was 77%. Conclusion: This approach is extremely well tolerated and the results compare favorably to other modalities including 3D conformal EBRT. A higher total dose can be delivered with prostatic brachytherapy and the operator can better correct for prostatic motion/displacement. As expected patients having Gleason score {>=} 7, elevated SPAP or PSA {>=} 20 are at increased risk for failure.

  4. Advanced prostate cancer: the results of a randomized comparative trial of high dose irradiation boosting with conformal protons compared with conventional dose irradiation using photons alone

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    Shipley, William U; Verhey, Lynn J; Munzenrider, John E; Suit, Herman D; Urie, Marcia M; McManus, Patricia L; Young, Robert H; Shipley, Jenot W; Zietman, Anthony L; Biggs, Peter J; Heney, Niall M; Goitein, Michael

    1995-04-30

    Purpose: Following a thorough Phase I/II study, we evaluated by a Phase III trial high versus conventional dose external beam irradiation as mono-therapy for patients with Stage T3-T4 prostate cancer. Patient outcome following standard dose radiotherapy or following a 12.5% increase in total dose to 75.6 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) using a conformal perineal proton boost was compared for local tumor control, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Methods and Materials: Stage T3-T4, Nx, N0-2, M0 patients received 50.4 Gy by four-field photons and were randomized to receive either an additional 25.2 CGE by conformal protons (arm 1--the high dose arm, 103 patients, total dose 75.6 CGE) or an additional 16.8 Gy by photons (arm 2--the conventional dose arm, 99 patients, total dose 67.2 Gy). Actuarial overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), total recurrence-free survival (TRFS), (clinically free, prostate specific antigen (PSA) less than 4ng/ml and a negative prostate rebiopsy, done in 38 patients without evidence of disease) and local control (digital rectal exam and rebiopsy negative) were evaluated. Results: The protocol completion rate was 90% for arm 1 and 97% for arm 2. With a median follow-up of 61 months (range 3 to 139 months) 135 patients are alive and 67 have died, 20 from causes other than prostate cancer. We found no significant differences in OS, DSS, TRFS or local control between the two arms. Among those completing randomized treatment (93 in arm 1 and 96 in arm 2), the local control at 5 and 8 years for arm 1 is 92% and 77%, respectively and is 80% and 60%, respectively for arm 2 (p = .089) and there are no significant differences in OS, DSS, and TRFS. The local control for the 57 patients with poorly differentiated (Gleason 4 or 5 of 5) tumors at 5 and 8 years for arm 1 is 94% and 84% and is 64% and 19% on arm 2 (p 0.0014). In patients whose digital rectal exam had normalized following treatment and underwent prostate rebiopsy

  5. Advanced prostate cancer: the results of a randomized comparative trial of high dose irradiation boosting with conformal protons compared with conventional dose irradiation using photons alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipley, William U.; Verhey, Lynn J.; Munzenrider, John E.; Suit, Herman D.; Urie, Marcia M.; McManus, Patricia L.; Young, Robert H.; Shipley, Jenot W.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Biggs, Peter J.; Heney, Niall M.; Goitein, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Following a thorough Phase I/II study, we evaluated by a Phase III trial high versus conventional dose external beam irradiation as mono-therapy for patients with Stage T3-T4 prostate cancer. Patient outcome following standard dose radiotherapy or following a 12.5% increase in total dose to 75.6 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) using a conformal perineal proton boost was compared for local tumor control, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Methods and Materials: Stage T3-T4, Nx, N0-2, M0 patients received 50.4 Gy by four-field photons and were randomized to receive either an additional 25.2 CGE by conformal protons (arm 1--the high dose arm, 103 patients, total dose 75.6 CGE) or an additional 16.8 Gy by photons (arm 2--the conventional dose arm, 99 patients, total dose 67.2 Gy). Actuarial overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), total recurrence-free survival (TRFS), (clinically free, prostate specific antigen (PSA) less than 4ng/ml and a negative prostate rebiopsy, done in 38 patients without evidence of disease) and local control (digital rectal exam and rebiopsy negative) were evaluated. Results: The protocol completion rate was 90% for arm 1 and 97% for arm 2. With a median follow-up of 61 months (range 3 to 139 months) 135 patients are alive and 67 have died, 20 from causes other than prostate cancer. We found no significant differences in OS, DSS, TRFS or local control between the two arms. Among those completing randomized treatment (93 in arm 1 and 96 in arm 2), the local control at 5 and 8 years for arm 1 is 92% and 77%, respectively and is 80% and 60%, respectively for arm 2 (p = .089) and there are no significant differences in OS, DSS, and TRFS. The local control for the 57 patients with poorly differentiated (Gleason 4 or 5 of 5) tumors at 5 and 8 years for arm 1 is 94% and 84% and is 64% and 19% on arm 2 (p 0.0014). In patients whose digital rectal exam had normalized following treatment and underwent prostate rebiopsy

  6. Conformal irradiation of the prostate: estimating long-term rectal bleeding risk using dose-volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartford, Alan C.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Adams, Judith A.; Urie, Marcia M.; Shipley, William U.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) may be very useful tools for estimating probability of normal tissue complications (NTCP), but there is not yet an agreed upon method for their analysis. This study introduces a statistical method of aggregating and analyzing primary data from DVHs and associated outcomes. It explores the dose-volume relationship for NTCP of the rectum, using long-term data on rectal wall bleeding following prostatic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Previously published data were reviewed and updated on 41 patients with Stages T3 and T4 prostatic carcinoma treated with photons followed by perineal proton boost, including dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient's anterior rectal wall and data on the occurrence of postirradiation rectal bleeding (minimum FU > 4 years). Logistic regression was used to test whether some individual combination of dose and volume irradiated might best separate the DVHs into categories of high or low risk for rectal bleeding. Further analysis explored whether a group of such dose-volume combinations might be superior in predicting complication risk. These results were compared with results of the 'critical volume model', a mathematical model based on assumptions of underlying radiobiological interactions. Results: Ten of the 128 tested dose-volume combinations proved to be 'statistically significant combinations' (SSCs) distinguishing between bleeders (14 out of 41) and nonbleeders (27 out of 41), ranging contiguously between 60 CGE (Cobalt Gray Equivalent) to 70% of the anterior rectal wall and 75 CGE to 30%. Calculated odds ratios for each SSC were not significantly different across the individual SSCs; however, analysis combining SSCs allowed segregation of DVHs into three risk groups: low, moderate, and high. Estimates of probabilities of normal tissue complications (NTCPs) based on these risk groups correlated strongly with observed data (p = 0.003) and with biomathematical model-generated NTCPs

  7. Conformal treatment of prostate cancer with improved targeting: superior prostate-specific antigen response compared to standard treatment

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    Corn, Benjamin W; Hanks, Gerald E; Schultheiss, Timothy E; Hunt, Margie A; Lee, W Robert; Coia, Lawrence R

    1995-05-15

    Purpose: Conformal radiation therapy (CRT) decreases the morbidity of prostate cancer treatment, but no published data attest to the improved ability of CRT to control disease. Therefore, we compared Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) response at 1 year among similarly staged patients treated by conformal techniques to those treated with conventional approaches, looking for an early indicator of tumor response. Method and Materials: Patients with locally advanced disease were treated by pelvic fields followed by prostate field conedowns; those with early stage/low grade disease received only prostate field irradiation. Between October, 1987 and November, 1991, conventional treatments used rectangular beams with or without corner blocks. Neither urethrography nor immobilization casts were used for conventionally treated patients. Between April, 1989 and December, 1992, conformal treatments have used rigid immobilization and Computed Tomography-based, beams-eye-view field design. As such, our conformal approach allowed improved targeting. Median prescribed doses (minimal doses to the Planning Target Volume) were 70 Gy (66-73 Gy) and 70.2 Gy (64.8-75 Gy) for conventionally and conformally treated patients, respectively. Median daily fraction size was 1.8 Gy for conventional treatment and 2.0 Gy for conformal therapy. Baseline PSA data were available on 170 consecutive patients treated conformally and 90 consecutive patients treated conventionally. Results: Among those receiving only prostatic field irradiation, 12-month PSA values returned to normal in 96% and 85% of conformally and conventionally treated patients, respectively, when normalization was defined as {<=} 4 ng/ml (p < 0.03) and in 76% vs. 55% of patients when PSA normalization was defined as {<=} 1.5 ng/ml (p < 0.02). Among those receiving pelvic irradiation prior to prostatic conedown, PSA normalization ({<=} 4 ng/ml) occurred in 82% and 61% (p < 0.01) of conformally and conventionally treated patients

  8. On-line conformal HDR dose escalation trial in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro; Stromberg, Jannifer; Edmundson, Gregory; Gustafson, Gary; Vicini, Frank; Brabbins, Donald

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To improve treatment results on prostatic adenocarcinoma, we began the first prospective Phase I/II dose-escalating clinical trial of conformal brachytherapy (CB) and concurrent external beam irradiation. Methods and Materials: Fifty-four patients with T2b-T3c prostatic adenocarcinoma received 172 transperineal conformal high-dose rate (HDR) boost implants. All patients received concomitant external beam pelvic irradiation. Dose escalation of the three HDR fractions were: 5.5 Gy (18 patients), 6 Gy (15 patients), and 6.5 Gy (21 patients). The urethra, anterior rectal wall, and prostate boundaries were identified individually and outlined at 5 mm intervals from the base to the apex of the gland. The CB using real-time ultrasound guidance with interactive online isodose distributions was performed on an outpatient basis. As needles were placed into the prostate, corrections for prostate displacement were recorded and the isodose distributions were recalculated to represent the new relationship between the needles, prostate, and normal structures. Results: Craniocaudal motion of the gland ranged from 0.5-2.0 cm (mean=1.0 cm), whereas lateral displacement was 0.1-0.4 cm. With the interactive online planning system, organ motion was immediately detected, accounted for, and corrected prior to each HDR treatment. The rectal dose has ranged from 45 to 87%, and the urethral dose from 97 to 112% of the prostate dose. Negative prostatic biopsies at 18 months were seen in (30(32)) patients. Biochemical (PSA <1.5 ng/ml) control at 36 months is is 89%. It is significant that operator dependence has been completely removed because the interactive online planning system uniformly guides the physicians. Conclusions: With ultrasound guidance and the interactive online dosimetry system, organ motion is insignificant because it can be corrected during the procedure. Common pitfalls of brachytherapy, including operator dependence and difficulty with reproducibility, have been

  9. Treatment planning evaluation of non-coplanar techniques for conformal radiotherapy of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedford, James L.; Henrys, Anthony J.; Dearnaley, David P.; Khoo, Vincent S.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the benefit of using non-coplanar treatment plans for irradiation of two different clinical treatment volumes: prostate only (PO) and the prostate plus seminal vesicles (PSV). Material and methods: An inverse planning algorithm was used to produce three-field, four-field, five-field and six-field non-coplanar treatment plans without intensity-modulation in ten patients. These were compared against a three-field coplanar plan. A dose of 74 Gy was prescribed to the isocentre. Plans were compared using the minimum dose to the planning target volume (PTV), maximum dose to the small bowel, and irradiated volumes of rectum, bladder and femoral head. Biological indices were also evaluated. Results: For the PO group, volume of rectum irradiated to 60 Gy (V 60 ) was 22.5±3.7% for the coplanar plan, and 21.5±5.3% for the five-field non-coplanar plan, which was the most beneficial (p=0.3). For the PSV group, the five-field non-coplanar plan was again the most beneficial. Rectal V 60 was in this case reduced from 41.5±10.4% for the coplanar plan to 35.2±9.3% for the non-coplanar plan (p=0.02). Conclusions: The use of non-coplanar beams in conformal prostate radiotherapy provides a small increase in rectal sparing, more significantly with PSV volumes than for PO volumes

  10. Prostatic carcinoma: limited field irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rounsaville, M.C.; Green, J.P.; Vaeth, J.M.; Purdon, R.P.; Heltzel, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    This is a retrospective study of 251 patients with histologically proven adenocarcinoma treated primarily with limited field radiotherapy techniques, under the principle direction of authors JMV and JPG, between 1968 and 1981 in San Francisco, California. All patients are followed for a minimum of 3 years; mean follow-up is 7.3 years. Routine clinical staging procedures included: HandP, digital prostate exam, cystoscopy, biopsy, blood studies including serum acid phosphatase, and imaging studies including chest X ray, IVP, bone survey or radionucleotide bone scan, and in recent years, pelvic CT scans. Twelve patients are Stage A1, 37-Stage A2, 50-Stage B, 140-Stage C1 and 12-Stage C2. Ninety percent of all cases and 85% of Stage C patients were treated with limited fields to the prostate and periprostatic volume only. Total doses were prescribed at midplane or isocenter and were generally 6500-7000 cGy, daily doses of 180-200 cGy, 5 days per week. Actuarial 5- and 10-year survival rates are: entire population-69% and 47%; Stage A1-74% and 50%; Stage A2-81% and 67%; Stage B-84% and 53%; Stage C1-63% and 42%; Stage C2-32% and 11%. The 5- and 10-year disease-free actuarial survivals are: entire population-71% and 50%; Stage A1-89% and 74%; Stage A2-82% and 69%; Stage B-71% and 52%; Stage C1-67% and 44%; Stage C2-0%. Sites of recurrence, alone or as a component of the failure pattern are: 37 (15%) local, 11 (4%) symptomatic regional recurrence (lower extremity edema, pelvic pain/sciatica, hydroureteronephrosis), and 87 (35%) distant metastasis. Seven (3%) had unknown sites of failure. Local-regional failure occurred in 42% of Stage C2 patients

  11. Efficient CT simulation of the four-field technique for conformal radiotherapy of prostate carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valicenti, Richard K.; Waterman, Frank M.; Croce, Raymond J.; Corn, Benjamin; Suntharalingam, Nagalingam; Curran, Walter J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Conformal radiotherapy of prostate carcinoma relies on contouring of individual CT slices for target and normal tissue localization. This process can be very time consuming. In the present report, we describe a method to more efficiently localize pelvic anatomy directly from digital reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Materials and Methods: Ten patients with prostate carcinoma underwent CT simulation (the spiral mode at 3 mm separation) for conformal four-field 'box' radiotherapy. The bulbous urethra and bladder were opacified with iodinated contrast media. On lateral and anteroposterior DRRs, the volume of interest (VOI) was restricted to 1.0-1.5 cm tissue thickness to optimize digital radiograph reconstruction of the prostate and seminal vesicles. By removing unessential voxel elements, this method provided direct visualization of those structures. For comparison, the targets of each patient were also obtained by contouring CT axial slices. Results: The method was successfully performed if the target structures were readily visualized and geometrically corresponded to those generated by contouring axial images. The targets in 9 of 10 patients were reliable representations of the CT-contoured volumes. One patient had 18 mm variation due to the lack of bladder opacification. Using VOIs to generate thin tissue DRRs, the time required for target and normal tissue localization was on the average less than 5 min. Conclusion: In CT simulation of the four-field irradiation technique for prostate carcinoma, thin-tissue DRRs allowed for efficient and accurate target localization without requiring individual axial image contouring. This method may facilitate positioning of the beam isocenter and provide reliable conformal radiotherapy

  12. Dose escalation using conformal high-dose-rate brachytherapy improves outcome in unfavorable prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alvaro A; Gustafson, Gary; Gonzalez, José; Armour, Elwood; Mitchell, Chris; Edmundson, Gregory; Spencer, William; Stromberg, Jannifer; Huang, Raywin; Vicini, Frank

    2002-06-01

    To overcome radioresistance for patients with unfavorable prostate cancer, a prospective trial of pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) interdigitated with dose-escalating conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy was performed. Between November 1991 and August 2000, 207 patients were treated with 46 Gy pelvic EBRT and increasing HDR brachytherapy boost doses (5.50-11.5 Gy/fraction) during 5 weeks. The eligibility criteria were pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level >or=10.0 ng/mL, Gleason score >or=7, or clinical Stage T2b or higher. Patients were divided into 2 dose levels, low-dose biologically effective dose 93 Gy (149 patients). No patient received hormones. We used the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition for biochemical failure. The median age was 69 years. The mean follow-up for the group was 4.4 years, and for the low and high-dose levels, it was 7.0 and 3.4 years, respectively. The actuarial 5-year biochemical control rate was 74%, and the overall, cause-specific, and disease-free survival rate was 92%, 98%, and 68%, respectively. The 5-year biochemical control rate for the low-dose group was 52%; the rate for the high-dose group was 87% (p failure. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 gastrointestinal/genitourinary complications ranged from 0.5% to 9%. The actuarial 5-year impotency rate was 51%. Pelvic EBRT interdigitated with transrectal ultrasound-guided real-time conformal HDR prostate brachytherapy boost is both a precise dose delivery system and a very effective treatment for unfavorable prostate cancer. We demonstrated an incremental beneficial effect on biochemical control and cause-specific survival with higher doses. These results, coupled with the low risk of complications, the advantage of not being radioactive after implantation, and the real-time interactive planning, define a new standard for treatment.

  13. Prostatic biopsy after irradiation therapy for prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scardino, P.T.; Wheeler, T.M.

    1985-01-01

    To determine the prognostic significance of a routine needle biopsy of the prostate performed six to thirty-six months after the completion of definitive radiotherapy, biopsy results were analyzed in 146 patients who had no evidence of disease at the time of biopsy and who received no other therapy before proved recurrence of the tumor. Patients were followed up a mean of 3.9 years after radioactive gold seed implantation and external beam irradiation. The total dose was 8,000 rad. Among 146 patients, 56 (38%) had one or more positive biopsy results within this time interval. The positive biopsy rate correlated with the clinical stage ranging from 17 per cent in Stage B1N to 59 per cent in Stage C1. The risk of developing local recurrence or distant metastases at any given time after irradiation therapy was markedly greater in those patients with a positive biopsy result (p less than 0.0005). Prostatic biopsy is an accurate means of measuring the success of radiotherapy. A positive postirradiation biopsy result carries grave prognostic implications for the patient and indicates that the treatment has failed

  14. Conformal fields in prostate radiotherapy: A comparison between measurement, calculation and simulation

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    Seied R Mahdavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The objective of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of a treatment planning system (TPS for calculating the dose distribution parameters in conformal fields (CF. Dosimetric parameters of CF′s were compared between measurement, Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP4C and TPS calculation. Materials and Methods: Field analyzer water phantom was used for obtaining percentage depth dose (PDD curves and beam profiles (BP of different conformal fields. MCNP4C was used to model conformal fields dose specification factors and head of linear accelerator varian model 2100C/D. Results: Results showed that the distance to agreement (DTA and dose difference (DD of our findings were well within the acceptance criteria of 3 mm and 3%, respectively. Conclusions: According to this study it can be revealed that TPS using equivalent tissue air ratio calculation method is still convenient for dose prediction in non small conformal fields normally used in prostate radiotherapy. It was also showed that, since there is a close correlation with Monte Carlo simulation, measurements and TPS, Monte Carlo can be further confirmed for implementation and calculation dose distribution in non standard and complex conformal irradiation field for treatment planning systems.

  15. Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and prostate gland shrinkage during conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Marcenaro, Michela; Franzone, Paola; Foppiano, Franca; Vitale, Vito

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The shrinking effect of 3-month neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (NAD) on preradiotherapy prostate gland volume is well documented. However, recently, it has been shown that the cancerous prostate gland keeps shrinking up to 12 months after NAD start. Thus, if such a reduction is not taken into account, a larger than planned portion of the surrounding normal tissues might shift in the high-dose region during conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) course. The present study was undertaken to quantify this issue. Materials and Methods: Prostate gland volume reduction between planning CT (plCT) and the last week of 3DCRT (tmtCT) was prospectively assessed in 33 consecutive patients with localized prostate carcinoma. The median time interval between plCT and tmtCT was 2.5 months (2.1-2.7 months). A single observer was asked to draw on each slice prostate gland volume as appropriate. The observer was 'blind' to the timing of CT (plCT vs. tmtCT). In order to estimate intra-observer variability, prostate gland delineation was repeated twice for each data set. Mean prostate gland change, plCT and tmtCT cumulative dose volume histogram (DVH) calculations for the rectum were analyzed for each patient. Results were correlated to AD status and its duration before plCT. Means were compared by non-parametric rank tests. Results: Based on an internal protocol, 14 patients (42%) did not receive AD, while 19 patients (58%) had undergone neoadjuvant and concomitant AD. The median duration of AD before plCT ranged from 0.2 to 6 months (median: 2.9 months). Although individual data were highly variable, compared to plCT volume, mean prostate gland volume change at the end of 3DCRT was similar for patients receiving (-7.3%) or not (-7%) androgen deprivation (P=0.77). However, within the group of patients treated with hormones, patients starting AD within 3 months from plCT had a significantly larger reduction in prostate volume (-14.2%) than patients with longer NAD duration (-1.1%, P

  16. Potential interest to combine an intensity modulated conformal radiotherapy (I.M.C.R.T.) with a daily repositioning on intra-prostate implants to reduce sexual toxicity induced by exclusive irradiation of prostate cancers; Interets potentiels de combiner une radiotherapie de conformation avec modulation d'intensite (RCMI) avec un repositionnement journalier sur implants intraprostatiques pour reduire la toxicite sexuelle induite par l'irradiation exclusive des cancers de prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapet, O.; Sotton, M.P.; Vial, L.; Belliere, A.; Ardiet, J.M.; Mornex, F.; Sentenac, I.; Romestaing, P. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Dept. de Radiotherapie-oncologie, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France); Bouffard, J. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Service de Radiologie, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France)

    2007-11-15

    A reduction in margins defining the forecast target volume thanks to a daily repositioning on intra prostate implants would reduce the doses delivered to the penis bulb, corpora cavernosa penis and a. pudendae internae left and right. An optimization of the I.M.C.R.T. on the same anatomical structures amplifies this earnings. The combination of the two could improve the sexual preservation and be proposed for patients with favourable stage prostate cancer. A study of Phase 2 begins soon. (N.C.)

  17. Strategies to evaluate the impact of rectal volume on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

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    Poli, Ana Paula Diniz Fortuna, E-mail: anapaulafortuna@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (CAISM/UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Centro de Atencao Integrada a Saude da Mulher. Divisao de Radioterapia; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo Jose; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo; Segreto, Roberto Araujo [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Divisao de Radioterapia

    2016-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the rectal volume influence on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Fifty-one patients with prostate cancer underwent a series of three computed tomography scans including an initial planning scan and two subsequent scans during 3D-CRT. The organs of interest were outlined. The prostate contour was compared with the initial CT images considering the anterior, posterior, superior, inferior and lateral edges of the organ. Variations in the anterior limits and volume of the rectum were assessed and correlated with prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction. Results: The maximum range of prostate motion was observed in the superoinferior direction, followed by the anteroposterior direction. A significant correlation was observed between prostate motion and rectal volume variation (p = 0.037). A baseline rectal volume superior to 70 cm{sup 3} had a significant influence on the prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction (p = 0.045). Conclusion: The present study showed a significant interfraction motion of the prostate during 3D-CRT with greatest variations in the superoinferior and anteroposterior directions, and that a large rectal volume influences the prostate motion with a cutoff value of 70 cm{sup 3}. Therefore, the treatment of patients with a rectal volume > 70 cm{sup 3} should be re-planned with appropriate rectal preparation. Keywords: Rectal volume; Prostate cancer; Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. (author)

  18. Factors influencing incidence of acute grade 2 morbidity in conformal and standard radiation treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanks, Gerald E.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Hunt, Margie A.; Epstein, Barry

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The fundament hypothesis of conformal radiation therapy is that tumor control can be increased by using conformal treatment techniques that allow a higher tumor dose while maintaining an acceptable level of complications. To test this hypothesis, it is necessary first to estimate the incidence of morbidity for both standard and conformal fields. In this study, we examine factors that influence the incidence of acute grade 2 morbidity in patients treated with conformal and standard radiation treatment for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Two hundred and forty-seven consecutive patients treated with conformal technique are combined with and compared to 162 consecutive patients treated with standard techniques. The conformal technique includes special immobilization by a cast, careful identification of the target volume in three dimensions, localization of the inferior border of the prostate using the retrograde urethrogram, and individually shaped portals that conform to the Planning Target Volume (PTV). Univariate analysis compares differences in the incidence of RTOG-EORTC grade two acute morbidity by technique, T stage, age, irradiated volume, and dose. Multivariate logistic regression includes these same variables. Results: In nearly all categories, the conformal treatment group experienced significantly fewer acute grade 2 complications than the standard treatment group. Only volume (prostate ± whole pelvis) and technique (conformal vs. standard) were significantly related to incidence of morbidity on multivariate analysis. When dose is treated as a continuous variable (rather than being dichotomized into two levels), a trend is observed on multivariate analysis, but it does not reach significant levels. The incidence of acute grade 2 morbidity in patients 65 years or older is significantly reduced by use of the conformal technique. Conclusion: The conformal technique is associated with fewer grade 2 acute toxicities for all patients. This

  19. Prostate carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledano, A.; Chauveinc, L.; Flam, T.; Thiounn, N.; Solignac, S.; Timbert, M.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Cosset, J.M.; Ammor, A.; Bonnetain, F.; Brenier, J.P.; Maingon, P.; Peignaux, K.; Truc, G.; Bosset, M.; Crevoisier, R. de; Tucker, S.; Dong, L.; Cheung, R.; Kuban, D.; Azria, D.; Llacer Moscardo, C.; Ailleres, N.; Allaw, A.; Serre, A.; Fenoglietto, P.; Hay, M.H.; Thezenas, S.; Dubois, J.B.; Pommier, P.; Perol, D.; Lagrange, J.L.; Richaud, P.; Brune, D.; Le Prise, E.; Azria, D.; Beckendorf, V.; Chabaud, S.; Carrie, C.; Bosset, M.; Bosset, J.F.; Maingon, P.; Ammor, A.; Crehangen, G.; Truc, G.; Peignaux, K.; Bonnetain, F.; Keros, L.; Bernier, V.; Aletti, P.; Wolf, D.; Marchesia, V.; Noel, A.; Artignan, X.; Fourneret, P.; Bacconier, M.; Shestaeva, O.; Pasquier, D.; Descotes, J.L.; Balosso, J.; Bolla, M.; Burette, R.; Corbusier, A.; Germeau, F.; Crevoisier, R. de; Dong, L.; Bonnen, M.; Cheung, R.; Tucker, S.; Kuban, D.; Crevoisier, R. de; Melancon, A.; Kuban, D.; Cheung, R.; Dong, L.; Peignaux, K.; Brenier, J.P.; Truc, G.; Bosset, M.; Ammor, A.; Barillot, I.; Maingon, P.; Molines, J.C.; Berland, E.; Cornulier, J. de; Coulet-Parpillon, A.; Cohard, C.; Picone, M.; Fourneret, P.; Artignan, X.; Daanen, V.; Gastaldo, J.; Bolla, M.; Collomb, D.; Dusserre, A.; Descotes, J.L.; Troccaz, J.; Giraud, J.Y.; Quero, L.; Hennequin, C.; Ravery, V.; Desgrandschamps, F.; Maylin, C.; Boccon-Gibod, L.; Salem, N.; Bladou, F.; Gravis, G.; Tallet, A.; Simonian, M.; Serment, G.; Salem, N.; Bladou, F.; Gravis, G.; Simonian, M.; Rosello, R.; Serment, G.

    2005-01-01

    Some short communications on the prostate carcinoma are given here. The impact of pelvic irradiation, conformation with intensity modulation, association of radiotherapy and chemotherapy reduction of side effects, imaging, doses escalation are such subjects studied and reported. (N.C.)

  20. Patient repositioning in prostate conformal radiotherapy by image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betrouni, Nacim

    2004-01-01

    This research thesis first proposes an overview of imaging modalities which are generally used in radiotherapy, and briefly presents operation principles for ultrasound scans, scanners and MRI. The issue of patient repositioning in radiotherapy is then introduced, and already proposed solutions are presented. In the next part, the author addresses space location and ultrasound-based location, with a brief overview of methods used to track the displacements of a mobile object, in this case an ultrasound probe, and calibration. Then, after a presentation of the adopted method, and a discussion of published works related to contour extraction and to filtering and noise reduction methods in ultrasound imagery, the author addresses the issue of prostate segmentation based on ultrasound images. The next part deals with image registration with an overview of available methods and tools. A method of registration of pre-operation images obtained by MRI or scanner, and of intra-operation ultrasound images is proposed for a real-time registration. This method is aimed at supporting patient repositioning during prostate conformal radiotherapy

  1. Daily-diary evaluated side-effects of conformal versus conventional prostatic cancer radiotherapy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmark, A.; Fransson, P.; Franzen, L.; Littbrand, B.; Henriksson, R.

    1997-01-01

    Conventional 4-field box radiotherapy technique induces high morbidity for patients with localized prostatic cancer. Using a patient daily diary, the present study compared side-effects after conventional radiotherapy with conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Fifty-eight patients treated with the conventional technique (with or without sucralfate) were compared with 72 patients treated with conformal technique. The patient groups were compared with an age-matched control population. Patients treated with conformal technique were also evaluated regarding acute and late urinary problems. Results showed that patients treated with conformal technique reported significantly fewer side-effects as compared with conventional technique. Patients treated with sucralfate also showed slightly decreased intestinal morbidity in comparison to non-sucralfate group. Acute and late morbidity evaluated by the patients was decreased after conformal radiotherapy as compared with the conventional technique. Sucralfate may be of value if conformal radiotherapy is used for dose escalation in prostatic cancer patients. (orig.)

  2. SU-E-T-279: Realization of Three-Dimensional Conformal Dose Planning in Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Z; Jiang, S; Yang, Z [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Bai, H; Zhang, X [Seeds biological Pharmacy Ltd, Tianjin (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Successful clinical treatment in prostate brachytherapy is largely dependent on the effectiveness of pre-surgery dose planning. Conventional dose planning method could hardly arrive at a satisfy result. In this abstract, a three-dimensional conformal localized dose planning method is put forward to ensure the accuracy and effectiveness of pre-implantation dose planning. Methods: Using Monte Carlo method, the pre-calculated 3-D dose map for single source is obtained. As for multiple seeds dose distribution, the maps are combined linearly to acquire the 3-D distribution. The 3-D dose distribution is exhibited in the form of isodose surface together with reconstructed 3-D organs group real-timely. Then it is possible to observe the dose exposure to target volume and normal tissues intuitively, thus achieving maximum dose irradiation to treatment target and minimum healthy tissues damage. In addition, the exfoliation display of different isodose surfaces can be realized applying multi-values contour extraction algorithm based on voxels. The needles could be displayed in the system by tracking the position of the implanted seeds in real time to conduct block research in optimizing insertion trajectory. Results: This study extends dose planning from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, realizing the three-dimensional conformal irradiation, which could eliminate the limitations of 2-D images and two-dimensional dose planning. A software platform is developed using VC++ and Visualization Toolkit (VTK) to perform dose planning. The 3-D model reconstruction time is within three seconds (on a Intel Core i5 PC). Block research could be conducted to avoid inaccurate insertion into sensitive organs or internal obstructions. Experiments on eight prostate cancer cases prove that this study could make the dose planning results more reasonable. Conclusion: The three-dimensional conformal dose planning method could improve the rationality of dose planning by safely reducing

  3. Dose escalation using conformal high-dose-rate brachytherapy improves outcome in unfavorable prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro A.; Gustafson, Gary; Gonzalez, Jose; Armour, Elwood; Mitchell, Chris; Edmundson, Gregory; Spencer, William; Stromberg, Jannifer; Huang, Raywin; Vicini, Frank

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To overcome radioresistance for patients with unfavorable prostate cancer, a prospective trial of pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) interdigitated with dose-escalating conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy was performed. Methods and Materials: Between November 1991 and August 2000, 207 patients were treated with 46 Gy pelvic EBRT and increasing HDR brachytherapy boost doses (5.50-11.5 Gy/fraction) during 5 weeks. The eligibility criteria were pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level ≥10.0 ng/mL, Gleason score ≥7, or clinical Stage T2b or higher. Patients were divided into 2 dose levels, low-dose biologically effective dose 93 Gy (149 patients). No patient received hormones. We used the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition for biochemical failure. Results: The median age was 69 years. The mean follow-up for the group was 4.4 years, and for the low and high-dose levels, it was 7.0 and 3.4 years, respectively. The actuarial 5-year biochemical control rate was 74%, and the overall, cause-specific, and disease-free survival rate was 92%, 98%, and 68%, respectively. The 5-year biochemical control rate for the low-dose group was 52%; the rate for the high-dose group was 87% (p<0.001). Improvement occurred in the cause-specific survival in favor of the brachytherapy high-dose level (p=0.014). On multivariate analysis, a low-dose level, higher Gleason score, and higher nadir value were associated with increased biochemical failure. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 gastrointestinal/genitourinary complications ranged from 0.5% to 9%. The actuarial 5-year impotency rate was 51%. Conclusion: Pelvic EBRT interdigitated with transrectal ultrasound-guided real-time conformal HDR prostate brachytherapy boost is both a precise dose delivery system and a very effective treatment for unfavorable prostate cancer. We demonstrated an incremental beneficial effect on biochemical control and cause

  4. Strategies to evaluate the impact of rectal volume on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Diniz Fortuna Poli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the rectal volume influence on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Fifty-one patients with prostate cancer underwent a series of three computed tomography scans including an initial planning scan and two subsequent scans during 3D-CRT. The organs of interest were outlined. The prostate contour was compared with the initial CT images considering the anterior, posterior, superior, inferior and lateral edges of the organ. Variations in the anterior limits and volume of the rectum were assessed and correlated with prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction. Results: The maximum range of prostate motion was observed in the superoinferior direction, followed by the anteroposterior direction. A significant correlation was observed between prostate motion and rectal volume variation ( p = 0.037. A baseline rectal volume superior to 70 cm3 had a significant influence on the prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction ( p = 0.045. Conclusion: The present study showed a significant interfraction motion of the prostate during 3D-CRT with greatest variations in the superoinferior and anteroposterior directions, and that a large rectal volume influences the prostate motion with a cutoff value of 70 cm3. Therefore, the treatment of patients with a rectal volume > 70 cm3 should be re-planned with appropriate rectal preparation.

  5. The effectiveness of immobilization during prostate irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentel, Gunilla C.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Sherouse, George W.; Spencer, David P.; Anscher, Mitchell S.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of a hemibody foam cradle on the reproducibility of patient setup during external beam radiation treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1992 and April 1993, 74 patients received external beam radiation treatment to the prostate ± nodes, generally with a four-field box technique. Forty-four of the 74 patients had a custom-made hemibody foam cast used in an attempt to improve setup accuracy. A review of the routine weekly port films was performed following the completion of therapy to determine the reproducibility of patient setup in all 74 patients. The physician's request of an isocenter shift was used as an indicator of reproducibility. Neither the treating technologists nor the physicians knew at the time the films were taken that the port films would be reviewed for setup reproducibility at a later date. The results were compared between the patients treated with (44) and without (30) an immobilization device. Results: In the 44 immobilized patients, 213 routine checks of the isocenter were performed during the 7-week course of radiation therapy. In 17.4% of these instances (37 out of 213), an isocenter shift was requested. This rate is compared to 23.1% (30 out of 130) in the 30 patients who did not have the immobilization device (p < 0.2). There was a statistically significant reduction in isocenter shifts requested in the anterior to posterior direction in the patients who were immobilized, 5.1% (9 out of 175) vs. 12.6% (13 out of 103) (p < 0.05, two tailed chi-square test). There was no significant improvement in the reproducibility of isocenter placement in the cephalad to caudal or right to left directions. Conclusions: This custom-made hemibody foam cradle appears to improve the reproducibility of patient setup during the 7-week course of fractionated external beam irradiation for patients with adenocarcinoma of the prostate. This type of immobilization device is now routinely used in our

  6. Postoperative irradiation in carcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilepich, M.V.; Walz, B.J.; Baglan, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients received postoperative radiotherapy with curative intent following either radical prostatectomy (18 patients) or enucleative prostatectomy (10 patients). In patients undergoing radical prostatectomy, the indications for postoperative radiotherapy included positive margins in 13, close margins in 2, and seminal vesicle involvement in 3 patients. The majority of patients (82%) received total dose to the prostatic bed in excess of 6500 rad. In over 80% of the patients, the pelvic lymphatics are also treated (to a total dose of 4000-5000 rad). All of the patients irradiated after radical prostatectomy clinically remained disease-free locally. Approximately one-half of the patients in both the enucleation and radial prostatectomy groups developed evidence of distant metastases. The complications of treatment have been comparable to those in patients treated with radiotherapy only. The continence status has not been affected significantly. All patients with incontinence following completion of radiotherapy had documented impairment of continence prior to radiotherapy. Postoperative radiotherapy administered following either radical or enucleative prostatectomy was tolerated well and resulted in excellent local control

  7. Conformal radiotherapy to 76 Gy in localized prostate cancer. Therapeutic modalities and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontvert, D.; Mammar, H.; Flam, T.; Debre, B.; Thiounn, N.; Gaboriaud, G.; Jourdan-Da Silvae, N.; Beuzeboc, P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: to describe therapeutic modalities for localized prostate cancer treated by conformal radiation to 76 Gy with or without androgen ablation. To evaluate the preliminary results in terms of survival, biological control and toxicity. Patients and method: between January 1998 and June 2001, 321 patients with localized prostate cancer were irradiated at Institut Curie. Tumors were stratified into the three Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center prognostic groups (1998) for analysis: favorable risk group (F.G.) 23%, intermediate risk group (I.G.) 36.5%, unfavorable risk group (U.G.) 40.5%. Androgen deprivation, mainly neo-adjuvant, less or equal to one year was prescribed to 93.8% of patients (72.6% less or equal to six months). Planning target volume prescription doses were: prostate: 76 Gy, seminal vesicles: 56 to 76 Gy, and pelvic lymph nodes: 44 Gy to 16.8% of patients. Results: the five-year actuarial overall survival was 94% (95% I.C.: 90-97%). The median post-therapeutic follow-up was 36 months (nine to 60 months). The 48-month actuarial rates of biochemical control for the three prognostic groups were statistically different according to both the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus (A.S.T.R.O. 1997) and the Fox Chase Cancer Center definitions of biochemical failure (F.C.C.C. 2000) with respectively 87 and 94% for F.G., 78 and 84% for I.G., 54 and 58% for U.G. (P < 10-6 and P < 10-8). At time of our analysis, late post-treatment rectal and bladder bleedings were 17,4 and 13,6%, respectively. According to a 1-4 scale adapted from M.D. Anderson Cancer Center criteria: rectal bleedings were grade 1 (9.6%), grade 2 (6.2%) and grade 3 (1.6%). Bladder bleedings were grade 2 (13%) and grade 3 (0.6%). Analysis of rectal bleeding risk factors showed significant correlations with pelvic lymph nodes irradiation for grade 2 and 3, (P = 0.02), and for all grades, a correlation with smaller rectal wall volumes (P = 0.03), and greater

  8. Hypo fractionated conformal irradiation of patients with malignant glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboziada, M.A.; Abo-Kresha, A.E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of a conformal irradiation in short fractionation scheme of 49.5 Gy in 15 fractions in an overall time of 3 weeks, in terms of overall survival (OAS) and progression free survival (PFS) rates in brain glioma patients. Patients and methods: A prospective study was conducted on 54 brain glioma patients and was carried out in the Radiation Oncology Department, South Egypt Cancer Institute, Assiut University during the period from April 2006 till June 2009. Patients were treated by hypo fractionated conformal irradiation (49.5 Gy/15 fractions/3 weeks). Results: The median follow up was 23 months (range: 9-39 months). Two-year OAS and PFS rates were 68% and 60%, respectively. In univariate analysis, age > 50 years, poor performance status [Karnofasky score of >40- 50 years and glioblastoma pathology were the only independent prognostic factors that were associated with poor OAS (p = 0.003 and p = 0.004, respectively), and PFS (p = 0.027 and p = 0.011, respectively). Conclusion: Hypo fractionated conformal radiotherapy was as effective as the conventional radiotherapy, with time sparing for patients, and for radiation oncology centers. Hypo fractionated radiotherapy may be considered the radiotherapy regimen of choice in clinical practice for patients with gliomas

  9. Prostate carcinomas; Cancer de la prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toledano, A.; Chauveinc, L.; Flam, T.; Thiounn, N.; Solignac, S.; Timbert, M.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Cosset, J.M.; Ammor, A.; Bonnetain, F.; Brenier, J.P.; Maingon, P.; Peignaux, K.; Truc, G.; Bosset, M.; Crevoisier, R. de; Tucker, S.; Dong, L.; Cheung, R.; Kuban, D.; Azria, D.; Llacer Moscardo, C.; Ailleres, N.; Allaw, A.; Serre, A.; Fenoglietto, P.; Hay, M.H.; Thezenas, S.; Dubois, J.B.; Pommier, P.; Perol, D.; Lagrange, J.L.; Richaud, P.; Brune, D.; Le Prise, E.; Azria, D.; Beckendorf, V.; Chabaud, S.; Carrie, C.; Bosset, M.; Bosset, J.F.; Maingon, P.; Ammor, A.; Crehangen, G.; Truc, G.; Peignaux, K.; Bonnetain, F.; Keros, L.; Bernier, V.; Aletti, P.; Wolf, D.; Marchesia, V.; Noel, A.; Artignan, X.; Fourneret, P.; Bacconier, M.; Shestaeva, O.; Pasquier, D.; Descotes, J.L.; Balosso, J.; Bolla, M.; Burette, R.; Corbusier, A.; Germeau, F.; Crevoisier, R. de; Dong, L.; Bonnen, M.; Cheung, R.; Tucker, S.; Kuban, D.; Crevoisier, R. de; Melancon, A.; Kuban, D.; Cheung, R.; Dong, L.; Peignaux, K.; Brenier, J.P.; Truc, G.; Bosset, M.; Ammor, A.; Barillot, I.; Maingon, P.; Molines, J.C.; Berland, E.; Cornulier, J. de; Coulet-Parpillon, A.; Cohard, C.; Picone, M.; Fourneret, P.; Artignan, X.; Daanen, V.; Gastaldo, J.; Bolla, M.; Collomb, D.; Dusserre, A.; Descotes, J.L.; Troccaz, J.; Giraud, J.Y.; Quero, L.; Hennequin, C.; Ravery, V.; Desgrandschamps, F.; Maylin, C.; Boccon-Gibod, L.; Salem, N.; Bladou, F.; Gravis, G.; Tallet, A.; Simonian, M.; Serment, G.; Salem, N.; Bladou, F.; Gravis, G.; Simonian, M.; Rosello, R.; Serment, G

    2005-11-15

    Some short communications on the prostate carcinoma are given here. The impact of pelvic irradiation, conformation with intensity modulation, association of radiotherapy and chemotherapy reduction of side effects, imaging, doses escalation are such subjects studied and reported. (N.C.)

  10. Three-dimensional conformal breast irradiation in the prone position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kurtman

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The prone position can be used for the planning of adjuvant radiotherapy after conservative breast surgery in order to deliver less irradiation to lung and cardiac tissue. In the present study, we compared the results of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning for five patients irradiated in the supine and prone position. Tumor stage was T1N0M0 in four patients and T1N1M0 in one. All patients had been previously submitted to conservative breast surgery. Breast size was large in three patients and moderate in the other two. Irradiation in the prone position was performed using an immobilization foam pad with a hole cut into it to accommodate the breast so that it would hang down away from the chest wall. Dose-volume histograms showed that mean irradiation doses reaching the ipsilateral lung were 8.3 ± 3.6 Gy with the patient in the supine position and 1.4 ± 1.0 Gy with the patient in the prone position (P = 0.043. The values for the contralateral lung were 1.3 ± 0.7 and 0.3 ± 0.1 Gy (P = 0.043 and the values for cardiac tissue were 4.6 ± 1.6 and 3.0 ± 1.7 Gy (P = 0.079, respectively. Thus, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that lung tissue irradiation was significantly lower with the patient in the prone position than in the supine position. Large-breasted women appeared to benefit most from irradiation in the prone position. Prone position breast irradiation appears to be a simple and effective alternative to the conventional supine position for patients with large breasts, since they are subjected to lower pulmonary doses which may cause less pulmonary side effects in the future.

  11. Low-dose irradiation for controlling prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuttler, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among North American men and the second leading cause of death in those aged 65 and over. The American Cancer Society recommends testing those over age 50 who are expected to live at least 10 years, even though the ability of early detection to decrease prostate cancer mortality has not been demonstrated. So controversy exists about the appropriateness of screening because of the considerable economic and social burden of diagnosing and treating prostate cancer, coupled with the projected large increase in the number of new cases as the population ages. This very important public health issue could be addressed at low cost by total-body low-dose irradiation therapy to stimulate the patient's own defences to prevent and control most cancers, including prostate cancer, with no symptomatic side effects. (author)

  12. Radical irradiation for carcinoma of the prostate | Abratt | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ninety-three patients treated by radical irradiation for stage A2, Band C1 carcinoma of the prostate between 1979 and 1988 at a joint radiotherapy service were reviewed. The average age was 63 years, 84% of the patients were white and on histological examination the tumours were well or moderately differentiated in ...

  13. 3D conformal external beam radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma: an experiment of Instituto do Radium de Campinas with 285 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Ricardo Akiyoshi; Monti, Carlos Roberto; Trevisan, Felipe Amstalden; Jacinto, Alexandre Arthur

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To report the outcomes of 3D conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer in a single institution. Materials and methods: From July 1997 to January 2002, 285 consecutive patients with prostate cancer were submitted to 3D conformal radiation therapy receiving a median dose of 7920 cGy to the prostate, and were retrospectively evaluated. The patients distribution according to the level of risk was the following: low risk - 95 (33.7%); intermediate risk - 66 (23.4%); high risk -121 (42.9%) patients. Results: Median follow-up of 53.6 months (3.6.95.3 months) demonstrated 85.1% actuarial five-year overall survival, 97.0% specific cause survival, 94.2% five-year distant metastasis-free survival, and 75.8% five-year biochemical recurrence-free survival. Rates of five-year actuarial survival free from late rectal and urinary toxicity were 96.4% and 91.1% respectively. Pre-3D conformal radiation therapy transurethral resection of the prostate and doses > 70 Gy in 30% of the bladder volume implied a higher grade 2-3 late urinary toxicity in five years (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.0264, respectively). Conclusion: The first experiment with 3D conformal radiation therapy reported in Brazil allowed high radiation doses with acceptable levels of urinary and rectal toxicity. Pre-3D conformal radiation therapy transurethral resection of prostate may determine a higher risk for post-irradiation grade 2-3 late urinary toxicity. At the tomography planning, the reduction of the radiation dose to . 70 Gy in 30% of the bladder volume may reduce the risk for late urinary complications. (author)

  14. Prostate specific antigen levels after definitive irradiation for carcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellhammer, P.F.; Schlossberg, S.M.; El-Mahdi, A.M.; Wright, G.L.; Brassil, D.N.

    1991-01-01

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels were determined in 78 patients judged clinically to be free of disease at intervals of 36 or more months (range 38 to 186 months, median 87 months) after completion of irradiation therapy by 125-iodine implantation or external beam radiation. Of this select group of patients 38% had undetectable serum PSA levels (0.5 ng./ml. or less) and 38% had PSA levels that were within normal limits (4.0 ng./ml. or less). All stages and grades were represented. Undetectable PSA levels were only rarely found (3%) in patients with carcinoma of the prostate before treatment. In 24 of these 78 patients a negative biopsy of the irradiated prostate had been obtained 18 to 42 months after treatment. When the PSA level was drawn, which ranged from 7 to 16 years after treatment, an equal percentage of these biopsied patients had either an undetectable, normal or elevated level. Irradiation is able to decrease PSA to undetectable levels in some patients with prostatic carcinoma. Whether this reflects suppression of marker production alone or, more importantly, ablation of prostate cancer producing that marker remains to be determined

  15. Free-breathing conformal irradiation of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solla, Ignazio; Zucca, Sergio; Possanzini, Marco; Piras, Sara; Pusceddu, Claudio; Porru, Sergio; Meleddu, Gianfranco; Farace, Paolo

    2013-07-08

    The purpose of this study was to assess treatment margins in free-breathing irradiation of pancreatic cancer after bone alignment, and evaluate their impact on conformal radiotherapy. Fifteen patients with adenocarcinoma of the head of the pancreas underwent implantation of single fiducial marker. Intrafraction uncertainties were assessed on simulation four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) by calculating maximal intrafraction fiducial excursion (MIFE). In the first ten patients, after bony alignment, the position of the fiducial was identified on weekly acquired megavolt cone-beam CT (MV-CBCT). The interfraction residual uncertainties were estimated by measuring the fiducial displacements with respect to the position in the first session. Patient mean (pM) and patient standard deviation (pSD) of fiducial displacement, mean (μM) and standard deviation (μSD) of pM, and root-mean-square of pSD (σ(res)) were calculated. In the other five patients, MIFE was added to the residual component to obtain personalized margin. In these patients, conformal kidney sparing (CONKISS) irradiation was planned prescribing 54/45 Gy to PTV1/PTV2. The organ-at-risk limits were set according to current NCCN recommendation. No morbidity related to the fiducial marker implantation was recorded. In the first ten patients, along right-left, anterior-posterior, and inferior-superior directions, MIFE was variable (mean ± std = 0.24 ± 0.13 cm, 0.31 ± 0.14 cm, 0.83 ± 0.35 cm, respectively) and was at most 0.51, 0.53, and 1.56 cm, respectively. Along the same directions, μM were 0.09, -0.05, -0.05 cm, μSD were 0.30, 0.17, 0.33 cm, and σ(res) were 0.35, 0.26, and 0.30 cm, respectively. MIFE was not correlated with pM and pSD. In the five additional patients, it was possible to satisfy recommended dose limits, with the exception of slightly higher doses to small bowel. After bony alignment, the margins for target expansion can be obtained by adding personalized MIFE to the residual

  16. 3-D conformal HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.; Baltas, D.; Kurek, R.; Roeddiger, S.; Kontova, M.; Anagnostopoulos, G.; Skazikis, G.; Zamboglou, N.; Dannenberg, T.; Buhleier, T.; Tunn, U.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: pilot study to evaluate feasibility, acute toxicity and conformal quality of three-dimensional (3-D) conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer using intraoperative real-time planning. Patients and methods: between 05/2002 and 05/2003, 52 patients with prostate cancer, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≤ 10 ng/ml, Gleason score ≤ 7 and clinical stage ≤ T2a were treated. Median PSA was 6.4 ng/ml and median Gleason score 5. 24/52 patients had stage T1c and 28/52 stage T2a. For transrectal ultrasound-(TRUS-)guided transperineal implantation of flexible plastic needles into the prostate, the real-time HDR planning system SWIFT trademark was used. After implantation, CT-based 3-D postplanning was performed. All patients received one implant for four fractions of HDR brachytherapy in 48 h using a reference dose (D ref ) of 9.5 Gy to a total dose of 38.0 Gy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed to evaluate the conformal quality of each implant using D 90 , D 10 urethra, and D 10 rectum. Acute toxicity was evaluated using the CTC (common toxicity criteria) scales. Results: median D 90 was 106% of D ref (range: 93-115%), median D 10 urethra 159% of D ref (range: 127-192%), and median D 10 rectum 55% of D ref (range: 35-68%). Median follow-up is currently 8 months. In 2/52 patients acute grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was observed. No gastrointestinal toxicity > grade 1 occurred. Conclusion: 3-D conformal HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy using intraoperative real-time planning is a feasible and highly conformal treatment for localized prostate cancer associated with minimal acute toxicity. Longer follow-up is needed to evaluate late toxicity and biochemical control. (orig.)

  17. Localized field conformation radiotherapy combined with endocrine therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Kaizu, Toshihide; Kurosaki, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Yoshiaki

    1999-01-01

    To improve the quality of life (QOL) of the patients with prostate cancer, we limit the radiotherapy target volume to the prostate and seminal vesicles while using endocrine therapy towards the disease outside the target volume. Radiotherapy technique was rotation conformation technique with computer-controlled multileaf collimators to the total doses of up to 66-70 Gy. Among 145 evaluable cases with the median age of 74, overall and cause-specific 5-year survival rates were 59.3% and 84.1%, respectively, and the relative survival rate of the Stage A-C cases was 100%. The two thirds (33/50) of the deaths were not of prostate cancer. The rate of severe complication was 1.4%. As for QOL, the rate of impotence was 90%, however, the patients' overall satisfaction towards the treatment was 90%. From this analysis, this combined treatment seems beneficial in the treatment of prostate cancer. (author)

  18. Ultrasound-guided high dose rate conformal brachytherapy boost in prostate cancer: treatment description and preliminary results of a phase I/II clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stromberg, Jannifer; Martinez, Alvaro; Gonzalez, Jose; Edmundson, Gregory; Ohanian, Neshan; Vicini, Frank; Hollander, Jay; Gustafson, Gary; Spencer, William; Di, Yan; Brabbins, Donald

    1995-08-30

    Purpose: To improve results for locally advanced prostate cancer, a prospective clinical trial of concurrent external beam irradiation and fractionated iridium-192 (Ir-192) high dose rate (HDR) conformal boost brachytherapy was initiated. Methods and Materials: Between November 1991 and February 1994, 99 implants were performed on 33 patients with prostatic adenocarcinoma at William Beaumont Hospital. Using AJCC staging criteria, 9 patients had T2b tumors, 17 patients had T2c tumors, and 7 patients had T3 disease. Patients were treated with (a) 45.6 Gy whole pelvis external irradiation and (b) three HDR fractions of 5.5 Gy each (18 patients) or 6 Gy each (15 patients) to the prostate. Transperineal needle implants using real-time ultrasound guidance with interactive on-line isodose distributions were performed on an outpatient basis during weeks 1, 2, and 3 of external irradiation. Acute toxicity was scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) morbidity grading system. Results: This technique of concurrent external pelvic irradiation and conformal HDR brachytherapy was well tolerated. No significant intraoperative or perioperative complications occurred. Three patients (9%) experienced Grade 3 acute toxicity (two dysuria and one diarrhea). All toxicities were otherwise Grades 1 or 2 and were primarily as expected from pelvic external irradiation. Persistent implant-related toxicities included Grades 1-2 perineal pain (12%) and hematospermia (15%). Median follow-up time was 13 months. Serum prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) levels normalized in 91% of patients (29 out of 32) within 1-14 months (median 2.8 months) after irradiation. PSA levels were progressively decreasing in the other three patients at last measurement. Prospectively planned prostatic rebiopsies done at 18 months in the first 10 patients were negative in 9 out of 10 (90%). Conclusions: Acute toxicity has been acceptable with this unique approach using conformal high dose rate Ir-192

  19. Late rectal symptoms and quality of life after conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geinitz, Hans; Zimmermann, Frank B.; Thamm, Reinhard; Erber, Caroline; Mueller, Tobias; Keller, Monika; Busch, Raymonde; Molls, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study was carried out in order to analyze the prevalence of late rectal and anal symptoms after conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer and to assess their association with quality of life. Patients and methods: Two-hundred and forty nine patients were interviewed at 24-111 months after definitive conformal radiation therapy of localized prostate cancer with a median dose of 70 Gy. Rectal symptoms and fecal incontinence were evaluated with standardized questionnaires. Quality of life was assessed with the EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire-C30 and the prostate cancer module PR25. Results: Rectal symptoms were mostly intermittent. Daily symptoms occurred in ≤5% of the patients. Incontinence was mostly mild with only 3% of the patients reporting daily incontinence episodes. Quality of life was comparable to that of the male German general population except that cognitive functioning and diarrhea were worse in the study population and pain was worse in the reference population. Global quality of life was associated with fecal incontinence, fecal urge, tenesmus, therapy for rectal symptoms and hormonal therapy for biochemical/clinical recurrence. Conclusions: Rectal symptoms and fecal incontinence after conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer are mostly intermittent. Fecal incontinence, fecal urge and tenesmus are associated with lower global quality of life levels

  20. Clinical feasibility study for the use of implanted gold seeds in the prostate as reliable positioning markers during megavoltage irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehnad, Homan; Nederveen, Aart J.; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Moorselaar, R. Jeroen A. van; Hofman, Pieter; Lagendijk, Jan J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using gold seed implants in the prostate for position verification, using an a-Si flat panel imager as a detector during megavoltage irradiation of prostate carcinoma. This is a study to guarantee positioning accuracy in intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and materials: Ten patients with localized prostate carcinoma (T2-3) received between one and three fiducial gold markers in the prostate. All patients were treated with 3-D conformal radiotherapy with an anterior-posterior (AP) and two lateral wedge fields. The acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were scored using common toxicity criteria scales (CTC). Using three consecutive CT scans and portal images obtained during the treatment we have studied the occurrence of any change in prostate shape (deformation), seed migration and the magnitude of translations and rotations of the prostate. Results: We observed no acute major complications for prostate irradiation regarding the seed implantation. The maximum acute GU toxicity grade 2 (dysuria and frequency) was observed in seven patients during the treatment. The maximum grade 2 (diarrhoea) was scored in two patients regarding the acute GI toxicities. No significant prostate deformation could be detected in the consecutive CT scans. It appeared that the distances between the markers only slightly changed during treatment (S.D. 0.5 mm). Random prostate translations were (1 S.D.) 2.1, 3.2 and 2.2 mm in the lateral (LR), AP and cranial-caudal (CC) directions, respectively, whereas systematic translations were 3.3, 4.8 and 3.5 mm in the LR, AP and CC directions, respectively. Random prostate rotations were (1 S.D.) 3.6, 1.7 and 1.9 deg. around the LR, AP and CC axis, respectively, whereas systematic rotations were 4.7, 2.0 and 2.7 deg. around the LR, AP and CC axis, respectively. Conclusions: We found that the fiducial gold seeds are a safe and appropriate

  1. The comparison of 5-field conformal radiotherapy techniques for the treatment of prostate cancer: The best for femoral head sparing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zare, Mahkameh; Lashkari, Marzieh; Ghalehtaki, Reza; Ghasemi, Arash; Dehghan Manshadi, Hamidreza; Mir, Ali; Noorollahi, Somayeh; Alamolhoda, Mahboobeh

    2016-01-01

    External radiotherapy is a standard treatment procedure for localized prostate cancer. Given the relatively high long term survival treatment complications have been brought in center of attention. In this planning study, between 2012 and 2014, CT simulation data of 90 consecutive high-risk prostate cancer patients were collected. In the first phase, all were planned for whole pelvis irradiation up to 46Gy in 23 daily fractions. In the second phase, only the prostate gland was the target of radiation. Next, the subjects were divided randomly into three groups and each received a unique 5field conformal radiation plan including Plan A (Gantry angle: 0, 60, 120, 240, and 300), Plan B (Gantry angles: 0, 90, 120, 240, and 270) and Plan C (Gantry angles: 0, 60, 90, 270, and 300). The total dose was 70Gy. For each patient, the rectum, bladder, and both femoral heads were contoured as the at risk organs (OAR). From dose volume histograms, the proportional dose of PTV V100, the bladder and rectum V80 and V90 and femoral head V50 and V100 were calculated in all subjects and compared across plans. A statistically significant difference in the femoral head V50 and V100 was found between our studied 5field plans so that in Plan A (beam angles: 0, 60, 120, 240 and 300) less dose was received by both heads of femur. This study suggests that 5 field treatment planning including an anterior, two anterior oblique and two posterior oblique portals to be more proper for 3D conformal radiotherapy in order to spare femoral head with acceptable PTV coverage, and bladder and rectal doses.

  2. Variation of clinical target volume definition in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valicenti, Richard K.; Sweet, John W.; Hauck, Walter W.; Hudes, Richard S.; Lee, Tony; Dicker, Adam P.; Waterman, Frank M.; Anne, Pramila R.; Corn, Benjamin W.; Galvin, James M.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Currently, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) planning relies on the interpretation of computed tomography (CT) axial images for defining the clinical target volume (CTV). This study investigates the variation among multiple observers to define the CTV used in 3D-CRT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Seven observers independently delineated the CTVs (prostate ± seminal vesicles [SV]) from the CT simulation data of 10 prostate cancer patients undergoing 3D-CRT. Six patients underwent CT simulation without the use of contrast material and serve as a control group. The other 4 had urethral and bladder opacification with contrast medium. To determine interobserver variation, we evaluated the derived volume, the maximum dimensions, and the isocenter for each examination of CTV. We assessed the reliability in the CTVs among the observers by correlating the variation for each class of measurements. This was estimated by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), with 1.00 defining absolute correlation. Results: For the prostate volumes, the ICC was 0.80 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.56-0.96). This changed to 0.92 (95% CI: 0.75-0.99) with the use of contrast material. Similarly, the maximal prostatic dimensions were reliable and improved. There was poor agreement in defining the SV. For this structure, the ICC never exceeded 0.28. The reliability of the isocenter was excellent, with the ICC exceeding 0.83 and 0.90 for the prostate ± SV, respectively. Conclusions: In 3D-CRT for prostate cancer, there was excellent agreement among multiple observers to define the prostate target volume but poor agreement to define the SV. The use of urethral and bladder contrast improved the reliability of localizing the prostate. For all CTVs, the isocenter was very reliable and should be used to compare the variation in 3D dosimetry among multiple observers

  3. External beam radiotherapy of localized prostatic adenocarcinoma. Evaluation of conformal therapy, field number and target margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennernaes, B.; Rikner, G.; Letocha, H.; Nilsson, S.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify factors of importance in the planning of external beam radiotherapy of prostatic adenocarcinoma. Seven patients with urogenital cancers were planned for external radiotherapy of the prostate. Four different techniques were used, viz. a 4-field box technique and four-, five- or six-field conformal therapy set-ups combined with three different margins (1-3 cm). The evaluations were based on the doses delivered to the rectum and the urinary bladder. A normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) was calculated for each plan using Lyman's dose volume reduction method. The most important factors that resulted in a decrease of the dose delivered to the rectum and the bladder were the use of conformal therapy and smaller margins. Conformal therapy seemed more important for the dose distribution in the urinary bladder. Five- and six-field set-ups were not significantly better than those with four fields. NTCP calculations were in accordance with the evaluation of the dose volume histograms. To conclude, four-field conformal therapy utilizing reduced margins improves the dose distribution to the rectum and the urinary bladder in the radiotherapy of prostatic adenocarcinoma. (orig.)

  4. Prostate cancer: experience with definitive irradiation in the aged

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, N.; Bodner, H.; Broth, E.

    1985-01-01

    When considering therapeutic options for localized prostate cancer, stage and grade of disease have been the most important determinants. In the elderly, the nominal age has assumed increasing importance in the final decision. A balanced judgment must be reached between the patient's normal life expectancy and the rapidity with which the cancer may be expected to express its malignant potential. By careful attention to patient selection and the details of treatment, definitive irradiation can improve quality of life and survival. Of 63 patients aged seventy-three to ninety years referred for irradiation, 56 were found medically suitable for definitive treatment. A review of the authors experience is presented

  5. Incidence of and factors related to late complications in conformal and conventional radiation treatment of cancer of the prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultheiss, Timothy E; Hanks, Gerald E; Hunt, Margie A; Lee, W Robert

    1995-06-15

    Purpose: The fundament hypothesis of conformal radiation therapy is that tumor control can be increased by using conformal treatment techniques that allow a higher tumor dose while maintaining an acceptable level of complications. To test this hypothesis, it is necessary first to estimate the incidence of morbidity for both standard and conformal fields. In this study, we examine factors that influence the incidence of late Grade 3 and 4 morbidity in patients treated with conformal and standard radiation treatment for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Six hundred sixteen consecutive patients treated with conformal or standard techniques between 1986 and 1994 to doses greater than 65 Gy and with more than 3 months follow-up were analyzed. No patients treated with prostatectomies were included in the analysis. The conformal technique includes special immobilization by a cast, careful identification of the target volume in three dimensions, localization of the inferior border of the prostate using a retrograde urethrogram, and individually shaped portals that conform to the Planning Target Volume (PTV). Multivariate analysis using a proportional hazards model compares differences in the incidence of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Center Treatment (RTOG/EORTC) Grade 3 and 4 late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) morbidity by technique, T-stage, grade, age, hormonal treatment, irradiated volume, dose, and comorbid conditions. Grade 3 rectal bleeding was defined as requiring three or more cautery procedures. Results: The overall actuarial incidence of genitourinary (GU) toxicities at 5 years was 3.4%, with the crude incidence being six cases in 616 patients satisfying the selection criteria; for gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities, the overall actuarial incidence was 2.7%, with the crude incidence being 13 cases out of 616 patients. The average time to complication for our patients was 12.8 months for GI toxicity and

  6. Late rectal toxicity: dose-volume effects of conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Eugene H.; Pollack, Alan; Levy, Larry; Starkschall, George; Lei Dong; Rosen, Isaac; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric, anatomic, and clinical factors that correlate with late rectal toxicity after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the dose-volume histograms and clinical records of 163 Stage T1b-T3c prostate cancer patients treated between 1992 and 1999 with 3D-CRT, to a total isocenter dose of 74-78 Gy at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The median follow-up was 62 months (range 24-102). All late rectal complications were scored using modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force criteria. The 6-year toxicity rate was assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis and the log-rank test. A univariate proportional hazards regression model was used to test the correlation between Grade 2 or higher toxicity and the dosimetric, anatomic, and clinical factors. In a multivariate regression model, clinical factors were added to the dosimetric and anatomic variables to determine whether they significantly altered the risk of developing late toxicity. Results: At 6 years, the rate of developing Grade 2 or higher late rectal toxicity was 25%. A significant volume effect was observed at rectal doses of 60, 70, 75.6, and 78 Gy, and the risk of developing rectal complications increased exponentially as greater volumes were irradiated. Although the percentage of rectal volume treated correlated significantly with the incidence of rectal complications at all dose levels (p 3 of the rectum. Of the clinical variables tested, only a history of hemorrhoids correlated with rectal toxicity (p=0.003). Multivariate analysis showed that the addition of hemorrhoids increased the risk of toxicity for each dosimetric variable found to be significant on univariate analysis (p<0.05 for all comparisons). Conclusion: Dose-volume histogram analyses clearly indicated a volume effect on the probability of developing late rectal complications

  7. Conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer: contribution of pelvic immobilization and new fiducial markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, R.; Oozeer, R.; Le Thanh, H.; Chauvet, B.; Toy, B.J.; Reboul, F.

    1997-01-01

    To reduce errors in the positioning of patients treated with external conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, we evaluated both the use of an immobilization device and new fiducial markers. The immobilization device consisted of an individual mold made of polyurethane foam. Two sets of skin markers located on the anterior tibial surfaces were used to identify the pelvic isocenter. The patient's position was evaluated by orthogonal port film which were then compared with the original simulation film. Results are presented with respect to orthogonal axes. Comparison with classic procedures without immobilization showed that use of the mold and new fiducial markers led to a decrease in set-up errors which were less than 5 mm. With the use of an immobilization device and optimized techniques for patients' positioning, conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer is more accurate. (authors)

  8. Anal wall sparing effect of an endorectal balloon in 3D conformal and intensity-modulated prostate radiotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeenk, R.J.; Lin, E.N.J.T. van; Kollenburg, P. van; Kunze-Busch, M.C.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To investigate the anal wall (Awall) sparing effect of an endorectal balloon (ERB) in 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 24 patients with localized prostate carcinoma, two planning

  9. Hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy in locally advanced prostate cancer: results of a dose escalation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.; Duclos, Marie; Shamsa, Falah; Porter, Arthur T.; Orton, Colin

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This study was initiated to assess the incidence of chronic complications and histologic and biochemical control following hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between October 1991 and October 1994, 49 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were entered on the first two dose levels of a prospective dose-escalation study using hyperfractionated three dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The first 25 patients received a minimum tumor dose of 78 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles in 6 weeks at 1.3 Gy, b.i.d. No increase in chronic toxicity compared with conventional radiotherapy was noted; therefore, an additional 24 patients were treated to a minimum tumor dose of 82.8 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles in 7 weeks at 1.15 Gy, b.i.d. Toxicity was scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity grading scale. Efficacy was assessed through scheduled postradiation prostate specific antigen values and ultrasound-guided biopsies. The median follow-up for the entire group was 20 months. Results: The hyperfractionated external radiation was well tolerated with minimal acute morbidity. At 30 months, the actuarial probability of Grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity was 17%. At 30 months, the actuarial probability of Grade 2 genitourinary toxicity was 16%. There was no statistically significant difference between the two dose levels. No Grade 3 or 4 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity was noted. At 12 months, 84% of patients had a prostate specific antigen ≤ 4; and 53%; ≤ 1 ng/ml. At 12 months, 71% of patients had post radiation biopsies that were either negative (55%) or showed a marked therapeutic effect (16%). Conclusion: The use of hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy facilitated dose escalation with no increase in chronic toxicity compared to standard doses. The initial tumor response based on prostate specific antigen measurements and

  10. Evaluation of homogeneity and dose conformity in IMRT planning in prostate radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Juliane S.; Leidens, Matheus; Estacio, Daniela R.; Razera, Ricardo A.Z.; Streck, Elaine E.; Silva, Ana M.M. da

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the dose distribution homogeneity and conformity of radiation therapy plans of prostate cancer using IMRT. Data from 34 treatment plans of Hospital Sao Lucas of PUCRS, where those plans were executed, were retrospectively analyzed. All of them were done with 6MV X-rays from a linear accelerator CLINAC IX, and the prescription doses varied between 60 and 74 Gy. Analyses showing the homogeneity and conformity indices for the dose distribution of those plans were made. During these analyses, some comparisons with the traditional radiation therapy planning technic, the 3D-CRT, were discussed. The results showed that there is no correlation between the prescribed dose and the homogeneity and conformity indices, indicating that IMRT works very well even for higher doses. Furthermore, a comparison between the results obtained and the recommendations of ICRU 83 was carried out. It has also been observed that the indices were really close to the ideal values. 82.4% of the cases showed a difference below 5% of the ideal value for the index of conformity, and 88.2% showed a difference below 10% for the homogeneity index. Concluding, it is possible to confirm the quality of the analyzed radiation therapy plans of prostate cancer using IMRT. (author)

  11. Conformal radiation therapy with or without intensity modulation in the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maingon, P.; Truc, G.; Bosset, M.; Peignaux, K.; Ammor, A.; Bolla, M.

    2005-01-01

    Conformal radiation therapy has now to be considered as a standard treatment of localized prostatic adenocarcinomas. Using conformational methods and intensity modulated radiation therapy requires a rigorous approach for their implementation in routine, focused on the reproducibility of the treatment, target volume definitions, dosimetry, quality control, setup positioning. In order to offer to the largest number of patients high-dose treatment, the clinicians must integrate as prognostic factors accurate definition of microscopic extension as well as the tolerance threshold of critical organs. High-dose delivery is expected to be most efficient in intermediary risks and locally advanced diseases. Intensity modulated radiation therapy is specifically dedicated to dose escalation. Perfect knowledge of classical constraints of conformal radiation therapy is required. Using such an approach in routine needs a learning curve including the physicists and a specific quality assurance program. (author)

  12. Interstitial gold and external beam irradiation for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boileau, M.A.; Dowling, R.A.; Gonzales, M.; Handel, P.H.; Benson, G.S.; Corriere, J.N. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    We treated 65 patients with prostatic cancer confined clinically to the prostate or periprostatic area during an 8-year period. Seven patients had stage A2, 38 stage B and 20 stage C disease. All 65 patients underwent staging pelvic lymphadenectomy and implantation of gold grains into the prostate (mean dose 3,167 rad). A total of 64 patients then completed a course of external beam irradiation to a mean total tumor dose of 6,965 rad. Complications of therapy were mild and limited (less than 3 months in duration) in most patients, and they included radiation cystitis (32 per cent), diarrhea (31 per cent), extremity lymphedema (7.7 per cent) and wound infection (3 per cent). Two patients suffered urinary incontinence after therapy and 2 (3 per cent) had diarrhea more than 3 months in duration. The actuarial 5-year survival rate for all patients was 87 per cent and the 5-year survival free of disease was 72 per cent

  13. Is there an increased risk of second primaries following prostate irradiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movsas, Benjamin; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Pinover, Wayne; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the risk of developing a second primary cancer following prostate irradiation compared to the underlying risk in patients with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: The baseline rate of secondary cancers following prostate cancer was obtained from a study of 18,135 patients from the Connecticut Tumor Registry, of whom only 12.5% received radiotherapy. These patients, with a mean age of 72 and a mean follow-up of 3.9 years, were compared to a cohort of 543 patients (median age 70) with similar follow-up (median 3.9 years), all of whom were treated with definitive radiotherapy at Fox Chase Cancer Center. The possible association between various covariates (age, dose, palpation stage, field size, Gleason score, pretreatment PSA) and the development of a secondary cancer was assessed. Results: 1,053 of 18,135 patients (5.8%) in the Connecticut Tumor Registry developed a second primary cancer compared with 31 of 543 (5.7%) patients treated with prostate radiation (p = 0.99). Although this risk increases gradually over time, it is not significantly different, at any time period, between the two groups of patients. Of the 31 secondary primaries in the irradiated group, 82% had a history of tobacco and/or alcohol use. Only melanomas were significantly increased compared to the expected rate in an age-matched population (p <0.001). Five of the 31 secondary cancers occurred within the radiation field (four bladder, one colon), four within 3 years and only one occurred 9 years after radiotherapy. No association was found between age (<70 vs. ≥70 and as a continuous variable), dose (<74 vs. ≥74 Gy), palpation stage (< T2C vs. ≥T2C), field size (prostate vs. pelvic), radiation technique (conventional vs. conformal), Gleason score (2-6 vs. 7-10), or pretreatment PSA (<15 vs. ≥15 and as a continuous variable) and the risk of developing a second primary. Although a lower radiation dose (as a continuous variable) correlated with an increased risk of

  14. Conformal radiation therapy of localized prostate cancer: acute tolerance and early evaluation of effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zierhut, D.; Flentje, M.; Sroka-Perez, G.; Rudat, V.; Engenhart-Cabillic, R.; Wannenmacher, M.

    1997-01-01

    Aim: In a prospective trial early effectiveness and acute toxicity of conformal 3D-planned radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer was quantified using dose-volume-histogramms and evaluated with respect of treatment technique. Results: Eleven patients (of 32) had none, 15 mild (RTOG grade 1) and 6 moderate symptoms (RTOG grade 2, mainly diarrhoea, dysuria and polyuria). Acute complications leading to treatment interruption did not occur. In 16 patients symptoms disappeared within 6 weeks after radiotherapy. Only 2 men had symptoms which lasted longer than 3 months and were endoscopically examined. Up to now no late complications were detected. Incidence and severity of toxicity was significantly (p [de

  15. A strategy to correct for intrafraction target translation in conformal prostate radiotherapy: Simulation results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keall, P. J.; Lauve, A. D.; Hagan, M. P.; Siebers, J. V.

    2007-01-01

    A strategy is proposed in which intrafraction internal target translation is corrected for by repositioning the multileaf collimator position aperture to conform to the new target pose in the beam projection, and the beam monitor units are adjusted to account for the change in the geometric relationship between the target and the beam. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric stability of the prostate and critical structures in the presence of internal target translation using the dynamic compensation strategy. Twenty-five previously treated prostate cancer patients were replanned using a four-field conformal technique to deliver 72 Gy to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV). Internal translation was introduced by displacing the prostate PTV (no rotation or deformation was considered). Thirty-six randomly selected isotropic displacements of magnitude 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 cm were sampled for each patient, for a total of 3600 errors. Due to their anatomic relation to the prostate, the rectum and bladder contours were also moved with the same magnitude and direction as the prostate. The dynamic compensation strategy was used to correct each of these errors by conforming the beam apertures to the new target pose and adjusting the monitor units using inverse-square and off-axis factor corrections. The dynamic compensation strategy plans were then compared to the original treatment plans via dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Changes of more than 5% of the prescription dose (3.6 Gy) were deemed clinically significant. Compared to the original treatment plans, the dynamic compensation strategy produced small discrepancies in isodose distributions and DVH analyses for all structures considered apart from the femoral heads. These differences increased with the magnitude of the internal motion. Coverage of the PTV was excellent: D 5 , D 95 , and D mean were not increased or decreased by more than 5% of the prescription dose for any of the 3600

  16. Modification of parotids in case of conformal ORL irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louvel, G.; Lafond, C.; Manens, J.P.; Jouyaux, F.; Williaume, D.; Le Prise, E.; Crevoisier, R. de; Cazoulat, G.; Simon, A.; Haigron, P.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study is to analyze the anatomical modifications of the parotids in case of tumors irradiation of the O.R.L. area. In case of irradiation of the O.R.L. area the parotids reduce about one third of their volume, by moving inwards and backwards. The dose received by these glands at the end of irradiation can be different from this one initially planned. (N.C.)

  17. Volume and hormonal effects for acute side effects of rectum and bladder during conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeters, Stephanie T.H.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Slot, Annerie; Tabak, Hans; Koper, Peter C.M.; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric variables predictive of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity and to determine whether hormonal therapy (HT) is independently associated with acute GI and GU toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated with conformal radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: This analysis was performed on 336 patients participating in a multicenter (four hospitals) randomized trial comparing 68 Gy and 78 Gy. The clinical target volume consisted of the prostate with or without the seminal vesicles, depending on the risk of seminal vesicle involvement. The margin from the clinical target volume to the planning target volume was 1 cm. For these patients, the treatment plan for a total dose of 68 Gy was used, because nearly all toxicity appeared before the onset of the 10-Gy boost. Acute toxicity ( 3 months before RT). Results: Acute GI toxicity Grade 2 or worse was seen in 46% of the patients. Patients with long-term neoadjuvant HT experienced less Grade 2 or worse toxicity (27%) compared with those receiving short-term neoadjuvant HT (50%) and no HT (50%). The volumes of the prostate and seminal vesicles were significantly smaller in both groups receiving neoadjuvant HT compared with those receiving no HT. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, including the two statistically significant clinical variables neoadjuvant HT and hospital, a volume effect was found for the relative, as well as absolute, rectal wall volumes exposed to intermediate and high doses. Of all the length parameters, the relative rectal length irradiated to doses of ≥5 Gy and ≥30 Gy and absolute lengths receiving ≥5-15 and 30 Gy were significant. Acute GU toxicity Grade 2 or worse was reported in 56% of cases. For patients with pretreatment GU symptoms, the rate was 93%. The use of short-term and long-term neoadjuvant HT resulted in more GU toxicity (73% and 71%) compared with no HT (50%). In multivariate analysis, containing the variables

  18. [Technique of complex mammary irradiation: Mono-isocentric 3D conformational radiotherapy and helical tomotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandendorpe, B; Guilbert, P; Champagne, C; Antoni, T; Nguyen, T D; Gaillot-Petit, N; Servagi Vernat, S

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the dosimetric contribution of helical tomotherapy for breast cancers compared with conformal radiotherapy in mono-isocentric technique. For 23 patients, the dosimetric results in mono-isocentric 3D conformational radiotherapy did not satisfy the constraints either of target volumes nor organs at risk. A prospective dosimetric comparison between mono-isocentric 3D conformational radiotherapy and helical tomotherapy was therefore carried out. The use of helical tomotherapy showed a benefit in these 23 patients, with either an improvement in the conformity index or homogeneity, but with an increase in low doses. Of the 23 patients, two had pectus excavatum, five had past thoracic irradiation and two required bilateral irradiation. The other 14 patients had a combination of morphology and/or indication of lymph node irradiation. For these patients, helical tomotherapy was therefore preferred to mono-isocentric 3D conformational radiotherapy. Tomotherapy appears to provide better homogeneity and tumour coverage. This technique of irradiation may be justified in the case of morphological situations such as pectus exavatum and in complex clinical situations. In other cases, conformal radiotherapy in mono-isocentric technique remains to be favoured. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Longitudinal Study of Intestinal Symptoms and Fecal Continence in Patients With Conformal Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geinitz, Hans; Thamm, Reinhard; Keller, Monika; Astner, Sabrina T.; Heinrich, Christine; Scholz, Christian; Pehl, Christian; Kerndl, Simone; Prause, Nina; Busch, Raymonde; Molls, Michael; Zimmermann, Frank B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the intestinal symptoms and fecal continence in patients who had undergone conformal radiotherapy (CRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 78 men who had undergone definitive CRT for prostate cancer were evaluated. The patients were assessed before, during (treatment Weeks 4 and 6), and 2, 12, and 24 months after CRT completion. The intestinal symptoms and fecal continence were evaluated with comprehensive standardized questionnaires. Results: The intestinal symptoms were mostly intermittent, with only a small minority of patients affected daily. Defecation pain, fecal urge, and rectal mucous discharge increased significantly during therapy. Defecation pain and rectal mucous discharge had returned to baseline levels within 8 weeks and 1 year after CRT, respectively. However, fecal urge remained significantly elevated for ≤1 year and then returned toward the pretreatment values. The prevalence of rectal bleeding was significantly elevated 2 years after CRT. Fecal continence deteriorated during CRT and remained impaired at 1 year after treatment. Incontinence was mostly minor, occurring less than once per week and predominantly affecting incontinence for gas. Conclusion: Intestinal symptoms and fecal incontinence increased during prostate CRT. Except for rectal bleeding, the intestinal symptoms, including fecal incontinence, returned to baseline levels within 1-2 years after CRT. Thus, the rate of long-term late radiation-related intestinal toxicity was low.

  20. Intraoperative real-time planned conformal prostate brachytherapy: Post-implantation dosimetric outcome and clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Cohen, Gil'ad N.; Sharma, Neha; Shippy, Alison M.; Fridman, David; Zaider, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report the dosimetric outcome of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with I-125 permanent implantation using an intraoperative real-time conformal planning technique. Methods and materials: Five hundred and sixty-two patients with prostate cancer were treated with I-125 permanent interstitial implantation using a transrectal ultrasound-guided approach. Real-time intraoperative treatment planning software that incorporates inverse planning optimization was used. Dose-volume constraints for this inverse-planning system included: prostate V100 ≥95%, maximal urethral dose ≤120%, and average rectal dose 3 of the rectum was exposed to the prescription dose, the incidence of late grade 2 toxicity rectal toxicity was 9% compared to 4% for smaller volumes of the rectum exposed to similar doses (p = 0.003). No dosimetric parameter in these patients with tight dose confines for the urethra influenced acute or late urinary toxicity. Conclusion: Real-time intraoperative planning was associated with a 90% consistency of achieving the planned intraoperative dose constraints for target coverage and maintaining planned urethral and rectal constraints in a high percentage of implants. Rectal volumes of ≥2.5 cm 3 exposed to the prescription doses were associated with an increased incidence of grade 2 rectal bleeding. Further enhancements in imaging guidance for optimal seed deposition are needed to guarantee optimal dose distribution for all patients. Whether such improvements lead to further reduction in acute and late morbidities associated with therapy requires further study

  1. A critical evaluation of the planning target volume for 3-d conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinger, Alfred; Michalski, Jeff M.; Cheng, Abel; Low, Daniel A.; Zhu, Ron; Bosch, Walter R.; Purdy, James A.; Perez, Carlos A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The goal was to determine an adequate planning target volume (PTV) margin for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) of prostate cancer. The uncertainty in the internal positions of the prostate and seminal vesicles and the uncertainty in the treatment set-ups for a single group of patients was measured. Methods: Weekly computed tomography (CT) scans of the pelvis (n=38) and daily electronic portal images (n=1225) were reviewed for six patients who received seven-field 3D CRT for prostate cancer. The weekly CT scans were registered in three dimensions to the original treatment planning CT scan using commercially available software. This registration permitted measurement of the motion in the center-of-volume (COV) of the prostate and seminal vesicles throughout the course of therapy. The daily portal images (PI) were registered to the corresponding simulation films to measure the set-up displacement for each of the seven fields. The field displacements were then entered into a matrix program which calculated the isocenter displacement by a least squares method. The uncertainty in the internal positions of the prostate and seminal vesicles (standard deviation of the motions) was added to the uncertainty in the set-up (standard deviation of the isocenter displacements) in quadrature to arrive at a total uncertainty. Positive directions were defined in the left, anterior, and superior directions. A discussion of an adequate PTV was based on these results. Results: The mean magnitude of motion for the COV of the prostate ± the standard deviation was 0 ± 1 mm in the left-right (LR) direction, 0.5 ± 2.8 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction, and 0.5 ± 3.5 mm in the superior-inferior (SI) direction. The mean magnitude of motion for the COV of the seminal vesicles ± the standard deviation was -0.3 ± 1.5 mm in the LR, 0.6 ± 4.1 mm in the AP, and 0.7 ± 2.3 mm in the SI directions, respectively. For all patients the mean isocenter

  2. Longitudinal analysis of quality of life in patients receiving conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geinitz, Hans; Thamm, Reinhard; Scholz, Christian; Heinrich, Christine; Prause, Nina; Kerndl, Simone; Molls, Michael; Zimmermann, Frank B.; Keller, Monika; Busch, Raymonde

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess quality of life (QoL) in patients receiving conformal radiation therapy (CRT) for prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: 78 men with definitive CRT for prostate cancer were entered into the study. Patients were assessed before CRT, at 40 and 60 Gy, and 2, 12 and 24 months after the end of treatment. QoL was assessed using the EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and the prostate module PR25. Changes in mean QoL scores with time of ≥ 10 points were considered clinically relevant. Results: Global QoL did not change statistically significant during CRT and was slightly above baseline levels during follow-up. CRT had a statistically significant negative short-term impact on role functioning, fatigue, and PR25 urinary symptoms. The scores recovered within 2 months to 1 year after CRT. Emotional functioning and social functioning scores slightly increased during and after CRT. Role functioning decreased by > 10 points at 60 Gy and urinary symptoms decreased by > 10 points at 40 and 60 Gy. All other differences were < 10 points. A high number of concomitant diseases and having no children were negative pretreatment predictors for long-term global QoL. Conclusion: Definitive CRT for prostate cancer does not compromise global QoL during therapy and up to 2 years after treatment. It has a limited negative effect on role functioning, urinary symptoms and, to a lesser extent, on fatigue with restitution within 2 months to 1 year after treatment. (orig.)

  3. Longitudinal analysis of quality of life in patients receiving conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geinitz, Hans; Thamm, Reinhard; Scholz, Christian; Heinrich, Christine; Prause, Nina; Kerndl, Simone; Molls, Michael; Zimmermann, Frank B. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Keller, Monika [Psychooncology Section, Dept. of Psychosomatic and General Clinical Medicine, Univ. Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Busch, Raymonde [Inst. of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To prospectively assess quality of life (QoL) in patients receiving conformal radiation therapy (CRT) for prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: 78 men with definitive CRT for prostate cancer were entered into the study. Patients were assessed before CRT, at 40 and 60 Gy, and 2, 12 and 24 months after the end of treatment. QoL was assessed using the EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and the prostate module PR25. Changes in mean QoL scores with time of {>=} 10 points were considered clinically relevant. Results: Global QoL did not change statistically significant during CRT and was slightly above baseline levels during follow-up. CRT had a statistically significant negative short-term impact on role functioning, fatigue, and PR25 urinary symptoms. The scores recovered within 2 months to 1 year after CRT. Emotional functioning and social functioning scores slightly increased during and after CRT. Role functioning decreased by > 10 points at 60 Gy and urinary symptoms decreased by > 10 points at 40 and 60 Gy. All other differences were < 10 points. A high number of concomitant diseases and having no children were negative pretreatment predictors for long-term global QoL. Conclusion: Definitive CRT for prostate cancer does not compromise global QoL during therapy and up to 2 years after treatment. It has a limited negative effect on role functioning, urinary symptoms and, to a lesser extent, on fatigue with restitution within 2 months to 1 year after treatment. (orig.)

  4. Outcomes After Intensity-Modulated Versus Conformal Radiotherapy in Older Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Mitra, Nandita; Efstathiou, Jason; Liao Kaijun; Sunderland, Robert; Yeboa, Deborah N.; Armstrong, Katrina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: There is little evidence comparing complications after intensity-modulated (IMRT) vs. three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT) for prostate cancer. The study objective was to test the hypothesis that IMRT, compared with CRT, is associated with a reduction in bowel, urinary, and erectile complications in elderly men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We undertook an observational cohort study using registry and administrative claims data from the SEER-Medicare database. We identified men aged 65 years or older diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer in the United States between 2002 and 2004 who received IMRT (n = 5,845) or CRT (n = 6,753). The primary outcome was a composite measure of bowel complications. Secondary outcomes were composite measures of urinary and erectile complications. We also examined specific subsets of bowel (proctitis/hemorrhage) and urinary (cystitis/hematuria) events within the composite complication measures. Results: IMRT was associated with reductions in composite bowel complications (24-month cumulative incidence 18.8% vs. 22.5%; hazard ratio [HR] 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79–0.93) and proctitis/hemorrhage (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.64–0.95). IMRT was not associated with rates of composite urinary complications (HR 0.93; 95% CI, 0.83–1.04) or cystitis/hematuria (HR 0.94; 95% CI, 0.83–1.07). The incidence of erectile complications involving invasive procedures was low and did not differ significantly between groups, although IMRT was associated with an increase in new diagnoses of impotence (HR 1.27, 95% CI, 1.14–1.42). Conclusion: IMRT is associated with a small reduction in composite bowel complications and proctitis/hemorrhage compared with CRT in elderly men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer.

  5. In vitro co-culture experiments on prostate cancer and small intestine cells irradiated with carbon ions and x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubeck, C. von; Weyrather, W.-K.; Durante, M.

    2009-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivers the dose in many small irradiation fields of different beam direction to achieve a 3 dimensional tumour conformal dose overlapping with a maximum of normal tissue protection. In 2006 a study was started at GSI to treat prostate cancer patients with a boost irradiation of carbon ions in combination with an IMRT treatment administered at the Uniklinikum Heidelberg. The carbon ions are delivered in two opposing fields. So IMRT irradiation includes more normal tissue than carbon ion treatment but even here parts of the rectum and the bladder are in the irradiated field. This raises the question whether the irradiated tumor cells influence the normal cells (irradiated/ unirradiated) but also whether the normal irradiated cells influences normal tissue in a different way for carbon and photon irradiation. To study this problem, we established an in vitro co-culture model of prostate cancer and small intestine cells of the rat to simulate the patient treatment situation for analyzing tissue reaction exemplary. For characterization of the cells lines the parameters alpha and beta (linear quadratic model) for clonogenic survival were determined for x-rays and for carbon ions of different energies. For co-culture experiments unirradiated and irradiated cells were seeded together and the survival was analyzed

  6. EPID detection of radio-opaque markers for the evaluation of prostate position during megavoltage irradiation: a clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigneault, E.; Pouliot, J.; Laverdiere, J.; Roy, J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To assess daily prostatic apex motion relative to pelvic bone structures during megavoltage irradiation. Materials and Methods: Radio-opaque markers were implanted under ultrasound guidance near the prostatic apex of ten patients with localized prostatic carcinoma. Patients were subsequently treated with four field box technique at a beam energy of 23 MV. During treatment, on-line images were obtained with an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for each field and fraction. The marker was easily identified, even on unprocessed images and the distance between the marker and a bony landmark was measured. Timelapse movie for the complete treatment of each patient were also reviewed. After the completion of treatment, a transrectal ultrasound examination was performed to verify the position of the marker relative to the apex. Results: Over 1000 digital portal images were acquired. Antero-posterior and lateral views of each fraction were analysed. The quality of portal images obtained with megavoltage irradiation was good. Even without image histogram equalization it was possible to evaluate pelvic bone structures. Moreover, the radio-opaque marker was easily visible on every on-line portal image. Qualitatively, the review of timelapse movies showed important interfraction motions of the marker while bone structures remained stable. Quantitatively, the position of the marker were measured for each fraction. Marker displacements of up to 1,4 cm were measured between two consecutive days of treatment. Important marker motions were predominately in the antero-posterior and cephalo-caudal directions. Position of the markers relative to the prostatic apex were verified with ultrasound at the end of the treatments and were found to remain globaly at their original position. Intratreatment images were reviewed in two cases and no change in marker positions was observed. Our results, obtained during the treatment courses, indicate similar or larger prostate motions

  7. SU-E-J-95: Predicting Treatment Outcomes for Prostate Cancer: Irradiation Responses of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Most prostate cancers are slow-growing diseases but normally require much higher doses (80Gy) with conventional fractionation radiotherapy, comparing to other more aggressive cancers. This study is to disclose the radiobiological basis of this discrepancy by proposing the concept of prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) and examining their specific irradiation responses. Methods: There are overwhelming evidences that CSC may keep their stemness, e.g. the competency of cell differentiation, in hypoxic microenvironments and hence become radiation resistive, though the probability is tiny for aggressiveness cancers. Tumor hypoxia used to be considered as an independent reason for poor treatment outcomes, and recent evidences showed that even prostate cancers were also hypoxic though they are very slow-growing. In addition, to achieve comparable outcomes to other much more aggressive cancers, much higher doses (rather than lower doses) are always needed for prostate cancers, regardless of its non-aggressiveness. All these abnormal facts can only be possibly interpreted by the irradiation responses characteristics of prostate CSCs. Results: Both normal cancer cells (NCCs) and CSCs exiting in tumors, in which NCCs are mainly for symptoms whereas killing all CSCs achieves disease-free. Since prostate cancers are slow-growing, the hypoxia in prostate cancers cannot possibly from NCCs, thus it is caused by hypoxic CSCs. However, single hypoxic cell cannot be imaged due to limitation of imaging techniques, unless a large group of hypoxic cells exist together, thus most of CSCs in prostate cancers are virtually hypoxic, i.e. not in working mode because CSCs in proliferating mode have to be normoxic, and this explains why prostate cancers are unaggressive. Conclusion: The fractional dose in conventional radiotherapy (∼2Gy) could only kill NCCs and CSCs in proliferating modes, whereas most CSCs survived fractional treatments since they were hypoxic, thus to eliminate all

  8. Overall survival after prostate-specific-antigen-detected recurrence following conformal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandler, Howard M.; Dunn, Rodney L.; McLaughlin, P. William; Hayman, James A.; Sullivan, Molly A.; Taylor, Jeremy M.G.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To study the significance, in terms of overall and cause-specific survival, of biochemical failure after conformal external-beam radiation therapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Of the 1844 patients in the Radiation Oncology prostate cancer database, 718 were deemed eligible. Patients excluded were those with N1 or M1 disease, those treated after radical prostatectomy, those who received hormone therapy before radiation therapy, and those who died, failed clinically, or had no PSA response in the first 6 months after RT. Patients included were required to have a minimum of 2 post-RT PSAs separated by at least 1 week. Biochemical relapse was defined as 3 consecutive PSA rises. This resulted in 154 patients with biochemical failure. Survival was calculated from the third PSA elevation. The rate of rise of PSA was calculated by fitting a regression line to the four rising PSAs on a ln PSA vs. time plot. Results: There were 41 deaths among the 154 patients with failure in 23 of the 41 due to prostate cancer. The overall survival after failure was 58% at 5 years, while the cause-specific failure was 73% at 5 years. Among the 154 failures, several factors were evaluated for an association with overall survival: age at failure, pre-RT PSA, PSA at second rise, PSA nadir, time from RT to failure, time to nadir, Gleason score, T-stage, and rate of rise, both from the nadir and from the beginning of the rise. None of these factors were significantly associated with an increased risk of death. As expected, the group of patients with biochemical failure have significantly worse prognostic factors than those without biochemical failure: median pre-RT PSA 15.9 vs. 9.0 (p < 0.001), and Gleason score of 7 or greater for 48% of subjects vs. 40% (p 0.1). Relative PSA rise and slope of ln PSA vs. time were associated with cause-specific mortality (p < 0.001 and p = 0.007, respectively). Conclusion: Overall survival after conformal radiotherapy for prostate

  9. Analysis of competing risk parameters in irradiated prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, R.; Mayer, E.; Langsenlehner, U.; Hackl, A.; Pummer, K.; Quehenberger, F.; Feigl, G.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Retrospective competing risk analysis of prognostic factors in definitive-irradiated prostate cancer patients. Patients and Methods: Data of 652 patients were analyzed according to three age subgroups ( 75 years; Table 1). Pre-RT PSA values (median 13.4 ng/ml) were available for 340 patients. Adjuvant hormone therapy (n = 261) consisted either of orchiectomy (n = 151) or LHRH agonist with/without antiandrogen therapy or, in the early years, diethystilbestrol. Neoadjuvant hormone therapy (n = 31) using LHRH agonists was given 6 months before and during radiotherapy. Results: Biochemical failure was observed in 69/.340 patients, 5 years after biochemical failure, 64.9% of them also had failed clinically. The cumulative incidence of local failure (LF) and distant metastases (DM) was 9.4% and 37.2%, respectively; LF and DM at the same time were seen in 18.2%. On multivariate analysis (Tables 2 and 3), advanced stage (relative risk [RR] 4.54), pre-RT PSA > 20 ng/ml (RR 2.79) and poorly differentiated tumors (RR 2.96) were significant predictors of biochemical failure. Advanced stage increased the risk of LF (RR 2.18), DM (RR 3.66), and prostate cancer death (PCD; RR 4.30). Hormone therapy decreased the risk of biochemical failure (RR 0.67), DM (RR 0.59), and PCD (RR 0.60) without reaching statistical significance. Median follow-up was 7.6 years. Conclusion: Risk of biochemical failure was predicted by pre-RT PSA, stage, and grade; in patients with biochemical failure, the cumulative incidence of death from intercurrent diseases and PCD was 25.0% and 29.2% after 5 years, respectively. The risk of DM and PCD was predicted by stage and grade. Higher age (> 75 years) decreased the relative risk of LF, DM, and PCD significantly. (orig.)

  10. Dosimetric impact of image-guided 3D conformal radiation therapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaly, B; Song, W; Bauman, G S; Battista, J J; Van Dyk, J

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this work is to quantify the impact of image-guided conformal radiation therapy (CRT) on the dose distribution by correcting patient setup uncertainty and inter-fraction tumour motion. This was a retrospective analysis that used five randomly selected prostate cancer patients that underwent approximately 15 computed tomography (CT) scans during their radiation treatment course. The beam arrangement from the treatment plan was imported into each repeat CT study and the dose distribution was recalculated for the new beam setups. Various setup scenarios were then compared to assess the impact of image guidance on radiation treatment precision. These included (1) daily alignment to skin markers, thus representing a conventional beam setup without image guidance (2) alignment to bony anatomy for correction of daily patient setup error, thus representing on-line portal image guidance, and (3) alignment to the 'CTV of the day' for correction of inter-fraction tumour motion, thus representing on-line CT or ultrasound image guidance. Treatment scenarios (1) and (3) were repeated with a reduced CTV to PTV margin, where the former represents a treatment using small margins without daily image guidance. Daily realignment of the treatment beams to the prostate showed an average increase in minimum tumour dose of 1.5 Gy, in all cases where tumour 'geographic miss' without image guidance was apparent. However, normal tissue sparing did not improve unless the PTV margin was reduced. Daily realignment to the tumour combined with reducing the margin size by a factor of 2 resulted in an average escalation in tumour dose of 9.0 Gy for all five static plans. However, the prescription dose could be escalated by 13.8 Gy when accounting for changes in anatomy by accumulating daily doses using nonlinear image registration techniques. These results provide quantitative information on the effectiveness of image-guided radiation treatment of prostate cancer and demonstrate that

  11. Transabdominal ultrasonography, computed tomography and electronic portal imaging for 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jereczek-Fossa, B.A.; Orecchia, R.; Cattani, F.; Garibaldi, C.; Cambria, R.; Valenti, M.; Ciocca, M.; Zerini, D.; Boboc, G.I.; Vavassori, A.; Ivaldi, G.B.; Kowalczyk, A.; Matei, D.V.; Cobelli, O. de

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of daily B-mode acquisition and targeting ultrasound-based prostate localization (BAT trademark) and to compare it with computed tomography (CT) and electronic portal imaging (EPI) in 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-D CRT) for prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: Ten patients were treated with 3-D CRT (72 Gy/30 fractions, 2.4 Gy/fraction, equivalent to 80 Gy/40 fractions, for α/β ratio of 1.5 Gy) and daily BAT-based prostate localization. For the first 5 fractions, CT and EPI were also performed in order to compare organ-motion and set-up error, respectively. Results: 287 BAT-, 50 CT- and 46 EPI-alignments were performed. The average BAT-determined misalignments in latero-lateral, antero-posterior and cranio-caudal directions were -0.9 mm ± 3.3 mm, 1.0 mm ± 4.0 mm and -0.9 mm ± 3.8 mm, respectively. The differences between BAT- and CT-determined organ-motion in latero-lateral, antero-posterior and cranio-caudal directions were 2.7 mm ± 1.9 mm, 3.9 ± 2.8 mm and 3.4 ± 3.0 mm, respectively. Weak correlation was found between BAT- and CT-determined misalignments in antero-posterior direction, while no correlation was observed in latero-lateral and cranio-caudal directions. The correlation was more significant when only data of good image-quality patients were analyzed (8 patients). Conclusion: BAT ensures the relative positions of target are the same during treatment and in treatment plan, however, the reliability of alignment is patient-dependent. The average BAT-determined misalignments were small, confirming the prevalence of random errors in 3-D CRT. Further study is warranted in order to establish the clinical value of BAT. (orig.)

  12. Australian and New Zealand three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy consensus guidelines for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skala, M.; Berry, M.; Kneebone, A.; Gogna, K.; Turner, S.; Rolfo, A.; Haworth, A.

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) has been shown to reduce normal tissue toxicity and allow dose escalation in the curative treatment of prostate cancer. The Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group initiated a consensus process to generate evidence-based guidelines for the safe and effective implementation of 3DCRT. All radiation oncology departments in Australia and New Zealand were invited to complete a survey of their prostate practice and to send representatives to a consensus workshop. After a review of the evidence, key issues were identified and debated. If agreement was not reached, working parties were formed to make recommendations. Draft guidelines were circulated to workshop participants for approval prior to publication. Where possible, evidence-based recommendations have been made with regard to patient selection, risk stratification, simulation, planning, treatment delivery and toxicity reporting. This is the first time a group of radiation therapists, physicists and oncologists representing professional radiotherapy practice across Australia and New Zealand have worked together to develop best-practice guidelines. These guidelines should serve as a baseline for prospective clinical trials, outcome research and quality assurance. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  13. Electronic portal imaging device detection of radioopaque markers for the evaluation of prostate position during megavoltage irradiation: a clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigneault, Eric; Pouliot, Jean; Laverdiere, Jacques; Roy, Jean; Dorion, Marc

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to assess daily prostatic apex motion relative to pelvic bone structures during megavoltage irradiation. Methods and Materials: Radioopaque markers were implanted under ultrasound guidance near the prostatic apex of 11 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma. Patients were subsequently treated with a four field-box technique at a beam energy of 23 MV. During treatment, on-line images were obtained with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). The marker was easily identified, even on unprocessed images, and the distance between the marker and a bony landmark was measured. Timelapse movies were also reviewed. After the completion of treatment, a transcrectal ultrasound examination was performed in 8 of 11 patients, to verify the position of the marker. Results: We acquired over 900 digital portal images and analyzed posterioanterior and right lateral views. The quality of portal images obtained with megavoltage irradiation was good. It was possible to evaluate pelvic bone structures even without image histogram equalization. Moreover, the radioopaque marker was easily visible on every online portal image. The review of timelapse movies showed important interfraction motion of the marker while bone structures remained stable. We measured the position of the marker for each fraction. Marker displacements up to 1.6 cm were measured between 2 consecutive days of treatment. Important marker motions were predominantly in the posteroanterior and cephalocaudal directions. In eight patients, we verified the position of the marker relative to the prostatic apex with ultrasound at the end of the treatments. The marker remained in the trapezoid zone. Intratreatment images reviewed in two cases showed no change in marker position. Our results, obtained during the treatment courses, indicate similar or larger prostate motions than previously observed in studies that used intertreatment x-ray films and CT images. Marker implantation under

  14. Image-guided conformation arc therapy for prostate cancer: Early side effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soete, Guy; Verellen, Dirk; Michielsen, Dirk; Rappe, Bernard; Keuppen, Frans; Storme, Guy

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate early side effects in prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided conformation arc therapy (IGCAT) using a minimultileaf collimator and daily X-ray-assisted patient positioning. Methods and Materials: Between May 2000 and November 2004, 238 cT1-T3N0M0 tumors were treated with doses of 70 or 78 Gy. Seventy patients also received neoadjuvant or concurrent hormonal treatment. Median follow-up is 18 months (range, 4-55 months). Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer toxicity scoring system was used to evaluate early side effects. Results: Grade 1, 2, and >2 acute side effects occurred in 19, 6, and 0% (gastrointestinal) and 37, 16, and 0% (genitourinary) of the patients. No relation between radiation dose and early side effects was observed. Conclusion: Patients treated with image-guided conformation arc therapy experience a low rate of Grade 2 (i.e., requiring medication) early side effects. The definitive evaluation of late side effects and biochemical control requires further follow-up

  15. 3D conformal radiation therapy and hormonal therapy for localized prostate cancer: Is age a limiting factor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, A.; Negrea, T.; Lechevallier, E.; Coulange, C.; Murraciole, X.; Jouvea, E.; Sambuca, R.; Cowen, D.

    2011-01-01

    No study on side effects had showed that conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer is more harmful in patients older than 70 years to patients younger. The aim of this study was to evaluate acute and late toxicities of conformal radiotherapy, with high dose for localized prostate cancer in patients older than 70 years and compared to patients younger than 70 years. Between 1996 and 2009, 104 patients were treated with radiation therapy and hormonal therapy for localized cancer prostate. Median follow-up was 105 months (9 300). Acute (occurred at ≤ three months) and late side effects of 55 patients older than 70 years (median age: 75 [71 92]) were graded according to the CTCAE 3.0 criteria and compared to the younger population. Median dose to the prostate was 75.6 Gy (67 80) in both groups. There were no significant differences in acute and late side effects between age groups. For patients above 70 years, the incidence of grade II or higher acute and late side effects were respectively 27 and 22% for urologic symptoms and 13 and 16% for rectal symptoms. The frequency of grade III late symptoms was low and ranged between 0 and 6% for the evaluated symptoms, irrespective of age group. Older patients had a better biochemical recurrence-free survival than younger patients (86 versus 77% at four years, P ≡ ns). High dose 3D conformal radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer was well tolerated in patients older than 70 years. Age is not a limiting factor for conformal radiation therapy and hormonotherapy for older patients. (authors)

  16. Salvage conformal radiotherapy for biochemical recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R. Monti

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Assess the results of salvage conformal radiotherapy in patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy and identify prognostic factors for biochemical recurrence and toxicity of the treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From June 1998 to November 2001, 35 patients were submitted to conformal radiotherapy for PSA > 0.2 ng/mL in progression after radical prostatectomy and were retrospectively analyzed. The mean dose of radiation in prostatic bed was of 77.4 Gy (68-81. Variables related to the treatment and to tumor were assessed to identify prognostic factors for biochemical recurrence after salvage radiotherapy. RESULTS: The median follow-up was of 55 months (17-83. The actuarial survival rates free of biochemical recurrence and free of metastasis at a distance of 5 years were 79.7% e 84.7%, respectively. The actuarial global survival rate in 5 years was 96.1%.The actuarial survival rate free of biochemical recurrence in 5 years was 83.3% with PSA pre-radiotherapy 1 and 2 (p = 0.023. Dose > 70 Gy in 30% of the bladder volume implied in more acute urinary toxicity (p = 0.035. The mean time for the development of late urinary toxicity was 21 months (12-51. Dose > 55 Gy in 50% bladder volume implied in more late urinary toxicity (p = 0.018. A patient presented late rectal toxicity of 2nd grade. CONCLUSIONS: Conformal radiotherapy showed to be effective for the control of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Patients with pre-therapy PSA < 2 ng/mL have more biochemical control.

  17. Salvage conformal radiotherapy for biochemical recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monti, Carlos R.; Nakamura, Ricardo A.; Ferrigno, Robson; Rossi Junior, Aristides; Kawakami, Neusa S.; Trevisan, Felipe A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Assess the results of salvage conformal radiotherapy in patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy and identify prognostic factors for biochemical recurrence and toxicity of the treatment. Materials and methods: From June 1998 to November 2001, 35 patients were submitted to conformal radiotherapy for PSA ≥ 0.2 ng/mL in progression after radical prostatectomy and were retrospectively analyzed. The mean dose of radiation in prostatic bed was of 77.4 Gy (68-81). Variables related to the treatment and to tumor were assessed to identify prognostic factors for biochemical recurrence after salvage radiotherapy. Results: The median follow-up was of 55 months (17-83). The actuarial survival rates free of biochemical recurrence and free of metastasis at a distance of 5 years were 79.7% e 84.7%, respectively. The actuarial global survival rate in 5 years was 96.1%.The actuarial survival rate free of biochemical recurrence in 5 years was 83.3% with PSA pre-radiotherapy ≤ 1, 100% when > 1 and ≤ 2, and 57.1% when > 2 (p = 0.023). Dose > 70 Gy in 30% of the bladder volume implied in more acute urinary toxicity (p = 0.035). The mean time for the development of late urinary toxicity was 21 months (12-51). Dose > 55 Gy in 50% bladder volume implied in more late urinary toxicity (p = 0.018). A patient presented late rectal toxicity of second grade. Conclusions: Conformal radiotherapy showed to be effective for the control of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Patients with pre-therapy PSA < 2 ng/mL have more biochemical control. (author)

  18. Cell Survival and DNA Damage in Normal Prostate Cells Irradiated Out-of-Field.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, L

    2014-10-31

    Interest in out-of-field radiation dose has been increasing with the introduction of new techniques, such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). These new techniques offer superior conformity of high-dose regions to the target compared to conventional techniques, however more normal tissue is exposed to low-dose radiation with VMAT. There is a potential increase in radiobiological effectiveness associated with lower energy photons delivered during VMAT as normal cells are exposed to a temporal change in incident photon energy spectrum. During VMAT deliveries, normal cells can be exposed to the primary radiation beam, as well as to transmission and scatter radiation. The impact of low-dose radiation, radiation-induced bystander effect and change in energy spectrum on normal cells are not well understood. The current study examined cell survival and DNA damage in normal prostate cells after exposure to out-of-field radiation both with and without the transfer of bystander factors. The effect of a change in energy spectrum out-of-field compared to in-field was also investigated. Prostate cancer (LNCaP) and normal prostate (PNT1A) cells were placed in-field and out-of-field, respectively, with the PNT1A cells being located 1 cm from the field edge when in-field cells were being irradiated with 2 Gy. Clonogenic and γ-H2AX assays were performed postirradiation to examine cell survival and DNA damage. The assays were repeated when bystander factors from the LNCaP cells were transferred to the PNT1A cells and also when the PNT1A cells were irradiated in-field to a different energy spectrum. An average out-of-field dose of 10.8 ± 4.2 cGy produced a significant reduction in colony volume and increase in the number of γ-H2AX foci\\/cell in the PNT1A cells compared to the sham-irradiated control cells. An adaptive response was observed in the PNT1A cells having first received a low out-of-field dose and then the bystander factors. The PNT1A cells showed a significant

  19. Clinical assessment of CT-MRI image fusion software in localization of the prostate for 3D conformal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagawa, Kazufumi; Lee, W. Robert; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Hunt, Margie A.; Shaer, Andrew H.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the utility of image fusion software and compare MRI prostate localization with CT localization in patients undergoing 3D conformal radiation therapy of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: After a phantom study was performed to ensure the accuracy of image fusion procedure, 22 prostate cancer patients had CT and MRI studies before the start of radiotherapy. Immobilization casts used during radiation treatment were also used for both imaging studies. After the clinical target volume (CTV) (prostate or prostate + seminal vesicles) was defined on CT, slices from MRI study were reconstructed to match precisely the corresponding CT slices by identifying three common bony landmarks on each study. The CTV was separately defined on the matched MRI slices. Data related to the size and location of the prostate were compared between CT and MRI. The spatial relationship between the tip of urethrogram cone on CT and prostate apex seen on MRI was also scrutinized. Results: The phantom study showed the registration discrepancies between CT and MRI smaller than 1.0 mm in any pair of comparison. The patient study showed mean image registration error of 0.9 (± 0.6) mm. The average prostate volume was 63.0 (± 25.8) cm 3 and 50.9 (± 22.9) cm 3 determined by CT and MRI respectively (Fig. 1). The difference in prostate location with the two studies most commonly differed at the base and at the apex of the prostate (Fig. 2). On transverse MRI, the prostate apex was situated 7.1 (± 4.5) mm dorsal and 15.1 (± 4.0) mm cephalad to the tip of urethrogram cone (Fig. 3). Conclusions: CT-MRI image fusion study made it possible to compare the two modalities directly. MRI localization of the prostate is more accurate than CT, and indicates the distance from cone to apex is 15 mm. In view of excellent treatment results obtained with current CT localization of the prostate, still it may not be wise to reduce target volume to that demonstrated on MRI

  20. Potency following high-dose three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and the impact of prior major urologic surgical procedures in patients treated for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinn, Daniel M.; Holland, John; Crownover, Richard L.; Roach, Mack

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of high-dose three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) on potency in patients treated for clinically localized prostate cancer and to identify factors that might predict the outcome of sexual function following treatment. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-four consecutive patients treated with 3DCRT for localized prostate cancer at UCSF between 1991-1993 were included in this retrospective analysis. Patient responses were obtained from a mailed questionnaire, telephone interviews, or departmental records. Median follow-up was 21 months. Results: Sixty patients reported having sexual function prior to 3DCRT, including 47 who were fully potent and 13 who were marginally potent. Of the remaining 64 patients, 45 were impotent, 7 were on hormones, 1 was status-postorchiectomy, and 11 were not evaluable. Following 3DCRT, 37 of 60 patients (62%) retained sexual function sufficient for intercourse. Of those with sexual function before irradiation, 33 of 47 (70%) of patients fully potent and 4 of 13 (31%) of patients marginally potent maintained function sufficient for intercourse (p < 0.01). Potency was retained in 6 of 15 (40%) patients with a history of a major urologic surgical procedure (MUSP) and in 31 of 45 (69%) with no history of a MUSP (p < 0.04). Transurethral resection of the prostate was the MUSP in eight of these patients, with four (50%) maintaining sexual function. Conclusions: Patients who receive definitive 3DCRT for localized prostate cancer appear to maintain potency similar to patients treated with conventional radiotherapy. However, patients who are marginally potent at presentation or who have a history of a MUSP appear to be at increased risk of impotence following 3DCRT

  1. 103PD brachytherapy and external beam irradiation for clinically localized, high-risk prostatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, Michael; Wallner, Kent; Sorace, Richard; Koval, John; Cash, Jennifer; Acosta, Rudolph; Brown, Charles; Etheridge, James; Binder, Michael; Brunelle, Richard; Kirwan, Novelle; Sanchez, Servando; Stein, Douglas; Wasserman, Stuart

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To summarize biochemical failure rates and morbidity of external beam irradiation (EBRT) combined with palladium ( 103 Pd) boost for clinically localized high-risk prostate carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three consecutive patients with stage T2a-T3 prostatic carcinoma were treated from 1991 through 1994. Each patient had at least one of the following risk factors for extracapsular disease extension: Stage T2b or greater (71 patients), Gleason score 7-10 (40 patients), prostate specific antigen (PSA) >15 (32 patients), or elevated prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) (17 patients). Patients received 41 Gy EBRT to a limited pelvic field, followed 4 weeks later by a 103 Pd boost (prescription dose: 80 Gy). Biochemical failure was defined as a PSA greater than 1.0 ng/ml (normal 103 Pd brachytherapy for clinically localized, high-risk prostate cancer compare favorably with that reported after conventional dose EBRT alone. Morbidity has been acceptable

  2. Pelvic nodal dose escalation with prostate hypofractionation using conformal avoidance defined (H-CAD) intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Theodore S.; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Jaradat, Hazim; Raisbeck, Bridget M.; Ritter, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    The management of prostate cancer patients with a significant risk of pelvic lymph node involvement is controversial. Both whole pelvis radiotherapy and dose escalation to the prostate have been linked to improved outcome in such patients, but it is unclear whether conventional whole pelvis doses of only 45-50 Gy are optimal for ultimate nodal control. The purpose of this study is to examine the dosimetric and clinical feasibility of combining prostate dose escalation via hypofractionation with conformal avoidance-based IMRT (H-CAD) dose escalation to the pelvic lymph nodes. One conformal avoidance and one conventional plan were generated for each of eight patients. Conformal avoidance-based IMRT plans were generated that specifically excluded bowel, rectum, and bladder. The prostate and lower seminal vesicles (PTV 70) were planned to receive 70 Gy in 2.5 Gy/fraction while the pelvic lymph nodes (PTV 56) were to concurrently receive 56 Gy in 2 Gy/fraction. The volume of small bowel receiving >45 Gy was restricted to 300 ml or less. These conformal avoidance plans were delivered using helical tomotherapy or LINAC-based IMRT with daily imaging localization. All patients received neoadjuvant and concurrent androgen deprivation with a planned total of two years. The conventional, sequential plans created for comparison purposes for all patients consisted of a conventional 4-field pelvic box prescribed to 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) followed by an IMRT boost to the prostate of 25.2 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) yielding a final prostate dose of 75.6 Gy. For all plans, the prescription dose was to cover the target structure. Equivalent uniform dose (EUD) analyses were performed on all targets and dose-volume histograms (DVH) were displayed in terms of both physical and normalized total dose (NTD), i.e. dose in 2 Gy fraction equivalents. H-CAD IMRT plans were created for and delivered to all eight patients. Analysis of the H-CAD plans demonstrates prescription dose coverage of >95

  3. Late rectal toxicity after conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer (I): multivariate analysis and dose-response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skwarchuk, Mark W.; Jackson, Andrew; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Venkatraman, Ennapadam S.; Cowen, Didier M.; Levegruen, Sabine; Burman, Chandra M.; Fuks, Zvi; Leibel, Steven A.; Ling, C. Clifton

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to use the outcome of a dose escalation protocol for three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) of prostate cancer to study the dose-response for late rectal toxicity and to identify anatomic, dosimetric, and clinical factors that correlate with late rectal bleeding in multivariate analysis. Methods and Materials: Seven hundred forty-three patients with T1c-T3 prostate cancer were treated with 3D-CRT with prescribed doses of 64.8 to 81.0 Gy. The 5-year actuarial rate of late rectal toxicity was assessed using Kaplan-Meier statistics. A retrospective dosimetric analysis was performed for patients treated to 70.2 Gy (52 patients) or 75.6 Gy (119 patients) who either exhibited late rectal bleeding (RTOG Grade 2/3) within 30 months after treatment (i.e., 70.2 Gy--13 patients, 75.6 Gy--36 patients) or were nonbleeding for at least 30 months (i.e., 70.2 Gy--39 patients, 75.6 Gy--83 patients). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was performed to correlate late rectal bleeding with several anatomic, dosimetric, and clinical variables. Results: A dose response for ≥ Grade 2 late rectal toxicity was observed. By multivariate analysis, the following factors were significantly correlated with ≥ Grade 2 late rectal bleeding for patients prescribed 70.2 Gy: 1) enclosure of the outer rectal contour by the 50% isodose on the isocenter slice (i.e., Iso50) (p max (p max

  4. Late toxicity after conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Impact of previous surgery for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odrazka, K.; Dolezel, M.; Vanasek, J.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively compare late toxicity of conventional-dose three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and high-dose intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. A total of 340 patients with T1-3 prostate cancer were treated with 3D-CRT (n=228) and IMRT (n=112). The median follow-up time was 5.9 years and 3.0 years, respectively. The prescription dose was 70 Gy for 3D-CRT and 78 Gy for IMRT. Late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were graded according to the Fox Chase modification of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force criteria. There was no difference between 3D-CRT and IMRT in the incidence of GI and GU toxicity at 3 years. On multivariate analysis, transurethral resection of prostate/open transvesical prostatectomy (TURP/TVPE) for benign prostatic hyperplasia, carried out before radiotherapy, significantly increased the risk of Grade ≥2 GU toxicity (risk ratio 1.88). Among patients who experienced TURP/TVPE, the 5-year actuarial likelihood of Grade 2-3 urinary incontinence was 23%, compared with 9% for those without prostate surgery (P=0.01). Tolerance of 3D-CRT and IMRT was similar, despite the use of high radiation dose with IMRT. Previous TURP/TVPE increased the risk of GU toxicity. (author)

  5. Irradiation of head-and-neck tumors with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Comparison between two IMRT techniques with 3D conformal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeger, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    For 12 patients with inoperable head-neck carcinoma that were treated with 3D conformal irradiation techniques additional irradiation plans using IMRT were developed. It was shown that the IMRT techniques are superior to the 3D conformal technique. The new rapid arc technique is unclear with respect to the critical organs (parotid glands, spinal canal and mandibles) but is significantly advantageous for the other normal tissue with respect to conformity (steeper dose gradients) and thus radiation dose reduction. The resulting lower irradiation time and the reduced radiation exposure being important for the treatment economy and patients' comfort should favor the more planning intensive rapid arc technique.

  6. Prostatic irradiation is not associated with any measurable increase in the risk of subsequent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendal, Wayne S.; Eapen, Libni; MacRae, Robert; Malone, Shawn; Nicholas, Garth

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate a putative increased risk of rectal cancer subsequent to prostatic radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: In an analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry, we compared men who had radiotherapy for prostatic carcinoma with those treated surgically and those treated with neither modality. Kaplan-Meier analyses for the time to failure from rectal cancer were performed between age-matched subgroups of the three cohorts. Cox proportional hazards analyses were performed to ascertain what influences might affect the incidence of subsequent rectal cancer. Results: In all, 33,831 men were irradiated, 167,607 were treated surgically, and 36,335 received neither modality. Rectal cancers developed in 243 (0.7%) of those irradiated (mean age, 70.7 years), 578 (0.3%) of those treated surgically (68.7 years), and 227 (0.8%) of those treated with neither modality (74.2 years). When age effects and the differences between the surgical and untreated cohorts were controlled for, we were unable to demonstrate any significant increased incidence of rectal cancer in men irradiated for prostatic cancer. Conclusions: An increased frequency of rectal cancer after prostatic irradiation, apparent on crude analysis, could be attributed to age confounding and other unmeasured confounders associated with prostate cancer treatment and rectal cancer risk

  7. Prostate and seminal vesicle volume based consideration of prostate cancer patients for treatment with 3D-conformal or intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Nandanuri M. S.; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chang, Hyesook; Lange, Christopher S.; Ravi, Akkamma [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York Hospital Queens, Flushing, New York 11355 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York 11203 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, New York Hospital Queens, Flushing, New York 11355 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to determine the suitability of the prostate and seminal vesicle volumes as factors to consider patients for treatment with image-guided 3D-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), using common dosimetry parameters as comparison tools. Methods: Dosimetry of 3D and IMRT plans for 48 patients was compared. Volumes of prostate, SV, rectum, and bladder, and prescriptions were the same for both plans. For both 3D and IMRT plans, expansion margins to prostate+SV (CTV) and prostate were 0.5 cm posterior and superior and 1 cm in other dimensions to create PTV and CDPTV, respectively. Six-field 3D plans were prepared retrospectively. For 3D plans, an additional 0.5 cm margin was added to PTV and CDPTV. Prescription for both 3D and IMRT plans was the same: 45 Gy to CTV followed by a 36 Gy boost to prostate. Dosimetry parameters common to 3D and IMRT plans were used for comparison: Mean doses to prostate, CDPTV, SV, rectum, bladder, and femurs; percent volume of rectum and bladder receiving 30 (V30), 50 (V50), and 70 Gy (V70), dose to 30% of rectum and bladder, minimum and maximum point dose to CDPTV, and prescription dose covering 95% of CDPTV (D95). Results: When the data for all patients were combined, mean dose to prostate and CDPTV was higher with 3D than IMRT plans (P<0.01). Mean D95 to CDPTV was the same for 3D and IMRT plans (P>0.2). On average, among all cases, the minimum point dose was less for 3D-CRT plans and the maximum point dose was greater for 3D-CRT than for IMRT (P<0.01). Mean dose to 30% rectum with 3D and IMRT plans was comparable (P>0.1). V30 was less (P<0.01), V50 was the same (P>0.2), and V70 was more (P<0.01) for rectum with 3D than IMRT plans. Mean dose to bladder was less with 3D than IMRT plans (P<0.01). V30 for bladder with 3D plans was less than that of IMRT plans (P<0.01). V50 and V70 for 3D plans were the same for 3D and IMRT plans (P>0.2). Mean dose to femurs

  8. Application of biological dose concept in dose optimization for conformal radiotherapy of prostate carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yunhai; Liao Yuan; Zhou Lijun; Pan Ziqiang; Feng Yan

    2003-01-01

    Objective: On basis of physical dose optimization, LQ model was used to investigate the difference between the curves of biological effective dose and physical isodose. The influence of applying the biological dose concept on three dimensional conformal radiotherapy of prostate carcinoma was discussed. Methods: Four treatment plannings were designed for physical dose optimization: three fields, four-box fields, five fields and six fields. Target dose uniformity and protection of the critical tissue-rectum were used as the principal standard for designing the treatment planning. Biological effective dose (BED) was calculated by LQ model. The difference between the BED curve drawn in the central layer and the physical isodose curve was studied. The difference between the adjusted physical dose (APD) and the physical dose was also studied. Results: Five field planning was the best in target dose uniformity and protection of the critical tissue-rectum. The physical dose was uniform in the target, but the biological effective doses revealed great discrepancy in the biological model. Adjusted physical dose distribution also displayed larger discrepancy than the physical dose unadjusted. Conclusions: Intensified Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) technique with inversion planning using biological dose concept may be much more advantageous to reach a high tumor control probability and low normal tissue complication probability

  9. CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT IN LOCALLY AND LOCALLY-ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER USING CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkachev Sergey Ivanovich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of androgen deprivation and radiotherapy increase the probability of diseases full regresses and survival rate. Modern technical and technological opportunities of 3D CRT allow to increase total dose to prostate up to 72-76Gy vs. radiotherapy of 66-70Gy. In this study we compare the rates of post radiation toxicity and the efficiency of treatment for the patients receiving conventional radiotherapy and 3D CRT. The use of 3D CRT has not only result to increase of 10-years recurrence free survival rate from 74% (I grope to 86,5% (II grope, р=0,01, but also to increase of 10-years overall survival, 70% versus 78,4% (р=0,04. The proposed version of conformal 3D CRT radiation therapy made ​​it possible compared to conventional 2D RT radiation therapy by increasing SOD radiation to the tumor, accuracy and compliance with the quality assurance of radiation therapy significantly reduce rates of recurrence and significantly increase the performance of 10-year overall and disease-free survival.

  10. Role of choline PET/CT in guiding target volume delineation for irradiation of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzenboeck, S.M.; Kurth, J. [University Medical Centre Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Gocke, C.; Kuhnt, T.; Hildebrandt, G. [University Medical Centre Rostock, Department of Radiotherapy, Rostock (Germany); Krause, B.J. [University Medical Centre Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Universitaet Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Universitaetsmedizin Rostock, Rostock (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Choline PET/CT has shown limitations for the detection of primary prostate cancer and nodal metastatic disease, mainly due to limited sensitivity and specificity. Conversely in the restaging of prostate cancer recurrence, choline PET/CT is a promising imaging modality for the detection of local regional and nodal recurrence with an impact on therapy management. This review highlights current literature on choline PET/CT for radiation treatment planning in primary and recurrent prostate cancer. Due to limited sensitivity and specificity in differentiating between benign and malignant prostatic tissues in primary prostate cancer, there is little enthusiasm for target volume delineation based on choline PET/CT. Irradiation planning for the treatment of single lymph node metastases on the basis of choline PET/CT is controversial due to its limited lesion-based sensitivity in primary nodal staging. In high-risk prostate cancer, choline PET/CT might diagnose lymph node metastases, which potentially can be included in the conventional irradiation field. Prior to radiation treatment of recurrent prostate cancer, choline PET/CT may prove useful for patient stratification by excluding distant disease which would require systemic therapy. In patients with local recurrence, choline PET/CT can be used to delineate local sites of recurrence within the prostatic resection bed allowing a boost to PET-positive sites. In patients with lymph node metastases outside the prostatic fossa and regional metastatic lymph nodes, choline PET/CT might influence radiation treatment planning by enabling extension of the target volume to lymphatic drainage sites with or without a boost to PET-positive lymph nodes. Further clinical randomized trials are required to assess treatment outcomes following choline-based biological radiation treatment planning in comparison with conventional radiation treatment planning. (orig.)

  11. Potency probability following conformal megavoltage radiotherapy using conventional doses for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantz, C.A.; Song, P.; Farhangi, E.; Nautiyal, J.; Awan, A.; Ignacio, L.; Weichselbaum, R.; Vijayakumar, S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Impotence is a familiar sequela of definitive external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for localized prostate cancer; however, nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (NSRP) has offered potency rates as high as 70% for selected for patients in several large series. To the authors' knowledge, age and stage-matched comparisons between the effects of EBRT and NSRP upon the normal age trend of impotence have not been performed. Herein, we report the change in potency over time in an EBRT-treated population, determine the significantly predisposing health factors affecting potency in this population, and compare age and stage-matched potency rates with those of normal males and prostatectomy patients. Methods and Materials: Our results are obtained from a retrospective study of 114 patients ranging in age from 52 to 85 (mean, 68) who were diagnosed with clinical stages A-C C (T1-T4N0M0) prostate cancer and then treated conformally with megavoltage x-rays to 6500-7000 cGy (180-200 cGy per fraction) using the four-field box technique. Information concerning pre-RT potency, medical and surgical history, and medications was documented for each patient as was time of post-RT change in potency during regular follow-up. The median follow-up time was 18.5 months. Results: The actuarial probability of potency for all patients gradually decreased throughout post-RT follow-up. At months 1, 12, 24, and 36, potency rates were 98, 92, 75, and 66%, respectively. For those patients who became impotent, the median time to impotence was 14 months. Factors identified from logistic regression analysis as significant predictors of post-EBRT impotence include pre-EBRT partial potency (p < 0.001), vascular disease (p < 0.001), and diabetes (p = 0.003). Next, an actuarial plot of potency probability to patient age for the EBRT-treated population was compared to that obtained from the Massachusetts Male Aging Study of normal males. The two curves were not significantly different (logrank

  12. Prostate and seminal vesicle volume based consideration of prostate cancer patients for treatment with 3D-conformal or intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, Nandanuri M. S.; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chang, Hyesook; Lange, Christopher S.; Ravi, Akkamma

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to determine the suitability of the prostate and seminal vesicle volumes as factors to consider patients for treatment with image-guided 3D-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), using common dosimetry parameters as comparison tools. Methods: Dosimetry of 3D and IMRT plans for 48 patients was compared. Volumes of prostate, SV, rectum, and bladder, and prescriptions were the same for both plans. For both 3D and IMRT plans, expansion margins to prostate+SV (CTV) and prostate were 0.5 cm posterior and superior and 1 cm in other dimensions to create PTV and CDPTV, respectively. Six-field 3D plans were prepared retrospectively. For 3D plans, an additional 0.5 cm margin was added to PTV and CDPTV. Prescription for both 3D and IMRT plans was the same: 45 Gy to CTV followed by a 36 Gy boost to prostate. Dosimetry parameters common to 3D and IMRT plans were used for comparison: Mean doses to prostate, CDPTV, SV, rectum, bladder, and femurs; percent volume of rectum and bladder receiving 30 (V30), 50 (V50), and 70 Gy (V70), dose to 30% of rectum and bladder, minimum and maximum point dose to CDPTV, and prescription dose covering 95% of CDPTV (D95). Results: When the data for all patients were combined, mean dose to prostate and CDPTV was higher with 3D than IMRT plans (P 0.2). On average, among all cases, the minimum point dose was less for 3D-CRT plans and the maximum point dose was greater for 3D-CRT than for IMRT (P 0.1). V30 was less (P 0.2), and V70 was more (P 0.2). Mean dose to femurs was more with 3D than IMRT plans (P 3 (39/48), respectively (P 3 , respectively, would be suitable for 3D-CRT. Patients with prostate and prostate+SV volumes >65 and 85 cm 3 , respectively, might get benefit from IMRT.

  13. Impact of radiation dose on achieving nadir PSA levels after 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for patients with localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Leibel, Steven A.; Kelson, Suzanne; Fuks, Zvi

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Several reports have documented the prognostic value of a post-irradiation nadir PSA of ≤1 ng/ml in prostatic cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to determine which pre-treatment and treatment-related variables impact upon achieving such nadir levels. Materials and Methods: Between January 1987 and June 1995, 740 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). 214 (29%) patients were treated with neo-adjuvant androgen ablation prior to therapy and were excluded from this analysis. Among the 526 evaluable patients, the clinical stage were as follows: T 1 C=128 (24%); T 2 A=76 (14%); T 2 B=116 (22%); T 2 C=99 (19%) and T 3 =107 (21%). The prescription dose to the planning target volume (PTV) was 64.8-68.4 Gy in 87 patients (17%); 70.2 Gy in 191 (36%); 75.6 Gy in 209 (40%) and 81 Gy in 39 (7%). The median pre-treatment PSA value was 11.2 ng/ml (range 0.3-114). The median follow-up was 20 months (range: 6-76 months). Results: 242 patients (46%) had PSA levels which declined to ≤1.0 ng/ml. The median time to a nadir level of ≤1.0 was 15.6 months (range: 1-43 months) from completion of 3D-CRT. 154 (29%) patients continued to show declining PSA levels within the first 2 years after therapy, and 130 patients (25%) failed to nadir at PSA levels of ≤1.0 ng/ml. Among patients with nadir PSA levels ≤1, the 3 year PSA relapse-free survival was 91% compared to 29% for patients with nadir PSA levels >1 ng/ml (p<0.0001). A Cox-regression analysis demonstrated that nadir PSA ≤1 was the strongest predictor of PSA relapse-free survival (p<0.001) followed by Gleason score ≤ 6 (p<0.001) and stage< T3 (p=0.004). Among patients who received doses of ≥75.6 Gy, the likelihood of achieving PSA nadir levels ≤1.0 at 24 and 36 months was 86% and 93%, respectively, compared to 74 and 80%, respectively, among those who received lower doses (p<0.001). Doses of ≥75.6 Gy was the strongest

  14. Conformal technique dose escalation in prostate cancer: improved cancer control with higher doses in patients with pretreatment PSA {>=} 10 ngm/ml

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanks, G E; Lee, W R; Hanlon, A L; Kaplan, E; Epstein, B; Schultheiss, T

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: Single institutions and an NCI supported group of institutions have been investigating the value of dose escalation in patients with prostate cancer treated by conformal treatment techniques. Improvement in morbidity has been previously established, while this report identifies the pretreatment PSA level subgroups of patients who benefitted in cancer control from higher dose. Materials and Methods: We report actuarial bNED survival rates for 375 consecutive patients with known pretreatment PSA levels treated with conformal technique between 5/89 and 12/93. The whole pelvis was treated to 45 Gy in 25 fractions in all T2C,3, all Gleason 8, 9, 10 and all patients with pretreatment PSA {>=}20. The prostate {+-} seminal vesicles was boosted at 2.1 Gy/day to the center of the prostate to 65-79 Gy (65-69 N=50), 70-72.49 N=94, 72.5-74.9 N=82, 75-77.49 N=129 and {>=}77.5 N=20). The median followup is 21 mos with a range of 3 to 67 mos. The highest dose patients have the least followup, reducing the impact of the highest dose levels at this time. Patients are analyzed for the entire group divided at 71 Gy and at 73 Gy calculated at the center of the prostate. Each dose group is then subdivided by pretreatment PSA levels <10, 10-19.9, and {>=}20 ngm/ml and dose levels are compared within pretreatment PSA level group. bNED failure is defined as PSA {>=}1.5 ngm/ml and rising on two consecutive values. Results: Table 1 shows the bNED survival rates at 24 and 36 mos for all patients and the three pretreatment PSA level groups. For all patients pooled, there is an overall advantage to using doses {>=}71 Gy (64% vs 85% at 36 mo, p=.006) and {>=}73 Gy (71% vs 86% at 36 mo, p=.07). The subgroup of PSA <10 ngm/ml, however, shows no benefit in bNED survival when using doses over 71 Gy (90% vs 93% at 36 mo) or 73 Gy (91 vs 94% at 36 mo). The subgroup PSA 10 ngm/ml to 19.9 ngm/ml shows improved cancer control when using doses over 71 Gy (61% vs 88% at 36 mo, p=.03) and over 73

  15. [Doses to organs at risk in conformational radiotherapy and stereotaxic irradiation: The heart].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandendorpe, B; Servagi Vernat, S; Ramiandrisoa, F; Bazire, L; Kirova, Y M

    2017-10-01

    Radiation therapy of breast cancer, Hodgkin lymphoma, lung cancer and others thoracic irradiations induce an ionizing radiation dose to the heart. Irradiation of the heart, associated with patient cardiovascular risk and cancer treatment-induced cardiotoxicity, increase cardiovascular mortality. The long survival after breast or Hodgkin lymphoma irradiation requires watching carefully late treatment toxicity. The over-risk of cardiac events is related to the dose received by the heart and the irradiated cardiac volume. The limitation of cardiac irradiation should be a priority in the planning of thoracic irradiations. Practices have to be modified, using modern techniques to approach of the primary objective of radiotherapy which is to optimize the dose to the target volume, sparing healthy tissues, in this case the heart. We have reviewed the literature on cardiac toxicity induced by conformational tridimensional radiation therapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy or stereotactic body radiation therapy, in order to evaluate the possibilities to limit cardiotoxicity. Finally, we summarise the recommendations on dose constraints to the heart and coronary arteries. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Longitudinal Investigation of Adaptive Functioning following Conformal Irradiation for Pediatric Craniopharyngioma and Low-Grade Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netson, Kelli L.; Conklin, Heather M.; Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Children treated for brain tumors with conformal radiation therapy experience preserved cognitive outcomes. Early evidence suggests that adaptive functions or independent living skills may be spared. This longitudinal investigation prospectively examined intellectual and adaptive functioning during the first 5 years following irradiation for childhood craniopharyngioma and low-grade glioma (LGG). The effect of visual impairment on adaptive outcomes was investigated. Methods and Materials Children with craniopharyngioma (n=62) and LGG (n=77) were treated using conformal or intensity-modulated radiation therapy. The median age was 8.05 years (3.21 years –17.64 years) and 8.09 years (2.20 years–19.27 years), respectively. Serial cognitive evaluations including measures of intelligence quotient (IQ) and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) were conducted at pre-irradiation baseline, 6 months after treatment, and annually through 5 years. A total of 588 evaluations were completed during the follow-up period. Results Baseline assessment revealed no deficits in IQ and VABS indices for children with craniopharyngioma, with significant (p craniopharyngioma. Children with LGG performed below population norms (p < .05) at baseline on VABS Communication, Daily Living Indices, and the Adaptive Behavior Composite, with significant (p < .05) longitudinal decline limited to VABS Communication. Older age at irradiation was a protective factor against longitudinal decline. Severe visual impairment did not independently correlate with poorer adaptive outcomes for either tumor group. Conclusions There was relative sparing of post-irradiation functional outcomes over time in this sample. Baseline differences in functional abilities prior to the initiation of irradiation suggested that other factors influence functional outcomes above and beyond the effects of irradiation. PMID:23245284

  17. A study of the effects of internal organ motion on dose escalation in conformal prostate treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Happersett, Laura; Mageras, Gig S.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Burman, Chandra M.; Leibel, Steven A.; Chui Chen; Fuks, Zvi; Bull, Sarah; Ling, C. Clifton; Kutcher, Gerald J.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: To assess the effect of internal organ motion on the dose distributions and biological indices for the target and non-target organs for three different conformal prostate treatment techniques. Materials and methods: We examined three types of treatment plans in 20 patients: (1) a six field plan, with a prescribed dose of 75.6 Gy; (2) the same six field plan to 72 Gy followed by a boost to 81 Gy; and (3) a five field plan with intensity modulated beams delivering 81 Gy. Treatment plans were designed using an initial CT data set (planning) and applied to three subsequent CT scans (treatment). The treatment CT contours were used to represent patient specific organ displacement; in addition, the dose distribution was convolved with a Gaussian distribution to model random setup error. Dose-volume histograms were calculated using an organ deformation model in which the movement between scans of individual points interior to the organs was tracked and the dose accumulated. The tumor control probability (TCP) for the prostate and proximal half of seminal vesicles (clinical target volume, CTV), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for the rectum and the percent volume of bladder wall receiving at least 75 Gy were calculated. Results: The patient averaged increase in the planned TCP between plan types 2 and 1 and types 3 and 1 was 9.8% (range 4.9-12.5%) for both, whereas the corresponding increases in treatment TCP were 9.0% (1.3-16%) and 8.1% (-1.3-13.8%). In all patients, plans 2 and 3 (81 Gy) exhibited equal or higher treatment TCP than plan 1 (75.6 Gy). The maximum treatment NTCP for rectum never exceeded the planning constraint and percent volume of bladder wall receiving at least 75 Gy was similar in the planning and treatment scans for all three plans. Conclusion: For plans that deliver a uniform prescribed dose to the planning target volume (PTV) (plan 1), current margins are adequate. In plans that further escalate the dose to part

  18. Normal tissue complication probabilities correlated with late effects in the rectum after prostate conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, Einar; Olsen, Dag R.; Fossa, Sophie D.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy of deep-sited tumours will always result in normal tissue doses to some extent. The aim of this study was to calculate different risk estimates of late effects in the rectum for a group of cancer prostate patients treated with conformal radiation therapy (CRT) and correlate these estimates with the occurrences of late effects. Since the rectum is a hollow organ, several ways of generating dose-volume distributions over the organ are possible, and we wanted to investigate two of them. Methods and Materials: A mathematical model, known as the Lyman-Kutcher model, conventionally used to estimate normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) associated with radiation therapy, was applied to a material of 52 cancer prostate patients. The patients were treated with a four field box technique, with the rectum as organ at risk. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were generated for the whole rectum (including the cavity) and of the rectum wall. One to two years after the treatment, the patients completed a questionnaire concerning bowel (rectum) related morbidity quantifying the extent of late effects. Results: A correlation analysis using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, for NTCP values calculated from the DVHs and the patients' scores, gave correlation coefficients which were not statistically significant at the p max , of the whole rectum, correlated better to observed late toxicity than D max derived from histograms of the rectum wall. Correlation coefficients from 'high-dose' measures were larger than those calculated from the NTCP values. Accordingly, as the volume parameter of the Lyman-Kutcher model was reduced, raising the impact of small high-dose volumes on the NTCP values, the correlation between observed effects and NTCP values became significant at p < 0.01 level. Conclusions: 1) High-dose levels corresponding to small volume fractions of the cumulative dose-volume histograms were best correlated with the occurrences of late

  19. Association of anorectal dose-volume histograms and impaired fecal continence after 3D conformal radiotherapy for carcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vordermark, Dirk; Schwab, Michael; Ness-Dourdoumas, Rhea; Sailer, Marco; Flentje, Michael; Koelbl, Oliver

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The late toxicity of fecal incontinence after pelvic radiotherapy is now frequently recognized but the etiology poorly understood. We therefore investigated associations between dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters of the rectum and the anal canal with fecal continence as measured by an established 10-item questionnaire. Methods and materials: Forty-four patients treated for carcinoma of the prostate with 58-72 Gy of 3D conformal radiotherapy between 1995 and 1999 who completed the questionnaire formed the study population. Total continence scores of treated patients obtained 1.5 years (median) after radiotherapy were compared to a control group of 30 patients before radiotherapy. Median, mean, minimum and maximum doses as well as the volume (% and ml) treated to 40, 50, 60 and 70 Gy were determined separately for anal canal and rectum. DVH parameters were correlated with total continence score (Spearman rank test) and patients grouped according to observed continence were compared regarding DVH values (Mann-Whitney U-test). Results: Median fecal continence scores were significantly worse in the irradiated than in the control group (31 vs. 35 of a maximum 36 points). In treated patients, 59%/27%/14% were classified as fully continent, slightly incontinent and severely incontinent. Continence was similar in the 58-to-62-Gy, 66-Gy and 68-to-72-Gy dose groups. No DVH parameter was significantly correlated with total continence score, but severely incontinent patients had a significantly higher minimum dose to the anal canal than fully continent/slightly incontinent, accompanied by portals extending significantly further inferiorly with respect to the ischial tuberosities. Conclusions: Excluding the inferior part of the anal canal from the treated volume in 3D conformal therapy for carcinoma of the prostate appears to be a promising strategy to prevent radiation-induced fecal incontinence

  20. Studies on 192Ir afterloading irradiation of the canine prostate with special consideration of thermoluminescent dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, M.

    1986-01-01

    A method for high dose rate afterloading irradiation of the prostate with iridium 192 was developed. The isodoses of the urethra and rectum, which were measured by means of thermoluminescent dosimetry, showed deviations from the doses pre-calculated by computer (BRACHY), because this calculation is based on an anatomically ideal condition. (MBC) [de

  1. Is There a Role for Pelvic Irradiation in Localized Prostate Adenocarcinoma? Update of the Long-Term Survival Results of the GETUG-01 Randomized Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pommier, Pascal, E-mail: Pascal.pommier@lyon.unicancer.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon (France); Chabaud, Sylvie [Department of Clinical Research and Innovation, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon (France); Lagrange, Jean-Leon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire H. Mondor, Créteil (France); Richaud, Pierre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Bergognié, Bordeaux (France); Le Prise, Elisabeth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Eugène Marquis, Rennes (France); Wagner, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Andrée Dutreix, Dunkerque (France); Azria, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de Montpellier, Montpellier (France); Beckendorf, Veronique [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de Lorraine, Nancy (France); Suchaud, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de Roanne, Roanne (France); Bernier, Valerie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille (France); Perol, David [Department of Clinical Research and Innovation, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon (France); Carrie, Christian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon (France)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To report the long-term results of the French Genitourinary Study Group (GETUG)-01 study in terms of event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) and assess the potential interaction between hormonotherapy and pelvic nodes irradiation. Patients and Methods: Between December 1998 and June 2004, 446 patients with T1b-T3, N0pNx, M0 prostate carcinoma were randomly assigned to either pelvic nodes and prostate or prostate-only radiation therapy. Patients were stratified into 2 groups: “low risk” (T1-T2 and Gleason score 6 and prostate-specific antigen <3× the upper normal limit of the laboratory) (92 patients) versus “high risk” (T3 or Gleason score >6 or prostate-specific antigen >3× the upper normal limit of the laboratory). Short-term 6-month neoadjuvant and concomitant hormonal therapy was allowed only for high-risk patients. Radiation therapy was delivered with a 3-dimensional conformal technique, using a 4-field technique for the pelvic volume (46 Gy). The total dose recommended to the prostate moved from 66 Gy to 70 Gy during the course of the study. Criteria for EFS included biologic prostate-specific antigen recurrences and/or a local or metastatic progression. Results: With a median follow-up of 11.4 years, the 10-year OS and EFS were similar in the 2 treatment arms. A higher but nonsignificant EFS was observed in the low-risk subgroup in favor of pelvic nodes radiation therapy (77.2% vs 62.5%; P=.18). A post hoc subgroup analysis showed a significant benefit of pelvic irradiation when the risk of lymph node involvement was <15% (Roach formula). This benefit seemed to be limited to patients who did not receive hormonal therapy. Conclusion: Pelvic nodes irradiation did not statistically improve EFS or OS in the whole population but may be beneficial in selected low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with exclusive radiation therapy.

  2. Study of PDMS conformation in PDMS-based hybrid materials prepared by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancastre, J.J.H.; Fernandes, N.; Margaça, F.M.A.; Miranda Salvado, I.M.; Ferreira, L.M.; Falcão, A.N.; Casimiro, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane-silicate based hybrid materials have recognized properties (high flexibility, low elastic modulus or high mechanical strength) for which there are a large number of applications in development, such as for the bioapplications field. The hybrids addressed in the present study were prepared by gamma irradiation of a mixture of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and zirconium propoxide (PrZr) without addition of any solvent or other product. The materials are homogeneous, transparent, monolithic and flexible. The structure dependence on the PrZr content is addressed. A combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Infrared Spectroscopy (IR) was used. The results reveal that the polymer in the hybrids prepared with PrZr, in a content≤5 wt%, shows a structure similar to that in the irradiated pure polymer sample. In these samples the presence of ordered polymer regions is clearly found. For samples prepared with higher content of Zr almost no ordered polymer regions are observed. The addition of PrZr plays an important role on polymer conformation in these hybrid materials. - Highlights: ► PDMS-based hybrid materials were prepared by γ-irradiation. ► FTIR, ATR/FT-IR and XRD techniques were used to characterize the materials. ► Changes in FTIR bands reflect growth of crosslinking network. ► Above certain Zr concentration regions of Zr-silicate oxide are formed. ► Zr content determines conformation of the polymer chain network.

  3. Anal wall sparing effect of an endorectal balloon in 3D conformal and intensity-modulated prostate radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smeenk, Robert Jan; Lin, Emile N.J.Th. van; Kollenburg, Peter van; Kunze-Busch, Martina; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the anal wall (Awall) sparing effect of an endorectal balloon (ERB) in 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Materials and methods: In 24 patients with localized prostate carcinoma, two planning CT-scans were performed: with and without ERB. A prostate planning target volume (PTV) was defined, and the Awall was delineated, using two different methods. Three-field and 4-field 3D-CRT plans, and IMRT plans were generated with a prescription dose of 78 Gy. In 144 treatment plans, the minimum dose (D min ), maximum dose (D max ), and mean dose (D mean ) to the Awall were calculated, as well as the Awall volumes exposed to doses ranging from ≥20 Gy to ≥70 Gy (V 20 - V 70 , respectively). Results: In the 3D-CRT plans, an ERB significantly reduced D mean , D max , and V 30 - V 70 . For IMRT all investigated dose parameters were significantly reduced by the ERB. The absolute reduction of D mean was 12 Gy in 3D-CRT and was 7.5 Gy in IMRT for both methods of Awall delineation. Conclusions: Application of an ERB showed a significant Awall sparing effect in both 3D-CRT and IMRT. This may lead to reduced late anal toxicity in prostate radiotherapy.

  4. Anal wall sparing effect of an endorectal balloon in 3D conformal and intensity-modulated prostate radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeenk, Robert Jan; van Lin, Emile N J Th; van Kollenburg, Peter; Kunze-Busch, Martina; Kaanders, Johannes H A M

    2009-10-01

    To investigate the anal wall (Awall) sparing effect of an endorectal balloon (ERB) in 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. In 24 patients with localized prostate carcinoma, two planning CT-scans were performed: with and without ERB. A prostate planning target volume (PTV) was defined, and the Awall was delineated, using two different methods. Three-field and 4-field 3D-CRT plans, and IMRT plans were generated with a prescription dose of 78Gy. In 144 treatment plans, the minimum dose (D(min)), maximum dose (D(max)), and mean dose (D(mean)) to the Awall were calculated, as well as the Awall volumes exposed to doses ranging from >or=20Gy to >or=70Gy (V(20)-V(70), respectively). In the 3D-CRT plans, an ERB significantly reduced D(mean), D(max), and V(30)-V(70). For IMRT all investigated dose parameters were significantly reduced by the ERB. The absolute reduction of D(mean) was 12Gy in 3D-CRT and was 7.5Gy in IMRT for both methods of Awall delineation. Application of an ERB showed a significant Awall sparing effect in both 3D-CRT and IMRT. This may lead to reduced late anal toxicity in prostate radiotherapy.

  5. Dosimetric and Radiobiologic Comparison of 3D Conformal Versus Intensity Modulated Planning Techniques for Prostate Bed Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, Bridget F.; Das, Shiva; Temple, Kathy; Bynum, Sigrun; Catalano, Suzanne; Koontz, Jason I.; Montana, Gustavo S.; Oleson, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer improves biochemical and clinical disease-free survival. While comparisons in intact prostate cancer show a benefit for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) over 3D conformal planning, this has not been studied for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (RT). This study compares normal tissue and target dosimetry and radiobiological modeling of IMRT vs. 3D conformal planning in the postoperative setting. 3D conformal plans were designed for 15 patients who had been treated with IMRT planning for salvage post-prostatectomy RT. The same computed tomography (CT) and target/normal structure contours, as well as prescription dose, was used for both IMRT and 3D plans. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) were calculated based on the dose given to the bladder and rectum by both plans. Dose-volume histogram and NTCP data were compared by paired t-test. Bladder and rectal sparing were improved with IMRT planning compared to 3D conformal planning. The volume of the bladder receiving at least 75% (V75) and 50% (V50) of the dose was significantly reduced by 28% and 17%, respectively (p = 0.002 and 0.037). Rectal dose was similarly reduced, V75 by 33% and V50 by 17% (p = 0.001 and 0.004). While there was no difference in the volume of rectum receiving at least 65 Gy (V65), IMRT planning significant reduced the volume receiving 40 Gy or more (V40, p = 0.009). Bladder V40 and V65 were not significantly different between planning modalities. Despite these dosimetric differences, there was no significant difference in the NTCP for either bladder or rectal injury. IMRT planning reduces the volume of bladder and rectum receiving high doses during post-prostatectomy RT. Because of relatively low doses given to the bladder and rectum, there was no statistically significant improvement in NTCP between the 3D conformal and IMRT plans.

  6. Dosimetric and radiobiologic comparison of 3D conformal versus intensity modulated planning techniques for prostate bed radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Bridget F; Das, Shiva; Temple, Kathy; Bynum, Sigrun; Catalano, Suzanne; Koontz, Jason I; Montana, Gustavo S; Oleson, James R

    2009-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer improves biochemical and clinical disease-free survival. While comparisons in intact prostate cancer show a benefit for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) over 3D conformal planning, this has not been studied for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (RT). This study compares normal tissue and target dosimetry and radiobiological modeling of IMRT vs. 3D conformal planning in the postoperative setting. 3D conformal plans were designed for 15 patients who had been treated with IMRT planning for salvage post-prostatectomy RT. The same computed tomography (CT) and target/normal structure contours, as well as prescription dose, was used for both IMRT and 3D plans. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) were calculated based on the dose given to the bladder and rectum by both plans. Dose-volume histogram and NTCP data were compared by paired t-test. Bladder and rectal sparing were improved with IMRT planning compared to 3D conformal planning. The volume of the bladder receiving at least 75% (V75) and 50% (V50) of the dose was significantly reduced by 28% and 17%, respectively (p = 0.002 and 0.037). Rectal dose was similarly reduced, V75 by 33% and V50 by 17% (p = 0.001 and 0.004). While there was no difference in the volume of rectum receiving at least 65 Gy (V65), IMRT planning significant reduced the volume receiving 40 Gy or more (V40, p = 0.009). Bladder V40 and V65 were not significantly different between planning modalities. Despite these dosimetric differences, there was no significant difference in the NTCP for either bladder or rectal injury. IMRT planning reduces the volume of bladder and rectum receiving high doses during post-prostatectomy RT. Because of relatively low doses given to the bladder and rectum, there was no statistically significant improvement in NTCP between the 3D conformal and IMRT plans.

  7. Prostatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostatitis Overview Prostatitis is swelling and inflammation of the prostate gland, a walnut-sized gland situated directly below the bladder in ... produces fluid (semen) that nourishes and transports sperm. Prostatitis often causes painful or difficult urination. Other symptoms ...

  8. Three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy compared with permanent prostate implantation in low-risk prostate cancer based on endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging and prostate-specific antigen level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickett, Barby; Kurhanewicz, John; Pouliot, Jean; Weinberg, Vivian; Shinohara, Katsuto; Coakley, Fergus; Roach, Mack

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the metabolic response by comparing the time to resolution of spectroscopic abnormalities (TRSA) and the time to prostate-specific antigen level in low-risk prostate cancer patients after treatment with three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT) compared with permanent prostate implantation (PPI). Recent studies have suggested that the treatment of low-risk prostate cancer yields similar results for patients treated with 3D-CRT or PPI. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 patients, 25 in each group, who had been treated with 3D-CRT or PPI, had undergone endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging before and/or at varying times after therapy. The 3D-CRT patients had received radiation doses of ≥72 Gy compared with 144 Gy for the PPI patients. The spectra from all usable voxels were examined for detectable levels of metabolic signal, and the percentages of atrophic and cancerous voxels were tabulated. Results: The median time to resolution of the spectroscopic abnormalities was 32.2 and 24.8 months and the time to the nadir prostate-specific antigen level was 52.4 and 38.0 months for the 3D-CRT and PPI patients, respectively. Of the 3D-CRT patients, 92% achieved negative endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging findings, with 40% having complete metabolic atrophy. All 25 PPI patients had negative endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging findings, with 60% achieving complete metabolic atrophy. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that metabolic and biochemical responses of the prostate are more pronounced after PPI. Our results have not proved PPI is more effective at curing prostate cancer, but they have demonstrated that it may be more effective at destroying prostate metabolism

  9. Local control and survival after external irradiation for adenocarcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangala, N.; Cox, J.D.; Byhardt, R.W.; Wilson, J.F.; Greenberg, M.; Conceicao, A.L.D.

    1982-01-01

    From 1966 through 1978, 128 patients with biopsy-proven adenocarcinoma of the prostate underwent external irradiation to the entire pelvis followed by additional irradiation with a field that encompassed the entire prostate with generous margins. Local recurrence was diagnosed when palpable regrowth occurred and was confirmed by biopsy. Eighteen patients (14%) had local recurrence. Actuarial (life table) local recurrence rates, however, were 24% for both for Stage B and C patients. Actuarial five year survival was 100% for the 10 Stage A patients, 91% for the 25 Stage B, and 78% for the 93 Stage C patients. Actuarial five year disease-free survival was 59% for Stage B and 69% for Stage C patients. Local recurrence was affected by the total dose to the whole pelvis and the dose at the center of the prostate. Disease-free survival was influenced by differentiation. High dose external irradiation to the prostate and regional lymph nodes offers the greatest probability of long-term disease-free survival for patients with localized disease. Late bowel complications were seen in 14 patients (11%), two of whom required colostomies. Late urinary tract complications were observed in five patients (4%)

  10. Longitudinal Investigation of Adaptive Functioning Following Conformal Irradiation for Pediatric Craniopharyngioma and Low-Grade Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netson, Kelli L. [Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Kansas University School of Medicine—Wichita, Kansas (United States); Conklin, Heather M. [Department of Psychology, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping [Department of Biostatistics, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Children treated for brain tumors with conformal radiation therapy experience preserved cognitive outcomes. Early evidence suggests that adaptive functions or independent-living skills may be spared. This longitudinal investigation prospectively examined intellectual and adaptive functioning during the first 5 years following irradiation for childhood craniopharyngioma and low-grade glioma (LGG). The effect of visual impairment on adaptive outcomes was investigated. Methods and Materials: Children with craniopharyngioma (n=62) and LGG (n=77) were treated using conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy. The median age was 8.05 years (3.21-17.64 years) and 8.09 years (2.20-19.27 years), respectively. Serial cognitive evaluations including measures of intelligence quotient (IQ) and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) were conducted at preirradiation baseline, 6 months after treatment, and annually through 5 years. Five hundred eighty-eight evaluations were completed during the follow-up period. Results: Baseline assessment revealed no deficits in IQ and VABS indices for children with craniopharyngioma, with significant (P<.05) longitudinal decline in VABS Communication and Socialization indices. Clinical factors associated with more rapid decline included females and preirradiation chemotherapy (interferon). The only change in VABS Daily Living Skills correlated with IQ change (r=0.34; P=.01) in children with craniopharyngioma. Children with LGG performed below population norms (P<.05) at baseline on VABS Communication, Daily Living Indices, and the Adaptive Behavior Composite, with significant (P<.05) longitudinal decline limited to VABS Communication. Older age at irradiation was a protective factor against longitudinal decline. Severe visual impairment did not independently correlate with poorer adaptive outcomes for either tumor group. Conclusions: There was relative sparing of postirradiation functional outcomes over time in this sample

  11. Longitudinal Investigation of Adaptive Functioning Following Conformal Irradiation for Pediatric Craniopharyngioma and Low-Grade Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Netson, Kelli L.; Conklin, Heather M.; Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Children treated for brain tumors with conformal radiation therapy experience preserved cognitive outcomes. Early evidence suggests that adaptive functions or independent-living skills may be spared. This longitudinal investigation prospectively examined intellectual and adaptive functioning during the first 5 years following irradiation for childhood craniopharyngioma and low-grade glioma (LGG). The effect of visual impairment on adaptive outcomes was investigated. Methods and Materials: Children with craniopharyngioma (n=62) and LGG (n=77) were treated using conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy. The median age was 8.05 years (3.21-17.64 years) and 8.09 years (2.20-19.27 years), respectively. Serial cognitive evaluations including measures of intelligence quotient (IQ) and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) were conducted at preirradiation baseline, 6 months after treatment, and annually through 5 years. Five hundred eighty-eight evaluations were completed during the follow-up period. Results: Baseline assessment revealed no deficits in IQ and VABS indices for children with craniopharyngioma, with significant (P<.05) longitudinal decline in VABS Communication and Socialization indices. Clinical factors associated with more rapid decline included females and preirradiation chemotherapy (interferon). The only change in VABS Daily Living Skills correlated with IQ change (r=0.34; P=.01) in children with craniopharyngioma. Children with LGG performed below population norms (P<.05) at baseline on VABS Communication, Daily Living Indices, and the Adaptive Behavior Composite, with significant (P<.05) longitudinal decline limited to VABS Communication. Older age at irradiation was a protective factor against longitudinal decline. Severe visual impairment did not independently correlate with poorer adaptive outcomes for either tumor group. Conclusions: There was relative sparing of postirradiation functional outcomes over time in this sample

  12. Long term results of ultrasonically guided implantation of 125-I seeds combined with external irradiation in localized prostatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iversen, P; Rasmussen, F; Holm, H H [Depts. of Urology and Ultrasound, Herlev Hospital, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1991-01-01

    Transperineal 125-iodine seed implantation guided by transrectal ultrasonography and subsequent external beam irradiation was employed in the treatment of 32 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma (16 poorly differentiated). Follow-up is currently 35-98 months with a median of 65 months. Distant metastases have developed in 18 patients, of whom 11 have died from prostatic cancer. Median change in prostatic volume was a reduction of 35%. Re-biopsy or transurethral resection of the prostate was performed in 25 patients after 1-4 years, revealing still malignant histology in 10 (40%), of whom 8 have developed distant metastases or died from prostatic cancer. Fourteen patients suffered from late complications of which surgical intervention was indicated in five cases. Nine patients are presently free of progression and prostate specific antigen is bigger than 0.5 ng/ml in 8 of these. The future role of ultrasonically guided implantation in the management of prostatic cancer is discussed. (au).

  13. A rectal balloon catheter as internal immobilization device for conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstner, N.; Wachter, S.; Dorner, D.; Goldner, G.; Colotto, A.; Poetter, R.

    1999-01-01

    Background: As known from the literature, prostate motion depends on different bladder and/or rectum fillings. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of a rectum balloon catheter, used as an internal immobilization device, on prostate and rectum motion during the treatment course. Moreover we have analysed if the balloon enables an increase of the distance between the prostate and the posterior rectum wall. Results: An increase of the distance between the prostate and the posterior rectal wall of 8 mm was observed at the base of the prostate when using the rectum balloon. Moreover prostate motion in the ventrodorsal direction ≥4 mm (1 SD) was reduced from 6/10 patients (60%) to 1/10 patients (10%) using the rectal balloon. In general, deviations in the latero-lateral and cranio-caudal directions were less (mean ≤ 2 mm, 1 SD), no difference between both examination series (with and without balloon) was observed. Conclusion: Rectal balloon catheter offers a possibility to reduce prostate motion and rectum filling variations during treatment course. In addition it enables an increase in the distance between prostate and posterior rectal wall, which could enable an improved protection of the posterior rectal wall. (orig./AJ) [de

  14. Factors related to late GI and GU complications in conformal and conventional radiation treatment of cancer of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Lee, W. Robert; Hunt, Margie A.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Peter, Ruth S.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the factors that predict for late GI and GU morbidity in radiation treatment of the prostate. Materials and Methods: Six hundred sixteen consecutive prostate cancer patients treated between 1985 and 1994 with conformal or conventional techniques were included in the analysis. All patients had at least 3 months followup (median 26 months) and received at least 65 Gy. Late GI morbidity was rectal bleeding (requiring more than 2 procedures) or proctitis. Late GU morbidity was cystitis or stricture. Univariate analysis compared the differences in the incidence of RTOG-EORTC grade 3 and 4 late morbidity by age (<60 versus ≥ 60 years), peracute side effects ≥ grade 1 (during treatment), subacute side effects ≥ grade 1 (0 to 90 days after treatment), irradiated volume parameters, and dose. Multivariate proportional hazards analysis includes these same variables in a model of time to complication. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze incidence of peracute and subacute GI and GU side effects by GI and GU comorbidities, performance status, pretreatment procedures (biopsy, TURP, etc.), age, treatment volume parameters, and peracute responses. Results: Peracute GI and GU side effects were noted in 441 and 442 patients, respectively. Subacute GI and GU side effects were noted in 34 and 54 patients, respectively. Subacute GI side effects were highly correlated with subacute GU side effects (p<0.00001). Late morbidities were not correlated with peracute side effects but were correlated with subacute side effects (both GI and GU). Thirteen of the 616 patients expressed grade 3 or 4 GI injuries 3 to 32 months after the end of treatment, with a mean of 13 months. The 6 GU morbidities occurred significantly later (9 - 52 months) with a mean of 33 months. Central axis dose and age less than 60 years were the only independent variables significantly related to the incidence of late GI morbidity on multivariate analysis. Subacute and peracute

  15. Prostate-specific antigen for pretreatment prediction and posttreatment evaluation of outcome after definitive irradiation for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuban, Deborah A; El-Mahdi, Anas M; Schellhammer, Paul F

    1995-05-15

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to assess the predictive value of pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and the difference between clinical and PSA disease-free status in patients with long-term follow-up after irradiation for prostatic carcinoma. Comparison of the distribution of prognostic factors between surgical and radiation series was also made. Methods and Materials: From 1975-1989, 652 patients with clinical Stage A2-C prostatic adenocarcinoma were definitively irradiated using external beam therapy. One hundred and fifty patients with banked serum and up to 14 years follow-up have pretreatment PSA levels and 355 patients with up to 17 years follow-up have posttreatment values. Treatment failure was analyzed by tumor stage, grade, and four pretreatment PSA categories. Disease-progression was evaluated by clinical and biochemical (PSA) endpoints. Prognostic factors were compared to two surgical series. Results: A significant difference was seen in clinical and PSA disease-free (PSA {<=} 4.0 ng/ml) status based on tumor grade, stage, and pretreatment PSA category. Although the expected clinical outcome has been well-documented previously, results based on posttreatment PSA levels show 5-year disease-free survivals reduced by 10-16% and 10-year survivals lessened by 15-39% depending upon the particular tumor grade and stage. The earlier stage, lower grade tumors showed the largest difference between clinical and biochemical recurrence rates at the longest interval from treatment. Even more notable were the differences in the clinical and PSA disease-free rates based on the pretreatment PSA level. Comparing the irradiated patients to two surgical series showed that the former had a larger percentage of more advanced stage tumors with more unfavorable PSA levels as compared to prostatectomy patients. Conclusion: With long-term follow-up, the pretreatment PSA level continues to be a powerful predictor of clinical and biochemical outcome in patients

  16. Chronic rectal bleeding after high dose conformal treatment of prostate cancer warrants modification of existing morbidity scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, A.L.; Schulthiess, T.E.; Hunt, M.A.; Movsas, B.; Peter, R.; Hanks, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Serious late morbidity (Grade (3(4))) from the conformal treatment of prostate cancer has been reported in <1% to 6% of patients. This study demonstrates that the reported frequency of Grade (3(4)) complications varies by the morbidity scale selected and that no existing morbidity scale adequately represents chronic rectal bleeding, which is our most frequent persisting late sequela of high dose conformal treatment. Materials and Methods: Between (5(89)) and (12(93)), 352 patients with T1-3 NXM0 prostate cancers were treated with our 4-field conformal technique without special rectal blocking. This technique includes a 1 cm margin from the CTV to the PTV in all directions. The median follow-up for these patients was 38 mos (4 to 78), and the median ICRU reporting point dose was 74 Gy (63 to 81). Patients are followed at six month intervals, and no patient is lost to follow-up. Three morbidity scales are assessed, the RTOG, the late effects group (LENT), and our modification of the LENT (FC-LENT). This modification registers chronic rectal bleeding requiring more than two coagulations as a grade 3 event. Estimates for Grade (3(4)) late GI complication rates were determined using Kaplan-Meier methodology. Differences in morbidity rates were evaluated using the log-rank test and differences in time to latency of complications were evaluated using the nonparametric Wilcoxon test. The duration of severe symptoms with chronic rectal bleeding is measured from the first to the last transrectal coagulation. Results: Sixteen patients developed Grade (3(4)) complications by one of the three morbidity scales. Two patients required surgery (colostomy, sigmoid resection), 5 required a transfusion, and 9 required more than two coagulations. The median latency to the third coagulation (plus or minus transfusions) was 24 mos (17 to 40). The median duration of bleeding between the first and last coagulation was 6 mos (3 to 25), illustrating the chronicity of this problem

  17. Daily CT planning during boost irradiation of prostate cancer. Feasibility and time requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geinitz, H.; Zimmermann, F.B.; Kuzmany, A.; Kneschaurek, P.

    2000-01-01

    Background: In the irradiation of prostate cancer internal organ movement leads to uncertainties in the daily localization of the clinical target volume. Therefore more or less large safety margins are added when designing the treatment portals. With daily CT planning internal organ movement can be compensated to some extent, safety margins can be reduced and irradiated normal tissue can be spared. The feasibility of daily CT-based 3D treatment planning is studied in a patient with localized prostate carcinoma using a new patient positioning system. Methods: Daily CT planning was applied during boost irradiation of a patient with prostate cancer: After patient immobilization the pelvis was scanned in 3 mm CT slices. Planning was done with the BrainSCAN planning system for stereotactic body irradiation. The prostate was contoured in all slices and the safety margins of the micromultileafs were automatically set to the distance chosen by the physician (0.8 cm). Patient positioning was done with the BrainLAB ExacTrac positioning system on the basis of skin attached stereotactic body markers. Before each treatment verification images of the isocenter were taken. Results: The total time requirement for planning and irradiation was about 1 hour 15 minutes. Patient positioning on the treatment couch took about 10 minutes. The accuracy of the positioning system was good (75% of the deviations were smaller than 3 mm). The shift of the single markers from CT scan to CT scan was more extensive than those of the center of all 7 markers combined (47% of the deviations were smaller than 3 mm). The location of the markers seems to influence the magnitude of their dislocation. Conclusion: Daily CT planning is feasible but time consuming. The new patient positioning system ExacTrac is an interesting tool especially for daily CT planning since conventional simulation can be omitted. (orig.) [de

  18. Estimation of the incidence of late bladder and rectum complications after high-dose (70-78 Gy) conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, using dose-volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boersma, Liesbeth J.; Brink, Mandy van den; Bruce, Allison M.; Shouman, Tarek; Gras, Luuk; Velde, Annet te; Lebesque, Joos V.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether Dose-Volume Histogram (DVH) parameters can be used to identify risk groups for developing late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: DVH parameters were analyzed for 130 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with conformal radiotherapy in a dose-escalating protocol (70-78 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction). The incidence of late (>6 months) GI and GU complications was classified using the RTOG/EORTC and the SOMA/LENT scoring system. In addition, GI complications were divided in nonsevere and severe (requiring one or more laser treatments or blood transfusions) rectal bleeding. The median follow-up time was 24 months. We investigated whether rectal and bladder wall volumes, irradiated to various dose levels, correlated with the observed actuarial incidences of GI and GU complications, using volume as a continuous variable. Subsequently, for each dose level in the DVH, the rectal wall volumes were dichotomized using different volumes as cutoff levels. The impact of the total radiation dose, and the maximum radiation dose in the rectal and bladder wall was analyzed as well. Results: The actuarial incidence at 2 years for GI complications ≥Grade II was 14% (RTOG/EORTC) or 20% (SOMA/LENT); for GU complications ≥Grade III 8% (RTOG/EORTC) or 21% (SOMA/LENT). Neither for GI complications ≥Grade II (RTOG/EORTC or SOMA/LENT), nor for GU complications ≥Grade III (RTOG/EORTC or SOMA/LENT), was a significant correlation found between any of the DVH parameters and the actuarial incidence of complications. For severe rectal bleeding (actuarial incidence at 2 years 3%), four consecutive volume cutoff levels were found, which significantly discriminated between high and low risk. A trend was observed that a total radiation dose ≥ 74 Gy (or a maximum radiation dose in the rectal wall >75 Gy) resulted in a higher incidence of severe rectal bleeding (p

  19. Evidence-based review of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: An ASTRO outcomes initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, David E.; Emami, Bahman; Mauch, Peter M.; Konski, Andre A.; Tao, May L.; Ng, Andrea K.; Klein, Eric A.; Mohideen, Najeeb; Hurwitz, Mark D.; Fraas, Bendick A.; Roach, Mack; Gore, Elizabeth M.; Tepper, Joel E.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a systematic review of the evidence to determine the efficacy and effectiveness of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for localized prostate cancer; provide a clear presentation of the key clinical outcome questions related to the use of 3D-CRT in the treatment of localized prostate cancer that may be answered by a formal literature review; and provide concise information on whether 3D-CRT improves the clinical outcomes in the treatment of localized prostate cancer compared with conventional RT. Methods and Materials: We performed a systematic review of the literature through a structured process developed by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology's Outcomes Committee that involved the creation of a multidisciplinary task force, development of clinical outcome questions, a formal literature review and data abstraction, data review, and outside peer review. Results: Seven key clinical questions were identified. The results and task force conclusions of the literature review for each question are reported. Conclusion: The technological goals of reducing morbidity with 3D-CRT have been achieved. Randomized trials and follow-up of completed trials remain necessary to address these clinical outcomes specifically with regard to patient subsets and the use of hormonal therapy

  20. Dosimetric Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and 4-Field 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Uysal

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this dosimetric study is the targeted dose homogeneity and critical organ dose comparison of 7-field Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT and 3-D 4-field conformal radiotherapy. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with low and moderate risk prostate cancer treated at Gülhane Military Medical School Radiation Oncology Department between January 2009 and December 2009 are included in this study. Two seperate dosimetric plans both for 7-field IMRT and 3D-CRT have been generated for each patient to comparatively evaluate the dosimetric status of both techniques and all the patients received 7-field IMRT. Results: Dose-comparative evaluation of two techniques revealed the superiority of IMRT technique with statistically significantly lower femoral head doses along with reduced critical organ dose-volume parameters of bladder V60 (the volume receiving 60 Gy and rectal V40 (the volume receiving 40 Gy and V60. Conclusion: It can be concluded that IMRT is an effective definitive management tool for prostate cancer with improved critical organ sparing and excellent dose homogenization in target organs of prostate and seminal vesicles.

  1. Half-body irradiation in the treatment of metastatic prostatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowland, C.G.; Bullimore, J.A.; Smith, P.J.B.; Roberts, J.B.M.

    1981-01-01

    High dose radiation therapy given as a single fraction to the upper and lower halves of the body gives effective palliation for metastatic solid tumours. This treatment modality appears to be particularly effective in tumours which may have a slow doubling time such as carcinoma of the prostate. Fifty-two patients with metastatic carcinoma of the prostate involving the skeletal system have received half-body irradiation (8 MeV X-rays at a dose rate of about 100 cGy/min). All had prior treatment with additive hormones or orchiectomy and the majority had received localised irradiation and/or chemotherapy. Significant immediate pain relief was achieved in 42 out of 52 patients (80%). This pain relief was maintained until death in 29 out of 43 patients (67%). Pain relief in responders appears to occur within 24 to 48 h of treatment. (author)

  2. Temporal and Spatial Dynamics of Androgen Receptor Conformation and Interactions in Prostate Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schaufele, Fred

    2007-01-01

    ... for prostate cancer treatment. Studies supported by this grant indicate that the failure of tumors to respond to anti-androgen therapy corresponded best with an increased nuclear transport of AR...

  3. Set-up error in supine-positioned patients immobilized with two different modalities during conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorino, C.; Cattaneo, G.M.; Calandrino, R.; Reni, M.; Bolognesi, A.; Bonini, A.

    1998-01-01

    Background: Conformal radiotherapy requires reduced margins around the clinical target volume (CTV) with respect to traditional radiotherapy techniques. Therefore, high set-up accuracy and reproducibility are mandatory. Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of two different immobilization techniques during conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer with small fields. Materials and methods: 52 patients with prostate cancer were treated by conformal three- or four-field techniques with radical or adjuvant intent between November 1996 and March 1998. In total, 539 portal images were collected on a weekly basis for at least the first 4 weeks of the treatment on lateral and anterior 18 MV X-ray fields. The average number of sessions monitored per patient was 5.7 (range 4-10). All patients were immobilized with an alpha-cradle system; 25 of them were immobilized at the pelvis level (group A) and the remaining 27 patients were immobilized in the legs (group B). The shifts with respect to the simulation condition were assessed by measuring the distances between the same bony landmarks and the field edges. The global distributions of cranio-caudal (CC), posterior-anterior (PA) and left-right (LR) shifts were considered; for each patient random and systematic error components were assessed by following the procedure suggested by Bijhold et al. (Bijhold J, Lebesque JV, Hart AAM, Vijlbrief RE. Maximising set-up accuracy using portal images as applied to a conformal boost technique for prostatic cancer. Radiother. Oncol. 1992;24:261-271). For each patient the average isocentre (3D) shift was assessed as the quadratic sum of the average shifts in the three directions. Results 5 mm equal to 4.4% with respect to the 21.6% of group A (P<0.0001). This value was also better than the corresponding value found in a previously investigated group of 21 non-immobilized patients (Italia C, Fiorino C, Ciocca M, et al. Quality control by portal film analysis of the conformal radiotherapy

  4. Adjuvant and salvage irradiation following radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, M M; Dallow, K C; Zietman, A L; Althausen, A F; Heney, N M; McGovern, F J; Shipley, W U

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the ability of adjuvant irradiation to prevent PSA failure in cases of pT3N0 disease, and of salvage irradiation to durably suppress a rising PSA following radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: 62 patients treated by post-operative radiation therapy (60-64Gy in 1.8Gy fractions to the tumor bed) between 1988 and 1993 were evaluated. All had complete pre- and post-radiation PSA data. Median follow up was 3.2 years from time of surgery and 2.2 years from irradiation. 20 patients had Gleason grade 3 disease (moderately differentiated) and 41 Gleason 4-5 (poorly differentiated). 46 had positive inked surgical margins, 18 involved seminal vesicles and 5 had palpable recurrent disease. None had known nodal or metastatic disease. 32 patients underwent adjuvant treatment (undetectable PSA at time of irradiation) and 30 salvage (detectable PSA at time of irradiation). Kaplan-Meier life table analysis was employed. The endpoint studied was freedom from biochemical failure. This was defined as a rise in the PSA of greater than 10% (intra laboratory error <8%) or a previously undetectable PSA becoming detectable. Results: The overall actuarial freedom from biochemical failure at 4 years from radiotherapy was 59%. A significant difference was seen between those receiving adjuvant and those receiving salvage irradiation (71% vs 51%, p=0.03). Amongst those in the salvage group neither the PSA prior to surgery, the PSA at the time of irradiation, the seminal vesicle status, nor the Gleason score (3 vs 4-5) correlated significantly with outcome. The time interval between surgery and irradiation was, however, significant. Those being treated within 6 months fared better than those treated later (60% vs 36%, p=0.04). Further, those treated early were more likely to achieve an undetectable nadir PSA level (94% vs 71%). Conclusion: The addition of adjuvant irradiation appears to improve the 4 year biochemical disease-free survival of patients with poor

  5. Thermoacoustic contrast of prostate cancer due to heating by very high frequency irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patch, S K; Hull, D; Thomas, M; Jacobsohn, K; See, WA; Griep, SK

    2015-01-01

    Applying the thermoacoustic (TA) effect to diagnostic imaging was first proposed in the 1980s. The object under test is irradiated by high-power pulses of electromagnetic energy, which heat tissue and cause thermal expansion. Outgoing TA pressure pulses are detected by ultrasound transducers and reconstructed to provide images of the object. The TA contrast mechanism is strongly dependent upon the frequency of the irradiating electromagnetic pulse. When very high frequency (VHF) electromagnetic irradiation is utilized, TA signal production is driven by ionic content. Prostatic fluids contain high levels of ionic metabolites, including citrate, zinc, calcium, and magnesium. Healthy prostate glands produce more ionic metabolites than diseased glands. VHF pulses are therefore expected to generate stronger TA signal in healthy prostate glands than in diseased glands. A benchtop system for performing ex vivo TA computed tomography with VHF energy is described and images are presented. The system utilizes irradiation pulses of 700 ns duration exceeding 20 kW power. Reconstructions frequently visualize anatomic landmarks such as the urethra and verumontanum. TA reconstructions from three freshly excised human prostate glands with little, moderate, and severe cancerous involvement are compared with histology. TA signal strength is negatively correlated with percent cancerous involvement in this small sample size. For the 45 regions of interest analyzed, a reconstruction value of 0.4 mV provides 100% sensitivity but only 29% specificity. This sample size is far too small to draw sweeping conclusions, but the results warrant a larger volume study including comparison of TA images to the gold standard, histology. (paper)

  6. Treatment-Related Morbidity in Prostate Cancer: A Comparison of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy With and Without Image Guidance Using Implanted Fiducial Markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Jasmeet; Greer, Peter B.; White, Martin A.; Parker, Joel; Patterson, Jackie; Tang, Colin I.; Capp, Anne; Wratten, Christopher; Denham, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the prevalence of rectal and urinary dysfunctional symptoms using image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) with fiducials and magnetic resonance planning for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: During the implementation stages of IGRT between September 2008 and March 2010, 367 consecutive patients were treated with prostatic irradiation using 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with and without IGRT (non-IGRT). In November 2010, these men were asked to report their bowel and bladder symptoms using a postal questionnaire. The proportions of patients with moderate to severe symptoms in these groups were compared using logistic regression models adjusted for tumor and treatment characteristic variables. Results: Of the 282 respondents, the 154 selected for IGRT had higher stage tumors, received higher prescribed doses, and had larger volumes of rectum receiving high dosage than did the 128 selected for non-IGRT. The follow-up duration was 8 to 26 months. Compared with the non-IGRT group, improvement was noted in all dysfunctional rectal symptoms using IGRT. In multivariable analyses, IGRT improved rectal pain (odds ratio [OR] 0.07 [0.009-0.7], P=.02), urgency (OR 0.27 [0.11-0.63], P=<.01), diarrhea (OR 0.009 [0.02-0.35], P<.01), and change in bowel habits (OR 0.18 [0.06-0.52], P<.010). No correlation was observed between rectal symptom levels and dose-volume histogram data. Urinary dysfunctional symptoms were similar in both treatment groups. Conclusions: In comparison with men selected for non-IGRT, a significant reduction of bowel dysfunctional symptoms was confirmed in men selected for IGRT, even though they had larger volumes of rectum treated to higher doses

  7. A phase II study of localized prostate cancer treated to 75.6 Gy with 3D conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichol, Alan; Chung, Peter; Lockwood, Gina; Rosewall, Tara; Divanbiegi, Lorella; Sweet, Joan; Toi, Ants; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Rob; Crook, Juanita; Gospodarowicz, Mary; McLean, Michael; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To prospectively evaluate toxicity, biochemical failure-free survival (bFFS) and biopsy-proven local control for prostate cancer patients treated with 75.6 Gy in 42 fractions using 6-field conformal radiotherapy to prostate alone. Patients and methods: From 1997 to 1999, 140 patients with T1-2NxM0, Gleason score ≤8, and PSA ≤20 ng/ml prostate cancer were assessed using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute and late toxicity scores. bFFS was determined for 120 patients treated without hormones. Post-treatment prostate biopsies were performed at a median of 3 years and a late toxicity questionnaire was administered at a median of 5 years. Results: Clinically important acute toxicities were gastrointestinal (GI) grade 2: 22% and 3: 0%, and genitourinary (GU) grade 2: 24% and 3: 2%. Late physician-assessed toxicities were GI ≥grade 2: 2%, and GU ≥grade 2: 1%. The 3-year bFFS of patients failure-free before biopsy was 93% (95% CI: 83-100) from a negative biopsy and 22% (95% CI: 0-56) from a positive biopsy (P=0.001). Patients reported significantly more late toxicity than physicians (GI: P=0.003, GU: P<0.001). At 5.0 years median follow-up, cause-specific survival was 98% (95% CI: 96-100), overall survival was 91% (95% CI: 86-97), and bFFS was 55% (95% CI: 45-64). Conclusions: 75.6 Gy caused modest levels of acute and late toxicity. Three-year biopsies predicted subsequent biochemical outcome

  8. Target volume definition in conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer: quality assurance in the MRC RT-01 trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddon, B.S.; Wilson, J.; Khoo, V.; Dearnaley, D.; Bidmead, M.

    2000-01-01

    Prior to randomization of patients into the UK Medical Research Council multicentre randomized trial (RT-01) of conformal radiotherapy (CFRT) in prostate cancer, clinicians at participating centres were required to complete a quality assurance (QA) clinical planning exercise to enable an investigation of inter-observer variability in gross target volume (GTV) and normal structure outlining. Thirteen participating centres and two investigators completed the clinical planning exercise of three practice planning cases. Clinicians were asked to draw outlines of the GTV, rectum and bladder on hard-copy computerized tomography (CT) films of the pelvis, which were transferred onto the Cadplan computer planning system by a single investigator. Centre, inferior and superior CT levels of GTV, rectum and bladder were noted, and volume calculations performed. Planning target volumes (PTV) were generated using automatic volume expansion of GTVs by a 1 cm margin. Anterior, right and left lateral beam eye views (BEV) of the PTVs were generated. Using a common central point, the BEV PTVs were superimposed for each beam direction of each case. Radial PTV variation was investigated by measurement of a novel parameter, termed the radial line measurement variation (RLMV). GTV central slice and length were defined with reasonable consistency. The RLMV analysis showed that the main part of the prostate gland, bladder and inferior rectum were outlined with good consistency among clinicians. However, the outlining of the prostatic apex, superior aspect of the prostate projecting into the bladder, seminal vesicles, the base of seminal vesicles and superior rectum were more variable. This exercise has demonstrated adequate consistency of GTV definition. The RLMV method of analysis indicates particular regions of clinician uncertainty. Appropriate feedback has been given to all participating clinicians, and the final RT-01 trial protocol has been modified to accommodate these findings

  9. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatti, M.; Bresciani, S.; Ponzone, R.; Panaia, R.; Salatino, A.; Stasi, M.; Gabriele, P. [IRCC, Candiolo (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.- To analyse the incidence and severity of acute and late normal tissue toxicity and cosmetic outcome using three - dimensional conformal radiotherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Patients and Methods.- 70 patients with stage I disease were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation, in an approved protocol. The prescribed dose was 34 Gy in all patients delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive days. On all CT scans gross tumor volume (GTV ) was defined around surgical clips. A 1.5 cm margin was added in order to account for clinical target volume (CTV) . A margin of 1 cm was added to CTI to define the planning target volume (PTV). The dose-volume constraints were followed in accordance with the specifications as dictated in the NSABP/RTOG protocol. After treatment, patients underwent a clinical and cosmetic evaluation every 3 months. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG grading schema. The cosmetic assessment was performed by the physicians using the controlateral untreated breast as the reference (Harvard scale). Results.- Median patient age was 66 years (range 51-80). Median follow-up was 15 months (range 6-46). Tumor size was < 10 mm in 33 patients (53%) and > 2 cm in 4(6%). The mean value of the ratio between the PTV and the whole ipsilateral breast volume was 38 % and the median percentage whole breast volume that received 95 % of prescribed dose was 34% (range 16%-55%). The rate of G1 and G2 acute skin toxicity was 28% and 2% respectively and the late toxicity was 17% (G1). G2 or greater toxicities were not observed. The most pronounced G1 late toxicity was subcutaneous fibrosis, developed in 3 patients. The cosmetic outcome was excellent in 83% and good in 17%. Conclusion.- Accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy is technically feasible with very low acute and late toxicity. Long

  10. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatti, M.; Bresciani, S.; Ponzone, R.; Panaia, R.; Salatino, A.; Stasi, M.; Gabriele, P.

    2011-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.- To analyse the incidence and severity of acute and late normal tissue toxicity and cosmetic outcome using three - dimensional conformal radiotherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Patients and Methods.- 70 patients with stage I disease were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation, in an approved protocol. The prescribed dose was 34 Gy in all patients delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive days. On all CT scans gross tumor volume (GTV ) was defined around surgical clips. A 1.5 cm margin was added in order to account for clinical target volume (CTV) . A margin of 1 cm was added to CTI to define the planning target volume (PTV). The dose-volume constraints were followed in accordance with the specifications as dictated in the NSABP/RTOG protocol. After treatment, patients underwent a clinical and cosmetic evaluation every 3 months. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG grading schema. The cosmetic assessment was performed by the physicians using the controlateral untreated breast as the reference (Harvard scale). Results.- Median patient age was 66 years (range 51-80). Median follow-up was 15 months (range 6-46). Tumor size was 2 cm in 4(6%). The mean value of the ratio between the PTV and the whole ipsilateral breast volume was 38 % and the median percentage whole breast volume that received 95 % of prescribed dose was 34% (range 16%-55%). The rate of G1 and G2 acute skin toxicity was 28% and 2% respectively and the late toxicity was 17% (G1). G2 or greater toxicities were not observed. The most pronounced G1 late toxicity was subcutaneous fibrosis, developed in 3 patients. The cosmetic outcome was excellent in 83% and good in 17%. Conclusion.- Accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy is technically feasible with very low acute and late toxicity. Long-term results are needed to assess

  11. Offline multiple adaptive planning strategy for concurrent irradiation of the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Peng; Xia, Ping; Pouliot, Jean; Roach, Mack

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Concurrent irradiation of the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes (PLNs) can be challenging due to the independent motion of the two target volumes. To address this challenge, the authors have proposed a strategy referred to as Multiple Adaptive Planning (MAP). To minimize the number of MAP plans, the authors’ previous work only considered the prostate motion in one major direction. After analyzing the pattern of the prostate motion, the authors investigated a practical number of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans needed to accommodate the prostate motion in two major directions simultaneously. Methods: Six patients, who received concurrent irradiation of the prostate and PLNs, were selected for this study. Nine MAP-IMRT plans were created for each patient with nine prostate contours that represented the prostate at nine locations with respect to the PLNs, including the original prostate contour and eight contours shifted either 5 mm in a single anterior-posterior (A-P), or superior-inferior (S-I) direction, or 5 mm in both A-P and S-I directions simultaneously. From archived megavoltage cone beam CT (MV-CBCT) and a dual imaging registration, 17 MV-CBCTs from 33 available MV-CBCT from these patients showed large prostate displacements (>3 mm in any direction) with respect to the pelvic bones. For each of these 17 fractions, one of nine MAP-IMRT plans was retrospectively selected and applied to the MV-CBCT for dose calculation. For comparison, a simulated isocenter-shifting plan and a reoptimized plan were also created for each of these 17 fractions. The doses to 95% (D95) of the prostate and PLNs, and the doses to 5% (D5) of the rectum and bladder were calculated and analyzed. Results: For the prostate, D95 > 97% of the prescription dose was observed in 16, 16, and 17 of 17 fractions for the MAP, isocenter-shifted, and reoptimized plans, respectively. For PLNs, D95 > 97% of the prescription doses was observed in 10, 3, and 17 of 17 fractions for

  12. Long-term results of ultrasonically guided implantation of 125-I seeds combined with external irradiation in localized prostatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Rasmussen, F; Holm, H H

    1991-01-01

    Transperineal 125-iodine seed implantation guided by transrectal ultrasonography and subsequent external beam irradiation was employed in the treatment of 32 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma (16 poorly differentiated). Follow-up is currently 35-98 months with a median of 65 months....... Distant metastases have developed in 18 patients, of whom 11 have died from prostatic cancer. Median change in prostatic volume was a reduction of 35%. Re-biopsy or transurethral resection of the prostate was performed in 25 patients after 1-4 years, revealing still malignant histology in 10 (40......%), of whom 8 have developed distant metastases or died from prostatic cancer. Fourteen patients suffered from late complications of which surgical intervention was indicated in five cases. Nine patients are presently free of progression and prostate specific antigen is less than 0.5 ng/ml in 8 of these...

  13. Long-term results of ultrasonically guided implantation of 125-I seeds combined with external irradiation in localized prostatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Rasmussen, F; Holm, H H

    1991-01-01

    %), of whom 8 have developed distant metastases or died from prostatic cancer. Fourteen patients suffered from late complications of which surgical intervention was indicated in five cases. Nine patients are presently free of progression and prostate specific antigen is less than 0.5 ng/ml in 8 of these......Transperineal 125-iodine seed implantation guided by transrectal ultrasonography and subsequent external beam irradiation was employed in the treatment of 32 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma (16 poorly differentiated). Follow-up is currently 35-98 months with a median of 65 months....... Distant metastases have developed in 18 patients, of whom 11 have died from prostatic cancer. Median change in prostatic volume was a reduction of 35%. Re-biopsy or transurethral resection of the prostate was performed in 25 patients after 1-4 years, revealing still malignant histology in 10 (40...

  14. Rectal dose sparing with a balloon catheter and ultrasound localization in conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Rakesh R.; Orton, Nigel; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Chappell, Rick; Ritter, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: To compare the rectal wall and bladder volume in the high dose region with or without the use of a balloon catheter with both three-dimensional (3D)-conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy (CRT, IMRT) approaches in the treatment of prostate cancer. Material and methods: Five patients with a wide range of prostate volumes and treated with primary external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer were selected for analysis. Pinnacle TM treatment plans were generated utilizing a 3D conformal six-field design and an IMRT seven coplanar-field plan with a novel, three-step optimization and with ultrasound localization. Separate plans were devised with a rectal balloon deflated or air inflated with and without inclusion of the seminal vesicles (SV) in the target volume. The prescription dose was 76 Gy in 38 fractions of 2 Gy each. Cumulative dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed for the planning target volume (PTV), rectal wall, and bladder with an inflated (60 cc air) or deflated balloon with and without SV included. The volumes of rectal wall and bladder above 60, 65, and 70 Gy with each treatment approach were evaluated. Results: Daily balloon placement was well-tolerated with good patient positional reproducibility. Inflation of the rectal balloon in all cases resulted in a significant decrease in the absolute volume of rectal wall receiving greater than 60, 65, or 70 Gy. The rectal sparing ratio (RSR), consisting of a structure's high dose volume with the catheter inflated, divided by the volume with the catheter deflated, was calculated for each patient with and without seminal vesicle inclusion for 3D-CRT and IMRT. For 3D-CRT, RSRs with SV included were 0.59, 0.59, and 0.56 and with SV excluded were 0.60, 0.58, and 0.54 at doses of greater than 60, 65, and 70 Gy, respectively. Similarly, for IMRT, the mean RSRs were 0.59, 0.59, and 0.63 including SV and 0.71, 0.66, and 0.67 excluding SV at these same dose levels

  15. Investigations of the conformation of DNA, native or alterated by irradiation, with ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zierenberg, B.

    1971-01-01

    An extension of the range of scattering angles in the direction of smaller angles (up to delta = 12 0 ) made it possible to successfully use the light scattering methods for the determination of DNA molecular weights >= 3 x 10 6 . In order to determine the conformation of native DNA in solution, different molecular weights were prepared by ultrasonic degradation. According to their hyperchromicity, these preparations are practically native. When native DNA in solution is irradiated with UV light of the wavelength lambda = 313 nm, two different photoreactions may occur: a) double and single strand breaks leading to degradation of the DNA molecule, and b) dimerisation of neighbouring thymine bases. The two reactions are independent of each other. In the presence of acetophenone as photosensitizer, the reaction type a) is greater by a factor 4 (in terms of single-strand breaks), while the reaction type b) is greater by a factor 16. The number of thymidine dimers per single strand break amounts to 100 for photosensitized reactions and to 25 for non-photosensitized reactions. The number of single strand breaks in terms of the quantum flux of 1 μ Einstein absorbed by the DNA is greater by a factor 3 during irradiation with UV light lambda = 254 nm as compared to the wavelength lambda = 313 nm. At this wavelength, DNA degradation starts at absorption energies as low as >= 2 x 10 7 erg/cm 3 . Light scattering and measurements with DNA containing thymidine dimers indicated neither a change in the total conformation nor a noticeable change in the microstructure. The hyperchromicity of the DNA was also unchanged. From these experimental results, it is concluded that the double helix of DNA is essentially stable to thymidine dimerisation. (orig./MG) [de

  16. 3D conformal external beam radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma: an experiment of Instituto do Radium de Campinas with 285 patients; Radioterapia externa conformada 3D para o carcinoma de prostata: experiencia do Instituto do Radium de Campinas com 285 pacientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Ricardo Akiyoshi [Hospital de Caridade Dr. Astrogildo de Azevedo, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Monti, Carlos Roberto; Trevisan, Felipe Amstalden [Instituto do Radium de Campinas (IRC), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Jacinto, Alexandre Arthur [Fundacao Pio XII, Barretos, SP (Brazil). Hospital de Cancer de Barretos

    2009-03-15

    Objective: To report the outcomes of 3D conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer in a single institution. Materials and methods: From July 1997 to January 2002, 285 consecutive patients with prostate cancer were submitted to 3D conformal radiation therapy receiving a median dose of 7920 cGy to the prostate, and were retrospectively evaluated. The patients distribution according to the level of risk was the following: low risk - 95 (33.7%); intermediate risk - 66 (23.4%); high risk -121 (42.9%) patients. Results: Median follow-up of 53.6 months (3.6.95.3 months) demonstrated 85.1% actuarial five-year overall survival, 97.0% specific cause survival, 94.2% five-year distant metastasis-free survival, and 75.8% five-year biochemical recurrence-free survival. Rates of five-year actuarial survival free from late rectal and urinary toxicity were 96.4% and 91.1% respectively. Pre-3D conformal radiation therapy transurethral resection of the prostate and doses > 70 Gy in 30% of the bladder volume implied a higher grade 2-3 late urinary toxicity in five years (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.0264, respectively). Conclusion: The first experiment with 3D conformal radiation therapy reported in Brazil allowed high radiation doses with acceptable levels of urinary and rectal toxicity. Pre-3D conformal radiation therapy transurethral resection of prostate may determine a higher risk for post-irradiation grade 2-3 late urinary toxicity. At the tomography planning, the reduction of the radiation dose to . 70 Gy in 30% of the bladder volume may reduce the risk for late urinary complications. (author)

  17. The evolution of rectal and urinary toxicity and immune response in prostate cancer patients treated with two three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vránová, J.; Vinakurau, S.; Richter, J.; Starec, M.; Fišerová, Anna; Rosina, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 6 (2011), s. 1-13 ISSN 1748-717X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200620 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) * gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity * prostate cancer Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.321, year: 2011

  18. Does prostate brachytherapy treat the seminal vesicles? A dose-volume histogram analysis of seminal vesicles in patients undergoing combined PD-103 prostate implantation and external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, Richard G.; Lo, Yeh-Chi; Gaildon, Mohamoud; Stone, Nelson N.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Combined brachytherapy of the prostate and external beam irradiation (EBRT) of the prostate and seminal vesicles (SV) is becoming a popular treatment for high-risk prostate cancer. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis of the SV in patients undergoing this treatment was performed to determine the dose distribution to the SV and the adequacy of this treatment in patients with potential SV involvement. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five consecutive patients were treated with a Pd-103 implant of the prostate alone and 45 Gy of EBRT to the prostate and SV. Attempts were not made to implant the SV but seeds were routinely placed at the junction of the prostate and SV. All patients underwent CT-based post implant dosimetric analysis 1 month after implantation. As part of this analysis, DVH were generated for the prostate and total SV volume (SVT). In addition, the SV was divided into 6-mm-thick volumes identified as SV1, SV2, SV3, SV4, and SV5 starting from the junction of the prostate and SV and extending distally. DVH were also generated for these structures. Delivered dose was defined as the D90 (dose delivered to 90% of the organ on DVH). Results: The median volumes in cc of the prostate, SVT, SV1, SV2, SV3, SV4, and SV5 were 34.33, 9.75, 2.7, 3.48, 2.92, 3.18, and 1.96 respectively. The SVT contained from 0-9 seeds (median 2). There was little dose delivered to the SVT and SV volumes from the implanted prostate. The median D90 values for the prostate, SVT, SV1, SV2, SV3, SV4, and SV5 were 8615 cGy, 675 cGy, 3100 cGy, 1329 cGy, 553 cGy, 246 cGy, and 67 cGy, respectively. The dose delivered to the prostate covered small percentages of SV. The percents of SV volumes covered by the prostate D90 were 11, 35, 3.3, 0, 0, and 0 for SVT, SV1, SV2, SV3, SV4, and SV5, respectively. Conclusions: DVH analysis of the SV reveals that dose generated from an implanted prostate contributes little to the SV. Those patients at high risk for SV involvement may be under treated

  19. Defining an outcomes management program for definitive irradiation of prostate cancer: preliminary considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seltzer, Jonathan; Valicenti, Richard K.; Dlutowski, Mark; Corn, Benjamin W.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: The advent of managed medical care presents challenges to health care providers who strive to maintain a high quality of patient care at a reasonable cost. The goals of clinical guidelines and paths are to improve the quality of patient care by using outcomes to redefine the path and to eliminate ineffective steps in the clinical algorithm. The purpose of the current endeavor was to systematically develop a clinical pathway for the radiation therapy of prostate cancer which can serve as 1) a measurement tool of operational variables such as cost and utilization, 2) a treatment tool to measure satisfaction and toxicity, 3) a research framework from which questions of efficacy can be investigated. METHODS: An initial path was constructed by the physicians based on recommendations from consensus conference of the Patterns of Care Study (PCS), and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). The program was initiated by a core group of 2 attending radiation oncologists, a radiation physicist, a clinical nurse specialist, a dosimetrist, a simulation technologist, a treatment technologist, and a medical social worker. These data served as a baseline from which clinical pathway development could begin using the method of Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) as described by Berwick (New Engl J Med 320: 53, 1989). Following the creation of a draft path, the document was circulated to other staff members of the team. Simultaneously, the Clinical Financial Management System (Transition Systems Incorporated, Boston, MA) was applied to departmental and institutional records to determine treatment patterns, utilization, toxicity, and cost for prostate cancer patients irradiated between July 1, 1995 and December 31, 1995. The aforementioned staff team as well as a seven person patient group were queried by a CQI facilitator to identify process and quality factors to be included in the clinical path. RESULTS: During the period of study, 51 patients were definitively

  20. Critical appraisal of a conformal head and neck cancer irradiation avoiding electron beams and field matching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogliata, Antonella; Cozzi, Luca; Bieri, Sabine; Bernier, Jacques

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: In head and neck cancer patients, spinal chains are usually irradiated by a combination of photon and electron beams, requiring high precision in field matching. This study compares a conventional treatment approach where two lateral photon beams are combined to direct electron fields, to a conformal radiotherapy based on five photon fields, covering the whole neck. Methods and Materials: A comparative analysis of dose distributions and dose-volume histograms was carried out in patients with locally advanced head and neck tumors, for which planning target volumes (PTV) were outlined from the base of the skull down to the supraclavicular region. The prescribed dose to PTV (excluding booster irradiation) was 54 Gy, with spinal dose constraint not exceeding 75% of the total dose, whatever the technique. Results: For the new five-field technique, minimum and maximum point doses showed mean deviations, on five patients entered in the study, of 84% and 113% from the ICRU prescription point. In the conventional treatment, the corresponding figures were 73% and 112%, respectively. A positioning error analysis (isocenter displacement of 2 mm, in all directions) did not elicit any systematic difference in five-field treatment plans while hot spots were found with electron fields. Conclusions: The five-field technique appears routinely feasible and compares favorably with the conventional mixed photon- and electron-therapy approach, especially in regard to its better compliance with dose homogeneity requirements and a reduced risk in dose inhomogeneity related to field matching and patient positioning

  1. Minimising contralateral breast dose in post-mastectomy intensity-modulated radiotherapy by incorporating conformal electron irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, Hans Paul; Korevaar, Erik W; Dolsma, Willemtje; Maduro, John H; Langendijk, Johannes A

    PURPOSE: To assess the potential benefit of incorporating conformal electron irradiation in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for loco-regional post-mastectomy RT. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Ten consecutive patients that underwent left-sided mastectomy were selected for this comparative planning

  2. Comparison of normal tissue dose with three-dimensional conformal techniques for breast cancer irradiation including the internal mammary nodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, Hans Paul; Dolsma, Willemtje; van t Veld, Aart; Bijl, HP; Langendijk, JA

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the Para Mixed technique for irradiation of the internal mammary nodes (IMN) with three commonly used strategies, by analyzing the dose to the heart and other organs at risk. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Four different three-dimensional conformal dose plans were created for 30 breast

  3. Locally advanced prostatic cancer: experience with combined pelvic external beam irradiation and interstitial thermobrachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancock, Steven L; Kapp, Daniel S; Goffinet, Don R; Prionas, Stavros; Cox, Richard S; Bagshaw, Malcolm A

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: Recurrence of prostatic carcinoma within the prostate gland remains a significant problem for patients who present with locally advanced disease. In an attempt to improve the local control of such tumors, an iridium-192 transperineal, template-guided prostatic implant was combined wit radiofrequency-induced hyperthermia after external beam irradiation of the pelvic lymph nodes and prostate gland. This study evaluates the influence of pre-treatment patient characteristics and treatment parameters upon outcome. Materials and Methods: Between July 1987 and April 1992 33 patients with adenocarcinoma of the prostate were selected for treatment: 28 of these patients had extensive local disease on clinical examination (AJCC-4 stages T2b or c: 9 patients; T3: 19 patients); two patients with T2a tumors had Gleason grade 5 + 4 disease or disproportionately high prostate specific antigen (PSA) values and a mass encroaching upon the bladder on computerized tomographic scan. Three patients with more clinically limited T2a or T2b involvement elected implantation in lieu of an external beam irradiation boost. The mean pre-treatment serum PSA value was 25.6 ng/ml (Hybritech scale), with values of above 19 ng/ml for 17 of the patients. Treatment consisted of 50 Gy of external beam irradiation to the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes followed by a transperineal needle implant of the prostate gland. Thirty-two patients had no evidence of pelvic nodal involvement during exploration at laparotomy performed after external irradiation, and 25 of these had lymph node samplings that were histologically negative for metastasis. Perineal template oriented needles were placed by inspection and palpation at laparotomy; 2 were performed closed under ultrasound guidance. Needles were afterloaded with {sup 192}Ir to provide a dose of 30 Gy to the periphery of the prostate gland. Interstitial radiofrequency-induced hyperthermia treatments were given in conjunction with the implant, one just

  4. Three-dimensional (3D) real-time conformal brachytherapy - a novel solution for prostate cancer treatment Part I. Rationale and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fijalkowski, M.; Bialas, B.; Maciejewski, B.; Bystrzycka, J.; Slosarek, K.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, the system for conformal real-time high-dose-rate brachytherapy has been developed and dedicated in general for the treatment of prostate cancer. The aim of this paper is to present the 3D-conformal real-time brachytherapy technique introduced to clinical practice at the Institute of Oncology in Gliwice. Equipment and technique of 3D-conformal real time brachytherapy (3D-CBRT) is presented in detail and compared with conventional high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Step-by-step procedures of treatment planning are described, including own modifications. The 3D-CBRT offers the following advantages: (1) on-line continuous visualization of the prostate and acquisition of the series of NS images during the entire procedure of planning and treatment; (2) high precision of definition and contouring the target volume and the healthy organs at risk (urethra, rectum, bladder) based on 3D transrectal continuous ultrasound images; (3) interactive on-line dose optimization with real-time corrections of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) till optimal dose distribution is achieved; (4) possibility to overcome internal prostate motion and set-up inaccuracies by stable positioning of the prostate with needles fixed to the template; (5) significant shortening of overall treatment time; (6) cost reduction - the treatment can be provided as an outpatient procedure. The 3D- real time CBRT can be advertised as an ideal conformal boost dose technique integrated or interdigitated with pelvic conformal external beam radiotherapy or as a monotherapy for prostate cancer. (author)

  5. Cost-benefit analysis of 3D conformal radiation therapy. Treatment of prostate cancer as a model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, K.H.; Khan, F.M.; Levitt, S.H.

    1999-01-01

    Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) is a promising new treatment technique based on the principle that improved precision in both tumor definition and dose delivery will enhance outcomes by maximizing dose to the tumor area while minimizing dose to normal tissue. Using a cost-benefit analysis, in terms of outcomes, we first examined the overall risks and benefits of 3D-CRT. We then used the treatment of prostate cancer as a model to compare actual clinical outcomes reported between 3D-CRT and standard radiation therapy (SRT). Our analysis shows that application of 3D-CRT to the clinical setting remains difficult because of the continual difficulties of target definition, and that dose escalation cannot yet be justified on the basis of the lack of benefit found, and suggested increased late toxicity, in most of the dose escalation series compared with SRT. (orig.)

  6. Erectile dysfunction after prostate three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. Correlation with the dose to the penile bulb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magli, A.; Ceschia, T.; Titone, F.; Parisi, G.; Fongione, S. [University Hospital Udine (Italy). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Giangreco, M. [Udine Univ. (Italy). Hygiene and Epidemiology Inst.; Crespi, M.; Negri, A. [University Hospital Udine (Italy). Dept. of Medical Physics; De Giorgi, G. [University Hospital Udine (Italy). Dept. of Urology

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Erectile dysfunction is associated with all the common treatment options for prostate cancer. The aim of this research was to evaluate the relationship between erectile function and radiation dose to the penile bulb (PB) and other proximal penile structures in men receiving conformal radiotherapy (CRT) without hormonal therapy (HT) for prostate cancer, whose sexual function was known before treatment. Patients and methods: The study included 19 patients treated with 3D-CRT for localized prostate cancer at our department, who were self-reported to be potent before treatment, had not received HT, and had complete follow-up data available. Our evaluation was based on the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5). Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were used to evaluate the dose to the PB. Statistical analysis was performed with an unconditional logistic regression model. Results: All patients reported change in potency after radiation. Eight patients (42%) remained potent but showed a decrease of 1 or 2 levels of potency, as defined by the IIEF-5 questionnaire (reduced potency group), while 11 patients (58%) reported a change of higher levels and revealed a severe erectile dysfunction after 2 years (impotence group). Multivariate analysis of morphological and dosimetric variables yielded significance for the mean dose (p = 0.05 with an odds ratio of 1.14 and 95% CI 1-1.30). Patients receiving a mean dose of less than 50 Gy to the PB appear to have a much greater likelihood of maintaining potency. Conclusion: Our data suggest a possible existence of a dose-volume correlation between the dose applied to the PB and radiation-induced impotence. (orig.)

  7. Erectile dysfunction after prostate three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. Correlation with the dose to the penile bulb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magli, A.; Ceschia, T.; Titone, F.; Parisi, G.; Fongione, S.; Giangreco, M.; Crespi, M.; Negri, A.; De Giorgi, G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Erectile dysfunction is associated with all the common treatment options for prostate cancer. The aim of this research was to evaluate the relationship between erectile function and radiation dose to the penile bulb (PB) and other proximal penile structures in men receiving conformal radiotherapy (CRT) without hormonal therapy (HT) for prostate cancer, whose sexual function was known before treatment. Patients and methods: The study included 19 patients treated with 3D-CRT for localized prostate cancer at our department, who were self-reported to be potent before treatment, had not received HT, and had complete follow-up data available. Our evaluation was based on the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5). Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were used to evaluate the dose to the PB. Statistical analysis was performed with an unconditional logistic regression model. Results: All patients reported change in potency after radiation. Eight patients (42%) remained potent but showed a decrease of 1 or 2 levels of potency, as defined by the IIEF-5 questionnaire (reduced potency group), while 11 patients (58%) reported a change of higher levels and revealed a severe erectile dysfunction after 2 years (impotence group). Multivariate analysis of morphological and dosimetric variables yielded significance for the mean dose (p = 0.05 with an odds ratio of 1.14 and 95% CI 1-1.30). Patients receiving a mean dose of less than 50 Gy to the PB appear to have a much greater likelihood of maintaining potency. Conclusion: Our data suggest a possible existence of a dose-volume correlation between the dose applied to the PB and radiation-induced impotence. (orig.)

  8. Acute and Late Toxicity in a Randomized Trial of Conventional Versus Hypofractionated Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcangeli, Giorgio; Fowler, Jack; Gomellini, Sara; Arcangeli, Stefano; Saracino, Biancamaria; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Benassi, Marcello; Strigari, Lidia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the toxicity between hypofractionation vs. conventional fractionation schedules in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2003 and December 2007, 168 patients were randomized to receive either hypofractionated (62 Gy in 20 fractions within 5 weeks, 4 fractions/wk) or conventionally fractionated (80 Gy in 40 fractions within 8 weeks) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to the prostate and seminal vesicles. All patients had undergone a 9-month course of total androgen deprivation, with radiotherapy starting 2 months after initiation of the total androgen deprivation. Results: The median follow-up was 32 and 35 months in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation arms, respectively. For the patients developing acute toxicity, no difference between the two fractionation groups was found in either severity or duration of gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity. Also, no difference was found in the incidence and severity of late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity between the two treatment schedules, with a 3-year rate of Grade 2 or greater toxicity of 17% and 16% for the hypofractionation arm and 14% and 11% for the conventional fractionation arm, respectively. A statistically significant correlation between acute and late gastrointestinal toxicity was found only in the conventional fractionation group. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the hypofractionation regimen used in our study is safe, with only a slight, nonsignificant increase in tolerable and temporary acute toxicity compared with the conventional fractionation schedule. The severity and frequency of late complications was equivalent between the two treatment groups.

  9. Analysis of dose volume histogram parameters to estimate late bladder and rectum complications after high-dose (70-78 Gy) conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boersma, L.J.; Brink, M. van den; Bruce, A.; Gras, L.; Velde, A. te; Lebesque, J.V.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) parameters can be used to identify risk groups for developing late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and to examine the effect of using different morbidity scoring systems on the results of these analyses. Materials and Methods: DVH parameters were analyzed for 130 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with conformal radiotherapy in a dose-escalating protocol (70-78 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction). The incidence of late (> 6 months) GI and GU complications was scored based on questionnaires and classified using the RTOG/EORTC and the SOMA/LENT scoring system. Moreover, patients were classified as being a rectal bleeder or no rectal bleeder and a distinction was made between non-severe and severe (requiring one or more laser treatments) rectal bleeding. The median follow-up time was 22 months. It was investigated whether the relative and absolute rectal wall volumes, irradiated to various dose levels (≥ 60 Gy, ≥ 65 Gy, ≥ 70 Gy and ≥ 75 Gy) were correlated with the observed actuarial incidences of GI complications. First, the analysis was performed using volume as a continuous variable. Subsequently, for each dose level in the DVH the rectal wall volumes were dichotomized using different volumes as cut-off levels. Twenty cut-off levels were tested on their ability to discriminate between high and low risk for developing GI complications (Fig.). The relationship between bladder wall volumes irradiated to various dose levels and observed actuarial GU complications was investigated using the absolute bladder wall volumes, measured as a continuous variable. For both GI and GU complications, the role of the prescribed radiation dose and the maximum radiation dose in the rectal and bladder wall was analyzed as well. Results: None of the DVH parameters of the rectal wall was significantly correlated with the actuarial incidences of

  10. Impact of pelvic nodal irradiation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy on treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Robert A.; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Horwitz, Eric; Buyyounouski, Mark; Ruth, Karen J.; Ma, C.-M.; Pollack, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of treating the pelvic lymphatic regions during prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with respect to our routine acceptance criteria. Methods and Materials: A series of 10 previously treated prostate patients were randomly selected and the pelvic lymphatic regions delineated on the fused magnetic resonance/computed tomography data sets. A targeting progression was formed from the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles only to the inclusion of all pelvic lymphatic regions and presacral region resulting in 5 planning scenarios of increasing geometric difficulty. IMRT plans were generated for each stage for two accelerator manufacturers. Dose volume histogram data were analyzed with respect to dose to the planning target volumes, rectum, bladder, bowel, and normal tissue. Analysis was performed for the number of segments required, monitor units, 'hot spots,' and treatment time. Results: Both rectal endpoints were met for all targets. Bladder endpoints were not met and the bowel endpoint was met in 40% of cases with the inclusion of the extended and presacral lymphatics. A significant difference was found in the number of segments and monitor units with targeting progression and between accelerators, with the smaller beamlets yielding poorer results. Treatment times between the 2 linacs did not exhibit a clinically significant difference when compared. Conclusions: Many issues should be considered with pelvic lymphatic irradiation during IMRT delivery for prostate cancer including dose per fraction, normal structure dose/volume limits, planning target volumes generation, localization, treatment time, and increased radiation leakage. We would suggest that, at a minimum, the endpoints used in this work be evaluated before beginning IMRT pelvic nodal irradiation

  11. High dose rate interstitial brachytherapy with external beam irradiation for localized prostate cancer. Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiratsuka, Junichi; Jo, Yoshimasa; Yoden, Eisaku; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Imajo, Yoshinari [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Nagase, Naomi; Narihiro, Naomasa; Kubota, Juichi

    2000-12-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the biochemical and pathological results of combined external beam radiotherapy and high dose rate Ir-192 brachytherapy (HDR-Ir192) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Between October 1997 and August 1999, 39 evaluable patients with adenocarcinoma of prostate diagnosed by biopsy were treated with interstitial and external beam irradiation. Patients ranged in age from 58-82 years, with a mean of 69.7 years. T1c, T2 and T3 tumors, according to the UICC classification system (1997), were found in 7, 21 and 11 cases respectively. The mean initial pre-treatment PSA was 35.9 ng/ml (median 13.2), with 77% of the patients having had a pre-treatment PSA greater than 10 ng/ml. Of all patients, 17 had received pre-treatment hormonal therapy. Hormonal pretreatment was stopped at the beginning of radiotherapy in all cases. External beam four-field box irradiation was given to the small pelvis to a dose of 45 Gy/25 fractions. Three HDR-Ir192 treatments were given over a 30-h period, with 5.5 Gy per fraction at the circumference of the prostate gland over the course of this study. Biochemical failure was defined as a PSA level >1.5 ng/ml and rising on three consecutive values. If serial post-treatment PSA levels showed a continuous downward trend, failure was not scored. The patient with clinical evidence of progression was classified as a clinical failure. The median follow-up at the time of evaluation was 19.6 months. A post-treatment PSA level {<=}1.0 ng/ml was seen in 26 (67%) patients, and values from >1.0 to {<=}2.0 ng/ml were seen in 10 (26%) patients. Biochemical failure was not seen in 38 patients except for one patient who developed a distant bone metastasis with negative prostatic biopsy 15 months after treatment. Biochemical control rate was 100% (38/38) except for the patient with bone metastasis classified as clinical failure. Negative biopsies 18 months after treatment were found in 93% (14/15) of patients. Only one patient

  12. Retrospective evaluation of dosimetric quality for prostate carcinomas treated with 3D conformal, intensity modulated and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, Scott B [Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Kairn, Tanya [Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Premion, Wesley Medical Centre, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Middlebrook, Nigel; Hill, Brendan; Christie, David R H; Knight, Richard T [Premion, Wesley Medical Centre, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Kenny, John [Australian Clinical Dosimetry Services, Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Langton, Christian M; Trapp, Jamie V [Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2013-12-15

    This study examines and compares the dosimetric quality of radiotherapy treatment plans for prostate carcinoma across a cohort of 163 patients treated across five centres: 83 treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), 33 treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 47 treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Treatment plan quality was evaluated in terms of target dose homogeneity and organs at risk (OAR), through the use of a set of dose metrics. These included the mean, maximum and minimum doses; the homogeneity and conformity indices for the target volumes; and a selection of dose coverage values that were relevant to each OAR. Statistical significance was evaluated using two-tailed Welch's T-tests. The Monte Carlo DICOM ToolKit software was adapted to permit the evaluation of dose metrics from DICOM data exported from a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system. The 3DCRT treatment plans offered greater planning target volume dose homogeneity than the other two treatment modalities. The IMRT and VMAT plans offered greater dose reduction in the OAR: with increased compliance with recommended OAR dose constraints, compared to conventional 3DCRT treatments. When compared to each other, IMRT and VMAT did not provide significantly different treatment plan quality for like-sized tumour volumes. This study indicates that IMRT and VMAT have provided similar dosimetric quality, which is superior to the dosimetric quality achieved with 3DCRT.

  13. Sexual dysfunctions after prostate cancer radiation therapy; Dysfonctions sexuelles apres irradiation pour cancer de la prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droupy, S. [Service d' urologie-andrologie, CHU Caremeau, 30 - Nimes (France)

    2010-10-15

    Sexual dysfunctions are a quality of life main concern following prostate cancer treatment. After both radiotherapy and brachytherapy, sexual function declines progressively, the onset of occurrence of erectile dysfunction being 12-18 months after both treatments. The pathophysiological pathways by which radiotherapy and brachytherapy cause erectile dysfunction are multi-factorial, as patient co-morbidities, arterial damage, exposure of neurovascular bundle to high levels of radiation, and radiation dose received by the corpora cavernosa at the crurae of the penis may be important in the aetiology of erectile dysfunction. Diagnosis and treatment of postradiation sexual dysfunctions must integrate pre-therapeutic evaluation and information to provide to the patient and his partner a multidisciplinary sexual medicine management. (authors)

  14. Chronic rectal bleeding after high-dose conformal treatment of prostate cancer warrants modification of existing morbidity scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Hunt, Margie A.; Movsas, Benjamin; Peter, Ruth S.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Serious late morbidity (Grade (3(4))) from the conformal treatment of prostate cancer has been reported in <1% to 6% of patients based on existing late gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity scales. None of the existing morbidity scales include our most frequently observed late GI complication, which is chronic rectal bleeding requiring multiple fulgerations. This communication documents the frequency of rectal bleeding requiring multiple fulgerations and illustrates the variation in reported late serious GI complication rates by the selection of morbidity scale. Methods and Materials: Between May 1989 and December 1993, 352 patients with T1-T3 nonmetastatic prostate cancers were treated with our four-field conformal technique without special rectal blocking. This technique includes a 1-cm margin from the clinical target volume (CTV) to the planning target volume (PTV) in all directions. The median follow-up for these patients was 36 months (range 2-76), and the median center of prostate dose was 74 Gy (range 63-81). Three morbidity scales are assessed: the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG), the Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force (LENT), and our modification of the LENT (FC-LENT). This modification registers chronic rectal bleeding requiring at least one blood transfusion and/or more than two coagulations as a Grade 3 event. Estimates for Grade (3(4)) late GI complication rates were determined using Kaplan-Meier methodology. The duration of severe symptoms with chronic rectal bleeding is measured from the first to the last transrectal coagulation. Latency is measured from the end of radiotherapy to surgery, first blood transfusion, or third coagulation procedure. Results: Sixteen patients developed Grade (3(4)) complications by one of the three morbidity scales. Two patients required surgery (colostomy or sigmoid resection), three required multiple blood transfusions, two required one or two blood transfusions, and nine required at least three

  15. Dose Escalation for Prostate Cancer Using the Three-Dimensional Conformal Dynamic Arc Technique: Analysis of 542 Consecutive Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A.; Vavassori, Andrea; Fodor, Cristiana; Santoro, Luigi; Zerini, Dario; Cattani, Federica; Garibaldi, Cristina; Cambria, Raffaella; Fodor, Andrei; Boboc, Genoveva Ionela; Vitolo, Viviana; Ivaldi, Giovanni Battista; Musi, Gennaro; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To present the results of dose escalation using three-dimensional conformal dynamic arc radiotherapy (3D-ART) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Five hundred and forty two T1-T3N0M0 prostate cancer patients were treated with 3D-ART. Dose escalation (from 76 Gy/38 fractions to 80 Gy/40 fractions) was introduced in September 2003; 32% of patients received 80 Gy. In 366 patients, androgen deprivation was added to 3D-ART. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria and Houston definition (nadir + 2) were used for toxicity and biochemical failure evaluation, respectively. Median follow-up was 25 months. Results: Acute toxicity included rectal (G1-2 28.9%; G3 0.5%) and urinary events (G1-2 57.9%; G3-4 2.4%). Late toxicity included rectal (G1-2 15.8%; G3-4 3.1%) and urinary events (G1-2 26.9%; G3-4 1.6%). Two-year failure-free survival and overall survival rates were 94.1% and 97.9%, respectively. Poor prognostic group (GS, iPSA, T), transurethral prostate resection, and dose >76 Gy showed significant association to high risk of progression in multivariate analysis (p = 0.014, p = 0.045, and p 0.04, respectively). The negative effect of dose >76 Gy was not observed (p 0.10), when the analysis was limited to 353 patients treated after September 2003 (when dose escalation was introduced). Higher dose was not associated with higher late toxicity. Conclusions: Three-dimensional-ART is a feasible modality allowing for dose escalation (no increase in toxicity has been observed with higher doses). However, the dose increase from 76 to 80 Gy was not associated with better tumor outcome. Further investigation is warranted for better understanding of the dose effect for prostate cancer

  16. The treatment of nonpalpable PSA-detected adenocarcinoma of the prostate with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, Eric M.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Pinover, Wayne H.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience treating patients with nonpalpable PSA-detected prostate cancer with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) to determine prognostic factors that predict for biochemical-free survival (bNED) control and present the bNED control rates. Methods and Materials: Between May 1, 1990 and November 30, 1994, 160 patients with nonpalpable PSA-detected prostate cancer received 3DCRT at Fox Chase Cancer Center (median total dose 73 Gy; range: 67-78 Gy). bNED failure was defined as three consecutive increases in posttreatment PSA after achieving a nadir. bNED failure was recorded as the time midway between the nadir and the first consecutive rising PSA. Five-year actuarial rates of bNED control were calculated for pretreatment PSA (0-9.9 vs. 10-19.9 vs. ≥ 20 ng/ml), Gleason score (2-6 vs. 7-10), treatment field size (prostate vs. small pelvis), age ( 73 Gy) using Kaplan-Meier methods and compared using the Log rank test. The Cox model was used to multivariately establish independent predictors based on significant univariate factors. Median follow-up was 39 months (range: 2-84 months). Results: The 5-year actuarial rate of bNED control was 86% for the entire group of patients. The Cox Proportional Hazards model demonstrated that pretreatment PSA was an independent predictor of bNED control. Treatment field size was marginally predictive. There was no difference in bNED control when patients were stratified by the number of lobes positive for disease. Statistically different rates of bNED control were seen when the patients with nonpalpable disease were univariately compared to T2b and T2c patients. Three patients experienced Grade 3-4 genitourinary (GU) toxicity and 3 patients experienced Grade 3-4 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Conclusions: Patients with nonpalpable PSA-detected prostate cancer can be effectively treated with 3DCRT with minimal morbidity and high rates of bNED control at 5 years. Pretreatment

  17. Dosimetric implications of changes in patient repositioning and organ motion in conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miralbell, Raymond; Oezsoy, Orhan; Pugliesi, Angela; Carballo, Natalia; Arnalte, Raquel; Escude, Lluis; Jargy, Clara; Nouet, Philippe; Rouzaud, Michel

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the influence of patient repositioning and organ motion on dose distribution within the prostate and the seminal vesicles (clinical target volume, (CTV)). Material and methods: Nine patients were simulated and treated in the supine position, with an empty bladder, and without immobilization devices. While on treatment, patients underwent weekly pelvic computed tomography (CT) scans under conditions identical to those at simulation. Patients were aligned using lasers on anterior and lateral skin tattoos, onto which lead markers were placed. After each CT scan (n=53) the CTV was redefined by contouring, and a new isocenter was obtained. A six-field technique was used. The field margins around the CTV were 20 mm in the cranio-caudal axis, and 13 mm in the other axes, except in the lateral fields where a 10 mm posterior margin was used. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for each organ were compared with those determined at simulation, using the notion of the proportional change in the area under the CTV-DVH curve resulting from a change in treatment plan (cDVH). Results: The reproducibility of the dose distribution was good for the prostate (%cDVH, mean±SD: -0.97±2.11%) and less than optimal for the seminal vesicles (%cDVH, mean±SD: -4.66±10.45%). When correlating prostate %cDVH variations with displacements of the isocenter in the Y axis (antero-posterior) the %cDVH exceeded (-)5% in only two dosimetries, both with an isocenter shift of >10 mm. For the seminal vesicles, however, ten out of 53 dosimetries showed a %cDVH exceeding (-) 5%. In nine of these ten dose distribution studies the posterior shift of the isocenter exceeded 8 mm. Conclusions: Precise targeting of prostate radiotherapy is primarily dependent on careful daily set-up and on random changes in rectal geometry. Margins no less than 10 mm around the prostate and at least 15 mm around the seminal vesicles are probably necessary to insure adequate target coverage with a six

  18. A treatment planning study comparing whole breast radiation therapy against conformal, IMRT and tomotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Mike; Chen, Jeff; Wong, Eugene; Van Dyk, Jake; Perera, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Purpose and background: Conventional early breast cancer treatment consists of a lumpectomy followed by whole breast radiation therapy. Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an investigational approach to post-lumpectomy radiation for early breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to compare four external beam APBI techniques, including tomotherapy, with conventional whole breast irradiation for their radiation conformity index, dose homogeneity index, and dose to organs at risk. Methods and materials: Small-field tangents, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy and helical tomotherapy were compared for each of 15 patients (7 right, 8 left). One radiation conformity and two dose homogeneity indices were used to evaluate the dose to the target. The mean dose to organs at risk was also evaluated. Results: All proposed APBI techniques improved the conformity index significantly over whole breast tangents while maintaining dose homogeneity and without a significant increase in dose to organs at risk. Conclusion: The four-field IMRT plan produced the best dosimetric results; however this technique would require appropriate respiratory motion management. An alternative would be to use a four-field conformal technique that is less sensitive to the effects of respiratory motion

  19. Initial clinical assessment of CT-MRI image fusion software in localization of the prostate for 3D conformal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagawa, Kazufumi; Lee, W. Robert; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Hunt, Margie A.; Shaer, Andrew H.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the utility of image fusion software and compare MRI prostate localization with CT localization in patients undergoing 3D conformal radiation therapy of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: After a phantom study was performed to ensure the accuracy of image fusion procedure, 22 prostate cancer patients had CT and MRI studies before the start of radiotherapy. Immobilization casts used during radiation treatment were also used for both imaging studies. After the clinical target volume (CTV) (prostate or prostate + seminal vesicles) was defined on CT, slices from the MRI study were reconstructed to precisely match the CT slices by identifying three common bony landmarks on each study. The CTV was separately defined on the matched MRI slices. Data related to the size and location of the prostate were compared between CT and MRI. The spatial relationship between the tip of urethrogram cone on CT and prostate apex seen on MRI was also estimated. Results: The phantom study showed the registration discrepancies between CT and MRI smaller than 1.0 mm in any pair in comparison. The patient study showed a mean image registration error of 0.9 (± 0.6) mm. The average prostate volume was 63.0 (± 25.8) cm 3 and 50.9 (± 22.9) cm 3 determined by CT and MRI, respectively. The difference in prostate location with the two studies usually differed at the base and at the apex of the prostate. On the transverse MRI, the prostate apex was situated 7.1 (± 4.5) mm dorsal and 15.1 (± 4.0) mm cephalad to the tip of urethrogram cone. Conclusions: CT-MRI image fusion study made it possible to compare the two modalities directly. MRI localization of the prostate is more accurate than CT, and indicates the distance from cone to apex is 15 mm. CT-MRI image fusion technique provides valuable supplements to CT technology for more precise targeting of the prostate cancer

  20. Study on apoptosis of prostate cancer cell induced by 125I seed irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Anyan; Wang Junjie; Wang Jidong; Zhuang Hongqing; Zhao Yong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the mechanism of apoptosis induced by 125 I seed irradiation on PC3 cells. Methods: Human prostate cancer cell line PC3 was treated by irradiation of 125 I (2.77 cGy/h) with various dose. Agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA and flows cytometry were used to detect the apoptosis of PC3 cells and indirect immunofluorescence assay was used to detect the expression of Bcl-2. The activity of Caspase-3 was measured by Caspase Colorimetric Assay Kits. Results: Apoptosis of PC3 cells could be efficiently induced by 125 I seed irradiation. The apoptotic peaks were found by flow cytometry and DNA ladder appeared on 1.8% agarose gel. The activity of Caspase-3 on PC3 cells treated by 125 I seed irradiation was not changed significantly. Bcl-2 gene expression was down-regulated with the sample concentration increased. Conclusion: 125 I irradiation can induce the apoptosis of PC3 cells and the mechanism of apoptosis is related with down regulation of Bcl-2 gene expression and is not related with Caspase-3 activity. (authors)

  1. Risk group dependence of dose-response for biopsy outcome after three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levegruen, Sabine; Jackson, Andrew; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Venkatraman, Ennapadam S.; Skwarchuk, Mark W.; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Fuks, Zvi; Leibel, Steven A.; Ling, C. Clifton

    2002-01-01

    Background and purpose: We fit phenomenological tumor control probability (TCP) models to biopsy outcome after three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) of prostate cancer patients to quantify the local dose-response of prostate cancer. Materials and methods: We analyzed the outcome after photon beam 3D-CRT of 103 patients with stage T1c-T3 prostate cancer treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) (prescribed target doses between 64.8 and 81 Gy) who had a prostate biopsy performed ≥2.5 years after end of treatment. A univariate logistic regression model based on D mean (mean dose in the planning target volume of each patient) was fit to the whole data set and separately to subgroups characterized by low and high values of tumor-related prognostic factors T-stage ( 6), and pre-treatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) (≤10 ng/ml vs. >10 ng/ml). In addition, we evaluated five different classifications of the patients into three risk groups, based on all possible combinations of two or three prognostic factors, and fit bivariate logistic regression models with D mean and the risk group category to all patients. Dose-response curves were characterized by TCD 50 , the dose to control 50% of the tumors, and γ 50 , the normalized slope of the dose-response curve at TCD 50 . Results: D mean correlates significantly with biopsy outcome in all patient subgroups and larger values of TCD 50 are observed for patients with unfavorable compared to favorable prognostic factors. For example, TCD 50 for high T-stage patients is 7 Gy higher than for low T-stage patients. For all evaluated risk group definitions, D mean and the risk group category are independent predictors of biopsy outcome in bivariate analysis. The fit values of TCD 50 show a clear separation of 9-10.6 Gy between low and high risk patients. The corresponding dose-response curves are steeper (γ 50 =3.4-5.2) than those obtained when all patients are analyzed together (γ 50 =2

  2. Initial results of irradiation for prostatic cancer following three-dimensional treatment planning. Irradiation technique and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegel, T.; Schmidt, R.; Baumann, M.; Schwarz, R.; Steiner, P.; Arps, H.; Goeckel-Beining, B.

    1994-01-01

    During the period from June 91 until May 93 thirty-three patients suffering from histologically confirmed carcinoms of the prostate were assigned to four treatment groups and subjected to irradiation of the prostate and, if required, efferent lymphatic system of the minor pelvis that was performed according to a three-dimensional prospective treatment plan. The doses used for localized radiotherapy of the tumour tissue were in the range between 62 and 70 Gy, the efferent lymph system of the minor pelvis was irradiated with doses of up to 50 Gy. The local or boost treatments were carried out using four (box technique) or five irregular fields, while radiotherapy of the minor pelvis was solely based on the box technique using four fields of irregular shape. The immediate and long-term toxicity was evaluated in a prospective approach according to the RTOG score for the rectum, urinary bladder and skin. Twenty-five of the thirty-three patients (76%) developed immediate toxic symptoms. Immediate reactions classifiable with degree II of the rating scale were, however, only observed in four patients (15%) for the rectum (2), bladder (1) and skin (1). Immediate toxic reactions compatible with RTOG grades III or IV were not recorded. In all patients, the untoward effects were completely reversed within a maximum period of 6 weeks following termination of treatment. Two patients from the study cohort (6%), which has so far been followed up for an average period of 16 months, showed long-term grade I effects in the rectum and a further long-term effect observed in the urinary bladder of another patient was classified with degree II. Two patients died intercurrently and two patients developed metastases remote from the primary tumour. Local tumour control can currently be reported for 96%. (orig.) [de

  3. Multimodal approaches including three-dimensional conformal re-irradiation for recurrent or persistent esophageal cancer. Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Shinsaku; Ohguri, Takayuki; Imada, Hajime

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the toxicity and efficacy of multimodal approaches, including three-dimensional conformal re-irradiation, for patients with recurrent or persistent esophageal cancer after radiotherapy. Thirty-one patients with esophageal cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal re-irradiation were retrospectively analyzed. Of the 31 patients, 27 patients received concurrent chemotherapy, and 14 patients underwent regional hyperthermia during the re-irradiation. We divided the patients into two groups on the basis of their clinical condition: the curative group (n=11) or the palliative group (n=20). Severe toxicities were detected in one patient with Grade 3 esophageal perforation in the curative group, and 5 patients had a Grade 3 or higher toxicity of the esophagus in the palliative group. Advanced T stage at the time of re-irradiation was found to be significantly correlated with Grade 3 or higher toxicity in the esophagus. For the curative group, 10 (91%) of 11 patients had an objective response. For the palliative group, symptom relief was recognized in 8 (57%) of 14 patients with obvious swallowing difficulty. In conclusion, in the curative group with early-stage recurrent or persistent esophageal cancer, the multimodal approaches, including three-dimensional conformal re-irradiation, may be feasible, showing acceptable toxicity and a potential value of promising results, although further evaluations especially for the toxicities of the organs at risk are required. In the palliative group, the benefit of our therapy may be restrictive because severe esophageal toxicities were not uncommon in the patients with advanced T stage at the time of re-irradiation. (author)

  4. Comparison of acute and subacute genitourinary and gastrointestinal adverse events of radiotherapy for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated radiation therapy, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, permanent implant brachytherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morimoto, Masahiro; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Konishi, Koji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Teshima, Teruki; Bijl, Henk P; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Langendijk, Johannes A; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    AIMS AND BACKGROUND: To examine acute and subacute urinary and rectal toxicity in patients with localized prostate cancer monotherapeutically treated with the following four radiotherapeutic techniques: intensity-modulated radiation therapy, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy,

  5. Conformal radiation therapy of localized prostate cancer: acute tolerance and early evaluation of effectiveness; Konformierende Strahlentherapie des lokalisierten Prostatakarzinoms: Akute Toleranz und fruehe Wirksamkeit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zierhut, D. [Klinische Radiologie, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany); Flentje, M. [Klinische Radiologie, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany); Sroka-Perez, G. [Klinische Radiologie, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany); Rudat, V. [Klinische Radiologie, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, R. [Klinische Radiologie, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany); Wannenmacher, M. [Klinische Radiologie, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    Aim: In a prospective trial early effectiveness and acute toxicity of conformal 3D-planned radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer was quantified using dose-volume-histogramms and evaluated with respect of treatment technique. Results: Eleven patients (of 32) had none, 15 mild (RTOG grade 1) and 6 moderate symptoms (RTOG grade 2, mainly diarrhoea, dysuria and polyuria). Acute complications leading to treatment interruption did not occur. In 16 patients symptoms disappeared within 6 weeks after radiotherapy. Only 2 men had symptoms which lasted longer than 3 months and were endoscopically examined. Up to now no late complications were detected. Incidence and severity of toxicity was significantly (p<0,05) related to the size of treatment volume. Akute toxicity was found to depend statistically significant (p<0,05) on the proportional volume of bladder and rectum, irradiated with more than 35 Gy. In 81% of the patients with pretherapeutic elevated PSA levels normalisation of PSA was observed. Overall mean PSA levels of 15.7{+-}22.6 {mu}g/l at the beginning of radiotherapy fell to 2.1{+-}3.7 {mu}g/l 6 weeks after irradiation. Only 1 Patient relapsed locally 22 months after radiation therapy. Conclusion: We conclude that due to modern 3D-planned conformal techniques with optimization of treatment dose and improved protection of critical organs such as urinary bladder and rectum, radiotherapy allows an effective and well tolerated therapy of localized prostatic carcinoma. (orig./VHE) [Deutsch] Ziel: Quantifizierung der fruehen Wirksamkeit und akuten Toxizitaet der 3D-geplanten und konformierenden Strahlentherapie des lokalisierten Prostatakarzinoms mittels Dosis-Volumen-Histogramm sowie Untersuchung der Abhaengigkeit von der Bestrahlungstechnik in einer prospektiven Studie. Ergebnisse: Elf Patienten hatten keine, 15 leichte (RTOG Grad I) und sechs maessiggradige Nebenwirkungen (RTOG Grad II, meist Diarrhoe, Dysurie und Polyurie). Bei keinem Patienten musste die

  6. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Early Vascular Response in Prostate Tumors Irradiated with Carbon Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Palmowski

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Individualized treatments with combination of radiotherapy and targeted drugs require knowledge about the behavior of molecular targets after irradiation. Angiogenic marker expression has been studied after conventional radiotherapy, but little is known about marker response to charged particles. For the very first time, we used molecular ultrasound imaging to intraindividually track changes in angiogenic marker expression after carbon ion irradiation in experimental tumors. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and of αvβ3-integrin in subcutaneous AT-1 prostate cancers in rats treated with carbon ions (16 Gy was studied using molecular ultrasound and immunohistochemistry. For this purpose, cyanoacrylate microbubbles were synthesized and linked to specific ligands. The accumulation of targeted microbubbles in tumors was quantified before and 36 hours after irradiation. In addition, tumor vascularization was analyzed using volumetric Doppler ultrasound. In tumors, the accumulation of targeted microbubbles was significantly higher than in nonspecific ones and could be inhibited competitively. Before irradiation, no difference in binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific or ICAM-1-specific microbubbles was observed in treated and untreated animals. After irradiation, however, treated animals showed a significantly higher binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific microbubbles and an enhanced binding of ICAM-1-specific microbubbles than untreated controls. In both groups, a decrease in vascularization occurred during tumor growth, but no significant difference was observed between irradiated and nonirradiated tumors. In conclusion, carbon ion irradiation upregulates ICAM-1 and αvβ3-integrin expression in tumor neovasculature. Molecular ultrasound can indicate the regulation of these markers and thus may help to identify the optimal drugs and time points in individualized therapy regimens.

  7. Is the alpha-beta ratio of prostate cancer really low? A prospective, non-randomized trial comparing standard and hyperfractionated conformal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdagni, Riccardo; Italia, Corrado; Montanaro, Paolo; Lanceni, Angelo; Lattuada, Paola; Magnani, Tiziana; Fiorino, Claudio; Nahum, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: The objectives of the current study were to compare genito-urinary (GU) and gastro-intestinal (GI) toxicities as well as biochemical control (bRFS) in prostate cancer, utilizing conventional (2.0 Gy daily) (STD) or hyperfractionated (HFX) conformal irradiation (CRT). HFX (1.2 Gy BID) was chosen as a radiobiological method to try to reduce long term sequelae without compromising local control. Patients and methods: Three-hundred-and-seventy consecutive patients (pts) entered this prospective, non-randomized trial in the period January 1993-January 2003; 209 were treated with STD and 161 with HFX CRT. All were evaluable for acute toxicity analysis, 179 (STD) and 151 pts (HFX) being evaluable for late sequelae and bRFS analyses. Pt characteristics were not statistically different in the two groups. CRT consisted of a 4-field technique for prostate and/or pelvic nodes and a 5-field boost with rectal shielding. Median doses were 74 and 79.2 Gy for STD and HFX patients respectively, the latter dose being isoeffective for tumour control assuming α/β=10 (EQD 2 =73.9 Gy). Median follow-up was 29.4 months (25.2 mos for STD; 37.7 mos for HFX; P<0.01). The two regimens were compared in terms of acute and late GU and GI toxicities and 5-year bRFS by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Acute grade≥2 GU toxicity was higher in the STD group (48.6% versus 37.3% in HFX, P=0.03), while no significant difference was found for acute GI toxicity. Late grade≥2 GU and GI toxicities were lower in the HFX group (5-year actuarial rate: GU: 10.1% versus 20.3%, P=0.05; GI: 6.0% versus 10.6%, P=0.18). Five-year bRFS were 70% (±13.8%, 95% CI) and 82.6% (±7.2%) for STD and HFX, respectively (P=0.44); a trend favouring HFX was found in the subgroup of pts who did not receive hormonal therapy (5-year bRFS: 85.9%±12.4% versus 63.9%±23.8%, P=0.15). Multivariate analysis revealed only risk groups and age statistically related to bRFS but not fractionation

  8. The evolution of rectal and urinary toxicity and immune response in prostate cancer patients treated with two three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vranova, Jana; Vinakurau, Stepan; Richter, Jan; Starec, Miroslav; Fiserova, Anna; Rosina, Jozef

    2011-01-01

    Our research compared whole pelvic (WP) and prostate-only (PO) 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) techniques in terms of the incidence and evolution of acute and late toxicity of the rectum and urinary bladder, and identified the PTV-parameters influencing these damages and changes in antitumor immune response. We analyzed 197 prostate cancer patients undergoing 3DCRT for gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities, and conducted a pilot immunological study including flow cytometry and an NK cell cytotoxicity assay. Acute and late toxicities were recorded according to the RTOG and the LENT-SOMA scales, respectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted for factors associated with toxicity. In the WP group, an increase of acute rectal toxicity was observed. A higher incidence of late GI/GU toxicity appeared in the PO group. Only 18 patients (WP-7.76% and PO-11.11%) suffered severe late GI toxicity, and 26 patients (WP-11.21% and PO-16.05%) severe late GU toxicity. In the majority of acute toxicity suffering patients, the diminution of late GI/GU toxicity to grade 1 or to no toxicity after radiotherapy was observed. The 3DCRT technique itself, patient age, T stage of TNM classification, surgical intervention, and some dose-volume parameters emerged as important factors in the probability of developing acute and late GI/GU toxicity. The proportion and differentiation of NK cells positively correlated during 3DCRT and negatively so after its completion with dose-volumes of the rectum and urinary bladder. T and NKT cells were down-regulated throughout the whole period. We found a negative correlation between leukocyte numbers and bone marrow irradiated by 44-54 Gy and a positive one for NK cell proportion and doses of 5-25 Gy. The acute GU, late GU, and GI toxicities up-regulated the T cell (CTL) numbers and NK cytotoxicity. Our study demonstrates the association of acute and late damage of the urinary bladder and rectum, with

  9. A pilot survey of sexual function and quality of life following 3D conformal radiotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, Mack; Chinn, Daniel M.; Holland, John; Clarke, Michelle

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of high dose three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) for prostate cancer on the sexual function-related quality of life of patients and their partners. Methods and Materials: Sixty of 124 consecutive patients (median age 72.3 years) treated with 3D CRT for localized prostate cancer were surveyed and reported being potent prior to treatment. The answers to survey questions assessing the impact of quality of life related to sexual function from these 60 patients and their partners forms the basis for this retrospective analysis. Results: Following 3D CRT, 37 of 60 patients (62%) retained sexual function sufficient for intercourse. Intercourse at least once per month was reduced from 71 to 40%, whereas intercourse less than once per year increased from 12 to 35%. Following treatment, 25% of patients reported that the change in sexual dysfunction negatively affected their relationship or resulted in poor self-esteem. This outcome was associated with impotence following treatment (p < 0.01). Patients who had partners and satisfactory sexual function appeared to be at a higher risk of having a negatively affected relationship or losing self-esteem if they become impotent (p < 0.05). Partners of patients who reported a negatively affected relationship or loss of self-esteem appear to be less likely to return the survey instrument used (p = 0.02). Conclusions: More work is needed to evaluate the impact of radiotherapy and other treatments on the quality of life of patients and their partners to allow adequate informed consent to be given

  10. Does hormonal therapy influence sexual function in men receiving 3D conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Christopher T.; Valicenti, Richard K.; Lu Jiandong; Derose, Troy; Dicker, Adam P.; Strup, Stephen E.; Mulholland, S. Grant; Hirsch, Irvin H.; McGinnis, David E.; Gomella, Leonard G.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the effect of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) with or without hormonal therapy (HT) on sexual function (SF) in prostate cancer patients whose SF was known before all treatment. Methods and Materials: Between March 1996 and March 1999, 144 patients received 3D-CRT (median dose = 70.2 Gy, range 66.6-79.2 Gy) for prostate cancer and had pre- and post-therapy SF data. All SF data were obtained with the O'Leary Brief SF Inventory, a self-administered, multidimensional, validated instrument. We defined total sexual potency as erections firm enough for penetration during intercourse. Mean follow-up time was 21 months (SD ± 11 months). The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to test for significance of the change from baseline. Results: Before 3D-CRT, 87 (60%) of 144 men were totally potent as compared to only 47 (47%) of 101 at 1-year follow-up. Of the 60 men totally potent at baseline and followed for at least 1 year, 35 (58%) remained totally potent. These changes corresponded to a significant reduction in SF (p<0.05). Patients who had 3D-CRT alone were more likely to be totally potent at 1 year than those receiving 3D-CRT with HT (56% vs. 31%, p=0.012); however, they were also more likely to be potent at baseline (71% vs. 44%, p=0.001). Although these two groups had a significant reduction in SF from baseline, their change was not significantly different from each other. Conclusion: These data indicate that 3D-CRT causes a significant reduction in total sexual potency as compared to pretreatment baseline. The addition of HT does not appear to increase the risk of sexual dysfunction

  11. Prognosis in patients with local recurrence after definitive irradiation for prostatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuban, D.A.; el-Mahdi, A.M.; Schellhammer, P.F.

    1989-01-01

    Of 414 patients with Stage A2-C disease, all with a minimum follow-up period of 3 years, who have been definitively irradiated by external beam therapy or iodine-125 (I-125) implantation for biopsy-proven prostatic adenocarcinoma, 83 patients (20%) have experienced local recurrences. The incidence of distant metastasis was significantly higher in patients with local tumor recurrence (56 of 83; 68%), as compared with those with local control (64 of 331; 19%; P less than 0.001). This difference remained significant within each tumor grade and stage. Subsequently, survival in patients with local recurrence was significantly shorter than in those with local tumor control (66% vs. 89% at 5 years; P = 0.001). Of the 83 patients with local tumor recurrence, 56 had local recurrence and distant metastasis, and 27 had local failure alone, with a median follow-up of 76 months for the latter group. Fifteen of 83 patients with local recurrence (18%) developed major complications secondary to local disease. Three of the 83 (4%) patients were known to die of prostatic recurrence alone and another 11 of 83 (13%) as a result of some combination of local and distant disease. Therefore, in reference to the entire group of definitively irradiated patients, only 0.72% expired solely of complications associated with local tumor recurrence and an additional 2.7% expired of a combination of both local and distant disease

  12. Accuracy of Real-time Couch Tracking During 3-dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy, and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbert, Juergen; Baier, Kurt; Hermann, Christian; Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of real-time couch tracking for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Intrafractional motion trajectories of 15 prostate cancer patients were the basis for this phantom study; prostate motion had been monitored with the Calypso System. An industrial robot moved a phantom along these trajectories, motion was detected via an infrared camera system, and the robotic HexaPOD couch was used for real-time counter-steering. Residual phantom motion during real-time tracking was measured with the infrared camera system. Film dosimetry was performed during delivery of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Results: Motion of the prostate was largest in the anterior–posterior direction, with systematic (∑) and random (σ) errors of 2.3 mm and 2.9 mm, respectively; the prostate was outside a threshold of 5 mm (3D vector) for 25.0%±19.8% of treatment time. Real-time tracking reduced prostate motion to ∑=0.01 mm and σ = 0.55 mm in the anterior–posterior direction; the prostate remained within a 1-mm and 5-mm threshold for 93.9%±4.6% and 99.7%±0.4% of the time, respectively. Without real-time tracking, pass rates based on a γ index of 2%/2 mm in film dosimetry ranged between 66% and 72% for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT, on average. Real-time tracking increased pass rates to minimum 98% on average for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT. Conclusions: Real-time couch tracking resulted in submillimeter accuracy for prostate cancer, which transferred into high dosimetric accuracy independently of whether 3D-CRT, IMRT, or VMAT was used.

  13. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R.; Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results

  14. Prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  15. 3D conformal MRI-controlled transurethral ultrasound prostate therapy: validation of numerical simulations and demonstration in tissue-mimicking gel phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtnyk, Mathieu; N'Djin, William Apoutou; Kobelevskiy, Ilya; Bronskill, Michael; Chopra, Rajiv

    2010-11-21

    MRI-controlled transurethral ultrasound therapy uses a linear array of transducer elements and active temperature feedback to create volumes of thermal coagulation shaped to predefined prostate geometries in 3D. The specific aims of this work were to demonstrate the accuracy and repeatability of producing large volumes of thermal coagulation (>10 cc) that conform to 3D human prostate shapes in a tissue-mimicking gel phantom, and to evaluate quantitatively the accuracy with which numerical simulations predict these 3D heating volumes under carefully controlled conditions. Eleven conformal 3D experiments were performed in a tissue-mimicking phantom within a 1.5T MR imager to obtain non-invasive temperature measurements during heating. Temperature feedback was used to control the rotation rate and ultrasound power of transurethral devices with up to five 3.5 × 5 mm active transducer elements. Heating patterns shaped to human prostate geometries were generated using devices operating at 4.7 or 8.0 MHz with surface acoustic intensities of up to 10 W cm(-2). Simulations were informed by transducer surface velocity measurements acquired with a scanning laser vibrometer enabling improved calculations of the acoustic pressure distribution in a gel phantom. Temperature dynamics were determined according to a FDTD solution to Pennes' BHTE. The 3D heating patterns produced in vitro were shaped very accurately to the prostate target volumes, within the spatial resolution of the MRI thermometry images. The volume of the treatment difference falling outside ± 1 mm of the target boundary was, on average, 0.21 cc or 1.5% of the prostate volume. The numerical simulations predicted the extent and shape of the coagulation boundary produced in gel to within (mean ± stdev [min, max]): 0.5 ± 0.4 [-1.0, 2.1] and -0.05 ± 0.4 [-1.2, 1.4] mm for the treatments at 4.7 and 8.0 MHz, respectively. The temperatures across all MRI thermometry images were predicted within -0.3 ± 1.6 °C and 0

  16. Quality of life following 3D conformal radiation therapy or permanent interstitial brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalski, J.M.; Kong, F.M.; Mansur, D.B.; Ahmed, N.; Perez, C.A.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Both 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (3DCRT) and Transperineal Interstitial Permanent Brachytherapy (TIPPB) are offered as suitable non-surgical alternatives to radical prostatectomy. Despite equivalent cancer control, very little data has been published that compares Quality of Life (QOL) in contemporary cohorts of patients choosing these treatments. Materials and Methods: Since 1998, patients selecting either 3DCRT alone or TIPPB (monotherapy or boost after external beam) for primary management of localized prostate cancer were asked to participate in a prospective assessment of QOL measures. In this preliminary report, 41 3DCRT and 40 TIPPB (34 monotherapy, 6 boost) patients completed validated QOL instruments at each followup visit. QOL instruments included the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), FACT-P, and Sexual Adjustment Questionnaire (SAQ). Results: The average age of men in each group was 69 years. Choice of treatment was left to the patient unless there were significant medical or technical contraindications to either modality. 3DCRT total doses ranged from 61-78 Gy (mean 73.5Gy) and TIPPB doses were 145Gy (TG43) in 34 I-125 implants and 115 Gy in 1 Pd-103 (monotherapy) or 90 Gy in 5 Pd-103 (boost) implants. Patients undergoing TIPPB reported significantly worse urinary and sexual function than their counterparts receiving 3DCRT. The mean cumulative IPSS was 12.5 with TIPPB compared to 8.3 with 3DCRT (p=0.036). Differences were most pronounced in the first 12 months after treatment, particularly with respect to the strength of stream and the need to strain. TIPPB patients were more likely to report a need to urinate frequently (p=0.02), require a pad (p=0.001), be bothered (p=0.02), or have activity limited by urinary side effects (p=0.01). TIPPB patients were less likely to resume sexual activity within 6 months after treatment (p=0.0003) and engaged in sexual activity less often (p= 0.016) than 3DCRT patients. They were also more

  17. Setup accuracy of stereoscopic X-ray positioning with automated correction for rotational errors in patients treated with conformal arc radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soete, Guy; Verellen, Dirk; Tournel, Koen; Storme, Guy

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated setup accuracy of NovalisBody stereoscopic X-ray positioning with automated correction for rotational errors with the Robotics Tilt Module in patients treated with conformal arc radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The correction of rotational errors was shown to reduce random and systematic errors in all directions. (NovalisBody TM and Robotics Tilt Module TM are products of BrainLAB A.G., Heimstetten, Germany)

  18. Brachytherapy or Conformal External Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Single-Institution Matched-Pair Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickles, Tom; Keyes, Mira; Morris, W. James

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In the absence of randomized study data, institutional case series have shown brachytherapy (BT) to produce excellent biochemical control (bNED) in patients with localized prostate cancer compared with alternative curative treatments. This study was designed to overcome some of the limitations of case series studies by using a matched-pair design in patients treated contemporaneously with BT and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) at a single institution. Methods and Materials: Six hundred one eligible patients treated between 1998 and 2001 were prospectively followed up in our institutional databases and matched on a 1:1 basis for the following known prognostic variables: prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score, T stage, the use and duration of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy, and the percentage of positive tissue core samples. Two hundred seventy-eight perfect matches of patients (139 in each group) with low- and intermediate-risk cancer were further analyzed. bNED (Phoenix definition) was the primary endpoint. Other endpoints were toxicity, PSA kinetics, and the secondary use of androgen deprivation therapy. Results: The 5-year bNED rates were 95% (BT) and 85% (EBRT) (p < 0.001). After 7 years, the BT bNED result was unchanged, but the rate in EBRT patients had fallen to 75%. The median posttreatment PSA nadirs were 0.04 ng/mL (BT) and 0.62 ng/mL (EBRT, p < 0.001), which predicted a higher ongoing treatment failure rate in association with EBRT use than with BT use. Late urinary toxicity and rectal/bowel toxicity were worse in patients treated with BT and EBRT, respectively. Conclusions: BT for both low-risk and selected intermediate-risk cancers achieves exceptional cure rates. Even with dose escalation, it will be difficult for EBRT to match the proven track record of BT seen over the past decade.

  19. Questionnaire based quality assurance for the RT01 trial of dose escalation in conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer (ISRCTN 47772397)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayles, W.; Moore, A.Rollo; Aird, Edwin G.A.; Bidmead, A. Margaret; Dearnaley, David P.; Griffiths, Sue E.; Stephens, Richard J.; Warrington, A.P. Jim

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: In order to ensure the validity of the outcome of the Medical Research Council's 'RT01 trial' of dose escalation in conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer it was considered important that the quality of treatment delivery should meet an adequate standard across all contributing centres. A questionnaire was therefore devised to ensure that all aspects of the planning and delivery process were adequately covered. Patients and methods: The questionnaire considered each step in the planning and delivery process and drew the attention of the participants to the specific requirements of the trial. Before entering patients into the trial each participating centre had to complete the questionnaire and an outlining exercise (reported elsewhere). Results: It was not practicable to define a detailed universally acceptable protocol for the whole process of delivery of conformal radiotherapy, not least because of the different equipment available for planning and treatment in different centres. The questionnaire identified some areas of difference in practice between centres where there may be a need for the development of a consensus as to best practice, particularly in the area of patient set-up. Occasionally it was necessary to follow up responses to questions that had been misunderstood or inadequately answered, but in most cases these issues proved to be easily resolved. Conclusions: The questionnaire proved to be a useful self-assessment tool as well as enabling the quality assurance group to ensure that the standards of the trial were being met. Subsequent follow-up visits confirmed the usefulness and validity of this self assessment process

  20. Comprehensive irradiation of head and neck cancer using conformal multisegmental fields: assessment of target coverage and noninvolved tissue sparing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Marsh, Lon H.; Martel, Mary K.; Ship, Jonathan A.; Haken, Randall ten; Pu, Anthony T.; Fraass, Benedick A.; Lichter, Allen S.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Conformal treatment using static multisegmental intensity modulation was developed for patients requiring comprehensive irradiation for head and neck cancer. The major aim is sparing major salivary gland function while adequately treating the targets. To assess the adequacy of the conformal plans regarding target coverage and dose homogeneity, they were compared with standard irradiation plans. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with stage III/IV head and neck cancer requiring comprehensive, bilateral neck irradiation participated in this study. CT-based treatment plans included five to six nonopposed fields, each having two to four in-field segments. Fields and segments were devised using beam's eye views of the planning target volumes (PTVs), noninvolved organs, and isodose surfaces, to achieve homogeneous dose distribution that encompassed the targets and spared major salivary gland tissue. For comparison, standard three-field radiation plans were devised retrospectively for each patient, with the same CT-derived targets used for the clinical (conformal) plans. Saliva flow rates from each major salivary gland were measured before and periodically after treatment. Results: On average, the minimal dose to the primary PTVs in the conformal plans [95.2% of the prescribed dose, standard deviation (SD) 4%] was higher than in the standard plans (91%, SD 7%; p = 0.02), and target volumes receiving <95% or <90% of the prescribed dose were smaller in the conformal plans (p = 0.004 and 0.02, respectively). Similar advantages of the conformal plans compared to standard plans were found in ipsilateral jugular nodes PTV coverage. The reason for underdosing in the standard treatment plans was primarily failure of electron beams to fully encompass targets. No significant differences were found in contralateral jugular or posterior neck nodes coverage. The minimal dose to the retropharyngeal nodes was higher in the standard plans. However, all conformal plans

  1. High-precision prostate cancer irradiation by clinical application of an offline patient setup verification procedure, using portal imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bel, A.; Vos, P. H.; Rodrigus, P. T.; Creutzberg, C. L.; Visser, A. G.; Stroom, J. C.; Lebesque, J. V.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate in three institutions, The Netherlands Cancer Institute (Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Huis [AvL]), Dr. Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center (DDHC), and Dr, Bernard Verbeeten Institute (BVI), how much the patient setup accuracy for irradiation of prostate cancer can be improved by an

  2. High-precision prostate cancer irradiation by clinical application of an offline patient setup verification procedure, using portal imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Bel (Arjan); P.H. Vos (Pieter); P. Rodrigus (Patrick); C.L. Creutzberg (Carien); A.G. Visser (Andries); J.Ch. Stroom (Joep); J.V. Lebesque (Joos)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To investigate in three institutions, The Netherlands Cancer Institute (Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Huis [AvL]), Dr. Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center (DDHC), and Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute (BVI), how much the patient setup accuracy for irradiation of prostate cancer can be improved

  3. Sexual Function After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results From a Dose-Escalation Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielen, Gerard J. van der; Putten, Wim van; Incrocci, Luca

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to provide information about sexual function (SF) after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer while taking important factors into account that influence SF. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and February 2003, a total of 268 patients from a randomized dose-escalation trial comparing 68 Gy and 78 Gy agreed to participate in an additional part of the trial that evaluated SF. Results: At baseline 28% of patients had erectile dysfunction (ED). After 1 year, 27% of the pretreatment potent patients had developed ED. After 2 years this percentage had increased to 36%. After 3 years it almost stabilized at 38%. Satisfaction with sexual life was significantly correlated with ED. After 2 years one third of the pre-treatment potent patients still had considerable to very much sexual desire and found sex (very) important. No significant differences were found between the two dose-arms. Potency aids were used on a regular base by 14% of the patients. Conclusion: By taking adjuvant hormonal therapy (HT), HT during follow-up and potency aids into account, we found a lower percentage of ED after 3D-CRT than reported in previous prospective studies. A large group of patients still had sexual desire, considered sex important and 14% used potency aids after 3D-CRT

  4. Rectal bleeding after conformal 3D treatment of prostate cancer: time to occurrence, response to treatment and duration of morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshina, Teruki; Hanks, Gerald E.; Peters, Ruth S.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Late rectal bleeding is the most common sequelae of high dose 3D conformal treatment (3DCRT) for prostate cancer and limits attempts to improve local control by dose escalation. The clinical course of this complication is reported including time to onset, response to treatment, duration of morbidity and risk factor analysis by multivariate analysis. Materials and Methods: From March, 1989 to June 1996, 670 patients with prostate cancer were treated with 3DCRT. Eighty-nine patients developed grade 2 or 3 complications due to rectal bleeding and are analyzed (Grade 2 LENT scale, Grade 3 Fox Chase modification of LENT including >2 coagulations as Grade 3). They are compared to 581 patients without Grade 2,3 morbidity in multivariate analysis. Time to development, response to initial and retreatment and duration of morbidity are tabulated. Results: The median time to occurrence is not significantly different (p=.09) for Grade 2 (13 mo. range 4-41 mo.) compared to Grade 3 (18 mo. range 4-40 mo.). The corresponding median duration of symptoms >Grade 1 were significantly different (p=.0001) being 1 month (range 1-<12) versus 10 months (1-34) respectively. The response to treatment and retreatment is shown in Table 1. For Grade 2 complications medication or coagulation was highly effective as initial or retreatment resolving 66 of 73 patients. For Grade 3 a few responded to only transfusion and with multiple coagulations and medication (12(16)) patients improved to ≤ Grade 1. Multivariate analysis demonstrates that dose is the only significant factor associated with Grade 2 (LENT) (p=.01) or Grade 3 (FC-LENT) (p=.01) complication. Lack of response to treatment was associated with hypertension on univariate analysis only. Of 7 non-responders to treatment of Grade 2 bleeding, 3 have died of intercurrent disease at 10, 19 and 26 months while 4 are alive with continuing Grade 2 bleeding at 26, 34, 41 and 45 months after onset. Of 4 non-responders to treatment of

  5. Rectal bleeding after conformal 3D treatment of prostate cancer: Time to occurrence, response to treatment and duration of morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Teruki; Hanks, Gerald E.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Peter, Ruth S.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Rectal bleeding is the most common late sequelae of high-dose 3D conformal treatment (3DCRT) for prostate cancer and may limit attempts to improve local control by dose escalation. The clinical course of this complication is reported including time to onset, response to treatment, duration of morbidity, and multivariate analysis for predictors. Methods and Materials: From March 1989 to June 1995, 670 patients with prostate cancer were treated with 3DCRT at Fox Chase Cancer Center. Eighty-nine patients developed Grade 2 or Grade 3 complications due to rectal bleeding and are analyzed. Multivariate analysis results for predictors of Grade 2 and 3 rectal bleeding are reported as well as time to development, response to initial and retreatment, and duration of morbidity. Results: The median time to occurrence is not significantly different (p = 0.09) for Grade 2 (13 months, range 4-41 months) compared to Grade 3 rectal bleeding (18 months, range 4-40 months), while the corresponding median duration of symptoms was significantly different (p < 0.0001) being 1 month (range 1-12) vs. 10 months (1-34) for Grade 2 and Grade 3 bleeding, respectively. For Grade 2 bleeding, medication or coagulation was highly effective as initial or retreatment resolving 66 of 73 patients. For Grade 3 bleeding, three patients responded without medication following blood transfusion only, while with multiple coagulations and medication 12 of 16 patients improved to ≤ Grade 1. Multivariate analysis demonstrates that dose is the only significant factor associated with Grade 2 (p = 0.01) or Grade 3 (p = 0.01) rectal bleeding. Of seven nonresponders to treatment for Grade 2 bleeding, three have died of intercurrent disease at 10, 19, and 26 months, while four are alive with continuing Grade 2 bleeding at 12, 14, 15, and 30 months after onset. The four nonresponders to treatment for Grade 3 bleeding continue to bleed 1, 9, 32, and 35 months after the third coagulation despite continuing

  6. Mechanisms of growth inhibition of primary prostate epithelial cells following gamma irradiation or photodynamic therapy include senescence, necrosis, and autophagy, but not apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frame, Fiona M.; Savoie, Huguette; Bryden, Francesca; Giuntini, Francesca; Mann, Vincent M.; Simms, Matthew S.; Boyle, Ross W.; Maitland, Norman J.

    2015-01-01

    In comparison to more differentiated cells, prostate cancer stem-like cells are radioresistant, which could explain radio-recurrent prostate cancer. Improvement of radiotherapeutic efficacy may therefore require combination therapy. We have investigated the consequences of treating primary prostate epithelial cells with gamma irradiation and photodynamic therapy (PDT), both of which act through production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Primary prostate epithelial cells were cultured from patient samples of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer prior to treatment with PDT or gamma irradiation. Cell viability was measured using MTT and alamar blue assay, and cell recovery by colony-forming assays. Immunofluorescence of gamma-H2AX foci was used to quantify DNA damage, and autophagy and apoptosis were assessed using Western blots. Necrosis and senescence were measured by propidium iodide staining and beta-galactosidase staining, respectively. Both PDT and gamma irradiation reduced the colony-forming ability of primary prostate epithelial cells. PDT reduced the viability of all types of cells in the cultures, including stem-like cells and more differentiated cells. PDT induced necrosis and autophagy, whereas gamma irradiation induced senescence, but neither treatment induced apoptosis. PDT and gamma irradiation therefore inhibit cell growth by different mechanisms. We suggest these treatments would be suitable for use in combination as sequential treatments against prostate cancer

  7. Evaluation of homogeneity and dose conformity in IMRT planning in prostate radiotherapy; Avaliacao da homogeneidade e conformidade de dose em planejamentos de IMRT de prostata em radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Juliane S.; Leidens, Matheus; Estacio, Daniela R., E-mail: juliane.lopes@pucrs.br [Hospital Sao Lucas (PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia; Razera, Ricardo A.Z.; Streck, Elaine E.; Silva, Ana M.M. da [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Fisica

    2015-12-15

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the dose distribution homogeneity and conformity of radiation therapy plans of prostate cancer using IMRT. Data from 34 treatment plans of Hospital Sao Lucas of PUCRS, where those plans were executed, were retrospectively analyzed. All of them were done with 6MV X-rays from a linear accelerator CLINAC IX, and the prescription doses varied between 60 and 74 Gy. Analyses showing the homogeneity and conformity indices for the dose distribution of those plans were made. During these analyses, some comparisons with the traditional radiation therapy planning technic, the 3D-CRT, were discussed. The results showed that there is no correlation between the prescribed dose and the homogeneity and conformity indices, indicating that IMRT works very well even for higher doses. Furthermore, a comparison between the results obtained and the recommendations of ICRU 83 was carried out. It has also been observed that the indices were really close to the ideal values. 82.4% of the cases showed a difference below 5% of the ideal value for the index of conformity, and 88.2% showed a difference below 10% for the homogeneity index. Concluding, it is possible to confirm the quality of the analyzed radiation therapy plans of prostate cancer using IMRT. (author)

  8. Intracavitary irradiation of prostatic carcinoma by a high dose-rate afterloading technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odelberg-Johnson, O.; Underskog, I.; Johansson, J.E.; Bernshaw, D.; Sorbe, B.; Persson, J.E. (Oerebro Medical Center Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology Oerebro Medical Center Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Urology Oerebro Medical Center Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Gynecologic Oncology Oerebro Medical Center Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics)

    1991-01-01

    A high dose-rate ({sup 60}Co) afterloading technique was evaluated in a series of 73 patients with prostatic carcinoma stages I-IV. The intraurethral irradiation was combined with external pelvic radiotherapy. A minimum total dose of 78 Gy was delivered to the target volume. In a subgroup of patients extramustine (Estracyt) was given as adjuvant chemohormonal therapy during irradiation. The median follow-up for the whole group was 63 months. The crude 5-year survival rate was 60% and the corrected survival rate 90%. Survival was related to the tumor grade. Local pelvic recurrences were recorded in 17.8%. 'Viable cells' in posttherapy aspiration biopsy were not associated with tumor recurrences or survival. Four patients (5%) had grade 3 late radiation reactions with urethral structure or bladder fibrosis. Urinary tract infections and prior transurethral resections were not associated with a higher frequency of reactions. Concurrent estramustine therapy seemed to increase the frequency of both acute and chronic radiation reactions. Local control, recurrence, and survival were not affected by chemohormonal therapy. The use of tomography, magnetic resonance, and ultrasound as aids to computerized dosimetry may improve local dose distribution and reduce the irradiated volume. (orig.).

  9. Ion Prostate Irradiation (IPI) – a pilot study to establish the safety and feasibility of primary hypofractionated irradiation of the prostate with protons and carbon ions in a raster scan technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habl, Gregor; Herfarth, Klaus; Hatiboglu, Gencay; Edler, Lutz; Uhl, Matthias; Krause, Sonja; Roethke, Matthias; Schlemmer, Heinz P; Hadaschik, Boris; Debus, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Due to physical characteristics, ions like protons or carbon ions can administer the dose to the target volume more efficiently than photons since the dose can be lowered at the surrounding normal tissue. Radiation biological considerations are based on the assumption that the α/β value for prostate cancer cells is 1.5 Gy, so that a biologically more effective dose could be administered due to hypofractionation without increasing risks of late effects of bladder (α/β = 4.0) and rectum (α/β = 3.9). The IPI study is a prospective randomized phase II study exploring the safety and feasibility of primary hypofractionated irradiation of the prostate with protons and carbon ions in a raster scan technique. The study is designed to enroll 92 patients with localized prostate cancer. Primary aim is the assessment of the safety and feasibility of the study treatment on the basis of incidence grade III and IV NCI-CTC-AE (v. 4.02) toxicity and/or the dropout of the patient from the planned therapy due to any reason. Secondary endpoints are PSA-progression free survival (PSA-PFS), overall survival (OS) and quality-of-life (QoL). This pilot study aims at the evaluation of the safety and feasibility of hypofractionated irradiation of the prostate with protons and carbon ions in prostate cancer patients in an active beam technique. Additionally, the safety results will be compared with Japanese results recently published for carbon ion irradiation. Due to the missing data of protons in this hypofractionated scheme, an in depth evaluation of the toxicity will be created to gain basic data for a following comparison study with carbon ion irradiation. Clinical Trial Identifier: http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01641185 (clinicaltrials.gov)

  10. Investigation of normal tissue complication probabilities in prostate and partial breast irradiation radiotherapy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezak, E.; Takam, R.; Bensaleh, S.; Yeoh, E.; Marcu, L.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Normal- Tissue-Complication Probabilities of rectum, bladder and urethra following various radiation techniques for prostate cancer were evaluated using the relative-seriality and Lyman models. NTCPs of lungs, heart and skin, their dependence on sourceposition, balloon-deformation were also investigated for HDR mammosite brachytherapy. The prostate treatment techniques included external three dimentional conformal-radiotherapy, Low-Dose-Rate brachytherapy (1-125), High-Dose-Rate brachytherapy (Ir-I92). Dose- Volume-Histograms of critical structures for prostate and breast radiotherapy, retrieved from corresponding treatment planning systems, were converted to Biological Effective Dose (BEffD)-based and Equivalent Dose(Deq)-based DVHs to account for differences in radiation delivery and fractionation schedule. Literature-based model parameters were used to calculate NTCPs. Hypofractionated 3D-CRT (2.75 Gy/fraction, total dose 55 Gy) NTCPs of rectum, bladder and urethra were less than those for standard fractionated 4-field 3D-CRT (2-Gy/fraction, 64 Gy) and dose-escalated 4- and 5-field 3D-CRT (74 Gy). Rectal and bladder NTCPs (5.2% and 6.6%) following the dose-escalated 4-field 3D-CRT (74 Gy) were the highest among analyzed techniques. The average NTCP for rectum and urethra were 0.6% and 24.7% for LDRBT and 0.5% and 11.2% for HDR-BT. For Mammosite, NTCP was estimated to be 0.1 %, 0.1 %, 1.2% and 3.5% for skin desquamation, erythema, telangiectasia and fibrosis respectively (the source positioned at the balloon centre). A 4 mm Mammosite-balloon deformation leads to overdosing of PTV regions by ∼40%, resulting in excessive skin dose and increased NTCP. Conclusions Prostate brachytherapy resulted in NTCPs lower compared to external beam techniques. Mammosite-brachytherapy resulted in no heart/lung complications regardless of balloon deformation. However, 4 mm deformation caused 0.6% increase in tissue fibrosis NTCP.

  11. Preoperative irradiation, lymphadenectomy, and 125iodine implantation for patients with localized carcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLaney, T.F.; Shipley, W.U.; O'Leary, M.P.; Biggs, P.J.; Prout, G.R. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Fifty-four patients with clinically and surgically localized prostatic carcinoma were treated with low-dose preoperative irradiation (1050 cGy), pelvic lymphadenectomy, and interstitial 125 Iodine implantation. The follow-up range is 2 to 9 years with a median follow-up of 5 years. Overall local tumor control is 92%. Actuarial 5-year survival is 86% and the actuarial disease-free survival at 5 years is 73%. Patients with poorly differentiated tumors have a significantly worse actuarial survival (62%) at 5 years than patients with well (95%) or moderately well differentiated tumors (93%), p = 0.04. Disease-free survival at 5 years was influenced by grade: well (100%), moderate (60%), and poor (48%), p = 0.03. Multivariate regression analysis indicates that only the degree of differentiation (p = 0.05) significantly impacts on survival. Both degree of differentiation (p = 0.04) and nodal status (p = 0.03) significantly influence disease-free survival. Potency has been maintained in 71% of patients potent at the time of implantation. Late reactions have been acceptable to date: bladder outlet obstruction (13%), mild proctitis (13%), cystourethritis (6%), incontinence (2%), and prostatic calculi (2%)

  12. Comparing conformal, arc radiotherapy and helical tomotherapy in craniospinal irradiation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Pamela A; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Stathakis, Sotirios

    2014-09-08

    Currently, radiotherapy treatment plan acceptance is based primarily on dosimetric performance measures. However, use of radiobiological analysis to assess benefit in terms of tumor control and harm in terms of injury to normal tissues can be advantageous. For pediatric craniospinal axis irradiation (CSI) patients, in particular, knowing the technique that will optimize the probabilities of benefit versus injury can lead to better long-term outcomes. Twenty-four CSI pediatric patients (median age 10) were retrospectively planned with three techniques: three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT), volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and helical tomotherapy (HT). VMAT plans consisted of one superior and one inferior full arc, and tomotherapy plans were created using a 5.02cm field width and helical pitch of 0.287. Each plan was normalized to 95% of target volume (whole brain and spinal cord) receiving prescription dose 23.4Gy in 13 fractions. Using an in-house MATLAB code and DVH data from each plan, the three techniques were evaluated based on biologically effective uniform dose (D=), the complication-free tumor control probability (P+), and the width of the therapeutically beneficial range. Overall, 3D CRT and VMAT plans had similar values of D= (24.1 and 24.2 Gy), while HT had a D= slightly lower (23.6 Gy). The average values of the P+ index were 64.6, 67.4, and 56.6% for 3D CRT, VMAT, and HT plans, respectively, with the VMAT plans having a statistically significant increase in P+. Optimal values of D= were 28.4, 33.0, and 31.9 Gy for 3D CRT, VMAT, and HT plans, respectively. Although P+ values that correspond to the initial dose prescription were lower for HT, after optimizing the D= prescription level, the optimal P+ became 94.1, 99.5, and 99.6% for 3D CRT, VMAT, and HT, respectively, with the VMAT and HT plans having statistically significant increases in P+. If the optimal dose level is prescribed using a radiobiological evaluation method, as

  13. Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer Patients: Rise in Interleukin 6 (IL-6) but not IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, Tumor Necrosis Factor-{alpha}, MIP-1-{alpha}, and LIF Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira Lopes, Carlos [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba, Centro de Oncologia Radioterapica do Vale do Paraiba, Universidade do Vale do Paraiba Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento, Universidade do Vale do Paraiba, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Callera, Fernando, E-mail: fcallera@gmail.com [Centro de Hematologia Onco-hematologia e Transplantes de Medula Ossea do Vale do Paraiba, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of radiotherapy (RT) on serum levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}), macrophage inflammatory protein-1-alpha (MIP-1-{alpha}) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) in patients with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty eight patients with prostate cancer received three-dimensional conformal blocking radiation therapy with a linear accelerator. IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, TNF-{alpha}, MIP-1-{alpha}, and LIF levels were measured by the related immunoassay kit 1 day before the beginning of RT and during RT at days 15 and 30. Results: The mean IL-2 values were elevated before and during the RT in contrast with those of IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, TNF-{alpha}, MIP-1-{alpha}, and LIF, which were within the normal range under the same conditions. Regarding markers IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, TNF-{alpha}, MIP-1-{alpha}, and LIF, comparisons among the three groups (before treatment and 15 and 30 days during RT) did not show significant differences. Although values were within the normal range, there was a significant rise in IL-6 levels at day 15 of RT (p = 0.0049) and a decline at day 30 to levels that were similar to those observed before RT. Conclusions: IL-6 appeared to peak after 15 days of RT before returning to pre-RT levels. In contrast, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, TNF-{alpha}, MIP-1-{alpha}, and LIF levels were not sensitive to irradiation. The increased levels of IL-6 following RT without the concurrent elevation of other cytokines involved in the acute phase reaction did not suggest a classical inflammatory response to radiation exposure. Further studies should be designed to elucidate the role of IL-6 levels in patients with prostate cancer treated with RT.

  14. 18F-fluorocholine PET-guided target volume delineation techniques for partial prostate re-irradiation in local recurrent prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hui; Vees, Hansjoerg; Miralbell, Raymond; Wissmeyer, Michael; Steiner, Charles; Ratib, Osman; Senthamizhchelvan, Srinivasan; Zaidi, Habib

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: We evaluate the contribution of 18 F-choline PET/CT in the delineation of gross tumour volume (GTV) in local recurrent prostate cancer after initial irradiation using various PET image segmentation techniques. Materials and methods: Seventeen patients with local-only recurrent prostate cancer (median = 5.7 years) after initial irradiation were included in the study. Rebiopsies were performed in 10 patients that confirmed the local recurrence. Following injection of 300 MBq of 18 F-fluorocholine, dynamic PET frames (3 min each) were reconstructed from the list-mode acquisition. Five PET image segmentation techniques were used to delineate the 18 F-choline-based GTVs. These included manual delineation of contours (GTV man ) by two teams consisting of a radiation oncologist and a nuclear medicine physician each, a fixed threshold of 40% and 50% of the maximum signal intensity (GTV 40% and GTV 50% ), signal-to-background ratio-based adaptive thresholding (GTV SBR ), and a region growing (GTV RG ) algorithm. Geographic mismatches between the GTVs were also assessed using overlap analysis. Results: Inter-observer variability for manual delineation of GTVs was high but not statistically significant (p = 0.459). In addition, the volumes and shapes of GTVs delineated using semi-automated techniques were significantly higher than those of GTVs defined manually. Conclusions: Semi-automated segmentation techniques for 18 F-choline PET-guided GTV delineation resulted in substantially higher GTVs compared to manual delineation and might replace the latter for determination of recurrent prostate cancer for partial prostate re-irradiation. The selection of the most appropriate segmentation algorithm still needs to be determined.

  15. 18F-fluorocholine PET-guided target volume delineation techniques for partial prostate re-irradiation in local recurrent prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Vees, Hansjörg; Miralbell, Raymond; Wissmeyer, Michael; Steiner, Charles; Ratib, Osman; Senthamizhchelvan, Srinivasan; Zaidi, Habib

    2009-11-01

    We evaluate the contribution of (18)F-choline PET/CT in the delineation of gross tumour volume (GTV) in local recurrent prostate cancer after initial irradiation using various PET image segmentation techniques. Seventeen patients with local-only recurrent prostate cancer (median=5.7 years) after initial irradiation were included in the study. Rebiopsies were performed in 10 patients that confirmed the local recurrence. Following injection of 300 MBq of (18)F-fluorocholine, dynamic PET frames (3 min each) were reconstructed from the list-mode acquisition. Five PET image segmentation techniques were used to delineate the (18)F-choline-based GTVs. These included manual delineation of contours (GTV(man)) by two teams consisting of a radiation oncologist and a nuclear medicine physician each, a fixed threshold of 40% and 50% of the maximum signal intensity (GTV(40%) and GTV(50%)), signal-to-background ratio-based adaptive thresholding (GTV(SBR)), and a region growing (GTV(RG)) algorithm. Geographic mismatches between the GTVs were also assessed using overlap analysis. Inter-observer variability for manual delineation of GTVs was high but not statistically significant (p=0.459). In addition, the volumes and shapes of GTVs delineated using semi-automated techniques were significantly higher than those of GTVs defined manually. Semi-automated segmentation techniques for (18)F-choline PET-guided GTV delineation resulted in substantially higher GTVs compared to manual delineation and might replace the latter for determination of recurrent prostate cancer for partial prostate re-irradiation. The selection of the most appropriate segmentation algorithm still needs to be determined.

  16. Carbon ion irradiation of the human prostate cancer cell line PC3: A whole genome microarray study

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUETENS, ANNELIES; MOREELS, MARJAN; QUINTENS, ROEL; CHIRIOTTI, SABINA; TABURY, KEVIN; MICHAUX, ARLETTE; GRÉGOIRE, VINCENT; BAATOUT, SARAH

    2014-01-01

    Hadrontherapy is a form of external radiation therapy, which uses beams of charged particles such as carbon ions. Compared to conventional radiotherapy with photons, the main advantage of carbon ion therapy is the precise dose localization along with an increased biological effectiveness. The first results obtained from prostate cancer patients treated with carbon ion therapy showed good local tumor control and survival rates. In view of this advanced treatment modality we investigated the effects of irradiation with different beam qualities on gene expression changes in the PC3 prostate adenocarcinoma cell line. For this purpose, PC3 cells were irradiated with various doses (0.0, 0.5 and 2.0 Gy) of carbon ions (LET=33.7 keV/μm) at the beam of the Grand Accélérateur National d’Ions Lourds (Caen, France). Comparative experiments with X-rays were performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre. Genome-wide gene expression was analyzed using microarrays. Our results show a downregulation in many genes involved in cell cycle and cell organization processes after 2.0 Gy irradiation. This effect was more pronounced after carbon ion irradiation compared with X-rays. Furthermore, we found a significant downregulation of many genes related to cell motility. Several of these changes were confirmed using qPCR. In addition, recurrence-free survival analysis of prostate cancer patients based on one of these motility genes (FN1) revealed that patients with low expression levels had a prolonged recurrence-free survival time, indicating that this gene may be a potential prognostic biomarker for prostate cancer. Understanding how different radiation qualities affect the cellular behavior of prostate cancer cells is important to improve the clinical outcome of cancer radiation therapy. PMID:24504141

  17. X-ray-assisted positioning of patients treated by conformal arc radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Comparison of setup accuracy using implanted markers versus bony structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soete, Guy; Cock, Mieke de; Verellen, Dirk; Michielsen, Dirk; Keuppens, Frans; Storme, Guy

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare setup accuracy of NovalisBody stereoscopic X-ray positioning using implanted markers in the prostate vs. bony structures in patients treated with dynamic conformal arc radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Random and systematic setup errors (RE and SE) of the isocenter with regard to the center of gravity of three fiducial markers were measured by means of orthogonal verification films in 120 treatment sessions in 12 patients. Positioning was performed using NovalisBody semiautomated marker fusion. The results were compared with a control group of 261 measurements in 15 patients who were positioned with NovalisBody automated bone fusion. In addition, interfraction and intrafraction prostate motion was registered in the patients with implanted markers. Results: Marker-based X-ray positioning resulted in a reduction of RE as well as SE in the anteroposterior, craniocaudal, and left-right directions compared with those in the control group. The interfraction prostate displacements with regard to the bony pelvis that could be avoided by marker positioning ranged between 1.6 and 2.8 mm for RE and between 1.3 and 4.3 mm for SE. Intrafraction random and systematic prostate movements ranged between 1.4 and 2.4 mm and between 0.8 and 1.3 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The problem of interfraction prostate motion can be solved by using implanted markers. In addition, the NovalisBody X-ray system performs more accurately with markers compared with bone fusion. Intrafraction organ motion has become the limiting factor for margin reduction around the clinical target volume

  18. The combined treatment of prostate cancer (stage C) with definitive megavoltage irradiation and fast neutrons (DT, 14 MeV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franke, H.D.; Hess, A.; Langendorff, G.; Borchers, H.D.

    1980-01-01

    We treated between 1977 and 1979 patients with low differentiated prostate cancer stage C with megavoltage irradiation (42 MeV-X-rays) in the whole pelvis, including the prostate, up to 30-45 Gy/3-4,5 weeks; thereafter we irradiated a boost on the primary with 6-8 isocentric fields of fast neutrons up to 3,9-8,4 Gy/1-2 weeks. The 13 treated patients had all clinically complete regression of the tumor, they are without local recidive since 9-43 months. Biopsies of 3 patients are morphologic free of tumor cells already 8-12 months after irradiation. Distant metastases occurred in 3 patients: 2 are living since 16 and 43 months, 1 died after 24 months. All patients are free of serious chronic side effects at bladder and rectum, only 1 lives with a slight proctitis after therapy with only 2 opposing fields. The 14th patient is treated on behalf of a local recidive after prostatectomy (anaplastic prostate cancer) and a big pararectal metastasis; we irradiated the whole pelvis with fast neutrons up to a dose of 15,3 Gy/4 weeks (total dose, n + γ): The patient is free of pains since 9 months and without tumor in computer tomography, and free of serious chronic complications. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Late Outcomes Following Hypofractionated Conformal Radiotherapy vs. Standard Fractionation for Localized Prostate Cancer: A Nonrandomized Contemporary Comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leborgne, Felix; Fowler, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To study retrospectively late complications and biochemical control in patients treated with three-dimensional conformal external-beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer administered using hypofractionation vs. a standard fractionation regimen. The hypofractionation regimen (Hypo) was designed to avoid more late rectal reactions and to be done in half as many treatment sessions. Methods and Materials: Eighty-nine nonrandomized patients chose Hypo delivered in 20 fractions of 3 Gy (n = 52) or 3.15 Gy (n = 37) for a median overall treatment time of 33 days. One hundred thirty comparable patients were contemporaneously treated with standard fractionation to a median dose of 78 Gy delivered over 55 days. The median follow-up time was 49 months (range, 24-73 months). Results: The 5-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 96%, 84%, and 85% for low-, medium-, and high-risk disease in the Hypo group, respectively. The respective rates in the standard fractionation group were 98%, 84%, and 87%, with no statistical difference between the two groups. The rate of rectal Grade 2-4 complications was 5.5% in both treatment groups and of urinary Grade 2-4 complications was 5.6% in the Hypo and 3% in the standard group (p = 0.36). Similarly, there were no statistical differences in the rate of late complications between patients treated with 3 Gy/fraction vs. 3.15 Gy/fraction. Conclusions: Our preliminary results showed that the Hypo regimen is feasible and does not reduce biochemical control compared with standard fractionation. The incidence of late complications was not increased when the tumor normalized total doses at 2Gy/fraction was increased from 77.1 to 83.7 Gy in patients treated with either 3 or 3.15 Gy/fraction in the Hypo group, respectively.

  20. Initial dosimetric experience using simple three-dimensional conformal external-beam accelerated partial-breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taghian, Alphonse G.; Kozak, Kevin R.; Doppke, Karen P.; Katz, Angela; Smith, Barbara L.; Gadd, Michele; Specht, Michelle; Hughes, Kevin; Braaten, Kristina; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Recht, Abram; Powell, Simon N.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Several accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) techniques are being investigated in patients with early-stage breast cancer. We present our initial experience using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Sixty-one patients with tumors of 2 cm or less and negative axillary nodes were treated with 3D-CRT accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) between August 2003 and March 2005. The prescribed radiation dose was 32 Gy in 4-Gy fractions given twice daily. Efforts were made to minimize the number of beams required to achieve adequate planning target volume (PTV) coverage. Results: A combination of photons and electrons was used in 85% of patients. A three-field technique that consisted of opposed, conformal tangential photons and enface electrons was employed in 43 patients (70%). Nine patients (15%) were treated with a four-field arrangement, which consisted of three photon fields and enface electrons. Mean PTV volumes that received 100%, 95%, and 90% of the prescribed dose were 93% ± 7%, 97% ± 4%, and 98% ± 2%, respectively. Dose inhomogeneity exceeded 10% in only 7 patients (11%). Mean doses to the ipsilateral lung and heart were 1.8 Gy and 0.8 Gy, respectively. Conclusions: Simple 3D-CRT techniques of APBI can achieve appropriate PTV coverage while offering significant normal-tissue sparing. Therefore, this noninvasive approach may increase the availability of APBI to patients with early-stage breast cancer

  1. A treatment planning comparison of two different 3D conformal techniques for irradiation of head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstevska, Valentina; Lukarski, Dusko; Petkovska, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this treatment planning study was to compare two different three dimensional conformal irradiation techniques for head and neck cancer patients. For 33 patients with head and neck carcinoma, irradiated according to the classical technique, we computed and evaluated a second irradiation technique in order to optimize the treatment planning protocol. The classical technique, termed 'electron-photon fields', employed two lateral semi-fields (23 fractions) for irradiation of the upper part of the planning target volume that should receive 50 Gy (PTV50) and an anterior and posterior field for the lower part. After the 23rd fraction the lateral fields were reduced from the dorsal side (2 fractions), in order to exclude the spinal cord from them. At the same time the dose to the shielded part of the target volume was delivered with matched electron fields. Finally, after the 25th fraction, the high risk volume was irradiated to the desired dose with plan where the spinal cord was completely shielded. In the new technique, termed 'oblique photon fields', 4 oblique isocentric photon fields were used (25 fractions): two anterior fields that covered the entire target volume that should receive 50 Gy and two posterior fields that covered only half of the target volume in order to shield the spinal cord. Thus, the necessity for using electron fields is eliminated. We kept the plan for irradiation of the high risk planning target volume the same as in the classical technique. The prescribed dose per fraction in all plans was 2 Gy. In both techniques the plans were optimized to the same maximal point dose and the same dose to the spinal cord. The oblique fields plan showed better coverage and homogeneity of the PTV50, except for the patients with positive resection margins receiving postoperative radiotherapy (receiving 66 Gy), where the coverage did not differ significantly. The conformity in both techniques did not differ significantly. The mean dose to the

  2. Phase II trial of 3D-conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation: Lessons learned from patients and physicians’ evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azoury, Fares; Heymann, Steve; Acevedo, Catalina; Spielmann, Marc; Vielh, Philippe; Garbay, Jean-Rémi; Taghian, Alphonse G.; Marsiglia, Hugo; Bourgier, Céline

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The present study prospectively reported both physicians’ and patients’ assessment for toxicities, cosmetic assessment and patients’ satisfaction after 3D-conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Materials and Methods: From October 2007 to September 2009, 30 early breast cancer patients were enrolled in a 3D-conformal APBI Phase II trial (40 Gy/10 fractions/5 days). Treatment related toxicities and cosmetic results were assessed by both patients and physicians at each visit (at 1, 2, 6 months, and then every 6 months). Patient satisfaction was also scored. Results: After a median follow-up of 27.7 months, all patients were satisfied with APBI treatment, regardless of cosmetic results or late adverse events. Good/excellent cosmetic results were noticed by 80% of patients versus 92% of cases by radiation oncologists. Breast pain was systematically underestimated by physicians (8–20% vs. 16.6–26.2%; Kappa coefficient KC = 0.16–0.44). Grade 1 and 2 fibrosis and/or breast retraction occurred in 7–12% of patients and were overestimated by patients (KC = 0.14–0.27). Conclusions: Present results have shown discrepancies between patient and physician assessments. In addition to the assessment of efficacy and toxicity after 3D-conformal APBI, patients’ cosmetic results consideration and satisfaction should be also evaluated.

  3. Impact of inter- and intrafraction deviations and residual set-up errors on PTV margins. Different alignment techniques in 3D conformal prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langsenlehner, T.; Doeller, C.; Winkler, P.; Kapp, K.S.; Galle, G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze interfraction and intrafraction deviations and residual set-up errors (RSE) after online repositioning to determine PTV margins for 3 different alignment techniques in prostate cancer radiotherapy. The present prospective study included 44 prostate cancer patients with implanted fiducials treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy. Daily localization was based on skin marks followed by marker detection using kilovoltage (kV) imaging and subsequent patient repositioning. Additionally, in-treatment megavoltage (MV) images were obtained for each treatment field. In an off-line analysis of 7,273 images, interfraction prostate motion, RSE after marker-based prostate localization, prostate position during each treatment session, and the effect of treatment time on intrafraction deviations were analyzed to evaluate PTV margins. Margins accounting for interfraction deviation, RSE and intrafraction motion were 14.1, 12.9, and 15.1 mm in anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right (LR) direction for skin mark alignment and 9.6, 8.7, and 2.6 mm for bony structure alignment, respectively. Alignment to implanted markers required margins of 4.6, 2.8, and 2.5 mm. As margins to account for intrafraction motion increased with treatment prolongation PTV margins could be reduced to 3.9, 2.6, and 2.4 mm if treatment time was ≤ 4 min. With daily online correction and repositioning based on implanted fiducials, a significant reduction of PTV margins can be achieved. The use of an optimized workflow with faster treatment techniques such as volumetric modulated arc techniques (VMAT) could allow for a further decrease. (orig.)

  4. Synchronous prostate and rectal adenocarcinomas irradiation utilising volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Sweet Ping; Tran, Thu; Moloney, Philip; Sale, Charlotte; Mathlum, Maitham; Ong, Grace; Lynch, Rod

    2015-12-01

    Cases of synchronous prostate and colorectal adenocarcinomas have been sporadically reported. There are case reports on patients with synchronous prostate and rectal cancers treated with external beam radiotherapy alone or combined with high-dose rate brachytherapy boost to the prostate. Here, we illustrate a patient with synchronous prostate and rectal cancers treated using the volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) technique. The patient was treated with radical radiotherapy to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions to the pelvis, incorporating the involved internal iliac node and the prostate. A boost of 24 Gy in 12 fractions was delivered to the prostate only, using VMAT. Treatment-related toxicities and follow-up prostate-specific antigen and carcinoembryonic antigen were collected for data analysis. At 12 months, the patient achieved complete response for both rectal and prostate cancers without significant treatment-related toxicities.

  5. Synchronous prostate and rectal adenocarcinomas irradiation utilising volumetric modulated arc therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Sweet Ping; Tran, Thu; Moloney, Philip; Sale, Charlotte; Mathlum, Maitham; Ong, Grace; Lynch, Rod

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cases of synchronous prostate and colorectal adenocarcinomas have been sporadically reported. There are case reports on patients with synchronous prostate and rectal cancers treated with external beam radiotherapy alone or combined with high?dose rate brachytherapy boost to the prostate. Here, we illustrate a patient with synchronous prostate and rectal cancers treated using the volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) technique. The patient was treated with radical radiotherapy to 50.4 Gy in 2...

  6. Radiotherapy of intensity modulated VS conformational in the treatment of carcinoma of the prostate. A dosimetric comparison; Radioterapia de intensidad modulada VS conformacional en el tratamiento de carcinoma de prostata. Una camparacion dosimetrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Martin, G.; Garcia Vicente, F.; Zapatero Laborda, A.; Bermudez Luna, R.; Roch Gonzalez, M.; Perez Gonzalez, L.; Torres Escobar, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    The intensity modulated (IMRT) radiation therapy is a technique of high conformation which, by its nature, has as one of its main directions prostate cancer radiotherapy treatment. The purpose of this work is presents results of the dosimetric indicators collected in our hospital a number of patients of carcinoma of the prostate with standard three-dimensional Conformal technique (3D-CRT) and IMRT. Aims to demonstrate and quantify with a statistical methodology that, establishing an adequate Protocol of IMRT, significant reductions in risk organ doses can be obtained by keeping the same prescription to the white volume. (Author)

  7. Health-related quality of life after intensity modulated radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. Comparison with conventional and conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namiki, Shunichi; Ishidoya, Shigeto; Tochigi, Tatsuo

    2006-01-01

    No previous studies have reported the longitudinal health-related quality of life (HRQOL) for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We compared HRQOL after IMRT with that after conventional and after conformal radiation therapy (XRT). A total of 110 patients underwent XRT (34 patients underwent conventional radiation therapy and 76 underwent conformal radiation therapy) and 30 underwent IMRT for clinically localized prostate cancer between 2000 and 2002. We measured the general and disease-specific HRQOL using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Health Survey and University of California, Los Angeles, Prostate Cancer Index, respectively. There were no significant differences in the preoperative characteristics and HRQOL scores of the two groups. Repeated measure analyses of variance revealed significantly different patterns of alteration in several general HRQOL domains between XRT and the IMRT groups. In the urinary domain, there was no difference in the alteration patterns between the two groups. The XRT group suffered worse bowel function at 3 and 6 months than the IMRT group (P<0.05). In the XRT group, sexual function decreased at 3 months and remained substantially lower than the baseline level. However, the IMRT group showed no significant difference from the baseline level at any of the observation periods. At 18 months the XRT group showed worse sexual function than the IMRT group. The two approaches showed different longitudinal profiles regarding general and disease-specific HRQOL during the first 2 years after treatment. The IMRT approach produced little impairment in bowel and sexual function. (author)

  8. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer: low risk of chronic rectal morbidity observed in a large series of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandler, Howard M.; McLaughlin, P. William; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Addison, Heather; Forman, Jeffrey; Lichter, Allen

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) may provide a technique to increase the dose delivered to target tissues while sparing uninvolved normal structures. To evaluate the role of 3D treatment in reducing the treatment toxicity, we analyzed the chronic rectal morbidity observed in a large group of patients undergoing radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From 1987 through 1992, 721 prostate cancer patients were treated with 3D CRT at the University of Michigan or Providence Hospital. All had axial computed tomography (CT) specifically for RT planning, multiple structures contoured on the axial images, and beam's-eye-view conformal beams edited to provide 3D dose coverage. Using current American Joint Commission (AJCC) staging, 537 patients had T1-T2 tumors, 123 had T3-T4 tumors, and 60 were treated postprostatectomy. Pelvic lymph nodes were treated in 462 patients. Prostate boosts were delivered with four-field axial, six-field axial, or four-field oblique, nonaxial fields. The median dose was 68.40 Gy (range 59.4-80.4). Median follow-up was 20.4 months; 175 were followed more than 3 years. All complications have been graded conservatively using the RTOG system. Results: Using a Cox proportional hazard's model, patient age, T-stage, prescribed dose, pelvic treatment, and boost technique were analyzed. The factor most strongly related to risk of morbidity was dose (p = 0.05); however, the boost technique was also related: the four-field oblique field had the lowest relative risk. Most episodes of rectal morbidity have been mild: 82 Grade 1 or 2. There have been only 14 more serious complications including 12 Grade 3 and 2 Grade 4. The actuarial risk of a Grade 3 or 4 complication is 3% at 3 and 5 years. Conclusions: A very small proportion of patients treated with 3D CRT had significant rectal morbidity related to RT, supporting the use of conformal treatment planning and dose delivery as a mechanism to minimize complications

  9. 3-D conformal radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer: A subgroup analysis of rectoscopic findings prior to radiotherapy and acute/late rectal side effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldner, Gregor; Zimmermann, Frank; Feldmann, Horst; Glocker, Stefan; Wachter-Gerstner, Natascha; Geinitz, Hans; Becker, Gerd; Poetzi, Regina; Wambersie, Andre; Bamberg, Michael; Molls, Michael; Wachter, Stefan; Poetter, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To identify endoscopic pathological findings prior to radiotherapy and a possible correlation with acute or chronic rectal side effects after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Patients and methods: Between 03/99 and 07/02, a total of 298 patients, who consented in a voluntary rectoscopy prior to radiotherapy were included into the analysis. Patients were treated with a total dose of either 70 or 74 Gy. Pathological rectoscopic findings like hemorrhoids, polyps or diverticula were documented. Acute and late rectal side effects were scored using the EORTC/RTOG score. Results: The most frequent pathological endosopic findings were hemorrhoids (35%), polyps (24%) and diverticula (13%). Rectal toxicity was mostly low to moderate. Grade 0/1 cumulative acute and late rectal side effects were 82 and 84%, grade 2 were 18 and 17%, respectively. We could not identify any correlation between preexisting pathological findings and rectal side effects by statistical analysis. Conclusions: There is no evidence that prostate cancer patients presenting with endoscopic verified pathological findings in the rectal mucosa at diagnosis are at an increased risk to develop rectal side effects when treated with 3D-CRT of the prostatic region

  10. Comparing two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the hypofractionated treatment of high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yartsev Slav

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the setting of hypofractionated high-risk prostate cancer treatment. Methods 3DCRT and dIMRT/Helical Tomotherapy(HT planning with 10 CT datasets was undertaken to deliver 68 Gy in 25 fractions (prostate and simultaneously delivering 45 Gy in 25 fractions (pelvic lymph node targets in a single phase. The paradigms of pelvic vessel targeting (iliac vessels with margin are used to target pelvic nodes and conformal normal tissue avoidance (treated soft tissues of the pelvis while limiting dose to identified pelvic critical structures were assessed compared to 3DCRT controls. Both dIMRT/HT and 3DCRT solutions were compared to each other using repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc paired t-tests. Results When compared to conformal pelvic vessel targeting, conformal normal tissue avoidance delivered more homogenous PTV delivery (2/2 t-test comparisons; p dose, 1–3 Gy over 5/10 dose points; p Conclusion dIMRT/HT nodal and pelvic targeting is superior to 3DCRT in dose delivery and critical structure sparing in the setting of hypofractionation for high-risk prostate cancer. The pelvic targeting paradigm is a potential solution to deliver highly conformal pelvic radiation treatment in the setting of nodal location uncertainty in prostate cancer and other pelvic malignancies.

  11. Therapeutic results and prognostic factors after irradiation of loco-regional prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debrigode, C.; Dubois, J.; Hay, H.M.; Astre, C.; Savu, N.M.

    1994-01-01

    The present study concerns 140 patients with loco-regional prostatic cancer, treated with external beam irradiation at the CRLC Val-d'Aurelle in Montpellier, France, between 1982 and 1988, with a minimum of 54 months follow-up. The local control after radiotherapy is 78.6%, all stages and histological grades combined. The median overall survival is 114 months and the median disease-free survival 59 months. The most frequent modality of treatment failure is metastatic disease, isolated (32.8%) or combined to local relapse (10%). The rate of urinary intolerance symptoms during treatment was 87.1 and 80.6% for the digestive ones. The late urinary complications and sequellae rate was 21.4% for the cystitis-type and 12.9% for post-radiotherapy urethral structures; the latter has imposed in 2/3 of cases one or more trans-urethral resections that never showed pathological signs of recurrence. Digestive complications and sequellae occurred in 31.3% of the patients; in the latter group there were two internal digestive fistulae which needed surgical treatment and three postradiotherapeutic stenosis of the anal canal. The prognostic factors revealed by statistical analysis are clinical stage, pathological grade for overall and disease-free survival, age for overall survival and trans-urethral resection for disease-free survival, the latter being equally a risk factor for cystitis-type complications and urethral structures. (authors). 26 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs

  12. High-dose (70-78 GY) conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer; the relation between observed late bladder and rectum complications and parameters derived from the dose volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebesque, J.V.; Bruce, A.; Boersma, L.J.; Velde, A. te

    1996-01-01

    complications (≥ grade II) was 13% at 2 years, both for doses to the anterior rectal wall ≤ 75 Gy and > 75 Gy (Figure). This is much lower than after conventional radiotherapy for prostate cancer (Smit et al.), where these figures were 21% and 60%, respectively. In univariate analyses, we did not find a significant relation between GI complications rates (grade II and/or III) and irradiated rectal wall volumes, total prescribed radiation dose or maximum radiation dose to the anterior rectal wall. The estimated NTCPs (on average 11%) were much higher than the incidence of grade III GI toxicity in our study ( 20% these figures were 11.4% and 0%, respectively. We are currently investigating whether dose surface histograms are more reliable to predict the observed late GI complications ≥ grade II. Conclusions: Conformal radiotherapy reduces late rectal complications significantly with respect to conventional radiotherapy. Observed late GI complications grade III were much lower than the NTCP estimations based on the model and parameter values of Kutcher et al. and Burman et al., respectively. Observed late GI complications ≥ grade II were overall in the range of the NTCP estimations, but did not correlate specifically with DVH parameters and NTCP estimations. Consequently, adaptation of the NTCP model and/or its parameter values for rectum complications is highly necessary. Grade III GU complications were mostly related to the prostatic urethra and consequently DVHs of the bladder have only limited value

  13. Later Outcomes and Alpha/Beta Estimate From Hypofractionated Conformal Three-Dimensional Radiotherapy Versus Standard Fractionation for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leborgne, Felix [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Italiano, Montevideo (Uruguay); Fowler, Jack, E-mail: jackfowlersbox@gmail.com [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States); Leborgne, Jose H.; Mezzera, Julieta [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Italiano, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Now that the follow-up time has exceeded 5 years, an estimate of the {alpha}/{beta} ratio can be presented. The additional late outcomes in patients treated with three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer using a hypofractionated vs. a standard fractionation regimen are reported from this prospective nonrandomized contemporary comparison. Methods and Materials: A total of 114 nonrandomized patients chose hypofractionation delivered in 20 fractions of 3 Gy or 3.15 Gy (mean 3.06 Gy) for localized prostate cancer within a median overall time of 32 days (range, 29-49) using four fractions weekly. A total of 160 comparable patients were contemporarily treated within a median of 55 days (range 49-66). The median follow-up was 66 months (range, 24-95) for the hypofractionated arm and 63 months (range, 36-92) for the standard arm. The percentage of patients in the low-, medium-, and high-risk groups was 36%, 46%, and 18% in the hypofractionated arm and 44%, 50%, and 6% in standard arm (2 Gy), respectively. Results: The 5-year actuarial biochemical absence of disease (prostate-specific antigen nadir + 2 ng/mL) and disease-free survival rate was the same at 89% in both arms, making the {alpha}/{beta} calculation unambiguous. The point ratio of {alpha}/{beta} was 1.86 (95% confidence interval, 0.7-5.1 Gy). The 95% confidence interval was determined entirely by the binomial confidence limits in the numbers of patients. Rectal reactions of grade 3 and 4 occurred in 1 of 114 (hypofractionated) and 2 of 160 (standard) patients. Conclusions: The presented three-dimensional conformal regimen was acceptable, and the {alpha}/{beta} value was 1.8, in agreement with other very recent low meta-analyses (reviewed in the '' section).

  14. Hypofractionated Prostate Radiotherapy with or without Conventionally Fractionated Nodal Irradiation: Clinical Toxicity Observations and Retrospective Daily Dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Andrew M; Bishop, Justin M; Jacob, Rojymon; Dobelbower, Michael C; Kim, Robert Y; Yang, Eddy S; Smith, Heather; Wu, Xingen; Fiveash, John B

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate toxicity associated with the addition of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) to a hypofractionated regimen for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials. Fifty-seven patients received pelvic image-guided IMRT to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions with a hypofractionated simultaneous boost to the prostate to 70 Gy. Thirty-one patients received prostate-only treatment to 70 Gy in 28 fractions. Results. Median followup was 41.1 months. Early grade ≥2 urinary toxicity rates were 49% (28 of 57) for patients receiving ENI and 58% (18 of 31) for those not (P = 0.61). Early grade ≥2 rectal toxicity rates were 40% (23 of 57) and 23% (7 of 31), respectively (P = 0.09). The addition of ENI resulted in a 21% actuarial rate of late grade ≥2 rectal toxicity at 4 years, compared to 0% for patients treated to the prostate only (P = 0.02). Retrospective daily dosimetry of patients experiencing late rectal toxicity revealed an average increase of 2.67% of the rectal volume receiving 70 Gy compared to the original plan. Conclusions. The addition of ENI resulted in an increased risk of late rectal toxicity. Grade ≥2 late rectal toxicity was associated with worse daily rectal dosimetry compared to the treatment plan.

  15. Late Gastrointestinal Toxicity After Dose-Escalated Conformal Radiotherapy for Early Prostate Cancer: Results From the UK Medical Research Council RT01 Trial (ISRCTN47772397)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syndikus, Isabel; Morgan, Rachel C.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Graham, John D.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In men with localized prostate cancer, dose-escalated conformal radiotherapy (CFRT) improves efficacy outcomes at the cost of increased toxicity. We present a detailed analysis to provide further information about the incidence and prevalence of late gastrointestinal side effects. Methods and Materials: The UK Medical Research Council RT01 trial included 843 men with localized prostate cancer, who were treated for 6 months with neoadjuvant radiotherapy and were randomly assigned to either 64-Gy or 74-Gy CFRT. Toxicity was evaluated before CFRT and during long-term follow-up using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading, the Late Effects on Normal Tissue: Subjective, Objective, Management (LENT/SOM) scale, and Royal Marsden Hospital assessment scores. Patients regularly completed Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy--Prostate (FACT-P) and University of California, Los Angeles, Prostate Cancer Index (UCLA-PCI) questionnaires. Results: In the dose-escalated group, the hazard ratio (HR) for rectal bleeding (LENT/SOM grade ≥2) was 1.55 (95% CI, 1.17-2.04); for diarrhea (LENT/SOM grade ≥2), the HR was 1.79 (95% CI, 1.10-2.94); and for proctitis (RTOG grade ≥2), the HR was 1.64 (95% CI, 1.20-2.25). Compared to baseline scores, the prevalence of moderate and severe toxicities generally increased up to 3 years and than lessened. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of patient-reported severe bowel problems was 6% vs. 8% (standard vs. escalated, respectively) and severe distress was 4% vs. 5%, respectively. Conclusions: There is a statistically significant increased risk of various adverse gastrointestinal events with dose-escalated CFRT. This remains at clinically acceptable levels, and overall prevalence ultimately decreases with duration of follow-up.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and conformal radiotherapy: Characterization of MRI alone simulation for conformal radiotherapy. Development and evaluation of an automatic volumes of interest segmentation tool for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquier, David

    2006-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a curative treatment of malignant tumours. Radiotherapy techniques considerably evolved last years with the increasing integration of medical images in conformal radiotherapy. This technique makes it possible to elaborate a complex ballistics conforming to target volume and sparing healthy tissues. The examination currently used to delineate volumes of interest is Computed Tomography (CT), on account of its geometrical precision and the information that it provides on electronic densities needed to dose calculation. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ensures a more precise delineation of target volumes in many locations, such as pelvis and brain. For pelvic tumours, the use of MRI needs image registration, which complicates treatment planning and poses the problem of the lack of in vivo standard method of validation. The obstacles in the use of MRI alone in treatment planning were evaluated. Neither geometrical distortion linked with the system and the patient nor the lack of information on electronic densities represent stumbling obstacles. Distortion remained low even in edge of large field of view on modern machines. The assignment of electronic densities to bone structures and soft tissues in MR images permitted to obtain equivalent dosimetry to that carried out on the original CT, with a good reproducibility and homogeneous distribution within target volume. The assignment of electronic densities could not be carried out using 20 MV photons and suitable ballistics. The development of Image Guided Radiotherapy could facilitate the use of MRI alone in treatment planning. Target volumes and organ at risk delineation is a time consuming task in radiotherapy planning. We took part in the development and evaluated a method of automatic and semi automatic delineation of volumes of interest from MRI images for prostate cancer radiotherapy. For prostate and organ at risk automatic delineation an organ model-based method and a seeded region growing method

  17. Irradiation of the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes with an adaptive algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, A. B.; Chen, J.; Nguyen, T. B.; Gottschalk, A. G.; Roach, M. R. III; Pouliot, J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The simultaneous treatment of pelvic lymph nodes and the prostate in radiotherapy for prostate cancer is complicated by the independent motion of these two target volumes. In this work, the authors study a method to adapt intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans so as to compensate for this motion by adaptively morphing the multileaf collimator apertures and adjusting the segment weights. Methods: The study used CT images, tumor volumes, and normal tissue contours from patients treated in our institution. An IMRT treatment plan was then created using direct aperture optimization to deliver 45 Gy to the pelvic lymph nodes and 50 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles. The prostate target volume was then shifted in either the anterior-posterior direction or in the superior-inferior direction. The treatment plan was adapted by adjusting the aperture shapes with or without re-optimizing the segment weighting. The dose to the target volumes was then determined for the adapted plan. Results: Without compensation for prostate motion, 1 cm shifts of the prostate resulted in an average decrease of 14% in D-95%. If the isocenter is simply shifted to match the prostate motion, the prostate receives the correct dose but the pelvic lymph nodes are underdosed by 14% ± 6%. The use of adaptive morphing (with or without segment weight optimization) reduces the average change in D-95% to less than 5% for both the pelvic lymph nodes and the prostate. Conclusions: Adaptive morphing with and without segment weight optimization can be used to compensate for the independent motion of the prostate and lymph nodes when combined with daily imaging or other methods to track the prostate motion. This method allows the delivery of the correct dose to both the prostate and lymph nodes with only small changes to the dose delivered to the target volumes.

  18. A comparison of four patient immobilization devices in the treatment of prostate cancer patients with three dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Paul Y.; Washington, Maxine; Vaida, Florin; Hamilton, Russell; Spelbring, Danny; Wyman, Brenda; Harrison, Joanne; Chen, George T. Y.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the variability of patient positioning during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer treated with no immobilization or one of four immobilization devices, and to determine the effects of patient body habitus and pelvic circumference on patient movement with each individual immobilization technique. Methods and Materials: To see whether our immobilization techniques have improved day-to-day patient movement, a retrospective analysis was carried out. A total of 62 patients treated at one facility on a single machine with 3D-CRT via a four-field box technique (anterior-posterior and opposed laterals) in the supine position with either no immobilization or one of four immobilization devices. Five groups of patients were compared: (a) group 1-no immobilization; (b) group 2-alpha cradle from the waist to upper thigh; (c) group 3-alpha cradle from waist to below the knees; (d) group 4-styrofoam leg immobilizer (below knees); and (e) group 5-aquaplast cast encompassing the entire abdomen and pelvis to midthigh with alpha cradle immobilization to their lower legs and feet. Prior to starting radiotherapy, portal films of all four treatment fields were obtained 1 day before treatment. Subsequently, portal films were then obtained at least once a week. Portal films were compared with the simulation films and appropriate changes were made and verified on the next day prior to treatment. A deviation of greater than 0.5 cm or greater was considered to be clinically significant in our analysis. We studied the difference among the types of immobilization and no immobilization by looking at the frequency of movements (overall, and on each of the three axes) that a patient had during the course of his treatment. Using a logistic regression model, the probability of overall and individual directional movement for each group was obtained. In addition, the effects of patient body habitus and pelvic circumference on movement were

  19. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using robotic radiotherapy: a dosimetric comparison with tomotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rault, Erwann; Lacornerie, Thomas; Dang, Hong-Phuong; Crop, Frederik; Lartigau, Eric; Reynaert, Nick; Pasquier, David

    2016-02-27

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is a new breast treatment modality aiming to reduce treatment time using hypo fractionation. Compared to conventional whole breast irradiation that takes 5 to 6 weeks, APBI is reported to induce worse cosmetic outcomes both when using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). These late normal tissue effects may be attributed to the dose volume effect because a large portion of the non-target breast tissue volume (NTBTV) receives a high dose. In the context of APBI, non-coplanar beams could spare the NTBTV more efficiently. This study evaluates the dosimetric benefit of using the Cyberknife (CK) for APBI in comparison to IMRT (Tomotherapy) and three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). The possibility of using surgical clips, implanted during surgery, to track target movements is investigated first. A phantom of a female thorax was designed in-house using the measurements of 20 patients. Surgical clips of different sizes were inserted inside the breast. A treatment plan was delivered to the mobile and immobile phantom. The motion compensation accuracy was evaluated using three radiochromic films inserted inside the breast. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), Tomotherapy (TOMO) and CK treatment plans were calculated for 10 consecutive patients who received APBI in Lille. To ensure a fair comparison of the three techniques, margins applied to the CTV were set to 10 mm. However, a second CK plan was prepared using 3 mm margins to evaluate the benefits of motion compensation. Only the larger clips (VITALITEC Medium-Large) could be tracked inside the larger breast (all gamma indices below 1 for 1 % of the maximum dose and 1 mm). All techniques meet the guidelines defined in the NSABP/RTOG and SHARE protocols. As the applied dose volume constraints are very strong, insignificant dosimetric differences exist between techniques regarding the PTV

  20. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using robotic radiotherapy: a dosimetric comparison with tomotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rault, Erwann; Lacornerie, Thomas; Dang, Hong-Phuong; Crop, Frederik; Lartigau, Eric; Reynaert, Nick; Pasquier, David

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is a new breast treatment modality aiming to reduce treatment time using hypo fractionation. Compared to conventional whole breast irradiation that takes 5 to 6 weeks, APBI is reported to induce worse cosmetic outcomes both when using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). These late normal tissue effects may be attributed to the dose volume effect because a large portion of the non-target breast tissue volume (NTBTV) receives a high dose. In the context of APBI, non-coplanar beams could spare the NTBTV more efficiently. This study evaluates the dosimetric benefit of using the Cyberknife (CK) for APBI in comparison to IMRT (Tomotherapy) and three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). The possibility of using surgical clips, implanted during surgery, to track target movements is investigated first. A phantom of a female thorax was designed in-house using the measurements of 20 patients. Surgical clips of different sizes were inserted inside the breast. A treatment plan was delivered to the mobile and immobile phantom. The motion compensation accuracy was evaluated using three radiochromic films inserted inside the breast. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), Tomotherapy (TOMO) and CK treatment plans were calculated for 10 consecutive patients who received APBI in Lille. To ensure a fair comparison of the three techniques, margins applied to the CTV were set to 10 mm. However, a second CK plan was prepared using 3 mm margins to evaluate the benefits of motion compensation. Only the larger clips (VITALITEC Medium-Large) could be tracked inside the larger breast (all gamma indices below 1 for 1 % of the maximum dose and 1 mm). All techniques meet the guidelines defined in the NSABP/RTOG and SHARE protocols. As the applied dose volume constraints are very strong, insignificant dosimetric differences exist between techniques regarding the PTV

  1. Radiation therapy for prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Akira; Minowada, Shigeru; Tomoishi, Junzo; Kinoshita, Kenji; Matsuda, Tadayoshi

    1983-01-01

    A conformation radiotherapy system with collimators, whose openings can be controlled symmetrically by computerized techniques during rotational irradiation by a linear accelerator, has been developed for routine use in our hospital. Forty-four patients underwent radiation therapy, including this particular modality of radiotherapy, for prostatic cancer during the period of July 1976 through December 1981. Eight patients were classified as stage A, 10 stage B, 10 stage C, and 16 as stage D. Twenty-nine patients underwent conformation radiotherapy, two rotation radiotherapy, eight 2-port opposing technique radiotherapy, one 4-field radiotherapy, and four underwent a combination of 2-port opposing technique and conformation radiotherapy. Transient mild side effects such as diarrhea occurred in seven cases, while severe side effects such as rectal stricture or contracted bladder occurred in three cases. The latter occurred only in one case among 29 of conformation radiotherapy and in two among eight of 2-port opposing technique radiotherapy. The results of the treatment of short intervals in stage B, C, and D are as follows: prostatic size was reduced in 26 cases among 36, serum acid phosphatase level was reduced in 15 among 18 who had showed high acid phosphatase levels before treatment, although almost all cases underwent simultaneous hormonal therapy. The effects of radiotherapy alone were verified in two cases of stage B in which radiotherapy preceded hormonal therapy. Prostatic size and serum acid phosphatase level were reduced by radiotherapy alone. (author)

  2. The impact of race on biochemical outcome in patients receiving irradiation for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nautiyal, Jai; Vaida, Florin; Awan, Azhar; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: African-Americans tend to present with a higher stage and grade prostate cancer than whites and hence previous studies have attempted to delineate the importance of race in outcome with radiotherapy. However, these studies have had limitations including insufficient number of African-American patients, lack of a similar quality of care or uniform treatment policy. In addition, race as a prognostic variable has not been analyzed in regards to PSA based outcome criteria. The current study was performed in order to determine the impact of race on survival and biochemical control in patients with prostate cancer treated at a single center using a standardized radiation protocol. Materials and Methods: Between 1988 and 1995, 455 patients with clinically localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate received external beam irradiation for a median dose of 68 Gy using a four field technique. Of the 455 patients, 211 were African-American and 244 were white. Pretreatment PSA were: 0-4 ng/ml (51), 4-10 ng/ml (129), 10-20 ng/ml (117), > 20 ng/ml (136), unknown (22). Clinical stages were: T1 (108), T2 (238), T3 (99), not available (10). There was no significant difference in pretreatment characteristics (stage, grade and PSA) or radiation dose between the African-American and white group of patients. Median follow-up is 37.8 months. Biochemical failure was defined as two or more consecutive PSA values that are greater than the posttreatment nadir. Race, pretreatment PSA, grade, age, stage and dose were assessed with univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis as prognostic factors for overall survival and biochemical disease free survival. Results: The 5 year actuarial overall survival (OS) was 79% and biochemical disease free survival (bNED) was 35% for the entire group of patients. There was no significant difference in 5 year OS (71% vs. 85%) (p=0.3) or bNED (26% vs. 40%) (p=0.26) for African-Americans in comparison to whites. Univariate analysis

  3. Adjuvant and salvage therapy following radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer: effect of combined transient androgen deprivation and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eulau, Stephen M.; Tate, David J.; Cox, Richard S.; Bagshaw, Malcolm A.; Hancock, Steven L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant and salvage irradiation have been shown to improve local control after radical prostatectomy for prostatic cancer in patients with high risk pathologic features, rising PSA, or evidence of local failure. Transient androgen deprivation combined with primary irradiation has resulted in improved local control and biochemical disease free survival in patients with locally advanced, unresected, prostate cancer. This retrospective study evaluates whether transient androgen blockade improves the outcome from post-prostatectomy irradiation given as either adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods: From August, 1985 to December, 1995, 105 patients were treated with radiotherapy to the prostatic fossa following radical prostatectomy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. No patient had clinically or radiographically evident distant disease. Median follow-up was 4.6 years from the date of surgery and 3.2 years from completion of radiotherapy. Findings at prostatectomy included capsular penetration in 38 patients, seminal vesicle involvement in 42 patients, lymph node involvement in 15 patients, and positive surgical margins in 70 patients. Treatment was administered as adjuvant therapy for high risk pathologic features in 39 patients, for persistent or rising PSA in 52 patients, or for clinically evident local recurrence in 14 patients. Of the 105 patients, 32 received combined androgen deprivation/radiotherapy and 73 received radiotherapy alone. Both groups received 60-70 Gy in 2 Gy daily fractions to the prostatic fossa. Selected patients with poor prognostic features received pelvic irradiation to a median dose of 50 Gy. Androgen deprivation typically consisted of Lupron and Flutamide for 4 to 6 months before, during, and in selected cases, after irradiation. No patients received maintenance androgen deprivation or underwent orchiectomy. Tumor stage, lymph node status, Gleason sum, and indications for treatment did not differ significantly between the two groups

  4. Dosimetric comparison of proton and photon three-dimensional, conformal, external beam accelerated partial breast irradiation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, Kevin R.; Katz, Angela; Adams, Judith C.; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; Nyamwanda, Jacqueline A.C.; Feng, Jennifer K.C.; Doppke, Karen P.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetry of proton and photon-electron three-dimensional, conformal, external beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (3D-CPBI). Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients with fully excised, Stage I breast cancer treated with adjuvant proton 3D-CPBI had treatment plans generated using the mixed-modality, photon-electron 3D-CPBI technique. To facilitate dosimetric comparisons, planning target volumes (PTVs; lumpectomy site plus 1.5-2.0 cm margin) and prescribed dose (32 Gy) were held constant. Plans were optimized for PTV coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: Proton and mixed-modality plans both provided acceptable PTV coverage with 95% of the PTV receiving 90% of the prescribed dose in all cases. Both techniques also provided excellent dose homogeneity with a dose maximum exceeding 110% of the prescribed dose in only one case. Proton 3D-CPBI reduced the volume of nontarget breast tissue receiving 50% of the prescribed dose by an average of 36%. Statistically significant reductions in the volume of total ipsilateral breast receiving 100%, 75%, 50%, and 25% of the prescribed dose were also observed. The use of protons resulted in small, but statistically significant, reductions in the radiation dose delivered to 5%, 10%, and 20% of ipsilateral and contralateral lung and heart. The nontarget breast tissue dosimetric advantages of proton 3D-CPBI were not dependent on tumor location, breast size, PTV size, or the ratio of PTV to breast volume. Conclusions: Compared to photon-electron 3D-CPBI, proton 3D-CPBI significantly reduces the volume of irradiated nontarget breast tissue. Both approaches to accelerated partial breast irradiation offer exceptional lung and heart sparing

  5. Positive resection margin and/or pathologic T3 adenocarcinoma of prostate with undetectable postoperative prostate-specific antigen after radical prostatectomy: to irradiate or not?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Richard; Hruby, George; Hong, Julie; Hong, Eugene; DeBoer, Gerrit; Danjoux, Cyril; Morton, Gerard; Klotz, Laurence; Bhak, Edward; Flavin, Aileen

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for positive resection margin and/or pathologic T3 (pT3) adenocarcinoma of the prostate with undetectable postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. Methods and materials: We retrospectively analyzed 125 patients with a positive resection margin and/or pT3 adenocarcinoma of the prostate who had undetectable postoperative serum PSA levels after radical prostatectomy. Seventy-three patients received postoperative adjuvant RT and 52 did not. Follow-up ranged from 1.5 to 12.0 years (median 4.2 for the irradiated group and 4.9 for the nonirradiated group). PSA outcome was available for all patients. Freedom from failure was defined as the maintenance of a serum PSA level of ≤0.2 ng/mL, as well as the absence of clinical local recurrence and distant metastasis. Results: No difference was found in the 5-year actuarial overall survival between the irradiated and nonirradiated group (94% vs. 95%). However, patients receiving adjuvant RT had a statistically superior 5-year actuarial relapse-free rate, including freedom from PSA failure, compared with those treated with surgery alone (88% vs. 65%, p=0.0013). In the irradiated group, 8 patients had relapse with PSA failure alone. None had local or distant recurrence. In the nonirradiated group, 15, 1, and 2 had PSA failure, local recurrence, and distant metastasis, respectively. On Cox regression analysis, pre-radical prostatectomy PSA level and adjuvant RT were statistically significant predictive factors for relapse, and Gleason score, extracapsular invasion, and resection margin status were not. There was a suggestion that seminal vesicle invasion was associated with an increased risk of relapse. The morbidity of postoperative adjuvant RT was acceptable, with only 2 patients developing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 genitourinary complications. Adjuvant RT had a minimal adverse effect on urinary continence and did not cause

  6. Assessing the variability of outcome for patients treated with localized prostate irradiation using different definitions of biochemical control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, Eric; Ziaja, Ellen; Vicini, Frank; Dmuchowski, Carl; Gonzalez, Jose; Stromberg, Jannifer; Brabbins, Donald; Hollander, Jay; Chen, Peter; Martinez, Alvaro

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Biochemical control is rapidly becoming the standard to assess treatment outcome of clinically localized prostate cancer. However, no standardized definition of biochemical control has been established. We reviewed our experience treating patients with localized prostate cancer and applied 3 different commonly used definitions to estimate the variability in rates of biochemical control. Materials and Methods: Between (1(87)) and (12(91)), 480 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received uniform treatment with external beam irradiation (RT) using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital. The median dose to the prostate was 66.6 Gy (range 58 to 70.4 Gy) through a 4 field technique. A total of 14 patients received pelvic nodal RT (median dose 45 Gy). Four hundred seventy patients had post-treatment (posttx) PSA values and 414 patients had pre-treatment (pretx) PSA values. Three different definitions of biochemical control were used: 1) Biochemical control was defined as posttx PSA nadir < 1 ng/ml within 1 year. After achieving nadir, if there were 2 consecutive increases, the patient was scored a failure at the time of the first increase; 2) Biochemical control was defined as posttx PSA nadir < 1.5 ng/ml within 1 year. After achieving nadir, if there were 2 consecutive increases, the patient was scored a failure at the time of the first increase; 3) Posttx PSA nadir < 4 ng/ml without a time limit. Once the nadir was achieved, and it did not rise above normal, the patient was considered controlled. Clinical local control was defined as no palpable prostate nodularity beyond 18 months, no new prostate nodularity, or a negative biopsy. If hormonal therapy was started, the patient was censored for biochemical failure at that time. Results: Median follow-up is 48 months (range 3 to 112 months). Pre-treatment PSA values were correlated with biochemical response using the 3 definitions of biochemical control as well as clinical local

  7. Analysis of biopsy outcome after three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy of prostate cancer using dose-distribution variables and tumor control probability models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levegruen, Sabine; Jackson, Andrew; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Venkatraman, Ennapadam S.; Skwarchuk, Mark W.; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Fuks, Zvi; Leibel, Steven A.; Ling, C. Clifton

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate tumor control following three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) of prostate cancer and to identify dose-distribution variables that correlate with local control assessed through posttreatment prostate biopsies. Methods and Material: Data from 132 patients, treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), who had a prostate biopsy 2.5 years or more after 3D-CRT for T1c-T3 prostate cancer with prescription doses of 64.8-81 Gy were analyzed. Variables derived from the dose distribution in the PTV included: minimum dose (Dmin), maximum dose (Dmax), mean dose (Dmean), dose to n% of the PTV (Dn), where n = 1%, ..., 99%. The concept of the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) was evaluated for different values of the surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF 2 ). Four tumor control probability (TCP) models (one phenomenologic model using a logistic function and three Poisson cell kill models) were investigated using two sets of input parameters, one for low and one for high T-stage tumors. Application of both sets to all patients was also investigated. In addition, several tumor-related prognostic variables were examined (including T-stage, Gleason score). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. The ability of the logistic regression models (univariate and multivariate) to predict the biopsy result correctly was tested by performing cross-validation analyses and evaluating the results in terms of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results: In univariate analysis, prescription dose (Dprescr), Dmax, Dmean, dose to n% of the PTV with n of 70% or less correlate with outcome (p 2 : EUD correlates significantly with outcome for SF 2 of 0.4 or more, but not for lower SF 2 values. Using either of the two input parameters sets, all TCP models correlate with outcome (p 2 , is limited because the low dose region may not coincide with the tumor location. Instead, for MSKCC prostate cancer patients with their

  8. When treating prostate cancer with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy the impact of bladder filling status on the volume and integral dose distribution of the target and critical organs should be kept in mind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yueping; Liu Xinfan; Li Yexiong; Guang Ying

    2007-01-01

    Objective: In prostate cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), we tried to prospectively assess the impact of the filling status of bladder on the volume and the integral dose distribution to the target and surrounding critical organs. Methods: Ten patients with stage T1-T2N0M0 prostate cancer were studied. All patients received 3DCRT to the prostate and inferior seminal vesicle. One hour before CT simulation, the bladder was first voided, and then 400 ml of oral contrast solution was given at every half hour before the CT scan. Urethral catheterization was used for voiding or distending the bladder. When distending the bladder, 250-300 ml of contrast was injected into the bladder with the patient fixed at the supine position. Two sets of transverse images were taken for the whole pelvis in empty and full bladder. After the target and critical organs (bladder, rectum, pelvic small bowel, and femoral heads) were contoured, a treatment plan of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy was made using the CMS Focus-Xio treatment planning system. The volume and mean doses of CTV, PTV, rectum, bladder, femoral heads, and small bowel with the bladder empty and full were evaluated. The percentage of volume which received 50 Gy in the rectum and bladder, 30 Gy in the femoral heads, and the maximal dose to the pelvic small bowel were also assessed . The variability of volume and dose distribution in these targets or organs was compared between the empty and full bladder status. Results: Comparing to the bladder empty status, full bladder led to a mean increase of 499% in the bladder volume, (67±9) ml and (336±48) ml (P=0.000), respectively. No volume change was found in the CTV, PTV, rectum, femoral heads and pel- vic small bowel(P=0.153,0.501,0.929,0.771,0.081). The mean dose to the bladder in full status was only 35% of that in empty status, (1501±201 ) cGy and (4267±216) cGy(P =0.000), respectively. The mean dose to the pelvic small

  9. Lateral rectal shielding reduces late rectal morbidity after high dose three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for clinically localized prostate cancer: further evidence for a dose effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W Robert; Hanks, Gerald E; Hanlon, Alexandra; Schultheiss, Timothy E

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: Using conventional treatment methods for the treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer central axis doses must be limited to 65-70 Gy to prevent significant damage to nearby normal tissues. A fundamental hypothesis of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) is that, by defining the target organ(s) accurately in three dimensions, it is possible to deliver higher doses to the target without a significant increase in normal tissue complications. This study examines whether this hypothesis holds true and whether a simple modification of treatment technique can reduce the incidence of late rectal morbidity in patients with prostate cancer treated with 3DCRT to minimum planning target volume (PTV) doses of 71-75 Gy. Materials and Methods: 257 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer completed 3DCRT by December 31, 1993 and received a minimum PTV dose of 71-75 Gy. The median follow-up time was 22 months (range 4-67 months) and 98% of patients had followup of longer than 12 months. The calculated dose at the center of the prostate was <74 Gy in 19 patients, 74-76 Gy in 206 patients and >76 Gy in 32 patients. Late rectal morbidity was graded according to the LENT scoring system. Eighty-eight consecutive patients were treated with a rectal block added to the lateral fields. In these patients the posterior margin from the prostate to the block edge was reduced from the standard 15 mm to 7.5 mm for the final 10 Gy which reduced the dose to portions of the anterior rectal wall by approximately 4-5 Gy. Estimates of rates for rectal morbidity were determined by Kaplan-Meier actuarial analyses. Differences in morbidity percentages were evaluated by the Pearson chi square test. Results: Grade 2-3 rectal morbidity developed in 46 of 257 patients (18%) and in the majority of cases consisted of rectal bleeding. No patient has developed grade 4 or 5 rectal morbidity. The actuarial rate of grade 2-3 morbidity is 22% at 24 months and the median

  10. Interim report of image-guided conformal high-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with unfavorable prostate cancer: the William Beaumont Phase II dose-escalating trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro A.; Kestin, Larry L.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Gonzalez, Jose A.; Wallace, Michelle; Gustafson, Gary S.; Edmundson, Gregory K.; Spencer, William; Vicini, Frank A.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: We analyzed our institution's experience treating patients with unfavorable prostate cancer in a prospective Phase II dose-escalating trial of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) integrated with conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boosts. This interim report discusses treatment outcome and prognostic factors using this treatment approach. Methods and Materials: From November 1991 through February 1998, 142 patients with unfavorable prostate cancer were prospectively treated in a dose-escalating trial with pelvic EBRT in combination with outpatient HDR brachytherapy at William Beaumont Hospital. Patients with any of the following characteristics were eligible: pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≥ 10.0 ng/ml, Gleason score ≥ 7, or clinical stage T2b or higher. All patients received pelvic EBRT to a median total dose of 46.0 Gy. Pelvic EBRT was integrated with ultrasound-guided transperineal conformal interstitial iridium-192 HDR implants. From 1991 to 1995, 58 patients underwent three conformal interstitial HDR implants during the first, second, and third weeks of pelvic EBRT. After October 1995, 84 patients received two interstitial implants during the first and third weeks of pelvic EBRT. The dose delivered via interstitial brachytherapy was escalated from 5.50 Gy to 6.50 Gy for each implant in those patients receiving three implants, and subsequently, from 8.25 Gy to 9.50 Gy per fraction in those patients receiving two implants. To improve implant quality and reduce operator dependency, an on-line, image-guided interactive dose optimization program was utilized during each HDR implant. No patient received hormonal therapy unless treatment failure was documented. The median follow-up was 2.1 years (range: 0.2-7.2 years). Biochemical failure was defined according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Consensus Panel definition. Results: The pretreatment PSA level was ≥ 10.0 ng/ml in 51% of patients. The

  11. Low grade gliomas: preliminary analysis of failure patterns among patients treated using 3D conformal external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu, Anthony T.; Sandler, Howard M.; Radany, Eric H.; Blaivas, Mila; Page, Michaelyn A.; Greenberg, Harry S.; Junck, Larry; Ross, Donald A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The pattern of failure of low grade gliomas following radiotherapy is less well known than that of the high grade gliomas. Stereotactic histologic studies have suggested that tumor cells extend beyond imaging abnormalities, and that large margins would be required for radiotherapy target volumes to encompass all of the neoplasm. Our experience using computerized tomography (CT)- and magnetic resonance (MR)-planned irradiation of low grade gliomas was reviewed to determine the pattern of tumor recurrence, in an effort to clinically define the minimum margin required. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients with low grade supratentorial gliomas were treated between April 1985 and November 1992 using three-dimensional (3D) conformal CT- or MR-planned external beam radiotherapy. Fields were designed to encompass a target volume created by adding a margin to the tumor in three dimensions. Generally, patients were treated using shrinking fields with an initial target (tumor plus a 1 to 3 cm margin) treated to a dose of 45 to 50.4 (median 50.4) Gy, and a boost (tumor plus a 0 to 2 cm margin) treated to a total of 54 to 59.4 (median 59.4) Gy. Median follow-up was 32.9 months. Results: There have been 11 failures; all of these occurred within the radiographic abnormality (either T2 prolongation or CT hypodensity) visualized at the time of treatment planning (i.e., all failures were within the boost volume). Median time to failure was 53 months. Because all failures were local, there was no relationship between the amount by which the tumor volumes were expanded to create target volumes and the eventual outcome. Conclusion: Despite pathologic data suggesting that low grade glioma cells can be found outside the MR T2-signal abnormality in many cases, our results demonstrate that conformal external beam radiotherapy, in which the high dose volume is limited, does not result in increased marginal or out-of-field failures. Until control of tumor within the

  12. Dosimetric evaluation of three adaptive strategies for prostate cancer treatment including pelvic lymph nodes irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantin, Audrey; Gingras, Luc; Lachance, Bernard; Foster, William; Goudreault, Julie; Archambault, Louis

    2015-12-01

    The movements of the prostate relative to the pelvic lymph nodes during intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment can limit margin reduction and affect the protection of the organs at risk (OAR). In this study, the authors performed an analysis of three adaptive treatment strategies that combine information from both bony and gold marker registrations. The robustness of those treatments against the interfraction prostate movements was evaluated. A retrospective study was conducted on five prostate cancer patients with 7-13 daily cone-beam CTs (CBCTs). The clinical target volumes (CTVs) consisting of pelvic lymph nodes, prostate, and seminal vesicles as well as the OARs were delineated on each CBCT and the initial CT. Three adaptive strategies were analyzed. Two of these methods relied on a two-step patient positioning at each fraction. First step: a bony registration was used to deliver the nodal CTV prescription. Second step: a gold marker registration was then used either to (1) complete the dose delivered to the prostate (complement); (2) or give almost the entire prescription to the prostate with a weak dose gradient between the targets to compensate for possible motions (gradient). The third method (COR) used a pool of precalculated plans based on images acquired at previous treatment fractions. At each new fraction, a plan is selected from that pool based on the daily position of prostate center-of-mass. The dosimetric comparison was conducted and results are presented with and without the systematic shift in the prostate position on the CT planning. The adaptive strategies were compared to the current clinical standard where all fractions are treated with the initial nonadaptive plan. The minimum daily prostate D95% is improved by 2%, 9%, and 6% for the complement, the gradient, and the COR approaches, respectively, compared to the nonadaptive method. The average nodal CTV D95% remains constant across the strategies, except for the gradient approach

  13. Dosimetric evaluation of three adaptive strategies for prostate cancer treatment including pelvic lymph nodes irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantin, Audrey; Gingras, Luc; Archambault, Louis; Lachance, Bernard; Foster, William; Goudreault, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The movements of the prostate relative to the pelvic lymph nodes during intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment can limit margin reduction and affect the protection of the organs at risk (OAR). In this study, the authors performed an analysis of three adaptive treatment strategies that combine information from both bony and gold marker registrations. The robustness of those treatments against the interfraction prostate movements was evaluated. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on five prostate cancer patients with 7–13 daily cone-beam CTs (CBCTs). The clinical target volumes (CTVs) consisting of pelvic lymph nodes, prostate, and seminal vesicles as well as the OARs were delineated on each CBCT and the initial CT. Three adaptive strategies were analyzed. Two of these methods relied on a two-step patient positioning at each fraction. First step: a bony registration was used to deliver the nodal CTV prescription. Second step: a gold marker registration was then used either to (1) complete the dose delivered to the prostate (complement); (2) or give almost the entire prescription to the prostate with a weak dose gradient between the targets to compensate for possible motions (gradient). The third method (COR) used a pool of precalculated plans based on images acquired at previous treatment fractions. At each new fraction, a plan is selected from that pool based on the daily position of prostate center-of-mass. The dosimetric comparison was conducted and results are presented with and without the systematic shift in the prostate position on the CT planning. The adaptive strategies were compared to the current clinical standard where all fractions are treated with the initial nonadaptive plan. Results: The minimum daily prostate D 95% is improved by 2%, 9%, and 6% for the complement, the gradient, and the COR approaches, respectively, compared to the nonadaptive method. The average nodal CTV D 95% remains constant across the strategies

  14. Postmastectomy Electron Beam Chest Wall Irradiation in Women With Breast Cancer: A Clinical Step Toward Conformal Electron Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, Youlia M.; Campana, Francois; Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Stilhart, Anne; Dendale, Remi; Bollet, Marc A.; Fourquet, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Electron beam radiotherapy of the chest wall with or without lymph node irradiation has been used at the Institut Curie for >20 years. The purpose of this report was to show the latest improvements of our technique developed to avoid hot spots and improve the homogeneity. Methods and Materials: The study was split into two parts. A new electron irradiation technique was designed and compared with the standard one (dosimetric study). The dose distributions were calculated using our treatment planning software ISIS (Technologie Diffusion). The dose calculation was performed using the same calculation parameters for the new and standard techniques. Next, the early skin toxicity of our new technique was evaluated prospectively in the first 25 patients using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria (clinical study). Results: The maximal dose found on the five slices was 53.4 ± 1.1 Gy for the new technique and 59.1 ± 2.3 Gy for the standard technique. The hot spots of the standard technique plans were situated at the overlap between the internal mammary chain and chest wall fields. The use of one unique field that included both chest wall and internal mammary chain volumes solved the problem of junction. To date, 25 patients have been treated with the new technique. Of these patients, 12% developed Grade 0, 48% Grade 1, 32% Grade 2, and 8% Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusions: This report describes an improvement in the standard postmastectomy electron beam technique of the chest wall. This new technique provides improved target homogeneity and conformality compared with the standard technique. This treatment was well tolerated, with a low rate of early toxicity events

  15. Assessing the variability of outcome for patients treated with localized prostate irradiation using different definitions of biochemical control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, Eric M.; Vicini, Frank A.; Ziaja, Ellen L.; Gonzalez, Jose; Dmuchowski, Carl F.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Brabbins, Donald S.; Hollander, Jay; Chen, Peter Y.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Biochemical control using serial posttreatment serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels is being increasingly used to assess treatment efficacy for localized prostate cancer. However, no standardized definition of biochemical control has been established. We reviewed our experience treating patients with localized prostate cancer and applied three different commonly used definitions of biochemical control to determine if differences in therapeutic outcome would be observed. Methods and Materials: Between January 1987 and December 1991, 480 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received external beam irradiation (RT) using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital. The median dose to the prostate was 66.6 Gy (range 58-70.4) using a four-field or arc technique. Pretreatment and posttreatment serum PSA levels were recorded. Over 86% (414 of 480) of patients had a pretreatment PSA level available. Three different definitions of biochemical control were used: (a) PSA nadir 20), and 5-year actuarial rates of biochemical control were calculated using the three biochemical control and one clinical local control definitions. For Group 1, 5-year actuarial rates of biochemical control were 84%, 90%, and 96% for Definitions 1-3 and clinical local control, respectively. For Group 2, 5-year actuarial control rates were 45%, 54%, 74%, and 92% for the four definitions, respectively. For Group 3, 5-year actuarial control rates were 26%, 31%, 63%, and 100% for the four definitions, respectively. For Group 4, 5-year actuarial control rates were 24%, 24%, 50%, and 100% for the four definitions, respectively. Finally, for Group 5, 5-year actuarial control rates were 5%, 14%, 15%, and 89% for the four definitions, respectively. Depending on the definition used, statistically significant differences overall in outcome rates were observed. Differences between all four definitions for all pairwise comparisons ranged from 5 to 53% (p < 0

  16. 3-D conformal treatment of prostate cancer to 74 Gy vs. high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost: A cross-sectional quality-of-life survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vordermark, Dirk [Univ. of Wuerzburg (DE). Dept. of Radiation Oncology] (and others)

    2006-09-15

    The effects of two modalities of dose-escalated radiotherapy on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) were compared. Forty-one consecutive patients were treated with a 3-D conformal (3-DC) boost to 74 Gy, and 43 with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost (2x9 Gy), following 3-D conformal treatment to 46 Gy. Median age was 70 years in both groups, median initial PSA was 7.9 {mu}g/l in 3-DC boost patients and 8.1 {mu}g/l in HDR boost patients. Stage was 7 in 52% and 47%, respectively. HRQOL was assessed cross-sectionally using EORTC QLQ-C30 and organ-specific PR25 modules 3-32 (median 19) and 4-25 (median 14) months after treatment, respectively. Questionnaires were completed by 93% and 97% of patients, respectively. Diarrhea and insomnia scores were significantly increased in both groups. In the PR25 module, scores of 3-DC boost and HDR boost patients for urinary, bowel and treatment-related symptoms were similar. Among responders, 34% of 3-DC boost patients and 86% of HDR boost patients had severe erectile problems. Dose escalation in prostate cancer by either 3-DC boost to 74 Gy or HDR brachytherapy boost appears to result in similar HRQOL profiles.

  17. 3-D conformal treatment of prostate cancer to 74 Gy vs. high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost: A cross-sectional quality-of-life survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vordermark, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    The effects of two modalities of dose-escalated radiotherapy on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) were compared. Forty-one consecutive patients were treated with a 3-D conformal (3-DC) boost to 74 Gy, and 43 with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost (2x9 Gy), following 3-D conformal treatment to 46 Gy. Median age was 70 years in both groups, median initial PSA was 7.9 μg/l in 3-DC boost patients and 8.1 μg/l in HDR boost patients. Stage was 7 in 52% and 47%, respectively. HRQOL was assessed cross-sectionally using EORTC QLQ-C30 and organ-specific PR25 modules 3-32 (median 19) and 4-25 (median 14) months after treatment, respectively. Questionnaires were completed by 93% and 97% of patients, respectively. Diarrhea and insomnia scores were significantly increased in both groups. In the PR25 module, scores of 3-DC boost and HDR boost patients for urinary, bowel and treatment-related symptoms were similar. Among responders, 34% of 3-DC boost patients and 86% of HDR boost patients had severe erectile problems. Dose escalation in prostate cancer by either 3-DC boost to 74 Gy or HDR brachytherapy boost appears to result in similar HRQOL profiles

  18. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Causes Fewer Side Effects than Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy When Used in Combination With Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsythe, Kevin; Blacksburg, Seth; Stone, Nelson; Stock, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To measure the benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) when used in combination with brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with localized prostate cancer who received external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in combination with brachytherapy with at least 1 year follow-up (n = 812). Combination therapy consisted of 103 Pd or 125 I implant, followed by a course of EBRT. From 1993 to March 2003 521 patients were treated with 3D-CRT, and from April 2003 to March 2009 291 patients were treated with IMRT. Urinary symptoms were prospectively measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score questionnaire with a single quality of life (QOL) question; rectal bleeding was assessed per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Schema. The Pearson χ 2 test was used to compare toxicities experienced by patients who were treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT. Logistic regression analyses were also performed to rule out possible confounding factors. Results: Within the first 3 months after treatment, patients treated with 3D-CRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 19% mild, 44% moderate, and 37% severe; patients treated with IMRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 36% mild, 47% moderate, and 17% severe (p < 0.001). The 3D-CRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 35% positive, 20% neutral, and 45% negative; IMRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 51% positive, 18% neutral, and 31% negative (p < 0.001). After 1 year of follow-up there was no longer any difference in urinary morbidity between the two groups. Logistic regression confirmed the differences in International Prostate Symptom Score and QOL in the acute setting (p < 0.001 for both). Grade ≥2 rectal bleeding was reported by 11% of 3D-CRT patients and 7

  19. Long-Term Results of a Highly Performing Conformal Electron Therapy Technique for Chest Wall Irradiation After Mastectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grellier Adedjouma, Noemie, E-mail: grellier.noemie@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Chevrier, Marion [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Fourquet, Alain; Costa, Emilie; Xu, Haoping [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Berger, Frederique [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Campana, Francois [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Laki, Fatima [Department of Surgical Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Beuzeboc, Philippe [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Lefeuvre, Delphine [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Kirova, Youlia M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate locoregional control and survival after mastectomy, as well as toxicity, in patients irradiated by a previously described postmastectomy highly conformal electron beam radiation therapy technique (PMERT). Methods and Materials: We included all women irradiated by postmastectomy electron beam radiation therapy for nonmetastatic breast cancer between 2007 and 2011 in our department. Acute and late toxicities were retrospectively assessed using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 criteria. Results: Among the 796 women included, 10.1% were triple-negative, 18.8% HER2-positive, and 24.6% received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CT). Multifocal lesions were observed in 51.3% of women, and 64.6% had at least 1 involved lymph node (LN). Internal mammary chain, supraclavicular, infraclavicular, and axillary LNs were treated in 85.6%, 88.3%, 77.9%, and 14.9% of cases, respectively. With a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 6-102 months), 5-year locoregional recurrence–free survival and overall survival were 90% (95% confidence interval 88.1%-92.4%) and 90.9% (95% confidence interval 88.9%-93%), respectively. Early skin toxicity was scored as grade 1 in 58.5% of patients, grade 2 in 35.9%, and grade 3 in 4.5%. Concomitant CT was associated with increased grade 3 toxicity (P<.001). At long-term follow-up, 29.8% of patients presented temporary or permanent hyperpigmentation or telangiectasia or fibrosis (grade 1: 23.6%; grade 2: 5.2%; grade 3: 1%), with higher rates among smokers (P=.06); 274 patients (34.4%) underwent breast reconstruction. Only 24 patients (3%) had early esophagitis of grade 1. Only 3 patients developed ischemic heart disease: all had been treated by anthracycline-based CT with or without trastuzumab, all had been irradiated to the left chest wall and LN, and all presented numerous cardiovascular risk factors (2-4 factors). Conclusions: This study demonstrated the good efficacy of this technique in terms of

  20. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy for synchronous bilateral breast irradiation using a mono iso-center technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Karthick Raj; Basu, Saumen; Bhuiyan, Md Anisuzzaman; Ahmed, Sharif; Sumon, Mostafa Aziz; Haque, Kh Anamul; Sengupta, Ashim Kumar; Un Nabi, Md Rashid; Das, K. J. Maria

    2017-06-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the synchronous bilateral breast irradiation radiotherapy technique using a single isocenter. Materials and Methods: Six patients of synchronous bilateral breast were treated with single isocenter technique from February 2011 to June 2016. All the patients underwent a CT-simulation using appropriate positioning device. Target volumes and critical structures like heart, lung, esophagus, thyroid, etc., were delineated slice by slice in the CT data. An isocenter was placed above the sternum on the skin and both medial tangential and lateral tangential of the breast / chest wall were created using asymmetrical jaws to avoid the beam divergence through the lung and heart. The field weighting were adjusted manually to obtain a homogenous dose distribution. The planning objectives were to deliver uniform doses around the target and keep the doses to the organ at risk within the permissible limit. The beam energy of 6 MV or combination of 6 MV and 15 MV photons were used in the tangential fields according to the tangential separation. Boluses were used for all the mastectomy patients to increase the doses on the chest wall. In addition to that enhanced dynamic wedge and field in field technique were also used to obtain a homogenous distribution around the target volume and reduce the hot spots. The isocenter was just kept on the skin, such that the beam junctions will be overlapped only on the air just above the sternum. Acute toxicity during the treatment and late toxicity were recorded during the patient's follow-up. Results: During the radiotherapy treatment follow-up there were no acute skin reactions in the field junctions, but one patient had grade 1 esophagitis and two patients had grade 2 skin reactions in the chest wall. With a median follow-up of 38.5 months (range: 8 - 49 months), no patients had a local recurrence, but one patients with triple negative disease had a distant metastases in brain and died

  1. Comparing two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in the hypofractionated treatment of high-risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuen, Jasper; Rodrigues, George; Trenka, Kristina; Coad, Terry; Yartsev, Slav; D'Souza, David; Lock, Michael; Bauman, Glenn

    2008-01-01

    To compare two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in the setting of hypofractionated high-risk prostate cancer treatment. 3DCRT and dIMRT/Helical Tomotherapy(HT) planning with 10 CT datasets was undertaken to deliver 68 Gy in 25 fractions (prostate) and simultaneously delivering 45 Gy in 25 fractions (pelvic lymph node targets) in a single phase. The paradigms of pelvic vessel targeting (iliac vessels with margin are used to target pelvic nodes) and conformal normal tissue avoidance (treated soft tissues of the pelvis while limiting dose to identified pelvic critical structures) were assessed compared to 3DCRT controls. Both dIMRT/HT and 3DCRT solutions were compared to each other using repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc paired t-tests. When compared to conformal pelvic vessel targeting, conformal normal tissue avoidance delivered more homogenous PTV delivery (2/2 t-test comparisons; p < 0.001), similar nodal coverage (8/8 t-test comparisons; p = ns), higher and more homogenous pelvic tissue dose (6/6 t-test comparisons; p < 0.03), at the cost of slightly higher critical structure dose (D dose , 1–3 Gy over 5/10 dose points; p < 0.03). The dIMRT/HT approaches were superior to 3DCRT in sparing organs at risk (22/24 t-test comparisons; p < 0.05). dIMRT/HT nodal and pelvic targeting is superior to 3DCRT in dose delivery and critical structure sparing in the setting of hypofractionation for high-risk prostate cancer. The pelvic targeting paradigm is a potential solution to deliver highly conformal pelvic radiation treatment in the setting of nodal location uncertainty in prostate cancer and other pelvic malignancies

  2. Weekly bi-fractionated 40 Gy three-dimensional conformational accelerated partial irradiation of breast: results of a phase II French pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgier, C.; Pichenot, C.; Verstraet, R.; Heymann, S.; Biron, B.; Delaloge, S.; Garbay, J.R.; Marsiglia, H.; Bourhis, J.; Taghian, A.; Marsiglia, H.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report the first French experience of three-dimensional conformational and accelerated partial irradiation of breast. Twenty five patients have been concerned by this phase II trial. The prescribed total dose was 40 Gy, was delivered over 5 days in two daily fractions. Irradiation was performed with two 6 MV tangential mini-beams and a 6-22 MeV front electron beams. The planning target volume coverage was very good. Toxicity has been assessed. Healthy tissues (heart, lungs) are considerably protected. The acute and late toxicity is correct. Short communication

  3. Comparison of 2D and 3D algorithms for adding a margin to the gross tumor volume in the conformal radiotherapy planning of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoo, V.S.; Bedford, J.L.; Webb, S.; Dearnaley, D.P.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the adequacy of tumor volume coverage using a three dimensional (3D) margin growing algorithm compared to a two dimensional (2D) margin growing algorithm in the conformal radiotherapy planning of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Two gross tumor volumes (GTV) were segmented in each of ten patients with localized prostate cancer: prostate gland only (PO) and prostate with seminal vesicles (PSV). A margin of 10 mm was applied to these two groups (PO and PSV) using both the 2D and 3D margin growing algorithms. The true planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the region delineated by the 3D algorithm. Adequacy of geometric coverage of the GTV with the two algorithms was examined throughout the target volume. Discrepancies between the two margin methods were measured in the transaxial plane. Results: The 2D algorithm underestimated the PTV by 17% (range 12-20) in the PO group and by 20% (range 13-28) for the PSV group when compared to the 3D algorithm. For both the PO and PSV groups, the inferior coverage of the PTV was consistently underestimated by the 2D margin algorithm when compared to the 3D margins with a mean radial distance of 4.8 mm (range 0-10). In the central region of the prostate gland, the anterior, posterior, and lateral PTV borders were underestimated with the 2D margin in both the PO and PSV groups by a mean of 3.6 mm (range 0-9), 2.1 mm (range 0-8), and 1.8 (range 0-9) respectively. The PTV coverage of the PO group superiorly was radially underestimated by 4.5mm (range 0-14) when comparing the 2D margins to the 3D margins. For the PSV group, the junction region between the prostate and the seminal vesicles was underestimated by the 2D margin by a mean transaxial distance of 18.1 mm in the anterior PTV border (range 4-30), 7.2 mm posteriorly (range 0-20), and 3.7 mm laterally (range 0-14). The superior region of the seminal vesicles in the PSV group was also consistently underestimated with a radial discrepancy of 3.3 mm

  4. Comparison of 2D and 3D algorithms for adding a margin to the gross tumor volume in the conformal radiotherapy planning of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoo, Vincent S.; Bedford, James L.; Webb, Steve; Dearnaley, David P.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the adequacy of tumor volume coverage using a three-dimensional (3D) margin-growing algorithm compared to a two-dimensional (2D) margin-growing algorithm in the conformal radiotherapy planning of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Two gross tumor volumes (GTV) were segmented in each of 10 patients with localized prostate cancer; prostate gland only (PO) and prostate with seminal vesicles (PSV). A predetermined margin of 10 mm was applied to these two groups (PO and PSV) using both 2D and 3D margin-growing algorithms. The 2D algorithm added a transaxial margin to each GTV slice, whereas the 3D algorithm added a volumetric margin all around the GTV. The true planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the region delineated by the 3D algorithm. The adequacy of geometric coverage of the GTV by the two algorithms was examined in a series of transaxial planes throughout the target volume. Results: The 2D margin-growing algorithm underestimated the PTV by 17% (range 12-20) in the PO group and by 20% (range 13-28) for the PSV group when compared to the 3D-margin algorithm. For the PO group, the mean transaxial difference between the 2D and 3D algorithm was 3.8 mm inferiorly (range 0-20), 1.8 mm centrally (range 0-9), and 4.4 mm superiorly (range 0-22). Considering all of these regions, the mean discrepancy anteriorly was 5.1 mm (range 0-22), posteriorly 2.2 (range 0-20), right border 2.8 mm (range 0-14), and left border 3.1 mm (range 0-12). For the PSV group, the mean discrepancy in the inferior region was 3.8 mm (range 0-20), central region of the prostate was 1.8 mm ( range 0-9), the junction region of the prostate and the seminal vesicles was 5.5 mm (range 0-30), and the superior region of the seminal vesicles was 4.2 mm (range 0-55). When the different borders were considered in the PSV group, the mean discrepancies for the anterior, posterior, right, and left borders were 6.4 mm (range 0-55), 2.5 mm (range 0-20), 2.6 mm (range 0-14), and 3

  5. A prospective three-dimensional analysis about the impact of differences in the clinical target volume in prostate cancer irradiation on normal-tissue exposure. A potential for increasing the benefit/risk ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille, A.; Toews, N.; Schmidberger, H.; Hess, C.F.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: rectal toxicity following external-beam irradiation of prostate cancer correlates with the exposed percentage of rectal volume. Recently, it has been recommended to reduce the volume of the seminal vesicles that should be included in the clinical target volume (CTV). The purpose of this study was to quantitatively assess the impact of this CTV reduction on the expected rectal and bladder dose sparing. Patients and methods: 14 patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing external-beam radiotherapy were investigated. The prostate, the prostate + entire seminal vesicles, or the prostate + proximal seminal vesicles were delineated as CTV. Treatment plans were generated and compared concerning rectum and bladder dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Results: the exposure of rectum and bladder volume was significantly lower in case of irradiation of the prostate only compared to inclusion of the proximal or entire seminal vesicles into the CTV. The reduction of the CTV from prostate + entire seminal vesicles to prostate + proximal seminal vesicles led to a significant reduction of the rectal and bladder dose exposure. Conclusion: reduction of the CTV to the prostate only, or to the prostate + proximal seminal vesicles led to significant rectal and bladder dose sparing compared to irradiation of the prostate + entire seminal vesicles. In patients with a higher risk for seminal vesicles involvement, irradiation of the prostate + proximal seminal vesicles should be preferred. In case of a need for irradiation of the entire seminal vesicles, patients should be informed about a higher risk for chronic rectal toxicity and, possibly, for bladder complications. (orig.)

  6. Assessment and management of interfractional variations in daily diagnostic-quality-CT guided prostate-bed irradiation after prostatectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Feng; Ahunbay, Ergun; Lawton, Colleen; Allen Li, X., E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify interfractional anatomic variations and limitations of the current practice of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for prostate-bed patients and to study dosimetric benefits of an online adaptive replanning scheme that addresses the interfractional variations. Methods: Contours for the targets and organs at risk (OARs) from daily diagnostic-quality CTs acquired with in-room CT (CTVision, Siemens) were generated by populating the planning contours using an autosegmentation tool based on deformable registration (ABAS, Elekta) with manual editing for ten prostate-bed patients treated with postoperative daily CT-guided IMRT. Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) obtained by maximizing the overlap of contours for a structure between the daily and plan contours was used to quantify the organ deformation between the plan and daily CTs. Three interfractional-variation-correction schemes, the current standard practice of IGRT repositioning, a previously developed online adaptive RT (ART), and the full reoptimization, were applied to these daily CTs and a number of dose-volume quantities for the targets and organs at risk were compared for their effectiveness to account for the interfractional variations. Results: Large interfractional organ deformations in prostate-bed irradiation were seen. The mean DSCs for CTV, rectum, and bladder were 86.6 ± 5.1% (range from 61% to 97%), 77.3% ± 7.4% (range from 55% to 90%), and 75.4% ± 11.2% (range from 46% to 96%), respectively. The fractional and cumulative dose-volume quantities for CTV and PTV: V100 (volume received at least 100% prescription dose), and rectum and bladder: V{sub 45Gy} and V{sub 60Gy} (volume received at least 45 or 60 Gy), were compared for the repositioning, adaptive, reoptimization, and original plans. The fractional and cumulative dosimetric results were nearly the same. The average cumulative CTV V100 were 88.0%, 98.4%, 99.2%, and 99.3% for the IGRT, ART, reoptimization, and original plans

  7. Gastro-intestinal and genito-urinary morbidity after 3D conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer: observations of a randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koper, Peter C.; Jansen, Peter; Putten, Wim van; Os, Marjolein van; Wijnmaalen, Arend J.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: The late morbidity of a randomized study was analyzed after a follow up of 2 years. The difference in intestinal morbidity was analyzed as a function of the treatment arm and dose volume parameters. The correlation with acute toxicity and (pre-existing) bowel complaints was investigated. Patients and methods: 266 T1-4N0M0 prostate cancer patients were randomized for conventional (open fields) and 3D conformal radiotherapy using beams eye view blocked fields with the same dose (66 Gy) and gross target volume-planning target volume margin (15 mm). Apart from the RTOG toxicity scoring system a patient self-assessment questionnaire was used to obtain detailed information on morbidity. Results: At 2 years there is only a trend for less rectal toxicity (grade≥1) in favor of the conformal radiotherapy (grade 1, 47 versus 40% and grade 2, 10 versus 7% for conventional and conformal radiotherapy, respectively (P=0.1). A significant relation was found between late rectal toxicity (grade≥1) and the volume of the anus and rectum exposed to≥90% tumor dose (TD). A highly significant relationship is observed between acute rectum and anal toxicity and late rectal toxicity. The patient self-assessment questionnaire analysis revealed that patients are most bothered by compliance related symptoms like urgency, soiling and fecal loss. In a multivariate analysis, all other variables loose significance, when anal volume exposed to≥90% TD and pre-treatment defaecation frequency are accounted for. Late anal toxicity is low and related only to acute anal toxicity. Late bladder toxicity is related solely to pre-treatment frequency and overall urological symptoms. The incidence of grade 2 toxicity increases with a factor 2.5-4 when (stool or urine) frequency is unfavorable at the start of treatment. Conclusions: Conformal radiotherapy at the dose level of 66 Gy does not significantly decrease the incidence of rectal, anal and bladder toxicity compared to

  8. Acute gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and dermatological toxicity during dose-escalated 3D-conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) using an intrarectal balloon for prostate gland localization and immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woel, Rosemonde; Beard, Clair; Chen, Ming-Hui; Hurwitz, Mark; Loffredo, Marian; McMahon, Elizabeth; Ching, Jane; Lopes, Lynn; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We determined the acute gastrointestinal (GI), genitourinary (GU), and dermatologic (D) toxicity during dose-escalated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT). A modified intrarectal balloon (Medrad) was used for prostate gland localization and immobilization. Methods: Forty-six men with clinical category T1c to T3a, and at least one high-risk feature (PSA >10, Gleason ≥7, or MRI evidence of extracapsular extension or seminal vesical invasion) comprised the study cohort. Treatment consisted of hormonal therapy and 4-field 3DCRT using an intrarectal balloon for the initial 15 of 40 treatments. Planning treatment volume dose was 72 Gy (95% normalization). A Mantel-Haenzel Chi-square test compared the distribution of GU, GI, and D symptoms at baseline and at end of treatment (EOT). Results: There was no significant difference between the 2 time points in the proportion of patients with bowel symptoms (p = 0.73), tenesmus (p = 0.27), nocturia (p = 1.00), or GU urgency (p = 0.40). However, there was a significant decrease in GU frequency (70% vs. 50%, p = 0.46) as a result of medical interventions and a significant increase in hemorrhoidal irritation (4% vs. 20%, p = 0.02) and anal cutaneous skin reaction (0% vs. 70%, p < 0.001). By 3 months after EOT compared to baseline, there was no significant difference in the proportion of patients experiencing hemorrhoidal bleeding (4% vs. 8%, p = 0.52), requiring intervention for hemorrhoidal symptoms (7% vs. 5%, p = 0.8), or experiencing persistent anal cutaneous skin reaction (0% vs. 3%, p = 0.31). Conclusion: Dose-escalated 3DCRT using an intrarectal balloon for prostate localization and immobilization was well tolerated. Acute GU, GI, and D symptoms resolved with standard dietary or medical interventions by the EOT or shortly thereafter

  9. Rapid Arc, helical tomotherapy, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy and three dimensional conformal radiation for localized prostate cancer: A dosimetric comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh A Kinhikar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the potential role of RapidArc (RA compared with helical tomotherapy (HT, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy (SW IMRT and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT for localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Prescription doses ranged from 60 Gy to planning target volume (PTV and 66.25 Gy for clinical target volume prostate (CTV-P over 25-30 fractions. PTV and CTV-P coverage were evaluated by conformity index (CI and homogeneity index (HI. Organ sparing comparison was done with mean doses to rectum and bladder. Results: CI 95 were 1.0 ± 0.01 (RA, 0.99 ± 0.01 (HT, 0.97 ± 0.02 (IMRT, 0.98 ± 0.02 (3D CRT for PTV and 1.0 ± 0.00 (RA, HT, SW IMRT and 3D CRT for CTV-P. HI was 0.11 ± 0.03 (RA, 0.16 ± 0.08 (HT, 0.12 ± 0.03 (IMRT, 0.06 ± 0.01 (3D CRT for PTV and 0.03 ± 0.00 (RA, 0.05 ± 0.01 (HT, 0.03 ± 0.01 (SW IMRT and 3D CRT for CTV-P. Mean dose to bladder were 23.68 ± 13.23 Gy (RA, 24.55 ± 12.51 Gy (HT, 19.82 ± 11.61 Gy (IMRT and 23.56 ± 12.81 Gy (3D CRT, whereas mean dose to rectum was 36.85 ± 12.92 Gy (RA, 33.18 ± 11.12 Gy (HT, IMRT and 38.67 ± 12.84 Gy (3D CRT. Conclusion: All studied intensity-modulated techniques yield treatment plans of significantly improved quality when compared with 3D CRT, with HT providing best organs at risk sparing and RA being the most efficient treatment option, reducing treatment time to 1.45-3.7 min and monitor unit to <400 for a 2 Gy fraction.

  10. Long-term urinary toxicity after 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer in patients with prior history of transurethral resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandhu, Ajaypal S.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Lee, Henry J.; Lombardi, Danna; Fuks, Zvi; Leibel, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To report on the long-term urinary morbidity among prostate cancer patients with a prior history of a transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) treated with high-dose 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Between 1988 and 1997, 1100 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with 3D-CRT. Of these, 120 patients (8%) were identified as having had a prior TURP and are the subjects of this analysis. The median age was 71 years (range: 49-83 years). The clinical stages of the patients were T1c: 33 (28%); T2a: 38 (32%); T2b: 15 (13%); and T3: 34 (27%). Neoadjuvant androgen ablation therapy was given to 39 (33%). The median radiation dose prescribed to the planning target volume was 75.6 Gy (range: 64.8-81 Gy). The median elapsed time from TURP to initiation of 3D-CRT was 69 months (range: 4-360 months). The median follow-up time was 51 months (range: 18-109 months). Results: Five patients of the 120 with a prior history of TURP (4%) developed a urethral stricture after 3D-CRT which was corrected with dilatation. The 5-year actuarial likelihood of ≥ Grade 2 late urinary toxicities was 9%. No Grade 4 urinary toxicities were observed in this group of patients. Among 110 patients who were completely continent of urine prior to 3D-CRT, 10 (9%) developed stress incontinence requiring 1 pad daily for protection or experienced occasional leakage (not requiring pad protection). The 5-year incidence of ≥ Grade 1 stress incontinence was 18% in patients who developed acute ≥ Grade 2 GU symptoms during the course of 3D-CRT compared to 7% for patients who experienced Grade 1 or no acute urinary symptoms (p = 0.05). The radiation dose (≥75.6 Gy vs. <75.6 Gy), the number of prior TURP procedures, or the volume of resected tissue at the time of TURP had no significant impact on the long-term urinary morbidity outcome. A multivariate analysis demonstrated that the presence of Grade 2 acute urinary symptoms was the

  11. Potential benefits of combining cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine gene therapy and irradiation for prostate cancer. Experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Hiroaki; Koshida, Kiyoshi; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Mizokami, Atsushi; Namiki, Mikio [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of combining cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine (CD/5-FC) gene therapy and radiation therapy (either external beam radiation or radioimmunotherapy [RIT]), for the treatment of prostate cancer. Tumor xenografts of CD-transduced LNCaP cells grown in the testes of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were used to evaluate antitumor effect. The mice were injected intraperitoneally with 500 mg/kg of 5-FC, or with 5, 15 or 30 mg/kg of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), for 9 days. The tumors were treated with fractionated radiation at a dose of 1 or 3 Gy/day for 3 days, or I-131 labelled anti-prostate specific antigen (anti-PSA) monoclonal antibody (mAb) administration at a subtherapeutic dose of 20 or 80 {mu}Ci. Intratumoral and serum concentrations of 5-FU were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Mice treated with CD/5-FC gene therapy presented a significant tumor growth inhibition comparable to that obtained with 15 mg/kg, 5-FU systemic administration without marked weight loss. Treatment with CD/5-FC gene therapy resulted in higher tumor but lower serum concentrations of 5-FU than treatment with systemic 5-FU chemotherapy. An additive antitumor effect was obtained when CD/5-FC therapy was combined with 1 Gy irradiation, which by itself did not produce a significant antitumor effect. However, the efficacy of CD/5-FC therapy was not enhanced when combined with RIT, probably due to poor accumulation of the mAb as the tumor/blood ratio never exceeded 1. These findings indicate that CD/5-FC gene therapy for prostate cancer may function with enhanced antitumor effect when combined with external beam radiation. However, combining CD/5-FC gene therapy and RIT using an anti-PSA mAb may not be effective because of insufficient accumulation of the mAb at the target tumors. (author)

  12. Potential benefits of combining cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine gene therapy and irradiation for prostate cancer. Experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroaki; Koshida, Kiyoshi; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Mizokami, Atsushi; Namiki, Mikio

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of combining cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine (CD/5-FC) gene therapy and radiation therapy (either external beam radiation or radioimmunotherapy [RIT]), for the treatment of prostate cancer. Tumor xenografts of CD-transduced LNCaP cells grown in the testes of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were used to evaluate antitumor effect. The mice were injected intraperitoneally with 500 mg/kg of 5-FC, or with 5, 15 or 30 mg/kg of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), for 9 days. The tumors were treated with fractionated radiation at a dose of 1 or 3 Gy/day for 3 days, or I-131 labelled anti-prostate specific antigen (anti-PSA) monoclonal antibody (mAb) administration at a subtherapeutic dose of 20 or 80 μCi. Intratumoral and serum concentrations of 5-FU were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Mice treated with CD/5-FC gene therapy presented a significant tumor growth inhibition comparable to that obtained with 15 mg/kg, 5-FU systemic administration without marked weight loss. Treatment with CD/5-FC gene therapy resulted in higher tumor but lower serum concentrations of 5-FU than treatment with systemic 5-FU chemotherapy. An additive antitumor effect was obtained when CD/5-FC therapy was combined with 1 Gy irradiation, which by itself did not produce a significant antitumor effect. However, the efficacy of CD/5-FC therapy was not enhanced when combined with RIT, probably due to poor accumulation of the mAb as the tumor/blood ratio never exceeded 1. These findings indicate that CD/5-FC gene therapy for prostate cancer may function with enhanced antitumor effect when combined with external beam radiation. However, combining CD/5-FC gene therapy and RIT using an anti-PSA mAb may not be effective because of insufficient accumulation of the mAb at the target tumors. (author)

  13. Efficacy of modest dose irradiation in combination with long-term endocrinal treatment for high-risk prostate cancer. A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tomonari; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki

    2004-01-01

    Although radiotherapy in combination with endocrinal manipulation has been identified as an effective treatment for patients with high-risk prostate cancer, the optimal dose for locoregional control of prostate cancer in combination with hormonal therapy has not yet been determined. The efficacy of modest doses of irradiation (60-62 Gy) combined with long-term endocrinal treatment for patients with high-risk prostate cancer (defined as a pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level greater than 20 ng/ml or a Gleason's score of 8-10 or T3-T4 disease) was analyzed in 60 Japanese patients. The patients included in this study had received radical radiotherapy with long-term endocrinal manipulation in the period between 1993 and 2000. The median age of the patients was 70 years (range, 56-83). Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy with a median duration of 3.9 months was performed prior to radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy was continued until recurrence. A median dose of 61.4 Gy (range, 44-71.4) was delivered to the prostate. Pelvic node irradiation was performed in 49 patients (81.6%). After a median follow-up period of 28.5 months, the overall survival, cause-specific survival and biochemical relapse-free survival at 3 years were 94.4%, 96% and 89.8%, respectively. Local failure was observed in one patient, distant metastases were observed in three patients and a late toxic effect greater than Grade 2 was not observed in any patients. This study, though preliminary due to a short-term follow-up period, reveals the possibility that modest doses of irradiation combined with long-term endocrinal treatment could be an effective means of achieving excellent local control of high-risk prostate cancer. (author)

  14. Prophylactic irradiation of the male mammary gland - prevention of gynaecomastia as caused by endocrine treatment of carcinomas of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggerath, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    During the period between 1975 and 1980 bilateral irradiation of the mammary glands was carried out in a total of 72 bearers of carcinomas of the prostate that had previously been confirmed on a histological basis. In no less than 35 (90%) out of the 39 patients where radiotherapy was started prior to the beginning of endocrine treatment the follow-up checks revealed a prevention or suppression of gynaecomastia as a result of radiation. The effectiveness of this treatment is described in the literature as being in the order 81% and its beneficial influences are confirmed by the data of our study. If gynaecomastia has already become established, radiotherapy holds out little promise of success and a relief of the associated discomfort is the best to be expected here. (orig./MG) [de

  15. SU-F-P-52: A Meta-Analysis of Controlled Clinical Trials Comparing Elective Nodal Irradiation with Involved-Field Irradiation for Conformal Or Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Patients with Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, W; Zhang, R; Zhou, Z; Qiao, X [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare elective nodal irradiation with involved-field irradiation for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer by a metaanalysis. Methods: Wanfang, CNKI, VIP, CBM databases, PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library were searched to identify the controlled clinical trials of elective nodal irradiation with involved-field irradiation for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer. The obtained data were analyzed using Stata 11.0. The difference between two groups was estimated by calculating the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Results: A total of 12 controlled clinical trials involving 1095 esophageal cancer patients, which were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, were included in this meta-analysis. The meta-analysis showed that the elective nodal irradiation group reduced the rates of out-field failure comparing with involved-field irradiation group (OR=3.727, P=0.007). However, the rates of ≥grades 3 acute radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis were significantly higher in the elective nodal irradiation group than in the involved-field irradiation group (OR=0.348, P=0.001, OR=0.385, P=0.000). 1-, 2-, 3-year local control rates (OR=0.966, P=0.837, OR=0.946, P=0.781; OR=0.732P=0.098) and 1-, 3-, 5-year survival rates were similar in the two groups ( OR=0.966, P=0.837; OR=0.946, P=0.781; OR=0.732, P=0.098; OR=0.952, P=0.756; OR=1.149, P=0.422; OR=0.768, P=0.120). It is the same with the rates of distant metastasis (OR=0.986, P=0.937). Conclusion: Compared with involved-field irradiation, the elective nodal irradiation can reduce the rates of out-field failure for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer. However, its advantage of local control and survival rates is not obvious and it increases the incidence

  16. Associations between volume changes and spatial dose metrics for the urinary bladder during local versus pelvic irradiation for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casares-Magaz, Oscar; Moiseenko, Vitali; Hopper, Austin; Pettersson, Niclas Johan; Thor, Maria; Knopp, Rick; Deasy, Joseph O; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Einck, John

    2017-06-01

    Inter-fractional variation in urinary bladder volumes during the course of radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer causes deviations between planned and delivered doses. This study compared planned versus daily cone-beam CT (CBCT)-based spatial bladder dose distributions, for prostate cancer patients receiving local prostate treatment (local treatment) versus prostate including pelvic lymph node irradiation (pelvic treatment). Twenty-seven patients (N = 15 local treatment; N = 12 pelvic treatment) were treated using daily image-guided RT (1.8 Gy@43-45 fx), adhering to a full bladder/empty rectum protocol. For each patient, 9-10 CBCTs were registered to the planning CT, using the clinically applied translations. The urinary bladder was manually segmented on each CBCT, 3 mm inner shells were generated, and semi and quadrant sectors were created using axial/coronal cuts. Planned and delivered DVH metrics were compared across patients and between the two groups of treatment (t-test, p bladder volume variations and the dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the bladder and its sectors were evaluated (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, r s ). Bladder volumes varied considerably during RT (coefficient of variation: 16-58%). The population-averaged planned and delivered DVH metrics were not significantly different at any dose level. Larger treatment bladder volumes resulted in increased absolute volume of the posterior/inferior bladder sector receiving intermediate-high doses, in both groups. The superior bladder sector received less dose with larger bladder volumes for local treatments (r s  ± SD: -0.47 ± 0.32), but larger doses for pelvic treatments (r s  ± SD: 0.74 ± 0.24). Substantial bladder volume changes during the treatment course occurred even though patients were treated under a full bladder/daily image-guided protocol. Larger bladder volumes resulted in less bladder wall spared at the posterior-inferior sector, regardless the

  17. Radical prostatectomy and postoperative irradiation in patients with pathological stage C (T3) carcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovich, Zbigniew; Lieskovsky, Gary; Langholz, Bryan; Formenti, Silvia; Baert, Luc; Streeter, Oscar; Skinner, Donald G.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Adenocarcinoma of the prostate is the most common human cancer of internal organs. Radical surgery is regarded by many to be the treatment of choice for capsule confined disease. Since accurate preoperative assessment of tumor stage is difficult to define, many patients are subsequently found to have pathological stage C (T3) disease. These patients should be considered for adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A group of 201 PS C (T3) unselected patients, treated with radical prostatectomy and limited pelvic lymphadenectomy, received postoperative irradiation to the prostate bed. This radiotherapy was given between 42-90 days after surgery and consisted of a median dose of 48 Gy. Patient survival, disease free survival, time to clinical and chemical relapse and the incidence of local and systemic relapse were analyzed. The influence of multiple parameters on the treatment outcome including patient age, treatment period, clinical stage, pathological stage, Gleason's score, prostate specific antigen (PSA), radiotherapy techniques and radiation dose were examined using univariate and multivariate analysis. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 15 years, with a median of 5 years. Results: The overall 5- and 10-year actuarial survival was 92% and 83% (median > 10 years), respectively and the 5- and 10-year disease-free survival (clinical and PSA) was 67% and 53% (median > 10 years), respectively. A total of 61 (30%) patients had a recurrence, including 23 (11%) patients who had clinical and 38 (19%) who had PSA recurrence. Of the 23 patients with clinical recurrence, 10 (5%) had local recurrence, including two patients who had local and systemic recurrence. Pathological stage and Gleason's score were independently predictive of recurrence (each with p 25 ng/ml) was also an important independent factor predicting tumor recurrence, p = 0.05. All other investigated parameters were not significant in predicting tumor recurrence. This treatment program was very well

  18. Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients With Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer After 76 Gy Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy vs. 70 Gy Conformal Radiotherapy in a Prospective and Longitudinal Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lips, Irene; Dehnad, Human; Kruger, Arto Boeken; Moorselaar, Jeroen van; Heide, Uulke van; Battermann, Jan; Vulpen, Marco van

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare quality of life (QoL) after 70 Gy conformal radiotherapy with QoL after 76 Gy intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with locally advanced prostate carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were treated with 70 Gy three-field conformal radiotherapy, and 92 patients received 76 Gy IMRT with fiducial markers for position verification. Quality of life was measured by RAND-36, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer core questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30(+3)), and the prostate-specific EORTC QLQ-PR25, before radiotherapy (baseline) and 1 month and 6 months after treatment. Quality of life changes in time (baseline vs. 1 month and baseline vs. 6 months) of ≥10 points were considered clinically relevant. Results: Differences between the treatment groups for QoL changes over time occurred in several QoL domains. The 76-Gy group revealed no significant deterioration in QoL compared with the 70-Gy group. The IMRT 76-Gy group even demonstrated a significantly better change in QoL from baseline to 1 month in several domains. The conformal 70-Gy group revealed temporary deterioration in pain, role functioning, and urinary symptoms; for the IMRT 76-Gy group a better QoL in terms of change in health existed after 1 month, which persisted after 6 months. For both treatment groups temporary deterioration in physical role restriction occurred after 1 month, and an improvement in emotional role restriction occurred after 6 months. Sexual activity was reduced after treatment for both groups and remained decreased after 6 months. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and accurate position verification seem to provide a possibility to increase the radiation dose for prostate cancer without deterioration in QoL

  19. Relation between the treated region of the patient with ca. of the uterine cervix and her body-type in whole pelvis irradiation with conformation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Kozo; Kakehi, Masae

    1975-01-01

    In whole pelvis irradiation using the conformation technique for the patient with carcinoma of the uterine cervix, standardization of the shape of the treated region was tried on the basis of measuring the pelvis in X-ray films. This was done on the X-rays of 200 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix. The body-type of the patient the most remarkably influenced the shape of the treated region. Ten clinical types of cam-group (treated region) were determined, in order to perform conformation radiotherapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Although the shape of the treated region could also be changed by the invasion of the lesion, the position of the portio and the general condition of the patients, these 10 standard types of cam-group can be applied practically to almost all of the patients. (Evans, J.)

  20. Longterm neurocognitive sequellae of a prospectively followed cohort of low grade tumor patients treated by conformal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, C.; Ruffer, J.; Hopwood, C.; Montenegro, L.; Mollman, J.; Judy, K.; Alavi, J.; Corn, B.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Although many advances have been made in the use of therapeutic irradiation to treat patients with brain tumors, the neurocognitive effects of conformal radiation therapy (CRT) are poorly known and controversial. Retrospective studies of radiotherapy in children and adults have revealed both leukoencephalopathy and cognitive impairments in follow-up of months to 20 years after treatment. Most prospective studies have examined neurocognitive effects at one year post CRT, and our previous findings (1993,1995) suggest that this endpoint misses the first two phases of the delayed effects of CRT. We also propose that the effects of CRT can be characterized in terms of dissociated curvilinear slopes of neurocognitive impairments, which allow specific hypotheses about the multiple phases of the delayed effects. Materials/Methods: We have examined our neurocognitive model of radiotherapy effects in our current group of 20 patients who have supratentorial, low grade, primary brain tumors. Total CRT doses ranged between 46 to 63 Gy (med. dose of 54 Gy, with fractionations of 1.8-2.0 Gy). Healthy control subjects were matched to patients with respect to age and education. Patients were tested with a comprehensive neuropsychological battery at baseline (6 weeks post resection/biopsy, immediately prior to CRT), at three month intervals for one year, and yearly; current analyses reflect three years post baseline. To test the hypothesis that long-term memory is generally impaired versus selective impairment of verbal/semantic memory processes, we used parallel tests of verbal/semantic and visual/perceptual long-term memory which require association to encode and retrieve the stimuli. The visual long-term memory test was available on 10 patients. Results: A specific treatment-dependent deficit in long-term memory retrieval of word lists was found in 18 of 20 patients at six weeks post completion of CRT, though it was a temporary impairment which rebounded by one

  1. Comparing morbidity and cancer control after 3D-conformal (70/74 Gy) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (78/82 Gy) for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolezel, Martin; Odrazka, Karel; Zouhar, Milan; Jansa, Jan; Paluska, Petr; Vaculikova, Miloslava; Sefrova, Jana; Kohlova, Tereza; Vanasek, Jaroslav; Kovarik, Josef

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare toxicity and cancer control between patients with prostate cancer treated using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and those treated using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). A total of 553 patients with prostate cancer were treated with 3D-CRT 70-74 Gy (3D-CRT 70, 3D-CRT 74) or IMRT 78-82 Gy (IMRT 78, IMRT/SIB 82). Late toxicity was scored according to FC-RTOG/LENT criteria. Biochemical failure was defined using the Phoenix and ASTRO definitions. The 5-year risk of grade 2-4 genitourinary toxicity was 26.3 % (3D-CRT 70), 27.2 % (3D-CRT 74), 17.3 % (IMRT 78), and 25.1 % (IMRT/SIB 82) without statistical differences. The 5-year risk of grade 2-4 gastrointestinal toxicity was 19.4 % (3D-CRT 70), 42.1 % (3D-CRT 74), 20.5 % (IMRT 78), and 26.6 % (IMRT/SIB 82). The differences between 3D-CRT 74 and 3D-CRT 70 and between 3D-CRT 74 and IMRT 78 were statistically significant (log rank p = 0.03). The 5-year Phoenix PSA relapse-free survival (PSA-RFS) in low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk patients treated using 3D-CRT were 89.4, 65.5, and 57.8 %, respectively. Patients treated with IMRT achieved the following results: 90.9, 89.4, and 83.9 %. Clinical relapse-free survival (C-RFS) in patients treated using 3D-CRT vs. IMRT for the aforementioned groups were 94.7 vs. 100 %, 86.8 vs. 98.6 %, and 84.4 vs. 94.5 %. Disease-free survival (DFS) for patients treated using 3D-CRT were 83.1, 70.9, and 71.5 %. The IMRT group reached 95.8, 89.1, and 87.6 %. The PSA-RFS for intermediate- and high-risk patients were statistically significant, while C-RFS and DFS were marginally better. Dose escalation with IMRT was associated with improved cancer control in intermediate- and high-risk patients in comparison with 3D-CRT, without compromising toxicity. (orig.) [de

  2. Normalization of serum testosterone levels in patients treated with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padula, Gilbert D.A.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Venkatraman, Ennapadam S.; Fuks, Zvi; Lee, Henry J.; Natale, Linda; Leibel, Steven A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the expected time to serum testosterone normalization after short-course neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (NAAD) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for patients with localized prostate cancer and to identify pretreatment predictors that correlated with the time to testosterone normalization. Methods: Between 1993 and 1999, 88 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with NAAD and external beam radiotherapy, were prospectively monitored after treatment with sequential testosterone levels. NAAD was administered before and during the entire course of radiotherapy and discontinued at the end of treatment. The median duration of NAAD was 6 months. The actuarial rate of serum testosterone normalization from the end of treatment was evaluated, and the presence or absence of androgen deprivation-related symptoms was correlated with serum testosterone levels. Symptoms assessed included weight gain, loss of libido, breast tenderness, breast enlargement, hot flashes, and fatigue. Results: Serum testosterone levels returned to the normal range in 57 (65%) of the 88 patients and failed to normalize in 31 patients (35%). The median time to normalization was 18.3 months. The actuarial rate of normalization at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months was 10%, 26%, 38%, and 59%, respectively. In a multivariate analysis, a pretreatment testosterone level in the lower range of normal was the only variable that predicted for delayed testosterone normalization after NAAD (p=0.00047). Among 45 patients with information concerning androgen deprivation-related symptoms recorded 1 year after cessation of NAAD, 24 (53%) had normalized testosterone levels, but in 21 patients (47%), the levels had not yet returned to normal. At 1 year, only 1 (4%) of 24 patients whose testosterone level had returned to normal experienced NAAD-related symptoms compared with 14 (67%) of 21 patients who did not have normal testosterone levels (p<0.001). Conclusion: Testosterone

  3. Comparison of megavoltage position verification for prostate irradiation based on bony anatomy and implanted fiducials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nederveen, Aart J.; Dehnad, Homan; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Moorselaar, R. Jeroen A. van; Hofman, Pieter; Lagendijk, Jan J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The patient position during radiotherapy treatment of prostate cancer can be verified with the help of portal images acquired during treatment. In this study we quantify the clinical consequences of the use of image-based verification based on the bony anatomy and the prostate target itself. Patients and methods: We analysed 2025 portal images and 23 computed tomography (CT) scans from 23 patients with prostate cancer. In all patients gold markers were implanted prior to CT scanning. Statistical data for both random and systematic errors were calculated for displacements of bones and markers and we investigated the effectiveness of an off-line correction protocol. Results: Standard deviations for systematic marker displacement are 2.4 mm in the lateral (LR) direction, 4.4 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction and 3.7 mm in the caudal-cranial direction (CC). Application of off-line position verification based on the marker positions results in a shrinkage of the systematic error to well below 1 mm. Position verification based on the bony anatomy reduces the systematic target uncertainty to 50% in the AP direction and in the LR direction. No reduction was observed in the CC direction. For six out of 23 patients we found an increase of the systematic error after application of bony anatomy-based position verification. Conclusions: We show that even if correction based on the bony anatomy is applied, considerable margins have to be set to account for organ motion. Our study highlights that for individual patients the systematic error can increase after application of bony anatomy-based position verification, whereas the population standard deviation will decrease. Off-line target-based position verification effectively reduces the systematic error to well below 1 mm, thus enabling significant margin reduction

  4. Robotic radiotherapy for prostate cancer with CyberKnife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannoun-Levi, J.M.; Benezery, K.; Bondiau, P.Y.; Marcie, S.; Gerard, J.P.; Chamorey, E.

    2007-01-01

    After 3D conformal radiation therapy without and with modulated intensity, image-guided radiation therapy represents a new technological step. Should prostate cancer treatment using radiotherapy with the CyberKnife robotic system be considered as a new treatment and then investigated through classical clinical research procedure rather than a technical improvement of an already validated treatment? After a general presentation of the CyberKnife, the authors focused on prostate cancer treatment assuming that, according to dosimetric and biological considerations, the treatment by robotic system appears comparable to high dose rate brachytherapy. For prostate cancer treatment are discussed: biological rational for hypo fractionated treatment, high dose rate brachytherapy boost and interest of dose escalation. A comparison is presented between CyberKnife and other validated treatment for prostate cancer (radical prostatectomy, 3D conformal radiation therapy and low and high dose rate brachytherapy). In summary, CyberKnife treatment could be considered as a technical improvement of an already validated treatment in order to deliver a prostate boost after pelvic or peri-prostatic area irradiation. However, the clinical, biological and economical results must be precisely analyzed and could be assessed in the frame of a National Observatory based on shared therapeutic program. (authors)

  5. Radiosensitivity of Prostate Cancer Cell Lines for Irradiation from Beta Particle-emitting Radionuclide ¹⁷⁷Lu Compared to Alpha Particles and Gamma Rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgqvist, Jörgen; Timmermand, Oskar Vilhelmsson; Larsson, Erik; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the radiosensitivity of the prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 when irradiated with beta particles emitted from (177)Lu, and to compare the effect with irradiation using alpha particles or gamma rays. Cells were irradiated with beta particles emitted from (177)Lu, alpha particles from (241)Am, or gamma rays from (137)Cs. A non-specific polyclonal antibody was labeled with (177)Lu and used to irradiate cells in suspension with beta particles. A previously described in-house developed alpha-particle irradiator based on a (241)Am source was used to irradiate cells with alpha particles. External gamma-ray irradiation was achieved using a standard (137)Cs irradiator. Cells were irradiated to absorbed doses equal to 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 Gy. The absorbed doses were calculated as mean absorbed doses. For evaluation of cell survival, the tetrazolium-based WST-1 assay was used. After irradiation, WST-1 was added to the cell solutions, incubated, and then measured for level of absorbance at 450 nm, indicating the live and viable cells. LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 cell lines all had similar patterns of survival for the different radiation types. No significant difference in surviving fractions were observed between cells treated with beta-particle and gamma-ray irradiation, represented for example by the surviving fraction values (mean±SD) at 2, 6, and 10 Gy (SF2, SF6, and SF10) for DU145 after beta-particle irradiation: 0.700±0.090, 0.186±0.050 and 0.056±0.010, respectively. A strong radiosensitivity to alpha particles was observed, with SF2 values of 0.048±0.008, 0.018±0.006 and 0.015±0.005 for LNCaP, DU145, and PC3, respectively. The surviving fractions after irradiation using beta particles or gamma rays did not differ significantly at the absorbed dose levels and dose rates used. Irradiation using alpha particles led to a high level of cell killing. The results show that the beta-particle emitter

  6. Dosimetry comparison of irradiation with conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, conformal radiotherapy in stereotactic conditions and robotic stereotactic radiotherapy for benign brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spasic, E.; Noel, A.; Buchheit, I.; Bernier, V.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. - To compare several techniques in order to determine the best treatment for benign brain tumours. Methods and patients. - A retrospective study was performed for five patients who received 3D-conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy or CyberKnife R . These patients had a meningioma, a pituitary tumour, a cranio-pharyngioma or a neurinoma. In each case, these treatment plans were optimised and compared with the three other dosimetries. Radiobiological or positioning parameters were evaluated, as well as dosimetric parameters, in order to compare treatments with different characteristics. Results. - The dosimetric parameters showed that the choice of treatment seemed to be determined mostly by tumour size, shape and proximity with organs at risk (not tumour localisation). Whereas the results showed no significant deviations with regards to the radiobiological parameters. Therefore, with these parameters, it was difficult to give priority to a treatment. Conclusions. - With regards to benign brain tumours of medium or large size, intensity modulated radiotherapy seemed the recommended treatment. It enabled to obtain a good ratio between efficacy and toxicity for tumours that are really close to organs at risk. Concerning small benign brain tumours, the CyberKnife R was probably the best treatment. (authors)

  7. Phase II clinical trial of whole-brain irradiation plus three-dimensional conformal boost with concurrent topotecan for brain metastases from lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge, Xiao-hui; Liu, Miao-ling; Lin, Qiang; Ren, Xiao-cang; Liu, Yue-e; Chen, Xue-ji; Wang, Dong-ying; Wang, Yong-qiang; Cao, Bin; Li, Zhi-gang

    2013-01-01

    Patients with brain metastases from lung cancer have poor prognoses and short survival time, and they are often excluded from clinical trials. Whole-cranial irradiation is considered to be the standard treatment, but its efficacy is not satisfactory. The purpose of this phase II clinical trial was to evaluate the preliminary efficacy and safety of the treatment of whole-brain irradiation plus three-dimensional conformal boost combined with concurrent topotecan for the patients with brain metastases from lung cancer. Patients with brain metastasis from lung cancer received concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy: conventional fractionated whole-brain irradiation, 2 fields/time, 1 fraction/day, 2 Gy/fraction, 5 times/week, and DT 40 Gy/20 fractions; for the patients with ≤ 3 lesions with diameter ≥ 2 cm, a three-dimensional (3-D) conformal localised boost was given to increase the dosage to 56–60 Gy; and during radiotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy with topotecan was given (the chemoradiotherapy group, CRT). The patients with brain metastasis from lung cancer during the same period who received radiotherapy only were selected as the controls (the radiotherapy-alone group, RT). From March 2009 to March 2012, both 38 patients were enrolled into two groups. The median progression-free survival(PFS) time , the 1- and 2-year PFS rates of CRT group and RT group were 6 months, 42.8%, 21.6% and 3 months, 11.6%, 8.7% (χ 2 = 6.02, p = 0.014), respectively. The 1- and 2-year intracranial lesion control rates of CRT and RT were 75.9% , 65.2% and 41.6% , 31.2% (χ 2 = 3.892, p = 0.049), respectively. The 1- and 2-year overall survival rates (OS) of CRT and RT were 50.8% , 37.9% and 40.4% , 16.5% (χ 2 = 1.811, p = 0.178), respectively. The major side effects were myelosuppression and digestive toxicities, but no differences were observed between the two groups. Compared with radiotherapy alone, whole-brain irradiation plus 3-D conformal boost irradiation and concurrent

  8. Late Side Effects After Image Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Compared to 3D-Conformal Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Results From 2 Prospective Cohorts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wortel, Ruud C.; Incrocci, Luca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pos, Floris J.; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Lebesque, Joos V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Aluwini, Shafak [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Witte, Marnix G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heemsbergen, Wilma D., E-mail: w.heemsbergen@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: Technical developments in the field of external beam radiation therapy (RT) enabled the clinical introduction of image guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT), which improved target conformity and allowed reduction of safety margins. Whether this had an impact on late toxicity levels compared to previously applied three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) is currently unknown. We analyzed late side effects after treatment with IG-IMRT or 3D-CRT, evaluating 2 prospective cohorts of men treated for localized prostate cancer to investigate the hypothesized reductions in toxicity. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with 3D-CRT (n=189) or IG-IMRT (n=242) to 78 Gy in 39 fractions were recruited from 2 Dutch randomized trials with identical toxicity scoring protocols. Late toxicity (>90 days after treatment) was derived from self-assessment questionnaires and case report forms, according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG-EORTC) scoring criteria. Grade ≥2 endpoints included gastrointestinal (GI) rectal bleeding, increased stool frequency, discomfort, rectal incontinence, proctitis, and genitourinary (GU) obstruction, increased urinary frequency, nocturia, urinary incontinence, and dysuria. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to compare grade ≥2 toxicities between both techniques, adjusting for other modifying factors. Results: The 5-year cumulative incidence of grade ≥2 GI toxicity was 24.9% for IG-IMRT and 37.6% following 3D-CRT (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 0.59, P=.005), with significant reductions in proctitis (HR: 0.37, P=.047) and increased stool frequency (HR: 0.23, P<.001). GU grade ≥2 toxicity levels at 5 years were comparable with 46.2% and 36.4% following IG-IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively (adjusted HR: 1.19, P=.33). Other strong predictors (P<.01) of grade ≥2 late toxicity were baseline complaints, acute toxicity, and age

  9. Late Side Effects After Image Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Compared to 3D-Conformal Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Results From 2 Prospective Cohorts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wortel, Ruud C.; Incrocci, Luca; Pos, Floris J.; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Lebesque, Joos V.; Aluwini, Shafak; Witte, Marnix G.; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Technical developments in the field of external beam radiation therapy (RT) enabled the clinical introduction of image guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT), which improved target conformity and allowed reduction of safety margins. Whether this had an impact on late toxicity levels compared to previously applied three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) is currently unknown. We analyzed late side effects after treatment with IG-IMRT or 3D-CRT, evaluating 2 prospective cohorts of men treated for localized prostate cancer to investigate the hypothesized reductions in toxicity. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with 3D-CRT (n=189) or IG-IMRT (n=242) to 78 Gy in 39 fractions were recruited from 2 Dutch randomized trials with identical toxicity scoring protocols. Late toxicity (>90 days after treatment) was derived from self-assessment questionnaires and case report forms, according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG-EORTC) scoring criteria. Grade ≥2 endpoints included gastrointestinal (GI) rectal bleeding, increased stool frequency, discomfort, rectal incontinence, proctitis, and genitourinary (GU) obstruction, increased urinary frequency, nocturia, urinary incontinence, and dysuria. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to compare grade ≥2 toxicities between both techniques, adjusting for other modifying factors. Results: The 5-year cumulative incidence of grade ≥2 GI toxicity was 24.9% for IG-IMRT and 37.6% following 3D-CRT (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 0.59, P=.005), with significant reductions in proctitis (HR: 0.37, P=.047) and increased stool frequency (HR: 0.23, P<.001). GU grade ≥2 toxicity levels at 5 years were comparable with 46.2% and 36.4% following IG-IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively (adjusted HR: 1.19, P=.33). Other strong predictors (P<.01) of grade ≥2 late toxicity were baseline complaints, acute toxicity, and age

  10. Margin to CTV in simultaneous irradiation of treatment volumes attache to various anatomical frameworks: The paradigm of the CA. Of prostate in high risk with indication of lymph node irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz Freire, C. J.; Perez Echaguen, S.; Collado chamorro, P.; Diaz Pascual, V.; Vazquez Galinanes, A.; Ossola Lentati, G. A.

    2013-01-01

    The triple objective of this work is: 1 check the effect on the positioning of the GGPP of corrections on the position of the prostate in simultaneous irradiation guided through daily image and its relationship with the filling of rectum and bladder 2. check if employees standard margins for CTV GGPP are valid for this technique 3 calculate the necessary extension of the margin to 2. is not verified. (Author)

  11. Micro-Raman studies of swift heavy ion irradiation induced structural and conformational changes in polyaniline nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Somik [Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784028, Assam (India); Kumar, A., E-mail: ask@tezu.ernet.i [Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784028, Assam (India)

    2010-09-15

    Polyaniline (PAni) nanofibers doped with camphor sulfonic acid have been irradiated with 90 MeV O{sup 7+} ions at different fluences (3 x 10{sup 10}-1 x 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}) using a 15UD Pelletron accelerator under ultra-high vacuum. XRD studies reveal a decrease in the domain length and an increase in the strain upon SHI irradiation. The increase in d-spacing corresponding to the (1 0 0) reflection of PAni nanofibers with increasing irradiation fluence has been attributed to the increase in the tilt angle of the chains with respect to the (a, b) basal plane of PAni. Decrease in the integral intensity upon SHI irradiation indicates amorphization of the material. Micro-Raman ({mu}R) studies confirm amorphization of the PAni nanofibers and also show that the PAni nanofibers get de-doped upon SHI irradiation. {mu}R spectroscopy also reveals a benzenoid to quinoid transition in the PAni chain upon SHI irradiation. TEM results show that the size of PAni nanofibers decreases with the increase in irradiation fluence, which has been attributed to the fragmentation of PAni nanofibers in the core of amorphized tracks caused by SHI irradiation.

  12. Initial clinical experience with infrared-reflecting skin markers in the positioning of patients treated by conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soete, Guy; Steene, Jan van de; Verellen, Dirk; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Berge, Dirk van den; Michielsen, Dirk; Keuppens, Frans; Roover, Patricia de; Storme, Guy

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate an infrared (IR) marker-based positioning system in patients receiving conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and materials: During 553 treatments, the ability of the IR system to automatically position the isocenter was recorded. Setup errors were measured by means of orthogonal verification films and compared to conventional positioning (using skin drawings and lasers) in 184 treatments. Results: The standard deviation of anteroposterior (AP) and lateral setup errors was significantly reduced with IR marker positioning compared to conventional: 2 vs. 4.8 mm AP (p<0.01) and 1.6 vs. 3.5 mm laterally (p<0.01). Longitudinally, the difference was not significant (3.5 vs. 3.0 mm). Systematic errors were on the average smaller AP and laterally for the IR method: 4.1 vs. 7.8 mm AP (p=0.01) and 3.1 vs. 5.6 mm lateral (p=0.07). Longitudinally, the IR system resulted in somewhat larger systematic errors: 5.0 vs. 3.4 mm for conventional positioning (p=0.03). The use of an off-line correction protocol, based on the average deviation measured over the first four fractions, allowed virtual elimination of systematic errors. Inability of the IR system to correctly locate the markers, leading to an executional failure, occurred in 21% of 553 fractions. Conclusion: IR marker-assisted patient positioning significantly improves setup accuracy along the AP and lateral axes. Executional failures need to be reduced

  13. Improvement in toxicity in high risk prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy without daily image guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveistrup, Joen; af Rosenschöld, Per Munck; Deasy, Joseph O; Oh, Jung Hun; Pommer, Tobias; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2014-02-04

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) facilitates the delivery of a very precise radiation dose. In this study we compare the toxicity and biochemical progression-free survival between patients treated with daily image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) without daily image guidance for high risk prostate cancer (PCa). A total of 503 high risk PCa patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and endocrine treatment between 2000 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. 115 patients were treated with 3DCRT, and 388 patients were treated with IG-IMRT. 3DCRT patients were treated to 76 Gy and without daily image guidance and with 1-2 cm PTV margins. IG-IMRT patients were treated to 78 Gy based on daily image guidance of fiducial markers, and the PTV margins were 5-7 mm. Furthermore, the dose-volume constraints to both the rectum and bladder were changed with the introduction of IG-IMRT. The 2-year actuarial likelihood of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity following RT was 57.3% in 3DCRT patients and 5.8% in IG-IMRT patients (p analysis, 3DCRT was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity compared to IG-IMRT (p analysis there was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival between 3DCRT and IG-IMRT. The difference in toxicity can be attributed to the combination of the IMRT technique with reduced dose to organs-at-risk, daily image guidance and margin reduction.

  14. Sucralfate versus mesalazine versus hydrocortisone in the prevention of acute radiation proctitis during conformal radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma. A randomized study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanguineti, G.; Franzone, P.; Marcenaro, M.; Vitale, V.; Foppiano, F.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To assess whether the topical use of steroids or 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) is superior to sucralfate in preventing acute rectal toxicity during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) to 76 Gy. Patients and Methods: Patients undergoing 3DCRT for prostate carcinoma at our institution were offered to be randomized to sucralfate 3 g in 15 ml suspension enema (Antepsin trademark ), mesalazine 4 g gel enema (Enterasyn trademark), or hydrocortisone 100 mg foam enema (Colifoam trademark ). Randomization was blind to the treating physician but not to the patient. Sucralfate was chosen as control arm. Topical treatment had to be performed once daily, starting on day 1 of 3DCRT. Acute rectal toxicity was scored weekly according to RTOG criteria. Time to occurrence of grade 2+ acute rectal toxicity was taken as endpoint. Results: The trial was opened in August 1999, and after the first 24 patients had been treated, arm 2 was discontinued because of eight patients receiving mesalazine, seven actually developed acute rectal toxicity (five patients grade 3 and two patients grade 2). Until May 2001, 134 consecutive patients were randomly assigned to sucralfate (63 patients), mesalazine (eight patients) or hydrocortisone (63 patients). The cumulative incidence of acute rectal toxicity at the end of treatment by arm is 61.9 ± 6.1%, 87.5 ± 11.7%, and 52.4 ± 6.2% for arms 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The difference between the mesalazine group and the sucralfate group is highly significant (hazard ratio [HR] 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-5.7; p = 0.03). At both uni- and multivariate analysis taking into account several patients and treatment covariates, the difference between hydrocortisone and sucralfate is not significant (HR 0.7, 95% CI 0.5-1.2; p = 0.2). Conclusion: Topical mesalazine is contraindicated during radiotherapy. Hydrocortisone enema is not superior to sucralfate in preventing acute rectal toxicity. (orig.)

  15. Sucralfate versus mesalazine versus hydrocortisone in the prevention of acute radiation proctitis during conformal radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma. A randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Franzone, Paola; Marcenaro, Michela; Foppiano, Franca; Vitale, Vito

    2003-07-01

    To assess whether the topical use of steroids or 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) is superior to sucralfate in preventing acute rectal toxicity during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) to 76 Gy. Patients undergoing 3DCRT for prostate carcinoma at our institution were offered to be randomized to sucralfate 3 g in 15 ml suspension enema (Antepsin, mesalazine 4 g gel enema (Enterasyn, or hydrocortisone 100 mg foam enema (Colifoam. Randomization was blind to the treating physician but not to the patient. Sucralfate was chosen as control arm. Topical treatment had to be performed once daily, starting on day 1 of 3DCRT. Acute rectal toxicity was scored weekly according to RTOG criteria. Time to occurrence of grade 2+ acute rectal toxicity was taken as endpoint. The trial was opened in August 1999, and after the first 24 patients had been treated, arm 2 was discontinued because of eight patients receiving mesalazine, seven actually developed acute rectal toxicity (five patients grade 3 and two patients grade 2). Until May 2001, 134 consecutive patients were randomly assigned to sucralfate (63 patients), mesalazine (eight patients) or hydrocortisone (63 patients). The cumulative incidence of acute rectal toxicity at the end of treatment by arm is 61.9 +/- 6.1%, 87.5 +/- 11.7%, and 52.4 +/- 6.2% for arms 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The difference between the mesalazine group and the sucralfate group is highly significant (hazard ratio [HR] 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-5.7; p = 0.03). At both uni- and multivariate analysis taking into account several patients and treatment covariates, the difference between hydrocortisone and sucralfate is not significant (HR 0.7, 95% CI 0.5-1.2; p = 0.2). Topical mesalazine is contraindicated during radiotherapy. Hydrocortisone enema is not superior to sucralfate in preventing acute rectal toxicity.

  16. Sucralfate versus mesalazine versus hydrocortisone in the prevention of acute radiation proctitis during conformal radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma. A randomized study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanguineti, G.; Franzone, P.; Marcenaro, M.; Vitale, V. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, National Inst. for Cancer Research, Genova (Italy); Foppiano, F. [Dept. of Physics, National Inst. for Cancer Research, Genova (Italy)

    2003-07-01

    Purpose: To assess whether the topical use of steroids or 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) is superior to sucralfate in preventing acute rectal toxicity during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) to 76 Gy. Patients and Methods: Patients undergoing 3DCRT for prostate carcinoma at our institution were offered to be randomized to sucralfate 3 g in 15 ml suspension enema (Antepsin {sup trademark}), mesalazine 4 g gel enema (Enterasyn trademark), or hydrocortisone 100 mg foam enema (Colifoam {sup trademark}). Randomization was blind to the treating physician but not to the patient. Sucralfate was chosen as control arm. Topical treatment had to be performed once daily, starting on day 1 of 3DCRT. Acute rectal toxicity was scored weekly according to RTOG criteria. Time to occurrence of grade 2+ acute rectal toxicity was taken as endpoint. Results: The trial was opened in August 1999, and after the first 24 patients had been treated, arm 2 was discontinued because of eight patients receiving mesalazine, seven actually developed acute rectal toxicity (five patients grade 3 and two patients grade 2). Until May 2001, 134 consecutive patients were randomly assigned to sucralfate (63 patients), mesalazine (eight patients) or hydrocortisone (63 patients). The cumulative incidence of acute rectal toxicity at the end of treatment by arm is 61.9 {+-} 6.1%, 87.5 {+-} 11.7%, and 52.4 {+-} 6.2% for arms 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The difference between the mesalazine group and the sucralfate group is highly significant (hazard ratio [HR] 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-5.7; p = 0.03). At both uni- and multivariate analysis taking into account several patients and treatment covariates, the difference between hydrocortisone and sucralfate is not significant (HR 0.7, 95% CI 0.5-1.2; p = 0.2). Conclusion: Topical mesalazine is contraindicated during radiotherapy. Hydrocortisone enema is not superior to sucralfate in preventing acute rectal toxicity. (orig.)

  17. Comparison of rectal volume definition techniques and their influence on rectal toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy: a dose-volume analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onal, Cem; Topkan, Erkan; Efe, Esma; Yavuz, Melek; Sonmez, Serhat; Yavuz, Aydin

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of four different rectum contouring techniques and rectal toxicities in patients with treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Clinical and dosimetric data were evaluated for 94 patients who received a total dose 3DCRT of 70 Gy, and rectal doses were compared in four different rectal contouring techniques: the prostate-containing CT sections (method 1); 1 cm above and below the planning target volume (PTV) (method 2); 110 mm starting from the anal verge (method 3); and from the anal verge to the sigmoid flexure (method 4). The percentage of rectal volume receiving RT doses (30–70 Gy) and minimum, mean rectal doses were assessed. Median age was 69 years. Percentage of rectal volume receiving high doses (≥ 70 Gy) were higher with the techniques that contoured smaller rectal volumes. In methods 2 and 3, the percentage of rectal volume receiving ≥ 70 Gy was significantly higher in patients with than without rectal bleeding (method 2: 30.8% vs. 22.5%, respectively (p = 0.03); method 3: 26.9% vs. 18.1%, respectively (p = 0.006)). Mean rectal dose was significant predictor of rectal bleeding only in method 3 (48.8 Gy in patients with bleeding vs. 44.4 Gy in patients without bleeding; p = 0.02). Different techniques of rectal contouring significantly influence the calculation of radiation doses to the rectum and the prediction of rectal toxicity. Rectal volume receiving higher doses (≥ 70 Gy) and mean rectal doses may significantly predict rectal bleeding for techniques contouring larger rectal volumes, as was in method 3

  18. The study of irradiation combined with targeted suicide gene therapy for prostate cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xueguan; Milas, L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study whether RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV, one of suicide gene therapy targeting to Integrin αv, can enhance radiotherapeutic effect for DU145 prostate cancer xenografts or not. Methods: When the diameter of tumor in 48 nude mice bearing DU145 prostate cancer in the right leg attained 6.0 mm (5.8-6.3 mm), the mice were entered into the experiment. There were 6 experimental groups (8 mice per group), including the control, radiotherapy only (RT), RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV only (Targeted, RGD-4C), AAVP HSV-TK/GCV (Non-targeted, non RGD-4C ), radiotherapy plus RGD- 4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV(XRT + RGD-4C) and radiotherapy plus AAVP HSV-TK/GCV group (XRT + Non RGD-4C). The effect of treatment was assessed by tumor growth delay ( the time required when tumor grew from 6.0 mm to 12.0 mm) and tumor cure. Results: Five mice died during the treatment course. There were 6 mice without tumor after treatment, including 1 in RT group, 1 in RGD-4C group, 1 in non RGD-4C group and 3 in XRT + RGD-4C group, respectively. For tumor growth delay analysis in 37 mice, the absolute growth delay (AGD) for RGD-4C, non RGD-4C and RT group was 24.4 ± 9.0, 22.6±11.3 and 28.3 ±5.5 days, respectively. When RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV or AAVP HSV-TK/GCV combined with radiotherapy, their AGD was 64.7±23.8 and 35.4±9.6 days, and nominal growth delay (NGD) was 40.3 ± 23.8 and 12.8 ± 9.6 days, respectively. The enhancement factor of RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV and AAVP HSV-TK/GCV for radiotherapy were 1.42 and 0.45. Conclusion: RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV can enhance radiotherapeutic effect for DU145 prostate cancer xenografts. Further study is needed. (authors)

  19. Intermittent hormonal therapy in the treatment of post-irradiation residual/recurrent prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Aaron O; Kocherill, Paul G; Wallace, Michelle; Forman, Jeffrey D

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of intermittent hormonal therapy in the treatment of residual/recurrent prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Seventeen patients with biochemical evidence of residual/recurrent prostate cancer were initially treated with radiation therapy (RT)(13), neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy and RT (3), or RT following prostatectomy (1). The mean follow-up time was 19.4 months from the initiation of hormonal therapy. Hormonal therapy consisted of an LH-RH agonist alone (7), an anti-androgen alone (1) or a combination of both (9). Hormonal therapy was continued until the prostatic specific antigen (PSA) level became undetectable. IHT was reinstituted when the PSA reached a pre-determined level, usually greater than or equal to 10ng/ml. Results: The mean time from completion of primary treatment to the initiation of hormonal therapy was 32.5 months. The mean PSA at the start of the first cycle of hormonal therapy was 43.9ng/ml, the second cycle, 11.9ng/ml and the third cycle, 24ng/ml. The mean PSA levels at the end of the first and second cycle of hormonal therapy were .48 and .42ng/ml, respectively. No patient has yet completed the third cycle of hormonal therapy. The average duration of hormonal therapy was 10 months for the first cycle and 4 months for the second cycle. The mean intermittent time off hormones were 9.3 months between cycles 1 and 2, and 10 months between cycles 2 and 3. No patient has yet become refractory to hormonal therapy. Currently all patients are alive. All patients experienced hot flashes and decreased libido at varying degrees during treatment. Thirty-five percent experienced gynecomastia. During the intervals between hormonal therapy, most patients reported a decrease in hot flashes. Conclusion: This analysis supplies preliminary evidence that intermittent hormonal therapy is a viable option in patients with biochemical evidence of disease following initial therapy. It is associated with less treatment

  20. IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy with or without elective nodal irradiation in locally advanced NSCLC: A direct comparison of PET-based treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleckenstein, Jochen; Kremp, Katharina; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Rübe, Christian

    2016-02-01

    The potential of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as opposed to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is analyzed for two different concepts of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)-based target volume delineation in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC): involved-field radiotherapy (IF-RT) vs. elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Treatment planning was performed for 41 patients with LA-NSCLC, using four different planning approaches (3D-CRT-IF, 3D-CRT-ENI, IMRT-IF, IMRT-ENI). ENI included a boost irradiation after 50 Gy. For each plan, maximum dose escalation was calculated based on prespecified normal tissue constraints. The maximum prescription dose (PD), tumor control probability (TCP), conformal indices (CI), and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were analyzed. IMRT resulted in statistically significant higher prescription doses for both target volume concepts as compared with 3D-CRT (ENI: 68.4 vs. 60.9 Gy, p ENI, there was a considerable theoretical increase in TCP (IMRT: 27.3 vs. 17.7 %, p ENI: 12.3 vs. 30.9 % p < 0.0001; IF: 15.9 vs. 24.1 %; p < 0.001). The IMRT technique and IF target volume delineation allow a significant dose escalation and an increase in TCP. IMRT results in an improved sparing of OARs as compared with 3D-CRT at equivalent dose levels.

  1. Prediction of the cumulated dose for external beam irradiation of prostate cancer patients with 3D-CRT technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giżyńska Marta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays in radiotherapy, much effort is taken to minimize the irradiated volume and consequently minimize doses to healthy tissues. In our work, we tested the hypothesis that the mean dose distribution calculated from a few first fractions can serve as prediction of the cumulated dose distribution, representing the whole treatment. We made our tests for 25 prostate cancer patients treated with three orthogonal fields technique. We did a comparison of dose distribution calculated as a sum of dose distribution from each fraction with a dose distribution calculated with isocenter shifted for a mean setup error from a few first fractions. The cumulative dose distribution and predicted dose distributions are similar in terms of gamma (3 mm 3% analysis, under condition that we know setup error from seven first fractions. We showed that the dose distribution calculated for the original plan with the isocenter shifted to the point, defined as the original isocenter corrected of the mean setup error estimated from the first seven fractions supports our hypothesis, i.e. can serve as a prediction for cumulative dose distribution.

  2. Multi-Institution Prospective Trial of Reduced-Dose Craniospinal Irradiation (23.4 Gy) Followed by Conformal Posterior Fossa (36 Gy) and Primary Site Irradiation (55.8 Gy) and Dose-Intensive Chemotherapy for Average-Risk Medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, Thomas E.; Kun, Larry E.; Krasin, Matthew J.; Wallace, Dana; Chintagumpala, Murali M.; Woo, Shiao Y.; Ashley, David M.; Sexton, Maree; Kellie, Stewart J.; Ahern, Verity M.B.B.S.; Gajjar, Amar

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Limiting the neurocognitive sequelae of radiotherapy (RT) has been an objective in the treatment of medulloblastoma. Conformal RT to less than the entire posterior fossa (PF) after craniospinal irradiation might reduce neurocognitive sequelae and requires evaluation. Methods and Materials: Between October 1996 and August 2003, 86 patients, 3-21 years of age, with newly diagnosed, average-risk medulloblastoma were treated in a prospective, institutional review board-approved, multi-institution trial of risk-adapted RT and dose-intensive chemotherapy. RT began within 28 days of definitive surgery and consisted of craniospinal irradiation (23.4 Gy), conformal PF RT (36.0 Gy), and primary site RT (55.8 Gy). The planning target volume for the primary site included the postoperative tumor bed surrounded by an anatomically confined margin of 2 cm that was then expanded with a geometric margin of 0.3-0.5 cm. Chemotherapy was initiated 6 weeks after RT and included four cycles of high-dose cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, and vincristine. Results: At a median follow-up of 61.2 months (range, 5.2-115.0 months), the estimated 5-year event-free survival and cumulative incidence of PF failure rate was 83.0% ± 5.3% and 4.9% ± 2.4% (± standard error), respectively. The targeting guidelines used in this study resulted in a mean reduction of 13% in the volume of the PF receiving doses >55 Gy compared with conventionally planned RT. The reductions in the dose to the temporal lobes, cochleae, and hypothalamus were statistically significant. Conclusion: This prospective trial has demonstrated that irradiation of less than the entire PF after 23.4 Gy craniospinal irradiation for average-risk medulloblastoma results in disease control comparable to that after treatment of the entire PF

  3. Chronic effects of therapeutic irradiation for localized prostatic carcinoma on anorectal function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeoh, Eric E.K.; Botten, Rochelle; Russo, Antonietta; McGowan, Roz; Fraser, Robert; Roos, Daniel; Penniment, Michael; Borg, Martin; Sun Weiming

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate prospectively the prevalence and pathophysiology of anorectal dysfunction following radiation therapy (RTH) for localized carcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: The following parameters of anorectal function were evaluated in each of 35 patients (aged 55-82 years) with localized prostatic carcinoma treated with RTH either to a dose of 55 Gy/20 fractions/4 weeks (18 patients) or 64 Gy/32 fractions/6.5 weeks (17 patients), before RTH and 4-6 weeks and at a mean (± SD) of 1.4 (± 0.2) years after its completion: (1) anorectal symptoms (questionnaire), (2) anorectal pressures at rest and in response to voluntary squeeze and increases in intra-abdominal pressure (multiport anorectal manometry), (3) rectal sensation (balloon distension) and (4) anal sphincteric morphology (endoanal ultrasound). Results: All but 1 patient completed three series of measurements. RTH had no effect on anal sphincteric morphology. The increase in frequency of defecation and fecal urgency and incontinence scores previously reported in the patients 4-6 weeks after RTH were sustained 1 year later (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p < 0.05, cf. baseline, respectively). At this time, 56% (19 of 34), 50% (17 of 34) and 26% (9 of 34) of the patients had increased frequency of defecation, fecal urgency, and incontinence, respectively. Decreases in anal sphincteric pressures at rest and in response to voluntary squeeze recorded in the patients 4-6 weeks after RTH were not sustained 1 year later but the volumes of rectal distension associated with perception of the stimulus and desire to defecate were lower compared with baseline volumes (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, respectively), reflecting heightened rectal sensitivity in the patients. There was no difference in measurements between the two radiation dose regimens. Univariate logistical regression analysis was performed on patients who had experienced increased symptom scores or decreases in recorded motor and sensory manometric

  4. Identification and comparison of predictive models of rectal and bladder toxicity in the case of prostatic irradiation; Identification et comparaison de modeles predictifs de toxicite rectale et vesicale en cas d'irradiation prostatique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnep, K.; Chira, C.; Le Prise, E.; Crevoisier, R. de [Centre Eugene-Marquis, Rennes (France); Zhu, J.; Simon, A.; Ospina Arango, J.D. [Inserm U642, Rennes (France); Messai, T.; Bossi, A. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Beckendorf, V. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Nancy (France)

    2011-10-15

    More than 400 patients have been treated by conformational radiation therapy for a localized prostate adenocarcinoma and some have been selected according to the availability of dose-volume histograms. Predictive models of rectal and bladder toxicity have been compared: LKB, Logit EUD and Poisson EUD for rectal toxicity, LKB, Logit EUD, Poisson EUD and Schultheiss for bladder toxicity. Results suggest that these models could be used during the inverse planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy in order to decrease toxicity. Short communication

  5. High-precision prostate cancer irradiation by clinical application of an offline patient setup verification procedure, using portal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bel, Arjan; Vos, Pieter H.; Rodrigus, Patrick T. R.; Creutzberg, Carien L.; Visser, Andries G.; Stroom, Joep C.; Lebesque, Joos V.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate in three institutions, The Netherlands Cancer Institute (Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Huis [AvL]), Dr. Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center (DDHC), and Dr, Bernard Verbeeten Institute (BVI), how much the patient setup accuracy for irradiation of prostate cancer can be improved by an offline setup verification and correction procedure, using portal imaging. Methods and Materials: The verification procedure consisted of two stages. During the first stage, setup deviations were measured during a number (N max ) of consecutive initial treatment sessions. The length of the average three dimensional (3D) setup deviation vector was compared with an action level for corrections, which shrunk with the number of setup measurements. After a correction was applied, N max measurements had to be performed again. Each institution chose different values for the initial action level (6, 9, and 10 mm) and N max (2 and 4). The choice of these parameters was based on a simulation of the procedure, using as input preestimated values of random and systematic deviations in each institution. During the second stage of the procedure, with weekly setup measurements, the AvL used a different criterion ('outlier detection') for corrective actions than the DDHC and the BVI ('sliding average'). After each correction the first stage of the procedure was restarted. The procedure was tested for 151 patients (62 in AvL, 47 in DDHC, and 42 in BVI) treated for prostate carcinoma. Treatment techniques and portal image acquisition and analysis were different in each institution. Results: The actual distributions of random and systematic deviations without corrections were estimated by eliminating the effect of the corrections. The percentage of mean (systematic) 3D deviations larger than 5 mm was 26% for the AvL and the DDHC, and 36% for the BVI. The setup accuracy after application of the procedure was considerably improved (percentage of mean 3D deviations larger than 5 mm was 1.6% in the

  6. Dose-Volume Relationships for Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Pelvic Nodal Irradiation for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorino, Claudio; Alongi, Filippo; Perna, Lucia; Broggi, Sara; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Cozzarini, Cesare; Di Muzio, Nadia; Fazio, Ferruccio; Calandrino, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To find correlation between dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the intestinal cavity (IC) and moderate-severe acute bowel toxicity in men with prostate cancer treated with pelvic nodal irradiation. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 191 patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent whole-pelvis radiotherapy with radical or adjuvant/salvage intent during January 2004 to November 2007. Complete planning/clinical data were available in 175 of these men, 91 of whom were treated with a conventional four-field technique (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fraction) and 84 of whom were treated with IMRT using conventional Linac (n = 26, 50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fraction) or Helical TomoTherapy (n = 58, 50-54 Gy, 1.8-2 Gy/fraction). The IC outside the planning target volume (PTV) was contoured and the DVH for the first 6 weeks of treatment was recovered in all patients. The correlation between a number of clinical and DVH (V10-V55) variables and toxicity was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses. The correlation between DVHs for the IC outside the PTV and DVHs for the whole IC was also assessed. Results: Twenty-two patients experienced toxicity (3/22 in the IMRT/tomotherapy group). Univariate analyses showed a significant correlation between V20-V50 and toxicity (p = 0.0002-0.001), with a higher predictive value observed for V40-V50. Previous prostatectomy (p = 0.066) and abdominal/pelvic surgery (p = 0.12) also correlated with toxicity. Multivariate analysis that included V45, abdominal/pelvic surgery, and prostatectomy showed that the most predictive parameters were V45 (p = 0.002) and abdominal/pelvic surgery (p = 0.05, HR = 2.4) Conclusions: Our avoidance IMRT approach drastically reduces the incidence of acute bowel toxicity. V40-V50 of IC and, secondarily, previous abdominal/pelvic surgery were the main predictors of acute bowel toxicity.

  7. Radiation dose delivered to the proximal penis as a predictor of the risk of erectile dysfunction after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wernicke, A. Gabriella; Valicenti, Richard; DiEva, Kelly; Houser, Christopher; Pequignot, Ed

    2004-01-01

    Purpose/objective: In this study, we evaluated in a serial manner whether radiation dose to the bulb of the penis is predictive of erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory difficulty (EJ), and overall satisfaction with sex life (quality of life) by using serial validated self-administered questionnaires. Methods and materials: Twenty-nine potent men with AJCC Stage II prostate cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy alone to a median dose 72.0 Gy (range: 66.6-79.2 Gy) were evaluated by determining the doses received by the penile bulb. The penile bulb was delineated volumetrically, and the dose-volume histogram was obtained on each patient. Results: The median follow-up time was 35 months (range, 16-43 months). We found that for D 30 , D 45 , D 60 , and D 75 (doses to a percent volume of PB: 30%, 45%, 60%, and 75%), higher than the corresponding median dose (defined as high-dose group) correlated with an increased risk of impotence (erectile dysfunction firmness score = 0) (odds ratio [OR] = 7.5, p = 0.02; OR = 7.5, p = 0.02; OR = 8.6, p = 0.008; and OR = 6.9, p = 0.015, respectively). Similarly, for EJD D 30 , D 45 , D 60 , and D 75 , doses higher than the corresponding median ones correlated with worsening ejaculatory function score (EJ = 0 or 1) (OR = 8, p = 0.013; OR = 8, p 0.013; OR = 9.2, p = 0.015; and OR = 8, p = 0.026, respectively). For quality of life, low (≤median dose) dose groups of patients improve over time, whereas high-dose groups of patients worsen. Conclusions: This study supports the existence of a penile bulb dose-volume relationship underlying the development of radiation-induced erectile dysfunction. Our data may guide the use of inverse treatment planning to maximize the probability of maintaining sexual potency after radiation therapy

  8. Improvement in toxicity in high risk prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy without daily image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sveistrup, Joen; Rosenschöld, Per Munck af; Deasy, Joseph O; Oh, Jung Hun; Pommer, Tobias; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) facilitates the delivery of a very precise radiation dose. In this study we compare the toxicity and biochemical progression-free survival between patients treated with daily image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) without daily image guidance for high risk prostate cancer (PCa). A total of 503 high risk PCa patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and endocrine treatment between 2000 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. 115 patients were treated with 3DCRT, and 388 patients were treated with IG-IMRT. 3DCRT patients were treated to 76 Gy and without daily image guidance and with 1–2 cm PTV margins. IG-IMRT patients were treated to 78 Gy based on daily image guidance of fiducial markers, and the PTV margins were 5–7 mm. Furthermore, the dose-volume constraints to both the rectum and bladder were changed with the introduction of IG-IMRT. The 2-year actuarial likelihood of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity following RT was 57.3% in 3DCRT patients and 5.8% in IG-IMRT patients (p < 0.001). For GU toxicity the numbers were 41.8% and 29.7%, respectively (p = 0.011). On multivariate analysis, 3DCRT was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity compared to IG-IMRT (p < 0.001, HR = 11.59 [CI: 6.67-20.14]). 3DCRT was also associated with an increased risk of developing GU toxicity compared to IG-IMRT. The 3-year actuarial biochemical progression-free survival probability was 86.0% for 3DCRT and 90.3% for IG-IMRT (p = 0.386). On multivariate analysis there was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival between 3DCRT and IG-IMRT. The difference in toxicity can be attributed to the combination of the IMRT technique with reduced dose to organs-at-risk, daily image guidance and margin reduction

  9. Finding dose-volume constraints to reduce late rectal toxicity following 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greco, Carlo; Mazzetta, Chiara; Cattani, Federica; Tosi, Giampiero; Castiglioni, Simona; Fodor, Andrei; Orecchia, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: The rectum is known to display a dose-volume effect following high-dose 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). The aim of the study is to search for significant dose-volume combinations with the specific treatment technique and patient set-up currently used in our institution. Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed the dose-volume histograms (DVH) of 135 patients with stage T1b-T3b prostate cancer treated consecutively with 3D-CRT between 1996 and 2000 to a total dose of 76 Gy. The median follow-up was 28 months (range 12-62). All late rectal complications were scored using RTOG criteria. Time to late toxicity was assessed using the Kaplan-Meyer method. The association between variables at baseline and ≥2 rectal toxicity was tested using χ 2 test or Fisher's exact test. A multivariate analysis using logistic regression was performed. Results: Late rectal toxicity grade ≥2 was observed in 24 of the 135 patients (17.8%). A 'grey area' of increased risk has been identified. Average DVHs of the bleeding and non-bleeding patients were generated. The area under the percent volume DVH for the rectum of the bleeding patients was significantly higher than that of patients without late rectal toxicity. On multivariate analysis the correlation between the high risk DVHs and late rectal bleeding was confirmed. Conclusions: The present analysis confirms the role of the rectal DVH as a tool to discriminate patients undergoing high-dose 3D-CRT into a low and a high risk of developing late rectal bleeding. Based on our own results and taking into account the data published in the literature, we have been able to establish new dose-volume constraints for treatment planning: if possible, the percentage of rectal volume exposed to 40, 50, 60, 72 and 76 Gy should be limited to 60, 50, 25, 15 and 5%, respectively

  10. A comparison of ventilatory prostate movement in four treatment positions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, Laura A.; Litzenberg, Dale W.; Brock, Kristy K.; Sanda, Martin; Sullivan, Molly; Sandler, Howard M.; Balter, James M.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To ensure target coverage during radiotherapy, all sources of geometric uncertainty in target position must be considered. Movement of the prostate due to breathing has not traditionally been considered in prostate radiotherapy. The purpose of this study is to report the influence of patient orientation and immobilization on prostate movement due to breathing. Methods and Materials: Four patients had radiopaque markers implanted in the prostate. Fluoroscopy was performed in four different positions: prone in alpha cradle, prone with an aquaplast mold, supine on a flat table, and supine with a false table under the buttocks. Fluoroscopic movies were videotaped and digitized. Frames were analyzed using 2D-alignment software to determine the extent of movement of the prostate markers and the skeleton for each position during normal and deep breathing. Results: During normal breathing, maximal movement of the prostate markers was seen in the prone position (cranial-caudal [CC] range: 0.9-5.1 mm; anterior-posterior [AP] range: up to 3.5 mm). In the supine position, prostate movement during normal breathing was less than 1 mm in all directions. Deep breathing resulted in CC movements of 3.8-10.5 mm in the prone position (with and without an aquaplast mold). This range was reduced to 2.0-7.3 mm in the supine position and 0.5-2.1 mm with the use of the false table top. Deep breathing resulted in AP skeletal movements of 2.7-13.1 mm in the prone position, whereas AP skeletal movements in the supine position were negligible. Conclusion: Ventilatory movement of the prostate is substantial in the prone position and is reduced in the supine position. The potential for breathing to influence prostate movement, and thus the dose delivered to the prostate and normal tissues, should be considered when positioning and planning patients for conformal irradiation

  11. The Role of Seminal Vesicle Motion in Target Margin Assessment for Online Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Jian; Wu Qiuwen; Yan Di

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: For patients with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer, the seminal vesicles (SVs) are included in the clinical target volume (CTV). The purposes of this study are to investigate interfraction motion characteristics of the SVs and determine proper margins for online computed tomography image guidance. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients, each with 16 daily helical computed tomography scans, were included in this study. A binary image mask was used for image registration to determine daily organ motion. Two online image-guided radiotherapy strategies (prostate only and prostate + SVs) were simulated in a hypofractionated scheme. Three margin designs were studied for both three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). In prostate-only guidance, Margin A was uniformly applied to the whole CTV, and Margin B was applied to the SVs with a fixed 3-mm prostate margin. In prostate plus SV guidance, Margin C was uniformly applied to the CTV. The minimum margins were sought to satisfy the criterion that minimum cumulative CTV dose be more than those of the planning target volume in the plan for greater than 95% of patients. Results: The prostate and SVs move significantly more in the anterior-posterior and superior-inferior than right-left directions. The anterior-posterior motion of the prostate and SVs correlated (R 2 = 0.7). The SVs move significantly more than the prostate. The minimum margins found were 2.5 mm for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and 4.5, 4.5, and 3.0 mm for Margins A, B, and C for IMRT, respectively. Margins for IMRT were larger, but the irradiated volume and doses to critical structures were smaller. Minimum margins of 4.5 mm to the SVs and 3 mm to the prostate are recommended for IMRT with prostate-only guidance. Conclusions: The SVs move independently from the prostate gland, and additional margins are necessary for image-guided radiotherapy

  12. Mapping of nodal disease in locally advanced prostate cancer: Rethinking the clinical target volume for pelvic nodal irradiation based on vascular rather than bony anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, Helen A.; Harisinghani, Mukesh; Zietman, Anthony L.; Wolfgang, John A.; Saksena, Mansi; Weissleder, Ralph

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Toxicity from pelvic irradiation could be reduced if fields were limited to likely areas of nodal involvement rather than using the standard 'four-field box.' We employed a novel magnetic resonance lymphangiographic technique to highlight the likely sites of occult nodal metastasis from prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eighteen prostate cancer patients with pathologically confirmed node-positive disease had a total of 69 pathologic nodes identifiable by lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced MRI and semiquantitative nodal analysis. Fourteen of these nodes were in the para-aortic region, and 55 were in the pelvis. The position of each of these malignant nodes was mapped to a common template based on its relation to skeletal or vascular anatomy. Results: Relative to skeletal anatomy, nodes covered a diffuse volume from the mid lumbar spine to the superior pubic ramus and along the sacrum and pelvic side walls. In contrast, the nodal metastases mapped much more tightly relative to the large pelvic vessels. A proposed pelvic clinical target volume to encompass the region at greatest risk of containing occult nodal metastases would include a 2.0-cm radial expansion volume around the distal common iliac and proximal external and internal iliac vessels that would encompass 94.5% of the pelvic nodes at risk as defined by our node-positive prostate cancer patient cohort. Conclusions: Nodal metastases from prostate cancer are largely localized along the major pelvic vasculature. Defining nodal radiation treatment portals based on vascular rather than bony anatomy may allow for a significant decrease in normal pelvic tissue irradiation and its associated toxicities

  13. Peripheral photon and neutron doses from prostate cancer external beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezak, Eva; Takam, Rundgham; Marcu, Loredana G

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral photon and neutron doses from external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) are associated with increased risk of carcinogenesis in the out-of-field organs; thus, dose estimations of secondary radiation are imperative. Peripheral photon and neutron doses from EBRT of prostate carcinoma were measured in Rando phantom. (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P and (7)LiF:Mg,Cu,P glass-rod thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) were inserted in slices of a Rando phantom followed by exposure to 80 Gy with 18-MV photon four-field 3D-CRT technique. The TLDs were calibrated using 6- and 18-MV X-ray beam. Neutron dose equivalents measured with CR-39 etch-track detectors were used to derive readout-to-neutron dose conversion factor for (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs. Average neutron dose equivalents per 1 Gy of isocentre dose were 3.8±0.9 mSv Gy(-1) for thyroid and 7.0±5.4 mSv Gy(-1) for colon. For photons, the average dose equivalents per 1 Gy of isocentre dose were 0.2±0.1 mSv Gy(-1) for thyroid and 8.1±9.7 mSv Gy(-1) for colon. Paired (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P and (7)LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs can be used to measure photon and neutron doses simultaneously. Organs in close proximity to target received larger doses from photons than those from neutrons whereas distally located organs received higher neutron versus photon dose. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Incidental irradiation of mediastinal and hilar lymph node stations during 3D-conformal radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kepka, Lucyna; Bujko, Krzysztof; Zolciak-Siwinska, Agnieszka; Garmol, Dariusz

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. To estimate the doses of incidental irradiation in particular lymph node stations (LNS) in different extents of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods. Doses of radiotherapy were estimated for particular LNS delineated according to the recommendations of the Univ. of Michigan in 220 patients treated using 3D-CRT with different (extended, limited and omitted) extents of ENI. Minimum doses and volumes of LNS receiving 40 Gy or more (V40) were compared for omitted vs. limited+extended ENI and limited vs. extended ENI. Results. For omission of the ENI the minimum doses and V40 for particular LNS were significantly lower than for patients treated with ENI. For the limited ENI group, the minimum doses for LNS 5, 6 lower parts of 3A and 3P (not included in the elective area) did not differ significantly from doses given to respective LNS for extended ENI group. When the V40 values for extended and limited ENI were compared, no significant differences were seen for any LNS, except for group 1/2R, 1/2L. Conclusions. Incidental irradiation of untreated LNS seems play a part in case of limited ENI, but not in cases without ENI. For subclinical disease the delineation of uninvolved LNS 5, 6, and lower parts of 3A, 3P may be not necessary, because these stations receive the substantial part of irradiation incidentally, if LNS 4R, 4L, 7, and ipsilateral hilum are included in the elective area while this is not case for stations 1 and 2

  15. Can We Spare the Pancreas and Other Abdominal Organs at Risk? A Comparison of Conformal Radiotherapy, Helical Tomotherapy and Proton Beam Therapy in Pediatric Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouglar, Emmanuel; Wagner, Antoine; Delpon, Grégory; Campion, Loïc; Meingan, Philippe; Bernier, Valérie; Demoor-Goldschmidt, Charlotte; Mahé, Marc-André; Lacornerie, Thomas; Supiot, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Late abdominal irradiation toxicity during childhood included renal damage, hepatic toxicity and secondary diabetes mellitus. We compared the potential of conformal radiotherapy (CRT), helical tomotherapy (HT) and proton beam therapy (PBT) to spare the abdominal organs at risk (pancreas, kidneys and liver- OAR) in children undergoing abdominal irradiation. We selected children with abdominal tumors who received more than 10 Gy to the abdomen. Treatment plans were calculated in order to keep the dose to abdominal OAR as low as possible while maintaining the same planned target volume (PTV) coverage. Dosimetric values were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The dose distribution of 20 clinical cases with a median age of 8 years (range 1-14) were calculated with different doses to the PTV: 5 medulloblastomas (36 Gy), 3 left-sided and 2 right-sided nephroblastomas (14.4 Gy to the tumor + 10.8 Gy boost to para-aortic lymphnodes), 1 left-sided and 4 right-sided or midline neuroblastomas (21 Gy) and 5 Hodgkin lymphomas (19.8 Gy to the para-aortic lymphnodes and spleen). HT significantly reduced the mean dose to the whole pancreas (WP), the pancreatic tail (PT) and to the ipsilateral kidney compared to CRT. PBT reduced the mean dose to the WP and PT compared to both CRT and HT especially in midline and right-sided tumors. PBT decreased the mean dose to the ispilateral kidney but also to the contralateral kidney and the liver compared to CRT. Low dose to normal tissue was similar or increased with HT whereas integral dose and the volume of normal tissue receiving at least 5 and 10 Gy were reduced with PBT compared to CRT and HT. In children undergoing abdominal irradiation therapy, proton beam therapy reduces the dose to abdominal OAR while sparing normal tissue by limiting low dose irradiation.

  16. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer in Australia and New Zealand: Report on a survey of radiotherapy centres and the proceedings of a consensus workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, K.-H.; Duchesne, G.; See, A.; Berry, M.

    2004-01-01

    There is an increasing use of 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in the radiotherapeutic management of prostate cancer. The Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group carried out a survey of Australian and New Zealand radiotherapy centres in the preparation of a consensus workshop. Of the 19 centres that were represented, there were 24 radiation oncologists, 16 radiation therapists and 12 medical physicists. The survey collected demographic information and data on the practices undertaken at those centres when delivering curative radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. There was much variation in the delivery of treatment in the areas of patient set-up, contouring of target volumes and organs of interest during computer planning, the techniques and the dose constraints used in these techniques, the use of adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy and the quality assurance processes used in monitoring effects of treatment. This variability reflects the range of data in the published literature. Emerging trends of practices were also identified. This is a first report on a multi-disciplinary approach to the development of guidelines in 3DCRT of prostate cancer. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  17. IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy with or without elective nodal irradiation in locally advanced NSCLC. A direct comparison of PET-based treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleckenstein, Jochen; Kremp, Katharina; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Ruebe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The potential of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as opposed to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is analyzed for two different concepts of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)-based target volume delineation in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC): involved-field radiotherapy (IF-RT) vs. elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Treatment planning was performed for 41 patients with LA-NSCLC, using four different planning approaches (3D-CRT-IF, 3D-CRT-ENI, IMRT-IF, IMRT-ENI). ENI included a boost irradiation after 50 Gy. For each plan, maximum dose escalation was calculated based on prespecified normal tissue constraints. The maximum prescription dose (PD), tumor control probability (TCP), conformal indices (CI), and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were analyzed. IMRT resulted in statistically significant higher prescription doses for both target volume concepts as compared with 3D-CRT (ENI: 68.4 vs. 60.9 Gy, p < 0.001; IF: 74.3 vs. 70.1 Gy, p < 0.03). With IMRT-IF, a PD of at least 66 Gy was achieved for 95 % of all plans. For IF as compared with ENI, there was a considerable theoretical increase in TCP (IMRT: 27.3 vs. 17.7 %, p < 0.00001; 3D-CRT: 20.2 vs. 9.9 %, p < 0.00001). The esophageal NTCP showed a particularly good sparing with IMRT vs. 3D-CRT (ENI: 12.3 vs. 30.9 % p < 0.0001; IF: 15.9 vs. 24.1 %; p < 0.001). The IMRT technique and IF target volume delineation allow a significant dose escalation and an increase in TCP. IMRT results in an improved sparing of OARs as compared with 3D-CRT at equivalent dose levels. (orig.) [de

  18. Dosimetric Verification and Evaluation of the 3-D Conformal Parotid Gland-Sparing Irradiation Technique for Bilateral Neck Treatment at University Hospital Centre Zagreb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacevic, N; Hrsak, H.; Bibic, J.

    2011-01-01

    3-D Conformal Parotid Gland-Sparing Irradiation Technique for Bilateral Neck (ConPas) is an alternative to Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and is in routine use at University Hospital Centre Rebro (KBC-Rebro), Zagreb. This technique includes highly asymmetric wedged conformal multi-leaf fields and demands very precise application. The aim of this paper is to present the dosimetric verification method of ConPas (and evaluation of ConPas applicability) as performed at KBC, taking into account the precision of the Treatment Planning System (TPS), possibilities of linear accelerator and patient set-up error. Results for two patients are shown in some details.ConPas is a rather sophisticated method and demands high precision in the whole radiotherapy process. Verification of ConPas using IMRT Verification Matrix Phantom shows good agreement between measured and predicted doses inside and outside PTV regions of the head and neck. Furthermore, a careful track of the positioning during the treatment shows that the overall set-up error is very small (practically negligible). When possible, one parotid gland may be partially spared, and therefore its function preserved at least to some extent. (author)

  19. Scrutiny of the ASTRO consensus definition of biochemical failure in irradiated prostate cancer patients demonstrates its usefulness and robustness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The goals of this study are: (1) to establish the robustness of the Fox Chase Cancer Center (FCCC) and the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) consensus definitions of failure by comparing biochemical estimates under various modifications of the censoring and failure time components to their respective unaltered definitions; (2) to isolate the source of variation between the two definitions of failure; and (3) to describe the hazard of failure over time for each definition. Methods: Between May 1989 and May 1997, 670 men were treated at Fox Chase Cancer Center for localized prostate cancer using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT). These men were stratified into three groups for analysis: 111 men treated with adjuvant hormones; 204 men treated with radiation therapy alone and presenting with more favorable prognosis tumor characteristics; 255 men treated with radiation therapy alone and presenting with less favorable prognosis tumor characteristics. For each group, biochemical failure was estimated and compared using the FCCC and ASTRO definitions of failure. The robustness of each definition was evaluated by comparing estimates under the definition as stated to those under various modifications of the censoring and failure components. Analyses were also performed while excluding slow-progressing patients. To isolate the source of variation between the two failure definitions, estimates were compared for patients with agreement in failure status. Estimates of biochemical failure, and thus hazard rates, were made using Kaplan-Meier methodology. Results: ASTRO biochemical failure estimates were higher than the FCCC failure estimates in the first 5 years post-treatment. Beyond 5 years, ASTRO estimates level off, while the FCCC failure estimates continued to increase. These failure patterns were similar in all patient groups; however, patients treated with adjuvant hormones had a much higher risk of failure

  20. Use of benchmark dose-volume histograms for selection of the optimal technique between three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Chunhui; Yang, Claus Chunli; Narayan, Samir; Stern, Robin L.; Perks, Julian; Goldberg, Zelanna; Ryu, Janice; Purdy, James A.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop and validate our own benchmark dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of bladder and rectum for both conventional three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and to evaluate quantitatively the benefits of using IMRT vs. 3D-CRT in treating localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: During the implementation of IMRT for prostate cancer, our policy was to plan each patient with both 3D-CRT and IMRT. This study included 31 patients with T1b to T2c localized prostate cancer, for whom we completed double-planning using both 3D-CRT and IMRT techniques. The target volumes included prostate, either with or without proximal seminal vesicles. Bladder and rectum DVH data were summarized to obtain an average DVH for each technique and then compared using two-tailed paired t test analysis. Results: For 3D-CRT our bladder doses were as follows: mean 28.8 Gy, v60 16.4%, v70 10.9%; rectal doses were: mean 39.3 Gy, v60 21.8%, v70 13.6%. IMRT plans resulted in similar mean dose values: bladder 26.4 Gy, rectum 34.9 Gy, but lower values of v70 for the bladder (7.8%) and rectum (9.3%). These benchmark DVHs have resulted in a critical evaluation of our 3D-CRT techniques over time. Conclusion: Our institution has developed benchmark DVHs for bladder and rectum based on our clinical experience with 3D-CRT and IMRT. We use these standards as well as differences in individual cases to make decisions on whether patients may benefit from IMRT treatment rather than 3D-CRT

  1. Postoperative Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in High Risk Prostate Cancer: A Dosimetric Comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digesu, Cinzia; Cilla, Savino; De Gaetano, Andrea; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Macchia, Gabriella; Ippolito, Edy; Deodato, Francesco; Panunzi, Simona; Iapalucci, Chiara; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; D'Angelo, Elisa; Padula, Gilbert D.A.; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with 3D conformal technique (3D-CRT), with respect to target coverage and irradiation of organs at risk for high dose postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) of the prostate fossa. 3D-CRT and IMRT treatment plans were compared with respect to dose to the rectum and bladder. The dosimetric comparison was carried out in 15 patients considering 2 different scenarios: (1) exclusive prostate fossa irradiation, and (2) pelvic node irradiation followed by a boost on the prostate fossa. In scenario (1), a 3D-CRT plan (box technique) and an IMRT plan were calculated and compared for each patient. In scenario (2), 3 treatment plans were calculated and compared for each patient: (a) 3D-CRT box technique for both pelvic (prophylactic nodal irradiation) and prostate fossa irradiation (3D-CRT only); (b) 3D-CRT box technique for pelvic irradiation followed by an IMRT boost to the prostatic fossa (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT); and (c) IMRT for both pelvic and prostate fossa irradiation (IMRT only). For exclusive prostate fossa irradiation, IMRT significantly reduced the dose to the rectum (lower Dmean, V50%, V75%, V90%, V100%, EUD, and NTCP) and the bladder (lower Dmean, V50%, V90%, EUD and NTCP). When prophylactic irradiation of the pelvis was also considered, plan C (IMRT only) performed better than plan B (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT) as respect to both rectum and bladder irradiation (reduction of Dmean, V50%, V75%, V90%, equivalent uniform dose [EUD], and normal tissue complication probability [NTCP]). Plan (b) (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT) performed better than plan (a) (3D-CRT only) with respect to dose to the rectum (lower Dmean, V75%, V90%, V100%, EUD, and NTCP) and the bladder (Dmean, EUD, and NTCP). Postoperative IMRT in prostate cancer significantly reduces rectum and bladder irradiation compared with 3D-CRT.

  2. Three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3d-crt) in prostate carcinoma: for whom and how?; La radiotherapie conformationnelle dans le cancer de la prostate: pour qui et comment?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bey, P.; Beckendorf, V.; Aletti, P.; Marchesi, V. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2002-05-01

    External radiotherapy is one of the modalities use o cure localized prostate carcinoma. Most of localized prostate carcinomas, specially those of the intermediate prognostic group, may benefit from escalated dose above 70 Gy at least as regard biochemical and clinical relapse free survival. 3D-CRT allows a reduction of the dose received by organs at risk and an increase of prostate dose over 70 Gy. It is on the way to become a standard. Intensity modulated radiation therapy increases dose homogeneity and reduces rectal dose. These methods necessitate rigorous procedures in reproducibility, delineation of volumes, dosimetry, daily treatment. They need also technological and human means. It is clear that localized prostate cancer is a good example for evaluation of these new radiotherapy modalities. (author)

  3. Partial-Body Irradiation in Patients with Prostate Cancer Treated with IMRT Has Little Effect on the Composition of Serum Proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrowska, Monika; Jelonek, Karol; Polanska, Joanna; Wojakowska, Anna; Marczak, Lukasz; Chawinska, Ewa; Chmura, Aleksanda; Majewski, Wojciech; Miszczyk, Leszek; Widlak, Piotr

    2015-06-30

    Partial body irradiation during cancer radiotherapy (RT) induces a response of irradiated tissues that could be observed at the level of serum proteome. Here we aimed to characterize the response to RT in group of patients treated because of prostate cancer. Five consecutive blood samples were collected before, during, and after the end of RT in a group of 126 patients who received definitive treatment with a maximum dose of 76 Gy. Serum peptidome, which was profiled in the 2000-16,000 Da range using MALDI-MS. Serum proteins were identified and quantified using the shotgun LC-MS/MS approach. The majority of changes in serum peptidome were detected between pre-treatment samples and samples collected after 3-4 weeks of RT (~25% of registered peptides changed their abundances significantly), yet the intensity of observed changes was not correlated significantly with the degree of acute radiation toxicity or the volume of irradiated tissues. Furthermore, there were a few serum proteins identified, the abundances of which were different in pre-RT and post-RT samples, including immunity and inflammation-related factors. Observed effects were apparently weaker than in comparable groups of head and neck cancer patients in spite of similar radiation doses and volumes of irradiated tissues in both groups. We concluded that changes observed at the level of serum proteome were low for this cohort of prostate cancer patients, although the specific components involved are associated with immunity and inflammation, and reflect the characteristic acute response of the human body to radiation.

  4. Partial-Body Irradiation in Patients with Prostate Cancer Treated with IMRT Has Little Effect on the Composition of Serum Proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Pietrowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Partial body irradiation during cancer radiotherapy (RT induces a response of irradiated tissues that could be observed at the level of serum proteome. Here we aimed to characterize the response to RT in group of patients treated because of prostate cancer. Five consecutive blood samples were collected before, during, and after the end of RT in a group of 126 patients who received definitive treatment with a maximum dose of 76 Gy. Serum peptidome, which was profiled in the 2000–16,000 Da range using MALDI-MS. Serum proteins were identified and quantified using the shotgun LC-MS/MS approach. The majority of changes in serum peptidome were detected between pre-treatment samples and samples collected after 3–4 weeks of RT (~25% of registered peptides changed their abundances significantly, yet the intensity of observed changes was not correlated significantly with the degree of acute radiation toxicity or the volume of irradiated tissues. Furthermore, there were a few serum proteins identified, the abundances of which were different in pre-RT and post-RT samples, including immunity and inflammation-related factors. Observed effects were apparently weaker than in comparable groups of head and neck cancer patients in spite of similar radiation doses and volumes of irradiated tissues in both groups. We concluded that changes observed at the level of serum proteome were low for this cohort of prostate cancer patients, although the specific components involved are associated with immunity and inflammation, and reflect the characteristic acute response of the human body to radiation.

  5. Acute Toxicity After Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Compared to 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortel, Ruud C.; Incrocci, Luca; Pos, Floris J.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Witte, Marnix G.; van der Heide, Uulke A.; van Herk, Marcel; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows significant dose reductions to organs at risk in prostate cancer patients. However, clinical data identifying the benefits of IG-IMRT in daily practice are scarce. The purpose of this study was to compare dose distributions

  6. Three-dimensional intrafractional internal target motions in accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Kimiko; Yoshimura, Michio; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Inoue, Minoru; Sasaki, Makoto; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Yano, Shinsuke; Nakata, Manabu; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2017-07-01

    We evaluated three-dimensional intrafractional target motion, divided into respiratory-induced motion and baseline drift, in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Paired fluoroscopic images were acquired simultaneously using orthogonal kV X-ray imaging systems at pre- and post-treatment for 23 patients who underwent APBI with external beam radiotherapy. The internal target motion was calculated from the surgical clips placed around the tumour cavity. The peak-to-peak respiratory-induced motions ranged from 0.6 to 1.5mm in all directions. A systematic baseline drift of 1.5mm towards the posterior direction and a random baseline drift of 0.3mm in the lateral-medial and cranial-caudal directions were observed. The baseline for an outer tumour cavity drifted towards the lateral and posterior directions, and that for an upper tumour cavity drifted towards the cranial direction. Moderate correlations were observed between the posterior baseline drift and the patients' physical characteristics. The posterior margin for intrafractional uncertainties was larger than 5mm in patients with greater fat thickness due to the baseline drift. The magnitude of the intrafractional motion was not uniform according to the direction, patients' physical characteristics, or tumour cavity location due to the baseline drift. Therefore, the intrafractional systematic movement should be properly managed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Conformity index: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feuvret, Loic; Noel, Georges; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Bey, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    We present a critical analysis of the conformity indices described in the literature and an evaluation of their field of application. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, with or without intensity modulation, is based on medical imaging techniques, three-dimensional dosimetry software, compression accessories, and verification procedures. It consists of delineating target volumes and critical healthy tissues to select the best combination of beams. This approach allows better adaptation of the isodose to the tumor volume, while limiting irradiation of healthy tissues. Tools must be developed to evaluate the quality of proposed treatment plans. Dosimetry software provides the dose distribution in each CT section and dose-volume histograms without really indicating the degree of conformity. The conformity index is a complementary tool that attributes a score to a treatment plan or that can compare several treatment plans for the same patient. The future of conformal index in everyday practice therefore remains unclear

  8. The antioxidant, MnTE-2-PyP, prevents side-effects incurred by prostate cancer irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca E Oberley-Deegan

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer, with an estimated 240,000 new cases reported annually in the United States. Due to early detection and advances in therapies, more than 90% of patients will survive 10 years post diagnosis and treatment. Radiation is a treatment option often used to treat localized disease; however, while radiation is very effective at killing tumor cells, normal tissues are damaged as well. Potential side-effects due to prostate cancer-related radiation therapy include bowel inflammation, erectile dysfunction, urethral stricture, rectal bleeding and incontinence. Currently, radiation therapy for prostate cancer does not include the administration of therapeutic agents to reduce these side effects and protect normal tissues from radiation-induced damage. In the current study, we show that the small molecular weight antioxidant, MnTE-2-PyP, protects normal tissues from radiation-induced damage in the lower abdomen in rats. Specifically, MnTE-2-PyP protected skin, prostate, and testes from radiation-induced damage. MnTE-2-PyP also protected from erectile dysfunction, a persistent problem regardless of the type of radiation techniques used because the penile neurovascular bundles lay in the peripheral zones of the prostate, where most prostate cancers reside. Based on previous studies showing that MnTE-2-PyP, in combination with radiation, further reduces subcutaneous tumor growth, we believe that MnTE-2-PyP represents an excellent radioprotectant in combination radiotherapy for cancer in general and specifically for prostate cancer.

  9. Five-Year Outcomes, Cosmesis, and Toxicity With 3-Dimensional Conformal External Beam Radiation Therapy to Deliver Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez, Núria; Sanz, Xavier; Dengra, Josefa; Foro, Palmira; Membrive, Ismael; Reig, Anna; Quera, Jaume; Fernández-Velilla, Enric; Pera, Óscar; Lio, Jackson; Lozano, Joan; Algara, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the interim results from a study comparing the efficacy, toxicity, and cosmesis of breast-conserving treatment with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) or whole breast irradiation (WBI) using 3-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: 102 patients with early-stage breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving surgery were randomized to receive either WBI (n=51) or APBI (n=51). In the WBI arm, 48 Gy was delivered to the whole breast in daily fractions of 2 Gy, with or without additional 10 Gy to the tumor bed. In the APBI arm, patients received 37.5 Gy in 3.75 Gy per fraction delivered twice daily. Toxicity results were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Common Toxicity Criteria. Skin elasticity was measured using a dedicated device (Multi-Skin-Test-Center MC-750-B2, CKelectronic-GmbH). Cosmetic results were assessed by the physician and the patients as good/excellent, regular, or poor. Results: The median follow-up time was 5 years. No local recurrences were observed. No significant differences in survival rates were found. APBI reduced acute side effects and radiation doses to healthy tissues compared with WBI (P 75% of patients in the APBI arm had excellent or good cosmesis, and these outcomes appear to be stable over time. The percentage of patients with excellent/good cosmetic results was similar in both groups. Conclusions: APBI delivered by 3D-CRT to the tumor bed for a selected group of early-stage breast cancer patients produces 5-year results similar to those achieved with conventional WBI

  10. A comparative dosimetric study of conventional, conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy in postoperative pelvic irradiation of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Bin; An Jusheng; Wu Lingying; Huang Manni; Gao Juzhen; Xu Yingjie; Dai Jianrong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate target-volume coverage and organ at risk (OAR) protection achieved with conventional radiotherapy (CRT), three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy(IMRT) through dosimetric comparison in patients with cervical cancer after hysterectomy. Methods: The planning CT scans of 10 patients treated with pelvic radiation after hysterectomy for cervical cancer were used to generate CRT, 3DCRT and IMRT plans for this study. Clinical target volume(CTV) was contoured on the individual axial CT slices of every patient. The CTV was then uniformly expanded by 1.0 cm to create the planning target volume (PTV). The small bowel, rectum, bladder, bone marrow, ovaries, and femoral heads were outlined for the organ at risk (OAR) evaluation. The CRT, 3DCRT and IMRT plans were generated using commercial planning software. CRT plan was prescribed to deliver 45 Gy to the reference point, while IMRT and 3DCRT plans were 45 Gy to 95% of the PTV. Isodose line and dose volume histograms(DVH) were used to evaluate the dose distribution in CTV and OAR. Results: For 10 patients, the average volume of CTV receiving the prescribed dose of CRT was significantly lower than 3DCRT(Q=8.27, P<0.01) and IMRT(Q=8.37, P<0.01), respectively. Comparing with the CRT plan, the 3DCRT and IMRT plans notably reduced the volume of bowel at 30 and 45 Gy levels. The IMRT plan significantly spared rectum and bladder at 30 and 45 Gy levels comparing with the CRT (P<0.01) and 3DCRT(P<0.05) plans, while the 3DCRT plan significantly spared rectum and bladder at 45 Gy level comparing with the CRT(P<0.01) plans. For 4 patients with ovarian transposition, the average doses of ovary over 3 Gy were 2 patients with the 3 DCRT and IMRT plans, and 2 with all three plans. Conclusions: IMRT and 3DCRT are superior to CRT in improving dose coverage of target volume and sparing of OAR, while IMRT being the best. The superiority of IMRT and 3DCRT is obvious in sparing

  11. The early toxicity of escalated versus standard dose conformal radiotherapy with neo-adjuvant androgen suppression for patients with localised prostate cancer: Results from the MRC RT01 trial (ISRCTN47772397)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, David P.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Langley, Ruth E.; Graham, John D.; Huddart, Robert A.; Syndikus, Isabel; Matthews, John H.L.; Scrase, Christopher D.; Jose, Chakiath C.; Logue, John; Stephens, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Five-year disease-free survival rates for localised prostate cancer following standard doses of conventional radical external beam radiotherapy are around 80%. Conformal radiotherapy (CFRT) raises the possibility that radiotherapy doses can be increased and long-term efficacy outcomes improved, with safety an important consideration. Methods: MRC RT01 is a randomised controlled trial of 862 men with localised prostate cancer comparing Standard CFRT (64 Gy/32 f) versus Escalated CFRT (74 Gy/37 f), both administered with neo-adjuvant androgen suppression. Early toxicity was measured using physician-reported instruments (RTOG, LENT/SOM, Royal Marsden Scales) and patient-reported questionnaires (MOS SF-36, UCLA Prostate Cancer Index, FACT-P). Results: Overall early radiotherapy toxicity was similar, apart from increased bladder, bowel and sexual toxicity, in the Escalated Group during a short immediate post-radiotherapy period. Toxicity in both groups had abated by week 12. Using RTOG Acute Toxicity scores, cumulative Grade ≥2 bladder and bowel toxicity was 38% and 30% for Standard Group and 39% and 33% in Escalated Group, respectively. Urinary frequency (Royal Marsden Scale) improved in both groups from pre-androgen suppression to 6 months post-radiotherapy (p < 0.001), but bowel and sexual functioning deteriorated. This pattern was supported by patient-completed assessments. Six months after starting radiotherapy the incidence of RTOG Grade ≥2 side-effects was low (<1%); but there were six reports of rectal ulceration (6 Escalated Group), six haematuria (5 Escalated Group) and eight urethral stricture (6 Escalated Group). Conclusions: The two CFRT schedules with neo-adjuvant androgen suppression have broadly similar early toxicity profiles except for the immediate post-RT period. At 6 months and compared to before hormone therapy, bladder symptoms improved, whereas bowel and sexual symptoms worsened. These assessments of early treatment safety will be

  12. Three-Year Outcomes of a Canadian Multicenter Study of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Conformal Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrang, Tanya S., E-mail: tberrang@bccancer.bc.ca [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Olivotto, Ivo [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Kim, Do-Hoon [Juravinski Cancer Centre, Ontario (Canada); McMaster University, Ontario (Canada); Nichol, Alan [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Centre, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Cho, B.C. John [Princess Margaret Hospital, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mohamed, Islam G. [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Southern Interior, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Parhar, Tarnjit [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Centre, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Wright, J.R. [Juravinski Cancer Centre, Ontario (Canada); McMaster University, Ontario (Canada); Truong, Pauline [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Centre, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Sussman, Jonathan [Juravinski Cancer Centre, Ontario (Canada); McMaster University, Ontario (Canada); Wai, Elaine [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Whelan, Tim [Juravinski Cancer Centre, Ontario (Canada); McMaster University, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To report 3-year toxicity, cosmesis, and efficacy of a multicenter study of external beam, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 and August 2006, 127 women aged {>=}40 years with ductal carcinoma in situ or node-negative invasive breast cancer {<=}3 cm in diameter, treated with breast-conserving surgery achieving negative margins, were accrued to a prospective study involving five Canadian cancer centers. Women meeting predefined dose constraints were treated with APBI using 3 to 5 photon beams, delivering 35 to 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions, twice a day, over 1 week. Patients were assessed for treatment-related toxicities, cosmesis, and efficacy before APBI and at specified time points for as long as 3 years after APBI. Results: 104 women had planning computed tomography scans showing visible seromas, met dosimetric constraints, and were treated with APBI to doses of 35 Gy (n = 9), 36 Gy (n = 33), or 38.5 Gy (n = 62). Eighty-seven patients were evaluated with minimum 3-year follow-up after APBI. Radiation dermatitis, breast edema, breast induration, and fatigue decreased from baseline levels or stabilized by the 3-year follow-up. Hypopigmentation, hyperpigmentation, breast pain, and telangiectasia slightly increased from baseline levels. Most toxicities at 3 years were Grade 1. Only 1 patient had a Grade 3 toxicity with telangiectasia in a skin fold inside the 95% isodose. Cosmesis was good to excellent in 86% (89/104) of women at baseline and 82% (70/85) at 3 years. The 3-year disease-free survival was 97%, with only one local recurrence that occurred in a different quadrant away from the treated site and two distant recurrences. Conclusions: At 3 years, toxicity and cosmesis were acceptable, and local control and disease-free survival were excellent, supporting continued accrual to randomized APBI trials.

  13. The correlation between the astro consensus panel definition of biochemical failure and clinical outcome for patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, Eric M.; Vicini, Frank A.; Ziaja, Ellen L.; Dmuchowski, Carl F.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Matter, Richard C.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The ASTRO Consensus Panel on PSA After Radiation Therapy recently recommended a definition of biochemical failure (BF) following treatment of prostate cancer with radiation therapy. We reviewed our institution's experience treating patients with external beam irradiation (RT) to determine if the Consensus Panel definition correlates with clinical distant metastases free survival (DMFS), disease free survival (DFS), cause specific survival (CSS), and local control (LC) rates for a large group of patients from the PSA era. Methods And Materials: Between 1/1/87 and 12/31/92, 653 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received external beam irradiation (RT) using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital. Of these patients, 568 had a minimum follow-up of 2 years and constitute the study population. The median pre-treatment PSA and Gleason score was 11 ng/ml and 6, respectively. The median dose to the prostate using megavoltage RT was 66.6 Gy (range: 60-70.4 Gy) using a four field or arc technique. No patient received hormonal therapy either prior to, during, or after radiotherapy unless local or distant failure was documented. Pre-treatment and post-treatment serum PSA levels were recorded. Biochemical failure was defined as three consecutive increases in post-treatment PSA after achieving a nadir. Biochemical failure was recorded as the time midway between the nadir and first increase in PSA. Five year actuarial rates of DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were calculated for patients who were biochemically controlled (BC) versus those who failed biochemically. Results: Median follow-up was 56 months (range: 24-118 months). The overall 5 year actuarial rates of DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were significantly better in patients who were biochemically controlled versus those who were not (p< 0.001). The median time to DM within the BF group was 21 months (range: 2-112 months). When stratifying by pre-treatment PSA, Gleason score, and T stage, these

  14. Prostate Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know the exact cause of your prostate problem. Prostatitis The cause of prostatitis depends on whether you ... prostate problem in men older than age 50. Prostatitis If you have a UTI, you may be ...

  15. A Dosimetric Comparison of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Techniques: Multicatheter Interstitial Brachytherapy, Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, and Supine Versus Prone Helical Tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Rakesh R.; Becker, Stewart J.; Das, Rupak K.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetrically four different techniques of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in the same patient. Methods and Materials: Thirteen post-lumpectomy interstitial brachytherapy (IB) patients underwent imaging with preimplant computed tomography (CT) in the prone and supine position. These CT scans were then used to generate three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and prone and supine helical tomotherapy (PT and ST, respectively) APBI plans and compared with the treated IB plans. Dose-volume histogram analysis and the mean dose (NTD mean ) values were compared. Results: Planning target volume coverage was excellent for all methods. Statistical significance was considered to be a p value mean dose of 1.3 Gy 3 and 1.2 Gy 3 , respectively. Both of these methods were statistically significantly lower than the supine external beam techniques. Overall, all four methods yielded similar low doses to the heart. Conclusions: The use of IB and PT resulted in greater normal tissue sparing (especially ipsilateral breast and lung) than the use of supine external beam techniques of 3D-CRT or ST. However, the choice of APBI technique must be tailored to the patient's anatomy, lumpectomy cavity location, and overall treatment goals

  16. Dose- and time-dependent gene expression alterations in prostate and colon cancer cells after in vitro exposure to carbon ion and X-irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetens, Annelies; Moreels, Marjan; Quintens, Roel; Soors, Els; Buset, Jasmine; Chiriotti, Sabina; Tabury, Kevin; Gregoire, Vincent; Baatout, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Hadrontherapy is an advanced form of radiotherapy that uses beams of charged particles (such as protons and carbon ions). Compared with conventional radiotherapy, the main advantages of carbon ion therapy are the precise absorbed dose localization, along with an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE). This high ballistic accuracy of particle beams deposits the maximal dose to the tumor, while damage to the surrounding healthy tissue is limited. Currently, hadrontherapy is being used for the treatment of specific types of cancer. Previous in vitro studies have shown that, under certain circumstances, exposure to charged particles may inhibit cell motility and migration. In the present study, we investigated the expression of four motility-related genes in prostate (PC3) and colon (Caco-2) cancer cell lines after exposure to different radiation types. Cells were irradiated with various absorbed doses (0, 0.5 and 2 Gy) of accelerated 13C-ions at the GANIL facility (Caen, France) or with X-rays. Clonogenic assays were performed to determine the RBE. RT-qPCR analysis showed dose- and time-dependent changes in the expression of CCDC88A, FN1, MYH9 and ROCK1 in both cell lines. However, whereas in PC3 cells the response to carbon ion irradiation was enhanced compared with X-irradiation, the effect was the opposite in Caco-2 cells, indicating cell-type–specific responses to the different radiation types. PMID:25190155

  17. Conformal Nets II: Conformal Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Arthur; Douglas, Christopher L.; Henriques, André

    2017-08-01

    Conformal nets provide a mathematical formalism for conformal field theory. Associated to a conformal net with finite index, we give a construction of the `bundle of conformal blocks', a representation of the mapping class groupoid of closed topological surfaces into the category of finite-dimensional projective Hilbert spaces. We also construct infinite-dimensional spaces of conformal blocks for topological surfaces with smooth boundary. We prove that the conformal blocks satisfy a factorization formula for gluing surfaces along circles, and an analogous formula for gluing surfaces along intervals. We use this interval factorization property to give a new proof of the modularity of the category of representations of a conformal net.

  18. Radiotherapy efficiency for patients of Polynesian origin suffering from localized prostate cancers: a comparative study; Efficacite de la radiotherapie chez les patients d'origine polynesienne atteints de cancers de la prostate localises: etude comparative mono-centrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, A.; Chargari, C.; Mozer, P.; Feuvret, L.; Lang, P.; Assouline, A.; Mazeron, J.J.; Simon, J.M. [CHU Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France); Chargari, C. [Hopital d' instruction des armees du Val-de-Grace, 75 - Paris (France); Desrez, G.; Leroux, S. [Centre hospitalier Mamao, Papeete, Polynesie francaise (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report a comparative study of survival probabilities without biochemical relapse for patients of Polynesian (46 patients) or European (106 patients) origin treated in the same establishment by exclusive conformational irradiation for a localized prostate cancer. Polynesian patients were younger with a greater proportion of low risk cancers. Side effects rates, survival probabilities without biochemical relapse by five years, prognostic with respect to cancer stage are compared with respect to the ethnic origin. Short communication

  19. Carcinoma of the prostate treated by pelvic node dissection, iodine-125 seed implant and external irradiation; a study of rectal complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abadir, R.; Ross, G. Jr.; Weinstein, S.H. (Missouri Univ., Columbia (USA). Hospital and Clinics)

    1984-09-01

    The University of Missouri-Columbia protocol for localised cancer of the prostate calls for pelvic node dissection, 10 000 cGy at the periphery of the prostate from /sup 125/I and 4000 cGy in 20 fractions to the whole pelvis using supervoltage X-ray therapy. Rectal complications were studied in 104 patients; acute and chronic reactions were defined. During external irradiation 54% did not develop diarrhoea, 43% had mild diarrhoea and 3% had severe diarrhoea. In the chronic stage 77% did not have diarrhoea, 12% had delayed, non-distressing rectal bleeding which did not need specific treatment or needed only simple treatment, 7% had prolonged distressing proctitis and 4% had rectal ulceration or recto-urethral fistula necessitating colostomy. Each of the four patients who had colostomy had an additional aetiological factor (arterial disease, pelvic inflammation, additional radiation, pelvic malignancy or second operation). None of the patients entered in the combined brachytherapy and teletherapy programme, and in whom 0.5 cm space was maintained between the closest seed and the rectal mucosa, developed prolonged proctitis.

  20. Chemical disease-free survival in localized carcinoma of prostate treated with external beam irradiation: comparison of American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Consensus or 1 ng/mL as endpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Carlos A.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Lockett, Mary Ann

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To compare postirradiation biochemical disease-free survival using the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus or elevation of postirradiation prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level beyond 1 ng/mL as an endpoint and correlate chemical failure with subsequent appearance of clinically detected local recurrence or distant metastasis. Methods and Materials: Records of 466 patients with histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated with irradiation alone between January 1987 and December 1995 were analyzed; 339 patients were treated with bilateral 120 deg. arc rotation and, starting in 1992, 117 with three-dimensional conformal irradiation. Doses were 68-77 Gy in 1.8 to 2 Gy daily fractions. Minimum follow-up is 4 years (mean, 5.5 years; maximum, 9.6 years). A chemical failure was recorded using the ASTRO Consensus or when postirradiation PSA level exceeded 1 ng/mL at any time. Clinical failures were determined by rectal examination, radiographic studies, and, when clinically indicated, biopsy. Results: Six-year chemical disease-free survival rates using the ASTRO Consensus according to pretreatment PSA level for T1 tumors were: ≤4 ng/mL, 100%; 4.1-20 ng/mL, 80%; and >20 ng/mL, 50%. For T2 tumors the rates were: ≤4 ng/mL, 91%; 4.1-10 ng/mL, 81%; 10.1-20 ng/mL, 55%; 20.1-40 ng/mL, 63%; and >40 ng/mL, 46%. When postirradiation PSA levels higher than 1 ng/mL were used, the corresponding 6-year chemical disease-free survival rates for T1 tumors were 92% for pretreatment PSA levels of ≤4 ng/mL, 58-60% for levels of 4.1-20 ng/mL, and 30% for levels >20 ng/mL. For T2 tumors, the 6-year chemical disease-free survival rates were 78% in patients with pretreatment PSA levels of 4-10 ng/mL, 45% for 10.1-40 ng/mL, and 25% for >40 ng/mL. Of 167 patients with T1 tumors, 30 (18%) developed a chemical failure, 97% within 5 years from completion of radiation therapy; no patient has developed a local recurrence or distant

  1. Prognostic role of serum prostatic acid phosphatase for 103Pd-based radiation for prostatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, Michael; Wallner, Kent; True, Lawrence; Sorace, Richard; Koval, John; Cash, Jennifer; Acosta, Rudolph; Biswas, Mohendra; Binder, Michael; Sullivan, Brent; Lastarria, Emilio; Kirwan, Novelle; Stein, Douglas

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the prognostic role of serum enzymatic prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) in patients treated with palladium ( 103 Pd) and supplemental external beam irradiation (EBRT) for clinically localized, high-risk prostate carcinoma. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-four consecutive patients with Stage T2a-T3 prostatic carcinoma were treated from 1992 through 1995. Each patient had at least one of the following risk factors for extracapsular disease extension: Stage T2b or greater (100 patients), Gleason score 7-10 (40 patients), pretreatment prostate specific antigen (PSA) > 15 ng/ml (32 patients), or elevated serum PAP (25 patients). Patients received 41 Gy conformal EBRT to a limited pelvic field, followed 4 weeks later by a 103 Pd boost (prescription dose 80 Gy). Biochemical failure was defined as a PSA greater than 1 ng/ml (normal < 4 ng/ml). Results: The overall, actuarial freedom from biochemical failure at 4 years after treatment was 79%. In Cox-proportional hazard multivariate analysis, the strongest predictor of failure was elevated pretreatment acid phosphatase (p = 0.02), followed by Gleason score (p = 0.1), and PSA (p = 0.14). Conclusion: PAP was the strongest predictor of long-term biochemical failure. It may be a more accurate indicator of micrometastatic disease than PSA, and as such, we suggest that it be reconsidered for general use in radiation-treated patients

  2. The impact of gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity on health related quality of life among irradiated prostate cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaake, Wouter; Wiegman, Erwin M.; de Groot, Martijn; van der Laan, Hans Paul; van der Schans, Cees; van den Bergh, Alfons C.M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the impact of late radiation-induced toxicity on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among patients with prostate cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study sample was composed of 227 patients, treated with external beam radiotherapy. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse

  3. The impact of gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity on health related quality of life among irradiated prostate cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaake, Wouter; Wiegman, Erwin M; de Groot, Martijn; van der Laan, Hans Paul; van der Schans, Cees P.; van den Bergh, Alfons C M; Langendijk, Johannes A

    PURPOSE: To determine the impact of late radiation-induced toxicity on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among patients with prostate cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study sample was composed of 227 patients, treated with external beam radiotherapy. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse

  4. IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy with or without elective nodal irradiation in locally advanced NSCLC. A direct comparison of PET-based treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleckenstein, Jochen; Kremp, Katharina; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Ruebe, Christian [Saarland University Medical School, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The potential of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as opposed to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is analyzed for two different concepts of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)-based target volume delineation in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC): involved-field radiotherapy (IF-RT) vs. elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Treatment planning was performed for 41 patients with LA-NSCLC, using four different planning approaches (3D-CRT-IF, 3D-CRT-ENI, IMRT-IF, IMRT-ENI). ENI included a boost irradiation after 50 Gy. For each plan, maximum dose escalation was calculated based on prespecified normal tissue constraints. The maximum prescription dose (PD), tumor control probability (TCP), conformal indices (CI), and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were analyzed. IMRT resulted in statistically significant higher prescription doses for both target volume concepts as compared with 3D-CRT (ENI: 68.4 vs. 60.9 Gy, p < 0.001; IF: 74.3 vs. 70.1 Gy, p < 0.03). With IMRT-IF, a PD of at least 66 Gy was achieved for 95 % of all plans. For IF as compared with ENI, there was a considerable theoretical increase in TCP (IMRT: 27.3 vs. 17.7 %, p < 0.00001; 3D-CRT: 20.2 vs. 9.9 %, p < 0.00001). The esophageal NTCP showed a particularly good sparing with IMRT vs. 3D-CRT (ENI: 12.3 vs. 30.9 % p < 0.0001; IF: 15.9 vs. 24.1 %; p < 0.001). The IMRT technique and IF target volume delineation allow a significant dose escalation and an increase in TCP. IMRT results in an improved sparing of OARs as compared with 3D-CRT at equivalent dose levels. (orig.) [German] Das Potenzial der intensitaetsmodulierten Strahlentherapie (IMRT) soll im Rahmen der FDG-PET basierten Bestrahlungsplanung des lokal fortgeschrittenen nichtkleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinoms (LA-NSCLC) fuer 2 Zielvolumenansaetze (Involved-Field-Bestrahlung, IF) sowie elektive Nodalbestrahlung (ENI) geprueft und mit der 3-D-konformalen Strahlentherapie (3-D

  5. Three-year outcomes of a once daily fractionation scheme for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Sharad; Daroui, Parima; Khan, Atif J; Kearney, Thomas; Kirstein, Laurie; Haffty, Bruce G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report 3-year outcomes of toxicity, cosmesis, and local control using a once daily fractionation scheme (49.95 Gy in 3.33 Gy once daily fractions) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between July 2008 and August 2010, women aged ≥40 years with ductal carcinoma in situ or node-negative invasive breast cancer ≤3 cm in diameter, treated with breast-conserving surgery achieving negative margins, were accrued to a prospective study. Women were treated with APBI using 3–5 photon beams, delivering 49.95 Gy over 15 once daily fractions over 3 weeks. Patients were assessed for toxicities, cosmesis, and local control rates before APBI and at specified time points. Thirty-four patients (mean age 60 years) with Tis 0 (n = 9) and T1N0 (n = 25) breast cancer were treated and followed up for an average of 39 months. Only 3% (1/34) patients experienced a grade 3 subcutaneous fibrosis and breast edema and 97% of the patients had good/excellent cosmetic outcome at 3 years. The 3-year rate of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) was 0% while the rate of contralateral breast events was 6%. The 3-year disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) was 94%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Our novel accelerated partial breast fractionation scheme of 15 once daily fractions of 3.33 Gy (49.95 Gy total) is a remarkably well-tolerated regimen of 3D-CRT-based APBI. A larger cohort of patients is needed to further ascertain the toxicity of this accelerated partial breast regimen

  6. Long-term Cosmetic Outcomes and Toxicities of Proton Beam Therapy Compared With Photon-Based 3-Dimensional Conformal Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation: A Phase 1 Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galland-Girodet, Sigolène; Pashtan, Itai; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Hirsch, Ariel E.; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Specht, Michelle; Gadd, Michele; Smith, Barbara L.; Powell, Simon N.; Recht, Abram; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present long-term outcomes of a prospective feasibility trial using either protons or 3-dimensional conformal photon-based (accelerated partial-breast irradiation [APBI]) techniques. Methods and Materials: From October 2003 to April 2006, 98 evaluable patients with stage I breast cancer were treated with APBI (32 Gy in 8 fractions given twice daily) on a prospective clinical trial: 19 with proton beam therapy (PBT) and 79 with photons or mixed photons/electrons. Median follow-up was 82.5 months (range, 2-104 months). Toxicity and patient satisfaction evaluations were performed at each visit. Results: At 7 years, the physician rating of overall cosmesis was good or excellent for 62% of PBT patients, compared with 94% for photon patients (P=.03). Skin toxicities were more common for the PBT group: telangiectasia, 69% and 16% (P=.0013); pigmentation changes, 54% and 22% (P=.02); and other late skin toxicities, 62% and 18% (P=.029) for PBT and photons, respectively. There were no significant differences between the groups in the incidences of breast pain, edema, fibrosis, fat necrosis, skin desquamation, and rib pain or fracture. Patient-reported cosmetic outcomes at 7 years were good or excellent for 92% and 96% of PBT and photon patients, respectively (P=.95). Overall patient satisfaction was 93% for the entire cohort. The 7-year local failure rate for all patients was 6%, with 3 local recurrences in the PBT group (7-year rate, 11%) and 2 in photon-treated patients (4%) (P=.22). Conclusions: Local failure rates of 3-dimensional APBI and PBT were similar in this study. However, PBT, as delivered in this study, led to higher rates of long-term telangiectasia, skin color changes, and skin toxicities. We recommend the use of multiple fields and treatment of all fields per treatment session or the use of scanning techniques to minimize skin toxicity

  7. Long-term Cosmetic Outcomes and Toxicities of Proton Beam Therapy Compared With Photon-Based 3-Dimensional Conformal Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation: A Phase 1 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galland-Girodet, Sigolène; Pashtan, Itai; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Ancukiewicz, Marek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hirsch, Ariel E.; Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle; Gadd, Michele; Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Recht, Abram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To present long-term outcomes of a prospective feasibility trial using either protons or 3-dimensional conformal photon-based (accelerated partial-breast irradiation [APBI]) techniques. Methods and Materials: From October 2003 to April 2006, 98 evaluable patients with stage I breast cancer were treated with APBI (32 Gy in 8 fractions given twice daily) on a prospective clinical trial: 19 with proton beam therapy (PBT) and 79 with photons or mixed photons/electrons. Median follow-up was 82.5 months (range, 2-104 months). Toxicity and patient satisfaction evaluations were performed at each visit. Results: At 7 years, the physician rating of overall cosmesis was good or excellent for 62% of PBT patients, compared with 94% for photon patients (P=.03). Skin toxicities were more common for the PBT group: telangiectasia, 69% and 16% (P=.0013); pigmentation changes, 54% and 22% (P=.02); and other late skin toxicities, 62% and 18% (P=.029) for PBT and photons, respectively. There were no significant differences between the groups in the incidences of breast pain, edema, fibrosis, fat necrosis, skin desquamation, and rib pain or fracture. Patient-reported cosmetic outcomes at 7 years were good or excellent for 92% and 96% of PBT and photon patients, respectively (P=.95). Overall patient satisfaction was 93% for the entire cohort. The 7-year local failure rate for all patients was 6%, with 3 local recurrences in the PBT group (7-year rate, 11%) and 2 in photon-treated patients (4%) (P=.22). Conclusions: Local failure rates of 3-dimensional APBI and PBT were similar in this study. However, PBT, as delivered in this study, led to higher rates of long-term telangiectasia, skin color changes, and skin toxicities. We recommend the use of multiple fields and treatment of all fields per treatment session or the use of scanning techniques to minimize skin toxicity.

  8. Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Combined With Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Locally Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma: An Irradiation Dose Escalation Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Zhigang; Zhao Jiandong; Gu Ke; Chen Zhen; Lin Junhua; Xu Zhiyong; Hu Weigang; Zhou Zhenhua; Liu Luming; Jiang Guoliang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT)/intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) combined with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for locally advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients were assigned to two subgroups based on tumor diameter: Group 1 had tumors <10 cm; Group II had tumors ≥10 cm. Escalation was achieved by increments of 4.0 Gy for each cohort in both groups. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as a grade of ≥3 acute liver or gastrointestinal toxicity or any grade 5 acute toxicity in other organs at risk or radiation-induced liver disease. The dose escalation would be terminated when ≥2 of 8 patients in a cohort experienced DLT. Results: From April 2005 to May 2008, 40 patients were enrolled. In Group I, 11 patients had grade ≤2 acute treatment-related toxicities, and no patient experienced DLT; and in Group II, 10 patients had grade ≤2 acute toxicity, and 1 patient in the group receiving 52 Gy developed radiation-induced liver disease. MTD was 62 Gy for Group I and 52 Gy for Group II. In-field progression-free and local progression-free rates were 100% and 69% at 1 year, and 93% and 44% at 2 years, respectively. Distant metastasis rates were 6% at 1 year and 15% at 2 years. Overall survival rates for 1-year and 2-years were 72% and 62%, respectively. Conclusions: The irradiation dose was safely escalated in hepatocellular carcinoma patients by using 3DCRT/IMRT with an active breathing coordinator. MTD was 62 Gy and 52 Gy for patients with tumor diameters of <10 cm and ≥10 cm, respectively.

  9. The correlation between the ASTRO consensus panel definition of biochemical failure and clinical outcome for patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, Eric M.; Vicini, Frank A.; Ziaja, Ellen L.; Dmuchowski, Carl F.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience treating patients with external beam irradiation (RT) to determine if the ASTRO Consensus Panel definition of biochemical failure (BF) following radiation therapy correlates with clinical distant metastases free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and local control (LC). Methods and Materials: Between 1/1/87 and 12/31/92, 568 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received external beam irradiation (RT) using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital (median total dose 66.6 Gy; range: 60-70.4 Gy). Biochemical failure was defined as three consecutive increases in post-treatment prostate specific antigen (PSA) after achieving a nadir. Biochemical failure was recorded as the time midway between the nadir and the first rising PSA. Five-year actuarial rates of clinical DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were calculated for patients who were biochemically controlled (BC) versus those who failed biochemically. Median follow-up was 56 months (range: 24-118 months). Results: Five-year actuarial rates of DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were significantly greater in patients who were biochemically controlled versus those who were not (p < 0.001). In patients who were BC, the 5-year actuarial rates of DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were 99%, 99%, 98%, and 99% respectively. For patients who failed biochemically, the 5-year actuarial rates of DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were 74%, 64%, 89%, and 86% respectively. When stratifying by pretreatment PSA, Gleason score, and T stage these differences remained significant for DMFS, DFS, and CSS. The Cox proportional hazards model demonstrated that BC was the single most important predictor of clinical outcome for DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC. Pretreatment PSA and Gleason score were also independent predictors of outcome for DMFS and DFS. Conclusions: The ASTRO Consensus Panel definition of BF following radiation therapy correlates well with clinical DMFS, DFS

  10. Conformal house

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryttov, Thomas Aaby; Sannino, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    fixed point. As a consistency check we recover the previously investigated bounds of the conformal windows when restricting to a single matter representation. The earlier conformal windows can be imagined to be part now of the new conformal house. We predict the nonperturbative anomalous dimensions...... at the infrared fixed points. We further investigate the effects of adding mass terms to the condensates on the conformal house chiral dynamics and construct the simplest instanton induced effective Lagrangian terms...

  11. Moderate hypofractionated radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy and simultaneous integrated boost for pelvic irradiation in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzese, C; Fogliata, A; D'Agostino, G R; Di Brina, L; Comito, T; Navarria, P; Cozzi, L; Scorsetti, M

    2017-07-01

    The optimal treatment for unfavourable intermediate/high-risk prostate cancer is still debated. In the present study, the pattern of toxicity and early clinical outcome of patients with localized prostate cancer was analyzed. A cohort of 90 patients treated on pelvic lymph nodes from 2010 to 2015 was selected. All patients were treated with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT), and Simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in 28 fractions; the prostate, the seminal vesicle and the pelvic lymph node received total doses of 74.2, 65.5, and 51.8 Gy, respectively. End points were the detection of acute and late toxicities graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria CTCAE version 3, evaluating the rectal, genito-urinary and gastro-intestinal toxicity. Correlation of OARs dose parameters and related toxicities was explored. Preliminary overall survival and Progression-free survival (PFS) were evaluated. With a median follow-up of 25 months, no interruptions for treatment-related toxicity were recorded. Univariate analysis among dosimetric data and acute toxicities showed no correlations. Regarding late toxicity: the dose received by a rectal volume of 90 cm 3 was found to be significant for toxicity prediction (p = 0.024). PFS was 90.6% and 60.2% at 2 and 4 years, respectively. PFS correlates with age (p = 0.011) and Gleason score (p = 0.011). Stratifying the PSA nadir in quartiles, its value was significant (p = 0.016) in predicting PFS, showing a reduction of PFS of 2 months for each PSA-nadir increase of 0.1 ng/ml. HRT with VMAT and SIB on the whole pelvis in unfavourable prostate cancer patients is effective with a mild pattern of toxicity.

  12. Field displacement during external radiotherapy in prostatic adenocarcinoma treated with radioactive 198Au implants and external irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennernaes, B.; Letocha, H.; Rikner, G.; Magnusson, A.; Nilsson, S.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study displacement error and internal movements of the prostate during external beam radiotherapy. Verification films in the frontal (n=194) and lateral (n=64) portals were investigated in 14 patients treated with radioactive 198 Au implants. Displacement errors of two implants were investigated. In seven patients, filling of the rectum and the bladder with contrast medium or isotonic saline was performed during CT investigation for planning purposes to detect movements of the prostate. Most (95%) of the displacement errors were less than 10 mm in the frontal portal and less than 15 mm in the lateral portals. No correlation to the patient's weight was found. The displacement errors were randomly distributed. The spatial relations between the implants were not altered during the treatments. Small movements of the prostate were observed. To conclude, the positioning system employed at present (laser) can be sufficient for the margins used (2 cm). In lateral portals, however, the system did not have the ability to detect a possible systematic displacement error from simulator to accelerator. The intention is to decrease the margins to 1 cm, which will necessitate a better positioning system. (orig.)

  13. Incidence of late rectal bleeding in high-dose conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer using equivalent uniform dose-based and dose-volume-based normal tissue complication probability models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soehn, Matthias; Yan Di; Liang Jian; Meldolesi, Elisa; Vargas, Carlos; Alber, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate modeling of rectal complications based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) data are necessary to allow safe dose escalation in radiotherapy of prostate cancer. We applied different equivalent uniform dose (EUD)-based and dose-volume-based normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models to rectal wall DVHs and follow-up data for 319 prostate cancer patients to identify the dosimetric factors most predictive for Grade ≥ 2 rectal bleeding. Methods and Materials: Data for 319 patients treated at the William Beaumont Hospital with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) under an adaptive radiotherapy protocol were used for this study. The following models were considered: (1) Lyman model and (2) logit-formula with DVH reduced to generalized EUD (3) serial reconstruction unit (RU) model (4) Poisson-EUD model, and (5) mean dose- and (6) cutoff dose-logistic regression model. The parameters and their confidence intervals were determined using maximum likelihood estimation. Results: Of the patients, 51 (16.0%) showed Grade 2 or higher bleeding. As assessed qualitatively and quantitatively, the Lyman- and Logit-EUD, serial RU, and Poisson-EUD model fitted the data very well. Rectal wall mean dose did not correlate to Grade 2 or higher bleeding. For the cutoff dose model, the volume receiving > 73.7 Gy showed most significant correlation to bleeding. However, this model fitted the data more poorly than the EUD-based models. Conclusions: Our study clearly confirms a volume effect for late rectal bleeding. This can be described very well by the EUD-like models, of which the serial RU- and Poisson-EUD model can describe the data with only two parameters. Dose-volume-based cutoff-dose models performed worse

  14. RapidArc, intensity modulated photon and proton techniques for recurrent prostate cancer in previously irradiated patients: a treatment planning comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Damien C; Miralbell, Raymond; Wang, Hui; Cozzi, Luca; Dipasquale, Giovanna; Khan, Haleem G; Ratib, Osman; Rouzaud, Michel; Vees, Hansjoerg; Zaidi, Habib

    2009-01-01

    A study was performed comparing volumetric modulated arcs (RA) and intensity modulation (with photons, IMRT, or protons, IMPT) radiation therapy (RT) for patients with recurrent prostate cancer after RT. Plans for RA, IMRT and IMPT were optimized for 7 patients. Prescribed dose was 56 Gy in 14 fractions. The recurrent gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined on 18 F-fluorocholine PET/CT scans. Plans aimed to cover at least 95% of the planning target volume with a dose > 50.4 Gy. A maximum dose (D Max ) of 61.6 Gy was allowed to 5% of the GTV. For the urethra, D Max was constrained to 37 Gy. Rectal D Median was < 17 Gy. Results were analyzed using Dose-Volume Histogram and conformity index (CI 90 ) parameters. Tumor coverage (GTV and PTV) was improved with RA (V 95% 92.6 ± 7.9 and 83.7 ± 3.3%), when compared to IMRT (V 95% 88.6 ± 10.8 and 77.2 ± 2.2%). The corresponding values for IMPT were intermediate for the GTV (V 95% 88.9 ± 10.5%) and better for the PTV (V 95% 85.6 ± 5.0%). The percentages of rectal and urethral volumes receiving intermediate doses (35 Gy) were significantly decreased with RA (5.1 ± 3.0 and 38.0 ± 25.3%) and IMPT (3.9 ± 2.7 and 25.1 ± 21.1%), when compared to IMRT (9.8 ± 5.3 and 60.7 ± 41.7%). CI 90 was 1.3 ± 0.1 for photons and 1.6 ± 0.2 for protons. Integral Dose was 1.1 ± 0.5 Gy*cm 3 *10 5 for IMPT and about a factor three higher for all photon's techniques. RA and IMPT showed improvements in conformal avoidance relative to fixed beam IMRT for 7 patients with recurrent prostate cancer. IMPT showed further sparing of organs at risk

  15. Chromosome Damage and Cell Proliferation Rates in In Vitro Irradiated Whole Blood as Markers of Late Radiation Toxicity After Radiation Therapy to the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaton, Lindsay A., E-mail: Lindsay.Beaton@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Ferrarotto, Catherine; Marro, Leonora [Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Samiee, Sara; Malone, Shawn; Grimes, Scott; Malone, Kyle [The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, 501 Smyth Rd, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Wilkins, Ruth C. [Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: In vitro irradiated blood samples from prostate cancer patients showing late normal tissue damage were examined for lymphocyte response by measuring chromosomal aberrations and proliferation rate. Methods and Materials: Patients were selected from a randomized trial evaluating the optimal timing of dose-escalated radiation and short-course androgen deprivation therapy. Of 438 patients, 3% experienced grade 3 late radiation proctitis and were considered to be radiosensitive. Blood samples were taken from 10 of these patients along with 20 matched samples from patients with grade 0 proctitis. The samples were irradiated at 6 Gy and, along with control samples, were analyzed for dicentric chromosomes and excess fragments per cell. Cells in first and second metaphase were also enumerated to determine the lymphocyte proliferation rate. Results: At 6 Gy, there were statistically significant differences between the radiosensitive and control cohorts for 3 endpoints: the mean number of dicentric chromosomes per cell (3.26 ± 0.31, 2.91 ± 0.32; P=.0258), the mean number of excess fragments per cell (2.27 ± 0.23, 1.43 ± 0.37; P<.0001), and the proportion of cells in second metaphase (0.27 ± 0.10, 0.46 ± 0.09; P=.0007). Conclusions: These results may be a valuable indicator for identifying radiosensitive patients and for tailoring radiation therapy.

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound or with a rectal examination, an ultrasound-guided biopsy can be performed. This procedure involves advancing ... of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored ...

  17. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is enlarged, also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) , with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment ... caption Related Articles and Media Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and ...

  18. Preliminary Toxicity Analysis of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy on the High-Dose Arm of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0126 Prostate Cancer Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalski, Jeff M., E-mail: jmichalski@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Yan, Yan [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [Emory University School of Nursing, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Department of Radiation Oncology Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Winter, Kathryn [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Galvin, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bahary, Jean-Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal-Notre Dame, Montreal, QC (Canada); Morton, Gerard C. [Department of Radiation Oncology Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Parliament, Matthew B. [Department of Oncology Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Sandler, Howard M. [Department of Radiation Oncology Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To give a preliminary report of clinical and treatment factors associated with toxicity in men receiving high-dose radiation therapy (RT) on a phase 3 dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: The trial was initiated with 3-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) and amended after 1 year to allow intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Patients treated with 3D-CRT received 55.8 Gy to a planning target volume that included the prostate and seminal vesicles, then 23.4 Gy to prostate only. The IMRT patients were treated to the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles to 79.2 Gy. Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0, and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer late morbidity scores were used for acute and late effects. Results: Of 763 patients randomized to the 79.2-Gy arm of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0126 protocol, 748 were eligible and evaluable: 491 and 257 were treated with 3D-CRT and IMRT, respectively. For both bladder and rectum, the volumes receiving 65, 70, and 75 Gy were significantly lower with IMRT (all P<.0001). For grade (G) 2+ acute gastrointestinal/genitourinary (GI/GU) toxicity, both univariate and multivariate analyses showed a statistically significant decrease in G2+ acute collective GI/GU toxicity for IMRT. There were no significant differences with 3D-CRT or IMRT for acute or late G2+ or 3+ GU toxicities. Univariate analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in late G2+ GI toxicity for IMRT (P=.039). On multivariate analysis, IMRT showed a 26% reduction in G2+ late GI toxicity (P=.099). Acute G2+ toxicity was associated with late G3+ toxicity (P=.005). With dose–volume histogram data in the multivariate analysis, RT modality was not significant, whereas white race (P=.001) and rectal V70 ≥15% were associated with G2+ rectal toxicity (P=.034). Conclusions: Intensity modulated RT is associated with a significant reduction in acute G2+ GI/GU toxicity. There is a trend for a

  19. Primary radiation therapy in the treatment of localized prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joensuu, T.K.; Blomqvist, C.P.; Kajanti, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    Prostatic carcinoma is one of the leading causes of male cancer deaths. However, the routine diagnostic and therapeutic strategies have not yet been established. Although the outcome of surgical and radiotherapeutical approaches has frequently been reported to be comparable, the profile of side effects is different. This could offer the basis for selecting the treatment of choice in individual cases. During the last decade the radiotherapeutical technique has markedly improved, in part due to the achievements in the field of computer assisted tomography planning and conformal technique; the outcome of side-effects has decreased with concurrent increase in the rate of local control. The prescribing, recording and reporting of irradiation have also recently developed, as well as the staging of the disease. Therefore we consider it timely to review progress in this subject and to emphasize the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of localized prostatic cancer. (orig.)

  20. A versatile phantom for quality assurance in the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) RT01 trial (ISRCTN47772397) in conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollo Moore, A.; Jim Warrington, A.P.; Aird, Edwin G.A.; Margaret Bidmead, A.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2006-01-01

    Within the UK RT01 trial the MRC also funded a quality assurance (QA) programme. This included a planning and dosimetry audit at participating centres using a purpose built phantom. Geometrical setup was visually assessed via field shaping around the phantom GTV (to within the order of 1 mm). Within the phantom, ion chamber positional uncertainties were estimated as 0.6 mm (95% CL, k = 2). This was the basis for ion chamber measurements in a variety of dose gradients around the PTV closely simulating a patient case. The design provides a representative but reproducible system for QA in the prostate radiotherapy process, from CT scan to treatment. Setup errors are not eliminated, but minimised and estimated

  1. The Effect of Dose-Volume Parameters and Interfraction Interval on Cosmetic Outcome and Toxicity After 3-Dimensional Conformal Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, Kara Lynne; Hepel, Jaroslaw T.; Hiatt, Jessica R.; Dipetrillo, Thomas A.; Price, Lori Lyn; Wazer, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dose-volume parameters and the interfraction interval (IFI) as they relate to cosmetic outcome and normal tissue effects of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: Eighty patients were treated by the use of 3D-CRT to deliver APBI at our institutions from 2003-2010 in strict accordance with the specified dose-volume constraints outlined in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 (NSABP-B39/RTOG 0413) protocol. The prescribed dose was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions delivered twice daily. Patients underwent follow-up with assessment for recurrence, late toxicity, and overall cosmetic outcome. Tests for association between toxicity endpoints and dosimetric parameters were performed with the chi-square test. Univariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of interfraction interval (IFI) with these outcomes. Results: At a median follow-up time of 32 months, grade 2-4 and grade 3-4 subcutaneous fibrosis occurred in 31% and 7.5% of patients, respectively. Subcutaneous fibrosis improved in 5 patients (6%) with extended follow-up. Fat necrosis developed in 11% of women, and cosmetic outcome was fair/poor in 19%. The relative volume of breast tissue receiving 5%, 20%, 50%, 80%, and 100% (V5-V100) of the prescribed dose was associated with risk of subcutaneous fibrosis, and the volume receiving 50%, 80%, and 100% (V50-V100) was associated with fair/poor cosmesis. The mean IFI was 6.9 hours, and the minimum IFI was 6.2 hours. The mean and minimum IFI values were not significantly associated with late toxicity. Conclusions: The incidence of moderate to severe late toxicity, particularly subcutaneous fibrosis and fat necrosis and resulting fair/poor cosmesis, remains high with continued follow-up. These toxicity endpoints are associated with several dose-volume parameters. Minimum and mean IFI values were

  2. Long-term results of high-dose conformal radiotherapy for patients with medically inoperable T1-3N0 non-small-cell lung cancer: Is low incidence of regional failure due to incidental nodal irradiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ming; Hayman, James A.; Haken, Randall K. ten; Tatro, Daniel; Fernando, Shaneli; Kong, F.-M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of high-dose conformal irradiation and examine incidental nodal irradiation and nodal failure in patients with inoperable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: This analysis included patients with inoperable CT-staged T1-3N0M0 NSCLC treated on our prospective dose-escalation trial. Patients were treated with radiation alone (total dose, 63-102.9 Gy in 2.1-Gy daily fractions) with a three-dimensional conformal technique without intentional nodal irradiation. Bilateral highest mediastinal and upper/lower paratracheal, prevascular and retrotracheal, sub- and para-aortic, subcarinal, paraesophageal, and ipsilateral hilar regions were delineated individually. Nodal failure and doses of incidental irradiation were studied. Results: The potential median follow-up was 104 months. For patients who completed protocol treatment, median survival was 31 months. The actuarial overall survival rate was 86%, 61%, 43%, and 21% and the cause-specific survival rate was 89%, 70%, 53%, and 35% at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years, respectively. Weight loss (p = 0.008) and radiation dose in Gy (p = 0.013) were significantly associated with overall survival. In only 22% and 13% of patients examined did ipsilateral hilar and paratracheal (and subaortic for left-sided tumor) nodal regions receive a dose of ≥40 Gy, respectively. Less than 10% of all other nodal regions received a dose of ≥40 Gy. No patients failed initially at nodal sites. Conclusions: Radiation dose is positively associated with overall survival in patients with medically inoperable T1-3N0 NSCLC, though long-term results remain poor. The nodal failure rate is low and does not seem to be due to high-dose incidental irradiation

  3. Transportation Conformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    This section provides information on: current laws, regulations and guidance, policy and technical guidance, project-level conformity, general information, contacts and training, adequacy review of SIP submissions

  4. The impact of gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity on health related quality of life among irradiated prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaake, Wouter; Wiegman, Erwin M.; Groot, Martijn de; Laan, Hans Paul van der; Schans, Cees P. van der; Bergh, Alfons C.M. van den; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of late radiation-induced toxicity on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among patients with prostate cancer. Patients and methods: The study sample was composed of 227 patients, treated with external beam radiotherapy. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 were used to grade late genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of life Questionnaire C30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) was used to assess HRQoL at baseline, and 6, 12 and 24 months after completion of radiotherapy. Statistical analysis was performed using a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). Results: Urinary incontinence and rectal discomfort significantly affected HRQoL. The impact of urinary incontinence on HRQoL was most pronounced 6 months after radiotherapy and gradually decreased over time. The impact of rectal discomfort on HRQoL was predominant at 6 months after radiotherapy, decreased at 12 months and increased again 2 years after radiotherapy. No significant impact on HRQoL was observed for any of the other toxicity endpoints, or non-toxicity related factors such as hormonal therapy, radiotherapy technique or age. Conclusion: Urinary incontinence and rectal discomfort have a significant impact on HRQoL. Prevention of these side effects may likely improve quality of life of prostate cancer patients after completion of treatment

  5. Evaluation of the radio modifier effect of propolis on chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) and human prostate cancer (PC3) cells, irradiated with 60-CO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Geyza Spigoti

    2011-01-01

    In the last decades, it has been given a great interest to investigations concerning natural, effective, nontoxic compounds with radioprotective potential together with the increasing utilization of different types of ionizing radiation for various applications. Among them propolis, a resinous compound produced by honeybees (Apis mellifera), has been considered quite promising, since it presents several advantageous biological characteristics, i. e., anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anticarcinogenic, antioxidant and also free radical scavenging action. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Brazilian propolis, collected in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) and human prostate cancer (PC3) cells, irradiated with 60 Co γ radiation. For this purpose, three interlinked parameters were analyzed: micronucleus induction, cell viability and clonogenic death. The choice of these parameters was justified by their biological significance, in addition to the fact that they are readily observable and measurable in irradiated cells. The cytogenetic data obtained showed a radioprotective effect of propolis (5-100 μg/ml) in the induction of DNA damage for both cell lines, irradiated with doses of 1 - 4 Gy. The cytotoxicity assay, however, showed a prominent antiproliferative effect of propolis (50 - 400μ/ml) in PC3 cells irradiated with 5 Gγ. The survival curves obtained were adequately fitted by a linear-quadratic model, where the α coefficient was higher in CHO-K1 cells. Concerning the clonogenic capacity, PC3 cells were more radiosensitive than CHO-K1 cells at the higher doses of the survival curve. Propolis at the concentrations of 30 - 100 μg/ml, did not influence the clonogenic potential of PC3 cells, since the survival curves, associated or not with propolis, were found similar, although the combined treatment in CHO-K1 cells exhibited a stimulating proliferative effect. The data obtained in vitro showed a

  6. Workers’ Conformism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Ivantchev

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Conformism was studied among 46 workers with different kinds of occupations by means of two modified scales measuring conformity by Santor, Messervey, and Kusumakar (2000 – scale for perceived peer pressure and scale for conformism in antisocial situations. The hypothesis of the study that workers’ conformism is expressed in a medium degree was confirmed partly. More than a half of the workers conform in a medium degree for taking risk, and for the use of alcohol and drugs, and for sexual relationships. More than a half of the respondents conform in a small degree for anti-social activities (like a theft. The workers were more inclined to conform for risk taking (10.9%, then – for the use of alcohol, drugs and for sexual relationships (8.7%, and in the lowest degree – for anti-social activities (6.5%. The workers who were inclined for the use of alcohol and drugs tended also to conform for anti-social activities.

  7. Hypofractionated intensity modulated irradiation for localized prostate cancer, results from a phase I/II feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junius, Sara; Haustermans, Karin; Bussels, Barbara; Oyen, Raymond; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Depuydt, Tom; Verstraete, Jan; Joniau, Steven; Van Poppel, Hendrik

    2007-01-01

    To assess acute (primary endpoint) and late toxicity, quality of life (QOL), biochemical or clinical failure (secondary endpoints) of a hypofractionated IMRT schedule for prostate cancer (PC). 38 men with localized PC received 66 Gy (2.64 Gy) to prostate,2 Gy to seminal vesicles (50 Gy total) using IMRT. Acute toxicity was evaluated weekly during radiotherapy (RT), at 1–3 months afterwards using RTOG acute scoring system. Late side effects were scored at 6, 9, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 36 months after RT using RTOG/EORTC criteria. Quality of life was assessed by EORTC-C30 questionnaire and PR25 prostate module. Biochemical failure was defined using ASTRO consensus and nadir+2 definition, clinical failure as local, regional or distant relapse. None experienced grade III-IV toxicity. 10% had no acute genito-urinary (GU) toxicity, 63% grade I; 26% grade II. Maximum acute gastrointestinal (GI) scores 0, I, II were 37%, 47% and 16%. Maximal acute toxicity was reached weeks 4–5 and resolved within 4 weeks after RT in 82%. Grade II rectal bleeding needing coagulation had a peak incidence of 18% at 16 months after RT but is 0% at 24–36 months. One developed a urethral stricture at 2 years (grade II late GU toxicity) successfully dilated until now. QOL urinary symptom scores reached a peak incidence 1 month after RT but normalized 6 months later. Bowel symptom scores before, at 1–6 months showed similar values but rose slowly 2–3 years after RT. Nadir of sexual symptom scores was reached 1–6 months after RT but improved 2–3 years later as well as physical, cognitive and role functional scales. Emotional, social functional scales were lowest before RT when diagnosis was given but improved later. Two years after RT global health status normalized. This hypofractionated IMRT schedule for PC using 25 fractions of 2.64 Gy did not result in severe acute side effects. Until now late urethral, rectal toxicities seemed acceptable as well as failure rates. Detailed analysis of

  8. Contribution of the deep-inspiration breath-hold technique in patients treated for a left breast cancer by mono-isocentric conformational irradiation; Apport du blocage inspiratoire profond chez des patientes traitees pour un cancer du sein gauche par irradiation conformationnelle mono-isocentrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zioueche, A.; Mege, A.; Bodez, V.; Rauglaudre, G. de [Institut Sainte-Catherine, Avignon (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report a study which aimed at assessing the benefit of a deep-inspiration-breath-hold on heart sparing in 31 women treated in the left breast or wall and locoregional ganglionary areas by three-dimensional conformational irradiation with field-in-field optimization. All heart and lung parameters (delivered doses) have been significantly improved by a deep-inspiration-breath-hold. Short communication

  9. Dosimetric comparison of standard three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy followed by intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost schedule (sequential IMRT plan) with simultaneous integrated boost-IMRT (SIB IMRT) treatment plan in patients with localized carcinoma prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, A; Kapoor, R; Singh, S K; Kumar, N; Oinam, A S; Sharma, S C

    2012-07-01

    DOSIMETERIC AND RADIOBIOLOGICAL COMPARISON OF TWO RADIATION SCHEDULES IN LOCALIZED CARCINOMA PROSTATE: Standard Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy (3DCRT) followed by Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) boost (sequential-IMRT) with Simultaneous Integrated Boost IMRT (SIB-IMRT). Thirty patients were enrolled. In all, the target consisted of PTV P + SV (Prostate and seminal vesicles) and PTV LN (lymph nodes) where PTV refers to planning target volume and the critical structures included: bladder, rectum and small bowel. All patients were treated with sequential-IMRT plan, but for dosimetric comparison, SIB-IMRT plan was also created. The prescription dose to PTV P + SV was 74 Gy in both strategies but with different dose per fraction, however, the dose to PTV LN was 50 Gy delivered in 25 fractions over 5 weeks for sequential-IMRT and 54 Gy delivered in 27 fractions over 5.5 weeks for SIB-IMRT. The treatment plans were compared in terms of dose-volume histograms. Also, Tumor Control Probability (TCP) and Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) obtained with the two plans were compared. The volume of rectum receiving 70 Gy or more (V > 70 Gy) was reduced to 18.23% with SIB-IMRT from 22.81% with sequential-IMRT. SIB-IMRT reduced the mean doses to both bladder and rectum by 13% and 17%, respectively, as compared to sequential-IMRT. NTCP of 0.86 ± 0.75% and 0.01 ± 0.02% for the bladder, 5.87 ± 2.58% and 4.31 ± 2.61% for the rectum and 8.83 ± 7.08% and 8.25 ± 7.98% for the bowel was seen with sequential-IMRT and SIB-IMRT plans respectively. For equal PTV coverage, SIB-IMRT markedly reduced doses to critical structures, therefore should be considered as the strategy for dose escalation. SIB-IMRT achieves lesser NTCP than sequential-IMRT.

  10. Accelerated partial breast irradiation with external beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Five-year results of a prospective phase II clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozsa, Emoeke [National Institute of Oncology, Centre of Radiotherapy, Budapest (Hungary); Landesklinikum Wiener Neustadt, Department of Radiooncology and Radiotherapy, Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Meszaros, Norbert; Major, Tibor; Froehlich, Georgina; Stelczer, Gabor; Fodor, Janos; Polgar, Csaba [National Institute of Oncology, Centre of Radiotherapy, Budapest (Hungary); Sulyok, Zoltan [National Institute of Oncology, Centre of Surgery, Budapest (Hungary)

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this study was to report the 5-year results of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using external beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between 2006 and 2011, 44 patients with low-risk, stage I-II breast cancer underwent breast-conserving surgery. Postoperative APBI was given by means of 3D-CRT using three to five non-coplanar fields. The total dose of APBI was 36.9 Gy (nine fractions of 4.1 Gy b.i.d.). The mean follow-up time was 58.2 months for surviving patients. Survival results, side effects, and cosmetic results were assessed. One (2.3 %) local recurrence was observed, for a 5-year actuarial rate of 3.7 %. Neither regional nor distant failure was observed. Two patients died of internal disease. The 5-year disease-free, cancer-specific, and overall survival rates were 96.3, 100, and 95.1 %, respectively. Acute side effects included grade 1 (G1) erythema in 75 %, G1 parenchymal induration in 46 %, and G1 pain in 46 % of patients. No G2 or higher acute side effect occurred. Late side effects included G1, G2, and G3 fibrosis in 44, 7, and 2 % of patients, respectively, G1 skin pigmentation in 12 %, and G1 pain in 2 %. Asymptomatic fat necrosis occurred in 14 %. Cosmetic results were rated excellent or good in 86 % of cases by the patients themselves and 84 % by the physicians. The 5-year local tumor control, toxicity profile, and cosmetic results of APBI delivered with external beam 3D-CRT are encouraging and comparable to other APBI series. (orig.) [German] Evaluation der 5-Jahres-Ergebnisse bezueglich Ueberleben, Tumorkontrolle, Nebenwirkungen und Kosmetik nach Teilbrustbestrahlung (APBI) mittels 3-D-konformaler, akzelerierter Radiotherapie (3D-CRT). Zwischen 2006 und 2011 wurden 44 Patienten mit Brustkrebs im Stadium I-II und niedrigem Risikoprofil brusterhaltend operiert. Die adjuvante, 3-D-konformale APBI wurde mittels 3-5 nonkoplanarer Feldern durchgefuehrt. Die Gesamtdosis betrug 36,9 Gy bei 9 -mal 4,1 Gy b.i.d.. Nach

  11. The importance of adequate follow-up in defining treatment success after external beam irradiation for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank A.; Kestin, Larry L.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience treating patients with localized prostate cancer with external beam radiation therapy (RT) to determine how differences in the length of follow-up affect the determination of treatment outcome using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus Panel Definition of biochemical failure (BF). Methods and Materials: From January 1987 through December 1997, 1109 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with definitive external beam RT at William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan. All patients received external beam RT to a median total prostate dose of 66.6 Gy (range: 59.4-70.4 Gy). A total of 1096 patients (99%) had sufficient prostate-specific antigen (PSA) follow-up to determine their biochemical status. To test the impact of differences in follow-up on the calculation of BF, 389 patients with at least 5 years of PSA follow-up were selected as the reference group for the initial analysis. BF was then retrospectively determined using the Consensus Panel definition at yearly intervals, ignoring the remainder of each patient's follow-up. The median follow-up for this group of patients was 6.6 years (range: 5.0-11.6 years). In a second analysis, patient cohorts were randomly selected with varying median PSA follow-up intervals in order to more accurately represent a population whose follow-up is distributed continuously over a defined range. Seven cohorts were randomly selected with 200 patients in each cohort. Cohorts were individually identified such that half of the patients (100) had 2 years or less follow-up than the stated time point for analysis and half (100) had up to 2 years more follow-up than the time point chosen for analysis. For example, in the cohort with a median follow-up of 3 years, 100 patients with a PSA follow-up from 1 to 3 years were randomly selected, and 100 patients with a follow-up from 3 to 5 years were randomly selected, thus generating a

  12. The Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Prostate Cancer This booklet is about prostate cancer. Learning about medical care for your cancer ... ePub This booklet covers: The anatomy of the prostate and basics about prostate cancer Treatments for prostate ...

  13. Acute Toxicity After Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Compared to 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wortel, Ruud C.; Incrocci, Luca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pos, Floris J.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Witte, Marnix G.; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Herk, Marcel van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heemsbergen, Wilma D., E-mail: w.heemsbergen@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows significant dose reductions to organs at risk in prostate cancer patients. However, clinical data identifying the benefits of IG-IMRT in daily practice are scarce. The purpose of this study was to compare dose distributions to organs at risk and acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity levels of patients treated to 78 Gy with either IG-IMRT or 3D-CRT. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with 3D-CRT (n=215) and IG-IMRT (n=260) receiving 78 Gy in 39 fractions within 2 randomized trials were selected. Dose surface histograms of anorectum, anal canal, and bladder were calculated. Identical toxicity questionnaires were distributed at baseline, prior to fraction 20 and 30 and at 90 days after treatment. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade ≥1, ≥2, and ≥3 endpoints were derived directly from questionnaires. Univariate and multivariate binary logistic regression analyses were applied. Results: The median volumes receiving 5 to 75 Gy were significantly lower (all P<.001) with IG-IMRT for anorectum, anal canal, and bladder. The mean dose to the anorectum was 34.4 Gy versus 47.3 Gy (P<.001), 23.6 Gy versus 44.6 Gy for the anal canal (P<.001), and 33.1 Gy versus 43.2 Gy for the bladder (P<.001). Significantly lower grade ≥2 toxicity was observed for proctitis, stool frequency ≥6/day, and urinary frequency ≥12/day. IG-IMRT resulted in significantly lower overall RTOG grade ≥2 GI toxicity (29% vs 49%, respectively, P=.002) and overall GU grade ≥2 toxicity (38% vs 48%, respectively, P=.009). Conclusions: A clinically meaningful reduction in dose to organs at risk and acute toxicity levels was observed in IG-IMRT patients, as a result of improved technique and tighter margins. Therefore reduced late toxicity levels can be expected as well; additional research is needed to quantify such reductions.

  14. Acute side effects during 3-D-planned conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Differences between patient's self-reported questionnaire and the corresponding doctor's report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldner, G.; Wachter-Gerstner, N.; Wachter, S.; Dieckmann, K.; Janda, M.; Poetter, R.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy-induced side effects are often scored retrospectively according to the EORTC/RTOG scores for organs at risk by reviewing the medical records. Some studies could prove an over- or underestimation of side effects as assessed by the medical professionals. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate differences in side effects as described by the doctors and the patients. Patients and Methods: 47 patients with prostate cancer were questioned about their side effects by a radiotherapist and asked to fill in a questionnaire at the start, in the middle and at the end of radiotherapy. The data of this questionnaire and the doctor's report were scored according to the German version of the EORTC/RTOG scores for gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) side effects and subsequently compared. We distinguished between ''moderate'' disagreement (better/worse by one grade, assessed by the doctor) and ''pronounced'' disagreement (better/worse by two grades, assessed by the doctor). Results: The number of GI and GU side effects increased during radiotherapy both according to data obtained from the doctor and the patient questionnaire. Comparing doctors' reports with patients' questionnaires, for GI side effects an agreement was found in 22/47 patients, ''moderately better'' scores by the doctor's report were found in 13/47 patients, and ''moderately worse'' scores in 9/47 patients on average. ''Pronouncedly better and worse'' scores were found in 2/47 patients. For GU side effects an agreement was seen in 22/47 patients, ''moderately better'' scores in 17/47 patients and ''moderately worse'' scores in 3/47 patients. Regarding GU side effects, only pronouncedly better scores, as assessed by the doctor, were found in a mean of 4/47 patients. If the EORTC/RTOG score is used in its original English version, a difference is found, particularly in the assessment of GU side effects, resulting in an higher amount of agreement concerning GU side effects

  15. Comparison study of the partial-breast irradiation techniques: Dosimetric analysis of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, electron beam therapy, and helical tomotherapy depending on various tumor locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min-Joo; Park, So-Hyun; Son, Seok-Hyun; Cheon, Keum-Seong; Choi, Byung-Ock; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2013-01-01

    The partial-breast irradiation (PBI) technique, an alternative to whole-breast irradiation, is a beam delivery method that uses a limited range of treatment volume. The present study was designed to determine the optimal PBI treatment modalities for 8 different tumor locations. Treatment planning was performed on computed tomography (CT) data sets of 6 patients who had received lumpectomy treatments. Tumor locations were classified into 8 subsections according to breast quadrant and depth. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), electron beam therapy (ET), and helical tomotherapy (H-TOMO) were utilized to evaluate the dosimetric effect for each tumor location. Conformation number (CN), radical dose homogeneity index (rDHI), and dose delivered to healthy tissue were estimated. The Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, and Bonferroni tests were used for statistical analysis. The ET approach showed good sparing effects and acceptable target coverage for the lower inner quadrant—superficial (LIQ-S) and lower inner quadrant—deep (LIQ-D) locations. The H-TOMO method was the least effective technique as no evaluation index achieved superiority for all tumor locations except CN. The ET method is advisable for treating LIQ-S and LIQ-D tumors, as opposed to 3D-CRT or H-TOMO, because of acceptable target coverage and much lower dose applied to surrounding tissue

  16. Conformal Infinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauendiener Jörg

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available The notion of conformal infinity has a long history within the research in Einstein's theory of gravity. Today, ``conformal infinity'' is related with almost all other branches of research in general relativity, from quantisation procedures to abstract mathematical issues to numerical applications. This review article attempts to show how this concept gradually and inevitably evolved out of physical issues, namely the need to understand gravitational radiation and isolated systems within the theory of gravitation and how it lends itself very naturally to solve radiation problems in numerical relativity. The fundamental concept of null-infinity is introduced. Friedrich's regular conformal field equations are presented and various initial value problems for them are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the conformal field equations provide a very powerful method within numerical relativity to study global problems such as gravitational wave propagation and detection.

  17. Conformal Infinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauendiener, Jörg

    2004-01-01

    The notion of conformal infinity has a long history within the research in Einstein's theory of gravity. Today, "conformal infinity" is related to almost all other branches of research in general relativity, from quantisation procedures to abstract mathematical issues to numerical applications. This review article attempts to show how this concept gradually and inevitably evolved from physical issues, namely the need to understand gravitational radiation and isolated systems within the theory of gravitation, and how it lends itself very naturally to the solution of radiation problems in numerical relativity. The fundamental concept of null-infinity is introduced. Friedrich's regular conformal field equations are presented and various initial value problems for them are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the conformal field equations provide a very powerful method within numerical relativity to study global problems such as gravitational wave propagation and detection.

  18. Conformal Infinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauendiener Jörg

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The notion of conformal infinity has a long history within the research in Einstein's theory of gravity. Today, 'conformal infinity' is related to almost all other branches of research in general relativity, from quantisation procedures to abstract mathematical issues to numerical applications. This review article attempts to show how this concept gradually and inevitably evolved from physical issues, namely the need to understand gravitational radiation and isolated systems within the theory of gravitation, and how it lends itself very naturally to the solution of radiation problems in numerical relativity. The fundamental concept of null-infinity is introduced. Friedrich's regular conformal field equations are presented and various initial value problems for them are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the conformal field equations provide a very powerful method within numerical relativity to study global problems such as gravitational wave propagation and detection.

  19. General Conformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The General Conformity requirements ensure that the actions taken by federal agencies in nonattainment and maintenance areas do not interfere with a state’s plans to meet national standards for air quality.

  20. Margin to CTV in simultaneous irradiation of treatment volumes attache to various anatomical frameworks: The paradigm of the CA. Of prostate in high risk with indication of lymph node irradiation; Margen al CTV en irradiacion simultanea de volumenes de tratamiento adscritos a distintos marcos anatomicos: El paradigma del CA. de prostata de alto riesgo con indicacion de irradiacion ganglionar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz Freire, C. J.; Perez Echaguen, S.; Collado chamorro, P.; Diaz Pascual, V.; Vazquez Galinanes, A.; Ossola Lentati, G. A.

    2013-07-01

    The triple objective of this work is: 1 check the effect on the positioning of the GGPP of corrections on the position of the prostate in simultaneous irradiation guided through daily image and its relationship with the filling of rectum and bladder 2. check if employees standard margins for CTV GGPP are valid for this technique 3 calculate the necessary extension of the margin to 2. is not verified. (Author)

  1. Conformal Infinity

    OpenAIRE

    Frauendiener, J?rg

    2000-01-01

    The notion of conformal infinity has a long history within the research in Einstein's theory of gravity. Today, 'conformal infinity' is related to almost all other branches of research in general relativity, from quantisation procedures to abstract mathematical issues to numerical applications. This review article attempts to show how this concept gradually and inevitably evolved from physical issues, namely the need to understand gravitational radiation and isolated systems within the theory...

  2. Analysis of Biochemical Control and Prognostic Factors in Patients Treated With Either Low-Dose Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy or High-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vora, Sujay A.; Wong, William W.; Schild, Steven E.; Ezzell, Gary A.; Halyard, Michele Y.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To identify prognostic factors and evaluate biochemical control rates for patients with localized prostate cancer treated with either high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or conventional-dose three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy 3D-CRT. Methods: Four hundred sixteen patients with a minimum follow-up of 3 years (median, 5 years) were included. Two hundred seventy-one patients received 3D-CRT with a median dose of 68.4 Gy (range, 66-71 Gy). The next 145 patients received IMRT with a median dose of 75.6 Gy (range, 70.2-77.4 Gy). Biochemical control rates were calculated according to both American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) consensus definitions. Prognostic factors were identified using both univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The 5-year biochemical control rate was 60.4% for 3D-CRT and 74.1% for IMRT (p < 0.0001, first ASTRO Consensus definition). Using the ASTRO Phoenix definition, the 5-year biochemical control rate was 74.4% and 84.6% with 3D-RT and IMRT, respectively (p = 0.0326). Univariate analyses determined that PSA level, T stage, Gleason score, perineural invasion, and radiation dose were predictive of biochemical control. On multivariate analysis, dose, Gleason score, and perineural invasion remained significant. Conclusion: On the basis of both ASTRO definitions, dose, Gleason score, and perineural invasion were predictive of biochemical control. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy allowed delivery of higher doses of radiation with very low toxicity, resulting in improved biochemical control

  3. Prostate Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Prostate Diseases Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic ... body. Approximately 3 million American men have some type of prostate disease. The most common prostate diseases ...

  4. Prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer; Radioactive seed placement; Internal radiation therapy - prostate; High dose radiation (HDR) ... place the seeds that deliver radiation into your prostate. The seeds are placed with needles or special ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to ... Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces pictures ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  7. Conformation radiotherapy and conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Kozo

    1999-01-01

    In order to coincide the high dose region to the target volume, the 'Conformation Radiotherapy Technique' using the multileaf collimator and the device for 'hollow-out technique' was developed by Prof. S. Takahashi in 1960. This technique can be classified a type of 2D-dynamic conformal RT techniques. By the clinical application of this technique, the late complications of the lens, the intestine and the urinary bladder after radiotherapy for the maxillary cancer and the cervical cancer decreased. Since 1980's the exact position and shape of the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues can be easily obtained by the tremendous development of the CT/MRI imaging technique. As a result, various kinds of new conformal techniques such as the 3D-CRT, the dose intensity modulation, the tomotherapy have been developed since the beginning of 1990'. Several 'dose escalation study with 2D-/3D conformal RT' is now under way to improve the treatment results. (author)

  8. Dose-volume effects for pelvic bone marrow in predicting hematological toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy with pelvic node irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sini, Carla; Fiorino, Claudio; Perna, Lucia; Noris Chiorda, Barbara; Deantoni, Chiara Lucrezia; Bianchi, Marco; Sacco, Vincenzo; Briganti, Alberto; Montorsi, Francesco; Calandrino, Riccardo; Di Muzio, Nadia; Cozzarini, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    To prospectively identify clinical/dosimetric predictors of acute/late hematologic toxicity (HT) in chemo-naÏve patients treated with whole-pelvis radiotherapy (WPRT) for prostate cancer. Data of 121 patients treated with adjuvant/salvage WPRT were analyzed (static-field IMRT n=19; VMAT/Rapidarc n=57; Tomotherapy n=45). Pelvic bone marrow (BM) was delineated as ilium (IL), lumbosacral, lower and whole pelvis (WP), and the relative DVHs were calculated. HT was graded both according to CTCAE v4.03 and as variation in percentage relative to baseline. Logistic regression was used to analyze association between HT and clinical/DVHs factors. Significant differences (p<0.005) in the DVH of BM volumes between different techniques were found: Tomotherapy was associated with larger volumes receiving low doses (3-20 Gy) and smaller receiving 40-50 Gy. Lower baseline absolute values of WBC, neutrophils and lymphocytes (ALC) predicted acute/late HT (p ⩽ 0.001). Higher BM V40 was associated with higher risk of acute Grade3 (OR=1.018) or late Grade2 lymphopenia (OR=1.005). Two models predicting lymphopenia were developed, both including baseline ALC, and BM WP-V40 (AUC=0.73) and IL-V40+smoking (AUC=0.904) for acute/late respectively. Specific regions of pelvic BM predicting acute/late lymphopenia, a risk factor for viral infections, were identified. The 2-variable models including specific constraints to BM may help reduce HT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Conformal Gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooft, G.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamical degree of freedom for the gravitational force is the metric tensor, having 10 locally independent degrees of freedom (of which 4 can be used to fix the coordinate choice). In conformal gravity, we split this field into an overall scalar factor and a nine-component remainder. All unrenormalizable infinities are in this remainder, while the scalar component can be handled like any other scalar field such as the Higgs field. In this formalism, conformal symmetry is spontaneously broken. An imperative demand on any healthy quantum gravity theory is that black holes should be described as quantum systems with micro-states as dictated by the Hawking-Bekenstein theory. This requires conformal symmetry that may be broken spontaneously but not explicitly, and this means that all conformal anomalies must cancel out. Cancellation of conformal anomalies yields constraints on the matter sector as described by some universal field theory. Thus black hole physics may eventually be of help in the construction of unified field theories. (author)

  10. Re-analysis of clinical and treatment related prognostic factors on outcome using biochemical control as an end-point in patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziaja, Ellen L.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Vicini, Frank A.; Dmuchowski, Carl F.; Brabbins, Donald S.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Hollander, Jay; Matter, Richard C.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate specific antigen (PSA) has been established as the most important prognostic factor for prostate cancer. We reviewed our experience treating patients with clinically localized prostate cancer with external beam irradiation (RT) to evaluate if previously defined clinical and treatment related prognostic factors remain valid when biochemical control was used as an end-point to evaluate results. Methods and Materials: Between 1/87 and 12/91, 480 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received external beam irradiation (RT) using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital. The median dose to the prostate was 66.6 Gy (range 58 - 70.4 Gy) using a 4 field or arc technique. Pre- and post-treatment serum PSA levels were recorded. Biochemical control was defined as PSA nadir ≤ 1.5 ng/ml within 1 year of treatment completion. After achieving nadir, if 2 consecutive increases of PSA were noted, the patient was scored a failure at the time of the first increase. Patients (pts) were divided into 3 groups according to total number of days on treatment: ≤ 49 days (≤ 7 weeks)- 21 pts; 50-63 days (8-9 weeks)- 429 pts; and ≥ 64 days (≥ 9 weeks)- 15 pts. Patients were also divided into groups with respect to the method of diagnosis: TURP (81 pts), or other means (399 pts). Patients were further divided into 2 groups: 1) if they had ever had a pre-treatment TURP (170 pts) or 2) if they had not (310 pts). Patients were divided into 2 groups according to boost technique: bilateral arcs (459 pts) or 4 field box (21 pts). Patients were also divided into groups according to total RT dose: ≤ 70 Gy (421 pts) or > 70 Gy (59 pts). Patients were further subdivided into 3 dose groups: 70 Gy (59 pts). Results: Median follow-up is 48 months (range 3 - 112 months). No statistically significant difference in rates of biochemical control were noted for treatment time, overall time (date of biopsy to completion of RT), or treatment time divided into

  11. Three-dimensional conformal radiation may deliver considerable dose of incidental nodal irradiation in patients with early stage node-negative non-small cell lung cancer when the tumor is large and centrally located

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Lujun; Chen Ming; Haken, Randall ten; Chetty, Indrin; Chapet, Olivier; Hayman, James A.; Kong Fengming

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine the dose to regional nodal stations in patients with T 1-3 N 0 M 0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) without intentional elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Materials and methods: Twenty-three patients with medically inoperable T 1-3 N 0 M 0 NSCLC were treated with 3DCRT without ENI. Hilar and mediastinal nodal regions were contoured on planning CT. The prescription dose was normalized to 70 Gy. Equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and other dosimetric parameters (e.g., V 40 ) were calculated for each nodal station. Results: The median EUD for the whole group ranged from 0.4 to 4.4 Gy for all elective nodal regions. Gross tumor volume (GTV) and the relationship between GTV and hilum were significantly correlated with irradiation dose to ipsilateral hilar nodal regions (P 3 (diameter ∼ 4 cm) and or having any overlap with hilum, the median EUDs were 9.6, 22.6, and 62.9 Gy for ipsilateral lower paratracheal, subcarinal, and ipsilateral hilar regions, respectively. The corresponding median V 40 were 32.5%, 39.3%, and 97.6%, respectively. Conclusions: Although incidental nodal irradiation dose is low in the whole group, the dose to high-risk nodal regions is considerable in patients with T 1-3 N 0 NSCLC when the primary is large and/or centrally located

  12. Clinical Applications of 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralbell, Raymond

    Although a significant improvement in cancer cure (i.e. 20% increment) has been obtained in the last 2-3 decades, 30-40% of patients still fail locally after curative radiotherapy. In order to improve local tumor control rates with radiotherapy high doses to the tumor volume are frequently necessary. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT) is used to denote a spectrum of radiation planning and delivery techniques that rely on three-dimensional imaging to define the target (tumor) and to distinguish it from normal tissues. Modern, high-precision radiotherapy (RT) techniques are needed in order to implement the goal of optimal tumor destruction delivering minimal dose to the non-target normal tissues. A better target definition is nowadays possible with contemporary imaging (computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography) and image registration technology. A highly precise dose distributions can be obtained with optimal 3-D CRT treatment delivery techniques such as stereotactic RT, intensity modulated RT (IMRT), or protontherapy (the latter allowing for in-depth conformation). Patient daily set-up repositioning and internal organ immobilization systems are necessary before considering to undertake any of the above mentioned high-precision treatment approaches. Prostate cancer, brain tumors, and base of skull malignancies are among the sites most benefitting of dose escalation approaches. Nevertheless, a significant dose reduction to the normal tissues in the vicinity of the irradiated tumor also achievable with optimal 3-D CRT may also be a major issue in the treatment of pediatric tumors in order to preserve growth, normal development, and to reduce the risk of developing radiation induced diseases such as cancer or endocrinologic disorders.

  13. HDR monotherapy for prostate cancer: A simulation study to determine the effect of catheter displacement on target coverage and normal tissue irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K.; Roos, Martin A.; Aluwini, Shafak

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to systematically analyse the effect of catheter displacements both on target coverage and normal tissue irradiation in fractionated high dose rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy, using a simulation study, and to define tolerances for catheter displacement ensuring that both target coverage and normal tissue doses remain clinically acceptable. Besides the effect of total implant displacement, also displacements of catheters belonging to selected template rows only were evaluated in terms of target coverage and normal tissue dose, in order to analyse the change in dose distribution as a function of catheter dwell weight and catheter location. Material and methods: Five representative implant geometries, with 17 catheters each, were selected. The clinical treatment plan was compared to treatment plans in which an entire implant displacement in caudal direction over 3, 5, 7 and 10 mm was simulated. Besides, treatment plans were simulated considering a displacement of either the central, most ventral or most dorsal catheter rows only, over 5 mm caudally. Results: Due to displacement of the entire implant the target coverage drops below the tolerance of 93% for all displacements studied. The effect of displacement of the entire implant on organs at risk strongly depended on the patient anatomy; e.g., for 80% of the implant geometries the V 80 of the rectum exceeded its tolerance for all displacements. The effect of displacement of catheters belonging to selected template rows depended strongly on the relative weight of each catheter row when considering the target coverage and on its location when considering the dose in the organs at risk. Conclusion: This study supports the need for a check of the catheter locations before each fraction and correction of deviations of the catheter position exceeding 3 mm.

  14. Moderate risk-adapted dose escalation with 3D-conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer from 70 to 74 Gy : long-term morbidity and survival from a prospective phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombosch, V. B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract English Background and Purpose: Evaluation of late side-effects and survival more than 60 months after 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with moderate, risk adapted dose escalation from 70 to 74 Gy in patients with localized prostate cancer within a prospective Austrian-German phase II multicenter trial. Material and Methods: Between 03/1999 and 07/2002 486 patients were registered in the prospective Austrian-German multicenter phase II trial. 441 (90.7%) patients were evaluated. Patients in the low and intermediate risk group were treated with 70Gy, patients in the high risk group received 74Gy. Additional hormonal-therapy was recommended for intermediate- and high-risk group patients. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) late toxicity according to EORTC/RTOG criteria, initial appearance, prevalence and duration of grade >=2 side-effects were investigated. Furthermore bNED (Phoenix/Nadir + 2), overall and disease specific survival were prospectively assessed. Results: Median follow-up was 90 (2-158) months in all 441 patients and 99 (18-158) months in living patients. 154 patients (35%) had a follow-up of longer or equal 120 months. Distribution among risk groups was 26% (low), 51% (intermediate) and 23% (high). HT was administered in 86% of patients prior to RT. Late gastrointestinal side-effects at 5- and 10 years were 29%/32% (70/74Gy) and 30%/35% (70/74Gy) as actuarial rates; p=0.67. Late genitourinary side-effects at 5- and 10 years were 17%/26% (70/74Gy) and 27%/34% (70/74Gy); p=0.12. No more than 15% (GI) and 15% (GU) of patients suffered from side-effects >=2 at any time after the end of therapy (prevalence). The proportion of patients suffering from severe toxicity was low (Grade 3 GI: 2%, GU: 10%). 10 year actuarial bNED rate was 65%, 70% and 58% in the low-, intermediate- and high risk group according to Phoenix (Nadir +2) criteria. Overall and disease specific survival were 67% and 91% in all patients. Conclusion: Dose escalation

  15. Evaluating the relationship between erectile dysfunction and dose received by the penile bulb: Using data from a randomised controlled trial of conformal radiotherapy in prostate cancer (MRC RT01, ISRCTN47772397)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangar, Stephen A.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Tucker, Helen L.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the relationship between erectile function and the radiation dose to the penile bulb and other proximal penile structures in men receiving conformal radiotherapy (CFRT) for prostate cancer (PCa). Methods: The Medical Research Council (MRC) RT01 trial randomised 843 men who had localised PCa to receive either 64 or 74 Gy after 3-6 months neoadjuvant hormonal treatment. Fifty-one men were selected who were potent prior to hormonal treatment, having completed both pre-hormone and 2-year post-CFRT Quality of Life assessments, and on whom dose volume data were available for analysis. The men were divided into three groups according to 2-year follow-up: potent, reduced potency, and impotent. The bulb of the penis together with the crura, were outlined on restored treatment plans. Dose-volume histograms were generated and compared between the three groups. An ordered logistic regression model was used to calculate the odds ratio of a range of dose-volume parameters to the penile bulb and effect on erectile dysfunction. The dose to the penile bulb was correlated to the dose received by the crura. Results: Of the 51 patients, 12 remained potent, 22 had reduced potency, and 17 were impotent at 2 years. No differences were seen in mean dose to the penile bulb by allocated treatment (t test = 1.61, p = 0.11). The mean doses to the penile bulb received by the potent, reduced potency, and impotent groups were 45.5 Gy (SD 17.1), 48 Gy (SD 16.1), and 59.2 Gy (SD 13.8), respectively. There was a strong correlation between the mean dose received by the penile bulb and dose to the crura (r = 0.82, p < 0.0001). 83.3% of impotent patients received a D90 ≥50 Gy to the penile bulb compared with 29.4% of patients who maintained potency at 2 years (p 0.006). Conclusion: There is evidence from this study to suggest a dose volume effect on the penile bulb and erectile dysfunction. A D90 ≥50 Gy is associated with a significant risk of erectile dysfunction and this should

  16. Persistently better treatment planning results of intensity-modulated (IMRT) over conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in prostate cancer patients with significant variation of clinical target volume and/or organs-at-risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenoglietto, Pascal; Laliberte, Benoit; Allaw, Ali; Ailleres, Norbert; Idri, Katia; Hay, Meng Huor; Moscardo, Carmen Llacer; Gourgou, Sophie; Dubois, Jean-Bernard; Azria, David

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the dose coverage of planning and clinical target volume (PTV, CTV), and organs-at-risk (OAR) between intensity-modulated (3D-IMRT) and conventional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) before and after internal organ variation in prostate cancer. Methods and materials: We selected 10 patients with clinically significant interfraction volume changes. Patients were treated with 3D-IMRT to 80 Gy (minimum PTV dose of 76 Gy, excluding rectum). Fictitious, equivalent 3D-CRT plans (80 Gy at isocenter, with 95% isodose (76 Gy) coverage of PTV, with rectal blocking above 76 Gy) were generated using the same planning CT data set ('CT planning'). The plans were then also applied to a verification CT scan ('CT verify') obtained at a different moment. PTV, CTV, and OAR dose coverage were compared using non-parametric tests statistics for V95, V90 (% of the volume receiving ≥95 or 90% of the dose) and D50 (dose to 50% of the volume). Results: Mean V95 of the PTV for 'CT planning' was 94.3% (range, 88-99) vs 89.1% (range, 84-94.5) for 3D-IMRT and 3D-CRT (p = 0.005), respectively. Mean V95 of the CTV for 'CT verify' was 97% for both 3D-IMRT and 3D-CRT. Mean D50 of the rectum for 'CT planning' was 26.8 Gy (range, 22-35) vs 43.5 Gy (range, 33.5-50.5) for 3D-IMRT and 3D-CRT (p = 0.0002), respectively. For 'CT verify', this D50 was 31.1 Gy (range, 16.5-44) vs 44.2 Gy (range, 34-55) for 3D-IMRT and 3D-CRT (p = 0.006), respectively. V95 of the rectum was 0% for both plans for 'CT planning', and 2.3% (3D-IMRT) vs 2.1% (3D-CRT) for 'CT verify' (p = non-sig.). Conclusion: Dose coverage of the PTV and OAR was better with 3D-IMRT for each patient and remained so after internal volume changes

  17. About the Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us About the Prostate Prostate Cancer Basics Risk Factors Prostate Cancer Prevention ... that connects to the anus. Ultrasound of the prostate Prostate Zones The prostate is divided into several ...

  18. Conformality lost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, David B.; Lee, Jong-Wan; Son, Dam T.; Stephanov, Mikhail A.

    2009-01-01

    We consider zero-temperature transitions from conformal to nonconformal phases in quantum theories. We argue that there are three generic mechanisms for the loss of conformality in any number of dimensions: (i) fixed point goes to zero coupling, (ii) fixed point runs off to infinite coupling, or (iii) an IR fixed point annihilates with a UV fixed point and they both disappear into the complex plane. We give both relativistic and nonrelativistic examples of the last case in various dimensions and show that the critical behavior of the mass gap behaves similarly to the correlation length in the finite temperature Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) phase transition in two dimensions, ξ∼exp(c/|T-T c | 1/2 ). We speculate that the chiral phase transition in QCD at large number of fermion flavors belongs to this universality class, and attempt to identify the UV fixed point that annihilates with the Banks-Zaks fixed point at the lower end of the conformal window.

  19. Osteogenic sarcoma of the prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiyama, Tsutomu; Terunuma, Masahiro [Koseiren Nagaoka Chuo General Hospital, Niigata (Japan); Ikarashi, Toshihiko; Ishizaki, Satoshi

    2001-04-01

    A 76-year-old man was treated with bilateral orchiectomy, estramustine phosphate and pelvic irradiation for prostate cancer. Osteogenic sarcoma of the prostate developed 18 months after the treatment. Postmortem examination revealed that the tumor was 8 cm in diameter and had infiltrated into the bladder and rectal walls and had resulted in peritoneal dissemination. There was no distant metastasis. Macroscopically, the tumor was ashen, firm and relatively homogenous and diffusely spread. Histologically, it was composed of spindle and pleomorphic cells, which were making osteoid with calcification. There was no ordinary tubular formation as shown in adenocarcinoma of the prostate. No positive immunostaining for prostate-specific antigen, epithelial membrane antigen and cytokeratin (AE-1, AE-3) were confirmed. Positive immunostaining for nonepithelial marker vimentin was confirmed. The ultimate diagnosis was osteogenic sarcoma of the prostate. (author)

  20. Dosimetric comparison between conformational irradiation and helical tomo-therapy in supra-diaphragmatic Hodgkin disease in paediatrics; Comparaison dosimetrique entre l'irradiation conformationelle et la tomotherapie helicoidale dans la maladie de Hodgkin sus-diaphragmatique en pediatrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padovani, L.; Taright, N.; Muraracciole, X.; Nomikossof, N.; Capdeville, S.; Portal, T.; Cowen, D. [Assistance publique-hopitaux de Marseille (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the comparison of dosimetry when using three-dimensional conformational radiotherapy or intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT) in the case of 13 children treated for a Hodgkin disease. The comparison is made in terms of previsional target volume (PTV) coverage and of doses received at the level of organs at risk. Coverage is almost the same for both techniques. Helical tomo-therapy allows the reduction of doses delivered to the heart, spine and lungs, including low doses (V5 and V10) while respecting an identical PTV coverage. This dose reduction could result in a reduction of toxicity on the long term, which is a major challenge for cured children. Short communication

  1. Dosimetric comparison between VMAT and RC3D techniques: case of prostate treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemingui, Fatima Zohra; Benrachi, Fatima; Bali, Mohamed Saleh; Ladjal, Hamid

    2017-09-01

    Considered as the second men cancer in Algeria, prostate cancer is treated in 70% by radiation. That's why radiation therapy is therapeutic weapon for prostate cancer. Conformational Radiotherapy in 3D is the most common technique [1-5]. The use of conventionally optimized treatment plans was compared at case scenario of optimized treatment plans VMAT for prostate cancer. The evaluation of the two optimizations strategies focused on the resulting plans ability to retain dose objectives under the influence of patient set up. Dose Volume Histogram in the Planning Target Volume and dose in the Organs At Risks were used to calculate the conformity index, and evaluation ratio of irradiated volume which represent the main tool of comparison [6,7]. The situation was analysed systematically. The 14% dose increase in the target leads to a decrease in the dose in adjacent organs with 39% in the bladder. Therefore, the criterion for better efficacy and less toxicity reveal that VMAT is the best choice.

  2. Dosimetric comparison between VMAT and RC3D techniques: case of prostate treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chemingui Fatima Zohra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Considered as the second men cancer in Algeria, prostate cancer is treated in 70% by radiation. That's why radiation therapy is therapeutic weapon for prostate cancer. Conformational Radiotherapy in 3D is the most common technique [1−5]. The use of conventionally optimized treatment plans was compared at case scenario of optimized treatment plans VMAT for prostate cancer. The evaluation of the two optimizations strategies focused on the resulting plans ability to retain dose objectives under the influence of patient set up. Dose Volume Histogram in the Planning Target Volume and dose in the Organs At Risks were used to calculate the conformity index, and evaluation ratio of irradiated volume which represent the main tool of comparison [6,7]. The situation was analysed systematically. The 14% dose increase in the target leads to a decrease in the dose in adjacent organs with 39% in the bladder. Therefore, the criterion for better efficacy and less toxicity reveal that VMAT is the best choice.

  3. Can the prostate brachytherapy by permanent implants represent an alternative to external radiotherapy for the localised prostate cancers with intermediary risk?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnault, B.; Duberge, T.; Salem, N.; Boher, J.M.; Gravis, G.; Bladou, F.; Jochen, W.; Resbeut, M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: the prostate brachytherapy stands out as treatment of low risk prostate cancers, but the data concerning its use as exclusive treatment of intermediary risk prostate cancer are rare. We present a retrospective analysis of intermediary risk prostate cancers which treatment was either an external conformal radiotherapy or an exclusive brachytherapy. conclusion: In this mono centric series, the brachytherapy brings excellent results in comparison with external conformal radiotherapy with dose escalation and could be proposed as alternative to patients suffering of intermediary risk prostate cancer. (N.C.)

  4. Prostatitis - nonbacterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    NBP; Prostatodynia; Pelvic pain syndrome; CPPS; Chronic nonbacterial prostatitis; Chronic genitourinary pain ... Possible causes of nonbacterial prostatitis include: A past ... common types of bacteria Irritation caused by a backup of urine ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty ... Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pictures of a man’s prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an ... Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Prostate ultrasound, ...

  7. Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  8. Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breast cancer (BRCA1 or BRCA2) or a very strong family history of breast cancer, your risk of prostate cancer may be higher. Obesity. Obese men diagnosed with prostate cancer may be more likely ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page ... to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ...

  10. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist and patient consultation. View full size with caption Related Articles and Media Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of the Prostate) ...

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such ... also called transrectal ultrasound, provides images of a man's prostate gland and surrounding tissue. The exam typically ...

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is used to guide the biopsy to specific regions of the prostate gland. When the examination is ... is relatively insensitive to the pain in the region of the prostate. A biopsy will add time ...

  13. An analysis of clinical and treatment related prognostic factors on outcome using biochemical control as an end-point in patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, Eric M.; Vicini, Frank A.; Ziaja, Ellen L.; Dmuchowski, Carl F.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience in treating patients with clinically localized prostate cancer with external beam irradiation (RT) to determine if previously analyzed clinical and treatment related prognostic factors affected outcome when biochemical control was used as an end-point to evaluate results. Materials and methods: Between 1 January 1987 and 31 December 1991, 470 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with external beam RT using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital. Biochemical control was defined as PSA nadir ≤1.5 ng/ml within 1 year of treatment. After achieving nadir, if two consecutive increases of PSA were noted, the patient was scored a failure at the time of the first increase. Prognostic factors, including the total number of days in treatment, the method of diagnosis, a history of any pretreatment transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and the type of boost were analyzed. Results: Median follow-up was 48 months. No statistically significant difference in rates of biochemical control were noted for treatment time, overall time (date of biopsy to completion of RT), history of any pretreatment TURP, history of diagnosis by TURP, or boost techniques. Patients diagnosed by TURP had a significant improvement in the overall rate of biochemical control (P < 0.03) compared to transrectal/transperineal biopsy. The 5-year actuarial rates were 58 versus 39%, respectively. This improvement was not evident when pretreatment PSA, T stage, or Gleason score were controlled for. On multivariate analysis, no variable was associated with outcome. When analysis was limited to a more favorable group of patients (T1/T2 tumors, pretreatment PSA ≤20 ng/ml and Gleason score <7), none of these variables were significantly predictive of biochemical control when controlling for pretreatment PSA, T stage and Gleason score. Conclusions: No significant effect of treatment time, overall time, pretreatment

  14. Bacterial prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Bradley C; Shoskes, Daniel A

    2016-02-01

    The review provides the infectious disease community with a urologic perspective on bacterial prostatitis. Specifically, the article briefly reviews the categorization of prostatitis by type and provides a distillation of new findings published on bacterial prostatitis over the past year. It also highlights key points from the established literature. Cross-sectional prostate imaging is becoming more common and may lead to more incidental diagnoses of acute bacterial prostatitis. As drug resistance remains problematic in this condition, the reemergence of older antibiotics such as fosfomycin, has proven beneficial. With regard to chronic bacterial prostatitis, no clear clinical risk factors emerged in a large epidemiological study. However, bacterial biofilm formation has been associated with more severe cases. Surgery has a limited role in bacterial prostatitis and should be reserved for draining of a prostatic abscess or the removal of infected prostatic stones. Prostatitis remains a common and bothersome clinical condition. Antibiotic therapy remains the basis of treatment for both acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis. Further research into improving prostatitis treatment is indicated.

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the prostate. help diagnose the cause of a man's infertility. A transrectal ultrasound of the prostate gland is typically used to help diagnose symptoms such as: a nodule felt by a physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated ...

  16. Prostate Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine away from ... and out of the body. A young man's prostate is about the size of a walnut. It ...

  17. In vivo studies on the efficiency of irradiation with carbon ions at the syngeneic prostate carcinoma model R3327; In vivo Untersuchungen zur Wirksamkeit von Bestrahlungen mit Kohlenstoffionen am syngenen Prostatakarzinom Modell R3327

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowa, Christin

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize differential effects after carbon ion ({sup 12}C) relative to photon irradiations in vivo in three different sublines of the syngeneic rat prostate adenocarcinoma (PCa) R3327 (AT1, HI, and H) as well as to identify tumor specific influence factors of the radiation response. Subcutaneous PCa tumor fragments in rats were irradiated with single (1 Fx) or split (2 Fx) doses of photons or carbon ions (75 keV/μ), respectively. Primary endpoint was local tumor control after 300 days. Based on dose-response curves, the TCD{sub 50{sup -}} values (dose at 50% tumor control probability) were used to calculate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon ions. Additionally, potential carbon ion specific irradiation effects were studied. For this, in vivo tumor-physiological changes, structural and functional radiation- induced effects of gene expression as well as tumor subpopulations with tumor-inducing properties were investigated. For {sup 12}C- irradiations with 1 Fx or 2 Fx, the RBEs were 1.62 (H), 2.08 (HI) and 2.3 (AT1) and 1.9 (H), 2.1 (HI) and 2.67 (AT1), respectively. Isoeffective irradiation with photons and {sup 12}C- ions showed different kinetics of the radiation response. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology showed a faster and stronger increase of tumor vessel permeability after {sup 12}C- irradiation compared to photons. After irradiation, DNA-repair mechanisms, immune system components and migration were induced, in contrast cell cycle progression, adhesion, angiogenesis, and the aerobic metabolism were downregulated. Especially, the kinetics of signaling cascades, apoptosis and stress-response were dependent on irradiation modality. In HI- and H-tumors CD24{sup +}/CD45{sup -} cells were identified as tumor inducing cells (TICs) in vivo. All three sublines were established under cell culture conditions to enable further molecular biological analyses. In conclusion, {sup 12}C- irradiation is

  18. What about sexual life after therapy for prostate cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosset, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The precise assessment of sexual dysfunction after treatment of prostatic cancer cannot be avoided in 2002. These iatrogenic complications may significantly alter the quality of life of the patients. In addition, sexual toxicity is progressively becoming a cardinal parameter for the treatment choice, both for the patient and the physician. Significant efforts allowed to reduce sexual toxicity after therapy in the recent years. As an example, nerve-sparing surgical techniques have been proposed, whenever reasonable. However, in spite of these surgical advances, data suggest that overall, the new irradiation techniques (conformal radiotherapy and brachytherapy) are responsible for less alteration of sexual life than surgery. Another potential advantage is that sildenafil (Viagra) is able to restore potency in a majority of cases after radiotherapy, while it is usually poorly effective after surgery. (author)

  19. Comparación de costes de tres tratamientos del cáncer de próstata localizado en España: prostatectomía radical, braquiterapia prostática y radioterapia conformacional externa 3D Cost comparison of three treatments for localized prostate cancer in Spain: radical prostatectomy, prostate brachytherapy and external 3D conformal radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Becerra Bachino

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Comparar los costes de los tratamientos más establecidos para el cáncer de próstata localizado según grupos de riesgo, edad y comorbilidad, desde la perspectiva del proveedor asistencial. Métodos: Comparación de costes en pacientes reclutados consecutivamente entre 2003 y 2005 en una unidad funcional de tratamiento del cáncer de próstata. La utilización de servicios hasta 6 meses después del inicio del tratamiento se obtuvo de las bases de datos hospitalarias, y los costes directos se estimaron mediante cálculo microcoste. La información sobre las características clínicas de los pacientes y los tratamientos recogió prospectivamente. Los costes se compararon mediante tests no paramétricos de comparación de medianas (Kruskall-Wallis y un modelo semilogarítmico de regresión múltiple. Resultados: La diferencia de costes fue estadísticamente significativa: medianas de 3229.10 €, 5369.00 € y 6265.60 € para los pacientes tratados con radioterapia conformacional externa 3D, braquiterapia, y prostatectomía radical retropública, respectivamente (pObjective: To compare the initial costs of the three most established treatments for clinically localized prostate cancer according to risk, age and comorbidity groups, from the healthcare provider's perspective. Methods: We carried out a cost comparison study in a sample of patients consecutively recruited between 2003 and 2005 from a functional unit for prostate cancer treatment in Catalonia (Spain. The use of services up to 6 months after the treatment start date was obtained from hospital databases and direct costs were estimated by micro-cost calculation. Information on the clinical characteristics of patients and treatments was collected prospectively. Costs were compared by using nonparametric tests comparing medians (Kruskall-Wallis and a semi-logarithmic multiple regression model. Results: Among the 398 patients included, the cost difference among treatments was

  20. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Prostate Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Prostate ...

  1. Incidental irradiation of internal mammary lymph nodes in breast cancer: conventional two-dimensional radiotherapy versus conformal three-dimensional radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Elton Trigo Teixeira; Ugino, Rafael Tsuneki; Lopes, Mauricio Russo; Pelosi, Edilson Lopes; Silva, Joao Luis Fernandes da, E-mail: eltontt@gmail.com [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radiologia e Oncologia; Santana, Marco Antonio; Ferreira, Denis Vasconcelos; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia e Oncologia

    2016-05-15

    Objective: to evaluate incidental irradiation of the internal mammary lymph nodes (IMLNs) through opposed tangential fields with conventional two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) radiotherapy techniques and to compare the results between the two techniques. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of 80 breast cancer patients in whom radiotherapy of the IMLNs was not indicated: 40 underwent 2D radiotherapy with computed tomography for dosimetric control, and 40 underwent 3D radiotherapy. The total prescribed dose was 50.0 Gy or 50.4 Gy (2.0 or 1.8 Gy/day, respectively). We reviewed all plans and defined the IMLNs following the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recommendations. For the IMLNs, we analyzed the proportion of the volume that received 45 Gy, the proportion of the volume that received 25 Gy, the dose to 95% of the volume, the dose to 50% of the volume, the mean dose, the minimum dose (Dmin), and the maximum dose (Dmax). Results: Left-sided treatments predominated in the 3D cohort. There were no differences between the 2D and 3D cohorts regarding tumor stage, type of surgery (mastectomy, breast-conserving surgery, or mastectomy with immediate reconstruction), or mean delineated IMLN volume (6.8 vs. 5.9 mL; p = 0.411). Except for the Dmin, all dosimetric parameters presented higher mean values in the 3D cohort (p < 0.05). The median Dmax in the 3D cohort was 50.34 Gy. However, the mean dose to the IMLNs was 7.93 Gy in the 2D cohort, compared with 20.64 Gy in the 3D cohort. Conclusion: Neither technique delivered enough doses to the IMLNs to achieve subclinical disease control. However, all of the dosimetric parameters were significantly higher for the 3D technique. (author)

  2. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy and external-beam radiotherapy versus external-beam irradiation alone for prostate cancer. A quality-of-life analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc D.; Asadpour, Branka; Gagel, Bernd; Fischedick, Karin; Siluschek, Jaroslav; Kehl, Mareike; Krenkel, Barbara; Eble, Michael J. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2009-02-15

    To evaluate the impact of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (NHT) on quality of life after external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. A group of 170 patients (85 with and 85 without NHT) has been surveyed prospectively before EBRT (70.2-72 Gy), at the last day of EBRT, a median time of 2 months and 15 months after EBRT using a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). Pairs with and without NHT (median treatment time of 3.5 months before EBRT) were matched according to the respective planning target volume and prostate volume. Before EBRT, significantly lower urinary function/bother, sexual function and hormonal function/bother scores were found for patients with NHT. More than 1 year after EBRT, only sexual function scores remained lower. In a multivariate analysis, NHT and adjuvant hormonal therapy (HT) versus NHT only (hazard ratio 14; 95% confidence interval 2.7-183; p = 0.02) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists versus antiandrogens (hazard ratio 3.6; 95% confidence interval 1.1-12; p = 0.04) proved to be independent risk factors for long-term erectile dysfunction (no or very poor ability to have an erection). With the exception of sexual function (additional adjuvant HT and application of LHRH analog independently adverse), short-term NHT was not found to decrease quality of life after EBRT for prostate cancer. (orig.)

  3. Risk of isolated nodal failure for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with the elective nodal irradiation (ENI) using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) techniques - A retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kepka, Lucyna; Bujko, Krzysztof; Zolciak-Siwinska, Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. To estimate retrospectively the rate of isolated nodal failures (INF) in NSCLC patients treated with the elective nodal irradiation (ENI) using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Materials/methods. One hundred and eighty-five patients with I-IIIB stage treated with 3D-CRT in consecutive clinical trials differing in an extent of the ENI were analyzed. According to the extent of the ENI, two groups were distinguished: extended (n=124) and limited (n=61) ENI. INF was defined as regional nodal failure occurring without local progression. Cumulative Incidence of INF (CIINF) was evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis with regard to prognostic factors. Results. With a median follow up of 30 months, the two-year actuarial overall survival was 35%. The two-year CIINF rate was 12%. There were 16 (9%) INF, eight (6%) for extended and eight (13%) for limited ENI. In the univariate analysis bulky mediastinal disease (BMD), left side, higher N stage, and partial response to RT had a significant negative impact on the CIINF. BMD was the only independent predictor of the risk of incidence of the INF (p=0.001). Conclusions. INF is more likely to occur in case of more advanced nodal status

  4. Risk of isolated nodal failure for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with the elective nodal irradiation (ENI) using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) techniques--a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepka, Lucyna; Bujko, Krzysztof; Zolciak-Siwinska, Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    To estimate retrospectively the rate of isolated nodal failures (INF) in NSCLC patients treated with the elective nodal irradiation (ENI) using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). One hundred and eighty-five patients with I-IIIB stage treated with 3D-CRT in consecutive clinical trials differing in an extent of the ENI were analyzed. According to the extent of the ENI, two groups were distinguished: extended (n = 124) and limited (n = 61) ENI. INF was defined as regional nodal failure occurring without local progression. Cumulative Incidence of INF (CIINF) was evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis with regard to prognostic factors. With a median follow up of 30 months, the two-year actuarial overall survival was 35%. The two-year CIINF rate was 12%. There were 16 (9%) INF, eight (6%) for extended and eight (13%) for limited ENI. In the univariate analysis bulky mediastinal disease (BMD), left side, higher N stage, and partial response to RT had a significant negative impact on the CIINF. BMD was the only independent predictor of the risk of incidence of the INF (p = 0.001). INF is more likely to occur in case of more advanced nodal status.

  5. Conformal Tachyons

    CERN Document Server

    Tomaschitz, R

    2000-01-01

    We study tachyons conformally coupled to the background geometry of a Milne universe. The causality of superluminal signal transfer is scrutinized in this context. The cosmic time of the comoving frame determines a distinguished time order for events connected by superluminal signals. An observer can relate his rest frame to the galaxy frame, and compare so the time order of events in his proper time to the cosmic time order. All observers can in this way arrive at identical conclusions on the causality of events connected by superluminal signals. An unambiguous energy concept for tachyonic rays is defined by means of the cosmic time of the comoving reference frame, without resorting to an antiparticle interpretation. On that basis we give an explicit proof that no signals can be sent into the past of observers. Causality violating signals are energetically forbidden, as they would have negative energy in the rest frame of the emitting observer. If an observer emits a superluminal signal, the tachyonic respon...

  6. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bey, P.; Beckendorf, V.; Stines, J.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation therapy of prostate carcinoma with a curative intent implies to treat the whole prostate at high dose (at least 66 Gy). According to clinical stage, PSA level, Gleason's score, the clinical target volume may include seminal vesicles and less often pelvic lymph nodes. Microscopic extra-capsular extension is found in 15 to 60% of T1-T2 operated on, specially in apex tumors. On contrary, cancers developing from the transitional zone may stay limited to the prostate even with a big volume and with a high PSA level. Zonal anatomy of the prostate identifies internal prostate, including the transitional zone (5% of the prostate in young people). External prostate includes central and peripheral zones. The inferior limit of the prostate is not lower than the inferior border of the pubic symphysis. Clinical and radiological examination: ultrasonography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), CT-scan identify prognostic factors as tumor volume, capsule effraction, seminal vesicles invasion and lymph node extension. The identification of the clinical target volume is now done mainly by CT-Scan which identifies prostate and seminal vesicles. NMR could be helpful to identify more precisely prostate apex. The definition of margins around the clinical target volume has to take in account daily reproducibility and organ motion and of course the maximum tolerable dose for organs at risk. (authors)

  7. Conformal field theory in conformal space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preitschopf, C.R.; Vasiliev, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    We present a new framework for a Lagrangian description of conformal field theories in various dimensions based on a local version of d + 2-dimensional conformal space. The results include a true gauge theory of conformal gravity in d = (1, 3) and any standard matter coupled to it. An important feature is the automatic derivation of the conformal gravity constraints, which are necessary for the analysis of the matter systems

  8. Margin Evaluation in the Presence of Deformation, Rotation, and Translation in Prostate and Entire Seminal Vesicle Irradiation With Daily Marker-Based Setup Corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutanga, Theodore F.; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Wielen, Gerard J. van der; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Incrocci, Luca; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method for margin evaluation accounting for all measured displacements during treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: For 21 patients treated with stereographic targeting marker-based online translation corrections, dose distributions with varying margins and gradients were created. Sets of possible cumulative delivered dose distributions were simulated by moving voxels and accumulating dose per voxel. Voxel motion was simulated consistent with measured distributions of systematic and random displacements due to stereographic targeting inaccuracies, deformation, rotation, and intrafraction motion. The method of simulation maintained measured correlation of voxel motions due to organ deformation. Results: For the clinical target volume including prostate and seminal vesicles (SV), the probability that some part receives <95% of the prescribed dose, the changes in minimum dose, and volume receiving 95% of prescription dose compared with planning were 80.5% ± 19.2%, 9.0 ± 6.8 Gy, and 3.0% ± 3.7%, respectively, for the smallest studied margins (3 mm prostate, 5 mm SV) and steepest dose gradients. Corresponding values for largest margins (5 mm prostate, 8 mm SV) with a clinical intensity-modulated radiotherapy dose distribution were 46.5% ± 34.7%, 6.7 ± 5.8 Gy, and 1.6% ± 2.3%. For