WorldWideScience

Sample records for prostate cancer therapies

  1. Focal therapy in prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bos, W.

    2016-01-01

    Interesting developments took place in the treatment of prostate cancer including focal therapy for less aggressive organ-confined prostate cancer. Fortunately, curative treatment is often still an option for patients suffering from the lower staged tumors. In carefully selected patients, the

  2. Radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Katsumasa

    2001-01-01

    In Japan, where the mortality rate of prostate cancer is lower than in Western countries, radical prostatectomy or hormonal therapy has been applied more frequently than radiation therapy. However, the number of patients with prostate cancer has been increasing recently and the importance of radiation therapy has rapidly been recognized. Although there have been no randomized trials, results from several institutions in Western countries suggest that similar results of cancer control are achieved with either radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. For higher-risk cases, conformal high-dose therapy or adjuvant hormonal therapy is more appropriate. In this article, the results of radiation therapy for prostate cancer were reviewed, with a view to the appropriate choice of therapy in Japan. (author)

  3. Gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-31

    Cancer remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in understanding, detection, and treatment, it accounts for almost one-fourth of all deaths per year in Western countries. Prostate cancer is currently the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in Europe and the United States, accounting for 15% of all cancers in men. As life expectancy of individuals increases, it is expected that there will also be an increase in the incidence and mortality of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer may be inoperable at initial presentation, unresponsive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, or recur following appropriate treatment. At the time of presentation, patients may already have metastases in their tissues. Preventing tumor recurrence requires systemic therapy; however, current modalities are limited by toxicity or lack of efficacy. For patients with such metastatic cancers, the development of alternative therapies is essential. Gene therapy is a realistic prospect for the treatment of prostate and other cancers, and involves the delivery of genetic information to the patient to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. Therapeutics can act directly (eg, by inducing tumor cells to produce cytotoxic agents) or indirectly by upregulating the immune system to efficiently target tumor cells or by destroying the tumor\\'s vasculature. However, technological difficulties must be addressed before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved (primarily by developing a means of delivering genes to the target cells or tissue safely and efficiently). A wealth of research has been carried out over the past 20 years, involving various strategies for the treatment of prostate cancer at preclinical and clinical trial levels. The therapeutic efficacy observed with many of these approaches in patients indicates that these treatment modalities will serve as an important component of urological malignancy treatment in the clinic, either in isolation or

  4. Radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Bridget F; Lee, W Robert

    2013-07-01

    Radiation therapy is an effective treatment for newly diagnosed prostate cancer, salvage treatment, or for palliation of advanced disease. Herein we briefly discuss the indications, results, and complications associated with brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy, when used as monotherapy and in combination with each other or androgen deprivation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiation therapy for prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Akira; Minowada, Shigeru; Tomoishi, Junzo; Kinoshita, Kenji; Matsuda, Tadayoshi

    1983-01-01

    A conformation radiotherapy system with collimators, whose openings can be controlled symmetrically by computerized techniques during rotational irradiation by a linear accelerator, has been developed for routine use in our hospital. Forty-four patients underwent radiation therapy, including this particular modality of radiotherapy, for prostatic cancer during the period of July 1976 through December 1981. Eight patients were classified as stage A, 10 stage B, 10 stage C, and 16 as stage D. Twenty-nine patients underwent conformation radiotherapy, two rotation radiotherapy, eight 2-port opposing technique radiotherapy, one 4-field radiotherapy, and four underwent a combination of 2-port opposing technique and conformation radiotherapy. Transient mild side effects such as diarrhea occurred in seven cases, while severe side effects such as rectal stricture or contracted bladder occurred in three cases. The latter occurred only in one case among 29 of conformation radiotherapy and in two among eight of 2-port opposing technique radiotherapy. The results of the treatment of short intervals in stage B, C, and D are as follows: prostatic size was reduced in 26 cases among 36, serum acid phosphatase level was reduced in 15 among 18 who had showed high acid phosphatase levels before treatment, although almost all cases underwent simultaneous hormonal therapy. The effects of radiotherapy alone were verified in two cases of stage B in which radiotherapy preceded hormonal therapy. Prostatic size and serum acid phosphatase level were reduced by radiotherapy alone. (author)

  6. Prostate Cancer (Radiation Therapy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be considered carefully, balancing the advantages against the disadvantages as they relate to the individual man's age, ... therapy with photon or x-rays: Uses advanced technology to tailor the x-ray or photon radiation ...

  7. Progress in Gene Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Davis, Brian J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Wilson, Torrence M. [Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Wiseman, Gregory A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Federspiel, Mark J. [Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Morris, John C., E-mail: davis.brian@mayo.edu [Division of Endocrinology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2012-11-19

    Gene therapy has held promise to correct various disease processes. Prostate cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. A number of clinical trials involving gene therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer have been reported. The ability to efficiently transduce tumors with effective levels of therapeutic genes has been identified as a fundamental barrier to effective cancer gene therapy. The approach utilizing gene therapy in prostate cancer patients at our institution attempts to address this deficiency. The sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) is responsible for the ability of the thyroid gland to transport and concentrate iodide. The characteristics of the NIS gene suggest that it could represent an ideal therapeutic gene for cancer therapy. Published results from Mayo Clinic researchers have indicated several important successes with the use of the NIS gene and prostate gene therapy. Studies have demonstrated that transfer of the human NIS gene into prostate cancer using adenovirus vectors in vitro and in vivo results in efficient uptake of radioactive iodine and significant tumor growth delay with prolongation of survival. Preclinical successes have culminated in the opening of a phase I trial for patients with advanced prostate disease which is currently accruing patients. Further study will reveal the clinical promise of NIS gene therapy in the treatment of prostate as well as other malignancies.

  8. Progress in Gene Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Davis, Brian J.; Wilson, Torrence M.; Wiseman, Gregory A.; Federspiel, Mark J.; Morris, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy has held promise to correct various disease processes. Prostate cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. A number of clinical trials involving gene therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer have been reported. The ability to efficiently transduce tumors with effective levels of therapeutic genes has been identified as a fundamental barrier to effective cancer gene therapy. The approach utilizing gene therapy in prostate cancer patients at our institution attempts to address this deficiency. The sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) is responsible for the ability of the thyroid gland to transport and concentrate iodide. The characteristics of the NIS gene suggest that it could represent an ideal therapeutic gene for cancer therapy. Published results from Mayo Clinic researchers have indicated several important successes with the use of the NIS gene and prostate gene therapy. Studies have demonstrated that transfer of the human NIS gene into prostate cancer using adenovirus vectors in vitro and in vivo results in efficient uptake of radioactive iodine and significant tumor growth delay with prolongation of survival. Preclinical successes have culminated in the opening of a phase I trial for patients with advanced prostate disease which is currently accruing patients. Further study will reveal the clinical promise of NIS gene therapy in the treatment of prostate as well as other malignancies.

  9. Radiation therapy of newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer and hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Minoru; Fujiwara, Kazuhisa; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Hida, Shuichi

    1994-01-01

    Ten patients with newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer were treated with radiotherapy and hormone therapy to improve tumor control and survival. Eight patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer were treated with radiotherapy to improve their quality of life. Local control of the tumor was achieved in 9 of 10 patients with newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer. Five of eight patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer obtained improved quality of life. Combined radiotherapy and hormone therapy were effective in the treatment of newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer, and radiotherapy was useful for improving the quality of life of patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer. (author)

  10. Emerging Therapies in Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenburg, Daniel W; Morgans, Alicia K

    2018-04-11

    In the last decade, there have been multiple landmark therapeutic advances for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer, both in the castration-resistant and hormone-sensitive setting. In this review, we highlight recent progress and ongoing trials for metastatic prostate cancer, including advances in chemotherapy, androgen receptor-directed therapy, targeted therapies, and immunotherapy. Several landmark studies for men with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer demonstrated improvement in overall survival with the addition of docetaxel chemotherapy or abiraterone acetate to standard androgen deprivation therapy. A single-arm phase 2 study of the PARP inhibitor olaparib demonstrated high response rates and more favorable progression-free and overall survival for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and DNA repair defects treated with olaparib compared with men without DNA repair defects. Multiple ongoing clinical trials are investigating novel hormonal therapies and combinations of chemotherapy, targeted small molecules, immunotherapy, and radiopharmaceuticals. Progress continues to be made in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer, and ongoing clinical trials continue to investigate novel agents and approaches to treatment.

  11. External beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The intent of this course is to review the issues involved in the management of non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. -- The value of pre-treatment prognostic factors including stage, grade and PSA value will be presented, and their value in determining therapeutic strategies will be discussed. -- Controversies involving the simulation process and treatment design will be presented. The value of CT scanning, Beams-Eye View, 3-D planning, intravesicle, intraurethral and rectal contrast will be presented. The significance of prostate and patient movement and strategies for dealing with them will be presented. -- The management of low stage, low to intermediate grade prostate cancer will be discussed. The dose, volume and timing of irradiation will be discussed as will the role of neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy, neutron irradiation and brachytherapy. The current status of radical prostatectomy and cryotherapy will be summarized. Treatment of locally advanced, poorly differentiated prostate cancer will be presented including a discussion of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormones, dose-escalation and neutron irradiation. -- Strategies for post-radiation failures will be presented including data on cryotherapy, salvage prostatectomy and hormonal therapy (immediate, delayed and/or intermittent). New areas for investigation will be reviewed. -- The management of patients post prostatectomy will be reviewed. Data on adjuvant radiation and therapeutic radiation for biochemical or clinically relapsed patients will be presented. This course hopes to present a realistic and pragmatic overview for treating patients with non-metastatic prostatic cancer

  12. Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... compete with androgens for binding to the androgen receptor. By competing for binding to the androgen receptor, ...

  13. Radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.J.; Richardson, G.; Hafermann, M.D.

    1979-01-01

    Since 1965, 401 patients with prostate cancer have received intensive local pelvic radiation therapy at the Virginia Mason Medical Center. Two hundred twenty-one of this series were in the Stage C category. The 36 Stage B cancers were either medically nonoperable, or advanced extent, or had high-grade histopathology. Ten patients each were in diffuse Stage A or Stage D groups, the latter receiving local palliative inensive treatment to the prostate area. The mean age of the patients was 67.6 years. The five year survival of the Stage C group was 57.7%. There was no apparent influence on the survival of irradiated Stage C patients who received estrogen therapy. Current treatment techniques employ 10 megavolt photon beam with whole pelvic nodal fields and bilateral are rotational boost fields. The incidence of reactions and complications is presented

  14. Targeting Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    deprivation therapy (ADT) or androgen receptor (AR) pathway inhibition (ARPI) but eventually develops into lethal castration resistance prostate cancer ...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0553 TITLE: Targeting Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Martin Gleave...Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0553 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Martin Gleave 5d

  15. Immune-Stimulating Combinatorial Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Overlap: None 20 90061946 (Drake) Title: Epigenetic Drugs and Immuno Therapy for Prostate Cancer (EDIT-PC) Effort: 1.2 calendar months (10% effort...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0667 TITLE: Immune-Stimulating Combinatorial Therapy for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert Ivkov...Stimulating Combinatorial Therapy for Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0667 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  16. Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Targeted Bio-orthogonal Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0595 TITLE: Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Targeted Bio -orthogonal Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer...Sep 2016 - 14 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Targeted Bio -orthogonal Therapy for Metastatic Prostate

  17. Hormone therapy in metastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jebelameli P

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Only orchiectomy is still commonly used today either as a single therapy or in combination regimens. Hypophysectomy & adrenalectomy showed such devastating effects on the endocrine equilibrium as to be inconsistent with an acceptable quality of life or even with survival. Chemical adrenalectomy was also tried with drugs (eg. aminoglutethmide, spironolactone leading to consequences superimposable to those of surgical adrenalectomy. Along with orchiectomy, three groups of substances are commonly used today for the hormonal therapy of prostate cancer: estrogens, LHRH agonists & anti androgens. Bilateral orchiectomy removes 90-95% of circulating testosterone. Clinical studies document 60-80% of positive responders to castration, on continued evaluation, relapse occurs usually within 6-24 months in responders, with a death rate of 50% within 6 months. The androgenic activity still remaining after castration may explain the partial & progressively decreasing effectiveness of this & other testosterone reducing therapies. Antiandrogens define substances that act directly at the target site, where interacting with steroid hormone receptors, they impede the binding of androgens. A trend towards the combination of testosterone-reducing & androgen-blocking treatment is developing in modern therapy of prostate cancer. This is due to the complementary characteristics of the two different pharmacological mechanisms that are involved. In this study castration+antiandrogen is compared to castration alone. The results demonstrate a significantly greater percentage of positive objective & subjective responses with antiandrogen than with placebo. In addition survival time was increased in patients treated with castration+antiandrogen than castration+placebo.

  18. Proton Therapy Coverage for Prostate Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos; Wagner, Marcus; Mahajan, Chaitali; Indelicato, Daniel; Fryer, Amber; Falchook, Aaron; Horne, David C.; Chellini, Angela; McKenzie, Craig C.; Lawlor, Paula C.; Li Zuofeng; Lin Liyong; Keole, Sameer

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of prostate motion on dose coverage in proton therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 120 prostate positions were analyzed on 10 treatment plans for 10 prostate patients treated using our low-risk proton therapy prostate protocol (University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute 001). Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging T 2 -weighted turbo spin-echo scans were registered for all cases. The planning target volume included the prostate with a 5-mm axial and 8-mm superoinferior expansion. The prostate was repositioned using 5- and 10-mm one-dimensional vectors and 10-mm multidimensional vectors (Points A-D). The beam was realigned for the 5- and 10-mm displacements. The prescription dose was 78 Gy equivalent (GE). Results: The mean percentage of rectum receiving 70 Gy (V 70 ) was 7.9%, the bladder V 70 was 14.0%, and the femoral head/neck V 50 was 0.1%, and the mean pelvic dose was 4.6 GE. The percentage of prostate receiving 78 Gy (V 78 ) with the 5-mm movements changed by -0.2% (range, 0.006-0.5%, p > 0.7). However, the prostate V 78 after a 10-mm displacement changed significantly (p 78 coverage had a large and significant reduction of 17.4% (range, 13.5-17.4%, p 78 coverage of the clinical target volume. The minimal prostate dose was reduced 33% (25.8 GE), on average, for Points A-D. The prostate minimal dose improved from 69.3 GE to 78.2 GE (p < 0.001) with realignment for 10-mm movements. Conclusion: The good dose coverage and low normal doses achieved for the initial plan was maintained with movements of ≤5 mm. Beam realignment improved coverage for 10-mm displacements

  19. Alpha Particle Therapy in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Sullivan, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a leading cause of cancer mortality among men in western countries. Although nearly 85% of patients present with localised disease, up to 40% will eventually develop metastatic disease during the course of illness. Of men dying from prostate cancer, more than 90% have bone metastases many with no other significant metastatic sites. Symptoms related to bone metastases and skeletal related events (SREs) account for the major cause of morbidity in these patients. Bone-seeking radionuclides have been used in the treatment of prostate cancer bone metastases for many years. The first bone seeking radionuclide drug approved by the FDA was Strontium-89. Other agents have also been used including Samarium-153 EDTMP, Rhenium-186 (-188)-HEDP. These radionuclides are all emit shortrange therapeutic beta radiation with bone marrow as the dose limiting toxicity. There is strong clinical trial evidence of benefit for these radionuclides in reducing pain in advanced prostate cancer; however, none of the drugs has been shown to improve survival, albeit none of the clinical trials were powered to detect differences in survival

  20. Clinical adenoviral gene therapy for prostate cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schenk, E.; Essand, M.; Bangma, Ch. H.; Barber, Ch.; Behr, J.-P.; Briggs, S.; Carlisle, R.; Cheng, W.-S.; Danielsson, A.; Dautzenberg, I. J. C.; Dzojic, H.; Erbacher, P.; Fisher, K.; Frazier, A.; Georgopoulos, L. J.; Hoeben, R.; Kochanek, S.; Koppers-Lalic, D.; Kraaij, R.; Kreppel, F.; Lindholm, L.; Magnusson, M.; Maitland, N.; Neuberg, P.; Nilsson, B.; Ogris, M.; Remy, J.-S.; Scaife, M.; Schooten, E.; Seymour, L.; Totterman, T.; Uil, T. G.; Ulbrich, Karel; Veldhoven-Zweistra, J. L. M.; de Vrij, J.; van Weerden, W.; Wagner, E.; Willemsen, R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 7 (2010), s. 807-813 ISSN 1043-0342 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 512087 - GIANT Keywords : adenovirus * gene delivery * prostate cancer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.829, year: 2010

  1. Cannabinoid Receptors: A Novel Target for Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    study could be to develop nonhabit-forming cannabi - noid agonist (s) for the management of prostate cancer . REFERENCES 1. Jemal, A., Siegel, R.W...for Therapy of Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Prof. Hasan Mukhtar, Ph.D (PI) Dr. Farrukh Afaq, Ph.D (Co-Investigator...REPORT DATE: February 2007 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command

  2. Lineage plasticity-mediated therapy resistance in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blee, Alexandra M; Huang, Haojie

    2018-06-12

    Therapy resistance is a significant challenge for prostate cancer treatment in clinic. Although targeted therapies such as androgen deprivation and androgen receptor (AR) inhibition are effective initially, tumor cells eventually evade these strategies through multiple mechanisms. Lineage reprogramming in response to hormone therapy represents a key mechanism that is increasingly observed. The studies in this area have revealed specific combinations of alterations present in adenocarcinomas that provide cells with the ability to transdifferentiate and perpetuate AR-independent tumor growth after androgen-based therapies. Interestingly, several master regulators have been identified that drive plasticity, some of which also play key roles during development and differentiation of the cell lineages in the normal prostate. Thus, further study of each AR-independent tumor type and understanding underlying mechanisms are warranted to develop combinational therapies that combat lineage plasticity in prostate cancer.

  3. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon, C.; Galli, M.; Meoli, P.; Mariani, L.; Novelli, L.; Gonzalez, G.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To analyze the feasibility of high dose assessing acute and late toxicities both rectal and genitourinary in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. Material and methods: Between April 2006 and April 2008 90 patients diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with MRT technique in the Department of Radiotherapy. The analysis included 80 patients, 10 of them in treatment. The total dose received was 80 Gy. One patient received 70.2 Gy (because of previous pelvic radiotherapy). Age average: 65 (r 43-85 years). Stage: T1c: 43 p (53.75%), T2: 35 p (43.75%), T3: 1 p (1.25%). Score of Gleason 10 ng/ml and [es

  4. MAIN MOLECULAR TARGETS FOR PROSTATE CANCER THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Krasnov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Androgenic pathway plays a pivotal role in the development of benign and malignant prostate tumors. Most of the prostate neoplasms are hormone-dependent at the time of diagnosis. Therapeutic interventions aimed at reducing the level of testosterone in the blood allow to stop progression of the disease. But over time, the tumor almost inevitably starts to progress, moving in the castration-resistant state (CRPC, representing a serious problem of oncourology. In recent years, the possibility of CRRPC therapy increased significantly – there was developed a number of new drugs that effectively inhibit the development of castration-resistant tumors and significantly push back the start of chemotherapy. This review describes the major drug targets and mechanisms of action of abiraterone, enzalutamide, galeterone, VT-464 and other approved and promising CRPC therapies.

  5. Castration-resistant prostate cancer: systemic therapy in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando C. Maluf

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common non-cutaneous neoplasm in the male population worldwide. It is typically diagnosed in its early stages, and the disease exhibits a relatively indolent course in most patients. Despite the curability of localized disease with prostatectomy and radiation therapy, some patients develop metastatic disease and die. Although androgen deprivation is present in the majority of patients with metastatic prostate cancer, a state of androgen resistance eventually develops. Castration-resistant prostate cancer, defined when there is progression of disease despite low levels of testosterone, requires specialized care, and improved communication between medical and urologic oncologists has been identified as a key component in delivering effective therapy. Despite being considered a chemoresistant tumor in the past, the use of a prostate-specific antigen has paved the way for a new generation of trials for castration-resistant prostate cancer. Docetaxel is a life-prolonging chemotherapy that has been established as the standard first-line agent in two phase III clinical trials. Cabazitaxel, a novel taxane with activity in cancer models resistant to paclitaxel and docetaxel, is the only agent that has been compared to a chemotherapy control in a phase III clinical trial as a second-line therapy; it was found to prolong the overall survival of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer previously treated with docetaxel when compared to mitoxantrone. Other agents used in this setting include abiraterone and sipuleucel-T, and novel therapies are continually being investigated in an attempt to improve the outcome for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  6. Management of severe urethral complications of prostate cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Sean P; McAninch, Jack W; Chi, Thomas; Doyle, Sean M; Master, Viraj A

    2006-12-01

    We present our management of urethral stenosis and rectourinary fistula resulting from prostate cancer therapy. We concentrated on cases refractory to minimally invasive treatment, such as dilation, urethrotomy, and urinary and/or fecal diversion. In our prospectively collected urethral reconstruction database we identified patients who underwent reconstruction of urethral stenosis or rectourinary fistula who also received prior treatment for prostate cancer. We documented demographics, prostate cancer pretreatment characteristics, prostate cancer therapy type, urethral reconstruction type and success. A total of 48 patients met the inclusion criteria, including 16 with rectourinary fistula and 32 with urethral stenosis. Urethral complications followed prior radical prostatectomy, brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy, cryotherapy, thermal ablation and any combination of these procedures. Stenosis repair was successful in 23 of 32 cases (73%) and it differed little between anterior and posterior urethral stenosis. Repair was accomplished by anastomotic urethroplasty in 19 cases, flap urethroplasty in 2, perineal urethrostomy in 2 and a urethral stent in 9. Prior external beam radiotherapy was a risk factor for urethral reconstruction failure. Fistula repair was successful in 14 of 15 patients (93%), excluding 1 who died postoperatively. The complexity of fistula management was dictated by fistula size and the presence or absence of coincident urethral stenosis. Urethral stenosis or rectourethral fistula following prostate cancer therapy can be managed by urethral reconstruction, such that normal voiding via the urethra is maintained, rather than abandoning the urethral outlet and performing heterotopic diversion. This can be accomplished with an acceptable rate of failure, given the complexity of the cases.

  7. A case of pyoderma gangrenosum involving the prostate gland after radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Toru; Ito, Masaaki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kawase, Norio; Taki, Yoji

    2002-01-01

    A 76-year-old man complained of difficulty in urination and miction pain with abacterial pyuria after radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Transurethral resection of the prostate was performed and histopathologically widespread necrosis was observed in the prostate. Thereafter retention of urine and fever occurred and computed tomography scan revealed an abscess of the penile corpus. The abscess was drained, but the fever continued. He developed an abacterial lung abscess and abacterial necrotic ulcerating lesions on his back, his left leg and his lower abdomen. Macroscopic findings demonstrated typical features of pyoderma gangrenosum. Steroid treatment was initiated and the response to steroid therapy was dramatic. Finally urinary diversion using an ileal conduit was performed. We found few cases of pyoderma gangrenosum involving lesions other than those of the skin in the literature. This is the first report of pyoderma gangrenosum involving the prostate gland after radiation therapy for prostate cancer. (author)

  8. A case of pyoderma gangrenosum involving the prostate gland after radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, Toru; Ito, Masaaki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kawase, Norio; Taki, Yoji [Toyooka Hospital, Hyogo (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    A 76-year-old man complained of difficulty in urination and miction pain with abacterial pyuria after radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Transurethral resection of the prostate was performed and histopathologically widespread necrosis was observed in the prostate. Thereafter retention of urine and fever occurred and computed tomography scan revealed an abscess of the penile corpus. The abscess was drained, but the fever continued. He developed an abacterial lung abscess and abacterial necrotic ulcerating lesions on his back, his left leg and his lower abdomen. Macroscopic findings demonstrated typical features of pyoderma gangrenosum. Steroid treatment was initiated and the response to steroid therapy was dramatic. Finally urinary diversion using an ileal conduit was performed. We found few cases of pyoderma gangrenosum involving lesions other than those of the skin in the literature. This is the first report of pyoderma gangrenosum involving the prostate gland after radiation therapy for prostate cancer. (author)

  9. Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Prostate Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chandratre, Shantanu S.; Dash, Alekha K.

    2014-01-01

    The relapse of cancer after first line therapy with anticancer agents is a common occurrence. This recurrence is believed to be due to the presence of a subpopulation of cells called cancer stem cells in the tumor. Therefore, a combination therapy which is susceptible to both types of cells is desirable. Delivery of this combinatorial approach in a nanoparticulate system will provide even a better therapeutic outcome in tumor targeting. The objective of this study was to develop and character...

  10. Nuclear Imaging for Assessment of Prostate Cancer Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    thymidine kinase transfected EL4 cells . Further exploration of Tc-99m conjugated potential HSV1-TK substrates is still undergoing in our laboratory...prostate cancer cells , has been demonstrated the utility for tissue-specific toxic gene therapy for prostate cancer[10, 11]. Therefore, an adenovirus...BJ5183 together with pAdeasy-1, the viral DNA plasmid. The pAdeasy-1 is E1 and E3 deleted, its E1 function can be complemented in 293A cells . The

  11. Prostatic biopsy after irradiation therapy for prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scardino, P.T.; Wheeler, T.M.

    1985-01-01

    To determine the prognostic significance of a routine needle biopsy of the prostate performed six to thirty-six months after the completion of definitive radiotherapy, biopsy results were analyzed in 146 patients who had no evidence of disease at the time of biopsy and who received no other therapy before proved recurrence of the tumor. Patients were followed up a mean of 3.9 years after radioactive gold seed implantation and external beam irradiation. The total dose was 8,000 rad. Among 146 patients, 56 (38%) had one or more positive biopsy results within this time interval. The positive biopsy rate correlated with the clinical stage ranging from 17 per cent in Stage B1N to 59 per cent in Stage C1. The risk of developing local recurrence or distant metastases at any given time after irradiation therapy was markedly greater in those patients with a positive biopsy result (p less than 0.0005). Prostatic biopsy is an accurate means of measuring the success of radiotherapy. A positive postirradiation biopsy result carries grave prognostic implications for the patient and indicates that the treatment has failed

  12. Proton therapy for prostate cancer online: patient education or marketing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Daniel J; Ellimoottil, Chandy S; Tejwani, Ajay; Gorbonos, Alex

    2013-12-01

    Proton therapy (PT) for prostate cancer is an expensive treatment with limited evidence of benefit over conventional radiotherapy. We sought to study whether online information on PT for prostate cancer was balanced and whether the website source influenced the content presented. We applied a systematic search process to identify 270 weblinks associated with PT for prostate cancer, categorized the websites by source, and filtered the results to 50 websites using predetermined criteria. We then used a customized version of the DISCERN instrument, a validated tool for assessing the quality of consumer health information, to evaluate the remaining websites for balance of content and description of risks, benefits and uncertainty. Depending on the search engine and key word used, proton center websites (PCWs) made up 10%-47% of the first 30 encountered links. In comparison, websites from academic and nonacademic medical centers without ownership stake in proton centers appeared much less frequently as a search result (0%-3%). PCWs scored lower on DISCERN questions compared to other sources for being balanced/unbiased (p online information regarding PT for prostate cancer may represent marketing by proton centers rather than comprehensive and unbiased patient education. An awareness of these results will also better prepare clinicians to address the potential biases of patients with prostate cancer who search the Internet for health information.

  13. Sexual dysfunctions after prostate cancer radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droupy, S.

    2010-01-01

    Sexual dysfunctions are a quality of life main concern following prostate cancer treatment. After both radiotherapy and brachytherapy, sexual function declines progressively, the onset of occurrence of erectile dysfunction being 12-18 months after both treatments. The pathophysiological pathways by which radiotherapy and brachytherapy cause erectile dysfunction are multi-factorial, as patient co-morbidities, arterial damage, exposure of neurovascular bundle to high levels of radiation, and radiation dose received by the corpora cavernosa at the crurae of the penis may be important in the aetiology of erectile dysfunction. Diagnosis and treatment of postradiation sexual dysfunctions must integrate pre-therapeutic evaluation and information to provide to the patient and his partner a multidisciplinary sexual medicine management. (authors)

  14. PREVENTION OF DYSURIA AFTER HIFU THERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Shestaev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify factors for the development of dysuria and its prevention in patients with prostate cancer (PC after high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU therapy.Subjects and methods. In September 2008 to June 2013, the Clinic of Urology, S.M. Kirov Military Medical Academy, treated 98 patients, by performing HIFU sessions on an Ablatherm apparatus (EDAP, France. All the patients underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP to reduce the volume of the ablated tissue. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 1 29 patients underwent TURP 3 days before HIFU therapy; 2 69 did this 1 month before major surgery. Each group was divided into 2 subgroups: 1 after ultrasound ablation, a urethral catheter was inserted for 10 days; 2 epicystostoma was applied, followed by its overlapping on day 3 postablation and spontaneous urination. The postoperative incidence of dysuria was estimated from subjective (complaints, voiding diary, and Inter-national Prostate Symptom Score and objective (uroflowmetry, small pelvic ultrasonography with determination of residual urine volume criteria.Results. In the patients who had undergone TURP one month before HIFU therapy, grades I–II urinary incontinence and urethral pros-tatic stricture occurred much less infrequently than in those who had undergone this maneuver 3 days prior to major surgery. Urinary in-continence and urethral prostatic stricture occurred 2-fold more frequently after TURP being carried out 3 days before HIFU therapy than after the urethral catheter being inserted. TURP performed one month before HIFU therapy showed no great difference in the incidence complications regardless of the type of bladder drainage.Conclusion. The short interval between TURP and HIFU therapy for PC increases the risk of postoperative dysuric events. The optimal time to perform TURP prior to HIFU therapy is 1 month.

  15. PREVENTION OF DYSURIA AFTER HIFU THERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Shestaev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify factors for the development of dysuria and its prevention in patients with prostate cancer (PC after high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU therapy.Subjects and methods. In September 2008 to June 2013, the Clinic of Urology, S.M. Kirov Military Medical Academy, treated 98 patients, by performing HIFU sessions on an Ablatherm apparatus (EDAP, France. All the patients underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP to reduce the volume of the ablated tissue. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 1 29 patients underwent TURP 3 days before HIFU therapy; 2 69 did this 1 month before major surgery. Each group was divided into 2 subgroups: 1 after ultrasound ablation, a urethral catheter was inserted for 10 days; 2 epicystostoma was applied, followed by its overlapping on day 3 postablation and spontaneous urination. The postoperative incidence of dysuria was estimated from subjective (complaints, voiding diary, and Inter-national Prostate Symptom Score and objective (uroflowmetry, small pelvic ultrasonography with determination of residual urine volume criteria.Results. In the patients who had undergone TURP one month before HIFU therapy, grades I–II urinary incontinence and urethral pros-tatic stricture occurred much less infrequently than in those who had undergone this maneuver 3 days prior to major surgery. Urinary in-continence and urethral prostatic stricture occurred 2-fold more frequently after TURP being carried out 3 days before HIFU therapy than after the urethral catheter being inserted. TURP performed one month before HIFU therapy showed no great difference in the incidence complications regardless of the type of bladder drainage.Conclusion. The short interval between TURP and HIFU therapy for PC increases the risk of postoperative dysuric events. The optimal time to perform TURP prior to HIFU therapy is 1 month.

  16. P52 Activation and Enzalutamide Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    c-Myc:hnRNPA1 pathway regulates expression of androgen receptor splice variants and enzalutamide sensitivity in prostate cancer . Castration resistant... prostate cancer (CRPC) remains dependent on androgen receptor (AR) signaling. Alternative splicing of the AR to generate constitutively active... receptor splice variants and enzalutamide sensitivity in prostate cancer . • We discovered that quercetin, a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound

  17. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Montero-Menei, C.; Menei, P. Mesenchymal Stem Cells as Cellular Vehicles for Delivery of Nanoparticles to Brain Tumors. Biomaterials 2010, 31, 8393... Stem Cells : Considerations for Regenerative Medicine Approaches. Tissue Eng. Part B. Rev. 2010, 16, 159–168. 55. Ellem, S. J.; Taylor, R. a.; Furic, L...Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0304 TITLE: Mesenchymal Stem Cell -Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John Isaacs CONTRACTING

  18. Multifunctional nanoparticles for prostate cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandratre, Shantanu S; Dash, Alekha K

    2015-02-01

    The relapse of cancer after first line therapy with anticancer agents is a common occurrence. This recurrence is believed to be due to the presence of a subpopulation of cells called cancer stem cells in the tumor. Therefore, a combination therapy which is susceptible to both types of cells is desirable. Delivery of this combinatorial approach in a nanoparticulate system will provide even a better therapeutic outcome in tumor targeting. The objective of this study was to develop and characterize nanoparticulate system containing two anticancer agents (cyclopamine and paclitaxel) having different susceptibilities toward cancer cells. Both drugs were entrapped in glyceryl monooleate (GMO)-chitosan solid lipid as well as poly(glycolic-lactic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles. The cytotoxicity studies were performed on DU145, DU145 TXR, and Wi26 A4 cells. The particle size of drug-loaded GMO-chitosan nanoparticles was 278.4 ± 16.4 nm with a positive zeta potential. However, the PLGA particles were 234.5 ± 6.8 nm in size with a negative zeta potential. Thermal analyses of both nanoparticles revealed that the drugs were present in noncrystalline state in the matrix. A sustained in vitro release was observed for both the drugs in these nanoparticles. PLGA blank particles showed no cytotoxicity in all the cell lines tested, whereas GMO-chitosan blank particles showed substantial cytotoxicity. The types of polymer used for the preparation of nanoparticles played a major role and affected the in vitro release, cytotoxicity, and uptake of nanoparticles in the all the cell lines tested.

  19. Prostate Cancer Clinical Consortium Clinical Research Site: Targeted Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    prostate cancer . Cancer Res 70: 7992-8002, 2010 8. Nelson PS: Molecular states underlying an- drogen receptor activation: A framework for thera- peutics...targeting androgen signaling in prostate cancer . J Clin Oncol 30:644-646, 2012 9. Thadani-Mulero M, Nanus DM, Giannakakou P: Androgen receptor on the... prostate cancer . Clin Cancer Res 21:795-807, 2015 17. van Soest RJ, de Morrée ES, Kweldam CF, et al: Targeting the androgen receptor confers in vivo

  20. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bey, P.; Beckendorf, V.; Stines, J.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation therapy of prostate carcinoma with a curative intent implies to treat the whole prostate at high dose (at least 66 Gy). According to clinical stage, PSA level, Gleason's score, the clinical target volume may include seminal vesicles and less often pelvic lymph nodes. Microscopic extra-capsular extension is found in 15 to 60% of T1-T2 operated on, specially in apex tumors. On contrary, cancers developing from the transitional zone may stay limited to the prostate even with a big volume and with a high PSA level. Zonal anatomy of the prostate identifies internal prostate, including the transitional zone (5% of the prostate in young people). External prostate includes central and peripheral zones. The inferior limit of the prostate is not lower than the inferior border of the pubic symphysis. Clinical and radiological examination: ultrasonography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), CT-scan identify prognostic factors as tumor volume, capsule effraction, seminal vesicles invasion and lymph node extension. The identification of the clinical target volume is now done mainly by CT-Scan which identifies prostate and seminal vesicles. NMR could be helpful to identify more precisely prostate apex. The definition of margins around the clinical target volume has to take in account daily reproducibility and organ motion and of course the maximum tolerable dose for organs at risk. (authors)

  1. Prostate Cancer: Epigenetic Alterations, Risk Factors, and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mankgopo M. Kgatle

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the most prevalent urological cancer that affects aging men in South Africa, and mechanisms underlying prostate tumorigenesis remain elusive. Research advancements in the field of PCa and epigenetics have allowed for the identification of specific alterations that occur beyond genetics but are still critically important in the pathogenesis of tumorigenesis. Anomalous epigenetic changes associated with PCa include histone modifications, DNA methylation, and noncoding miRNA. These mechanisms regulate and silence hundreds of target genes including some which are key components of cellular signalling pathways that, when perturbed, promote tumorigenesis. Elucidation of mechanisms underlying epigenetic alterations and the manner in which these mechanisms interact in regulating gene transcription in PCa are an unmet necessity that may lead to novel chemotherapeutic approaches. This will, therefore, aid in developing combination therapies that will target multiple epigenetic pathways, which can be used in conjunction with the current conventional PCa treatment.

  2. Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breast cancer (BRCA1 or BRCA2) or a very strong family history of breast cancer, your risk of prostate cancer may be higher. Obesity. Obese men diagnosed with prostate cancer may be more likely ...

  3. New Approaches for Prostate Cancer Combination Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Freemont AJ, et al. E - cadherin and h-catenin are down-regulated in prostatic bone metastases. BJU Int 2002;89:400–3. ...ola r Di clo fen ac 20 Di clo fen ac 10 Di clo fen ac 5 Su lin da c S ulf on e 2 00 Su lin da c S ulf on e 1 00 Su lin da c S ulf on e 5 0 Su...lin da c S ulf on e 2 5 Flu rb ipr ofe n 2 0 Flu rb ipr ofe n 1 0 Flu rb ipr ofe n 5 Flu rb ipr ofe n 2 As pir

  4. Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBERS: W81XWH-14-1-0554 TITLE: Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Dr. Nora M. Navone CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center 1515 Holcombe Blvd. Houston, TX 77030-4009...COVERED 09/22/2016-09/21/2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER N/A Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with Advanced

  5. Image Guidance Based on Prostate Position for Prostate Cancer Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos; Wagner, Marcus; Indelicato, Daniel; Fryer, Amber; Horne, David; Chellini, Angela; McKenzie, Craig; Lawlor, Paula; Mahajan, Chaitali; Li Zuofeng; Lin Liyong; Keole, Sameer

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the target coverage for proton therapy with and without image guidance and daily prebeam reorientation. Methods and Materials: A total of 207 prostate positions were analyzed for 9 prostate cancer patients treated using our low-risk prostate proton therapy protocol (University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute 001). The planning target volume was defined as the prostate plus a 5-mm axial and 8-mm superoinferior extension. The prostate was repositioned using 5- and 10-mm shifts (anteriorly, inferiorly, posteriorly, and superiorly) and for Points A-D using a combination of 10-mm multidimensional movements (anteriorly or inferiorly; posteriorly or superiorly; and left or right). The beams were then realigned using the new prostate position. The prescription dose was 78 Gray equivalent (GE) to 95% of the planning target volume. Results: For small movements in the anterior, inferior, and posterior directions within the planning target volume (≤5 mm), treatment realignment demonstrated small, but significant, improvements in the clinical target volume (CTV) coverage to the prescribed dose (78 GE). The anterior and posterior shifts also significantly increased the minimal CTV dose (Δ +1.59 GE). For prostate 10-mm movements in the inferior, posterior, and superior directions, the beam realignment produced larger and significant improvements for both the CTV V 78 (Δ +6.4%) and the CTV minimal dose (Δ +8.22 GE). For the compounded 10-mm multidimensional shifts, realignment significantly improved the CTV V 78 (Δ +11.8%) and CTV minimal dose (Δ +23.6 GE). After realignment, the CTV minimal dose was >76.6 GE (>98%) for all points (A-D). Conclusion: Proton beam realignment after target shift will enhance CTV coverage for different prostate positions

  6. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R.; Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results

  7. Prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  8. Solidago Vigaurea for Prostate Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    and modi fication including CTP synthetase, thymidylate synthase, dihydrofo late reductase, IMP dehydrogenase, ribonucleotide reductase, DNA polymerase...this context, it is worth noting that some metabolic abnormalities such as diabetes and even ageing are linked with higher incidence of cancers. However

  9. Solidago Virgaurea for Prostate Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    F. Rodríguez, K. Reinicke, A.J. Yañez, L. García Mde , R.A. Medina, M. Carrasco, S. Barberis, T. Castro, F. Martínez, X. Koch, J.C. Vera, M.T...277] NCI web site: http://www.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials/search. [278] N. Asou, 2. All-trans retinoic acid in the treatment of acute promyelocytic

  10. Metastatic prostate cancer in transsexual diagnosed after three decades of estrogen therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turo, Rafal; Jallad, Samer; Prescott, Stephen; Cross, William Richard

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of prostate cancer in transsexual patients is very low with only few reported cases. Many years before presenting with prostate cancer, these patients receive hormone ablation as a part of their gender therapy. Their disease is already defined as castrate resistant, and the treatment and follow-up of such patients remains a challenge. We report a case of a male-to-female transgender woman who was diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer, 31 years post-feminization.

  11. Metastatic prostate cancer in transsexual diagnosed after three decades of estrogen therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Turo, Rafal; Jallad, Samer; Prescott, Stephen; Cross, William Richard

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of prostate cancer in transsexual patients is very low with only few reported cases. Many years before presenting with prostate cancer, these patients receive hormone ablation as a part of their gender therapy. Their disease is already defined as castrate resistant, and the treatment and follow-up of such patients remains a challenge. We report a case of a male-to-female transgender woman who was diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer, 31 years post-feminization.

  12. Novel epigenetic target therapy for prostate cancer: a preclinical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Naldi

    Full Text Available Epigenetic events are critical contributors to the pathogenesis of cancer, and targeting epigenetic mechanisms represents a novel strategy in anticancer therapy. Classic demethylating agents, such as 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Decitabine, hold the potential for reprograming somatic cancer cells demonstrating high therapeutic efficacy in haematological malignancies. On the other hand, epigenetic treatment of solid tumours often gives rise to undesired cytotoxic side effects. Appropriate delivery systems able to enrich Decitabine at the site of action and improve its bioavailability would reduce the incidence of toxicity on healthy tissues. In this work we provide preclinical evidences of a safe, versatile and efficient targeted epigenetic therapy to treat hormone sensitive (LNCap and hormone refractory (DU145 prostate cancers. A novel Decitabine formulation, based on the use of engineered erythrocyte (Erythro-Magneto-Hemagglutinin Virosomes, EMHVs drug delivery system (DDS carrying this drug, has been refined. Inside the EMHVs, the drug was shielded from the environment and phosphorylated in its active form. The novel magnetic EMHV DDS, endowed with fusogenic protein, improved the stability of the carried drug and exhibited a high efficiency in confining its delivery at the site of action in vivo by applying an external static magnetic field. Here we show that Decitabine loaded into EMHVs induces a significant tumour mass reduction in prostate cancer xenograft models at a concentration, which is seven hundred times lower than the therapeutic dose, suggesting an improved pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of drug. These results are relevant for and discussed in light of developing personalised autologous therapies and innovative clinical approach for the treatment of solid tumours.

  13. Novel epigenetic target therapy for prostate cancer: a preclinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naldi, Ilaria; Taranta, Monia; Gherardini, Lisa; Pelosi, Gualtiero; Viglione, Federica; Grimaldi, Settimio; Pani, Luca; Cinti, Caterina

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic events are critical contributors to the pathogenesis of cancer, and targeting epigenetic mechanisms represents a novel strategy in anticancer therapy. Classic demethylating agents, such as 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Decitabine), hold the potential for reprograming somatic cancer cells demonstrating high therapeutic efficacy in haematological malignancies. On the other hand, epigenetic treatment of solid tumours often gives rise to undesired cytotoxic side effects. Appropriate delivery systems able to enrich Decitabine at the site of action and improve its bioavailability would reduce the incidence of toxicity on healthy tissues. In this work we provide preclinical evidences of a safe, versatile and efficient targeted epigenetic therapy to treat hormone sensitive (LNCap) and hormone refractory (DU145) prostate cancers. A novel Decitabine formulation, based on the use of engineered erythrocyte (Erythro-Magneto-Hemagglutinin Virosomes, EMHVs) drug delivery system (DDS) carrying this drug, has been refined. Inside the EMHVs, the drug was shielded from the environment and phosphorylated in its active form. The novel magnetic EMHV DDS, endowed with fusogenic protein, improved the stability of the carried drug and exhibited a high efficiency in confining its delivery at the site of action in vivo by applying an external static magnetic field. Here we show that Decitabine loaded into EMHVs induces a significant tumour mass reduction in prostate cancer xenograft models at a concentration, which is seven hundred times lower than the therapeutic dose, suggesting an improved pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of drug. These results are relevant for and discussed in light of developing personalised autologous therapies and innovative clinical approach for the treatment of solid tumours.

  14. Prostate-specific antigen bounce following stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles C. Vu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA bounce after brachytherapy has been well-documented. This phenomenon has also been identified in patients undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT. While the parameters that predict PSA bounce have been extensively studied in prostate brachytherapy patients, this study is the first to analyze the clinical and pathologic predictors of PSA bounce in prostate SBRT patients. Materials and Methods: Our institution has maintained a prospective database of patients undergoing SBRT for prostate cancer since 2006. Our study population includes patients between May 2006 and November 2011 who have at least 18 months of follow-up. All patients were treated using the CyberKnife treatment system. The prescription dose was 3500-3625cGy in 5 fractions.Results: 120 patients were included in our study. Median PSA follow-up was 24 months (range 18-78 months. 34 (28% patients had a PSA bounce. The median time to PSA bounce was 9 months, and the median bounce size was 0.50ng/mL. On univariate analysis, only younger age (p = .011 was shown to be associated with an increased incidence of PSA bounce. Other patient factors, including race, prostate size, prior treatment by hormones, and family history of prostate cancer, did not predict PSA bounces. None of the tumor characteristics studied, including Gleason score, pre-treatment PSA, T-stage, or risk classification by NCCN guidelines, was associated with increased incidence of PSA bounces. Younger age was the only statistically significant predictor of PSA bounce on multivariate analysis (OR = 0.937, p = 0.009.Conclusion: PSA bounce, which has been reported after prostate brachytherapy, is also seen in a significant percentage of patients after CyberKnife SBRT. Close observation rather than biopsy can be considered for these patients. Younger age was the only factor that predicted PSA bounce.

  15. Advances in radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Zhengping; Zhang Yangde; Huang Fang; Liang Zhaoyu; Yang Shuren

    2007-01-01

    Modern advances in computers have fueled advances in imaging technologies. The improvements in imaging have in turn allowed a higher level of complexity to be incorporated into radiotherapy treatment planning systems. As a result of these changes, the delivery of radiotherapy evolved from therapy designed based primarily on plain (two dimensional) X-ray images and hand calculations to three-dimensional X-ray based images incorporating increasingly complex computer algorithms. More recently, biologic variables based on differences between tumor metabolism, tumor antigens, and normal tissues have been incorporated into the treatment process. In addition, greater awareness of the challenges to the accuracy of the treatment planning process, such as problems with set-error and organ movement, have begun to be systematically addressed, ushering in an era of socalled four-dimensional radiotherapy. (authors)

  16. Potency preservation following stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obayomi-Davies, Olusola; Pahira, John; McGeagh, Kevin G; Collins, Brian T; Kowalczyk, Keith; Bandi, Gaurav; Kumar, Deepak; Suy, Simeng; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John H; Collins, Sean P; Chen, Leonard N; Bhagat, Aditi; Wright, Henry C; Uhm, Sunghae; Kim, Joy S; Yung, Thomas M; Lei, Siyuan; Batipps, Gerald P

    2013-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction after prostate radiation therapy remains an ongoing challenge and critical quality of life issue. Given the higher dose of radiation per fraction using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) there is concern that post-SBRT impotency would be higher than conventional radiation therapy approaches. This study sought to evaluate potency preservation and sexual function following SBRT for prostate cancer. Between February 2008 and March 2011, 216 men with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated definitively with SBRT monotherapy at Georgetown University Hospital. Potency was defined as the ability to have an erection firm enough for intercourse with or without sexual aids while sexual activity was defined as the ability to have an erection firm enough for masturbation and foreplay. Patients who received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) were excluded from this study. Ninety-seven hormone-naïve men were identified as being potent at the initiation of therapy and were included in this review. All patients were treated to 35–36.25 Gy in 5 fractions delivered with the CyberKnife Radiosurgical System (Accuray). Prostate specific antigen (PSA) and total testosterone levels were obtained pre-treatment, every 3 months for the first year and every 6 months for the subsequent year. Sexual function was assessed with the Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM), the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC)-26 and Utilization of Sexual Medication/Device questionnaires at baseline and all follow-up visits. Ninety-seven men (43 low-, 50 intermediate- and 4 high-risk) at a median age of 68 years (range, 48–82 years) received SBRT. The median pre-treatment PSA was 5.9 ng/ml and the minimum follow-up was 24 months. The median pre-treatment total serum testosterone level was 11.4 nmol/L (range, 4.4-27.9 nmol/L). The median baseline SHIM was 22 and 36% of patients utilized sexual aids prior to treatment. Although potency rates declined following

  17. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Oligometastatic Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muldermans, Jonathan L. [F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Romak, Lindsay B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Kwon, Eugene D. [Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Park, Sean S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Olivier, Kenneth R., E-mail: olivier.kenneth@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To review outcomes of patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer (PCa) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to identify variables associated with local failure. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed records of patients treated with SBRT for oligometastatic PCa. Metastasis control (ie, control of the treated lesion, MC), biochemical progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, and overall survival were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Sixty-six men with 81 metastatic PCa lesions, 50 of which were castrate-resistant, were included in the analysis. Lesions were in bone (n=74), lymph nodes (n=6), or liver (n=1). Stereotactic body radiation therapy was delivered in 1 fraction to 71 lesions (88%), at a median dose of 16 Gy (range, 16-24 Gy). The remaining lesions received 30 Gy in 3 fractions (n=6) or 50 Gy in 5 fractions (n=4). Median follow-up was 16 months (range, 3-49 months). Estimated MC at 2 years was 82%. Biochemical progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, and overall survival were 54%, 45%, and 83%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, only the dose of SBRT was significantly associated with MC; lesions treated with 16 Gy had 58% MC, and those treated with ≥18 Gy had 95% MC at 2 years (P≤.001). At 2 years, MC for lesions treated with 18 Gy (n=21) was 88%. No patient treated with ≥18 Gy in a single fraction or with any multifraction regimen had local failure. Six patients (9%) had grade 1 pain flare, and 2 (3%) had grade 2 pain flare. No grade 2 or greater late toxicities were reported. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer provided optimal metastasis control and acceptable toxicity with doses ≥18 Gy. Biochemical progression-free survival was 54% at 16 months with the inclusion of SBRT in the treatment regimen. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should be considered in

  18. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Oligometastatic Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muldermans, Jonathan L.; Romak, Lindsay B.; Kwon, Eugene D.; Park, Sean S.; Olivier, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To review outcomes of patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer (PCa) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to identify variables associated with local failure. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed records of patients treated with SBRT for oligometastatic PCa. Metastasis control (ie, control of the treated lesion, MC), biochemical progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, and overall survival were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Sixty-six men with 81 metastatic PCa lesions, 50 of which were castrate-resistant, were included in the analysis. Lesions were in bone (n=74), lymph nodes (n=6), or liver (n=1). Stereotactic body radiation therapy was delivered in 1 fraction to 71 lesions (88%), at a median dose of 16 Gy (range, 16-24 Gy). The remaining lesions received 30 Gy in 3 fractions (n=6) or 50 Gy in 5 fractions (n=4). Median follow-up was 16 months (range, 3-49 months). Estimated MC at 2 years was 82%. Biochemical progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, and overall survival were 54%, 45%, and 83%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, only the dose of SBRT was significantly associated with MC; lesions treated with 16 Gy had 58% MC, and those treated with ≥18 Gy had 95% MC at 2 years (P≤.001). At 2 years, MC for lesions treated with 18 Gy (n=21) was 88%. No patient treated with ≥18 Gy in a single fraction or with any multifraction regimen had local failure. Six patients (9%) had grade 1 pain flare, and 2 (3%) had grade 2 pain flare. No grade 2 or greater late toxicities were reported. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer provided optimal metastasis control and acceptable toxicity with doses ≥18 Gy. Biochemical progression-free survival was 54% at 16 months with the inclusion of SBRT in the treatment regimen. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should be considered in

  19. A Systematic Overview of Radiation Therapy Effects in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Sten; Norlen, Bo Johan; Widmark, Anders

    2004-01-01

    A systematic review of radiation therapy trials in prostate cancer has been performed according to principles adopted by the Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). This synthesis of the literature is based on data from one meta-analysis, 30 randomized trials, many dealing with hormonal therapy, 55 prospective trials, and 210 retrospective studies. Totally the studies included 152,614 patients. There is a lack of properly controlled clinical trials in most important aspects of radiation therapy in prostate cancer. The conclusions reached can be summarized as follows: There are no randomized studies that compare the outcome of surgery (radical prostatectomy) with either external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy for patients with clinically localized low-risk prostate cancer. However, with the advent of widely accepted prognostic markers for prostate cancer (pre-treatment PSA, Gleason score, and T-stage), such comparisons have been made possible. There is substantial documentation from large single-institutional and multi-institutional series on patients with this disease category (PSA T2) disease, i.e. patients normally not suited for surgery, benefit from higher than conventional total dose. No overall survival benefit has yet been shown. Dose escalation to patients with intermediate-risk or high-risk disease can be performed with 3D conformal radiotherapy (photon or proton) boost, with Ir-192 high dose rate brachytherapy boost, or brachytherapy boost with permanent seed implantation. Despite an increased risk of urinary tract and/or rectal side effects, dose-escalated therapy can generally be safely delivered with all three techniques. There is some evidence that 3D conformal radiotherapy results in reduced late rectal toxicity and acute anal toxicity compared with radiotherapy administered with non-conformal treatment volumes. There is some evidence that postoperative external beam radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy in patients with

  20. Exosomes in diagnosis and therapy of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Jun; Ding, Meng; Xu, Kai; Yang, Chunhua; Mao, Li-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes are small vesicular bodies released by a variety of cells. Exosomes contain miRNAs, mRNAs and proteins with the potential to regulate signaling pathways in recipient cells. Exosomes deliver nucleic acids and proteins to mediate the communication between cancer cells and stroma cells. In this review, we summarize recent progress in our understanding of the role of exosomes in prostate cancer. The tumorigenesis, metastasis and drug resistance of prostate cancer are associated with the ...

  1. Duration of short-course androgen suppression therapy and the risk of death as a result of prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    D'Amico, Anthony V

    2011-12-10

    We evaluated whether the duration of androgen suppression therapy (AST) had an impact on the risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) in men with unfavorable-risk prostate cancer (PC) within established Gleason score (GS) categories.

  2. Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  3. Patterns of care study and evidence based medicine for radiation therapy. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Katsumasa; Mitsuhashi, Norio

    2002-01-01

    In Japan, where the mortality rate of prostate cancer is lower than in Western countries, there is little evidence of radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Therefore, we have to refer to the evidence of radiation therapy from Western countries, but we should pay attention to the differences of cultural, racial, or social background between Japan and Western countries. The Patterns of Care Study (PCS) was conducted in Japan and extramural audits were performed for 50 randomly selected institutions. Detailed information of 311 prostate cancer patients without distant metastases and other cancers, who were treated with radiation therapy in 1996-1998, was collected. In this article, the results of PCS for primary prostate cancer were shown, with a review of literature for the appropriate choice of radiation therapy. This study was supported by the Grantin-Aid for Cancer Research from Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (10-17). (author)

  4. Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy and Risk of Thromboembolic Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosco, Cecilia, E-mail: Cecilia.t.bosco@kcl.ac.uk [Translational Oncology & Urology Research (TOUR), Division of Cancer Studies, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Garmo, Hans [Translational Oncology & Urology Research (TOUR), Division of Cancer Studies, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Regional Cancer Centre, Uppsala, Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala (Sweden); Adolfsson, Jan [CLINTEC Department, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Stattin, Pär [Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Umeå (Sweden); Holmberg, Lars [Translational Oncology & Urology Research (TOUR), Division of Cancer Studies, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Regional Cancer Centre, Uppsala, Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Nilsson, Per; Gunnlaugsson, Adalsteinn [Department of Hematology, Oncology and Radiation Physics, Skane University Hospital, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Widmark, Anders [Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology, Umeå University, Umeå (Sweden); Van Hemelrijck, Mieke [Translational Oncology & Urology Research (TOUR), Division of Cancer Studies, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the risk of thromboembolic disease (TED) after radiation therapy (RT) with curative intent for prostate cancer (PCa). Patients and Methods: We identified all men who received RT as curative treatment (n=9410) and grouped according to external beam RT (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BT). By comparing with an age- and county-matched comparison cohort of PCa-free men (n=46,826), we investigated risk of TED after RT using Cox proportional hazard regression models. The model was adjusted for tumor characteristics, demographics, comorbidities, PCa treatments, and known risk factors of TED, such as recent surgery and disease progression. Results: Between 2006 and 2013, 6232 men with PCa received EBRT, and 3178 underwent BT. A statistically significant association was found between EBRT and BT and risk of pulmonary embolism in the crude analysis. However, upon adjusting for known TED risk factors these associations disappeared. No significant associations were found between BT or EBRT and deep venous thrombosis. Conclusion: Curative RT for prostate cancer using contemporary methodologies was not associated with an increased risk of TED.

  5. Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy and Risk of Thromboembolic Events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosco, Cecilia; Garmo, Hans; Adolfsson, Jan; Stattin, Pär; Holmberg, Lars; Nilsson, Per; Gunnlaugsson, Adalsteinn; Widmark, Anders; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the risk of thromboembolic disease (TED) after radiation therapy (RT) with curative intent for prostate cancer (PCa). Patients and Methods: We identified all men who received RT as curative treatment (n=9410) and grouped according to external beam RT (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BT). By comparing with an age- and county-matched comparison cohort of PCa-free men (n=46,826), we investigated risk of TED after RT using Cox proportional hazard regression models. The model was adjusted for tumor characteristics, demographics, comorbidities, PCa treatments, and known risk factors of TED, such as recent surgery and disease progression. Results: Between 2006 and 2013, 6232 men with PCa received EBRT, and 3178 underwent BT. A statistically significant association was found between EBRT and BT and risk of pulmonary embolism in the crude analysis. However, upon adjusting for known TED risk factors these associations disappeared. No significant associations were found between BT or EBRT and deep venous thrombosis. Conclusion: Curative RT for prostate cancer using contemporary methodologies was not associated with an increased risk of TED.

  6. Percutaneous radiation therapy for localized and generalized stages of prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, R.P.; Schnepper, E.; Castrup, W.

    1981-01-01

    Eighty-three patients with prostatic cancer, who underwent megavoltage therapy of the carcinoma or of its metastases, are reported. The majority of the patients had advanced disease (Stage C or D according to Flocks) when they came to be treated, and thus the general prognosis was bad. Radiation therapy, however, represents on the whole an important constituent of therapy in prostatic cancer, with regard to the practicability as well as to palliative treatment of metastases to the skeleton. (orig.) [de

  7. Cannabinoid Receptors: A Novel Target for Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mukhtar, Hasan; Afaq, Farrukh; Sarfaraz, Sami

    2008-01-01

    We have shown that the expression levels of both cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 are higher in human prostate cancer cells than in normal prostate epithelial cells and treatment of LNCaP cells with WIN-55,212-2 (WIN...

  8. Cannabinoid Receptors: A Novel Target for Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mukhtar, Hasan; Afaq, Farrukh; Sarfaraz, Sami

    2007-01-01

    .... We have shown that the expression levels of both cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 are higher in human prostate cancer cells than in normal prostate epithelial cells and treatment of LNCaP cells with WIN-55,212-2 (WIN...

  9. Nonlinear system identification for prostate cancer and optimality of intermittent androgen suppression therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Taiji; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2013-09-01

    These days prostate cancer is one of the most common types of malignant neoplasm in men. Androgen ablation therapy (hormone therapy) has been shown to be effective for advanced prostate cancer. However, continuous hormone therapy often causes recurrence. This results from the progression of androgen-dependent cancer cells to androgen-independent cancer cells during the continuous hormone therapy. One possible method to prevent the progression to the androgen-independent state is intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) therapy, which ceases dosing intermittently. In this paper, we propose two methods to estimate the dynamics of prostate cancer, and investigate the IAS therapy from the viewpoint of optimality. The two methods that we propose for dynamics estimation are a variational Bayesian method for a piecewise affine (PWA) system and a Gaussian process regression method. We apply the proposed methods to real clinical data and compare their predictive performances. Then, using the estimated dynamics of prostate cancer, we observe how prostate cancer behaves for various dosing schedules. It can be seen that the conventional IAS therapy is a way of imposing high cost for dosing while keeping the prostate cancer in a safe state. We would like to dedicate this paper to the memory of Professor Luigi M. Ricciardi. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [New Radiopharmaceuticals Based on Prostate-Specific Inhibitors of Membrane Antigen for Diagnostics and Therapy of Metastatic Prostate Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, O P; German, K E; Krilov, V V; Petriev, V M; Epstein, N B

    2015-01-01

    About 10.7% cases of prostate cancer were registered in Russia in 2011 (40,000 patients). More than half of cancer cases were revealed in advanced (III-IV) stages when metastases inevitably developed quickly. Clinical problem of early diagnostics and treatment of metastatic prostate cancer is still not solved. Anatomical imaging techniques have low sensitivity and specificity for the detection of this disease. Metabolic visualization methods which use prostate specific antigen (PSA) as a marker are also ineffective. This article describes prostate-specific membrane antigens (PSMA) that are proposed as a marker for diagnostics and therapy of prostate cancer. The most promising PSMA-based radiopharmaceutical agent for diagnostics has been developed and clinically tested in the European countries. These pharmaceuticals are based on small peptide molecules modified with urea, and have the highest affinity to PSMA. Favorable phannacokinetics, rapid accumulation in the tumor and rapid excretion from the body are beneficial features of these pharmaceuticals.

  11. Hyaluronan-Based Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Importantly, the system can target CD44+ prostate cancer stem cells through intrinsic HA-CD44 receptor interactions and deliver drugs directly to...be released by enzymatic degradation via HYAL1. Importantly, the system can target CD44+ prostate cancer stem cells through intrinsic HA-CD44...In Situ DNA Strand Break Labeling (TUNEL assay)—Tumor tissues were recovered from euthanized animals. Sections (5 μm) were cut from 10% neutral

  12. What about sexual life after therapy for prostate cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosset, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The precise assessment of sexual dysfunction after treatment of prostatic cancer cannot be avoided in 2002. These iatrogenic complications may significantly alter the quality of life of the patients. In addition, sexual toxicity is progressively becoming a cardinal parameter for the treatment choice, both for the patient and the physician. Significant efforts allowed to reduce sexual toxicity after therapy in the recent years. As an example, nerve-sparing surgical techniques have been proposed, whenever reasonable. However, in spite of these surgical advances, data suggest that overall, the new irradiation techniques (conformal radiotherapy and brachytherapy) are responsible for less alteration of sexual life than surgery. Another potential advantage is that sildenafil (Viagra) is able to restore potency in a majority of cases after radiotherapy, while it is usually poorly effective after surgery. (author)

  13. Androgens as therapy for androgen receptor-positive castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Hui-Ping

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed non-cutaneous tumor of men in Western countries. While surgery is often successful for organ-confined prostate cancer, androgen ablation therapy is the primary treatment for metastatic prostate cancer. However, this therapy is associated with several undesired side-effects, including increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Shortening the period of androgen ablation therapy may benefit prostate cancer patients. Intermittent Androgen Deprivation therapy improves quality of life, reduces toxicity and medical costs, and delays disease progression in some patients. Cell culture and xenograft studies using androgen receptor (AR-positive castration-resistant human prostate cancers cells (LNCaP, ARCaP, and PC-3 cells over-expressing AR suggest that androgens may suppress the growth of AR-rich prostate cancer cells. Androgens cause growth inhibition and G1 cell cycle arrest in these cells by regulating c-Myc, Skp2, and p27Kip via AR. Higher dosages of testosterone cause greater growth inhibition of relapsed tumors. Manipulating androgen/AR signaling may therefore be a potential therapy for AR-positive advanced prostate cancer.

  14. Autophagosomal Sequestration of Mitochondria as an Indicator of Antiandrogen Therapy Resistance of Prostate Cancer (PCa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Prostate Cancer (PCa) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: George Wilding, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Houston, TX...Indicator of Antiandrogen Therapy Resistance of Prostate Cancer (PCa) 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0509 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center 1515 Holcombe Blvd. Houston, TX 77030-4009

  15. Dysuria Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einsley-Marie eJanowski

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dysuria following prostate radiation therapy is a common toxicity that adversely affects patients’ quality of life and may be difficult to manage. Methods: 204 patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT from 2007 to 2010 for localized prostate carcinoma with a minimum follow up of three years were included in this retrospective review of prospectively collected data. All patients were treated to 35-36.25Gy in 5 fractions delivered with robotic SBRT with real time fiducial tracking. Dysuria and other lower urinary tract symptoms were assessed via Question 4b (Pain or burning on urination of the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC-26 and the American Urological Association (AUA Symptom Score at baseline and at routine follow up. Results: 204 patients (82 low-, 105 intermediate-, and 17 high risk according to the D’Amico classification at a median age of 69 years (range 48-91 received SBRT for their localized prostate cancer with a median follow up of 47 months. Bother associated with dysuria significantly increased from a baseline of 12% to a maximum of 43% at one month (p<0.0001. There were two distinct peaks of moderate to severe dysuria bother at 1 month and at 6-12 months, with 9% of patients experiencing a late transient dysuria flare. While a low level of dysuria was seen through the first two years of follow-up, it returned to below baseline by two years (p=0.91. The median baseline AUA score of 7.5 significantly increased to 11 at 1 month (p<0.0001 and returned to 7 at 3 months (p= 0.54. Patients with dysuria had a statistically higher AUA score at baseline and at all follow-ups up to 30 months. Dysuria significantly correlated with dose and AUA score on multivariate analysis. Frequency and strain significantly correlated with dysuria on stepwise multivariate analysis.Conclusions: The rate and severity of dysuria following SBRT is comparable to patients treated with other radiation modalities.

  16. Risk of Second Cancers According to Radiation Therapy Technique and Modality in Prostate Cancer Survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy, E-mail: berringtona@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Wong, Jeannette; Kleinerman, Ruth; Kim, Clara; Morton, Lindsay [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) techniques for prostate cancer are evolving rapidly, but the impact of these changes on risk of second cancers, which are an uncommon but serious consequence of RT, are uncertain. We conducted a comprehensive assessment of risks of second cancer according to RT technique (>10 MV vs ≤10 MV and 3-dimensional [3D] vs 2D RT) and modality (external beam RT, brachytherapy, and combined modes) in a large cohort of prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The cohort was constructed using the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare database. We included cases of prostate cancer diagnosed in patients 66 to 84 years of age from 1992 to 2004 and followed through 2009. We used Poisson regression analysis to compare rates of second cancer across RT groups with adjustment for age, follow-up, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and comorbidities. Analyses of second solid cancers were based on the number of 5-year survivors (n=38,733), and analyses of leukemia were based on number of 2-year survivors (n=52,515) to account for the minimum latency period for radiation-related cancer. Results: During an average of 4.4 years' follow-up among 5-year prostate cancer survivors (2DRT = 5.5 years; 3DRT = 3.9 years; and brachytherapy = 2.7 years), 2933 second solid cancers were diagnosed. There were no significant differences in second solid cancer rates overall between 3DRT and 2DRT patients (relative risk [RR] = 1.00, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.91-1.09), but second rectal cancer rates were significantly lower after 3DRT (RR = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.40-0.88). Rates of second solid cancers for higher- and lower-energy RT were similar overall (RR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.89-1.06), as were rates for site-specific cancers. There were significant reductions in colon cancer and leukemia rates in the first decade after brachytherapy compared to those after external beam RT. Conclusions: Advanced treatment planning may have reduced rectal

  17. Definitions of biochemical failure in prostate cancer following radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Jeremy M.G.; Griffith, Kent A.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) published a consensus panel definition of biochemical failure following radiation therapy for prostate cancer. In this paper, we develop a series of alternative definitions of biochemical failure. Using data from 688 patients, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of the various definitions, with respect to a defined 'clinically meaningful' outcome. Methods and Materials: The ASTRO definition of biochemical failure requires 3 consecutive rises in prostate-specific antigen (PSA). We considered several modifications to the standard definition: to require PSA rises of a certain magnitude, to consider 2 instead of 3 rises, to require the final PSA value to be greater than a fixed cutoff level, and to define biochemical failure based on the slope of PSA over 1, 1.5, or 2 years. A clinically meaningful failure is defined as local recurrence, distant metastases, initiation of unplanned hormonal therapy, unplanned radical prostatectomy, or a PSA>25 later than 6 months after radiation. Results: Requiring the final PSA in a series of consecutive rises to be larger than 1.5 ng/mL increased the specificity of biochemical failure. For a fixed specificity, defining biochemical failure based on 2 consecutive rises, or the slope over the last year, could increase the sensitivity by up to approximately 20%, compared to the ASTRO definition. Using a rule based on the slope over the previous year or 2 rises leads to a slightly earlier detection of biochemical failure than does the ASTRO definition. Even with the best rule, only approximately 20% of true failures are biochemically detected more than 1 year before the clinically meaningful event time. Conclusion: There is potential for improvement in the ASTRO consensus definition of biochemical failure. Further research is needed, in studies with long follow-up times, to evaluate the relationship between various definitions of biochemical failure and

  18. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Targeted Therapy of Prostate Cancer Using a DUPA-Paclitaxel Conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qingzhi; Yang, Jincheng; Zhang, Ruoshi; Yang, Zimeng; Yang, Zhengtao; Wang, Yongjun; Xu, Youjun; He, Zhonggui

    2018-05-07

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most prevalent cancer among men in the United States and remains the second-leading cause of cancer mortality in men. Paclitaxel (PTX) is the first line chemotherapy for PCa treatment, but its therapeutic efficacy is greatly restricted by the nonspecific distribution in vivo. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is overexpressed on the surface of most PCa cells, and its expression level increases with cancer aggressiveness, while being present at low levels in normal cells. The high expression level of PSMA in PCa cells offers an opportunity for target delivery of nonspecific cytotoxic drugs to PCa cells, thus improving therapeutic efficacy and reducing toxicity. PSMA has high affinity for DUPA, a glutamate urea ligand. Herein, a novel DUPA-PTX conjugate is developed using DUPA as the targeting ligand to deliver PTX specifically for treatment of PSMA expressing PCa. The targeting ligand DUPA enhances the transport capability and selectivity of PTX to tumor cells via PSMA mediated endocytosis. Besides, DUPA is conjugated with PTX via a disulfide bond, which facilitates the rapid and differential drug release in tumor cells. The DUPA-PTX conjugate exhibits potent cytotoxicity in PSMA expressing cell lines and induces a complete cessation of tumor growth with no obvious toxicity. Our findings give new insight into the PSMA-targeted delivery of chemotherapeutics and provide an opportunity for the development of novel active targeting drug delivery systems for PCa therapy.

  19. Hormonal therapy with external radiation therapy for metastatic spinal cord compression from newly diagnosed prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, So; Hozumi, Takahiro; Yamakawa, Kiyofumi; Higashikawa, Akiro; Goto, Takahiro; Shinohara, Mitsuru; Kondo, Taiji

    2013-01-01

    Although hormonal therapy is effective for treatment of prostate cancer, its effect in the treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) has not been established. The objective of this study was to clarify the efficacy of conservative treatment of MSCC-induced paralysis resulting from prostate cancer for patients without a previous treatment history. We reviewed data from 38 patients with MSCC-induced paralysis from newly diagnosed prostate cancer who presented to our service between 1984 and 2010. Conservative treatment consisted of hormonal therapy with external radiation therapy (ERT). Patient demographic data, treatment details, involved spine MRI images, complications, and the course of neurologic recovery were investigated. Twenty-five patients were treated conservatively. Mean follow-up period was 36.8 months. Sixteen patients (two with Frankel B, 14 with Frankel C) were unable to walk at initial presentation. After initiating conservative treatment, 75% (12 of 16) of these patients regained the ability to walk within 1 month, 88% (14 in 16) did so within 3 months, and all non-ambulatory patients did so within 6 months. No one had morbid complications. Four patients who did not regain the ability to walk at 1 month were found to have progressed to paraplegia rapidly, and tended to have severe compression as visualized on MRI, with a delay in the start of treatment in comparison with those who did so within 1 month (21.0 vs. 7.8 days). Hormonal therapy associated with ERT is an important option for treatment of MSCC resulting from newly diagnosed prostate cancer. (author)

  20. Maintaining intimacy for prostate cancer patients on androgen deprivation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassersug, Richard J

    2016-03-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) causes erectile dysfunction and increases patients' emotionality while diminishing their sexual interest. ADT has been linked to erosion of spousal bonds; however, this is not an invariant outcome. Understanding the factors that lead to these various outcomes may help couples deal with ADT. A subset of couples report that they became closer as a result of the patients going on ADT. Recent data suggest that what helps couples most is preemptive awareness of ADT's side-effects and congruence in how patients and their partners understand and accept the psychosexual impact of ADT. Sex therapy for prostate cancer patients divides along gendered lines, with distinctly 'male' (recovery of erections) and 'female' (promoting sexual practices that are not erection dependent) approaches. Unfortunately, neither is very effective for couples when the patient is on ADT. Options beyond the standard gendered framework, such as use of an external penile prosthesis, may be worth offering to ADT patients trying to find a 'new normal' that is sexually rewarding for them. Intimacy is sharing something with someone that one shares with no one else. Exploring novel sexual practices can help couples stay intimate, even when the patient is on ADT.

  1. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Prostate Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Prostate ...

  2. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spera, G.

    2010-01-01

    This work is about diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of prostate cancer. The techniques used are: transrectal ultrasound, laparascopy, bone scan, chest x-ray, radiography, chemoterapy and radiotherapy

  3. Impact of short course hormonal therapy on overall and cancer specific survival after permanent prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, David C.; McKeough, Timothy; Thomas, Theresa

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of prior hormonal therapy on 10-year overall and prostate cancer specific survival after primary brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on the Arizona Oncology Services tumor registry for 2,378 consecutive permanent prostate brachytherapy cases from 1988 through 2001. Hormonal therapy was administered before the implant in 464 patients for downsizing of the prostate or at the discretion of the referring physician. All deceased patients with known clinical recurrence were considered to have died of prostate cancer, irrespective of the immediate cause of death. Risk groups were defined, with 1,135 favorable (prostate-specific antigen [PSA] 70 years (p = 0.0013), Gleason score ≥ 7 (p = 0.0005), and prior hormone use (p = 0.0065) on overall survival. Conclusions: At 10 years, in prostate cancer patients receiving brachytherapy, overall survival is worse in men receiving neoadjuvant hormonal therapy, compared with hormone naive patients. This does not appear to be due to other known risk factors for survival (i.e., stage, grade, PSA, age) on multivariate analysis. The leading causes of death were cardiovascular, prostate cancer, and other cancers with no obvious discrepancy between the two groups. This finding is unexpected and requires confirmation from other centers

  4. Adenovirus-derived vectors for prostate cancer gene therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de Vrij, J.; Willemsen, R. A.; Lindholm, L.; Hoeben, R. C.; Bangma, Ch. H.; Barber, Ch.; Behr, J.-P.; Briggs, S.; Carlisle, R.; Cheng, W.-S.; Dautzenberg, I. J. C.; de Ridder, C.; Dzojic, H.; Erbacher, P.; Essand, M.; Fisher, K.; Frazier, A.; Georgopoulos, L. J.; Jennings, I.; Kochanek, S.; Koppers-Lalic, D.; Kraaij, R.; Kreppel, F.; Magnusson, M.; Maitland, N.; Neuberg, P.; Nugent, R.; Ogris, M.; Remy, J.-S.; Scaife, M.; Schenk, E.; Schooten, E.; Seymour, L.; Slade, M.; Szyjanowicz, P.; Totterman, T.; Uil, T. G.; Ulbrich, Karel; van der Weel, L.; van Weerden, W.; Wagner, E.; Zuber, G.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 7 (2010), s. 795-805 ISSN 1043-0342 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 512087 - GIANT Keywords : adenovirus * gene delivery * prostate cancer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.829, year: 2010

  5. Focal therapy for prostate cancer: possibilities and limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggener, Scott; Salomon, Georg; Scardino, Peter T.; de la Rosette, Jean; Polascik, Thomas J.; Brewster, Simon

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT: A significant proportion of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer have well-differentiated, low-volume tumors at minimal risk of impacting their quality of life or longevity. The selection of a treatment strategy, among the multitude of options, has enormous implications for individuals

  6. Outcomes in men with large prostates ({>=}60 cm{sup 3}) treated with definitive proton therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgee, Lisa; Mendenhall, William M. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Florida Coll. of Medicine, Gainesville (United States); Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Morris, Christopher G.; Marcus, Robert J. Jr. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Florida Coll. of Medicine, Gainesville (United States); Univ. of Florida Proton Therapy Inst., Jacksonville (United States); Henderson, Randal H.; Nichols, Romaine C. Jr.; Li, Zuofeng; Williams, Christopher R.; Hoppe, Bradford S. [Univ. of Florida Proton Therapy Inst., Jacksonville (United States)], e-mail: bhoppe@floridaproton.org

    2013-04-15

    Background: Large prostate size is associated with higher rates of genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities after definitive treatment for prostate cancer, and because of this many men will undergo cytoreduction with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) before definitive therapy, which results in its own unique toxicities and worsens quality of life. This series investigates genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity in men with large prostates (> 60 cm{sup 3}) undergoing definitive proton therapy (PT) for prostate cancer. Material and methods: From 2006 to 2010, 186 men with prostates {>=}60 cm{sup 3} were treated with definitive PT (median dose, 78 CGE) for low- (47%), intermediate- (37%) and high-risk (16%) prostate cancer. Median prostate size was 76 cm{sup 3} (range, 60-143 cm{sup 3}) and pretreatment IPSS was > 15 in 27%. At baseline, 51% were managed for obstructive symptoms with transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) (9.7%) or medical management with {alpha} blockers (32%), 5 {alpha}-reductase inhibitors (15%), and/or saw palmetto (11%). Fourteen men received ADT for cytoreduction. Results: Median follow-up was two years. Grade 3 genitourinary toxicities occurred in 14 men, including temporary catheterization (n = 7), TURP (n = 6), and balloon dilation for urethral stricture (n = 1). Multivariate analysis demonstrated pretreatment medical management (p = 0.0065) and pretreatment TURP (p 0.0002) were significantly associated with grade 3 genitourinary toxicity. One man experienced grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity and 15 men had grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities. On multivariate analysis, dose > 78 CGE was associated with increased grade 2 + gastrointestinal toxicity (p = 0.0142). Conclusion: Definitive management of men with large prostates without ADT was associated with low rates of genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity.

  7. Outcomes in men with large prostates (≥60 cm3) treated with definitive proton therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mcgee, Lisa; Mendenhall, William M.; Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Morris, Christopher G.; Marcus, Robert J. Jr.; Henderson, Randal H.; Nichols, Romaine C. Jr.; Li, Zuofeng; Williams, Christopher R.; Hoppe, Bradford S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Large prostate size is associated with higher rates of genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities after definitive treatment for prostate cancer, and because of this many men will undergo cytoreduction with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) before definitive therapy, which results in its own unique toxicities and worsens quality of life. This series investigates genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity in men with large prostates (> 60 cm 3 ) undergoing definitive proton therapy (PT) for prostate cancer. Material and methods: From 2006 to 2010, 186 men with prostates ≥60 cm 3 were treated with definitive PT (median dose, 78 CGE) for low- (47%), intermediate- (37%) and high-risk (16%) prostate cancer. Median prostate size was 76 cm 3 (range, 60-143 cm 3 ) and pretreatment IPSS was > 15 in 27%. At baseline, 51% were managed for obstructive symptoms with transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) (9.7%) or medical management with α blockers (32%), 5 α-reductase inhibitors (15%), and/or saw palmetto (11%). Fourteen men received ADT for cytoreduction. Results: Median follow-up was two years. Grade 3 genitourinary toxicities occurred in 14 men, including temporary catheterization (n = 7), TURP (n = 6), and balloon dilation for urethral stricture (n = 1). Multivariate analysis demonstrated pretreatment medical management (p = 0.0065) and pretreatment TURP (p 0.0002) were significantly associated with grade 3 genitourinary toxicity. One man experienced grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity and 15 men had grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities. On multivariate analysis, dose > 78 CGE was associated with increased grade 2 + gastrointestinal toxicity (p = 0.0142). Conclusion: Definitive management of men with large prostates without ADT was associated with low rates of genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity

  8. Benzimidazole as Novel Therapy for Hormone-Refractory Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    8 4 INTRODUCTION The focus of this project is to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of benzimidazoles as a...potential anti-metastatic prostate cancer therapy. We identified benzimidazoles , a class of anti-parasitic drug, in a drug screening process for...preferential anti-tumor activity on metastatic prostate cancer cells. We have data indicate that benzimidazoles have potent anti-tumor activities

  9. Overall Survival Benefit From Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Organ-Confined, Margin-Positive Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, Robert O.; Hafer, Russell; Cox, Craig; McClure, Stephanie E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Radical prostatectomy for invasive prostate cancer is associated with positive margin rates in 10% to 50% of resected specimens. Postoperative radiation therapy may benefit patients who have organ-confined prostate cancer with positive margins. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis to examine whether adjunctive radiation therapy enhanced long-term survival for prostate cancer patients who underwent prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer but with positive margins. We used the Hoag Cancer Center database to identify patients diagnosed with invasive prostate cancer. Relative and overall survival rates were calculated. Results: Among 1,474 patients diagnosed with localized invasive prostate cancer during the years 1990 to 2006 and undergoing prostatectomy, 113 (7.7%) were identified who had positive margins and did not have local extension of disease, positive lymph nodes, or distant metastases. A total of 17 patients received adjunctive radiation therapy (Group A), whereas 96 did not (Group B; 3 received hormonal therapy). Both groups had a median age of 64 years and median follow-up of 7.5 years. In Group A, no patients have died as of last follow-up, but in Group B, 18 have died. Estimated 10-year and 15-year overall survival rates were both 100% for Group A compared with 85% and 57% respectively for Group B (p 2 = 0.050, log rank). Relative 10- and 15 year survival rates were both 100% for Group A compared with 100% and 79% respectively for Group B. Conclusions: This retrospective analysis suggests that prostate cancer patients with localized disease but positive margins do derive a survival benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy.

  10. Development of a Combination Therapy for Prostate Cancer by Targeting Stat3 and HIF-1alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    inflammation-induced cancer, making it an attractive target (25-27). A3. Innovation 1. TEL03 is a novel anti-cancer agent from Chinese herbal medicine ...agents from Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) that targets HIF-1α /2α for prostate cancer therapy. Hypoxia orchestrated by HIF-1αis crucial for tumor...Stat3 for treatment of prostate and other cancers. TEL03, which is a novel anti-cancer agent derived from Chinese herbal medicine (CHM: Hypocrella

  11. Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    of this study is to develop a strategy to identify molecular markers of response of advanced prostate cancer to specific therapies using clinically...combination treatment strategies are urgently needed. The purpose of this study is to develop a strategy for identifying molecular markers of response of...PENDING) Level of Funding: $125,978 annual direct Project Goals: To develop a strategy for identifying molecular therapeutic response markers of

  12. [Epigenetics of prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiao-Ming; Zhou, Wen-Quan

    2010-07-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in males, and its etiology and pathogenesis remain unclear. Epigenesis is involved in prostate cancer at all stages of the process, and closely related with its growth and metastasis. DNA methylation and histone modification are the most important manifestations of epigenetics in prostate cancer. The mechanisms of carcinogenesis of DNA methylation include whole-genome hypomethylation, aberrant local hypermethylation of promoters and genomic instability. DNA methylation is closely related to the process of prostate cancer, as in DNA damage repair, hormone response, tumor cell invasion/metastasis, cell cycle regulation, and so on. Histone modification causes corresponding changes in chromosome structure and the level of gene transcription, and it may affect the cycle, differentiation and apoptosis of cells, resulting in prostate cancer. Some therapies have been developed targeting the epigenetic changes in prostate cancer, including DNA methyltransferases and histone deacetylase inhibitors, and have achieved certain desirable results.

  13. Prostate cancer and radiation therapy--the message conveyed by serum prostate-specific antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagars, Gunar K.; Pollack, Alan; Eschenbach, Andrew C. von

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a powerful pretreatment prognosticator and a sensitive post-treatment outcome measure for clinically localized prostate cancer treated with radiation therapy. Today, the pretreatment serum PSA level appears to supersede both grade and T-stage as a determinant of outcome. This study was undertaken to attempt a reconciliation between the old (pre-PSA) and the new (PSA) data-in particular to address the question of why stage and grade apparently play so little role in this PSA era. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the outcome of two cohorts of men with T1-T4, N0, or NX, M0 prostate cancer, one group (648 patients) treated and followed in the pre-PSA era (1966-1988), another group (707 patients) treated and followed in the PSA era (1987-1993)--who received definitive radiation as their only initial treatment. The patterns of relapse and prognostic factors for these groups were compared and contrasted using univariate and multivariate techniques. Results: At a median follow-up of 6.5 years, the relapse patterns in the pre-PSA series were: local in 109 (17%), nodal in 17 (3%), and distant metastatic in 186 (29%). Actuarial local and metastatic rates at 5 years were 13 and 26%, respectively. Local recurrence was only weakly predictable, Gleason grade being the only significant, albeit weak, covariate. Metastatic failure, however, was highly significantly and meaningfully correlated with Gleason grade and T-stage. Because metastasis was the most common adverse end point in this series, overall freedom from progression also correlated with grade and stage. At a median follow-up of 31 months, the patterns of failure in the PSA series were: local in 77 (11%), nodal in 3 (< 1%), and distant metastatic in 24 (3%). Actuarial local and metastatic rates at 5 years were 30 and 6%, respectively. Local recurrence was highly and meaningfully correlated with pretreatment PSA level, which was the only significant determinant of this end

  14. Prostate cancer and radiation therapy--the message conveyed by serum prostate-specific antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagars, Gunar K; Pollack, Alan; Eschenbach, Andrew C. von

    1995-08-30

    Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a powerful pretreatment prognosticator and a sensitive post-treatment outcome measure for clinically localized prostate cancer treated with radiation therapy. Today, the pretreatment serum PSA level appears to supersede both grade and T-stage as a determinant of outcome. This study was undertaken to attempt a reconciliation between the old (pre-PSA) and the new (PSA) data-in particular to address the question of why stage and grade apparently play so little role in this PSA era. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the outcome of two cohorts of men with T1-T4, N0, or NX, M0 prostate cancer, one group (648 patients) treated and followed in the pre-PSA era (1966-1988), another group (707 patients) treated and followed in the PSA era (1987-1993)--who received definitive radiation as their only initial treatment. The patterns of relapse and prognostic factors for these groups were compared and contrasted using univariate and multivariate techniques. Results: At a median follow-up of 6.5 years, the relapse patterns in the pre-PSA series were: local in 109 (17%), nodal in 17 (3%), and distant metastatic in 186 (29%). Actuarial local and metastatic rates at 5 years were 13 and 26%, respectively. Local recurrence was only weakly predictable, Gleason grade being the only significant, albeit weak, covariate. Metastatic failure, however, was highly significantly and meaningfully correlated with Gleason grade and T-stage. Because metastasis was the most common adverse end point in this series, overall freedom from progression also correlated with grade and stage. At a median follow-up of 31 months, the patterns of failure in the PSA series were: local in 77 (11%), nodal in 3 (< 1%), and distant metastatic in 24 (3%). Actuarial local and metastatic rates at 5 years were 30 and 6%, respectively. Local recurrence was highly and meaningfully correlated with pretreatment PSA level, which was the only significant determinant of this end

  15. MRI-guided biopsies and minimally invasive therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeet Ghai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI have led to a paradigm shift in the diagnosis and management of prostate cancer (PCa. Its sensitivity in detecting clinically significant cancer and the ability to localize the tumor within the prostate gland has opened up discussion on targeted diagnosis and therapy in PCa. Use of mp-MRI in conjunction with prostate-specific antigen followed by targeted biopsy allows for a better diagnostic pathway than transrectal ultrasound (TRUS biopsy and improves the diagnosis of PCa. Improved detection of PCa by mp-MRI has also opened up opportunities for focal therapy within the organ while reducing the incidence of side-effects associated with the radical treatment methods for PCa. This review discusses the evidence and techniques for in-bore MRI-guided prostate biopsy and provides an update on the status of MRI-guided targeted focal therapy in PCa.

  16. Prostate-specific antigen-activated thapsigargin prodrug as targeted therapy for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denmeade, Samuel R; Jakobsen, Carsten M; Janssen, Samuel

    2003-01-01

    Standard anti-proliferative chemotherapy is relatively ineffective against slowly proliferating androgen-independent prostate cancer cells within metastatic sites. In contrast, the lipophilic cytotoxin thapsigargin, which causes apoptosis by disrupting intracellular free Ca2+ levels, is effective...... against both proliferative and quiescent (i.e., G0-arrested) cells. However, thapsigargin's mechanism of action indicates that it is unlikely to be selective for cancer cells or prostate cells....

  17. Cannabinoid Receptors: A Novel Target for Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    experiments, the long term implications of our study could be to develop nonhabit-forming cannabi - noid agonist (s) for the management of prostate cancer ...Corbacho, C., Velasco, G., Galve-Roperh, I., Huffman, J. W., Ramon, y ., Cajal. S., and Guzman, M. (2001) Cancer Res. 61, 5784–5789 7. Casanova,M. L...Nithipatikom, K., Endsley, M. P., Isbell, M. A., Falck, J. R., Iwamoto, Y ., Hillard, C. J., and Campbell, W. B. (2004) Cancer Res. 64, 8826–8830 29. Bisogno, T

  18. Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Monitor Prostate Response to Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, Anna Lia; Gui, Benedetta; D’Agostino, Giuseppe Roberto; Mattiucci, Giancarlo; Clementi, Valeria; Di Molfetta, Ippolita Valentina; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Mantini, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate results of three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and time since external beam irradiation (EBRT) in patients treated with long-term hormone therapy (HT) and EBRT for locally advanced disease to verify successful treatment by documenting the achievement of metabolic atrophy (MA). Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2008, 109 patients were consecutively enrolled. MA was assessed by choline and citrate peak area-to-noise-ratio 1.5:1 or choline signal-to-noise-ratio >5:1. To test the strength of association between MRSI results and the time elapsed since EBRT (TEFRT), PSA levels, Gleason score (GS), and stage, logistic regression (LR) was performed. p value 2 years. MA was detected in 54.1% of patients of group 1, 88.9% of group 2, and in 94.5% of group 3 (100% when PSA nadir was reached). CM was detected in 50% of patients with reached PSA nadir in group 1. Local relapse was found in 3 patients previously showing CM at long TEFRT. Conclusion: MA detection, indicative of successful treatment because growth of normal or abnormal cells cannot occur without metabolism, increases with decreasing PSA levels and increasing time on HT after EBRT. This supports long-term HT in advanced prostate cancer. Larger study series are needed to assess whether MRSI could predict local relapse by detecting CM at long TEFRT.

  19. Primary radiation therapy in the treatment of localized prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joensuu, T.K.; Blomqvist, C.P.; Kajanti, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    Prostatic carcinoma is one of the leading causes of male cancer deaths. However, the routine diagnostic and therapeutic strategies have not yet been established. Although the outcome of surgical and radiotherapeutical approaches has frequently been reported to be comparable, the profile of side effects is different. This could offer the basis for selecting the treatment of choice in individual cases. During the last decade the radiotherapeutical technique has markedly improved, in part due to the achievements in the field of computer assisted tomography planning and conformal technique; the outcome of side-effects has decreased with concurrent increase in the rate of local control. The prescribing, recording and reporting of irradiation have also recently developed, as well as the staging of the disease. Therefore we consider it timely to review progress in this subject and to emphasize the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of localized prostatic cancer. (orig.)

  20. Focal Therapy in Prostate Cancer-Report from a Consensus Panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de la Rosette, J.; Ahmed, H.; Barentsz, J.; Johansen, T. Bjerklund; Brausi, M.; Emberton, M.; Frauscher, F.; Greene, D.; Harisinghani, M.; Haustermans, K.; Heidenreich, A.; Kovacs, G.; Mason, M.; Montironi, R.; Mouraviev, V.; de Reijke, T.; Taneja, S.; Thuroff, S.; Tombal, B.; Trachtenberg, J.; Wijkstra, H.; Polascik, T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To establish a consensus in relation to case selection, conduct of therapy, and outcomes that are associated with focal therapy for men with localized prostate cancer. Material and Methods: Urologic surgeons, radiation oncologists, radiologists, and histopathologists from North America and

  1. Focal therapy in prostate cancer-report from a consensus panel.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosette, J.J.M.H.C. de la; Ahmed, H.; Barentsz, J.O.; Johansen, T.B.; Brausi, M.; Emberton, M.; Frauscher, F.; Greene, D.; Harisinghani, M.; Haustermans, K.; Heidenreich, A.; Kovacs, G.; Mason, M.; Montironi, R.; Mouraviev, V.; Reijke, T. de; Taneja, S.; Thuroff, S.; Tombal, B.; Trachtenberg, J.; Wijkstra, H.; Polascik, T.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To establish a consensus in relation to case selection, conduct of therapy, and outcomes that are associated with focal therapy for men with localized prostate cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Urologic surgeons, radiation oncologists, radiologists, and histopathologists from North America and

  2. T2-weighted endorectal magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphalen, Antonio C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Cunha, Rui M.G.; Hsu, I-Chow; Kornak, John; Zhao, Shoujun; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively determine the accuracy of T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy and to investigate the relationship between imaging accuracy and time since therapy. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained and the study was HIPPA compliant. We identified 59 patients who underwent 1.5 Tesla endorectal MR imaging of the prostate between 1999 and 2006 after definitive external beam radiation therapy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer. Two readers recorded the presence or absence of tumor on T2-weighted images. Logistic regression and Fisher's exact tests for 2x2 tables were used to determine the accuracy of imaging and investigate if accuracy differed between those imaged within 3 years of therapy (n = 25) and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (n = 34). Transrectal biopsy was used as the standard of reference for the presence or absence of recurrent cancer. Results: Thirty-four of 59 patients (58%) had recurrent prostate cancer detected on biopsy. The overall accuracy of T2-weighted MR imaging in the detection cancer after external beam radiation therapy was 63% (37/59) for reader 1 and 71% for reader 2 (42/59). For both readers, logistic regression showed no difference in accuracy between those imaged within 3 years of therapy and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (p = 0.86 for reader 1 and 0.44 for reader 2). Conclusion: T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging has low accuracy in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy, irrespective of the time since therapy. (author)

  3. Effects of occupational therapy on quality of life of patients with metastatic prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Huri, Meral; Huri, Emre; Kayihan, Hulya; Altuntas, Onur

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the efficiency of occupational therapy relative to a home program in improving quality of life (QoL) among men who were treated for metastatic prostate cancer (MPC). Methods: Fifty-five men were assigned randomly to either the 12-week cognitive behavioral therapy based occupational therapy (OT-CBSM) intervention (treatment group) or a home program (control group) between March 2012 and August 2014 in the Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, H...

  4. Immunotherapy and genic therapy in hormonoresistent prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, Carmen; Pelaez, Karina

    2005-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a heterogeneous disease with a variable degree of aggressively, metastatic patterns and therapeutic response. Hormonotherapy is most used in the world how palliative treatment. Therapeutic options are very limited and at present there is no curative treatment available. We made an actualized bibliographical review in this article, about of new advances in treatment resistant hormone with patient that they are looking for increase sensibility to the treatment with chemotherapy and, on the other hand, to give tools for those defense systems so could recognize and destroy cancerous cells. (The author)

  5. Studies of vascular acting photosensitizer Tookad for the photodynamic therapy of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zheng; Chen, Qun; Blanc, Dominique; Hetzel, Fred W.

    2005-01-01

    In this pre-clinical study, photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated with a vascular acting photosensitizer Tookad (palladium-bacteriopheophorbide) is investigated as an alternative treatment modality for the ablation of prostate cancer. Canine prostate was used as the animal model. PDT was performed by interstitially irradiating the surgically exposed prostates with a diode laser (763 nm) to activate the IV infused photosensitizer. The effects of drug dose, drug-light interval, and light fluence rate on PDT efficacy were evaluated. The prostates and adjacent tissues were harvested at one-week post PDT and subjected to histopathological examination. The dogs recovered well with little or no urethral complications. Urinalysis showed trace blood. Histological examination showed minimal damage to the prostatic urethra. These indicated that the urethra was well preserved. PDT induced prostate lesions were characterized by marked hemorrhagic necrosis with a clear demarcation. Maximum lesion volume of ~3 cm3 could be achieved with a single 1-cm diffuser fiber at a dose level of 1 mg/kg and 200 J/cm, suggesting the therapy is very effective in ablating prostatic tissue. PDT induced lesion could reach the capsule layers but adjacent tissues were well preserved. The novel photosensitizer is a vascular drug and cleared rapidly from the circulation. Light irradiation can be performed during drug infusion thereby eliminating waiting time. The novel vascular acting photosensitizer Tookad-mediated PDT could provide an effective alternative to treat prostate cancer.

  6. Sexual dysfunctions after prostate cancer radiation therapy; Dysfonctions sexuelles apres irradiation pour cancer de la prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droupy, S. [Service d' urologie-andrologie, CHU Caremeau, 30 - Nimes (France)

    2010-10-15

    Sexual dysfunctions are a quality of life main concern following prostate cancer treatment. After both radiotherapy and brachytherapy, sexual function declines progressively, the onset of occurrence of erectile dysfunction being 12-18 months after both treatments. The pathophysiological pathways by which radiotherapy and brachytherapy cause erectile dysfunction are multi-factorial, as patient co-morbidities, arterial damage, exposure of neurovascular bundle to high levels of radiation, and radiation dose received by the corpora cavernosa at the crurae of the penis may be important in the aetiology of erectile dysfunction. Diagnosis and treatment of postradiation sexual dysfunctions must integrate pre-therapeutic evaluation and information to provide to the patient and his partner a multidisciplinary sexual medicine management. (authors)

  7. Localized field conformation radiotherapy combined with endocrine therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Kaizu, Toshihide; Kurosaki, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Yoshiaki

    1999-01-01

    To improve the quality of life (QOL) of the patients with prostate cancer, we limit the radiotherapy target volume to the prostate and seminal vesicles while using endocrine therapy towards the disease outside the target volume. Radiotherapy technique was rotation conformation technique with computer-controlled multileaf collimators to the total doses of up to 66-70 Gy. Among 145 evaluable cases with the median age of 74, overall and cause-specific 5-year survival rates were 59.3% and 84.1%, respectively, and the relative survival rate of the Stage A-C cases was 100%. The two thirds (33/50) of the deaths were not of prostate cancer. The rate of severe complication was 1.4%. As for QOL, the rate of impotence was 90%, however, the patients' overall satisfaction towards the treatment was 90%. From this analysis, this combined treatment seems beneficial in the treatment of prostate cancer. (author)

  8. Therapy assessment in prostate cancer using choline and PSMA PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceci, Francesco; Castellucci, Paolo; Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, Nuclear Medicine Unit, S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Herrmann, Ken [University Hospital Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); University of California Los Angeles, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hadaschik, Boris [University Hospital Essen, Department of Urology, Essen (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    While PET with non-FDG tracers (mainly choline and Ga-PSMA) has commonly been used for restaging in men with biochemically recurrent prostate cancer, as well as for primary staging, it is only recently that a few preliminary studies have addressed the possible use of PET for monitoring the response to systemic therapy of metastatic disease, especially innovative treatments such as abiraterone and enzalutamide. This article aims to evaluate the role of PET imaging with different non-FDG radiotracers for assessment of therapy in advanced prostate cancer patients. (orig.)

  9. The value of MRI three-dimensional reconstruction in diagnosis and therapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Feiyu; Wang Xiaoying; Xu Yufeng; Xiao Jiangxi; Jiang Xuexiang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate three-dimensional reconstruction of MRI images in diagnosis and therapy of prostate cancer. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with proven prostate cancers were recruited in this study. Seventeen of them were diagnosed as having prostate cancer according to the ultrasound guided systemic biopsy. Their MR examinations showed fourteen lesions in the peripheral zone and three in the central gland of the prostate. The other eleven patients underwent MR examination after a period of treatment, including endocrinetherapy and brachytherapy. Using endorectal coil, a series of T 2 -weighted images were acquired on the axial plane. These source images were processed by 3D-Doctor software to reconstruct into three-dimensional images. Results: In the fourteen patients with peripheral zone cancer, reconstruction images could display the 3D regions of cancer and the involvement of capsular. The outspread of central gland and the compression of peripheral zone in patients with central gland cancer could be revealed in the same way. The volumetric changes of the lesion and the prostate after endocrinetherapy could also be perceived through these 3 D images. Similarly, radioactive seeds were revealed in a spatial manner that could be easily evaluated. Conclusion: Three-dimensional reconstruction images were obtained in all patients. They were able to provide stereotyped information about the lesions and their surrounding tissues. MRI three-dimensional reconstruction can be an adjunctive tool in the evaluation of prostate lesions. (authors)

  10. Prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Balslev, Ingegerd; Logager, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data.......To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data....

  11. Quality of Life in Men Treated With Carbon Ion Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakatsuki, Masaru; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Yanagi, Takeshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Nakano, Takashi; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Akakura, Koichiro; Shimazaki, Jun; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess patient quality of life (QOL) after carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) for prostate cancer, using established questionnaires. Methods and Material: The subjects were 150 patients who underwent C-ion RT. Of these, 25 patients with low-risk prostate cancer received C-ion RT alone, whereas the remaining 125 patients with a high-risk tumor also received androgen deprivation therapy. Quality of life was assessed using the self-administered Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P) questionnaire in all patients three times. In addition, University of California-Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index (UCLA-PCI) was conducted in the low-risk patients. Results: The FACT-General (FACT-G) and FACT-P scores at 12 months after treatment averaged over all 150 patients showed no significant change compared with those before C-ion RT. In FACT-P subscales, emotional well-being increased significantly just after and 12 months after treatment. In contrast, physical well-being (PWB) and social/family well-being (S/FWB) decreased significantly at 12 months, whereas the prostate cancer subscale (PCS) decreased significantly just after treatment. Average scores for FACT-G, FACT-P, PWB, S/FWB, and PCS for the 125 patients receiving hormone therapy showed substantial detrimental changes at 12 months. In contrast, those of the 25 low-risk patients who had no hormone therapy showed no significant change. Similarly no significant change in the average of the UCLA-PCI scores in the low-risk patients was seen at 12 months. Conclusions: Average QOL parameters reported by patients with localized prostate cancer treated with C-ion RT, in the absence of hormone therapy, showed no significant decrease 12 months after C-ion RT

  12. Prostate-specific antigen and radiation therapy for clinically localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagars, Gunar K; Pollack, Alan; Kavadi, Vivek S; Eschenbach, Andrew C. von

    1995-05-15

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to: (a) define the prognostic significance of pretreatment serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in localized prostate cancer treated with radiation; (b) define the prognostic usefulness of postradiation PSA levels; (c) evaluate the outcome of radiation using PSA as an endpoint. Methods and Materials: Disease outcome in 707 patients with Stages T1 (205 men), T2 (256 men), T3 (239 men), and T4 (7 men), receiving definitive external radiation as sole therapy, was evaluated using univariate and multivariate techniques. Results: At a mean follow-up of 31 months, 157 patients (22%) developed relapse or a rising PSA. Multivariate analysis revealed pretreatment PSA level to be the most significant prognostic factor, with lesser though significant contributions due to Gleason grade (2-6 vs. 7-10) and transurethral resection in (T3(T4)) disease. The following four prognostic groupings were defined: group I, PSA {<=} 4 ng/ml, any grade; group II, 4 < PSA {<=} 20, grades 2-6; group III, 4 < PSA {<=} 20, grades 7-10; group IV, PSA > 20, any grade. Five-year actuarial relapse rates in these groups were: I, 12%; II, 34%; III, 40%; and IV, 81%. Posttreatment nadir PSA was an independent determinant of outcome and only patients with nadir values < 1 ng/ml fared well (5-year relapse rate 20%). Using rising PSA as an endpoint the 461 patients with (T1(T2)) disease had an actuarial freedom from disease rate of 70% at 5 years, which appeared to plateau, suggesting that many were cured. No plateau was evident for (T3(T4)) disease. Conclusion: Pretreatment serum PSA is the single most important predictor of disease outcome after radiation for local prostate cancer. Tumor grade has a lesser though significant prognostic role. Postirradiation nadir PSA value during the first year is a sensitive indicator of response to treatment. Only nadir values < 1 ng/ml are associated with a favorable outlook. A significant fraction of men with (T1(T2

  13. Prostate-specific antigen and radiation therapy for clinically localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagars, Gunar K.; Pollack, Alan; Kavadi, Vivek S.; Eschenbach, Andrew C. von

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to: (a) define the prognostic significance of pretreatment serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in localized prostate cancer treated with radiation; (b) define the prognostic usefulness of postradiation PSA levels; (c) evaluate the outcome of radiation using PSA as an endpoint. Methods and Materials: Disease outcome in 707 patients with Stages T1 (205 men), T2 (256 men), T3 (239 men), and T4 (7 men), receiving definitive external radiation as sole therapy, was evaluated using univariate and multivariate techniques. Results: At a mean follow-up of 31 months, 157 patients (22%) developed relapse or a rising PSA. Multivariate analysis revealed pretreatment PSA level to be the most significant prognostic factor, with lesser though significant contributions due to Gleason grade (2-6 vs. 7-10) and transurethral resection in (T3(T4)) disease. The following four prognostic groupings were defined: group I, PSA ≤ 4 ng/ml, any grade; group II, 4 20, any grade. Five-year actuarial relapse rates in these groups were: I, 12%; II, 34%; III, 40%; and IV, 81%. Posttreatment nadir PSA was an independent determinant of outcome and only patients with nadir values < 1 ng/ml fared well (5-year relapse rate 20%). Using rising PSA as an endpoint the 461 patients with (T1(T2)) disease had an actuarial freedom from disease rate of 70% at 5 years, which appeared to plateau, suggesting that many were cured. No plateau was evident for (T3(T4)) disease. Conclusion: Pretreatment serum PSA is the single most important predictor of disease outcome after radiation for local prostate cancer. Tumor grade has a lesser though significant prognostic role. Postirradiation nadir PSA value during the first year is a sensitive indicator of response to treatment. Only nadir values < 1 ng/ml are associated with a favorable outlook. A significant fraction of men with (T1(T2)) disease may be cured with radiation. There was no evidence for a cured fraction among

  14. Photodynamic therapy in prostate cancer: optical dosimetry and response of normal tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qun; Shetty, Sugandh D.; Heads, Larry; Bolin, Frank; Wilson, Brian C.; Patterson, Michael S.; Sirls, Larry T., II; Schultz, Daniel; Cerny, Joseph C.; Hetzel, Fred W.

    1993-06-01

    The present study explores the possibility of utilizing photodynamic therapy (PDT) in treating localized prostate carcinoma. Optical properties of ex vivo human prostatectomy specimens, and in vivo and ex vivo dog prostate glands were studied. The size of the PDT induced lesion in dog prostate was pathologically evaluated as a biological endpoint. The data indicate that the human normal and carcinoma prostate tissues have similar optical properties. The average effective attenuation depth is less in vivo than that of ex vivo. The PDT treatment generated a lesion size of up to 16 mm in diameter. The data suggest that PDT is a promising modality in prostate cancer treatment. Multiple fiber system may be required for clinical treatment.

  15. Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with AdvancedProstate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    propose to study the mechanism of pharmacologic inhibition of the MLL complex in prostate cancer cells 3) we will assess the in vivo efficacy of the...Project Goals: 1) Enroll patients with known or suspicious for prostate cancer in the NIH MRI /metabolic imaging program, 2) Whole exome and...Henderson 02/11/2014-01/31/2017 Project Goals: 1) Enroll patients with known or suspicious for prostate cancer in the NIH MRI /metabolic imaging program

  16. Management of Biochemical Recurrence after Primary Localized Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darwish, Oussama M.; Raj, Ganesh V.

    2012-01-01

    Clinically localized prostate cancer is typically managed by well established therapies like radical prostatectomy, brachytherapy, and external beam radiation therapy. While many patients can be cured with definitive local therapy, some will have biochemical recurrence (BCR) of disease detected by a rising serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Management of these patients is nuanced and controversial. The natural history indicates that a majority of patients with BCR will not die from prostate cancer but from other causes. Despite this, a vast majority of patients with BCR are empirically treated with non-curable systemic androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), with its myriad of real and potential side effects. In this review article, we examined the very definition of BCR after definitive local therapy, the current status of imaging studies in its evaluation, the need for additional therapies, and the factors involved in the decision making in the choice of additional therapies. This review aims to help clinicians with the management of patients with BCR. The assessment of prognostic factors including absolute PSA level, time to recurrence, PSA kinetics, multivariable nomograms, imaging, and biopsy of the prostatic bed may help stratify the patients into localized or systemic recurrence. Patients with low-risk of systemic disease may be cured by a salvage local therapy, while those with higher risk of systemic disease may be offered the option of ADT or a clinical trial. An algorithm incorporating these factors is presented.

  17. Late rectal symptoms and quality of life after conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geinitz, Hans; Zimmermann, Frank B.; Thamm, Reinhard; Erber, Caroline; Mueller, Tobias; Keller, Monika; Busch, Raymonde; Molls, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study was carried out in order to analyze the prevalence of late rectal and anal symptoms after conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer and to assess their association with quality of life. Patients and methods: Two-hundred and forty nine patients were interviewed at 24-111 months after definitive conformal radiation therapy of localized prostate cancer with a median dose of 70 Gy. Rectal symptoms and fecal incontinence were evaluated with standardized questionnaires. Quality of life was assessed with the EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire-C30 and the prostate cancer module PR25. Results: Rectal symptoms were mostly intermittent. Daily symptoms occurred in ≤5% of the patients. Incontinence was mostly mild with only 3% of the patients reporting daily incontinence episodes. Quality of life was comparable to that of the male German general population except that cognitive functioning and diarrhea were worse in the study population and pain was worse in the reference population. Global quality of life was associated with fecal incontinence, fecal urge, tenesmus, therapy for rectal symptoms and hormonal therapy for biochemical/clinical recurrence. Conclusions: Rectal symptoms and fecal incontinence after conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer are mostly intermittent. Fecal incontinence, fecal urge and tenesmus are associated with lower global quality of life levels

  18. A comparison of robotic arm versus gantry linear accelerator stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avkshtol, Vladimir; Dong, Yanqun; Hayes, Shelly B; Hallman, Mark A; Price, Robert A; Sobczak, Mark L; Horwitz, Eric M; Zaorsky, Nicholas G

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalent cancer diagnosed in men in the United States besides skin cancer. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT; 6-15 Gy per fraction, up to 45 minutes per fraction, delivered in five fractions or less, over the course of approximately 2 weeks) is emerging as a popular treatment option for prostate cancer. The American Society for Radiation Oncology now recognizes SBRT for select low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. SBRT grew from the notion that high doses of radiation typical of brachytherapy could be delivered noninvasively using modern external-beam radiation therapy planning and delivery methods. SBRT is most commonly delivered using either a traditional gantry-mounted linear accelerator or a robotic arm-mounted linear accelerator. In this systematic review article, we compare and contrast the current clinical evidence supporting a gantry vs robotic arm SBRT for prostate cancer. The data for SBRT show encouraging and comparable results in terms of freedom from biochemical failure (>90% for low and intermediate risk at 5-7 years) and acute and late toxicity (6 MV). Finally, SBRT (particularly on a gantry) may also be more cost-effective than conventionally fractionated external-beam radiation therapy. Randomized controlled trials of SBRT using both technologies are underway.

  19. Prostate Cancer FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundraise for PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us Prostate Cancer FAQs Top 10 Things You Should Know About ... prostate cancer detected? What are the symptoms of prostate cancer? If the cancer is caught at its earliest ...

  20. Eph receptor A10 has a potential as a target for a prostate cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, Kazuya; Yamashita, Takuya; Inoue, Masaki; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Abe, Yasuhiro; Mukai, Yohei; Kamada, Haruhiko

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • EphA10 mRNA is overexpressed in breast, prostate and colon cancer cell lines. • EphA10 is overexpressed in clinical prostate tumors at mRNA and protein levels. • Anti-EphA10 antibodies were cytotoxic on EphA10-positive prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: We recently identified Eph receptor A10 (EphA10) as a novel breast cancer-specific protein. Moreover, we also showed that an in-house developed anti-EphA10 monoclonal antibody (mAb) significantly inhibited proliferation of breast cancer cells, suggesting EphA10 as a promising target for breast cancer therapy. However, the only other known report for EphA10 was its expression in the testis at the mRNA level. Therefore, the potency of EphA10 as a drug target against cancers other than the breast is not known. The expression of EphA10 in a wide variety of cancer cells was studied and the potential of EphA10 as a drug target was evaluated. Screening of EphA10 mRNA expression showed that EphA10 was overexpressed in breast cancer cell lines as well as in prostate and colon cancer cell lines. Thus, we focused on prostate cancers in which EphA10 expression was equivalent to that in breast cancers. As a result, EphA10 expression was clearly shown in clinical prostate tumor tissues as well as in cell lines at the mRNA and protein levels. In order to evaluate the potential of EphA10 as a drug target, we analyzed complement-dependent cytotoxicity effects of anti-EphA10 mAb and found that significant cytotoxicity was mediated by the expression of EphA10. Therefore, the idea was conceived that the overexpression of EphA10 in prostate cancers might have a potential as a target for prostate cancer therapy, and formed the basis for the studies reported here

  1. Co-Targeting Prostate Cancer Epithelium and Bone Stroma by Human Osteonectin-Promoter-Mediated Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Inhibits Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shian-Ying Sung

    Full Text Available Stromal-epithelial interaction has been shown to promote local tumor growth and distant metastasis. We sought to create a promising gene therapy approach that co-targets cancer and its supporting stromal cells for combating castration-resistant prostate tumors. Herein, we demonstrated that human osteonectin is overexpressed in the prostate cancer epithelium and tumor stroma in comparison with their normal counterpart. We designed a novel human osteonectin promoter (hON-522E containing positive transcriptional regulatory elements identified in both the promoter and exon 1 region of the human osteonectin gene. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the hON-522E promoter is highly active in androgen receptor negative and metastatic prostate cancer and bone stromal cells compared to androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells. Moreover, in vivo prostate-tumor-promoting activity of the hON-522E promoter was confirmed by intravenous administration of an adenoviral vector containing the hON-522E promoter-driven luciferase gene (Ad-522E-Luc into mice bearing orthotopic human prostate tumor xenografts. In addition, an adenoviral vector with the hON-522E-promoter-driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (Ad-522E-TK was highly effective against the growth of androgen-independent human prostate cancer PC3M and bone stromal cell line in vitro and in pre-established PC3M tumors in vivo upon addition of the prodrug ganciclovir. Because of the heterogeneity of human prostate tumors, hON-522E promoter-mediated gene therapy has the potential for the treatment of hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancers.

  2. External radiation therapy in early stage prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandler, Howard M.

    1996-01-01

    Optimal therapy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate is controversial. Numerous options are available, however, comparison of results is difficult in view of the insufficiency of phase III randomized trials comparing alternative treatment strategies. These options include such strategies as no curative therapy (so-called watchful waiting), radiotherapy (external and/or internal), cryotherapy, or radical prostatectomy. Clearly, a broad spectrum of clinical approaches. When reported experiences involving radiation therapy and radical prostatectomy are compared, surgical patients tend to be younger, of earlier stage, of higher performance status, and have lower pre-therapy PSA. These prognostic factors influence the probability of disease control, and since patient selection can have a profound impact on results reporting, these issues need to be carefully controlled. A review of patients who are potentially candidates for surgery at the University of Michigan treated with conformal therapy external beam treatment, indicates that these relatively early patients are doing well. These issues will be elaborated upon further during the presentation

  3. Sexual function with localized prostate cancer: active surveillance vs radical therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, Roderick C. N.; Korfage, Ida J.; Roobol, Monique J.; Bangma, Chris H.; de Koning, Harry J.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare sexual function of men with localized prostate cancer (PCa) on active surveillance (AS) with similar patients who received radical therapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS Two groups of men with screening-detected localized PCa were compared. The first were men on AS within the prospective

  4. Does tadalafil prevent erectile dysfunction in patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Incrocci (Luca)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractA recently published paper addressed the interesting topic of prevention of erectile dysfunction (ED) with tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase-type 5 inhibitor (PDE5i) in patients undergoing radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. [1]Tadalafil 5 mg or placebo was

  5. Inherited Variants in Wnt Pathway Genes Influence Outcomes of Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiun-Hung Geng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant Wnt signaling has been associated with many types of cancer. However, the association of inherited Wnt pathway variants with clinical outcomes in prostate cancer patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT has not been determined. Here, we comprehensively studied the contribution of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in Wnt pathway genes to the clinical outcomes of 465 advanced prostate cancer patients treated with ADT. Two SNPs, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC rs2707765 and rs497844, were significantly (p ≤ 0.009 and q ≤ 0.043 associated with both prostate cancer progression and all-cause mortality, even after multivariate analyses and multiple testing correction. Patients with a greater number of favorable alleles had a longer time to disease progression and better overall survival during ADT (p for trend ≤ 0.003. Additional, cDNA array and in silico analyses of prostate cancer tissue suggested that rs2707765 affects APC expression, which in turn is correlated with tumor aggressiveness and patient prognosis. This study identifies the influence of inherited variants in the Wnt pathway on the efficacy of ADT and highlights a preclinical rationale for using APC as a prognostic marker in advanced prostate cancer.

  6. Saw Palmetto for Symptom Management During Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Gwen K; Sikorskii, Alla; Safikhani, Abolfazl; McVary, Kevin T; Herman, James

    2016-06-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTSs) affect 75%-80% of men undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for prostate cancer. To determine the safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), and preliminary efficacy of Serenoa repens commonly known as saw palmetto (SP) for management of LUTS during RT for prostate cancer. The dose finding phase used the time-to-event continual reassessment method to evaluate safety of three doses (320, 640, and 960 mg) of SP. Dose-limiting toxicities were assessed for 22 weeks using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events for nausea, gastritis, and anorexia. The exploratory randomized controlled trial phase assessed preliminary efficacy of the MTD against placebo. The primary outcome of LUTS was measured over 22 weeks using the International Prostate Symptom Score. Additional longitudinal assessments included quality of life measured with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate. The dose finding phase was completed by 27 men who reported no dose-limiting toxicities and with 20 participants at the MTD of 960 mg daily. The exploratory randomized controlled trial phase included 21 men, and no statistically significant differences in the International Prostate Symptom Score were observed. The prostate-specific concerns score of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate improved in the SP group (P = 0.03). Of 11 men in the placebo group, two received physician-prescribed medications to manage LUTS compared with none of the 10 men in the SP group. SP at 960 mg may be a safe herbal supplement, but its efficacy in managing LUTS during RT needs further investigation. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Improved Beam Angle Arrangement in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Treatment Planning for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino J.; Li, Yupeng; Zhu, X. Ronald; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates potential gains of an improved beam angle arrangement compared to a conventional fixed gantry setup in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment for localized prostate cancer patients based on a proof of principle study. Materials and Methods: Three patients with localized prostate cancer retrospectively selected from our institution were studied. For each patient, IMPT plans were designed using two, three and four beam angles, respectively, obtained from a beam angle optimization algorithm. Those plans were then compared with ones using two lateral parallel-opposed beams according to the conventional planning protocol for localized prostate cancer adopted at our institution. Results: IMPT plans with two optimized angles achieved significant improvements in rectum sparing and moderate improvements in bladder sparing against those with two lateral angles. Plans with three optimized angles further improved rectum sparing significantly over those two-angle plans, whereas four-angle plans found no advantage over three-angle plans. A possible three-beam class solution for localized prostate patients was suggested and demonstrated with preserved dosimetric benefits because individually optimized three-angle solutions were found sharing a very similar pattern. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the potential of using an improved beam angle arrangement to better exploit the theoretical dosimetric benefits of proton therapy and provided insights of selecting quality beam angles for localized prostate cancer treatment

  8. Role of the Technical Aspects of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy Treatment of Prostate Cancer: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemente, Stefania, E-mail: clemente_stefania@libero.it [Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Centro di Riferimento Oncologico della Basilicata Rionero in Vulture, Potenza (Italy); Nigro, Roberta [Azienda Sanitaria Locale Rieti, Roma (Italy); Oliviero, Caterina [Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Centro di Riferimento Oncologico della Basilicata Rionero in Vulture, Potenza (Italy); Marchioni, Chiara [Azienda Sanitaria Locale Rieti, Roma (Italy); Esposito, Marco [Azienda Sanitaria, Firenze (Italy); Giglioli, Francesca Romana [Azienda Ospedaliera Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, Torino (Italy); Mancosu, Pietro [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milano (Italy); Marino, Carmelo [Humanitas Centro Catanese di Oncologia, Catania (Italy); Russo, Serenella [Azienda Sanitaria, Firenze (Italy); Stasi, Michele [Azienda Ospedaliera Ordine Mauriziano di Torino, Torino (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Regina Elena, Roma (Italy); Veronese, Ivan [Universita' degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy); Landoni, Valeria [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Regina Elena, Roma (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of moderate (<35 fractions) and extreme (<5 fractions) hypofractionated radiation therapy in prostate cancer is yielding favorable results, both in terms of maintained biochemical response and toxicity. Several hypofractionation (HF) schemes for the treatment of prostate cancer are available, although there is considerable variability in the techniques used to manage intra-/interfraction motion and deliver radiation doses. We performed a review of the published studies on HF regimens as a topic of interest for the Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy working group, which is part of the Italian Association of Medical Physics. Aspects of organ motion management (imaging for contouring, target volume definition, and rectum/bladder preparation) and treatment delivery (prostate localization, image guided radiation therapy strategy and frequency) were evaluated and categorized to assess outcome relative to disease control and toxicity. Despite the heterogeneity of the data, some interesting trends that emerged from the review might be useful in identifying an optimum HF strategy.

  9. Radical radiation therapy for prostate cancer in Japan. A patterns of care study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Katsumasa; Mitsuhashi, Norio

    2003-01-01

    The patterns of radical radiation therapy for prostate cancer are unclear in Japan. A Patterns of Care Study was performed throughout Japan to examine the patterns of radiation therapy for prostate cancer. From 1999 to 2000, extramural audits were performed on 50 randomly selected institutions (∼7% of all institutions in Japan). Detailed information was collected on a total of 311 prostate cancer patients without evidence of distant metastases, who were treated by radiation therapy between 1996 and 1998. Of these 311 patients, 162 treated radically using photon beams were analyzed in this study. Eighty percent of the patients had high-risk diseases defined as T3 or T4 tumors, a pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/ml or poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Androgen ablation was performed in 85.8% of patients and the median duration of hormonal therapy before and after radiation therapy was 5.3 and 21.4 months, respectively. The median total dose of radiation therapy to the prostate was 65.0 Gy (range: 20-74 Gy). The 3-year overall and biochemical relapse-free survival rates were 86.7 and 86.1%, respectively. Late toxicity was mild, with only nine patients (5.6%) exhibiting grade 2 late morbidity. The majority of the patients who received radical radiation therapy in Japan have high-risk disease. Androgen ablation plus radiation therapy was commonly used to treat these patients and resulted in high rates of initial control with a low risk of complications. (author)

  10. Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Monitor Prostate Response to Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, Anna Lia, E-mail: alvalentini@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); Gui, Benedetta [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); D' Agostino, Giuseppe Roberto; Mattiucci, Giancarlo [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiotherapy, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); Clementi, Valeria [Clinical Science Development Group, GE Healthcare, Milan (Italy); Di Molfetta, Ippolita Valentina [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); Bonomo, Pierluigi [OU Clinic Radiobiology, I.F.C.A. Florence (Italy); Mantini, Giovanna [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiotherapy, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To correlate results of three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and time since external beam irradiation (EBRT) in patients treated with long-term hormone therapy (HT) and EBRT for locally advanced disease to verify successful treatment by documenting the achievement of metabolic atrophy (MA). Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2008, 109 patients were consecutively enrolled. MA was assessed by choline and citrate peak area-to-noise-ratio <5:1. Cancerous metabolism (CM) was defined by choline-to-creatine ratio >1.5:1 or choline signal-to-noise-ratio >5:1. To test the strength of association between MRSI results and the time elapsed since EBRT (TEFRT), PSA levels, Gleason score (GS), and stage, logistic regression (LR) was performed. p value <0.05 was statistically significant. The patients' outcomes were verified in 2011. Results: MRSI documented MA in 84 of 109 and CM in 25 of 109 cases. LR showed that age, GS, stage, and initial and recent PSA had no significant impact on MRSI results which were significantly related to PSA values at the time of MRSI and to TEFRT. Patients were divided into three groups according to TEFRT: <1 year, 1-2 years, and >2 years. MA was detected in 54.1% of patients of group 1, 88.9% of group 2, and in 94.5% of group 3 (100% when PSA nadir was reached). CM was detected in 50% of patients with reached PSA nadir in group 1. Local relapse was found in 3 patients previously showing CM at long TEFRT. Conclusion: MA detection, indicative of successful treatment because growth of normal or abnormal cells cannot occur without metabolism, increases with decreasing PSA levels and increasing time on HT after EBRT. This supports long-term HT in advanced prostate cancer. Larger study series are needed to assess whether MRSI could predict local relapse by detecting CM at long TEFRT.

  11. Anti-Angiogenic Gene Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    S. Parvovirus vectors for cancer gene therapy. Expert. Opin. Bid. Ther., 2004, 4: 53-64. Ponnazhagan, S., and Hoover, F. Delivery of DNA to tumor... vaccine with plasmid adjuvants 95h Annual Meeting of the American Society for Cancer Research, Orlando, FL, April 2004. Chaudhuri, T.R., Cao, Z...with recombinant AAV vectors results in sustained expression in a dog model of hemophilia. Gene Ther., 5: 40-49, 1998. 2ś 35. Bohl, D., Bosch, A

  12. Endocrine therapy for recurrence after definitive radiotherapy in patients with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Yuzo; Akakura, Koichiro; Ichikawa, Tomohiko; Igarashi, Tatsuo; Ito, Haruo; Tanaka, Masashi; Murakami, Shino

    2001-01-01

    Long-term results were analyzed to evaluate the role of endocrine therapy in the management of local and distant recurrence of prostate cancer following external radiation therapy. Between 1976 and 1994, 92 patients with untreated prostate cancer underwent external beam radiation therapy alone. Endocrine therapy had been started when relapse was evident. Failure was seen in 35 of 92 patients: 10 local, 19 distant and six biochemical failures. Endocrine treatment was performed in 28 patients with nine local and 19 distant failures. The cancer-specific survival rate from the endocrine treatment was 54.5% at 5 years. Prostate-specific antigen level in 20 of 20 patients (100%) decreased to below the normal limit 3 months after the start of endocrine therapy. In univariate analysis, T classification was the most significant variable for cancer-specific survival from the initial treatment. A favorable outcome was achieved by endocrine therapy in patients who had relapsed after external beam radiation monotherapy. Even the recurrent tumor had a sensitivity to androgen. Patients with locally advanced disease (T2b and T3) had poorer prognosis than those with minimally extended disease (T1b and T2a). (author)

  13. Variation of clinical target volume definition in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valicenti, Richard K.; Sweet, John W.; Hauck, Walter W.; Hudes, Richard S.; Lee, Tony; Dicker, Adam P.; Waterman, Frank M.; Anne, Pramila R.; Corn, Benjamin W.; Galvin, James M.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Currently, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) planning relies on the interpretation of computed tomography (CT) axial images for defining the clinical target volume (CTV). This study investigates the variation among multiple observers to define the CTV used in 3D-CRT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Seven observers independently delineated the CTVs (prostate ± seminal vesicles [SV]) from the CT simulation data of 10 prostate cancer patients undergoing 3D-CRT. Six patients underwent CT simulation without the use of contrast material and serve as a control group. The other 4 had urethral and bladder opacification with contrast medium. To determine interobserver variation, we evaluated the derived volume, the maximum dimensions, and the isocenter for each examination of CTV. We assessed the reliability in the CTVs among the observers by correlating the variation for each class of measurements. This was estimated by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), with 1.00 defining absolute correlation. Results: For the prostate volumes, the ICC was 0.80 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.56-0.96). This changed to 0.92 (95% CI: 0.75-0.99) with the use of contrast material. Similarly, the maximal prostatic dimensions were reliable and improved. There was poor agreement in defining the SV. For this structure, the ICC never exceeded 0.28. The reliability of the isocenter was excellent, with the ICC exceeding 0.83 and 0.90 for the prostate ± SV, respectively. Conclusions: In 3D-CRT for prostate cancer, there was excellent agreement among multiple observers to define the prostate target volume but poor agreement to define the SV. The use of urethral and bladder contrast improved the reliability of localizing the prostate. For all CTVs, the isocenter was very reliable and should be used to compare the variation in 3D dosimetry among multiple observers

  14. Combinatorial strategy of epigenetic and hormonal therapies: A novel promising approach for treating advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motawi, Tarek K; Darwish, Hebatallah A; Diab, Iman; Helmy, Maged W; Noureldin, Mohamed H

    2018-04-01

    Estrogens act as key factors in prostate biology, cellular proliferation and differentiation as well as cancer development and progression. The expression of estrogen receptor (ER)-β appears to be lost during prostate cancer progression through hypermethylation mechanism. Epigenetic drugs such as 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-AZAC) and Trichostatin A (TSA) showed efficacy in restoring ERβ expression in prostate cancer cells. This study was designed to explore the potential anti-carcinogenic effects resulting from re-expressing ERβ1 using 5-AZAC and/or TSA, followed by its stimulation with Diarylpropionitrile (DPN), a selective ERβ1 agonist, in prostate cancer cell line PC-3. Cells were treated with 5-AZAC, TSA, DPN and their combination. Subsequently, they were subjected to proliferation assays, determinations of ERβ1 expression, protein levels of active caspase-3, cyclin D1, β-catenin and VEGF. Treatment with these drugs exhibited an increase in ERβ1 expression to different extents as well as active caspase-3 levels. Meanwhile, a significant reduction in cyclin D1, VEGF and β-catenin levels was achieved as compared to the vehicle control group (p epigenetic and hormonal therapies may be beneficial in treating advanced prostate cancer. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Prostate Cancer Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundraise for PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us Prostate Cancer Symptoms and Signs Prostate Cancer Basics Risk Factors ... earlier. So what are the warning signs of prostate cancer? Unfortunately, there usually aren’t any early warning ...

  16. Prostate cancer - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000403.htm Prostate cancer - treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... drugs is recommended. References National Cancer Institute. Prostate cancer treatment (PDQ): Stages of prostate cancer. Updated July 31, ...

  17. Impact of Androgen Deprivation Therapy on Self-Reported Cognitive Function in Men with Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzouk, Shireen; Naglie, Gary; Tomlinson, George; Duff Canning, Sarah; Breunis, Henriette; Timilshina, Narhari; Alibhai, Shabbir M H

    2018-03-01

    Although androgen deprivation therapy is widely used to treat prostate cancer, its effects on cognitive function are unclear. To our knowledge no prior report has examined the impact of androgen deprivation therapy on self-reported cognitive function. Three groups of men 50 years old or older who were matched on age and education were enrolled in the study, including 81 with prostate cancer starting on continuous androgen deprivation therapy, 84 controls with prostate cancer not receiving androgen deprivation therapy and 85 healthy controls. Two scales from the FACT-Cog (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Cognitive subscale) version 3 were used to assess self-reported cognitive function. Changes in cognitive scores with time were analyzed by 2 approaches, including 1) multivariable regression and 2) calculation of the proportion of subjects per group with a decrease of 1 SD or more. Multivariable regression was applied to assess predictors of a decline in self-reported cognitive function. We also examined relationships between the FACT-Cog and a neuropsychological battery of 15 tests. Mean participant age was 69 years (range 50 to 87). The mean educational level was 15 years (range 8 to 24). FACT-Cog scores were similar at baseline across the cohorts. Neither analytical approach revealed that androgen deprivation therapy was associated with changes in self-reported cognitive function on either FACT-Cog scale. Mood and fatigue correlated with changes in self-reported cognitive function. The relationship between self-reported and objective cognitive measures was weak (maximum Spearman correlation coefficient 0.14) and only 2 of 30 correlations were statistically significant. A total of 12 months of androgen deprivation therapy were not associated with self-reported cognitive function changes in older men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  18. Effects of Hormone Deprivation, 2-Methoxyestradiol Combination Therapy on Hormone-Dependent Prostate Cancer In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuminori Sato

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available 2-Methoxyestradiol (2-ME has potent anti proliferative effects on cancer cells. Its utility alone or in combination with other therapies for treating prostate cancer, however, has not been fully explored. Androgendependent, independent human prostate cancer cells were examined in vivo for their response to combination therapy. Efficacy was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay, measuring microvessel density (MVD in excised tumors. Animals harboring hormonedependent tumors treated with 2-ME alone, androgen deprivation therapy alone, or the combination of the two had a 3.1-fold, 5.3-fold, 10.1-fold increase in apoptosis, respectively. For hormone-independent tumors, treatment with 2-ME resulted in a 2.43-fold increase in apoptosis, a 73% decrease in MVD. 2-ME was most effective against hormone-dependent tumors in vivo, combination therapy resulted in a significant increase in efficacy compared to no treatment controls, trended toward greater efficacy than either 2-ME or androgen deprivation alone. Combination therapy should be investigated further as an additional therapeutic option for early prostate cancer.

  19. Cost comparison of curative therapies for localized prostate cancer in Japan. A single-institution experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Takefumi; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Matsumoto, Kazumasa

    2009-01-01

    In addition to open surgery, curative therapies for prostate cancer now include endoscopic surgery and radiation therapies. Because of the expansion and subdivision of treatment methods for prostate cancer, the medical fee point schedule in Japan was revised in fiscal year 2006. We examined changes in medical income and expenditure after this revision of the medical fee system. We studied income and expenditure, after institution of the new medical fee schedule, for the five types of therapies for prostate cancer performed at our hospital: two surgical therapies (radical retropubic prostatectomy and laparoscopic prostatectomy) and three radiation therapies (three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, 192 Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy, and 125 I low-dose-rate brachytherapy). Low-dose-rate brachytherapy was found to be associated with a profit of 199 yen per patient. Laparoscopic prostatectomy, a highly advanced medical treatment that the fee revision changed from a partially insured to an insured procedure, yielded a profit of 75672 yen per patient. However, high-dose-rate brachytherapy was associated with a loss of 654016 yen per patient. Given the loss in hospital income per patient undergoing high-dose-rate brachytherapy, the medical fee point system for this procedure should be reassessed. (author)

  20. Plumbagin improves the efficacy of androgen deprivation therapy in prostate cancer: A pre-clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedinpour, Parisa; Baron, Véronique T; Chrastina, Adrian; Rondeau, Gaelle; Pelayo, Jennifer; Welsh, John; Borgström, Per

    2017-12-01

    Plumbagin is a candidate drug for the treatment of prostate cancer. Previous observations indicated that it may improve the efficacy of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). This study evaluates the effectiveness of treatment with combinations of plumbagin and alternative strategies for ADT in mouse models of prostate cancer to support its clinical use. Plumbagin was administered per oral in a new sesame oil formulation. Standard toxicology studies were performed in rats. For tumor growth studies, mouse prostate cancer cell spheroids were placed on top of grafted prostate tissue in a dorsal chamber and allowed to form tumors. Mice were separated in various treatment groups and tumor size was measured over time by intra-vital microscopy. Survival studies were done in mice after injection of prostate cancer cells in the prostate of male animals. Androgen receptor (AR) levels were analyzed by Western blot from prostate cancer cells treated with plumbagin. Plumbagin caused a decrease in AR levels in vitro. In mice, plumbagin at 1 mg/kg in sesame oil displayed low toxicity and caused a 50% tumor regression when combined with castration. The combination of plumbagin with various forms of chemical ADT including treatment with a GnRH receptor agonist, a GnRH receptor antagonist, or CYP17A1 inhibitors, outperformed ADT alone, increasing mouse survival compared to the standard regimen of castration alone. In contrast, the combination of plumbagin with AR antagonists, such as bicalutamide and enzalutamide, showed no improvement over AR antagonists alone. Thus, plumbagin is effective in combination with drugs that prevent the synthesis of testosterone or its conversion to dihydrotestosterone, but not with drugs that bind to AR. Plumbagin significantly improves the effect of ADT drugs currently used in the clinic, with few side effects in mice. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Quantitative evaluation of bone metastases in patients with advanced prostate cancer during endocrine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahara, Jyunro

    2003-01-01

    A well-recognized difficulty in assessing the response to therapy for advanced prostate cancer is the infrequency of measurable metastatic disease. The most common metastatic site is bone, and it is manifested by diffuse ostoblastic lesions that cannot be measured reliably to allow for assessments of therapeutic benefits. We assessed the clinical usefulness of quantifying the extent of disease on bone scans in monitoring treatment response in patients with advance prostate cancer using computer-assisted image analysis. Percentage of the positive area on the bone scan (%PABS) was quantified automatically using a personal computer with the NIH Image program. Serial measurements of %PABS in 44 patients with bone metastasis from prostate cancer followed for a mean of 33 month (range 4 to 72) with hormonal therapy were compared with those of the extent of disease (EOD) grades in bone lesions and serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels according to treatment response. Serial measurements of EOD grades and %PABS in 13 patients with partial response (PR) disease and those in 12 patients with progressive disease (PD) who did not show bone metastasis progression demonstrated a downward trend during the treatment. On the other hand, changes of EOD grades and %PABS in the remaining 19 patients with PD who showed bone metastasis progression demonstrated an upward trend. Estimated survival curves showed that %PABS was a useful prognostic indicator, with the patients who showed a 25% decline in %PABS surviving longer than the patients who showed a less than 25% decline in %PABS after treatment (p=0.0207). The %PABS is a simple and reproducible estimate of the percentage of the skeleton involving tumors in patients with advanced prostate cancer, and serial measurements of %PABS can assist in monitoring the treatment response in patients with bone metastatic prostate cancer. (author)

  2. Hip fractures and pain following proton therapy for management of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valery, Raul; Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Nichols, Romaine C. Jr.; Henderson, Randal; Morris, Christopher G.; Su, Zhong; Li, Zuofeng; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Mendenhall, William M.; Williams, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Proton therapy (PT) for prostate cancer reduces rectal and bladder dose, but increases dose to the femoral necks. We assessed the risk of hip fracture and pain in men treated with PT for prostate cancer. Material and methods: From 2006 to 2008, 382 men were treated for prostate cancer and evaluated at six-month intervals after PT for toxicities at Univ. of Florida Proton Therapy Institute (UFPTI). The WHO Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) generated annual hip-fracture risk for the cohort. The WHO FRAX tool was utilized to generate the expected number of patients with hip fractures and the observed-to-expected ratio; confidence intervals and p-value were generated with the mid-P exact test. Univariate analysis of hip pain as a function of several prognostic factors was accomplished with Fisher's exact test. Results. Median follow-up was four years (range, 0.1-5.5 years). Per FRAX, 3.02 patients were expected to develop a hip fracture without PT. Three PT patients actually developed fractures for a rate of 0.21 fractures per 100 person-years of follow-up. There was an observed-expected ratio of 0.99 (p-value not significant). Forty-eight patients (13%) reported new pain in the hip during follow-up; three required prescription analgesics. Conclusion. PT for prostate cancer did not increase hip-fractures in the first four years after PT compared to expected rates in untreated men

  3. Combination therapy with hormonal, radiation and chemotherapy for stage C prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasawa, Toshihisa; Matsumoto, Hidetsugu

    1996-01-01

    To improve the effectiveness of treatment for patients with stage C prostate cancer, therapy in combination with hormonal, radiation and chemotherapy was given for the initial period, and there after, hormonal therapy was continuously administered to 18 patients with chemotherapy and three patients without it. At the Social Health Insurance Medical Center, between May 1988 and August 1991, 21 patients were diagnosed to have stage C histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the prostate. The average age of the patients was 69.0 years. The tumor was well, moderate and poorly differentiated in 5, 6 and 10 patients, respectively. As hormonal therapy, orchiectomy was performed on 19 of the 21 patients. Furthermore, 11 patients were administered estramustine phosphate, 9 chlormadinone acetate, and one diethylstilbesterol diphosphate. As, radiation therapy, all patients were treated with AP-PA parallel opposing technique to small pelvis with a 12 cm x 12 cm treatment field (44-45 Gy) combined with conformation radiotherapy to prostate (20-26 Gy). Chemotherapy was performed using either one or a combination of the following; cis-diamminedichloroplatinum, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate and etoposide. The observation period was 54.5 months on the average. Recurrence was observed in 3 patients, for all of which the sites were at bone. The 5-year non-recurrence rate was 90.4% by Kaplan-Meier's method. There were 4 deaths, three were due to prostate cancer and one to gastric cancer. The 5-year cumulative survival rate by Kaplan-Meier's method was 90.5%. In conclusion, this treatment was effective for stage C cases of prostate cancer. (author)

  4. Survival benefit of early androgen receptor inhibitor therapy in locally advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik B; Brasso, Klaus; Christensen, Ib J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal timing of endocrine therapy in non-metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) is still an issue of debate. METHODS: A randomised, double-blind, parallel-group trial comparing bicalutamide 150mg once daily with placebo in addition to standard care in patients with hormone-naïve, non......-metastatic PCa. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate overall survival (OS) and multivariate Cox proportional hazard model was performed to analyse time-to-event (death). FINDINGS: A total of 1218 patients were included into the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group (SPCG)-6 study of which 607 were randomised...... disease (hazard ratios (HR)=0.77 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.63-0.94, p=0.01), regardless of baseline prostate-specific antigen (PSA), with a survival benefit which was apparent throughout the study period. In contrast, survival favoured randomisation to the placebo arm in patients with localised...

  5. New Insights into the Androgen-Targeted Therapies and Epigenetic Therapies in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit M. Godbole

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the United States, and it is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in American men. The androgen receptor (AR, a receptor of nuclear family and a transcription factor, is the most important target in this disease. While most efforts in the clinic are currently directed at lowering levels of androgens that activate AR, resistance to androgen deprivation eventually develops. Most prostate cancer deaths are attributable to this castration-resistant form of prostate cancer (CRPC. Recent work has shed light on the importance of epigenetic events including facilitation of AR signaling by histone-modifying enzymes, posttranslational modifications of AR such as sumoylation. Herein, we provide an overview of the structure of human AR and its key structural domains that can be used as targets to develop novel antiandrogens. We also summarize recent findings about the antiandrogens and the epigenetic factors that modulate the action of AR.

  6. Decreased sexual capacity after external radiation therapy for prostate cancer impairs quality of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helgason, Asgeir R.; Fredrikson, Mats; Adolfsson, Jan; Steineck, Gunnar

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess to what extent patients treated with radiation therapy for prostate cancer experience change in sexual functioning and to what extent this effects quality of life. Methods and Materials: Information was provided by 53 men treated with radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. Assessment was made with the ''Radiumhemmets Scale of Sexual Functioning,'' which measures sexual desire, erectile capacity, orgasm, and to what extent a decrease in any of these aspects of sexual functioning affects quality of life. Function before treatment was assessed retrospectively. Results: Sexual desire diminished among 77% after treatment. The erection stiffness decreased in 77%. Before external radiation therapy, 66% had an erection usually sufficient for intercourse. Half of the men lost this ability after treatment. Of those retaining orgasm after treatment, 47% reported a decreased orgasmic pleasure and 91% a reduced ejaculation volume. Of all men, 50% reported that quality of life had decreased much or very much due to a decline in the erectile capacity following external radiation therapy. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicate that external radiation therapy for prostate cancer is associated with a reduction in sexual desire, erectile capacity, and orgasm functions. In a majority of patients this reduces quality of life. Previously, we may have underestimated the importance an intact sexual function has for the quality of life in this patient category of elderly men

  7. Radioimmunoassay of human prostate-specific acid phosphatase in the diagnosis and follow-up of therapy of prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vihko, P.

    1981-01-01

    The author describes the development of a radioimmunoassay for the determination of serum prostate-specific acid phosphatase and studies its application to the diagnosis and follow-up of therapy of prostatic carcinoma. (Auth./C.F.)

  8. Bicalutamide as immediate therapy either alone or as adjuvant to standard care of patients with localized or locally advanced prostate cancer: first analysis of the early prostate cancer program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    See, William A; Wirth, Manfred P; McLeod, David G

    2002-01-01

    We determine the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide as immediate therapy, either alone or as adjuvant to treatment of curative intent, in patients with clinically localized or locally advanced prostate cancer.......We determine the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide as immediate therapy, either alone or as adjuvant to treatment of curative intent, in patients with clinically localized or locally advanced prostate cancer....

  9. Hematuria following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for clinically localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurka, Marie K; Chen, Leonard N; Bhagat, Aditi; Moures, Rudy; Kim, Joy S; Yung, Thomas; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian T; Krishnan, Pranay; Suy, Simeng; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John H; Collins, Sean P

    2015-01-01

    Hematuria following prostate radiotherapy is a known toxicity that may adversely affect a patient’s quality of life. Given the higher dose of radiation per fraction using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) there is concern that post-SBRT hematuria would be more common than with alternative radiation therapy approaches. Herein, we describe the incidence and severity of hematuria following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer at our institution. Two hundred and eight consecutive patients with prostate cancer treated with SBRT monotherapy with at least three years of follow-up were included in this retrospective analysis. Treatment was delivered using the CyberKnife® (Accuray) to doses of 35–36.25 Gy in 5 fractions. Toxicities were scored using the CTCAE v.4. Hematuria was counted at the highest grade it occurred in the acute and late setting for each patient. Cystoscopy findings were retrospectively reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Hematuria-associated bother was assessed via the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC)-26. The median age was 69 years with a median prostate volume of 39 cc. With a median follow-up of 48 months, 38 patients (18.3%) experienced at least one episode of hematuria. Median time to hematuria was 13.5 months. In the late period, there were three grade 3 events and five grade 2 events. There were no grade 4 or 5 events. The 3-year actuarial incidence of late hematuria ≥ grade 2 was 2.4%. On univariate analysis, prostate volume (p = 0.022) and history of prior procedure(s) for benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) (p = 0.002) were significantly associated with hematuria. On multivariate analysis, history of prior procedure(s) for BPH (p < 0.0001) and α 1A antagonist use (p = 0.008) were significantly associated with the development of hematuria. SBRT for prostate cancer was well tolerated with hematuria rates comparable to other radiation modalities. Patients factors

  10. Selective Androgen Receptor Down-Regulators (SARDs): A New Prostate Cancer Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bhattacharyya, Rumi S

    2007-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a key role in the development and progression of prostate cancer Targeting the AR for down-regulation would be a useful strategy for treating prostate cancer, especially hormone-refractory...

  11. Probiotics for Rectal Volume Variation During Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ki, Yongkan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Wontaek, E-mail: rokwt@hanmail.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Jiho; Kim, Donghyun; Lee, Juhye; Park, Dahl; Jeon, Hosang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Honggu; Kim, Taenam [Department of Urology, Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dongwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus on the percentage volume change of the rectum (PVC{sub R}), a crucial factor of prostate movement. Methods and Materials: Prostate cancer patients managed with tomotherapy as a radical treatment were enrolled in the study to take a probiotic capsule containing 1.0 × 10{sup 8} colony-forming units of L acidophilus or a placebo capsule twice daily. Radiation therapy was performed at a dose of 78 Gy in 39 fractions. The PVC{sub R}, defined as the difference in rectal volume between the planning computed tomographic (CT) and daily megavoltage CT images, was analyzed. Results: Forty patients were randomized into 2 groups. The L acidophilus group showed significantly lower median rectal volume and median PVC{sub R} values than the placebo group. L acidophilus showed a significant reduction effect on the PVC{sub R} (P<.001). However, the radiation therapy fraction number did not significantly influence the PVC{sub R}. Conclusions: L acidophilus was useful in reducing the PVC{sub R}, which is the most important determining factor of prostate position, during radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

  12. Cannabinoid Receptors: A Novel Target for Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mukhtar, Hasan; Afaq, Farrukh; Sarfaraz, Sami

    2005-01-01

    .... Here we show that expression levels of both cannabinoid receptors CB(sub 1) and CB(sub 2) are significantly higher in CA-HPV-10 and other human prostate cells LNCaP, DUI45, PC3, and CWR22RV1 than in human prostate epithelial and PZ-HPV-7 cells...

  13. Depression related to (neo)adjuvant hormonal therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tol-Geerdink, Julia J. van; Leer, Jan Willem; Lin, Emile N.J.T. van; Schimmel, Erik C.; Stalmeier, Peep F.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: We studied whether hormonal therapy, (neo)adjuvant to radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer, is related to an increase in depression and whether this is caused by the hormonal therapy itself or by the relatively poor prognosis of patients who get (neo)adjuvant hormonal therapy. Methods: Between 2002 and 2005, 288 patients, irradiated for prostate cancer (T1-3N0M0), were studied prospectively in two clinics. In one clinic almost all patients received (neo)adjuvant androgen deprivation (Bicalutamide + Gosereline). In a second clinic hormonal therapy was prescribed mainly for high risk patients. This allowed us to separate the effects of hormonal therapy and the patient's prognosis. Results: During the course of hormonal therapy, depression was significantly heightened by both hormone use (p < 0.001) and poor prognosis (p < 0.01). After completion of hormonal therapy, poor prognosis continued to affect the depression score (p < 0.01). The increase was, however, small. Conclusions: Depression was mildly increased in patients receiving hormonal therapy. The increase appeared to be related to both the hormone therapy itself and the high risk status of patients. High risk status, with the associated poor prognosis, had a more sustained effect on depression. The rise was statistically significant, but was too small, however, to bear clinical significance.

  14. 3D conformal radiation therapy and hormonal therapy for localized prostate cancer: Is age a limiting factor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, A.; Negrea, T.; Lechevallier, E.; Coulange, C.; Murraciole, X.; Jouvea, E.; Sambuca, R.; Cowen, D.

    2011-01-01

    No study on side effects had showed that conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer is more harmful in patients older than 70 years to patients younger. The aim of this study was to evaluate acute and late toxicities of conformal radiotherapy, with high dose for localized prostate cancer in patients older than 70 years and compared to patients younger than 70 years. Between 1996 and 2009, 104 patients were treated with radiation therapy and hormonal therapy for localized cancer prostate. Median follow-up was 105 months (9 300). Acute (occurred at ≤ three months) and late side effects of 55 patients older than 70 years (median age: 75 [71 92]) were graded according to the CTCAE 3.0 criteria and compared to the younger population. Median dose to the prostate was 75.6 Gy (67 80) in both groups. There were no significant differences in acute and late side effects between age groups. For patients above 70 years, the incidence of grade II or higher acute and late side effects were respectively 27 and 22% for urologic symptoms and 13 and 16% for rectal symptoms. The frequency of grade III late symptoms was low and ranged between 0 and 6% for the evaluated symptoms, irrespective of age group. Older patients had a better biochemical recurrence-free survival than younger patients (86 versus 77% at four years, P ≡ ns). High dose 3D conformal radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer was well tolerated in patients older than 70 years. Age is not a limiting factor for conformal radiation therapy and hormonotherapy for older patients. (authors)

  15. A pilot study of exercise in men with prostate cancer receiving androgen deprivation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C Ellen; Leslie, William D; Lau, YK James

    2012-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the mainstay therapy for men with prostate cancer. However, there are musculoskeletal side effects from ADT that increase the risk for osteoporosis and fracture, and can compromise the quality of life of these individuals. The objectives of this study are to determine the efficacy of a home-based walking exercise program in promoting bone health, physical function and quality of life in men with prostate cancer receiving ADT. A 12-month prospective, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial will be conducted to compare the Exercise Group with the Control Group. Sixty men with prostate cancer who will be starting ADT will be recruited and randomly assigned to one of the two groups: the Exercise Group will receive instructions in setting up an individualized 12-month home-based walking exercise program, while the Control Group will receive standard medical advice from the attending physician. A number of outcome measures will be used to assess bone health, physical function, and health-related quality of life. At baseline and 12 months, bone health will be assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. At baseline and every 3 months up to 12 months, physical function will be evaluated using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy - Fatigue Scale, Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, Short Physical Performance Battery, and Six-Minute Walk Test; and health-related quality of life will be assessed using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Prostate Module and the Medical Outcomes Study 12-item Short Form Health Survey Version 2. A mixed multiple analysis of variance will be used to analyze the data. Musculoskeletal health management remains a challenge in men with prostate cancer receiving ADT. This study addresses this issue by designing a simple and accessible home-based walking exercise program that will potentially have significant impact on reducing the risk of fracture, promoting physical

  16. Hormonal changes after localized prostate cancer treatment. Comparison between external beam radiation therapy and radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, J; Celma, A; Placer, J; Maldonado, X; Trilla, E; Salvador, C; Lorente, D; Regis, L; Cuadras, M; Carles, J; Morote, J

    2016-11-01

    To determine the influence of radical prostatectomy (RP) and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) on the hypothalamic pituitary axis of 120 men with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with RP or EBRT exclusively. 120 patients with localized prostate cancer were enrolled. Ninety two patients underwent RP and 28 patients EBRT exclusively. We measured serum levels of luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), total testosterone (T), free testosterone, and estradiol at baseline and at 3 and 12 months after treatment completion. Patients undergoing RP were younger and presented a higher prostate volume (64.3 vs. 71.1 years, p<0.0001 and 55.1 vs. 36.5 g, p<0.0001; respectively). No differences regarding serum hormonal levels were found at baseline. Luteinizing hormone and FSH levels were significantly higher in those patients treated with EBRT at three months (luteinizing hormone 8,54 vs. 4,76 U/l, FSH 22,96 vs. 8,18 U/l, p<0,0001) while T and free testosterone levels were significantly lower (T 360,3 vs. 414,83ng/dl, p 0,039; free testosterone 5,94 vs. 7,5pg/ml, p 0,018). At 12 months FSH levels remained significantly higher in patients treated with EBRT compared to patients treated with RP (21,01 vs. 8,51 U/l, p<0,001) while T levels remained significantly lower (339,89 vs. 402,39ng/dl, p 0,03). Prostate cancer treatment influences the hypothalamic pituitary axis. This influence seems to be more important when patients with prostate cancer are treated with EBRT rather than RP. More studies are needed to elucidate the role that prostate may play as an endocrine organ. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiation therapy induces circulating serum Hsp72 in patients with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurwitz, Mark D.; Kaur, Punit; Nagaraja, Ganachari M.; Bausero, Maria A.; Manola, Judith; Asea, Alexzander

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hsp72 found in the extracellular milieu has been shown to play an important role in immune regulation. The impact of common cancer therapies on extracellular release of Hsp72 however, has been to date undefined. Materials and methods: Serum from 13 patients undergoing radiation therapy (XRT) for prostate cancer with or without hormonal therapy (ADT) was measured for levels of circulating serum Hsp72 and pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α) using the classical sandwich ELISA technique and the relative expression of CD8 + T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells was measured using flow cytometry. Mouse orthotopic xenograft of human prostate cancer tumors (DU-145 and PC-3) were used to validate and further characterize the response noted in the clinical setting. The biological significance of tumor released Hsp72 was studied in human dendritic cells (DC) in vitro. Results: Circulating serum Hsp72 levels increased an average of 3.5-fold (median per patient 4.8-fold) with XRT but not with ADT (p = 0.0002). Increases in IL-6 (3.3-fold), TNF-α (1.8-fold), CD8 + CTL (2.1-fold) and NK cells (3.2-fold) also occurred. Using PC-3 and DU-145 human prostate cancer xenograft models in mice, we confirmed that XRT induces Hsp72 release primarily from implanted tumors. In vitro studies using supernatant recovered from irradiated human prostate cancer cells point to exosomes containing Hsp72 as a possible stimulator of pro-inflammatory cytokine production and costimulatory molecules expression in human DC. Conclusions: The current study confirms for the first time in an actual clinical setting elevation of circulating serum Hsp72 with XRT. The accompanying studies in mice and in vitro identify the released exosomes containing Hsp72 as playing a pivotal role in stimulating pro-inflammatory immune responses. These findings, if validated, may lead to new treatment paradigms for common human malignancies.

  18. Decision Regret in Men Undergoing Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steer, Anna N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Aherne, Noel J., E-mail: noel.aherne@ncahs.health.nsw.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Rural Clinical School Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Gorzynska, Karen; Hoffman, Matthew; Last, Andrew; Hill, Jacques [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Shakespeare, Thomas P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Rural Clinical School Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour (Australia)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Decision regret (DR) is a negative emotion associated with medical treatment decisions, and it is an important patient-centered outcome after therapy for localized prostate cancer. DR has been found to occur in up to 53% of patients treated for localized prostate cancer, and it may vary depending on treatment modality. DR after modern dose-escalated radiation therapy (DE-RT) has not been investigated previously, to our knowledge. Our primary aim was to evaluate DR in a cohort of patients treated with DE-RT. Methods and Materials: We surveyed 257 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer who had previously received DE-RT, by means of a validated questionnaire. Results: There were 220 responses (85.6% response rate). Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy was given in 85.0% of patients and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in 15.0%. Doses received included 73.8 Gy (34.5% patients), 74 Gy (53.6%), and 76 Gy (10.9%). Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (AD) was given in 51.8% of patients and both neoadjuvant and adjuvant AD in 34.5%. The median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 12-67 months). In all, 3.8% of patients expressed DR for their choice of treatment. When asked whether they would choose DE-RT or AD again, only 0.5% probably or definitely would not choose DE-RT again, compared with 8.4% for AD (P<.01). Conclusion: Few patients treated with modern DE-RT express DR, with regret appearing to be lower than in previously published reports of patients treated with radical prostatectomy or older radiation therapy techniques. Patients experienced more regret with the AD component of treatment than with the radiation therapy component, with implications for informed consent. Further research should investigate regret associated with individual components of modern therapy, including AD, radiation therapy and surgery.

  19. Decision Regret in Men Undergoing Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steer, Anna N.; Aherne, Noel J.; Gorzynska, Karen; Hoffman, Matthew; Last, Andrew; Hill, Jacques; Shakespeare, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Decision regret (DR) is a negative emotion associated with medical treatment decisions, and it is an important patient-centered outcome after therapy for localized prostate cancer. DR has been found to occur in up to 53% of patients treated for localized prostate cancer, and it may vary depending on treatment modality. DR after modern dose-escalated radiation therapy (DE-RT) has not been investigated previously, to our knowledge. Our primary aim was to evaluate DR in a cohort of patients treated with DE-RT. Methods and Materials: We surveyed 257 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer who had previously received DE-RT, by means of a validated questionnaire. Results: There were 220 responses (85.6% response rate). Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy was given in 85.0% of patients and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in 15.0%. Doses received included 73.8 Gy (34.5% patients), 74 Gy (53.6%), and 76 Gy (10.9%). Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (AD) was given in 51.8% of patients and both neoadjuvant and adjuvant AD in 34.5%. The median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 12-67 months). In all, 3.8% of patients expressed DR for their choice of treatment. When asked whether they would choose DE-RT or AD again, only 0.5% probably or definitely would not choose DE-RT again, compared with 8.4% for AD (P<.01). Conclusion: Few patients treated with modern DE-RT express DR, with regret appearing to be lower than in previously published reports of patients treated with radical prostatectomy or older radiation therapy techniques. Patients experienced more regret with the AD component of treatment than with the radiation therapy component, with implications for informed consent. Further research should investigate regret associated with individual components of modern therapy, including AD, radiation therapy and surgery

  20. Decision regret in men undergoing dose-escalated radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, Anna N; Aherne, Noel J; Gorzynska, Karen; Hoffman, Matthew; Last, Andrew; Hill, Jacques; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2013-07-15

    Decision regret (DR) is a negative emotion associated with medical treatment decisions, and it is an important patient-centered outcome after therapy for localized prostate cancer. DR has been found to occur in up to 53% of patients treated for localized prostate cancer, and it may vary depending on treatment modality. DR after modern dose-escalated radiation therapy (DE-RT) has not been investigated previously, to our knowledge. Our primary aim was to evaluate DR in a cohort of patients treated with DE-RT. We surveyed 257 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer who had previously received DE-RT, by means of a validated questionnaire. There were 220 responses (85.6% response rate). Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy was given in 85.0% of patients and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in 15.0%. Doses received included 73.8 Gy (34.5% patients), 74 Gy (53.6%), and 76 Gy (10.9%). Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (AD) was given in 51.8% of patients and both neoadjuvant and adjuvant AD in 34.5%. The median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 12-67 months). In all, 3.8% of patients expressed DR for their choice of treatment. When asked whether they would choose DE-RT or AD again, only 0.5% probably or definitely would not choose DE-RT again, compared with 8.4% for AD (P<.01). Few patients treated with modern DE-RT express DR, with regret appearing to be lower than in previously published reports of patients treated with radical prostatectomy or older radiation therapy techniques. Patients experienced more regret with the AD component of treatment than with the radiation therapy component, with implications for informed consent. Further research should investigate regret associated with individual components of modern therapy, including AD, radiation therapy and surgery. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Impact of Pretreatment Prostate Volume on Severe Acute Genitourinary Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizer, Ayal A.; Anderson, Nicole S.; Oh, Steven C.; Yu, James B.; McKeon, Anne M.; Decker, Roy H.; Peschel, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of pretreatment prostate volume on the development of severe acute genitourinary toxicity in patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2007, a consecutive sample of 214 patients who underwent IMRT (75.6 Gy) for prostate cancer at two referral centers was analyzed. Prostate volumes were obtained from computed tomography scans taken during treatment simulation. Genitourinary toxicity was defined using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 3.0 guidelines. Acute toxicity was defined as any toxicity originating within 90 days of the completion of radiation therapy. Patients were characterized as having a small or large prostate depending on whether their prostate volume was less than or greater than 50 cm 3 , respectively. Genitourinary toxicity was compared in these groups using the chi-square or Fisher's exact test, as appropriate. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to further assess the impact of prostate volume on severe (Grade 3) acute genitourinary toxicity. Results: Patients with large prostates (>50 cm 3 ) had a higher rate of acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity (p = .02). Prostate volume was predictive of the likelihood of developing acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity on bivariate (p = .004) and multivariate (p = .006) logistic regression. Every 27.0 cm 3 increase in prostate volume doubled the likelihood of acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity. Conclusions: Patients with larger prostates are at higher risk for the development of severe acute genitourinary toxicity when treated with IMRT for prostate cancer.

  2. Probiotics for Rectal Volume Variation During Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Wontaek; Nam, Jiho; Kim, Donghyun; Lee, Juhye; Park, Dahl; Jeon, Hosang; Ha, Honggu; Kim, Taenam; Kim, Dongwon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus on the percentage volume change of the rectum (PVC R ), a crucial factor of prostate movement. Methods and Materials: Prostate cancer patients managed with tomotherapy as a radical treatment were enrolled in the study to take a probiotic capsule containing 1.0 × 10 8 colony-forming units of L acidophilus or a placebo capsule twice daily. Radiation therapy was performed at a dose of 78 Gy in 39 fractions. The PVC R , defined as the difference in rectal volume between the planning computed tomographic (CT) and daily megavoltage CT images, was analyzed. Results: Forty patients were randomized into 2 groups. The L acidophilus group showed significantly lower median rectal volume and median PVC R values than the placebo group. L acidophilus showed a significant reduction effect on the PVC R (P R . Conclusions: L acidophilus was useful in reducing the PVC R , which is the most important determining factor of prostate position, during radiation therapy for prostate cancer

  3. Prostate cancer volume adds significantly to prostate-specific antigen in the prediction of early biochemical failure after external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amico, Anthony V.; Propert, Kathleen J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: A new clinical pretreatment quantity that closely approximates the true prostate cancer volume is defined. Methods and Materials: The cancer-specific prostate-specific antigen (PSA), PSA density, prostate cancer volume (V Ca ), and the volume fraction of the gland involved with carcinoma (V Ca fx) were calculated for 227 prostate cancer patients managed definitively with external beam radiation therapy. 1. PSA density PSA/ultrasound prostate gland volume 2. Cancer-specific PSA = PSA - [PSA from benign epithelial tissue] 3. V Ca = Cancer-specific PSA/[PSA in serum per cm 3 of cancer] 4. V Ca fx = V Ca /ultrasound prostate gland volume A Cox multiple regression analysis was used to test whether any of these-clinical pretreatment parameters added significantly to PSA in predicting early postradiation PSA failure. Results: The prostate cancer volume (p = 0.039) and the volume fraction of the gland involved by carcinoma (p = 0.035) significantly added to the PSA in predicting postradiation PSA failure. Conversely, the PSA density and the cancer-specific PSA did not add significantly (p > 0.05) to PSA in predicting postradiation PSA failure. The 20-month actuarial PSA failure-free rates for patients with calculated tumor volumes of ≤0.5 cm 3 , 0.5-4.0 cm 3 , and >4.0 cm 3 were 92, 80, and 47%, respectively (p = 0.00004). Conclusion: The volume of prostate cancer (V Ca ) and the resulting volume fraction of cancer both added significantly to PSA in their ability to predict for early postradiation PSA failure. These new parameters may be used to select patients in prospective randomized trials that examine the efficacy of combining radiation and androgen ablative therapy in patients with clinically localized disease, who are at high risk for early postradiation PSA failure

  4. The Danish Prostate Cancer Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen-Nielsen, Mary; Høyer, Søren; Friis, Søren

    2016-01-01

    variables include Gleason scores, cancer staging, prostate-specific antigen values, and therapeutic measures (active surveillance, surgery, radiotherapy, endocrine therapy, and chemotherapy). DESCRIPTIVE DATA: In total, 22,332 patients with prostate cancer were registered in DAPROCAdata as of April 2015......AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Prostate Cancer Database (DAPROCAdata) is a nationwide clinical cancer database that has prospectively collected data on patients with incident prostate cancer in Denmark since February 2010. The overall aim of the DAPROCAdata is to improve the quality of prostate cancer...... care in Denmark by systematically collecting key clinical variables for the purposes of health care monitoring, quality improvement, and research. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish patients with histologically verified prostate cancer are included in the DAPROCAdata. MAIN VARIABLES: The DAPROCAdata...

  5. Prostate Cancer Foundation News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Finding a Doctor Treatment Options Side Effects Managing Prostate Cancer Treatment Related Side Effects Clinical Trials Patient Resources Guides Videos Prostate Cancer FAQs Information by Stage Newly Diagnosed with Prostate ...

  6. Ozone Therapy in the Management of Persistent Radiation-Induced Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardino Clavo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Persistent radiation-induced proctitis and rectal bleeding are debilitating complications with limited therapeutic options. We present our experience with ozone therapy in the management of such refractory rectal bleeding. Methods. Patients (n=12 previously irradiated for prostate cancer with persistent or severe rectal bleeding without response to conventional treatment were enrolled to receive ozone therapy via rectal insufflations and/or topical application of ozonized-oil. Ten (83% patients had Grade 3 or Grade 4 toxicity. Median follow-up after ozone therapy was 104 months (range: 52–119. Results. Following ozone therapy, the median grade of toxicity improved from 3 to 1 (p<0.001 and the number of endoscopy treatments from 37 to 4 (p=0.032. Hemoglobin levels changed from 11.1 (7–14 g/dL to 13 (10–15 g/dL, before and after ozone therapy, respectively (p=0.008. Ozone therapy was well tolerated and no adverse effects were noted, except soft and temporary flatulence for some hours after each session. Conclusions. Ozone therapy was effective in radiation-induced rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients without serious adverse events. It proved useful in the management of rectal bleeding and merits further evaluation.

  7. The 5th Conference on Asian Trends in Prostate Cancer Hormone Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaza, Hideyuki; Moore, Malcolm A; Chang, Shu-Jen; Cheng, Christopher; Choi, Han Yong; Esuvaranathan, Kesavan; Hinotsu, Shiro; Hong, Sung-Joon; Kim, Choung-Soo; Kim, Wun-Jae; Murai, Masaru; Naito, Seiji; Soebadi, Doddy; Song, Jae-Mann; Umbas, Rainy; Usami, Michiyuki; Xia, Shujie; Yang, Chi-Rei

    2007-01-01

    The Conference on Asian Trends in Prostate Cancer Hormone Therapy is an annual forum for Asian urologists now in its 5th year. The 2006 conference, held in Bali, Indonesia, was attended by 27 leading urologic oncologists from China, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan and featured a packed program of presentations and discussions on a wide range of topics such as relationships among clinicians and the newly opened Asia Regional Office for Cancer Control of the International Union Against Cancer (UICC), detection rates of prostate cancer by biopsy in each of the 6 Asian countries, and favored treatment modalities for hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) in each country. The first session of the conference kicked off with a keynote lecture entitled "Activities of the UICC ARO". UICC's new office will be the nerve center for its activities in the Asia region. Along with the Asian Pacific Organization for Cancer Prevention (APOCP), UICC aims to shift the focus of attention to cancer control. As such APOCP's long-running publication the APJCP is to be re-launched as the Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Control. Although UICC is primarily concerned with cancer, several risk factors for cancer are common also to other non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and heart disease, and an important strategy is to implement measures to control these various pathologic conditions as a whole. Apart from contributing to an Asian prostate cancer registry the UICC-ARO will provide training courses, working groups, and assistance in collecting and processing data. The keynote lecture was followed by a roundtable discussion on possible ways in which clinicians from each Asian country can work with UICC. A number of suggestions were put forth including better registration, epidemiology research, possible implementation of UICC prostate cancer guidelines, early detection and screening, and roles of diet and phytotherapy. The underlying reasons for the large but

  8. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy as monotherapy for intermediate-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Andrew W

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT has been advanced as monotherapy for low-risk prostate cancer. We examined the dose distributions and early clinical outcomes using this modality for the treatment of intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods Forty-one sequential hormone-naïve intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients received 35–36.25 Gy of CyberKnife-delivered SBRT in 5 fractions. Radiation dose distributions were analyzed for coverage of potential microscopic ECE by measuring the distance from the prostatic capsule to the 33 Gy isodose line. PSA levels, toxicities, and quality of life (QOL measures were assessed at baseline and follow-up. Results All patients completed treatment with a mean coverage by the 33 Gy isodose line extending >5 mm beyond the prostatic capsule in all directions except posteriorly. Clinical responses were documented by a mean PSA decrease from 7.67 ng/mL pretreatment to 0.64 ng/mL at the median follow-up of 21 months. Forty patients remain free from biochemical progression. No Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed. Mean EPIC urinary irritation/obstruction and bowel QOL scores exhibited a transient decline post-treatment with a subsequent return to baseline. No significant change in sexual QOL was observed. Conclusions In this intermediate-risk patient population, an adequate radiation dose was delivered to areas of expected microscopic ECE in the majority of patients. Although prospective studies are needed to confirm long-term tumor control and toxicity, the short-term PSA response, biochemical relapse-free survival rate, and QOL in this interim analysis are comparable to results reported for prostate brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy. Trial registration The Georgetown Institutional Review Board has approved this retrospective study (IRB 2009–510.

  9. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy as monotherapy for intermediate-risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Andrew W; Lei, Siyuan; Suy, Simeng; Lynch, John H; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Collins, Sean P; Wang, Hongkun; Oermann, Eric K; Sherer, Benjamin A; Uhm, Sunghae; Chen, Viola J; Pendharkar, Arjun V; Hanscom, Heather N; Kim, Joy S

    2013-01-01

    Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been advanced as monotherapy for low-risk prostate cancer. We examined the dose distributions and early clinical outcomes using this modality for the treatment of intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Forty-one sequential hormone-naïve intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients received 35–36.25 Gy of CyberKnife-delivered SBRT in 5 fractions. Radiation dose distributions were analyzed for coverage of potential microscopic ECE by measuring the distance from the prostatic capsule to the 33 Gy isodose line. PSA levels, toxicities, and quality of life (QOL) measures were assessed at baseline and follow-up. All patients completed treatment with a mean coverage by the 33 Gy isodose line extending >5 mm beyond the prostatic capsule in all directions except posteriorly. Clinical responses were documented by a mean PSA decrease from 7.67 ng/mL pretreatment to 0.64 ng/mL at the median follow-up of 21 months. Forty patients remain free from biochemical progression. No Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed. Mean EPIC urinary irritation/obstruction and bowel QOL scores exhibited a transient decline post-treatment with a subsequent return to baseline. No significant change in sexual QOL was observed. In this intermediate-risk patient population, an adequate radiation dose was delivered to areas of expected microscopic ECE in the majority of patients. Although prospective studies are needed to confirm long-term tumor control and toxicity, the short-term PSA response, biochemical relapse-free survival rate, and QOL in this interim analysis are comparable to results reported for prostate brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy. The Georgetown Institutional Review Board has approved this retrospective study (IRB 2009–510)

  10. Risk factors for bone loss with prostate cancer in Korean men not receiving androgen deprivation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Ouck Kim

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Preexisting bone loss in men with prostate cancer is an important issue due to the accelerated bone loss during androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. In addition, a high prostate-specific antigen (PSA level has been reported to be related to bone metabolism. This study assessed the factors associated with osteoporosis in Korean men with non-metastatic prostate cancer before undergoing ADT. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study enrolled patients admitted for a prostate biopsy because of a high PSA or palpable nodule on a digital rectal examination. We divided the patients (n = 172 according to the results of the biopsy: group I, non-metastatic prostate cancer (n = 42 and group II, benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH; n = 130. The lumbar bone mineral density (BMD was evaluated using quantitative computed tomography. The demographic, health status, lifestyle, body mass index (BMI, serum testosterone concentration, and disease variables in prostate cancer (Gleason score, clinical stage, and PSA were analyzed prospectively to determine their effect on the BMD. RESULTS: The estimated mean T-score was higher in group I than in group II (-1.96 ± 3.35 vs. -2.66 ± 3.20, but without statistic significance (p = 0.235. The significant factors correlated with BMD in group I were a high serum PSA (ß = -0.346, p = 0.010 and low BMI (ß = 0.345, p = 0.014 in the multiple linear regression model. Also old age (r = -0.481, p = 0.001, a high serum PSA (r = -0.571, p < 0.001, low BMI (r = 0.598, p < 0.001, and a high Gleason’s score (r = -0.319, p = 0.040 were the factors related to BMD in the correlation. The significant factors correlated with BMD in group II were old age (ß = -0.324, p = 0.001 and BMI (ß = 0.143, p = 0.014 in the multiple linear regression model. CONCLUSIONS: The risk factors for osteoporosis in men with prostate cancer include a low BMI, and elevated serum PSA. Monitoring BMD from the outset of ADT is a logical first step in the clinical

  11. Preclinical targeted alpha therapy for melanoma, leukaemia, breast, prostate and colorectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, B.J.; Rizvi, S.; Li, Y.; Tian, Z.; University of Wollongong, NSW; Ranson, M.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Targeted Alpha therapy (TAT) offers the potential to inhibit the growth of micro-metastases by selectively killing isolated and preangiogenic clusters of cancer cells. The alpha emitting radioisotopes Tb-149 and Bi-213 are produced by accelerator and generator respectively and are chelated to a cancer specific monoclonal antibody, peptide or protein to form the alpha-conjugates (AC) against melanoma, leukaemia, breast, prostate and colorectal cancers. These ACs are tested for stability, specificity and cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo using several nude mouse models. The Australian TAT program began some 7 years at ANSTO but was still-born. Later, TAT had a second wind at St George Hospital, where collaborative research led to the investigation of Tb-149 as a new alpha emitting radionuclide. Subsequently, increased emphasis was placed on the Ac-225 generator to produce Bi-213. Although in-house funding was terminated in 1998, the project received its third wind with local fund raising in the Shire and a US grant in 1999, and continues to break new ground in the control of the above cancers. Stable alpha-ACs are produced which are highly specific and cytotoxic in vitro against melanoma, leukaemia, colorectal, breast and prostate cancers. Subcutaneous inoculation of 11.5 million cells into the flanks of nude mice causes tumours to grow in all mice. The tumour growth is compared with untreated controls, nonspecific AC and specific AC, for local (subcutaneous) and systemic (tail vein or intraperitoneal) injection models. Local TAT at 2 days post-inoculation completely prevents tumour formation for all cancers tested so far. Intra-lesional TAT can completely regress melanoma but is less successful for breast and prostate cancers. Systemic TAT inhibits the growth of melanoma xenografts and gives almost complete control of breast cancer tumour growth in the primary site and metastatic invasion of the lymph nodes. These results point to the application of local

  12. Short-term Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Improves Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zumsteg, Zachary S.; Spratt, Daniel E.; Pei, Xin; Yamada, Yoshiya; Kalikstein, Abraham; Kuk, Deborah; Zhang, Zhigang; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the benefit of short-term androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer (PC) receiving dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The present retrospective study comprised 710 intermediate-risk PC patients receiving external beam radiation therapy with doses of ≥81 Gy at a single institution from 1992 to 2005, including 357 patients receiving neoadjuvant and concurrent ADT. Prostate-specific antigen recurrence-free survival (PSA-RFS) and distant metastasis (DM) were compared using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards models. PC-specific mortality (PCSM) was assessed using competing-risks analysis. Results: The median follow-up was 7.9 years. Despite being more likely to have higher PSA levels, Gleason score 4 + 3 = 7, multiple National Comprehensive Cancer Network intermediate-risk factors, and older age (P≤.001 for all comparisons), patients receiving ADT had improved PSA-RFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.598; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.435-0.841; P=.003), DM (HR, 0.424; 95% CI, 0.219-0.819; P=.011), and PCSM (HR, 0.380; 95% CI, 0.157-0.921; P=.032) on univariate analysis. Using multivariate analysis, ADT was an even stronger predictor of improved PSA-RFS (adjusted HR [AHR], 0.516; 95% CI, 0.360-0.739; P<.001), DM (AHR, 0.347; 95% CI, 0.176-0.685; P=.002), and PCSM (AHR, 0.297; 95% CI, 0.128-0.685; P=.004). Gleason score 4 + 3 = 7 and ≥50% positive biopsy cores were other independent predictors of PCSM. Conclusions: Short-term ADT improves PSA-RFS, DM, and PCSM in patients with intermediate-risk PC undergoing dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy

  13. Self-assembled albumin nanoparticles for combination therapy in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian H

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Huibo Lian,1 Jinhui Wu,2 Yiqiao Hu,2 Hongqian Guo1 1Department of Urology, Drum Tower Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, 2State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Resistance to regular treatment strategies is a big challenge in the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Combination of photothermal and photodynamic therapy (PTT/PDT with chemotherapy offers unique advantages over monotherapy alone. However, free drugs, such as photosensitizers and chemotherapeutic agents, lack tumor-targeted accumulation and can be easily eliminated from the body. Moreover, most of the PTT drugs are hydrophobic and their organic solvents have in vivo toxicity, thereby limiting their potential in clinical translation. Herein, simple multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs using IR780 (a near-infrared dye and docetaxel (DTX-loaded nanoplatform based on human serum albumin (HSA (HSA@IR780@DTX was developed for targeted imaging and for PTT/PDT with chemotherapy for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer treatment. In this platform, HSA is a biocompatible nanocarrier that binds to both DTX and IR780. DTX and IR780, as hydrophobic drug, can induce the self-assembly of HSA proteins. Transmission electron microscopic imaging showed that NPs formed by self-assembly are spherical with a smooth surface with a hydrodynamic diameter of 146.5±10.8 nm. The cytotoxicity of HSA@IR780@DTX NPs with or without laser irradiation in prostate cancer cells (22RV1 was determined via CCK-8 assay. The antitumor effect of HSA@IR780@DTX plus laser irradiation was better than either HSA@IR780@DTX without laser exposure or single PTT heating induced by HSA@IR780 NPs under near-infrared laser, suggesting a significant combined effect in comparison to monotherapy. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging showed that HSA@IR780@DTX NPs could preferentially

  14. Beta-carotene Antioxidant Use During Radiation Therapy and Prostate Cancer Outcome in the Physicians' Health Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margalit, Danielle N.; Kasperzyk, Julie L.; Martin, Neil E.; Sesso, Howard D.; Gaziano, John Michael; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir J.; Mucci, Lorelei A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The safety of antioxidant supplementation during radiation therapy (RT) for cancer is controversial. Antioxidants could potentially counteract the pro-oxidant effects of RT and compromise therapeutic efficacy. We performed a prospective study nested within the Physicians’ Health Study (PHS) randomized trial to determine if supplemental antioxidant use during RT for prostate cancer is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer death or metastases. Methods and Materials: PHS participants (383) received RT for prostate cancer while randomized to receive beta-carotene (50 mg on alternate days) or placebo. The primary endpoint was time from RT to lethal prostate cancer, defined as prostate cancer death or bone metastases. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate survival probabilities and the log-rank test to compare groups. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate the effect of beta-carotene compared with that of placebo during RT. Results: With a median follow-up of 10.5 years, there was no significant difference between risk of lethal prostate cancer with the use of beta-carotene during RT compared with that of placebo (hazard ratio = 0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.42–1.24; p = 0.24). After we adjusted for age at RT, prostate-specific antigen serum level, Gleason score, and clinical stage, the difference remained nonsignificant. The 10-year freedom from lethal prostate cancer was 92% (95% CI, 87–95%) in the beta-carotene group and 89% (95% CI, 84–93%) in the placebo group. Conclusion: The use of supplemental antioxidant beta-carotene during RT was not associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer death or metastases. This study suggests a lack of harm from supplemental beta-carotene during RT for prostate cancer.

  15. Therapeutic effects of strontium-89 combined with endocrine therapy for treatment of bone metastasis in patients with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Deming

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of strontium-89 ( 89 Sr) combined with endocrine therapy for the treatment of bone metastasis in patients with advanced prostate cancer. Methods: 45 cases of prostate cancer with bone metastasis were randomly divided into 2 groups: patients in study group (23 cases) were given 89 Sr combined with endocrine therapy while patients in control group (22 cases) were given endocrine therapy only. The effect on pain relief, the serum PSA level, hemogram and biochemical indicators of hepatic and renal function were observed. Results: The pain degree was not statistically significant between two groups before treatment (P>0.05) and was statistically significant after treatment (P 89 Sr radionuclide combined with endocrine therapy was more effective than endocrine therapy alone in relief of the pain from bone metastasis and reduction of metastasis size in patients with advaced prostatic cancer. (authors)

  16. Increasing Use of Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiation Therapy for Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Mitra, Nandita; Woo, Kaitlin; Smaldone, Marc; Uzzo, Robert; Bekelman, Justin E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine recent practice patterns, using a large national cancer registry, to understand the extent to which dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) has been incorporated into routine clinical practice for men with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective observational cohort study using the National Cancer Data Base, a nationwide oncology outcomes database in the United States. We identified 98,755 men diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer between 2006 and 2011 who received definitive EBRT and classified patients into National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk groups. We defined dose-escalated EBRT as total prescribed dose of ≥75.6 Gy. Using multivariable logistic regression, we examined the association of patient, clinical, and demographic characteristics with the use of dose-escalated EBRT. Results: Overall, 81.6% of men received dose-escalated EBRT during the study period. The use of dose-escalated EBRT did not vary substantially by NCCN risk group. Use of dose-escalated EBRT increased from 70.7% of patients receiving treatment in 2006 to 89.8% of patients receiving treatment in 2011. On multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis and use of intensity modulated radiation therapy were significantly associated with receipt of dose-escalated EBRT. Conclusions: Our study results indicate that dose-escalated EBRT has been widely adopted by radiation oncologists treating prostate cancer in the United States. The proportion of patients receiving dose-escalated EBRT increased nearly 20% between 2006 and 2011. We observed high utilization rates of dose-escalated EBRT within all disease risk groups. Adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy was strongly associated with use of dose-escalated treatment

  17. Football training improves lean body mass in men with prostate cancer undergoing androgen deprivation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uth, J; Hornstrup, Therese; Schmidt, Jakob Friis

    2014-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) remains a cornerstone in the management of patients with prostate cancer (PCa) despite adverse effects on body composition and functional parameters. We compared the effects of football training with standard care in PCa patients managed with ADT (> 6 months......). Fifty-seven men aged 67 (range: 43-74) were randomly assigned to a football group (FG, n = 29) or a usual care control group (CON, n = 28). The primary outcome was change in lean body mass (LBM) assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning. Secondary outcomes included changes in knee.......7%; 95%CI 1.3-0.0; P = 0.06), but these changes were not significantly different from CON. In conclusion, football training over 12 weeks improved LBM and muscle strength compared with usual care in men with prostate cancer receiving ADT....

  18. Low Incidence of Fatigue after Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiranjeev eDash

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fatigue is a common side-effect of conventional prostate cancer radiation therapy. The increased delivery precision necessitated by the high dose per fraction of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT offers the potential of reduce target volumes and hence the exposure of normal tissues to high radiation doses. Herein, we examine the level of fatigue associated with SBRT treatment.Methods: Forty patients with localized prostate cancer treated with hypofractionated SBRT, and a minimum of 12 months follow-up were included in this analysis. Self-reported fatigue and other quality of life measures were assessed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post-SBRT.Results: Mean levels of fatigue were elevated at 1 month post-SBRT compared to baseline values (p=0.02. Fatigue at the 3-month follow-up and later were higher but not statistically significantly different compared to baseline. African-American patients reported higher fatigue post-SBRT than Caucasian patients. Fatigue was correlated with hormonal symptoms as measured by the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC quality of life questionnaire, but not with urinary, bowel, or sexual symptoms. Age, co-morbidities, smoking, prostate specific antigen (PSA levels, testosterone levels, and tumor stage were not associated with fatigue. Conclusion: This is the first study to investigate fatigue as a side-effect of SBRT. In contrast to standard radiation therapy, results suggest SBRT-related fatigue is short-term rather than a long-term side effect of SBRT. These results also suggest post-SBRT fatigue to be a more frequent complication in African-Americans than Caucasians.

  19. Ion therapy of prostate cancer: daily rectal dose reduction by application of spacer gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucinski, Antoni; Brons, Stephan; Richter, Daniel; Habl, Gregor; Debus, Jürgen; Bert, Christoph; Haberer, Thomas; Jäkel, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Ion beam therapy represents a promising approach to treat prostate cancer, mainly due to its high conformity and radiobiological effectiveness. However, the presence of prostate motion, patient positioning and range uncertainties may deteriorate target dose and increase exposure of organs at risk. Spacer gel injected between prostate and rectum may increase the safety of prostate cancer (PC) radiation therapy by separating the rectum from the target dose field. The dosimetric impact of the application of spacer gel for scanned carbon ion therapy of PC has been analyzed at Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). The robustness of ion therapy treatment plans was investigated by comparison of two data sets of patients treated with and without spacer gel. A research treatment planning system for ion therapy was used for treatment plan optimization and calculation of daily dose distributions on 2 to 9 Computed Tomography (CT) studies available for each of the 19 patients. Planning and daily dose distributions were analyzed with respect to target coverage, maximal dose to the rectum (excluding 1 ml of the greatest dose; Dmax-1 ml) and the rectal volume receiving dose greater than 90% of prescribed target dose (V90 Rectum ), respectively. The application of spacer gel did substantially diminish rectum dose. Dmax-1 ml on the treatment planning CT was on average reduced from 100.0 ± 1.0% to 90.2 ± 4.8%, when spacer gel was applied. The robustness analysis performed with daily CT studies demonstrated for all analyzed patient cases that application of spacer gel results in a decrease of the daily V90 Rectum index, which calculated over all patient cases and CT studies was 10.2 ± 10.4 [ml] and 1.1 ± 2.1 [ml] for patients without and with spacer gel, respectively. The dosimetric benefit of increasing the distance between prostate and rectum using spacer gel for PC treatment with carbon ion beams has been quantified. Application of spacer gel substantially reduced rectal

  20. Targeting Survivin by 3, 3'-Diindolylmethane (DIM) for Prostate Cancer Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rahman, K. M

    2008-01-01

    ...) family, is associated with both progression of prostate carcinoma and drug resistance. Therefore, we hypothesized that survivin plays a role in the development of hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC...

  1. The MCT4 Gene: A Novel, Potential Target for Therapy of Advanced Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Stephen Yiu Chuen; Xue, Hui; Wu, Rebecca; Fazli, Ladan; Lin, Dong; Collins, Colin C; Gleave, Martin E; Gout, Peter W; Wang, Yuzhuo

    2016-06-01

    The management of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a major challenge in the clinic. Androgen receptor signaling-directed strategies are not curative in CRPC therapy, and new strategies targeting alternative, key cancer properties are needed. Using reprogrammed glucose metabolism (aerobic glycolysis), cancer cells typically secrete excessive amounts of lactic acid into their microenvironment, promoting cancer development, survival, and progression. Cellular lactic acid secretion is thought to be predominantly mediated by MCT4, a plasma membrane transporter protein. As such, the MCT4 gene provides a unique, potential therapeutic target for cancer. A tissue microarray of various Gleason grade human prostate cancers was stained for MCT4 protein. Specific, MCT4-targeting antisense oligonucleotides (MCT4 ASO) were designed and candidate MCT4 ASOs checked for effects on (i) MCT4 expression, lactic acid secretion/content, glucose consumption, glycolytic gene expression, and proliferation of human CRPC cells and (ii) growth of PC-3 tumors in nude mice. Elevated MCT4 expression was associated with human CRPC and an earlier time to relapse. The treatment of PC-3, DU145, and C4-2 CRPC cultures with candidate MCT4 ASOs led to marked inhibition of MCT4 expression, lactic acid secretion, to increased intracellular lactic acid levels, and markedly reduced aerobic glycolysis and cell proliferation. Treatment of PC-3 tumor-bearing nude mice with the MCT4 ASOs markedly inhibited tumor growth without inducing major host toxicity. MCT4-targeting ASOs that inhibit lactic acid secretion may be useful for therapy of CRPC and other cancers, as they can interfere with reprogrammed energy metabolism of cancers, an emerging hallmark of cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 22(11); 2721-33. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Effects of occupational therapy on quality of life of patients with metastatic prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huri, Meral; Huri, Emre; Kayihan, Hulya; Altuntas, Onur

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the efficiency of occupational therapy relative to a home program in improving quality of life (QoL) among men who were treated for metastatic prostate cancer (MPC). Methods: Fifty-five men were assigned randomly to either the 12-week cognitive behavioral therapy based occupational therapy (OT-CBSM) intervention (treatment group) or a home program (control group) between March 2012 and August 2014 in the Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) was used to measure the occupational performance and identify difficulties in daily living activities. The QoL and symptom status were measured by The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and its Prostate Cancer Module. A 12-week OT-CBSM intervention including client-centered training of daily living activities, recreational group activities, and cognitive behavioral stress management intervention were applied. Results: The COPM performance and satisfaction scores, which indicate occupational participation and QoL increased statistically in the treatment group in relation to men who were included in the home-program (p≤0.05). Conclusion: A 12-week OT-CBSM intervention was effective in improving QoL in men treated for MPC, and these changes were associated significantly with occupational performance. PMID:26219446

  3. Intermittent hormonal therapy in the treatment of post-irradiation residual/recurrent prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Aaron O; Kocherill, Paul G; Wallace, Michelle; Forman, Jeffrey D

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of intermittent hormonal therapy in the treatment of residual/recurrent prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Seventeen patients with biochemical evidence of residual/recurrent prostate cancer were initially treated with radiation therapy (RT)(13), neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy and RT (3), or RT following prostatectomy (1). The mean follow-up time was 19.4 months from the initiation of hormonal therapy. Hormonal therapy consisted of an LH-RH agonist alone (7), an anti-androgen alone (1) or a combination of both (9). Hormonal therapy was continued until the prostatic specific antigen (PSA) level became undetectable. IHT was reinstituted when the PSA reached a pre-determined level, usually greater than or equal to 10ng/ml. Results: The mean time from completion of primary treatment to the initiation of hormonal therapy was 32.5 months. The mean PSA at the start of the first cycle of hormonal therapy was 43.9ng/ml, the second cycle, 11.9ng/ml and the third cycle, 24ng/ml. The mean PSA levels at the end of the first and second cycle of hormonal therapy were .48 and .42ng/ml, respectively. No patient has yet completed the third cycle of hormonal therapy. The average duration of hormonal therapy was 10 months for the first cycle and 4 months for the second cycle. The mean intermittent time off hormones were 9.3 months between cycles 1 and 2, and 10 months between cycles 2 and 3. No patient has yet become refractory to hormonal therapy. Currently all patients are alive. All patients experienced hot flashes and decreased libido at varying degrees during treatment. Thirty-five percent experienced gynecomastia. During the intervals between hormonal therapy, most patients reported a decrease in hot flashes. Conclusion: This analysis supplies preliminary evidence that intermittent hormonal therapy is a viable option in patients with biochemical evidence of disease following initial therapy. It is associated with less treatment

  4. National Trends and Predictors of Androgen Deprivation Therapy Use in Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, David D. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Muralidhar, Vinayak [Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mahal, Brandon A. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Labe, Shelby A.; Nezolosky, Michelle D.; Vastola, Marie E.; King, Martin T.; Martin, Neil E.; Orio, Peter F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Choueiri, Toni K. [Department of Medical Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Trinh, Quoc-Dien [Division of Urological Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Spratt, Daniel E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Departments of Urology & Medicine and Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); and others

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is not recommended for low-risk prostate cancer because of its lack of benefit and potential for harm. We evaluated the incidence and predictors of ADT use in low-risk disease. Methods and Materials: Using the National Cancer Database, we identified 197,957 patients with low-risk prostate cancer (Gleason score of 3 + 3 = 6, prostate-specific antigen level <10 ng/mL, and cT1-T2a) diagnosed from 2004 to 2012 with complete demographic and treatment information. We used multiple logistic regression to evaluate predictors of ADT use and Cox regression to examine its association with all-cause mortality. Results: Overall ADT use decreased from 17.6% in 2004 to 3.5% in 2012. In 2012, 11.5% of low-risk brachytherapy patients and 7.6% of external beam radiation therapy patients received ADT. Among 82,352 irradiation-managed patients, predictors of ADT use included treatment in a community versus academic cancer program (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.50-1.71; P<.001; incidence, 14.0% vs 6.0% in 2012); treatment in the South (AOR, 1.51), Midwest (AOR, 1.81), or Northeast (AOR, 1.90) versus West (P<.001); and brachytherapy use versus external beam radiation therapy (AOR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.27-1.37; P<.001). Among 25,196 patients who did not receive local therapy, predictors of primary ADT use included a Charlson-Deyo comorbidity score of ≥2 versus 0 (AOR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.06-1.91; P=.018); treatment in a community versus academic cancer program (AOR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.37-1.90; P<.001); and treatment in the South (AOR, 1.26), Midwest (AOR, 1.52), or Northeast (AOR, 1.28) versus West (P≤.008). Primary ADT use was associated with increased all-cause mortality in patients who did not receive local therapy (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.14-1.43; P<.001) after adjustment for age and comorbidity. Conclusions: ADT use in low-risk prostate cancer has declined nationally but may remain an issue

  5. Depressive symptomatology in men receiving androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer: a controlled comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Morgan; Jim, Heather S; Fishman, Mayer; Zachariah, Babu; Heysek, Randy; Biagioli, Matthew; Jacobsen, Paul B

    2015-04-01

    Prostate cancer patients who receive androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) often experience many physical and psychological side effects. ADT may be associated with increased risk for depression, but the relationship between ADT and depression is not fully understood. This study used a longitudinal design to assess depressive symptomatology in patients receiving ADT compared with two groups of matched controls. Participants were men initiating ADT treatment (ADT+ group; n = 61) and their matched controls: prostate cancer patients treated with radical prostatectomy (ADT- group; n = 61), and no-cancer controls (CA- group; n = 61). Depressive symptomatology was assessed using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale at ADT initiation and again 6 months later. Differences in depressive symptomatology and rates of clinically significant depressive symptomatology were analyzed between groups at each time point and within groups over time. Between baseline and follow-up, ADT+ participants demonstrated increased depressive symptomatology and increased rates of clinically significant depressive symptomatology (ps depressive symptomatology than both control groups at follow-up (ps depressive symptomatology were higher in the ADT+ group than the ADT- and CA- groups at both time points (baseline: 28%, 5%, 12%; follow-up: 39%, 9%, 11%). Findings support the hypothesis that ADT administration yields increases in depression and suggest that the mechanism behind ADT's association with depression should be explored and that prostate cancer patients treated with ADT should receive particular focus in depression screening and intervention. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Integrating diet and exercise into care of prostate cancer patients on androgen deprivation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyad MA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mark A Moyad,1 Robert U Newton,2 Ulf W Tunn,3 Damian Gruca4 1Department of Urology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 2Exercise Medicine Research Institute, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA, Australia; 3Urological Clinic, Facharztzentrum Academic Hospital Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach/Main, 4Global Medical Affairs, AbbVie Deutschland, Ludwigshafen, Germany Abstract: Improved diagnosis and treatment regimens have resulted in greater longevity for men with prostate cancer. This has led to an increase in both androgen deprivation therapy (ADT use and duration of exposure, and therefore to its associated adverse effects, such as sexual dysfunction, osteoporosis, reduced muscle mass, increased fat mass, and increased incidence of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Given that the adverse effects of ADT are systemic, often debilitating, and difficult to treat, efforts continue in the development of new strategies for long-term management of prostate cancer. The PubMed database was searched to select trials, reviews, and meta-analyses in English using such search terms as “prostate cancer” and “androgen deprivation therapy”, “cardiovascular risk”, “lean body mass”, “exercise”, and “diet”. The initial searches produced 379 articles with dates 2005 or more recent. Articles published after 2004 were favored. This review utilizes the latest data to provide a status update on the effects of exercise and diet on patients with prostate cancer, focusing on ADT-associated side effects, and it discusses the evidence for such interventions. Since the evidence of large-scale trials in patients with prostate cancer is missing, and an extrapolation of supporting data to all patient subgroups cannot be provided, individualized risk assessments remain necessary before the initiation of exercise and diet programs. Exercise, diet, and nutritional supplementation interventions have the potential to

  7. uPAR Targeted Radionuclide Therapy with 177Lu-DOTA-AE105 Inhibits Dissemination of Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Morten; Juhl, Karina; Rasmussen, Palle

    2014-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is implicated in cancer invasion and metastatic development in prostate cancer and provides therefore an attractive molecular target for both imaging and therapy. In this study, we provide the first in vivo data on an antimetastatic effect...... of uPAR radionuclide targeted therapy in such lesions and show the potential of uPAR positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for identifying small foci of metastatic cells in a mouse model of disseminating human prostate cancer. Two radiolabeled ligands were generated in high purity and specific...... value of 100 nM in a competitive binding experiment. In vivo, uPAR targeted radionuclide therapy significantly reduced the number of metastatic lesions in the disseminated metastatic prostate cancer model, when compared to vehicle and nontargeted 177Lu groups (p

  8. Accuracy of Real-time Couch Tracking During 3-dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy, and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbert, Juergen; Baier, Kurt; Hermann, Christian; Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of real-time couch tracking for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Intrafractional motion trajectories of 15 prostate cancer patients were the basis for this phantom study; prostate motion had been monitored with the Calypso System. An industrial robot moved a phantom along these trajectories, motion was detected via an infrared camera system, and the robotic HexaPOD couch was used for real-time counter-steering. Residual phantom motion during real-time tracking was measured with the infrared camera system. Film dosimetry was performed during delivery of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Results: Motion of the prostate was largest in the anterior–posterior direction, with systematic (∑) and random (σ) errors of 2.3 mm and 2.9 mm, respectively; the prostate was outside a threshold of 5 mm (3D vector) for 25.0%±19.8% of treatment time. Real-time tracking reduced prostate motion to ∑=0.01 mm and σ = 0.55 mm in the anterior–posterior direction; the prostate remained within a 1-mm and 5-mm threshold for 93.9%±4.6% and 99.7%±0.4% of the time, respectively. Without real-time tracking, pass rates based on a γ index of 2%/2 mm in film dosimetry ranged between 66% and 72% for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT, on average. Real-time tracking increased pass rates to minimum 98% on average for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT. Conclusions: Real-time couch tracking resulted in submillimeter accuracy for prostate cancer, which transferred into high dosimetric accuracy independently of whether 3D-CRT, IMRT, or VMAT was used.

  9. Osteoporosis and prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mads Hvid; Nielsen, Morten Frost Munk; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence of osteoporosis and risk factors of osteoporotic fractures before androgen deprivation in Danish men. Treatment and prognosis of prostate cancer necessitate management of long-term consequences of androgen deprivation therapy...... (ADT), including accelerated bone loss resulting in osteoporosis. Osteoporotic fractures are associated with excess morbidity and mortality. Material and methods. Patients with prostate cancer awaiting initiation of ADT were consecutively included. Half of the patients had localized disease and were...... level was 30.5 g/l (1-5714 g/l). The average Gleason score was 7.8 (range 5-10, SD 1.1). Fifty patients had localized prostate cancer and the other 55 patients had disseminated disease. The prevalence of osteoporosis was 10% and the prevalence of osteopenia was 58% before ADT. There was no significant...

  10. Adjuvant hormone therapy in patients undergoing high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Neimark

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency and safety of using the luteinizing hormone releasing hormone leuprorelin with the Atrigel delivery system in doses of 7.5, 22.5, and 45 mg as an adjuvant regimen in high- and moderate-risk cancer patients who have received high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU therapy.Subjects and methods. Moderate- and high-risk locally advanced prostate cancer (PC patients treated with HIFU (n = 28 and HIFU in combination with hormone therapy during 6 months (n = 31 were examined.Results. The investigation has shown that leuprorelin acetate monotherapy used within 6 months after HIFU therapy can achieve the highest reduction in prostate-specific antigen levels and positively affect the symptoms of the disease. HIFU in combination with androgen deprivation substantially diminishes the clinical manifestations of the disease and improves quality of life in HIFU-treated patients with PC, by reducing the degree of infravesical obstruction (according to uroflowmetric findings and IPSS scores, and causes a decrease in prostate volume as compared to those who have undergone HIFU only. Treatment with leuprorelin having the Atrigel delivery system has demonstrated the low incidence of adverse reactions and good tolerability.

  11. The survival analysis on localized prostate cancer treated with neoadjuvant endocrine therapy followed by intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hong; Li Gaofeng; Wu Qinhong; Li Xuenan; Zhong Qiuzi; Xu Yonggang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively investigate clinical outcomes and prognostic factors in localized prostate cancer treated with neoadjuvant endocrine therapy followed by intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods: Between March 2003 and October 2008, 54 localized prostate cancer treated by IMRT were recruited. All patients had received endocrine therapy before IMRT. The endocrine therapy included surgical castration or medical castration in combination with antiandrogens. The target of IMRT was the prostate and seminal vesicles with or without pelvis. The biochemical failure was defined according to the phoenix definition. By using the risk grouping standard proposed by D'Amico, patients were divided into three groups: low-risk group (n = 5), intermediate-risk group (n = 12), and high-risk group (n = 37). Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the overall survival rate. Prognostic factors were analyzed by univariate and multiple Cox regression analysis. Results: The follow-up rate was 98%. The number of patients under follow-up was 39 at 3 years and 25 at 5 years. Potential prognostic factors, including risk groups, mode of endocrine therapy, time of endocrine therapy, phoenix grouping before IMRT, the prostate specific antigen doubling time (PSADT) before radiotherapy, PSA value before IMRT, interval of endocrine therapy and IMRT, irradiation region, and irradiation dose were analyzed by survival analysis. In univariate analysis, time of endocrine therapy (75 % vs 95 %, χ 2 = 6. 45, P = 0. 011), phoenix grouping before IMRT (87% vs 96%, χ 2 = 4. 36, P = 0. 037), interval of endocrine therapy and IMRT (80% vs 95%, χ 2 = 11.60, P= 0. 001), irradiation dose (75% vs 91%, χ 2 =5.92, P= 0. 015) were statistically significant prognostic factors for 3 - year overall survival , and risk groups (85 vs 53 vs 29, χ 2 = 6. 40, P =0. 041) and PSADT before IMRT (62 vs 120, U =24. 50, P =0. 003) were significant factors for the median survival time. In the multiple Cox

  12. A Patterns of Care Study of the Various Radiation Therapies for Prostate Cancer among Korean Radiation Oncologists in 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Jae Sung; Ha, Sung Whan

    2008-01-01

    To conduct a nationwide academic hospital patterns of the practice status and principles of radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The survey will help develop the framework of a database of Korean in Patterns of Case Study. A questionnaire about radiation treatment status and principles was sent to radiation oncologists in charge of prostate cancer treatment at thirteen academic hospitals in Korea. The data was analyzed to find treatment principles among the radiation oncologists when treating prostate cancer. The number of patients with prostate cancer and treated with radiation ranged from 60 to 150 per academic hospital in Seoul City and 10 to 15 outside of Seoul City in 2006. The primary diagnostic methods of prostate cancer included the ultrasound guided biopsy on 6 to 12 prostate sites (mean=9), followed by magnetic resonance imaging and a whole body bone scan. Internal and external immobilizations were used in 61.5% and 76.9%, respectively, with diverse radiation targets. Whole pelvis radiation therapy (dose ranging from 45.0 to 50.4 Gy) was performed in 76.9%, followed by the irradiation of seminal vesicles (54.0∼73.8 Gy) in 92.3%. The definitive radiotherapy doses were increased as a function of risk group, but the range of radiation doses was wide (60.0 to 78.5 Gy). Intensity modulated radiation therapy using doses greater than 70 Gy, were performed in 53.8% of academic hospitals. In addition, the simultaneous intra-factional boost (SIB) technique was used in three hospitals; however, the target volume and radiation dose were diverse. Radiation therapy to biochemical recurrence after a radical prostatectomy was performed in 84.6%; however, the radiation dose was variable and the radiation field ranged from whole pelvis to prostate bed. The results of this study suggest that a nationwide Korean Patterns of Care Study is necessary for the recommendation of radiation therapy guidelines of prostate cancer

  13. The role of metastasis-directed therapy and local therapy of the primary tumor in the management of oligometastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongchan; Park, Jee Soo; Ham, Won Sik

    2017-09-01

    Oligometastasis has been proposed as an intermediate stage of cancer spread between localized disease and widespread metastasis. Oligometastatic malignancy is now being diagnosed more frequently as the result of improvements in diagnostic modalities such as functional imaging. The importance of oligometastasis in managing metastatic prostate cancer is that it is possible to treat with a curative aim by metastasis-directed or local therapy in selected patients. Many studies have shown that these aggressive treatments lead to improved survival in other oligometastatic malignancies. However, few studies have shown definitive benefits of metastasis-directed or local therapy in oligometastatic prostate cancer. Review of the available studies suggests that stereotactic radiotherapy (RT) of metastatic lesions in oligorecurrent disease is a feasible and safe modality for managing oligometastatic prostate cancer. Also, stereotactic RT can delay the start of androgen deprivation therapy. Many retrospective studies of metastatic prostate cancer have shown that patients undergoing local therapy seem to have superior overall and cancer-specific survival compared with patients not receiving local therapy. Ongoing prospective randomized trials would be helpful to evaluate the role of local therapy in oligometastatic prostate cancer.

  14. The role of metastasis-directed therapy and local therapy of the primary tumor in the management of oligometastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongchan Kim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Oligometastasis has been proposed as an intermediate stage of cancer spread between localized disease and widespread metas-tasis. Oligometastatic malignancy is now being diagnosed more frequently as the result of improvements in diagnostic modalities such as functional imaging. The importance of oligometastasis in managing metastatic prostate cancer is that it is possible to treat with a curative aim by metastasis-directed or local therapy in selected patients. Many studies have shown that these aggressive treatments lead to improved survival in other oligometastatic malignancies. However, few studies have shown definitive benefits of metastasis-directed or local therapy in oligometastatic prostate cancer. Review of the available studies suggests that stereotac-tic radiotherapy (RT of metastatic lesions in oligorecurrent disease is a feasible and safe modality for managing oligometastatic prostate cancer. Also, stereotactic RT can delay the start of androgen deprivation therapy. Many retrospective studies of metastatic prostate cancer have shown that patients undergoing local therapy seem to have superior overall and cancer-specific survival compared with patients not receiving local therapy. Ongoing prospective randomized trials would be helpful to evaluate the role of local therapy in oligometastatic prostate cancer.

  15. Radiation therapy for oligorecurrence in prostate cancer. Preliminary results of our centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Ruiz de León, C; Ramírez Backhaus, M; Sobrón Bustamante, M; Casaña, J; Arribas, L; Rubio-Briones, J

    2017-12-01

    There is growing interest in the use of more aggressive therapeutic modalities for treating metastatic prostate cancer. In this study, we examine the use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for patients with oligorecurrent prostate cancer. We analysed the biochemical response and toxicity of patients who underwent this therapy at our centre. We selected patients who experienced oligorecurrence between January 2015 to December 2016 and were administered SBRT. The association of androgen deprivation (AD) was left in each case to the decision of the tumour committee. We describe the clinical situation at diagnosis of oligorecurrence, the treatment administered and the biochemical response. We considered a biochemical response to be a 50% reduction in the absolute prostate-specific antigen (PSA) readings. SBRT was administered to 11 patients with bone (82%) and/or lymph node oligometastasis (18%). The treatment regimen for bone oligometastasis was 27Gy divided into 3 sessions, while the treatment for lymph node oligometastasis reached 70Gy. Seven patients had no treatment at the time of diagnosis, 2 were in the castration-resistant phase, 1 patient was in the off phase of intermittent AD, and 1 patient had adjuvant AD for pN1. Seven patients presented a biochemical response with a PSA reduction of 75-100%. The response was not assessable in 4 patients due to the continuing adjuvant AD. With a mean follow-up of 10.5 months, only 2 patients had progressed. Grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity was detected in only 1 patient. Our data suggest that the use of SBRT in carefully selected patients with metastatic oligorecurrence of prostate cancer can achieve biochemical response and potentially delay progression and the use of systemic treatments. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Longitudinal analysis of quality of life in patients receiving conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geinitz, Hans; Thamm, Reinhard; Scholz, Christian; Heinrich, Christine; Prause, Nina; Kerndl, Simone; Molls, Michael; Zimmermann, Frank B.; Keller, Monika; Busch, Raymonde

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess quality of life (QoL) in patients receiving conformal radiation therapy (CRT) for prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: 78 men with definitive CRT for prostate cancer were entered into the study. Patients were assessed before CRT, at 40 and 60 Gy, and 2, 12 and 24 months after the end of treatment. QoL was assessed using the EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and the prostate module PR25. Changes in mean QoL scores with time of ≥ 10 points were considered clinically relevant. Results: Global QoL did not change statistically significant during CRT and was slightly above baseline levels during follow-up. CRT had a statistically significant negative short-term impact on role functioning, fatigue, and PR25 urinary symptoms. The scores recovered within 2 months to 1 year after CRT. Emotional functioning and social functioning scores slightly increased during and after CRT. Role functioning decreased by > 10 points at 60 Gy and urinary symptoms decreased by > 10 points at 40 and 60 Gy. All other differences were < 10 points. A high number of concomitant diseases and having no children were negative pretreatment predictors for long-term global QoL. Conclusion: Definitive CRT for prostate cancer does not compromise global QoL during therapy and up to 2 years after treatment. It has a limited negative effect on role functioning, urinary symptoms and, to a lesser extent, on fatigue with restitution within 2 months to 1 year after treatment. (orig.)

  17. Longitudinal analysis of quality of life in patients receiving conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geinitz, Hans; Thamm, Reinhard; Scholz, Christian; Heinrich, Christine; Prause, Nina; Kerndl, Simone; Molls, Michael; Zimmermann, Frank B. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Keller, Monika [Psychooncology Section, Dept. of Psychosomatic and General Clinical Medicine, Univ. Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Busch, Raymonde [Inst. of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To prospectively assess quality of life (QoL) in patients receiving conformal radiation therapy (CRT) for prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: 78 men with definitive CRT for prostate cancer were entered into the study. Patients were assessed before CRT, at 40 and 60 Gy, and 2, 12 and 24 months after the end of treatment. QoL was assessed using the EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and the prostate module PR25. Changes in mean QoL scores with time of {>=} 10 points were considered clinically relevant. Results: Global QoL did not change statistically significant during CRT and was slightly above baseline levels during follow-up. CRT had a statistically significant negative short-term impact on role functioning, fatigue, and PR25 urinary symptoms. The scores recovered within 2 months to 1 year after CRT. Emotional functioning and social functioning scores slightly increased during and after CRT. Role functioning decreased by > 10 points at 60 Gy and urinary symptoms decreased by > 10 points at 40 and 60 Gy. All other differences were < 10 points. A high number of concomitant diseases and having no children were negative pretreatment predictors for long-term global QoL. Conclusion: Definitive CRT for prostate cancer does not compromise global QoL during therapy and up to 2 years after treatment. It has a limited negative effect on role functioning, urinary symptoms and, to a lesser extent, on fatigue with restitution within 2 months to 1 year after treatment. (orig.)

  18. Radiotherapy combined with hormonal therapy in prostate cancer: the state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Milecki

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Piotr Milecki1,2, Piotr Martenka1, Andrzej Antczak3, Zbigniew Kwias31Department of Radiotherapy, Greater Poland Cancer Center, Poznan, Poland; 2Department of Electroradiology, Medical University, Poznan, Poland; 3Chair of Urology, Medical University, Poznan, PolandAbstract: Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT is used routinely in combination with definitive external beam radiation therapy (EBRT in patients with high-risk clinically localized or locally advanced disease. The combined treatment (ADT–EBRT also seems to play a significant role in improving treatment results in the intermediate-risk group of prostate cancer patients. On the other hand, there is a growing body of evidence that treatment with ADT can be associated with serious and lifelong adverse events including osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and many others. Almost all ADT adverse events are time dependant and tend to increase in severity with prolongation of hormonal manipulation. Therefore, it is crucial to clearly state the optimal schedule for ADT in combination with EBRT, that maintaining the positive effect on treatment efficacy would keep the adverse events risk at reasonable level. To achieve this goal, treatment schedule may have to be highly individualized on the basis of the patient-specific potential vulnerability to adverse events. In this study, the concise and evidence-based review of current literature concerning the general rationales for combining radiotherapy and hormonal therapy, its mechanism, treatment results, and toxicity profile is presented.Keywords: prostate cancer, radiotherapy, androgen deprivation, combined treatment

  19. Prostate carcinoma: results of radiation therapy in the French Cancer Centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allain, Y.M.; Bolla, M.; Douchez, J.; Gary-Bobo, J.; Geslin, J.; Huart, J.; Mazeron, J.J.; Mathieu, G.

    1985-01-01

    From 1975 to 1982, 597 patients with localized prostatic adenocarcinoma were treated using external beam irradiation in one of 6 cooperating centers. The mean patient age was 67 years. The 5 and 10 years actuarial survivals (including all causes of death) were 70% and 40% respectively. The adjusted survival rates become 86% at 5 years and 61% at 10 years when only death due to cancer is taken into consideration. Despite the fact that patients with stage A1 and A2 disease show different patterns of lymphatic spread, the actuarial and adjusted 8 years survivals were identical for both staging groups, in this study, 57% and 90% respectively. It is significant that the majority of patients in both group A1 and in group A2 received irradiation to the pelvic lymph nodes as well as the prostate. Patients with stage B1 disease showed a 7 years actuarial survival of 53% and an 82% survival adjusted for death due to cancer only. Patients in both group B2 and group C, showed an identical 10 year actuarial survival rate of 49%. However, without CT scanning, it is difficult to differentiate between these 2 staging groups. Patients with stage C2 disease showed 10 years actuarial and adjusted survival rates of 20% and 40% respectively. The local recurrence rate after primary radiation therapy did not exceed 11% in any patient group. These data demonstrate, once again, that the dogma pertaining to the radioresistance of prostatic cancer is outdated [fr

  20. External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Patients on Anticoagulation Therapy: How Significant is the Bleeding Toxicity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Kevin S.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Liauw, Stanley L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the bleeding toxicity associated with external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer patients receiving anticoagulation (AC) therapy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of 568 patients with adenocarcinoma of the prostate who were treated with definitive external beam radiotherapy. Of these men, 79 were receiving AC therapy with either warfarin or clopidogrel. All patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Bleeding complications were recorded during treatment and subsequent follow-up visits. Results: With a median follow-up of 48 months, the 4-year actuarial risk of Grade 3 or worse bleeding toxicity was 15.5% for those receiving AC therapy compared with 3.6% among those not receiving AC (p < .0001). On multivariate analysis, AC therapy was the only significant factor associated with Grade 3 or worse bleeding (p < .0001). For patients taking AC therapy, the crude rate of bleeding was 39.2%. Multivariate analysis within the AC group demonstrated that a higher radiotherapy dose (p = .0408), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (p = 0.0136), and previous transurethral resection of the prostate (p = .0001) were associated with Grade 2 or worse bleeding toxicity. Androgen deprivation therapy was protective against bleeding, with borderline significance (p = 0.0599). Dose-volume histogram analysis revealed that Grade 3 or worse bleeding was minimized if the percentage of the rectum receiving ≥70 Gy was <10% or the rectum receiving ≥50 Gy was <50%. Conclusion: Patients taking AC therapy have a substantial risk of bleeding toxicity from external beam radiotherapy. In this setting, dose escalation or intensity-modulated radiotherapy should be used judiciously. With adherence to strict dose-volume histogram criteria and minimizing hotspots, the risk of severe bleeding might be reduced.

  1. Evaluation of Online/Offline Image Guidance/Adaptation Approaches for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, An; Sun, Ying; Liang, Jian; Yan, Di

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate online/offline image-guided/adaptive treatment techniques for prostate cancer radiation therapy with daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging. Methods and Materials: Three treatment techniques were evaluated retrospectively using daily pre- and posttreatment CBCT images on 22 prostate cancer patients. Prostate, seminal vesicles (SV), rectal wall, and bladder were delineated on all CBCT images. For each patient, a pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy plan with clinical target volume (CTV) = prostate + SV and planning target volume (PTV) = CTV + 3 mm was created. The 3 treatment techniques were as follows: (1) Daily Correction: The pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy plan was delivered after online CBCT imaging, and position correction; (2) Online Planning: Daily online inverse plans with 3-mm CTV-to-PTV margin were created using online CBCT images, and delivered; and (3) Hybrid Adaption: Daily Correction plus an offline adaptive inverse planning performed after the first week of treatment. The adaptive plan was delivered for all remaining 15 fractions. Treatment dose for each technique was constructed using the daily posttreatment CBCT images via deformable image registration. Evaluation was performed using treatment dose distribution in target and critical organs. Results: Treatment equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for the CTV was within [85.6%, 100.8%] of the pretreatment planned target EUD for Daily Correction; [98.7%, 103.0%] for Online Planning; and [99.2%, 103.4%] for Hybrid Adaptation. Eighteen percent of the 22 patients in Daily Correction had a target dose deficiency >5%. For rectal wall, the mean ± SD of the normalized EUD was 102.6% ± 2.7% for Daily Correction, 99.9% ± 2.5% for Online Planning, and 100.6% ± 2.1% for Hybrid Adaptation. The mean ± SD of the normalized bladder EUD was 108.7% ± 8.2% for Daily Correction, 92.7% ± 8.6% for Online Planning, and 89.4% ± 10.8% for Hybrid

  2. A Comparison of daily megavoltage CT and ultrasound image guided radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Cheng; Kainz, Kristofer; Lawton, Colleen; Li, X. Allen

    2008-01-01

    In order to quantify the differences between ultrasound-imaging and megavoltage-CT (MVCT) daily prostate localization in prostate-cancer radiotherapy and their dosimetric impacts, daily shifts were analyzed for a total of 140 prostate cancer patients; 106 positioned using ultrasound-based imaging [B-mode Acquisition and Targeting (BAT)], and 34 using the MVCT from a TomoTherapy Hi-Art unit. The shifts indicated by the two systems were compared statistically along the right/left (R/L), superior/inferior (S/I), and anterior/posterior (A/P) directions. The systematic and random variations among the daily alignments were calculated. Margins to account for these shifts were estimated. The mean shifts and standard deviations along the R/L, S/I, and A/P directions were -0.11±3.80, 0.67±4.67, and 2.71±6.31 mm for BAT localizations and -0.98±5.13, 0.27±3.35, and 1.00±4.22 mm for MVCT localizations, respectively. The systematic and random variations in daily shifts based on MVCT were generally smaller than those based on BAT, especially along the A/P direction. A t-test showed this difference to be statistically significant. The planning target volume margins in the A/P direction estimated to account for daily variations were 8.81 and 14.66 mm based on MVCT and BAT data, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the daily prostate movement pattern between the first few fractions and the remaining fractions. Dosimetric comparison of MVCT and BAT prostate alignments was performed for seven fractions from a patient. The degradation from the plan caused by the MVCT alignment is trivial, while that by BAT is substantial. The MVCT technique results in smaller variations in daily shifts than ultrasound imaging, indicating that MVCT is more reliable and precise for prostate localization. Ultrasound-based localization may overestimate the daily prostate motion, particularly in the A/P direction, negatively impacting prostate dose coverage and rectal

  3. A Comparison of daily megavoltage CT and ultrasound image guided radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Cheng; Kainz, Kristofer; Lawton, Colleen; Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    In order to quantify the differences between ultrasound-imaging and megavoltage-CT (MVCT) daily prostate localization in prostate-cancer radiotherapy and their dosimetric impacts, daily shifts were analyzed for a total of 140 prostate cancer patients; 106 positioned using ultrasound-based imaging [B-mode Acquisition and Targeting (BAT)], and 34 using the MVCT from a TomoTherapy Hi-Art unit. The shifts indicated by the two systems were compared statistically along the right/left (R/L), superior/inferior (S/I), and anterior/posterior (A/P) directions. The systematic and random variations among the daily alignments were calculated. Margins to account for these shifts were estimated. The mean shifts and standard deviations along the R/L, S/I, and A/P directions were -0.11{+-}3.80, 0.67{+-}4.67, and 2.71{+-}6.31 mm for BAT localizations and -0.98{+-}5.13, 0.27{+-}3.35, and 1.00{+-}4.22 mm for MVCT localizations, respectively. The systematic and random variations in daily shifts based on MVCT were generally smaller than those based on BAT, especially along the A/P direction. A t-test showed this difference to be statistically significant. The planning target volume margins in the A/P direction estimated to account for daily variations were 8.81 and 14.66 mm based on MVCT and BAT data, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the daily prostate movement pattern between the first few fractions and the remaining fractions. Dosimetric comparison of MVCT and BAT prostate alignments was performed for seven fractions from a patient. The degradation from the plan caused by the MVCT alignment is trivial, while that by BAT is substantial. The MVCT technique results in smaller variations in daily shifts than ultrasound imaging, indicating that MVCT is more reliable and precise for prostate localization. Ultrasound-based localization may overestimate the daily prostate motion, particularly in the A/P direction, negatively impacting prostate dose coverage

  4. Mitochondrial mutations drive prostate cancer aggression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hopkins, Julia F.; Sabelnykova, Veronica Y.; Weischenfeldt, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear mutations are well known to drive tumor incidence, aggression and response to therapy. By contrast, the frequency and roles of mutations in the maternally inherited mitochondrial genome are poorly understood. Here we sequence the mitochondrial genomes of 384 localized prostate cancer...... in prostate cancer, and suggest interplay between nuclear and mitochondrial mutational profiles in prostate cancer....

  5. 3D Registration of mpMRI for Assessment of Prostate Cancer Focal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orczyk, Clément; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Mikheev, Artem; Villers, Arnauld; Bernaudin, Myriam; Taneja, Samir S; Valable, Samuel; Rusinek, Henry

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to assess a novel method of three-dimensional (3D) co-registration of prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations performed before and after prostate cancer focal therapy. We developed a software platform for automatic 3D deformable co-registration of prostate MRI at different time points and applied this method to 10 patients who underwent focal ablative therapy. MRI examinations were performed preoperatively, as well as 1 week and 6 months post treatment. Rigid registration served as reference for assessing co-registration accuracy and precision. Segmentation of preoperative and postoperative prostate revealed a significant postoperative volume decrease of the gland that averaged 6.49 cc (P = .017). Applying deformable transformation based on mutual information from 120 pairs of MRI slices, we refined by 2.9 mm (max. 6.25 mm) the alignment of the ablation zone, segmented from contrast-enhanced images on the 1-week postoperative examination, to the 6-month postoperative T2-weighted images. This represented a 500% improvement over the rigid approach (P = .001), corrected by volume. The dissimilarity by Dice index of the mapped ablation zone using deformable transformation vs rigid control was significantly (P = .04) higher at the ablation site than in the whole gland. Our findings illustrate our method's ability to correct for deformation at the ablation site. The preliminary analysis suggests that deformable transformation computed from mutual information of preoperative and follow-up MRI is accurate in co-registration of MRI examinations performed before and after focal therapy. The ability to localize the previously ablated tissue in 3D space may improve targeting for image-guided follow-up biopsy within focal therapy protocols. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Multivalent Peptidomimetic Conjugates as Inhibitors of Androgen Receptor Function in Therapy-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    treat patients with prostate cancer, over time the tumors become resistant to the drugs, leaving few treatment options. The goal of this proposal is to...interactions with the AR. 15. SUBJECT TERMS androgen receptor, prostate cancer, peptidomimetic conjugates, 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...used successfully to treat patients with prostate cancer, over time the tumors become resistant to the drugs, leaving few treatment options. The goal

  7. p52 Activation and Enzalutamide Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    1413–5. 11. David CJ, Manley JL. Alternative pre-mRNA splicing regulation in cancer: pathways and programs unhinged. Genes Dev 2010;24:2343–64. 12...CJ, Chen M, Assanah M, Canoll P, Manley JL. HnRNP proteins controlled by c-Myc deregulate pyruvate kinase mRNA splicing in cancer. Nature 2010;463...nucleoparticule A1/A2 proteins induces apoptosis in human cancer cells but not in normal mortal cell lines. Cancer Res 2003;63:7679–88. 49. Liu LL , Xie N, Sun S

  8. General Information about Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of bisphosphonate drugs to prevent or slow the growth of bone metastases is being studied in clinical trials. There are treatments for bone pain caused by bone metastases or hormone therapy. Prostate cancer that has spread to the ...

  9. Treatment planning and dose analysis for interstitial photodynamic therapy of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Sean R H; Gertner, Mark R; Bogaards, Arjen; Sherar, Michael D; Wilson, Brian C [Division of Biophysics and Bioimaging, Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Weersink, Robert A; Giewercer, David [Laboratory for Applied Biophysics, Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Haider, Masoom A [Joint Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Scherz, Avigdor [Department of Plant Science, Weizmann Institute of Science, PO Box 26, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Elhilali, Mostafa [Department of Surgery, McGill University, 3655 Promenade Sir William Osler, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1Y6 (Canada); Chin, Joseph L [Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, 800 Commissioners Road East, PO Box 5010, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada); Trachtenberg, John [Department of Urology, University Health Network, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)], E-mail: wilson@uhnres.utoronto.ca

    2009-04-21

    With the development of new photosensitizers that are activated by light at longer wavelengths, interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT) is emerging as a feasible alternative for the treatment of larger volumes of tissue. Described here is the application of PDT treatment planning software developed by our group to ensure complete coverage of larger, geometrically complex target volumes such as the prostate. In a phase II clinical trial of TOOKAD vascular targeted photodynamic therapy (VTP) for prostate cancer in patients who failed prior radiotherapy, the software was used to generate patient-specific treatment prescriptions for the number of treatment fibres, their lengths, their positions and the energy each delivered. The core of the software is a finite element solution to the light diffusion equation. Validation against in vivo light measurements indicated that the software could predict the location of an iso-fluence contour to within approximately {+-}2 mm. The same software was used to reconstruct the treatments that were actually delivered, thereby providing an analysis of the threshold light dose required for TOOKAD-VTP of the post-irradiated prostate. The threshold light dose for VTP-induced prostate damage, as measured one week post-treatment using contrast-enhanced MRI, was found to be highly heterogeneous, both within and between patients. The minimum light dose received by 90% of the prostate, D{sub 90}, was determined from each patient's dose-volume histogram and compared to six-month sextant biopsy results. No patient with a D{sub 90} less than 23 J cm{sup -2} had complete biopsy response, while 8/13 (62%) of patients with a D{sub 90} greater than 23 J cm{sup -2} had negative biopsies at six months. The doses received by the urethra and the rectal wall were also investigated.

  10. Lactate - A new frontier in the immunology and therapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenu, Iuliana; Gafencu, Grigore-Aristide; Popescu, Tiberiu; Kacso, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer, one of the most common male malignancies with an increasing incidence in the recent years, requires the development of new methods of treatment. One of the most debated subjects is the tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). Although, the pathophysiological mechanisms are still a subject of intense research, TAM acts as procarcinogenic factors. It was also demonstrated that hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) induces the expression of TAM genes involved in prostate carcinogenesis. Furthermore, it should be noted that the stromal extracellular lactate, the result of tumoral glycolysis process is one of the HIF1 activators. In addition, lactate inhibits the differentiation of monocytes and dendritic cells and also induces the inactivation of the cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. Through an analysis of recent studies, we conclude that lactate is a vital component of several ways of modulating the immune response at the stromal prostatic adenocarcinoma including TAM activation and cytotoxic T lymphocytes immunosuppression. Our review focuses on the impact of lactate on prostatic adenocarcinoma progression in terms of its immunology, and how this influences the therapy of this condition and the clinical outcome.

  11. Planning and implementing an implanted fiducial programme for prostate cancer radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, A.; Owen, R.; Laferlita, M.; Fox, C.; Foroudi, F.; Tai, K. H.; Styles, C.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Using implanted gold seeds as fiducial markers to verify the position of the prostate in radiation therapy is well accepted and is becoming the standard of practice and requirement for international multicentre trials. In 2006 the decision was made at the Peter MacCallum Caner Centre (Peter Mac) to plan for and implement this process as standard clinical practice for radical dose prostate treatments (74-78 Gy). Before this, programme verification of field placement for prostate cancer radiation treatment was routinely carried out using regular off-line electronic portal imaging with matching of bony anatomy. A small multidisciplinary team investigated and assisted in the implementation of this new practice across the Peter Mac sites at East Melbourne and our three satellite centres. Issues considered included seed size, number and position in the prostate, implant equipment, imaging equipment and procedure and consent and information forms. The use of a custom made fiducial pack, comprehensive patient information and a daily on-line imaging process was implemented. The experience of the first 28 patients at Peter Mac from January 2007 to May 2007 inclusive is reported on.

  12. Urethral Pain Among Prostate Cancer Survivors 1 to 14 Years After Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, Niclas; Olsson, Caroline; Tucker, Susan L.; Alsadius, David; Wilderäng, Ulrica; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Steineck, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how treatment-related and non-treatment-related factors impact urethral pain among long-term prostate cancer survivors. Methods and Materials: Men treated for prostate cancer with radiation therapy at the Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Göteborg, Sweden from 1993 to 2006 were approached with a study-specific postal questionnaire addressing symptoms after treatment, including urethral burning pain during urination (n=985). The men had received primary or salvage external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or EBRT in combination with brachytherapy (BT). Prescribed doses were commonly 70 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions for primary and salvage EBRT and 50 Gy plus 2 × 10.0 Gy for EBRT + BT. Prostatic urethral doses were assessed from treatment records. We also recruited 350 non-pelvic-irradiated, population-based controls matched for age and residency to provide symptom background rates. Results: Of the treated men, 16% (137 of 863) reported urethral pain, compared with 11% (27 of 242) of the controls. The median time to follow-up was 5.2 years (range, 1.1-14.3 years). Prostatic urethral doses were similar to prescription doses for EBRT and 100% to 115% for BT. Fractionation-corrected dose and time to follow-up affected the occurrence of the symptom. For a follow-up ≥3 years, 19% of men (52 of 268) within the 70-Gy EBRT + BT group reported pain, compared with 10% of men (23 of 222) treated with 70 Gy primary EBRT (prevalence ratio 1.9; 95% confidence interval 1.2-3.0). Of the men treated with salvage EBRT, 10% (20 of 197) reported urethral pain. Conclusions: Survivors treated with EBRT + BT had a higher risk for urethral pain compared with those treated with EBRT. The symptom prevalence decreased with longer time to follow-up. We found a relationship between fractionation-corrected urethral dose and pain. Among long-term prostate cancer survivors, the occurrence of pain was not increased above the background rate for prostatic urethral doses up to 70 Gy

  13. Angiostatic Therapy: A New Treatment Modality for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    ppendices .................................................................................................. 12 4 Per Borgstrbm INTRODUCTION The...human testing. It has low acute and chronic cvtological and thermographic examination of breast cancer toxicity and shows no clinically adverse reactions...reactions occurred during the 8, 1991. first 24 h or within 7 days. Acute toxicity assessments at 100 8 Hayes DF: Tumor markers for breast cancer. Ann

  14. The prospect of gene therapy for prostate cancer: update on theory and status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeneman, K S; Hsieh, J T

    2001-09-01

    Molecularly based novel therapeutic agents are needed to address the problem of locally recurrent, or metastatic, advanced hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Recent basic science advances in mechanisms of gene expression, vector delivery, and targeting have rendered clinically relevant gene therapy to the prostatic fossa and distant sites feasible in the near future. Current research and clinical investigative efforts involving methods for more effective vector delivery and targeting, with enhanced gene expression to selected (specific) sites, are reviewed. These areas of research involve tissue-specific promoters, transgene exploration, vector design and delivery, and selective vector targeting. The 'vectorology' involved mainly addresses selective tissue homing with ligands, mechanisms of innate immune system evasion for durable transgene expression, and the possibility of repeat administration.

  15. Disparities in staging prostate magnetic resonance imaging utilization for nonmetastatic prostate cancer patients undergoing definitive radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayobami Ajayi, BA

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: In this urban, academic center cohort, older patients across all risk groups and black or nonprivate insurance patients in the low risk group were less likely to undergo staging prostate MRI scans. Further research should investigate these differences to ensure equitable utilization across all demographic groups considering the burden of prostate cancer disparities.

  16. Radiotherapy and hormone therapy in intermediate risk prostate cancer: a critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, Rejane Carolina; Souhami, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The standard treatment for patients with high risk prostate cancer is the combined use of radiation therapy (RT ) and hormone therapy (HT). In regards to patients stratified as intermediate risk, the use of HT associated with RT remains controversial, and its use should be carefully planned and based on available evidence. Objective: To critically assess results of randomized studies published in the literature that associated the use of HT of short duration with an average period of 6 months with RT in the treatment of patients with localized prostate cancer classified as intermediate risk. Method: Only randomized studies comparing these treatments were eligible for this review. A structured search through 'PubMed' was carried out using the terms 'androgen suppression therapy', 'radiotherapy', 'randomized trials', 'phase 3 trials', 'prostate cancer' and 'intermediate risk'. Results: Four randomized studies comparing RT alone to RT plus short course HT were found and selected. The majority of the trials had a mixed population of intermediate and high risk disease and did not include patients with only intermediate risk. Despite that, there appears to be a significant benefit for the combined approach regarding disease-free survival, biochemical free survival and overall survival. Conclusion: The randomized studies published so far suggest improved outcomes for the group of patients receiving RT and short course HT. Data from randomized trials comparing RT alone to RT and short course HT in patients with intermediate risk only are forthcoming. (author)

  17. Nutrition therapy with high intensity interval training to improve prostate cancer-related fatigue in men on androgen deprivation therapy: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baguley, Brenton J; Skinner, Tina L; Leveritt, Michael D; Wright, Olivia R L

    2017-01-03

    Cancer-related fatigue is one of the most prevalent, prolonged and distressing side effects of prostate cancer treatment with androgen deprivation therapy. Preliminary evidence suggests natural therapies such as nutrition therapy and structured exercise prescription can reduce symptoms of cancer-related fatigue. Men appear to change their habitual dietary patterns after prostate cancer diagnosis, yet prostate-specific dietary guidelines provide limited support for managing adverse side effects of treatment. The exercise literature has shown high intensity interval training can improve various aspects of health that are typically impaired with androgen deprivation therapy; however exercise at this intensity is yet to be conducted in men with prostate cancer. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of nutrition therapy beyond the current healthy eating guidelines with high intensity interval training for managing cancer-related fatigue in men with prostate cancer treated with androgen deprivation therapy. This is a two-arm randomized control trial of 116 men with prostate cancer and survivors treated with androgen deprivation therapy. Participants will be randomized to either the intervention group i.e. nutrition therapy and high intensity interval training, or usual care. The intervention group will receive 20 weeks of individualized nutrition therapy from an Accredited Practising Dietitian, and high intensity interval training (from weeks 12-20 of the intervention) from an Accredited Exercise Physiologist. The usual care group will maintain their standard treatment regimen over the 20 weeks. Both groups will undertake primary and secondary outcome testing at baseline, week 8, 12, and 20; testing includes questionnaires of fatigue and quality of life, objective measures of body composition, muscular strength, cardiorespiratory fitness, biomarkers for disease progression, as well as dietary analysis. The primary outcomes for this trial are measures of

  18. Prostate-specific antigen bounce after high-dose rate brachytherapy with external beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Naotaka; Kakinoki, Hiroaki; Tsutsui, Akio; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Iguchi, Atsushi; Matsunobu, Toru; Uehara, Satoru

    2008-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce after high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer patients was evaluated. Sixty-one patients treated with HDR-brachytherapy followed by EBRT had a minimum follow-up of 12 months (median, 24 months) in our institute. A PSA bounce was defined as a rise of at least 0.1 ng/ml greater than a previous PSA level, with a subsequent decline equal to, or less than, the initial nadir. A PSA bounce was noted in 16 (26.2%) of 61 patients (one patient had a PSA bounce twice). Median time to develop a PSA bounce was 18 months, but 23.5% developed a PSA bounce after 24 months. Median duration of PSA bounce was 6 months and 11.8% had increased PSA within a period of 12 months. Median bounce height was 0.2 ng/ml (range, 0.1 to 3.39 ng/ml). A bounce height of gerater than 2 ng/ml was seen in 11.8%. Clinical characteristics (age, prostate volume, neoadjuvant endocrine therapy, risk classification, stage, pretreatment PSA, Gleason score) do not predict whether or not there will be a PSA bounce. In patients treated with HDR-brachytherapy followed by EBRT, the incidence and characteristics of PSA bounce were similar to those in patients treated with low-dose rate brachytherapy. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of PSA bounce following HDR-brachytherapy with EBRT. (author)

  19. Prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjær, Maria Carlsen; Andersen, Morten Heebøll; Høyer, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Background Active surveillance (AS) of low-risk prostate cancer (PCa) is an accepted alternative to active treatment. However, the conventional diagnostic trans-rectal ultrasound guided biopsies (TRUS-bx) underestimate PCa aggressiveness in almost half of the cases, when compared with the surgical...... lesions. Significant cancer was defined as GS > 6 or GS 6 (3 + 3) lesions with ≥ 6 mm maximal cancer core length (MCCL). Results A total of 78 patients were included and in 21 patients a total of 22 PIRADS-score 4 or 5 lesions were detected. MRGB pathology revealed that 17 (81%) of these and 22......% of the entire AS population harbored significant cancers at AS inclusion. In eight (38%) cases, the GS was upgraded. Also, nine patients (43%) had GS 6 (3 + 3) foci with MCCL ≥ 6 mm. Conclusion In an AS cohort based on TRUS and TRUS-bx diagnostic strategies, supplemental mpMRI and in-bore MRGB were able...

  20. Cabazitaxel as second-line or third-line therapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Per; Svane, Inge M; Lindberg, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    To compare treatment outcomes in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with cabazitaxel (CA) as second-line or third-line therapy in the everyday clinical setting. Charts from 94 patients treated with CA as second-line (n=28) or third-line therapy (n=66) were...... evaluated. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events were used to register grade 3-4 nonhematological toxicity during treatment with CA. Baseline metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer-related prognostic factors, duration of therapy, and maximum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) percentage...... change were registered during treatment with CA and previous/subsequent novel androgen receptor targeting therapies. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A median of 6 versus 5 treatment cycles was administered in patients treated...

  1. What Aspects of Personal Care Are Most Important to Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, Kimberley A.; Feldman-Stewart, Deb; Groome, Patti A.; Brundage, Michael D.; McArdle, Siobhan; Wallace, David; Peng, Yingwei; Mackillop, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The overall quality of patient care is a function of the quality of both its technical and its nontechnical components. The purpose of this study was to identify the elements of nontechnical (personal) care that are most important to patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the literature and interviewed patients and health professionals to identify elements of personal care pertinent to patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer. We identified 143 individual elements relating to 10 aspects of personal care. Patients undergoing radical radiation therapy for prostate cancer completed a self-administered questionnaire in which they rated the importance of each element. The overall importance of each element was measured by the percentage of respondents who rated it as “very important.” The importance of each aspect of personal care was measured by the mean importance of its elements. Results: One hundred eight patients completed the questionnaire. The percentage of patients who rated each element “very important” ranged from 7% to 95% (mean 61%). The mean importance rating of the elements of each aspect of care varied significantly: “perceived competence of caregivers,” 80%; “empathy and respectfulness of caregivers,” 67%; “adequacy of information sharing,” 67%; “patient centeredness,” 59%; “accessibility of caregivers,” 57%; “continuity of care,” 51%; “privacy,” 51%; “convenience,” 45%; “comprehensiveness of services,” 44%; and “treatment environment,” 30% (P<.0001). Neither age nor education was associated with importance ratings, but the patient's health status was associated with the rating of some elements of care. Conclusions: Many different elements of personal care are important to patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer, but the 3 aspects of care that most believe are most important are these: the perceived

  2. What Aspects of Personal Care Are Most Important to Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Kimberley A. [Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Feldman-Stewart, Deb [Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Oncology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Groome, Patti A. [Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Brundage, Michael D. [Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Oncology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); McArdle, Siobhan [Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Wallace, David [Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Peng, Yingwei [Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Mackillop, William J., E-mail: William.mackillop@krcc.on.ca [Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Oncology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose/Objective: The overall quality of patient care is a function of the quality of both its technical and its nontechnical components. The purpose of this study was to identify the elements of nontechnical (personal) care that are most important to patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the literature and interviewed patients and health professionals to identify elements of personal care pertinent to patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer. We identified 143 individual elements relating to 10 aspects of personal care. Patients undergoing radical radiation therapy for prostate cancer completed a self-administered questionnaire in which they rated the importance of each element. The overall importance of each element was measured by the percentage of respondents who rated it as “very important.” The importance of each aspect of personal care was measured by the mean importance of its elements. Results: One hundred eight patients completed the questionnaire. The percentage of patients who rated each element “very important” ranged from 7% to 95% (mean 61%). The mean importance rating of the elements of each aspect of care varied significantly: “perceived competence of caregivers,” 80%; “empathy and respectfulness of caregivers,” 67%; “adequacy of information sharing,” 67%; “patient centeredness,” 59%; “accessibility of caregivers,” 57%; “continuity of care,” 51%; “privacy,” 51%; “convenience,” 45%; “comprehensiveness of services,” 44%; and “treatment environment,” 30% (P<.0001). Neither age nor education was associated with importance ratings, but the patient's health status was associated with the rating of some elements of care. Conclusions: Many different elements of personal care are important to patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer, but the 3 aspects of care that most believe are most important are these: the

  3. The potential of 211Astatine for NIS-mediated radionuclide therapy in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willhauck, Michael J.; Sharif Samani, Bibi-Rana; Goeke, Burkhard; Wolf, Ingo; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard; Stark, Hans-Juergen; Meyer, Geerd J.; Knapp, Wolfram H.; Morris, John C.; Spitzweg, Christine

    2008-01-01

    We reported recently the induction of selective iodide uptake in prostate cancer cells (LNCaP) by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) promoter-directed sodium iodide symporter (NIS) expression that allowed a significant therapeutic effect of 131 I. In the current study, we studied the potential of the high-energy alpha-emitter 211 At, also transported by NIS, as an alternative radionuclide after NIS gene transfer in tumors with limited therapeutic efficacy of 131 I due to rapid iodide efflux. We investigated uptake and therapeutic efficacy of 211 At in LNCaP cells stably expressing NIS under the control of the PSA promoter (NP-1) in vitro and in vivo. NP-1 cells concentrated 211 At in a perchlorate-sensitive manner, which allowed a dramatic therapeutic effect in vitro. After intrapertoneal injection of 211 At (1 MBq), NP-1 tumors accumulated approximately 16% ID/g 211 At (effective half-life 4.6 h), which resulted in a tumor-absorbed dose of 1,580 ± 345 mGy/MBq and a significant tumor volume reduction of up to 82 ± 19%, while control tumors continued their growth exponentially. A significant therapeutic effect of 211 At has been demonstrated in prostate cancer after PSA promoter-directed NIS gene transfer in vitro and in vivo suggesting a potential role for 211 At as an attractive alternative radioisotope for NIS-targeted radionuclide therapy, in particular in smaller tumors with limited radionuclide retention time. (orig.)

  4. Androgen-deprivation therapy-induced aggressive prostate cancer with neuroendocrine differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Lipianskaya

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Most prostate cancers (PCas are classified as acinar type (conventional adenocarcinoma which are composed of tumor cells with luminal differentiation including the expression of androgen receptor (AR and prostate-specific antigen (PSA. There are also scattered neuroendocrine (NE cells in every case of adenocarcinoma. The NE cells are quiesecent, do not express AR or PSA, and their function remains unclear. We have demonstrated that IL8-CXCR2-P53 pathway provides a growth-inhibitory signal and keeps the NE cells in benign prostate and adenocarcinoma quiescent. Interestingly, some patients with a history of adenocarcinoma recur with small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (SCNC after hormonal therapy, and such tumors are composed of pure NE cells that are highly proliferative and aggressive, due to P53 mutation and inactivation of the IL8-CXCR2-P53 pathway. The incidence of SCNC will likely increase due to the widespread use of novel drugs that further inhibit AR function or intratumoral androgen synthesis. A phase II trial has demonstrated that platinum-based chemotherapy may be useful for such therapy-induced tumors.

  5. Extracellular vesicles for personalized therapy decision support in advanced metastatic cancers and its potential impact for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soekmadji, Carolina; Corcoran, Niall M; Oleinikova, Irina; Jovanovic, Lidija; Ramm, Grant A; Nelson, Colleen C; Jenster, Guido; Russell, Pamela J

    2017-10-01

    The use of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as exosomes, as liquid biopsy-derived biomarkers for cancers have been investigated. CTC enumeration using the CellSearch based platform provides an accurate insight on overall survival where higher CTC counts indicate poor prognosis for patients with advanced metastatic cancer. EVs provide information based on their lipid, protein, and nucleic acid content and can be isolated from biofluids and analyzed from a relatively small volume, providing a routine and non-invasive modality to monitor disease progression. Our pilot experiment by assessing the level of two subpopulations of small EVs, the CD9 positive and CD63 positive EVs, showed that the CD9 positive EV level is higher in plasma from patients with advanced metastatic prostate cancer with detectable CTCs. These data show the potential utility of a particular EV subpopulation to serve as biomarkers for advanced metastatic prostate cancer. EVs can potentially be utilized as biomarkers to provide accurate genotypic and phenotypic information for advanced prostate cancer, where new strategies to design a more personalized therapy is currently the focus of considerable investigation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Treatment strategy for metastatic prostate cancer with extremely high PSA level: reconsidering the value of vintage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasutaka; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Amiya, Yoshiyasu; Sasaki, Makoto; Shima, Takayuki; Komiya, Akira; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Akakura, Koichiro; Ichikawa, Tomohiko; Nakatsu, Hiroomi

    2018-05-04

    The prognostic significance of initial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level for metastatic prostate cancer remains uncertain. We investigated the differences in prognosis and response to hormonal therapies of metastatic prostate cancer patients according to initial PSA levels. We analyzed 184 patients diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer and divided them into three PSA level groups as follows: low (PSA progression-free survival (PFS) for first-line ADT and overall survival (OS) within each of the three groups. Furthermore, we analyzed response to antiandrogen withdrawal (AW) and alternative antiandrogen (AA) therapies after development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). No significant differences in OS were observed among the three groups (P = 0.654). Patients with high PSA levels had significantly short PFS for first-line ADT (P = 0.037). Conversely, patients in the high PSA level group had significantly longer PFS when treated with AW than those in the low PSA level group (P = 0.047). Furthermore, patients with high PSA levels had significantly longer PFS when provided with AA therapy (P = 0.049). PSA responders to AW and AA therapies had significantly longer survival after CRPC development than nonresponders (P = 0.011 and P PSA level predicted favorable response to vintage sequential ADT and AW. The current data suggest a novel aspect of extremely high PSA value as a favorable prognostic marker after development of CRPC.

  7. Postoperative Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in High Risk Prostate Cancer: A Dosimetric Comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digesu, Cinzia; Cilla, Savino; De Gaetano, Andrea; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Macchia, Gabriella; Ippolito, Edy; Deodato, Francesco; Panunzi, Simona; Iapalucci, Chiara; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; D'Angelo, Elisa; Padula, Gilbert D.A.; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with 3D conformal technique (3D-CRT), with respect to target coverage and irradiation of organs at risk for high dose postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) of the prostate fossa. 3D-CRT and IMRT treatment plans were compared with respect to dose to the rectum and bladder. The dosimetric comparison was carried out in 15 patients considering 2 different scenarios: (1) exclusive prostate fossa irradiation, and (2) pelvic node irradiation followed by a boost on the prostate fossa. In scenario (1), a 3D-CRT plan (box technique) and an IMRT plan were calculated and compared for each patient. In scenario (2), 3 treatment plans were calculated and compared for each patient: (a) 3D-CRT box technique for both pelvic (prophylactic nodal irradiation) and prostate fossa irradiation (3D-CRT only); (b) 3D-CRT box technique for pelvic irradiation followed by an IMRT boost to the prostatic fossa (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT); and (c) IMRT for both pelvic and prostate fossa irradiation (IMRT only). For exclusive prostate fossa irradiation, IMRT significantly reduced the dose to the rectum (lower Dmean, V50%, V75%, V90%, V100%, EUD, and NTCP) and the bladder (lower Dmean, V50%, V90%, EUD and NTCP). When prophylactic irradiation of the pelvis was also considered, plan C (IMRT only) performed better than plan B (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT) as respect to both rectum and bladder irradiation (reduction of Dmean, V50%, V75%, V90%, equivalent uniform dose [EUD], and normal tissue complication probability [NTCP]). Plan (b) (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT) performed better than plan (a) (3D-CRT only) with respect to dose to the rectum (lower Dmean, V75%, V90%, V100%, EUD, and NTCP) and the bladder (Dmean, EUD, and NTCP). Postoperative IMRT in prostate cancer significantly reduces rectum and bladder irradiation compared with 3D-CRT.

  8. Role of transurethral resection of the prostate in the management of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szollosi Attila

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prostate cancer is the second most diagnosed cancer in men, after lung cancer. The gold standard procedure in prostate cancer (PCa diagnosis is the ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP used in solving the bladder outlet obstruction, can have a role in detection of PCa. The aim of this retrospective study is to examine the role of transurethral resection of the prostate in the diagnosis and therapy of prostate cancer.

  9. Genetic Predictors of Fatigue in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with Androgen Deprivation Therapy: Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jim, Heather S.L.; Park, Jong Y.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Rincon, Maria A.; Phillips, Kristin M.; Small, Brent J.; Jacobsen, Paul B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Fatigue is a common and distressing side effect of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer. The goal of the current study was to examine the relationship between changes in fatigue following initiation of ADT and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in three pro-inflammatory cytokine genes: interleukin-1 beta (IL1B), interleukin-6 (IL6), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFA). Methods As part of a larger study, men with prostate cancer (n=53) were recruited prior to initiation of ADT. Fatigue was assessed at recruitment and six months after initiation of ADT. DNA was extracted from blood drawn at baseline. Results Patients with the IL6-174 (rs1800795) G/C or C/C genotype displayed greater increases in fatigue intrusiveness, frequency, and duration than the G/G genotype (p values≤0.05), although inclusion of age, race, and baseline depressive symptomatology in the model attenuated these relationships (p values≤0.09). Patients with the TNFA-308 (rs1800629) G/A genotype showed greater increases in fatigue severity than the G/G genotype (p=0.02). IL1B-511 (rs16944) genotype did not significantly predict changes in fatigue (p values>0.46). Patients with higher numbers of variants displayed greater increases in fatigue duration and interference (p values≤0.02) than patients with lower numbers of variants. Conclusions Prostate cancer patients treated with ADT who carry variant alleles of the IL6 and TNFA genes are susceptible to heightened fatigue. These preliminary data lend support for the role of genetic variation in the development of cancer-related fatigue secondary to ADT. Findings are relevant to attempts to develop personalized approaches to cancer treatment. PMID:22475653

  10. Erectile Function, Incontinence, and Other Quality of Life Outcomes Following Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer in Men 60 Years Old and Younger

    OpenAIRE

    Hoppe, Bradford S; Nichols, Romaine C; Henderson, Randal H; Morris, Christopher G; Williams, Christopher R; Costa, Joseph; Marcus, Robert B; Mendenhall, William M; Li, Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study sought to evaluate patient-reported health-related quality of life following proton therapy for prostate cancer in men ≤60 years old. METHODS Between August 2006 and January 2010, 262 hormone-naive men ≤60 years old were treated with definitive proton therapy for prostate cancer. Before treatment and every 6 months after treatment, patients filled out the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC) and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaires. Pote...

  11. A case report of monitoring PSA level changes in two prostate cancer patients treated with Mountain Ginseng Pharmacopuncture and Sweet Bee Venom along with western anticancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonhee Lee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this report is to find out how Mountain Ginseng Pharmacopuncture(MGP and Sweet Bee Venom(SBV treatments are effective on prostate cancer patients by monitoring Prostate specific antigen(PSA values. Methods: We treated two prostate cancer patients with MGP and SBV from October 2008 to April 2011. One patient had localized prostate cancer, the other was in the terminal stage of prostate cancer with lung and bone metastasis and both had been receiving western anticancer therapy. We had monitored the changes of PSA value. Results: In case 1, MGP and SBV treatments seemed to be helpful in preventing the recurrence of localized prostate cancer. In case 2, PSA value was decreased by MGP treatment. Conclusions: It is conceivable that MGP and SBV are effective treatments for patients with prostate cancer.

  12. Prospective study of exercise intervention in prostate cancer patients on androgen deprivation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beydoun, Nadine; Bucci, Joseph A.; Chin, Yaw S.; Spry, Nigel; Newton, Robert; Galvão, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is an important component of modern prostate cancer treatment. Survival benefits from neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormones may take years to manifest, and balancing this with potential morbidity of therapy can be challenging. This study aimed to assess whether education and short-term combined aerobic and resistance exercises could help to ameliorate the adverse side effects of ADT. Eight hundred fifty-nine patients with relapsed or metastatic prostate cancer on leuprorelin acetate were allocated to three interventional streams based on patient preference and medical fitness: supervised group (Face-to-Face) exercise sessions, home-based (At Home) exercise or a support programme for those incapable of exercising (Support). Patients enrolled onto Face to Face underwent measurement of body composition and cardiorespiratory fitness variables at baseline and programme completion. Patients in the exercise streams were surveyed to determine the programme's impact on physical fitness and well-being. Statistically significant improvements (p<0.001) were seen in all measured cardiorespiratory fitness and strength variables. Programme attrition rates were low (75/859; 8.7%), the primary reason for withdrawal being discontinuation of hormones (70%). Programme satisfaction was high, with 98% of surveyed patients reporting a positive impact on fitness and 97% planning to continue exercising after programme completion. At 6 months, improved physical and emotional well-being was reported by 93 and 79% of patients, respectively. A short-term structured exercise intervention results in high compliance and significant improvements in muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness in prostate cancer patients on ADT.

  13. Phase 1 Trial of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Before Prostatectomy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, Bridget F.; Quaranta, Brian P.; Pura, John A.; Lee, W.R.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Gerber, Leah; Haake, Michael; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Robertson, Cary N.; Polascik, Thomas J.; Moul, Judd W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 1 study, the safety of neoadjuvant whole-pelvis radiation therapy (RT) administered immediately before radical prostatectomy in men with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Twelve men enrolled and completed a phase 1 single-institution trial between 2006 and 2010. Eligibility required a previously untreated diagnosis of localized but high-risk prostate cancer. Median follow-up was 46 months (range, 14-74 months). Radiation therapy was dose-escalated in a 3 × 3 design with dose levels of 39.6, 45, 50.4, and 54 Gy. The pelvic lymph nodes were treated up to 45 Gy with any additional dose given to the prostate and seminal vesicles. Radical prostatectomy was performed 4-8 weeks after RT completion. Primary outcome measure was intraoperative and postoperative day-30 morbidity. Secondary measures included late morbidity and oncologic outcomes. Results: No intraoperative morbidity was seen. Chronic urinary grade 2+ toxicity occurred in 42%; 2 patients (17%) developed a symptomatic urethral stricture requiring dilation. Two-year actuarial biochemical recurrence-free survival was 67% (95% confidence interval 34%-86%). Patients with pT3 or positive surgical margin treated with neoadjuvant RT had a trend for improved biochemical recurrence-free survival compared with a historical cohort with similar adverse factors. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant RT is feasible with moderate urinary morbidity. However, oncologic outcomes do not seem to be substantially different from those with selective postoperative RT. If this multimodal approach is further evaluated in a phase 2 setting, 54 Gy should be used in combination with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy to improve biochemical outcomes

  14. Phase 1 Trial of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Before Prostatectomy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koontz, Bridget F., E-mail: Bridget.Koontz@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Prostate Center, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Quaranta, Brian P. [21st Century Oncology, Asheville, North Carolina (United States); Pura, John A. [Division of Biostatistics, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Lee, W.R.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Prostate Center, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Gerber, Leah [Duke Prostate Center, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Haake, Michael [Southeast Radiation Oncology, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Anscher, Mitchell S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Robertson, Cary N.; Polascik, Thomas J.; Moul, Judd W. [Department of Surgery, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Prostate Center, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 1 study, the safety of neoadjuvant whole-pelvis radiation therapy (RT) administered immediately before radical prostatectomy in men with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Twelve men enrolled and completed a phase 1 single-institution trial between 2006 and 2010. Eligibility required a previously untreated diagnosis of localized but high-risk prostate cancer. Median follow-up was 46 months (range, 14-74 months). Radiation therapy was dose-escalated in a 3 × 3 design with dose levels of 39.6, 45, 50.4, and 54 Gy. The pelvic lymph nodes were treated up to 45 Gy with any additional dose given to the prostate and seminal vesicles. Radical prostatectomy was performed 4-8 weeks after RT completion. Primary outcome measure was intraoperative and postoperative day-30 morbidity. Secondary measures included late morbidity and oncologic outcomes. Results: No intraoperative morbidity was seen. Chronic urinary grade 2+ toxicity occurred in 42%; 2 patients (17%) developed a symptomatic urethral stricture requiring dilation. Two-year actuarial biochemical recurrence-free survival was 67% (95% confidence interval 34%-86%). Patients with pT3 or positive surgical margin treated with neoadjuvant RT had a trend for improved biochemical recurrence-free survival compared with a historical cohort with similar adverse factors. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant RT is feasible with moderate urinary morbidity. However, oncologic outcomes do not seem to be substantially different from those with selective postoperative RT. If this multimodal approach is further evaluated in a phase 2 setting, 54 Gy should be used in combination with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy to improve biochemical outcomes.

  15. Efficacy of walking exercise in promoting cognitive-psychosocial functions in men with prostate cancer receiving androgen deprivation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee C

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed non-melanoma cancer among men. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT has been the core therapy for men with advanced prostate cancer. It is only in recent years that clinicians began to recognize the cognitive-psychosocial side effects from ADT, which significantly compromise the quality of life of prostate cancer survivors. The objectives of the study are to determine the efficacy of a simple and accessible home-based, walking exercise program in promoting cognitive and psychosocial functions of men with prostate cancer receiving ADT. Methods A 6-month prospective, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial will be conducted to compare the Exercise Group with the Control Group. Twenty men with prostate cancer starting ADT will be recruited and randomly assigned to one of the two groups: the Exercise Group will receive instructions in setting up an individualized 6-month home-based, walking exercise program, while the Control Group will receive standard medical advice from the attending physician. The primary outcomes will be psychosocial and cognitive functions. Cognitive functions including memory, attention, working memory, and executive function will be assessed using a battery of neurocognitive tests at baseline and 6 months. Psychosocial functions including depression, anxiety and self-esteem will be assessed at baseline, 3 and 6 months using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Discussion The significance of the cognitive-psychosocial side effects of ADT in men with prostate cancer has only been recently recognized, and the management remains unclear. This study addresses this issue by designing a simple and accessible home-based, exercise program that may potentially have significant impact on reducing the cognitive and psychosocial side effects of ADT, and ultimately

  16. Prostate Cancer Clinical Consortium Clinical Research Site: Targeted Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Physics of Cancer Metabolism This application seeks to put together a multidiscipline team of experts in various institutions in USA to assemble and...of this project is to build a research cohort of engaged volunteers that reflects the racial , ethnic, and socioeconomic diversity of New York City...assessed in a randomized, phase III clinical trial. Conflict of interest: Advisory Board: Joe O’Sullivan holds consulting/ advisory roles with Bayer

  17. Prostate cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000397.htm Prostate cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... trials you may be able to join How Prostate Cancer Staging is Done Initial staging is based on ...

  18. Prostate Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treat. There is no standard screening test for prostate cancer. Researchers are studying different tests to find those ... PSA level may be high if you have prostate cancer. It can also be high if you have ...

  19. Cryotherapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000907.htm Cryotherapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing features ... first treatment for prostate cancer. What Happens During Cryotherapy Before the procedure, you will be given medicine ...

  20. Prostate cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, K; Friis, S; Kjaer, S K

    1998-01-01

    To review the trends in prostate cancer (PC) incidence and mortality rates in Denmark during a 50-year period.......To review the trends in prostate cancer (PC) incidence and mortality rates in Denmark during a 50-year period....

  1. Solitary recurrence of castration-resistant prostate cancer with low or undetectable levels of prostate specific antigen salvaged with local ablative radiation therapy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chiachien Jake; Ying, James; Kapur, Payal; Wohlfeld, Bryan; Roehrborn, Claus; Kim, Dong W Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer recurrences are usually first detected by increased levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA), and systemic therapy is often initiated if distant metastasis is confirmed. However, low or nearly undetectable levels of PSA in the modern era of ultrasensitive PSA assay may be difficult to interpret in patients with a history of prostate cancer. Deciding whether to initiate additional systemic therapy in limited indolent metastatic disease while balancing the quality of life of the patient and ensuring the oncologic control of the disease may be challenging. In the present study, the case of a biopsy-confirmed solitary spine recurrence of prostate cancer with nearly undetectable but persistent levels of PSA (0.05 ng/ml) is reported. Treatment of the recurrence with local ablative radiotherapy improved the pain experienced by the patient, and reduced his levels of PSA to undetectable limits (<0.05 ng/ml). Repeated imaging analysis, PSA assay and clinical assessment demonstrated durable control of the disease without the requirement for additional systemic treatments. The present case highlighted the importance of initiating appropriate work-up according to the clinical scenario. Local treatment for solitary or oligometastatic recurrence of prostate cancer may enhance the effectiveness of current therapeutic strategies and benefit certain patients.

  2. Infiltration of tumour-associated macrophages in prostate biopsy specimens is predictive of disease progression after hormonal therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonomura, Norio; Takayama, Hitoshi; Nakayama, Masashi; Nakai, Yasutomo; Kawashima, Atsunari; Mukai, Masatoshi; Nagahara, Akira; Aozasa, Katsuyuki; Tsujimura, Akira

    2011-06-01

    • To evaluate tumour-associated macrophage (TAM) infiltration in prostate biopsy specimens as a possible prognostic factor for prostate cancer (PCa) after hormonal therapy. • Immunostaining of TAMs in prostate biopsy specimens was performed using a monoclonal antibody CD68 for 71 patients having PCa treated with hormonal therapy. • Six microscopic (×400) fields around the cancer foci were selected for TAM counting. • The median value of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was 50.1 ng/mL, and the median TAM count was 22. • Recurrence-free survival was significantly better in patients with fewer TAMs (<22) than in those with higher numbers of TAMs (≥22) (P < 0.001). • TAM count was higher in those with higher serum PSA (PSA), higher Gleason score, clinical T stage or those with PSA failure. Cox multivariate analysis showed that TAM count is one of the prognostic factors for PCa treated by hormonal therapy (P < 0.0001). • TAM infiltration in prostate needle biopsy specimens is a useful predictive factor for PSA failure or progression of PCa after hormonal therapy. © 2010 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2010 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  3. Gene Polymorphism-related Individual and Interracial Differences in the Outcomes of Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Naohiro; Shiota, Masaki; Tomisaki, Ikko; Minato, Akinori

    2017-06-01

    Among patients with prostate cancer, the prognosis after androgen deprivation therapy differs significantly among individuals and among races; however, the reasons underlying these differences are poorly understood. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes associated with prostate cancer progression or castration resistance might serve as the host factor that influences prognosis and, thus, accounts for these individual and racial gaps in treatment outcomes. Accordingly, single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with treatment outcomes could be used as predictive and/or prognostic biomarkers for patient stratification and to identify personalized treatment and follow-up protocols. The present review has summarized the genetic polymorphisms that have been reported to associate with androgen deprivation therapy outcomes among patients with prostate cancer and compared the allele frequencies among different ethnic groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Management of Localized Prostate Cancer by Focal Transurethral Resection of Prostate Cancer: An Application of Radical TUR-PCa to Focal Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Morita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We analyzed radical TUR-PCa against localized prostate cancer. Patients and Methods. Seventy-nine out of 209 patients with prostate cancer in one lobe were studied. Patients’ age ranged from 58 to 91 years and preoperative PSA, 0.70 to 17.30 ng/mL. In other 16 additional patients we performed focal TUR-PCa. Patients’ age ranged from 51 to 87 years and preoperative PSA, 1.51 to 25.74 ng/mL. Results. PSA failure in radical TUR-PCa was 5.1% during the mean follow-up period of 58.9 months. The actuarial biochemical non-recurrence rate was 98.2% for pT2a and 90.5% for pT2b. Bladder neck contracture occurred in 28 patients (35.4%. In 209 patients, pathological study revealed prostate cancer of the peripheral zone near the neurovascular bundle bilaterally in 25%, unilaterally in 39% and no cancer bilaterally in 35%, suggesting the possibility of focal TUR-PCa. Postoperative PSA of 16 patients treated by focal TUR-PCa was stable between 0.007 and 0.406 ng/mL at 24.2 months’ follow-up. No patients suffered from urinary incontinence. Bladder neck contracture developed in only 1 patient and all 5 patients underwent nerve-preserving TUR-PCa did not show erectile dysfunction. Conclusion. Focal TUR-PCa was considered to be a promising option among focal therapies against localized prostate cancer.

  5. Management of Localized Prostate Cancer by Focal Transurethral Resection of Prostate Cancer: An Application of Radical TUR-PCa to Focal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Masaru; Matsuura, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Background. We analyzed radical TUR-PCa against localized prostate cancer. Patients and Methods. Seventy-nine out of 209 patients with prostate cancer in one lobe were studied. Patients' age ranged from 58 to 91 years and preoperative PSA, 0.70 to 17.30 ng/mL. In other 16 additional patients we performed focal TUR-PCa. Patients' age ranged from 51 to 87 years and preoperative PSA, 1.51 to 25.74 ng/mL. Results. PSA failure in radical TUR-PCa was 5.1% during the mean follow-up period of 58.9 months. The actuarial biochemical non-recurrence rate was 98.2% for pT2a and 90.5% for pT2b. Bladder neck contracture occurred in 28 patients (35.4%). In 209 patients, pathological study revealed prostate cancer of the peripheral zone near the neurovascular bundle bilaterally in 25%, unilaterally in 39% and no cancer bilaterally in 35%, suggesting the possibility of focal TUR-PCa. Postoperative PSA of 16 patients treated by focal TUR-PCa was stable between 0.007 and 0.406 ng/mL at 24.2 months' follow-up. No patients suffered from urinary incontinence. Bladder neck contracture developed in only 1 patient and all 5 patients underwent nerve-preserving TUR-PCa did not show erectile dysfunction. Conclusion. Focal TUR-PCa was considered to be a promising option among focal therapies against localized prostate cancer.

  6. Immunotherapy and Immune Evasion in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Archana; Vaishampayan, Ulka; Lum, Lawrence G.

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer remains to this day a terminal disease. Prostatectomy and radiotherapy are effective for organ-confined diseases, but treatment for locally advanced and metastatic cancer remains challenging. Although advanced prostate cancers treated with androgen deprivation therapy achieves debulking of disease, responses are transient with subsequent development of castration-resistant and metastatic disease. Since prostate cancer is typically a slowly progressing disease, use of immune-based therapies offers an advantage to target advanced tumors and to induce antitumor immunity. This review will discuss the clinical merits of various vaccines and immunotherapies in castrate resistant prostate cancer and challenges to this evolving field of immune-based therapies

  7. Immunotherapy and Immune Evasion in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Archana, E-mail: thakur@karmanos.org; Vaishampayan, Ulka [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Lum, Lawrence G., E-mail: thakur@karmanos.org [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2013-05-24

    Metastatic prostate cancer remains to this day a terminal disease. Prostatectomy and radiotherapy are effective for organ-confined diseases, but treatment for locally advanced and metastatic cancer remains challenging. Although advanced prostate cancers treated with androgen deprivation therapy achieves debulking of disease, responses are transient with subsequent development of castration-resistant and metastatic disease. Since prostate cancer is typically a slowly progressing disease, use of immune-based therapies offers an advantage to target advanced tumors and to induce antitumor immunity. This review will discuss the clinical merits of various vaccines and immunotherapies in castrate resistant prostate cancer and challenges to this evolving field of immune-based therapies.

  8. MRI evaluation following partial HIFU therapy for localized prostate cancer: A single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoquetis, L; Malavaud, B; Game, X; Beauval, J B; Portalez, D; Soulie, M; Rischmann, P

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the value of MRI for surveillance of primary hemi-HIFU therapy for localized PCa in a single-center. Patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with hemi-HIFU from October 2009 to March 2014. All patients performed MRI before focal therapy, the reader was blinded to the treatment. Oncological failure was defined as positive biopsy or biochemical recurrence (Phoenix). Twenty-five patients were treated with hemi-HIFU in one center. The median nadir PSA was 1.45±1.4ng/mL. Prostate volume decreased from 45 cc to 25 cc on MRI findings. At 20 months, none of the patients had histological recurrence. Biochemical-free survival rate was 88%. MRI evaluation had a negative predictive value of 100% on the treated area and 81% on the untreated area. PSAd≥0.1ng/mL(2) was a predictive factor for cancer on untreated area (P=0.042). MRI control at 6 months is a potentially effective evaluation of treated area after hemi-HIFU and may replace randomized biopsies if PSAd<0.1ng/mL(2) during follow-up. 4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Epigenomic Regulation of Androgen Receptor Signaling: Potential Role in Prostate Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Cucchiara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor (AR signaling remains the major oncogenic pathway in prostate cancer (PCa. Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT is the principle treatment for locally advanced and metastatic disease. However, a significant number of patients acquire treatment resistance leading to castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Epigenetics, the study of heritable and reversible changes in gene expression without alterations in DNA sequences, is a crucial regulatory step in AR signaling. We and others, recently described the technological advance Chem-seq, a method to identify the interaction between a drug and the genome. This has permitted better understanding of the underlying regulatory mechanisms of AR during carcinogenesis and revealed the importance of epigenetic modifiers. In screening for new epigenomic modifiying drugs, we identified SD-70, and found that this demethylase inhibitor is effective in CRPC cells in combination with current therapies. The aim of this review is to explore the role of epigenetic modifications as biomarkers for detection, prognosis, and risk evaluation of PCa. Furthermore, we also provide an update of the recent findings on the epigenetic key processes (DNA methylation, chromatin modifications and alterations in noncoding RNA profiles involved in AR expression and their possible role as therapeutic targets.

  10. Microscopic Gold Particle-Based Fiducial Markers for Proton Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Young Kyung; Kwak, Jungwon; Kim, Dong Wook; Shin, Dongho; Yoon, Myonggeun; Park, Soah; Kim, Jin Sung; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Shin, Jungwook; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Sung Yong; Pyo, Hong Ryeol; Kim, Dae Yong M.D.; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: We examined the feasibility of using fiducial markers composed of microscopic gold particles and human-compatible polymers as a means to overcome current problems with conventional macroscopic gold fiducial markers, such as dose reduction and artifact generation, in proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We examined two types of gold particle fiducial marker interactions: that with diagnostic X-rays and with a therapeutic proton beam. That is, we qualitatively and quantitatively compared the radiographic visibility of conventional gold and gold particle fiducial markers and the CT artifacts and dose reduction associated with their use. Results: The gold particle fiducials could be easily distinguished from high-density structures, such as the pelvic bone, in diagnostic X-rays but were nearly transparent to a proton beam. The proton dose distribution was distorted <5% by the gold particle fiducials with a 4.9% normalized gold density; this was the case even in the worst configuration (i.e., parallel alignment with a single-direction proton beam). In addition, CT artifacts were dramatically reduced for the gold particle mixture. Conclusion: Mixtures of microscopic gold particles and human-compatible polymers have excellent potential as fiducial markers for proton therapy for prostate cancer. These include good radiographic visibility, low distortion of the depth-dose distribution, and few CT artifacts.

  11. Determining if pretreatment PSA doubling time predicts PSA trajectories after radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, Daniel E.; Andridge, Rebecca R.; Pan, Charlie C.; Williams, Scott G.; Taylor, Jeremy M.G.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: To determine if pretreatment PSA doubling time (PSA-DT) can predict post-radiation therapy (RT) PSA trajectories for localized prostate cancer. Materials and methods: Three hundred and seventy-five prostate cancer patients treated with external beam RT without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) were identified with an adequate number of PSA values. We utilized a linear mixed model (LMM) analysis to model longitudinal PSA data sets after definitive treatment. Post-treatment PSA trajectories were allowed to depend on the pre-RT PSA-DT, pre-RT PSA (iPSA), Gleason score (GS), and T-stage. Results: Pre-RT PSA-DT had a borderline impact on predicting the rate of PSA rise after nadir (p = 0.08). For a typical low risk patient (T1, GS ≤ 6, iPSA 10), the predicted PSA-DT post-nadir was 21% shorter for pre-RT PSA-DT 24 month (19 month vs. 24 month). Additional significant predictors of post-RT PSA rate of rise included GS (p < 0.0001), iPSA (p < 0.0001), and T-stage (p = 0.02). Conclusions: We observed a trend between rapidly rising pre-RT PSA and the post-RT post-nadir PSA rise. This effect appeared to be independent of iPSA, GS, or T-stage. The results presented suggest that pretreatment PSA-DT may help predict post-RT PSA trajectories

  12. Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    MD Anderson. Fusion analysis of the first 19 cases demonstrates 10 cases are ETS fusion positive, while 9 cases are ETS fusion negative. Notably...Foundation Grants Officer: Jane Zuber, Director, Contracts & Grants, Texas A&M Univ. System 400 Harvey Mitchell Pkwy South, Suite 300 College Station, TX...prostate cancer PDXs for expression of targets of interest to company. 18 ARAUJO, John None BROOM, Bradley ACTIVE Bioinformatics Gift ( Weinstein

  13. Association of Fatigue Intensification with Cognitive Impairment during Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li Rebekah; Espina, Alexandra; Saligan, Leorey N

    2018-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue is a common complaint during cancer treatment and is often associated with cognitive impairment. This study examined cognitive deficits that were associated with fatigue symptoms during external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in men with localized prostate cancer. A total of 36 participants were enrolled and followed up at baseline, 24 h, 7 days, 14 days after EBRT initiation, at midpoint, and at completion of EBRT. Fatigue was measured by self-report using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Fatigue (FACT-F), and cognitive impairment by the Computer Assessment of Mild Cognitive Impairment (CAMCI®). Subjects with increased fatigue during EBRT reported a significant decline in cognitive function and had difficulties with CAMCI®'s route finding and item recall tasks during EBRT. Increased fatigue during EBRT was associated with perceived cognitive difficulties in executive function and recognition memory, but not with attention or verbal memory. Our results suggest that there might be specific cognitive domains that are associated with increased fatigue during EBRT. These findings will provide important information for targeting specific cognitive domains using pharmacotherapy or behavioral interventions. CAMCI® is a valuable tool for psycho social providers to detect subtle cognitive impairment in fatigued cancer patients in a clinical setting. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. A Prospective Comparison of the Effects of Interfractional Variations on Proton Therapy and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moteabbed, Maryam, E-mail: mmoteabbed@partners.org; Trofimov, Alexei; Sharp, Gregory C.; Wang, Yi; Zietman, Anthony L.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To quantify and compare the impact of interfractional setup and anatomic variations on proton therapy (PT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with low-risk or intermediate-risk prostate cancer randomized to receive passive-scattering PT (n=10) and IMRT (n=10) were selected. For both modalities, clinical treatment plans included 50.4 Gy(RBE) to prostate and proximal seminal vesicles, and prostate-only boost to 79.2 Gy(RBE) in 1.8 Gy(RBE) per fraction. Implanted fiducials were used for prostate localization and endorectal balloons were used for immobilization. Patients in PT and IMRT arms received weekly computed tomography (CT) and cone beam CT (CBCT) scans, respectively. The planned dose was recalculated on each weekly image, scaled, and mapped onto the planning CT using deformable registration. The resulting accumulated dose distribution over the entire treatment course was compared with the planned dose using dose-volume histogram (DVH) and γ analysis. Results: The target conformity index remained acceptable after accumulation. The largest decrease in the average prostate D{sub 98} was 2.2 and 0.7 Gy for PT and IMRT, respectively. On average, the mean dose to bladder increased by 3.26 ± 7.51 Gy and 1.97 ± 6.84 Gy for PT and IMRT, respectively. These values were 0.74 ± 2.37 and 0.56 ± 1.90 for rectum. Differences between changes in DVH indices were not statistically significant between modalities. All volume indices remained within the protocol tolerances after accumulation. The average pass rate for the γ analysis, assuming tolerances of 3 mm and 3%, for clinical target volume, bladder, rectum, and whole patient for PT/IMRT were 100/100, 92.6/99, 99.2/100, and 97.2/99.4, respectively. Conclusion: The differences in target coverage and organs at risk dose deviations for PT and IMRT were not statistically significant under the guidelines of this protocol.

  15. Treatment of prostatic cancer using daily intermittent multiportal therapy (DIMT) technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Keishiro; Irie, Goro (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine); Shirato, Hiroki; Takayama, Naohisa; Sutoh, Susumu

    1992-06-01

    In the treatment of prostatic cancer using a newly proposed intermittent multiportal therapy (DIMT), acute reactions, change in tumor marker levels, and complications more than 6 months after treatment were evaluated. From June 1989 to September 1990, 26 patients with prostatic cancer (stage A2, 3 patients; B, 9; C, 2; D, 10; recurrence, 2) were treated. Fifteen patients were followed up for more than one year, with a mean period of 11.6 months. The treatment schedule is 52.5 Gy in 16 fractions in 4 weeks for radical treatment, and 30.0 Gy in 8 fractions in 2 weeks for palliative treatment. The 360 degree rotation about the patient was divided into 16 fractions, and 2 opposing fractions were used in one day as parallel opposed portals to treat the target volume. The fractions were serially treated one per day, so that 8 treatment days produced a total dose of distribution similar to that for conventional conformational therapy. The size of the irradiation field varied from 6 x 6 cm to 9 x 9 cm. No hormonal therapy was performed for stage A2 or B. Acute effect was minimal including skin erythema 2/26 (7%), pollakisuria 1/26 (4%), mild symptoms due to acute proctitis 9/26 (35%). Abnormality high PSA and/or PAP levels returned to the normal range after the treatment in 7 of 10 patients. Local recurrence was detected in 1 patient with stage D, 15 months after completion of therapy, but 21 other patients continued for more than 6 months with no clinical evidence of local recurrence. No residual disease was detected by biopsy undertaken in 10 patients after more than 6 months. No severe complication was detected after more than 6 months except in 1 patient who needed colostomy for the relief of rectal bleeding. DIMT can have the total dose distribution similar to that of conventional conformational therapy without specific devices. Initial results on prostatic cancer treatment were encouraging. (J.P.N.).

  16. Key papers in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney, Simon; Shah, Taimur Tariq; Patel, Hitendra R H; Arya, Manit

    2014-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer and second leading cause of death in men. The evidence base for the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer is continually changing. We aim to review and discuss past and contemporary papers on these topics to provoke debate and highlight key dilemmas faced by the urological community. We review key papers on prostate-specific antigen screening, radical prostatectomy versus surveillance strategies, targeted therapies, timing of radiotherapy and alternative anti-androgen therapeutics. Previously, the majority of patients, irrespective of risk, underwent radical open surgical procedures associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Evidence is emerging that not all prostate cancers are alike and that low-grade disease can be safely managed by surveillance strategies and localized treatment to the prostate. The question remains as to how to accurately stage the disease and ultimately choose which treatment pathway to follow.

  17. Prostate cancer brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Vita; Silva, Joao L. F.; Srougi, Miguel; Nesrallah, Adriano

    1999-01-01

    The transperineal brachytherapy with 125 I/Pd 103 seed implantation guided by transurethral ultrasound must be presented as therapeutical option of low urinary morbidity in patients with localized prostate cancer. The combined clinical staging - including Gleason and initial PSA - must be encouraged, for definition of a group of low risk and indication of exclusive brachytherapy. Random prospective studies are necessary in order to define the best role of brachytherapy, surgery and external beam radiation therapy

  18. Clinical outcomes and nadir prostate-specific antigen (PSA) according to initial PSA levels in primary androgen deprivation therapy for metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Yasuhide; Ueno, Satoru; Izumi, Kouji; Kadono, Yoshifumi; Mizokami, Atsushi; Hinotsu, Shiro; Akaza, Hideyuki; Namiki, Mikio

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the clinical outcomes of metastatic prostate cancer patients and the relationship between nadir prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and different types of primary androgen deprivation therapy (PADT). This study utilized data from the Japan Study Group of Prostate Cancer registry, which is a large, multicenter, population-based database. A total of 2982 patients treated with PADT were enrolled. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to compare progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients treated using combined androgen blockade (CAB) and non-CAB therapies. The relationships between nadir PSA levels and PADT type according to initial serum PSA levels were also investigated. Among the 2982 enrolled patients, 2101 (70.5 %) were treated with CAB. Although CAB-treated patients had worse clinical characteristics, their probability of PFS and OS was higher compared with those treated with a non-CAB therapy. These results were due to a survival benefit with CAB in patients with an initial PSA level of 500-1000 ng/mL. Nadir PSA levels were significantly lower in CAB patients than in non-CAB patients with comparable initial serum PSA levels. A small survival benefit for CAB in metastatic prostate cancer was demonstrated in a Japanese large-scale prospective cohort study. The clinical significance of nadir PSA levels following PADT was evident, but the predictive impact of PSA nadir on OS was different between CAB and non-CAB therapy.

  19. Engineering a prostate-specific membrane antigen-activated tumor endothelial cell prodrug for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denmeade, Samuel R; Mhaka, Annastasiah M; Rosen, D Marc; Brennen, W Nathaniel; Dalrymple, Susan; Dach, Ingrid; Olesen, Claus; Gurel, Bora; Demarzo, Angelo M; Wilding, George; Carducci, Michael A; Dionne, Craig A; Møller, Jesper V; Nissen, Poul; Christensen, S Brøgger; Isaacs, John T

    2012-06-27

    Heterogeneous expression of drug target proteins within tumor sites is a major mechanism of resistance to anticancer therapies. We describe a strategy to selectively inhibit, within tumor sites, the function of a critical intracellular protein, the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase (SERCA) pump, whose proper function is required by all cell types for viability. To achieve targeted inhibition, we took advantage of the unique expression of the carboxypeptidase prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) by tumor endothelial cells within the microenvironment of solid tumors. We generated a prodrug, G202, consisting of a PSMA-specific peptide coupled to an analog of the potent SERCA pump inhibitor thapsigargin. G202 produced substantial tumor regression against a panel of human cancer xenografts in vivo at doses that were minimally toxic to the host. On the basis of these data, a phase 1 dose-escalation clinical trial has been initiated with G202 in patients with advanced cancer.

  20. The results of radical retropubic prostatectomy and adjuvant therapy for pathologic stage C prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schild, Steven E.; Wong, William W.; Grado, Gordon L.; Halyard, Michele Y.; Novicki, Donald E.; Swanson, Scott K.; Larson, Thayne R.; Ferrigni, Robert G.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The results of therapy in 288 men with pathologic Stage C prostate cancer who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) were analyzed to determine the effects of adjuvant therapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven of the 288 patients received preoperative neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (leuprolide acetate). Postoperatively, 60 patients received adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) to the prostate bed. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 83 months (median = 32 months). Freedom from failure (FFF) was defined as maintaining a serum PSA level of ≤ 0.3 ng/ml. Results: The FFF was 61% at 3 years and 45% at 5 years for the entire group. The FFF following RRP plus RT was 75% at 3 years and 57% at 5 years as compared to 56% at 3 years and 40% at 5 years for RRP without RT (p = 0.049). The FFF following RRP plus neoadjuvant hormonal therapy was 58% at 3 years and 40% at 5 years as compared to 60% at 3 years and 45% at 5 years following RRP without hormonal therapy (p = 0.3). In patients without seminal vesicle (SV) invasion, the FFF was 81% at 3 and 5 years for RRP plus RT as compared to 61% at 3 years and 50% at 5 years for RRP without RT (p = 0.01). In patients with SV invasion, the FFF was 61% at 3 years and 36% at 5 years for RRP plus RT as compared to 44% at 3 years and 23% at 5 years for RRP without RT (p = 0.23). The projected local control rate was 83% at 5 years for those with RRP alone as compared to 100% for RRP plus RT (p = 0.02). Survival at 5 years was projected to be 92% and was not significantly altered by the administration of adjuvant therapies. Conclusions: Postoperative RT was associated with significantly improved local control and FFF rates, especially in patients with tumors which did not involve the seminal vesicles

  1. Clinical and biochemical outcomes of men undergoing radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, David; Weiss, Jeffrey P.; Safdieh, Joseph; Weiner, Joseph; Rotman, Marvin; Schwartz, David [Veterans Affairs, New York Harbor Healthcare System, Brooklyn (United States); Rineer, Justin [University of Florida Health Cancer Center at Orlando Health, Orlando (United States)

    2015-03-15

    We analyzed outcomes of patients with prostate cancer undergoing either radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) +/- salvage radiation or definitive radiation therapy (RT) +/- androgen deprivation. From 2003-2010 there were 251 patients who underwent RRP and 469 patients who received RT (> or =7,560 cGy) for prostate cancer. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed with the log-rank test to compare biochemical control (bCR), distant metastatic-free survival (DMPFS), and prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS) between the two groups. The median follow-up was 70 months and 61.3% of the men were African American. For low risk disease the 6-year bCR were 90.3% for RT and 85.6% for RRP (p = 0.23) and the 6-year post-salvage bCR were 90.3% vs. 90.9%, respectively (p = 0.84). For intermediate risk disease the 6-year bCR were 82.6% for RT and 59.7% for RRP (p < 0.001) and 82.6% vs. 74.0%, respectively, after including those salvaged with RT (p = 0.06). For high risk disease, the 6-year bCR were 67.4% for RT and 41.3% for RRP (p < 0.001) and after including those salvaged with RT was 67.4% vs. 43.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in regards to DMPFS or PCSS. Treatment approaches utilizing RRP +/- salvage radiation or RT +/- androgen deprivation yielded equivalent DMPFS and PCSS outcomes. Biochemical control rates, using their respective definitions, appeared equivalent or better in those who received treatment with RT.

  2. Hormonal response recovery after long-term androgen deprivation therapy in patients with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, Jacques; Celma, Ana; Placer, José; Cuadras, Mercè; Regis, Lucas; Gasanz, Carlos; Trilla, Enrique; Salvador, Carlos; Lorente, David; Morote, Juan

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate hormonal recovery after cessation of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in a group of elderly prostate cancer patients. Forty patients with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer, with a mean age of 71.5 years [95% confidence interval (CI) 69.1-73.9], were treated with ADT for a mean duration of 74.6 months (95% CI 59.7-89.5 months). Mean follow-up time after ADT cessation was 36.5 months (95% CI 30.6-42.3 months). Serum testosterone and luteinizing hormone (LH) were determined at 6 month intervals after ADT cessation. After 18 months of follow-up, all patients had recovered normal LH levels, while 38% of patients still presented castration levels of testosterone (50 ng/dl). Neither age at start of ADT nor clinical stage reached statistical significance. Only time under ADT was correlated with testosterone recovery (p = .031). Kaplan-Meier curves were obtained. Mean time for testosterone recovery was 14.5 months (95% CI 6.5-22.6 months) in patients treated with ADT for less than 60 months compared to 29.3 months (95% CI 19.6-39.1 months) in patients treated with ADT for more than 60 months (log-rank p = .029). Age did not correlate with testosterone recovery in a group of elderly prostate cancer patients in whom ADT was stopped. Testosterone recovery after ADT cessation was significantly correlated with time under ADT treatment. Significant implications related to economic aspects of the dosage schedule may be considered.

  3. Clinical and biochemical outcomes of men undergoing radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, David; Weiss, Jeffrey P.; Safdieh, Joseph; Weiner, Joseph; Rotman, Marvin; Schwartz, David; Rineer, Justin

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed outcomes of patients with prostate cancer undergoing either radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) +/- salvage radiation or definitive radiation therapy (RT) +/- androgen deprivation. From 2003-2010 there were 251 patients who underwent RRP and 469 patients who received RT (> or =7,560 cGy) for prostate cancer. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed with the log-rank test to compare biochemical control (bCR), distant metastatic-free survival (DMPFS), and prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS) between the two groups. The median follow-up was 70 months and 61.3% of the men were African American. For low risk disease the 6-year bCR were 90.3% for RT and 85.6% for RRP (p = 0.23) and the 6-year post-salvage bCR were 90.3% vs. 90.9%, respectively (p = 0.84). For intermediate risk disease the 6-year bCR were 82.6% for RT and 59.7% for RRP (p < 0.001) and 82.6% vs. 74.0%, respectively, after including those salvaged with RT (p = 0.06). For high risk disease, the 6-year bCR were 67.4% for RT and 41.3% for RRP (p < 0.001) and after including those salvaged with RT was 67.4% vs. 43.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in regards to DMPFS or PCSS. Treatment approaches utilizing RRP +/- salvage radiation or RT +/- androgen deprivation yielded equivalent DMPFS and PCSS outcomes. Biochemical control rates, using their respective definitions, appeared equivalent or better in those who received treatment with RT.

  4. Late toxicity after conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Impact of previous surgery for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odrazka, K.; Dolezel, M.; Vanasek, J.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively compare late toxicity of conventional-dose three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and high-dose intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. A total of 340 patients with T1-3 prostate cancer were treated with 3D-CRT (n=228) and IMRT (n=112). The median follow-up time was 5.9 years and 3.0 years, respectively. The prescription dose was 70 Gy for 3D-CRT and 78 Gy for IMRT. Late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were graded according to the Fox Chase modification of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force criteria. There was no difference between 3D-CRT and IMRT in the incidence of GI and GU toxicity at 3 years. On multivariate analysis, transurethral resection of prostate/open transvesical prostatectomy (TURP/TVPE) for benign prostatic hyperplasia, carried out before radiotherapy, significantly increased the risk of Grade ≥2 GU toxicity (risk ratio 1.88). Among patients who experienced TURP/TVPE, the 5-year actuarial likelihood of Grade 2-3 urinary incontinence was 23%, compared with 9% for those without prostate surgery (P=0.01). Tolerance of 3D-CRT and IMRT was similar, despite the use of high radiation dose with IMRT. Previous TURP/TVPE increased the risk of GU toxicity. (author)

  5. The metabolic syndrome and its components in patients with prostate cancer on androgen deprivation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morote, Juan; Gómez-Caamaño, Antonio; Alvarez-Ossorio, José L; Pesqueira, Daniel; Tabernero, Angel; Gómez Veiga, Francisco; Lorente, José A; Porras, Mariano; Lobato, Juan J; Ribal, María J; Planas, Jacques

    2015-06-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy may promote the development of the metabolic syndrome in patients with prostate cancer. We assessed the prevalence of the full metabolic syndrome and its components during the first year of androgen deprivation therapy. This observational, multicenter, prospective study included 539 patients with prostate cancer scheduled to receive 3-month depot luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogs for more than 12 months. Waist circumference, body mass index, lipid profile, blood pressure and fasting glucose were evaluated at baseline and after 6 and 12 months. The metabolic syndrome was assessed according to NCEP ATP III criteria (2001) and 4 other definitions (WHO 1998, AACE 2003, AHA/NHLBI 2005 and IDF 2005). At 6 and 12 months after the initiation of androgen deprivation therapy, significant increases were observed in waist circumference, body mass index, fasting glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and high-density and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. No significant changes in blood pressure 130/85 or greater were detected. A nonsignificant increase of 3.9% in the prevalence of the full metabolic syndrome (ATP III) was observed (22.9% at baseline vs 25.5% and 26.8% at 6 and 12 months, respectively). The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome at baseline varied according to the definition used, ranging from 9.4% (WHO) to 50% (IDF). At 12 months significant increases in prevalence were observed with the WHO (4.1%) and AHA/NHLBI (8.1%) definitions. Androgen deprivation therapy produces significant early effects on waist circumference, body mass index, fasting glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol. The prevalence of and increase in the metabolic syndrome depend on the defining criteria. Counseling patients on the prevention, early detection and treatment of specific metabolic alterations is recommended. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of primary androgen deprivation therapy in prostate cancer patients using the J-CAPRA risk score

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaza, Hideyuki; Hinotsu, Shiro; Usami, Michiyuki; Ogawa, Osamu; Kitamura, Tadaichi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Naito, Seiji; Namiki, Mikio; Hirao, Yoshihiko; Murai, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the influence of maximal androgen blockade (MAB) and non-MAB hormonal therapy with an luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) analog on overall survival of prostate cancer patients in the Japan Study Group of Prostate Cancer (J-CaP) registry according to risk, as assessed using the novel J-CAPRA risk instrument. To undertake a multivariate analysis combining J-CAPRA risk score, type of hormonal therapy and comorbidities, in order to assess their impact on overall survival. Methods: The J-CaP database includes men in Japan diagnosed with any stage of prostate cancer between 2001 and 2003 and treated with primary androgen deprivation therapy (PADT), as monotherapy or in combination. A total of 26,272 men were enrolled and of these 19,265 were treated with PADT. This analysis was undertaken using the latest data set (30 April, 2010) including a total of 15,727 patients who received PADT and had follow-up data for periods ranging from 0 to 9.2 years. Results: MAB for prostate cancer patients with intermediate- or high-risk disease has a significant benefit in terms of overall survival compared with LHRH analog monotherapy or surgical castration alone. Better results may be achieved in older (≥75 years) patients. Patient comorbidities are an important factor in determining overall survival, notably in older patients, and should be considered when selecting therapy. Conclusions: Based on large-scale registry data, this report is the first to analyze the outcomes of MAB therapy in patients with prostate cancer at a wide range of disease stages. MAB therapy may provide significant survival benefits in intermediate- and high-risk patients. PMID:24223407

  7. Multivalent Peptidomimetic Conjugates as Inhibitors of Androgen Receptor Function in Therapy-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    K, Logan SK, Kirshenbaum K, Garabedian MJ. Multivalent Peptoid Conjugates Which Overcome Enzalutamide Resistance in Prostate Cancer Cells. Cancer...Wang Y, Dehigaspitiya DC, Levine PM, Profit AA, Haugbro M, Imberg-Kazdan K, Logan SK, Kirshenbaum K, Garabedian MJ. Multivalent Peptoid Conjugates...Prostate Cancer Cells Yu Wang1, Dilani C. Dehigaspitiya2, Paul M. Levine2, Adam A. Profit3, Michael Haugbro2, Keren Imberg-Kazdan4, Susan K. Logan1,5

  8. Lymphocyte function following radium-223 therapy in patients with metastasized, castration-resistant prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsegian, Vahe; Moeckel, Daniel; Mueller, Stefan P.; Bockisch, Andreas; Horn, Peter A.; Lindemann, Monika

    2017-01-01

    Therapy with the alpha-emitter radium-223 chloride ("2"2"3Ra) is an innovative therapeutic option in patients with metastasized, castration-resistant prostate cancer. However, radiotherapy can lead to hematopoietic toxicity. The aim of this study was to determine if "2"2"3Ra therapy induces an impairment of cellular antimicrobial immune responses. In 11 patients receiving "2"2"3Ra treatment, lymphocyte proliferation and the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (interferon-γ and interleukin-10) were determined, using lymphocyte transformation testing and ELISpot, respectively. Lymphocyte function after stimulation with mitogens and microbial antigens was assessed prior to therapy and at day 1, 7 and 28 after therapy. Lymphocyte proliferation and the production of interferon-γ and interleukin-10 towards mitogens and antigens remained unchanged after therapy. Consistent with these in vitro data, we did not observe infectious complications after treatment. The results argue against an impairment of lymphocyte function after "2"2"3Ra therapy. Thus, immune responses against pathogens should remain unaffected. (orig.)

  9. Lymphocyte function following radium-223 therapy in patients with metastasized, castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsegian, Vahe; Moeckel, Daniel [Helios Kliniken, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Schwerin (Germany); Mueller, Stefan P.; Bockisch, Andreas [University Hospital Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Horn, Peter A.; Lindemann, Monika [University Hospital Essen, Institute for Transfusion Medicine, Essen (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Therapy with the alpha-emitter radium-223 chloride ({sup 223}Ra) is an innovative therapeutic option in patients with metastasized, castration-resistant prostate cancer. However, radiotherapy can lead to hematopoietic toxicity. The aim of this study was to determine if {sup 223}Ra therapy induces an impairment of cellular antimicrobial immune responses. In 11 patients receiving {sup 223}Ra treatment, lymphocyte proliferation and the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (interferon-γ and interleukin-10) were determined, using lymphocyte transformation testing and ELISpot, respectively. Lymphocyte function after stimulation with mitogens and microbial antigens was assessed prior to therapy and at day 1, 7 and 28 after therapy. Lymphocyte proliferation and the production of interferon-γ and interleukin-10 towards mitogens and antigens remained unchanged after therapy. Consistent with these in vitro data, we did not observe infectious complications after treatment. The results argue against an impairment of lymphocyte function after {sup 223}Ra therapy. Thus, immune responses against pathogens should remain unaffected. (orig.)

  10. Effective photodynamic therapy in drug-resistant prostate cancer cells utilizing a non-viral antitumor vector (a secondary publication).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Masaya; Honda, Norihiro; Hazama, Hisanao; Tachikawa, Shoji; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Awazu, Kunio

    2016-03-31

    There is an urgent need to develop an efficient strategy for the treatment of drug-resistant prostate cancer. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), in which low incident levels of laser energy are used to activate a photosensitizer taken up by tumor cells, is expected as a novel therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer because of the minimal invasive nature of PDT. The present study was designed to assess the efficacy of a novel vector approach combined with a conventional porphyrin-based photosensitizer. Our group focused on a non-viral vector (hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope; HVJ-E) combined with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) lipid, termed the porphyrus envelope (PE). It has been previously confirmed that HVJ-E has drug-delivering properties and can induce cancer-specific cell death. The PE (HVJ-E contained in PpIX lipid) was developed as a novel photosensitizer. In this study, the antitumor and PDT efficacy of the PE against hormone-antagonistic human prostate cancer cells (PC-3) were evaluated. Our results demonstrated that, under specific circumstances, PDT using the PE was very effective against PC-3 cells. A novel therapy for drug-resistant prostate cancer based on this vector approach is eagerly anticipated.

  11. Prostate Cancer Biorepository Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0185 TITLE: Prostate Cancer Biorepository Network PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jonathan Melamed, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Prostate Cancer Biorepository Network 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-2-0185 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...infrastructure and operations of the Prostate Cancer Biorepository Network (PCBN). The aim of the PCBN is to provide prostate researchers with high-quality

  12. Causes of Mortality After Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy and Androgen Deprivation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Hunter, Grant K.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Abdel-Wahab, May; Stephenson, Andrew J.; Klein, Eric A.; Mahadevan, Arul; Kupelian, Patrick A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Men with high-risk prostate cancer have other competing causes of mortality; however, current risk stratification schema do not account for comorbidities. We aim to identify the causes of death and factors predictive for mortality in this population. Methods and Materials: A total of 660 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated with definitive high-dose external beam radiation therapy (≥74 Gy) and androgen deprivation (AD) between 1996 and 2009 at a single institution. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to determine factors predictive of survival. Results: The median radiation dose was 78 Gy, median duration of AD was 6 months, and median follow-up was 74 months. The 10-year overall survival (OS) was 60.6%. Prostate cancer was the leading single cause of death, with 10-year mortality of 14.1% (95% CI 10.7-17.6), compared with other cancers (8.4%, 95% CI 5.7-11.1), cardiovascular disease (7.3%, 95% CI 4.7-9.9), and all other causes (10.4%, 95% CI 7.2-13.6). On multivariate analysis, older age (HR 1.55, P=.002) and Charlson comorbidity index score (CS) ≥1 (HR 2.20, P<.0001) were significant factors predictive of OS, whereas Gleason score, T stage, prostate-specific antigen, duration of AD, radiation dose, smoking history, and body mass index were not. Men younger than 70 years of age with CS = 0 were more likely to die of prostate cancer than any other cause, whereas older men or those with CS ≥1 more commonly suffered non-prostate cancer death. The cumulative incidences of prostate cancer-specific mortality were similar regardless of age or comorbidities (P=.60). Conclusions: Men with high-risk prostate cancer are more likely to die of causes other than prostate cancer, except for the subgroup of men younger than 70 years of age without comorbidities. Only older age and presence of comorbidities significantly predicted for OS, whereas prostate cancer- and treatment-related factors did not

  13. The Utility of PET/CT in the Planning of External Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calais, Jeremie; Cao, Minsong; Nickols, Nicholas G

    2018-04-01

    Radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy are the definitive treatment options for patients with localized prostate cancer. A rising level of prostate-specific antigen after radical prostatectomy indicates prostate cancer recurrence, and these patients may still be cured with salvage radiotherapy. To maximize chance for cure, the irradiated volumes should completely encompass the extent of disease. Therefore, accurate estimation of the location of disease is critical for radiotherapy planning in both the definitive and the salvage settings. Current first-line imaging for prostate cancer has limited sensitivity for detection of disease both at initial staging and at biochemical recurrence. Integration of PET into routine evaluation of prostate cancer patients may improve both staging accuracy and radiotherapy planning. 18 F-FDG PET/CT is now routinely used in radiation planning for several cancer types. However, 18 F-FDG PET/CT has low sensitivity for prostate cancer. Additional PET probes evaluated in prostate cancer include 18 F-sodium fluoride, 11 C-acetate, 11 C- or 18 F-choline, 18 F-fluciclovine, and 68 Ga- or 18 F-labeled ligands that bind prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA). PSMA ligands appear to be the most sensitive and specific but have not yet received Food and Drug Administration New Drug Application approval for use in the United States. Retrospective and prospective investigations suggest a potential major impact of PET/CT on prostate radiation treatment planning. Prospective trials randomizing patients to routine radiotherapy planning versus PET/CT-aided planning may show meaningful clinical outcomes. Prospective clinical trials evaluating the addition of 18 F-fluciclovine PET/CT for planning of salvage radiotherapy with clinical endpoints are under way. Prospective trials evaluating the clinical impact of PSMA PET/CT on prostate radiation planning are indicated. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  14. A novel IgE antibody targeting the prostate-specific antigen as a potential prostate cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels-Wells, Tracy R; Nicodemus, Christopher F; Penichet, Manuel L; Helguera, Gustavo; Leuchter, Richard K; Quintero, Rafaela; Kozman, Maggie; Rodríguez, José A; Ortiz-Sánchez, Elizabeth; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Schultes, Birgit C

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men in the United States. The prostate-specific antigen (PSA), often found at high levels in the serum of PCa patients, has been used as a marker for PCa detection and as a target of immunotherapy. The murine IgG1 monoclonal antibody AR47.47, specific for human PSA, has been shown to enhance antigen presentation by human dendritic cells and induce both CD4 and CD8 T-cell activation when complexed with PSA. In this study, we explored the properties of a novel mouse/human chimeric anti-PSA IgE containing the variable regions of AR47.47 as a potential therapy for PCa. Our goal was to take advantage of the unique properties of IgE in order to trigger immune activation against PCa. Binding characteristics of the antibody were determined by ELISA and flow cytometry. In vitro degranulation was determined by the release of β-hexosaminidase from effector cells. In vivo degranulation was monitored in human FcεRIα transgenic mice using the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis assay. These mice were also used for a vaccination study to determine the in vivo anti-cancer effects of this antibody. Significant differences in survival were determined using the Log Rank test. In vitro T-cell activation was studied using human dendritic cells and autologous T cells. The anti-PSA IgE, expressed in murine myeloma cells, is properly assembled and secreted, and binds the antigen and FcεRI. In addition, this antibody is capable of triggering effector cell degranulation in vitro and in vivo when artificially cross-linked, but not in the presence of the natural soluble antigen, suggesting that such an interaction will not trigger systemic anaphylaxis. Importantly, the anti-PSA IgE combined with PSA also triggers immune activation in vitro and in vivo and significantly prolongs the survival of human FcεRIα transgenic mice challenged with PSA-expressing tumors in a prophylactic vaccination setting. The anti-PSA IgE exhibits

  15. Endurance training improves insulin sensitivity and body composition in prostate cancer patients treated with androgen deprivation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Thine; Winding, Kamilla; Rinnov, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance and changes in body composition are side effects of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) given to prostate cancer patients. The present study investigated whether endurance training improves insulin sensitivity and body composition in ADT-treated prostate cancer patients. Nine me...... and magnetic resonance imaging). The secondary endpoint was systemic inflammation. Statistical analysis was carried out using two-way ANOVA. Endurance training increased VO2max (ml(O2)/min per kg) by 11 and 13% in the patients and controls respectively (P...

  16. Androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer and the risk of hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Blánaid M; Yin, Hui; Bladou, Franck; Ernst, Pierre; Azoulay, Laurent

    2017-07-01

    Androgens have been shown to influence both the immune system and lung tissue, raising the hypothesis that androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer may increase the risk of pneumonia. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether ADT is associated with an increased risk of hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia in patients with prostate cancer. This was a population-based cohort study using the United Kingdom Clinical Practice Research Datalink linked to the Hospital Episode Statistics repository. The cohort consisted of 20 310 men newly diagnosed with non-metastatic prostate cancer between 1 April 1998 and 31 March 2015. Time-dependent Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate adjusted HRs and 95% CIs for hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia associated with current and past use of ADT compared with non-use. During a mean follow-up of 4.3 years, there were 621 incident hospitalisations for community-acquired pneumonia (incidence rate: 7.2/1000 person-years). Current ADT use was associated with an 81% increased risk of hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia (12.1 vs 3.8 per 1000 person-years, respectively; HR 1.81, 95% CI 1.47 to 2.23). The association was observed within the first six months of use (HR 1.73, 95% CI 1.23 to 2.42) and remained elevated with increasing durations of use (≥25 months; HR 1.79, 95% CI 1.39 to 2.30). In contrast, past ADT use was not associated with an increased risk (HR 1.23, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.60). The use of ADT is associated with an increased risk of hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia in men with prostate cancer. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Fully Automated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plan Generation for Prostate Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voet, Peter W.J.; Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Incrocci, Luca; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate fully automated volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning for prostate cancer patients, avoiding manual trial-and-error tweaking of plan parameters by dosimetrists. Methods and Materials: A system was developed for fully automated generation of VMAT plans with our commercial clinical treatment planning system (TPS), linked to the in-house developed Erasmus-iCycle multicriterial optimizer for preoptimization. For 30 randomly selected patients, automatically generated VMAT plans (VMAT auto ) were compared with VMAT plans generated manually by 1 expert dosimetrist in the absence of time pressure (VMAT man ). For all treatment plans, planning target volume (PTV) coverage and sparing of organs-at-risk were quantified. Results: All generated plans were clinically acceptable and had similar PTV coverage (V 95%  > 99%). For VMAT auto and VMAT man plans, the organ-at-risk sparing was similar as well, although only the former plans were generated without any planning workload. Conclusions: Fully automated generation of high-quality VMAT plans for prostate cancer patients is feasible and has recently been implemented in our clinic

  18. Physician Evaluation of Internet Health Information on Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Anand, E-mail: as4351@columbia.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Paly, Jonathan J.; Efstathiou, Jason A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Many patients considering prostate cancer (PCa) treatment options report seeking proton beam therapy (PBT) based in part on information readily available on the Internet. There is, however, potential for considerable variation in Internet health information (IHI). We thus evaluated the characteristics, quality, and accuracy of IHI on PBT for PCa. Methods and Materials: We undertook a qualitative research study using snowball-purposive sampling in which we evaluated the top 50 Google search results for “proton prostate cancer.” Quality was evaluated on a 5-point scale using the validated 15-question DISCERN instrument. Accuracy was evaluated by comparing IHI with the best available evidence. Results: Thirty-seven IHI websites were included in the final sample. These websites most frequently were patient information/support resources (46%), were focused exclusively on PBT (51%), and had a commercial affiliation (38%). There was a significant difference in quality according to the type of IHI. Substantial inaccuracies were noted in the study sample compared with best available or contextual evidence. Conclusions: There are shortcomings in quality and accuracy in consumer-oriented IHI on PBT for PCa. Providers must be prepared to educate patients how to critically evaluate IHI related to PBT for PCa to best inform their treatment decisions.

  19. Physician Evaluation of Internet Health Information on Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Anand; Paly, Jonathan J.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Bekelman, Justin E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Many patients considering prostate cancer (PCa) treatment options report seeking proton beam therapy (PBT) based in part on information readily available on the Internet. There is, however, potential for considerable variation in Internet health information (IHI). We thus evaluated the characteristics, quality, and accuracy of IHI on PBT for PCa. Methods and Materials: We undertook a qualitative research study using snowball-purposive sampling in which we evaluated the top 50 Google search results for “proton prostate cancer.” Quality was evaluated on a 5-point scale using the validated 15-question DISCERN instrument. Accuracy was evaluated by comparing IHI with the best available evidence. Results: Thirty-seven IHI websites were included in the final sample. These websites most frequently were patient information/support resources (46%), were focused exclusively on PBT (51%), and had a commercial affiliation (38%). There was a significant difference in quality according to the type of IHI. Substantial inaccuracies were noted in the study sample compared with best available or contextual evidence. Conclusions: There are shortcomings in quality and accuracy in consumer-oriented IHI on PBT for PCa. Providers must be prepared to educate patients how to critically evaluate IHI related to PBT for PCa to best inform their treatment decisions

  20. Predictors of Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality in Elderly Men With Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Brachytherapy With or Without External Beam Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, Akash; Chen, M.-H.; Moran, Brian J.; Braccioforte, Michelle H.; Dosoretz, Daniel; Salenius, Sharon; Katin, Michael; Ross, Rudi; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical factors associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), adjusting for comorbidity, in elderly men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with brachytherapy alone or in conjunction with external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 1,978 men of median age 71 (interquartile range, 66-75) years with intermediate-risk disease (Gleason score 7, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 20 ng/mL or less, tumor category T2c or less). Fine and Gray's multivariable competing risks regression was used to assess whether prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD), age, treatment, year of brachytherapy, PSA level, or tumor category was associated with the risk of PCSM. Results: After a median follow-up of 3.2 (interquartile range, 1.7-5.4) years, the presence of CVD was significantly associated with a decreased risk of PCSM (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.20; 95% CI 0.04-0.99; p = 0.05), whereas an increasing PSA level was significantly associated with an increased risk of PCSM (adjusted hazard ratio 1.14; 95% CI 1.02-1.27; p = 0.02). In the absence of CVD, cumulative incidence estimates of PCSM were higher (p = 0.03) in men with PSA levels above as compared with the median PSA level (7.3 ng/mL) or less; however, in the setting of CVD there was no difference (p = 0.27) in these estimates stratified by the median PSA level (6.9 ng/mL). Conclusions: In elderly men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer, CVD status is a negative predictor of PCSM and affects the prognostic capacity of pretreatment PSA level. These observations support the potential utility of prerandomization stratification by comorbidity to more accurately assess prognostic factors and treatment effects within this population.

  1. Multimodal therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: the roles of radiotherapy, androgen deprivation therapy, and their combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho [The Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Locally advanced prostate cancer (LAPC) is defined as histologically proven T3–4 prostatic adenocarcinoma. In this review, we define the individual roles of radiotherapy (RT), short-term (ST-) and long-term (LT-) androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), and their combination in multimodal therapy for LAPC. Despite limitations in comparing the clinical outcomes among published papers, in the present study, a trend of 10-year clinical outcomes was roughly estimated by calculating the average rates weighted by the cohort number. With RT alone, the following rates were estimated: 87% biochemical failure, 34% local failure (LF), 48% distant metastasis (DM), 38% overall survival (OS), and 27% disease-specific mortality (DSM). Those associated with ADT alone were 74% BCF, 54% OS, and 25% DSM, which appeared to be better than those of RT alone. The addition of ADT to RT produced a notable local and systemic effect, regardless of ST- or LT-ADT. The LF rate decreased from 34% with RT alone to 21% with ST-ADT and further to 15% with LT-ADT. The DM and DSM rates also showed a similar trend among RT alone, RT+ST-ADT, and RT+LT-ADT. The combination of RT+LT-ADT resulted in the best long-term clinical outcomes, indicating that both RT and ADT are important parts of multimodal therapy.

  2. Multimodal therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: the roles of radiotherapy, androgen deprivation therapy, and their combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2017-01-01

    Locally advanced prostate cancer (LAPC) is defined as histologically proven T3–4 prostatic adenocarcinoma. In this review, we define the individual roles of radiotherapy (RT), short-term (ST-) and long-term (LT-) androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), and their combination in multimodal therapy for LAPC. Despite limitations in comparing the clinical outcomes among published papers, in the present study, a trend of 10-year clinical outcomes was roughly estimated by calculating the average rates weighted by the cohort number. With RT alone, the following rates were estimated: 87% biochemical failure, 34% local failure (LF), 48% distant metastasis (DM), 38% overall survival (OS), and 27% disease-specific mortality (DSM). Those associated with ADT alone were 74% BCF, 54% OS, and 25% DSM, which appeared to be better than those of RT alone. The addition of ADT to RT produced a notable local and systemic effect, regardless of ST- or LT-ADT. The LF rate decreased from 34% with RT alone to 21% with ST-ADT and further to 15% with LT-ADT. The DM and DSM rates also showed a similar trend among RT alone, RT+ST-ADT, and RT+LT-ADT. The combination of RT+LT-ADT resulted in the best long-term clinical outcomes, indicating that both RT and ADT are important parts of multimodal therapy

  3. To Die or to Survive, a Fatal Question for the Destiny of Prostate Cancer Cells after Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Kai-Xin; Firus, Jessica; Prieur, Brenda; Jia, William; Rennie, Paul S.

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed non-skin cancer in adult males in North America and is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality. For locally advanced or metastatic disease, androgen deprivation, through medical or surgical castration, is the primary treatment to induce prostate cancer cell death and extend patient survival. However, the vast majority of cancers progress to a castration-resistant/androgen-independent state where the cell death processes are no longer active. This review describes the main cell death processes, apoptosis, autophagy, necrosis and necroptosis, which may be activated in prostate cancers after androgen deprivation therapy as well as the molecular mechanisms through which the cancers progress to become castration resistant. In particular, the central role of persistent androgen receptor (AR)-mediated signaling and AR crosstalk with other critical cell signaling pathways, including (i) the PI3K/Akt pathway, (ii) receptor tyrosine kinases, (iii) the p38 MAPK pathway, and (iv) the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, as well as reactivation of AR by de novo synthesized androgen are discussed in this context. Understanding the molecular changes that subvert normal cell death mechanisms and thereby compromise the survival of prostate cancer patients continues to be a major challenge

  4. To Die or to Survive, a Fatal Question for the Destiny of Prostate Cancer Cells after Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kai-Xin; Firus, Jessica; Prieur, Brenda [The Vancouver Prostate Centre, 2660 Oak St., Vancouver, BC V6H 3Z6 (Canada); Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6H 3Z6 (Canada); Jia, William [Department of Surgery and Brain Research Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6H 3Z6 (Canada); Rennie, Paul S., E-mail: prennie@interchange.ubc.ca [The Vancouver Prostate Centre, 2660 Oak St., Vancouver, BC V6H 3Z6 (Canada); Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6H 3Z6 (Canada)

    2011-03-24

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed non-skin cancer in adult males in North America and is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality. For locally advanced or metastatic disease, androgen deprivation, through medical or surgical castration, is the primary treatment to induce prostate cancer cell death and extend patient survival. However, the vast majority of cancers progress to a castration-resistant/androgen-independent state where the cell death processes are no longer active. This review describes the main cell death processes, apoptosis, autophagy, necrosis and necroptosis, which may be activated in prostate cancers after androgen deprivation therapy as well as the molecular mechanisms through which the cancers progress to become castration resistant. In particular, the central role of persistent androgen receptor (AR)-mediated signaling and AR crosstalk with other critical cell signaling pathways, including (i) the PI3K/Akt pathway, (ii) receptor tyrosine kinases, (iii) the p38 MAPK pathway, and (iv) the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, as well as reactivation of AR by de novo synthesized androgen are discussed in this context. Understanding the molecular changes that subvert normal cell death mechanisms and thereby compromise the survival of prostate cancer patients continues to be a major challenge.

  5. To Die or to Survive, a Fatal Question for the Destiny of Prostate Cancer Cells after Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S. Rennie

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed non-skin cancer in adult males in North America and is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality. For locally advanced or metastatic disease, androgen deprivation, through medical or surgical castration, is the primary treatment to induce prostate cancer cell death and extend patient survival. However, the vast majority of cancers progress to a castration-resistant/androgen-independent state where the cell death processes are no longer active. This review describes the main cell death processes, apoptosis, autophagy, necrosis and necroptosis, which may be activated in prostate cancers after androgen deprivation therapy as well as the molecular mechanisms through which the cancers progress to become castration resistant. In particular, the central role of persistent androgen receptor (AR-mediated signaling and AR crosstalk with other critical cell signaling pathways, including (i the PI3K/Akt pathway, (ii receptor tyrosine kinases, (iii the p38 MAPK pathway, and (iv the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, as well as reactivation of AR by de novo synthesized androgen are discussed in this context. Understanding the molecular changes that subvert normal cell death mechanisms and thereby compromise the survival of prostate cancer patients continues to be a major challenge.

  6. Effects of recreational soccer in men with prostate cancer undergoing androgen deprivation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uth, Jacob; Schmidt, Jakob Friis; Christensen, Jesper Frank

    2013-01-01

    (FC) Prostate' study is a randomized trial comparing the effects of soccer training with standard treatment approaches on body composition, cardiovascular function, physical function parameters, glucose tolerance, bone health, and patient-reported outcomes in men undergoing ADT for prostate cancer....

  7. Early Outcomes From Three Prospective Trials of Image-Guided Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Li Zuofeng; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Marcus, Robert B.; Mendenhall, William M.; Nichols, R. Charles; Morris, Christopher G.; Williams, Christopher R.; Costa, Joseph; Henderson, Randal

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report early outcomes with image-guided proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We accrued 211 prostate cancer patients on prospective Institutional Review Board-approved trials of 78 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) in 39 fractions for low–risk disease, dose escalation from 78 to 82 CGE for intermediate-risk disease, and 78 CGE with concomitant docetaxel followed by androgen deprivation for high-risk disease. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. Results: One intermediate-risk patient and 2 high-risk patients had disease progression. Pretreatment genitourinary (GU) symptom management was required in 38% of patients. A cumulative 88 (42%) patients required posttreatment GU symptom management. Four transient Grade 3 GU toxicities occurred, all among patients requiring pretreatment GU symptom management. Multivariate analysis showed correlation between posttreatment GU 2+ symptoms and pretreatment GU symptom management (p < 0.0001) and age (p = 0.0048). Only 1 Grade 3+ gastrointestinal (GI) symptom occurred. The prevalence of Grade 2+ GI symptoms was 0 (0%), 10 (5%), 12 (6%), and 8 (4%) at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, with a cumulative incidence of 20 (10%) patients at 2 years after proton therapy. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed significant correlation between Grade 2+ rectal bleeding and proctitis and the percentage of rectal wall (rectum) receiving doses ranging from 40 CGE (10 CGE) to 80 CGE. Conclusions: Early outcomes with image-guided proton therapy suggest high efficacy and minimal toxicity with only 1.9% Grade 3 GU symptoms and <0.5% Grade 3 GI toxicities.

  8. Early Outcomes From Three Prospective Trials of Image-Guided Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendenhall, Nancy P., E-mail: menden@shands.ufl.edu [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Li Zuofeng; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Marcus, Robert B.; Mendenhall, William M.; Nichols, R. Charles; Morris, Christopher G. [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Williams, Christopher R.; Costa, Joseph [Division of Urology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Henderson, Randal [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report early outcomes with image-guided proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We accrued 211 prostate cancer patients on prospective Institutional Review Board-approved trials of 78 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) in 39 fractions for low-risk disease, dose escalation from 78 to 82 CGE for intermediate-risk disease, and 78 CGE with concomitant docetaxel followed by androgen deprivation for high-risk disease. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. Results: One intermediate-risk patient and 2 high-risk patients had disease progression. Pretreatment genitourinary (GU) symptom management was required in 38% of patients. A cumulative 88 (42%) patients required posttreatment GU symptom management. Four transient Grade 3 GU toxicities occurred, all among patients requiring pretreatment GU symptom management. Multivariate analysis showed correlation between posttreatment GU 2+ symptoms and pretreatment GU symptom management (p < 0.0001) and age (p = 0.0048). Only 1 Grade 3+ gastrointestinal (GI) symptom occurred. The prevalence of Grade 2+ GI symptoms was 0 (0%), 10 (5%), 12 (6%), and 8 (4%) at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, with a cumulative incidence of 20 (10%) patients at 2 years after proton therapy. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed significant correlation between Grade 2+ rectal bleeding and proctitis and the percentage of rectal wall (rectum) receiving doses ranging from 40 CGE (10 CGE) to 80 CGE. Conclusions: Early outcomes with image-guided proton therapy suggest high efficacy and minimal toxicity with only 1.9% Grade 3 GU symptoms and <0.5% Grade 3 GI toxicities.

  9. Effect of radiation combined with p53 gene therapy and endostatin on mouse prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Min; Ren Jun; Xu Bo; Gao Xianshu; He Zhisong; He Xiaoming; Zhang Ming; Liu Chaoxing; He Xinyong; Cao Guangming; Zhang Shaolong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that p53 gene therapy combined with endostatin can enhance tumor response to radiation therapy of RM-1 mouse xenograft prostate cancer and to investigate its mechanism. Methods: A mouse prostate cancer model was established. Then mice with xenograft tumor were randomly divided into group A (control), B (radiation), C (radiation and rAdp53), D (radiation and rh-endostatin) and E (radiation and rAdp53 and rhendostatin). On day 1, rAdp53 was injected intra-tumorously with 1 x 10 10 vp per animal to group C and E. From day 1 to 14, rh-endostatin was given 15 mg/kg intraperitoneally daily to group D and E. On day 4 single fraction of 15 Gy was given to tumors in groups B, C, D and E. Normal saline was injected intra-tumorously or intraperitoneaUy accordingly as control. No treatment was done to group A. Tumor volume was measured daily. Samples were collected on Days 5, 10 and 15. Ki67, CD31, p53 and VEGF were detected by means of immunohistochemistry. Results: (1) Radiation alone, radiation combined with intra-tumorous injection of Adp53 and/or intraperitoneal injection of rhendostatin resulted in tumor growth arrest of RM-1 cells in vivo (P = 0.000). Radiation combined with both rAdp53 and rhendostatin was the most effective treatment (P < 0.05). (2) All the four treatment groups had a decreased expression of mutant type P53 (P = 0.000). The expression of Ki67 in groups B and C were equal (P 0.05) and increasing (P = 0.000), respectively. Group D had a up-down-up curve (P < 0.05), but group E had a up-down one. On day 5 the expresion of VEGF in group E was the lowest (P < 0.05). An increased expression of MVD compared with the control was shown, and MVD in groups C, D and E were always higher than that in the control (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The limitation of radiotherapy could be overcome by combination with beth p53 gene therapy and endostatin on the growth of mouse prostate cancer cell. Radiation, rAdp53 and endostatin have their

  10. Androgen deprivation therapy and cardiovascular risk in patients with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.Y.; Haider, N.; Rasul, S.; Mahmood, A.; Nadeem, M.S.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) on risk of subsequent cardiovascular morbidity in men with prostate cancer. Study Design: Quasi experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of oncology Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from Sep 2014 to May 2015. Patients and Methods: Thirty consecutive patients fulfilling inclusion criteria were enrolled. All patients were subjected to medical castration/ androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with monthly 3.75 mg leuprorelin acetate intramuscular injection until castrate levels of testosterone (<50ng/dL) were achieved. We used Framingham's score for assessment of 10 years cardiovascular risk of individual patient before initiation and after completion of 6 months ADT. Serum lipid profile (fasting), systolic blood pressure, history of smoking, diabetes and antihypertensive medication were recorded. Proforma was designed to get clinical information. A p-value of <0.05 was considered significant. A paired-samples t-test was conducted to compare Framingham cardiovascular risk scores before initiation and after completion of 6 months ADT. Results: We enrolled 30 men with high/intermediate risk localized prostate cancer. Mean age was 63.47 +- 7.32 years. All patients received 6 months ADT with monthly 3.75mg leuprorelin acetate intramuscular injection. There was a significant difference in Framingham cardiovascular risk scores before (mean +- sd; 20.95 +- 7.98) and after (mean +- sd; 25.72 +- 6.15) 6 months ADT; t (29) =-4.54, p<0.01, two-tailed. Hence ADT resulted in a significant increase (mean +- sd; 25.7 +- 6.15) in 10 years cardiovascular morbidity risk t (29) =-4.54, p<0.01, two tailed. Subset analyses revealed significant increase in fasting serum total cholesterol, triglycerides and Low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels after 6 months ADT (p<0.01, <0.01 and <0.01 respectively) however high density lipoprotein (HDL) remained un-changed (p=0.043) in

  11. Dosimetric impact of image-guided 3D conformal radiation therapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaly, B; Song, W; Bauman, G S; Battista, J J; Van Dyk, J

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this work is to quantify the impact of image-guided conformal radiation therapy (CRT) on the dose distribution by correcting patient setup uncertainty and inter-fraction tumour motion. This was a retrospective analysis that used five randomly selected prostate cancer patients that underwent approximately 15 computed tomography (CT) scans during their radiation treatment course. The beam arrangement from the treatment plan was imported into each repeat CT study and the dose distribution was recalculated for the new beam setups. Various setup scenarios were then compared to assess the impact of image guidance on radiation treatment precision. These included (1) daily alignment to skin markers, thus representing a conventional beam setup without image guidance (2) alignment to bony anatomy for correction of daily patient setup error, thus representing on-line portal image guidance, and (3) alignment to the 'CTV of the day' for correction of inter-fraction tumour motion, thus representing on-line CT or ultrasound image guidance. Treatment scenarios (1) and (3) were repeated with a reduced CTV to PTV margin, where the former represents a treatment using small margins without daily image guidance. Daily realignment of the treatment beams to the prostate showed an average increase in minimum tumour dose of 1.5 Gy, in all cases where tumour 'geographic miss' without image guidance was apparent. However, normal tissue sparing did not improve unless the PTV margin was reduced. Daily realignment to the tumour combined with reducing the margin size by a factor of 2 resulted in an average escalation in tumour dose of 9.0 Gy for all five static plans. However, the prescription dose could be escalated by 13.8 Gy when accounting for changes in anatomy by accumulating daily doses using nonlinear image registration techniques. These results provide quantitative information on the effectiveness of image-guided radiation treatment of prostate cancer and demonstrate that

  12. Propensity Score Matched Comparison of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy vs Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: A Survival Analysis from the National Cancer Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Ricco

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available PurposeNo direct comparisons between extreme hypofractionation and conventional fractionation have been reported in randomized trials for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. The goal of this study is to use a propensity score matched (PSM analysis with the National Cancer Database (NCDB for the comparison of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT for organ confined prostate cancer.MethodsMen with localized prostate cancer treated with radiation dose ≥72 Gy for IMRT and ≥35 Gy for SBRT to the prostate only were abstracted from the NCDB. Men treated with previous surgery, brachytherapy, or proton therapy were excluded. Matching was performed to eliminate confounding variables via PSM. Simple 1–1 nearest neighbor matching resulted in a matched sample of 5,430 (2,715 in each group. Subset analyses of men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA > 10, GS = 7, and GS > 7 yielded matched samples of 1,020, 2,194, and 247, respectively.ResultsNo difference in survival was noted between IMRT and SBRT at 8 years (p = 0.65. Subset analyses of higher risk men with PSA > 10 or GS = 7 histology or GS > 7 histology revealed no difference in survival between IMRT and SBRT (p = 0.58, p = 0.68, and p = 0.62, respectively. Variables significant for survival for the matched group included: age (p < 0.0001, primary payor (p = 0.0001, Charlson/Deyo Score (p = 0.0002, PSA (p = 0.0013, Gleason score (p < 0.0001, and use of hormone therapy (p = 0.02.ConclusionUtilizing the NCDB, there is no difference in survival at 8 years comparing IMRT to SBRT in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Subset analysis confirmed no difference in survival even for intermediate- and high-risk patients based on Gleason Score and PSA.

  13. The impact of androgen deprivation therapy on setup errors during external beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onal, Cem; Dolek, Yemliha; Ozdemir, Yurday [Baskent University, Faculty of Medicine, Adana Dr. Turgut Noyan Research and Treatment Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Adana (Turkey)

    2017-06-15

    To determine whether setup errors during external beam radiation therapy (RT) for prostate cancer are influenced by the combination of androgen deprivation treatment (ADT) and RT. Data from 175 patients treated for prostate cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Treatment was as follows: concurrent ADT plus RT, 33 patients (19%); neoadjuvant and concurrent ADT plus RT, 91 patients (52%); RT only, 51 patients (29%). Required couch shifts without rotations were recorded for each megavoltage (MV) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan, and corresponding alignment shifts were recorded as left-right (x), superior-inferior (y), and anterior-posterior (z). The nonparametric Mann-Whitney test was used to compare shifts by group. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to measure the correlation of couch shifts between groups. Mean prostate shifts and standard deviations (SD) were calculated and pooled to obtain mean or group systematic error (M), SD of systematic error (Σ), and SD of random error (σ). No significant differences were observed in prostate shifts in any direction between the groups. Shifts on CBCT were all less than setup margins. A significant positive correlation was observed between prostate volume and the z-direction prostate shift (r = 0.19, p = 0.04), regardless of ADT group, but not between volume and x- or y-direction shifts (r = 0.04, p = 0.7; r = 0.03, p = 0.7). Random and systematic errors for all patient cohorts and ADT groups were similar. Hormone therapy given concurrently with RT was not found to significantly impact setup errors. Prostate volume was significantly correlated with shifts in the anterior-posterior direction only. (orig.) [German] Ziel war zu untersuchen, ob Konfigurationsfehler bei der externen Radiotherapie (RT) des Prostatakarzinoms durch die Kombination aus Androgendeprivationstherapie (ADT) und RT beeinflusst werden. Retrospektiv wurden die Daten von 175 wegen eines Prostatakarzinoms behandelten Patienten

  14. Image Guided Hypofractionated Postprostatectomy Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Stephen L.; Patel, Pretesh; Song, Haijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Freedland, Stephen J. [Surgery Section, Durham Veterans Administration, and Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Bynum, Sigrun; Oh, Daniel; Palta, Manisha; Yoo, David; Oleson, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Salama, Joseph K., E-mail: joseph.salama@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) has promising long-term biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) with comparable toxicity for definitive treatment of prostate cancer. However, data reporting outcomes after adjuvant and salvage postprostatectomy hypofractionated RT are sparse. Therefore, we report the toxicity and clinical outcomes after postprostatectomy hypofractionated RT. Methods and Materials: From a prospectively maintained database, men receiving image guided hypofractionated intensity modulated RT (HIMRT) with 2.5-Gy fractions constituted our study population. Androgen deprivation therapy was used at the discretion of the radiation oncologist. Acute toxicities were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Late toxicities were scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scale. Biochemical recurrence was defined as an increase of 0.1 in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) from posttreatment nadir or an increase in PSA despite treatment. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for the time-to-event outcomes. Results: Between April 2008 and April 2012, 56 men received postoperative HIMRT. The median follow-up time was 48 months (range, 21-67 months). Thirty percent had pre-RT PSA <0.1; the median pre-RT detectable PSA was 0.32 ng/mL. The median RT dose was 65 Gy (range, 57.5-65 Gy). Ten patients received neoadjuvant and concurrent hormone therapy. Posttreatment acute urinary toxicity was limited. There was no acute grade 3 toxicity. Late genitourinary (GU) toxicity of any grade was noted in 52% of patients, 40% of whom had pre-RT urinary incontinence. The 4-year actuarial rate of late grade 3 GU toxicity (exclusively gross hematuria) was 28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 16%-41%). Most grade 3 GU toxicity resolved; only 7% had persistent grade ≥3 toxicity at the last follow-up visit. Fourteen patients experienced biochemical recurrence at a

  15. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for clinically localized prostate cancer: the Georgetown University experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Leonard N; Lei, Siyuan; Batipps, Gerald P; Kowalczyk, Keith; Bandi, Gaurav

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivers fewer high-dose fractions of radiation which may be radiobiologically favorable to conventional low-dose fractions commonly used for prostate cancer radiotherapy. We report our early experience using SBRT for localized prostate cancer. Patients treated with SBRT from June 2008 to May 2010 at Georgetown University Hospital for localized prostate carcinoma, with or without the use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), were included in this retrospective review of data that was prospectively collected in an institutional database. Treatment was delivered using the CyberKnife® with doses of 35 Gy or 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions. Biochemical control was assessed using the Phoenix definition. Toxicities were recorded and scored using the CTCAE v.3. Quality of life was assessed before and after treatment using the Short Form-12 Health Survey (SF-12), the American Urological Association Symptom Score (AUA) and Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) questionnaires. Late urinary symptom flare was defined as an AUA score ≥ 15 with an increase of ≥ 5 points above baseline six months after the completion of SBRT. One hundred patients (37 low-, 55 intermediate- and 8 high-risk according to the D’Amico classification) at a median age of 69 years (range, 48–90 years) received SBRT, with 11 patients receiving ADT. The median pre-treatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was 6.2 ng/ml (range, 1.9-31.6 ng/ml) and the median follow-up was 2.3 years (range, 1.4-3.5 years). At 2 years, median PSA decreased to 0.49 ng/ml (range, 0.1-1.9 ng/ml). Benign PSA bounce occurred in 31% of patients. There was one biochemical failure in a high-risk patient, yielding a two-year actuarial biochemical relapse free survival of 99%. The 2-year actuarial incidence rates of GI and GU toxicity ≥ grade 2 were 1% and 31%, respectively. A median baseline AUA symptom score of 8 significantly increased to 11 at 1 month (p = 0.001), however returned to

  16. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Colorectal Cancer Incidence and Mortality in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symer, Matthew M; Wong, Natalie Z; Abelson, Jonathan S; Milsom, Jeffrey W; Yeo, Heather L

    2018-06-01

    Hormone replacement therapy has been shown to reduce colorectal cancer incidence, but its effect on colorectal cancer mortality is controversial. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of hormone replacement therapy on survival from colorectal cancer. We performed a secondary analysis of data from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, a large multicenter randomized trial run from 1993 to 2001, with follow-up data recently becoming mature. Participants were women aged 55 to 74 years, without recent colonoscopy. Data from the trial were analyzed to evaluate colorectal cancer incidence, disease-specific mortality, and all-cause mortality based on subjects' use of hormone replacement therapy at the time of randomization: never, current, or former users. A total of 75,587 women with 912 (1.21%) incident colorectal cancers and 239 associated deaths were analyzed, with median follow-up of 11.9 years. Overall, 88.6% were non-Hispanic white, and colorectal cancer incidence in current users compared to never-users was lower (hazard ratio [HR], 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69-0.94; P = .005), as was death from colorectal cancer (HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.47-0.85; P = .002) and all-cause mortality (HR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.72-0.80; P colorectal cancer incidence and improved colorectal cancer-specific survival, as well as all-cause mortality. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Phosphoproteomic Assessment of Therapeutic Kinases for Personalized Therapy in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    including bladder cancer and squamous cell carcinoma (22–24). Constitutive activation of the Notch receptors through gene rearrangements or mutations leads to...Babic I, Wei X, Huang J, Witte ON (2011) Invasive prostate carcinoma driven by c-Src and androgen receptor synergy. Cancer Res 71(3):862–872. 20. Dai B...prostate cancer cells. Cancer Res 70(13):5587–5596. 21. Guo Z, et al. (2006) Regulation of androgen receptor activity by tyrosine phosphor- ylation. Cancer

  18. Image-guided conformation arc therapy for prostate cancer: Early side effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soete, Guy; Verellen, Dirk; Michielsen, Dirk; Rappe, Bernard; Keuppen, Frans; Storme, Guy

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate early side effects in prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided conformation arc therapy (IGCAT) using a minimultileaf collimator and daily X-ray-assisted patient positioning. Methods and Materials: Between May 2000 and November 2004, 238 cT1-T3N0M0 tumors were treated with doses of 70 or 78 Gy. Seventy patients also received neoadjuvant or concurrent hormonal treatment. Median follow-up is 18 months (range, 4-55 months). Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer toxicity scoring system was used to evaluate early side effects. Results: Grade 1, 2, and >2 acute side effects occurred in 19, 6, and 0% (gastrointestinal) and 37, 16, and 0% (genitourinary) of the patients. No relation between radiation dose and early side effects was observed. Conclusion: Patients treated with image-guided conformation arc therapy experience a low rate of Grade 2 (i.e., requiring medication) early side effects. The definitive evaluation of late side effects and biochemical control requires further follow-up

  19. Targeting Radiation Therapy for Developing Dendritic Cell Based Immunotherapy of Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chakravarty, Prabir K

    2006-01-01

    .... The hypothesis was tested using a murine prostate cancer model, RM-1. The study showed that irradiation induces apoptosis and the irradiated tumor cells were able to activate dendritic cells and stimulate tumor specific immune response in vitro...

  20. Sociodemographic disparities in the utilization of proton therapy for prostate cancer at an urban academic center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina D. Woodhouse, MD

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: Sociodemographic disparities exist in PT use for prostate cancer at an urban academic institution. Further investigation of potential barriers to access is warranted to ensure equitable distribution across all demographic groups.

  1. The link between benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsted, David Dynnes; Bojesen, Stig E

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer are among the most common diseases of the prostate gland and represent significant burdens for patients and health-care systems in many countries. The two diseases share traits such as hormone-dependent growth and response to antiandrogen...... therapy. Furthermore, risk factors such as prostate inflammation and metabolic disruption have key roles in the development of both diseases. Despite these commonalities, BPH and prostate cancer exhibit important differences in terms of histology and localization. Although large-scale epidemiological...... studies have shown that men with BPH have an increased risk of prostate cancer and prostate-cancer-related mortality, it remains unclear whether this association reflects a causal link, shared risk factors or pathophysiological mechanisms, or detection bias upon statistical analysis. Establishing BPH...

  2. Perceived barriers and facilitators to physical activity in men with prostate cancer: possible influence of androgen deprivation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, J W L; Patel, A; MacLeod, R D; Masters, J

    2014-03-01

    While physical activity is beneficial for men with prostate cancer, too few perform sufficient activity for such benefit. This study examined perceptions of men with prostate cancer of their barriers and facilitators to physical activity, and how androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) may influence these perceptions. Two focus groups were conducted, involving six ADT and eight non-ADT patients respectively. Data were transcribed verbatim and themes developed using a general inductive thematic approach. Facilitators to physical activity common to both groups of cancer survivors included clinician and spousal involvement, with pre-existing co-morbidities and increased age cited as barriers by both groups. The ADT subgroup cited personal involvement as a facilitator to physical activity, with fatigue, reduced motivation and a relative lack of specific advice from their clinician as additional barriers. The non-ADT subgroup had no additional facilitators to physical activity but cited time constraints as a barrier. These results highlight the important role that cancer clinicians and spouses play in promoting physical activity for men with prostate cancer and how ADT may influence their other facilitators and barriers. As physical activity is beneficial for prostate cancer survivors, especially those on ADT, cancer clinicians should regularly discuss physical activity with their patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Multivalent Peptidomimetic Conjugates as Inhibitors of Androgen Receptor Function in Therapy-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and...hormones that play a critical role in stimulating prostate cancer growth. Androgens activate a protein called the androgen receptor (AR), which...treat patients with prostate cancer, over time the tumors become resistant to the drugs, leaving few treatment options. The goal of this proposal is to

  4. Effects of endocrine therapy on the primary lesion in patients with prostatic cancer. Evaluation with Gd-dynamic subtraction MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizako, Takeshi; Watanabe, Yuji; Dohke, Masako

    2000-01-01

    The effects of endocrine therapy on prostate cancer were assessed by using Gd-dynamic subtraction MRI (DSMRI). The 36 lesions showed early enhancement before therapy were treated with endocrine therapy. The criteria used for the assessment of therapeutic effect was; the degree of early enhancement could decrease with the viability of cancer reduced by treatment. According to this criteria, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 35.7% (5/14), 81.8% (18/22), and 58.3% (21/36). In conclusion, interval decrease of early enhancement could be a indicator of therapeutic effect. (author)

  5. Football training in men with prostate cancer undergoing androgen deprivation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uth, Jacob; Hornstrup, Therese; Christensen, Jesper F

    2016-01-01

    ) and density, BTMs and postural balance. RESULTS: In the last part of the 12 weeks, FTG performed 194 ± 41 accelerations and 296 ± 65 decelerations at >0.6 m/s/s and covered a distance of 905 ± 297 m at speeds >6 km/h and 2646 ± 705 m per training session. Analysis of baseline-to-12-week change scores showed......PURPOSE: To investigate the activity profile of football training and its short-term effects on bone mass, bone turnover markers (BTMs) and postural balance in men with prostate cancer (PCa) undergoing androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). METHODS: This was a randomised 12-week study in which men...

  6. Granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin instillation therapy: A potential cause of incidental F-18 FDG uptke in the prostate gland on F-18 FDG PET/CT in patients with bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Choon Young; Lee, Sang Woo; Choi, Seock Hwan; Son, Seung Hyun; Jung, Ji Hoon; Lee, Chang Hee; Jeong, Shin Young; Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Jae Tae

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility that Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-induced granulomatous prostatitis can be a potential cause of benign F-18 FDG uptake. A total of 395 bladder cancer patients who underwent F-18 FDG PET/CT (PET/CT) were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups according to BCG therapy status. Elapsed time after BCG therapy, serum PSA level, results of prostate biopsy, and the SUV max and uptake pattern in the prostate gland were reviewed. For patients who underwent follow-up PET/CT, the changes in SUV max were calculated. While 35 % of patients showed prostate uptake in the BCG therapy group, only 1 % showed prostate uptake in the non-BCG therapy group (p < 0.001). Among 49 patients with FDG-avid prostate lesions, none had suspected malignancy during the follow-up period (median: 16 months). Five patients revealed granulomatous prostatitis on biopsy. The incidence of FDG-avid prostate lesions was significantly higher if the elapsed time after BCG therapy was less than 1 year compared to more than 1 year (p < 0.001). Serum PSA was normal in 88 % of patients. All patients with incidental F-18 FDG uptake in the prostate gland showed focal or multifocal prostate uptake, and median SUV max was 4.7. In 16 patients who underwent follow-up PET/CT, SUV max was decreased in 14 patients (88 %) without treatment, and no patients demonstrated further increased prostate uptake (p < 0.001). BCG-induced granulomatous prostatitis can be a potential cause of benign F-18 FDG uptake, especially in those with a history of bladder cancer treated with BCG. In BCG-induced granulomatous prostatitis, focal or multifocal prostate uptake is frequently seen within 1 year after BCG therapy, and the intensity of prostate uptake is decreased on the follow-up PET/CT without any treatment

  7. Epigenetic Regulation in Prostate Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggero, Katia; Farran-Matas, Sonia; Martinez-Tebar, Adrian; Aytes, Alvaro

    2018-01-01

    An important number of newly identified molecular alterations in prostate cancer affect gene encoding master regulators of chromatin biology epigenetic regulation. This review will provide an updated view of the key epigenetic mechanisms underlying prostate cancer progression, therapy resistance, and potential actionable mechanisms and biomarkers. Key players in chromatin biology and epigenetic master regulators has been recently described to be crucially altered in metastatic CRPC and tumors that progress to AR independency. As such, epigenetic dysregulation represents a driving mechanism in the reprograming of prostate cancer cells as they lose AR-imposed identity. Chromatin integrity and accessibility for transcriptional regulation are key features altered in cancer progression, and particularly relevant in nuclear hormone receptor-driven tumors like prostate cancer. Understanding how chromatin remodeling dictates prostate development and how its deregulation contributes to prostate cancer onset and progression may improve risk stratification and treatment selection for prostate cancer patients.

  8. Random Forests to Predict Rectal Toxicity Following Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ospina, Juan D.; Zhu, Jian; Chira, Ciprian; Bossi, Alberto; Delobel, Jean B.; Beckendorf, Véronique; Dubray, Bernard; Lagrange, Jean-Léon; Correa, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To propose a random forest normal tissue complication probability (RF-NTCP) model to predict late rectal toxicity following prostate cancer radiation therapy, and to compare its performance to that of classic NTCP models. Methods and Materials: Clinical data and dose-volume histograms (DVH) were collected from 261 patients who received 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer with at least 5 years of follow-up. The series was split 1000 times into training and validation cohorts. A RF was trained to predict the risk of 5-year overall rectal toxicity and bleeding. Parameters of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model were identified and a logistic regression model was fit. The performance of all the models was assessed by computing the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results: The 5-year grade ≥2 overall rectal toxicity and grade ≥1 and grade ≥2 rectal bleeding rates were 16%, 25%, and 10%, respectively. Predictive capabilities were obtained using the RF-NTCP model for all 3 toxicity endpoints, including both the training and validation cohorts. The age and use of anticoagulants were found to be predictors of rectal bleeding. The AUC for RF-NTCP ranged from 0.66 to 0.76, depending on the toxicity endpoint. The AUC values for the LKB-NTCP were statistically significantly inferior, ranging from 0.62 to 0.69. Conclusions: The RF-NTCP model may be a useful new tool in predicting late rectal toxicity, including variables other than DVH, and thus appears as a strong competitor to classic NTCP models

  9. Androgen Induces Adaptation to Oxidative Stress in Prostate Cancer: Implications for Treatment with Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jehonathan H. Pinthus

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is a standard treatment for prostate cancer (PC. The postulated mechanism of action for radiation therapy is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Adjuvant androgen deprivation (AD therapy has been shown to confer a survival advantage over radiation alone in high-risk localized PC. However, the mechanism of this interaction is unclear. We hypothesize that androgens modify the radioresponsiveness of PC through the regulation of cellular oxidative homeostasis. Using androgen receptor (AR+ 22rv1 and AR− PC3 human PC cell lines, we demonstrated that testosterone increased basal reactive oxygen species (bROS levels, resulting in dose-dependent activation of phospho-p38 and pAKT, increased expression of clusterin, catalase, manganese superoxide dismutase. Similar data were obtained in three human PC xenografts; WISH-PC14, WISH-PC23, CWR22, growing in testosterone-supplemented or castrated SCID mice. These effects were reversible through AD or through incubation with a reducing agent. Moreover, testosterone increased the activity of catalase, superoxide dismutases, glutathione reductase. Consequently, AD significantly facilitated the response of AR+ cells to oxidative stress challenge. Thus, testosterone induces a preset cellular adaptation to radiation through the generation of elevated bROS, which is modified by AD. These findings provide a rational for combined hormonal and radiation therapy for localized PC.

  10. Immunotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer

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    Susan F Slovin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prostate cancer remains a challenge as a target for immunological approaches. The approval of the first cell-based immune therapy, Sipuleucel-T for prostate cancer introduced prostate cancer as a solid tumor with the potential to be influenced by the immune system. Methods: We reviewed articles on immunological management of prostate cancer and challenges that lie ahead for such strategies. Results: Treatments have focused on the identification of novel cell surface antigens thought to be unique to prostate cancer. These include vaccines against carbohydrate and blood group antigens, xenogeneic and naked DNA vaccines, and pox viruses used as prime-boost or checkpoint inhibitors. No single vaccine construct to date has resulted in a dramatic antitumor effect. The checkpoint inhibitor, anti-CTLA-4 has resulted in several long-term remissions, but phase III trials have not demonstrated an antitumor effect or survival benefit. Conclusions: Multiple clinical trials suggest that prostate cancer may not be optimally treated by single agent immune therapies and that combination with biologic agents, chemotherapies, or radiation may offer some enhancement of benefit.

  11. Residual Prostate Cancer in Patients Treated With Endocrine Therapy With or Without Radical Radiotherapy: A Side Study of the SPCG-7 Randomized Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solberg, Arne; Haugen, Olav A.; Viset, Trond; Bergh, Anders; Tasdemir, Ilker; Ahlgren, Goeran; Widmark, Anders; Angelsen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group-7 randomized trial demonstrated a survival benefit of combined endocrine therapy and external-beam radiotherapy over endocrine therapy alone in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. In a subset of the study population, the incidence and clinical implications of residual prostate cancer in posttreatment prostate biopsy specimens was evaluated. Methods and Materials: Biopsy specimens were obtained from 120 of 875 men in the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group-7 study. Results: Biopsies were performed at median of 45 months follow-up. In 63 patients receiving endocrine treatment only and 57 patients receiving combined treatment, residual cancer was found in 66% (n = 41) and 22% (n = 12), respectively (p < 0.0001). The vast majority of residual tumors were poorly differentiated (Gleason score ≥8). Endocrine therapy alone was predictive of residual prostate cancer: odds ratio 7.49 (3.18-17.7), p < 0.0001. In patients with positive vs. negative biopsy the incidences of clinical events were as follows: biochemical recurrence 74% vs. 27% (p < 0.0001), local progression 26% vs. 4.7% (p = 0.002), distant recurrence 17% vs. 9.4% (p = 0.27), clinical recurrence 36% vs. 13% (p = 0.006), cancer-specific death 19% vs. 9.7% (p = 0.025). In multivariable analysis, biochemical recurrence was significantly associated with residual cancer: hazard ratio 2.69 (1.45-4.99), p = 0.002, and endocrine therapy alone hazard ratio 3.45 (1.80-6.62), p < 0.0001. Conclusions: Radiotherapy combined with hormones improved local tumor control in comparison with endocrine therapy alone. Residual prostate cancer was significantly associated with serum prostate-specific antigen recurrence, local tumor progression, clinical recurrence, and cancer-specific death in univariable analysis. Residual cancer was predictive of prostate-specific antigen recurrence in multivariable analysis.

  12. Prostate-specific antigen kinetics after primary stereotactic body radiation therapy using CyberKnife for localized prostate cancer

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    Yong Hyun Park

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: PSA decline occurred rapidly in the first month, and then the rate of PSA decline fell off steadily over time throughout 2 years after treatment. Also, SBRT using CyberKnife leads to long-term favorable BCR-free survival in localized prostate cancer.

  13. Daily variations in the position of the prostate bed in patients with prostate cancer receiving postoperative external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupelian, Patrick A.; Langen, Katja M.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Wagner, Thomas H.; Zeidan, Omar A.; Meeks, Sanford L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of the variation in the position of the prostate bed with respect to the bony anatomy. Methods and Materials: Four patients were treated to 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Before each fraction, a megavoltage computed tomography (CT) of the prostate bed was obtained, resulting in a total of 140 CT studies. Retrospectively, each CT scan was aligned to the simulation kilovoltage scan based on bony anatomy and the prostate bed. The difference between the 2 alignments was calculated for each scan. Results: The average differences (±1 SD) between the two alignments were 0.06 ± 0.37, 0.10 ± 0.86, and 0.39 ± 1.27 mm in the lateral, longitudinal (SI), and vertical (AP) directions, respectively. Laterally, there was no difference ≥3 mm. The cumulative frequency of SI differences were as follows; ≥3 mm: 3%, ≥4 mm: 1%, and ≥5 mm: 1% (maximum: 5 mm). The cumulative frequency of AP differences were as follows; ≥3 mm: 7%, and ≥4 mm: 3% (maximum: 4 mm). Conclusion: In patients with prostate cancer receiving postoperative radiotherapy, the prostate bed motion relative to the pelvic bony anatomy is of a relatively small magnitude. Significant motion (≥3 mm) is infrequent. However, small differences between the prostate bed and the bony anatomy still exist. This might have implications on treatment margins when daily alignment on bony anatomy is performed

  14. Time to second prostate specific antigen (PSA) failure is a surrogate endpoint for prostate cancer death in prospective trials of therapy for localized disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zietman, A L; Dallow, K C; Shipley, W U; Heney, N M; McManus, P L

    1995-07-01

    Purpose In assessing the efficacy of the competing curative therapies for prostate cancer the most relevant endpoint is cancer specific death. Due to the long natural history of the disease and the use of salvage androgen suppression prospective trials need to mature for at least a decade to provide meaningful results. An endpoint that predicted for cancer death with high probability would allow more rapid completion of prospective studies, hopefully before the tested therapies become outdated. Materials and methods 202 patients entered into a single institution prospective randomized study for T3-4 prostate cancer between 1982 and 1992 were evaluated. All received radical irradiation to either a standard dose of 67.2Gy or a higher dose of 75.6Gy (the latter employing a proton beam boost). 76 men have received androgen suppression or orchiectomy for salvage following relapse (median follow-up 6.9 years). Of this group 35 experienced a second relapse heralded by a rise in the serum PSA. Second failure was scored on the date that the serum PSA rose to greater than 10% above the post-androgen suppression nadir. Kaplan-Meier analysis was made of survival from the time of second PSA failure and the cause of death established in all patients who subsequently died. Results The median duration of response to hormone therapy following first failure was 27.2 months. The actuarial survival from the time of second biochemical relapse was 93%, 66%, 35%, and 0% at 1, 2, 3, and 4 years respectively (50% at 32 months). 16 patients have so far died after second failure all from causes related to their prostate cancer. Conclusion Second PSA failure appears to be a secure surrogate for impending prostate cancer death. Its use as an endpoint in prospective studies should allow earlier reporting by 2 - 3 years.

  15. Does hormonal therapy influence sexual function in men receiving 3D conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Christopher T.; Valicenti, Richard K.; Lu Jiandong; Derose, Troy; Dicker, Adam P.; Strup, Stephen E.; Mulholland, S. Grant; Hirsch, Irvin H.; McGinnis, David E.; Gomella, Leonard G.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the effect of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) with or without hormonal therapy (HT) on sexual function (SF) in prostate cancer patients whose SF was known before all treatment. Methods and Materials: Between March 1996 and March 1999, 144 patients received 3D-CRT (median dose = 70.2 Gy, range 66.6-79.2 Gy) for prostate cancer and had pre- and post-therapy SF data. All SF data were obtained with the O'Leary Brief SF Inventory, a self-administered, multidimensional, validated instrument. We defined total sexual potency as erections firm enough for penetration during intercourse. Mean follow-up time was 21 months (SD ± 11 months). The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to test for significance of the change from baseline. Results: Before 3D-CRT, 87 (60%) of 144 men were totally potent as compared to only 47 (47%) of 101 at 1-year follow-up. Of the 60 men totally potent at baseline and followed for at least 1 year, 35 (58%) remained totally potent. These changes corresponded to a significant reduction in SF (p<0.05). Patients who had 3D-CRT alone were more likely to be totally potent at 1 year than those receiving 3D-CRT with HT (56% vs. 31%, p=0.012); however, they were also more likely to be potent at baseline (71% vs. 44%, p=0.001). Although these two groups had a significant reduction in SF from baseline, their change was not significantly different from each other. Conclusion: These data indicate that 3D-CRT causes a significant reduction in total sexual potency as compared to pretreatment baseline. The addition of HT does not appear to increase the risk of sexual dysfunction

  16. PROCTITIS ONE WEEK AFTER STEREOTACTIC BODY RADIATION THERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER: IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL TRIAL DESIGN

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    Ima Paydar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proctitis following prostate cancer radiation therapy is a primary determinant of quality of life (QOL. While previous studies have assessed acute rectal morbidity at 1 month after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT, little data exist on the prevalence and severity of rectal morbidity within the first week following treatment. This study reports the acute bowel morbidity one week following prostate SBRT. Materials and methods: Between May 2013 and August 2014, 103 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with 35 to 36.25 Gy in five fractions using robotic SBRT delivered on a prospective clinical trial. Bowel toxicity was graded using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAEv.4. Bowel QOL was assessed using EPIC-26 questionnaire bowel domain at baseline, one week, one month, and three months. Time-dependent changes in bowel symptoms were statistically compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Clinically significant change was assessed by the minimally important difference (MID in EPIC score. This was defined as a change of one-half standard deviation (SD from the baseline score. Results: One hundred and three patients with a minimum of three months of follow-up were analyzed. The cumulative incidence of acute grade 2 GI toxicity was 23%. There were no acute ≥ grade 3 bowel toxicities. EPIC bowel summary scores maximally declined at 1 week after SBRT (-13.9, p<0.0001 before returning to baseline at three months after SBRT (+0.03, p=0.94. Prior to treatment, 4.9% of men reported that their bowel bother was a moderate to big problem. This increased to 28.4% (p<0.0001 one week after SBRT and returned to baseline at three months after SBRT (0.0%, p=0.66. Only the bowel summary and bowel bother score declines at 1 week met the MID threshold for clinically significant change. Conclusion: The rate and severity of acute proctitis following prostate SBRT peaked at one week after

  17. Australian and New Zealand three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy consensus guidelines for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skala, M.; Berry, M.; Kneebone, A.; Gogna, K.; Turner, S.; Rolfo, A.; Haworth, A.

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) has been shown to reduce normal tissue toxicity and allow dose escalation in the curative treatment of prostate cancer. The Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group initiated a consensus process to generate evidence-based guidelines for the safe and effective implementation of 3DCRT. All radiation oncology departments in Australia and New Zealand were invited to complete a survey of their prostate practice and to send representatives to a consensus workshop. After a review of the evidence, key issues were identified and debated. If agreement was not reached, working parties were formed to make recommendations. Draft guidelines were circulated to workshop participants for approval prior to publication. Where possible, evidence-based recommendations have been made with regard to patient selection, risk stratification, simulation, planning, treatment delivery and toxicity reporting. This is the first time a group of radiation therapists, physicists and oncologists representing professional radiotherapy practice across Australia and New Zealand have worked together to develop best-practice guidelines. These guidelines should serve as a baseline for prospective clinical trials, outcome research and quality assurance. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  18. Intermittent Versus Continuous Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-xiao ZHENG

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The strategy of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT applied in patients with prostate cancer (PCa to achieve optimal clinical and oncologic outcomes has been a longstanding debate. The objective of our study was to perform a metaanalysis to compare the efficacy, quality of life and adverse events profile of intermittent versus continuous androgen deprivation for prostate cancer. Methods: We searched PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science to extract the basic characteristics. Besides, data of endpoint such as overall survival (OS, progression free survival (PFS, cancer-specific survival (CSS and time to progression (TTP as well as quality of life (QoL were also collected. In addition, the results were expressed as hazard ratio (HR with 95% confidence interval (CI. Results: 17 articles including a total 6,733 patients with any stage of PCa were included in our review. No significant differences were found in PFS (HR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.83-1.03, TTP (HR = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.84-1.07 between intermittent androgen deprivation (IAD and continuous androgen deprivation (CAD, whereas CAD showed benefits associated with OS (HR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.85-0.98 and CSS (HR = 0.86, 95% CI: 0.74-0.98. In addition, IAD might have a superior outcome compared with CAD, especially in sexual functioning and headache favoring. Controversial outcomes were also seen in some aspects such as hot flushes, gynecomastia, breast pain or fatigue. Conclusion: PFS and TTP were similar between IAD and CAD, whereas CAD showed benefits associated with OS and CSS. IAD might have benefits in QoL and have less adverse effects, especially in sexual dysfunction and headache.

  19. The new era of minimally invasive interventions for prostate cancer: robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and focal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schatloff O

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Oscar Schatloff1, Alyssa S Louis2, Uri Lindner21Global Robotics Institute, Florida Hospital Celebration Health, Celebration, FL, USA; 2Division of Urology, Department of Surgical Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, CanadaAbstract: Prostate cancer remains a common but highly treatable disease. Innovations in prostate cancer treatment have allowed a transition toward minimally invasive approaches in an attempt to avoid treatment-related morbidities. In the middle of the treatment spectrum between radical open surgeries and active surveillance lies robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP and focal therapy (FT. This review sets out the most current information on RALP and FT (including laser ablation, cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, and irreversible electroporation.Keywords: PCa, RALP, FT, laser ablation, cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, irreversible electroporation

  20. Hit by waves-living with local advanced or localized prostate cancer treated with endocrine therapy or under active surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervik, Bente; Nordøy, Tone; Asplund, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies of living with prostate cancer have shown that the illness and the treatment cause physical as well as psychosocial problems. The aim of this study was to illuminate men's experiences living with localized or local advanced prostate cancer when curative treatment such as surgery or radiation therapy is not an option at the time of diagnosis. The study was conducted via qualitative interviews, using a phenomenological hermeneutic approach. Ten men treated with endocrine therapy or under active surveillance were interviewed. Being diagnosed with prostate cancer was described as a shock, with different aspects of the illness revealed gradually. The limited amount of time available for meeting with health care providers contributed to patients' feelings of being left alone with difficulty getting information and help. Sexual and urinary problems were perceived as a threat to their manhood. The spouses provided the closest everyday support. The life situation of these patients can be understood as living in a "state of readiness," expecting something to happen regarding their illness, and not always knowing where to get help. The results confirm existing knowledge of patient's experiences in living with prostate cancer regarding the initial shock perceived by the patients, the bodily alterations, and the important role of their spouses. Nurses, as well as general practitioners, must play a more active role in follow-up to ensure that the men and their spouses receive better help and support.

  1. Prognostic significance of genetic polymorphisms in disease progression and survival in prostate cancer after androgen deprivation therapy

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    Tsung-Yi Huang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is believed that androgens and their receptors regulate normal prostate growth and mediate prostate cancer development. Androgen deprivation therapy is the most commonly used treatment for advanced prostate cancer. Although the therapy is initially effective, progression of the disease to castration-resistant prostate cancer is almost inevitable, leading to treatment failure. Despite the existence of current clinical parameters, new biomarkers are urgently needed to improve the prognosis. Some molecules and DNA-based genetic biomarkers are under investigation as potential prognostic factors. The advancement in molecular cytogenetic research, such as genome-wide association for single-nucleotide polymorphisms, has made possible the detection of genetic mutations. In this study, a literature search from August 1985 to April 2013 was performed through the PubMed database using the keywords “genetic polymorphisms”, “prostate cancer” and “androgen deprivation therapy”. The results revealed that several genome-wide association studies (such as rs16901979, rs7931342, HSD17B4, rs6162 in the CYP17A1, rs4243229 and rs7201637 in the HSD17B2, rs1062577 in the ESR1, SLCO1B3, SLCO2B1, rs2939244 in the ARRDC3, rs9508016 in the FLT1, rs6504145 in the SKAP1, rs7830611 in the FBXO32, rs9508016 in the FLT1, rs12529 in the AKR1C3, rs16934641 in the BNC2, rs3763763 in the TACC2, rs2051778 in the ALPK1, and rs3763763 in the TACC2, AR, ESR1, and ESR2 and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in important pathways (such as androgen signal, biosynthesis, metabolism, androgen receptor binding site, response element, androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism length, and estrogen receptor-binding sites involved in prostate cancer occurrence and mechanism could serve as candidate biomarkers for the early detection of castration-resistant prostate cancer after androgen deprivation therapy. Additional investigations are required to decipher precisely the gene

  2. Enhanced combined tumor-specific oncolysis and suicide gene therapy for prostate cancer using M6 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, M; Lee, S-J; Li, X; Jiménez, J A; Zhang, Y-P; Bae, K-H; Mohammadi, Y; Kao, C; Gardner, T A

    2009-01-01

    Enzyme pro-drug suicide gene therapy has been hindered by inefficient viral delivery and gene transduction. To further explore the potential of this approach, we have developed AdIU1, a prostate-restricted replicative adenovirus (PRRA) armed with the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK). In our previous Ad-OC-TK/ACV phase I clinical trial, we demonstrated safety and proof of principle with a tissue-specific promoter-based TK/pro-drug therapy using a replication-defective adenovirus for the treatment of prostate cancer metastases. In this study, we aimed to inhibit the growth of androgen-independent (AI), PSA/PSMA-positive prostate cancer cells by AdIU1. In vitro the viability of an AI- PSA/PSMA-expressing prostate cancer cell line, CWR22rv, was significantly inhibited by treatment with AdIU1 plus GCV (10 microg ml(-1)), compared with AdIU1 treatment alone and also cytotoxicity was observed following treatment with AdIU1 plus GCV only in PSA/PSMA-positive CWR22rv and C4-2 cells, but not in the PSA/PSMA-negative cell line, DU-145. In vivo assessment of AdIU1 plus GCV treatment revealed a stronger therapeutic effect against CWR22rv tumors in nude mice than treatment with AdIU1 alone, AdE4PSESE1a alone or in combination with GCV. Our results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of specific-oncolysis and suicide gene therapy for AI-PSA/PSMA-positive prostate cancer gene therapy.

  3. Comparison of acute and subacute genitourinary and gastrointestinal adverse events of radiotherapy for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated radiation therapy, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, permanent implant brachytherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morimoto, Masahiro; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Konishi, Koji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Teshima, Teruki; Bijl, Henk P; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Langendijk, Johannes A; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    AIMS AND BACKGROUND: To examine acute and subacute urinary and rectal toxicity in patients with localized prostate cancer monotherapeutically treated with the following four radiotherapeutic techniques: intensity-modulated radiation therapy, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy,

  4. Current Challenges in Prostate Cancer Management and the Rationale behind Targeted Focal Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al B. Barqawi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Among men, prostate cancer has a high prevalence, with relatively lower cancer-specific mortality risk compared to lung and colon cancer. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA screening has increased prostate cancer awareness since its implementation as a screening tool almost 25 years ago, but, due to the largely indolent course of this disease and the unspecific nature of the PSA test, increased incidence has largely been associated with cancers that would not go on to cause death (clinically insignificant, leading to an overdiagnosis challenge and an ensuing overtreatment consequences. The overtreatment problem is exacerbated by the high risk of side effects that current treatment techniques have, putting patients’ quality of life at risk with little or no survival benefit. The goals of this paper are to evaluate the rise, prevalence, and impact of the overdiagnosis and ensuing overtreatment problems, as well as highlight potential solutions. In this effort, a review of major epidemiological and screening studies, cancer statistics from the advent of prostate-specific antigen screening to the present, and reports on patient concerns and treatment outcomes was conducted to present the dominant factors that underlie current challenges in prostate cancer treatment and illuminate potential solutions.

  5. Immediate treatment with bicalutamide 150mg as adjuvant therapy significantly reduces the risk of PSA progression in early prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    See, W; Iversen, P; Wirth, M

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of bicalutamide ('Casodex') 150mg (in addition to standard care), on the risk of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression, in patients with early prostate cancer.......To evaluate the effect of bicalutamide ('Casodex') 150mg (in addition to standard care), on the risk of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression, in patients with early prostate cancer....

  6. AR copy number and AR signaling-directed therapies in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Samanta; Conteduca, Vincenza; Lolli, Cristian; Testoni, Sara; Casadio, Valentina; Zaccheroni, Andrea; Rossi, Lorena; Burgio, Salvatore Luca; Menna, Cecilia; Schepisi, Giuseppe; De Giorgi, Ugo

    2017-11-22

    Adaptive upregulation of androgen receptor (AR) is the most common event involved in the progression from hormone sensitive to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). AR signaling remains the main target of new AR signalling-directed therapies such as abiraterone and enzalutamide in CRPC patients. In this review, we discuss general mechanisms of resistance to AR-targeted therapies, with a focus on the role of AR copy number (CN). We reported methods and clinical applications of AR CN evaluation in tissue and liquid biopsy, thus to have a complete information regarding its role as predictive and prognostic biomarker. Outcomes of CRPC patients are reported to be highly variable as consequence of tumor heterogeneity. AR CN could contribute to patient selection and tumor monitoring in CRPC treated with new anti-cancer treatment as abiraterone and enzalutamide. Further studies to investigate AR CN effect to these agents and its potential combination with other prognostic or predictive clinical factors are necessary in the context of harmonized clinical trial design. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Obesity and the Odds of Weight Gain following Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

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    Lior Z. Braunstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Increasing body mass index (BMI is associated with increased risk of mortality; however, quantifying weight gain in men undergoing androgen deprivation therapy (ADT for prostate cancer (PC remains unexplored. Methods. Between 1995 and 2001, 206 men were enrolled in a randomized trial evaluating the survival difference of adding 6 months of ADT to radiation therapy (RT. BMI measurements were available in 171 men comprising the study cohort. The primary endpoint was weight gain of ≥10 lbs by 6-month followup. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess whether baseline BMI or treatment received was associated with this endpoint adjusting for known prognostic factors. Results. By the 6-month followup, 12 men gained ≥10 lbs, of which 10 (83% received RT + ADT and, of these, 7 (70% were obese at randomization. Men treated with RT as compared to RT + ADT were less likely to gain ≥10 lbs (adjusted odds ratio (AOR: 0.18 [95% CI: 0.04–0.89]; P=0.04, whereas this risk increased with increasing BMI (AOR: 1.15 [95% CI: 1.01–1.31]; P=0.04. Conclusions. Consideration should be given to avoid ADT in obese men with low- or favorable-intermediate risk PC where improved cancer control has not been observed, but shortened life expectancy from weight gain is expected.

  8. Acute Toxicity After Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Compared to 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortel, Ruud C.; Incrocci, Luca; Pos, Floris J.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Witte, Marnix G.; van der Heide, Uulke A.; van Herk, Marcel; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows significant dose reductions to organs at risk in prostate cancer patients. However, clinical data identifying the benefits of IG-IMRT in daily practice are scarce. The purpose of this study was to compare dose distributions

  9. Prospective Randomized Phase 2 Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With or Without Oncolytic Adenovirus-Mediated Cytotoxic Gene Therapy in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freytag, Svend O., E-mail: sfreyta1@hfhs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Stricker, Hans [Vattikuti Urology Institute, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Lu, Mei [Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Elshaikh, Mohamed; Aref, Ibrahim; Pradhan, Deepak; Levin, Kenneth; Kim, Jae Ho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Peabody, James [Vattikuti Urology Institute, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Siddiqui, Farzan; Barton, Kenneth; Pegg, Jan; Zhang, Yingshu; Cheng, Jingfang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Bourgeois, Renee [Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Gupta, Nilesh; Lane, Zhaoli [Pathology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Rodriguez, Ron [Urology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); DeWeese, Theodore [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); and others

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of combining oncolytic adenovirus-mediated cytotoxic gene therapy (OAMCGT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive either OAMCGT plus IMRT (arm 1; n=21) or IMRT only (arm 2; n=23). The primary phase 2 endpoint was acute (≤90 days) toxicity. Secondary endpoints included quality of life (QOL), prostate biopsy (12-core) positivity at 2 years, freedom from biochemical/clinical failure (FFF), freedom from metastases, and survival. Results: Men in arm 1 exhibited a greater incidence of low-grade influenza-like symptoms, transaminitis, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia than men in arm 2. There were no significant differences in gastrointestinal or genitourinary events or QOL between the 2 arms. Two-year prostate biopsies were obtained from 37 men (84%). Thirty-three percent of men in arm 1 were biopsy-positive versus 58% in arm 2, representing a 42% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm (P=.13). There was a 60% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm in men with <50% positive biopsy cores at baseline (P=.07). To date, 1 patient in each arm exhibited biochemical failure (arm 1, 4.8%; arm 2, 4.3%). No patient developed hormone-refractory or metastatic disease, and none has died from prostate cancer. Conclusions: Combining OAMCGT with IMRT does not exacerbate the most common side effects of prostate radiation therapy and suggests a clinically meaningful reduction in positive biopsy results at 2 years in men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer.

  10. Prospective Randomized Phase 2 Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With or Without Oncolytic Adenovirus-Mediated Cytotoxic Gene Therapy in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freytag, Svend O.; Stricker, Hans; Lu, Mei; Elshaikh, Mohamed; Aref, Ibrahim; Pradhan, Deepak; Levin, Kenneth; Kim, Jae Ho; Peabody, James; Siddiqui, Farzan; Barton, Kenneth; Pegg, Jan; Zhang, Yingshu; Cheng, Jingfang; Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Bourgeois, Renee; Gupta, Nilesh; Lane, Zhaoli; Rodriguez, Ron; DeWeese, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of combining oncolytic adenovirus-mediated cytotoxic gene therapy (OAMCGT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive either OAMCGT plus IMRT (arm 1; n=21) or IMRT only (arm 2; n=23). The primary phase 2 endpoint was acute (≤90 days) toxicity. Secondary endpoints included quality of life (QOL), prostate biopsy (12-core) positivity at 2 years, freedom from biochemical/clinical failure (FFF), freedom from metastases, and survival. Results: Men in arm 1 exhibited a greater incidence of low-grade influenza-like symptoms, transaminitis, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia than men in arm 2. There were no significant differences in gastrointestinal or genitourinary events or QOL between the 2 arms. Two-year prostate biopsies were obtained from 37 men (84%). Thirty-three percent of men in arm 1 were biopsy-positive versus 58% in arm 2, representing a 42% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm (P=.13). There was a 60% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm in men with <50% positive biopsy cores at baseline (P=.07). To date, 1 patient in each arm exhibited biochemical failure (arm 1, 4.8%; arm 2, 4.3%). No patient developed hormone-refractory or metastatic disease, and none has died from prostate cancer. Conclusions: Combining OAMCGT with IMRT does not exacerbate the most common side effects of prostate radiation therapy and suggests a clinically meaningful reduction in positive biopsy results at 2 years in men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer

  11. Whole-Pelvic Nodal Radiation Therapy in the Context of Hypofractionation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients: A Step Forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaidar-Person, Orit; Roach, Mack; Créhange, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Given the low α/β ratio of prostate cancer, prostate hypofractionation has been tested through numerous clinical studies. There is a growing body of literature suggesting that with high conformal radiation therapy and even with more sophisticated radiation techniques, such as high-dose-rate brachytherapy or image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy, morbidity associated with shortening overall treatment time with higher doses per fraction remains low when compared with protracted conventional radiation therapy to the prostate only. In high-risk prostate cancer patients, there is accumulating evidence that either dose escalation to the prostate or hypofractionation may improve outcome. Nevertheless, selected patients who have a high risk of lymph node involvement may benefit from whole-pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT). Although combining WPRT with hypofractionated prostate radiation therapy is feasible, it remains investigational. By combining modern advances in radiation oncology (high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy with an improved image guidance for soft-tissue sparing), it is hypothesized that WPRT could take advantage of recent results from hypofractionation trials. Moreover, the results from hypofractionation trials raise questions as to whether hypofractionation to pelvic lymph nodes with a high risk of occult involvement might improve the outcomes in WPRT. Although investigational, this review discusses the challenging idea of WPRT in the context of hypofractionation for patients with high-risk prostate cancer

  12. Whole-Pelvic Nodal Radiation Therapy in the Context of Hypofractionation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients: A Step Forward

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaidar-Person, Orit [Division of Oncology, Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa (Israel); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Créhange, Gilles, E-mail: gcrehange@cgfl.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Georges-François Leclerc Cancer Center, Dijon (France)

    2013-07-15

    Given the low α/β ratio of prostate cancer, prostate hypofractionation has been tested through numerous clinical studies. There is a growing body of literature suggesting that with high conformal radiation therapy and even with more sophisticated radiation techniques, such as high-dose-rate brachytherapy or image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy, morbidity associated with shortening overall treatment time with higher doses per fraction remains low when compared with protracted conventional radiation therapy to the prostate only. In high-risk prostate cancer patients, there is accumulating evidence that either dose escalation to the prostate or hypofractionation may improve outcome. Nevertheless, selected patients who have a high risk of lymph node involvement may benefit from whole-pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT). Although combining WPRT with hypofractionated prostate radiation therapy is feasible, it remains investigational. By combining modern advances in radiation oncology (high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy with an improved image guidance for soft-tissue sparing), it is hypothesized that WPRT could take advantage of recent results from hypofractionation trials. Moreover, the results from hypofractionation trials raise questions as to whether hypofractionation to pelvic lymph nodes with a high risk of occult involvement might improve the outcomes in WPRT. Although investigational, this review discusses the challenging idea of WPRT in the context of hypofractionation for patients with high-risk prostate cancer.

  13. On cribriform prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kweldam, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    markdownabstractThis general aim of the thesis is to study the clinical relevance, interobserver reproducibility, and genetics of cribriform growth in prostate cancer. More specifically, the aims and outline of this thesis are • To study the metastatic potential of modified Gleason score 3+3 prostate cancer in radical prostatectomies. (Chapter 2) • To examine the prognostic value of individual Gleason grade 4 patterns in prostate cancer in radical prostatectomy and diagnostic biopsy specimens...

  14. Maximal exercise testing of men with prostate cancer being treated with androgen deprivation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Bradley A; Galvão, Daniel A; Fatehee, Naeem; Taaffe, Dennis R; Spry, Nigel; Joseph, David; Newton, Robert U

    2014-12-01

    Exercise is being increasingly established as a key adjuvant therapy in clinical oncology. As research has demonstrated the beneficial effect of exercise for cancer management, a growing number of patients with cancer are undertaking structured exercise programs. This study aimed to determine the safety and feasibility of formal exercise testing in clinical settings as it is becoming increasingly used as a screening tool and for exercise prescription purposes. One hundred and twelve patients with prostate cancer undergoing androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) took part in a physician-supervised multistage maximal stress test (Bruce protocol). Sixty patients had been on ADT for 3 months (chronic). Of these men, 85% were able to meet the criteria for the attainment of V˙O2max, whereas three positive tests (3.2%) were observed. The three participants who recorded a positive stress test underwent further medical examination and were subsequently cleared of clinically significant cardiovascular disease. Apart from the relatively low V˙O2max (24.7 ± 6.0 mL·kg·min, 10th-15th percentile), compared with normative data in healthy age-matched controls, the cardiovascular response to exercise was similar in this cancer population. Moreover, treatment duration did not seem to influence cardiovascular responses to exercise. This early evidence suggests that risk of adverse events during maximal exercise testing is relatively low in this population and certainly no higher than that in ages-matched, apparently healthy individuals. Maximal exercise testing was demonstrated to be feasible and safe, providing a direct assessment of V˙O2max. The relatively low number of positive tests in this study suggests that the risk of adverse events is relatively low in this population and certainly no higher than that in age-matched, apparently healthy individuals.

  15. The study of irradiation combined with targeted suicide gene therapy for prostate cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xueguan; Milas, L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study whether RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV, one of suicide gene therapy targeting to Integrin αv, can enhance radiotherapeutic effect for DU145 prostate cancer xenografts or not. Methods: When the diameter of tumor in 48 nude mice bearing DU145 prostate cancer in the right leg attained 6.0 mm (5.8-6.3 mm), the mice were entered into the experiment. There were 6 experimental groups (8 mice per group), including the control, radiotherapy only (RT), RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV only (Targeted, RGD-4C), AAVP HSV-TK/GCV (Non-targeted, non RGD-4C ), radiotherapy plus RGD- 4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV(XRT + RGD-4C) and radiotherapy plus AAVP HSV-TK/GCV group (XRT + Non RGD-4C). The effect of treatment was assessed by tumor growth delay ( the time required when tumor grew from 6.0 mm to 12.0 mm) and tumor cure. Results: Five mice died during the treatment course. There were 6 mice without tumor after treatment, including 1 in RT group, 1 in RGD-4C group, 1 in non RGD-4C group and 3 in XRT + RGD-4C group, respectively. For tumor growth delay analysis in 37 mice, the absolute growth delay (AGD) for RGD-4C, non RGD-4C and RT group was 24.4 ± 9.0, 22.6±11.3 and 28.3 ±5.5 days, respectively. When RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV or AAVP HSV-TK/GCV combined with radiotherapy, their AGD was 64.7±23.8 and 35.4±9.6 days, and nominal growth delay (NGD) was 40.3 ± 23.8 and 12.8 ± 9.6 days, respectively. The enhancement factor of RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV and AAVP HSV-TK/GCV for radiotherapy were 1.42 and 0.45. Conclusion: RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV can enhance radiotherapeutic effect for DU145 prostate cancer xenografts. Further study is needed. (authors)

  16. Prostate-Specific Antigen Halving Time While on Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy Is Associated With Biochemical Control in Men Treated With Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, Renuka; Jani, Ashesh B.; Liauw, Stanley L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess whether the PSA response to neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is associated with biochemical control in men treated with radiation therapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In a cohort of men treated with curative-intent RT for localized prostate cancer between 1988 and 2005, 117 men had PSA values after the first and second months of neoadjuvant ADT. Most men had intermediate-risk (45%) or high-risk (44%) disease. PSA halving time (PSAHT) was calculated by first order kinetics. Median RT dose was 76 Gy and median total duration of ADT was 4 months. Freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF, nadir + 2 definition) was analyzed by PSAHT and absolute PSA nadir before the start of RT. Results: Median follow-up was 45 months. Four-year FFBF was 89%. Median PSAHT was 2 weeks. A faster PSA decline (PSAHT ≤2 weeks) was associated with greater FFBF (96% vs. 81% for a PSAHT >2 weeks, p = 0.0110). Those within the fastest quartile of PSAHTs (≤ 10 days) achieved a FFBF of 100%. Among high-risk patients, a PSAHT ≤2 weeks achieved a 4-yr FFBF of 93% vs. 70% for those with PSAHT >2 weeks (p = 0.0508). Absolute PSA nadir was not associated with FFBF. On multivariable analysis, PSAHT (p = 0.0093) and Gleason score (p = 0.0320) were associated with FFBF, whereas T-stage (p = 0.7363) and initial PSA level (p = 0.9614) were not. Conclusions: For men treated with combined ADT and RT, PSA response to the first month of ADT may be a useful criterion for prognosis and treatment modification.

  17. Prostate Cancer Stem-Like Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death among men, killing an estimated 27,000 men each year in the United States. Men with advanced prostate cancer often become resistant to conventional therapies. Many researchers speculate that the emergence of resistance is due to the presence of cancer stem cells, which are believed to be a small subpopulation

  18. The relationship between technical parameters of external beam radiation therapy and complications for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Kei; Shirato, Hiroki; Suzuki, Keishiro

    2000-01-01

    This study was performed to review retrospectively the clinical course of chronic rectal bleeding as a complication of external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer and to analyze the relationship between technical parameters of radiation therapy and the complications. Seventy-one patients with stages A2, B and C were treated with local-field radiotherapy (total dose 52.5-66 Gy, daily dose 2.0-3.28 Gy, field area 30-81 cm 2 , number of fields 3-15 ports, planning simulations X-ray or CT-based) between 1989 and 1998 at three institutions. The protocols were consistent during this same period at these institutions. Multivariate analysis revealed pretreatment PSA and Gleason sum to be statistically significant predictors of 5 year prostatic specific antigen (PSA) relapse-free rates in a median follow-up period of 42 months (range 12-119 months). The significant risk factors for higher grading of acute morbidity were a biological equivalent dose, α/β=10 (BED 10 ) ≥65 Gy, dose per fraction ≥3.0 Gy, field area ≥42 cm 2 , fewer ports and X-ray planning simulation. However, no parameter was associated with higher grading of late morbidity. Eleven patients (15.4%) experienced a late GI complication: grade 1 (4.2%), grade 2 (9.8%), grade 3 (1.4%). The median time to occurrence of rectal bleeding was 12 months after radiotherapy and the mean duration of morbidity was 11 months. Higher total dose and dose per fraction, larger field area, fewer ports and X-ray simulation increased the grades of acute morbidity. A majority of chronic rectal bleedings were transient and responded to conservative treatment. (author)

  19. Quality of Life and Toxicity From Passively Scattered and Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, Thomas J.; Munsell, Mark F.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quyhn Nhu; Mathai, Benson; Zhu, X. Ron; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Amos, Richard A.; Dong, Lei; Mahmood, Usama; Kuban, Deborah A.; Frank, Steven J.; Hoffman, Karen E.; McGuire, Sean E.; Lee, Andrew K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL)/toxicity in men treated with proton beam therapy for localized prostate cancer and to compare outcomes between passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods and Materials: Men with localized prostate cancer enrolled on a prospective QOL protocol with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up were reviewed. Comparative groups were defined by technique (PSPT vs SSPT). Patients completed Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaires at baseline and every 3-6 months after proton beam therapy. Clinically meaningful differences in QOL were defined as ≥0.5 × baseline standard deviation. The cumulative incidence of modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ≥2 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity and argon plasma coagulation were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 226 men received PSPT, and 65 received SSPT. Both PSPT and SSPT resulted in statistically significant changes in sexual, urinary, and bowel Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite summary scores. Only bowel summary, function, and bother resulted in clinically meaningful decrements beyond treatment completion. The decrement in bowel QOL persisted through 24-month follow-up. Cumulative grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity at 24 months were 13.4% and 9.6%, respectively. There was 1 grade 3 GI toxicity (PSPT group) and no other grade ≥3 GI or GU toxicity. Argon plasma coagulation application was infrequent (PSPT 4.4% vs SSPT 1.5%; P=.21). No statistically significant differences were appreciated between PSPT and SSPT regarding toxicity or QOL. Conclusion: Both PSPT and SSPT confer low rates of grade ≥2 GI or GU toxicity, with preservation of meaningful sexual and urinary QOL at 24 months. A modest, yet clinically meaningful, decrement in bowel QOL was seen throughout follow-up. No toxicity or QOL differences between PSPT and SSPT were identified. Long-term comparative results in a

  20. Clinical observation on strontium-89-chloride therapy in elder patients with prostate cancer for palliation of pain from bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Weimin; Lin Tiansheng; Wang Shen; Chen Tanying

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To estimate clinical curative efficacy and adverse reaction of 89 Sr-chloride therapy for palliation of pain from bone metastases in the older patients with prostate cancer. Methods: 48 cases of older patients with metastatic prostate cancer with bone pain were studied after androgen deprivation therapy, 89 Sr- chloride were administrated iv for the palliative treatment of metastatic bone pain. The curative effects in patients were investigated, including palliation of pain, change of metastatic focus, the tumor sign of PSA, and the adverse reaction. Results: After 89 Sr-chloride therapy, the total palliation rate was 89.6%, inefficiency rate was 10.4%, while metastatic focus and PSA decreased to some extent. No severe adverse reaction occurred. Conclusions: It is shown that the curative efficacy of acesodyne is evident after 89 Sr-chloride therapy in older patients suffering from bone metastase with prostate cancer. It is an effective therapeutic method for the palliation of pain from bone metastases especially to the older patients with multiple metastatases. (authors)

  1. Multivalent Peptidomimetic Conjugates as Inhibitors of Androgen Receptor Function in Therapy Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Haugbro M, Imberg-Kazdan K, Logan SK, Kirshenbaum K, Garabedian MJ. Multivalent Peptoid Conjugates Which Overcome Enzalutamide Resistance in Prostate...attached documents Wang Y, Dehigaspitiya DC, Levine PM, Profit AA, Haugbro M, Imberg-Kazdan K, Logan SK, Kirshenbaum K, Garabedian MJ. Multivalent...Enzalutamide Resistance in Prostate Cancer Cells Yu Wang1, Dilani C. Dehigaspitiya2, Paul M. Levine2, Adam A. Profit3, Michael Haugbro2, Keren Imberg

  2. Curie-therapy of prostate cancer assisted by three-dimensional echography and robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolla, M.; Giraud, J.Y.; Descotes, J.L.; Long, J.A.; Hungr, N.; Baumann, M.; Troccaz, J.

    2011-01-01

    The author present and report the first assessments of the Prosper system which is based on the use of a robot coupled to methods of automatic tracking of prostate by three-dimensional ultrasonic imagery. This system aims at solving some difficulties met by curie-therapy. System accuracy has been assessed on a deformable anatomic phantom: a needle can be positioned with accuracy smaller that 2 mm, despite deformations and movements of the prostate embedded in the phantom. Short communication

  3. Monotherapy of androgen deprivation therapy versus radical prostatectomy among veterans with localized prostate cancer: comparative effectiveness analysis of retrospective cohorts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Jinan Liu1,2, Lizheng Shi1,2,3, Oliver Sartor31Tulane University, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, 2Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System, Tulane University, 3School of Medicine and Tulane Cancer Center, New Orleans, LA, USABackground: This retrospective cohort study aimed to examine the comparative effectiveness of monotherapy of primary androgen deprivation therapy or radical prostatectomy.Methods: Male patients with localized prostate cancer (T1-T2, N0, M0 were identified in the Veterans Affairs Veterans Integrated Service Network 16 data warehouse (January 2003 to June 2006, with one-year baseline and at least three-year follow-up data (until June 2009. Patients were required to be 18–75 years old and without other recorded cancer history. The initiation of primary androgen deprivation therapy or monotherapy of radical prostatectomy within six months after the first diagnosis of prostate cancer was used as the index date. Primary androgen deprivation therapy patients were matched to the radical prostatectomy patients via propensity score, which was predicted from a logistic regression of treatment selection (primary androgen deprivation therapy versus radical prostatectomy on age, race, marital status, insurance type, cancer stage, Charlson comorbidity index, and alcohol and tobacco use. The overall survival from initiation of index treatment was then analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazards model.Results: The two cohorts were well matched at baseline (all P > 0.05. During a median follow-up of 4.3 years, the cumulative incidence of death was 13 (10.57% among 123 primary androgen deprivation therapy patients and four (3.25% among 123 radical prostatectomy patients (P < 0.05. The overall three-year survival rate was 92.68% for primary androgen deprivation therapy and 98.37% for radical prostatectomy (P < 0.05. Patients who received primary androgen deprivation therapy had almost three times as

  4. High biologically effective dose radiation therapy using brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisei Okamoto

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the outcomes of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with biologically effective dose (BED ≥ 220 Gy of high-dose radiotherapy, using low-dose-rate (LDR brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and short-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. Material and methods : From 2005 to 2013, a total of 143 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated by radiotherapy of BED ≥ 220 Gy with a combination of LDR brachytherapy, EBRT, and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. The high-risk patients in the present study included both high-risk and very high-risk prostate cancer. The number of high-risk features were: 60 patients with 1 high-risk factor (42%, 61 patients with 2 high-risk factors (43%, and 22 patients with 3 high-risk factors (15% including five N1 disease. External beam radiotherapy fields included prostate and seminal vesicles only or whole pelvis depending on the extension of the disease. Biochemical failure was defined by the Phoenix definition. Results : Six patients developed biochemical failure, thus providing a 5-year actual biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS rate of 95.2%. Biochemical failure was observed exclusively in cases with distant metastasis in the present study. All six patients with biochemical relapse had clinical failure due to bone metastasis, thus yielding a 5-year freedom from clinical failure (FFCF rate of 93.0%. None of the cases with N1 disease experienced biochemical failure. We observed four deaths, including one death from prostate cancer, therefore yielding a cause-specific survival (CSS rate of 97.2%, and an overall survival (OS rate of 95.5%. Conclusions : High-dose (BED ≥ 220 Gy radiotherapy by LDR in combination with EBRT has shown an excellent outcome on BFFS in high-risk and very high-risk cancer, although causal relationship between BED and BFFS remain to be explained further.

  5. Sleep disturbance in men receiving androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer: The role of hot flashes and nocturia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Brian D; Small, Brent J; Cases, Mallory G; Williams, Noelle L; Fishman, Mayer N; Jacobsen, Paul B; Jim, Heather S L

    2018-02-01

    Patients with prostate cancer receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) are at risk of sleep disturbance; however, to the authors' knowledge, the mechanisms by which ADT may affect sleep are not well understood. The current study compared objective and subjective sleep disturbance in ADT recipients and controls and examined whether sleep disturbance in ADT recipients is attributable to the influence of ADT on hot flashes and nocturia. Patients with prostate cancer were assessed before or within 1 month after the initiation of ADT as well as 6 months and 12 months later (78 patients). Patients with prostate cancer were treated with prostatectomy only (99 patients) and men with no history of cancer (108 men) were assessed at similar intervals. Participants self-reported their sleep disturbance (Insomnia Severity Index) and interference from hot flashes (Hot Flash Related Daily Interference Scale). One hundred participants also wore actigraphs for 3 days at the 6-month assessment to measure objective sleep disturbance and reported their nocturia frequency. ADT recipients reported worse sleep disturbance, higher rates of clinically significant sleep disturbance, and greater hot flash interference than controls (Ps≤.03). In cross-sectional analyses among those with actigraphy data, ADT recipients had greater objective sleep disturbance and more episodes of nocturia (Pshot flashes (Pshot flash interference. Future studies should examine behavioral and pharmacologic interventions to address these symptoms among ADT recipients. Cancer 2018;124:499-506. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  6. The treatment of prostate cancer by conventional radiation therapy: an analysis of long-term outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zietman, Anthony L; Coen, John J; Dallow, Katherine C; Shipley, William U

    1995-05-15

    Purpose: To assess the long-term outcome of conventional external beam radiation therapy in the management of clinically confined prostate cancer and to examine the proposition that radiation accelerates tumor growth in those who fail treatment. Methods and Materials: One thousand and forty-four men with T1-4NxM0 prostate cancer treated by conventional external beam radiation therapy at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1977 and 1991 were analyzed. Median follow-up was 49 months. Failure was defined as: two sequential rises in serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) level; or a PSA > 1 ng/ml 2 or more years after radiation; or any clinical failure. Kaplan-Meier actuarial analyses were used to assess outcome. Results: At 10 years only 40% of the T1-2 group remained disease free. When subdivided by grade, the well-differentiated tumors (Gleason 1-2) exhibited a 53% actuarial 10-year disease-free survival, moderately differentiated (Gleason 3) 42%, and poorly differentiated (Gleason 4-5) 20%. The corresponding values for the T3-4 men were 33% for Gleason 1-2, 20% for Gleason 3, and 10% for Gleason 4-5. Overall the value for T3-4 tumors was 18% at 10 years. On relapse the median PSA doubling times for the T1-2 patients were predicted by histology: 18.8 months for Gleason 1-2 patients; 11.1 months for Gleason 3; and 9.6 months for Gleason 5. Significant differences were found between the Gleason 3 and the Gleason 4-5 groups (p = 0.04) and the Gleason 1-2 and the Gleason 4-5 groups (p = 0.03). A wide range of doubling times was seen within each grade group. When compared with recently reported data on selected T1-2 patients who were managed by expectant observation there was no advantage over the first decade (and certainly no disadvantage) in terms of metastasis-free survival or disease-specific survival for the irradiated Gleason 1-3 patients. However, a gain was seen for those with Gleason 4-5 tumors. Conclusion: Less than half of the T1-2NxM0 and less than one

  7. Prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... high in fat, especially animal fat Obese men Tire plant workers Painters Men who have been around ... therapy, and hormone therapy can affect your sexual performance. Problems with urine control are possible after surgery ...

  8. Identification, diagnostic assistance and planning methods that use multi-modality imaging for prostate cancer focal therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makni, Nasr

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of death from cancer among men. In In the last decade, new diagnosis procedures and treatment options have been developed and made possible thanks to the recent progress in prostate imaging modalities. The newest challenges in this field are to detect the smallest tumors and to treat locally to minimise the treatment morbidity. In this thesis, we introduce a set of automatic image processing methods for the guidance and assistance of diagnosis and treatment, in laser-based prostate cancer focal therapies. In the first part of this work, segmentation and computer-aided detection algorithms have been developed for the enhancement of image-based diagnosis of prostate cancer. First, we propose a novel approach that combines Markov Random Fields framework with an Active Shape Model, in order to extract three dimensional outlines of the gland from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data. Second, prostate's MRI volume is segmented into peripheral and central zones: we introduce a method that explores features of multispectral MRI, and is based on belief functions and the modelling of an a priori knowledge as an additional source of information. Finally, computer-aided detection of prostate's peripheral zone tumors is investigated by experimenting novel texture features based on fractal geometry-based. These parameters, extracted from morphological MRI, were tested using both supervised and unsupervised classification methods. The results of these different approaches were studied and compared. The second part of this work addresses the guidance of laser-based focal ablation of prostate tumors. A novel non rigid registration method is introduced for fusion of pre-operative MRI and planning data, and per-operative ultrasound imaging. We test and evaluate our algorithms using simulated data and physical phantoms, which enable comparison to ground truth. Patients' data, combined to expert interpretation, are also used in the

  9. Evaluation of urinary prostate cancer antigen-3 (PCA3) and TMPRSS2-ERG score changes when starting androgen-deprivation therapy with triptorelin 6-month formulation in patients with locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez-Piñeiro, Luis; Schalken, Jack A; Cabri, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    change at 6 months, according to baseline variables. Other outcome measures included urinary PCA3 and TMPRSS2-ERG scores and statuses, and serum testosterone and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels at baseline and at 1, 3 and 6 months after initiation of ADT. Safety was assessed by recording adverse......OBJECTIVE: To assess prostate cancer antigen-3 (PCA3) and TMPRSS2-ERG scores in patients with advanced and metastatic prostate cancer at baseline and after 6 months of treatment with triptorelin 22.5 mg, and analyse these scores in patient-groups defined by different disease characteristics....... PATIENTS AND METHODS: The Triptocare study was a prospective, open-label, multicentre, single-arm, Phase III study of triptorelin 22.5 mg in men with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer, who were naïve to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). The primary objective was to model the urinary PCA3...

  10. Radiolabeled enzyme inhibitors and binding agents targeting PSMA: Effective theranostic tools for imaging and therapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, Maroor Raghavan Ambikalmajan; Nanabala, Raviteja; Joy, Ajith; Sasikumar, Arun; Knapp, Furn F.

    2016-01-01

    Because of the broad incidence, morbidity and mortality associated with prostate-derived cancer, the development of more effective new technologies continues to be an important goal for the accurate detection and treatment of localized prostate cancer, lymphatic involvement and metastases. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA; Glycoprotein II) is expressed in high levels on prostate-derived cells and is an important target for visualization and treatment of prostate cancer. Radiolabeled peptide targeting technologies have rapidly evolved over the last decade and have focused on the successful development of radiolabeled small molecules that act as inhibitors to the binding of the N-acetyl-L-aspartyl-L-glutamate (NAAG) substrate to the PSMA molecule. A number of radiolabeled PSMA inhibitors have been described in the literature and labeled with SPECT, PET and therapeutic radionuclides. Clinical studies with these agents have demonstrated the improved potential of PSMA-targeted PET imaging agents to detect metastatic prostate cancer in comparison with conventional imaging technologies. Although many of these agents have been evaluated in humans, by far the most extensive clinical literature has described use of the 68 Ga and 177 Lu agents. This review describes the design and development of these agents, with a focus on the broad clinical introduction of PSMA targeting motifs labeled with 68 Ga for PET-CT imaging and 177 Lu for therapy. In particular, because of availability from the long-lived 68 Ge (T 1/2 = 270 days)/ 68 Ga (T 1/2 = 68 min) generator system and increasing availability of PET-CT, the 68 Ga-labeled PSMA targeted agent is receiving widespread interest and is one of the fastest growing radiopharmaceuticals for PET-CT imaging.

  11. Psychological effects of androgen-deprivation therapy on men with prostate cancer and their partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Kristine A; Walker, Lauren M; Wassersug, Richard J; Thompson, Lora M A; Robinson, John W

    2015-12-15

    The clinical benefits of androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) for men with prostate cancer (PC) have been well documented and include living free from the symptoms of metastases for longer periods and improved quality of life. However, ADT comes with a host of its own serious side effects. There is considerable evidence of the adverse cardiovascular, metabolic, and musculoskeletal effects of ADT. Far less has been written about the psychological effects of ADT. This review highlights several adverse psychological effects of ADT. The authors provide evidence for the effect of ADT on men's sexual function, their partner, and their sexual relationship. Evidence of increased emotional lability and depressed mood in men who receive ADT is also presented, and the risk of depression in the patient's partner is discussed. The evidence for adverse cognitive effects with ADT is still emerging but suggests that ADT is associated with impairment in multiple cognitive domains. Finally, the available literature is reviewed on interventions to mitigate the psychological effects of ADT. Across the array of adverse effects, physical exercise appears to have the greatest potential to address the psychological effects of ADT both in men who are receiving ADT and in their partners. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  12. Computerized cognitive training in prostate cancer patients on androgen deprivation therapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lisa M; Amidi, Ali; Tanenbaum, Molly L; Winkel, Gary; Gordon, Wayne A; Hall, Simon J; Bovbjerg, Katrin; Diefenbach, Michael A

    2018-06-01

    Prostate cancer patients who have undergone androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) may experience cognitive impairment, yet there is an unmet need for nonpharmacological interventions to address cognitive impairment in this population. This study examines the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of a home-based computerized cognitive training (CCT) program to treat cancer-related cognitive impairment. Sixty men who had received ≥ 3 months of ADT were screened for at least mild cognitive or neurobehavioral impairment and randomized to 8 weeks of CCT or usual care. Follow-up assessments occurred immediately post-intervention or equivalent (T2) and 8 weeks later (T3). The acceptability of CCT was also assessed. Feasibility:A priori feasibility thresholds were partially met (i.e., randomization rate > 50%, retention rate > 70% excluding CCT drop-outs, but cognitive functioning, neurobehavioral functioning, nor quality of life. This study provides tentative support for the feasibility and acceptability of CCT to treat mild cognitive impairment in ADT patients. CCT had a beneficial effect on reaction time, but temporarily suppressed memory. CCT's benefits may be limited to a narrow area of functioning. Larger-scale studies are needed.

  13. Falls and Frailty in Prostate Cancer Survivors: Current, Past, and Never Users of Androgen Deprivation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters-Stone, Kerri M; Moe, Esther; Graff, Julie N; Dieckmann, Nathan F; Stoyles, Sydnee; Borsch, Carolyn; Alumkal, Joshi J; Amling, Christopher L; Beer, Tomasz M

    2017-07-01

    To compare the prevalence of and association between falls and frailty of prostate cancer survivors (PCSs) who were current, past or never users of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Cross-sectional. Mail and electronic survey. PCSs (N = 280; mean age 72 ± 8). Cancer history, falls, and frailty status (robust, prefrail, frail) using traditionally defined and obese phenotypes. Current (37%) or past (34%) ADT users were more than twice as likely to have fallen in the previous year as never users (15%) (P = .002). ADT users had twice as many recurrent falls (P users were more likely to be classified as prefrail or frail than never users (15%) (P users than never users (25%) (P < .001). Traditional and obese frailty significantly increased the likelihood of reporting falls in the previous year (odds ratio (OR) = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.18-3.94 and OR = 2.97, 95% CI = 1.62-5.58, respectively) and was also associated with greater risk of recurrent falls (OR = 3.10, 95% CI = 1.48-6.5 and OR = 3.99, 95% CI = 1.79-8.89, respectively). Current and past exposure to ADT is linked to higher risk of falls and frailty than no treatment. PCSs should be appropriately counseled on fall prevention strategies, and approaches to reduce frailty should be considered. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  14. Challenges in the sequencing of therapies for the management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Phillip; Parnis, Francis; Gurney, Howard

    2014-09-01

    Prior to 2010, docetaxel was the standard option for chemotherapy in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Today, the picture is vastly different: several additional therapies have each demonstrated a survival benefit such that we now have chemotherapy (cabazitaxel), androgen suppressive agents (abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide), a cellular vaccine (sipuleucel-T) and radium-233 (for symptomatic bone metastases). With several other agents in the pipeline for late-stage disease, the future looks promising for mCRPC. As the available data are not able to inform as to the optimum sequencing of therapy, this remains a challenge. This paper draws on insights from published and ongoing clinical studies to provide a practical patient-focused approach to maximize the benefits of the current therapeutic armamentarium. Preliminary sequencing suggestions are made based on clinical trial criteria. But until more data become available, clinical gestalt, experience, cost and individual patient preferences will continue to drive choices. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. A Case of Definitive Therapy for Localised Prostate Cancer: Report of a Urological Nightmare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Sommerhuber

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy and permanent brachytherapy are the most common treatment options for nonmetastatic localised adenocarcinoma of the prostate (PCa. Accurate pretherapeutic clinical staging is difficult, the number of positive cores after biopsy does not imperatively represent the extension of the cancer. Furthermore postoperative upgrading in Gleason score is frequently observed. Even in a localised setting a certain amount of patients with organ-confined PCa will develop biochemical progression. In case of a rise in PSA level after radiation the majority of patients will receive androgen deprivation therapy what must be considered as palliative. If local or systemic progressive disease is associated with evolving neuroendocrine differentiation hormonal manipulation is increasingly ineffective; radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy with a platinum agent and etoposide are recommended. In case of local progression complications such as pelvic pain, gross haematuria, infravesical obstruction and rectal invasion with obstruction and consecutive ileus can possibly occur. In this situation palliative radical surgery is a therapy option especially in the absence of distant metastases. A case with local and later systemic progression after permanent brachytherapy is presented here.

  16. A description of heterosexual couples' sexual adjustment to androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lauren M; Robinson, John W

    2011-08-01

    It is estimated that 600,000 men are currently living in North America with castrate levels of testosterone as a result of androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer. The goal of this study was to explore how patients and their partners adjust to changes associated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Eighteen couples were interviewed regarding their adjustment to ADT side effects. Three distinct patterns of adjustment were observed. One group of couples had assumed sex to be impossible after commencing ADT, and quickly accepted the loss of sex in exchange for a life extending treatment (four couples). Another group was found to be struggling to either maintain satisfying sex or adapt to the loss of their sexual relationship (five couples). The third group had struggled, but found that they were satisfied with their sexual outcome (nine couples). A subset of these couples successfully adjusted to changes in the man's sexual function and found satisfying ways to be sexually active (five couples). The finding that some couples are able to enjoy satisfying sex, despite castrate levels of testosterone, raised questions about how patients are prepared to undergo ADT and how they are managed. It is possible that both the couples who gave up on sex because they believed that satisfying sex was impossible, and the couples who continued to struggle to adjust, may have faired better if they had known how other couples are able to maintain satisfying sex while the man is androgen-deprived. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. The Impact of Brachytherapy on Prostate Cancer–Specific Mortality for Definitive Radiation Therapy of High-Grade Prostate Cancer: A Population-Based Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Xinglei; Keith, Scott W.; Mishra, Mark V.; Dicker, Adam P.; Showalter, Timothy N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This population-based analysis compared prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM) in a cohort of patients with high-risk prostate cancer after nonsurgical treatment with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), brachytherapy (BT), or combination (BT + EBRT). Methods and Materials: We identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database patients diagnosed from 1988 through 2002 with T1–T3N0M0 prostate adenocarcinoma of poorly differentiated grade and treated with BT, EBRT, or BT + EBRT. During this time frame, the database defined high grade as prostate cancers with Gleason score 8–10, or Gleason grade 4–5 if the score was not recorded. This corresponds to a cohort primarily with high-risk prostate cancer, although some cases where only Gleason grade was recorded may have included intermediate-risk cancer. We used multivariate models to examine patient and tumor characteristics associated with the likelihood of treatment with each radiation modality and the effect of radiation modality on PCSM. Results: There were 12,745 patients treated with EBRT (73.5%), BT (7.1%), or BT + EBRT (19.4%) included in the analysis. The median follow-up time for all patients was 6.4 years. The use of BT or BT + EBRT increased from 5.1% in 1988–1992 to 31.4% in 1998–2002. Significant predictors of use of BT or BT + EBRT were younger age, later year of diagnosis, urban residence, and earlier T-stage. On multivariate analysis, treatment with either BT (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% confidence interval, 0.49–0.86) or BT + EBRT (hazard ratio, 0.77; 95% confidence ratio, 0.66–0.90) was associated with significant reduction in PCSM compared with EBRT alone. Conclusion: In patients with high-grade prostate cancer, treatment with brachytherapy is associated with reduced PCSM compared with EBRT alone. Our results suggest that brachytherapy should be investigated as a component of definitive treatment strategies for patients with high-risk prostate cancer.

  18. Granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical immunotherapy mimicking prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Białek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical immunotherapy with attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis is a widely used therapeutic option in patients with non-muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. A rare complication of intravesical therapy with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is granulomatous prostatitis, which due to increasing levels of prostate-specific antigen and abnormalities found in transrectal examination of the prostate may suggest concomitant prostate cancer. A case of extensive granulomatous prostatitis in a 61-year-old patient which occurred after the first course of a well-tolerated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy is presented. Due to abnormalities found in rectal examination and an abnormal transrectal ultrasound image of the prostate with extensive infiltration mimicking neoplastic hyperplasia a core biopsy of the prostate was performed. Histopathological examination revealed inflammatory infiltration sites of tuberculosis origin.

  19. Phase II Study of Dutasteride for Recurrent Prostate Cancer During Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Satyan K.; Trump, Donald L.; Sartor, Oliver; Tan, Wei; Wilding, Gregory E.; Mohler, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We determined the response rate to and safety of a dual 5α-reductase inhibitor, dutasteride, in men with castration recurrent prostate cancer. Materials and Methods A total of 28 men with asymptomatic castration recurrent prostate cancer were treated with 3.5 mg dutasteride daily (luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone treatment continued), and evaluated monthly for response and toxicity. Eligibility included appropriate duration antiandrogen withdrawal, baseline prostate specific antigen 2.0 ng/ml or greater and a new lesion on bone scan, increase in measurable disease using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, or 2 or more consecutive prostate specific antigen measurements increased over baseline. Outcomes were progression, stable disease, partial response (prostate specific antigen less than 50% of enrollment for 4 or more weeks) or complete response. Results There were 25 evaluable men with a mean age of 70 years (range 57 to 88), a mean prostate specific antigen of 61.9 ng/ml (range 5.0 to 488.9) and mean Gleason score 8 (range 6 to 10), 15 of whom had bone metastases. Eight men had 10 grade 3 or higher adverse events using National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria, all of which were judged to be unrelated to treatment. Of the 25 men 14 had disease progression by 2 months, 9 had stable (2.5, 3, 3, 4, 4, 5, 5, 8.5, 9 months) disease, 2 had a partial response and none had a complete response. Overall median time to progression was 1.87 months (range 1 to 10, 95% CI 1.15–3.91). Conclusions Dutasteride rarely produces biochemical responses in men with castration recurrent prostate cancer. However, further study is warranted given its favorable safety profile. PMID:19091347

  20. Development of cell-penetrating bispecific antibodies targeting the N-terminal domain of androgen receptor for prostate cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicochea, Nancy L; Garnovskaya, Maria; Blanton, Mary G; Chan, Grace; Weisbart, Richard; Lilly, Michael B

    2017-12-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer cells exhibit continued androgen receptor signaling in spite of low levels of ligand. Current therapies to block androgen receptor signaling act by inhibiting ligand production or binding. We developed bispecific antibodies capable of penetrating cells and binding androgen receptor outside of the ligand-binding domain. Half of the bispecific antibody molecule consists of a single-chain variable fragment of 3E10, an anti-DNA antibody that enters cells. The other half is a single-chain variable fragment version of AR441, an anti-AR antibody. The resulting 3E10-AR441 bispecific antibody enters human LNCaP prostate cells and accumulates in the nucleus. The antibody binds to wild-type, mutant and splice variant androgen receptor. Binding affinity of 3E10-AR441 to androgen receptor (284 nM) was lower than that of the parental AR441 mAb (4.6 nM), but could be improved (45 nM) through alternative placement of the affinity tags, and ordering of the VH and VK domains. The 3E10-AR441 bispecific antibody blocked genomic signaling by wild-type or splice variant androgen receptor in LNCaP cells. It also blocked non-genomic signaling by the wild-type receptor. Furthermore, bispecific antibody inhibited the growth of C4-2 prostate cancer cells under androgen-stimulated conditions. The 3E10-AR441 biAb can enter prostate cancer cells and inhibits androgen receptor function in a ligand-independent manner. It may be an attractive prototype agent for prostate cancer therapy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Prostate-specific membrane antigen targeted imaging and therapy of prostate cancer using a PSMA inhibitor as a homing ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kularatne, Sumith A; Wang, Kevin; Santhapuram, Hari-Krishna R; Low, Philip S

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in Western society today. Current methods for detecting PCa are limited, leaving most early malignancies undiagnosed and sites of metastasis in advanced disease undetected. Major deficiencies also exist in the treatment of PCa, especially metastatic disease. In an effort to improve both detection and therapy of PCa, we have developed a PSMA-targeted ligand that delivers attached imaging and therapeutic agents selectively to PCa cells without targeting normal cells. The PSMA-targeted radioimaging agent (DUPA-(99m)Tc) was found to bind PSMA-positive human PCa cells (LNCaP cell line) with nanomolar affinity (K(D) = 14 nM). Imaging and biodistribution studies revealed that DUPA-(99m)Tc localizes primarily to LNCaP cell tumor xenografts in nu/nu mice (% injected dose/gram = 11.3 at 4 h postinjection; tumor-to-muscle ratio = 75:1). Two PSMA-targeted optical imaging agents (DUPA-FITC and DUPA-rhodamine B) were also shown to efficiently label PCa cells and to internalize and traffic to intracellular endosomes. A PSMA-targeted chemotherapeutic agent (DUPA-TubH) was demonstrated to kill PSMA-positive LNCaP cells in culture (IC(50) = 3 nM) and to eliminate established tumor xenografts in nu/nu mice with no detectable weight loss. Blockade of tumor targeting upon administration of excess PSMA inhibitor (PMPA) and the absence of targeting to PSMA-negative tumors confirmed the specificity of each of the above targeted reagents for PSMA. Tandem use of the imaging and therapeutic agents targeted to the same receptor could allow detection, staging, monitoring, and treatment of PCa with improved accuracy and efficacy.

  2. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillessen, S; Omlin, A; Attard, G

    2015-01-01

    The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration......-resistant prostate cancer and the recent studies of chemo-hormonal therapy in men with castration-naïve prostate cancer have led to considerable uncertainty as to the best treatment choices, sequence of treatment options and appropriate patient selection. Management recommendations based on expert opinion...

  3. MRI-alone radiation therapy planning for prostate cancer: Automatic fiducial marker detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghose, Soumya; Mitra, Jhimli; Rivest-Hénault, David; Fazlollahi, Amir; Fripp, Jurgen; Dowling, Jason A.; Stanwell, Peter; Pichler, Peter; Sun, Jidi; Greer, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The feasibility of radiation therapy treatment planning using substitute computed tomography (sCT) generated from magnetic resonance images (MRIs) has been demonstrated by a number of research groups. One challenge with an MRI-alone workflow is the accurate identification of intraprostatic gold fiducial markers, which are frequently used for prostate localization prior to each dose delivery fraction. This paper investigates a template-matching approach for the detection of these seeds in MRI. Methods: Two different gradient echo T1 and T2* weighted MRI sequences were acquired from fifteen prostate cancer patients and evaluated for seed detection. For training, seed templates from manual contours were selected in a spectral clustering manifold learning framework. This aids in clustering “similar” gold fiducial markers together. The marker with the minimum distance to a cluster centroid was selected as the representative template of that cluster during training. During testing, Gaussian mixture modeling followed by a Markovian model was used in automatic detection of the probable candidates. The probable candidates were rigidly registered to the templates identified from spectral clustering, and a similarity metric is computed for ranking and detection. Results: A fiducial detection accuracy of 95% was obtained compared to manual observations. Expert radiation therapist observers were able to correctly identify all three implanted seeds on 11 of the 15 scans (the proposed method correctly identified all seeds on 10 of the 15). Conclusions: An novel automatic framework for gold fiducial marker detection in MRI is proposed and evaluated with detection accuracies comparable to manual detection. When radiation therapists are unable to determine the seed location in MRI, they refer back to the planning CT (only available in the existing clinical framework); similarly, an automatic quality control is built into the automatic software to ensure that all gold

  4. MRI-alone radiation therapy planning for prostate cancer: Automatic fiducial marker detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghose, Soumya, E-mail: soumya.ghose@case.edu; Mitra, Jhimli [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and CSIRO Health and Biosecurity, The Australian e-Health & Research Centre, Herston, QLD 4029 (Australia); Rivest-Hénault, David; Fazlollahi, Amir; Fripp, Jurgen; Dowling, Jason A. [CSIRO Health and Biosecurity, The Australian e-Health & Research Centre, Herston, QLD 4029 (Australia); Stanwell, Peter [School of health sciences, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308 (Australia); Pichler, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cavalry Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, NSW 2298 (Australia); Sun, Jidi; Greer, Peter B. [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia and Department of Radiation Oncology, Cavalry Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, NSW 2298 (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The feasibility of radiation therapy treatment planning using substitute computed tomography (sCT) generated from magnetic resonance images (MRIs) has been demonstrated by a number of research groups. One challenge with an MRI-alone workflow is the accurate identification of intraprostatic gold fiducial markers, which are frequently used for prostate localization prior to each dose delivery fraction. This paper investigates a template-matching approach for the detection of these seeds in MRI. Methods: Two different gradient echo T1 and T2* weighted MRI sequences were acquired from fifteen prostate cancer patients and evaluated for seed detection. For training, seed templates from manual contours were selected in a spectral clustering manifold learning framework. This aids in clustering “similar” gold fiducial markers together. The marker with the minimum distance to a cluster centroid was selected as the representative template of that cluster during training. During testing, Gaussian mixture modeling followed by a Markovian model was used in automatic detection of the probable candidates. The probable candidates were rigidly registered to the templates identified from spectral clustering, and a similarity metric is computed for ranking and detection. Results: A fiducial detection accuracy of 95% was obtained compared to manual observations. Expert radiation therapist observers were able to correctly identify all three implanted seeds on 11 of the 15 scans (the proposed method correctly identified all seeds on 10 of the 15). Conclusions: An novel automatic framework for gold fiducial marker detection in MRI is proposed and evaluated with detection accuracies comparable to manual detection. When radiation therapists are unable to determine the seed location in MRI, they refer back to the planning CT (only available in the existing clinical framework); similarly, an automatic quality control is built into the automatic software to ensure that all gold

  5. The Interval to Biochemical Failure Is Prognostic for Metastasis, Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality, and Overall Mortality After Salvage Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Skyler; Jackson, William; Li, Darren; Song, Yeohan; Foster, Corey; Foster, Ben; Zhou, Jessica; Vainshtein, Jeffrey; Feng, Felix; Hamstra, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the utility of the interval to biochemical failure (IBF) after salvage radiation therapy (SRT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer as a surrogate endpoint for distant metastasis (DM), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), and overall mortality (OM). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 575 patients treated with SRT after RP from a single institution. Of those, 250 patients experienced biochemical failure (BF), with the IBF defined as the time from commencement of SRT to BF. The IBF was evaluated by Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models for its association with DM, PCSM, and OM. Results: The median follow-up time was 85 (interquartile range [IQR] 49.8-121.1) months, with a median IBF of 16.8 (IQR, 8.5-37.1) months. With a cutoff time of 18 months, as previously used, 129 (52%) of patients had IBF ≤18 months. There were no differences among any clinical or pathologic features between those with IBF ≤ and those with IBF >18 months. On log–rank analysis, IBF ≤18 months was prognostic for increased DM (P<.0001, HR 4.9, 95% CI 3.2-7.4), PCSM (P<.0001, HR 4.1, 95% CI 2.4-7.1), and OM (P<.0001, HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.7-4.1). Cox proportional hazards models with adjustment for other clinical variables demonstrated that IBF was independently prognostic for DM (P<.001, HR 4.9), PCSM (P<.0001, HR 4.0), and OM (P<.0001, HR 2.7). IBF showed minimal change in performance regardless of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) use. Conclusion: After SRT, a short IBF can be used for early identification of patients who are most likely to experience progression to DM, PCSM, and OM. IBF ≤18 months may be useful in clinical practice or as an endpoint for clinical trials

  6. Clinical survey of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Tsuyoshi; Hatano, Koji; Satoh, Mototaka; Tsujimoto, Yuichi; Honda, Masahito; Matsumiya, Kiyomi; Fujioka, Hideki

    2007-01-01

    Treatment trends and outcomes for prostate cancer in our hospital were reported. A total of 482 patients with prostate cancer treated in our hospital between January, 1990 and December, 2004. The age distribution was from 51 to 99 years-old, with the mean age of 72.9 years-old at onset. The number of prostate cancer patients, especially asymptomatic patients with prostatic specific antigen (PSA) elevation, have increased recently. As for the clinical stage, 92 cases (19.1%), 238 cases (49.4%), 48 cases (10.0%) and 104 cases (21.6%) were stage A, B, C and D, respectively. 425 cases (88.2%) received some form of endocrine therapy. Retropubic prostatectomy or external beam radiation therapy was performed in 77 and 57 cases, respectively all cases. The cause-specific 5-year survival rate of the 482 cases was 79.7%, comprising 100% for stage A1, 96.8% for stage A2, 89.4% for stage B, 79.9% for stage C and 42.9% for stage D. The cause-specific 5-year survival was significantly better in the latter patients (1997-2004) than the former patients (1990-1996) in stage C (p=0.0226), D (p=0.0448). In stage C patients, the retropubic prostatectomy (with endocrine therapy) group, increased in the latter period and showed longer cause-specific 5-year survival than the endocrine therapy group (p=0.0027). In stage D2 patients, chemo-endocrine therapy with etoposide (VP-16), adriamycin (ADM) and cisplatin (CDDP) refractory and cause-specific 5-year survival was longer than endocrine therapy alone (p=0.0467, P=0.0381). Our results suggest that retropubic prostatectomy with endocrine therapy and chemo-endocrine therapy are useful for stage C and D prostate cancer patients, respectively. (author)

  7. Survival After Conservative Management Versus External Beam Radiation Therapy in Elderly Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell' Oglio, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.delloglio@gmail.com [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Department of Urology and Division of Experimental Oncology, Urological Research Institute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Boehm, Katharina [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Martini-Clinic, Prostate Cancer Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Trudeau, Vincent [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Department of Urology, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Tian, Zhe [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Larcher, Alessandro [Department of Urology and Division of Experimental Oncology, Urological Research Institute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Leyh-Bannurah, Sami-Ramzi [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Martini-Clinic, Prostate Cancer Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Moschini, Marco; Capitanio, Umberto [Department of Urology and Division of Experimental Oncology, Urological Research Institute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Shariat, Shahrokh F. [Department of Urology, Medical University of Vienna and General Hospital, Vienna (Austria); and others

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To compare survival in elderly men with clinically localized prostate cancer (PCa) according to treatment type, defined as radiation therapy (RT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) versus conservative management (observation). Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare linked database, we identified 23,790 patients aged 80 years or more with clinically localized PCa treated with either RT or observation between 1991 and 2009. Competing risks analyses focused on cancer-specific mortality and other-cause mortality, after accounting for confounders. All analyses were repeated after stratification according to grade (well-differentiated vs moderately differentiated vs poorly differentiated disease), race, and United States region, in patients with no comorbidities and in patients with at least 1 comorbidity. Analyses were repeated within most contemporary patients, namely those treated between 2001 and 2009. Results: Radiation therapy was associated with more favorable cancer-specific mortality rates than observation in patients with moderately differentiated disease (hazard ratio [HR] 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.66-0.94; P=.009) and in patients with poorly differentiated disease (HR 0.58; 95% CI 0.49-0.69; P<.001). Conversely, the benefit of RT was not observed in well-differentiated disease. The benefit of RT was confirmed in black men (HR 0.54; 95% CI 0.35-0.83; P=.004), across all United States regions (all P≤.004), in the subgroups of the healthiest patients (HR 0.67; 95% CI 0.57-0.78; P<.001), in patients with at least 1 comorbidity (HR 0.69; 95% CI 0.56-0.83; P<.001), and in most contemporary patients (HR 0.55; 95% CI 0.46-0.66; P<.001). Conclusions: Radiation therapy seems to be associated with a reduction in the risk of death from PCa relative to observation in elderly patients with clinically localized PCa, except for those with well-differentiated disease.

  8. Survival After Conservative Management Versus External Beam Radiation Therapy in Elderly Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Oglio, Paolo; Boehm, Katharina; Trudeau, Vincent; Tian, Zhe; Larcher, Alessandro; Leyh-Bannurah, Sami-Ramzi; Moschini, Marco; Capitanio, Umberto; Shariat, Shahrokh F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare survival in elderly men with clinically localized prostate cancer (PCa) according to treatment type, defined as radiation therapy (RT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) versus conservative management (observation). Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare linked database, we identified 23,790 patients aged 80 years or more with clinically localized PCa treated with either RT or observation between 1991 and 2009. Competing risks analyses focused on cancer-specific mortality and other-cause mortality, after accounting for confounders. All analyses were repeated after stratification according to grade (well-differentiated vs moderately differentiated vs poorly differentiated disease), race, and United States region, in patients with no comorbidities and in patients with at least 1 comorbidity. Analyses were repeated within most contemporary patients, namely those treated between 2001 and 2009. Results: Radiation therapy was associated with more favorable cancer-specific mortality rates than observation in patients with moderately differentiated disease (hazard ratio [HR] 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.66-0.94; P=.009) and in patients with poorly differentiated disease (HR 0.58; 95% CI 0.49-0.69; P<.001). Conversely, the benefit of RT was not observed in well-differentiated disease. The benefit of RT was confirmed in black men (HR 0.54; 95% CI 0.35-0.83; P=.004), across all United States regions (all P≤.004), in the subgroups of the healthiest patients (HR 0.67; 95% CI 0.57-0.78; P<.001), in patients with at least 1 comorbidity (HR 0.69; 95% CI 0.56-0.83; P<.001), and in most contemporary patients (HR 0.55; 95% CI 0.46-0.66; P<.001). Conclusions: Radiation therapy seems to be associated with a reduction in the risk of death from PCa relative to observation in elderly patients with clinically localized PCa, except for those with well-differentiated disease.

  9. Prostate cancer epigenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinaranagari, Swathi; Sharma, Pankaj; Bowen, Nathan J; Chaudhary, Jaideep

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a major health burden within the ever-increasingly aging US population. The molecular mechanisms involved in prostate cancer are diverse and heterogeneous. In this context, epigenetic changes, both global and gene specific, are now an emerging alternate mechanism in disease initiation and progression. The three major risk factors in prostate cancer: age, geographic ancestry, and environment are all influenced by epigenetics and additional significant insight is required to gain an understanding of the underlying mechanisms. The androgen receptor and its downstream effector pathways, central to prostate cancer initiation and progression, are subject to a multitude of epigenetic alterations. In this review we focus on the global perspective of epigenetics and the use of recent next-generation sequencing platforms to interrogate epigenetic changes in the prostate cancer genome.

  10. Improved irritative voiding symptoms three years after stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakie eRana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Irritative voiding symptoms are common in elderly men and following prostate radiotherapy. The impact of hypofractionated treatment on irritative voiding symptoms has not been determined. This study sought to evaluate urgency, frequency and nocturia following SBRT for prostate cancer. Methods: Patients treated with SBRT monotherapy for localized prostate cancer from August 2007 to July 2011 at Georgetown University Hospital were included in this study. Treatment was delivered using the CyberKnife® with doses of 35 Gy-36.25 Gy in 5 fractions. Patient-reported urinary symptoms were assessed using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS before treatment and at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12 months post-treatment and every 6 months thereafter.Results: 204 patients at a median age of 69 years received SBRT with a median follow-up of 4.8 years. Prior to treatment, 50.0% of patients reported moderate to severe lower urinary track symptoms and 17.7% felt that urinary frequency was a moderate to big problem. The mean prostate volume was 39 cc and 8% had prior procedures for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. A mean baseline IPSS-irritative score of 4.8 significantly increased to 6.5 at 1 month (p 8 at baseline, the mean IPSS-I decreased from a baseline score of 6.8 to 4.9 at three years post-SBRT. This decrease was both statistically (p < 0.0001 and clinically significant (MID = 1.45. Only 14.6% of patients felt that urinary frequency was a moderate to big problem at three years post-SBRT (p = 0.23.Conclusions: Treatment of prostate cancer

  11. Survival Following Radiation and Androgen Suppression Therapy for Prostate Cancer in Healthy Older Men: Implications for Screening Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Paul L.; Chen, Ming-Hui; Renshaw, Andrew A.; Loffredo, Marian; Kantoff, Philip W.; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has recommended against screening men over 75 for prostate cancer. We examined whether older healthy men could benefit from aggressive prostate cancer treatment. Methods and Materials: 206 men with intermediate to high risk localized prostate cancer randomized to 70 Gy of radiation (RT) or RT plus 6 months of androgen suppression therapy (RT+AST) constituted the study cohort. Within subgroups stratified by Adult Comorbidity Evaluation-27 comorbidity score and age, Cox multivariable analysis was used to determine whether treatment with RT+AST as compared with RT was associated with a decreased risk of death. Results: Among healthy men (i.e., with mild or no comorbidity), 78 were older than the median age of 72.4 years, and in this subgroup, RT+AST was associated with a significantly lower risk of death on multivariable analysis (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.36 (95% CI=0.13-0.98), p = 0.046, with significantly lower 8-year mortality estimates of 16.5% vs. 41.4% (p = 0.011). Conversely, among men with moderate or severe comorbidity, 24 were older than the median age of 73, and in this subgroup, treatment with RT+AST was associated with a higher risk of death (adjusted hazard ratio = 5.2 (1.3-20.2), p = 0.018). Conclusion: In older men with mild or no comorbidity, treatment with RT+AST was associated with improved survival compared with treatment with RT alone, suggesting that healthy older men may derive the same benefits from prostate cancer treatment as younger men. We therefore suggest that prostate cancer screening recommendations should not be based on strict age cutoffs alone but should also take into account comorbidity.

  12. Comparison of testicular dose delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Jeffrey M.; Handorf, Elizabeth A.; Price, Robert A.; Cherian, George; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Chen, David Y.; Kutikov, Alexander; Johnson, Matthew E.; Ma, Chung-Ming Charlie; Horwitz, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    A small decrease in testosterone level has been documented after prostate irradiation, possibly owing to the incidental dose to the testes. Testicular doses from prostate external beam radiation plans with either intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were calculated to investigate any difference. Testicles were contoured for 16 patients being treated for localized prostate cancer. For each patient, 2 plans were created: 1 with IMRT and 1 with VMAT. No specific attempt was made to reduce testicular dose. Minimum, maximum, and mean doses to the testicles were recorded for each plan. Of the 16 patients, 4 received a total dose of 7800 cGy to the prostate alone, 7 received 8000 cGy to the prostate alone, and 5 received 8000 cGy to the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. The mean (range) of testicular dose with an IMRT plan was 54.7 cGy (21.1 to 91.9) and 59.0 cGy (25.1 to 93.4) with a VMAT plan. In 12 cases, the mean VMAT dose was higher than the mean IMRT dose, with a mean difference of 4.3 cGy (p = 0.019). There was a small but statistically significant increase in mean testicular dose delivered by VMAT compared with IMRT. Despite this, it unlikely that there is a clinically meaningful difference in testicular doses from either modality

  13. Comparison of testicular dose delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients with prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Jeffrey M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Handorf, Elizabeth A. [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Price, Robert A.; Cherian, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Chen, David Y.; Kutikov, Alexander [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Johnson, Matthew E.; Ma, Chung-Ming Charlie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M., E-mail: eric.horwitz@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    A small decrease in testosterone level has been documented after prostate irradiation, possibly owing to the incidental dose to the testes. Testicular doses from prostate external beam radiation plans with either intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were calculated to investigate any difference. Testicles were contoured for 16 patients being treated for localized prostate cancer. For each patient, 2 plans were created: 1 with IMRT and 1 with VMAT. No specific attempt was made to reduce testicular dose. Minimum, maximum, and mean doses to the testicles were recorded for each plan. Of the 16 patients, 4 received a total dose of 7800 cGy to the prostate alone, 7 received 8000 cGy to the prostate alone, and 5 received 8000 cGy to the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. The mean (range) of testicular dose with an IMRT plan was 54.7 cGy (21.1 to 91.9) and 59.0 cGy (25.1 to 93.4) with a VMAT plan. In 12 cases, the mean VMAT dose was higher than the mean IMRT dose, with a mean difference of 4.3 cGy (p = 0.019). There was a small but statistically significant increase in mean testicular dose delivered by VMAT compared with IMRT. Despite this, it unlikely that there is a clinically meaningful difference in testicular doses from either modality.

  14. Utilization of bone densitometry for prediction and administration of bisphosphonates to prevent osteoporosis in patients with prostate cancer without bone metastases receiving antiandrogen therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, Abby; Khan, Muhammad A; Gujja, Swetha; Govindarajan, Rangaswmy

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer subjects with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse who are treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) are recommended to have baseline and serial bone densitometry and receive bisphosphonates. The purpose of this community population study was to assess the utilization of bone densitometry and bisphosphonate therapy in men receiving ADT for non-metastatic prostate cancer. A cohort study of men aged 65 years or older with non-metastatic incident diagnoses of prostate cancer was obtained from the Surveillance Epidemiology End Results (SEER)-linked Medicare claims between 2004 and 2008. Claims were used to assess prescribed treatment of ADT, bone densitometry, and bisphosphonates. A total of 30,846 incident prostate cancer cases receiving ADT and aged 65 years or older had no bone metastases; 87.3% (n=26,935) on ADT did not receive either bone densitometry or bisphosphonate therapy. Three percent (n=931) of the cases on ADT received bisphosphonate therapy without ever receiving bone densitometry, 8.8% (n=2,702) of the cases on ADT received bone densitometry without receiving intravenous bisphosphonates, while nearly 1% (0.90%, n=278) of the cases on ADT received both bone densitometry and bisphosphonates. Analysis showed treatment differed by patient characteristics. Contrary to the recommendations, bone densitometry and bisphosphonate therapy are underutilized in men receiving ADT for non-metastatic prostate cancer

  15. Five-Year Outcomes from 3 Prospective Trials of Image-Guided Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Nichols, Romaine C.; Mendenhall, William M.; Morris, Christopher G.; Li, Zuofeng; Su, Zhong; Williams, Christopher R.; Costa, Joseph; Henderson, Randal H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report 5-year clinical outcomes of 3 prospective trials of image-guided proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 211 prostate cancer patients (89 low-risk, 82 intermediate-risk, and 40 high-risk) were treated in institutional review board-approved trials of 78 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) in 39 fractions for low-risk disease, 78 to 82 CGE for intermediate-risk disease, and 78 CGE with concomitant docetaxel therapy followed by androgen deprivation therapy for high-risk disease. Toxicities were graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0. Median follow-up was 5.2 years. Results: Five-year rates of biochemical and clinical freedom from disease progression were 99%, 99%, and 76% in low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively. Actuarial 5-year rates of late CTCAE, version 3.0 (or version 4.0) grade 3 gastrointestinal and urologic toxicity were 1.0% (0.5%) and 5.4% (1.0%), respectively. Median pretreatment scores and International Prostate Symptom Scores at >4 years posttreatment were 8 and 7, 6 and 6, and 9 and 8, respectively, among the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients. There were no significant changes between median pretreatment summary scores and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite scores at >4 years for bowel, urinary irritative and/or obstructive, and urinary continence. Conclusions: Five-year clinical outcomes with image-guided proton therapy included extremely high efficacy, minimal physician-assessed toxicity, and excellent patient-reported outcomes. Further follow-up and a larger patient experience are necessary to confirm these favorable outcomes

  16. Prognostic Utility of Cell Cycle Progression Score in Men With Prostate Cancer After Primary External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedland, Stephen J., E-mail: steve.freedland@duke.edu [Department of Surgery, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery (Urology), Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Gerber, Leah [Department of Surgery, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery (Urology), Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Reid, Julia; Welbourn, William; Tikishvili, Eliso; Park, Jimmy; Younus, Adib; Gutin, Alexander; Sangale, Zaina; Lanchbury, Jerry S. [Myriad Genetics, Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Salama, Joseph K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Stone, Steven [Myriad Genetics, Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic utility of the cell cycle progression (CCP) score, a RNA signature based on the average expression level of 31 CCP genes, for predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR) in men with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as their primary curative therapy. Methods and Materials: The CCP score was derived retrospectively from diagnostic biopsy specimens of men diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1991 to 2006 (n=141). All patients were treated with definitive EBRT; approximately half of the cohort was African American. Outcome was time from EBRT to BCR using the Phoenix definition. Median follow-up for patients without BCR was 4.8 years. Association with outcome was evaluated by Cox proportional hazards survival analysis and likelihood ratio tests. Results: Of 141 patients, 19 (13%) had BCR. The median CCP score for patient samples was 0.12. In univariable analysis, CCP score significantly predicted BCR (P=.0017). The hazard ratio for BCR was 2.55 for 1-unit increase in CCP score (equivalent to a doubling of gene expression). In a multivariable analysis that included Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen, percent positive cores, and androgen deprivation therapy, the hazard ratio for CCP changed only marginally and remained significant (P=.034), indicating that CCP provides prognostic information that is not provided by standard clinical parameters. With 10-year censoring, the CCP score was associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality (P=.013). There was no evidence for interaction between CCP and any clinical variable, including ethnicity. Conclusions: Among men treated with EBRT, the CCP score significantly predicted outcome and provided greater prognostic information than was available with clinical parameters. If validated in a larger cohort, CCP score could identify high-risk men undergoing EBRT who may need more aggressive therapy.

  17. Five-Year Outcomes from 3 Prospective Trials of Image-Guided Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendenhall, Nancy P., E-mail: menden@shands.ufl.edu [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Hoppe, Bradford S.; Nichols, Romaine C.; Mendenhall, William M.; Morris, Christopher G.; Li, Zuofeng; Su, Zhong [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Williams, Christopher R.; Costa, Joseph [Division of Urology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Henderson, Randal H. [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To report 5-year clinical outcomes of 3 prospective trials of image-guided proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 211 prostate cancer patients (89 low-risk, 82 intermediate-risk, and 40 high-risk) were treated in institutional review board-approved trials of 78 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) in 39 fractions for low-risk disease, 78 to 82 CGE for intermediate-risk disease, and 78 CGE with concomitant docetaxel therapy followed by androgen deprivation therapy for high-risk disease. Toxicities were graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0. Median follow-up was 5.2 years. Results: Five-year rates of biochemical and clinical freedom from disease progression were 99%, 99%, and 76% in low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively. Actuarial 5-year rates of late CTCAE, version 3.0 (or version 4.0) grade 3 gastrointestinal and urologic toxicity were 1.0% (0.5%) and 5.4% (1.0%), respectively. Median pretreatment scores and International Prostate Symptom Scores at >4 years posttreatment were 8 and 7, 6 and 6, and 9 and 8, respectively, among the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients. There were no significant changes between median pretreatment summary scores and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite scores at >4 years for bowel, urinary irritative and/or obstructive, and urinary continence. Conclusions: Five-year clinical outcomes with image-guided proton therapy included extremely high efficacy, minimal physician-assessed toxicity, and excellent patient-reported outcomes. Further follow-up and a larger patient experience are necessary to confirm these favorable outcomes.

  18. Prognostic Utility of Cell Cycle Progression Score in Men With Prostate Cancer After Primary External Beam Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedland, Stephen J.; Gerber, Leah; Reid, Julia; Welbourn, William; Tikishvili, Eliso; Park, Jimmy; Younus, Adib; Gutin, Alexander; Sangale, Zaina; Lanchbury, Jerry S.; Salama, Joseph K.; Stone, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic utility of the cell cycle progression (CCP) score, a RNA signature based on the average expression level of 31 CCP genes, for predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR) in men with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as their primary curative therapy. Methods and Materials: The CCP score was derived retrospectively from diagnostic biopsy specimens of men diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1991 to 2006 (n=141). All patients were treated with definitive EBRT; approximately half of the cohort was African American. Outcome was time from EBRT to BCR using the Phoenix definition. Median follow-up for patients without BCR was 4.8 years. Association with outcome was evaluated by Cox proportional hazards survival analysis and likelihood ratio tests. Results: Of 141 patients, 19 (13%) had BCR. The median CCP score for patient samples was 0.12. In univariable analysis, CCP score significantly predicted BCR (P=.0017). The hazard ratio for BCR was 2.55 for 1-unit increase in CCP score (equivalent to a doubling of gene expression). In a multivariable analysis that included Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen, percent positive cores, and androgen deprivation therapy, the hazard ratio for CCP changed only marginally and remained significant (P=.034), indicating that CCP provides prognostic information that is not provided by standard clinical parameters. With 10-year censoring, the CCP score was associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality (P=.013). There was no evidence for interaction between CCP and any clinical variable, including ethnicity. Conclusions: Among men treated with EBRT, the CCP score significantly predicted outcome and provided greater prognostic information than was available with clinical parameters. If validated in a larger cohort, CCP score could identify high-risk men undergoing EBRT who may need more aggressive therapy

  19. Perineural Invasion Predicts Increased Recurrence, Metastasis, and Death From Prostate Cancer Following Treatment With Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Felix Y. [University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ann Arbor Veteran Affairs Medical System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Qian Yushen; Stenmark, Matthew H.; Halverson, Schuyler; Blas, Kevin; Vance, Sean [University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sandler, Howard M. [Cedars Sinai Medical System, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@med.umich.edu [University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the prognostic value of perineural invasion (PNI) for patients treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed for 651 men treated for prostate cancer with EBRT to a minimum dose {>=}75 Gy. We assessed the impact of PNI as well as pretreatment and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), freedom from metastasis (FFM), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival. Results: PNI was present in 34% of specimens at biopsy and was significantly associated with higher Gleason score (GS), T stage, and prostate-specific antigen level. On univariate and multivariate analysis, the presence of PNI was associated with worse FFBF (hazard ratio = 1.7, p <0.006), FFM (hazard ratio = 1.8, p <0.03), and CSS (HR = 1.4, p <0.05) compared with absence of PNI; there was no difference in overall survival. Seven-year rates of FFBF, FFM, and CCS were 64% vs. 80%, 84% vs. 92%, and 91% vs. 95% for those patients with and without PNI, respectively. On recursive partitioning analysis, PNI predicted for worse FFM and CSS in patients with GS 8-10, with FFM of 67% vs. 89% (p <0.02), and CSS of 69% vs. 91%, (p <0.04) at 7 years for those with and without PNI, respectively. Conclusions: The presence of PNI in the prostate biopsy predicts worse clinical outcome for patients treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy. Particularly in patients with GS 8-10 disease, the presence of PNI suggests an increased risk of metastasis and prostate cancer death.

  20. Perineural Invasion Predicts Increased Recurrence, Metastasis, and Death From Prostate Cancer Following Treatment With Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Felix Y.; Qian Yushen; Stenmark, Matthew H.; Halverson, Schuyler; Blas, Kevin; Vance, Sean; Sandler, Howard M.; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the prognostic value of perineural invasion (PNI) for patients treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed for 651 men treated for prostate cancer with EBRT to a minimum dose ≥75 Gy. We assessed the impact of PNI as well as pretreatment and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), freedom from metastasis (FFM), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival. Results: PNI was present in 34% of specimens at biopsy and was significantly associated with higher Gleason score (GS), T stage, and prostate-specific antigen level. On univariate and multivariate analysis, the presence of PNI was associated with worse FFBF (hazard ratio = 1.7, p <0.006), FFM (hazard ratio = 1.8, p <0.03), and CSS (HR = 1.4, p <0.05) compared with absence of PNI; there was no difference in overall survival. Seven-year rates of FFBF, FFM, and CCS were 64% vs. 80%, 84% vs. 92%, and 91% vs. 95% for those patients with and without PNI, respectively. On recursive partitioning analysis, PNI predicted for worse FFM and CSS in patients with GS 8–10, with FFM of 67% vs. 89% (p <0.02), and CSS of 69% vs. 91%, (p <0.04) at 7 years for those with and without PNI, respectively. Conclusions: The presence of PNI in the prostate biopsy predicts worse clinical outcome for patients treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy. Particularly in patients with GS 8–10 disease, the presence of PNI suggests an increased risk of metastasis and prostate cancer death.

  1. Potential benefits of combining cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine gene therapy and irradiation for prostate cancer. Experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Hiroaki; Koshida, Kiyoshi; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Mizokami, Atsushi; Namiki, Mikio [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of combining cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine (CD/5-FC) gene therapy and radiation therapy (either external beam radiation or radioimmunotherapy [RIT]), for the treatment of prostate cancer. Tumor xenografts of CD-transduced LNCaP cells grown in the testes of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were used to evaluate antitumor effect. The mice were injected intraperitoneally with 500 mg/kg of 5-FC, or with 5, 15 or 30 mg/kg of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), for 9 days. The tumors were treated with fractionated radiation at a dose of 1 or 3 Gy/day for 3 days, or I-131 labelled anti-prostate specific antigen (anti-PSA) monoclonal antibody (mAb) administration at a subtherapeutic dose of 20 or 80 {mu}Ci. Intratumoral and serum concentrations of 5-FU were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Mice treated with CD/5-FC gene therapy presented a significant tumor growth inhibition comparable to that obtained with 15 mg/kg, 5-FU systemic administration without marked weight loss. Treatment with CD/5-FC gene therapy resulted in higher tumor but lower serum concentrations of 5-FU than treatment with systemic 5-FU chemotherapy. An additive antitumor effect was obtained when CD/5-FC therapy was combined with 1 Gy irradiation, which by itself did not produce a significant antitumor effect. However, the efficacy of CD/5-FC therapy was not enhanced when combined with RIT, probably due to poor accumulation of the mAb as the tumor/blood ratio never exceeded 1. These findings indicate that CD/5-FC gene therapy for prostate cancer may function with enhanced antitumor effect when combined with external beam radiation. However, combining CD/5-FC gene therapy and RIT using an anti-PSA mAb may not be effective because of insufficient accumulation of the mAb at the target tumors. (author)

  2. Potential benefits of combining cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine gene therapy and irradiation for prostate cancer. Experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroaki; Koshida, Kiyoshi; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Mizokami, Atsushi; Namiki, Mikio

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of combining cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine (CD/5-FC) gene therapy and radiation therapy (either external beam radiation or radioimmunotherapy [RIT]), for the treatment of prostate cancer. Tumor xenografts of CD-transduced LNCaP cells grown in the testes of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were used to evaluate antitumor effect. The mice were injected intraperitoneally with 500 mg/kg of 5-FC, or with 5, 15 or 30 mg/kg of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), for 9 days. The tumors were treated with fractionated radiation at a dose of 1 or 3 Gy/day for 3 days, or I-131 labelled anti-prostate specific antigen (anti-PSA) monoclonal antibody (mAb) administration at a subtherapeutic dose of 20 or 80 μCi. Intratumoral and serum concentrations of 5-FU were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Mice treated with CD/5-FC gene therapy presented a significant tumor growth inhibition comparable to that obtained with 15 mg/kg, 5-FU systemic administration without marked weight loss. Treatment with CD/5-FC gene therapy resulted in higher tumor but lower serum concentrations of 5-FU than treatment with systemic 5-FU chemotherapy. An additive antitumor effect was obtained when CD/5-FC therapy was combined with 1 Gy irradiation, which by itself did not produce a significant antitumor effect. However, the efficacy of CD/5-FC therapy was not enhanced when combined with RIT, probably due to poor accumulation of the mAb as the tumor/blood ratio never exceeded 1. These findings indicate that CD/5-FC gene therapy for prostate cancer may function with enhanced antitumor effect when combined with external beam radiation. However, combining CD/5-FC gene therapy and RIT using an anti-PSA mAb may not be effective because of insufficient accumulation of the mAb at the target tumors. (author)

  3. ABO blood type correlates with survival on prostate cancer vaccine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthana, Saddam M; Gulley, James L; Hodge, James W; Schlom, Jeffrey; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C

    2015-10-13

    Immunotherapies for cancer are transforming patient care, but clinical responses vary considerably from patient to patient. Simple, inexpensive strategies to target treatment to likely responders could substantially improve efficacy while simultaneously reducing health care costs, but identification of reliable biomarkers has proven challenging. Previously, we found that pre-treatment serum IgM to blood group A (BG-A) correlated with survival for patients treated with PROSTVAC-VF, a therapeutic cancer vaccine in phase III clinical trials for the treatment of prostate cancer. These results suggested that ABO blood type might influence efficacy. Unfortunately, blood types were not available in the clinical records for all but 8 patients and insufficient amounts of sera were left for standard blood typing methods. To test the hypothesis, therefore, we developed a new glycan microarray-based method for determining ABO blood type. The method requires only 4 μL of serum, provides 97% accuracy, and allows simultaneous profiling of many other serum anti-glycan antibodies. After validation with 220 healthy subjects of known blood type, the method was then applied to 74 PROSTVAC-VF patients and 37 control patients from a phase II trial. In this retrospective study, we found that type B and O PROSTVAC-VF patients demonstrated markedly improved clinical outcomes relative to A and AB patients, including longer median survival, longer median survival relative to Halabi predicted survival, and improved overall survival via Kaplan-Meier survival analysis (p = 0.006). Consequently, blood type may provide an inexpensive screen to pre-select patients likely to benefit from PROSTVAC-VF therapy.

  4. Serum Testosterone Levels in Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone Agonist Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morote, Juan; Comas, Inma; Planas, Jacques; Maldonado, Xavier; Celma, Ana; Placer, José; Ferrer, Roser; Carles, Joan; Regis, Lucas

    2018-04-01

    Serum testosterone measurement is recommended to assess the efficacy of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and to diagnose castration resistance in patients with prostate cancer (PCa). Currently, the accepted castrate level of serum testosterone is 50 ng/dL. Liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC MSMS) is the appropriate method to measure testosterone, especially at low levels. However, worldwide, chemiluminescent assays (CLIAs) are used in clinical laboratories, despite their lack of accuracy and reproducibility, because they are automatable, fast, sensitive, and inexpensive. We compared serum testosterone levels measured using LC MSMS and CLIAs in 126 patients with PCa undergoing luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist therapy. The median serum testosterone level was 14.0 ng/dL (range, 2.0-67.0 ng/dL) with LC MSMS and 31.9 ng/dL (range, 10.0-91.6 ng/dL) with CLIA (P  50 ng/dL in 3 patients (2.4%). These ranges were found in 34 (27%), 72 (57.1%), and 20 (15.9%) patients when testosterone was measured using CLIA (P < .001). The castrate level of serum testosterone using LC MSMS and CLIA was 39.8 ng/dL (95% confidence interval [CI], 37.1-43.4 ng/dL) and 66.5 ng/dL (95% CI, 62.3-71.2 ng/dL), respectively. We found that CLIA overestimated the testosterone levels in PCa patients undergoing LHRH agonist therapy. Thus, the castration level was incorrectly considered inadequate with CLIA in almost 15% of patients. The true castration level of serum testosterone using an appropriate method is < 50 ng/dL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Preferred treatment frequency in patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy for advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Nielsen, Torben K; Al-Hamadani, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    satisfaction and side-effects. Overall, 238 men receiving ADT for prostate cancer were presented with the questionnaire between September 2011 and May 2012. Descriptive statistics, the chi-squared test and multiple regression were used for analyses. RESULTS: In total, 176 questionnaires (74%) were available...

  6. The Role of Estrogen Receptor β in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Christoforou, Paraskevi; Christopoulos, Panagiotis F; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Although androgen receptor (AR) signaling is the main molecular tool regulating growth and function of the prostate gland, estrogen receptor β (ERβ) is involved in the differentiation of prostatic epithelial cells and numerous antiproliferative actions on prostate cancer cells. However, ERβ splice variants have been associated with prostate cancer initiation and progression mechanisms. ERβ is promising as an anticancer therapy and in the prevention of prostate cancer. Herein, we review the re...

  7. Towards prostate cancer gene therapy: Development of a chlorotoxin-targeted nanovector for toxic (melittin) gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarokh, Zahra; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein; Nazari, Mahboobeh

    2017-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death due to cancer in men. Owing to shortcomings in the current treatments, other therapies are being considered. Toxic gene delivery is one of the most effective methods for cancer therapy. Cationic polymers are able to form stable nanoparticles via interaction with nucleic acids electrostatically. Branched polyethylenimine that contains amine groups has notable buffering capacity and the ability to escape from endosome through the proton sponge effect. However, the cytotoxicity of this polymer is high, and modification is one of the applicable strategies to overcome this problem. In this study, PEI was targeted with chlorotoxin (CTX) via N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate (SPDP) cross-linker. CTX can bind specifically to matrix metalloproteinase-2 that is overexpressed in certain cancers. Melittin as the major component of bee venom has been reported to have anti-cancer activity. This was thus selected to deliver to PC3 cell line. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that transfection efficiency of targeted nanoparticles is significantly higher compared to non-targeted nanoparticles. Targeted nanoparticles carrying the melittin gene also decreased cell viability of PC3 cells significantly while no toxic effects were observed on NIH3T3 cell line. Therefore, CTX-targeted nanoparticles carrying the melittin gene could serve as an appropriate gene delivery system for prostate and other MMP-2 positive cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Multivalent Peptidomimetic Conjugates as Inhibitors of Androgen Receptor Function in Therapy-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    findings in the journal Cancer Research. 15. SUBJECT TERMS androgen receptor, prostate cancer, peptidomimetic conjugates, 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...CAN-16-0385. Epub 2016 Aug 3, which is widely read by basic and clinical oncologists. The study was also highlighted in the journal Nature Reviews...This article must therefore be hereby marked advertisement in accordance with 18 U.S.C. Section 1734 solely to indicate this fact. Received February 11

  9. Metabolic syndrome in patients with prostate cancer undergoing intermittent androgen-deprivation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Mohammadali Mohammadzadeh; Rezaei, Mohammadhadi Mohammadzadeh; Ghoreifi, Alireza; Kerigh, Behzad Feyzzadeh

    2016-01-01

    The presence of metabolic syndrome in men with prostate cancer (PCa) undergoing androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), especially intermittent type, has not been completely evaluated. The aim of this study is to evaluate metabolic syndrome in men with PCa undergoing intermittent ADT. In this longitudinal study, we studied the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in 190 patients who were undergoing intermittent ADT. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to the Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. All metabolic parameters, including lipid profile, blood glucose, blood pressures, and waist circumferences of the patients were measured six and 12 months after treatment. Mean age of the patients was 67.5 ± 6.74 years. The incidence of metabolic syndrome after six and 12 months was 6.8% and 14.7%, respectively. Analysis of various components of the metabolic syndrome revealed that patients had significantly higher overall prevalence of hyperglycemia, abdominal obesity, and hypertriglyceridemia in their six- and 12-month followups, but blood pressure has not been changed in the same period except for diastolic blood pressure after six months. Although there was an increased risk of metabolic syndrome in patients receiving intermittent ADT, it was lower than other studies that treated the same patients with continuous ADT. Also it seems that intermittent ADT has less metabolic complications than continuous ADT and could be used as a safe alternative in patients with advanced and metastatic PCa.

  10. Cardiometabolic and Skeletal Risk Factors in Black Men with Prostate Cancer Starting Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnarsson, Orvar, E-mail: orvar.gunnarsson@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, 16 Penn Tower, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Basaria, Shehzad [Department of Medicine, Section of Men’s Health, Aging and Metabolism, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Gignac, Gretchen A. [Department of Medicine, Section of Hematology and Oncology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118 (United States)

    2015-04-22

    Background: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer (PCa) is associated with multiple metabolic complications, previously predominantly evaluated in the white population. Methods: A chart-based retrospective review was conducted on black patients with PCa, considered for ADT, from September 2007 to July 2010. Baseline data were collected on body mass index (BMI), vitamin-D status, bone mineral density (BMD), dyslipidemia and diabetes. Overweight and obesity were classified as BMI ≥ 25 and BMI ≥ 30, respectively. Vitamin-D sufficiency was defined as levels ≥30 ng/mL, insufficiency as <30 ng/mL and deficiency as ≤20 ng/mL. Osteopenia was defined as T scores between −1 to −2.5 and osteoporosis when T scores ≤−2.5. Results: Of the initial cohort of 130 black men, 111 (85.4%) patients underwent ADT. At baseline, average BMI was 28.1 ± 5.9 with 43.3% of men being overweight and 30.8% obese. More than one-third of the patients had pre-existing dyslipidemia while 28.8% were diabetics. 50% were vitamin-D deficient while 41% had low bone mass. Conclusions: Black men with PCa presenting for consideration of ADT have a high prevalence of existing metabolic risk factors. Close monitoring of this patient population is needed during ADT to prevent and treat metabolic complications.

  11. Cardiometabolic and Skeletal Risk Factors in Black Men with Prostate Cancer Starting Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnarsson, Orvar; Basaria, Shehzad; Gignac, Gretchen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer (PCa) is associated with multiple metabolic complications, previously predominantly evaluated in the white population. Methods: A chart-based retrospective review was conducted on black patients with PCa, considered for ADT, from September 2007 to July 2010. Baseline data were collected on body mass index (BMI), vitamin-D status, bone mineral density (BMD), dyslipidemia and diabetes. Overweight and obesity were classified as BMI ≥ 25 and BMI ≥ 30, respectively. Vitamin-D sufficiency was defined as levels ≥30 ng/mL, insufficiency as <30 ng/mL and deficiency as ≤20 ng/mL. Osteopenia was defined as T scores between −1 to −2.5 and osteoporosis when T scores ≤−2.5. Results: Of the initial cohort of 130 black men, 111 (85.4%) patients underwent ADT. At baseline, average BMI was 28.1 ± 5.9 with 43.3% of men being overweight and 30.8% obese. More than one-third of the patients had pre-existing dyslipidemia while 28.8% were diabetics. 50% were vitamin-D deficient while 41% had low bone mass. Conclusions: Black men with PCa presenting for consideration of ADT have a high prevalence of existing metabolic risk factors. Close monitoring of this patient population is needed during ADT to prevent and treat metabolic complications

  12. Cardiometabolic and Skeletal Risk Factors in Black Men with Prostate Cancer Starting Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orvar Gunnarsson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT for prostate cancer (PCa is associated with multiple metabolic complications, previously predominantly evaluated in the white population. Methods: A chart-based retrospective review was conducted on black patients with PCa, considered for ADT, from September 2007 to July 2010. Baseline data were collected on body mass index (BMI, vitamin-D status, bone mineral density (BMD, dyslipidemia and diabetes. Overweight and obesity were classified as BMI ≥ 25 and BMI ≥ 30, respectively. Vitamin-D sufficiency was defined as levels ≥30 ng/mL, insufficiency as <30 ng/mL and deficiency as ≤20 ng/mL. Osteopenia was defined as T scores between −1 to −2.5 and osteoporosis when T scores ≤−2.5. Results: Of the initial cohort of 130 black men, 111 (85.4% patients underwent ADT. At baseline, average BMI was 28.1 ± 5.9 with 43.3% of men being overweight and 30.8% obese. More than one-third of the patients had pre-existing dyslipidemia while 28.8% were diabetics. 50% were vitamin-D deficient while 41% had low bone mass. Conclusions: Black men with PCa presenting for consideration of ADT have a high prevalence of existing metabolic risk factors. Close monitoring of this patient population is needed during ADT to prevent and treat metabolic complications.

  13. A randomised comparison of bicalutamide ('Casodex') 150 mg versus placebo as immediate therapy either alone or as adjuvant to standard care for early non-metastatic prostate cancer. First report from the Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group Study No. 6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Tammela, T L J; Vaage, S

    2002-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide 150 mg ('Casodex'(1)) as immediate therapy, either alone or as adjuvant to treatment of curative intent, in patients with early (T1b-T4, any N, M0) prostate cancer....

  14. Outcomes and toxicity from a prospective study of moderately hypofractionated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Gang Wang, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to report the long-term outcomes and toxicity results of a prospective trial of moderately hypofractionated, image guided radiation therapy (RT for localized prostate cancer. Methods and materials: Patients were enrolled between December 2006 and February 2012. Patients in group 1 were stage T1-T2b, had a Gleason score (GS of 2 to 6 or 7 (3 + 4 with only 1 lobe involved, and had prostate-specific antigen levels ≤10 ng/mL. Group 2 patients were stage ≥T2c, had a GS ≥7 (4 + 3, a GS 7 (3 + 4 involving both lobes, or a PSA >10 ng/mL and ≤30 ng/mL. All patients underwent transrectal ultrasound guided fiducial (Visicoil placement prior to computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging simulation. Daily cone beam computed tomography with online correction was used. The prescribed dose was 64 Gy in 20 fractions. The primary endpoint was acute and late toxicity. The secondary endpoint was biochemical control. Results: A total of 40 patients with a median age of 70 years were recruited for the study. Twenty-two patients (55% were in group 1, and 18 patients (45% were in group 2. Thirteen patients (32.5% were classified as low, 26 patients (65% as intermediate, and 1 patient (2.5% as high risk per the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. The median follow-up time was 59 months. Five-year biochemical control was 100% and 94.4% for groups 1 and 2, respectively. Thirteen patients (32.5% developed acute gastrointestinal (GI toxicities grade ≥2 and 3 (7.5% developed acute grade 3 GI toxicity. A total of 17 patients (42.5% developed grade ≥2 acute genitourinary toxicities and 1 (2.5% developed acute grade 3 dysuria. Two patients (5% developed late GI toxicities grade ≥2. There was 1 case (2.5% of grade 4 fistula requiring sigmoid resection. Seven patients (17.5% developed grade ≥2 late genitourinary toxicities; 2 patients (5% late grade 3 urinary frequency/urgency. Conclusions

  15. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography for Prostate Cancer: Distribution of Disease and Implications for Radiation Therapy Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sandeep K; Watson, Tahne; Denham, Jim; Shakespeare, Thomas P; Rutherford, Natalie; McLeod, Nicholas; Picton, Kevin; Ainsworth, Paul; Bonaventura, Tony; Martin, Jarad M

    2017-11-01

    To explore the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-avid distribution of prostate cancer (PC) on positron emission tomography (PET), both at the time of initial diagnosis and at the time of relapse after definitive local treatment. A total of 179 PSMA PET scans in patients with nil or ≤3 lesions on conventional imaging were retrospectively categorized into 3 subgroups: group A, high-risk PC with no prior definitive therapy (n=34); group B, prior prostatectomy (n=75); and group C, prior radiation therapy (n=70). The numbers and locations of the PSMA-avid lesions were mapped. The PSMA-positive lesions were identified subjectively by a nuclear medicine physician on the basis of clinical experience and taking into account the recent literature and artefacts. A total of 893 PSMA-avid lesions were identified; at least 1 lesion was detected in 80% of all scans. A high detection rate was present even at very low serum PSA levels (eg, at PSA ≤0.20 ng/mL in group B, the detection rate was 46%). Thirty-eight percent of studies revealed extrapelvic disease (41%, 31%, and 46% in groups A, B, and C, respectively). Almost one-third of all studies showed only oligometastases (24%, 36%, and 31% in groups A, B, and C, respectively). A large proportion of these (40%) were a solitary lesion. Prostate-specific membrane antigen PET demonstrated a large number of otherwise unknown metastatic lesions. Therefore we recommend PSMA PET for more accurate assessment of disease burden in initial staging of high-risk PC, as well as for restaging in patients with prostate-specific antigen relapse after primary therapies. Furthermore, a high proportion of oligometastases on PSMA PET provides a prime opportunity to investigate the role of targeted local therapies for oligometastatic PCs. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Epigenetics in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Albany, Costantine; Alva, Ajjai S.; Aparicio, Ana M.; Singal, Rakesh; Yellapragada, Sarvari; Sonpavde, Guru; Hahn, Noah M.

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most commonly diagnosed nonskin malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death among men in the United States. Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in gene expression caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequences. Two common epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation and histone modification, have demonstrated critical roles in prostate cancer growth and metastasis. DNA hypermethylation of cytosine-guanine (CpG) rich sequ...

  17. Effects of occupational therapy on quality of life of patients with metastatic prostate cancer. A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huri, Meral; Huri, Emre; Kayihan, Hulya; Altuntas, Onur

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of occupational therapy relative to a home program in improving quality of life (QoL) among men who were treated for metastatic prostate cancer (MPC). Fifty-five men were assigned randomly to either the 12-week cognitive behavioral therapy based occupational therapy (OT-CBSM) intervention (treatment group) or a home program (control group) between March 2012 and August 2014 in the Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) was used to measure the occupational performance and identify difficulties in daily living activities. The QoL and symptom status were measured by The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and its Prostate Cancer Module. A 12-week OT-CBSM intervention including client-centered training of daily living activities, recreational group activities, and cognitive behavioral stress management intervention were applied. The COPM performance and satisfaction scores, which indicate occupational participation and QoL increased statistically in the treatment group in relation to men who were included in the home-program (p less than or equal to 0.05). A 12-week OT-CBSM intervention was effective in improving QoL in men treated for MPC, and these changes were associated significantly with occupational performance.

  18. The Prevalence of Cardiac Risk Factors in Men with Localized Prostate Cancer Undergoing Androgen Deprivation Therapy in British Columbia, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margot K. Davis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. While androgen deprivation therapy (ADT reduces the risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality in high-risk localized prostate cancer, it adversely affects cardiovascular (CV risk factor profiles in treated men. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 100 consecutive men with intermediate- or high-risk localized prostate cancer referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency for ADT. Data on CV risk factors and disease were collected and Framingham risk scores were calculated. Results. The median age of the study cohort was 73 years. Established cardiovascular disease was present in 25% of patients. Among patients without established CV disease, calculated Framingham risk was high in 65%, intermediate in 33%, and low in 1%. Baseline hypertension was present in 58% of patients, dyslipidemia in 51%, and diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance in 24%. Hypertension was more prevalent in the study cohort than in an age- and sex-matched population sample (OR 1.74, P=0.006; diabetes had a similar prevalence (OR 0.93, P=0.8. Conclusions. Patients receiving ADT have a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease and risk factors and are more likely to be hypertensive than population controls. Low rates of CV risk screening suggest opportunities for improved primary and secondary prevention of CV disease in this population.

  19. Can multiparametric MRI replace Roach equations in staging prostate cancer before external beam radiation therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girometti, Rossano; Signor, Marco Andrea; Pancot, Martina; Cereser, Lorenzo; Zuiani, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the agreement between Roach equations (RE) and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) in assessing the T-stage of prostate cancer (PCa). Materials and methods: Seventy-three patients with biopsy-proven PCa and previous RE assessment prospectively underwent mpMRI on a 3.0T magnet before external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Using Cohen’s kappa statistic, we assessed the agreement between RE and mpMRI in defining the T-stage (≥T3 vs.T ≤ 2) and risk category according to the National comprehensive cancer network criteria (≤intermediate vs. ≥high). We also calculated sensitivity and specificity for ≥T3 stage in an additional group of thirty-seven patients with post-prostatectomy histological examination (mpMRI validation group). Results: The agreement between RE and mpMRI in assessing the T stage and risk category was moderate (k = 0.53 and 0.56, respectively). mpMRI changed the T stage and risk category in 21.9% (95%C.I. 13.4–33-4) and 20.5% (95%C.I. 12.3–31.9), respectively, prevalently downstaging PCa compared to RE. Sensitivity and specificity for ≥T3 stage in the mpMRI validation group were 81.8% (95%C.I. 65.1–91.9) and 88.5% (72.8–96.1). Conclusion: RE and mpMRI show moderate agreement only in assessing the T-stage of PCa, translating into an mpMRI-induced change in risk assessment in about one fifth of patients. As supported by high sensitivity/specificity for ≥T3 stage in the validation group, the discrepancy we found is in favour of mpMRI as a tool to stage PCa before ERBT.

  20. Can multiparametric MRI replace Roach equations in staging prostate cancer before external beam radiation therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girometti, Rossano, E-mail: rgirometti@sirm.org [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, University of Udine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Santa Maria della Misericordia − via Colugna, 50–33100, Udine (Italy); Signor, Marco Andrea, E-mail: marco.signor@asuiud.sanita.fvg.it [Department of Oncological Radiation Therapy, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Santa Maria della Misericordia, Piazzale S. M. della Misericordia, 15–33100, Udine (Italy); Pancot, Martina, E-mail: martypancot@libero.it [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, University of Udine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Santa Maria della Misericordia − via Colugna, 50–33100, Udine (Italy); Cereser, Lorenzo, E-mail: lcereser@sirm.org [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, University of Udine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Santa Maria della Misericordia − via Colugna, 50–33100, Udine (Italy); Zuiani, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.zuiani@uniud.it [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, University of Udine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Santa Maria della Misericordia − via Colugna, 50–33100, Udine (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate the agreement between Roach equations (RE) and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) in assessing the T-stage of prostate cancer (PCa). Materials and methods: Seventy-three patients with biopsy-proven PCa and previous RE assessment prospectively underwent mpMRI on a 3.0T magnet before external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Using Cohen’s kappa statistic, we assessed the agreement between RE and mpMRI in defining the T-stage (≥T3 vs.T ≤ 2) and risk category according to the National comprehensive cancer network criteria (≤intermediate vs. ≥high). We also calculated sensitivity and specificity for ≥T3 stage in an additional group of thirty-seven patients with post-prostatectomy histological examination (mpMRI validation group). Results: The agreement between RE and mpMRI in assessing the T stage and risk category was moderate (k = 0.53 and 0.56, respectively). mpMRI changed the T stage and risk category in 21.9% (95%C.I. 13.4–33-4) and 20.5% (95%C.I. 12.3–31.9), respectively, prevalently downstaging PCa compared to RE. Sensitivity and specificity for ≥T3 stage in the mpMRI validation group were 81.8% (95%C.I. 65.1–91.9) and 88.5% (72.8–96.1). Conclusion: RE and mpMRI show moderate agreement only in assessing the T-stage of PCa, translating into an mpMRI-induced change in risk assessment in about one fifth of patients. As supported by high sensitivity/specificity for ≥T3 stage in the validation group, the discrepancy we found is in favour of mpMRI as a tool to stage PCa before ERBT.

  1. Profiling Prostate Cancer Therapeutic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron A. Wade; Natasha Kyprianou

    2018-01-01

    The major challenge in the treatment of patients with advanced lethal prostate cancer is therapeutic resistance to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) and chemotherapy. Overriding this resistance requires understanding of the driving mechanisms of the tumor microenvironment, not just the androgen receptor (AR)-signaling cascade, that facilitate therapeutic resistance in order to identify new drug targets. The tumor microenvironment enables key signaling pathways promoting cancer cell survival ...

  2. Prostate Cancer Ambassadors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vines, Anissa I.; Hunter, Jaimie C.; Carlisle, Veronica A.; Richmond, Alan N.

    2016-01-01

    African American men bear a higher burden of prostate cancer than Caucasian men, but knowledge about how to make an informed decision about prostate cancer screening is limited. A lay health advisor model was used to train “Prostate Cancer Ambassadors” on prostate cancer risk and symptoms, how to make an informed decision for prostate-specific antigen screening, and how to deliver the information to members of their community. Training consisted of two, 6-hour interactive sessions and was implemented in three predominantly African American communities over an 8-month period between 2013 and 2014. Following training, Ambassadors committed to contacting at least 10 people within 3 months using a toolkit composed of wallet-sized informational cards for distribution, a slide presentation, and a flip chart. Thirty-two Ambassadors were trained, with more than half being females (59%) and half reporting a family history of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer knowledge improved significantly among Ambassadors (p ≤ .0001). Self-efficacy improved significantly for performing outreach tasks (p < .0001), and among women in helping a loved one with making an informed decision (p = .005). There was also an improvement in collective efficacy in team members (p = .0003). Twenty-nine of the Ambassadors fulfilled their commitment to reach at least 10 people (average number of contacts per Ambassador was 11). In total, 355 individuals were reached with the prostate cancer information. The Ambassador training program proved successful in training Ambassadors to reach communities about prostate cancer and how to make an informed decision about screening. PMID:27099348

  3. Organoid cultures derived from patients with advanced prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Dong; Vela, Ian; Sboner, Andrea; Iaquinta, Phillip J; Karthaus, Wouter R; Gopalan, Anuradha; Dowling, Catherine; Wanjala, Jackline N; Undvall, Eva A; Arora, Vivek K; Wongvipat, John; Kossai, Myriam; Ramazanoglu, Sinan; Barboza, Luendreo P; Di, Wei; Cao, Zhen; Zhang, Qi Fan; Sirota, Inna; Ran, Leili; MacDonald, Theresa Y; Beltran, Himisha; Mosquera, Juan-Miguel; Touijer, Karim A; Scardino, Peter T; Laudone, Vincent P; Curtis, Kristen R; Rathkopf, Dana E; Morris, Michael J; Danila, Daniel C; Slovin, Susan F; Solomon, Stephen B; Eastham, James A; Chi, Ping; Carver, Brett; Rubin, Mark A; Scher, Howard I; Clevers, Hans; Sawyers, Charles L; Chen, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The lack of in vitro prostate cancer models that recapitulate the diversity of human prostate cancer has hampered progress in understanding disease pathogenesis and therapy response. Using a 3D organoid system, we report success in long-term culture of prostate cancer from biopsy specimens and

  4. Cognitive Impairment in Men with Prostate Cancer Treated with Androgen Deprivation Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Maxine; Cole, Alexander P; Hanna, Nawar; Mucci, Lorelei A; Berry, Donna L; Basaria, Shehzad; Ahern, David K; Kibel, Adam S; Choueiri, Toni K; Trinh, Quoc-Dien

    2018-06-01

    Use of androgen deprivation therapy may increase the risk of cognitive impairment in men with prostate cancer. We performed a systematic review of the risk of overall cognitive impairment as an outcome in men receiving androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer. Studies were identified through PubMed®, MEDLINE®, PsycINFO®, Cochrane Library and Web of Knowledge/Science™. Articles were included if they 1) were published in English, 2) had subjects treated for prostate cancer with androgen deprivation therapy, 3) incorporated longitudinal comparisons and 4) used control groups. In addition, prospective studies were required to assess an established cognitive related end point using International Cognition and Cancer Task Force criteria defining impaired cognitive performance as scoring 1.5 or more standard deviations below published norms on 2 or more tests, or scoring 2.0 or more standard deviations below published norms on at least 1 test. The effect of androgen deprivation therapy on cognitive impairment was pooled using a random effects model. Of 221 abstracts 26 were selected for full text review, and 2 prospective and 4 retrospective studies were analyzed. Androgen deprivation therapy was not associated with overall cognitive impairment when the prospective cohort studies were pooled (OR 1.57, 95% CI 0.50 to 4.92, p = 0.44) with significant heterogeneity between estimates (I 2 = 83%). In retrospective data the relative risk of any cognitive impairment, including senile dementia and Alzheimer disease, was increased in men receiving androgen deprivation therapy, although the difference was not statistically significant (HR 1.28, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.76, p = 0.13) with moderate heterogeneity between estimates (I 2 = 67%). Analyses between overall cognitive impairment and use of androgen deprivation therapy defined according to International Cognition and Cancer Task Force criteria in a pooled analysis were inconclusive. In retrospective cohort studies the

  5. The Impact of the Grid Size on TomoTherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Motohiro; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Onishi, Masahiro; Takakusagi, Yosuke; Okonogi, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Atsushi; Sekihara, Tetsuo; Ando, Yoshitaka; Nakano, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Discretization errors due to the digitization of computed tomography images and the calculation grid are a significant issue in radiation therapy. Such errors have been quantitatively reported for a fixed multifield intensity-modulated radiation therapy using traditional linear accelerators. The aim of this study is to quantify the influence of the calculation grid size on the dose distribution in TomoTherapy. This study used ten treatment plans for prostate cancer. The final dose calculation was performed with “fine” (2.73 mm) and “normal” (5.46 mm) grid sizes. The dose distributions were compared from different points of view: the dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters for planning target volume (PTV) and organ at risk (OAR), the various indices, and dose differences. The DVH parameters were used Dmax, D2%, D2cc, Dmean, D95%, D98%, and Dmin for PTV and Dmax, D2%, and D2cc for OARs. The various indices used were homogeneity index and equivalent uniform dose for plan evaluation. Almost all of DVH parameters for the “fine” calculations tended to be higher than those for the “normal” calculations. The largest difference of DVH parameters for PTV was Dmax and that for OARs was rectal D2cc. The mean difference of Dmax was 3.5%, and the rectal D2cc was increased up to 6% at the maximum and 2.9% on average. The mean difference of D95% for PTV was the smallest among the differences of the other DVH parameters. For each index, whether there was a significant difference between the two grid sizes was determined through a paired t-test. There were significant differences for most of the indices. The dose difference between the “fine” and “normal” calculations was evaluated. Some points around high-dose regions had differences exceeding 5% of the prescription dose. The influence of the calculation grid size in TomoTherapy is smaller than traditional linear accelerators. However, there was a significant difference. We recommend calculating the final

  6. Effects of Presurgical Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, men diagnosed with androgen-sensitive prostate cancer with intermediate- or high-risk features will be examined with mpMRI, undergo targeted biopsies, and be treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy.

  7. A phase III clinical trial of exercise modalities on treatment side-effects in men receiving therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, Robert U; Taaffe, Dennis R; Spry, Nigel; Gardiner, Robert A; Levin, Gregory; Wall, Bradley; Joseph, David; Chambers, Suzanne K; Galvão, Daniel A

    2009-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is accompanied by a number of adverse side effects including reduced bone mass and increased risk for fracture, reduced lean mass and muscle strength, mood disturbance and increased fat mass compromising physical functioning, independence, and quality of life. The purpose of this investigation is to examine the effects of long term exercise on reversing musculoskeletal-related side effects, and cardiovascular and diabetes risk factors in men receiving androgen deprivation for their prostate cancer. Specifically, we aim to investigate the effects of a 12-month exercise program designed to load the musculoskeletal system and reduce cardiovascular and diabetes disease progression on the following primary endpoints: 1) bone mineral density; 2) cardiorespiratory function and maximal oxygen capacity; 3) body composition (lean mass and fat mass); 4) blood pressure and cardiovascular function; 5) lipids and glycemic control; and 6) quality of life and psychological distress. Multi-site randomized controlled trial of 195 men (65 subjects per arm) undergoing treatment for prostate cancer involving ADT in the cities of Perth and Brisbane in Australia. Participants will be randomized to (1) resistance/impact loading exercise, (2) resistance/cardiovascular exercise groups and (3) usual care/delayed exercise. Participants will then undergo progressive training for 12 months. Measurements for primary and secondary endpoints will take place at baseline, 6 and 12 months (end of the intervention). The principal outcome of this project will be the determination of the strength of effect of exercise on the well established musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and insulin metabolism side effects of androgen deprivation in prostate cancer patients. As this project is much longer term than previous investigations in the area of exercise and cancer, we will gain knowledge as to the continuing effects of exercise in this patient population specifically

  8. Endurance training improves insulin sensitivity and body composition in prostate cancer patients treated with androgen deprivation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvid, Thine; Winding, Kamilla; Rinnov, Anders; Dejgaard, Thomas; Thomsen, Carsten; Iversen, Peter; Brasso, Klaus; Mikines, Kari J; van Hall, Gerrit; Lindegaard, Birgitte; Solomon, Thomas P J; Pedersen, Bente K

    2013-10-01

    Insulin resistance and changes in body composition are side effects of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) given to prostate cancer patients. The present study investigated whether endurance training improves insulin sensitivity and body composition in ADT-treated prostate cancer patients. Nine men undergoing ADT for prostate cancer and ten healthy men with normal testosterone levels underwent 12 weeks of endurance training. Primary endpoints were insulin sensitivity (euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps with concomitant glucose-tracer infusion) and body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and magnetic resonance imaging). The secondary endpoint was systemic inflammation. Statistical analysis was carried out using two-way ANOVA. Endurance training increased VO2max (ml(O2)/min per kg) by 11 and 13% in the patients and controls respectively (PBody weight (Pbody fat mass (FM) (Pbody mass (P=0.99) was unchanged. Additionally, reductions were observed in abdominal (Pcancer patients exhibited improved insulin sensitivity and body composition to a similar degree as eugonadal men.

  9. Predictors of Fracture Risk and Bone Mineral Density in Men with Prostate Cancer on Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Neubecker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Decrease of bone mineral density (BMD and fracture risk is increased in men with prostate cancer receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. We looked at possible predictors of decreased BMD and increased fracture risk in men with prostate cancer; most of whom were on ADT. In a retrospective study, we analyzed serum, BMD, and clinical risk factors used in the Fracture Risk Assessment (FRAX tool and others in 78 men with prostate cancer with reported height loss. The subjects were divided in two groups: 22 men with and 56 without vertebral fractures. 17 of the 22 men with vertebral fractures on spine X-rays did not know they had a vertebral fracture. Of those 17 men, 9 had not previously qualified for treatment based on preradiograph FRAX score calculated with BMD, and 6 based on FRAX calculated without BMD. Performing spine films increased the predictive ability of FRAX for vertebral fracture. Vertebral fracture was better predicted by FRAX for other osteoporotic fractures than FRAX for hip fractures. The inclusion of BMD in FRAX calculations did not affect the predictive ability of FRAX. The PSA level showed a positive correlation with lumbar spine BMD and accounted for about 9% of spine BMD.

  10. Epigenetics in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albany, Costantine; Alva, Ajjai S; Aparicio, Ana M; Singal, Rakesh; Yellapragada, Sarvari; Sonpavde, Guru; Hahn, Noah M

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most commonly diagnosed nonskin malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death among men in the United States. Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in gene expression caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequences. Two common epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation and histone modification, have demonstrated critical roles in prostate cancer growth and metastasis. DNA hypermethylation of cytosine-guanine (CpG) rich sequence islands within gene promoter regions is widespread during neoplastic transformation of prostate cells, suggesting that treatment-induced restoration of a "normal" epigenome could be clinically beneficial. Histone modification leads to altered tumor gene function by changing chromosome structure and the level of gene transcription. The reversibility of epigenetic aberrations and restoration of tumor suppression gene function have made them attractive targets for prostate cancer treatment with modulators that demethylate DNA and inhibit histone deacetylases.

  11. Epigenetics in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costantine Albany

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the most commonly diagnosed nonskin malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death among men in the United States. Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in gene expression caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequences. Two common epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation and histone modification, have demonstrated critical roles in prostate cancer growth and metastasis. DNA hypermethylation of cytosine-guanine (CpG rich sequence islands within gene promoter regions is widespread during neoplastic transformation of prostate cells, suggesting that treatment-induced restoration of a “normal” epigenome could be clinically beneficial. Histone modification leads to altered tumor gene function by changing chromosome structure and the level of gene transcription. The reversibility of epigenetic aberrations and restoration of tumor suppression gene function have made them attractive targets for prostate cancer treatment with modulators that demethylate DNA and inhibit histone deacetylases.

  12. The use of combined radiation therapy and hormonal therapy in the management of lymph node-positive prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittington, Richard; Malkowicz, S Bruce; Machtay, Mitchell; Van Arsdalen, Keith; Barnes, Margaret M; Broderick, Gregory A; Wein, Alan J

    1997-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the rate of tumor response and patterns of relapse following combined hormonal-radiation therapy of adenocarcinoma of the prostate and to measure the survival in a group of men with tumor metastatic to pelvic lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: 66 patients with adenocarcinoma of the prostate with pathologically confirmed pelvic lymph node involvement were treated with combined radiation therapy and hormonal therapy. An additional five patients declined hormonal therapy. The patients treated with combined therapy represented a group with locally advanced disease including 44 patients (67%) with T3 or T4 tumors and 51 patients (80%) had N2 or N3 lymph node metastases. The pelvic lymph nodes were treated to a dose of 45 Gy and the prostate was boosted to a dose of 65 to 71 Gy. Hormonal therapy began up to 2 months before radiation and continued indefinitely. Patients were allowed to select their hormonal therapy and could choose DES (2 patients), orchiectomy (21 patients), LHRH agonist (7 patients) or combined androgen blockade (34 patients). Results: Median follow-up is 49 months (range 12 to 131 months) and 21 patients have been followed for longer than 5 years. There have been 15 recurrences the entire group including three local recurrences in the prostate, seven patients with distant metastases, four patients with biochemical recurrences without clinical evidence of disease, and one patient where the location was unknown. Two of the PSA recurrences occurred in patients who elected to discontinue hormones after less than 3 years of therapy. The overall survival at 5 and 8 years is 94 and 84%, the clinical disease free survival is 85 and 67%, and the biochemical disease-free survival is 78 and 47%. There was no increased toxicity of the combined modality regimen compared to the expected effects of radiation and hormonal therapy. Conclusion: Combined hormonal and radiation therapy represents an effective treatment option for patients with

  13. The use of combined radiation therapy and hormonal therapy in the management of lymph node-positive prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittington, Richard; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Machtay, Mitchell; Van Arsdalen, Keith; Barnes, Margaret M.; Broderick, Gregory A.; Wein, Alan J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the rate of tumor response and patterns of relapse following combined hormonal-radiation therapy of adenocarcinoma of the prostate and to measure the survival in a group of men with tumor metastatic to pelvic lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: 66 patients with adenocarcinoma of the prostate with pathologically confirmed pelvic lymph node involvement were treated with combined radiation therapy and hormonal therapy. An additional five patients declined hormonal therapy. The patients treated with combined therapy represented a group with locally advanced disease including 44 patients (67%) with T3 or T4 tumors and 51 patients (80%) had N2 or N3 lymph node metastases. The pelvic lymph nodes were treated to a dose of 45 Gy and the prostate was boosted to a dose of 65 to 71 Gy. Hormonal therapy began up to 2 months before radiation and continued indefinitely. Patients were allowed to select their hormonal therapy and could choose DES (2 patients), orchiectomy (21 patients), LHRH agonist (7 patients) or combined androgen blockade (34 patients). Results: Median follow-up is 49 months (range 12 to 131 months) and 21 patients have been followed for longer than 5 years. There have been 15 recurrences the entire group including three local recurrences in the prostate, seven patients with distant metastases, four patients with biochemical recurrences without clinical evidence of disease, and one patient where the location was unknown. Two of the PSA recurrences occurred in patients who elected to discontinue hormones after less than 3 years of therapy. The overall survival at 5 and 8 years is 94 and 84%, the clinical disease free survival is 85 and 67%, and the biochemical disease-free survival is 78 and 47%. There was no increased toxicity of the combined modality regimen compared to the expected effects of radiation and hormonal therapy. Conclusion: Combined hormonal and radiation therapy represents an effective treatment option for patients with

  14. ETS Gene Fusions as Predictive Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    phenotype  in   preclinical  models  of  prostate  cancer,  2)  to  explore  the  mechanism  of  interaction  between   ERG  (the  predominant  ETS...established  this  axis  as  a  potential  therapeutic   target.         15. SUBJECT  TERMS Prostate cancer, ETS gene fusions, ERG , radiation resistance, DNA...interaction  between   ERG   (the   predominant   ETS   gene   fusion   product)   and   the   DNA   repair   protein   DNA-­PK,   and   3)   to

  15. Structure-Based Design, Synthesis and Testing of Non-Peptide, Cell-Permeable, Potent Small Molecule Smac Mimetics as a New Therapy for Prostate Cancer. Revision

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Shanomeng

    2007-01-01

    XIAP (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein) is a promising new therapeutic target for the design of an entirely new class of effective and non-toxic cancer therapy to improve survival and quality of life of prostate cancer patients...

  16. Sustained long-term immune responses after in situ gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and hormonal therapy in prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Tetsuo; Teh, Bin S.; Timme, Terry L.; Mai, W.-Y.; Satoh, Takefumi; Kusaka, Nobuyuki; Naruishi, Koji; Fattah, Elmoataz Abdel; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Butler, E. Brian; Thompson, Timothy C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To explore long-term immune responses after combined radio-gene-hormonal therapy. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients with prostate specific antigen 10 or higher or Gleason score of 7 or higher or clinical stage T2b to T3 were treated with gene therapy that consisted of 3 separate intraprostatic injections of AdHSV-tk on Days 0, 56, and 70. Each injection was followed by 2 weeks of valacyclovir. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was delivered 2 days after the second AdHSV-tk injection for 7 weeks. Hormonal therapy was initiated on Day 0 and continued for 4 months or 2.3 years. Blood samples were taken before, during, and after treatment. Lymphocytes were analyzed by fluorescent antibody cell sorting (FACS). Results: Median follow-up was 26 months (range, 4-48 months). The mean percentages of DR + CD8 + T cells were increased at all timepoints up to 8 months. The mean percentages of DR + CD4 + T cells were increased later and sustained longer until 12 months. Long-term (2.3 years) use of hormonal therapy did not affect the percentage of any lymphocyte population. Conclusions: Sustained long-term (up to 8 to 12 months) systemic T-cell responses were noted after combined radio-gene-hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Prolonged use of hormonal therapy does not suppress this response. These results suggest the potential for sustained activation of cell-mediated immune responses against cancer

  17. Hypoxia-Independent Downregulation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Targets by Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragnum, Harald Bull; Røe, Kathrine; Holm, Ruth; Vlatkovic, Ljiljana; Nesland, Jahn Marthin; Aarnes, Eva-Katrine; Ree, Anne Hansen; Flatmark, Kjersti; Seierstad, Therese; Lilleby, Wolfgang; Lyng, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We explored changes in hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) signaling during androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) of androgen-sensitive prostate cancer xenografts under conditions in which no significant change in immunostaining of the hypoxia marker pimonidazole had occurred. Methods and Materials: Gene expression profiles of volume-matched androgen-exposed and androgen-deprived CWR22 xenografts, with similar pimonidazole-positive fractions, were compared. Direct targets of androgen receptor (AR) and HIF1 transcription factors were identified among the differentially expressed genes by using published lists. Biological processes affected by ADT were determined by gene ontology analysis. HIF1α protein expression in xenografts and biopsy samples from 35 patients receiving neoadjuvant ADT was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: A total of 1344 genes showed more than 2-fold change in expression by ADT, including 35 downregulated and 5 upregulated HIF1 targets. Six genes were shared HIF1 and AR targets, and their downregulation was confirmed with quantitative RT-PCR. Significant suppression of the biological processes proliferation, metabolism, and stress response in androgen-deprived xenografts was found, consistent with tumor regression. Nineteen downregulated HIF1 targets were involved in those significant biological processes, most of them in metabolism. Four of these were shared AR and HIF1 targets, including genes encoding the regulatory glycolytic proteins HK2, PFKFB3, and SLC2A1. Most of the downregulated HIF1 targets were induced by hypoxia in androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines, confirming their role as hypoxia-responsive HIF1 targets in prostate cancer. Downregulation of HIF1 targets was consistent with the absence of HIF1α protein in xenografts and downregulation in patients by ADT (P<.001). Conclusions: AR repression by ADT may lead to downregulation of HIF1 signaling independently of hypoxic fraction, and this may contribute to

  18. Hypoxia-Independent Downregulation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Targets by Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragnum, Harald Bull [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Røe, Kathrine [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Division of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog (Norway); Holm, Ruth; Vlatkovic, Ljiljana [Department of Pathology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Nesland, Jahn Marthin [Department of Pathology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Aarnes, Eva-Katrine [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Ree, Anne Hansen [Division of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog (Norway); Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Flatmark, Kjersti [Department of Tumor Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Seierstad, Therese [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud University College, Drammen (Norway); Lilleby, Wolfgang [Department of Oncology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Lyng, Heidi, E-mail: heidi.lyng@rr-research.no [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: We explored changes in hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) signaling during androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) of androgen-sensitive prostate cancer xenografts under conditions in which no significant change in immunostaining of the hypoxia marker pimonidazole had occurred. Methods and Materials: Gene expression profiles of volume-matched androgen-exposed and androgen-deprived CWR22 xenografts, with similar pimonidazole-positive fractions, were compared. Direct targets of androgen receptor (AR) and HIF1 transcription factors were identified among the differentially expressed genes by using published lists. Biological processes affected by ADT were determined by gene ontology analysis. HIF1α protein expression in xenografts and biopsy samples from 35 patients receiving neoadjuvant ADT was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: A total of 1344 genes showed more than 2-fold change in expression by ADT, including 35 downregulated and 5 upregulated HIF1 targets. Six genes were shared HIF1 and AR targets, and their downregulation was confirmed with quantitative RT-PCR. Significant suppression of the biological processes proliferation, metabolism, and stress response in androgen-deprived xenografts was found, consistent with tumor regression. Nineteen downregulated HIF1 targets were involved in those significant biological processes, most of them in metabolism. Four of these were shared AR and HIF1 targets, including genes encoding the regulatory glycolytic proteins HK2, PFKFB3, and SLC2A1. Most of the downregulated HIF1 targets were induced by hypoxia in androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines, confirming their role as hypoxia-responsive HIF1 targets in prostate cancer. Downregulation of HIF1 targets was consistent with the absence of HIF1α protein in xenografts and downregulation in patients by ADT (P<.001). Conclusions: AR repression by ADT may lead to downregulation of HIF1 signaling independently of hypoxic fraction, and this may contribute to

  19. Enhancement of Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer by DNA-PKcs Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    for targeted radiosensitization of prostate cancer cells. The FDA-approved biocompatible and biodegradable PLGA is a commonly used polymer in drug...cut-off (MWCO) dialysis bags (Spectrum laboratories, Rancho Dominguez, CA) and shaken at 37oC for 21 days. At pre-determined time points, 1 ml of... biodegradable photoluminescent polymer (BPLP)-coated iron oxide NPs were also significantly uptaken by PC3 in the presence of a 1.3T magnet. The R11

  20. Addition to our technical center arco therapy volume (VMAT) in the treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateos, J. C.; Cabrera, P.; Luis, J.; Perucha, M.; Sanchez, G.; Herrador, M.; Ortiz, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is the description of the incorporation of the treatment technique radiotherapic Arcoterapia Volumetric (VMAT) in our hospital, patients with prostate cancer risk. The technological complexity of this type, which vary simultaneously the influence of radiation, the blades of the multileaf collimator (MLC) and the angular velocity of the accelerator head, determine a major challenge in designing the plan and verify the feasibility treatments.

  1. Targeting a Novel Androgen Receptor-Repressed Pathway in Prostate Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    receptor; TNF, tumor necrosis factor; TGN, trans-Golgi network; EMT, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition; MMP, matrix metalloprotease; HDAC, histone...such as bioactive peptides [31], lipids [32], growth factors [33], tumor necrosis factor (TNF) [34], chemo- kines, and many of which act through...of prostate cancer [91]. It has also been shown that vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) promote cell proliferation and migration via PKD

  2. Imaging response during therapy with radium-223 for castration-resistant prostate cancer with bone metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keizman, D; Fosboel, M O; Reichegger, H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The imaging response to radium-223 therapy is at present poorly described. We aimed to describe the imaging response to radium-223 treatment. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated the computed tomography (CT) and bone scintigraphy response of metastatic castration-resistant prostate c....../or radiological) may be noted during the first 3 months, and should not be confused with progression. Imaging by CT scan should be considered after three and six doses of radium-223 to rule out extraskeletal disease progression....

  3. Granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin instillation therapy: A potential cause of incidental F-18 FDG uptke in the prostate gland on F-18 FDG PET/CT in patients with bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Choon Young; Lee, Sang Woo; Choi, Seock Hwan; Son, Seung Hyun; Jung, Ji Hoon; Lee, Chang Hee; Jeong, Shin Young; Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Jae Tae [Kyungpook National University Medical Center and School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility that Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-induced granulomatous prostatitis can be a potential cause of benign F-18 FDG uptake. A total of 395 bladder cancer patients who underwent F-18 FDG PET/CT (PET/CT) were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups according to BCG therapy status. Elapsed time after BCG therapy, serum PSA level, results of prostate biopsy, and the SUV{sub max} and uptake pattern in the prostate gland were reviewed. For patients who underwent follow-up PET/CT, the changes in SUV{sub max} were calculated. While 35 % of patients showed prostate uptake in the BCG therapy group, only 1 % showed prostate uptake in the non-BCG therapy group (p < 0.001). Among 49 patients with FDG-avid prostate lesions, none had suspected malignancy during the follow-up period (median: 16 months). Five patients revealed granulomatous prostatitis on biopsy. The incidence of FDG-avid prostate lesions was significantly higher if the elapsed time after BCG therapy was less than 1 year compared to more than 1 year (p < 0.001). Serum PSA was normal in 88 % of patients. All patients with incidental F-18 FDG uptake in the prostate gland showed focal or multifocal prostate uptake, and median SUV{sub max} was 4.7. In 16 patients who underwent follow-up PET/CT, SUV{sub max} was decreased in 14 patients (88 %) without treatment, and no patients demonstrated further increased prostate uptake (p < 0.001). BCG-induced granulomatous prostatitis can be a potential cause of benign F-18 FDG uptake, especially in those with a history of bladder cancer treated with BCG. In BCG-induced granulomatous prostatitis, focal or multifocal prostate uptake is frequently seen within 1 year after BCG therapy, and the intensity of prostate uptake is decreased on the follow-up PET/CT without any treatment.

  4. Surveillance on interfacility differences in dose-prescription policy of intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Hatano, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has recently become popular in Japan. Prostate cancer is indisputably one of the main targets of IMRT. However, the current status and interfacility differences in dose-prescription policies for prostate IMRT are unknown. Therefore, a nationwide survey of 43 institutions that had implemented prostate IMRT was conducted by sending a questionnaire regarding the above-mentioned issues. Thirty-three institutions (77%) had responded to the questionnaire by the end of October 2010. A total of 5245 patients with localized prostate cancer had been treated with IMRT by the end of 2009. Regular multileaf collimator-based techniques were the most common beam delivery method. Dose-prescription policies were divided into four major categories: isocenter-based (at isocenter), dose delivered to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) (D95)-based (D95 at PTV), mean dose to the PTV-based (Mean at PTV), and mean dose to the clinical target volume (CTV)-based (at CTV). The mean doses of the CTV and PTV, and the volume of the PTV receiving 95% of the dose (V95) were significantly higher with the D95 at PTV policy than with the other prescription policies. Low-dose areas and hot spots were observed within the PTV in plans with at isocenter and at CTV policies. In conclusion, there are currently considerable differences among institutions in Japan regarding target doses for prostate IMRT. The D95 at PTV prescription policy resulted in significant dose escalation compared with the other policies. These differences should be taken into consideration when interpreting treatment outcomes and creating multi-institutional protocols in the future. (author)

  5. Imaging and prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    1996-01-01

    The use of imaging in evaluating patients with prostate cancer is highly dependent upon the purpose of the evaluation. Ultrasound, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, TC-99m Bone Scanning, and Positron Emission Tomography may all be utilized for imaging in prostate cancer. The utility of each of these modalities depends upon the intended purpose: for instance, screening, staging, or evaluating for progression of disease in patients with prostate cancer. Transrectal ultrasound is performed by placing a 5MHz to 7.5 MHz transducer in the rectum and imaging the prostate in the coronal and sagittal planes. Prostate cancer generally appears as an area of diminished echogenocity in the peripheral zone of the prostate gland. However, up to 24% of prostate cancers are isoechoic and cannot be well distinguished from the remainder of the peripheral zone. In addition, the incidence of malignancy in a lesion judged to be suspicious on ultrasound is between 20% and 25%. Therefore, while ultrasound is the least expensive of the three cross sectional imaging modalities, its relatively low specificity precludes it from being used as a screening examination. Investigators have also looked at the ability of ultrasound to evaluate the presence and extent of extracapsular spread of prostate cancer. The RDOG (Radiology Diagnostic Oncology Group) multi-institutional cooperative trial reported a disappointing overall accuracy of ultrasound of 58% for staging prostate cancer. The accuracy was somewhat higher 63%, for patients with advanced disease. The other cross-sectional imaging modalities available for imaging the prostate include Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Computed Tomography is useful as an 'anatomic' imaging technique to detect lymph node enlargement. It is not sensitive in detecting microscopic nodal involvement with tumor, or tumor in non-enlarged pelvic lymph nodes. The primary prostate neoplasm is generally the same attenuation as the normal

  6. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Dose Painting for Localized Prostate Cancer Using 11C-choline Positron Emission Tomography Scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Joe H.; Lim Joon, Daryl; Lee, Sze Ting; Gong, Sylvia J.; Anderson, Nigel J.; Scott, Andrew M.; Davis, Ian D.; Clouston, David; Bolton, Damien; Hamilton, Christopher S.; Khoo, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the technical feasibility of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose painting using 11 C-choline positron emission tomography PET scans in patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was an RT planning study of 8 patients with prostate cancer who had 11 C-choline PET scans prior to radical prostatectomy. Two contours were semiautomatically generated on the basis of the PET scans for each patient: 60% and 70% of the maximum standardized uptake values (SUV 60% and SUV 70% ). Three IMRT plans were generated for each patient: PLAN 78 , which consisted of whole-prostate radiation therapy to 78 Gy; PLAN 78-90 , which consisted of whole-prostate RT to 78 Gy, a boost to the SUV 60% to 84 Gy, and a further boost to the SUV 70% to 90 Gy; and PLAN 72-90 , which consisted of whole-prostate RT to 72 Gy, a boost to the SUV 60% to 84 Gy, and a further boost to the SUV 70% to 90 Gy. The feasibility of these plans was judged by their ability to reach prescription doses while adhering to published dose constraints. Tumor control probabilities based on PET scan-defined volumes (TCP PET ) and on prostatectomy-defined volumes (TCP path ), and rectal normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were compared between the plans. Results: All plans for all patients reached prescription doses while adhering to dose constraints. TCP PET values for PLAN 78 , PLAN 78-90 , and PLAN 72-90 were 65%, 97%, and 96%, respectively. TCP path values were 71%, 97%, and 89%, respectively. Both PLAN 78-90 and PLAN 72-90 had significantly higher TCP PET (P=.002 and .001) and TCP path (P 78 . PLAN 78-90 and PLAN 72-90 were not significantly different in terms of TCP PET or TCP path . There were no significant differences in rectal NTCPs between the 3 plans. Conclusions: IMRT dose painting for localized prostate cancer using 11 C-choline PET scans is technically feasible. Dose painting results in higher TCPs without higher NTCPs.

  7. Targeting Quiescence in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0413 TITLE: Targeting Quiescence in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Laura Buttitta CONTRACTING...Quiescence in Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting uiescence in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0413 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT A major problem in prostate cancer is finding and eliminating the non-proliferating or “quiescent” cancer cells. This is because early

  8. PSMA-Based Radioligand Therapy for Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: The Bad Berka Experience Since 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Harshad R; Singh, Aviral; Schuchardt, Christiane; Niepsch, Karin; Sayeg, Manal; Leshch, Yevgeniy; Wester, Hans-Juergen; Baum, Richard P

    2016-10-01

    A potential milestone in personalized nuclear medicine is theranostics of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) based on molecular imaging using PET/CT with 68 Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligands and molecular radiotherapy using PSMA-targeted radioligand therapy (PRLT) with 177 Lu-PSMA ligands. 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT enables accurate detection of mCRPC lesions with high diagnostic sensitivity and specificity and provides quantitative and reproducible data that can be used to select patients for PRLT and therapeutic monitoring. Our comprehensive experience over the last 3 years using different radioligands indicates that PRLT is highly effective for the treatment of mCRPC, even in advanced cases, and potentially lends a significant benefit to overall and progression-free survival. Additionally, significant improvement in clinical symptoms and excellent palliation of pain can be achieved. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  9. Lowering T Cell Activation Thresholds and Deregulating Homeostasis to Facilitate Immunotherapeutic Responses to Treat Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kwon, Eugene D

    2006-01-01

    ... to develop immune-based therapies for prostate cancer Hence, relatively straightforward manipulations that induce specific T cell responses against prostate tumors or epithelial tissues, especially...

  10. Hormone therapy and radiotherapy for early prostate cancer: A utility-adjusted number needed to treat (NNT) analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jani, Ashesh B.; Kao, Johnny; Heimann, Ruth; Hellman, Samuel

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify, using the number needed to treat (NNT) methodology, the benefit of short-term (≤6 months) hormone therapy adjuvant to radiotherapy in the group of patients with early (clinical stage T1-T2c) prostate cancer. Methods and materials: The absolute biochemical control benefit for the use of hormones adjuvant to radiotherapy in early-stage disease was determined by literature review. A model was developed to estimate the utility-adjusted survival detriment due to the side effects of hormone therapy. The NNTs before and after the incorporation of hormone sequelae were computed; the sign and magnitude of the NNTs were used to gauge the effect of the hormones. Results: The absolute NNT analysis, based on summarizing the results of 8 reports including a total of 3652 patients, demonstrated an advantage to the addition of hormones for the general early-stage prostate cancer population as well as for all prognostic groups. After adjustment for hormone-induced functional loss, the advantage of hormones remained considerable in the high- and intermediate-risk groups, with the utility-adjusted NNT becoming weakened in the low-risk group when the utility compromise from complications of hormones was assumed to be considerable. Conclusions: Short-term hormone therapy seems to be beneficial for selected early-stage prostate cancer patients. The advantage seems to be greatest in the intermediate- and high-risk groups; with current follow-up, the side effects of hormones may outweigh their benefit in certain clinical situations in the favorable group. The present investigation demonstrates the significant role of the NNT technique for oncologic and radiotherapeutic management decisions when treatment complications need to be considered and balanced with the beneficial effects of the treatment

  11. Genomic rearrangements of PTEN in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sopheap ePhin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The phosphatase and tensin homolog gene on chromosome 10q23.3 (PTEN is a negative regulator of the PIK3/Akt survival pathway and is the most frequently deleted tumor suppressor gene in prostate cancer. Monoallelic loss of PTEN is present in up to 60% of localized prostate cancers and complete loss of PTEN in prostate cancer is linked to metastasis and androgen independent progression. Studies on the genomic status of PTEN in prostate cancer initially used a two-color fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH assay for PTEN copy number detection in formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue preparations. More recently, a four-color FISH assay containing two additional control probes flanking the PTEN locus with a lower false-positive rate was reported. Combined with the detection of other critical genomic biomarkers for prostate cancer such as ERG, AR, and MYC, the evaluation of PTEN genomic status has proven to be invaluable for patient stratification and management. Although less frequent than allelic deletions, point mutations in the gene and epigenetic silencing are also known to contribute to loss of PTEN function, and ultimately to prostate cancer initiation. Overall, it is clear that PTEN is a powerful biomarker for prostate cancer. Used as a companion diagnostic for emerging therapeutic drugs, FISH analysis of PTEN is promisingly moving human prostate cancer closer to more effective cancer management and therapies.

  12. WE-FG-BRA-02: Docetaxel Eluting Brachytherapy Spacers for Local Chemo-Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belz, J [Northeastern University, Boston, MA (United States); Kumar, R; Sridhar, S [Northeastern University & Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Makrigiorgos, G; Nguyen, P [Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); D’Amico, A [Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Cormack, R [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We propose an innovative combinatorial treatment strategy of Local ChemoRadiation Therapy (LCRT) using a sustained drug delivery platform in the form of a spacer to locally radio-sensitize the prostate with Docetaxel (DTX) enabling a synergisti