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Sample records for prostate cancer dose

  1. Prostate cancer: Doses and volumes of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennequin, C.; Rivera, S.; Quero, L.; Latorzeff, I.

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy is nowadays a major therapeutic option in prostate cancer. Technological improvements allowed dose escalation without increasing late toxicity. Some randomized trials have shown that dose escalation decreases the biochemical failure rate, without any benefit in survival with the present follow-up. However, some studies indicate that the distant metastases rate is also decreased. Most of these studies have been done without hormonal treatment, and the role of dose escalation in case of long-term androgen deprivation is unknown. The target volume encompassed the whole gland: however, complete or partial focal treatment of the prostate can be done with sophisticated IMRT technique and must be evaluated. Proximal part of the seminal vesicles must be included in the target volumes. The role of nodal irradiation is another debate, but it could be logically proposed for the unfavourable group. (authors)

  2. Treatment of the prostate cancer with high dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro; Torres Silva, Felipe

    2002-01-01

    The prostate cancer treatment in early stages is controversial. The high dose rate brachytherapy has been used like monotherapy or boost with external beam radiotherapy in advanced disease. This paper describes the technique and the advantages over other modalities

  3. Low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Yosuke; Dokiya, Takushi; Yorozu, Atsunori; Suzuki, Takayuki; Saito, Shiro; Monma, Tetsuo; Ohki, Takahiro [National Tokyo Medical Center (Japan); Murai, Masaru; Kubo, Atsushi

    2000-04-01

    From December 1997 through January 1999, fifteen prostatic cancer patients were treated with low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy using TRUS and perineal template guidance without external radiotherapy. Up to now, as no apparent side effects were found, the safety of this treatment is suggested. In the future, in order to treat prostatic cancer patients with interstitial brachytherapy using I-125 or Pd-103, more investigation for this low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy is needed. (author)

  4. Low-dose irradiation for controlling prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuttler, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among North American men and the second leading cause of death in those aged 65 and over. The American Cancer Society recommends testing those over age 50 who are expected to live at least 10 years, even though the ability of early detection to decrease prostate cancer mortality has not been demonstrated. So controversy exists about the appropriateness of screening because of the considerable economic and social burden of diagnosing and treating prostate cancer, coupled with the projected large increase in the number of new cases as the population ages. This very important public health issue could be addressed at low cost by total-body low-dose irradiation therapy to stimulate the patient's own defences to prevent and control most cancers, including prostate cancer, with no symptomatic side effects. (author)

  5. Testicular Doses in Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Jun; Chen Zhe; Yu, James B.; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Peschel, Richard E.; Nath, Ravinder

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate testicular doses contributed by kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: An EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose distributions from kVCBCT on 3 prostate cancer patients. Absorbed doses to various organs were compared between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatments and kVCBCT scans. The impact of CBCT scanning mode, kilovoltage peak energy (kVp), and CBCT field span on dose deposition to testes and other organs was investigated. Results: In comparison with one 10-MV IMRT treatment, a 125-kV half-fan CBCT scan delivered 3.4, 3.8, 4.1, and 5.7 cGy to the prostate, rectum, bladder, and femoral heads, respectively, accounting for 1.7%, 3.2%, 3.2%, and 8.4% of megavoltage photon dose contributions. However, the testes received 2.9 cGy from the same CBCT scan, a threefold increase as compared with 0.7 cGy received during IMRT. With the same kVp, full-fan mode deposited much less dose to organs than half-fan mode, ranging from 9% less for prostate to 69% less for testes, except for rectum, where full-fan mode delivered 34% more dose. As photon beam energy increased from 60 to 125 kV, kVCBCT-contributed doses increased exponentially for all organs, irrespective of scanning mode. Reducing CBCT field span from 30 to 10 cm in the superior–inferior direction cut testicular doses from 5.7 to 0.2 cGy in half-fan mode and from 1.5 to 0.1 cGy in full-fan mode. Conclusions: Compared with IMRT, kVCBCT-contributed doses to the prostate, rectum, bladder, and femoral heads are clinically insignificant, whereas dose to the testes is threefold more. Full-fan CBCT usually deposits much less dose to organs (except for rectum) than half-fan mode in prostate patients. Kilovoltage CBCT–contributed doses increase exponentially with photon beam energy. Reducing CBCT field significantly cuts doses to testes and other organs.

  6. Testicular Doses in Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Jun, E-mail: jun.deng@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Chen Zhe; Yu, James B.; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Peschel, Richard E.; Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate testicular doses contributed by kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: An EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose distributions from kVCBCT on 3 prostate cancer patients. Absorbed doses to various organs were compared between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatments and kVCBCT scans. The impact of CBCT scanning mode, kilovoltage peak energy (kVp), and CBCT field span on dose deposition to testes and other organs was investigated. Results: In comparison with one 10-MV IMRT treatment, a 125-kV half-fan CBCT scan delivered 3.4, 3.8, 4.1, and 5.7 cGy to the prostate, rectum, bladder, and femoral heads, respectively, accounting for 1.7%, 3.2%, 3.2%, and 8.4% of megavoltage photon dose contributions. However, the testes received 2.9 cGy from the same CBCT scan, a threefold increase as compared with 0.7 cGy received during IMRT. With the same kVp, full-fan mode deposited much less dose to organs than half-fan mode, ranging from 9% less for prostate to 69% less for testes, except for rectum, where full-fan mode delivered 34% more dose. As photon beam energy increased from 60 to 125 kV, kVCBCT-contributed doses increased exponentially for all organs, irrespective of scanning mode. Reducing CBCT field span from 30 to 10 cm in the superior-inferior direction cut testicular doses from 5.7 to 0.2 cGy in half-fan mode and from 1.5 to 0.1 cGy in full-fan mode. Conclusions: Compared with IMRT, kVCBCT-contributed doses to the prostate, rectum, bladder, and femoral heads are clinically insignificant, whereas dose to the testes is threefold more. Full-fan CBCT usually deposits much less dose to organs (except for rectum) than half-fan mode in prostate patients. Kilovoltage CBCT-contributed doses increase exponentially with photon beam energy. Reducing CBCT field significantly cuts doses to testes and other organs.

  7. Take with Food: Study Tests Lowering Dose of Prostate Cancer Drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Currents Blog Cancer Currents Blog Take with Food: Study Tests Lowering Dose of Prostate Cancer Drug Subscribe April ... to this page included, e.g., “Take with Food: Study Tests Lowering Dose of Prostate Cancer Drug was originally ...

  8. Urethral stricture following high dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, Lisa; Williams, Scott G.; Tai, Keen Hun; Foroudi, Farshad; Cleeve, L.; Duchesne, Gillian M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence, timing, nature and outcome of urethral strictures following high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) for prostate carcinoma. Methods and materials: Data from 474 patients with clinically localised prostate cancer treated with HDRB were analysed. Ninety percent received HDRB as a boost to external beam radiotherapy (HDRBB) and the remainder as monotherapy (HDRBM). Urethral strictures were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results: At a median follow-up of 41 months, 38 patients (8%) were diagnosed with a urethral stricture (6-year actuarial risk 12%). Stricture location was bulbo-membranous (BM) urethra in 92.1%. The overall actuarial rate of grade 2 or more BM urethral stricture was estimated at 10.8% (95% CI 7.0-14.9%), with a median time to diagnosis of 22 months (range 10-68 months). All strictures were initially managed with either dilatation (n = 15) or optical urethrotomy (n = 20). Second line therapy was required in 17 cases (49%), third line in three cases (9%) and 1 patient open urethroplasty (grade 3 toxicity). Predictive factors on multivariate analysis were prior trans-urethral resection of prostate (hazard ratio (HR) 2.81, 95% CI 1.15-6.85, p = 0.023); hypertension (HR 2.83, 95% CI 1.37-5.85, p = 0.005); and dose per fraction used in HDR (HR for 1 Gy increase per fraction 1.33, 95% CI 1.08-1.64, p = 0.008). Conclusions: BM urethral strictures are the most common late grade 2 or more urinary toxicity following HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Most are manageable with minimally invasive procedures. Both clinical and dosimetric factors appear to influence the risk of stricture formation.

  9. Choline PET based dose-painting in prostate cancer - Modelling of dose effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niyazi, Maximilian; Bartenstein, Peter; Belka, Claus; Ganswindt, Ute

    2010-01-01

    Several randomized trials have documented the value of radiation dose escalation in patients with prostate cancer, especially in patients with intermediate risk profile. Up to now dose escalation is usually applied to the whole prostate. IMRT and related techniques currently allow for dose escalation in sub-volumes of the organ. However, the sensitivity of the imaging modality and the fact that small islands of cancer are often dispersed within the whole organ may limit these approaches with regard to a clear clinical benefit. In order to assess potential effects of a dose escalation in certain sub-volumes based on choline PET imaging a mathematical dose-response model was developed. Based on different assumptions for α/β, γ50, sensitivity and specificity of choline PET, the influence of the whole prostate and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) dose on tumor control probability (TCP) was calculated. Based on the given heterogeneity of all potential variables certain representative permutations of the parameters were chosen and, subsequently, the influence on TCP was assessed. Using schedules with 74 Gy within the whole prostate and a SIB dose of 90 Gy the TCP increase ranged from 23.1% (high detection rate of choline PET, low whole prostate dose, high γ50/ASTRO definition for tumor control) to 1.4% TCP gain (low sensitivity of PET, high whole prostate dose, CN + 2 definition for tumor control) or even 0% in selected cases. The corresponding initial TCP values without integrated boost ranged from 67.3% to 100%. According to a large data set of intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients the resulting TCP gains ranged from 22.2% to 10.1% (ASTRO definition) or from 13.2% to 6.0% (CN + 2 definition). Although a simplified mathematical model was employed, the presented model allows for an estimation in how far given schedules are relevant for clinical practice. However, the benefit of a SIB based on choline PET seems less than intuitively expected. Only under the

  10. Dose escalation using conformal high-dose-rate brachytherapy improves outcome in unfavorable prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alvaro A; Gustafson, Gary; Gonzalez, José; Armour, Elwood; Mitchell, Chris; Edmundson, Gregory; Spencer, William; Stromberg, Jannifer; Huang, Raywin; Vicini, Frank

    2002-06-01

    To overcome radioresistance for patients with unfavorable prostate cancer, a prospective trial of pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) interdigitated with dose-escalating conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy was performed. Between November 1991 and August 2000, 207 patients were treated with 46 Gy pelvic EBRT and increasing HDR brachytherapy boost doses (5.50-11.5 Gy/fraction) during 5 weeks. The eligibility criteria were pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level >or=10.0 ng/mL, Gleason score >or=7, or clinical Stage T2b or higher. Patients were divided into 2 dose levels, low-dose biologically effective dose 93 Gy (149 patients). No patient received hormones. We used the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition for biochemical failure. The median age was 69 years. The mean follow-up for the group was 4.4 years, and for the low and high-dose levels, it was 7.0 and 3.4 years, respectively. The actuarial 5-year biochemical control rate was 74%, and the overall, cause-specific, and disease-free survival rate was 92%, 98%, and 68%, respectively. The 5-year biochemical control rate for the low-dose group was 52%; the rate for the high-dose group was 87% (p failure. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 gastrointestinal/genitourinary complications ranged from 0.5% to 9%. The actuarial 5-year impotency rate was 51%. Pelvic EBRT interdigitated with transrectal ultrasound-guided real-time conformal HDR prostate brachytherapy boost is both a precise dose delivery system and a very effective treatment for unfavorable prostate cancer. We demonstrated an incremental beneficial effect on biochemical control and cause-specific survival with higher doses. These results, coupled with the low risk of complications, the advantage of not being radioactive after implantation, and the real-time interactive planning, define a new standard for treatment.

  11. Radiation dose and late failures in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, Peter B.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Pollack, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of radiation dose escalation on the timing of biochemical failure (BF) and distant metastasis (DM) for prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone. Methods: The data from 667 men with clinically localized intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal RT alone were retrospectively analyzed. The interval hazard rates of DM and BF, using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) and Phoenix (nadir + 2) definitions, were determined. The median follow-up was 77 months. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that increasing radiation dose was independently associated with decreased ASTRO BF (p < 0.0001), nadir + 2 BF (p = 0.001), and DM (p = 0.006). The preponderance (85%) of ASTRO BF occurred at ≤4 years after RT, and nadir + 2 BF was more evenly spread throughout Years 1-10, with 55% of BF in ≤4 years. Radiation dose escalation caused a shift in the BF from earlier to later years. The interval hazard function for DM appeared to be biphasic (early and late peaks) overall and for the <74-Gy group. In patients receiving ≥74 Gy, a reduction occurred in the risk of DM in the early and late waves, although the late wave appeared reduced to a greater degree. Conclusion: The ASTRO definition of BF systematically underestimated late BF because of backdating. Radiation dose escalation diminished and delayed BF; the delay suggested that local persistence may still be present in some patients. For DM, a greater radiation dose reduced the early and late waves, suggesting that persistence of local disease contributed to both

  12. Early termination of prostate cancer hyperfractionated dose escalation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D; Porter, Arthur T; Kocheril, Paul; Grignon, David; Orton, Colin

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This study was initiated to determine the maximum tolerable dose of hyperfractionated radiation in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine patients with locally advanced prostate cancer (T3-T4 Nx, 0, 1 M0 and/or Gleason Score ≥ 8) were treated on the first two steps of a prospective dose-escalation study using hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy. The first 25 patients received a minimum dose of 78Gy to the clinical tumor volume (CTV) including the prostate, seminal vesicle and a 5mm margin at 1.3Gy b.i.d. The second group (24 patients) received a minimum dose to the CTV of 82.8Gy at 1.15Gy b.i.d. Twenty eight patients received neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy in conjunction with their radiation (8 of 25 patients at 78Gy and 20 of 24 patients at 82.8Gy). Toxicity was scored according to the RTOG grading scale. Efficacy was evaluated by PSA levels and ultrasound guided biopsies. Median follow up was 36 and 18 months for the 78Gy and 82.8Gy dose levels, respectively. Results: No grade 3 or 4 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity was noted. At 36 months, the actuarial probability of Grade 2 GI and GU toxicity were 16 and 20%, respectively. Twelve to 18 months following radiation, 41 patients (86%) underwent ultrasound guided biopsy. At 78Gy, 60% of 20 patients had a biopsy which was negative or showed a marked therapeutic effect. At 82.8Gy, these combined rates were 95% in the 21 patients who had biopsies. Nine patients (50%) who did not receive neo-adjuvant hormones had positive biopsies. No patient who received neo-adjuvant hormones plus 78Gy (5 patients) or 82.8Gy (18 patients) had a positive biopsy. Conclusion: Proceeding to the next dose level (87.4Gy) was justified by the lack of severe chronic toxicity. However, in view of the high rate of histologic sterilization when hyperfractionated irradiation was given in conjunction with neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy, it was felt to be unethical to

  13. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bey, P.; Beckendorf, V.; Stines, J.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation therapy of prostate carcinoma with a curative intent implies to treat the whole prostate at high dose (at least 66 Gy). According to clinical stage, PSA level, Gleason's score, the clinical target volume may include seminal vesicles and less often pelvic lymph nodes. Microscopic extra-capsular extension is found in 15 to 60% of T1-T2 operated on, specially in apex tumors. On contrary, cancers developing from the transitional zone may stay limited to the prostate even with a big volume and with a high PSA level. Zonal anatomy of the prostate identifies internal prostate, including the transitional zone (5% of the prostate in young people). External prostate includes central and peripheral zones. The inferior limit of the prostate is not lower than the inferior border of the pubic symphysis. Clinical and radiological examination: ultrasonography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), CT-scan identify prognostic factors as tumor volume, capsule effraction, seminal vesicles invasion and lymph node extension. The identification of the clinical target volume is now done mainly by CT-Scan which identifies prostate and seminal vesicles. NMR could be helpful to identify more precisely prostate apex. The definition of margins around the clinical target volume has to take in account daily reproducibility and organ motion and of course the maximum tolerable dose for organs at risk. (authors)

  14. Dose escalation using conformal high-dose-rate brachytherapy improves outcome in unfavorable prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro A.; Gustafson, Gary; Gonzalez, Jose; Armour, Elwood; Mitchell, Chris; Edmundson, Gregory; Spencer, William; Stromberg, Jannifer; Huang, Raywin; Vicini, Frank

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To overcome radioresistance for patients with unfavorable prostate cancer, a prospective trial of pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) interdigitated with dose-escalating conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy was performed. Methods and Materials: Between November 1991 and August 2000, 207 patients were treated with 46 Gy pelvic EBRT and increasing HDR brachytherapy boost doses (5.50-11.5 Gy/fraction) during 5 weeks. The eligibility criteria were pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level ≥10.0 ng/mL, Gleason score ≥7, or clinical Stage T2b or higher. Patients were divided into 2 dose levels, low-dose biologically effective dose 93 Gy (149 patients). No patient received hormones. We used the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition for biochemical failure. Results: The median age was 69 years. The mean follow-up for the group was 4.4 years, and for the low and high-dose levels, it was 7.0 and 3.4 years, respectively. The actuarial 5-year biochemical control rate was 74%, and the overall, cause-specific, and disease-free survival rate was 92%, 98%, and 68%, respectively. The 5-year biochemical control rate for the low-dose group was 52%; the rate for the high-dose group was 87% (p<0.001). Improvement occurred in the cause-specific survival in favor of the brachytherapy high-dose level (p=0.014). On multivariate analysis, a low-dose level, higher Gleason score, and higher nadir value were associated with increased biochemical failure. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 gastrointestinal/genitourinary complications ranged from 0.5% to 9%. The actuarial 5-year impotency rate was 51%. Conclusion: Pelvic EBRT interdigitated with transrectal ultrasound-guided real-time conformal HDR prostate brachytherapy boost is both a precise dose delivery system and a very effective treatment for unfavorable prostate cancer. We demonstrated an incremental beneficial effect on biochemical control and cause

  15. Changes of dose delivery distribution within the first month after permanent interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkawa, M.; Gagel, B.; Piroth, M.D.; Eble, M.J.; Borchers, H.; Jakse, G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate changes of dose distribution for both the prostate and the surrounding tissues after permanent brachy therapy as monotherapy for prostate cancer. Patients and methods: in 35 patients, CT scans were performed before, 1 day after (day 1) and 1 month after the implantation (day 30). Changes of prostate volume, dosimetric parameters, and distances between posterior prostate contour and rectal wall as well as prostate contour and prescription isodose were analyzed. Results: prostate volume increased from 37 ± 11 cm 3 (mean ± standard deviation) to 49 ± 12 cm 3 on day 1 and dropped to 40 ± 9 cm 3 on day 30. Prostate V 100 increased from 87 ± 7% to 90 ± 7%, prostate D90 from 138 ± 21 Gy to 151 ± 30 Gy. Mean rectal volume covered by the prescription isodose rose from 0.4 cm 3 to 1.0 cm 3 ; a changing distance between the prostate and rectal wall was excluded as a reason. Prostate D 90 (day 1) and rectum V 100 (day 30) proved to be significantly higher for larger prostate sizes. The distance between the prescription isodose and the prostate contour increased particularly at the posterior and inferior borders: 1.9 mm and 2.5 mm on average (0.1 mm and -0.7 mm at opposite borders, respectively). Conclusion: with a decreasing edema of the prostate, an increasing dose both to the prostate and the anterior rectal wall resulted - the postimplant interval is essential for the dosimetry report. Due to a larger edema, a higher prescription dose might be needed for optimal cancer control in smaller prostates. Compared to day 1, the dose to the surrounding tissues increased on day 30, particularly at the posterior and inferior prostate borders. (orig.)

  16. Low-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and prostate cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Charlotte; Dehlendorff, Christian; Borre, Michael

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Increasing evidence suggests that aspirin use may protect against prostate cancer. In a nationwide case-control study, using Danish high-quality registry data, we evaluated the association between the use of low-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs......) and the risk of prostate cancer. METHODS: We identified 35,600 patients (cases) with histologically verified prostate cancer during 2000-2012. Cases were matched to 177,992 population controls on age and residence by risk-set sampling. Aspirin and nonaspirin NSAID exposure was defined by type, estimated dose......, duration, and consistency of use. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs), with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs), for prostate cancer associated with low-dose aspirin (75-150 mg) or nonaspirin NSAID use, adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Use of low-dose aspirin...

  17. Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breast cancer (BRCA1 or BRCA2) or a very strong family history of breast cancer, your risk of prostate cancer may be higher. Obesity. Obese men diagnosed with prostate cancer may be more likely ...

  18. Plumbagin Nanoparticles Induce Dose and pH Dependent Toxicity on Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Harikrishnan A; Snima, K S; Kamath, Ravindranath C; Nair, Shantikumar V; Lakshmanan, Vinoth-Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Stable nano-formulation of Plumbagin nanoparticles from Plumbago zeylanica root extract was explored as a potential natural drug against prostate cancer. Size and morphology analysis by DLS, SEM and AFM revealed the average size of nanoparticles prepared was 100±50nm. In vitro cytotoxicity showed concentration and time dependent toxicity on prostate cancer cells. However, plumbagin crude extract found to be highly toxic to normal cells when compared to plumbagin nanoformulation, thus confirming nano plumbagin cytocompatibility with normal cells and dose dependent toxicity to prostate cells. In vitro hemolysis assay confirmed the blood biocompatibility of the plumbagin nanoparticles. In wound healing assay, plumbagin nanoparticles provided clues that it might play an important role in the anti-migration of prostate cancer cells. DNA fragmentation revealed that partial apoptosis induction by plumbagin nanoparticles could be expected as a potent anti-cancer effect towards prostate cancer.

  19. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R.; Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results

  20. Prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  1. Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  2. Advantages of high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in treatment of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molokov, A. A.; Vanina, E. A.; Tseluyko, S. S.

    2017-09-01

    One of the modern methods of preserving organs radiation treatment is brachytherapy. This article analyzes the results of prostate brachytherapy. These studies of the advantages of high dose brachytherapy lead to the conclusion that this method of radiation treatment for prostate cancer has a favorable advantage in comparison with remote sensing methods, and is competitive, preserving organs in comparison to surgical methods of treatment. The use of the method of polyfocal transperineal biopsy during the brachytherapy session provides information on the volumetric spread of prostate cancer and adjust the dosimetry plan taking into account the obtained data.

  3. Prostate cancer: variables to keep in mind at the moment to decide the external radiotherapy dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donato, H.; Barros, J.M.; Fernandez Bibiloni, C.; Barrios, E.; Martinez, A.; Broda, E.; Cardiello, C.; Alva, R.; Chiozza, J.; Filomia, M.L.; Rafailovici, L.; Dosoretz, B.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate forecast factors and other variables in the decision of the final dose for prostate cancer treatment with 3D conformal radiotherapy techniques of modulated intensity. To determine the optimal dose, direct and indirect variables related to the disease should be considered. Also the equipment and the radiotherapy technique will impact on this decision [es

  4. Focal low-dose rate brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong WY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available William Y Tong, Gilad Cohen, Yoshiya Yamada Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Whole-gland low-dose rate (LDR brachytherapy has been a well-established modality of treating low-risk prostate cancer. Treatment in a focal manner has the advantages of reduced toxicity to surrounding organs. Focal treatment using LDR brachytherapy has been relatively unexplored, but it may offer advantages over other modalities that have established experiences with a focal approach. This is particularly true as prostate cancer is being detected at an earlier and more localized stage with the advent of better detection methods and newer imaging modalities. Keywords: prostate cancer, focal, low dose rate, brachytherapy

  5. A new method for synthesizing radiation dose-response data from multiple trials applied to prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diez, Patricia; Vogelius, Ivan S; Bentzen, Søren M

    2010-01-01

    A new method is presented for synthesizing dose-response data for biochemical control of prostate cancer according to study design (randomized vs. nonrandomized) and risk group (low vs. intermediate-high).......A new method is presented for synthesizing dose-response data for biochemical control of prostate cancer according to study design (randomized vs. nonrandomized) and risk group (low vs. intermediate-high)....

  6. Urethral dose and increment of international prostate symptom score (IPSS) in transperineal permanent interstitial implant (TPI) of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, N.; Itami, J.; Okuma, K.; Marino, H.; Ban, T.; Nakazato, M.; Kanai, K.; Naoi, K.; Fuse, M.; Nakagawa, K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: to find the factors which influence the acute increment of international prostate symptom score (IPSS) after transperineal permanent interstitial implant (TPI) using 125 I seeds. Patients and methods: from April 2004 through September 2006, 104 patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer underwent TPI without external-beam irradiation. Median patient age was 70 years with a median follow-up of 13.0 months. 73 patients (70%) received neoadjuvant hormone therapy. The increment of IPSS was defined as the difference between pre- and postimplant maximal IPSS. Clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters evaluated included age, initial prostate-specific antigen, Gleason Score, neoadjuvant hormone therapy, initial IPSS, post-TPI prostatic volume, number of implanted seeds, prostate V 100 , V 150 , D 90 , urethral D max , and urethral D 90 . In order to further evaluate detailed urethral doses, the base and apical urethra were defined and the dosimetric parameters were calculated. Results: the IPSS peaked 3 months after TPI and returned to baseline at 12-15 months. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a statistically significant correlation of post-TPI prostatic volume, number of implanted seeds, and the dosimetric parameters of the base urethra with IPSS increment. Conclusion: the base urethra appears to be susceptible to radiation and the increased dose to this region deteriorates IPSS. It remains unclear whether the base urethral dose relates to the incidence of late urinary morbidities. (orig.)

  7. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I-II Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eMeier

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I dose escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation and (III the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately adjacent organs, potentially reducing complications. This approach is also more convenient for patients, and is cheaper than intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Several external beam platforms are capable of delivering SBRT for early-stage prostate cancer, although most of the mature reported series have employed a robotic non-coplanar platform (i.e., CyberKnife. Several large studies report 5-year biochemical relapse rates which compare favorably to IMRT. Rates of late GU toxicity are similar to those seen with IMRT, and rates of late rectal toxicity may be less than with IMRT and low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy. Patient-reported quality of life (QOL outcomes appear similar to IMRT in the urinary domain. Bowel QOL may be less adversely affected by SBRT than with other radiation modalities. After five years of follow-up, SBRT delivered on a robotic platform is yielding outcomes at least as favorable as IMRT, and may be considered appropriate therapy for stage I-II prostate cancer.

  8. High-Dose-Rate Monotherapy: Safe and Effective Brachytherapy for Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demanes, D. Jeffrey; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Ghilezan, Michel; Hill, Dennis R.; Schour, Lionel; Brandt, David; Gustafson, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy used as the only treatment (monotherapy) for early prostate cancer is consistent with current concepts in prostate radiobiology, and the dose is reliably delivered in a prospectively defined anatomic distribution that meets all the requirements for safe and effective therapy. We report the disease control and toxicity of HDR monotherapy from California Endocurietherapy (CET) and William Beaumont Hospital (WBH) in low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: There were 298 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with HDR monotherapy between 1996 and 2005. Two biologically equivalent hypofractionation protocols were used. At CET the dose was 42 Gy in six fractions (two implantations 1 week apart) delivered to a computed tomography–defined planning treatment volume. At WBH the dose was 38 Gy in four fractions (one implantation) based on intraoperative transrectal ultrasound real-time treatment planning. The bladder, urethral, and rectal dose constraints were similar. Toxicity was scored with the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. Results: The median follow-up time was 5.2 years. The median age of the patients was 63 years, and the median value of the pretreatment prostate-specific antigen was 6.0 ng/mL. The 8-year results were 99% local control, 97% biochemical control (nadir +2), 99% distant metastasis–free survival, 99% cause-specific survival, and 95% overall survival. Toxicity was scored per event, meaning that an individual patient with more than one symptom was represented repeatedly in the morbidity data table. Genitourinary toxicity consisted of 10% transient Grade 2 urinary frequency or urgency and 3% Grade 3 episode of urinary retention. Gastrointestinal toxicity was <1%. Conclusions: High disease control rates and low morbidity demonstrate that HDR monotherapy is safe and effective for patients with localized prostate cancer.

  9. Increasing Use of Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiation Therapy for Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Mitra, Nandita; Woo, Kaitlin; Smaldone, Marc; Uzzo, Robert; Bekelman, Justin E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine recent practice patterns, using a large national cancer registry, to understand the extent to which dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) has been incorporated into routine clinical practice for men with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective observational cohort study using the National Cancer Data Base, a nationwide oncology outcomes database in the United States. We identified 98,755 men diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer between 2006 and 2011 who received definitive EBRT and classified patients into National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk groups. We defined dose-escalated EBRT as total prescribed dose of ≥75.6 Gy. Using multivariable logistic regression, we examined the association of patient, clinical, and demographic characteristics with the use of dose-escalated EBRT. Results: Overall, 81.6% of men received dose-escalated EBRT during the study period. The use of dose-escalated EBRT did not vary substantially by NCCN risk group. Use of dose-escalated EBRT increased from 70.7% of patients receiving treatment in 2006 to 89.8% of patients receiving treatment in 2011. On multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis and use of intensity modulated radiation therapy were significantly associated with receipt of dose-escalated EBRT. Conclusions: Our study results indicate that dose-escalated EBRT has been widely adopted by radiation oncologists treating prostate cancer in the United States. The proportion of patients receiving dose-escalated EBRT increased nearly 20% between 2006 and 2011. We observed high utilization rates of dose-escalated EBRT within all disease risk groups. Adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy was strongly associated with use of dose-escalated treatment

  10. The impact of increasing dose on overall survival in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, Matthew D.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Smith, David D.; Tseng, Bertrand P.; Wong, Jeffrey Y. C.

    2015-01-01

    To assess the impact of increasing dose on overall survival (OS) for prostate cancer patients. Treatment data were obtained on more than 20,000 patients in the National Oncology Data Alliance®, a proprietary database of merged tumor registries, who were treated for prostate cancer with definitive radiotherapy between 1995 and 2006. Eligible patients had complete data on total dose, T stage, use and timing of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), and treatment start date (n = 20,028). Patients with prior malignancies were excluded. On multivariate analysis, dose, T stage, grade, marital status, age, and neoadjuvant ADT were significant predictors of OS. Hazard ratios for OS declined monotonically with increasing dose, reaching 0.63 (95 % Confidence Interval 0.53–0.76) at ≥80 Gy. On subset analysis, neoadjuvant ADT significantly improved OS in high risk patients but was not significant in lower risk patients. The dose response was maintained across all risk groups. Medical comorbidities were balanced across all dose strata and sensitivity analysis demonstrated that other prognostic factors were unlikely to explain the observed dose response. This study suggests that increasing dose significantly improves OS in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-015-0419-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  11. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Prostate Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Prostate ...

  12. Psa control for dose escalation with 3DCRT in the treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez Sosa, Amarilys; Rodriguez, Yaima; Perez Velasquez, Reytel

    2009-01-01

    In the detection of prostate cancer PSA carry out checks on patients between 40-50 years or more. The present work has as objective to establish the procedure 'in vivo' and i n vitro , based on ISO 9000, for assessment changes in PSA levels in patients who underwent scaling the dose through the 3D-CRT. The procedure provides the steps to follow from diagnostic evaluation to the completion of treatment with 3D-CRT. Finally This document is a valuable tool in assessing the effectiveness of treatment for prostate cancer with 3D-CRT. (author)

  13. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spera, G.

    2010-01-01

    This work is about diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of prostate cancer. The techniques used are: transrectal ultrasound, laparascopy, bone scan, chest x-ray, radiography, chemoterapy and radiotherapy

  14. Testicular dose in prostate cancer radiotherapy. Impact on impairment of fertility and hormonal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehmer, D.; Badakhshi, H.; Budach, V. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Charite - Univ. Clinic - Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Kuschke, W.; Bohsung, J. [Dept. of Medical Physics, Charite - Univ. Clinic - Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: to determine the dose received by the unshielded testicles during a course of 20-MV conventional external-beam radiotherapy for patients with localized prostate cancer. Critical evaluation of the potential impact on fertility and hormonal impairment in these patients according to the literature. Patients and methods: the absolute dose received by the testicles of 20 randomly selected patients undergoing radiotherapy of prostate cancer was measured by on-line thermoluminescence dosimetry. Patients were treated in supine position with an immobilization cushion under their knees. A flexible tube, containing three calibrated thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) was placed on top or underneath the testicle closest to the perineal region with a day-to-day alternation. The single dose to the planning target volume was 1.8 Gy. Ten subsequent testicle measurements were performed on each patient. The individual TLDs were then read out and the total absorbed dose was calculated. Results: the mean total dose ({+-} standard deviation) measured in a series of 10 subsequent treatment days in all patients was 49 cGy ({+-} 36 cGy). The calculated projected doses made on a standard series of 40 fractions of external-beam radiotherapy were 196 cGy ({+-} 145 cGy). The results of this study are appraised with the available data in the literature. Conclusion: the dose received by the unshielded testes can be assessed as a risk for permanent infertility and impairment of hormonal function in prostate cancer patients treated with external-beam radiotherapy. (orig.)

  15. Strategies for Online Organ Motion Correction for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer: Prostate, Rectum, and Bladder Dose Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijkhorst, Erik-Jan; Lakeman, Annemarie; Nijkamp, Jasper; Bois, Josien de; Herk, Marcel van; Lebesque, Joos V.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify and evaluate the accumulated prostate, rectum, and bladder dose for several strategies including rotational organ motion correction for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer using realistic organ motion data. Methods and Materials: Repeat computed tomography (CT) scans of 19 prostate patients were used. Per patient, two IMRT plans with different uniform margins were created. To quantify prostate and seminal vesicle motion, repeat CT clinical target volumes (CTVs) were matched onto the planning CTV using deformable registration. Four different strategies, from online setup to full motion correction, were simulated. Rotations were corrected for using gantry and collimator angle adjustments. Prostate, rectum, and bladder doses were accumulated for each patient, plan, and strategy. Minimum CTV dose (D min ), rectum equivalent uniform dose (EUD, n = 0.13), and bladder surface receiving ≥78 Gy (S78), were calculated. Results: With online CTV translation correction, a 7-mm margin was sufficient (i.e., D min ≥ 95% of the prescribed dose for all patients). A 4-mm margin required additional rotational correction. Margin reduction lowered the rectum EUD(n = 0.13) by ∼2.6 Gy, and the bladder S78 by ∼1.9%. Conclusions: With online correction of both translations and rotations, a 4-mm margin was sufficient for 15 of 19 patients, whereas the remaining four patients had an underdosed CTV volume <1%. Margin reduction combined with online corrections resulted in a similar or lower dose to the rectum and bladder. The more advanced the correction strategy, the better the planned and accumulated dose agreed.

  16. Brachytherapy guideline in prostate cancer (high and low dose rate)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanna, Samir Abdallah; Pimentel, Leonardo [Sociedade Brasileira de Radioterapia (SBR), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-04-15

    Through the elaboration of seven relevant clinical questions related to the proposed theme, we sought to present the main evidences regarding safety, toxicity and effectiveness of the presented radiotherapy (RT) techniques. The study population consisted of male patients of all ages with early primary prostate cancer and candidates for treatment with curative intent. For this, a systematic review of the literature was carried out in primary scientific databases (MEDLINE - PubMed; Embase - Elsevier; LILACS - BIREME; Cochrane Library -Record of Controlled Trials). All articles available through February 22, 2015 were considered. The search strategy used in MEDLINE searches is described in Appendix 1. The articles were selected based on critical evaluation, seeking the best evidence available. The recommendations were elaborated from discussions held with a drafting group composed of four members of the Brazilian Society of Radiotherapy. The guideline was reviewed by an independent group, which specializes in evidence-based clinical guidelines. After completion, the guideline was released for public consultation for 15 days; the suggestions obtained were forwarded to the authors for evaluation and possible insertion in the final text. (author)

  17. Daily variations in delivered doses in patients treated with radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupelian, Patrick A.; Langen, Katja M.; Zeidan, Omar A.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Wagner, Thomas H.; Jeswani, Sam; Ruchala, Kenneth J.; Haimerl, Jason; Olivera, Gustavo H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to study the variations in delivered doses to the prostate, rectum, and bladder during a full course of image-guided external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with helical tomotherapy to 78 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction in 39 fractions. Daily target localization was performed using intraprostatic fiducials and daily megavoltage pelvic computed tomography (CT) scans, resulting in a total of 390 CT scans. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were manually contoured on each CT by a single physician. Daily dosimetric analysis was performed with dose recalculation. The study endpoints were D95 (dose to 95% of the prostate), rV2 (absolute rectal volume receiving 2 Gy), and bV2 (absolute bladder volume receiving 2 Gy). Results: For the entire cohort, the average D95 (±SD) was 2.02 ± 0.04 Gy (range, 1.79-2.20 Gy). The average rV2 (±SD) was 7.0 ± 8.1 cc (range, 0.1-67.3 cc). The average bV2 (±SD) was 8.7 ± 6.8 cc (range, 0.3-36.8 cc). Unlike doses for the prostate, there was significant daily variation in rectal and bladder doses, mostly because of variations in volume and shape of these organs. Conclusion: Large variations in delivered doses to the rectum and bladder can be documented with daily megavoltage CT scans. Image guidance for the targeting of the prostate, even with intraprostatic fiducials, does not take into account the variation in actual rectal and bladder doses. The clinical impact of techniques that take into account such dosimetric parameters in daily patient set-ups should be investigated

  18. Magnetic resonance only workflow and validation of dose calculations for radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lübeck Christiansen, Rasmus; Jensen, Henrik R.; Brink, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Background: Current state of the art radiotherapy planning of prostate cancer utilises magnetic resonance (MR) for soft tissue delineation and computed tomography (CT) to provide an electron density map for dose calculation. This dual scan workflow is prone to setup and registration error....... This study evaluates the feasibility of an MR-only workflow and the validity of dose calculation from an MR derived pseudo CT. Material and methods: Thirty prostate cancer patients were CT and MR scanned. Clinical treatment plans were generated on CT using a single 18 MV arc volumetric modulated arc therapy...... was successfully delivered to one patient, including manually performed daily IGRT. Conclusions: Median gamma pass rates were high for pseudo CT and proved superior to uniform density. Local differences in dose calculations were concluded not to have clinical relevance. Feasibility of the MR-only workflow...

  19. Dose-escalated simultaneous integrated-boost treatment of prostate cancer patients via helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geier, M.; Astner, S.T.; Duma, M.N.; Putzhammer, J.; Winkler, C.; Molls, M.; Geinitz, H. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie; Jacob, V. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde; Nieder, C. [Nordland Hospital, Bodoe (Norway). Dept. of Oncology and Palliative Care; Tromsoe Univ. (Norway). Inst. of Clinical Medicine

    2012-05-15

    The goal of this work was to assess the feasibility of moderately hypofractionated simultaneous integrated-boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) with helical tomotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer regarding acute side effects and dose-volume histogram data (DVH data). Acute side effects and DVH data were evaluated of the first 40 intermediate risk prostate cancer patients treated with a definitive daily image-guided SIB-IMRT protocol via helical tomotherapy in our department. The planning target volume including the prostate and the base of the seminal vesicles with safety margins was treated with 70 Gy in 35 fractions. The boost volume containing the prostate and 3 mm safety margins (5 mm craniocaudal) was treated as SIB to a total dose of 76 Gy (2.17 Gy per fraction). Planning constraints for the anterior rectal wall were set in order not to exceed the dose of 76 Gy prescribed to the boost volume. Acute toxicity was evaluated prospectively using a modified CTCAE (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) score. SIB-IMRT allowed good rectal sparing, although the full boost dose was permitted to the anterior rectal wall. Median rectum dose was 38 Gy in all patients and the median volumes receiving at least 65 Gy (V65), 70 Gy (V70), and 75 Gy (V75) were 13.5%, 9%, and 3%, respectively. No grade 4 toxicity was observed. Acute grade 3 toxicity was observed in 20% of patients involving nocturia only. Grade 2 acute intestinal and urological side effects occurred in 25% and 57.5%, respectively. No correlation was found between acute toxicity and the DVH data. This institutional SIB-IMRT protocol using daily image guidance as a precondition for smaller safety margins allows dose escalation to the prostate without increasing acute toxicity. (orig.)

  20. Hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy in locally advanced prostate cancer: results of a dose escalation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.; Duclos, Marie; Shamsa, Falah; Porter, Arthur T.; Orton, Colin

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This study was initiated to assess the incidence of chronic complications and histologic and biochemical control following hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between October 1991 and October 1994, 49 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were entered on the first two dose levels of a prospective dose-escalation study using hyperfractionated three dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The first 25 patients received a minimum tumor dose of 78 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles in 6 weeks at 1.3 Gy, b.i.d. No increase in chronic toxicity compared with conventional radiotherapy was noted; therefore, an additional 24 patients were treated to a minimum tumor dose of 82.8 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles in 7 weeks at 1.15 Gy, b.i.d. Toxicity was scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity grading scale. Efficacy was assessed through scheduled postradiation prostate specific antigen values and ultrasound-guided biopsies. The median follow-up for the entire group was 20 months. Results: The hyperfractionated external radiation was well tolerated with minimal acute morbidity. At 30 months, the actuarial probability of Grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity was 17%. At 30 months, the actuarial probability of Grade 2 genitourinary toxicity was 16%. There was no statistically significant difference between the two dose levels. No Grade 3 or 4 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity was noted. At 12 months, 84% of patients had a prostate specific antigen ≤ 4; and 53%; ≤ 1 ng/ml. At 12 months, 71% of patients had post radiation biopsies that were either negative (55%) or showed a marked therapeutic effect (16%). Conclusion: The use of hyperfractionated conformal radiotherapy facilitated dose escalation with no increase in chronic toxicity compared to standard doses. The initial tumor response based on prostate specific antigen measurements and

  1. Early quality of life outcomes in patients with prostate cancer managed by high-dose-rate brachytherapy as monotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komiya, Akira; Fujiuchi, Yasuyoshi; Ito, Takatoshi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the early quality of life outcomes in prostate cancer patients managed by high-dose-rate brachytherapy as monotherapy. A total of 51 patients with cT1c-T3aN0M0 prostate cancer treated between July 2007 and January 2010 were included in this study. The average age was 69?years, and the average initial serum prostate-specific antigen was 10.98?ng/mL. A total of 25, 18 and eight patients were considered to be low, intermediate and high risk, respectively. All patients received one implant of Ir-192 and seven fractions of 6.5?Gy within 3.5?days for a total prescribed dose of 45.5?Gy. For high-risk prostate cancer, neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy was carried out for at least 6?months, and continued after high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Quality of life outcomes were measured by using the International Prostate Symptom Score, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate and the International Index of Erectile Function Questionnaire. The oncological outcome was assessed by serum prostate-specific antigen and diagnostic imaging. Adverse events were also recorded. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate scores decreased for a few months after high-dose-rate brachytherapy, and recovered to pretreatment condition thereafter. The International Prostate Symptom Score significantly increased 2?weeks after treatment for each of its items and their sum, and it returned to baseline after 12?weeks. Sexual function decreased at 2 and 4?weeks, and recovered after 12?weeks. Severe complications were rare. Within a median follow up of 17.2?months, two patients showed a prostate-specific antigen recurrence. High-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer is a feasible treatment modality with acceptable toxicity and only a limited impact on the quality of life. (author)

  2. Use of CT or MR dosimetry in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.; Das, R.; See, A.; Duchesne, G.M.; Van Dyk, S.; Tai, K.H.

    2003-01-01

    Brachytherapy (BT) has, in recent years, become a well-utilised treatment option for prostate cancer. Tumour control probability relies on accurate dosimetry, which in turn relies on the accurate definition of the prostate gland. In external beam radiotherapy and BT, MRI has been shown to be a superior imaging modality when delineating the prostate gland especially at the apex. To date, data on MRI planning in prostate BT has focussed mainly on permanent interstitial implants. No data currently exists comparing MRI vs CT planning in HDR BT and its subsequent impact on prostate dosimetry. To determine the effects of MRI vs CT in HDR BT with respect to prostatic volumes and normal tissue doses, with the evaluations made using dose-volume histograms (DVH). Dosimetry parameters derived using CT and MRI (T2 weighted) scans of 11 patients who had received TRUS guided implants for HDR BT, were compared using the PlatoTM computer planning system. Treatment plans were generated on volumes marked by the same radiation oncologist for each patient. Comparison was made of the treatment plans (dosimetry) between: 1. CT generated plans; 2. CT generated plans assessed using MRI marked volumes and 3. MRI generated plans. We confirm the previously reported results that CT scans can overestimate prostatic volumes compared with MRI. Variations were noted in CT and MRI based plans that may allow improved sparing of the rectum and urethra when using MRI planning. The main disadvantages of using MRI scans are access to facilities as well as identifying a dummy source to adequately define the tips of our catheters. It is feasible to utilise MRI scans for HDR BT planning. The clearer definition of anatomical structures has added advantages when contouring the prostate

  3. DOSE-ESCALATED EXTERNAL BEAM RADIOTHERAPY DURING HORMONO-RADIOTHERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Gumenetskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The introduction of modern technologies of conformal external beam radiotherapy (EBRT into clinical practice for the treatment of prostate cancer requires proper quality assurance measures as well as a careful analysis of both the efficacy and toxicity data of treatments. The purpose of this study was to inves- tigate tolerance and the immediate efficacy of conformal dose-escalated EBRT during hormono-radiotherapy for prostate cancer. material and methods. The study involved 156 prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT. Among them, 30 patients received a total dose of 70 Gy, and in 126 patients the total dose was esca- lated to 72-76 Gy (median total dose - 74.0 Gy. Fifty-nine patients received intensity modulated radiation therapy. Results. The prescribed course of treatment was completed in all the patients with prostate cancer. Acute radiation-induced bladder reactions (RTOG were observed in 50 (32.1 % patients, of whom 48 (30.8 % experienced grade I reactions, and 2 (1.3 % experienced grade II reactions. Eighteen (11.5 % patients had radiation-induced rectum reactions, not above grade I. The development of grade II dysuric phenomena necessitated treatment interruption only in two patients. Of 9 (5.8 % patients who had late bladder complica- tions (RTOG/EORTC, 8 (5.1 % patients developed grade I complications, and one (0.6 % patient developed grade II complications. Of 11 (7.1 % patients who had rectum complications, 8 (5.1 % patients developed grade I complications, and 3 (1.9 % patients developed grade II complications. No patients experienced the increase in toxicity of treatment during dose escalation up to a total dose exceeding 70 Gy. During the follow-up period, only one patient developed recurrent disease. Conclusion. The results of our study suggest acceptable levels of toxicity following a continuous course of dose-escalated EBRT given in conjunction with hormono-radiotherapy to prostate cancer patients. Further

  4. Radiation proctitis after the high dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitano, Masashi; Katsumata, Tomoe; Satoh, Takefumi

    2006-01-01

    We reviewed the medical records of 12 patients treated for rectal bleeding after high-dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer. All patients developed grade 2 proctitis according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAC) and no patients needed blood transfusion. The patients were treated with argon plasma coagulation (APC) and/or steroid suppositories. The bleeding stopped or improved in 11 patients. Although re-bleeding was noticed in 7 patients the same treatment was effective in 5 patients. (author)

  5. Ion therapy of prostate cancer: daily rectal dose reduction by application of spacer gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucinski, Antoni; Brons, Stephan; Richter, Daniel; Habl, Gregor; Debus, Jürgen; Bert, Christoph; Haberer, Thomas; Jäkel, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Ion beam therapy represents a promising approach to treat prostate cancer, mainly due to its high conformity and radiobiological effectiveness. However, the presence of prostate motion, patient positioning and range uncertainties may deteriorate target dose and increase exposure of organs at risk. Spacer gel injected between prostate and rectum may increase the safety of prostate cancer (PC) radiation therapy by separating the rectum from the target dose field. The dosimetric impact of the application of spacer gel for scanned carbon ion therapy of PC has been analyzed at Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). The robustness of ion therapy treatment plans was investigated by comparison of two data sets of patients treated with and without spacer gel. A research treatment planning system for ion therapy was used for treatment plan optimization and calculation of daily dose distributions on 2 to 9 Computed Tomography (CT) studies available for each of the 19 patients. Planning and daily dose distributions were analyzed with respect to target coverage, maximal dose to the rectum (excluding 1 ml of the greatest dose; Dmax-1 ml) and the rectal volume receiving dose greater than 90% of prescribed target dose (V90 Rectum ), respectively. The application of spacer gel did substantially diminish rectum dose. Dmax-1 ml on the treatment planning CT was on average reduced from 100.0 ± 1.0% to 90.2 ± 4.8%, when spacer gel was applied. The robustness analysis performed with daily CT studies demonstrated for all analyzed patient cases that application of spacer gel results in a decrease of the daily V90 Rectum index, which calculated over all patient cases and CT studies was 10.2 ± 10.4 [ml] and 1.1 ± 2.1 [ml] for patients without and with spacer gel, respectively. The dosimetric benefit of increasing the distance between prostate and rectum using spacer gel for PC treatment with carbon ion beams has been quantified. Application of spacer gel substantially reduced rectal

  6. Prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Balslev, Ingegerd; Logager, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data.......To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data....

  7. Treatment planning and dose analysis for interstitial photodynamic therapy of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Sean R H; Gertner, Mark R; Bogaards, Arjen; Sherar, Michael D; Wilson, Brian C [Division of Biophysics and Bioimaging, Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Weersink, Robert A; Giewercer, David [Laboratory for Applied Biophysics, Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Haider, Masoom A [Joint Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Scherz, Avigdor [Department of Plant Science, Weizmann Institute of Science, PO Box 26, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Elhilali, Mostafa [Department of Surgery, McGill University, 3655 Promenade Sir William Osler, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1Y6 (Canada); Chin, Joseph L [Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, 800 Commissioners Road East, PO Box 5010, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada); Trachtenberg, John [Department of Urology, University Health Network, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)], E-mail: wilson@uhnres.utoronto.ca

    2009-04-21

    With the development of new photosensitizers that are activated by light at longer wavelengths, interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT) is emerging as a feasible alternative for the treatment of larger volumes of tissue. Described here is the application of PDT treatment planning software developed by our group to ensure complete coverage of larger, geometrically complex target volumes such as the prostate. In a phase II clinical trial of TOOKAD vascular targeted photodynamic therapy (VTP) for prostate cancer in patients who failed prior radiotherapy, the software was used to generate patient-specific treatment prescriptions for the number of treatment fibres, their lengths, their positions and the energy each delivered. The core of the software is a finite element solution to the light diffusion equation. Validation against in vivo light measurements indicated that the software could predict the location of an iso-fluence contour to within approximately {+-}2 mm. The same software was used to reconstruct the treatments that were actually delivered, thereby providing an analysis of the threshold light dose required for TOOKAD-VTP of the post-irradiated prostate. The threshold light dose for VTP-induced prostate damage, as measured one week post-treatment using contrast-enhanced MRI, was found to be highly heterogeneous, both within and between patients. The minimum light dose received by 90% of the prostate, D{sub 90}, was determined from each patient's dose-volume histogram and compared to six-month sextant biopsy results. No patient with a D{sub 90} less than 23 J cm{sup -2} had complete biopsy response, while 8/13 (62%) of patients with a D{sub 90} greater than 23 J cm{sup -2} had negative biopsies at six months. The doses received by the urethra and the rectal wall were also investigated.

  8. Defining a dose-response relationship with radiotherapy for prostate cancer: is more really better?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank A.; Abner, Anthony; Baglan, Kathy L.; Kestin, Larry L.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Data were reviewed addressing the association between radiation therapy (RT) dose and treatment outcome for localized prostate cancer to help clarify the existence of a potential dose-response relationship. Methods and Materials: Articles were identified through the MEDLINE database, CancerLit database, and reference lists of relevant articles. Studies were categorized into four groups based upon the endpoint analyzed, including biochemical control (BC), local control (LC), pathologic control (PC), and cause-specific survival (CSS). The impact of increasing RT dose with each endpoint was recorded. Results: Twenty-two trials involving a total of 11,297 patients were identified. Of the 11 trials addressing the association of RT dose with LC, 9 showed statistically significant improvements. Of the 12 trials that reported BC with RT dose, all showed statistically significant improvements. Two out of 4 studies analyzing PC with increasing dose showed a positive correlation. Finally, 3 out of 9 studies addressing RT dose with CSS showed statistically significant improvements. Despite inconclusive results, patients with poor risk features (e.g., prostate-specific antigen [PSA] ≥10, Gleason score [GS] ≥7, or tumor stage ≥T2b) were most likely to benefit from increasing dose with respect to each endpoint. However, the optimal RT dose and the magnitude of benefit of dose escalation could not be identified. Conclusions: Although RT dose appears to correlate with various measures of treatment outcome, objective, high-quality data addressing this critical issue are still lacking. At the present time, the absolute improvement in outcome due to dose escalation, the subset of patients benefiting most, and the optimal dose remain to be defined

  9. Dose escalation with 3-D CRT in prostate cancer: five year dose responses and optimal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanks, Gerald; Hanlon, Alexandra; Pinover, Wayne; Hunt, Margie; Movsas, Benjamin; Schultheiss, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To report 5 yr dose responses in prostate cancer patients treated with 3D-CRT and describe optimal treatment based on dose response. Methods: Dose escalation was studied in 233 consecutive patients treated with 3D-CRT between 3/89 and 10/92. All surviving patients have >32 mo follow-up, the median follow-up is 55 mo. Estimated logistic cumulative distribution functions (logit response models) fit to 5 yr actuarial bNED outcome are reported for 3 dose groups in each of 3 pretreatment PSA groupings (10-19.9 ng/ml and 20+ ng/ml); no dose response is observed for patients with pretreatment PSA <10 ng/ml. Logit response models fit to 5 yr actuarial late morbidity rates (grade 2 GI, grade 2 GU, grade 3,4 GI) are also reported for 4 dose groups. Patients are treated with CT planned 4-field conformal technique where the PTV encompasses the CTV by 1.0 cm in all directions including the anterior rectal wall margin. Patients are followed at 6 mo intervals with PSA and DRE, and bNED failure is defined as PSA ≥1.5 ng/ml and rising on two consecutive measures. The Fox Chase modification of the LENT morbidity scale is used for GI morbidity including any blood transfusion and/or more than 2 coagulations as a grade 3 event. GU morbidity follows the RTOG scale. Results: The logit response models based on 5 yr bNED results have slopes of 27% and 18% for pretreatment PSA grouping 10-19.9 ng/ml and 20+ ng/ml, respectively. The 50% bNED response is observed at 71 Gy and 80 Gy respectively, while the 80% bNED response is observed at 76 Gy for the 10-19.9 ng/ml group and estimated at 88 Gy for the 20+ ng/ml group. Logit dose response models for grade 2 GI and grade 2 GU morbidity show markedly different slopes, 23% versus 4%, respectively. The slope for grade 3,4 GI is 12%. The dose response model indicates grade 3,4 GI complication rates at 5 yrs are 8% at 76 Gy and 12% at 80 Gy. Conclusion: Based on 5 yr results, we can draw some conclusions about appropriate dose from these

  10. Interindividual registration and dose mapping for voxelwise population analysis of rectal toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dréan, Gaël; Acosta, Oscar, E-mail: Oscar.Acosta@univ-rennes1.fr; Simon, Antoine; Haigron, Pascal [INSERM, U1099, Rennes F-35000 (France); Université de Rennes 1, LTSI, Rennes F-35000 (France); Lafond, Caroline; Crevoisier, Renaud de [INSERM, U1099, Rennes F-35000 (France); Université de Rennes 1, LTSI, Rennes F-35000 (France); Département de Radiothérapie, Center Eugène Marquis, Rennes F-35000 (France)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Recent studies revealed a trend toward voxelwise population analysis in order to understand the local dose/toxicity relationships in prostate cancer radiotherapy. Such approaches require, however, an accurate interindividual mapping of the anatomies and 3D dose distributions toward a common coordinate system. This step is challenging due to the high interindividual variability. In this paper, the authors propose a method designed for interindividual nonrigid registration of the rectum and dose mapping for population analysis. Methods: The method is based on the computation of a normalized structural description of the rectum using a Laplacian-based model. This description takes advantage of the tubular structure of the rectum and its centerline to be embedded in a nonrigid registration-based scheme. The performances of the method were evaluated on 30 individuals treated for prostate cancer in a leave-one-out cross validation. Results: Performance was measured using classical metrics (Dice score and Hausdorff distance), along with new metrics devised to better assess dose mapping in relation with structural deformation (dose-organ overlap). Considering these scores, the proposed method outperforms intensity-based and distance maps-based registration methods. Conclusions: The proposed method allows for accurately mapping interindividual 3D dose distributions toward a single anatomical template, opening the way for further voxelwise statistical analysis.

  11. Salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for local prostate cancer recurrence after radical radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Solodkiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies salvage interstitial radiation therapy for recurrent prostate cancer, launched at the end of the XX century. In recent years, more and more attention is paid to high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT as a method of treating local recurrence.The purpose of research – preliminary clinical results of salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy applied in cases of suspected local recurrence or of residual tumour after radiotherapy.Preliminary findings indicate the possibility of using HDR-BT, achieving local tumor control with low genitourinary toxicity.

  12. Comparison of doses according to change of bladder volume in treatment of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kyung Tae [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Dongnam Health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Min, Jung Whan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shingu University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    In the case of radiation therapy for prostate cancer, a balloon infused with a certain amount of air through the anus is used to reduce rectal dose. Because of the reason, radiation therapy for prostate cancer has acquired CBCT for daily image induction. In order to maintain the anatomical structure most similar to the first CT taken before treatment, it is pretreated, but it can not be said to be perfectly consistent. In two actual treatment regimens, the volume of the bladder was measured as 45.82 cc and 63.43 cc, and the equivalent diameter was 4.4 cm and 4.9 cm. As a result of this study, the mean volume of the bladder was estimated to be 56.2 cc, 105.6 cc by 20 CBCT. The mean dose of CBCT was 1.74% and the mean Bladder mean dose was 96.67%. In case B, PTV mean dose was 4.31%, Bladder mean Dose was estimated to be 97.35%. The changes in the volume of the bladder resulted in changes in the dose of PTV and bladder. The correlation coefficient of bladder dose according to the change of bladder volume showed linearity of mean dose R2= -0.94. The correlation coefficient of the PTV dose according to the volume change of the bladder showed linearity of mean dose R2= 0.04. It was found that the dose change of PTV was larger than that of bladder according to the change of bladder volume.

  13. Prostate Cancer FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundraise for PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us Prostate Cancer FAQs Top 10 Things You Should Know About ... prostate cancer detected? What are the symptoms of prostate cancer? If the cancer is caught at its earliest ...

  14. Evaluation of radiation dose on people adjacent to implant patients during brachytherapy for prostate cancer using {sup 192}Ir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Ko, Seong Jin; Kang, Se Sik; Kim, Chang Soo [Catholic University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    The incidence of prostate cancer is rapidly increasing due to aging of the population and westernization of dietary habits, etc. As a result, the frequency of prostate cancer has become the fifth highest among all male cancers and the first among urological cancers. Brachytherapy is commonly used for locally progressing prostate cancers. Since the mid 1980s, therapies using radio-isotopes, such as low-invasive {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd and {sup 192}Ir, have been widely performed in the U.S. and Europe. However, brachytherapy involves implanting radio-isotopes into the human body which is of concern because it may expose the health care professionals administering the therapy to unnecessary radiation. Accordingly, this study intends to predict the radiation dose that people adjacent to patients implanted with a radio-isotope are exposed to during prostate cancer radiation therapy by using a mathematical anthropomorphic phantom and {sup 192}Ir.

  15. Dose-to-medium vs. dose-to-water: Dosimetric evaluation of dose reporting modes in Acuros XB for prostate, lung and breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Rana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Acuros XB (AXB dose calculation algorithm is available for external beam photon dose calculations in Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS. The AXB can report the absorbed dose in two modes: dose-to-water (Dw and dose-to-medium (Dm. The main purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric results of the AXB_Dm with that of AXB_Dw on real patient treatment plans. Methods: Four groups of patients (prostate cancer, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT lung cancer, left breast cancer, and right breast cancer were selected for this study, and each group consisted of 5 cases. The treatment plans of all cases were generated in the Eclipse TPS. For each case, treatment plans were computed using AXB_Dw and AXB_Dm for identical beam arrangements. Dosimetric evaluation was done by comparing various dosimetric parameters in the AXB_Dw plans with that of AXB_Dm plans for the corresponding patient case. Results: For the prostate cancer, the mean planning target volume (PTV dose in the AXB_Dw plans was higher by up to 1.0%, but the mean PTV dose was within ±0.3% for the SBRT lung cancer. The analysis of organs at risk (OAR results in the prostate cancer showed that AXB_Dw plans consistently produced higher values for the bladder and femoral heads but not for the rectum. In the case of SBRT lung cancer, a clear trend was seen for the heart mean dose and spinal cord maximum dose, with AXB_Dw plans producing higher values than the AXB_Dm plans. However, the difference in the lung doses between the AXB_Dm and AXB_Dw plans did not always produce a clear trend, with difference ranged from -1.4% to 2.9%. For both the left and right breast cancer, the AXB_Dm plans produced higher maximum dose to the PTV for all cases. The evaluation of the maximum dose to the skin showed higher values in the AXB_Dm plans for all 5 left breast cancer cases, whereas only 2 cases had higher maximum dose to the skin in the AXB_Dm plans for the right breast cancer

  16. A self-adaptive case-based reasoning system for dose planning in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Nishikant; Petrovic, Sanja; Sundar, Santhanam [Automated Scheduling, Optimisation and Planning Research Group, School of Computer Science, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG8 1BB (United Kingdom); Department of Oncology, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham NG5 1PB (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in the male population. Radiotherapy is often used in the treatment for prostate cancer. In radiotherapy treatment, the oncologist makes a trade-off between the risk and benefit of the radiation, i.e., the task is to deliver a high dose to the prostate cancer cells and minimize side effects of the treatment. The aim of our research is to develop a software system that will assist the oncologist in planning new treatments. Methods: A nonlinear case-based reasoning system is developed to capture the expertise and experience of oncologists in treating previous patients. Importance (weights) of different clinical parameters in the dose planning is determined by the oncologist based on their past experience, and is highly subjective. The weights are usually fixed in the system. In this research, the weights are updated automatically each time after generating a treatment plan for a new patient using a group based simulated annealing approach. Results: The developed approach is analyzed on the real data set collected from the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, City Hospital Campus, UK. Extensive experiments show that the dose plan suggested by the proposed method is coherent with the dose plan prescribed by an experienced oncologist or even better. Conclusions: The developed case-based reasoning system enables the use of knowledge and experience gained by the oncologist in treating new patients. This system may play a vital role to assist the oncologist in making a better decision in less computational time; it utilizes the success rate of the previously treated patients and it can also be used in teaching and training processes.

  17. A self-adaptive case-based reasoning system for dose planning in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Nishikant; Petrovic, Sanja; Sundar, Santhanam

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in the male population. Radiotherapy is often used in the treatment for prostate cancer. In radiotherapy treatment, the oncologist makes a trade-off between the risk and benefit of the radiation, i.e., the task is to deliver a high dose to the prostate cancer cells and minimize side effects of the treatment. The aim of our research is to develop a software system that will assist the oncologist in planning new treatments. Methods: A nonlinear case-based reasoning system is developed to capture the expertise and experience of oncologists in treating previous patients. Importance (weights) of different clinical parameters in the dose planning is determined by the oncologist based on their past experience, and is highly subjective. The weights are usually fixed in the system. In this research, the weights are updated automatically each time after generating a treatment plan for a new patient using a group based simulated annealing approach. Results: The developed approach is analyzed on the real data set collected from the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, City Hospital Campus, UK. Extensive experiments show that the dose plan suggested by the proposed method is coherent with the dose plan prescribed by an experienced oncologist or even better. Conclusions: The developed case-based reasoning system enables the use of knowledge and experience gained by the oncologist in treating new patients. This system may play a vital role to assist the oncologist in making a better decision in less computational time; it utilizes the success rate of the previously treated patients and it can also be used in teaching and training processes.

  18. Chromosomal aberration in peripheral lymphocytes and doses to the active bone marrow in radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershkevitsh, E.; Trott, K.R.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy plays an important role in the management of prostate cancer. Epidemiological data indicate a small but significant risk of radiation-induced leukemia after radiotherapy which might be related to the high mean bone marrow dose associated with radiotherapy of prostate cancer. The purpose of the study was to investigate the relation between the mean bone marrow dose and unstable chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes in patients undergoing conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer as a possible indicator of risk. Endometrial cancer patients were also included for comparison. Patients and Methods: Nine patients, six with prostate cancer (60-73 years old) and three with endometrial cancer (61-81 years old) treated with radiotherapy were included in the study. The non-bony spaces inside the pelvic bones were outlined on every CT slice using the treatment planning system and mean doses to the bone marrow calculated. Blood samples of the patients were obtained at different times before, during and at the end of treatment. Lymphocytes were cultured in the usual way and metaphases scored for dicentric aberrations. Results: 46 samples from nine patients were obtained. The mean number of metaphases analyzed per sample was 180 with a range from 52 to 435. The mean bone marrow doses for prostate cancer patients ranged from 2.8 to 4.2 Gy and for endometrial cancer patients from 12.8 to 14.8 Gy. The aberration yield increased with the planning target volume and the mean bone marrow dose. Conclusion: The yield of dicentric aberrations for prostate cancer patients correlated closely with the mean bone marrow dose albeit the induction of dicentrics occurred in mature T lymphocytes most of which were probably in transit through the irradiated volumes. Therefore, the observed relationship between dicentrics and mean bone marrow doses are indirect. (orig.) [de

  19. Rectal dose variation during the course of image-guided radiation therapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lili; Paskalev, Kamen; Xu Xiu; Zhu, Jennifer; Wang Lu; Price, Robert A.; Hu Wei; Feigenberg, Steven J.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Pollack, Alan; Charlie Ma, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the change in rectal dose during the treatment course for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer with image-guidance. Materials and methods: Twenty prostate cancer patients were recruited for this retrospective study. All patients have been treated with IMRT. For each patient, MR and CT images were fused for target and critical structure delineation. IMRT treatment planning was performed on the simulation CT images. Inter-fractional motion during the course of treatment was corrected using a CT-on-rails system. The rectum was outlined on both the original treatment plan and the subsequent daily CT images from the CT-on-rails by the same investigator. Dose distributions on these daily CT images were recalculated with the isocenter shifts relative to the simulation CT images using the leaf sequences/MUs based on the original treatment plan. The rectal doses from the subsequent daily CTs were compared with the original doses planned on the simulation CT using our clinical acceptance criteria. Results: Based on 20 patients with 139 daily CT sets, 28% of the subsequent treatment dose distributions did not meet our criterion of V 40 65 < 17%. The inter-fractional rectal volume variation is significant for some patients. Conclusions: Due to the large inter-fractional variation of the rectal volume, it is more favorable to plan prostate IMRT based on an empty rectum and deliver treatment to patients with an empty rectum. Over 70% of actual treatments showed better rectal doses than our clinical acceptance criteria. A significant fraction (27%) of the actual treatments would benefit from adaptive image-guided radiotherapy based on daily CT images.

  20. Quantification of dose uncertainties for the bladder in prostate cancer radiotherapy based on dominant eigenmodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Richard; Acosta, Oscar; Lafond, Caroline; Espinosa, Jairo; de Crevoisier, Renaud

    2017-11-01

    In radiotherapy for prostate cancer the dose at the treatment planning for the bladder may be a bad surrogate of the actual delivered dose as the bladder presents the largest inter-fraction shape variations during treatment. This paper presents PCA models as a virtual tool to estimate dosimetric uncertainties for the bladder produced by motion and deformation between fractions. Our goal is to propose a methodology to determine the minimum number of modes required to quantify dose uncertainties of the bladder for motion/deformation models based on PCA. We trained individual PCA models using the bladder contours available from three patients with a planning computed tomography (CT) and on-treatment cone-beam CTs (CBCTs). Based on the above models and via deformable image registration (DIR), we estimated two accumulated doses: firstly, an accumulated dose obtained by integrating the planning dose over the Gaussian probability distribution of the PCA model; and secondly, an accumulated dose obtained by simulating treatment courses via a Monte Carlo approach. We also computed a reference accumulated dose for each patient using his available images via DIR. Finally, we compared the planning dose with the three accumulated doses, and we calculated local dose variability and dose-volume histogram uncertainties.

  1. Prostate-Specific Antigen Bounce After High-Dose-Rate Monotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Niraj H.; Kamrava, Mitchell; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Steinberg, Michael; Demanes, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the magnitude and kinetics of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounces after high-dose-rate (HDR) monotherapy and determine relationships between certain clinical factors and PSA bounce. Methods and Materials: Longitudinal PSA data and various clinical parameters were examined in 157 consecutive patients treated with HDR monotherapy between 1996 and 2005. We used the following definition for PSA bounce: rise in PSA ≥threshold, after which it returns to the prior level or lower. Prostate-specific antigen failure was defined per the Phoenix definition (nadir +2 ng/mL). Results: A PSA bounce was noted in 67 patients (43%). The number of bounces per patient was 1 in 45 cases (67%), 2 in 19 (28%), 3 in 2 (3%), 4 in 0, and 5 in 1 (1%). The median time to maximum PSA bounce was 1.3 years, its median magnitude was 0.7, and its median duration was 0.75 years. Three patients (2%) were noted to have PSA failure. None of the 3 patients who experienced biochemical failure exhibited PSA bounce. In the fully adjusted model for predicting each bounce, patients aged <55 years had a statistically significant higher likelihood of experiencing a bounce (odds ratio 2.22, 95% confidence interval 1.38-3.57, P=.001). There was also a statistically significant higher probability of experiencing a bounce for every unit decrease in Gleason score (odds ratio 1.52, 95% confidence interval 1.01-2.04, P=.045). Conclusions: A PSA bounce occurs in a significant percentage of patients treated with HDR monotherapy, with magnitudes varying from <1 in 28% of cases to ≥1 in 15%. The median duration of bounce is <1 year. More bounces were identified in patients with lower Gleason score and age <55 years. Further investigation using a model to correlate magnitude and frequency of bounces with clinical variables are under way

  2. Prostate Cancer Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundraise for PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us Prostate Cancer Symptoms and Signs Prostate Cancer Basics Risk Factors ... earlier. So what are the warning signs of prostate cancer? Unfortunately, there usually aren’t any early warning ...

  3. Prostate cancer - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000403.htm Prostate cancer - treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... drugs is recommended. References National Cancer Institute. Prostate cancer treatment (PDQ): Stages of prostate cancer. Updated July 31, ...

  4. Dose escalation by hypo fractionation in localized prostate cancer - a large single institution experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadevan, A.; Klein, E.; Kupelian, P.

    2003-01-01

    To report the outcomes of high dose radiation therapy using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) with hypo fractionation in localized prostate cancer at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. A total of 278 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with IMRT between 1998 and 2001. All cases had available pretreatment PSA (iPSA) and biopsy Gleason scores (bGS), no nodal metastasis, a minimum 2 year follow-up, and >5 follow-up PSA levels. The frequency by T-stage was: T1-T2A in 86%, T2B-T2C in 9%, and T3 in 5%. The median iPSA was 8.35. The frequency by bGS was: =7 in 45%. The age range for the patients was from 48 to 85 years (median 68 years). The median follow-up was 33 months (range: 24-49 months). The median doses delivered were 83Gy (delivered at 2.5Gy per fraction to 70 Gy; this being equivalent to 83 Gy at standard fractionation of 1.8 Gy using an alpha/beta of 2). The ASTRO definition for biochemical failure was used. Toxicity was assessed using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. The 3-year biochemical relapse free survival (bRFS) for the entire cohort at three years was 91%. Any (grade 1 or higher) acute genito-urinary (GU) side effects were seen in 79% of patients. Grade 2 or higher acute GU toxicity was seen in 18% of patients. Any (grade 1 or higher) acute gastro-intestinal (GI) side effects were seen in 65% of patients. Grade 2 or higher acute GI toxicity was seen in 11% of patients. Any (grade 1 or higher) late GU side effects were seen in 3% of patients. Grade 2 or higher late GU toxicity was seen in 1.5% of patients. Any (grade 1 or higher) late GI side effects were seen in 13% of patients. Grade 2 or higher late GI toxicity was seen in 5% of patients. Higher doses of radiation delivered by IMRT resulted in excellent bRFS outcomes in patients with localized prostate cancer receiving external beam radiation therapy. IMRT can be effectively used to safely increase dose delivery without compromising on quality of life

  5. High dose rate interstitial brachytherapy with external beam irradiation for localized prostate cancer. Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiratsuka, Junichi; Jo, Yoshimasa; Yoden, Eisaku; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Imajo, Yoshinari [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Nagase, Naomi; Narihiro, Naomasa; Kubota, Juichi

    2000-12-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the biochemical and pathological results of combined external beam radiotherapy and high dose rate Ir-192 brachytherapy (HDR-Ir192) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Between October 1997 and August 1999, 39 evaluable patients with adenocarcinoma of prostate diagnosed by biopsy were treated with interstitial and external beam irradiation. Patients ranged in age from 58-82 years, with a mean of 69.7 years. T1c, T2 and T3 tumors, according to the UICC classification system (1997), were found in 7, 21 and 11 cases respectively. The mean initial pre-treatment PSA was 35.9 ng/ml (median 13.2), with 77% of the patients having had a pre-treatment PSA greater than 10 ng/ml. Of all patients, 17 had received pre-treatment hormonal therapy. Hormonal pretreatment was stopped at the beginning of radiotherapy in all cases. External beam four-field box irradiation was given to the small pelvis to a dose of 45 Gy/25 fractions. Three HDR-Ir192 treatments were given over a 30-h period, with 5.5 Gy per fraction at the circumference of the prostate gland over the course of this study. Biochemical failure was defined as a PSA level >1.5 ng/ml and rising on three consecutive values. If serial post-treatment PSA levels showed a continuous downward trend, failure was not scored. The patient with clinical evidence of progression was classified as a clinical failure. The median follow-up at the time of evaluation was 19.6 months. A post-treatment PSA level {<=}1.0 ng/ml was seen in 26 (67%) patients, and values from >1.0 to {<=}2.0 ng/ml were seen in 10 (26%) patients. Biochemical failure was not seen in 38 patients except for one patient who developed a distant bone metastasis with negative prostatic biopsy 15 months after treatment. Biochemical control rate was 100% (38/38) except for the patient with bone metastasis classified as clinical failure. Negative biopsies 18 months after treatment were found in 93% (14/15) of patients. Only one patient

  6. Proposed Rectal Dose Constraints for Patients Undergoing Definitive Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Linda W.; Xia Ping; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Akazawa, Michelle; Scala, Matthew; Pickett, Barby M.S.; Hsu, I-C.; Speight, Joycelyn; Roach, Mack

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Although several institutions have reported rectal dose constraints according to threshold toxicity, the plethora of trials has resulted in multiple, confusing dose-volume histogram recommendations. A set of standardized, literature-based constraints for patients undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer would help guide the practice of prostate RT. The purpose of this study was to develop these constraints, demonstrate that they are achievable, and assess the corresponding rectal toxicity. Methods and Materials: An extensive literature search identified eight key studies relating dose-volume histogram data to rectal toxicity. A correction factor was developed to address differences in the anatomic definition of the rectum across studies. The dose-volume histogram constraints recommended by each study were combined to generate the constraints. The data from all patients treated with definitive intensity-modulated RT were then compared against these constraints. Acute rectal toxicity was assessed. Results: A continuous, proposed rectal dose-constraint curve was generated. Intensity-modulated RT not only met this constraint curve, but also was able to achieve at least 30-40% lower dose to the rectum. The preliminary clinical results were also positive: 50% of patients reported no acute bowel toxicity, 33% reported Grade 1 toxicity, and 17% reported Grade 2 toxicity. No patients reported Grade 3-4 acute rectal toxicity. Conclusions: In this study, we developed a set of proposed rectal dose constraints. This allowed for volumetric assessment of the dose-volume relationship compared with single dose-volume histogram points. Additional research will be performed to validate this threshold as a class solution for rectal dose constraints

  7. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost for Prostate Cancer: Comparison of Two Different Fractionation Schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaprealian, Tania; Weinberg, Vivian; Speight, Joycelyn L.; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Roach, Mack; Shinohara, Katsuto; Hsu, I.-Chow

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This is a retrospective study comparing our experience with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost for prostate cancer, using two different fractionation schemes, 600 cGy × 3 fractions (patient group 1) and 950 cGy × 2 fractions (patient group 2). Methods and Materials: A total of 165 patients were treated for prostate cancer using external beam radiation therapy up to a dose of 45 Gy, followed by an HDR brachytherapy prostate radiation boost. Between July 1997 and Nov 1999, 64 patients were treated with an HDR boost of 600 cGy × 3 fractions; and between June 2000 and Nov 2005, 101 patients were treated with an HDR boost of 950 cGy × 2 fractions. All but 9 patients had at least one of the following risk features: pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level >10, a Gleason score ≥7, and/or clinical stage T3 disease. Results: Median follow-up was 105 months for group 1 and 43 months for group 2. Patients in group 2 had a greater number of high-risk features than group 1 (p = 0.02). Adjusted for comparable follow-up, there was no difference in biochemical no-evidence-of-disease (bNED) rate between the two fractionation scheme approaches, with 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of 93.5% in group 1 and 87.3% in group 2 (p = 0.19). The 5-year estimates of progression-free survival were 86% for group 1 and 83% for group 2 (p = 0.53). Among high-risk patients, there were no differences in bNED or PFS rate due to fractionation. Conclusions: Results were excellent for both groups. Adjusted for comparable follow-up, no differences were found between groups.

  8. Dose Volume Histogram analysis for rectum and urethral reaction of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagi, Takeshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinically relevant parameters for rectum and urethral reaction using DVH (dose volume histogram) in carbon ion radiotherapy of prostate cancer. In this year, we studied the urinary reaction mainly. 35 patients with prostate cancer were treated with carbon ion beams between June 1995 and December 1997. The applied dose was escalated from 54.0 GyE to 72.0 GyE in fixed 20 fractions. Clinical urinary reaction and rectum reaction were reviewed using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring system for acute reactions, RTOG/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) scoring system for late reactions. Taking the ROI (region of interest) for DVH of urethra, we used surrogate one that was derived from the observation of MR images. 35 patients were analyzed for acute urinary reaction and 34 for late urinary reaction in the study of this year. DVH analysis suggested difference among the grades for acute and late reactions. These analysis appears to be a useful tool for predicting the urinary reactions. (author)

  9. Can we avoid high levels of dose escalation for high-risk prostate cancer in the setting of androgen deprivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, Thomas P; Wilcox, Shea W; Aherne, Noel J

    2016-01-01

    Both dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy (DE-EBRT) and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) improve outcomes in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. However, there is little evidence specifically evaluating DE-EBRT for patients with high-risk prostate cancer receiving ADT, particularly for EBRT doses >74 Gy. We aimed to determine whether DE-EBRT >74 Gy improves outcomes for patients with high-risk prostate cancer receiving long-term ADT. Patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated on an institutional protocol prescribing 3-6 months neoadjuvant ADT and DE-EBRT, followed by 2 years of adjuvant ADT. Between 2006 and 2012, EBRT doses were escalated from 74 Gy to 76 Gy and then to 78 Gy. We interrogated our electronic medical record to identify these patients and analyzed our results by comparing dose levels. In all, 479 patients were treated with a 68-month median follow-up. The 5-year biochemical disease-free survivals for the 74 Gy, 76 Gy, and 78 Gy groups were 87.8%, 86.9%, and 91.6%, respectively. The metastasis-free survivals were 95.5%, 94.5%, and 93.9%, respectively, and the prostate cancer-specific survivals were 100%, 94.4%, and 98.1%, respectively. Dose escalation had no impact on any outcome in either univariate or multivariate analysis. There was no benefit of DE-EBRT >74 Gy in our cohort of high-risk prostate patients treated with long-term ADT. As dose escalation has higher risks of radiotherapy-induced toxicity, it may be feasible to omit dose escalation beyond 74 Gy in this group of patients. Randomized studies evaluating dose escalation for high-risk patients receiving ADT should be considered.

  10. The Effect of Dose and Quality Assurance in Early Prostate Cancer Treated with Low Dose Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, A M; Rodda, S L; Mason, M; Musunuru, H; Al-Qaisieh, B; Bownes, P; Smith, J; Franks, K; Carey, B; Bottomley, D

    2015-07-01

    To examine the relationship between post-implant computed tomography dosimetry and long-term prostate-specific antigen relapse-free survival in patients treated with iodine 125 (I-125) low dose rate prostate brachytherapy as monotherapy and, second, to audit recent practice against Royal College of Radiologists' (RCR) guidelines after the re-introduction of post-implant dosimetry for all patients in our centre. Between March 1995 and September 2007, 2157 consecutive patients with localised prostate cancer underwent I-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy as monotherapy in a single UK centre. All patients were transrectal ultrasound planned delivering a 145 Gy (TG 43) minimum peripheral dose. None received supplemental external beam radiotherapy. Post-implant computed tomography-based dosimetry was undertaken between 4 and 6 weeks after treatment and was available for 711 (33%). Outcomes were analysed in terms of the relationship of D90 to prostate-specific antigen relapse-free survival (nadir 2+ definition) and all patients had a minimum follow-up of 5 years. For contemporary patients from 2011, quality metrics from post-implant computed tomography as defined by RCR guidelines are presented. A mean D90 of 138.7 Gy (standard deviation 24.7) was achieved for the historic cohort. Biochemical control at 10 years was 76% in patients with D90 > 140 Gy and 68% in those with D90 standard deviation) D90 has increased from 154 (15.3) Gy in 2011 to 164 (13.5) Gy in 2013. Similarly, an increase in the mean (standard deviation) V100 from 92 (4.4) to 95 (3.2) % is noted over time. No difference between clinicians was noted. D90 values of less than 140 Gy continue to be predictive of increased risk of recurrence of prostate cancer across risk groups with longer follow-up. Quality assurance can be used to ensure improved and consistent implant quality in a team with multiple clinicians. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  11. Prostate-specific antigen bounce after high-dose rate brachytherapy with external beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Naotaka; Kakinoki, Hiroaki; Tsutsui, Akio; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Iguchi, Atsushi; Matsunobu, Toru; Uehara, Satoru

    2008-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce after high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer patients was evaluated. Sixty-one patients treated with HDR-brachytherapy followed by EBRT had a minimum follow-up of 12 months (median, 24 months) in our institute. A PSA bounce was defined as a rise of at least 0.1 ng/ml greater than a previous PSA level, with a subsequent decline equal to, or less than, the initial nadir. A PSA bounce was noted in 16 (26.2%) of 61 patients (one patient had a PSA bounce twice). Median time to develop a PSA bounce was 18 months, but 23.5% developed a PSA bounce after 24 months. Median duration of PSA bounce was 6 months and 11.8% had increased PSA within a period of 12 months. Median bounce height was 0.2 ng/ml (range, 0.1 to 3.39 ng/ml). A bounce height of gerater than 2 ng/ml was seen in 11.8%. Clinical characteristics (age, prostate volume, neoadjuvant endocrine therapy, risk classification, stage, pretreatment PSA, Gleason score) do not predict whether or not there will be a PSA bounce. In patients treated with HDR-brachytherapy followed by EBRT, the incidence and characteristics of PSA bounce were similar to those in patients treated with low-dose rate brachytherapy. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of PSA bounce following HDR-brachytherapy with EBRT. (author)

  12. Decision Regret in Men Undergoing Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steer, Anna N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Aherne, Noel J., E-mail: noel.aherne@ncahs.health.nsw.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Rural Clinical School Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Gorzynska, Karen; Hoffman, Matthew; Last, Andrew; Hill, Jacques [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Shakespeare, Thomas P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Rural Clinical School Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour (Australia)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Decision regret (DR) is a negative emotion associated with medical treatment decisions, and it is an important patient-centered outcome after therapy for localized prostate cancer. DR has been found to occur in up to 53% of patients treated for localized prostate cancer, and it may vary depending on treatment modality. DR after modern dose-escalated radiation therapy (DE-RT) has not been investigated previously, to our knowledge. Our primary aim was to evaluate DR in a cohort of patients treated with DE-RT. Methods and Materials: We surveyed 257 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer who had previously received DE-RT, by means of a validated questionnaire. Results: There were 220 responses (85.6% response rate). Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy was given in 85.0% of patients and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in 15.0%. Doses received included 73.8 Gy (34.5% patients), 74 Gy (53.6%), and 76 Gy (10.9%). Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (AD) was given in 51.8% of patients and both neoadjuvant and adjuvant AD in 34.5%. The median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 12-67 months). In all, 3.8% of patients expressed DR for their choice of treatment. When asked whether they would choose DE-RT or AD again, only 0.5% probably or definitely would not choose DE-RT again, compared with 8.4% for AD (P<.01). Conclusion: Few patients treated with modern DE-RT express DR, with regret appearing to be lower than in previously published reports of patients treated with radical prostatectomy or older radiation therapy techniques. Patients experienced more regret with the AD component of treatment than with the radiation therapy component, with implications for informed consent. Further research should investigate regret associated with individual components of modern therapy, including AD, radiation therapy and surgery.

  13. Decision Regret in Men Undergoing Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steer, Anna N.; Aherne, Noel J.; Gorzynska, Karen; Hoffman, Matthew; Last, Andrew; Hill, Jacques; Shakespeare, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Decision regret (DR) is a negative emotion associated with medical treatment decisions, and it is an important patient-centered outcome after therapy for localized prostate cancer. DR has been found to occur in up to 53% of patients treated for localized prostate cancer, and it may vary depending on treatment modality. DR after modern dose-escalated radiation therapy (DE-RT) has not been investigated previously, to our knowledge. Our primary aim was to evaluate DR in a cohort of patients treated with DE-RT. Methods and Materials: We surveyed 257 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer who had previously received DE-RT, by means of a validated questionnaire. Results: There were 220 responses (85.6% response rate). Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy was given in 85.0% of patients and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in 15.0%. Doses received included 73.8 Gy (34.5% patients), 74 Gy (53.6%), and 76 Gy (10.9%). Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (AD) was given in 51.8% of patients and both neoadjuvant and adjuvant AD in 34.5%. The median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 12-67 months). In all, 3.8% of patients expressed DR for their choice of treatment. When asked whether they would choose DE-RT or AD again, only 0.5% probably or definitely would not choose DE-RT again, compared with 8.4% for AD (P<.01). Conclusion: Few patients treated with modern DE-RT express DR, with regret appearing to be lower than in previously published reports of patients treated with radical prostatectomy or older radiation therapy techniques. Patients experienced more regret with the AD component of treatment than with the radiation therapy component, with implications for informed consent. Further research should investigate regret associated with individual components of modern therapy, including AD, radiation therapy and surgery

  14. Decision regret in men undergoing dose-escalated radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, Anna N; Aherne, Noel J; Gorzynska, Karen; Hoffman, Matthew; Last, Andrew; Hill, Jacques; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2013-07-15

    Decision regret (DR) is a negative emotion associated with medical treatment decisions, and it is an important patient-centered outcome after therapy for localized prostate cancer. DR has been found to occur in up to 53% of patients treated for localized prostate cancer, and it may vary depending on treatment modality. DR after modern dose-escalated radiation therapy (DE-RT) has not been investigated previously, to our knowledge. Our primary aim was to evaluate DR in a cohort of patients treated with DE-RT. We surveyed 257 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer who had previously received DE-RT, by means of a validated questionnaire. There were 220 responses (85.6% response rate). Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy was given in 85.0% of patients and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in 15.0%. Doses received included 73.8 Gy (34.5% patients), 74 Gy (53.6%), and 76 Gy (10.9%). Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (AD) was given in 51.8% of patients and both neoadjuvant and adjuvant AD in 34.5%. The median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 12-67 months). In all, 3.8% of patients expressed DR for their choice of treatment. When asked whether they would choose DE-RT or AD again, only 0.5% probably or definitely would not choose DE-RT again, compared with 8.4% for AD (P<.01). Few patients treated with modern DE-RT express DR, with regret appearing to be lower than in previously published reports of patients treated with radical prostatectomy or older radiation therapy techniques. Patients experienced more regret with the AD component of treatment than with the radiation therapy component, with implications for informed consent. Further research should investigate regret associated with individual components of modern therapy, including AD, radiation therapy and surgery. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Second salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for radiorecurrent prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metha Maenhout

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Salvage treatments for localized radiorecurrent prostate cancer can be performed safely when a focal and image guided approach is used. Due to the low toxicity, the opportunity exists to investigate a second salvage treatment when a second locally recurrent prostate cancer occurs. Here, we describe a second salvage treatment procedure of 4 patients. Material and methods : Four patients with a pathologically proven second local recurrence were treated in an outpatient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-guided setting with a single fraction of 19 Gy focal high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT. Delineation was performed using choline-PET-CT or a 68Ga-PSMA PET in combination with multiparametric 3 Tesla MRI in all four patients. Toxicity was measured using common toxicity criteria for adverse events (CTCAE version 4.0. Results : With a median follow-up of 12 months (range, 6-15, there were 2 patients with biochemical recurrence as defined by the Phoenix-definition. There were no patients with grade 3 or more toxicity. In all second salvage HDR-BT treatments, the constraints for rectum, bladder, and urethra were met. Median treatment volume (GTV was 4.8 cc (range, 1.9-6.6 cc. A median of 8 catheters (range, 6-9 were used, and the median dose to the treatment volume (GTV was a D95: 19.3 Gy (SD 15.5-19.4 Gy. Conclusions : Second focal salvage MRI-guided HDR-BT for a select group of patients with a second locally recurrent prostate cancer is feasible. There was no grade 3 or more acute toxicity for these four patients.

  16. Dose response in prostate cancer with 8-12 years' follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanks, Gerald E.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Epstein, Barry; Horwitz, Eric M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This communication reports the long-term results of the original group of prostate cancer patients who participated in the first prospective Fox Chase Cancer Center radiation dose escalation study for which 8-12 years of follow-up is now available. Methods and Materials: Between March 1, 1989 and October 31, 1992, 232 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy only at Fox Chase Cancer Center in a prospective dose-escalation study. Of these patients, 229 were assessable. The 8-, 10-, and 12-year actuarial rates of biochemical control (biochemically no evidence of disease [bNED]), freedom from distant metastasis (FDM), and morbidity were calculated. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess multivariately the predictors of bNED control and FDM, including pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level (continuous), tumor stage (T1/T2a vs. T2b/T3), Gleason score (2-6 vs. 7-10), and radiation dose (continuous). The median total dose for all patients was 74 Gy (range 67-81). The median follow-up for living patients was 110 months (range 89-147). bNED control was defined using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus definition. Results: The actuarial bNED control for all patients included in this series was 55% at 5 years, 48% at 10 years, and 48% at 12 years. Patients with pretreatment PSA levels of 10-20 ng/mL had statistically significant differences (19% vs. 31% vs. 84%, p=0.0003) in bNED control when stratified by dose ( 75.6 Gy, respectively) on univariate analysis. For the 229 patients with follow-up, 124 (54%) were clinically and biochemically without evidence of disease. Sixty-nine patients were alive at the time of last follow-up, and 55 patients were dead of intercurrent disease. On multivariate analysis, radiation dose was a statistically significant predictor of bNED control for all patients and for unfavorable patients with a pretreatment PSA 20

  17. Causes of Mortality After Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy and Androgen Deprivation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Hunter, Grant K.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Abdel-Wahab, May; Stephenson, Andrew J.; Klein, Eric A.; Mahadevan, Arul; Kupelian, Patrick A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Men with high-risk prostate cancer have other competing causes of mortality; however, current risk stratification schema do not account for comorbidities. We aim to identify the causes of death and factors predictive for mortality in this population. Methods and Materials: A total of 660 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated with definitive high-dose external beam radiation therapy (≥74 Gy) and androgen deprivation (AD) between 1996 and 2009 at a single institution. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to determine factors predictive of survival. Results: The median radiation dose was 78 Gy, median duration of AD was 6 months, and median follow-up was 74 months. The 10-year overall survival (OS) was 60.6%. Prostate cancer was the leading single cause of death, with 10-year mortality of 14.1% (95% CI 10.7-17.6), compared with other cancers (8.4%, 95% CI 5.7-11.1), cardiovascular disease (7.3%, 95% CI 4.7-9.9), and all other causes (10.4%, 95% CI 7.2-13.6). On multivariate analysis, older age (HR 1.55, P=.002) and Charlson comorbidity index score (CS) ≥1 (HR 2.20, P<.0001) were significant factors predictive of OS, whereas Gleason score, T stage, prostate-specific antigen, duration of AD, radiation dose, smoking history, and body mass index were not. Men younger than 70 years of age with CS = 0 were more likely to die of prostate cancer than any other cause, whereas older men or those with CS ≥1 more commonly suffered non-prostate cancer death. The cumulative incidences of prostate cancer-specific mortality were similar regardless of age or comorbidities (P=.60). Conclusions: Men with high-risk prostate cancer are more likely to die of causes other than prostate cancer, except for the subgroup of men younger than 70 years of age without comorbidities. Only older age and presence of comorbidities significantly predicted for OS, whereas prostate cancer- and treatment-related factors did not

  18. Can we avoid high levels of dose escalation for high-risk prostate cancer in the setting of androgen deprivation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakespeare TP

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Thomas P Shakespeare,1,2 Shea W Wilcox,1 Noel J Aherne1,2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, 2Rural Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia Aim: Both dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy (DE-EBRT and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT improve outcomes in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. However, there is little evidence specifically evaluating DE-EBRT for patients with high-risk prostate cancer receiving ADT, particularly for EBRT doses >74 Gy. We aimed to determine whether DE-EBRT >74 Gy improves outcomes for patients with high-risk prostate cancer receiving long-term ADT. Patients and methods: Patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated on an institutional protocol prescribing 3–6 months neoadjuvant ADT and DE-EBRT, followed by 2 years of adjuvant ADT. Between 2006 and 2012, EBRT doses were escalated from 74 Gy to 76 Gy and then to 78 Gy. We interrogated our electronic medical record to identify these patients and analyzed our results by comparing dose levels. Results: In all, 479 patients were treated with a 68-month median follow-up. The 5-year biochemical disease-free survivals for the 74 Gy, 76 Gy, and 78 Gy groups were 87.8%, 86.9%, and 91.6%, respectively. The metastasis-free survivals were 95.5%, 94.5%, and 93.9%, respectively, and the prostate cancer-specific survivals were 100%, 94.4%, and 98.1%, respectively. Dose escalation had no impact on any outcome in either univariate or multivariate analysis. Conclusion: There was no benefit of DE-EBRT >74 Gy in our cohort of high-risk prostate patients treated with long-term ADT. As dose escalation has higher risks of radiotherapy-induced toxicity, it may be feasible to omit dose escalation beyond 74 Gy in this group of patients. Randomized studies evaluating dose escalation for high-risk patients receiving ADT should be considered. Keywords: radiotherapy, IMRT, dose

  19. Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Versus Cryotherapy in Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gestaut, Matthew M.; Cai, Wendi; Vyas, Shilpa; Patel, Belur J.; Hasan, Salman A.; MunozMaldonado, Yolanda; Deb, Niloyjyoti; Swanson, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Cryotherapy and brachytherapy are definitive local treatment options for low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. There are both prospective and retrospective data for brachytherapy, but the use of cryotherapy has been limited primarily to single-institution retrospective studies. Currently, no published evidence has compared low-dose-rate brachytherapy versus cryotherapy. Methods and Materials: Institutional review board approval was obtained to conduct a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients treated at our institution from 1990 to 2012. For inclusion, patients must have received a prostate cancer diagnosis and have been considered to have low- to intermediate-risk disease according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. All patients received brachytherapy or cryotherapy treatment. Disease specifics and failure details were collected for all patients. Failure was defined as prostate-specific antigen nadir +2 ng/mL. Results: A total of 359 patients were analyzed. The groups comprised 50 low-risk cryotherapy (LRC), 92 intermediate-risk cryotherapy (IRC), 133 low-risk brachytherapy (LRB), and 84 intermediate-risk brachytherapy (IRB) patients. The median prostate-specific antigen follow-up periods were 85.6 months (LRC), 59.2 months (IRC), 74.9 months (LRB), and 59.8 months (IRB). The 5-year biochemical progression–free survival (bPFS) rate was 57.9% in the cryotherapy group versus 89.6% in the brachytherapy group (P<.0001). The 5-year bPFS rate was 70.0% (LRC), 51.4% (IRC), 89.4% (LRB), and 89.7% (IRB). The bPFS rate was significantly different between brachytherapy and cryotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk groups (P<.05). The mean nadir temperature reached for cryotherapy patients was −35°C (range, −96°C to −6°C). Cryotherapy used a median of 2 freeze-thaw cycles (range, 2-4 freeze-thaw cycles). Conclusions: Results from this study suggest that cryotherapy is inferior to brachytherapy for patients with

  20. Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Versus Cryotherapy in Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestaut, Matthew M; Cai, Wendi; Vyas, Shilpa; Patel, Belur J; Hasan, Salman A; MunozMaldonado, Yolanda; Deb, Niloyjyoti; Swanson, Gregory

    2017-05-01

    Cryotherapy and brachytherapy are definitive local treatment options for low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. There are both prospective and retrospective data for brachytherapy, but the use of cryotherapy has been limited primarily to single-institution retrospective studies. Currently, no published evidence has compared low-dose-rate brachytherapy versus cryotherapy. Institutional review board approval was obtained to conduct a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients treated at our institution from 1990 to 2012. For inclusion, patients must have received a prostate cancer diagnosis and have been considered to have low- to intermediate-risk disease according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. All patients received brachytherapy or cryotherapy treatment. Disease specifics and failure details were collected for all patients. Failure was defined as prostate-specific antigen nadir +2 ng/mL. A total of 359 patients were analyzed. The groups comprised 50 low-risk cryotherapy (LRC), 92 intermediate-risk cryotherapy (IRC), 133 low-risk brachytherapy (LRB), and 84 intermediate-risk brachytherapy (IRB) patients. The median prostate-specific antigen follow-up periods were 85.6 months (LRC), 59.2 months (IRC), 74.9 months (LRB), and 59.8 months (IRB). The 5-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS) rate was 57.9% in the cryotherapy group versus 89.6% in the brachytherapy group (Pcryotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk groups (Pcryotherapy patients was -35°C (range, -96°C to -6°C). Cryotherapy used a median of 2 freeze-thaw cycles (range, 2-4 freeze-thaw cycles). Results from this study suggest that cryotherapy is inferior to brachytherapy for patients with low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Patient selection criteria for consideration of cryotherapy and brachytherapy are similar in terms of anesthesia candidacy. Therefore, cryotherapy would not be recommended as a first-line local therapy for this particular

  1. Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Versus Cryotherapy in Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gestaut, Matthew M., E-mail: Matthew.Gestaut@BSWHealth.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States); Cai, Wendi [Department of Biostatistics, Baylor Scott and White Health, Temple, Texas (United States); Vyas, Shilpa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Swedish Cancer Institute, Seattle, Washington (United States); Patel, Belur J. [Department of Urology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States); Hasan, Salman A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States); MunozMaldonado, Yolanda [Department of Biostatistics, Baylor Scott and White Health, Temple, Texas (United States); Deb, Niloyjyoti; Swanson, Gregory [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: Cryotherapy and brachytherapy are definitive local treatment options for low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. There are both prospective and retrospective data for brachytherapy, but the use of cryotherapy has been limited primarily to single-institution retrospective studies. Currently, no published evidence has compared low-dose-rate brachytherapy versus cryotherapy. Methods and Materials: Institutional review board approval was obtained to conduct a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients treated at our institution from 1990 to 2012. For inclusion, patients must have received a prostate cancer diagnosis and have been considered to have low- to intermediate-risk disease according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. All patients received brachytherapy or cryotherapy treatment. Disease specifics and failure details were collected for all patients. Failure was defined as prostate-specific antigen nadir +2 ng/mL. Results: A total of 359 patients were analyzed. The groups comprised 50 low-risk cryotherapy (LRC), 92 intermediate-risk cryotherapy (IRC), 133 low-risk brachytherapy (LRB), and 84 intermediate-risk brachytherapy (IRB) patients. The median prostate-specific antigen follow-up periods were 85.6 months (LRC), 59.2 months (IRC), 74.9 months (LRB), and 59.8 months (IRB). The 5-year biochemical progression–free survival (bPFS) rate was 57.9% in the cryotherapy group versus 89.6% in the brachytherapy group (P<.0001). The 5-year bPFS rate was 70.0% (LRC), 51.4% (IRC), 89.4% (LRB), and 89.7% (IRB). The bPFS rate was significantly different between brachytherapy and cryotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk groups (P<.05). The mean nadir temperature reached for cryotherapy patients was −35°C (range, −96°C to −6°C). Cryotherapy used a median of 2 freeze-thaw cycles (range, 2-4 freeze-thaw cycles). Conclusions: Results from this study suggest that cryotherapy is inferior to brachytherapy for patients with

  2. High-Dose-Rate Monotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: 10-Year Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauswald, Henrik; Kamrava, Mitchell R.; Fallon, Julia M.; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Park, Sang-June; Van, Thanh; Borja, Lalaine; Steinberg, Michael L.; Demanes, D. Jeffrey, E-mail: JDemanes@mednet.ucla.edu

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy was originally used with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to increase the dose to the prostate without injuring the bladder or rectum. Numerous studies have reported HDR brachytherapy is safe and effective. We adapted it for use without EBRT for cases not requiring lymph node treatment. Patients and Methods: We entered the patient demographics, disease characteristics, and treatment parameters into a prospective registry and serially added follow-up data for 448 men with low-risk (n=288) and intermediate-risk (n=160) prostate cancer treated from 1996 to 2009. Their median age was 64 years (range 42-90). The median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 6.0 ng/mL (range 0.2-18.2). The Gleason score was ≤6 in 76% and 7 in 24%. The median dose was 43.5 Gy in 6 fractions. The clinical and biochemical disease control and survival rates were calculated. Adverse events were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria of Adverse Events. Results: The median follow-up period was 6.5 years (range 0.3-15.3). The actuarial 6- and 10-year PSA progression-free survival was 98.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 96.9%-99.4%) and 97.8% (95% CI 95.5%-98.9%). Overall survival at 10 years was 76.7% (95% CI 69.9%-82.2%). The local control, distant metastasis-free survival, and cause-specific survival were 99.7% (95% CI 97.9%-99.9%), 98.9% (95% CI 96.3%-99.7%), and 99.1% (95% CI 95.8%-99.8%). T stage, initial PSA level, Gleason score, National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group, patient age, and androgen deprivation therapy did not significantly correlate with disease control or survival. No late grade 3 to 4 rectal toxicities developed. Late grade 3 to 4 genitourinary toxicity occurred in 4.9% (grade 3 in 4.7%). Conclusions: HDR monotherapy is a safe and highly effective treatment of low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer.

  3. Late rectal toxicity after conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer (I): multivariate analysis and dose-response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skwarchuk, Mark W.; Jackson, Andrew; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Venkatraman, Ennapadam S.; Cowen, Didier M.; Levegruen, Sabine; Burman, Chandra M.; Fuks, Zvi; Leibel, Steven A.; Ling, C. Clifton

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to use the outcome of a dose escalation protocol for three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) of prostate cancer to study the dose-response for late rectal toxicity and to identify anatomic, dosimetric, and clinical factors that correlate with late rectal bleeding in multivariate analysis. Methods and Materials: Seven hundred forty-three patients with T1c-T3 prostate cancer were treated with 3D-CRT with prescribed doses of 64.8 to 81.0 Gy. The 5-year actuarial rate of late rectal toxicity was assessed using Kaplan-Meier statistics. A retrospective dosimetric analysis was performed for patients treated to 70.2 Gy (52 patients) or 75.6 Gy (119 patients) who either exhibited late rectal bleeding (RTOG Grade 2/3) within 30 months after treatment (i.e., 70.2 Gy--13 patients, 75.6 Gy--36 patients) or were nonbleeding for at least 30 months (i.e., 70.2 Gy--39 patients, 75.6 Gy--83 patients). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was performed to correlate late rectal bleeding with several anatomic, dosimetric, and clinical variables. Results: A dose response for ≥ Grade 2 late rectal toxicity was observed. By multivariate analysis, the following factors were significantly correlated with ≥ Grade 2 late rectal bleeding for patients prescribed 70.2 Gy: 1) enclosure of the outer rectal contour by the 50% isodose on the isocenter slice (i.e., Iso50) (p max (p max

  4. Late rectal toxicity: dose-volume effects of conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Eugene H.; Pollack, Alan; Levy, Larry; Starkschall, George; Lei Dong; Rosen, Isaac; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric, anatomic, and clinical factors that correlate with late rectal toxicity after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the dose-volume histograms and clinical records of 163 Stage T1b-T3c prostate cancer patients treated between 1992 and 1999 with 3D-CRT, to a total isocenter dose of 74-78 Gy at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The median follow-up was 62 months (range 24-102). All late rectal complications were scored using modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force criteria. The 6-year toxicity rate was assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis and the log-rank test. A univariate proportional hazards regression model was used to test the correlation between Grade 2 or higher toxicity and the dosimetric, anatomic, and clinical factors. In a multivariate regression model, clinical factors were added to the dosimetric and anatomic variables to determine whether they significantly altered the risk of developing late toxicity. Results: At 6 years, the rate of developing Grade 2 or higher late rectal toxicity was 25%. A significant volume effect was observed at rectal doses of 60, 70, 75.6, and 78 Gy, and the risk of developing rectal complications increased exponentially as greater volumes were irradiated. Although the percentage of rectal volume treated correlated significantly with the incidence of rectal complications at all dose levels (p 3 of the rectum. Of the clinical variables tested, only a history of hemorrhoids correlated with rectal toxicity (p=0.003). Multivariate analysis showed that the addition of hemorrhoids increased the risk of toxicity for each dosimetric variable found to be significant on univariate analysis (p<0.05 for all comparisons). Conclusion: Dose-volume histogram analyses clearly indicated a volume effect on the probability of developing late rectal complications

  5. Prostate Cancer Foundation News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Finding a Doctor Treatment Options Side Effects Managing Prostate Cancer Treatment Related Side Effects Clinical Trials Patient Resources Guides Videos Prostate Cancer FAQs Information by Stage Newly Diagnosed with Prostate ...

  6. Evaluation of the 'dose of the day' for IMRT prostate cancer patients derived from portal dose measurements and cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zijtveld, Mathilda van; Dirkx, Maarten; Breuers, Marcel; Kuipers, Ruud; Heijmen, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: High geometrical and dosimetrical accuracies are required for radiotherapy treatments where IMRT is applied in combination with narrow treatment margins in order to minimize dose delivery to normal tissues. As an overall check, we implemented a method for reconstruction of the actually delivered 3D dose distribution to the patient during a treatment fraction, i.e., the 'dose of the day'. In this article results on the clinical evaluation of this concept for a group of IMRT prostate cancer patients are presented. Materials and methods: The actual IMRT fluence maps delivered to a patient were derived from measured EPID-images acquired during treatment using a previously described iterative method. In addition, the patient geometry was obtained from in-room acquired cone-beam CT images. For dose calculation, a mapping of the Hounsfield Units from the planning CT was applied. With the fluence maps and the modified cone-beam CT the 'dose of the day' was calculated. The method was validated using phantom measurements and evaluated clinically for 10 prostate cancer patients in 4 or 5 fractions. Results: The phantom measurements showed that the delivered dose could be reconstructed within 3%/3 mm accuracy. For prostate cancer patients, the isocenter dose agreed within -0.4 ± 1.0% (1 SD) with the planned value, while for on average 98.1% of the pixels within the 50% isodose surface the actually delivered dose agreed within 3% or 3 mm with the planned dose. For most fractions, the dose coverage of the prostate volume was slightly deteriorated which was caused by small prostate rotations and small inaccuracies in fluence delivery. The dose that was delivered to the rectum remained within the constraints used during planning. However, for two patients a large degrading of the dose delivery was observed in two fractions. For one patient this was related to changes in rectum filling with respect to the planning CT and for the other to large intra-fraction motion during

  7. Prostate position variability and dose-volume histograms in radiotherapy for prostate cancer with full and empty bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Asadpour, Branka; Gagel, Bernd; Piroth, Marc D.; Holy, Richard; Eble, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate prostate position variability and dose-volume histograms in prostate radiotherapy with full bladder (FB) and empty bladder (EB). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients underwent planning computed tomography scans in a supine position with FB and EB before and after 4 and 8 weeks of radiation therapy. The scans were matched by alignment of pelvic bones. Displacements of the prostate/seminal vesicle organ borders and center of mass were determined. Treatment plans (FB vs. EB) were compared. Results: Compared with the primary scan, FB volume varied more than EB volume (standard deviation, 106 cm 3 vs. 47 cm 3 ), but the prostate/seminal vesicle center of mass position variability was the same (>3 mm deviation in right-left, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions in 0, 41%, and 33%, respectively, with FB vs. 0, 44%, and 33% with EB). The bladder volume treated with 90% of the prescription dose was significantly larger with EB (39% ± 14% vs. 22% ± 10%; p < 0.01). Bowel loops received ≥90% of prescription dose in 37% (3% with FB; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Despite the larger variability of bladder filling, prostate position stability was the same with FB compared with EB. An increased amount of bladder volume in the high-dose region and a higher dose to bowel loops result from treatment plans with EB

  8. Elimination of ascorbic acid after high-dose infusion in prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Kjær; Højgaard, Martin; Andersen, Jon Thor Trærup

    2015-01-01

    IV AA. The purpose of the present study was to assess the basic kinetic variables in human beings over a relevant AA dosing interval for proper design of future clinical trials. Ten patients with metastatic prostate cancer were treated for four weeks with fixed AA doses of 5, 30 and 60 g. AA...... was measured consecutively in plasma and indicated first-order elimination kinetics throughout the dosing range with supra-physiological concentrations. The target dose of 60g AA IV produced a peak plasma AA concentration of 20.3 mM. Elimination half-life was 1.87 hr (mean, SD ± 0.40), volume of distribution 0.......19 L/kg (SD ±0.05) and clearance rate 6.02 L/hr (100mL/min). No differences in pharmacokinetic parameters were observed between weeks/doses. A relatively fast first-order elimination with half-life of about 2 hr makes it impossible to maintain AA concentrations in the potential cytotoxic range after...

  9. Conformal technique dose escalation in prostate cancer: improved cancer control with higher doses in patients with pretreatment PSA {>=} 10 ngm/ml

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanks, G E; Lee, W R; Hanlon, A L; Kaplan, E; Epstein, B; Schultheiss, T

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: Single institutions and an NCI supported group of institutions have been investigating the value of dose escalation in patients with prostate cancer treated by conformal treatment techniques. Improvement in morbidity has been previously established, while this report identifies the pretreatment PSA level subgroups of patients who benefitted in cancer control from higher dose. Materials and Methods: We report actuarial bNED survival rates for 375 consecutive patients with known pretreatment PSA levels treated with conformal technique between 5/89 and 12/93. The whole pelvis was treated to 45 Gy in 25 fractions in all T2C,3, all Gleason 8, 9, 10 and all patients with pretreatment PSA {>=}20. The prostate {+-} seminal vesicles was boosted at 2.1 Gy/day to the center of the prostate to 65-79 Gy (65-69 N=50), 70-72.49 N=94, 72.5-74.9 N=82, 75-77.49 N=129 and {>=}77.5 N=20). The median followup is 21 mos with a range of 3 to 67 mos. The highest dose patients have the least followup, reducing the impact of the highest dose levels at this time. Patients are analyzed for the entire group divided at 71 Gy and at 73 Gy calculated at the center of the prostate. Each dose group is then subdivided by pretreatment PSA levels <10, 10-19.9, and {>=}20 ngm/ml and dose levels are compared within pretreatment PSA level group. bNED failure is defined as PSA {>=}1.5 ngm/ml and rising on two consecutive values. Results: Table 1 shows the bNED survival rates at 24 and 36 mos for all patients and the three pretreatment PSA level groups. For all patients pooled, there is an overall advantage to using doses {>=}71 Gy (64% vs 85% at 36 mo, p=.006) and {>=}73 Gy (71% vs 86% at 36 mo, p=.07). The subgroup of PSA <10 ngm/ml, however, shows no benefit in bNED survival when using doses over 71 Gy (90% vs 93% at 36 mo) or 73 Gy (91 vs 94% at 36 mo). The subgroup PSA 10 ngm/ml to 19.9 ngm/ml shows improved cancer control when using doses over 71 Gy (61% vs 88% at 36 mo, p=.03) and over 73

  10. Implementation of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Androgen Deprivation in Patients With Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilleby, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.lilleby@ous-hf.no [Cancer Clinic, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radiumhospital, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Oslo (Norway); Tafjord, Gunnar; Raabe, Nils K. [Cancer Clinic, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radiumhospital, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Oslo (Norway)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcome (overall survival [OS], the actuarial 5-year cancer-specific survival [CSS], disease-free survival [DFS], biochemical failure-free survival [BFS]), complications and morbidity in patients treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) boost and hormonal treatment with curative aims. Methods: Between 2004 and 2009, 275 prospectively followed pN0/N0M0 patients were included: 19 patients (7%) with T2, Gleason score 7 and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <10 and 256 patients (93%) with T3 or Gleason score 8-10 or PSA >20 received multimodal treatment with conformal four-field radiotherapy (prostate/vesiculae 2 Gy Multiplication-Sign 25) combined with HDR-BT (iridium 192; prostate 10 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) with long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Results: After a median observation time of 44.2 months (range, 10.4-90.5 months) 12 patients had relapsed clinically and/or biochemically and 10 patients were dead, of which 2 patients died from prostate cancer. Five-year estimates of BFS, CSS, DFS, and OS rates were 98.5%, 99.3%, 95.6%, and 96.3%, respectively. None of the patients with either Gleason score <8 or with intermediate risk profile had relapsed. The number of HDR-BT treatments was not related to outcome. Despite of age (median, 65.7 years; range, 45.7-77 years) and considerable pretreatment comorbidity in 39 of 275 patients, Genitourinary treatment-related morbidity was moderate with long-lasting Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2 voiding problems in 26 patients (9.5%) and occasionally mucous discharge in 20 patients (7%), none with Grade >2 for gastrointestinal at follow-up. Complications during implantations were related to pubic arch interference (4 patients) and lithotomy time, causing 2 patients to develop compartment syndrome. Conclusion: Despite still preliminary observations, our 5-year outcome estimates favor the implementation of high-dose-rate brachytherapy in high-risk patients combined with conformal

  11. Surveillance on interfacility differences in dose-prescription policy of intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Hatano, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has recently become popular in Japan. Prostate cancer is indisputably one of the main targets of IMRT. However, the current status and interfacility differences in dose-prescription policies for prostate IMRT are unknown. Therefore, a nationwide survey of 43 institutions that had implemented prostate IMRT was conducted by sending a questionnaire regarding the above-mentioned issues. Thirty-three institutions (77%) had responded to the questionnaire by the end of October 2010. A total of 5245 patients with localized prostate cancer had been treated with IMRT by the end of 2009. Regular multileaf collimator-based techniques were the most common beam delivery method. Dose-prescription policies were divided into four major categories: isocenter-based (at isocenter), dose delivered to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) (D95)-based (D95 at PTV), mean dose to the PTV-based (Mean at PTV), and mean dose to the clinical target volume (CTV)-based (at CTV). The mean doses of the CTV and PTV, and the volume of the PTV receiving 95% of the dose (V95) were significantly higher with the D95 at PTV policy than with the other prescription policies. Low-dose areas and hot spots were observed within the PTV in plans with at isocenter and at CTV policies. In conclusion, there are currently considerable differences among institutions in Japan regarding target doses for prostate IMRT. The D95 at PTV prescription policy resulted in significant dose escalation compared with the other policies. These differences should be taken into consideration when interpreting treatment outcomes and creating multi-institutional protocols in the future. (author)

  12. DuraSeal® as a spacer to reduce rectal doses in low-dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkilä, Vesa-Pekka; Kärnä, Aarno; Vaarala, Markku H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of off-label use of DuraSeal® polyethylene glycol (PEG) gel in low-dose rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy seed implantation to reduce rectal doses. Diluted DuraSeal® was easy to use and, in spite of a clearance effect, useful in decreasing D 2cc rectal doses

  13. Nationwide, Multicenter, Retrospective Study on High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, Yasuo, E-mail: yoshioka@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Kotsuma, Tadayuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Komiya, Akira [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, Toyama (Japan); Department of Urology, Chiba University Hospital, Chiba (Japan); Kariya, Shinji [Department of Radiology, Kochi Medical School, Kochi (Japan); Konishi, Koji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Nonomura, Norio [Department of Urology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Tanaka, Eiichi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Nishimura, Kensaku [Department of Urology, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Fujiuchi, Yasuyoshi; Kitamura, Hiroshi [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, Toyama (Japan); Yamagami, Takuji [Department of Radiology, Kochi Medical School, Kochi (Japan); Yamasaki, Ichiro [Department of Urology, Kochi Medical School, Kochi (Japan); Nishimura, Kazuo [Department of Urology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Teshima, Teruki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan); Itami, Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To present, analyze, and discuss results of a nationwide, multicenter, retrospective study on high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) as monotherapy for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From 1995 through 2013, 524 patients, 73 (14%) with low-risk, 207 (40%) with intermediate-risk, and 244 (47%) with high-risk prostate cancer, were treated with HDR-BT as monotherapy at 5 institutions in Japan. Dose fractionations were 27 Gy/2 fractions for 69 patients (13%), 45.5 Gy/7 fractions for 168 (32%), 49 Gy/7 fractions for 149 (28%), 54 Gy/9 fractions for 130 (25%), and others for 8 (2%). Of these patients, 156 (30%) did not receive androgen deprivation therapy, and 202 patients (39%) did receive androgen deprivation therapy <1 year, 112 (21%) for 1-3 years, and 54 (10%) for >3 years. Median follow-up time was 5.9 years (range, 0.4-18.1 years), with a minimum of 2 years for surviving patients. Results: After 5 years, respective actuarial rates of no biochemical evidence of disease, overall survival, cause-specific survival, and metastasis-free survival for all patients were 92%, 97%, 99%, and 94%. For low/intermediate/high-risk patients, the 5-year no biochemical evidence of disease rates were 95%/94%/89%, the 5-year overall survival rates were 98%/98%/94%, the 5-year cause-specific survival rates were 98%/100%/98%, and the 5-year metastasis-free survival rates were 98%/95%/90%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of late grade 2 to 3 genitourinary toxicity at 5 years was 19%, and that of late grade 3 was 1%. The corresponding incidences of gastrointestinal toxicity were 3% and 0% (0.2%). No grade 4 or 5 of either type of toxicity was detected. Conclusions: The findings of this nationwide, multicenter, retrospective study demonstrate that HDR-BT as monotherapy was safe and effective for all patients with low-, intermediate-, and high-risk prostate cancer.

  14. Nationwide, Multicenter, Retrospective Study on High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Yasuo; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Komiya, Akira; Kariya, Shinji; Konishi, Koji; Nonomura, Norio; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Eiichi; Nishimura, Kensaku; Fujiuchi, Yasuyoshi; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Yamagami, Takuji; Yamasaki, Ichiro; Nishimura, Kazuo; Teshima, Teruki; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Itami, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To present, analyze, and discuss results of a nationwide, multicenter, retrospective study on high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) as monotherapy for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From 1995 through 2013, 524 patients, 73 (14%) with low-risk, 207 (40%) with intermediate-risk, and 244 (47%) with high-risk prostate cancer, were treated with HDR-BT as monotherapy at 5 institutions in Japan. Dose fractionations were 27 Gy/2 fractions for 69 patients (13%), 45.5 Gy/7 fractions for 168 (32%), 49 Gy/7 fractions for 149 (28%), 54 Gy/9 fractions for 130 (25%), and others for 8 (2%). Of these patients, 156 (30%) did not receive androgen deprivation therapy, and 202 patients (39%) did receive androgen deprivation therapy 3 years. Median follow-up time was 5.9 years (range, 0.4-18.1 years), with a minimum of 2 years for surviving patients. Results: After 5 years, respective actuarial rates of no biochemical evidence of disease, overall survival, cause-specific survival, and metastasis-free survival for all patients were 92%, 97%, 99%, and 94%. For low/intermediate/high-risk patients, the 5-year no biochemical evidence of disease rates were 95%/94%/89%, the 5-year overall survival rates were 98%/98%/94%, the 5-year cause-specific survival rates were 98%/100%/98%, and the 5-year metastasis-free survival rates were 98%/95%/90%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of late grade 2 to 3 genitourinary toxicity at 5 years was 19%, and that of late grade 3 was 1%. The corresponding incidences of gastrointestinal toxicity were 3% and 0% (0.2%). No grade 4 or 5 of either type of toxicity was detected. Conclusions: The findings of this nationwide, multicenter, retrospective study demonstrate that HDR-BT as monotherapy was safe and effective for all patients with low-, intermediate-, and high-risk prostate cancer.

  15. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with transurethral resection before implantation in prostate cancer: long-term results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prada, Pedro J.; Anchuelo, Javier; Blanco, Ana Garcia; Paya, Gema; Cardenal, Juan; Acuña, Enrique; Ferri, Maria; Vazquez, Andres; Pacheco, Maite; Sanchez, Jesica

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We analyzed the long-term oncologic outcome for patients with prostate cancer and transurethral resection who were treated using low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From January 2001 to December 2005, 57 consecutive patients were treated with clinically localized prostate cancer. No patients received external beam radiation. All of them underwent LDR prostate brachytherapy. Biochemical failure was defined according to the 'Phoenix consensus'. Patients were stratified as low and intermediate risk based on The Memorial Sloan Kettering group definition. Results: The median follow-up time for these 57 patients was 104 months. The overall survival according to Kaplan-Meier estimates was 88% (±6%) at 5 years and 77% (±6%) at 12 years. The 5 and 10 years for failure in tumour-free survival (TFS) was 96% and respectively (±2%), whereas for biochemical control was 94% and respectively (±3%) at 5 and 10 years, 98% (±1%) of patients being free of local recurrence. A patient reported incontinence after treatment (1.7%). The chronic genitourinary complains grade I were 7% and grade II, 10%. At six months 94% of patients reported no change in bowel function. Conclusions: The excellent long-term results and low morbidity presented, as well as the many advantages of prostate brachytherapy over other treatments, demonstrates that brachytherapy is an effective treatment for patients with transurethral resection and clinical organ-confined prostate cancer. (author)

  16. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with transurethral resection before implantation in prostate cancer: long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prada, Pedro J.; Anchuelo, Javier; Blanco, Ana Garcia; Paya, Gema; Cardenal, Juan; Acuña, Enrique; Ferri, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Cantabria (Spain); Vazquez, Andres; Pacheco, Maite; Sanchez, Jesica [Department of Radiation Physics, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Cantabria (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Objectives: We analyzed the long-term oncologic outcome for patients with prostate cancer and transurethral resection who were treated using low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From January 2001 to December 2005, 57 consecutive patients were treated with clinically localized prostate cancer. No patients received external beam radiation. All of them underwent LDR prostate brachytherapy. Biochemical failure was defined according to the 'Phoenix consensus'. Patients were stratified as low and intermediate risk based on The Memorial Sloan Kettering group definition. Results: The median follow-up time for these 57 patients was 104 months. The overall survival according to Kaplan-Meier estimates was 88% (±6%) at 5 years and 77% (±6%) at 12 years. The 5 and 10 years for failure in tumour-free survival (TFS) was 96% and respectively (±2%), whereas for biochemical control was 94% and respectively (±3%) at 5 and 10 years, 98% (±1%) of patients being free of local recurrence. A patient reported incontinence after treatment (1.7%). The chronic genitourinary complains grade I were 7% and grade II, 10%. At six months 94% of patients reported no change in bowel function. Conclusions: The excellent long-term results and low morbidity presented, as well as the many advantages of prostate brachytherapy over other treatments, demonstrates that brachytherapy is an effective treatment for patients with transurethral resection and clinical organ-confined prostate cancer. (author)

  17. Obstructive urination problems after high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost treatment for prostate cancer are avoidable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kragelj, Borut

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at improving treatment individualization in patients with prostate cancer treated with combination of external beam radiotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy to boost the dose to prostate (HDRB-B), the objective was to evaluate factors that have potential impact on obstructive urination problems (OUP) after HDRB-B. In the follow-up study 88 patients consecutively treated with HDRB-B at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana in the period 2006-2011 were included. The observed outcome was deterioration of OUP (DOUP) during the follow-up period longer than 1 year. Univariate and multivariate relationship analysis between DOUP and potential risk factors (treatment factors, patients’ characteristics) was carried out by using binary logistic regression. ROC curve was constructed on predicted values and the area under the curve (AUC) calculated to assess the performance of the multivariate model. Analysis was carried out on 71 patients who completed 3 years of follow-up. DOUP was noted in 13/71 (18.3%) of them. The results of multivariate analysis showed statistically significant relationship between DOUP and anti-coagulation treatment (OR 4.86, 95% C.I. limits: 1.21-19.61, p = 0.026). Also minimal dose received by 90% of the urethra volume was close to statistical significance (OR = 1.23; 95% C.I. limits: 0.98-1.07, p = 0.099). The value of AUC was 0.755. The study emphasized the relationship between DOUP and anticoagulation treatment, and suggested the multivariate model with fair predictive performance. This model potentially enables a reduction of DOUP after HDRB-B. It supports the belief that further research should be focused on urethral sphincter as a critical structure for OUP

  18. Obstructive urination problems after high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost treatment for prostate cancer are avoidable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragelj, Borut

    2016-03-01

    Aiming at improving treatment individualization in patients with prostate cancer treated with combination of external beam radiotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy to boost the dose to prostate (HDRB-B), the objective was to evaluate factors that have potential impact on obstructive urination problems (OUP) after HDRB-B. In the follow-up study 88 patients consecutively treated with HDRB-B at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana in the period 2006-2011 were included. The observed outcome was deterioration of OUP (DOUP) during the follow-up period longer than 1 year. Univariate and multivariate relationship analysis between DOUP and potential risk factors (treatment factors, patients' characteristics) was carried out by using binary logistic regression. ROC curve was constructed on predicted values and the area under the curve (AUC) calculated to assess the performance of the multivariate model. Analysis was carried out on 71 patients who completed 3 years of follow-up. DOUP was noted in 13/71 (18.3%) of them. The results of multivariate analysis showed statistically significant relationship between DOUP and anti-coagulation treatment (OR 4.86, 95% C.I. limits: 1.21-19.61, p = 0.026). Also minimal dose received by 90% of the urethra volume was close to statistical significance (OR = 1.23; 95% C.I. limits: 0.98-1.07, p = 0.099). The value of AUC was 0.755. The study emphasized the relationship between DOUP and anticoagulation treatment, and suggested the multivariate model with fair predictive performance. This model potentially enables a reduction of DOUP after HDRB-B. It supports the belief that further research should be focused on urethral sphincter as a critical structure for OUP.

  19. High biologically effective dose radiation therapy using brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisei Okamoto

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the outcomes of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with biologically effective dose (BED ≥ 220 Gy of high-dose radiotherapy, using low-dose-rate (LDR brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and short-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. Material and methods : From 2005 to 2013, a total of 143 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated by radiotherapy of BED ≥ 220 Gy with a combination of LDR brachytherapy, EBRT, and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. The high-risk patients in the present study included both high-risk and very high-risk prostate cancer. The number of high-risk features were: 60 patients with 1 high-risk factor (42%, 61 patients with 2 high-risk factors (43%, and 22 patients with 3 high-risk factors (15% including five N1 disease. External beam radiotherapy fields included prostate and seminal vesicles only or whole pelvis depending on the extension of the disease. Biochemical failure was defined by the Phoenix definition. Results : Six patients developed biochemical failure, thus providing a 5-year actual biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS rate of 95.2%. Biochemical failure was observed exclusively in cases with distant metastasis in the present study. All six patients with biochemical relapse had clinical failure due to bone metastasis, thus yielding a 5-year freedom from clinical failure (FFCF rate of 93.0%. None of the cases with N1 disease experienced biochemical failure. We observed four deaths, including one death from prostate cancer, therefore yielding a cause-specific survival (CSS rate of 97.2%, and an overall survival (OS rate of 95.5%. Conclusions : High-dose (BED ≥ 220 Gy radiotherapy by LDR in combination with EBRT has shown an excellent outcome on BFFS in high-risk and very high-risk cancer, although causal relationship between BED and BFFS remain to be explained further.

  20. On-line conformal HDR dose escalation trial in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro; Stromberg, Jannifer; Edmundson, Gregory; Gustafson, Gary; Vicini, Frank; Brabbins, Donald

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To improve treatment results on prostatic adenocarcinoma, we began the first prospective Phase I/II dose-escalating clinical trial of conformal brachytherapy (CB) and concurrent external beam irradiation. Methods and Materials: Fifty-four patients with T2b-T3c prostatic adenocarcinoma received 172 transperineal conformal high-dose rate (HDR) boost implants. All patients received concomitant external beam pelvic irradiation. Dose escalation of the three HDR fractions were: 5.5 Gy (18 patients), 6 Gy (15 patients), and 6.5 Gy (21 patients). The urethra, anterior rectal wall, and prostate boundaries were identified individually and outlined at 5 mm intervals from the base to the apex of the gland. The CB using real-time ultrasound guidance with interactive online isodose distributions was performed on an outpatient basis. As needles were placed into the prostate, corrections for prostate displacement were recorded and the isodose distributions were recalculated to represent the new relationship between the needles, prostate, and normal structures. Results: Craniocaudal motion of the gland ranged from 0.5-2.0 cm (mean=1.0 cm), whereas lateral displacement was 0.1-0.4 cm. With the interactive online planning system, organ motion was immediately detected, accounted for, and corrected prior to each HDR treatment. The rectal dose has ranged from 45 to 87%, and the urethral dose from 97 to 112% of the prostate dose. Negative prostatic biopsies at 18 months were seen in (30(32)) patients. Biochemical (PSA <1.5 ng/ml) control at 36 months is is 89%. It is significant that operator dependence has been completely removed because the interactive online planning system uniformly guides the physicians. Conclusions: With ultrasound guidance and the interactive online dosimetry system, organ motion is insignificant because it can be corrected during the procedure. Common pitfalls of brachytherapy, including operator dependence and difficulty with reproducibility, have been

  1. Higher-Than-Conventional Radiation Doses in Localized Prostate Cancer Treatment: A Meta-analysis of Randomized, Controlled Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viani, Gustavo Arruda; Stefano, Eduardo Jose; Afonso, Sergio Luis

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine in a meta-analysis whether the outcomes in men with localized prostate cancer treated with high-dose radiotherapy (HDRT) are better than those in men treated with conventional-dose radiotherapy (CDRT), by quantifying the effect of the total dose of radiotherapy on biochemical control (BC). Methods and Materials: The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CANCERLIT, and Cochrane Library databases, as well as the proceedings of annual meetings, were systematically searched to identify randomized, controlled studies comparing HDRT with CDRT for localized prostate cancer. To evaluate the dose-response relationship, we conducted a meta-regression analysis of BC ratios by means of weighted linear regression. Results: Seven RCTs with a total patient population of 2812 were identified that met the study criteria. Pooled results from these RCTs showed a significant reduction in the incidence of biochemical failure in those patients with prostate cancer treated with HDRT (p 2 gastrointestinal toxicity after HDRT than after CDRT. In the subgroup analysis, patients classified as being at low (p = 0.007), intermediate (p < 0.0001), and high risk (p < 0.0001) of biochemical failure all showed a benefit from HDRT. The meta-regression analysis also detected a linear correlation between the total dose of radiotherapy and biochemical failure (BC = -67.3 + [1.8 x radiotherapy total dose in Gy]; p = 0.04). Conclusions: Our meta-analysis showed that HDRT is superior to CDRT in preventing biochemical failure in low-, intermediate-, and high-risk prostate cancer patients, suggesting that this should be offered as a treatment for all patients, regardless of their risk status.

  2. High-dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer: acute toxicity and biochemical behavior analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, Sergio Carlos Barros; Oliveira, Antonio Carlos Zuliani de; Cardoso, Herbeni; Tagawa, Eduardo Komai; Castelo, Roberto; D'Imperio, Marcio

    2006-01-01

    Objective: this study focuses on the biochemical response of the following variables: prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value, Gleason scores, staging, the risk of the disease, and hormone therapy. Objective: in the period between February of 1998 and July of 2001, 46 patients with prostate cancer were treated with radiotherapy, in a combination of teletherapy and high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The age ranged from 51 to 79 years (averaging 66.4 years). T1c stage was the most frequent one: 30 (65%). The Gleason score was below 7 in 78% of the patients. PSA ranged from 3.4 to 33.3, being below 10 in 39% of the cases. The average prostatic volume was 32.3 cc. Twenty-eight percent of the patients received hormone therapy. Teletherapy dose ranged from 45 to 50.4 Gy, associated to four fractions of 4 Gy of HDR brachytherapy. Results: the follow-up period varied from 6 to 43 months. Four patients missed the follow-up and four died (one due to the disease). Out of the 39 patients that were analyzed, 76% presented a less than 1.5 PSA. None of the analyzed variables were found to be of statistical significance (p > 0.05) regarding biochemical control. Conclusion: the use of HDR brachytherapy was found to be effective in the treatment of prostate cancer and, in this study, the variables considered as prognostic factors did not interfere in the biochemical control. (author)

  3. Impact of geometric uncertainties on dose calculations for intensity modulated radiation therapy of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Runqing

    uniform dose per fraction (EUDf) and NTCP. The dose distribution including geometric uncertainties was determined from integration of the convolution of the static dose gradient with the PDF. Integration of the convolution of the static dose and derivative of the PDF can also be used to determine the dose including geometric uncertainties although this method was not investigated in detail. Local maximum dose gradient (LMDG) was determined via optimization of dose objective function by manually adjusting DVH control points or selecting beam numbers and directions during IMRT treatment planning. Minimum SD (SDmin) is used when geometric uncertainty is corrected with verification imaging. Maximum SD (SDmax) is used when the geometric uncertainty is known to be large and difficult to manage. SDmax was 4.38 mm in anterior-posterior (AP) direction, 2.70 mm in left-right (LR) direction and 4.35 mm in superior-inferior (SI) direction; SDmin was 1.1 mm in all three directions if less than 2 mm threshold was used for uncorrected fractions in every direction. EUDf is a useful QA parameter for interpreting the biological impact of geometric uncertainties on the static dose distribution. The EUD f has been used as the basis for the time-course NTCP evaluation in the thesis. Relative NTCP values are useful for comparative QA checking by normalizing known complications (e.g. reported in the RTOG studies) to specific DVH control points. For prostate cancer patients, rectal complications were evaluated from specific RTOG clinical trials and detailed evaluation of the treatment techniques (e.g. dose prescription, DVH, number of beams, bean angles). Treatment plans that did not meet DVH constraints represented additional complication risk. Geometric uncertainties improved or worsened rectal NTCP depending on individual internal organ motion within patient.

  4. Prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjær, Maria Carlsen; Andersen, Morten Heebøll; Høyer, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Background Active surveillance (AS) of low-risk prostate cancer (PCa) is an accepted alternative to active treatment. However, the conventional diagnostic trans-rectal ultrasound guided biopsies (TRUS-bx) underestimate PCa aggressiveness in almost half of the cases, when compared with the surgical...... lesions. Significant cancer was defined as GS > 6 or GS 6 (3 + 3) lesions with ≥ 6 mm maximal cancer core length (MCCL). Results A total of 78 patients were included and in 21 patients a total of 22 PIRADS-score 4 or 5 lesions were detected. MRGB pathology revealed that 17 (81%) of these and 22......% of the entire AS population harbored significant cancers at AS inclusion. In eight (38%) cases, the GS was upgraded. Also, nine patients (43%) had GS 6 (3 + 3) foci with MCCL ≥ 6 mm. Conclusion In an AS cohort based on TRUS and TRUS-bx diagnostic strategies, supplemental mpMRI and in-bore MRGB were able...

  5. Influence of image slice thickness on rectal dose-response relationships following radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, C.; Thor, M.; Liu, M.; Moissenko, V.; Petersen, S. E.; Høyer, M.; Apte, A.; Deasy, J. O.

    2014-07-01

    When pooling retrospective data from different cohorts, slice thicknesses of acquired computed tomography (CT) images used for treatment planning may vary between cohorts. It is, however, not known if varying slice thickness influences derived dose-response relationships. We investigated this for rectal bleeding using dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum and rectal wall for dose distributions superimposed on images with varying CT slice thicknesses. We used dose and endpoint data from two prostate cancer cohorts treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to either 74 Gy (N = 159) or 78 Gy (N = 159) at 2 Gy per fraction. The rectum was defined as the whole organ with content, and the morbidity cut-off was Grade ≥2 late rectal bleeding. Rectal walls were defined as 3 mm inner margins added to the rectum. DVHs for simulated slice thicknesses from 3 to 13 mm were compared to DVHs for the originally acquired slice thicknesses at 3 and 5 mm. Volumes, mean, and maximum doses were assessed from the DVHs, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) values were calculated. For each organ and each of the simulated slice thicknesses, we performed predictive modeling of late rectal bleeding using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. For the most coarse slice thickness, rectal volumes increased (≤18%), whereas maximum and mean doses decreased (≤0.8 and ≤4.2 Gy, respectively). For all a values, the gEUD for the simulated DVHs were ≤1.9 Gy different than the gEUD for the original DVHs. The best-fitting LKB model parameter values with 95% CIs were consistent between all DVHs. In conclusion, we found that the investigated slice thickness variations had minimal impact on rectal dose-response estimations. From the perspective of predictive modeling, our results suggest that variations within 10 mm in slice thickness between cohorts are unlikely to be a limiting factor when pooling multi-institutional rectal dose data that include slice thickness

  6. The brachytherapy with low dose-rate iridium for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momma, Tetsuo; Saito, Shiro; Ohki, Takahiro; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Toya, Kazuhito; Dokiya, Takushi; Murai, Masaru

    2000-01-01

    Brachytherapy as an option for the treatment of prostate cancer has been commonly performed in USA. As the permanent seeding of the radioactive materials is strictly restricted by the law in Japan, brachytherapy must be performed by the temporary implant. This treatment has been performed at a few facilities in Japan mostly using high dose-rate iridium. Only our facility has been using low dose-rate iridium (LDR-Ir) for prostate cancer. This study evaluates the clinical results of the treatment. Since December 1997 to December 1999, 26 patients with histologically diagnosed as prostate cancer (Stage B, 92%; Stage C, 8%) underwent brachytherapy. Twenty-two patients received brachytherapy alone, three were treated with a combination of brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy (ERT) and one was treated with a combination of brachytherapy and neoadjuvant endocrine therapy. Patients ranged in age from 61 to 84 (median 76) years old. Treatment was initiated with perineal needle placement. From 10 to 14 needles were placed through the holes on the template which was fixed to the stabilizer of the transrectal ultrasound probe. After the needle placement, CT scan was performed to draw distribution curves for the treatment planning. LDR-Ir wires were introduced to the sheath and indwelled during the time calculated from dosimetry. Peripheral dose was 70 Gy for the monotherapy of brachytherapy. For the combination therapy, 40 Gy was given by brachytherapy and 36 Gy with ERT afterwards. LDR-Ir wires were removed after completion of the radiation and patients were followed with serum PSA level and annual biopsy. During 2 to 26 (median 12) months follow-up, 8 out of 9 patients with initial PSA level above 20 ng/ml showed PSA failure. All 13 patients with initial PSA level lower than 20 ng/ml were free from PSA failure. Eight out of 11 patients with Gleason's score 7 or higher showed PSA failure, and all 14 patients (including three patients with combined therapy) with

  7. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, high-dose rate brachytherapy, and low-dose rate permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ruijie; Zhao, Nan; Liao, Anyan; Wang, Hao; Qu, Ang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, and low-dose rate (LDR) permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer. A total of 10 patients with localized prostate cancer were selected for this study. VMAT, HDR brachytherapy, and LDR permanent seeds implant plans were created for each patient. For VMAT, planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the clinical target volume plus a margin of 5 mm. Rectum, bladder, urethra, and femoral heads were considered as organs at risk. A 78 Gy in 39 fractions were prescribed for PTV. For HDR and LDR plans, the dose prescription was D 90 of 34 Gy in 8.5 Gy per fraction, and 145 Gy to clinical target volume, respectively. The dose and dose volume parameters were evaluated for target, organs at risk, and normal tissue. Physical dose was converted to dose based on 2-Gy fractions (equivalent dose in 2 Gy per fraction, EQD 2 ) for comparison of 3 techniques. HDR and LDR significantly reduced the dose to rectum and bladder compared with VMAT. The D mean (EQD 2 ) of rectum decreased 22.36 Gy in HDR and 17.01 Gy in LDR from 30.24 Gy in VMAT, respectively. The D mean (EQD 2 ) of bladder decreased 6.91 Gy in HDR and 2.53 Gy in LDR from 13.46 Gy in VMAT. For the femoral heads and normal tissue, the mean doses were also significantly reduced in both HDR and LDR compared with VMAT. For the urethra, the mean dose (EQD 2 ) was 80.26, 70.23, and 104.91 Gy in VMAT, HDR, and LDR brachytherapy, respectively. For localized prostate cancer, both HDR and LDR brachytherapy were clearly superior in the sparing of rectum, bladder, femoral heads, and normal tissue compared with VMAT. HDR provided the advantage in sparing of urethra compared with VMAT and LDR.

  8. Perineural Invasion Predicts Increased Recurrence, Metastasis, and Death From Prostate Cancer Following Treatment With Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Felix Y. [University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ann Arbor Veteran Affairs Medical System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Qian Yushen; Stenmark, Matthew H.; Halverson, Schuyler; Blas, Kevin; Vance, Sean [University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sandler, Howard M. [Cedars Sinai Medical System, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@med.umich.edu [University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the prognostic value of perineural invasion (PNI) for patients treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed for 651 men treated for prostate cancer with EBRT to a minimum dose {>=}75 Gy. We assessed the impact of PNI as well as pretreatment and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), freedom from metastasis (FFM), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival. Results: PNI was present in 34% of specimens at biopsy and was significantly associated with higher Gleason score (GS), T stage, and prostate-specific antigen level. On univariate and multivariate analysis, the presence of PNI was associated with worse FFBF (hazard ratio = 1.7, p <0.006), FFM (hazard ratio = 1.8, p <0.03), and CSS (HR = 1.4, p <0.05) compared with absence of PNI; there was no difference in overall survival. Seven-year rates of FFBF, FFM, and CCS were 64% vs. 80%, 84% vs. 92%, and 91% vs. 95% for those patients with and without PNI, respectively. On recursive partitioning analysis, PNI predicted for worse FFM and CSS in patients with GS 8-10, with FFM of 67% vs. 89% (p <0.02), and CSS of 69% vs. 91%, (p <0.04) at 7 years for those with and without PNI, respectively. Conclusions: The presence of PNI in the prostate biopsy predicts worse clinical outcome for patients treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy. Particularly in patients with GS 8-10 disease, the presence of PNI suggests an increased risk of metastasis and prostate cancer death.

  9. Perineural Invasion Predicts Increased Recurrence, Metastasis, and Death From Prostate Cancer Following Treatment With Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Felix Y.; Qian Yushen; Stenmark, Matthew H.; Halverson, Schuyler; Blas, Kevin; Vance, Sean; Sandler, Howard M.; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the prognostic value of perineural invasion (PNI) for patients treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed for 651 men treated for prostate cancer with EBRT to a minimum dose ≥75 Gy. We assessed the impact of PNI as well as pretreatment and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), freedom from metastasis (FFM), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival. Results: PNI was present in 34% of specimens at biopsy and was significantly associated with higher Gleason score (GS), T stage, and prostate-specific antigen level. On univariate and multivariate analysis, the presence of PNI was associated with worse FFBF (hazard ratio = 1.7, p <0.006), FFM (hazard ratio = 1.8, p <0.03), and CSS (HR = 1.4, p <0.05) compared with absence of PNI; there was no difference in overall survival. Seven-year rates of FFBF, FFM, and CCS were 64% vs. 80%, 84% vs. 92%, and 91% vs. 95% for those patients with and without PNI, respectively. On recursive partitioning analysis, PNI predicted for worse FFM and CSS in patients with GS 8–10, with FFM of 67% vs. 89% (p <0.02), and CSS of 69% vs. 91%, (p <0.04) at 7 years for those with and without PNI, respectively. Conclusions: The presence of PNI in the prostate biopsy predicts worse clinical outcome for patients treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy. Particularly in patients with GS 8–10 disease, the presence of PNI suggests an increased risk of metastasis and prostate cancer death.

  10. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Dose Painting for Localized Prostate Cancer Using 11C-choline Positron Emission Tomography Scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Joe H.; Lim Joon, Daryl; Lee, Sze Ting; Gong, Sylvia J.; Anderson, Nigel J.; Scott, Andrew M.; Davis, Ian D.; Clouston, David; Bolton, Damien; Hamilton, Christopher S.; Khoo, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the technical feasibility of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose painting using 11 C-choline positron emission tomography PET scans in patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was an RT planning study of 8 patients with prostate cancer who had 11 C-choline PET scans prior to radical prostatectomy. Two contours were semiautomatically generated on the basis of the PET scans for each patient: 60% and 70% of the maximum standardized uptake values (SUV 60% and SUV 70% ). Three IMRT plans were generated for each patient: PLAN 78 , which consisted of whole-prostate radiation therapy to 78 Gy; PLAN 78-90 , which consisted of whole-prostate RT to 78 Gy, a boost to the SUV 60% to 84 Gy, and a further boost to the SUV 70% to 90 Gy; and PLAN 72-90 , which consisted of whole-prostate RT to 72 Gy, a boost to the SUV 60% to 84 Gy, and a further boost to the SUV 70% to 90 Gy. The feasibility of these plans was judged by their ability to reach prescription doses while adhering to published dose constraints. Tumor control probabilities based on PET scan-defined volumes (TCP PET ) and on prostatectomy-defined volumes (TCP path ), and rectal normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were compared between the plans. Results: All plans for all patients reached prescription doses while adhering to dose constraints. TCP PET values for PLAN 78 , PLAN 78-90 , and PLAN 72-90 were 65%, 97%, and 96%, respectively. TCP path values were 71%, 97%, and 89%, respectively. Both PLAN 78-90 and PLAN 72-90 had significantly higher TCP PET (P=.002 and .001) and TCP path (P 78 . PLAN 78-90 and PLAN 72-90 were not significantly different in terms of TCP PET or TCP path . There were no significant differences in rectal NTCPs between the 3 plans. Conclusions: IMRT dose painting for localized prostate cancer using 11 C-choline PET scans is technically feasible. Dose painting results in higher TCPs without higher NTCPs.

  11. Brachytherapy optimization using radiobiological-based planning for high dose rate and permanent implants for prostate cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Kaelyn; Cunha, J. Adam; Hong, Tae Min

    2017-01-01

    We discuss an improvement in brachytherapy--a prostate cancer treatment method that directly places radioactive seeds inside target cancerous regions--by optimizing the current standard for delivering dose. Currently, the seeds' spatiotemporal placement is determined by optimizing the dose based on a set of physical, user-defined constraints. One particular approach is the ``inverse planning'' algorithms that allow for tightly fit isodose lines around the target volumes in order to reduce dose to the patient's organs at risk. However, these dose distributions are typically computed assuming the same biological response to radiation for different types of tissues. In our work, we consider radiobiological parameters to account for the differences in the individual sensitivities and responses to radiation for tissues surrounding the target. Among the benefits are a more accurate toxicity rate and more coverage to target regions for planning high-dose-rate treatments as well as permanent implants.

  12. Reduction of Dose Delivered to Organs at Risk in Prostate Cancer Patients via Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlowski, Jason M.; Yang, Eddy S.; Malcolm, Arnold W.; Coffey, Charles W.; Ding, George X.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether image guidance can improve the dose delivered to target organs and organs at risk (OARs) for prostate cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Eight prostate cancer patients were treated with IMRT to 76 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Daily target localization was performed via alignment of three intraprostatic fiducials and weekly kV-cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. The prostate and OARs were manually contoured on each CBCT by a single physician. Daily patient setup shifts were obtained by comparing alignment of skin tattoos with the treatment position based on fiducials. Treatment fields were retrospectively applied to CBCT scans. The dose distributions were calculated using actual treatment plans (an 8-mm PTV margin everywhere except for 6-mm posteriorly) with and without image guidance shifts. Furthermore, the feasibility of margin reduction was evaluated by reducing planning margins to 4 mm everywhere except for 3 mm posteriorly. Results: For the eight treatment plans on the 56 CBCT scans, the average doses to 98% of the prostate (D98) were 102% (range, 99-104%) and 99% (range, 45-104%) with and without image guidance, respectively. Using margin reduction, the average D98s were 100% (range, 84-104%) and 92% (range, 40-104%) with and without image guidance, respectively. Conclusions: Currently, margins used in IMRT plans are adequate to deliver a dose to the prostate with conventional patient positioning using skin tattoos or bony anatomy. The use of image guidance may facilitate significant reduction of planning margins. Future studies to assess the efficacy of decreasing margins and improvement of treatment-related toxicities are warranted.

  13. Prostate cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000397.htm Prostate cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... trials you may be able to join How Prostate Cancer Staging is Done Initial staging is based on ...

  14. Prostate Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treat. There is no standard screening test for prostate cancer. Researchers are studying different tests to find those ... PSA level may be high if you have prostate cancer. It can also be high if you have ...

  15. Cryotherapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000907.htm Cryotherapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing features ... first treatment for prostate cancer. What Happens During Cryotherapy Before the procedure, you will be given medicine ...

  16. Prostate cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, K; Friis, S; Kjaer, S K

    1998-01-01

    To review the trends in prostate cancer (PC) incidence and mortality rates in Denmark during a 50-year period.......To review the trends in prostate cancer (PC) incidence and mortality rates in Denmark during a 50-year period....

  17. High-dose-rate brachytherapy as salvage modality for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy. A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatzikonstantinou, Georgios; Zamboglou, Nikolaos; Roedel, Claus; Tselis, Nikolaos; Zoga, Eleni; Strouthos, Iosif; Butt, Saeed Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    To review the current status of interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy as a salvage modality (sHDR BRT) for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy (RT). A literature search was performed in PubMed using ''high-dose-rate, brachytherapy, prostate cancer, salvage'' as search terms. In all, 51 search results published between 2000 and 2016 were identified. Data tables were generated and summary descriptions created. The main outcome parameters used were biochemical control (BC) and toxicity scores. Eleven publications reported clinical outcome and toxicity with follow-up ranging from 4-191 months. A variety of dose and fractionation schedules were described, including 19.0 Gy in 2 fractions up to 42.0 Gy in 6 fractions. The 5-year BC ranged from 18-77%. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 0-32% and 0-5.1%, respectively. sHDR BRT appears as safe and effective salvage modality for the reirradiation of locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive RT. (orig.) [de

  18. Short-term Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Improves Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zumsteg, Zachary S.; Spratt, Daniel E.; Pei, Xin; Yamada, Yoshiya; Kalikstein, Abraham; Kuk, Deborah; Zhang, Zhigang; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the benefit of short-term androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer (PC) receiving dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The present retrospective study comprised 710 intermediate-risk PC patients receiving external beam radiation therapy with doses of ≥81 Gy at a single institution from 1992 to 2005, including 357 patients receiving neoadjuvant and concurrent ADT. Prostate-specific antigen recurrence-free survival (PSA-RFS) and distant metastasis (DM) were compared using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards models. PC-specific mortality (PCSM) was assessed using competing-risks analysis. Results: The median follow-up was 7.9 years. Despite being more likely to have higher PSA levels, Gleason score 4 + 3 = 7, multiple National Comprehensive Cancer Network intermediate-risk factors, and older age (P≤.001 for all comparisons), patients receiving ADT had improved PSA-RFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.598; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.435-0.841; P=.003), DM (HR, 0.424; 95% CI, 0.219-0.819; P=.011), and PCSM (HR, 0.380; 95% CI, 0.157-0.921; P=.032) on univariate analysis. Using multivariate analysis, ADT was an even stronger predictor of improved PSA-RFS (adjusted HR [AHR], 0.516; 95% CI, 0.360-0.739; P<.001), DM (AHR, 0.347; 95% CI, 0.176-0.685; P=.002), and PCSM (AHR, 0.297; 95% CI, 0.128-0.685; P=.004). Gleason score 4 + 3 = 7 and ≥50% positive biopsy cores were other independent predictors of PCSM. Conclusions: Short-term ADT improves PSA-RFS, DM, and PCSM in patients with intermediate-risk PC undergoing dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy

  19. Dose Escalation for Prostate Cancer Using the Three-Dimensional Conformal Dynamic Arc Technique: Analysis of 542 Consecutive Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A.; Vavassori, Andrea; Fodor, Cristiana; Santoro, Luigi; Zerini, Dario; Cattani, Federica; Garibaldi, Cristina; Cambria, Raffaella; Fodor, Andrei; Boboc, Genoveva Ionela; Vitolo, Viviana; Ivaldi, Giovanni Battista; Musi, Gennaro; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To present the results of dose escalation using three-dimensional conformal dynamic arc radiotherapy (3D-ART) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Five hundred and forty two T1-T3N0M0 prostate cancer patients were treated with 3D-ART. Dose escalation (from 76 Gy/38 fractions to 80 Gy/40 fractions) was introduced in September 2003; 32% of patients received 80 Gy. In 366 patients, androgen deprivation was added to 3D-ART. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria and Houston definition (nadir + 2) were used for toxicity and biochemical failure evaluation, respectively. Median follow-up was 25 months. Results: Acute toxicity included rectal (G1-2 28.9%; G3 0.5%) and urinary events (G1-2 57.9%; G3-4 2.4%). Late toxicity included rectal (G1-2 15.8%; G3-4 3.1%) and urinary events (G1-2 26.9%; G3-4 1.6%). Two-year failure-free survival and overall survival rates were 94.1% and 97.9%, respectively. Poor prognostic group (GS, iPSA, T), transurethral prostate resection, and dose >76 Gy showed significant association to high risk of progression in multivariate analysis (p = 0.014, p = 0.045, and p 0.04, respectively). The negative effect of dose >76 Gy was not observed (p 0.10), when the analysis was limited to 353 patients treated after September 2003 (when dose escalation was introduced). Higher dose was not associated with higher late toxicity. Conclusions: Three-dimensional-ART is a feasible modality allowing for dose escalation (no increase in toxicity has been observed with higher doses). However, the dose increase from 76 to 80 Gy was not associated with better tumor outcome. Further investigation is warranted for better understanding of the dose effect for prostate cancer

  20. Changes in Treatment Volume of Hormonally Treated and Untreated Cancerous Prostate and its Impact on Rectal Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilleby, Wolfgang; Dale, Einar; Olsen, Dag R.; Gude, Unn; Fossaa, Sophie D.

    2003-01-01

    Late chronic side effects of the rectum constitute one of the principal limiting factors for curative radiation therapy in patients with prostate cancer. The purpose of the study was to determine the impact of immediate androgen deprivation (IAD) prior to conformal radiotherapy on rectal volume exposed to high doses, as compared with a deferred treatment strategy (DAD). Twenty-five patients (13 in the IAD group and 12 in the DAD group) with bulky tumours of the prostate, T3pN1-2M0 from the prospective EORTC trial 30846 were analysed. Three-dimensional conformal radiation treatment plans (3D CRT) using a 4-field box technique were generated based on the digitized computed tomographic or magnetic resonance findings acquired during the first 9 months after inclusion in the EORTC trial. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated for the prostate and rectum. In the DAD group, there was no obvious alteration in the mean size of the prostate or other evaluated structures. In the IAD patients, a statistically significant reduction of approximately 40% of the gross tumour volume (GTV) was reached after a 6 months' course of hormonal treatment (p<0.001). High-dose rectal volume was correlated with the volume changes of the GTV (p<0.001). Mean rectal volume receiving 95% or more of the target dose was significantly reduced by 20%. Our study confirms the effect of downsizing of locally advanced prostate tumours following AD treatment and demonstrates the interdependence of the high-dose rectal volume with the volume changes of the GTV. However, the mean beneficial sparing of rectal volume was outweighed in some patients by considerable inter-patient variations

  1. High dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) in prostate cancer - technique description and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordova Junior, Ardo Lotar; Salvajoli, Joao Victor; Pelizzon, Antonio CAssio Assis; Cecilio, Paulo Jose

    1998-01-01

    Describe the technique and preliminary results of high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) in localized prostate cancer. Subjects methods: Between March, 1997 and April, 1998, 26 patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45 to 50.4 Gy - 1.8 Gy per day) and implants (16 Gy in 2 days - twice a day). Median age was 68 years. The distribution by clinical stage was: 5 T1c, 9 T2a, 10 T2b and 2 T3a. Median initial PSA was 16 ng/ml. Results: With a median follow-up of 4 months, 85% of patients showed normal levels of PSA, with a median of 0.6 ng/ml, 60 to 90 days after treatment. Dysuria grades 1 and 2 and proctitis grade 1 were found in 11,3 and 5 patients, respectively. Conclusion: The method is safe, with acceptable early side effects. Longer follow-up is necessary before drawing any conclusions. (author)

  2. Defining the appropriate radiation dose for pretreatment PSA no. <=no. 10 ng/mL prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinover, Wayne H.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether a dose response exists for biochemical no evidence of disease (bNED) control in prostate cancer patients with pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) no. =no. 7600 cGy. Median dose in these three groups was 7067 cGy, 7278 cGy, and 7734 cGy, respectively. Univariate analysis was performed to determine differences in bNED control (American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology [ASTRO] Consensus Guidelines definition of failure) by dose group for the entire cohort, for 310 good prognosis patients (T1-T2A, Gleason score 2-6, absence of PNI), and for 178 poor prognosis patients (T2B-T3 or Gleason score 7-10 or presence of PNI) . Multivariate analysis (MVA) was performed to determine if dose was an independent predictor of bNED control. Median follow-up was 36 months. Results: A dose response was not demonstrated for the entire group of patients with pretreatment PSA no. =no. 7600 cGy were associated with 5-year bNED control rates of 73%, 86%, and 89%, respectively (p = 0.12). MVA demonstrated prognosis group (p = 0.038) to be the only independent predictor of bNED control. Good prognosis patients had a 5-year bNED of 85% and no dose response was seen. The subgroup of poor prognosis patients demonstrated a 5-year bNED control rate of 81% and a dose response was seen for those receiving no. >=no. 7600 cGy, compared to the two lower dose groups (94% vs. 75% vs. 70%; p = 0.0062). MVA for the poor prognosis subset demonstrated dose (p = 0.01) to be the only independent predictor for improved bNED control. Conclusions: The poor prognosis subset of PSA no. <=no. 10 ng/mL prostate cancer patients benefit from dose escalation. A dose response is not demonstrated for prostate cancer patients with pretreatment PSA no. <=no. 10 ng/mL and other favorable features

  3. Dosimetric Evaluation of High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy Boost Treatments for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehlich, Georgina; Agoston, Peter; Loevey, Jozsef; Somogyi, Andras; Fodor, Janos; Polgar, Csaba; Major, Tibor

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: to quantitatively evaluate the dose distributions of high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate implants regarding target coverage, dose homogeneity, and dose to organs at risk. Material and methods: treatment plans of 174 implants were evaluated using cumulative dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The planning was based on transrectal ultrasound (US) imaging, and the prescribed dose (100%) was 10 Gy. The tolerance doses to rectum and urethra were 80% and 120%, respectively. Dose-volume parameters for target (V90, V100, V150, V200, D90, D min ) and quality indices (DNR [dose nonuniformity ratio], DHI [dose homogeneity index], CI [coverage index], COIN [conformal index]) were calculated. Maximum dose in reference points of rectum (D r ) and urethra (D u ), dose to volume of 2 cm 3 of the rectum (D 2ccm ), and 0.1 cm 3 and 1% of the urethra (D 0.1ccm and D1) were determined. Nonparametric correlation analysis was performed between these parameters. Results: the median number of needles was 16, the mean prostate volume (V p ) was 27.1 cm 3 . The mean V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 90%, 97%, 39% and 13%, respectively. The mean D90 was 109%, and the D min was 87%. The mean doses in rectum and urethra reference points were 75% and 119%, respectively. The mean volumetric doses were D 2ccm = 49% for the rectum, D 0.1ccm = 126%, and D1 = 140% for the urethra. The mean DNR was 0.37, while the DHI was 0.60. The mean COIN was 0.66. The Spearman rank order correlation coefficients for volume doses to rectum and urethra were R(D r , D 2ccm ) = 0.69, R(D u , D 0.1ccm ) = 0.64, R(D u , D1) = 0.23. Conclusion: US-based treatment plans for HDR prostate implants based on the real positions of catheters provided acceptable dose distributions. In the majority of the cases, the doses to urethra and rectum were kept below the defined tolerance levels. For rectum, the dose in reference points correlated well with dose-volume parameters. For urethra dose characterization, the use of D1 volumetric

  4. Dosimetric Evaluation of High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy Boost Treatments for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehlich, Georgina [Semmelweis Univ., Budapest (Hungary); Dept. of Radiotherapy, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Agoston, Peter; Loevey, Jozsef; Somogyi, Andras; Fodor, Janos; Polgar, Csaba; Major, Tibor [Dept. of Radiotherapy, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: to quantitatively evaluate the dose distributions of high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate implants regarding target coverage, dose homogeneity, and dose to organs at risk. Material and methods: treatment plans of 174 implants were evaluated using cumulative dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The planning was based on transrectal ultrasound (US) imaging, and the prescribed dose (100%) was 10 Gy. The tolerance doses to rectum and urethra were 80% and 120%, respectively. Dose-volume parameters for target (V90, V100, V150, V200, D90, D{sub min}) and quality indices (DNR [dose nonuniformity ratio], DHI [dose homogeneity index], CI [coverage index], COIN [conformal index]) were calculated. Maximum dose in reference points of rectum (D{sub r}) and urethra (D{sub u}), dose to volume of 2 cm{sup 3} of the rectum (D{sub 2ccm}), and 0.1 cm{sup 3} and 1% of the urethra (D{sub 0.1ccm} and D1) were determined. Nonparametric correlation analysis was performed between these parameters. Results: the median number of needles was 16, the mean prostate volume (V{sub p}) was 27.1 cm{sup 3}. The mean V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 90%, 97%, 39% and 13%, respectively. The mean D90 was 109%, and the D{sub min} was 87%. The mean doses in rectum and urethra reference points were 75% and 119%, respectively. The mean volumetric doses were D{sub 2ccm} = 49% for the rectum, D{sub 0.1ccm} = 126%, and D1 = 140% for the urethra. The mean DNR was 0.37, while the DHI was 0.60. The mean COIN was 0.66. The Spearman rank order correlation coefficients for volume doses to rectum and urethra were R(D{sub r}, D{sub 2ccm}) = 0.69, R(D{sub u}, D{sub 0.1ccm}) = 0.64, R(D{sub u}, D1) = 0.23. Conclusion: US-based treatment plans for HDR prostate implants based on the real positions of catheters provided acceptable dose distributions. In the majority of the cases, the doses to urethra and rectum were kept below the defined tolerance levels. For rectum, the dose in reference points correlated well with dose

  5. Dosimetric evaluation of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy boost treatments for localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Georgina; Agoston, Péter; Lövey, József; Somogyi, András; Fodor, János; Polgár, Csaba; Major, Tibor

    2010-07-01

    To quantitatively evaluate the dose distributions of high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate implants regarding target coverage, dose homogeneity, and dose to organs at risk. Treatment plans of 174 implants were evaluated using cumulative dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The planning was based on transrectal ultrasound (US) imaging, and the prescribed dose (100%) was 10 Gy. The tolerance doses to rectum and urethra were 80% and 120%, respectively. Dose-volume parameters for target (V90, V100, V150, V200, D90, D(min)) and quality indices (DNR [dose nonuniformity ratio], DHI [dose homogeneity index], CI [coverage index], COIN [conformal index]) were calculated. Maximum dose in reference points of rectum (D(r)) and urethra (D(u)), dose to volume of 2 cm(3) of the rectum (D(2ccm)), and 0.1 cm(3) and 1% of the urethra (D(0.1ccm) and D1) were determined. Nonparametric correlation analysis was performed between these parameters. The median number of needles was 16, the mean prostate volume (V(p)) was 27.1 cm(3). The mean V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 99%, 97%, 39%, and 13%, respectively. The mean D90 was 109%, and the D(min) was 87%. The mean doses in rectum and urethra reference points were 75% and 119%, respectively. The mean volumetric doses were D(2ccm) = 49% for the rectum, D(0.1ccm) = 126%, and D1 = 140% for the urethra. The mean DNR was 0.37, while the DHI was 0.60. The mean COIN was 0.66. The Spearman rank order correlation coefficients for volume doses to rectum and urethra were R(D(r),D(2ccm)) = 0.69, R(D(u),D0.(1ccm)) = 0.64, R(D(u),D1) = 0.23. US-based treatment plans for HDR prostate implants based on the real positions of catheters provided acceptable dose distributions. In the majority of the cases, the doses to urethra and rectum were kept below the defined tolerance levels. For rectum, the dose in reference points correlated well with dose-volume parameters. For urethra dose characterization, the use of D1 volumetric parameter is recommended.

  6. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as a Monotherapy for Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer: A Phase II Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkati, Maroie; Williams, Scott G.; Foroudi, Farshad; Tai, Keen Hun; Chander, Sarat; Dyk, Sylvia van; See, Andrew; Duchesne, Gillian M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: There are multiple treatment options for favorable-risk prostate cancer. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a monotherapy is appealing, but its use is still investigational. A Phase II trial was undertaken to explore the value of such treatment in low-to-intermediate risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a single-institution, prospective study. Eligible patients had low-risk prostate cancer features but also Gleason scores of 7 (51% of patients) and stage T2b to T2c cancer. Treatment with HDR brachytherapy with a single implant was administered over 2 days. One of four fractionation schedules was used in a dose escalation study design: 3 fractions of 10, 10.5, 11, or 11.5 Gy. Patients were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 2.0 for urinary toxicity, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scoring schema for rectal toxicity, and the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaire to measure patient-reported health-related quality of life. Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir plus 2 ng/ml. Results: Between 2003 and 2008, 79 patients were enrolled. With a median follow-up of 39.5 months, biochemical relapse occurred in 7 patients. Three- and 5-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 88.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 78.0-96.2%) and 85.1% (95% CI, 72.5-94.5%), respectively. Acute grade 3 urinary toxicity was seen in only 1 patient. There was no instance of acute grade 3 rectal toxicity. Rates of late grade 3 rectal toxicity, dysuria, hematuria, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence were 0%, 10.3%, 1.3%, 9.0%, and 0%, respectively. No grade 4 or greater toxicity was recorded. Among the four (urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal) domains assessed with the EPIC questionnaire, only the sexual domain did not recover with time. Conclusions: HDR brachytherapy as a monotherapy for favorable

  7. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as a Monotherapy for Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer: A Phase II Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkati, Maroie [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Williams, Scott G., E-mail: scott.williams@petermac.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Foroudi, Farshad; Tai, Keen Hun; Chander, Sarat [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Dyk, Sylvia van [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); See, Andrew [Ballarat Austin Radiation Oncology Centre, Ballarat (Australia); Duchesne, Gillian M. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: There are multiple treatment options for favorable-risk prostate cancer. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a monotherapy is appealing, but its use is still investigational. A Phase II trial was undertaken to explore the value of such treatment in low-to-intermediate risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a single-institution, prospective study. Eligible patients had low-risk prostate cancer features but also Gleason scores of 7 (51% of patients) and stage T2b to T2c cancer. Treatment with HDR brachytherapy with a single implant was administered over 2 days. One of four fractionation schedules was used in a dose escalation study design: 3 fractions of 10, 10.5, 11, or 11.5 Gy. Patients were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 2.0 for urinary toxicity, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scoring schema for rectal toxicity, and the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaire to measure patient-reported health-related quality of life. Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir plus 2 ng/ml. Results: Between 2003 and 2008, 79 patients were enrolled. With a median follow-up of 39.5 months, biochemical relapse occurred in 7 patients. Three- and 5-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 88.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 78.0-96.2%) and 85.1% (95% CI, 72.5-94.5%), respectively. Acute grade 3 urinary toxicity was seen in only 1 patient. There was no instance of acute grade 3 rectal toxicity. Rates of late grade 3 rectal toxicity, dysuria, hematuria, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence were 0%, 10.3%, 1.3%, 9.0%, and 0%, respectively. No grade 4 or greater toxicity was recorded. Among the four (urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal) domains assessed with the EPIC questionnaire, only the sexual domain did not recover with time. Conclusions: HDR brachytherapy as a monotherapy for favorable

  8. Influence of daily setup measurements and corrections on the estimated delivered dose during IMRT treatment of prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haaren, Paul M.A. van; Bel, Arjan; Hofman, Pieter; Vulpen, Marco van; Kotte, Alexis N.T.J.; Heide, Uulke A. van der

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of marker-based position verification, using daily imaging and an off-line correction protocol, by calculating the delivered dose to prostate, rectum and bladder. Methods: Prostate cancer patients (n = 217) were treated with IMRT, receiving 35 daily fractions. Plans with five beams were optimized taking target coverage (CTV, boost) and organs-at-risk (rectum and bladder) into account. PTV margins were 8 mm. Prostate position was verified daily using implanted fiducial gold markers by imaging the first segment of all the five beams on an EPID. Setup deviations were corrected off-line using an adapted shrinking-action-level protocol. The estimated delivered dose, including daily organ movements, was calculated using a version of PLATO's dose engine, enabling batch processing of large numbers of patients. The dose was calculated ± inclusion of setup corrections, and was evaluated relative to the original static plan. The marker-based measurements were considered representative for all organs. Results: Daily organ movements would result in an underdosage of 2-3 Gy to CTV and boost volume relative to the original plan, which was prevented by daily setup corrections. The dose to rectum and bladder was on average unchanged, but a large spread was introduced by organ movements, which was reduced by including setup corrections. Conclusions: Without position verification and setup corrections, margins of 8mm would be insufficient to account for position uncertainties during IMRT of prostate cancer. With the daily off-line correction protocol, the remaining variations are accommodated adequately

  9. Radiation dose response in patients with favorable localized prostate cancer (Stage T1-T2, biopsy Gleason ≤6, and pretreatment prostate-specific antigen ≤10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupelian, Patrick A.; Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Klein, Eric A.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To study the radiation dose response as determined by biochemical relapse-free survival in patients with favorable localized prostate cancers, i.e., Stage T1-T2, biopsy Gleason score (bGS) ≤6, and pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (iPSA) ≤10 ng/mL. Methods and Materials: A total of 292 patients with favorable localized prostate cancer were treated with radiotherapy alone between 1986 and 1999. The median age was 69 years. Sixteen percent of cases (n=46) were African-American. The distribution by clinical T stage was as follows: T1/T2A, 243 (83%); and T2B/T2C, 49 (17%). The distribution by iPSA was as follows: ≤4 ng/mL, 49 (17%); and >4 ng/mL, 243 (83%). The mean iPSA level was 6.2 (median, 6.4). The distribution by bGS was as follows: ≤5 in 89 cases (30%) and 6 in 203 cases (70%). The median radiation dose was 70.0 Gy (range, 63.0-78.0 Gy). Doses of ≤70.0 Gy were delivered in 175 cases, 70.2-72.0 Gy in 24 cases, 74 Gy in 30 cases, and 78 Gy in 63 cases. For patients receiving 2 =5.7), and radiation dose (p=0.021, χ 2 =5.3) were independent predictors of outcome. Age (p=0.94), race (p=0.89), stage (p=0.45), biopsy GS (p=0.40), and radiation technique (p=0.45) were not. Conclusion: There is a clear radiation dose response in patients with favorable localized prostate cancers (i.e., Stage T1-T2, biopsy Gleason score ≤6, and iPSA ≤10 ng/mL). At least 74 Gy should be delivered to the prostate and periprostatic tissues. With our cohort of patients, longer follow-up will be needed to assess the importance of doses exceeding 74 Gy

  10. Postoperative high-dose pelvic radiotherapy for N+ prostate cancer: Toxicity and matched case comparison with postoperative prostate bed-only radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Praet, Charles; Ost, Piet; Lumen, Nicolaas; De Meerleer, Gert; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Villeirs, Geert; Decaestecker, Karel; Fonteyne, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report on toxicity of postoperative high-dose whole-pelvis radiotherapy (WPRT) with androgen deprivation therapy for lymph node metastasized (N1) prostate cancer (PC). To perform a matched-case analysis to compare this toxicity profile to postoperative prostate bed-only radiotherapy (PBRT). Materials and methods: Forty-eight N1-PC patients were referred for WPRT and 239 node-negative patients for PBRT. Patients were matched 1:1 according to pre-treatment demographics, symptoms, treatment and tumor characteristics. Mean dose to the prostate bed was 75 Gy (WPRT–PBRT) and 54 Gy to the elective nodes (WPRT) in 36 or 37 fractions. End points are genito-urinary (GU) and gastro-intestinal (GI) toxicity. Results: After WPRT, 35% developed grade 2 (G2) and 4% G3 acute GU toxicity. Acute GI toxicity developed in 42% (G2). Late GU toxicity developed in 36% (G2) and 7% (G3). One patient had G4 incontinence. Recuperation occurred in 59%. Late GI toxicity developed in 25% (G2) with 100% recuperation. Incidence of acute and late GI toxicity was higher following WPRT compared to PBRT (p ⩽ 0.041). GU toxicity was similar. With WPRT mean dose to bladder and rectosigmoid were higher. Conclusions: Postoperative high-dose WPRT comes at the cost of a temporary increase in G2. GI toxicity compared to PBRT because larger volumes of rectosigmoid are irradiated

  11. Lateral rectal shielding reduces late rectal morbidity after high dose three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for clinically localized prostate cancer: further evidence for a dose effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W Robert; Hanks, Gerald E; Hanlon, Alexandra; Schultheiss, Timothy E

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: Using conventional treatment methods for the treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer central axis doses must be limited to 65-70 Gy to prevent significant damage to nearby normal tissues. A fundamental hypothesis of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) is that, by defining the target organ(s) accurately in three dimensions, it is possible to deliver higher doses to the target without a significant increase in normal tissue complications. This study examines whether this hypothesis holds true and whether a simple modification of treatment technique can reduce the incidence of late rectal morbidity in patients with prostate cancer treated with 3DCRT to minimum planning target volume (PTV) doses of 71-75 Gy. Materials and Methods: 257 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer completed 3DCRT by December 31, 1993 and received a minimum PTV dose of 71-75 Gy. The median follow-up time was 22 months (range 4-67 months) and 98% of patients had followup of longer than 12 months. The calculated dose at the center of the prostate was <74 Gy in 19 patients, 74-76 Gy in 206 patients and >76 Gy in 32 patients. Late rectal morbidity was graded according to the LENT scoring system. Eighty-eight consecutive patients were treated with a rectal block added to the lateral fields. In these patients the posterior margin from the prostate to the block edge was reduced from the standard 15 mm to 7.5 mm for the final 10 Gy which reduced the dose to portions of the anterior rectal wall by approximately 4-5 Gy. Estimates of rates for rectal morbidity were determined by Kaplan-Meier actuarial analyses. Differences in morbidity percentages were evaluated by the Pearson chi square test. Results: Grade 2-3 rectal morbidity developed in 46 of 257 patients (18%) and in the majority of cases consisted of rectal bleeding. No patient has developed grade 4 or 5 rectal morbidity. The actuarial rate of grade 2-3 morbidity is 22% at 24 months and the median

  12. Risk group dependence of dose-response for biopsy outcome after three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levegruen, Sabine; Jackson, Andrew; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Venkatraman, Ennapadam S.; Skwarchuk, Mark W.; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Fuks, Zvi; Leibel, Steven A.; Ling, C. Clifton

    2002-01-01

    Background and purpose: We fit phenomenological tumor control probability (TCP) models to biopsy outcome after three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) of prostate cancer patients to quantify the local dose-response of prostate cancer. Materials and methods: We analyzed the outcome after photon beam 3D-CRT of 103 patients with stage T1c-T3 prostate cancer treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) (prescribed target doses between 64.8 and 81 Gy) who had a prostate biopsy performed ≥2.5 years after end of treatment. A univariate logistic regression model based on D mean (mean dose in the planning target volume of each patient) was fit to the whole data set and separately to subgroups characterized by low and high values of tumor-related prognostic factors T-stage ( 6), and pre-treatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) (≤10 ng/ml vs. >10 ng/ml). In addition, we evaluated five different classifications of the patients into three risk groups, based on all possible combinations of two or three prognostic factors, and fit bivariate logistic regression models with D mean and the risk group category to all patients. Dose-response curves were characterized by TCD 50 , the dose to control 50% of the tumors, and γ 50 , the normalized slope of the dose-response curve at TCD 50 . Results: D mean correlates significantly with biopsy outcome in all patient subgroups and larger values of TCD 50 are observed for patients with unfavorable compared to favorable prognostic factors. For example, TCD 50 for high T-stage patients is 7 Gy higher than for low T-stage patients. For all evaluated risk group definitions, D mean and the risk group category are independent predictors of biopsy outcome in bivariate analysis. The fit values of TCD 50 show a clear separation of 9-10.6 Gy between low and high risk patients. The corresponding dose-response curves are steeper (γ 50 =3.4-5.2) than those obtained when all patients are analyzed together (γ 50 =2

  13. Applicability and dosimetric impact of ultrasound-based preplanning in high-dose-rate brachytherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aebersold, D.M.; Isaak, B.; Behrensmeier, F.; Kolotas, C.; Mini, R.; Greiner, R.H.; Thalmann, G.; Kranzbuehler, H.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: analyses of permanent brachytherapy seed implants of the prostate have demonstrated that the use of a preplan may lead to a considerable decrease of dosimetric implant quality. The authors aimed to determine whether the same drawbacks of preplanning also apply to high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Patients and methods: 15 patients who underwent two separate HDR brachytherapy implants in addition to external-beam radiation therapy for advanced prostate cancer were analyzed. A pretherapeutic transrectal ultrasound was performed in all patients to generate a preplan for the first brachytherapy implant. For the second brachytherapy, a subset of patients were treated by preplans based on the ultrasound from the first brachytherapy implant. Preplans were compared with the respective postplans assessing the following parameters: coverage index, minimum target dose, homogeneity index, and dose exposure of organs at risk. The prostate geometries (volume, width, height, length) were compared as well. Results: at the first brachytherapy, the matching between the preplan and actual implant geometry was sufficient in 47% of the patients, and the preplan could be applied. The dosimetric implant quality decreased considerably: the mean coverage differed by -0.11, the mean minimum target dose by -0.15, the mean homogeneity index by -0.09. The exposure of organs at risk was not substantially altered. At the second brachytherapy, all patients could be treated by the preplan; the differences between the implant quality parameters were less pronounced. The changes of prostate geometry between preplans and postplans were considerable, the differences in volume ranging from -8.0 to 13.8 cm 3 and in dimensions (width, height, length) from -1.1 to 1.0 cm. Conclusion: preplanning in HDR brachytherapy of the prostate is associated with a substantial decrease of dosimetric implant quality, when the preplan is based on a pretherapeutic ultrasound. The implant quality

  14. Prostate Cancer Biorepository Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0185 TITLE: Prostate Cancer Biorepository Network PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jonathan Melamed, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Prostate Cancer Biorepository Network 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-2-0185 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...infrastructure and operations of the Prostate Cancer Biorepository Network (PCBN). The aim of the PCBN is to provide prostate researchers with high-quality

  15. Low dose combinations of 2-methoxyestradiol and docetaxel block prostate cancer cells in mitosis and increase apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Teresita; de las Pozas, Alicia; Gomez, Lourdes A; Perez-Stable, Carlos

    2009-04-08

    Clinical trials have shown that chemotherapy with docetaxel (Doc) combined with prednisone can improve survival of patients with androgen-independent prostate cancer (AI-PC). It is likely that the combination of Doc with other novel agents would also improve the survival of AI-PC patients. We investigated whether the combination of Doc and 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2), an endogenous metabolite of estradiol promising for cancer therapy, can increase apoptotic cell death in prostate cancer cells. Low concentration 2ME2 (0.5-1 microM)+Doc (0.05-0.1 nM) combinations inhibit cell growth, increase G2/M cell cycle arrest, and increase apoptosis more effectively than the single concentrations in a variety of human AI-PC cells. Effects on apoptosis were associated with an increase in p53 protein and a decrease in cyclin A-dependent kinase activity. We then investigated whether the combination of 2ME2+Doc can increase apoptotic cell death and inhibit the growth of prostate tumors in the FG/Tag transgenic mouse model of AI-PC. Doses of 2ME2 and Doc that increase mitotic cell cycle arrest result in an increase in apoptosis and lower primary prostate tumor weights in FG/Tag mice. High dose 2ME2+Doc combinations did not increase G2/M cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in AI-PC cell lines and in the FG/Tag mice more than the single drugs. Overall, our data indicate that low dose 2ME2+Doc combinations may provide a treatment strategy that can improve therapeutic efficacy against AI-PC while reducing toxicity often seen in patients treated with Doc.

  16. The Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) score predicts biochemical recurrence in intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) dose escalation or low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Vimal; Delouya, Guila; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Larrivée, Sandra; Taussky, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    To study the prognostic value of the University of California, San Francisco Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) score to predict biochemical failure (bF) after various doses of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or permanent seed low-dose rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy (PB). We retrospectively analysed 345 patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer, with PSA levels of 10-20 ng/mL and/or Gleason 7 including 244 EBRT patients (70.2-79.2 Gy) and 101 patients treated with LDR PB. The minimum follow-up was 3 years. No patient received primary androgen-deprivation therapy. bF was defined according to the Phoenix definition. Cox regression analysis was used to estimate the differences between CAPRA groups. The overall bF rate was 13% (45/345). The CAPRA score, as a continuous variable, was statistically significant in multivariate analysis for predicting bF (hazard ratio [HR] 1.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10-1.72, P = 0.006). There was a trend for a lower bF rate in patients treated with LDR PB when compared with those treated by EBRT ≤ 74 Gy (HR 0.234, 95% CI 0.05-1.03, P = 0.055) in multivariate analysis. In the subgroup of patients with a CAPRA score of 3-5, CAPRA remained predictive of bF as a continuous variable (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.01-2.27, P = 0.047) in multivariate analysis. The CAPRA score is useful for predicting biochemical recurrence in patients treated for intermediate-risk prostate cancer with EBRT or LDR PB. It could help in treatment decisions. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  17. Moderate Hypofractionated Protracted Radiation Therapy and Dose Escalation for Prostate Cancer: Do Dose and Overall Treatment Time Matter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kountouri, Melpomeni; Zilli, Thomas; Rouzaud, Michel; Dubouloz, Angèle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Linero, Dolors; Escudé, Lluís; Jorcano, Sandra [Radiation Oncology, Teknon Oncologic Institute, Barcelona (Spain); Miralbell, Raymond, E-mail: Raymond.Miralbell@hcuge.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Radiation Oncology, Teknon Oncologic Institute, Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: This was a retrospective study of 2 sequential dose escalation regimens of twice-weekly 4 Gy/fractions hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT): 56 Gy and 60 Gy delivered within a protracted overall treatment time (OTT) of 6.5 and 7 weeks, respectively. Methods and Materials: 163 prostate cancer patients with cT1c-T3a disease and nodal involvement risk ≤20% (Roach index) were treated twice weekly to the prostate ± seminal vesicles with 2 sequential dose-escalated IMRT schedules: 56 Gy (14 × 4 Gy, n=81) from 2003 to 2007 and 60 Gy (15 × 4 Gy, n=82) from 2006 to 2010. Patient repositioning was made with bone matching on portal images. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 grading scale. Results: There were no significant differences regarding the acute GU and GI toxicities in the 2 dose groups. The median follow-up times were 80.2 months (range, 4.5-121 months) and 56.5 months (range, 1.4-91.2 months) for patients treated to 56 and 60 Gy, respectively. The 5-year grade ≥2 late GU toxicity-free survivals with 56 Gy and 60 Gy were 96 ± 2.3% and 78.2 ± 5.1% (P=.001), respectively. The 5-year grade ≥2 late GI toxicity-free survivals with 56 Gy and 60 Gy were 98.6 ± 1.3% and 85.1 ± 4.5% (P=.005), respectively. Patients treated with 56 Gy showed a 5-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS) of 80.8 ± 4.7%, worse than patients treated with 60 Gy (93.2 ± 3.9%, P=.007). A trend for a better 5-year distant metastasis-free survival was observed among patients treated in the high-dose group (95.3 ± 2.7% vs 100%, P=.073, respectively). On multivariate analysis, only the 60-Gy group predicted for a better bPFS (P=.016, hazard ratio = 4.58). Conclusions: A single 4-Gy additional fraction in patients treated with a hypofractionated protracted IMRT schedule of 14 × 4 Gy resulted in

  18. Comparison of testicular dose delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Jeffrey M.; Handorf, Elizabeth A.; Price, Robert A.; Cherian, George; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Chen, David Y.; Kutikov, Alexander; Johnson, Matthew E.; Ma, Chung-Ming Charlie; Horwitz, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    A small decrease in testosterone level has been documented after prostate irradiation, possibly owing to the incidental dose to the testes. Testicular doses from prostate external beam radiation plans with either intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were calculated to investigate any difference. Testicles were contoured for 16 patients being treated for localized prostate cancer. For each patient, 2 plans were created: 1 with IMRT and 1 with VMAT. No specific attempt was made to reduce testicular dose. Minimum, maximum, and mean doses to the testicles were recorded for each plan. Of the 16 patients, 4 received a total dose of 7800 cGy to the prostate alone, 7 received 8000 cGy to the prostate alone, and 5 received 8000 cGy to the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. The mean (range) of testicular dose with an IMRT plan was 54.7 cGy (21.1 to 91.9) and 59.0 cGy (25.1 to 93.4) with a VMAT plan. In 12 cases, the mean VMAT dose was higher than the mean IMRT dose, with a mean difference of 4.3 cGy (p = 0.019). There was a small but statistically significant increase in mean testicular dose delivered by VMAT compared with IMRT. Despite this, it unlikely that there is a clinically meaningful difference in testicular doses from either modality

  19. Comparison of testicular dose delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients with prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Jeffrey M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Handorf, Elizabeth A. [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Price, Robert A.; Cherian, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Chen, David Y.; Kutikov, Alexander [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Johnson, Matthew E.; Ma, Chung-Ming Charlie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M., E-mail: eric.horwitz@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    A small decrease in testosterone level has been documented after prostate irradiation, possibly owing to the incidental dose to the testes. Testicular doses from prostate external beam radiation plans with either intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were calculated to investigate any difference. Testicles were contoured for 16 patients being treated for localized prostate cancer. For each patient, 2 plans were created: 1 with IMRT and 1 with VMAT. No specific attempt was made to reduce testicular dose. Minimum, maximum, and mean doses to the testicles were recorded for each plan. Of the 16 patients, 4 received a total dose of 7800 cGy to the prostate alone, 7 received 8000 cGy to the prostate alone, and 5 received 8000 cGy to the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. The mean (range) of testicular dose with an IMRT plan was 54.7 cGy (21.1 to 91.9) and 59.0 cGy (25.1 to 93.4) with a VMAT plan. In 12 cases, the mean VMAT dose was higher than the mean IMRT dose, with a mean difference of 4.3 cGy (p = 0.019). There was a small but statistically significant increase in mean testicular dose delivered by VMAT compared with IMRT. Despite this, it unlikely that there is a clinically meaningful difference in testicular doses from either modality.

  20. Dose-Volume Parameters of the Corpora Cavernosa Do Not Correlate With Erectile Dysfunction After External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results From a Dose-Escalation Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielen, Gerard J. van der; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Dohle, Gert R.; Putten, Wim L.J. van; Incrocci, Luca

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the correlation between dose-volume parameters of the corpora cavernosa and erectile dysfunction (ED) after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and February 2003, a randomized dose-escalation trial comparing 68 Gy and 78 Gy was conducted. Patients at our institute were asked to participate in an additional part of the trial evaluating sexual function. After exclusion of patients with less than 2 years of follow-up, ED at baseline, or treatment with hormonal therapy, 96 patients were eligible. The proximal corpora cavernosa (crura), the superiormost 1-cm segment of the crura, and the penile bulb were contoured on the planning computed tomography scan and dose-volume parameters were calculated. Results: Two years after EBRT, 35 of the 96 patients had developed ED. No statistically significant correlations between ED 2 years after EBRT and dose-volume parameters of the crura, the superiormost 1-cm segment of the crura, or the penile bulb were found. The few patients using potency aids typically indicated to have ED. Conclusion: No correlation was found between ED after EBRT for prostate cancer and radiation dose to the crura or penile bulb. The present study is the largest study evaluating the correlation between ED and radiation dose to the corpora cavernosa after EBRT for prostate cancer. Until there is clear evidence that sparing the penile bulb or crura will reduce ED after EBRT, we advise to be careful in sparing these structures, especially when this involves reducing treatment margins

  1. Associations between volume changes and spatial dose metrics for the urinary bladder during local versus pelvic irradiation for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casares-Magaz, Oscar; Moiseenko, Vitali; Hopper, Austin; Pettersson, Niclas Johan; Thor, Maria; Knopp, Rick; Deasy, Joseph O; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Einck, John

    2017-06-01

    Inter-fractional variation in urinary bladder volumes during the course of radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer causes deviations between planned and delivered doses. This study compared planned versus daily cone-beam CT (CBCT)-based spatial bladder dose distributions, for prostate cancer patients receiving local prostate treatment (local treatment) versus prostate including pelvic lymph node irradiation (pelvic treatment). Twenty-seven patients (N = 15 local treatment; N = 12 pelvic treatment) were treated using daily image-guided RT (1.8 Gy@43-45 fx), adhering to a full bladder/empty rectum protocol. For each patient, 9-10 CBCTs were registered to the planning CT, using the clinically applied translations. The urinary bladder was manually segmented on each CBCT, 3 mm inner shells were generated, and semi and quadrant sectors were created using axial/coronal cuts. Planned and delivered DVH metrics were compared across patients and between the two groups of treatment (t-test, p bladder volume variations and the dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the bladder and its sectors were evaluated (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, r s ). Bladder volumes varied considerably during RT (coefficient of variation: 16-58%). The population-averaged planned and delivered DVH metrics were not significantly different at any dose level. Larger treatment bladder volumes resulted in increased absolute volume of the posterior/inferior bladder sector receiving intermediate-high doses, in both groups. The superior bladder sector received less dose with larger bladder volumes for local treatments (r s  ± SD: -0.47 ± 0.32), but larger doses for pelvic treatments (r s  ± SD: 0.74 ± 0.24). Substantial bladder volume changes during the treatment course occurred even though patients were treated under a full bladder/daily image-guided protocol. Larger bladder volumes resulted in less bladder wall spared at the posterior-inferior sector, regardless the

  2. Daily dose monitoring with atlas-based auto-segmentation on diagnostic quality CT for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wen; Vassil, Andrew; Xia, Ping; Zhong, Yahua

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of daily dose monitoring using a patient specific atlas-based autosegmentation method on diagnostic quality verification images.Methods: Seven patients, who were treated for prostate cancer with intensity modulated radiotherapy under daily imaging guidance of a CT-on-rails system, were selected for this study. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were manually contoured on the first six and last seven sets of daily verification images. For each patient, three patient specific atlases were constructed using manual contours from planning CT alone (1-image atlas), planning CT plus first three verification CTs (4-image atlas), and planning CT plus first six verification CTs (7-image atlas). These atlases were subsequently applied to the last seven verification image sets of the same patient to generate the auto-contours. Daily dose was calculated by applying the original treatment plans to the daily beam isocenters. The autocontours and manual contours were compared geometrically using the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), and dosimetrically using the dose to 99% of the prostate CTV (D99) and the D5 of rectum and bladder.Results: The DSC of the autocontours obtained with the 4-image atlases were 87.0%± 3.3%, 84.7%± 8.6%, and 93.6%± 4.3% for the prostate, rectum, and bladder, respectively. These indices were higher than those from the 1-image atlases (p 0.05). Daily prostate D99 of the autocontours was comparable to those of the manual contours (p= 0.55). For the bladder and rectum, the daily D5 were 95.5%± 5.9% and 99.1%± 2.6% of the planned D5 for the autocontours compared to 95.3%± 6.7% (p= 0.58) and 99.8%± 2.3% (p < 0.01) for the manual contours.Conclusions: With patient specific 4-image atlases, atlas-based autosegmentation can adequately facilitate daily dose monitoring for prostate cancer

  3. Daily dose monitoring with atlas-based auto-segmentation on diagnostic quality CT for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wen; Vassil, Andrew; Xia, Ping [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Zhong, Yahua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of daily dose monitoring using a patient specific atlas-based autosegmentation method on diagnostic quality verification images.Methods: Seven patients, who were treated for prostate cancer with intensity modulated radiotherapy under daily imaging guidance of a CT-on-rails system, were selected for this study. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were manually contoured on the first six and last seven sets of daily verification images. For each patient, three patient specific atlases were constructed using manual contours from planning CT alone (1-image atlas), planning CT plus first three verification CTs (4-image atlas), and planning CT plus first six verification CTs (7-image atlas). These atlases were subsequently applied to the last seven verification image sets of the same patient to generate the auto-contours. Daily dose was calculated by applying the original treatment plans to the daily beam isocenters. The autocontours and manual contours were compared geometrically using the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), and dosimetrically using the dose to 99% of the prostate CTV (D99) and the D5 of rectum and bladder.Results: The DSC of the autocontours obtained with the 4-image atlases were 87.0%± 3.3%, 84.7%± 8.6%, and 93.6%± 4.3% for the prostate, rectum, and bladder, respectively. These indices were higher than those from the 1-image atlases (p < 0.01) and comparable to those from the 7-image atlases (p > 0.05). Daily prostate D99 of the autocontours was comparable to those of the manual contours (p= 0.55). For the bladder and rectum, the daily D5 were 95.5%± 5.9% and 99.1%± 2.6% of the planned D5 for the autocontours compared to 95.3%± 6.7% (p= 0.58) and 99.8%± 2.3% (p < 0.01) for the manual contours.Conclusions: With patient specific 4-image atlases, atlas-based autosegmentation can adequately facilitate daily dose monitoring for prostate cancer.

  4. Phase I Trial of Pelvic Nodal Dose Escalation With Hypofractionated IMRT for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adkison, Jarrod B.; McHaffie, Derek R.; Bentzen, Soren M.; Patel, Rakesh R.; Khuntia, Deepak [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Petereit, Daniel G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, John T. Vucurevich Regional Cancer Care Institute, Rapid City Regional Hospital, Rapid City, SD (United States); Hong, Theodore S.; Tome, Wolfgang [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Ritter, Mark A., E-mail: ritter@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Toxicity concerns have limited pelvic nodal prescriptions to doses that may be suboptimal for controlling microscopic disease. In a prospective trial, we tested whether image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can safely deliver escalated nodal doses while treating the prostate with hypofractionated radiotherapy in 5 Vulgar-Fraction-One-Half weeks. Methods and Materials: Pelvic nodal and prostatic image-guided IMRT was delivered to 53 National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) high-risk patients to a nodal dose of 56 Gy in 2-Gy fractions with concomitant treatment of the prostate to 70 Gy in 28 fractions of 2.5 Gy, and 50 of 53 patients received androgen deprivation for a median duration of 12 months. Results: The median follow-up time was 25.4 months (range, 4.2-57.2). No early Grade 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group or Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v.3.0 genitourinary (GU) or gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were seen. The cumulative actuarial incidence of Grade 2 early GU toxicity (primarily alpha blocker initiation) was 38%. The rate was 32% for Grade 2 early GI toxicity. None of the dose-volume descriptors correlated with GU toxicity, and only the volume of bowel receiving {>=}30 Gy correlated with early GI toxicity (p = 0.029). Maximum late Grades 1, 2, and 3 GU toxicities were seen in 30%, 25%, and 2% of patients, respectively. Maximum late Grades 1 and 2 GI toxicities were seen in 30% and 8% (rectal bleeding requiring cautery) of patients, respectively. The estimated 3-year biochemical control (nadir + 2) was 81.2 {+-} 6.6%. No patient manifested pelvic nodal failure, whereas 2 experienced paraaortic nodal failure outside the field. The six other clinical failures were distant only. Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT nodal dose escalation to 56 Gy was delivered concurrently with 70 Gy of hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy in a convenient, resource-efficient, and well-tolerated 28-fraction schedule. Pelvic nodal dose

  5. Long term results of a prospective dose escalation phase-II trial: Interstitial pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy as boost for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lettmaier, Sebastian; Lotter, Michael; Kreppner, Stephan; Strnad, Annedore; Fietkau, Rainer; Strnad, Vratislav

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our seven year single institution experience with pulsed dose rate brachytherapy dose escalation study in patients with intermediate and high risk prostate cancer. Materials and methods: We treated a total of 130 patients for intermediate and high risk prostate cancer at our institution between 2000 and 2007 using PDR-brachytherapy as a boost after conformal external beam radiation therapy to 50.4 Gy. The majority of patients had T2 disease (T1c 6%, T2 75%, T3 19%). Seventy three patients had intermediate-risk and 53 patients had high-risk disease according to the D’Amico classification. The dose of the brachytherapy boost was escalated from 25 to 35 Gy – 33 pts. received 25 Gy (total dose 75 Gy), 63 pts. 30 Gy (total dose 80 Gy) and 34 pts. 35 Gy, (total dose 85 Gy) given in one session (dose per pulse was 0.60 Gy or 0.70 Gy/h, 24 h per day, night and day, with a time interval of 1 h between two pulses). PSA-recurrence-free survival according to Kaplan–Meier using the Phoenix definition of biochemical failure was calculated and also late toxicities according to Common Toxicity Criteria scale were assessed. Results: At the time of analysis with a median follow-up of 60 months biochemical control was achieved by 88% of patients – only 16/130 patients (12.3%) developed a biochemical relapse. Biochemical relapse free survival calculated according to Kaplan–Meier for all patients at 5 years was 85.6% (83.9% for intermediate-risk patients and 84.2% for high-risk patients) and at 9 years’ follow up it was 79.0%. Analysing biochemical relapse free survival separately for different boost dose levels, at 5 years it was 97% for the 35 Gy boost dose and 82% for the 25 and 30 Gy dose levels. The side effects of therapy were negligible: There were 18 cases (15%) of grade 1/2 rectal proctitis, one case (0.8%) of grade 3 proctitis, 18 cases (15%) of grade 1/2 cystitis, and no cases (0%) with dysuria grade 3. No patient had a bulbourethral

  6. Needle migration and dosimetric impact in high-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer evaluated by repeated MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buus, Simon; Lizondo, Maria; Hokland, Steffen; Rylander, Susanne; Pedersen, Erik M; Tanderup, Kari; Bentzen, Lise

    To quantify needle migration and dosimetric impact in high-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer and propose a threshold for needle migration. Twenty-four high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with an HDR boost of 2 × 8.5 Gy were included. Patients received an MRI for planning (MRI1), before (MRI2), and after treatment (MRI3). Time from needle insertion to MRI3 was ∼3 hours. Needle migration was evaluated from coregistered images: MRI1-MRI2 and MRI1-MRI3. Dose volume histogram parameters from the treatment plan based on MRI1 were related to parameters based on needle positions in MRI2 or MRI3. Regression was used to model the average needle migration per implant and change in D90 clinical target volume, CTV prostate+3mm . The model fit was used for estimating the dosimetric impact in equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions for dose levels of 6, 8.5, 10, 15, and 19 Gy. Needle migration was on average 2.2 ± 1.8 mm SD from MRI1-MRI2 and 5.0 ± 3.0 mm SD from MRI1-MRI3. D90 CTV prostate+3mm was robust toward average needle migration ≤3 mm, whereas for migration >3 mm D90 decreased by 4.5% per mm. A 3 mm of needle migration resulted in a decrease of 0.9, 1.7, 2.3, 4.8, and 7.6 equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions for dose levels of 6, 8.5, 10, 15, and 19 Gy, respectively. Substantial needle migration in high-dose-rate brachytherapy occurs frequently in 1-3 hours following needle insertion. A 3-mm threshold of needle migration is proposed, but 2 mm may be considered for dose levels ≥15 Gy. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Vitamins, metabolomics, and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondul, Alison M; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Albanes, Demetrius

    2017-06-01

    How micronutrients might influence risk of developing adenocarcinoma of the prostate has been the focus of a large body of research (especially regarding vitamins E, A, and D). Metabolomic profiling has the potential to discover molecular species relevant to prostate cancer etiology, early detection, and prevention, and may help elucidate the biologic mechanisms through which vitamins influence prostate cancer risk. Prostate cancer risk data related to vitamins E, A, and D and metabolomic profiling from clinical, cohort, and nested case-control studies, along with randomized controlled trials, are examined and summarized, along with recent metabolomic data of the vitamin phenotypes. Higher vitamin E serologic status is associated with lower prostate cancer risk, and vitamin E genetic variant data support this. By contrast, controlled vitamin E supplementation trials have had mixed results based on differing designs and dosages. Beta-carotene supplementation (in smokers) and higher circulating retinol and 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentrations appear related to elevated prostate cancer risk. Our prospective metabolomic profiling of fasting serum collected 1-20 years prior to clinical diagnoses found reduced lipid and energy/TCA cycle metabolites, including inositol-1-phosphate, lysolipids, alpha-ketoglutarate, and citrate, significantly associated with lower risk of aggressive disease. Several active leads exist regarding the role of micronutrients and metabolites in prostate cancer carcinogenesis and risk. How vitamins D and A may adversely impact risk, and whether low-dose vitamin E supplementation remains a viable preventive approach, require further study.

  8. Association of rectal toxicity with thermal dose parameters in treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer with radiation and hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurwitz, Mark D.; Kaplan, Irving D.; Hansen, Jorgen L.; Prokopios-Davos, Savina; Topulos, George P.; Wishnow, Kenneth; Manola, Judith; Bornstein, Bruce A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Although hyperthermia has been used for more than two decades in the treatment of pelvic tumors, little is known about the potential impact of heat on rectal toxicity when combined with other treatment modalities. Because rectal toxicity is a concern with radiation and may be exacerbated by hyperthermia, definition of the association of thermal dose parameters with rectal toxicity is important. In this report, we correlate rectal toxicity with thermal dose parameters for patients treated with hyperthermia and radiation for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with T2b-T3b disease (1992 American Joint Committee On Cancer criteria) enrolled in a Phase II study of external beam radiation ± androgen-suppressive therapy with two transrectal ultrasound hyperthermia treatments were assessed for rectal toxicity. Prostatic and anterior rectal wall temperatures were monitored for all treatments. Rectal wall temperatures were limited to 40 deg. C in 19 patients, 41 deg. C in 3 patients, and 42 deg. C in 8 patients. Logistic regression was used to estimate the log hazard of developing National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 2 toxicity based on temperature parameters. The following were calculated: hazard ratios, 95% confidence intervals, p values for statistical significance of each parameter, and proportion of variability explained for each parameter. Results: Gastrointestinal toxicity was limited to Grade 2. The rate of acute Grade 2 proctitis was greater for patients with an allowable rectal wall temperature of >40 deg. C. In this group, 7 of 11 patients experienced acute Grade 2 proctitis, as opposed to 3 of 19 patients in the group with rectal wall temperatures limited to 40 deg. C (p=0.004). Preliminary assessment of long-term toxicity revealed no differences in toxicity. Hazard ratios for acute Grade 2 proctitis for allowable rectal wall temperature, average rectal wall Tmax, and average prostate Tmax were 9.33 (p=0.01), 3

  9. High-dose-rate brachytherapy as salvage modality for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy. A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatzikonstantinou, Georgios; Zamboglou, Nikolaos; Roedel, Claus; Tselis, Nikolaos [J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Zoga, Eleni [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Offenbach am Main (Germany); Strouthos, Iosif [Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University of Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany); Butt, Saeed Ahmed [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Offenbach am Main (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    To review the current status of interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy as a salvage modality (sHDR BRT) for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy (RT). A literature search was performed in PubMed using ''high-dose-rate, brachytherapy, prostate cancer, salvage'' as search terms. In all, 51 search results published between 2000 and 2016 were identified. Data tables were generated and summary descriptions created. The main outcome parameters used were biochemical control (BC) and toxicity scores. Eleven publications reported clinical outcome and toxicity with follow-up ranging from 4-191 months. A variety of dose and fractionation schedules were described, including 19.0 Gy in 2 fractions up to 42.0 Gy in 6 fractions. The 5-year BC ranged from 18-77%. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 0-32% and 0-5.1%, respectively. sHDR BRT appears as safe and effective salvage modality for the reirradiation of locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive RT. (orig.) [German] Zusammenfassende Darstellung relevanter Literatur zur interstitiellen High-Dose-Rate-Brachytherapie als Salvage-Modalitaet (sHDR-BRT) bei der Behandlung des lokal rezidivierten Prostatakarzinoms nach vorausgegangener definitiver Radiotherapie (RT). In der PubMed-Datenbank wurde eine Literaturrecherche mit den Suchbegriffen ''high-dose-rate, brachytherapy, prostate cancer, salvage'' durchgefuehrt. Zwischen den Jahren 2000 und 2016 wurden 51 Publikationen identifiziert. Die biochemische Kontrolle (BC) sowie das assoziierte Toxizitaetsprofil waren onkologische Hauptpunkte in der Analyse der beruecksichtigten Literatur. Von onkologischen Ergebnissen und Toxizitaeten berichteten 11 Publikationen bei einer medianen Nachbeobachtungszeit von 4-191 Monaten. Eine Variabilitaet von Dosis- und Fraktionierungsregimen wurde beschrieben mit totalen physikalischen Dosen von 19,0 Gy in 2 Fraktionen bis zu 42,0 Gy in 6 Fraktionen

  10. Radical prostatectomy vs high-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Health-related quality-of-life effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Yoshimasa; Fujisawa, Masato

    2004-01-01

    A screening comparison was made of health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) outcomes between two primary treatment modalities for localized prostate cancer: radical prostatectomy (RP) and iridium-192 (Ir-192) high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) followed by external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The subjects were 182 patients diagnosed with T1c to T3bN0M0 prostate cancer between October 1997 through August 2002 who underwent RP (n=89) or HDR-BT with 36.8 Gy of EBRT (n=93) and follow-up for at least 6 months. A postal survey was sent, in which HRQOL was assessed using the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and disease-specific QOL using the University of California Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index (UCLA-PCI). We obtained responses to questionnaires from 151 out of 182 patients (83.0%; RP, 78.7%, HDR-BT, 87.1%). No significant difference was observed in SF-36 scale scores between RP and HDR-BT. In the UCLA-PCI, the HDR-BT group had better urinary function (UF, p<0.001) and sexual function (SF, p=0.0272), whereas the RP group had better bowel bother (BB, p=0.0425). In patients with at least 2 years of follow-up, UF (p<0.001) and sexual bother (SB, p=0.0286) were better for the HDR-BT group than for the RP group. HDR-BT patients had significantly better UF (p=0.009) and SB (p=0.0134) than even patients with uni-lateral nerve-sparing RP (n=30). When planning treatment, QOL concerns including mental health issues associated with prostate cancer need to be addressed with the patients, as well as the potential side effects. (author)

  11. Subgroup analysis of patients with localized prostate cancer treated within the Dutch-randomized dose escalation trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Levendag, Peter C.; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of dose escalation within prognostic risk groups in prostate cancer. Patients and methods: Between 1997 and 2003, 664 patients with localized prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive 68- or 78-Gy of radiotherapy. Two prognostic models were examined: a risk group model (low-, intermediate-, and high-risk) and PSA-level groupings. High-risk patients with hormonal therapy (HT) were analyzed separately. Outcome variable was freedom from failure (FFF) (clinical failure or PSA nadir + 2 μg/L). Results: In relation to the advantage of high-dose radiotherapy, intermediate-risk patients benefited most from dose escalation. However no significant heterogeneity could be demonstrated between the risk groups. For two types of PSA-level groupings: PSA 8 μg/L, the test for heterogeneity was significant (p = 0.03 and 0.05, respectively). Patients with PSA 8-18 μg/L (n = 297, HR = 0.59) derived the greatest benefit from dose escalation. No heterogeneity could be demonstrated for high-risk patients with and without HT. Conclusion: Intermediate-risk group derived the greatest benefit for dose escalation. However, from this trial no indication was found to exclude low-risk or high-risk patients from high-dose radiotherapy. Patients could be selected for high-dose radiotherapy based on PSA-level groupings: for patients with a PSA < 8 μg/L high-dose radiotherapy is probably not indicated, but should be confirmed in other randomized studies.

  12. Impact of learning curve and technical changes on dosimetry in low-dose brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Fur, E. [CHU Brest (France). Radiation Therapy Dept.; Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France). Faculte de Medecine et des Sciences de la Sante; Malhaire, J.P.; Baverez, D.; Schlurmann, F. [CHU Brest (France). Radiation Therapy Dept.; Delage, F.; Perrouin-Verbe, M.A. [CHU Brest (France). Urology Dept.; Guerif, S. [University Hospital La Miletrie, Poitiers (France). Radiation Therapy Dept.; Poitiers Univ. (France); Fournier, G.; Valeri, A. [CHU Brest (France). Urology Dept.; Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France). Faculte de Medecine et des Sciences de la Sante; Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, Rennes (France); APHP, Hopital Tenon, Paris (France). CeRe.PP; Pradier, O. [CHU Brest (France). Radiation Therapy Dept.; Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France). Faculte de Medecine et des Sciences de la Sante; Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, Rennes (France); CHU Brest (France). LaTIM, INSERM U650

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To assess the impact of experience and technical changes on peri- and postimplantation (1 month later) dosimetry for permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB). Patients and methods: From July 2003 to May 2010, 150 prostate cancer patients underwent low-dose, loose-seed I{sup 125} PPB as monotherapy with intraoperative planning. Patients were divided into three groups - P1 (n = 64), P2 (n = 45), P3 (n = 41) - according to the technical changes that occurred during the study period: use of an automatic stepper at the beginning of P2 and a high-frequency ultrasound probe in P3. Peri- and postimplantation dosimetric parameters (on day 30) were reported: D90 (dose received by 90% of prostate volume), V100 and V150 (prostate volume receiving, respectively, 100% and 150% of the prescribed dose), D2 cc and D0.1 cc (doses received by 2 cc and 0.1 cc of the rectum), R100 (rectum volume that received 100% of the prescribed dose), and D10 and D30 (doses received by 10% and 30% of the urethra, only during peri-implantation). Results: We observed a decrease in the number of needles and seeds used over time. The mean peri-implantation D90 was 187.52 Gy without a significant difference between the three periods (p = 0.48). The postimplantation D90, V100, and V150 parameters were, respectively, 168.3 Gy, 91.9%, and 55% with no significant difference between the three periods. The peri-implantation and postimplantation D0.1 cc and R100 significantly decreased over time; on day 30: D0.1 cc P1 = 223.1 Gy vs. D0.1 cc P3 = 190.4 Gy (p = 8.10- 5) and R100 P1 = 1.06 cc vs. R100 P3 = 0.53 cc (p = 0.0008). Conclusion: We observed a learning curve for the implantation parameters, which led to a significant decrease in the rectal doses without having any impact on the prostate dosimetric parameters. (orig.)

  13. Impact of learning curve and technical changes on dosimetry in low-dose brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Fur, E.; Fournier, G.; Valeri, A.; Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest; Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, Rennes; APHP, Hopital Tenon, Paris; Pradier, O.; Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest; Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, Rennes; CHU Brest

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of experience and technical changes on peri- and postimplantation (1 month later) dosimetry for permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB). Patients and methods: From July 2003 to May 2010, 150 prostate cancer patients underwent low-dose, loose-seed I 125 PPB as monotherapy with intraoperative planning. Patients were divided into three groups - P1 (n = 64), P2 (n = 45), P3 (n = 41) - according to the technical changes that occurred during the study period: use of an automatic stepper at the beginning of P2 and a high-frequency ultrasound probe in P3. Peri- and postimplantation dosimetric parameters (on day 30) were reported: D90 (dose received by 90% of prostate volume), V100 and V150 (prostate volume receiving, respectively, 100% and 150% of the prescribed dose), D2 cc and D0.1 cc (doses received by 2 cc and 0.1 cc of the rectum), R100 (rectum volume that received 100% of the prescribed dose), and D10 and D30 (doses received by 10% and 30% of the urethra, only during peri-implantation). Results: We observed a decrease in the number of needles and seeds used over time. The mean peri-implantation D90 was 187.52 Gy without a significant difference between the three periods (p = 0.48). The postimplantation D90, V100, and V150 parameters were, respectively, 168.3 Gy, 91.9%, and 55% with no significant difference between the three periods. The peri-implantation and postimplantation D0.1 cc and R100 significantly decreased over time; on day 30: D0.1 cc P1 = 223.1 Gy vs. D0.1 cc P3 = 190.4 Gy (p = 8.10- 5) and R100 P1 = 1.06 cc vs. R100 P3 = 0.53 cc (p = 0.0008). Conclusion: We observed a learning curve for the implantation parameters, which led to a significant decrease in the rectal doses without having any impact on the prostate dosimetric parameters. (orig.)

  14. Dose delivered from Varian's CBCT to patients receiving IMRT for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Ning; Guan Huaiqun; Hammoud, Rabih; Pradhan, Deepak; Nurushev, T; Li Shidong; Movsas, Benjamin [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2007-04-21

    With the increased use of cone beam CT (CBCT) for daily patient setup, the accumulated dose from CBCT may be significantly higher than that from simulation CT or portal imaging. The objective of this work is to measure the dose from daily pelvic scans with fixed technical settings and collimations. CBCT scans were acquired in half-fan mode using a half bowtie and x-rays were delivered in pulsed-fluoro mode. The skin doses for seven prostate patients were measured on an IRB-approved protocol. TLD capsules were placed on the patient's skin at the central axis of three beams: AP, left lateral (Lt Lat) and right lateral (Rt Lat). To avoid the ring artefacts centred in the prostate, the treatment couch was dropped 3 cm from the patient's tattoo (central axis). The measured AP skin doses ranged 3-6 cGy for 20-33 cm separation. The larger the patient size the less the AP skin dose. Lateral doses did not change much with patient size. The Lt Lat dose was {approx}4.0 cGy, which was {approx}40% higher than the Rt Lat dose of {approx}2.6 cGy. To verify this dose asymmetry, surface doses on an IMRT QA phantom (oval shaped, 30 cm x 20 cm) were measured at the same three sites using TLD capsules with 3 cm table-drop. The dose asymmetry was due to: (1) kV source rotation which always starts from the patient's Lt Lat and ends at Lt Lat. Gantry rotation gets much slower near the end of rotation but dose rate stays constant and (2) 370{sup 0} scan rotation (10{sup 0} scan overlap on the Lt Lat side). In vivo doses were measured inside a Rando pelvic heterogeneous phantom using TLDs. The left hip (femoral head and neck) received the highest doses of {approx}10-11 cGy while the right hip received {approx}6-7 cGy. The surface and in vivo doses were also measured for phantoms at the central-axis setup. The difference was less than {approx}12% to the table-drop setup.

  15. Dose delivered from Varian's CBCT to patients receiving IMRT for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Ning; Guan Huaiqun; Hammoud, Rabih; Pradhan, Deepak; Nurushev, T; Li Shidong; Movsas, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    With the increased use of cone beam CT (CBCT) for daily patient setup, the accumulated dose from CBCT may be significantly higher than that from simulation CT or portal imaging. The objective of this work is to measure the dose from daily pelvic scans with fixed technical settings and collimations. CBCT scans were acquired in half-fan mode using a half bowtie and x-rays were delivered in pulsed-fluoro mode. The skin doses for seven prostate patients were measured on an IRB-approved protocol. TLD capsules were placed on the patient's skin at the central axis of three beams: AP, left lateral (Lt Lat) and right lateral (Rt Lat). To avoid the ring artefacts centred in the prostate, the treatment couch was dropped 3 cm from the patient's tattoo (central axis). The measured AP skin doses ranged 3-6 cGy for 20-33 cm separation. The larger the patient size the less the AP skin dose. Lateral doses did not change much with patient size. The Lt Lat dose was ∼4.0 cGy, which was ∼40% higher than the Rt Lat dose of ∼2.6 cGy. To verify this dose asymmetry, surface doses on an IMRT QA phantom (oval shaped, 30 cm x 20 cm) were measured at the same three sites using TLD capsules with 3 cm table-drop. The dose asymmetry was due to: (1) kV source rotation which always starts from the patient's Lt Lat and ends at Lt Lat. Gantry rotation gets much slower near the end of rotation but dose rate stays constant and (2) 370 0 scan rotation (10 0 scan overlap on the Lt Lat side). In vivo doses were measured inside a Rando pelvic heterogeneous phantom using TLDs. The left hip (femoral head and neck) received the highest doses of ∼10-11 cGy while the right hip received ∼6-7 cGy. The surface and in vivo doses were also measured for phantoms at the central-axis setup. The difference was less than ∼12% to the table-drop setup

  16. Can we avoid dose escalation for intermediate-risk prostate cancer in the setting of short-course neoadjuvant androgen deprivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, Thomas P; Wilcox, Shea W; Aherne, Noel J

    2016-01-01

    Both dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy (DE-EBRT) and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) improve the outcomes in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Despite this, there are only few reports evaluating DE-EBRT for patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer receiving neoadjuvant ADT, and virtually no studies investigating dose escalation >74 Gy in this setting. We aimed to determine whether DE-EBRT >74 Gy improved the outcomes for patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer who received neoadjuvant ADT. In our institution, patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were treated with neoadjuvant ADT and DE-EBRT, with doses sequentially increasing from 74 Gy to 76 Gy and then to 78 Gy between 2006 and 2012. We identified 435 patients treated with DE-EBRT and ADT, with a median follow-up of 70 months. For the 74 Gy, 76 Gy, and 78 Gy groups, five-year biochemical disease-free survival rates were 95.0%, 97.8%, and 95.3%, respectively; metastasis-free survival rates were 99.1%, 100.0%, and 98.6%, respectively; and prostate cancer-specific survival rate was 100% for all three dose levels. There was no significant benefit for dose escalation either on univariate or multivariate analysis for any outcome. There was no benefit for DE-EBRT >74 Gy in our cohort of intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant ADT. Given the higher risks of toxicity associated with dose escalation, it may be feasible to omit dose escalation in this group of patients. Randomized studies evaluating dose de-escalation should be considered.

  17. Examining Margin Reduction and Its Impact on Dose Distribution for Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Daily Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammoud, Rabih; Patel, Samir H.; Pradhan, Deepak; Kim, Jinkoo; Guan, Harrison; Li Shidong; Movsas, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the dosimetric impact of margin reduction and quantify residual error after three-dimensional (3D) image registration using daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: One hundred forty CBCTs from 5 prostate cancer patients were examined. Two intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans were generated on CT simulation on the basis of two planning target volume (PTV) margins: 10 mm all around the prostate and seminal vesicles except 6 mm posteriorly (10/6) and 5 mm all around except 3 mm posteriorly (5/3). Daily CBCT using the Varian On-Board Imaging System was acquired. The 10/6 and 5/3 simulation plans were overlaid onto each CBCT, and each CBCT plan was calculated. To examine residual error, PlanCT/CBCT intensity-based 3D image registration was performed for prostate localization using center of mass and maximal border displacement. Results: Prostate coverage was within 2% between the 10/6 and 5/3 plans. Seminal vesicle coverage was reduced with the 5/3 plan compared with the 10/6 plan, with coverage difference within 7%. The 5/3 plan allowed 30-50% sparing of bladder and rectal high-dose regions. For residual error quantification, center of mass data show that 99%, 93%, and 96% of observations fall within 3 mm in the left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions, respectively. Maximal border displacement observations range from 79% to 99%, within 5 mm for all directions. Conclusion: Cone-beam CT dosimetrically validated a 10/6 margin when soft-tissue localization is not used. Intensity-based 3D image registration has the potential to improve target localization and to provide guidelines for margin definition

  18. Prediction of the cumulated dose for external beam irradiation of prostate cancer patients with 3D-CRT technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giżyńska Marta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays in radiotherapy, much effort is taken to minimize the irradiated volume and consequently minimize doses to healthy tissues. In our work, we tested the hypothesis that the mean dose distribution calculated from a few first fractions can serve as prediction of the cumulated dose distribution, representing the whole treatment. We made our tests for 25 prostate cancer patients treated with three orthogonal fields technique. We did a comparison of dose distribution calculated as a sum of dose distribution from each fraction with a dose distribution calculated with isocenter shifted for a mean setup error from a few first fractions. The cumulative dose distribution and predicted dose distributions are similar in terms of gamma (3 mm 3% analysis, under condition that we know setup error from seven first fractions. We showed that the dose distribution calculated for the original plan with the isocenter shifted to the point, defined as the original isocenter corrected of the mean setup error estimated from the first seven fractions supports our hypothesis, i.e. can serve as a prediction for cumulative dose distribution.

  19. Patient-reported urinary incontinence after radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Quantifying the dose-effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzarini, Cesare; Rancati, Tiziana; Palorini, Federica; Avuzzi, Barbara; Garibaldi, Elisabetta; Balestrini, Damiano; Cante, Domenico; Munoz, Fernando; Franco, Pierfrancesco; Girelli, Giuseppe; Sini, Carla; Vavassori, Vittorio; Valdagni, Riccardo; Fiorino, Claudio

    2017-10-01

    Urinary incontinence following radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer (PCa) has a relevant impact on patient's quality of life. The aim of the study was to assess the unknown dose-effect relationship for late patient-reported urinary incontinence (LPRUI). Patients were enrolled within the multi-centric study DUE01. Clinical and dosimetry data including the prescribed 2Gy equivalent dose (EQD2) were prospectively collected. LPRUI was evaluated through the ICIQ-SF questionnaire filled in by the patients at RT start/end and therefore every 6months. Patients were treated with conventional (74-80Gy, 1.8-2Gy/fr) or moderately hypo-fractionated RT (65-75.2Gy, 2.2-2.7Gy/fr) in 5 fractions/week with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Six different end-points of 3-year LPRUI, including or not patient's perception (respectively, subjective and objective end-points), were considered. Multivariable logistic models were developed for each end-point. Data of 298 patients were analyzed. The incidence of the most severe end-point (ICIQ-SF>12) was 5.1%. EQD2 calculated with alpha-beta=0.8Gy showed the best performance in fitting data: the risk of LPRUI markedly increased for EQD2>80Gy. Previous abdominal/pelvic surgery and previous TURP were the clinical factors more significantly predictive of LPRUI. Models showed excellent performances in terms of goodness-of-fit and calibration, confirmed by bootstrap-based internal validation. When included in the analyses, baseline symptoms were a major predictor for 5 out of six end-points. LPRUI after RT for PCa dramatically depends on EQD2 and few clinical factors. Results are consistent with a larger than expected impact of moderate hypo-fractionation on the risk of LPRUI. As expected, baseline symptoms, as captured by ICIQ-SF, are associated to an increased risk of LPRUI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: rigid compliance to dose-volume constraints as a warranty of acceptable toxicity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Michael J; Nadalin, Wladmir; Weltman, Eduardo; Hanriot, Rodrigo M; Luz, Fábio P; Cecílio, Paulo J; Cruz, José C da; Moreira, Frederico R; Santos, Adriana S; Martins, Lidiane C

    2007-01-01

    To report the toxicity after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for patients with localized prostate cancer, as a sole treatment or after radical prostatectomy. Between August 2001 and December 2003, 132 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IMRT and 125 were evaluable to acute and late toxicity analysis, after a minimum follow-up time of one year. Clinical and treatment data, including normal tissue dose-volume histogram (DVH) constraints, were reviewed. Gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) signs and symptoms were evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scales. Median prescribed dose was 76 Gy. Median follow-up time was of 26.1 months. From the 125 patients, 73 (58.4%) presented acute Grade 1 or Grade 2 GI and 97 (77.2%) presented acute Grade 1 or Grade 2 GU toxicity. Grade 3 GI acute toxicity occurred in only 2 patients (1.6%) and Grade 3 GU acute toxicity in only 3 patients (2.4%). Regarding Grade 1 and 2 late toxicity, 26 patients (20.8%) and 21 patients (16.8%) presented GI and GU toxicity, respectively. Grade 2 GI late toxicity occurred in 6 patients (4.8%) and Grade 2 GU late toxicity in 4 patients (3.2%). None patient presented any Grade 3 or higher late toxicity. Non-conformity to DVH constraints occurred in only 11.2% of treatment plans. On univariate analysis, no significant risk factor was identified for Grade 2 GI late toxicity, but mean dose delivered to the PTV was associated to higher Grade 2 GU late toxicity (p = 0.042). IMRT is a well tolerable technique for routine treatment of localized prostate cancer, with short and medium-term acceptable toxicity profiles. According to the data presented here, rigid compliance to DHV constraints might prevent higher incidences of normal tissue complication

  1. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, high-dose rate brachytherapy, and low-dose rate permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ruijie, E-mail: ruijyang@yahoo.com; Zhao, Nan; Liao, Anyan; Wang, Hao; Qu, Ang

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, and low-dose rate (LDR) permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer. A total of 10 patients with localized prostate cancer were selected for this study. VMAT, HDR brachytherapy, and LDR permanent seeds implant plans were created for each patient. For VMAT, planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the clinical target volume plus a margin of 5 mm. Rectum, bladder, urethra, and femoral heads were considered as organs at risk. A 78 Gy in 39 fractions were prescribed for PTV. For HDR and LDR plans, the dose prescription was D{sub 90} of 34 Gy in 8.5 Gy per fraction, and 145 Gy to clinical target volume, respectively. The dose and dose volume parameters were evaluated for target, organs at risk, and normal tissue. Physical dose was converted to dose based on 2-Gy fractions (equivalent dose in 2 Gy per fraction, EQD{sub 2}) for comparison of 3 techniques. HDR and LDR significantly reduced the dose to rectum and bladder compared with VMAT. The D{sub mean} (EQD{sub 2}) of rectum decreased 22.36 Gy in HDR and 17.01 Gy in LDR from 30.24 Gy in VMAT, respectively. The D{sub mean} (EQD{sub 2}) of bladder decreased 6.91 Gy in HDR and 2.53 Gy in LDR from 13.46 Gy in VMAT. For the femoral heads and normal tissue, the mean doses were also significantly reduced in both HDR and LDR compared with VMAT. For the urethra, the mean dose (EQD{sub 2}) was 80.26, 70.23, and 104.91 Gy in VMAT, HDR, and LDR brachytherapy, respectively. For localized prostate cancer, both HDR and LDR brachytherapy were clearly superior in the sparing of rectum, bladder, femoral heads, and normal tissue compared with VMAT. HDR provided the advantage in sparing of urethra compared with VMAT and LDR.

  2. [Epigenetics of prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiao-Ming; Zhou, Wen-Quan

    2010-07-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in males, and its etiology and pathogenesis remain unclear. Epigenesis is involved in prostate cancer at all stages of the process, and closely related with its growth and metastasis. DNA methylation and histone modification are the most important manifestations of epigenetics in prostate cancer. The mechanisms of carcinogenesis of DNA methylation include whole-genome hypomethylation, aberrant local hypermethylation of promoters and genomic instability. DNA methylation is closely related to the process of prostate cancer, as in DNA damage repair, hormone response, tumor cell invasion/metastasis, cell cycle regulation, and so on. Histone modification causes corresponding changes in chromosome structure and the level of gene transcription, and it may affect the cycle, differentiation and apoptosis of cells, resulting in prostate cancer. Some therapies have been developed targeting the epigenetic changes in prostate cancer, including DNA methyltransferases and histone deacetylase inhibitors, and have achieved certain desirable results.

  3. Peripheral photon and neutron doses from prostate cancer external beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezak, Eva; Takam, Rundgham; Marcu, Loredana G

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral photon and neutron doses from external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) are associated with increased risk of carcinogenesis in the out-of-field organs; thus, dose estimations of secondary radiation are imperative. Peripheral photon and neutron doses from EBRT of prostate carcinoma were measured in Rando phantom. (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P and (7)LiF:Mg,Cu,P glass-rod thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) were inserted in slices of a Rando phantom followed by exposure to 80 Gy with 18-MV photon four-field 3D-CRT technique. The TLDs were calibrated using 6- and 18-MV X-ray beam. Neutron dose equivalents measured with CR-39 etch-track detectors were used to derive readout-to-neutron dose conversion factor for (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs. Average neutron dose equivalents per 1 Gy of isocentre dose were 3.8±0.9 mSv Gy(-1) for thyroid and 7.0±5.4 mSv Gy(-1) for colon. For photons, the average dose equivalents per 1 Gy of isocentre dose were 0.2±0.1 mSv Gy(-1) for thyroid and 8.1±9.7 mSv Gy(-1) for colon. Paired (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P and (7)LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs can be used to measure photon and neutron doses simultaneously. Organs in close proximity to target received larger doses from photons than those from neutrons whereas distally located organs received higher neutron versus photon dose. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Bladder dose accumulation based on a biomechanical deformable image registration algorithm in volumetric modulated arc therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, E S; Muren, L P; Thor, M; Petersen, J B; Tanderup, K; Sørensen, T S; Noe, K Ø; Høyer, M; Bentzen, L

    2012-01-01

    Variations in bladder position, shape and volume cause uncertainties in the doses delivered to this organ during a course of radiotherapy for pelvic tumors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of dose accumulation based on repeat imaging and deformable image registration (DIR) to improve the accuracy of bladder dose assessment. For each of nine prostate cancer patients, the initial treatment plan was re-calculated on eight to nine repeat computed tomography (CT) scans. The planned bladder dose–volume histogram (DVH) parameters were compared to corresponding parameters derived from DIR-based accumulations as well as DVH summation based on dose re-calculations. It was found that the deviations between the DIR-based accumulations and the planned treatment were substantial and ranged (−0.5–2.3) Gy and (−9.4–13.5) Gy for D 2% and D mean , respectively, whereas the deviations between DIR-based accumulations and DVH summation were small and well within 1 Gy. For the investigated treatment scenario, DIR-based bladder dose accumulation did not result in substantial improvement of dose estimation as compared to the straightforward DVH summation. Large variations were found in individual patients between the doses from the initial treatment plan and the accumulated bladder doses. Hence, the use of repeat imaging has a potential for improved accuracy in treatment dose reporting. (paper)

  5. High-dose-rate brachytherapy with two or three fractions as monotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskin, Peter; Rojas, Ana; Ostler, Peter; Hughes, Robert; Alonzi, Roberto; Lowe, Gerry; Bryant, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Background: To evaluate late urinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events (AEs) and biochemical control of disease after high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in locally advanced prostate cancer. Patients and methods: 227 consecutive patients were treated with 3 × 10.5 Gy (n = 109) or 2 × 13 Gy (n = 118) HDR-BT alone. Biochemical failure was assessed using the Phoenix definition of PSA nadir + 2 μg/l and late AEs using the RTOG scoring system and the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). Results: Kaplan–Meier estimates and prevalence of late events indicate that urinary, bowel and IPSS symptoms are higher after 31.5 Gy than after 26 Gy, however differences are significant only for Grade 1 and 2 urinary toxicity. Kaplan–Meier estimates of morbidity are consistently and considerably higher than time-point estimates of prevalence; which reflects the transient nature of most symptoms. At 3 years 93% and 97% of patients treated with 26 and 31.5 Gy, respectively, were free from biochemical relapse (p = 0.5) and 91% for the latter regimen at 5 years. In univariate and multivariate analysis risk-category was the only significant predictor of relapse (p < 0.03). Conclusion: These HDR-BT schedules achieved high levels of biochemical control of disease in patients with advanced prostate cancer with few severe complications seen throughout the first 3 years

  6. On cribriform prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kweldam, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    markdownabstractThis general aim of the thesis is to study the clinical relevance, interobserver reproducibility, and genetics of cribriform growth in prostate cancer. More specifically, the aims and outline of this thesis are • To study the metastatic potential of modified Gleason score 3+3 prostate cancer in radical prostatectomies. (Chapter 2) • To examine the prognostic value of individual Gleason grade 4 patterns in prostate cancer in radical prostatectomy and diagnostic biopsy specimens...

  7. SU-E-T-34: An in Vivo Study On Pulsed Low Dose-Rate Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, B; Cvetkovic, D; Chen, L; Ma, C; Chen, X; Zhang, P; Zhang, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Re-irradiation with conventional radiotherapy techniques (CRT) may pose significant risks due to high accumulative radiation doses. Pulsed low dose-rate radiotherapy (PLDR) has been used in clinical trials for recurrent cancer treatment. In our previous studies, PLDR irradiation showed significantly lower toxicity than CRT, resulting in much longer survival of mice after PLDR total body irradiation (TBI) than conventional TBI. The purpose of this study was to investigate tumor control efficacy of PLDR treatment for prostate cancer with an animal model of prostate cancer LNCaP. Methods: We used an orthotopic murine model of LNCaP cell line for this study. LNCaP cells were implanted into immune-suppressed male nude mice via surgery. We monitored the tumor growth with MRI. The tumor-bearing mice were allocated into a PLDR(n=9), CRT(n=7), and control group(n=7) randomly. The mice in the PLDR and CRT groups were irradiated with 2Gy dose for one time. For the CRT treatment, the mice received 2Gy at a dose-rate of 300 MU/minute. For the PLDR treatment, the 2Gy dose was further divided into ten pulses of 0.2Gy at the same dose-rate with an interval of 3 minutes between the pulses. Results: Sizable tumor growth delays were observed for the PLDR and CRT groups through weekly MRI scans. The mean values of the normalized tumor volumes (± standard deviation of the mean) were 1.53±0.07, 1.53±0.14, and 1.81±0.09 at one week after treatment, 2.28±0.13, 2.19±0.16, and 3.04±0.25 at two weeks after treatment, and 3.31±0.23, 3.14±0.24 and 4.62±0.49 at three weeks after treatment, for the PLDR, CRT, and control groups, respectively. Conclusion: The PLDR and CRT treatments showed comparable tumor control rates in this study. Our in vivo results indicate that PLDR may be a viable option for treating recurrent prostate cancer due to its equivalent tumor control but low normal tissue toxocities

  8. External beam radiotherapy dose response characteristics of 1127 men with prostate cancer treated in the PSA era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollack, Alan; Smith, Lewis G.; Eschenbach, Andrew C. von

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the relationship of radiotherapy dose to prostate cancer patient outcome, with an emphasis on the influence of pretreatment prognostic variables. Methods and Materials: The 1127 Stage T1-T4 prostate cancer patients examined were treated consecutively with definitive external beam radiotherapy at the University of Texas-M.D. Anderson Cancer Center from 1987 to 1997. All had a pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. Treatment failure was defined as two consecutive PSA elevations on follow-up. There were 994 patients treated with a four-field box throughout to 60-70 Gy after a small reduction at 46 Gy and 161 treated with a six-field conformal boost after 46 Gy to 74-78 Gy. No patient received neoadjuvant or adjuvant androgen ablation. Median follow-up was 51.8 months. Results: Patients were divided into three radiotherapy dose groups consisting of ≤67 Gy (n = 500), >67-77 Gy (n = 495), and >77 Gy (n = 132). Relative to other prognostic factors, there were fewer patients treated to the highest dose level with a pretreatment PSA (PSAB) ≤4 or >20 ng/ml, Stage T3/T4 disease, or a Gleason score of 2-6. Actuarial 4-year freedom from biochemical failure (bNED) rates for the entire cohort were 54%, 71%, and 77% (p 67-77 Gy was associated with improved bNED rates for all PSAB (≤10 and >10), stage (T1/T2 and T3/T4), and Gleason score (2-6 and 7-10) subgroups tested. In contrast, the only prognostic group that benefited from raising dose from >67-77 Gy to >77 Gy was patients with a PSAB >10 ng/ml; although trends were noted for Stage T1/T2 and Gleason 2-6 patients. Patients with the combined features of a PSAB >10 ng/ml and Stage T1/T2 disease had 4-year bNED rates of 61% and 93% at the intermediate- and high-dose levels. A strongly significant linear association between dose (60-78 Gy) and 4-year actuarial bNED was demonstrated for patients with these intermediate-risk features. Conclusion: Prostate cancer dose response to external

  9. Dose-response characteristics of low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Rex; Tucker, Susan L.; Lee, Andrew K.; Crevoisier, Renaud de; Dong Lei; Kamat, Ashish; Pisters, Louis; Kuban, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: In this era of dose escalation, the benefit of higher radiation doses for low-risk prostate cancer remains controversial. For intermediate-risk patients, the data suggest a benefit from higher doses. However, the quantitative characterization of the benefit for these patients is scarce. We investigated the radiation dose-response relation of tumor control probability in low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy alone. We also investigated the differences in the dose-response characteristics using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) definition vs. an alternative biochemical failure definition. Methods and materials: This study included 235 low-risk and 387 intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with external beam radiotherapy without hormonal treatment between 1987 and 1998. The low-risk patients had 1992 American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage T2a or less disease as determined by digital rectal examination, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels of ≤10 ng/mL, and biopsy Gleason scores of ≤6. The intermediate-risk patients had one or more of the following: Stage T2b-c, PSA level of ≤20 ng/mL but >10 ng/mL, and/or Gleason score of 7, without any of the following high-risk features: Stage T3 or greater, PSA >20 ng/mL, or Gleason score ≥8. The logistic models were fitted to the data at varying points after treatment, and the dose-response parameters were estimated. We used two biochemical failure definitions. The ASTRO PSA failure was defined as three consecutive PSA rises, with the time to failure backdated to the mid-point between the nadir and the first rise. The second biochemical failure definition used was a PSA rise of ≥2 ng/mL above the current PSA nadir (CN + 2). The failure date was defined as the time at which the event occurred. Local, nodal, and distant relapses and the use of salvage hormonal therapy were also failures. Results: On the basis of the

  10. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for low- and low-intermediate risk prostate cancer: Is there a dose effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Jay Katz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the efficacy and toxicity of two stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT dose regimens for treatment of early prostate cancer. Forty-one patients treated with 35 Gy were matched with 41 patients treated with 36.25 Gy. Both patient groups received SBRT in 5 fractions over 5 consecutive days using the CyberKnife. Each group had 37 low-risk patients and 4 intermediate-risk patients. No statistically significant differences were present for age, prostate volume, PSA, Gleason score, stage, or risk between the groups. The dose was prescribed to the 83-87% isodose line to cover the prostate and a 5-mm margin all around, except 3 mm posteriorly. The overall median follow-up is 51 months (range, 45-58 months with a median 54 months and 48 months follow-up for the 35-Gy and 36.25-Gy dose groups, respectively. One biochemical failure occurred in each group yielding a 97.5% freedom from biochemical failure. The PSA response has been favorable for all patients with a mean PSA of 0.1 ng/ml at 4-years. Overall toxicity has been mild with 5% late grade 2 rectal toxicity in both dose groups. Late grade 1 urinary toxicity was equivalent between groups; grade 2 urinary toxicity was 5% (2/41 patients and 10% (4/41 patients in the 35-Gy and 36.25-Gy dose groups (p = 0.6969, respectively. Overall, the highly favorable PSA response, limited biochemical failures, limited toxicity, and limited impact on quality of life in these low- to low-intermediate-risk patients are supportive of excellent long-term results for CyberKnife delivered SBRT.

  11. Salvage Radiation Therapy Dose Response for Biochemical Failure of Prostate Cancer After Prostatectomy—A Multi-Institutional Observational Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisansky, Thomas M., E-mail: pisansky.thomas@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Agrawal, Shree [Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Koontz, Bridget F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Liauw, Stanley L. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Abramowitz, Matthew C.; Pollack, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Anscher, Mitchell S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Moghanaki, Drew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Hunter Holmes McGuire Veterans Administration Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Den, Robert B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Stephans, Kevin L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Zietman, Anthony L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kattan, Michael W. [Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); and others

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether a dose-response relationship exists for salvage radiation therapy (RT) of biochemical failure after prostatectomy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Individual data from 1108 patients who underwent salvage RT at 10 academic centers were pooled. The cohort was enriched for selection criteria more likely associated with tumor recurrence in the prostate bed (margin positive and pre-RT prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level of ≤2.0 ng/mL) and without the confounding of planned androgen suppression. The cumulative incidence of biochemical failure and distant metastasis over time was computed, and competing risks hazard regression models were used to investigate the association between potential predictors and these outcomes. The association of radiation dose with outcomes was the primary focus. Results: With a 65.2-month follow-up duration, the 5- and 10-year estimates of freedom from post-RT biochemical failure (PSA level >0.2 ng/mL and rising) was 63.5% and 49.8%, respectively, and the cumulative incidence of distant metastasis was 12.4% by 10 years. A Gleason score of ≥7, higher pre-RT PSA level, extraprostatic tumor extension, and seminal vesicle invasion were associated with worse biochemical failure and distant metastasis outcomes. A salvage radiation dose of ≥66.0 Gy was associated with a reduced cumulative incidence of biochemical failure, but not of distant metastasis. Conclusions: The use of salvage radiation doses of ≥66.0 Gy are supported by evidence presented in the present multicenter pooled analysis of individual patient data. The observational reporting method, limited sample size, few distant metastasis events, modest follow-up duration, and elective use of salvage therapy might have diminished the opportunity to identify an association between the radiation dose and this endpoint.

  12. The role and strategy of IMRT in radiotherapy of pelvic tumors: Dose escalation and critical organ sparing in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.-M.; Shiau, C.-Y.; Lee, M.-L.; Huang, P.-I.; Hsieh, C.-M.; Chen, P.-H.; Lin, Y.-H.; Wang, L.-W.; Yen, S.-H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) strategy in dose escalation of prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Plan dosimetric data of 10 prostate cancer patients were compared with two-dimensional (2D) or IMRT techniques for pelvis (two-dimensional whole pelvic radiation therapy [2D-WPRT] or IM-WPRT) to receive 50 Gy or 54 Gy and additional prostate boost by three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or IMRT (3D-PBRT or IM-PBRT) techniques up to 72 Gy or 78 Gy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs), normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) of critical organ, and conformity of target volume in various combinations were calculated. Results: In DVH analysis, the plans with IM-WPRT (54 Gy) and additional boost up to 78 Gy had lower rectal and bladder volume percentage at 50 Gy and 60 Gy, compared with those with 2D-WPRT (50 Gy) and additional boost up to 72 Gy or 78 Gy. Those with IM-WPRT (54 Gy) also had better small bowel sparing at 30 Gy and 50 Gy, compared with those with 2D-WPRT (50 Gy). In NTCP, those with IM-WPRT and total dose of 78 Gy achieved lower complication rates in rectum and small bowel, compared with those of 2D-WPRT with total dose of 72 Gy. In conformity, those with IM-WPRT had better conformity compared with those with 2D-WPRT with significance (p < 0.005). No significant difference in DVHs, NTCP, or conformity was found between IM-PBRT and 3D-PBRT after IM-WPRT. Conclusions: Initial pelvic IMRT is the most important strategy in dose escalation and critical organ sparing. IM-WPRT is recommended for patients requiring WPRT. There is not much benefit for critical organ sparing by IMRT after 2D-WPRT

  13. Salvage Radiation Therapy Dose Response for Biochemical Failure of Prostate Cancer After Prostatectomy—A Multi-Institutional Observational Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisansky, Thomas M.; Agrawal, Shree; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Koontz, Bridget F.; Liauw, Stanley L.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Feng, Felix Y.; Abramowitz, Matthew C.; Pollack, Alan; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Moghanaki, Drew; Den, Robert B.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Lee, W. Robert; Kattan, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether a dose-response relationship exists for salvage radiation therapy (RT) of biochemical failure after prostatectomy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Individual data from 1108 patients who underwent salvage RT at 10 academic centers were pooled. The cohort was enriched for selection criteria more likely associated with tumor recurrence in the prostate bed (margin positive and pre-RT prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level of ≤2.0 ng/mL) and without the confounding of planned androgen suppression. The cumulative incidence of biochemical failure and distant metastasis over time was computed, and competing risks hazard regression models were used to investigate the association between potential predictors and these outcomes. The association of radiation dose with outcomes was the primary focus. Results: With a 65.2-month follow-up duration, the 5- and 10-year estimates of freedom from post-RT biochemical failure (PSA level >0.2 ng/mL and rising) was 63.5% and 49.8%, respectively, and the cumulative incidence of distant metastasis was 12.4% by 10 years. A Gleason score of ≥7, higher pre-RT PSA level, extraprostatic tumor extension, and seminal vesicle invasion were associated with worse biochemical failure and distant metastasis outcomes. A salvage radiation dose of ≥66.0 Gy was associated with a reduced cumulative incidence of biochemical failure, but not of distant metastasis. Conclusions: The use of salvage radiation doses of ≥66.0 Gy are supported by evidence presented in the present multicenter pooled analysis of individual patient data. The observational reporting method, limited sample size, few distant metastasis events, modest follow-up duration, and elective use of salvage therapy might have diminished the opportunity to identify an association between the radiation dose and this endpoint.

  14. Higher than standard radiation doses (≥72 Gy) with or without androgen deprivation in the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupelian, Patrick A.; Mohan, Dasarahally S.; Lyons, Janice; Klein, Eric A.; Reddy, Chandana A.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effect on biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) and clinical disease-free survival of radiation doses delivered to the prostate and periprostatic tissues for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 1041 consecutive localized prostate cancer cases treated with external beam radiotherapy (RT) at our institution between 7/86 and 2/99 were reviewed. All cases had available pretreatment parameters including pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (iPSA), biopsy Gleason score (bGS), and clinical T stage. The median age was 69 years. Twenty-three percent of cases (n = 238) were African-American. The distribution by clinical T stage was as follows: T1 in 365 cases (35%), T2 in 562 cases (54%), and T3 in 114 cases (11%). The median iPSA level was 10.1 ng/ml (range: 0.4-692.9). The distribution by biopsy Gleason score (bGS) was as follows: ≤6 in 580 cases (56%) and ≥7 in 461 cases (44%). Androgen deprivation (AD) in the adjuvant or neoadjuvant setting was given in 303 cases (29%). The mean RT dose was 71.9 Gy (range: 57.6-78.0 Gy). The median RT dose was 70.2 Gy, with 458 cases (44%) receiving at least 72.0 Gy. The average dose in patients receiving <72 Gy was 68.3 Gy (median 68.4) versus 76.5 Gy (median 78.0) for patients receiving ≥72 Gy. The mean follow-up was 38 months (median 33 months). The number of follow-up prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels available was 5998. Results: The 5- and 8-year bRFS rates were 61% (95% CI 55-65%) and 58% (95% CI 51-65%), respectively. The 5-year bRFS rates for patients receiving radiation doses ≥72 Gy versus <72 Gy were 87% (95% CI 82-92%) and 55% (95% CI 49-60%), respectively. The 8-year bRFS rates for patients receiving radiation doses ≥72 Gy versus <72 Gy were 87% (95% CI 82-92%) and 51% (95% CI 44-58%), respectively (p < 0.001). A multivariate analysis of factors affecting bRFS was performed using the following parameters: age (continuous variable), race, T-stage (T1-T2 vs. T3

  15. Technical Evaluation of Radiation Dose Delivered in Prostate Cancer Patients as Measured by an Implantable MOSFET Dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, Gloria P.; Scarantino, Charles W.; Prestidge, Bradley R.; Sadeghi, Amir G.; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Miften, Moyed; Carrea, Tammy B.; Sims, Marianne C.; Black, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a comparison of the daily measured dose at depth in tissue with the predicted dose values from treatment plans for 29 prostate cancer patients involved in a clinical trial. Methods and Materials: Patients from three clinical sites were implanted with one or two dosimeters in or near the prostatic capsule. The implantable device, known as the DVS, is based on a metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) detector. A portable telemetric readout system couples to the dosimeter antenna (visible on kilovoltage, computed tomography, and ultrasonography) for data transfer. The predicted dose values were determined by the location of the MOSFET on the treatment planning computed tomography scan. Serial computed tomography images were taken every 2 weeks to evaluate any migration of the device. The clinical protocol did not permit alteration of the treatment parameters using the dosimeter readings. For some patients, one of several image-guided radiotherapy (RT) modalities was used for target localization. Results: The evaluation of dose discrepancy showed that in many patients the standard deviation exceeded the previous values obtained for the dosimeter in a phantom. In some patients, the cumulative dose disagreed with the planned dose by ≥5%. The data presented suggest that an implantable dosimeter can help identify dose discrepancies (random or systematic) for patients treated with external beam RT and could be used as a daily treatment verification tool for image-guided RT and adaptive RT. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that knowledge of the dose delivered per fraction can potentially prevent over- or under-dosage to the treatment area and increase the accuracy of RT. The implantable dosimeter could also be used as a localizer for image-guided RT

  16. Can we avoid dose escalation for intermediate-risk prostate cancer in the setting of short-course neoadjuvant androgen deprivation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakespeare TP

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Thomas P Shakespeare,1,2 Shea W Wilcox,1 Noel J Aherne1,2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, 2Faculty of Medicine, Rural Clinical School, The University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour, New South Wales, Australia Background: Both dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy (DE-EBRT and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT improve the outcomes in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Despite this, there are only few reports evaluating DE-EBRT for patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer receiving neoadjuvant ADT, and virtually no studies investigating dose escalation >74 Gy in this setting. We aimed to determine whether DE-EBRT >74 Gy improved the outcomes for patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer who received neoadjuvant ADT. Findings: In our institution, patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were treated with neoadjuvant ADT and DE-EBRT, with doses sequentially increasing from 74 Gy to 76 Gy and then to 78 Gy between 2006 and 2012. We identified 435 patients treated with DE-EBRT and ADT, with a median follow-up of 70 months. For the 74 Gy, 76 Gy, and 78 Gy groups, five-year biochemical disease-free survival rates were 95.0%, 97.8%, and 95.3%, respectively; metastasis-free survival rates were 99.1%, 100.0%, and 98.6%, respectively; and prostate cancer-specific survival rate was 100% for all three dose levels. There was no significant benefit for dose escalation either on univariate or multivariate analysis for any outcome. Conclusion: There was no benefit for DE-EBRT >74 Gy in our cohort of intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant ADT. Given the higher risks of toxicity associated with dose escalation, it may be feasible to omit dose escalation in this group of patients. Randomized studies evaluating dose de-escalation should be considered. Keywords: radiotherapy, IMRT, dose, dose escalation, dose de-escalation, androgen deprivation therapy

  17. Automatically-generated rectal dose constraints in intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Taejin; Kim, Yong Nam; Kim, Soo Kon; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Park, Soah; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Han, Taejin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Meyeon; Kim, Kyoung-Joo; Bae, Hoonsik; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-06-01

    The dose constraint during prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization should be patient-specific for better rectum sparing. The aims of this study are to suggest a novel method for automatically generating a patient-specific dose constraint by using an experience-based dose volume histogram (DVH) of the rectum and to evaluate the potential of such a dose constraint qualitatively. The normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) of the rectum with respect to V %ratio in our study were divided into three groups, where V %ratio was defined as the percent ratio of the rectal volume overlapping the planning target volume (PTV) to the rectal volume: (1) the rectal NTCPs in the previous study (clinical data), (2) those statistically generated by using the standard normal distribution (calculated data), and (3) those generated by combining the calculated data and the clinical data (mixed data). In the calculated data, a random number whose mean value was on the fitted curve described in the clinical data and whose standard deviation was 1% was generated by using the `randn' function in the MATLAB program and was used. For each group, we validated whether the probability density function (PDF) of the rectal NTCP could be automatically generated with the density estimation method by using a Gaussian kernel. The results revealed that the rectal NTCP probability increased in proportion to V %ratio , that the predictive rectal NTCP was patient-specific, and that the starting point of IMRT optimization for the given patient might be different. The PDF of the rectal NTCP was obtained automatically for each group except that the smoothness of the probability distribution increased with increasing number of data and with increasing window width. We showed that during the prostate IMRT optimization, the patient-specific dose constraints could be automatically generated and that our method could reduce the IMRT optimization time as well as maintain the

  18. Chronic rectal bleeding after high dose conformal treatment of prostate cancer warrants modification of existing morbidity scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, A.L.; Schulthiess, T.E.; Hunt, M.A.; Movsas, B.; Peter, R.; Hanks, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Serious late morbidity (Grade (3(4))) from the conformal treatment of prostate cancer has been reported in <1% to 6% of patients. This study demonstrates that the reported frequency of Grade (3(4)) complications varies by the morbidity scale selected and that no existing morbidity scale adequately represents chronic rectal bleeding, which is our most frequent persisting late sequela of high dose conformal treatment. Materials and Methods: Between (5(89)) and (12(93)), 352 patients with T1-3 NXM0 prostate cancers were treated with our 4-field conformal technique without special rectal blocking. This technique includes a 1 cm margin from the CTV to the PTV in all directions. The median follow-up for these patients was 38 mos (4 to 78), and the median ICRU reporting point dose was 74 Gy (63 to 81). Patients are followed at six month intervals, and no patient is lost to follow-up. Three morbidity scales are assessed, the RTOG, the late effects group (LENT), and our modification of the LENT (FC-LENT). This modification registers chronic rectal bleeding requiring more than two coagulations as a grade 3 event. Estimates for Grade (3(4)) late GI complication rates were determined using Kaplan-Meier methodology. Differences in morbidity rates were evaluated using the log-rank test and differences in time to latency of complications were evaluated using the nonparametric Wilcoxon test. The duration of severe symptoms with chronic rectal bleeding is measured from the first to the last transrectal coagulation. Results: Sixteen patients developed Grade (3(4)) complications by one of the three morbidity scales. Two patients required surgery (colostomy, sigmoid resection), 5 required a transfusion, and 9 required more than two coagulations. The median latency to the third coagulation (plus or minus transfusions) was 24 mos (17 to 40). The median duration of bleeding between the first and last coagulation was 6 mos (3 to 25), illustrating the chronicity of this problem

  19. Use of radiobiological indices to guide dose escalation of the prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burman, Chandra; Happersett, Laura; Kutcher, Gerald; Leibel, Steven; Zelefsky, Michael; Fuks, Zvi; Ling, C. Clifton

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: In the radiation treatment of localized prostate carcinoma, a portion of the anterior rectal wall is included in the planning target volume (PTV). Thus, in dose escalation studies, radiation induced rectal complication may limit the dose that can be delivered safely. In this study we investigate the potential of increasing tumor control without increasing rectal complication by limiting the rectal volume receiving the high prescription dose. The evaluation is with the aid of radiobiological indices. Methods and Materials: Two types of 3D conformal treatment plans were performed for a group of ten patients, for prescription doses of 75.6 to 95.0 Gy. Type I plan involved 6 fields (2 lateral, 2 anterior oblique and 2 posterior oblique), with the dose prescribed to the maximum isodose line encompassing the PTV. Type II plan comprised a primary treatment (using the 6 fields of the first plan) of 72 Gy to the PTV, and a boost with 6 posterior obliques to deliver the additional dose, except to the portion of the rectal wall included by the PTV. Based on the composite 3D dose distribution, TCP and rectal NTCP were calculated with the Goitein and Lyman models, respectively, using parameters derived from our clinical experience and from the 1991 NCI Collaborating Work Group publication. Results: In the figure, the calculated values of TCP, NTCP and TCP * [1-NTCP] (or uncomplicated control), averaged over the 10 patients, are plotted against the prescription dose. The dotted and solid lines are for type I (with uniform PTV dose) and type II (with reduction in rectal dose for the boost) plans, respectively, and the error bars represent the range of computed values for the 10 patients. For type I plans, the increase in TCP, from 75% at 75.6 Gy to 98% at 95 Gy, must be balanced against the rise in rectal NTCP to >20%. The TCP for type II plan is slightly less, but with little increase in NTCP with prescription dose. Thus, the uncomplicated control continues to increase

  20. Rectal toxicity after intensity modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Which rectal dose volume constraints should we use?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonteyne, Valérie; Ost, Piet; Vanpachtenbeke, Frank; Colman, Roos; Sadeghi, Simin; Villeirs, Geert; Decaestecker, Karel; De Meerleer, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Background: To define rectal dose volume constraints (DVC) to prevent ⩾grade2 late rectal toxicity (LRT) after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer (PC). Material and methods: Six hundred thirty-seven PC patients were treated with primary (prostate median dose: 78 Gy) or postoperative (prostatic bed median dose: 74 Gy (adjuvant)–76 Gy (salvage)) IMRT while restricting the rectal dose to 76 Gy, 72 Gy and 74 Gy respectively. The impact of patient characteristics and rectal volume parameters on ⩾grade2 LRT was determined. DVC were defined to estimate the 5% and 10% risk of developing ⩾grade2 LRT. Results: The 5-year probability of being free from ⩾grade2 LRT, non-rectal blood loss and persisting symptoms is 88.8% (95% CI: 85.8–91.1%), 93.4% (95% CI: 91.0–95.1%) and 94.3% (95% CI: 92.0–95.9%) respectively. There was no correlation with patient characteristics. All volume parameters, except rectal volume receiving ⩾70 Gy (R70), were significantly correlated with ⩾grade2 LRT. To avoid 10% and 5% risk of ⩾grade2 LRT following DVC were derived: R40, R50, R60 and R65 <64–35%, 52–22%, 38–14% and 5% respectively. Conclusion: Applying existing rectal volume constraints resulted in a 5-year estimated risk of developing late ⩾grade2 LRT of 11.2%. New rectal DVC for primary and postoperative IMRT planning of PC patients are proposed. A prospective evaluation is needed

  1. Advanced prostate cancer: the results of a randomized comparative trial of high dose irradiation boosting with conformal protons compared with conventional dose irradiation using photons alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipley, William U; Verhey, Lynn J; Munzenrider, John E; Suit, Herman D; Urie, Marcia M; McManus, Patricia L; Young, Robert H; Shipley, Jenot W; Zietman, Anthony L; Biggs, Peter J; Heney, Niall M; Goitein, Michael

    1995-04-30

    Purpose: Following a thorough Phase I/II study, we evaluated by a Phase III trial high versus conventional dose external beam irradiation as mono-therapy for patients with Stage T3-T4 prostate cancer. Patient outcome following standard dose radiotherapy or following a 12.5% increase in total dose to 75.6 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) using a conformal perineal proton boost was compared for local tumor control, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Methods and Materials: Stage T3-T4, Nx, N0-2, M0 patients received 50.4 Gy by four-field photons and were randomized to receive either an additional 25.2 CGE by conformal protons (arm 1--the high dose arm, 103 patients, total dose 75.6 CGE) or an additional 16.8 Gy by photons (arm 2--the conventional dose arm, 99 patients, total dose 67.2 Gy). Actuarial overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), total recurrence-free survival (TRFS), (clinically free, prostate specific antigen (PSA) less than 4ng/ml and a negative prostate rebiopsy, done in 38 patients without evidence of disease) and local control (digital rectal exam and rebiopsy negative) were evaluated. Results: The protocol completion rate was 90% for arm 1 and 97% for arm 2. With a median follow-up of 61 months (range 3 to 139 months) 135 patients are alive and 67 have died, 20 from causes other than prostate cancer. We found no significant differences in OS, DSS, TRFS or local control between the two arms. Among those completing randomized treatment (93 in arm 1 and 96 in arm 2), the local control at 5 and 8 years for arm 1 is 92% and 77%, respectively and is 80% and 60%, respectively for arm 2 (p = .089) and there are no significant differences in OS, DSS, and TRFS. The local control for the 57 patients with poorly differentiated (Gleason 4 or 5 of 5) tumors at 5 and 8 years for arm 1 is 94% and 84% and is 64% and 19% on arm 2 (p 0.0014). In patients whose digital rectal exam had normalized following treatment and underwent prostate rebiopsy

  2. Advanced prostate cancer: the results of a randomized comparative trial of high dose irradiation boosting with conformal protons compared with conventional dose irradiation using photons alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipley, William U.; Verhey, Lynn J.; Munzenrider, John E.; Suit, Herman D.; Urie, Marcia M.; McManus, Patricia L.; Young, Robert H.; Shipley, Jenot W.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Biggs, Peter J.; Heney, Niall M.; Goitein, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Following a thorough Phase I/II study, we evaluated by a Phase III trial high versus conventional dose external beam irradiation as mono-therapy for patients with Stage T3-T4 prostate cancer. Patient outcome following standard dose radiotherapy or following a 12.5% increase in total dose to 75.6 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) using a conformal perineal proton boost was compared for local tumor control, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Methods and Materials: Stage T3-T4, Nx, N0-2, M0 patients received 50.4 Gy by four-field photons and were randomized to receive either an additional 25.2 CGE by conformal protons (arm 1--the high dose arm, 103 patients, total dose 75.6 CGE) or an additional 16.8 Gy by photons (arm 2--the conventional dose arm, 99 patients, total dose 67.2 Gy). Actuarial overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), total recurrence-free survival (TRFS), (clinically free, prostate specific antigen (PSA) less than 4ng/ml and a negative prostate rebiopsy, done in 38 patients without evidence of disease) and local control (digital rectal exam and rebiopsy negative) were evaluated. Results: The protocol completion rate was 90% for arm 1 and 97% for arm 2. With a median follow-up of 61 months (range 3 to 139 months) 135 patients are alive and 67 have died, 20 from causes other than prostate cancer. We found no significant differences in OS, DSS, TRFS or local control between the two arms. Among those completing randomized treatment (93 in arm 1 and 96 in arm 2), the local control at 5 and 8 years for arm 1 is 92% and 77%, respectively and is 80% and 60%, respectively for arm 2 (p = .089) and there are no significant differences in OS, DSS, and TRFS. The local control for the 57 patients with poorly differentiated (Gleason 4 or 5 of 5) tumors at 5 and 8 years for arm 1 is 94% and 84% and is 64% and 19% on arm 2 (p 0.0014). In patients whose digital rectal exam had normalized following treatment and underwent prostate rebiopsy

  3. Split-Course, High-Dose Palliative Pelvic Radiotherapy for Locally Progressive Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogna, Nirdosh Kumar, E-mail: kumar_gogna@health.qld.gov.au [Radiation Oncology Services, Mater Centre, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Baxi, Siddhartha; Hickey, Brigid; Baumann, Kathryn [Radiation Oncology Services, Mater Centre, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Burmeister, Elizabeth [Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Holt, Tanya [Radiation Oncology Services, Mater Centre, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Local progression, in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer, often causes significant morbidity. Pelvic radiotherapy (RT) provides effective palliation in this setting, with most published studies supporting the use of high-dose regimens. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of split-course hypofractionated RT used at our institution in treating this group of patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 34 men with locoregionally progressive hormone-refractory prostate cancer, treated with a split course of pelvic RT (45-60 Gy in 18-24 fractions) between 2000 and 2008 were analyzed. The primary endpoints were the response rate and actuarial locoregional progression-free survival. Secondary endpoints included overall survival, compliance, and acute and late toxicity. Results: The median age was 71 years (range, 53-88). Treatment resulted in an overall initial response rate of 91%, a median locoregional progression-free survival of 43 months, and median overall survival of 28 months. Compliance was excellent and no significant late toxicity was reported. Conclusions: The split course pelvic RT described has an acceptable toxicity profile, is effective, and compares well with other high-dose palliative regimens that have been previously reported.

  4. After low and high dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy followed by IMRT radiotherapy for intermediate and high risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Satoshi; Murakami, Naoya; Inaba, Koji; Wakita, Akihisa; Kobayashi, Kazuma; Takahashi, Kana; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Umezawa, Rei; Morota, Madoka; Sumi, Minako; Igaki, Hiroshi; Ito, Yoshinori; Itami, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to compare urinary symptoms in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer after a combination of either low-dose-rate or high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy along with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (LDR-ISBT + IMRT or HDR-ISBT + IMRT). From June 2009 to April 2014, 16 and 22 patients were treated with LDR-ISBT + IMRT and HDR-ISBT + IMRT, respectively. No patient from these groups was excluded from this study. The prescribed dose of LDR-ISBT, HDR-ISBT, and IMRT was 115 Gy, 20 Gy in 2 fractions, and 46 Gy in 23 fractions, respectively. Obstructive and irritative urinary symptoms were assessed by the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) examined before and after treatments. After ISBT, IPSS was evaluated in the 1st and 4th weeks, then every 2–3 months for the 1st year, and every 6 months thereafter. The median follow-up of the patients treated with LDR-ISBT + IMRT and HDR-ISBT + IMRT was 1070.5 days and 1048.5 days, respectively (p = 0.321). The IPSS-increment in the LDR-ISBT + IMRT group was greater than that in the HDR-ISBT + IMRT between 91 and 180 days after ISBT (p = 0.015). In the LDR-ISBT + IMRT group, the IPSS took longer time to return to the initial level than in the HDR-ISBT + IMRT group (in LDR-ISBT + IMRT group, the recovery time was 90 days later). The dose to urethra showed a statistically significant association with the IPSS-increment in the irritative urinary symptoms (p = 0.011). Clinical outcomes were comparable between both the groups. Both therapeutic modalities are safe and well suited for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer; however, it took patients longer to recover from LDR-ISBT + IMRT than from HDR-ISBT + IMRT. It is possible that fast dose delivery induced early symptoms and early recovery, while gradual dose delivery induced late symptoms and late recovery. Urethral dose reductions were associated with small increments in IPSS

  5. Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head After Palliative Radiotherapy in Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Absence of a Dose Threshold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, Alia M; Hudson, Mack; Magnus, Kenneth G; Huang, Fleur; Danielson, Brita L; Venner, Peter; Saluja, Ronak; LeGuerrier, Bronwen; Daly, Helene; Emmenegger, Urban; Fairchild, Alysa

    2016-03-06

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) is the final common pathway resulting from insufficient blood supply to bone, commonly the femoral head. There are many postulated etiologies of non-traumatic AVN, including corticosteroids, bisphosphonates, and radiotherapy (RT). However, it is unclear whether there is a dose threshold for the development of RT-induced AVN. In this case report, we describe a patient with prostate cancer metastatic to bone diagnosed with AVN after receiving single-fraction palliative RT to the left femoral head. Potential contributing factors are discussed, along with a review of other reported cases. At present, the RT dose threshold below which there is no risk for AVN is unknown, and therefore detrimental impact from the RT cannot be excluded. Given the possibility that RT-induced AVN is a stochastic effect, it is important to be aware of the possibility of this diagnosis in any patient with a painful hip who has received RT to the femoral head.

  6. Radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Katsumasa

    2001-01-01

    In Japan, where the mortality rate of prostate cancer is lower than in Western countries, radical prostatectomy or hormonal therapy has been applied more frequently than radiation therapy. However, the number of patients with prostate cancer has been increasing recently and the importance of radiation therapy has rapidly been recognized. Although there have been no randomized trials, results from several institutions in Western countries suggest that similar results of cancer control are achieved with either radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. For higher-risk cases, conformal high-dose therapy or adjuvant hormonal therapy is more appropriate. In this article, the results of radiation therapy for prostate cancer were reviewed, with a view to the appropriate choice of therapy in Japan. (author)

  7. Rectal dose sparing with a balloon catheter and ultrasound localization in conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Rakesh R.; Orton, Nigel; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Chappell, Rick; Ritter, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: To compare the rectal wall and bladder volume in the high dose region with or without the use of a balloon catheter with both three-dimensional (3D)-conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy (CRT, IMRT) approaches in the treatment of prostate cancer. Material and methods: Five patients with a wide range of prostate volumes and treated with primary external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer were selected for analysis. Pinnacle TM treatment plans were generated utilizing a 3D conformal six-field design and an IMRT seven coplanar-field plan with a novel, three-step optimization and with ultrasound localization. Separate plans were devised with a rectal balloon deflated or air inflated with and without inclusion of the seminal vesicles (SV) in the target volume. The prescription dose was 76 Gy in 38 fractions of 2 Gy each. Cumulative dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed for the planning target volume (PTV), rectal wall, and bladder with an inflated (60 cc air) or deflated balloon with and without SV included. The volumes of rectal wall and bladder above 60, 65, and 70 Gy with each treatment approach were evaluated. Results: Daily balloon placement was well-tolerated with good patient positional reproducibility. Inflation of the rectal balloon in all cases resulted in a significant decrease in the absolute volume of rectal wall receiving greater than 60, 65, or 70 Gy. The rectal sparing ratio (RSR), consisting of a structure's high dose volume with the catheter inflated, divided by the volume with the catheter deflated, was calculated for each patient with and without seminal vesicle inclusion for 3D-CRT and IMRT. For 3D-CRT, RSRs with SV included were 0.59, 0.59, and 0.56 and with SV excluded were 0.60, 0.58, and 0.54 at doses of greater than 60, 65, and 70 Gy, respectively. Similarly, for IMRT, the mean RSRs were 0.59, 0.59, and 0.63 including SV and 0.71, 0.66, and 0.67 excluding SV at these same dose levels

  8. Young age under 60 years is not a contraindication to treatment with definitive dose escalated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klayton, Tracy L.; Ruth, Karen; Horwitz, Eric M.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Kutikov, Alexander; Chen, David Y.T.; Sobczak, Mark; Buyyounouski, Mark K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: It is widely believed that younger prostate cancer patients are at greater risk of recurrence following radiotherapy (RT). Methods: From 1992 to 2007, 2168 (395 age ⩽60) men received conformal RT alone for prostate cancer at our institution (median dose = 76 Gy, range: 72–80). Multivariable analysis (MVA) was used to identify significant predictors for BF and PCSM. Cumulative incidence was estimated using the competing risk method (Fine and Gray) for BF (Phoenix definition) and PCSM to account for the competing risk of death. Results: With a median follow-up of 72.2 months (range: 24.0–205.1), 8-year BF was 27.1% for age ⩽60 vs. 23.7% for age >60 (p = 0.29). Eight-year PCSM was 3.0% for age ⩽60 vs. 2.0% for age >60 (p = 0.52). MVA for BF identified initial PSA [adjusted HR = 1.7 (PSA 10–20), 2.6 (PSA >20), p 12 months), p < 0.01] as significant, but not age or ADT <12 months. MVA for PCSM identified Gleason score [adjusted HR = 3.0 (G8–10), p = 0.01] and T-stage [adjusted HR = 8.7 (T3-4), p < 0.01] as significant, but not age, PSA, or ADT. Conclusion: This is the largest, most mature study of younger men treated with RT for prostate cancer that confirms young age is not prognostic for BF.

  9. Prostate cancer epigenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinaranagari, Swathi; Sharma, Pankaj; Bowen, Nathan J; Chaudhary, Jaideep

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a major health burden within the ever-increasingly aging US population. The molecular mechanisms involved in prostate cancer are diverse and heterogeneous. In this context, epigenetic changes, both global and gene specific, are now an emerging alternate mechanism in disease initiation and progression. The three major risk factors in prostate cancer: age, geographic ancestry, and environment are all influenced by epigenetics and additional significant insight is required to gain an understanding of the underlying mechanisms. The androgen receptor and its downstream effector pathways, central to prostate cancer initiation and progression, are subject to a multitude of epigenetic alterations. In this review we focus on the global perspective of epigenetics and the use of recent next-generation sequencing platforms to interrogate epigenetic changes in the prostate cancer genome.

  10. Evaluating organ delineation, dose calculation and daily localization in an open-MRI simulation workflow for prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doemer, Anthony; Chetty, Indrin J; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Nurushev, Teamour; Hearshen, David; Pantelic, Milan; Traughber, Melanie; Kim, Joshua; Levin, Kenneth; Elshaikh, Mohamed A; Walker, Eleanor; Movsas, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    This study describes initial testing and evaluation of a vertical-field open Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanner for the purpose of simulation in radiation therapy for prostate cancer. We have evaluated the clinical workflow of using open MRI as a sole modality for simulation and planning. Relevant results related to MRI alignment (vs. CT) reference dataset with Cone-Beam CT (CBCT) for daily localization are presented. Ten patients participated in an IRB approved study utilizing MRI along with CT simulation with the intent of evaluating the MRI-simulation process. Differences in prostate gland volume, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb were assessed with MRI and compared to CT. To evaluate dose calculation accuracy, bulk-density-assignments were mapped onto respective MRI datasets and treated IMRT plans were re-calculated. For image localization purposes, 400 CBCTs were re-evaluated with MRI as the reference dataset and daily shifts compared against CBCT-to-CT registration. Planning margins based on MRI/CBCT shifts were computed using the van Herk formalism. Significant organ contour differences were noted between MRI and CT. Prostate volumes were on average 39.7% (p = 0.002) larger on CT than MRI. No significant difference was found in seminal vesicle volumes (p = 0.454). Penile bulb volumes were 61.1% higher on CT, without statistical significance (p = 0.074). MRI-based dose calculations with assigned bulk densities produced agreement within 1% with heterogeneity corrected CT calculations. The differences in shift positions for the cohort between CBCT-to-CT registration and CBCT-to-MRI registration are −0.15 ± 0.25 cm (anterior-posterior), 0.05 ± 0.19 cm (superior-inferior), and −0.01 ± 0.14 cm (left-right). This study confirms the potential of using an open-field MRI scanner as primary imaging modality for prostate cancer treatment planning simulation, dose calculations and daily image localization

  11. Is Androgen Deprivation Therapy Necessary in All Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated in the Dose Escalation Era?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castle, Katherine O.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Levy, Lawrence B.; Lee, Andrew K.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quynh N.; Frank, Steven J.; Pugh, Thomas J.; McGuire, Sean E.; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The benefit of adding androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) for men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer is unclear; therefore, we assessed the impact of adding ADT to dose-escalated RT on freedom from failure (FFF). Methods: Three groups of men treated with intensity modulated RT or 3-dimensional conformal RT (75.6-78 Gy) from 1993-2008 for prostate cancer were categorized as (1) 326 intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone, (2) 218 intermediate-risk patients treated with RT and ≤6 months of ADT, and (3) 274 low-risk patients treated with definitive RT. Median follow-up was 58 months. Recursive partitioning analysis based on FFF using Gleason score (GS), T stage, and pretreatment PSA concentration was applied to the intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate 5-year FFF. Results: Based on recursive partitioning analysis, intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone were divided into 3 prognostic groups: (1) 188 favorable patients: GS 6, ≤T2b or GS 3+4, ≤T1c; (2) 71 marginal patients: GS 3+4, T2a-b; and (3) 68 unfavorable patients: GS 4+3 or T2c disease. Hazard ratios (HR) for recurrence in each group were 1.0, 2.1, and 4.6, respectively. When intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone were compared to intermediate-risk patients treated with RT and ADT, the greatest benefit from ADT was seen for the unfavorable intermediate-risk patients (FFF, 74% vs 94%, respectively; P=.005). Favorable intermediate-risk patients had no significant benefit from the addition of ADT to RT (FFF, 94% vs 95%, respectively; P=.85), and FFF for favorable intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone approached that of low-risk patients treated with RT alone (98%). Conclusions: Patients with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer did not benefit from the addition of ADT to dose-escalated RT, and their FFF was nearly as good as patients with low-risk disease

  12. Potency probability following conformal megavoltage radiotherapy using conventional doses for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantz, C.A.; Song, P.; Farhangi, E.; Nautiyal, J.; Awan, A.; Ignacio, L.; Weichselbaum, R.; Vijayakumar, S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Impotence is a familiar sequela of definitive external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for localized prostate cancer; however, nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (NSRP) has offered potency rates as high as 70% for selected for patients in several large series. To the authors' knowledge, age and stage-matched comparisons between the effects of EBRT and NSRP upon the normal age trend of impotence have not been performed. Herein, we report the change in potency over time in an EBRT-treated population, determine the significantly predisposing health factors affecting potency in this population, and compare age and stage-matched potency rates with those of normal males and prostatectomy patients. Methods and Materials: Our results are obtained from a retrospective study of 114 patients ranging in age from 52 to 85 (mean, 68) who were diagnosed with clinical stages A-C C (T1-T4N0M0) prostate cancer and then treated conformally with megavoltage x-rays to 6500-7000 cGy (180-200 cGy per fraction) using the four-field box technique. Information concerning pre-RT potency, medical and surgical history, and medications was documented for each patient as was time of post-RT change in potency during regular follow-up. The median follow-up time was 18.5 months. Results: The actuarial probability of potency for all patients gradually decreased throughout post-RT follow-up. At months 1, 12, 24, and 36, potency rates were 98, 92, 75, and 66%, respectively. For those patients who became impotent, the median time to impotence was 14 months. Factors identified from logistic regression analysis as significant predictors of post-EBRT impotence include pre-EBRT partial potency (p < 0.001), vascular disease (p < 0.001), and diabetes (p = 0.003). Next, an actuarial plot of potency probability to patient age for the EBRT-treated population was compared to that obtained from the Massachusetts Male Aging Study of normal males. The two curves were not significantly different (logrank

  13. An investigation of the dose distribution effect related with collimator angle in volumetric arc therapy of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Tas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the dose-volume variations of planning target volume (PTV and organ at risks (OARs in eleven prostate cancer patients planned with single and double arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT when varying collimator angle. Single and double arc VMAT treatment plans were created using Monaco5.0® with collimator angle set to 0°. All plans were normalized 7600 cGy dose to the 95% of clinical target volume (CTV volume. The single arc VMAT plans were reoptimized with different collimator angles (0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, and 90°, and for double arc VMAT plans (0–0°, 15°–345, 30–330°, 45–315°, 60–300°, 75–285°, 90–270° using the same optimization parameters. For the comparison the parameters of heterogeneity index (HI, dose-volume histogram and minimum dose to the 95% of PTV volume (D95 PTV calculated and analyzed. The best plans were verified using 2 dimensional ion chamber array IBA Matrixx® and three-dimensional IBA Compass® program. The comparison between calculation and measurement were made by the γ-index (3%/3 mm analysis. A higher D95 (PTV were found for single arc VMAT with 15° collimator angle. For double arc, VMAT with 60–300° and 75–285° collimator angles. However, lower rectum doses obtained for 75–285° collimator angles. There was no significant dose difference, based on other OARs which are bladder and femur head. When we compared single and double arc VMAT's D95 (PTV, we determined 2.44% high coverage and lower HI with double arc VMAT. All plans passed the γ-index (3%/3 mm analysis with more than 97% of the points and we had an average γ-index for CTV 0.36, for PTV 0.32 with double arc VMAT. These results were significant by Wilcoxon signed rank test statistically. The results show that dose coverage of target and OAR's doses also depend significantly on the collimator angles due to the geometry of target and OARs. Based on the results we have decided to plan prostate

  14. High-dose intensity modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer: early toxicity and biochemical outcome in 772 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Fuks, Zvi; Hunt, Margie; Yamada, Yoshiya; Marion, Christine; Ling, C. Clifton; Amols, Howard; Venkatraman, E.S.; Leibel, Steven A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To report the acute and late toxicity and preliminary biochemical outcomes in 772 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between April 1996 and January 2001, 772 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with IMRT. Treatment was planned using an inverse-planning approach, and the desired beam intensity profiles were delivered by dynamic multileaf collimation. A total of 698 patients (90%) were treated to 81.0 Gy, and 74 patients (10%) were treated to 86.4 Gy. Acute and late toxicities were scored by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity grading scales. PSA relapse was defined according to The American Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology Consensus Statement. The median follow-up time was 24 months (range: 6-60 months). Results: Thirty-five patients (4.5%) developed acute Grade 2 rectal toxicity, and no patient experienced acute Grade 3 or higher rectal symptoms. Two hundred seventeen patients (28%) developed acute Grade 2 urinary symptoms, and one experienced urinary retention (Grade 3). Eleven patients (1.5%) developed late Grade 2 rectal bleeding. Four patients (0.1%) experienced Grade 3 rectal toxicity requiring either one or more transfusions or a laser cauterization procedure. No Grade 4 rectal complications have been observed. The 3-year actuarial likelihood of ≥ late Grade 2 rectal toxicity was 4%. Seventy-two patients (9%) experienced late Grade 2 urinary toxicity, and five (0.5%) developed Grade 3 urinary toxicity (urethral stricture). The 3-year actuarial likelihood of ≥ late Grade 2 urinary toxicity was 15%. The 3-year actuarial PSA relapse-free survival rates for favorable, intermediate, and unfavorable risk group patients were 92%, 86%, and 81%, respectively. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the feasibility of high-dose IMRT in a large number of patients. Acute and late rectal toxicities seem to be

  15. Relationships Between Rectal Wall Dose-Volume Constraints and Radiobiologic Indices of Toxicity for Patients With Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzi, Simona; Arcangeli, Giorgio; Saracino, Bianca; Petrongari, Maria G.; Bruzzaniti, Vicente; Iaccarino, Giuseppe; Landoni, Valeria; Soriani, Antonella; Benassi, Marcello

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to investigate how exceeding specified rectal wall dose-volume constraints impacts on the risk of late rectal bleeding by using radiobiologic calculations. Methods and Materials: Dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the rectal wall of 250 patients with prostate cancer were analyzed. All patients were treated by three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, receiving mean target doses of 80 Gy. To study the main features of the patient population, the average and the standard deviation of the distribution of DVHs were generated. The mean dose , generalized equivalent uniform dose formulation (gEUD), modified equivalent uniform dose formulation (mEUD) 0 , and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) distributions were also produced. The DVHs set was then binned into eight classes on the basis of the exceeding or the fulfilling of three dose-volume constraints: V 40 = 60%, V 50 = 50%, and V 70 = 25%. Comparisons were made between them by , gEUD, mEUD 0 , and NTCP. Results: The radiobiologic calculations suggest that late rectal toxicity is mostly influenced by V 70 . The gEUD and mEUD 0 are risk factors of toxicity always concordant with NTCP, inside each DVH class. The mean dose, although a reliable index, may be misleading in critical situations. Conclusions: Both in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and particularly in intensity-modulated radiation therapy, it should be known what the relative importance of each specified dose-volume constraint is for each organ at risk. This requires a greater awareness of radiobiologic properties of tissues and radiobiologic indices may help to gradually become aware of this issue

  16. Estimation of the incidence of late bladder and rectum complications after high-dose (70-78 Gy) conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, using dose-volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boersma, Liesbeth J.; Brink, Mandy van den; Bruce, Allison M.; Shouman, Tarek; Gras, Luuk; Velde, Annet te; Lebesque, Joos V.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether Dose-Volume Histogram (DVH) parameters can be used to identify risk groups for developing late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: DVH parameters were analyzed for 130 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with conformal radiotherapy in a dose-escalating protocol (70-78 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction). The incidence of late (>6 months) GI and GU complications was classified using the RTOG/EORTC and the SOMA/LENT scoring system. In addition, GI complications were divided in nonsevere and severe (requiring one or more laser treatments or blood transfusions) rectal bleeding. The median follow-up time was 24 months. We investigated whether rectal and bladder wall volumes, irradiated to various dose levels, correlated with the observed actuarial incidences of GI and GU complications, using volume as a continuous variable. Subsequently, for each dose level in the DVH, the rectal wall volumes were dichotomized using different volumes as cutoff levels. The impact of the total radiation dose, and the maximum radiation dose in the rectal and bladder wall was analyzed as well. Results: The actuarial incidence at 2 years for GI complications ≥Grade II was 14% (RTOG/EORTC) or 20% (SOMA/LENT); for GU complications ≥Grade III 8% (RTOG/EORTC) or 21% (SOMA/LENT). Neither for GI complications ≥Grade II (RTOG/EORTC or SOMA/LENT), nor for GU complications ≥Grade III (RTOG/EORTC or SOMA/LENT), was a significant correlation found between any of the DVH parameters and the actuarial incidence of complications. For severe rectal bleeding (actuarial incidence at 2 years 3%), four consecutive volume cutoff levels were found, which significantly discriminated between high and low risk. A trend was observed that a total radiation dose ≥ 74 Gy (or a maximum radiation dose in the rectal wall >75 Gy) resulted in a higher incidence of severe rectal bleeding (p

  17. Epigenetics in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Albany, Costantine; Alva, Ajjai S.; Aparicio, Ana M.; Singal, Rakesh; Yellapragada, Sarvari; Sonpavde, Guru; Hahn, Noah M.

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most commonly diagnosed nonskin malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death among men in the United States. Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in gene expression caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequences. Two common epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation and histone modification, have demonstrated critical roles in prostate cancer growth and metastasis. DNA hypermethylation of cytosine-guanine (CpG) rich sequ...

  18. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-05: Dose Escalation to Biological Tumor Volumes of Prostate Cancer Patients Using Gold Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jermoumi, M; Ngwa, W [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Medical Physics Program, University of Massachusetts Lowell (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Insitute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical, Boston, MA (United States); Sajo, E [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Medical Physics Program, University of Massachusetts Lowell (United States); Houari, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Insitute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Studies have shown that radiation boosting could help reduce prostate cancer (PCa) recurrence. Biological tumor volumes (BTV) are a high priority for such radiation boosting. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential of radiation boosting of real patient BTVs using gold nanoparticles (GNP) released from gold-loaded brachytherapy spacers (GBS) during brachytherapy. Methods: The BTVs of 12 patients having prostate adenocarcinoma identified with positron emission tomography (PET) and CT scanner using C-11 labeled tracer [11C]acetate were investigated. The initial GNP concentration and time to achieve a dose enhancement effect (DEF) of 2 was simulated using the freely downloadable software RAID APP. The investigations were carried out for low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy sources (BTS) described in AAPM Task Group report 43: Cs-131, I-125, and Pd-103. In first case, we used 7 mg/g and 18 mg/g of GNP initial concentrations to estimate the time needed for released GNP to achieve a DEF of 2 for the different BTS, and compare with clinically relevant treatment times. In second case, we calculated the initial concentration of GNPs needed to achieve a DEF of 2 during the time the BTS would typically deliver 50%, 70% and 90% of the total dose. Results: For an initial concentration of 18 mg/g, when using Cs-131, and Pd-103, a DEF of 2 could only be achieved for BTV of 3.3 cm3 and 1 cm3 respectively. Meanwhile a DEF of 2 could be achieved for all 12 BTVs when using I-125. To achieve a DEF of 2 for all patients using Cs-131 and Pd-103, much higher initial concentrations would have to be used than have been typically employed in pre-clinical studies. Conclusion: The I-125 is the most viable BTS that can be employed with GBS to guide dose painting treatment planning for localized PCa.

  19. Justification for inter-fraction correction of catheter movement in fractionated high dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simnor, Tania; Li, Sonia; Lowe, Gerry; Ostler, Peter; Bryant, Linda; Chapman, Caroline; Inchley, Dave; Hoskin, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Fractionated high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer relies on reproducible catheter positions for each fraction to ensure adequate tumour coverage while minimising dose to normal tissues. Peri-prostatic oedema may cause caudal displacement of the catheters relative to the prostate gland between fractions. This can be corrected for by changing source dwell positions or by physical re-advancement of catheters before treatment. Materials and methods: Data for 20 consecutive monotherapy patients receiving three HDR fractions of 10.5 Gy per fraction over 2 days were analysed retrospectively. Pre-treatment CT scans were used to assess the effect of catheter movement between fractions on implant quality, with and without movement correction. Implant quality was evaluated using dosimetric parameters. Results: Compared to the first fraction (f1) the mean inter-fraction caudal movement relative to the prostate base was 7.9 mm (f2) (range 0-21 mm) and 3.9 mm (f3) (range 0-25.5 mm). PTV D90% was reduced without movement correction by a mean of 27.8% (f2) and 32.3% (f3), compared with 5.3% and 5.1%, respectively, with catheter movement correction. Dose to 2 cc of the rectum increased by a mean of 0.69 (f2) and 0.76 Gy (f3) compared with an increase of 0.03 and 0.04 Gy, respectively, with correction. The urethra V12 also increased by a mean of 0.36 (f2) and 0.39 Gy (f3) compared with 0.06 and 0.16 Gy, respectively, with correction. Conclusions: Inter-fraction correction for catheter movement using pre-treatment imaging is critical to maintain the quality of an implant. Without movement correction there is significant risk of tumour under-dosage and normal tissue over-dosage. The findings of this study justify additional imaging between fractions in order to carry out correction.

  20. Efficacy of modest dose irradiation in combination with long-term endocrinal treatment for high-risk prostate cancer. A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tomonari; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki

    2004-01-01

    Although radiotherapy in combination with endocrinal manipulation has been identified as an effective treatment for patients with high-risk prostate cancer, the optimal dose for locoregional control of prostate cancer in combination with hormonal therapy has not yet been determined. The efficacy of modest doses of irradiation (60-62 Gy) combined with long-term endocrinal treatment for patients with high-risk prostate cancer (defined as a pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level greater than 20 ng/ml or a Gleason's score of 8-10 or T3-T4 disease) was analyzed in 60 Japanese patients. The patients included in this study had received radical radiotherapy with long-term endocrinal manipulation in the period between 1993 and 2000. The median age of the patients was 70 years (range, 56-83). Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy with a median duration of 3.9 months was performed prior to radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy was continued until recurrence. A median dose of 61.4 Gy (range, 44-71.4) was delivered to the prostate. Pelvic node irradiation was performed in 49 patients (81.6%). After a median follow-up period of 28.5 months, the overall survival, cause-specific survival and biochemical relapse-free survival at 3 years were 94.4%, 96% and 89.8%, respectively. Local failure was observed in one patient, distant metastases were observed in three patients and a late toxic effect greater than Grade 2 was not observed in any patients. This study, though preliminary due to a short-term follow-up period, reveals the possibility that modest doses of irradiation combined with long-term endocrinal treatment could be an effective means of achieving excellent local control of high-risk prostate cancer. (author)

  1. Prostate Cancer Ambassadors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vines, Anissa I.; Hunter, Jaimie C.; Carlisle, Veronica A.; Richmond, Alan N.

    2016-01-01

    African American men bear a higher burden of prostate cancer than Caucasian men, but knowledge about how to make an informed decision about prostate cancer screening is limited. A lay health advisor model was used to train “Prostate Cancer Ambassadors” on prostate cancer risk and symptoms, how to make an informed decision for prostate-specific antigen screening, and how to deliver the information to members of their community. Training consisted of two, 6-hour interactive sessions and was implemented in three predominantly African American communities over an 8-month period between 2013 and 2014. Following training, Ambassadors committed to contacting at least 10 people within 3 months using a toolkit composed of wallet-sized informational cards for distribution, a slide presentation, and a flip chart. Thirty-two Ambassadors were trained, with more than half being females (59%) and half reporting a family history of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer knowledge improved significantly among Ambassadors (p ≤ .0001). Self-efficacy improved significantly for performing outreach tasks (p < .0001), and among women in helping a loved one with making an informed decision (p = .005). There was also an improvement in collective efficacy in team members (p = .0003). Twenty-nine of the Ambassadors fulfilled their commitment to reach at least 10 people (average number of contacts per Ambassador was 11). In total, 355 individuals were reached with the prostate cancer information. The Ambassador training program proved successful in training Ambassadors to reach communities about prostate cancer and how to make an informed decision about screening. PMID:27099348

  2. Radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, S.; Herfarth, K.

    2011-01-01

    With the development of modern radiation techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), a dose escalation in the definitive radiotherapy of prostate cancer and a consecutive improvement in biochemical recurrence-free survival (BFS) could be achieved. Among others, investigators at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) saw 5-year BFS rates of up to 98%. A further gain in effectiveness and safety is expected of hypofractionation schedules, as suggested by data published by Kupelian et al., who saw a low 5-year rate of grade ≥2 rectal side-effects of 4.5%. However, randomized studies are just beginning to mature. Patients with intermediate or high-risk tumors should receive neoadjuvant (NHT) and adjuvant (AHT) androgen deprivation. Bolla et al. could show an increase in 5-year overall survival from 62-78%. The inclusion of the whole pelvis in the treatment field (WPRT) is still controversial. The RTOG 94-13 study showed a significant advantage in disease-free survival after 60 months but long-term data did not yield significant differences between WPRT and irradiation of the prostate alone. The German Society of Urology strongly recommends adjuvant radiotherapy of the prostate bed for pT3 N0 tumors with positive margins. In a pT3 N0 R0 or pT2 N0 R+ situation, adjuvant radiotherapy should at least be considered. So far, no randomized data on NHT and AHT have been published, so androgen deprivation remains an individual decision in the postoperative setting. In a retrospective analysis Spiotto et al. reported a positive effect for adjuvant WPRT and biochemical control. This article summarizes the essential publications on definitive and adjuvant radiotherapy and discusses the additional use of androgen deprivation and WPRT. (orig.) [de

  3. SU-E-T-767: Treatment Planning Study of Prostate Cancer by CyberKnife with Respect to the Urethral Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, H; Mizuno, H; Sumida, I; Otani, Y; Yagi, M; Takashina, M; Suzuki, O; Yoshioka, Y; Koizumi, M; Ogawa, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Hypo-fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is nowadays one of the treatment strategies for prostate cancer. There are few reports on planning study of prostate cancer by CyberKnife with respect to the urethral dose because of the invisibility in CT. We have investigated a planning method using fixed collimators with considering dose homogeneity, conformity and urethral dose. Methods: Radiotherapy treatment planning of prostate cancer were under a clinical trial approved by the institutional review board. The prescription dose of 35 Gy were delivered to the PTV in five fractions with the urethral catheter. Urethra position was identified by pretreatment CT and catheter, which was inserted before treatment planning CT and released after the treatment. All plans agreed to the criteria as shown in table 1, and the following constraints were recommended as well: the prescribed iso-dose line should be from 70% to 90%; the total MU should be below 50,000 MU; the minimum MU per beam should be larger than 15 MU; the estimated delivery time (excluding patient setup time) by Multiplan with image time interval of 60 s should be less than 35 min. Collimator size and position were decided as shown in figure 1. Fixed collimator of 15 mm was positioned around urethra and PTV for avoiding high dose of urethra and achieving conformity, and fixed collimator of 30 or 40 were positioned around PTV for achieving dose homogeneity. Results: With this method, all constraints were achieved. (Table 1, Figure 2) Max dose of urethra was ranging from 103.9% to 114.2%, because urethra position was identified by pretreatment CT and urethral catheter. Conclusion: Hypo-fractionated SBRT with IMRT utilizing urethral catheter could be a promising new treatment option for prostate cancer. This work was supported by JSPS Core-to-Core program Number 23003

  4. SU-E-T-767: Treatment Planning Study of Prostate Cancer by CyberKnife with Respect to the Urethral Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, H; Mizuno, H; Sumida, I; Otani, Y; Yagi, M; Takashina, M; Suzuki, O; Yoshioka, Y; Koizumi, M; Ogawa, K [Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Hypo-fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is nowadays one of the treatment strategies for prostate cancer. There are few reports on planning study of prostate cancer by CyberKnife with respect to the urethral dose because of the invisibility in CT. We have investigated a planning method using fixed collimators with considering dose homogeneity, conformity and urethral dose. Methods: Radiotherapy treatment planning of prostate cancer were under a clinical trial approved by the institutional review board. The prescription dose of 35 Gy were delivered to the PTV in five fractions with the urethral catheter. Urethra position was identified by pretreatment CT and catheter, which was inserted before treatment planning CT and released after the treatment. All plans agreed to the criteria as shown in table 1, and the following constraints were recommended as well: the prescribed iso-dose line should be from 70% to 90%; the total MU should be below 50,000 MU; the minimum MU per beam should be larger than 15 MU; the estimated delivery time (excluding patient setup time) by Multiplan with image time interval of 60 s should be less than 35 min. Collimator size and position were decided as shown in figure 1. Fixed collimator of 15 mm was positioned around urethra and PTV for avoiding high dose of urethra and achieving conformity, and fixed collimator of 30 or 40 were positioned around PTV for achieving dose homogeneity. Results: With this method, all constraints were achieved. (Table 1, Figure 2) Max dose of urethra was ranging from 103.9% to 114.2%, because urethra position was identified by pretreatment CT and urethral catheter. Conclusion: Hypo-fractionated SBRT with IMRT utilizing urethral catheter could be a promising new treatment option for prostate cancer. This work was supported by JSPS Core-to-Core program Number 23003.

  5. Feasibility of MR-only proton dose calculations for prostate cancer radiotherapy using a commercial pseudo-CT generation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maspero, Matteo; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.; Landry, Guillaume; Belka, Claus; Parodi, Katia; Seevinck, Peter R.; Raaymakers, Bas W.; Kurz, Christopher

    2017-12-01

    A magnetic resonance (MR)-only radiotherapy workflow can reduce cost, radiation exposure and uncertainties introduced by CT-MRI registration. A crucial prerequisite is generating the so called pseudo-CT (pCT) images for accurate dose calculation and planning. Many pCT generation methods have been proposed in the scope of photon radiotherapy. This work aims at verifying for the first time whether a commercially available photon-oriented pCT generation method can be employed for accurate intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) dose calculation. A retrospective study was conducted on ten prostate cancer patients. For pCT generation from MR images, a commercial solution for creating bulk-assigned pCTs, called MR for Attenuation Correction (MRCAT), was employed. The assigned pseudo-Hounsfield Unit (HU) values were adapted to yield an increased agreement to the reference CT in terms of proton range. Internal air cavities were copied from the CT to minimise inter-scan differences. CT- and MRCAT-based dose calculations for opposing beam IMPT plans were compared by gamma analysis and evaluation of clinically relevant target and organ at risk dose volume histogram (DVH) parameters. The proton range in beam’s eye view (BEV) was compared using single field uniform dose (SFUD) plans. On average, a (2%, 2 mm) gamma pass rate of 98.4% was obtained using a 10% dose threshold after adaptation of the pseudo-HU values. Mean differences between CT- and MRCAT-based dose in the DVH parameters were below 1 Gy (radiotherapy, is feasible following adaptation of the assigned pseudo-HU values.

  6. Interim report of image-guided conformal high-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with unfavorable prostate cancer: the William Beaumont Phase II dose-escalating trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro A.; Kestin, Larry L.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Gonzalez, Jose A.; Wallace, Michelle; Gustafson, Gary S.; Edmundson, Gregory K.; Spencer, William; Vicini, Frank A.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: We analyzed our institution's experience treating patients with unfavorable prostate cancer in a prospective Phase II dose-escalating trial of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) integrated with conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boosts. This interim report discusses treatment outcome and prognostic factors using this treatment approach. Methods and Materials: From November 1991 through February 1998, 142 patients with unfavorable prostate cancer were prospectively treated in a dose-escalating trial with pelvic EBRT in combination with outpatient HDR brachytherapy at William Beaumont Hospital. Patients with any of the following characteristics were eligible: pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≥ 10.0 ng/ml, Gleason score ≥ 7, or clinical stage T2b or higher. All patients received pelvic EBRT to a median total dose of 46.0 Gy. Pelvic EBRT was integrated with ultrasound-guided transperineal conformal interstitial iridium-192 HDR implants. From 1991 to 1995, 58 patients underwent three conformal interstitial HDR implants during the first, second, and third weeks of pelvic EBRT. After October 1995, 84 patients received two interstitial implants during the first and third weeks of pelvic EBRT. The dose delivered via interstitial brachytherapy was escalated from 5.50 Gy to 6.50 Gy for each implant in those patients receiving three implants, and subsequently, from 8.25 Gy to 9.50 Gy per fraction in those patients receiving two implants. To improve implant quality and reduce operator dependency, an on-line, image-guided interactive dose optimization program was utilized during each HDR implant. No patient received hormonal therapy unless treatment failure was documented. The median follow-up was 2.1 years (range: 0.2-7.2 years). Biochemical failure was defined according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Consensus Panel definition. Results: The pretreatment PSA level was ≥ 10.0 ng/ml in 51% of patients. The

  7. Expression of Bcl-2, p53, and MDM2 in Localized Prostate Cancer With Respect to the Outcome of Radical Radiotherapy Dose Escalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergis, Roy; Corbishley, Catherine M.; Thomas, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Established prognostic factors in localized prostate cancer explain only a moderate proportion of variation in outcome. We analyzed tumor expression of apoptotic markers with respect to outcome in men with localized prostate cancer in two randomized controlled trials of radiotherapy dose escalation. Methods and Materials: Between 1995 and 2001, 308 patients with localized prostate cancer received neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and radical radiotherapy at our institution in one of two dose-escalation trials. The biopsy specimens in 201 cases were used to make a biopsy tissue microarray. We evaluated tumor expression of Bcl-2, p53, and MDM2 by immunohistochemistry with respect to outcome. Results: Median follow-up was 7 years, and 5-year freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) was 70.4% (95% CI, 63.5-76.3%). On univariate analysis, expression of Bcl-2 (p < 0.001) and p53 (p = 0.017), but not MDM2 (p = 0.224), was significantly associated with FFBF. Expression of Bcl-2 remained significantly associated with FFBF (p = 0.001) on multivariate analysis, independently of T stage, Gleason score, initial prostate-specific antigen level, and radiotherapy dose. Seven-year biochemical control was 61% vs. 41% (p = 0.0122) for 74 Gy vs. 64 Gy, respectively, among patients with Bcl-2-positive tumors and 87% vs. 81% (p = 0.423) for 74 Gy vs. 64 Gy, respectively, among patients with Bcl-2-negative tumors. There was no statistically significant interaction between dose and Bcl-2 expression. Conclusions: Bcl-2 expression was a significant, independent determinant of biochemical control after neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer. These data generate the hypothesis that Bcl-2 expression could be used to inform the choice of radiotherapy dose in individual patients.

  8. Epigenetics in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albany, Costantine; Alva, Ajjai S; Aparicio, Ana M; Singal, Rakesh; Yellapragada, Sarvari; Sonpavde, Guru; Hahn, Noah M

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most commonly diagnosed nonskin malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death among men in the United States. Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in gene expression caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequences. Two common epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation and histone modification, have demonstrated critical roles in prostate cancer growth and metastasis. DNA hypermethylation of cytosine-guanine (CpG) rich sequence islands within gene promoter regions is widespread during neoplastic transformation of prostate cells, suggesting that treatment-induced restoration of a "normal" epigenome could be clinically beneficial. Histone modification leads to altered tumor gene function by changing chromosome structure and the level of gene transcription. The reversibility of epigenetic aberrations and restoration of tumor suppression gene function have made them attractive targets for prostate cancer treatment with modulators that demethylate DNA and inhibit histone deacetylases.

  9. Epigenetics in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costantine Albany

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the most commonly diagnosed nonskin malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death among men in the United States. Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in gene expression caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequences. Two common epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation and histone modification, have demonstrated critical roles in prostate cancer growth and metastasis. DNA hypermethylation of cytosine-guanine (CpG rich sequence islands within gene promoter regions is widespread during neoplastic transformation of prostate cells, suggesting that treatment-induced restoration of a “normal” epigenome could be clinically beneficial. Histone modification leads to altered tumor gene function by changing chromosome structure and the level of gene transcription. The reversibility of epigenetic aberrations and restoration of tumor suppression gene function have made them attractive targets for prostate cancer treatment with modulators that demethylate DNA and inhibit histone deacetylases.

  10. Impact of radiation dose on achieving nadir PSA levels after 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for patients with localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Leibel, Steven A.; Kelson, Suzanne; Fuks, Zvi

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Several reports have documented the prognostic value of a post-irradiation nadir PSA of ≤1 ng/ml in prostatic cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to determine which pre-treatment and treatment-related variables impact upon achieving such nadir levels. Materials and Methods: Between January 1987 and June 1995, 740 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). 214 (29%) patients were treated with neo-adjuvant androgen ablation prior to therapy and were excluded from this analysis. Among the 526 evaluable patients, the clinical stage were as follows: T 1 C=128 (24%); T 2 A=76 (14%); T 2 B=116 (22%); T 2 C=99 (19%) and T 3 =107 (21%). The prescription dose to the planning target volume (PTV) was 64.8-68.4 Gy in 87 patients (17%); 70.2 Gy in 191 (36%); 75.6 Gy in 209 (40%) and 81 Gy in 39 (7%). The median pre-treatment PSA value was 11.2 ng/ml (range 0.3-114). The median follow-up was 20 months (range: 6-76 months). Results: 242 patients (46%) had PSA levels which declined to ≤1.0 ng/ml. The median time to a nadir level of ≤1.0 was 15.6 months (range: 1-43 months) from completion of 3D-CRT. 154 (29%) patients continued to show declining PSA levels within the first 2 years after therapy, and 130 patients (25%) failed to nadir at PSA levels of ≤1.0 ng/ml. Among patients with nadir PSA levels ≤1, the 3 year PSA relapse-free survival was 91% compared to 29% for patients with nadir PSA levels >1 ng/ml (p<0.0001). A Cox-regression analysis demonstrated that nadir PSA ≤1 was the strongest predictor of PSA relapse-free survival (p<0.001) followed by Gleason score ≤ 6 (p<0.001) and stage< T3 (p=0.004). Among patients who received doses of ≥75.6 Gy, the likelihood of achieving PSA nadir levels ≤1.0 at 24 and 36 months was 86% and 93%, respectively, compared to 74 and 80%, respectively, among those who received lower doses (p<0.001). Doses of ≥75.6 Gy was the strongest

  11. Increasing Fractional Doses Increases the Probability of Benign PSA Bounce in Patients Undergoing Definitive HDR Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauck, Carlin R.; Ye, Hong; Chen, Peter Y.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Limbacher, Amy; Krauss, Daniel J., E-mail: Daniel.krauss@beaumont.edu

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce is a temporary elevation of the PSA level above a prior nadir. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the frequency of a PSA bounce following high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer is associated with individual treatment fraction size. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2014, 554 patients underwent treatment of low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer with definitive HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy and had ≥3 subsequent PSA measurements. Four different fraction sizes were used: 950 cGy × 4 fractions, 1200 cGy × 2 fractions, 1350 cGy × 2 fractions, 1900 cGy × 1 fraction. Four definitions of PSA bounce were applied: ≥0.2, ≥0.5, ≥1.0, and ≥2.0 ng/mL above the prior nadir with a subsequent return to the nadir. Results: The median follow-up period was 3.7 years. The actuarial 3-year rate of PSA bounce for the entire cohort was 41.3%, 28.4%, 17.4%, and 6.8% for nadir +0.2, +0.5, +1.0, and +2.0 ng/mL, respectively. The 3-year rate of PSA bounce >0.2 ng/mL was 42.2%, 32.1%, 41.0%, and 59.1% for the 950-, 1200-, 1350-, and 1900-cGy/fraction levels, respectively (P=.002). The hazard ratio for bounce >0.2 ng/mL for patients receiving a single fraction of 1900 cGy compared with those receiving treatment in multiple fractions was 1.786 (P=.024). For patients treated with a single 1900-cGy fraction, the 1-, 2-, and 3-year rates of PSA bounce exceeding the Phoenix biochemical failure definition (nadir +2 ng/mL) were 4.5%, 18.7%, and 18.7%, respectively, higher than the rates for all other administered dose levels (P=.025). Conclusions: The incidence of PSA bounce increases with single-fraction HDR treatment. Knowledge of posttreatment PSA kinetics may aid in decision making regarding management of potential biochemical failures.

  12. Increasing Fractional Doses Increases the Probability of Benign PSA Bounce in Patients Undergoing Definitive HDR Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauck, Carlin R.; Ye, Hong; Chen, Peter Y.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Limbacher, Amy; Krauss, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce is a temporary elevation of the PSA level above a prior nadir. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the frequency of a PSA bounce following high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer is associated with individual treatment fraction size. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2014, 554 patients underwent treatment of low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer with definitive HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy and had ≥3 subsequent PSA measurements. Four different fraction sizes were used: 950 cGy × 4 fractions, 1200 cGy × 2 fractions, 1350 cGy × 2 fractions, 1900 cGy × 1 fraction. Four definitions of PSA bounce were applied: ≥0.2, ≥0.5, ≥1.0, and ≥2.0 ng/mL above the prior nadir with a subsequent return to the nadir. Results: The median follow-up period was 3.7 years. The actuarial 3-year rate of PSA bounce for the entire cohort was 41.3%, 28.4%, 17.4%, and 6.8% for nadir +0.2, +0.5, +1.0, and +2.0 ng/mL, respectively. The 3-year rate of PSA bounce >0.2 ng/mL was 42.2%, 32.1%, 41.0%, and 59.1% for the 950-, 1200-, 1350-, and 1900-cGy/fraction levels, respectively (P=.002). The hazard ratio for bounce >0.2 ng/mL for patients receiving a single fraction of 1900 cGy compared with those receiving treatment in multiple fractions was 1.786 (P=.024). For patients treated with a single 1900-cGy fraction, the 1-, 2-, and 3-year rates of PSA bounce exceeding the Phoenix biochemical failure definition (nadir +2 ng/mL) were 4.5%, 18.7%, and 18.7%, respectively, higher than the rates for all other administered dose levels (P=.025). Conclusions: The incidence of PSA bounce increases with single-fraction HDR treatment. Knowledge of posttreatment PSA kinetics may aid in decision making regarding management of potential biochemical failures.

  13. Imaging and prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    1996-01-01

    The use of imaging in evaluating patients with prostate cancer is highly dependent upon the purpose of the evaluation. Ultrasound, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, TC-99m Bone Scanning, and Positron Emission Tomography may all be utilized for imaging in prostate cancer. The utility of each of these modalities depends upon the intended purpose: for instance, screening, staging, or evaluating for progression of disease in patients with prostate cancer. Transrectal ultrasound is performed by placing a 5MHz to 7.5 MHz transducer in the rectum and imaging the prostate in the coronal and sagittal planes. Prostate cancer generally appears as an area of diminished echogenocity in the peripheral zone of the prostate gland. However, up to 24% of prostate cancers are isoechoic and cannot be well distinguished from the remainder of the peripheral zone. In addition, the incidence of malignancy in a lesion judged to be suspicious on ultrasound is between 20% and 25%. Therefore, while ultrasound is the least expensive of the three cross sectional imaging modalities, its relatively low specificity precludes it from being used as a screening examination. Investigators have also looked at the ability of ultrasound to evaluate the presence and extent of extracapsular spread of prostate cancer. The RDOG (Radiology Diagnostic Oncology Group) multi-institutional cooperative trial reported a disappointing overall accuracy of ultrasound of 58% for staging prostate cancer. The accuracy was somewhat higher 63%, for patients with advanced disease. The other cross-sectional imaging modalities available for imaging the prostate include Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Computed Tomography is useful as an 'anatomic' imaging technique to detect lymph node enlargement. It is not sensitive in detecting microscopic nodal involvement with tumor, or tumor in non-enlarged pelvic lymph nodes. The primary prostate neoplasm is generally the same attenuation as the normal

  14. Targeting Quiescence in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0413 TITLE: Targeting Quiescence in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Laura Buttitta CONTRACTING...Quiescence in Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting uiescence in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0413 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT A major problem in prostate cancer is finding and eliminating the non-proliferating or “quiescent” cancer cells. This is because early

  15. Long-term outcomes from dose-escalated image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy with androgen deprivation: encouraging results for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Shea W; Aherne, Noel J; Benjamin, Linus C; Wu, Bosco; de Campos Silva, Thomaz; McLachlan, Craig S; McKay, Michael J; Last, Andrew J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2014-01-01

    Dose-escalated (DE) radiotherapy in the setting of localized prostate cancer has been shown to improve biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) in several studies. In the same group of patients, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been shown to confer a survival benefit when combined with radiotherapy doses of up to 70 Gy; however, there is currently little long-term data on patients who have received high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with ADT. We report the long-term outcomes in a large cohort of patients treated with the combination of DE image-guided IMRT (IG-IMRT) and ADT. Patients with localized prostate cancer were identified from a centralized database across an integrated cancer center. All patients received DE IG-IMRT, combined with ADT, and had a minimum follow up of 12 months post-radiotherapy. All relapse and toxicity data were collected prospectively. Actuarial bDFS, metastasis-free survival, prostate cancer-specific survival, and multivariate analyses were calculated using the SPSS v20.0 statistical package. Seven hundred and eighty-two eligible patients were identified with a median follow up of 46 months. Overall, 4.3% of patients relapsed, 2.0% developed distant metastases, and 0.6% died from metastatic prostate cancer. At 5-years, bDFS was 88%, metastasis-free survival was 95%, and prostate cancer-specific survival was 98%. Five-year grade 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 2.1% and 3.4%, respectively. No grade 3 or 4 late toxicities were reported. Pretreatment prostate specific antigen (P=0.001) and Gleason score (P=0.03) were significant in predicting biochemical failure on multivariate analysis. There is a high probability of tumor control with DE IG-IMRT combined with androgen deprivation, and this is a technique with a low probability of significant late toxicity. Our long term results corroborate the safety and efficacy of treating with IG-IMRT to high doses and compares favorably with published series for

  16. Chronic rectal bleeding after high-dose conformal treatment of prostate cancer warrants modification of existing morbidity scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Hunt, Margie A.; Movsas, Benjamin; Peter, Ruth S.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Serious late morbidity (Grade (3(4))) from the conformal treatment of prostate cancer has been reported in <1% to 6% of patients based on existing late gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity scales. None of the existing morbidity scales include our most frequently observed late GI complication, which is chronic rectal bleeding requiring multiple fulgerations. This communication documents the frequency of rectal bleeding requiring multiple fulgerations and illustrates the variation in reported late serious GI complication rates by the selection of morbidity scale. Methods and Materials: Between May 1989 and December 1993, 352 patients with T1-T3 nonmetastatic prostate cancers were treated with our four-field conformal technique without special rectal blocking. This technique includes a 1-cm margin from the clinical target volume (CTV) to the planning target volume (PTV) in all directions. The median follow-up for these patients was 36 months (range 2-76), and the median center of prostate dose was 74 Gy (range 63-81). Three morbidity scales are assessed: the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG), the Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force (LENT), and our modification of the LENT (FC-LENT). This modification registers chronic rectal bleeding requiring at least one blood transfusion and/or more than two coagulations as a Grade 3 event. Estimates for Grade (3(4)) late GI complication rates were determined using Kaplan-Meier methodology. The duration of severe symptoms with chronic rectal bleeding is measured from the first to the last transrectal coagulation. Latency is measured from the end of radiotherapy to surgery, first blood transfusion, or third coagulation procedure. Results: Sixteen patients developed Grade (3(4)) complications by one of the three morbidity scales. Two patients required surgery (colostomy or sigmoid resection), three required multiple blood transfusions, two required one or two blood transfusions, and nine required at least three

  17. Analysis of biopsy outcome after three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy of prostate cancer using dose-distribution variables and tumor control probability models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levegruen, Sabine; Jackson, Andrew; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Venkatraman, Ennapadam S.; Skwarchuk, Mark W.; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Fuks, Zvi; Leibel, Steven A.; Ling, C. Clifton

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate tumor control following three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) of prostate cancer and to identify dose-distribution variables that correlate with local control assessed through posttreatment prostate biopsies. Methods and Material: Data from 132 patients, treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), who had a prostate biopsy 2.5 years or more after 3D-CRT for T1c-T3 prostate cancer with prescription doses of 64.8-81 Gy were analyzed. Variables derived from the dose distribution in the PTV included: minimum dose (Dmin), maximum dose (Dmax), mean dose (Dmean), dose to n% of the PTV (Dn), where n = 1%, ..., 99%. The concept of the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) was evaluated for different values of the surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF 2 ). Four tumor control probability (TCP) models (one phenomenologic model using a logistic function and three Poisson cell kill models) were investigated using two sets of input parameters, one for low and one for high T-stage tumors. Application of both sets to all patients was also investigated. In addition, several tumor-related prognostic variables were examined (including T-stage, Gleason score). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. The ability of the logistic regression models (univariate and multivariate) to predict the biopsy result correctly was tested by performing cross-validation analyses and evaluating the results in terms of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results: In univariate analysis, prescription dose (Dprescr), Dmax, Dmean, dose to n% of the PTV with n of 70% or less correlate with outcome (p 2 : EUD correlates significantly with outcome for SF 2 of 0.4 or more, but not for lower SF 2 values. Using either of the two input parameters sets, all TCP models correlate with outcome (p 2 , is limited because the low dose region may not coincide with the tumor location. Instead, for MSKCC prostate cancer patients with their

  18. Predictors of Rectal Tolerance Observed in a Dose-Escalated Phase 1-2 Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.W. Nathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Cho, L. Chinsoo [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Straka, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Christie, Alana [Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Lotan, Yair [Department of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Pistenmaa, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado (United States); Nanda, Akash [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Health Cancer Center at Orlando Health, Orlando, Florida (United States); Kueplian, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Brindle, Jeffrey [Prairie Lakes Hospital, Watertown, South Dakota (United States); Cooley, Susan; Perkins, Alida [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Raben, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado (United States); Xie, Xian-Jin [Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Timmerman, Robert D., E-mail: robert.timmerman@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To convey the occurrence of isolated cases of severe rectal toxicity at the highest dose level tested in 5-fraction stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for localized prostate cancer; and to rationally test potential causal mechanisms to guide future studies and experiments to aid in mitigating or altogether avoiding such severe bowel injury. Methods and Materials: Clinical and treatment planning data were analyzed from 91 patients enrolled from 2006 to 2011 on a dose-escalation (45, 47.5, and 50 Gy in 5 fractions) phase 1/2 clinical study of SBRT for localized prostate cancer. Results: At the highest dose level, 6.6% of patients treated (6 of 91) developed high-grade rectal toxicity, 5 of whom required colostomy. Grade 3+ delayed rectal toxicity was strongly correlated with volume of rectal wall receiving 50 Gy >3 cm{sup 3} (P<.0001), and treatment of >35% circumference of rectal wall to 39 Gy (P=.003). Grade 2+ acute rectal toxicity was significantly correlated with treatment of >50% circumference of rectal wall to 24 Gy (P=.010). Conclusion: Caution is advised when considering high-dose SBRT for treatment of tumors near bowel structures, including prostate cancer. Threshold dose constraints developed from physiologic principles are defined, and if respected can minimize risk of severe rectal toxicity.

  19. [18F]fluoroethylcholine-PET/CT imaging for radiation treatment planning of recurrent and primary prostate cancer with dose escalation to PET/CT-positive lymph nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahl Andreas

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At present there is no consensus on irradiation treatment volumes for intermediate to high-risk primary cancers or recurrent disease. Conventional imaging modalities, such as CT, MRI and transrectal ultrasound, are considered suboptimal for treatment decisions. Choline-PET/CT might be considered as the imaging modality in radiooncology to select and delineate clinical target volumes extending the prostate gland or prostate fossa. In conjunction with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and imaged guided radiotherapy (IGRT, it might offer the opportunity of dose escalation to selected sites while avoiding unnecessary irradiation of healthy tissues. Methods Twenty-six patients with primary (n = 7 or recurrent (n = 19 prostate cancer received Choline-PET/CT planned 3D conformal or intensity modulated radiotherapy. The median age of the patients was 65 yrs (range 45 to 78 yrs. PET/CT-scans with F18-fluoroethylcholine (FEC were performed on a combined PET/CT-scanner equipped for radiation therapy planning. The majority of patients had intermediate to high risk prostate cancer. All patients received 3D conformal or intensity modulated and imaged guided radiotherapy with megavoltage cone beam CT. The median dose to primary tumours was 75.6 Gy and to FEC-positive recurrent lymph nodal sites 66,6 Gy. The median follow-up time was 28.8 months. Results The mean SUVmax in primary cancer was 5,97 in the prostate gland and 3,2 in pelvic lymph nodes. Patients with recurrent cancer had a mean SUVmax of 4,38. Two patients had negative PET/CT scans. At 28 months the overall survival rate is 94%. Biochemical relapse free survival is 83% for primary cancer and 49% for recurrent tumours. Distant disease free survival is 100% and 75% for primary and recurrent cancer, respectively. Acute normal tissue toxicity was mild in 85% and moderate (grade 2 in 15%. No or mild late side effects were observed in the majority of patients (84%. One patient had

  20. Urinary bladder dose-response relationships for patient-reported genitourinary morbidity domains following prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thor, Maria; Olsson, Caroline; Oh, Jung Hun; Petersen, Stine Elleberg; Alsadius, David; Bentzen, Lise; Pettersson, Niclas; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Høyer, Morten; Steineck, Gunnar; Deasy, Joseph O

    2016-04-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) induced genitourinary (GU) morbidity is typically assessed by physicians as single symptoms or aggregated scores including symptoms from various domains. Here we apply a method to group patient-reported GU symptoms after RT for localized prostate cancer based on their interplay, and study how these relate to urinary bladder dose. Data were taken from two Scandinavian studies (N=207/276) including men treated with external-beam RT (EBRT) to 78/70Gy (2Gy/fraction; median time-to-follow-up: 3.6-6.4y). Within and across cohorts, bladder dose-volume parameters were tested as predictors for GU symptom domains identified from two study-specific questionnaires (35 questions on frequency, incontinence, obstruction, pain, urgency, and sensory symptoms) using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis (MVA) with 10-fold cross-validation. Performance was evaluated using Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (Az). For the identified Incontinence (2-5 symptoms), Obstruction (3-5 symptoms), and Urgency (2-7 symptoms) domains, MVA demonstrated that bladder doses close to the prescription doses were the strongest predictors for Obstruction (Az: 0.53-0.57) and Urgency (Az: 0.60). For Obstruction, performance increased for the across cohort analysis (Az: 0.61-0.64). Our identified patient-reported GU symptom domains suggest that high urinary bladder doses, and increased focus on both obstruction and urgency is likely to further add to the understanding of GU tract RT responses. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Hyaluronan Biosynthesis in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCarthy, James B

    2006-01-01

    Despite advances in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer in the last several years metastasis represents the major cause of frustration and failure in the successful treatment of prostate cancer patients. Hyaluronan (HA...

  2. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  3. Dose-Escalated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Patients With Intermediate- and High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Initial Dosimetry Analysis and Patient Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotecha, Rupesh; Djemil, Toufik; Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Thousand, Richard A.; Vassil, Andrew; Stovsky, Mark; Berglund, Ryan K.; Klein, Eric A.; Stephans, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the short-term clinical outcomes and acute and late treatment-related genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities in patients with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2011 and 2014, 24 patients with prostate cancer were treated with SBRT to the prostate gland and proximal seminal vesicles. A high-dose avoidance zone (HDAZ) was created by a 3-mm expansion around the rectum, urethra, and bladder. Patients were treated to a minimum dose of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions, with a simultaneous dose escalation to a dose of 50 Gy to the target volume away from the HDAZ. Acute and late GU and GI toxicity outcomes were measured according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events toxicity scale, version 4. Results: The median follow-up was 25 months (range, 18-45 months). Nine patients (38%) experienced an acute grade 2 GU toxicity, which was medically managed, and no patients experienced an acute grade 2 GI toxicity. Two patients (8%) experienced late grade 2 GU toxicity, and 2 patients (8%) experienced late grade 2 GI toxicity. No acute or late grade ≥3 GU or GI toxicities were observed. The 24-month prostate-specific antigen relapse-free survival outcome for all patients was 95.8% (95% confidence interval 75.6%-99.4%), and both biochemical failures occurred in patients with high-risk disease. All patients are currently alive at the time of this analysis and continue to be followed. Conclusions: A heterogeneous prostate SBRT planning technique with differential treatment volumes (low dose: 36.25 Gy; and high dose: 50 Gy) with an HDAZ provides a safe method of dose escalation. Favorable rates of biochemical control and acceptably low rates of acute and long-term GU and GI toxicity can be achieved in patients with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer treated with SBRT.

  4. Dose-Escalated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Patients With Intermediate- and High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Initial Dosimetry Analysis and Patient Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotecha, Rupesh; Djemil, Toufik; Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Thousand, Richard A.; Vassil, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Stovsky, Mark; Berglund, Ryan K.; Klein, Eric A. [Department of Urology, Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Stephans, Kevin L., E-mail: stephak@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: To report the short-term clinical outcomes and acute and late treatment-related genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities in patients with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2011 and 2014, 24 patients with prostate cancer were treated with SBRT to the prostate gland and proximal seminal vesicles. A high-dose avoidance zone (HDAZ) was created by a 3-mm expansion around the rectum, urethra, and bladder. Patients were treated to a minimum dose of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions, with a simultaneous dose escalation to a dose of 50 Gy to the target volume away from the HDAZ. Acute and late GU and GI toxicity outcomes were measured according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events toxicity scale, version 4. Results: The median follow-up was 25 months (range, 18-45 months). Nine patients (38%) experienced an acute grade 2 GU toxicity, which was medically managed, and no patients experienced an acute grade 2 GI toxicity. Two patients (8%) experienced late grade 2 GU toxicity, and 2 patients (8%) experienced late grade 2 GI toxicity. No acute or late grade ≥3 GU or GI toxicities were observed. The 24-month prostate-specific antigen relapse-free survival outcome for all patients was 95.8% (95% confidence interval 75.6%-99.4%), and both biochemical failures occurred in patients with high-risk disease. All patients are currently alive at the time of this analysis and continue to be followed. Conclusions: A heterogeneous prostate SBRT planning technique with differential treatment volumes (low dose: 36.25 Gy; and high dose: 50 Gy) with an HDAZ provides a safe method of dose escalation. Favorable rates of biochemical control and acceptably low rates of acute and long-term GU and GI toxicity can be achieved in patients with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer treated with SBRT.

  5. Analysis of dose volume histogram parameters to estimate late bladder and rectum complications after high-dose (70-78 Gy) conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boersma, L.J.; Brink, M. van den; Bruce, A.; Gras, L.; Velde, A. te; Lebesque, J.V.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) parameters can be used to identify risk groups for developing late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and to examine the effect of using different morbidity scoring systems on the results of these analyses. Materials and Methods: DVH parameters were analyzed for 130 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with conformal radiotherapy in a dose-escalating protocol (70-78 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction). The incidence of late (> 6 months) GI and GU complications was scored based on questionnaires and classified using the RTOG/EORTC and the SOMA/LENT scoring system. Moreover, patients were classified as being a rectal bleeder or no rectal bleeder and a distinction was made between non-severe and severe (requiring one or more laser treatments) rectal bleeding. The median follow-up time was 22 months. It was investigated whether the relative and absolute rectal wall volumes, irradiated to various dose levels (≥ 60 Gy, ≥ 65 Gy, ≥ 70 Gy and ≥ 75 Gy) were correlated with the observed actuarial incidences of GI complications. First, the analysis was performed using volume as a continuous variable. Subsequently, for each dose level in the DVH the rectal wall volumes were dichotomized using different volumes as cut-off levels. Twenty cut-off levels were tested on their ability to discriminate between high and low risk for developing GI complications (Fig.). The relationship between bladder wall volumes irradiated to various dose levels and observed actuarial GU complications was investigated using the absolute bladder wall volumes, measured as a continuous variable. For both GI and GU complications, the role of the prescribed radiation dose and the maximum radiation dose in the rectal and bladder wall was analyzed as well. Results: None of the DVH parameters of the rectal wall was significantly correlated with the actuarial incidences of

  6. Impact of Dose to the Bladder Trigone on Long-Term Urinary Function After High-Dose Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Spratt, Daniel E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Oh, Jung Hun; Hunt, Margie [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kollmeier, Marisa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Happersett, Laura; Yorke, Ellen; Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Jackson, Andrew, E-mail: jacksona@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the potential association between genitourinary (GU) toxicity and planning dose–volume parameters for GU pelvic structures after high-dose intensity modulated radiation therapy in localized prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 268 patients who underwent intensity modulated radiation therapy to a prescribed dose of 86.4 Gy in 48 fractions during June 2004-December 2008 were evaluated with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire. Dose–volume histograms of the whole bladder, bladder wall, urethra, and bladder trigone were analyzed. The primary endpoint for GU toxicity was an IPSS sum increase ≥10 points over baseline. Univariate and multivariate analyses were done by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazard models, respectively. Results: Median follow-up was 5 years (range, 3-7.7 years). Thirty-nine patients experienced an IPSS sum increase ≥10 during follow-up; 84% remained event free at 5 years. After univariate analysis, lower baseline IPSS sum (P=.006), the V90 of the trigone (P=.006), and the maximal dose to the trigone (P=.003) were significantly associated with an IPSS sum increase ≥10. After multivariate analysis, lower baseline IPSS sum (P=.009) and increased maximal dose to the trigone (P=.005) remained significantly associated. Seventy-two patients had both a lower baseline IPSS sum and a higher maximal dose to the trigone and were defined as high risk, and 68 patients had both a higher baseline IPSS sum and a lower maximal dose to the trigone and were defined as low risk for development of an IPSS sum increase ≥10. Twenty-one of 72 high-risk patients (29%) and 5 of 68 low-risk patients (7%) experienced an IPSS sum increase ≥10 (P=.001; odds ratio 5.19). Conclusions: The application of hot spots to the bladder trigone was significantly associated with relevant changes in IPSS during follow-up. Reduction of radiation dose to the lower bladder and specifically the

  7. Incidence of late rectal bleeding in high-dose conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer using equivalent uniform dose-based and dose-volume-based normal tissue complication probability models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soehn, Matthias; Yan Di; Liang Jian; Meldolesi, Elisa; Vargas, Carlos; Alber, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate modeling of rectal complications based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) data are necessary to allow safe dose escalation in radiotherapy of prostate cancer. We applied different equivalent uniform dose (EUD)-based and dose-volume-based normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models to rectal wall DVHs and follow-up data for 319 prostate cancer patients to identify the dosimetric factors most predictive for Grade ≥ 2 rectal bleeding. Methods and Materials: Data for 319 patients treated at the William Beaumont Hospital with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) under an adaptive radiotherapy protocol were used for this study. The following models were considered: (1) Lyman model and (2) logit-formula with DVH reduced to generalized EUD (3) serial reconstruction unit (RU) model (4) Poisson-EUD model, and (5) mean dose- and (6) cutoff dose-logistic regression model. The parameters and their confidence intervals were determined using maximum likelihood estimation. Results: Of the patients, 51 (16.0%) showed Grade 2 or higher bleeding. As assessed qualitatively and quantitatively, the Lyman- and Logit-EUD, serial RU, and Poisson-EUD model fitted the data very well. Rectal wall mean dose did not correlate to Grade 2 or higher bleeding. For the cutoff dose model, the volume receiving > 73.7 Gy showed most significant correlation to bleeding. However, this model fitted the data more poorly than the EUD-based models. Conclusions: Our study clearly confirms a volume effect for late rectal bleeding. This can be described very well by the EUD-like models, of which the serial RU- and Poisson-EUD model can describe the data with only two parameters. Dose-volume-based cutoff-dose models performed worse

  8. Near real-time automated dose restoration in IMPT to compensate for daily tissue density variations in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagt, Thyrza; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; van de Water, Steven; Heijmen, Ben; Hoogeman, Mischa

    2017-06-01

    Proton therapy is very sensitive to daily density changes along the pencil beam paths. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate an automated method for adaptation of IMPT plans to compensate for these daily tissue density variations. A two-step restoration method for ‘densities-of-the-day’ was created: (1) restoration of spot positions (Bragg peaks) by adapting the energy of each pencil beam to the new water equivalent path length; and (2) re-optimization of pencil beam weights by minimizing the dosimetric difference with the planned dose distribution, using a fast and exact quadratic solver. The method was developed and evaluated using 8-10 repeat CT scans of 10 prostate cancer patients. Experiments demonstrated that giving a high weight to the PTV in the re-optimization resulted in clinically acceptable restorations. For all scans we obtained V 95%  ⩾  98% and V 107%  ⩽  2%. For the bladder, the differences between the restored and the intended treatment plan were below  +2 Gy and  +2%-point. The rectum differences were below  +2 Gy and  +2%-point for 90% of the scans. In the remaining scans the rectum was filled with air, which partly overlapped with the PTV. The air cavity distorted the Bragg peak resulting in less favorable rectum doses.

  9. Sexual Function After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results From a Dose-Escalation Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielen, Gerard J. van der; Putten, Wim van; Incrocci, Luca

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to provide information about sexual function (SF) after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer while taking important factors into account that influence SF. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and February 2003, a total of 268 patients from a randomized dose-escalation trial comparing 68 Gy and 78 Gy agreed to participate in an additional part of the trial that evaluated SF. Results: At baseline 28% of patients had erectile dysfunction (ED). After 1 year, 27% of the pretreatment potent patients had developed ED. After 2 years this percentage had increased to 36%. After 3 years it almost stabilized at 38%. Satisfaction with sexual life was significantly correlated with ED. After 2 years one third of the pre-treatment potent patients still had considerable to very much sexual desire and found sex (very) important. No significant differences were found between the two dose-arms. Potency aids were used on a regular base by 14% of the patients. Conclusion: By taking adjuvant hormonal therapy (HT), HT during follow-up and potency aids into account, we found a lower percentage of ED after 3D-CRT than reported in previous prospective studies. A large group of patients still had sexual desire, considered sex important and 14% used potency aids after 3D-CRT

  10. Surveillance after prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supiot, S.; Rio, E.; Clement-Colmou, K.; Bouchot, O.; Rigaud, J.

    2011-01-01

    Follow-up after prostate cancer radiotherapy aims at detecting local or metastatic relapse, as well as long-term toxicity, requiring adapted treatments. Several scientific societies have published guidelines including clinical, biological and imaging recommendations. More data suggest a role for aggressive salvage therapy in case of local failure following radiotherapy. An adequate follow-up is required for the sake of patients' safety, i.e. to a posteriori validate dose constraints and radiation technique in each radiotherapy department. (authors)

  11. Clinical Usefulness of the Histoculture Drug Response Assay for Prostate Cancer and Benign Prostate Hypertrophy (BPH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2018-01-01

    The histoculture drug response assay (HDRA) has been adapted to determine androgen sensitivity in Gelfoam histoculture of human benign prostatic tissue as well as prostate cancer. Gelfoam histoculture was used to measure androgen-independent and androgen-dependent growth of benign and malignant prostate tissue. The androgen-sensitivity index was significantly higher in 23 paired specimens of prostate cancer compared to benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH). Genistein decreased the androgen-sensitivity index of BPH and prostate cancer in Gelfoam ® histoculture in a dose-dependent manner.

  12. Correlations of post-implant regional dosimetric parameters at 24 hours and one month, with clinical results of low-dose-rate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiichiro Okazaki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the correlations of post-implant regional dosimetrics at 24 hours (24 h and 1 month after implant procedures, with clinical outcomes of low-dose-rate (LDR brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Material and methods : Between January 2008 and December 2014, 130 consecutive patients treated for localized prostate cancer, receiving definitive iodine-125 ( 125 I brachytherapy treatment were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent post-implant CT imaging for dosimetric analysis at 24 h and 1 month after implantation procedure. Prostate contours were divided into quadrants: anterior-superior (ASQ, posterior-superior (PSQ, anterior-inferior (AIQ, and posterior-inferior (PIQ. Predictive factors and cut-off values of biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS and toxicities of LDR brachytherapy were analyzed. Results : The median follow-up time was 69.5 months. Seven patients (5.4% had biochemical failure. The 3-year and 5-year BFFS rates were 96.7% and 93.1%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, prostate-specific antigen and Gleason score were significant prognostic factors for biochemical failure. D 90 (the minimal dose received by 90% of the volume of PSQ and PIQ at 24 h, and D 90 of PSQ at 1 month were also significant factors. The cut-off values of PSQ D 90 were 145 Gy at 24 h and 160 Gy at 1 month. D 90 of the whole prostate was not significant at 24 h and at 1 month. D 90 of PSQ at 1 month was a significant factor for rectal hemorrhage. Conclusions : Post-implant D 90 of PSQ is significantly associated with BFFS for localized prostate cancer not only at 1 month, but also at 24 hours. D 90 of PSQ at 1 month is also a significant factor for rectal hemorrhage.

  13. Absorbed dose distributions in patients with bone metastases from hormone refractory prostate cancer treated with Re-186 HEDP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis Bacelar, A.M.; Dearnaley, D.P.; Divoli, A.; Chittenden, S.; Du, Y.; Flux, G.D.; O'Sullivan, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: intravenous administration of Re-186 hydroxyethylidene-diphosphonate (HEDP) is used for metastatic bone pain palliation in hormone refractory prostate cancer patients. Dosimetry for bone seeking radionuclides is challenging due to the complex structure with osteoblastic, osteolytic and mixed lesions. The aim of this study was to perform image-based patient-specific 3D convolution dosimetry to obtain a distribution of the absorbed doses to each lesion and estimate inter- and intra-patient variations. Materials and methods: 28 patients received a fixed 5 GBq activity of Re-186 HEDP followed by peripheral blood stem cell rescue at 14 days in a phase II trial. A FORTE dual-headed gamma camera was used to acquire sequential Single-Photon-Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) data of the thorax and pelvis area at 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 hours following administration. The projection data were reconstructed using filtered-back projection and were corrected for attenuation and scatter. Voxelised cumulated activity distributions were obtained with two different methods. First, the scans were co-registered and the time-activity curves were obtained on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Second, the clearance curve was obtained from the mean number of counts in each individual lesion and used to scale the uptake distribution taken at 24 hours. The calibration factors required for image quantification were obtained from a phantom experiment. An in-house developed EGSnrc Monte Carlo code was used for the calculation of dose voxel kernels for soft-tissue and cortical/trabecular bone used to perform convolution dosimetry. Cumulative dose-volume histograms were produced and mean absorbed doses calculated for each spinal and pelvic lesion. Results: preliminary results show that the lesion mean absorbed doses ranged from 25 to 55 Gy when the medium was soft tissue and decreased by 40% if bone was considered. The use of the cumulated activity distribution

  14. Permanent interstitial low-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with low risk prostate cancer. An interim analysis of 312 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badakhshi, Harun; Graf, Reinhold; Budach, Volker; Wust, Peter [University Hospital Berlin, Department for Radiation Oncology of Charite School of Medicine, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    The biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) rate after treatment with permanent iodine-125 seed implantation (PSI) or combined seeds and external beam radiotherapy (COMB) for clinical stage T1-T2 localized prostate cancer is a clinically relevant endpoint. The goal of this work was to evaluate the influence of relevant patient- and treatment-related factors. The study population comprised 312 consecutive patients treated with permanent seed implantation. All patients were evaluable for analysis of overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS), 230 for bRFS, of which 192 were in the PSI group and 38 in the COMB group. The prescribed minimum peripheral dose was 145 Gy for PSI, for COMB 110 Gy implant and external beam radiotherapy of 45 Gy. The median follow-up time was 33 months (range 8-66 months). bRFS was defined as a serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level ≤ 0.2 ng/ml at last follow-up. Overall, the actuarial bRFS at 50 months was 88.4 %. The 50-month bRFS rate for PSI and COMB was 90.9 %, and 77.2 %, respectively. In the univariate analysis, age in the categories ≤ 63 and > 63 years (p < 0.00), PSA nadir (≤ 0.5 ng/ml and > 0.5 ng/ml) and PSA bounce (yes/no) were the significant predicting factors for bRFS. None of the other patient and treatment variables (treatment modality, stage, PSA, Gleason score, risk group, number of risk factors, D90 and various other dose parameters) were found to be a statistically significant predictor of 50-month bRFS. The biochemical failure rates were low in this study. As a proof of principle, our large monocenteric analysis shows that low-dose-rate brachytherapy is an effective and safe procedure for patients with early stage prostate cancer. (orig.) [German] Das biochemisch rezidivfreie Ueberleben (bRFS) nach der Brachytherapie mit permanenter Iod-125-Seed-Implantation (PSI) oder in Kombination mit externer Radiotherapie (COMB) ist beim Patienten mit fruehem Prostatakarzinom (T1/T2) ein relevanter

  15. Re-distribution of brachytherapy dose using a differential dose prescription adapted to risk of local failure in low-risk prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rylander, Susanne; Polders, Daniel; Steggerda, Marcel J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We investigated the application of a differential target- and dose prescription concept for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-BT), involving a re-distribution of dose according to risk of local failure and treatment-related morbidity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Our study......- and dose prescription concept of prescribing a lower dose to the whole gland and an escalated dose to the GTV using LDR-BT seed planning was technically feasible and resulted in a significant dose-reduction to urethra and bladder neck....

  16. Outcomes Associated With 3 Treatment Schedules of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Monotherapy for Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jawad, Maha Saada; Dilworth, Joshua T.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Ye, Hong; Wallace, Michelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Martinez, Alvaro [Michigan HealthCare Professionals/21" s" t Century Oncology, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States); Chen, Peter Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Krauss, Daniel J., E-mail: DKrauss@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: We report the outcomes associated with 3 high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy regimens used as monotherapy for favorable-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Four hundred ninety-four patients with stage ≤T2b prostate cancer, Gleason score ≤7, and prostate-specific antigen levels ≤15 ng/mL underwent HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy. Of those, 319 received 38 Gy in 4 fractions, 79 received 24 Gy in 2 fractions, and 96 received 27 Gy in 2 fractions. Acute and chronic genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were defined as side effects occurring ≤6 and >6 months, respectively, after radiation therapy (RT) and were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. The time to toxicity was calculated from the date of RT completion. Variables were analyzed with χ{sup 2} test. P values <.05 were considered significant. Results: The median overall follow-up time was 4 years (range, 5.5, 3.5, and 2.5 years for 38 Gy, 24 Gy, and 27 Gy, respectively, P<.001). Acute and chronic grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity profiles were similar among groups. Acceptable rates of grade 2 GU toxicities were seen with overall acute/chronic frequency/urgency, dysuria, retention, incontinence, and hematuria rates of 14%/20%, 6%/7%, 7%/4%, 1.5%/2%, and 1.5%/7%, respectively. Minimal grade 3 and no grade 4 or 5 toxicities were seen. Grade 1, 2, and 3 chronic urethral stricture rates were 0.3%, 2%, and 1%, respectively. All GI toxicities were similar between groups, with overall rates of acute/chronic grade 2 diarrhea, rectal pain/tenesmus, rectal bleeding, and proctitis of 1%/1%, <1%/0.5%, 0%/2%, and <1%/1%, respectively. No grade 3, 4, or 5 toxicities were seen. All comparisons were similar for hormone-naïve patients. The median time to maximal GU/GI toxicity was similar between groups, ranging from 1 to 1.6 to 0.9 to 1.2 years, respectively. There were no differences in clinical outcomes between the 3 groups at 5

  17. Late toxicity and five year outcomes after high-dose-rate brachytherapy as a monotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Oesch, Sebastian L; Rentsch, Cyrill A; Isaak, Bernhard; Cihoric, Nikola; Manser, Peter; Thalmann, George N; Aebersold, Daniel M

    2014-01-01

    To determine the 5-year outcome after high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) as a monotherapy. Between 10/2003 and 06/2006, 36 patients with low (28) and intermediate (8) risk prostate cancer were treated by HDR-BT monotherapy. All patients received one implant and 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy within 48 hours for a total prescribed dose (PD) of 38 Gy. Five patients received concomitant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Toxicity was scored according to the common terminology criteria for adverse events from the National Cancer Institute (CTCAE) version 3.0. Biochemical recurrence was defined according to the Phoenix criteria and analyzed using the Kaplan Meier method. Predictors for late grade 3 GU toxicity were analyzed using univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses. The median follow-up was 6.9 years (range, 1.5-8.0 years). Late grade 2 and 3 genitourinary (GU) toxicity was observed in 10 (28%) and 7 (19%) patients, respectively. The actuarial proportion of patients with late grade 3 GU toxicity at 5 years was 17.7%. Late grade 2 and 3 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were not observed. The crude erectile function preservation rate in patients without ADT was 75%. The 5 year biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS) rate was 97%. Late grade 3 GU toxicity was associated with the urethral volume (p = 0.001) and the urethral V 120 (urethral volume receiving ≥120% of the PD; p = 0.0005) after multivariate Cox regression. After HDR-BT monotherapy late grade 3 GU was observed relatively frequently and was associated with the urethral V 120 . GI toxicity was negligible, the erectile function preservation rate and the bRFS rate was excellent

  18. Novel Therapeutic Approaches Toward Treating Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Kinases, Prostate Cancer, AKT inhibition, Mouse, Prostate Stem Cells 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES...Bearss 0, Wierda WG, Gandhi V (2009) Pim kinase inhibitor, 5GI-1776, induces apoptosis in CLL lymphocytes. Blood 114:4150--4157. 27. Grey R, et aL...PIM1 expression predict outcome in mantle cell lymphoma treated with high dose therapy, stem eel! transplantation and rituximab: a Cancer and Leukemia

  19. Osteoporosis and prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mads Hvid; Nielsen, Morten Frost Munk; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence of osteoporosis and risk factors of osteoporotic fractures before androgen deprivation in Danish men. Treatment and prognosis of prostate cancer necessitate management of long-term consequences of androgen deprivation therapy...... (ADT), including accelerated bone loss resulting in osteoporosis. Osteoporotic fractures are associated with excess morbidity and mortality. Material and methods. Patients with prostate cancer awaiting initiation of ADT were consecutively included. Half of the patients had localized disease and were...... level was 30.5 g/l (1-5714 g/l). The average Gleason score was 7.8 (range 5-10, SD 1.1). Fifty patients had localized prostate cancer and the other 55 patients had disseminated disease. The prevalence of osteoporosis was 10% and the prevalence of osteopenia was 58% before ADT. There was no significant...

  20. Prostate Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HPV-Associated Lung Ovarian Skin Uterine Cancer Home Prostate Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English (US) ... Tweet Share Compartir The rate of men getting prostate cancer or dying from prostate cancer varies by race ...

  1. Prostatic specific antigen for prostate cancer detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Nogueira

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Prostate-specific antigen (PSA has been used for prostate cancer detection since 1994. PSA testing has revolutionized our ability to diagnose, treat, and follow-up patients. In the last two decades, PSA screening has led to a substantial increase in the incidence of prostate cancer (PC. This increased detection caused the incidence of advanced-stage disease to decrease at a dramatic rate, and most newly diagnosed PC today are localized tumors with a high probability of cure. PSA screening is associated with a 75% reduction in the proportion of men who now present with metastatic disease and a 32.5% reduction in the age-adjusted prostate cancer mortality rate through 2003. Although PSA is not a perfect marker, PSA testing has limited specificity for prostate cancer detection, and its appropriate clinical application remains a topic of debate. Due to its widespread use and increased over-detection, the result has been the occurrence of over-treatment of indolent cancers. Accordingly, several variations as regards PSA measurement have emerged as useful adjuncts for prostate cancer screening. These procedures take into consideration additional factors, such as the proportion of different PSA isoforms (free PSA, complexed PSA, pro-PSA and B PSA, the prostate volume (PSA density, and the rate of change in PSA levels over time (PSA velocity or PSA doubling time. The history and evidence underlying each of these parameters are reviewed in the following article.

  2. Prostatic specific antigen for prostate cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Lucas; Corradi, Renato; Eastham, James A

    2009-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has been used for prostate cancer detection since 1994. PSA testing has revolutionized our ability to diagnose, treat, and follow-up patients. In the last two decades, PSA screening has led to a substantial increase in the incidence of prostate cancer (PC). This increased detection caused the incidence of advanced-stage disease to decrease at a dramatic rate, and most newly diagnosed PC today are localized tumors with a high probability of cure. PSA screening is associated with a 75% reduction in the proportion of men who now present with metastatic disease and a 32.5% reduction in the age-adjusted prostate cancer mortality rate through 2003. Although PSA is not a perfect marker, PSA testing has limited specificity for prostate cancer detection, and its appropriate clinical application remains a topic of debate. Due to its widespread use and increased over-detection, the result has been the occurrence of over-treatment of indolent cancers. Accordingly, several variations as regards PSA measurement have emerged as useful adjuncts for prostate cancer screening. These procedures take into consideration additional factors, such as the proportion of different PSA isoforms (free PSA, complexed PSA, pro-PSA and B PSA), the prostate volume (PSA density), and the rate of change in PSA levels over time (PSA velocity or PSA doubling time). The history and evidence underlying each of these parameters are reviewed in the following article.

  3. Genitourinary Toxicity After High-Dose-Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy Combined With Hypofractionated External Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: An Analysis to Determine the Correlation Between Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters in HDR Brachytherapy and Severity of Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Kitano, Masashi; Satoh, Takefumi; Kotani, Shouko; Uemae, Mineko; Matsumoto, Kazumasa; Okusa, Hiroshi; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Baba, Shiro; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the severity of genitourinary (GU) toxicity in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and to explore factors that might affect the severity of GU toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 100 Japanese men with prostate cancer underwent 192 Ir HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Mean (SD) dose to 90% of the planning target volume was 6.3 (0.7) Gy per fraction of HDR. After 5 fractions of HDR treatment, EBRT with 10 fractions of 3 Gy was administrated. The urethral volume receiving 1-15 Gy per fraction in HDR brachytherapy (V1-V15) and the dose to at least 5-100% of urethral volume in HDR brachytherapy (D5-D100) were compared between patients with Grade 3 toxicity and those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Prostate volume, patient age, and International Prostate Symptom Score were also compared between the two groups. Results: Of the 100 patients, 6 displayed Grade 3 acute GU toxicity, and 12 displayed Grade 3 late GU toxicity. Regarding acute GU toxicity, values of V1, V2, V3, and V4 were significantly higher in patients with Grade 3 toxicity than in those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Regarding late GU toxicity, values of D70, D80, V12, and V13 were significantly higher in patients with Grade 3 toxicity than in those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Conclusions: The severity of GU toxicity in HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT for prostate cancer was relatively high. The volume of prostatic urethra was associated with grade of acute GU toxicity, and urethral dose was associated with grade of late GU toxicity.

  4. Improving Positioning in High-Dose Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Safety and Visibility of Frequently Used Gold Fiducial Markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonteyne, Valerie, E-mail: valerie.fonteyne@uzgent.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Ost, Piet [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Villeirs, Geert [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Oosterlinck, Willem [Department of Urology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Impens, Aline; De Gersem, Werner; De Wagter, Carlos; De Meerleer, Gert [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The use of gold fiducial markers (GFMs) for prostate positioning in high-dose radiotherapy is gaining interest. The purpose of this study was to compare five GFMs regarding feasibility of ultrasound-based implantation in the prostate and intraprostatic lesion (IPL); toxicity; visibility on transabdominal ultrasound (TU) and cone-beam CT (CBCT); reliability of automatic, soft tissue, and GFM-based CBCT patient positioning by comparing manual and automatic fusion CBCT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients were included. Pain and toxicity were scored after implantation and high-dose radiotherapy. Fisher exact test was used to evaluate the correlation of patients' characteristics and prostatitis. Positioning was evaluated on TU and kilovoltage CBCT images. CBCT fusion was performed automatically (Elekta XVI technology, release 3.5.1 b27, based on grey values) and manually on soft tissue and GFMs. Pearson correlation statistics and Bland-Altman evaluation were used. Five GFMs were compared. Results: Twenty percent of the patients developed prostatitis despite antibiotic prophylaxis. Cigarette smoking was significantly correlated with prostatitis. The visualization of all GFMs on TU was disappointing. Consequently we cannot recommend the use of these GFMs for TU-based prostate positioning. For all GFMs, there was only fair to poor linear correlation between automatic and manual CBCT images, indicating that even when GFMs are used, an operator evaluation is imperative. However, when GFMs were analyzed individually, a moderate to very strong correlation between automatic and manual positioning was found for larger GFMs in all directions. Conclusion: The incidence of prostatitis in our series was high. Further research is imperative to define the ideal preparation protocol preimplantation and to select patients. Automatic fusion is more reliable with larger GFMs at the cost of more scatter. The stability of all GFMs was proven.

  5. WE-AB-207B-09: Margin Reduction for Planning Target Volume (PTV) in Patients with Localized Prostate Cancer: Impact On Delivered Dose and Quality of Life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumarasiri, A; Liu, C; Brown, S; Glide-Hurst, C; Elshaikh, M; Chetty, I; Movsas, B [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To estimate the delivered (cumulative) dose to targets and organs at risk for localized prostate cancer patients treated with reduced PTV margins and to evaluate preliminary patient reported quality-of-life (QOL). Methods: Under an IRB-approved protocol, 20 prostate cancer patients (including 11 control patients) were treated with reduced planning margins (5 mm uniform with 4 mm at prostate/rectum interface). Control patients had standard margin (10/6 mm)-based treatments. A parameter-optimized Elastix algorithm along with energy-mass mapping was used to deform and resample dose of the day onto the planning CT for each fraction to estimate the delivered dose over all fractions. QOL data were collected via Expanded Prostate cancer Index Composite (EPIC-26) questionnaires at time points pre-treatment, post-treatment, and at 2, 6, 12, 18 month follow-ups. Standardized QOL scores [range: 0–100] were determined and baseline-corrected by subtracting pre-treatment QOL data. Mean QOL differences between the margin reduced group and control group (QOLmr-QOLcontrol) were calculated for first 18 months. Results: The difference between the cumulative mean dose (Dmean) and the planned mean dose (±SD) for PTV, prostate, bladder, and rectum were −2.2±1.0, 0.3±0.5, −0.7±2.6, and −2.1±1.3 Gy respectively for the margin-reduced group, and −0.8±2.0, 0.9±1.4, - 0.7±3.1 and −1.0±2.4 Gy for the control group. Difference between the two groups was statistically insignificant (p=0.1). Standardized and baseline corrected QOLmr-QOLcontrol for EPIC domains categorized as “Urinary Incontinence”, “Urinary Irritative/Obstructive”, “Bowel”, “Sexual”, and “Hormonal” were 0.6, 12.1, 9.1, 13.3, and −0.9 for the 18 months following radiation therapy (higher values better). Delivered dose to rectum showed a weak correlation to “Bowel” domain (Pearson’s coefficient −0.24, p<0.001), while bladder dose did not correlate to Urinary Incontinence

  6. WE-AB-207B-09: Margin Reduction for Planning Target Volume (PTV) in Patients with Localized Prostate Cancer: Impact On Delivered Dose and Quality of Life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumarasiri, A; Liu, C; Brown, S; Glide-Hurst, C; Elshaikh, M; Chetty, I; Movsas, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the delivered (cumulative) dose to targets and organs at risk for localized prostate cancer patients treated with reduced PTV margins and to evaluate preliminary patient reported quality-of-life (QOL). Methods: Under an IRB-approved protocol, 20 prostate cancer patients (including 11 control patients) were treated with reduced planning margins (5 mm uniform with 4 mm at prostate/rectum interface). Control patients had standard margin (10/6 mm)-based treatments. A parameter-optimized Elastix algorithm along with energy-mass mapping was used to deform and resample dose of the day onto the planning CT for each fraction to estimate the delivered dose over all fractions. QOL data were collected via Expanded Prostate cancer Index Composite (EPIC-26) questionnaires at time points pre-treatment, post-treatment, and at 2, 6, 12, 18 month follow-ups. Standardized QOL scores [range: 0–100] were determined and baseline-corrected by subtracting pre-treatment QOL data. Mean QOL differences between the margin reduced group and control group (QOLmr-QOLcontrol) were calculated for first 18 months. Results: The difference between the cumulative mean dose (Dmean) and the planned mean dose (±SD) for PTV, prostate, bladder, and rectum were −2.2±1.0, 0.3±0.5, −0.7±2.6, and −2.1±1.3 Gy respectively for the margin-reduced group, and −0.8±2.0, 0.9±1.4, - 0.7±3.1 and −1.0±2.4 Gy for the control group. Difference between the two groups was statistically insignificant (p=0.1). Standardized and baseline corrected QOLmr-QOLcontrol for EPIC domains categorized as “Urinary Incontinence”, “Urinary Irritative/Obstructive”, “Bowel”, “Sexual”, and “Hormonal” were 0.6, 12.1, 9.1, 13.3, and −0.9 for the 18 months following radiation therapy (higher values better). Delivered dose to rectum showed a weak correlation to “Bowel” domain (Pearson’s coefficient −0.24, p<0.001), while bladder dose did not correlate to Urinary Incontinence

  7. Late Gastrointestinal Toxicity After Dose-Escalated Conformal Radiotherapy for Early Prostate Cancer: Results From the UK Medical Research Council RT01 Trial (ISRCTN47772397)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syndikus, Isabel; Morgan, Rachel C.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Graham, John D.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In men with localized prostate cancer, dose-escalated conformal radiotherapy (CFRT) improves efficacy outcomes at the cost of increased toxicity. We present a detailed analysis to provide further information about the incidence and prevalence of late gastrointestinal side effects. Methods and Materials: The UK Medical Research Council RT01 trial included 843 men with localized prostate cancer, who were treated for 6 months with neoadjuvant radiotherapy and were randomly assigned to either 64-Gy or 74-Gy CFRT. Toxicity was evaluated before CFRT and during long-term follow-up using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading, the Late Effects on Normal Tissue: Subjective, Objective, Management (LENT/SOM) scale, and Royal Marsden Hospital assessment scores. Patients regularly completed Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy--Prostate (FACT-P) and University of California, Los Angeles, Prostate Cancer Index (UCLA-PCI) questionnaires. Results: In the dose-escalated group, the hazard ratio (HR) for rectal bleeding (LENT/SOM grade ≥2) was 1.55 (95% CI, 1.17-2.04); for diarrhea (LENT/SOM grade ≥2), the HR was 1.79 (95% CI, 1.10-2.94); and for proctitis (RTOG grade ≥2), the HR was 1.64 (95% CI, 1.20-2.25). Compared to baseline scores, the prevalence of moderate and severe toxicities generally increased up to 3 years and than lessened. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of patient-reported severe bowel problems was 6% vs. 8% (standard vs. escalated, respectively) and severe distress was 4% vs. 5%, respectively. Conclusions: There is a statistically significant increased risk of various adverse gastrointestinal events with dose-escalated CFRT. This remains at clinically acceptable levels, and overall prevalence ultimately decreases with duration of follow-up.

  8. Prostate carcinomas; Cancer de la prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toledano, A.; Chauveinc, L.; Flam, T.; Thiounn, N.; Solignac, S.; Timbert, M.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Cosset, J.M.; Ammor, A.; Bonnetain, F.; Brenier, J.P.; Maingon, P.; Peignaux, K.; Truc, G.; Bosset, M.; Crevoisier, R. de; Tucker, S.; Dong, L.; Cheung, R.; Kuban, D.; Azria, D.; Llacer Moscardo, C.; Ailleres, N.; Allaw, A.; Serre, A.; Fenoglietto, P.; Hay, M.H.; Thezenas, S.; Dubois, J.B.; Pommier, P.; Perol, D.; Lagrange, J.L.; Richaud, P.; Brune, D.; Le Prise, E.; Azria, D.; Beckendorf, V.; Chabaud, S.; Carrie, C.; Bosset, M.; Bosset, J.F.; Maingon, P.; Ammor, A.; Crehangen, G.; Truc, G.; Peignaux, K.; Bonnetain, F.; Keros, L.; Bernier, V.; Aletti, P.; Wolf, D.; Marchesia, V.; Noel, A.; Artignan, X.; Fourneret, P.; Bacconier, M.; Shestaeva, O.; Pasquier, D.; Descotes, J.L.; Balosso, J.; Bolla, M.; Burette, R.; Corbusier, A.; Germeau, F.; Crevoisier, R. de; Dong, L.; Bonnen, M.; Cheung, R.; Tucker, S.; Kuban, D.; Crevoisier, R. de; Melancon, A.; Kuban, D.; Cheung, R.; Dong, L.; Peignaux, K.; Brenier, J.P.; Truc, G.; Bosset, M.; Ammor, A.; Barillot, I.; Maingon, P.; Molines, J.C.; Berland, E.; Cornulier, J. de; Coulet-Parpillon, A.; Cohard, C.; Picone, M.; Fourneret, P.; Artignan, X.; Daanen, V.; Gastaldo, J.; Bolla, M.; Collomb, D.; Dusserre, A.; Descotes, J.L.; Troccaz, J.; Giraud, J.Y.; Quero, L.; Hennequin, C.; Ravery, V.; Desgrandschamps, F.; Maylin, C.; Boccon-Gibod, L.; Salem, N.; Bladou, F.; Gravis, G.; Tallet, A.; Simonian, M.; Serment, G.; Salem, N.; Bladou, F.; Gravis, G.; Simonian, M.; Rosello, R.; Serment, G

    2005-11-15

    Some short communications on the prostate carcinoma are given here. The impact of pelvic irradiation, conformation with intensity modulation, association of radiotherapy and chemotherapy reduction of side effects, imaging, doses escalation are such subjects studied and reported. (N.C.)

  9. Late toxicity and biochemical control in 554 prostate cancer patients treated with and without dose escalated image guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kok, David; Gill, Suki; Bressel, Mathias; Byrne, Keelan; Kron, Tomas; Fox, Chris; Duchesne, Gillian; Tai, Keen Hun; Foroudi, Farshad

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To compare rates of late gastrointestinal toxicity, late genitourinary toxicity and biochemical failure between patients treated for prostate cancer with implanted fiducial marker image guided radiotherapy (FMIGRT), and those treated without FMIGRT. Methods and materials: We performed a single institution retrospective study comparing all 311 patients who received 74 Gy without fiducial markers in 2006 versus all 243 patients who received our updated regimen of 78 Gy with FMIGRT in 2008. Patient records were reviewed 27 months after completing radiotherapy. Biochemical failure was defined using the Phoenix definition. Details of late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities were graded according to CTCAEv4. Moderate/severe toxicity was defined as a grade 2 or higher toxicity. Cumulative incidence and prevalence curves for moderate/severe toxicity were constructed and compared using multistate modeling while biochemical failure free survival was compared using the log rank test. A Cox regression model was developed to correct for confounding factors. Results: Median follow-up time for both groups was 22 months. The hazard ratio for moderate/severe late gastrointestinal toxicity in the non-FMIGRT group was 3.66 [95% CI (1.63–8.23), p = 0.003] compared to patients in the FMIGRT group. There was no difference in the hazard ratio of moderate/severe late genitourinary toxicity between the two groups (0.44 [95% CI (0.19–1.00)]), but patients treated with FMIGRT did have a quicker recovery from their genitourinary toxicities HR = 0.24 [95% CI (0.10–0.59)]. We were unable to detect any differences in biochemical failure free survival between the cohorts HR = 0.60 [95% CI (0.30–1.20), p = 0.143]. Conclusion: Despite dose escalation, the use of FMIGRT in radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer significantly reduces the incidence of gastrointestinal toxicity and the duration of late genitourinary toxicity when compared to conventional non

  10. Dose-Volume Relationships for Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Pelvic Nodal Irradiation for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorino, Claudio; Alongi, Filippo; Perna, Lucia; Broggi, Sara; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Cozzarini, Cesare; Di Muzio, Nadia; Fazio, Ferruccio; Calandrino, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To find correlation between dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the intestinal cavity (IC) and moderate-severe acute bowel toxicity in men with prostate cancer treated with pelvic nodal irradiation. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 191 patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent whole-pelvis radiotherapy with radical or adjuvant/salvage intent during January 2004 to November 2007. Complete planning/clinical data were available in 175 of these men, 91 of whom were treated with a conventional four-field technique (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fraction) and 84 of whom were treated with IMRT using conventional Linac (n = 26, 50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fraction) or Helical TomoTherapy (n = 58, 50-54 Gy, 1.8-2 Gy/fraction). The IC outside the planning target volume (PTV) was contoured and the DVH for the first 6 weeks of treatment was recovered in all patients. The correlation between a number of clinical and DVH (V10-V55) variables and toxicity was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses. The correlation between DVHs for the IC outside the PTV and DVHs for the whole IC was also assessed. Results: Twenty-two patients experienced toxicity (3/22 in the IMRT/tomotherapy group). Univariate analyses showed a significant correlation between V20-V50 and toxicity (p = 0.0002-0.001), with a higher predictive value observed for V40-V50. Previous prostatectomy (p = 0.066) and abdominal/pelvic surgery (p = 0.12) also correlated with toxicity. Multivariate analysis that included V45, abdominal/pelvic surgery, and prostatectomy showed that the most predictive parameters were V45 (p = 0.002) and abdominal/pelvic surgery (p = 0.05, HR = 2.4) Conclusions: Our avoidance IMRT approach drastically reduces the incidence of acute bowel toxicity. V40-V50 of IC and, secondarily, previous abdominal/pelvic surgery were the main predictors of acute bowel toxicity.

  11. Long-term outcomes from dose-escalated image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy with androgen deprivation: encouraging results for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilcox SW

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Shea W Wilcox,1,4 Noel J Aherne,2,4 Linus C Benjamin,1 Bosco Wu,1 Thomaz de Campos Silva,3 Craig S McLachlan,4 Michael J McKay,3,5 Andrew J Last,1 Thomas P Shakespeare1–4 1North Coast Cancer Institute, Port Macquarie, NSW, Australia; 2North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia; 3North Coast Cancer Institute, Lismore, NSW, Australia; 4The University of New South Wales, Rural Clinical School, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 5The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Purpose: Dose-escalated (DE radiotherapy in the setting of localized prostate cancer has been shown to improve biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS in several studies. In the same group of patients, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT has been shown to confer a survival benefit when combined with radiotherapy doses of up to 70 Gy; however, there is currently little long-term data on patients who have received high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT with ADT. We report the long-term outcomes in a large cohort of patients treated with the combination of DE image-guided IMRT (IG-IMRT and ADT. Methods and materials: Patients with localized prostate cancer were identified from a centralized database across an integrated cancer center. All patients received DE IG-IMRT, combined with ADT, and had a minimum follow up of 12 months post-radiotherapy. All relapse and toxicity data were collected prospectively. Actuarial bDFS, metastasis-free survival, prostate cancer-specific survival, and multivariate analyses were calculated using the SPSS v20.0 statistical package. Results: Seven hundred and eighty-two eligible patients were identified with a median follow up of 46 months. Overall, 4.3% of patients relapsed, 2.0% developed distant metastases, and 0.6% died from metastatic prostate cancer. At 5-years, bDFS was 88%, metastasis-free survival was 95%, and prostate cancer-specific survival was 98%. Five-year grade 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 2

  12. Studies of rhodamine-123: effect on rat prostate cancer and human prostate cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcadi, J A; Narayan, K S; Techy, G; Ng, C P; Saroufeem, R M; Jones, L W

    1995-06-01

    The effect of the lipophilic, cationic dye, Rhodamine-123 (Rh-123), on prostate cancer in rats, and on three tumor cell lines in vitro is reported here. The general toxicity of Rh-123 in mice has been found to be minimal. Lobund-Wistar (L-W) rats with the autochthonous prostate cancer of Pollard were treated for six doses with Rh-123 at a dose of 15 mg/kg subcutaneously every other day. Microscopic examination of the tumors revealed cellular and acinar destruction. The effectiveness of Rh-123 as a cytotoxic agent was tested by clonogenic and viability assays in vitro with three human prostate cancer cell lines. Severe (60-95%) growth inhibition was observed following Rh-123 exposure for 2-5 days at doses as low as 1.6 micrograms/ml in all three prostate cancer cell lines.

  13. Treatment of localized prostate cancer using a combination of high dose rate lridium-192 brachytherapy and external beam irradiation: Initial Australian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, M.J.; Stricker, P.D.; Brenner, P.C.; Kooner, R.; O'Neil, G.F.A.; Duval, P.J.; Jagavkar, R.S.; Cross, P.; Saalfeld, J.; Martland, J.

    2003-01-01

    Combination high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) and external beam radiation therapy is technically and clinically feasible as definitive treatment for localized prostate cancer. We report the first large Australian experience using this technique of radiation dose escalation in 82 patients with intermediate- and high-risk disease. With a median follow up of 3 years (156 weeks), complications were low and overall prostate-specific antigen progression-free survival was 91% using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus definition. The delivery of hypofractionated radiation through the HDRB component shortens overall treatment time and is both biologically and logistically advantageous. As a radiation boost strategy, HDRB is easy to learn and could be introduced into most facilities with brachytherapy capability. Copyright (2003) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  14. Lack of benefit for the addition of androgen deprivation therapy to dose-escalated radiotherapy in the treatment of intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Krauss, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: Assessment of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) benefits for prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated radiotherapy (RT). METHODS AND MATERIALS: From 1991 to 2004, 1,044 patients with intermediate- (n = 782) or high-risk (n = 262) prostate cancer were treated with dose-escalated RT at William Beaumont Hospital. Patients received external-beam RT (EBRT) alone, brachytherapy (high or low dose rate), or high dose rate brachytherapy plus pelvic EBRT. Intermediate-risk patients had Gleason score 7, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 10.0-19.9 ng\\/mL, or Stage T2b-T2c. High-risk patients had Gleason score 8-10, PSA >\\/=20, or Stage T3. Patients were additionally divided specifically by Gleason score, presence of palpable disease, and PSA level to further define subgroups benefitting from ADT. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 5 years; 420 patients received ADT + dose-escalated RT, and 624 received dose-escalated RT alone. For all patients, no advantages in any clinical endpoints at 8 years were associated with ADT administration. No differences in any endpoints were associated with ADT administration based on intermediate- vs. high-risk group or RT modality when analyzed separately. Patients with palpable disease plus Gleason >\\/=8 demonstrated improved clinical failure rates and a trend toward improved survival with ADT. Intermediate-risk patients treated with brachytherapy alone had improved biochemical control when ADT was given. CONCLUSION: Benefits of ADT in the setting of dose-escalated RT remain poorly defined. This question must continue to be addressed in prospective study.

  15. The Danish Prostate Cancer Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen-Nielsen, Mary; Høyer, Søren; Friis, Søren

    2016-01-01

    variables include Gleason scores, cancer staging, prostate-specific antigen values, and therapeutic measures (active surveillance, surgery, radiotherapy, endocrine therapy, and chemotherapy). DESCRIPTIVE DATA: In total, 22,332 patients with prostate cancer were registered in DAPROCAdata as of April 2015......AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Prostate Cancer Database (DAPROCAdata) is a nationwide clinical cancer database that has prospectively collected data on patients with incident prostate cancer in Denmark since February 2010. The overall aim of the DAPROCAdata is to improve the quality of prostate cancer...... care in Denmark by systematically collecting key clinical variables for the purposes of health care monitoring, quality improvement, and research. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish patients with histologically verified prostate cancer are included in the DAPROCAdata. MAIN VARIABLES: The DAPROCAdata...

  16. Favorable Preliminary Outcomes for Men With Low- and Intermediate-risk Prostate Cancer Treated With 19-Gy Single-fraction High-dose-rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Daniel J., E-mail: dkrauss@beaumont.edu [Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Ye, Hong [Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Martinez, Alvaro A. [21st Century Oncology, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States); Mitchell, Beth; Sebastian, Evelyn; Limbacher, Amy; Gustafson, Gary S. [Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To report the toxicity and preliminary clinical outcomes of a prospective trial evaluating 19-Gy, single-fraction high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for men with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 63 patients were treated according to an institutional review board-approved prospective study of single-fraction HDR brachytherapy. Eligible patients had tumor stage ≤T2a, prostate-specific antigen level ≤15 ng/mL, and Gleason score ≤7. Patients with a prostate gland volume >50 cm{sup 3} and baseline American Urologic Association symptom score >12 were ineligible. Patients underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided transperineal implantation of the prostate, followed by single-fraction HDR brachytherapy. Treatment was delivered using {sup 192}Ir to a dose of 19 Gy prescribed to the prostate, with no additional margin applied. Results: Of the 63 patients, 58 had data available for analysis. Five patients had withdrawn consent during the follow-up period. The median follow-up period was 2.9 years (range 0.3-5.2). The median age was 61.4 years. The median gland volume at treatment was 34.8 cm{sup 3}. Of the 58 patients, 91% had T1 disease, 71% had Gleason score ≤6 (29% with Gleason score 7), and the median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level was 5.1 ng/mL. The acute and chronic grade 2 genitourinary toxicity incidence was 12.1% and 10.3%, respectively. No grade 3 urinary toxicity occurred. No patients experienced acute rectal toxicity grade ≥2, and 2 experienced grade ≥2 chronic gastrointestinal toxicity. Three patients experienced biochemical failure, yielding a 3-year cumulative incidence estimate of 6.8%. Conclusions: Single-fraction HDR brachytherapy is well-tolerated, with favorable preliminary biochemical and clinical disease control rates.

  17. Tuberculous prostatitis: mimicking a cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, El Majdoub; Abdelhak, Khallouk; Hassan, Farih Moulay

    2016-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common type of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis . The kidneys, ureter, bladder or genital organs are usually involved. Tuberculosis of the prostate has mainly been described in immune-compromised patients. However, it can exceptionally be found as an isolated lesion in immune-competent patients. Tuberculosis of the prostate may be difficult to differentiate from carcinoma of the prostate and the chronic prostatitis when the prostate is hard and nodular on digital rectal examination and the urine is negative for tuberculosis bacilli. In many cases, a diagnosis of tuberculous prostatitis is made by the pathologist, or the disease is found incidentally after transurethral resection. Therefore, suspicion of tuberculous prostatitis requires a confirmatory biopsy of the prostate. We report the case of 60-year-old man who presented a low urinary tract syndrome. After clinical and biological examination, and imaging, prostate cancer was highly suspected. Transrectal needle biopsy of the prostate was performed and histological examination showed tuberculosis lesions.

  18. Health-Related Quality of Life After Single-Fraction High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Hypofractionated External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, Gerard C.; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Chung, Hans; Tsang, Gail; Sankreacha, Raxa; Deabreu, Andrea; Zhang Liying; Mamedov, Alexandre; Cheung, Patrick; Batchelar, Deidre; Danjoux, Cyril; Szumacher, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the change in health-related quality of life for men after high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer and the factors associated with this change. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had clinically localized intermediate-risk prostate cancer. The patients received high-dose-rate brachytherapy as a single 15-Gy implant, followed by external beam radiotherapy to 37.5 Gy in 15 fractions. The patients were monitored prospectively for toxicity (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0) and health-related quality of life (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite [EPIC]). The proportion of patients developing a clinically significant difference in the EPIC domain score (minimally important difference of >0.5 standard deviation) was determined and correlated with the baseline clinical and dosimetric factors. The study accrued 125 patients, with a median follow-up of 24 months. Results: By 24 months, 23% had Grade 2 urinary toxicity and only 5% had Grade 2 bowel toxicity, with no Grade 3 toxicity. The proportion of patients reporting a significant decrease in EPIC urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal domain scores was 53%, 51%, 45%, and 40% at 12 months and 57%, 65%, 51%, and 30% at 24 months, respectively. The proportion with a >1 standard deviation decrease in the EPIC urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal domain scores was 38%, 36%, 24%, and 20% at 12 months and 46%, 48%, 19%, and 8% at 24 months, respectively. On multivariate analysis, the dose to 10% of the urethra was associated with a decreasing EPIC urinary domain score (p = .0089) and, less strongly (p = .0312) with a decreasing hormonal domain score. No association was found between the prostate volume, bladder dose, or high-dose volume and urinary health-related quality of life. A high baseline International Index of Erectile Function score was associated (p = .0019) with a decreasing sexual domain score. The optimal maximal dose

  19. Dose optimization in simulated permanent interstitial implant of prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Fernando Pereira de

    2006-01-01

    Any treatment of cancer that uses some modality of radiotherapy is planned before being executed. In general the goal in radiotherapy is to irradiate the target to be treated minimizing the incidence of radiation in healthy surrounding tissues. The planning differ among themselves according to the modality of radiotherapy, the type of cancer and where it is located. This work approaches the problem of dose optimization for the planning of prostate cancer treatment through the modality of low dose-rate brachytherapy with Iodine 125 or Palladium 103 seeds. An algorithm for dose calculation and optimization was constructed to find the seeds configuration that better fits the relevant clinical criteria such as as the tolerated dose by the urethra and rectum and the desired dose for prostate. The algorithm automatically finds this configuration from the prostate geometry established in two or three dimensions by using images of ultrasound, magnetic resonance or tomography and from the establishment of minimum restrictions to the positions of the seeds in the prostate and needles in a template. Six patterns of seeds distribution based on clinical criteria were suggested and tested in this work. Each one of these patterns generated a space of possible seeds configurations for the prostate tested by the dose calculation and optimization algorithm. The configurations that satisfied the clinical criteria were submitted to a test according to an optimization function suggested in this work. The configuration that produced maximum value for this function was considered the optimized one. (author)

  20. Review article: Prostate cancer screening using prostate specific ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Prostate cancer is the commonest cancer among men in Nigeria and early detection is key to cure and survival but its screening through prostate specific antigen (PSA) has remain controversial in literature. Screening with prostate specific antigen (PSA) has led to more men diagnosed with prostate cancer than ...

  1. Planning magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer intensity-modulated radiation therapy: Impact on target volumes, radiotherapy dose and androgen deprivation administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsley, Patrick J; Aherne, Noel J; Edwards, Grace V; Benjamin, Linus C; Wilcox, Shea W; McLachlan, Craig S; Assareh, Hassan; Welshman, Richard; McKay, Michael J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are increasingly utilized for radiotherapy planning to contour the primary tumors of patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). These scans may also demonstrate cancer extent and may affect the treatment plan. We assessed the impact of planning MRI detection of extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, or adjacent organ invasion on the staging, target volume delineation, doses, and hormonal therapy of patients with prostate cancer undergoing IMRT. The records of 509 consecutive patients with planning MRI scans being treated with IMRT for prostate cancer between January 2010 and July 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Tumor staging and treatment plans before and after MRI were compared. Of the 509 patients, 103 (20%) were upstaged and 44 (9%) were migrated to a higher risk category as a result of findings at MRI. In 94 of 509 patients (18%), the MRI findings altered management. Ninety-four of 509 patients (18%) had a change to their clinical target volume (CTV) or treatment technique, and in 41 of 509 patients (8%) the duration of hormone therapy was changed because of MRI findings. The use of radiotherapy planning MRI altered CTV design, dose and/or duration of androgen deprivation in 18% of patients in this large, single institution series of men planned for dose-escalated prostate IMRT. This has substantial implications for radiotherapy target volumes and doses, as well as duration of androgen deprivation. Further research is required to investigate whether newer MRI techniques can simultaneously fulfill staging and radiotherapy contouring roles. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Questionnaire based quality assurance for the RT01 trial of dose escalation in conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer (ISRCTN 47772397)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayles, W.; Moore, A.Rollo; Aird, Edwin G.A.; Bidmead, A. Margaret; Dearnaley, David P.; Griffiths, Sue E.; Stephens, Richard J.; Warrington, A.P. Jim

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: In order to ensure the validity of the outcome of the Medical Research Council's 'RT01 trial' of dose escalation in conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer it was considered important that the quality of treatment delivery should meet an adequate standard across all contributing centres. A questionnaire was therefore devised to ensure that all aspects of the planning and delivery process were adequately covered. Patients and methods: The questionnaire considered each step in the planning and delivery process and drew the attention of the participants to the specific requirements of the trial. Before entering patients into the trial each participating centre had to complete the questionnaire and an outlining exercise (reported elsewhere). Results: It was not practicable to define a detailed universally acceptable protocol for the whole process of delivery of conformal radiotherapy, not least because of the different equipment available for planning and treatment in different centres. The questionnaire identified some areas of difference in practice between centres where there may be a need for the development of a consensus as to best practice, particularly in the area of patient set-up. Occasionally it was necessary to follow up responses to questions that had been misunderstood or inadequately answered, but in most cases these issues proved to be easily resolved. Conclusions: The questionnaire proved to be a useful self-assessment tool as well as enabling the quality assurance group to ensure that the standards of the trial were being met. Subsequent follow-up visits confirmed the usefulness and validity of this self assessment process

  3. Dose-volume effects for pelvic bone marrow in predicting hematological toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy with pelvic node irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sini, Carla; Fiorino, Claudio; Perna, Lucia; Noris Chiorda, Barbara; Deantoni, Chiara Lucrezia; Bianchi, Marco; Sacco, Vincenzo; Briganti, Alberto; Montorsi, Francesco; Calandrino, Riccardo; Di Muzio, Nadia; Cozzarini, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    To prospectively identify clinical/dosimetric predictors of acute/late hematologic toxicity (HT) in chemo-naÏve patients treated with whole-pelvis radiotherapy (WPRT) for prostate cancer. Data of 121 patients treated with adjuvant/salvage WPRT were analyzed (static-field IMRT n=19; VMAT/Rapidarc n=57; Tomotherapy n=45). Pelvic bone marrow (BM) was delineated as ilium (IL), lumbosacral, lower and whole pelvis (WP), and the relative DVHs were calculated. HT was graded both according to CTCAE v4.03 and as variation in percentage relative to baseline. Logistic regression was used to analyze association between HT and clinical/DVHs factors. Significant differences (p<0.005) in the DVH of BM volumes between different techniques were found: Tomotherapy was associated with larger volumes receiving low doses (3-20 Gy) and smaller receiving 40-50 Gy. Lower baseline absolute values of WBC, neutrophils and lymphocytes (ALC) predicted acute/late HT (p ⩽ 0.001). Higher BM V40 was associated with higher risk of acute Grade3 (OR=1.018) or late Grade2 lymphopenia (OR=1.005). Two models predicting lymphopenia were developed, both including baseline ALC, and BM WP-V40 (AUC=0.73) and IL-V40+smoking (AUC=0.904) for acute/late respectively. Specific regions of pelvic BM predicting acute/late lymphopenia, a risk factor for viral infections, were identified. The 2-variable models including specific constraints to BM may help reduce HT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Time-driven activity-based costing of low-dose-rate and high-dose-rate brachytherapy for low-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilg, Annette M; Laviana, Aaron A; Kamrava, Mitchell; Veruttipong, Darlene; Steinberg, Michael; Park, Sang-June; Burke, Michael A; Niedzwiecki, Douglas; Kupelian, Patrick A; Saigal, Christopher

    Cost estimates through traditional hospital accounting systems are often arbitrary and ambiguous. We used time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) to determine the true cost of low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for prostate cancer and demonstrate opportunities for cost containment at an academic referral center. We implemented TDABC for patients treated with I-125, preplanned LDR and computed tomography based HDR brachytherapy with two implants from initial consultation through 12-month followup. We constructed detailed process maps for provision of both HDR and LDR. Personnel, space, equipment, and material costs of each step were identified and used to derive capacity cost rates, defined as price per minute. Each capacity cost rate was then multiplied by the relevant process time and products were summed to determine total cost of care. The calculated cost to deliver HDR was greater than LDR by $2,668.86 ($9,538 vs. $6,869). The first and second HDR treatment day cost $3,999.67 and $3,955.67, whereas LDR was delivered on one treatment day and cost $3,887.55. The greatest overall cost driver for both LDR and HDR was personnel at 65.6% ($4,506.82) and 67.0% ($6,387.27) of the total cost. After personnel costs, disposable materials contributed the second most for LDR ($1,920.66, 28.0%) and for HDR ($2,295.94, 24.0%). With TDABC, the true costs to deliver LDR and HDR from the health system perspective were derived. Analysis by physicians and hospital administrators regarding the cost of care afforded redesign opportunities including delivering HDR as one implant. Our work underscores the need to assess clinical outcomes to understand the true difference in value between these modalities. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Daily organ tracking in intensity-modulated radiotherapy of prostate cancer using an electronic portal imaging device with a dose saving acquisition mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetterli, Daniel; Thalmann, Sandrine; Behrensmeier, Frank; Kemmerling, Ludger; Born, Ernst J.; Mini, Roberto; Greiner, Richard H.; Aebersold, Daniel M.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Daily use of conventional electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) for organ tracking is limited due to the relatively high dose required for high quality image acquisition. We studied the use of a novel dose saving acquisition mode (RadMode) allowing to take images with one monitor unit per image in prostate cancer patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and tracking of implanted fiducial gold markers. Patients and methods: Twenty five patients underwent implantation of three fiducial gold markers prior to the planning CT. Before each treatment of a course of 37 fractions, orthogonal localization images from the antero-posterior and from the lateral direction were acquired. Portal images of both the setup procedure and the five IMRT treatment beams were analyzed. Results: On average, four localization images were needed for a correct patient setup, resulting in four monitor units extra dose per fraction. The mean extra dose delivered to the patient was thereby increased by 1.2%. The procedure was precise enough to reduce the mean displacements prior to treatment to ≤0.3 mm. Conclusions: The use of a new dose saving acquisition mode enables to perform daily EPID-based prostate tracking with a cumulative extra dose of below 1 Gy. This concept is efficiently used in IMRT-treated patients, where separation of setup beams from treatment beams is mandatory

  6. Characterization of adenoviral transduction profile in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Jianzhong; Tai, Phillip W L; Lu, Yi; Li, Jia; Ma, Hong; Su, Qin; Wei, Qiang; Li, Hong; Gao, Guangping

    2017-09-01

    Prostate diseases are common in males worldwide with high morbidity. Gene therapy is an attractive therapeutic strategy for prostate diseases, however, it is currently underdeveloped. As well known, adeno virus (Ad) is the most widely used gene therapy vector. The aims of this study are to explore transduction efficiency of Ad in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate tissue, thus further providing guidance for future prostate pathophysiological studies and therapeutic development of prostate diseases. We produced Ad expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), and characterized the transduction efficiency of Ad in both human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines in vitro, as well as prostate tumor xenograft, and wild-type mouse prostate tissue in vivo. Ad transduction efficiency was determined by EGFP fluorescence using microscopy and flow cytometry. Cell type-specific transduction was examined by immunofluorescence staining of cell markers. Our data showed that Ad efficiently transduced human and mouse prostate cancer cells in vitro in a dose dependent manner. Following intratumoral and intraprostate injection, Ad could efficiently transduce prostate tumor xenograft and the major prostatic cell types in vivo, respectively. Our findings suggest that Ad can efficiently transduce prostate tumor cells in vitro as well as xenograft and normal prostate tissue in vivo, and further indicate that Ad could be a potentially powerful toolbox for future gene therapy of prostate diseases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Updated results of high-dose rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy for locally and locally advanced prostate cancer using the RTOG-ASTRO phoenix definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio C. Pellizzon

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the prognostic factors for patients with local or locally advanced prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (RT and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR according to the RTOG-ASTRO Phoenix Consensus Conference. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The charts of 209 patients treated between 1997 and 2005 with localized RT and HDR as a boost at the Department of Radiation Oncology, AC Camargo Hospital, Sao Paulo, Brazil were reviewed. Clinical and treatment parameters i.e.: patient's age, Gleason score, clinical stage, initial PSA (iPSA, risk group (RG for biochemical failure, doses of RT and HDR were evaluated. Median age and median follow-up time were 68 and 5.3 years, respectively. Median RT and HDR doses were 45 Gy and 20 Gy. RESULTS: Disease specific survival (DSS at 3.3 year was 94.2%. Regarding RG, for the LR (low risk, IR (intermediate risk and HR (high risk, the DSS rates at 3.3 years were 91.5%, 90.2% and 88.5%, respectively. On univariate analysis prognostic factors related to DSS were RG (p = 0.040, Gleason score ≤ 6 ng/mL (p = 0.002, total dose of HDR ≥ 20 Gy (p < 0.001 On multivariate analysis the only statistical significant predictive factor for biochemical control (bNED was the RG, p < 0.001 (CI - 1.147-3.561. CONCLUSIONS: Although the radiation dose administered to the prostate is an important factor related to bNED, this could not be established with statistical significance in this group of patients. To date , in our own experience, HDR associated to RT could be considered a successful approach in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  8. Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer Epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudit Verma

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the etiology of a disease such as prostate cancer may help in identifying populations at high risk, timely intervention of the disease, and proper treatment. Biomarkers, along with exposure history and clinical data, are useful tools to achieve these goals. Individual risk and population incidence of prostate cancer result from the intervention of genetic susceptibility and exposure. Biochemical, epigenetic, genetic, and imaging biomarkers are used to identify people at high risk for developing prostate cancer. In cancer epidemiology, epigenetic biomarkers offer advantages over other types of biomarkers because they are expressed against a person’s genetic background and environmental exposure, and because abnormal events occur early in cancer development, which includes several epigenetic alterations in cancer cells. This article describes different biomarkers that have potential use in studying the epidemiology of prostate cancer. We also discuss the characteristics of an ideal biomarker for prostate cancer, and technologies utilized for biomarker assays. Among epigenetic biomarkers, most reports indicate GSTP1 hypermethylation as the diagnostic marker for prostate cancer; however, NKX2-5, CLSTN1, SPOCK2, SLC16A12, DPYS, and NSE1 also have been reported to be regulated by methylation mechanisms in prostate cancer. Current challenges in utilization of biomarkers in prostate cancer diagnosis and epidemiologic studies and potential solutions also are discussed.

  9. MRI diagnosis for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamada, Tsutomu; Nagai, Kiyohisa; Imai, Shigeki; Kajihara, Yasumasa; Jo, Yoshimasa; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Fukunaga, Masao (Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan)); Matsuki, Takakazu

    1998-01-01

    Recently, in Japan, both the Westernization of life styles and the advent of an aged-society have led to an increase in the incidence of prostate cancer. In making a localizing diagnosis of prostate cancer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has excellent contrast resolution, and transrectal ultrasonography, are used clinically, and their usefulness is being established. MRI is employed in the diagnosis of prostate cancer to detect tumors, and to determine the stage of such tumors. For the visualization of prostate cancer by MRI, T2-weighted axial images are used exclusively. After becoming familiar with normal prostate images, it is important to evaluate the localization of a tumor, and the invasion of the capsule and seminal vesicles. Future applications of new techniques for MRI will undoubtedly be found. In this paper, the present state of MRI diagnosis of prostate cancer at Kawasaki Medical School Hospital will be reviewed. (author)

  10. MRI diagnosis for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamada, Tsutomu; Nagai, Kiyohisa; Imai, Shigeki; Kajihara, Yasumasa; Jo, Yoshimasa; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Fukunaga, Masao [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Matsuki, Takakazu

    1998-12-31

    Recently, in Japan, both the Westernization of life styles and the advent of an aged-society have led to an increase in the incidence of prostate cancer. In making a localizing diagnosis of prostate cancer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has excellent contrast resolution, and transrectal ultrasonography, are used clinically, and their usefulness is being established. MRI is employed in the diagnosis of prostate cancer to detect tumors, and to determine the stage of such tumors. For the visualization of prostate cancer by MRI, T2-weighted axial images are used exclusively. After becoming familiar with normal prostate images, it is important to evaluate the localization of a tumor, and the invasion of the capsule and seminal vesicles. Future applications of new techniques for MRI will undoubtedly be found. In this paper, the present state of MRI diagnosis of prostate cancer at Kawasaki Medical School Hospital will be reviewed. (author)

  11. SU-F-J-203: Retrospective Assessment of Delivered Proton Dose in Prostate Cancer Patients Based On Daily In-Room CT Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuetzer, K; Paessler, T [OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Valentini, C; Thiele, J; Hoelscher, T [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Techenische Universitaet Dresden (Germany); Exner, F [OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); now with: University of Wuerzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Krause, M; Richter, C [OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Techenische Universitaet Dresden (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiooncology, Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Dresden, Germany and German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Retrospective calculation of the delivered proton dose in prostate cancer patients based on a unique dataset of daily CT images. Methods: Inter-fractional motion in prostate cancer patients treated at our proton facility is counteracted by water-filled endorectal ballon and bladder filling protocol. Typical plans (XiO, Elekta Instruments AB, Stockholm) for 74 Gy(RBE) sequential boost treatment in 37 fractions include two series of opposing lateral double-scattered proton beams covering the respective iCTV. Stability of fiducial markers and anatomy were checked in 12 patients by daily scheduled in-room control CT (cCT) after immobilization and positioning according to bony anatomy utilizing orthogonal X-ray. In RayStation 4.6 (RaySearch Laboritories AB, Stockholm), all cCTs are delineated retrospectively and the treatment plans were recalculated on the planning CT and the registered cCTs. All fraction doses were accumulated on the planning CT after deformable registration. Parameters of delivered dose to iCTV (D98%>95%, D2%<107%), bladder (V75Gy<15%, V70Gy<25%, V65Gy<30%), rectum (V70Gy<10%, V50Gy<40%) and femoral heads (V50Gy<5%) are compared to those in the treatment plan. Intra-therapy variation is represented in DVH bands. Results: No alarming differences were observed between planned and retrospectively accumulated dose: iCTV constraints were met, except for one patient (D98%=94.6% in non-boosted iCTV). Considered bladder and femoral head values were below the limits. Rectum V70Gy was slightly exceeded (<11.3%) in two patients. First intra-therapy variability analysis in 4 patients showed no timedependent parameter drift, revealed strongest variability for bladder dose. In some fractions, iCTV coverage (D98%) and rectum V70Gy was missed. Conclusion: Double scattered proton plans are accurately delivered to prostate cancer patients due to fractionation effects and the applied precise positioning and immobilization protocols. As a result of rare

  12. Step-and-Shoot versus Compensator-based IMRT: Calculation and Comparison of Integral Dose in Non-tumoral and Target Organs in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Shirani Tak Abi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT is becoming an increasingly routine treatment method. IMRT can be delivered by use of conventional Multileaf Collimators (MLCs and/or physical compensators. One of the most important factors in selecting an appropriate IMRT technique is integral dose. Integral dose is equal to the mean energy deposited in the total irradiated volume of the patient. The aim of the present study was to calculate and compare the integral dose in normal and target organs in two different procedures of IMRT: Step-and-Shoot (SAS and compensator-based IMRT. Materials and Methods In this comparative study, five patients with prostate cancer were selected. Module Integrated Radiotherapy System was applied, using three energy ranges. In both treatment planning methods, the integral dose dramatically decreased by increasing energy. Results Comparison of two treatment methods showed that on average, the integral dose of body in SAS radiation therapy was about 1.62% lower than that reported in compensator-based IMRT. In planning target volume, rectum, bladder, and left and right femoral heads, the integral doses for SAS method were 1.01%, 1.02%, 1.11%, 1.47%, and 1.40% lower than compensator-based IMRT, respectively. Conclusion Considering the treatment conditions, the definition of dose volume constraints for healthy tissues, and the equal volume of organs in both treatment methods, SAS radiation therapy by providing a lower integral dose seems to be more advantageous and efficient for prostate cancer treatment, compared to compensator-based IMRT.

  13. Weekly, low-dose docetaxel combined with estramustine for Japanese castration-resistant prostate cancer: its efficacy and safety profile compared with tri-weekly standard-dose treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Yasutomo; Nishimura, Kazuo; Nakayama, Masashi; Uemura, Motohide; Takayama, Hitoshi; Nonomura, Norio; Tsujimura, Akira

    2014-02-01

    We retrospectively investigated the efficacy and safety profile of weekly low-dose docetaxel (DTX) with estramustine in comparison with triweekly standard-dose DTX treatment for Japanese patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Between April 2002 and January 2011, 75 CRPC patients were treated with triweekly DTX (60-75 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks) (standard-dose group), and 76 CRPC patients were treated with weekly low-dose DTX (20-30 mg/m(2) on days 2 and 9 with estramustine 560 mg on days 1-3 and 8-10) every 3 weeks (low-dose group). Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response and progression-free and overall survival were analyzed in each group. Median serum PSA level of the standard-dose group and low-dose group was 25.0 and 35.5 ng/ml, respectively. In the standard-dose and low-dose groups, 57.8 and 65.2 % of patients, respectively, achieved a PSA decline ≥ 50 %. There was no significant difference in either median time to progression between the standard-dose group (10.0 months) and low-dose group (7.1 months) or in median duration of survival between the standard-dose group (24.2 months) and low-dose group (30.6 months). Multivariate analysis with a Cox proportional hazards regression model showed that DTX treatment protocol did not influence the risk of death. Incidences of grade 3-4 neutropenia, febrile neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia were significantly higher in the standard-dose versus low-dose group (58.7 vs. 7.9 %, 16.0 vs. 3.9 %, and 8.0 vs. 0 %, respectively). For Japanese CRPC patients, weekly low-dose DTX combined with estramustine has similar efficacy to standard-dose DTX but with fewer adverse events.

  14. Epigenetic modifications in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngollo, Marjolaine; Dagdemir, Aslihan; Karsli-Ceppioglu, Seher; Judes, Gaelle; Pajon, Amaury; Penault-Llorca, Frederique; Boiteux, Jean-Paul; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Guy, Laurent; Bernard-Gallon, Dominique J

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men in France. Apart from the genetic alterations in prostate cancer, epigenetics modifications are involved in the development and progression of this disease. Epigenetic events are the main cause in gene regulation and the three most epigenetic mechanisms studied include DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNA expression. In this review, we summarized epigenetic mechanisms in prostate cancer. Epigenetic drugs that inhibit DNA methylation, histone methylation and histone acetylation might be able to reactivate silenced gene expression in prostate cancer. However, further understanding of interactions of these enzymes and their effects on transcription regulation in prostate cancer is needed and has become a priority in biomedical research. In this study, we summed up epigenetic changes with emphasis on pharmacologic epigenetic target agents.

  15. Prostate cancer brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Vita; Silva, Joao L. F.; Srougi, Miguel; Nesrallah, Adriano

    1999-01-01

    The transperineal brachytherapy with 125 I/Pd 103 seed implantation guided by transurethral ultrasound must be presented as therapeutical option of low urinary morbidity in patients with localized prostate cancer. The combined clinical staging - including Gleason and initial PSA - must be encouraged, for definition of a group of low risk and indication of exclusive brachytherapy. Random prospective studies are necessary in order to define the best role of brachytherapy, surgery and external beam radiation therapy

  16. Retrospective Evaluation Reveals That Long-term Androgen Deprivation Therapy Improves Cause-Specific and Overall Survival in the Setting of Dose-Escalated Radiation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Felix Y.; Blas, Kevin; Olson, Karin; Stenmark, Matthew; Sandler, Howard; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and duration for high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated RT (minimum 75 Gy) with or without ADT was performed. The relationship between ADT use and duration with biochemical failure (BF), metastatic failure (MF), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), non-prostate cancer death (NPCD), and overall survival (OS) was assessed as a function of pretreatment characteristics, comorbid medical illness, and treatment using Fine and Gray's cumulative incidence methodology. Results: The median follow-up time was 64 months. In men with National Comprehensive Cancer Network defined high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated RT, on univariate analysis, both metastasis (P<.0001; hazard ratio 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.18-0.67; cumulative incidence at 60 months 13% vs 35%) and PCSM (P=.015; hazard ratio 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.0; cumulative incidence at 60 months 6% vs 11%) were improved with the use of ADT. On multivariate analysis for all high-risk patients, Gleason score was the strongest negative prognostic factor, and long-term ADT (LTAD) improved MF (P=.002), PCSM (P=.034), and OS (P=.001). In men with prostate cancer and Gleason scores 8 to 10, on multivariate analysis after adjustment for other risk features, there was a duration-dependent improvement in BF, metastasis, PCSM, and OS, all favoring LTAD in comparison with STAD or RT alone. Conclusion: For men with high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated EBRT, this retrospective study suggests that the combination of LTAD and RT provided a significant improvement in clinical outcome, which was especially true for those with Gleason scores of 8 to 10

  17. Comparison of the outcome and morbidity for localized or locally advanced prostate cancer treated by high-dose-rate brachytherapy plus external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) versus EBRT alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Fumin; Wang Yuming; Wang Chongjong; Huang Hsuanying; Chiang Pohui

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the survival, gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity for localized or locally advanced prostate cancer treated by high-dose-rate-brachytherapy (HDR-BT) plus external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) versus EBRT alone at a single institute in Taiwan. Eighty-eight patients with T1c-T3b prostate cancer consecutively treated by EBRT alone (33 patients) or HDR-BT+EBRT (55 patients) were studied. The median dose of EBRT was 70.2 Gy in the EBRT group and 50.4 Gy in the HDR-BT group. HDR-BT was performed 2-3 weeks before EBRT, with 12.6 Gy in three fractions over 24 h. Five patients (15.2%) in the EBRT group and seven (12.7%) in the HDR-BT group developed a biochemical relapse. The 5-year actuarial biochemical relapse-free survival rates were 65.0% in the EBRT group and 66.7% in the HDR-BT group (P=0.76). The 5-year actuarial likelihood of late ≥Grade 2 and ≥Grade 3 GI toxicity in the EBRT versus HDR-BT group was 62.8 versus 7.7% (P<0.001) and 19.6 versus 0% (P=0.001), respectively. In a multivariate analysis, the only predictor for late GI toxicity was the mode of RT. The 5-year actuarial likelihood of late ≥Grade 2 and ≥Grade 3 GU toxicity in the EBRT versus HDR-BT group was 14.8 versus 15.9% (P=0.86) and 3.6 versus 8.5% (P=0.40), respectively. The addition of HDR-BT before EBRT with a reduced dose from the EBRT produces a comparable survival outcome and GU toxicity but a significantly less GI toxicity for prostate cancer patients. (author)

  18. The Early Prostate Cancer program: bicalutamide in nonmetastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter; Roder, Martin Andreas; Røder, Martin Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The Early Prostate Cancer program is investigating the addition of bicalutamide 150 mg to standard care for localized or locally advanced, nonmetastatic prostate cancer. The third program analysis, at 7.4 years' median follow-up, has shown that bicalutamide 150 mg does not benefit patients...

  19. A comparison of HDR brachytherapy and IMRT techniques for dose escalation in prostate cancer: A radiobiological modeling study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatyga, M.; Williamson, J. F.; Dogan, N.; Todor, D.; Siebers, J. V.; George, R.; Barani, I.; Hagan, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, 401 College Street, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    A course of one to three large fractions of high dose rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy is an attractive alternative to intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for delivering boost doses to the prostate in combination with additional external beam irradiation for intermediate risk disease. The purpose of this work is to quantitatively compare single-fraction HDR boosts to biologically equivalent fractionated IMRT boosts, assuming idealized image guided delivery (igIMRT) and conventional delivery (cIMRT). For nine prostate patients, both seven-field IMRT and HDR boosts were planned. The linear-quadratic model was used to compute biologically equivalent dose prescriptions. The cIMRT plan was evaluated as a static plan and with simulated random and setup errors. The authors conclude that HDR delivery produces a therapeutic ratio which is significantly better than the conventional IMRT and comparable to or better than the igIMRT delivery. For the HDR, the rectal gBEUD analysis is strongly influenced by high dose DVH tails. A saturation BED, beyond which no further injury can occur, must be assumed. Modeling of organ motion uncertainties yields mean outcomes similar to static plan outcomes.

  20. Blood lipids and prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, Caroline J; Bonilla, Carolina; Holly, Jeff M P

    2016-01-01

    Genetic risk scores were used as unconfounded instruments for specific lipid traits (Mendelian randomization) to assess whether circulating lipids causally influence prostate cancer risk. Data from 22,249 prostate cancer cases and 22,133 controls from 22 studies within the international PRACTICAL...... into logistic regression models to estimate the presence (and direction) of any causal effect of each lipid trait on prostate cancer risk. There was weak evidence for an association between the LDL genetic score and cancer grade: the odds ratio (OR) per genetically instrumented standard deviation (SD) in LDL.......95, 3.00; P = 0.08). The rs12916-T variant in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) was inversely associated with prostate cancer (OR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.94, 1.00; P = 0.03). In conclusion, circulating lipids, instrumented by our genetic risk scores, did not appear to alter prostate cancer risk...

  1. Potency following high-dose three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and the impact of prior major urologic surgical procedures in patients treated for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinn, Daniel M.; Holland, John; Crownover, Richard L.; Roach, Mack

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of high-dose three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) on potency in patients treated for clinically localized prostate cancer and to identify factors that might predict the outcome of sexual function following treatment. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-four consecutive patients treated with 3DCRT for localized prostate cancer at UCSF between 1991-1993 were included in this retrospective analysis. Patient responses were obtained from a mailed questionnaire, telephone interviews, or departmental records. Median follow-up was 21 months. Results: Sixty patients reported having sexual function prior to 3DCRT, including 47 who were fully potent and 13 who were marginally potent. Of the remaining 64 patients, 45 were impotent, 7 were on hormones, 1 was status-postorchiectomy, and 11 were not evaluable. Following 3DCRT, 37 of 60 patients (62%) retained sexual function sufficient for intercourse. Of those with sexual function before irradiation, 33 of 47 (70%) of patients fully potent and 4 of 13 (31%) of patients marginally potent maintained function sufficient for intercourse (p < 0.01). Potency was retained in 6 of 15 (40%) patients with a history of a major urologic surgical procedure (MUSP) and in 31 of 45 (69%) with no history of a MUSP (p < 0.04). Transurethral resection of the prostate was the MUSP in eight of these patients, with four (50%) maintaining sexual function. Conclusions: Patients who receive definitive 3DCRT for localized prostate cancer appear to maintain potency similar to patients treated with conventional radiotherapy. However, patients who are marginally potent at presentation or who have a history of a MUSP appear to be at increased risk of impotence following 3DCRT

  2. Predictors for Rectal and Intestinal Acute Toxicities During Prostate Cancer High-Dose 3D-CRT: Results of a Prospective Multicenter Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavassori, Vittorio; Fiorino, Claudio; Rancati, Tiziana; Magli, Alessandro; Fellin, Gianni; Baccolini, Michela; Bianchi, Carla; Cagna, Emanuela; Mauro, Flora A.; Monti, Angelo F.; Munoz, Fernando; Stasi, Michele; Franzone, Paola; Valdagni, Riccardo

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To find predictors for rectal and intestinal acute toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with ≥70 Gy conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between July 2002 and March 2004, 1,132 patients were entered into a cooperative study (AIROPROS01-02). Toxicity was scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scale and by considering the changes (before and after treatment) of the scores of a self-administered questionnaire on rectal/intestinal toxicity. The correlation with a number of parameters was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Concerning the questionnaire, only moderate/severe complications were considered. Results: Of 1,132 patients, 1,123 were evaluable. Of these patients, 375, 265, and 28 had Grade 1, 2, and 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer toxicity, respectively. The mean rectal dose was the most predictive parameter (p = 0.0004; odds ratio, 1.035) for Grade 2 or worse toxicity, and the use of anticoagulants/antiaggregants (p 0.02; odds ratio, 0.63) and hormonal therapy (p = 0.04, odds ratio, 0.65) were protective. The questionnaire-based scoring revealed that a greater mean rectal dose was associated with a greater risk of bleeding; larger irradiated volumes were associated with frequency, tenesmus, incontinence, and bleeding; hormonal therapy was protective against frequency and tenesmus; hemorrhoids were associated with a greater risk of tenesmus and bleeding; and diabetes associated highly with diarrhea. Conclusion: The mean rectal dose correlated with acute rectal/intestinal toxicity in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and hormonal therapy and the use of anticoagulants/antiaggregants were protective. According to the moderate/severe injury scores on the self-assessed questionnaire, several clinical and dose-volume parameters were independently predictive for

  3. Rectal Bleeding After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Combined With Hypofractionated External-Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: The Relationship Between Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters and the Occurrence Rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Masahiko; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Ebara, Takeshi; Kato, Hiroyuki; Tamaki, Tomoaki; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Ito, Kazuto; Miyakubo, Mai; Yamamoto, Takumi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Takeo; Nakano, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the predictive risk factors for Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding after high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer using dose–volume histogram analysis. Methods and Materials: The records of 216 patients treated with HDR-BT combined with EBRT were analyzed. The treatment protocols for HDR-BT were 5 Gy × five times in 3 days or 7 Gy × three, 10.5 Gy × two, or 9 Gy × two in 2 days. The EBRT doses ranged from 45 to 51 Gy with a fractional dose of 3 Gy. Results: In 20 patients Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding developed, and the cumulative incidence rate was 9% at 5 years. By converting the HDR-BT and EBRT radiation doses into biologic effective doses (BED), the BED 3 at rectal volumes of 5% and 10% in the patients who experienced bleeding were significantly higher than those in the remaining 196 patients. Univariate analysis showed that a higher rectal BED 3–5% and the use of fewer needles in brachytherapy were correlated with the incidence of bleeding, but BED 3–5% was found to be the only significant factor on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: The radiation dose delivered to small rectal lesions as 5% is important for predicting Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding after HDR-BT combined with EBRT for prostate cancer.

  4. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  5. Focal therapy in prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bos, W.

    2016-01-01

    Interesting developments took place in the treatment of prostate cancer including focal therapy for less aggressive organ-confined prostate cancer. Fortunately, curative treatment is often still an option for patients suffering from the lower staged tumors. In carefully selected patients, the

  6. Treatment outcome of high-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy using intra-prostate fiducial markers for localized prostate cancer at a single institute in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Ken; Shimizu, Eiji; Abe, Keiko; Shirata, Yuko; Ishikawa, Yohjiro

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have confirmed the advantages of delivering high doses of external beam radiotherapy to achieve optimal tumor-control outcomes in patients with localized prostate cancer. We evaluated the medium-term treatment outcome after high-dose, image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using intra-prostate fiducial markers for clinically localized prostate cancer. In total, 141 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with image-guided IMRT (76 Gy in 13 patients and 80 Gy in 128 patients) between 2003 and 2008 were enrolled in this study. The patients were classified according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network-defined risk groups. Thirty-six intermediate-risk patients and 105 high-risk patients were included. Androgen-deprivation therapy was performed in 124 patients (88%) for a median of 11 months (range: 2–88 months). Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse was defined according to the Phoenix-definition (i.e., an absolute nadir plus 2 ng/ml dated at the call). The 5-year actuarial PSA relapse-free survival, the 5-year distant metastasis-free survival, the 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS), the 5-year overall survival (OS) outcomes and the acute and late toxicities were analyzed. The toxicity data were scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The median follow-up was 60 months. The 5-year PSA relapse-free survival rates were 100% for the intermediate-risk patients and 82.2% for the high-risk patients; the 5-year actuarial distant metastasis-free survival rates were 100% and 95% for the intermediate- and high-risk patients, respectively; the 5-year CSS rates were 100% for both patient subsets; and the 5-year OS rates were 100% and 91.7% for the intermediate- and high-risk patients, respectively. The Gleason score (<8 vs. ≥8) was significant for the 5-year PSA relapse-free survival on multivariate analysis (p = 0.044). There was no grade 3 or 4 acute toxicity. The incidence of

  7. Feasibility of MRI-only treatment planning for proton therapy in brain and prostate cancers: Dose calculation accuracy in substitute CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koivula, Lauri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used for radiotherapy target delineation, image guidance, and treatment response monitoring. Recent studies have shown that an entire external x-ray radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) workflow for brain tumor or prostate cancer patients based only on MRI reference images is feasible. This study aims to show that a MRI-only based RTP workflow is also feasible for proton beam therapy plans generated in MRI-based substitute computed tomography (sCT) images of the head and the pelvis. Methods: The sCTs were constructed for ten prostate cancer and ten brain tumor patients primarily by transforming the intensity values of in-phase MR images to Hounsfield units (HUs) with a dual model HU conversion technique to enable heterogeneous tissue representation. HU conversion models for the pelvis were adopted from previous studies, further extended in this study also for head MRI by generating anatomical site-specific conversion models (a new training data set of ten other brain patients). This study also evaluated two other types of simplified sCT: dual bulk density (for bone and water) and homogeneous (water only). For every clinical case, intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans robustly optimized in standard planning CTs were calculated in sCT for evaluation, and vice versa. Overall dose agreement was evaluated using dose–volume histogram parameters and 3D gamma criteria. Results: In heterogeneous sCTs, the mean absolute errors in HUs were 34 (soft tissues: 13, bones: 92) and 42 (soft tissues: 9, bones: 97) in the head and in the pelvis, respectively. The maximum absolute dose differences relative to CT in the brain tumor clinical target volume (CTV) were 1.4% for heterogeneous sCT, 1.8% for dual bulk sCT, and 8.9% for homogenous sCT. The corresponding maximum differences in the prostate CTV were 0.6%, 1.2%, and 3.6%, respectively. The percentages of dose points in the head and pelvis passing 1% and 1 mm

  8. Feasibility of MRI-only treatment planning for proton therapy in brain and prostate cancers: Dose calculation accuracy in substitute CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivula, Lauri [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, P.O. Box 180, Helsinki 00029 HUS (Finland)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used for radiotherapy target delineation, image guidance, and treatment response monitoring. Recent studies have shown that an entire external x-ray radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) workflow for brain tumor or prostate cancer patients based only on MRI reference images is feasible. This study aims to show that a MRI-only based RTP workflow is also feasible for proton beam therapy plans generated in MRI-based substitute computed tomography (sCT) images of the head and the pelvis. Methods: The sCTs were constructed for ten prostate cancer and ten brain tumor patients primarily by transforming the intensity values of in-phase MR images to Hounsfield units (HUs) with a dual model HU conversion technique to enable heterogeneous tissue representation. HU conversion models for the pelvis were adopted from previous studies, further extended in this study also for head MRI by generating anatomical site-specific conversion models (a new training data set of ten other brain patients). This study also evaluated two other types of simplified sCT: dual bulk density (for bone and water) and homogeneous (water only). For every clinical case, intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans robustly optimized in standard planning CTs were calculated in sCT for evaluation, and vice versa. Overall dose agreement was evaluated using dose–volume histogram parameters and 3D gamma criteria. Results: In heterogeneous sCTs, the mean absolute errors in HUs were 34 (soft tissues: 13, bones: 92) and 42 (soft tissues: 9, bones: 97) in the head and in the pelvis, respectively. The maximum absolute dose differences relative to CT in the brain tumor clinical target volume (CTV) were 1.4% for heterogeneous sCT, 1.8% for dual bulk sCT, and 8.9% for homogenous sCT. The corresponding maximum differences in the prostate CTV were 0.6%, 1.2%, and 3.6%, respectively. The percentages of dose points in the head and pelvis passing 1% and 1 mm

  9. Vitamin D in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trump, Donald L; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B

    2018-04-13

    Signaling through the vitamin D receptor has been shown to be biologically active and important in a number of preclinical studies in prostate and other cancers. Epidemiologic data also indicate that vitamin D signaling may be important in the cause and prognosis of prostate and other cancers. These data indicate that perturbation of vitamin D signaling may be a target for the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer. Large studies of vitamin D supplementation will be required to determine whether these observations can be translated into prevention strategies. This paper reviews the available data in the use of vitamin D compounds in the treatment of prostate cancer. Clinical data are limited which support the use of vitamin D compounds in the management of men with prostate cancer. However, clinical trials guided by existing preclinical data are limited.

  10. Vitamin D in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald L Trump

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Signaling through the vitamin D receptor has been shown to be biologically active and important in a number of preclinical studies in prostate and other cancers. Epidemiologic data also indicate that vitamin D signaling may be important in the cause and prognosis of prostate and other cancers. These data indicate that perturbation of vitamin D signaling may be a target for the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer. Large studies of vitamin D supplementation will be required to determine whether these observations can be translated into prevention strategies. This paper reviews the available data in the use of vitamin D compounds in the treatment of prostate cancer. Clinical data are limited which support the use of vitamin D compounds in the management of men with prostate cancer. However, clinical trials guided by existing preclinical data are limited.

  11. Vitamin D in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trump, Donald L; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B

    2018-01-01

    Signaling through the vitamin D receptor has been shown to be biologically active and important in a number of preclinical studies in prostate and other cancers. Epidemiologic data also indicate that vitamin D signaling may be important in the cause and prognosis of prostate and other cancers. These data indicate that perturbation of vitamin D signaling may be a target for the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer. Large studies of vitamin D supplementation will be required to determine whether these observations can be translated into prevention strategies. This paper reviews the available data in the use of vitamin D compounds in the treatment of prostate cancer. Clinical data are limited which support the use of vitamin D compounds in the management of men with prostate cancer. However, clinical trials guided by existing preclinical data are limited. PMID:29667615

  12. External beam radiation therapy and a low-dose-rate brachytherapy boost without or with androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Tobin J.; Hutchinson, Sean Z.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Cruz, Alex A.; Figura, Nicholas B.; Nethers, Kevin; Biagioli, Matthew C.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Heysek, Randy V.; Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richard.wilder@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To assess outcomes with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and a low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy boost without or with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: From January 2001 through August 2011, 120 intermediate-risk or high-risk prostate cancer patients were treated with EBRT to a total dose of 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions and a palladium-103 LDR brachytherapy boost of 10,000 cGy (n = 90) or an iodine-125 LDR brachytherapy boost of 11,000 cGy (n = 30). ADT, consisting of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist ± an anti-androgen, was administered to 29/92 (32%) intermediate-risk patients for a median duration of 4 months and 26/28 (93%) high-risk patients for a median duration of 28 months. Results: Median follow-up was 5.2 years (range, 1.1-12.8 years). There was no statistically-significant difference in biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), or overall survival (OS) without or with ADT. Also, there was no statistically-significant difference in bDFS, DMFS, or OS with a palladium-103 vs. an iodine-125 LDR brachytherapy boost. Conclusions: There was no statistically-significant difference in outcomes with the addition of ADT, though the power of the current study was limited. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0815 and 0924 phase III trials, which have accrual targets of more than 1,500 men, will help to clarify the role ADT in locally-advanced prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT and a brachytherapy boost. Palladium-103 and iodine-125 provide similar bDFS, DMFS, and OS. (author)

  13. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy of a Single Implant With Two Fractions Combined With External Beam Radiotherapy for Hormone-Naive Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Morio; Mori, Takashi; Shirai, Shintaro; Kishi, Kazushi; Inagaki, Takeshi; Hara, Isao

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the preliminary outcomes of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of a single implant with two fractions and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for hormone-naive prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between March 2000 and Sept 2003, a total of 53 patients with tumor Stage T1c-T3b N0 M0 prostate cancer were treated with HDR brachytherapy boost doses (7.5 Gy/fraction) and 50-Gy EBRT during a 5.5-week period. Median follow-up was 61 months. Patients were divided into groups with localized (T1c-T2b) and advanced disease (T3a-T3b). We used the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) definition for biochemical failure. According to recommendations of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-ASTRO Phoenix Consensus Conference, biochemical failure-free control rates (BF-FCRs) at 3 years were investigated as 2 years short of the median follow-up. Results: Between April 2000 and Sept 2007, Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 2.0 late Grade 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity rates were 0% and 3.8%, respectively. Erectile preservation was 25% at 5 years. Overall survival was 88.1% and cause-specific survival was 100%. At 3 years, ASTRO BF-FCRs of the localized and advanced groups were 100% and 42%, respectively (p = 0.001). Conclusions: The HDR brachytherapy of a single implant with two fractions plus EBRT is effective in treating patients with localized hormone-naive prostate cancer, with the least genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities; however, longer median BF-FCR follow-up is required to assess these findings

  14. Fat Intake Is Not Linked to Prostate Cancer: A Systematic Review and Dose-Response Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Xu

    Full Text Available Since the late 1960s, the average global supply of fat has increased by 20 g per capita per day. While fat intake has been considered a potential risk factor for prostate cancer (Pca, the hypothesis from previous epidemiologic studies remained equivocal.Relevant cohort studies were identified through a literature search in PubMed, ScienceDirect and Wiley Online Library up to March 1, 2015. A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis were used to assess the relationship between fat intake and the risk for Pca.We identified 14 cohort studies, which included 37,349 cases and a total of 751,030 participants. We found no evidence of a non-linear association between fat intake and the risk for Pca. Overall, the summarized relative risks for every 28.35 g increment a day was 0.99 (95%CI: 0.98, 1.01; P=0.94; n=13 for total fat intake, 1.00 (95%CI: 1.00, 1.00; P=0.72; n=9 for saturated fat, 0.99 (95%CI: 0.95, 1.03; P=0.55; n=7 for polyunsaturated fat, and 1.00 (95%CI: 0.95, 1.04; P=0.85; n=8 for monounsaturated fat. Additionally, there was no link to the risk for advanced stage Pca regarding total fat intake (RR=1.02, 95%CI: 0.96, 1.08; P=0.63; n=5, saturated fat (RR=0.96, 95%CI: 0.84, 1.11; P=0.61; n=6, polyunsaturated fat (RR=0.96, 95%CI: 0.79, 1.17; P=0.68; n=6, or monounsaturated fat (RR=0.96, 95%CI: 0.86, 1.07; P=0.42; n=6. Subgroup and sensitively analyses showed consistent results.Little evidence from published cohort studies supports the statement that total fat, saturated fat or unsaturated fat intake increases the risk for Pca or advanced stage Pca.

  15. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Dose constraints for the anterior rectal wall to minimize rectal toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Jennifer L., E-mail: peterson.jennifer2@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Buskirk, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N. [Section of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Bernard, Johnny R. [Section of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Southern Ohio Medical Center, Portsmouth, OH (United States); Tzou, Katherine S.; Casale, Henry E.; Bellefontaine, Louis P.; Serago, Christopher; Kim, Siyong; Vallow, Laura A.; Daugherty, Larry C.; Ko, Stephen J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Rectal adverse events (AEs) are a major concern with definitive radiotherapy (RT) treatment for prostate cancer. The anterior rectal wall is at the greatest risk of injury as it lies closest to the target volume and receives the highest dose of RT. This study evaluated the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall receiving a high dose to identify potential ideal dose constraints that can minimize rectal AEs. A total of 111 consecutive patients with Stage T1c to T3a N0 M0 prostate cancer who underwent image-guided intensity-modulated RT at our institution were included. AEs were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The volume of anterior rectal wall receiving 5 to 80 Gy in 2.5-Gy increments was determined. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to identify cut points in these volumes that led to an increased risk of early and late rectal AEs. Early AEs occurred in most patients (88%); however, relatively few of them (13%) were grade ≥2. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of late rectal AEs was 37%, with only 5% being grade ≥2. For almost all RT doses, we identified a threshold of irradiated absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which there was at least a trend toward a significantly higher rate of AEs. Most strikingly, patients with more than 1.29, 0.73, or 0.45 cm{sup 3} of anterior rectal wall exposed to radiation doses of 67.5, 70, or 72.5 Gy, respectively, had a significantly increased risk of late AEs (relative risks [RR]: 2.18 to 2.72; p ≤ 0.041) and of grade ≥ 2 early AEs (RR: 6.36 to 6.48; p = 0.004). Our study provides evidence that definitive image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for prostate cancer is well tolerated and also identifies dose thresholds for the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which patients are at greater risk of early and late complications.

  16. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Dose constraints for the anterior rectal wall to minimize rectal toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, Jennifer L.; Buskirk, Steven J.; Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Bernard, Johnny R.; Tzou, Katherine S.; Casale, Henry E.; Bellefontaine, Louis P.; Serago, Christopher; Kim, Siyong; Vallow, Laura A.; Daugherty, Larry C.; Ko, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Rectal adverse events (AEs) are a major concern with definitive radiotherapy (RT) treatment for prostate cancer. The anterior rectal wall is at the greatest risk of injury as it lies closest to the target volume and receives the highest dose of RT. This study evaluated the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall receiving a high dose to identify potential ideal dose constraints that can minimize rectal AEs. A total of 111 consecutive patients with Stage T1c to T3a N0 M0 prostate cancer who underwent image-guided intensity-modulated RT at our institution were included. AEs were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The volume of anterior rectal wall receiving 5 to 80 Gy in 2.5-Gy increments was determined. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to identify cut points in these volumes that led to an increased risk of early and late rectal AEs. Early AEs occurred in most patients (88%); however, relatively few of them (13%) were grade ≥2. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of late rectal AEs was 37%, with only 5% being grade ≥2. For almost all RT doses, we identified a threshold of irradiated absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which there was at least a trend toward a significantly higher rate of AEs. Most strikingly, patients with more than 1.29, 0.73, or 0.45 cm 3 of anterior rectal wall exposed to radiation doses of 67.5, 70, or 72.5 Gy, respectively, had a significantly increased risk of late AEs (relative risks [RR]: 2.18 to 2.72; p ≤ 0.041) and of grade ≥ 2 early AEs (RR: 6.36 to 6.48; p = 0.004). Our study provides evidence that definitive image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for prostate cancer is well tolerated and also identifies dose thresholds for the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which patients are at greater risk of early and late complications

  17. High-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer using daily fiducial marker-based position verification: acute and late toxicity in 331 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lips, Irene M; Dehnad, Homan; Gils, Carla H van; Boeken Kruger, Arto E; Heide, Uulke A van der; Vulpen, Marco van

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the acute and late toxicity after high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with fiducial marker-based position verification for prostate cancer. Between 2001 and 2004, 331 patients with prostate cancer received 76 Gy in 35 fractions using IMRT combined with fiducial marker-based position verification. The symptoms before treatment (pre-treatment) and weekly during treatment (acute toxicity) were scored using the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC). The goal was to score late toxicity according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) scale with a follow-up time of at least three years. Twenty-two percent of the patients experienced pre-treatment grade ≥ 2 genitourinary (GU) complaints and 2% experienced grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) complaints. Acute grade 2 GU and GI toxicity occurred in 47% and 30%, respectively. Only 3% of the patients developed acute grade 3 GU and no grade ≥ 3 GI toxicity occurred. After a mean follow-up time of 47 months with a minimum of 31 months for all patients, the incidence of late grade 2 GU and GI toxicity was 21% and 9%, respectively. Grade ≥ 3 GU and GI toxicity rates were 4% and 1%, respectively, including one patient with a rectal fistula and one patient with a severe hemorrhagic cystitis (both grade 4). In conclusion, high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker-based position verification is well tolerated. The low grade ≥ 3 toxicity allows further dose escalation if the same dose constraints for the organs at risk will be used

  18. High-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer using daily fiducial marker-based position verification: acute and late toxicity in 331 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boeken Kruger Arto E

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We evaluated the acute and late toxicity after high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT with fiducial marker-based position verification for prostate cancer. Between 2001 and 2004, 331 patients with prostate cancer received 76 Gy in 35 fractions using IMRT combined with fiducial marker-based position verification. The symptoms before treatment (pre-treatment and weekly during treatment (acute toxicity were scored using the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC. The goal was to score late toxicity according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC scale with a follow-up time of at least three years. Twenty-two percent of the patients experienced pre-treatment grade ≥ 2 genitourinary (GU complaints and 2% experienced grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI complaints. Acute grade 2 GU and GI toxicity occurred in 47% and 30%, respectively. Only 3% of the patients developed acute grade 3 GU and no grade ≥ 3 GI toxicity occurred. After a mean follow-up time of 47 months with a minimum of 31 months for all patients, the incidence of late grade 2 GU and GI toxicity was 21% and 9%, respectively. Grade ≥ 3 GU and GI toxicity rates were 4% and 1%, respectively, including one patient with a rectal fistula and one patient with a severe hemorrhagic cystitis (both grade 4. In conclusion, high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker-based position verification is well tolerated. The low grade ≥ 3 toxicity allows further dose escalation if the same dose constraints for the organs at risk will be used.

  19. Gastrointestinal toxicity and its relation to dose distributions in the anorectal region of prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Hart, Guus A.M.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Koper, Peter C.M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To study the correlations between the dose distributions in the anorectal region and late GI symptoms in patients treated for localized prostate carcinoma. Methods and materials: Data from a randomized study were analyzed. In this trial, patients were treated with either rectangular or conformal fields with a dose of 66 Gy. Data concerning GI symptoms were collected from questionnaires of 197 patients. The distributions of the anorectal region were projected on maps, and the dose parameters were calculated. The incidences of complaints were studied as a function of the dose-area parameters and clinical parameters, using a proportional hazard regression model. Finally, we tested a series of dose parameters originating from different parts of the anorectal region. Results: Analyzing the total region, only a statistically significant dose-area effect relation for bleeding was found (p < 0.01). Defining subareas, we found effect relations for bleeding, soiling, fecal incontinence, and mucus loss. For bleeding and mucus loss, the strongest correlation was found for the dose received by the upper 70-80% of the anorectal region (p < 0.01). For soiling and fecal incontinence, we found the strongest association with the dose to the lower 40-50% (p < 0.05). Conclusion: We found evidence that complaints originate from specific regions of the irradiated lower GI tract. Bleeding and mucus loss are probably related to irradiation of the upper part of the rectum. Soiling and fecal incontinence are more likely related to the dose to the anal canal and the lower part of the rectum

  20. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Alone for Localized Prostate Cancer in Patients at Moderate or High Risk of Biochemical Recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoskin, Peter [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Rojas, Ana, E-mail: arc03@btconnect.com [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Lowe, Gerry; Bryant, Linda; Ostler, Peter; Hughes, Rob; Milner, Jessica; Cladd, Helen [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity and biochemical control of disease in patients with localized prostate adenocarcinoma treated with escalating doses per fraction of high-dose rate brachytherapy alone. Methods and Materials: A total of 197 patients were treated with 34 Gy in four fractions, 36 Gy in four fractions, 31.5 Gy in three fractions, or 26 Gy in two fractions. Median follow-up times were 60, 54, 36, and 6 months, respectively. Results: Incidence of early Grade {>=} 3 GU morbidity was 3% to 7%, and Grade 4 was 0% to 4%. During the first 12 weeks, the highest mean International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) value was 14, and between 6 months and 5 years it was 8. Grade 3 or 4 early GI morbidity was not observed. The 3-year actuarial rate of Grade 3 GU was 3% to 16%, and was 3% to 7% for strictures requiring surgery (4-year rate). An incidence of 1% Grade 3 GI events was seen at 3 years. Late Grade 4 GU or GI events were not observed. At 3 years, 99% of patients with intermediate-risk and 91% with high-risk disease were free of biochemical relapse (log-rank p = 0.02). Conclusions: There was no significant difference in urinary and rectal morbidity between schedules. Biochemical control of disease in patients with intermediate and high risk of relapse was good.

  1. Key papers in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney, Simon; Shah, Taimur Tariq; Patel, Hitendra R H; Arya, Manit

    2014-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer and second leading cause of death in men. The evidence base for the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer is continually changing. We aim to review and discuss past and contemporary papers on these topics to provoke debate and highlight key dilemmas faced by the urological community. We review key papers on prostate-specific antigen screening, radical prostatectomy versus surveillance strategies, targeted therapies, timing of radiotherapy and alternative anti-androgen therapeutics. Previously, the majority of patients, irrespective of risk, underwent radical open surgical procedures associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Evidence is emerging that not all prostate cancers are alike and that low-grade disease can be safely managed by surveillance strategies and localized treatment to the prostate. The question remains as to how to accurately stage the disease and ultimately choose which treatment pathway to follow.

  2. Efficacy of c-Met inhibitor for advanced prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, William H; Zhu, Chunfang; Clark, Curtis; Christensen, James G; Sun, Zijie

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant expression of HGF/SF and its receptor, c-Met, often correlates with advanced prostate cancer. Our previous study showed that expression of c-Met in prostate cancer cells was increased after attenuation of androgen receptor (AR) signalling. This suggested that current androgen ablation therapy for prostate cancer activates c-Met expression and may contribute to development of more aggressive, castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Therefore, we directly assessed the efficacy of c-Met inhibition during androgen ablation on the growth and progression of prostate cancer. We tested two c-Met small molecule inhibitors, PHA-665752 and PF-2341066, for anti-proliferative activity by MTS assay and cell proliferation assay on human prostate cancer cell lines with different levels of androgen sensitivity. We also used renal subcapsular and castrated orthotopic xenograft mouse models to assess the effect of the inhibitors on prostate tumor formation and progression. We demonstrated a dose-dependent inhibitory effect of PHA-665752 and PF-2341066 on the proliferation of human prostate cancer cells and the phosphorylation of c-Met. The effect on cell proliferation was stronger in androgen insensitive cells. The c-Met inhibitor, PF-2341066, significantly reduced growth of prostate tumor cells in the renal subcapsular mouse model and the castrated orthotopic mouse model. The effect on cell proliferation was greater following castration. The c-Met inhibitors demonstrated anti-proliferative efficacy when combined with androgen ablation therapy for advanced prostate cancer

  3. Late Toxicity After Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: An Exploration of Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters to Limit Genitourinary and Gastrointestinal Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pederson, Aaron W.; Fricano, Janine; Correa, David; Pelizzari, Charles A. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Liauw, Stanley L., E-mail: sliauw@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for prostate cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and propose dose-volume histogram (DVH) guidelines to limit late treatment-related toxicity. Methods and Materials: In this study 296 consecutive men were treated with IMRT for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Most patients received treatment to the prostate with or without proximal seminal vesicles (90%), to a median dose of 76 Gy. Concurrent androgen deprivation therapy was given to 150 men (51%) for a median of 4 months. Late toxicity was defined by Common Toxicity Criteria version 3.0 as greater than 3 months after radiation therapy completion. Four groupings of DVH parameters were defined, based on the percentage of rectal or bladder tissue receiving 70 Gy (V{sub 70}), 65 Gy (V{sub 65}), and 40 Gy (V{sub 40}). These DVH groupings, as well as clinical and treatment characteristics, were correlated to maximal Grade 2+ GU and GI toxicity. Results: With a median follow-up of 41 months, the 4-year freedom from maximal Grade 2+ late toxicity was 81% and 91% for GU and GI systems, respectively, and by last follow-up, the rates of Grade 2+ GU and GI toxicity were 9% and 5%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, whole-pelvic IMRT was associated with Grade 2+ GU toxicity and age was associated with Grade 2+ GI toxicity. Freedom from Grade 2+ GI toxicity at 4 years was 100% for men with rectal V{sub 70} {<=}10%, V{sub 65} {<=}20%, and V{sub 40} {<=}40%; 92% for men with rectal V{sub 70} {<=}20%, V{sub 65} {<=}40%, and V{sub 40} {<=}80%; and 85% for men exceeding these criteria (p = 0.13). These criteria were more highly associated with GI toxicity in men aged {>=}70 years (p = 0.07). No bladder dose-volume relationships were associated with the risk of GU toxicity. Conclusions: IMRT is associated with low rates of severe GU or GI toxicity after treatment for prostate cancer. Rectal dose constraints

  4. Prostate Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system located just below the bladder (the organ that ... up part of semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  5. Prostate cancer and social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Stacy; Katz, Matthew S; Langford, Aisha; Byrne, Nataliya; Ciprut, Shannon

    2018-04-11

    The use of social media is increasing globally and is employed in a variety of ways in the prostate cancer community. In addition to their use in research, advocacy, and awareness campaigns, social media offer vast opportunities for education and networking for patients with prostate cancer and health-care professionals, and many educational resources and support networks are available to patients with prostate cancer and their caregivers. Despite the considerable potential for social media to be employed in the field of prostate cancer, concerns remain - particularly regarding the maintenance of patient confidentiality, variable information quality, and possible financial conflicts of interest. A number of professional societies have, therefore, issued guidance regarding social media use in medicine. Social media are used extensively in other cancer communities, particularly among patients with breast cancer, and both the quantity and type of information available are expected to grow in the future.

  6. Single-Fraction High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Hypofractionated External Beam Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer - Long Term Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cury, Fabio L., E-mail: fabio.cury@muhc.mcgill.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Duclos, Marie [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Aprikian, Armen [Department of Urology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Patrocinio, Horacio [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Kassouf, Wassim [Department of Urology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Shenouda, George; Faria, Sergio; David, Marc; Souhami, Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We present the long-term results of a cohort of patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer (PC) treated with single-fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) combined with hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (HypoRT). Methods and Materials: Patients were treated exclusively with HDRB and HypoRT. HDRB delivered a dose of 10 Gy to the prostate surface and HypoRT consisted of 50 Gy delivered in 20 daily fractions. The first 121 consecutive patients with a minimum of 2 years posttreatment follow-up were assessed for toxicity and disease control. Results: The median follow-up was 65.2 months. No acute Grade III or higher toxicity was seen. Late Grade II gastrointestinal toxicity was seen in 9 patients (7.4%) and Grade III in 2 (1.6%). Late Grade III genitourinary toxicity was seen in 2 patients (1.6%). After a 24-month follow-up, a rebiopsy was offered to the first 58 consecutively treated patients, and 44 patients agreed with the procedure. Negative biopsies were found in 40 patients (91%). The 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival rate was 90.7% (95% CI, 84.5-96.9%), with 13 patients presenting biochemical failure. Among them, 9 were diagnosed with distant metastasis. Prostate cancer-specific and overall survival rates at 5 years were 100% and 98.8% (95% CI, 96.4-100%), respectively. Conclusion: The combination of HDRB and HypoRT is well tolerated, with acceptable toxicity rates. Furthermore, results from rebiopsies revealed an encouraging rate of local control. These results confirm that the use of conformal RT techniques, adapted to specific biological tumor characteristics, have the potential to improve the therapeutic ratio in intermediate-risk PC patients.

  7. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and External-Beam Radiotherapy for Hormone-Naïve Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: A 7-Year Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluwini, Shafak; Rooij, Peter H. van; Kirkels, Wim J.; Jansen, Peter P.; Praag, John O.; Bangma, Chris H.; Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report clinical outcomes and early and late complications in 264 hormone-naïve patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in combination with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Between February 2000 and July 2007, 264 patients underwent HDR-BT in combination with EBRT as a treatment for their low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. The HDR-BT was performed using ultrasound-based implantation. The total HDR-BT dose was 18 Gy in 3 fractions within 24 h, with a 6-h minimum interval. The EBRT started 2 weeks after HDR-BT and was delivered in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy to 45 Gy within 5 weeks. Results: After a mean follow-up of 74.5 months, 4 patients (1.5%) showed prostate-specific antigen progression according to the American Society for Radiation Oncology definition and 8 patients (3%) according to the Phoenix definition. A biopsy-proven local recurrence was registered in 1 patient (0.4%), and clinical progression (bone metastases) was documented in 2 patients (0.7%). Seven-year actuarial freedom from biochemical failure was 97%, and 7-year disease-specific survival and overall survival were 100% and 91%, respectively. Toxicities were comparable to other series. Conclusions: Treatment with interstitial HDR-BT plus EBRT shows a low incidence of late complications and a favorable oncologic outcome after 7 years follow-up.

  8. Comprehensive Genetic Characterization of Intraprostatic Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer in African American Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Response and Eradication of Androgen Receptor Amplification with High-dose Testosterone in Prostate Cancer ." Eur Urol 71(6): 997-998. Case Report...34 Prostate -specific Antigen Response and Eradication of Androgen Receptor Amplification with High-dose Testosterone in Prostate Cancer ." Eur Urol 71...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0379 TITLE: Comprehensive genetic characterization of intraprostatic chronic inflammation and prostate cancer in

  9. SU-C-BRA-01: 18F-NaF PET/CT-Directed Dose Escalation in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Spine Oligometastases From Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, L [Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Zhang, W; Li, M; Peng, X; Xie, L; Lin, Z [Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); Kwee, S [The Queen’s Medical Center, Honolulu, HI (United States); Wang, H; Kuang, Y [University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the technical feasibility of SBRT dose painting using {sup 18}F-NaF positron emission tomography (PET) scans guidance in patients with spine oligometastases from prostate cancer. Methods: As a proof of concept, six patients with 14 spine oligometastatic lesions from prostate cancer who had {sup 18}F-NaF PET/CT scan prior to treatment were retrospectively included. GTV{sub reg} was delineated according to the regular tumor boundary shown on PET and/or CT images; and GTV{sub MATV} was contoured based on a net metabolically active tumor volume (MATV) defined by 60% of the SUV{sub max} values on {sup 18}F-NaF PET images. The PTVs (PTV{sub reg} and PTV{sub MATV}) were defined as respective GTVs (plus involved entire vertebral body for PTV{sub reg}) with a 3-mm isotropic expansion margin. Three 1-fraction SBRT plans using VMAT technique along with 10 MV FFF beams (Plan{sub 24Gy}, Plan{sub 24–27Gy}, and Plan{sub 24–30Gy}) were generated for each patient. All plans included a dose of 24 Gy prescribed to PTV{sub reg}. The Plan{sub 24–27Gy} and Plan{sub 24–30Gy} also included a simultaneous boost dose of 27 Gy or 30 Gy prescribed to the PTV{sub MATV}, respectively. The feasibility of 18F-NaF PET-guided SBRT dose escalation was evaluated by its ability to achieve the prescription dose objectives while adhering to organ-at-risk (OAR) dose constraints. The normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) calculated by radiological models were also compared between the plans. Results: In all 33 SBRT plans generated, the planning objectives and dose constraints were met without exception. Plan{sub 24–27Gy} and Plan{sub 24–30Gy} had a significantly higher dose in PTV{sub MATV} than Plan{sub 24Gy} (p < 0.05), respectively, while maintaining a similar OAR sparing profile and NTCP values. Conclusion: Using VMAT with FFF beams to incorporate a simultaneous {sup 18}F-NaF PET-guided radiation boost dose up to 30 Gy into a SBRT plan is technically

  10. Chemotherapeutic prevention studies of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djavan, Bob; Zlotta, Alexandre; Schulman, Claude

    2004-01-01

    Despite advances in the detection and management of prostate cancer, this disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in men. Increasing attention has focused on the role of chemoprevention for prostate cancer, ie the administration of agents that inhibit 1 or more steps in the natural...... history of prostate carcinogenesis. We review prostate cancer chemoprevention studies in Europe....

  11. Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Dipamoy; Aftabuddin, Md.; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Raha, Sanghamitra; Sen, Prosenjit

    2016-01-01

    Human prostate cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease that mainly affects elder male population of the western world with a high rate of mortality. Acquisitions of diverse sets of hallmark capabilities along with an aberrant functioning of androgen receptor signaling are the central driving forces behind prostatic tumorigenesis and its transition into metastatic castration resistant disease. These hallmark capabilities arise due to an intense orchestration of several crucial factors, including deregulation of vital cell physiological processes, inactivation of tumor suppressive activity and disruption of prostate gland specific cellular homeostasis. The molecular complexity and redundancy of oncoproteins signaling in prostate cancer demands for concurrent inhibition of multiple hallmark associated pathways. By an extensive manual curation of the published biomedical literature, we have developed Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map (HPCHM), an onco-functional atlas of human prostate cancer associated signaling and events. It explores molecular architecture of prostate cancer signaling at various levels, namely key protein components, molecular connectivity map, oncogenic signaling pathway map, pathway based functional connectivity map etc. Here, we briefly represent the systems level understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with prostate tumorigenesis by considering each and individual molecular and cell biological events of this disease process. PMID:27476486

  12. Polyethylene glycol hydrogel rectal spacer implantation in patients with prostate cancer undergoing combination high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jekwon; Lehrich, Brandon; Tran, Carolyn; Mesa, Albert; Baghdassarian, Ruben; Yoshida, Jeffrey; Torrey, Robert; Gazzaniga, Michael; Weinberg, Alan; Chalfin, Stuart; Ravera, John; Tokita, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    To present rectal toxicity rates in patients administered a polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel rectal spacer in conjunction with combination high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy. Between February 2010 and April 2015, 326 prostate carcinoma patients underwent combination high-dose-rate brachytherapy of 16 Gy (average dose 15.5 Gy; standard deviation [SD] = 1.6 Gy) and external beam radiotherapy of 59.4 Gy (average dose 60.2 Gy; SD = 2.9 Gy). In conjunction with the radiation therapy regimen, each patient was injected with 10 mL of a PEG hydrogel in the anterior perirectal fat space. The injectable spacer (rectal spacer) creates a gap between the prostate and the rectum. The rectum is displaced from the radiation field, and rectal dose is substantially reduced. The goal is a reduction in rectal radiation toxicity. Clinical efficacy was determined by measuring acute and chronic rectal toxicity using the National Cancer Center Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0 grading scheme. Median followup was 16 months. The mean anterior-posterior separation achieved was 1.6 cm (SD = 0.4 cm). Rates of acute Grade 1 and 2 rectal toxicity were 37.4% and 2.8%, respectively. There were no acute Grade 3/4 toxicities. Rates of late Grade 1, 2, and 3 rectal toxicity were 12.7%, 1.4%, and 0.7%, respectively. There were no late Grade 4 toxicities. PEG rectal spacer implantation is safe and well tolerated. Acute and chronic rectal toxicities are low despite aggressive dose escalation. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ultrasound-guided high dose rate conformal brachytherapy boost in prostate cancer: treatment description and preliminary results of a phase I/II clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stromberg, Jannifer; Martinez, Alvaro; Gonzalez, Jose; Edmundson, Gregory; Ohanian, Neshan; Vicini, Frank; Hollander, Jay; Gustafson, Gary; Spencer, William; Di, Yan; Brabbins, Donald

    1995-08-30

    Purpose: To improve results for locally advanced prostate cancer, a prospective clinical trial of concurrent external beam irradiation and fractionated iridium-192 (Ir-192) high dose rate (HDR) conformal boost brachytherapy was initiated. Methods and Materials: Between November 1991 and February 1994, 99 implants were performed on 33 patients with prostatic adenocarcinoma at William Beaumont Hospital. Using AJCC staging criteria, 9 patients had T2b tumors, 17 patients had T2c tumors, and 7 patients had T3 disease. Patients were treated with (a) 45.6 Gy whole pelvis external irradiation and (b) three HDR fractions of 5.5 Gy each (18 patients) or 6 Gy each (15 patients) to the prostate. Transperineal needle implants using real-time ultrasound guidance with interactive on-line isodose distributions were performed on an outpatient basis during weeks 1, 2, and 3 of external irradiation. Acute toxicity was scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) morbidity grading system. Results: This technique of concurrent external pelvic irradiation and conformal HDR brachytherapy was well tolerated. No significant intraoperative or perioperative complications occurred. Three patients (9%) experienced Grade 3 acute toxicity (two dysuria and one diarrhea). All toxicities were otherwise Grades 1 or 2 and were primarily as expected from pelvic external irradiation. Persistent implant-related toxicities included Grades 1-2 perineal pain (12%) and hematospermia (15%). Median follow-up time was 13 months. Serum prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) levels normalized in 91% of patients (29 out of 32) within 1-14 months (median 2.8 months) after irradiation. PSA levels were progressively decreasing in the other three patients at last measurement. Prospectively planned prostatic rebiopsies done at 18 months in the first 10 patients were negative in 9 out of 10 (90%). Conclusions: Acute toxicity has been acceptable with this unique approach using conformal high dose rate Ir-192

  14. External beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The intent of this course is to review the issues involved in the management of non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. -- The value of pre-treatment prognostic factors including stage, grade and PSA value will be presented, and their value in determining therapeutic strategies will be discussed. -- Controversies involving the simulation process and treatment design will be presented. The value of CT scanning, Beams-Eye View, 3-D planning, intravesicle, intraurethral and rectal contrast will be presented. The significance of prostate and patient movement and strategies for dealing with them will be presented. -- The management of low stage, low to intermediate grade prostate cancer will be discussed. The dose, volume and timing of irradiation will be discussed as will the role of neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy, neutron irradiation and brachytherapy. The current status of radical prostatectomy and cryotherapy will be summarized. Treatment of locally advanced, poorly differentiated prostate cancer will be presented including a discussion of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormones, dose-escalation and neutron irradiation. -- Strategies for post-radiation failures will be presented including data on cryotherapy, salvage prostatectomy and hormonal therapy (immediate, delayed and/or intermittent). New areas for investigation will be reviewed. -- The management of patients post prostatectomy will be reviewed. Data on adjuvant radiation and therapeutic radiation for biochemical or clinically relapsed patients will be presented. This course hopes to present a realistic and pragmatic overview for treating patients with non-metastatic prostatic cancer

  15. Prostate Cancer Screening Results from PLCO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn the results of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, a large-scale clinical trial to determine whether certain cancer screening tests can help reduce deaths from prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer.

  16. A dose-escalation trial with the adaptive radiotherapy process as a delivery system in localized prostate cancer: Analysis of chronic toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brabbins, Donald; Martinez, Alvaro; Yan Di; Lockman, David; Wallace, Michell; Gustafson, Gary; Chen, Peter; Vicini, Frank; Wong, John

    2005-01-01

    prostate and seminal vesicles. Chronic genitourinary and/or gastrointestinal categories were incontinence, persistent urinary retention, increased urinary frequency/urgency, urethral stricture, hematuria, diarrhea, rectal pain, bleeding, ulcer, fistula, incontinence, and proctitis. Toxicity at the high dose level was not different from toxicity at the intermediate or lower dose levels. No significant difference was observed in any of the individual toxicity categories. Conclusions: By applying the ART process-namely, developing a patient-specific PTV-to prostate cancer patients, significant dose escalation can be achieved without increases in genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity. Our data validate the rectal and bladder dose-volume constraints chosen for our three-dimensional conformal and IMRT prostrate radiotherapy planning

  17. Dose- and time-dependent gene expression alterations in prostate and colon cancer cells after in vitro exposure to carbon ion and X-irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetens, Annelies; Moreels, Marjan; Quintens, Roel; Soors, Els; Buset, Jasmine; Chiriotti, Sabina; Tabury, Kevin; Gregoire, Vincent; Baatout, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Hadrontherapy is an advanced form of radiotherapy that uses beams of charged particles (such as protons and carbon ions). Compared with conventional radiotherapy, the main advantages of carbon ion therapy are the precise absorbed dose localization, along with an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE). This high ballistic accuracy of particle beams deposits the maximal dose to the tumor, while damage to the surrounding healthy tissue is limited. Currently, hadrontherapy is being used for the treatment of specific types of cancer. Previous in vitro studies have shown that, under certain circumstances, exposure to charged particles may inhibit cell motility and migration. In the present study, we investigated the expression of four motility-related genes in prostate (PC3) and colon (Caco-2) cancer cell lines after exposure to different radiation types. Cells were irradiated with various absorbed doses (0, 0.5 and 2 Gy) of accelerated 13C-ions at the GANIL facility (Caen, France) or with X-rays. Clonogenic assays were performed to determine the RBE. RT-qPCR analysis showed dose- and time-dependent changes in the expression of CCDC88A, FN1, MYH9 and ROCK1 in both cell lines. However, whereas in PC3 cells the response to carbon ion irradiation was enhanced compared with X-irradiation, the effect was the opposite in Caco-2 cells, indicating cell-type–specific responses to the different radiation types. PMID:25190155

  18. BTG2 Antiproliferative Gene and Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walden, Paul D

    2008-01-01

    .... During this study we showed that BTG2 protein expression is lost as an early event in prostate carcinogenesis and that prostate cancer cells degrade BTG2 at a greater rate than noncancerous prostate cells...

  19. Other biomarkers for detecting prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Lucas; Corradi, Renato; Eastham, James A

    2010-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has been used for detecting prostate cancer since 1994. Although it is the best cancer biomarker available, PSA is not perfect. It lacks both the sensitivity and specificity to accurately detect the presence of prostate cancer. None of the PSA thresholds currently in use consistently identify patients with prostate cancer and exclude patients without cancer. Novel approaches to improve our ability to detect prostate cancer and predict the course of the disease are needed. Additional methods for detecting prostate cancer have been evaluated. Despite the discovery of many new biomarkers, only a few have shown some clinical value. These markers include human kallikrein 2, urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor, prostate-specific membrane antigen, early prostate cancer antigen, PCA3, alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase and glutathione S-transferase pi hypermethylation. We review the reports on biomarkers for prostate cancer detection, and their possible role in the clinical practice.

  20. Prostate-specific antigen nadir within 12 months as an early surrogate marker of biochemical failure and distant metastasis after low-dose-rate brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Shuichi; Ohashi, Toshio; Momma, Tetsuo; Sakayori, Masanori; Eriguchi, Takahisa; Tanaka, Tomoki; Yamashita, Shoji; Kosaka, Takeo; Oya, Mototsugu; Shigematsu, Naoyuki

    2018-05-01

    Prostate-specific antigen nadir (nPSA) after radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer has been investigated as a predictor. However, nPSA usually requires several years, limiting its clinical utility. We investigated the significance of nPSA within 12 months (nPSA12) after low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-PB) or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) on treatment outcomes. Between 2006 and 2014, 663 patients with prostate cancer were treated with LDR-PB or EBRT at two institutions. Four hundred and seventy-four men received LDR-PB and 189 men received EBRT, without androgen deprivation therapy. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for biochemical failure (BF)-free survival (BFFS) and distant metastasis (DM)-free survival (DMFS) analyses, and multivariable Cox regression analysis was performed. The median follow-up was 61.3 months. The median nPSA12 in the LDR-PB and EBRT cohorts was 0.7 and 1.0 ng/mL, respectively. The 7-year BFFS and DMFS rates in LDR-PB patients with nPSA12 ≤ 0.7 ng/mL were 99.1% and 99.5%, respectively; when nPSA12 was >0.7 ng/mL, they were 90.2% and 94.8%, respectively. In EBRT patients with nPSA12 ≤ 1.0 ng/mL, BFFS and DMFS rates were 85.4% and 98.5%, respectively; when nPSA12 was >1.0 ng/mL, they were 67.1% and 87.2%, respectively. nPSA12 was an independent predictor of BF and DM in both cohorts (LDR-PB, P = 0.004 and 0.020, respectively; EBRT, P = 0.005 and 0.041, respectively). The nPSA12 after LDR-PB or EBRT is significantly associated with treatment outcomes of prostate cancer. Higher nPSA12 may identify patients at high risk of relapse who might benefit from salvage treatment. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Dose Escalation and Quality of Life in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy: Long-Term Results of the Dutch Randomized Dose-Escalation Trial (CKTO 96-10 Trial)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Putten, Wim L.J. van; Wielen, Gerard J. van der; Levendag, Peter C.; Incrocci, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of dose escalation of radiotherapy on quality of life (QoL) in prostate cancer patients. Patients and Methods: Three hundred prostate cancer patients participating in the Dutch randomized trial (CKTO 69-10) comparing 68 Gy with 78 Gy were the subject of this analysis. These patients filled out the SF-36 QoL questionnaire before radiotherapy (baseline) and 6, 12, 24, and 36 months thereafter. Changes in QoL over time of ≥10 points were considered clinically relevant. Repeated-measures regression analyses were applied to estimate and test the QoL changes over time, the differences between the two arms, and for association with a number of covariates. Results: At 3-year follow-up, the summary score physical health was 73.2 for the 68-Gy arm vs. 71.6 for the 78-Gy arm (p = 0.81), and the summary score mental health was 76.7 for the 68-Gy arm vs. 76.1 for the 78-Gy arm (p = 0.97). Statistically significant (p 10 points) was seen for only two scales. None of the tested covariates were significantly correlated with QoL scores. Conclusion: Dose escalation did not result in significant deterioration of QoL in prostate cancer patients. In both randomization arms, statistically significant decreases in QoL scores over time were seen in six scales. The deterioration of QoL was more pronounced in the physical than in the mental health domain and in some scales more in the high- than in the low-dose arm, but the differences between arms were not statistically significant.

  2. The role of androgen deprivation therapy on biochemical failure and distant metastasis in intermediate-risk prostate cancer: effects of radiation dose escalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, Michelle S; Kuban, Deborah A; Du, Xianglin L; Lopez, David S; Yamal, Jose-Miguel; Strom, Sara S

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether the effect of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) on the risk of biochemical failure varies at different doses of radiation in patients treated with definitive external beam radiation for intermediate risk prostate cancer (IRPC). This study included 1218 IRPC patients treated with definitive external beam radiation therapy to the prostate and seminal vesicles from June 1987 to January 2009 at our institution. Patient, treatment, and tumor information was collected, including age, race, Gleason score, radiation dose, PSA, T-stage, and months on ADT. The median follow-up was 6 years. A total of 421(34.6%) patients received ADT, 211 (17.3%) patients experienced a biochemical failure, and 38 (3.1%) developed distant metastasis. On univariable analyses, higher PSA, earlier year of diagnosis, higher T-stage, lower doses of radiation, and the lack of ADT were associated with an increased risk of biochemical failure. No difference in biochemical failure was seen among different racial groups or with the use of greater than 6 months of ADT compared with less than 6 months. On multivariate analysis, the use of ADT was associated with a lower risk of biochemical failure than no ADT (HR, 0.599; 95% CI, 0.367-0.978; P < 0.04) and lower risk of distant metastasis (HR, 0.114; 95% CI, 0.014-0.905; P = 0.04). ADT reduced the risk of biochemical failure and distant metastasis in both low- and high dose radiation groups among men with intermediate-risk PCa. Increasing the duration of ADT beyond 6 months did not reduce the risk of biochemical failures. Better understanding the benefit of ADT in the era of dose escalation will require a randomized clinical trial

  3. Dose-volume analysis of predictors for chronic rectal toxicity after treatment of prostate cancer with adaptive image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos; Martinez, Alvaro; Kestin, Larry L.; Yan Di; Grills, Inga; Brabbins, Donald S.; Lockman, David M.; Liang Jian; Gustafson, Gary S.; Chen, Peter Y.; Vicini, Frank A.; Wong, John W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose We analyzed our experience treating localized prostate cancer with image-guided off-line correction with adaptive high-dose radiotherapy (ART) in our Phase II dose escalation study to identify factors predictive of chronic rectal toxicity. Materials and Methods From 1999-2002, 331 patients with clinical stage T1-T3N0M0 prostate cancer were prospectively treated in our Phase II 3D conformal dose escalation ART study to a median dose of 75.6 Gy (range, 63.0-79.2 Gy), minimum dose to confidence limited-planning target volume (cl-PTV) in 1.8 Gy fractions (median isocenter dose = 79.7 Gy). Seventy-four patients (22%) also received neoadjuvant/adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. A patient-specific cl-PTV was constructed using 5 computed tomography scans and 4 sets of electronic portal images by applying an adaptive process to assure target accuracy and minimize PTV margin. For each case, the rectum (rectal solid) was contoured from the sacroiliac joints or rectosigmoid junction (whichever was higher) to the anal verge or ischial tuberosities (whichever was lower), with a median volume of 81.2 cc. The rectal wall was defined using the rectal solid with an individualized 3-mm wall thickness (median volume = 29.8 cc). Rectal wall dose-volume histogram was used to determine the prescribed dose. Toxicity was quantified using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria 2.0. Multiple dose-volume endpoints were evaluated for their association with chronic rectal toxicity. Results Median follow-up was 1.6 years. Thirty-four patients (crude rate 10.3%) experienced Grade 2 chronic rectal toxicity at a median interval of 1.1 years. Nine patients (crude rate = 2.7%) experienced Grade ≥3 chronic rectal toxicity (1 was Grade 4) at a median interval of 1.2 years. The 3-year rates of Grade ≥2 and Grade ≥3 chronic rectal toxicity were 20% and 4%, respectively. Acute toxicity predicted for chronic: Acute Grade 2-3 rectal toxicity (p 40% respectively. The volume

  4. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy for the treatment of localised prostate cancer in men with a high risk of disease relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Robert; Uribe, Jennifer; Uribe-Lewis, Santiago; Money-Kyrle, Julian; Perna, Carla; Chintzoglou, Stylianos; Khaksar, Sara; Langley, Stephen E M

    2018-04-01

    To report clinical outcomes of 125 I low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-PB) as monotherapy or combined with androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) and/or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in high-risk localised prostate cancer. Analysis of clinical outcomes from a prospective cohort of patients treated with LDR-PB alone or combined treatment in a single institution. Men with a high risk of disease relapse were identified by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) criteria or by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) criteria. Relapse-free survival (RFS), overall survival (OS), prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS), and metastases-free survival (MFS), were analysed together with patient-reported symptom scores and physician-reported adverse events. The NICE and NCCN criteria identified 267 and 202 high-risk patients, respectively. NICE-defined patients had significantly lower pre-treatment PSA levels, Gleason scores LDR-PB monotherapy. At 9 years after implantation RFS was 89% and 87% in the NICE and NCCN groups, respectively (log-rank P = 0.637), and OS 93% and 94%, respectively (log-rank P = 0.481). All of the survival estimates were similar between LDR-PB monotherapy and combined therapies. Cox proportional hazards regression confirmed RFS was similar between the treatment types. Treatment-related toxicity was also similar between the treatment methods. LDR-PB is effective at controlling localised prostate cancer in patients with a high risk of disease relapse. As the present study was not randomised, it is not possible to define those patients who need the addition of ADT and/or EBRT. However, the NICE criteria appear suitable to define treatment options where patients could benefit from LDR-PB as monotherapy or combined treatment. This choice should be discussed with the patient taking into account comorbidities and presence of multiple high-risk factors. © 2018 The Authors BJU International © 2018 BJU International

  5. SU-E-J-95: Predicting Treatment Outcomes for Prostate Cancer: Irradiation Responses of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Most prostate cancers are slow-growing diseases but normally require much higher doses (80Gy) with conventional fractionation radiotherapy, comparing to other more aggressive cancers. This study is to disclose the radiobiological basis of this discrepancy by proposing the concept of prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) and examining their specific irradiation responses. Methods: There are overwhelming evidences that CSC may keep their stemness, e.g. the competency of cell differentiation, in hypoxic microenvironments and hence become radiation resistive, though the probability is tiny for aggressiveness cancers. Tumor hypoxia used to be considered as an independent reason for poor treatment outcomes, and recent evidences showed that even prostate cancers were also hypoxic though they are very slow-growing. In addition, to achieve comparable outcomes to other much more aggressive cancers, much higher doses (rather than lower doses) are always needed for prostate cancers, regardless of its non-aggressiveness. All these abnormal facts can only be possibly interpreted by the irradiation responses characteristics of prostate CSCs. Results: Both normal cancer cells (NCCs) and CSCs exiting in tumors, in which NCCs are mainly for symptoms whereas killing all CSCs achieves disease-free. Since prostate cancers are slow-growing, the hypoxia in prostate cancers cannot possibly from NCCs, thus it is caused by hypoxic CSCs. However, single hypoxic cell cannot be imaged due to limitation of imaging techniques, unless a large group of hypoxic cells exist together, thus most of CSCs in prostate cancers are virtually hypoxic, i.e. not in working mode because CSCs in proliferating mode have to be normoxic, and this explains why prostate cancers are unaggressive. Conclusion: The fractional dose in conventional radiotherapy (∼2Gy) could only kill NCCs and CSCs in proliferating modes, whereas most CSCs survived fractional treatments since they were hypoxic, thus to eliminate all

  6. Under-utilisation of high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost in men with intermediate-high risk prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Wee Loon; Evans, Sue M; Millar, Jeremy L

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) boost with definitive external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in prostate cancer (CaP) management. The study population comprised men with intermediate-high risk CaP captured in the population-based Prostate Cancer Outcome Registry Victoria (PCOR-Vic), treated with EBRT from January 2010 to December 2015. The primary outcome is the proportion of men who received HDR-BT boost. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to evaluate the effect of patient-, tumour- and treatment-factors on the likelihood of HDR-BT use. Medicare Benefit Schedule (MBS) data was accessed to evaluate the Australia-wide pattern of HDR-BT use. One thousand eight hundred and six patients were included in this study - 886 (49%) intermediate-risk, and 920 (51%) high-risk CaP patients. Overall, only 124 (7%) patients had EBRT + HDR-BT - 47 (5%) intermediate-risk and 77 (8%) high-risk CaP patients (P = 0.01). There is higher proportion of patients who had HDR-BT in public institutions (7% public vs. 3% private, P = 0.005) and in metropolitan centres (9% metropolitan vs. 2% regional, P Victorian men with CaP. The decline in HDR-BT use was also observed nationally. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  7. Metronomic Treatment with Low-Dose Trofosfamide Leads to a Long-Term Remission in a Patient with Docetaxel-Refractory Advanced Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Greiner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of metastatic prostate cancer patients refractory to androgen withdrawal and docetaxel therapy is currently discouraging and new therapeutic approaches are vastly needed. Here, we report a long-term remission over one year in a 68-year-old patient with metastatic docetaxel-refractory prostate cancer employing low-dose trofosfamide. The patient suffered from distant failure with several bone lesions and lymph node metastases depicted by a (11 C-Choline positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT. After initiation of trofosfamide 100 mg taken orally once a day we observed a steadily decreasing PSA value from initial 46.6 down to 2.1 g/l. The Choline-PET/CT was repeated after 10 months of continuous therapy and demonstrated a partial remission of the bone lesions and a regression of all involved lymph nodes but one. Taken together we found an astonishing and durable activity of the alkylating agent trofosfamide given in a metronomic fashion. We rate the side effects as low and state an excellent therapeutic ratio of this drug in our patient.

  8. Long-Term Results After High-Dose Radiotherapy and Adjuvant Hormones in Prostate Cancer: How Curable Is High-Risk Disease?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapatero, Almudena, E-mail: azapatero.hlpr@salud.madrid.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Vicente, Feliciano [Department of Medical Physics, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid (Spain); Martin de Vidales, Carmen; Cruz Conde, Alfonso; Ibanez, Yamile [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, Inmaculada; Rabadan, Mariano [Department of Urology, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze long-term outcome and prognostic factors for high-risk prostate cancer defined by National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria treated with high-dose radiotherapy and androgen deprivation in a single institution. Methods and Materials: A total of 306 patients treated between 1995 and 2007 in a radiation dose-escalation program fulfilled the National Comprehensive Cancer Network high-risk criteria. Median International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements radiation dose was 78 Gy (range, 66.0-84.1 Gy). Long-term androgen deprivation (LTAD) was administered in 231 patients, short-term androgen deprivation (STAD) in 59 patients, and no hormones in 16 patients. The Phoenix (nadir plus 2 ng/mL) consensus definition was used for biochemical control. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine the independent prognostic impact of clinical and treatment factors. Median follow-up time was 64 months (range, 24-171 months). Results: The actuarial overall survival at 5 and 10 years was 95.7% and 89.8%, respectively, and the corresponding biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was 89.5% and 67.2%, respectively. Fourteen patients (4.6%) developed distant metastasis. Multivariate analysis showed that Gleason score >7 (p = 0.001), pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level >20 ng/mL (p = 0.037), higher radiation dose (p = 0.005), and the use of adjuvant LTAD vs. STAD (p = 0.011) were independent prognostic factors affecting bDFS in high-risk disease. The 5-year bDFS for patients treated with LTAD plus radiotherapy dose >78 Gy was 97%. Conclusions: For high-risk patients the present series showed that the use of LTAD in conjunction with higher doses (>78 Gy) of radiotherapy was associated with improved biochemical tumor control. We observed that the presence of Gleason sum >7 and pretreatment PSA level >20 ng/mL in the same patient represents a 6.8 times higher risk of PSA failure. These men could be considered for clinical trials with

  9. Methylselenium and Prostate Cancer Apoptosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Junxuan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to gain a better understanding of the biochemical pathways and molecular targets for the selective induction of apoptosis signaling and execution of prostate cancer (PCa...

  10. Methylselenium and Prostate Cancer Apoptosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Junxuan

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to gain a better understanding of the biochemical pathways and molecular targets for the selective induction of apoptosis signaling and execution of prostate cancer (PCa...

  11. Methylselenium and Prostate Cancer Apoptosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Junxuan

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to gain a better understanding of the biochemical pathways and molecular targets for the selective induction of apoptosis signaling and execution of prostate cancer (PCa...

  12. Methylselenium and Prostate Cancer Apoptosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Junxuan

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to gain a better understanding of the biochemical pathways and molecular targets for the selective induction of apoptosis signaling and execution of prostate cancer (PCa...

  13. Contemporary Management of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Katherine; Konety, Badrinath; Ordonez, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer represents a spectrum ranging from low-grade, localized tumors to devastating metastatic disease. We discuss the general options for treatment and recent developments in the field. PMID:26949522

  14. General Information about Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of bisphosphonate drugs to prevent or slow the growth of bone metastases is being studied in clinical trials. There are treatments for bone pain caused by bone metastases or hormone therapy. Prostate cancer that has spread to the ...

  15. Phase I dose-escalation and pharmacokinetic study (TED 11576) of cabazitaxel in Japanese patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Shunji; Nozawa, Masahiro; Onozawa, Yusuke; Miyazaki, Jun; Ohno, Keiji; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of cabazitaxel and evaluate its safety and tolerability as a 1-h IV infusion every 3 weeks in Japanese patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Seventeen patients were treated with cabazitaxel at doses of 20 and 25 mg/m(2) for PK analyses. Dose escalation was performed only in the absence of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was the highest dose at which less than 33 % of the patients developed DLT. Cabazitaxel exhibited a triphasic elimination profile with a long terminal half-life of 116 ± 29.0 or 113 ± 28.0 h after IV infusion of 20 or 25 mg/m(2) cabazitaxel, respectively. The major differences in the PK parameters of cabazitaxel and docetaxel were cabazitaxel's fairly high clearance rate, representing approximately half the hepatic flow, and its large volume of distribution at steady-state conditions. No DLT was observed during Cycle 1. Mild-to-moderate hematological adverse events (AEs), including neutropenia, and other AEs typically associated with taxanes were observed; all AEs were manageable. Cabazitaxel at 25 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks was selected as the MTD in Japanese patients. The PK parameters of cabazitaxel in Japanese CRPC patients were comparable with those previously determined in Caucasian subjects. The safety and tolerability of cabazitaxel were also comparable in both ethnic populations.

  16. A quantitative analysis of two-dimensional manually segmented transrectal ultrasound axial images in planning high dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabić-Stanković Kata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Prostate delineation, pre-planning and catheter implantation procedures, in high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT, are commonly based on the prostate manually segmented transrectal ultrasound (TRUS images. The aim of this study was to quantitatively analyze the consistency of prostate capsule delineation, done by a single therapist, prior to each HDR-BT fraction and the changes in the shape of the prostate capsule during HDR-BT, using two dimensional (2D TRUS axial image. Methods. A group of 16 patients were treated at the Medical System Belgrade Brachytherapy Department with definitive HDRBT. The total applied median dose of 52 Gy was divided into four individual fractions, each fraction being delivered 2– 3 weeks apart. Real time prostate axial visualization and the manual segmentation prior to each fraction were performed using B-K Medical ultrasound. Quantitative analyses, analysis of an area and shape were applied on 2D-TRUS axial images of the prostate. Area analyses were used to calculate the average value of the cross-sectional area of the prostate image. The parameters of the prostate shape, the fractal dimension and the circularity ratio of the prostate capsule contour were estimated at the maximum axial cross section of the prostate image. Results. The sample group consisted of four phases, each phase being performed prior to the first, second, third and fourth HDR-BT fraction, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that during HDR-BT fractions there were no significant differences in the average value of area, as well as in the maximum shape of prostate capsule. Conclusions. Quantitative analysis of TRUS axial prostate segmented images shows a successful capsule delineation in the series of manually segmented TRUS images, and the prostate maximum shape remaining unchanged during HDR-BT fractions.

  17. Osteoblast-Prostate Cancer Cell Interaction in Prostate Cancer Bone Metastases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Navone, Nora

    2001-01-01

    .... This suggests that prostate cancer cells interact with cells from the osteoblastic lineage. To understand the molecular bases of prostatic bone metastases, we established two prostate cancer cell lines, MDA PCa 2a and MDA PCa 2b (1...

  18. No Impairment of Quality of Life 18 Months After High-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: A Prospective Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchand, Virginie; Bourdin, Sylvain; Charbonnel, Christelle; Rio, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine prospectively intermediate-term toxicity and quality of life (QoL) of prostate cancer patients after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Patients and Methods: Fifty-five patients with localized prostate adenocarcinoma were treated by IMRT (76 Gy). Physicians scored acute and late toxicity using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Patients assessed general and prostate-specific QoL before IMRT (baseline) and at 2, 6, and 18 months using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer questionnaires QLQ-C30(+3) and QLQ-PR25. Results: Median age was 73 years (range, 54-80 years). Risk categories were 18% low risk, 60% intermediate risk, and 22% high risk; 45% of patients received hormonal therapy (median duration, 6 months). The incidence of urinary and bowel toxicity immediately after IMRT was, respectively, 38% and 13% (Grade 2) and 2% and none (Grade 3); at 18 months it was 15% and 11% (Grade 2) and none (Grade 3). Significant worsening of QoL was reported at 2 months with regard to fatigue (+11.31, p = 1.10 -7 ), urinary symptoms (+9.07, p = 3.10 -11 ), dyspnea (+7.27, p = 0.008), and emotional (-7.02, p = 0.002), social (-6.36, p = 0.003), cognitive (-4.85, p = 0.004), and physical (-3.39, p = 0.007) functioning. Only fatigue (+5.86, p = 0.003) and urinary symptoms (+5.86, p = 0.0004) had not improved by 6 months. By 18 months all QoL scores except those for dyspnea (+8.02, p = 0.01) and treatment-related symptoms (+4.24, p = 0.01) had returned to baseline. These adverse effects were exacerbated by hormonal therapy. Conclusion: High-dose IMRT with accurate positioning induces only a temporary worsening of QoL.

  19. An improved distance-to-dose correlation for predicting bladder and rectum dose-volumes in knowledge-based VMAT planning for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Phillip D. H.; Carver, Robert L.; Fontenot, Jonas D.

    2018-01-01

    The overlap volume histogram (OVH) is an anatomical metric commonly used to quantify the geometric relationship between an organ at risk (OAR) and target volume when predicting expected dose-volumes in knowledge-based planning (KBP). This work investigated the influence of additional variables contributing to variations in the assumed linear DVH-OVH correlation for the bladder and rectum in VMAT plans of prostate patients, with the goal of increasing prediction accuracy and achievability of knowledge-based planning methods. VMAT plans were retrospectively generated for 124 prostate patients using multi-criteria optimization. DVHs quantified patient dosimetric data while OVHs quantified patient anatomical information. The DVH-OVH correlations were calculated for fractional bladder and rectum volumes of 30, 50, 65, and 80%. Correlations between potential influencing factors and dose were quantified using the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (R). Factors analyzed included the derivative of the OVH, prescribed dose, PTV volume, bladder volume, rectum volume, and in-field OAR volume. Out of the selected factors, only the in-field bladder volume (mean R  =  0.86) showed a strong correlation with bladder doses. Similarly, only the in-field rectal volume (mean R  =  0.76) showed a strong correlation with rectal doses. Therefore, an OVH formalism accounting for in-field OAR volumes was developed to determine the extent to which it improved the DVH-OVH correlation. Including the in-field factor improved the DVH-OVH correlation, with the mean R values over the fractional volumes studied improving from  -0.79 to  -0.85 and  -0.82 to  -0.86 for the bladder and rectum, respectively. A re-planning study was performed on 31 randomly selected database patients to verify the increased accuracy of KBP dose predictions by accounting for bladder and rectum volume within treatment fields. The in-field OVH led to significantly more precise

  20. Immunotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan F Slovin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prostate cancer remains a challenge as a target for immunological approaches. The approval of the first cell-based immune therapy, Sipuleucel-T for prostate cancer introduced prostate cancer as a solid tumor with the potential to be influenced by the immune system. Methods: We reviewed articles on immunological management of prostate cancer and challenges that lie ahead for such strategies. Results: Treatments have focused on the identification of novel cell surface antigens thought to be unique to prostate cancer. These include vaccines against carbohydrate and blood group antigens, xenogeneic and naked DNA vaccines, and pox viruses used as prime-boost or checkpoint inhibitors. No single vaccine construct to date has resulted in a dramatic antitumor effect. The checkpoint inhibitor, anti-CTLA-4 has resulted in several long-term remissions, but phase III trials have not demonstrated an antitumor effect or survival benefit. Conclusions: Multiple clinical trials suggest that prostate cancer may not be optimally treated by single agent immune therapies and that combination with biologic agents, chemotherapies, or radiation may offer some enhancement of benefit.

  1. High-dose-rate brachytherapy as monotherapy delivered in two fractions within one day for favorable/intermediate-risk prostate cancer: preliminary toxicity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghilezan, Michel; Martinez, Alvaro; Gustason, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Antonucci, J Vito; Chen, Peter; Fontanesi, James; Wallace, Michelle; Ye, Hong; Casey, Alyse; Sebastian, Evelyn; Kim, Leonard; Limbacher, Amy

    2012-07-01

    To report the toxicity profile of high-dose-rate (HDR)-brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy in a Human Investigation Committee-approved study consisting of a single implant and two fractions (12 Gy × 2) for a total dose of 24 Gy, delivered within 1 day. The dose was subsequently increased to 27 Gy (13.5 Gy × 2) delivered in 1 day. We report the acute and early chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. A total of 173 patients were treated between December 2005 and July 2010. However, only the first 100 were part of the IRB-approved study and out of these, only 94 had a minimal follow-up of 6 months, representing the study population for this preliminary report. All patients had clinical Stage T2b or less (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition), Gleason score 6-7 (3+4), and prostate-specific antigen level of ≤12 ng/mL. Ultrasound-guided HDR-BT with real-time dosimetry was used. The prescription dose was 24 Gy for the first 50 patients and 27 Gy thereafter. The dosimetric goals and constraints were the same for the two dose groups. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. The highest toxicity scores encountered at any point during follow-up are reported. The median follow-up was 17 months (range, 6-40.5). Most patients had Grade 0-1 acute toxicity. The Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was mainly frequency/urgency (13%), dysuria (5%), hematuria, and dribbling/hesitancy (2%). None of the patients required a Foley catheter at any time; however, 8% of the patients experienced transient Grade 1 diarrhea. No other acute gastrointestinal toxicities were found. The most common chronic toxicity was Grade 2 urinary frequency/urgency in 16% of patients followed by dysuria in 4% of patients; 2 patients had Grade 2 rectal bleeding and 1 had Grade 4, requiring laser treatment. Favorable-risk prostate cancer patients treated with a single implant HDR-BT to 24-27 Gy in two fractions

  2. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy Delivered in Two Fractions Within One Day for Favorable/Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Toxicity Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghilezan, Michel, E-mail: mghilezan@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital and Rose Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Martinez, Alvaro; Gustason, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Antonucci, J. Vito; Chen, Peter; Fontanesi, James; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong; Casey, Alyse; Sebastian, Evelyn; Kim, Leonard; Limbacher, Amy [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital and Rose Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report the toxicity profile of high-dose-rate (HDR)-brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy in a Human Investigation Committee-approved study consisting of a single implant and two fractions (12 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) for a total dose of 24 Gy, delivered within 1 day. The dose was subsequently increased to 27 Gy (13.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) delivered in 1 day. We report the acute and early chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 173 patients were treated between December 2005 and July 2010. However, only the first 100 were part of the IRB-approved study and out of these, only 94 had a minimal follow-up of 6 months, representing the study population for this preliminary report. All patients had clinical Stage T2b or less (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition), Gleason score 6-7 (3+4), and prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}12 ng/mL. Ultrasound-guided HDR-BT with real-time dosimetry was used. The prescription dose was 24 Gy for the first 50 patients and 27 Gy thereafter. The dosimetric goals and constraints were the same for the two dose groups. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. The highest toxicity scores encountered at any point during follow-up are reported. Results: The median follow-up was 17 months (range, 6-40.5). Most patients had Grade 0-1 acute toxicity. The Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was mainly frequency/urgency (13%), dysuria (5%), hematuria, and dribbling/hesitancy (2%). None of the patients required a Foley catheter at any time; however, 8% of the patients experienced transient Grade 1 diarrhea. No other acute gastrointestinal toxicities were found. The most common chronic toxicity was Grade 2 urinary frequency/urgency in 16% of patients followed by dysuria in 4% of patients; 2 patients had Grade 2 rectal bleeding and 1 had Grade 4, requiring laser treatment. Conclusions: Favorable

  3. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy Delivered in Two Fractions Within One Day for Favorable/Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Toxicity Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghilezan, Michel; Martinez, Alvaro; Gustason, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Antonucci, J. Vito; Chen, Peter; Fontanesi, James; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong; Casey, Alyse; Sebastian, Evelyn; Kim, Leonard; Limbacher, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the toxicity profile of high-dose-rate (HDR)-brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy in a Human Investigation Committee-approved study consisting of a single implant and two fractions (12 Gy × 2) for a total dose of 24 Gy, delivered within 1 day. The dose was subsequently increased to 27 Gy (13.5 Gy × 2) delivered in 1 day. We report the acute and early chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 173 patients were treated between December 2005 and July 2010. However, only the first 100 were part of the IRB-approved study and out of these, only 94 had a minimal follow-up of 6 months, representing the study population for this preliminary report. All patients had clinical Stage T2b or less (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition), Gleason score 6-7 (3+4), and prostate-specific antigen level of ≤12 ng/mL. Ultrasound-guided HDR-BT with real-time dosimetry was used. The prescription dose was 24 Gy for the first 50 patients and 27 Gy thereafter. The dosimetric goals and constraints were the same for the two dose groups. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. The highest toxicity scores encountered at any point during follow-up are reported. Results: The median follow-up was 17 months (range, 6–40.5). Most patients had Grade 0-1 acute toxicity. The Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was mainly frequency/urgency (13%), dysuria (5%), hematuria, and dribbling/hesitancy (2%). None of the patients required a Foley catheter at any time; however, 8% of the patients experienced transient Grade 1 diarrhea. No other acute gastrointestinal toxicities were found. The most common chronic toxicity was Grade 2 urinary frequency/urgency in 16% of patients followed by dysuria in 4% of patients; 2 patients had Grade 2 rectal bleeding and 1 had Grade 4, requiring laser treatment. Conclusions: Favorable-risk prostate cancer patients treated with

  4. SU-G-BRA-12: Development of An Intra-Fractional Motion Tracking and Dose Reconstruction System for Adaptive Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaeian, N Hassan; Chi, Y; Tian, Z; Jiang, S; Hannan, R; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A clinical trial on stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for high-risk prostate cancer is undergoing at our institution. In addition to escalating dose to the prostate, we have increased dose to intra-prostatic lesions. Intra-fractional prostate motion deteriorates well planned radiation dose, especially for the small intra-prostatic lesions. To solve this problem, we have developed a motion tracking and 4D dose-reconstruction system to facilitate adaptive re-planning. Methods: Patients in the clinical trial were treated with VMAT using four arcs and 10 FFF beam. KV triggered x-ray projections were taken every 3 sec during delivery to acquire 2D projections of 3D anatomy at the direction orthogonal to the therapeutic beam. Each patient had three implanted prostate markers. Our developed system first determined 2D projection locations of these markers and then 3D prostate translation and rotation via 2D/3D registration of the markers. Using delivery log files, our GPU-based Monte Carlo tool (goMC) reconstructed dose corresponding to each triggered image. The calculated 4D dose distributions were further aggregated to yield the delivered dose. Results: We first tested each module in our system. MC dose engine were commissioned to our treatment planning system with dose difference of <0.5%. For motion tracking, 1789 kV projections from 7 patients were acquired. The 2D marker location error was <1 mm. For 3D motion tracking, root mean square (RMS) errors along LR, AP, and CC directions were 0.26mm, 0.36mm, and 0.01mm respectively in simulation studies and 1.99mm, 1.37mm, and 0.22mm in phantom studies. We also tested the entire system workflow. Our system was able to reconstruct delivered dose. Conclusion: We have developed a functional intra-fractional motion tracking and 4D dose re-construction system to support our clinical trial on adaptive high-risk prostate cancer SBRT. Comprehensive evaluations have shown the capability and accuracy of our system.

  5. Analysis of the testicular dose in patients undergoing radiotherapy for carcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bejar Navarro, M. J.; Ordonez Marquez, J.; Hervas Moron, A.; Alvarez Rodriguez, S.; Garcia-Galloway, E.; Sanchez Casanueva, R.; Polo Rubio, A.; Rodriguez-Patron, R.; Yanowsky, K.; Gomez Dos Santos, V.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this work are: -Studying comparatively the doses received in testes in patients undergoing radiotherapy of prostate carcinoma with external beam radiation and brachytherapy of low rate using I-125 seeds. -Compare doses due to images of verification using Cone Beam CT (CBCT), with doses of radiotherapy treatment itself. -Determine the seminal alterations and cytogenetic after treatment with ionizing radiation (RTE or BQT) in patients diagnosed with prostate cancer and its relation with testicular dose. (Author)

  6. Prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer; Radioactive seed placement; Internal radiation therapy - prostate; High dose radiation (HDR) ... place the seeds that deliver radiation into your prostate. The seeds are placed with needles or special ...

  7. Perceived causes of prostate cancer among prostate cancer survivors in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, D.E.G.; Cremers, R.G.H.M.; Aben, K.K.H.; Oort, van I.M.; Kampman, E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate self-reported causes of prostate cancer among prostate cancer survivors in the Netherlands to obtain insight into the common beliefs and perceptions of risk factors for prostate cancer. Materials and methods A total of 956 prostate cancer survivors,

  8. Alpha Particle Therapy in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Sullivan, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a leading cause of cancer mortality among men in western countries. Although nearly 85% of patients present with localised disease, up to 40% will eventually develop metastatic disease during the course of illness. Of men dying from prostate cancer, more than 90% have bone metastases many with no other significant metastatic sites. Symptoms related to bone metastases and skeletal related events (SREs) account for the major cause of morbidity in these patients. Bone-seeking radionuclides have been used in the treatment of prostate cancer bone metastases for many years. The first bone seeking radionuclide drug approved by the FDA was Strontium-89. Other agents have also been used including Samarium-153 EDTMP, Rhenium-186 (-188)-HEDP. These radionuclides are all emit shortrange therapeutic beta radiation with bone marrow as the dose limiting toxicity. There is strong clinical trial evidence of benefit for these radionuclides in reducing pain in advanced prostate cancer; however, none of the drugs has been shown to improve survival, albeit none of the clinical trials were powered to detect differences in survival

  9. Multiple primary cancers: Simultaneously occurring prostate cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We also reviewed the existing literatures for possible biologic links between prostatic carcinoma and other primary tumors. ... The primary tumors co-existing with prostate cancer were colonic adenocarcinoma, rectal adenocarcinoma, urinary bladder transitional cell carcinoma, primary liver cell carcinoma, and thyroid ...

  10. Image-guided method for TLD-based in vivo rectal dose verification with endorectal balloon in proton therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsi, Wen C.; Fagundes, Marcio; Zeidan, Omar; Hug, Eugen; Schreuder, Niek

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To present a practical image-guided method to position an endorectal balloon that improves in vivo thermoluminiscent dosimeter (TLD) measurements of rectal doses in proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods: TLDs were combined with endorectal balloons to measure dose at the anterior rectal wall during daily proton treatment delivery. Radiopaque metallic markers were employed as surrogates for balloon position reproducibility in rotation and translation. The markers were utilized to guide the balloon orientation during daily treatment employing orthogonal x-ray image-guided patient positioning. TLDs were placed at the 12 o'clock position on the anterior balloon surface at the midprostatic plane. Markers were placed at the 3 and 9 o'clock positions on the balloon to align it with respect to the planned orientation. The balloon rotation along its stem axis, referred to as roll, causes TLD displacement along the anterior-posterior direction. The magnitude of TLD displacement is revealed by the separation distance between markers at opposite sides of the balloon on sagittal x-ray images. Results: A total of 81 in vivo TLD measurements were performed on six patients. Eighty-three percent of all measurements (65 TLD readings) were within +5% and −10% of the planning dose with a mean of −2.1% and a standard deviation of 3.5%. Examination of marker positions with in-room x-ray images of measured doses between −10% and −20% of the planned dose revealed a strong correlation between balloon roll and TLD displacement posteriorly from the planned position. The magnitude of the roll was confirmed by separations of 10–20 mm between the markers which could be corrected by manually adjusting the balloon position and verified by a repeat x-ray image prior to proton delivery. This approach could properly correct the balloon roll, resulting in TLD positioning within 2 mm along the anterior-posterior direction. Conclusions: Our results show that image-guided TLD

  11. Continued Benefit to Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy Across Multiple Definitions of High-Risk Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenmark, Matthew H.; Blas, Kevin; Halverson, Schuyler; Sandler, Howard M.; Feng, Felix Y.; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze prognostic factors in patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and androgen deprivation (ADT). Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2008 at University of Michigan Medical Center, 718 men were consecutively treated with EBRT to at least 75 Gy. Seven definitions of high-risk prostate cancer, applying to 11–33% of patients, were evaluated. Biochemical failure (BF), salvage ADT use, metastatic progression, and prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM) were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: Each high-risk definition was associated with increased BF (hazard ratio [HR] 2.8–3.9, p < 0.0001), salvage ADT use (HR 3.9–6.3, p < 0.0001), metastasis (HR 3.7–6.6, p < 0.0001), and PCSM (HR 3.7–16.2, p < 0.0001). Furthermore, an increasing number of high-risk features predicted worse outcome. Adjuvant ADT yielded significant reductions in both metastases (HR 0.19–0.38, p < 0.001) and PCSM (HR 0.38–0.50, p < 0.05) for all high-risk definitions (with the exception of clinical Stage T3–4 disease) but improved BF only for those with elevated Gleason scores (p < 0.03, HR 0.25–0.48). When treated with ADT and dose-escalated EBRT, patients with Gleason scores 8 to 10, without other high-risk features, had 8-year freedom from BF of 74%, freedom from distant metastases of 93%, and cause-specific survival of 92%, with salvage ADT used in 16% of patients. Conclusion: Adjuvant ADT results in a significant improvement in clinical progression and PCSM across multiple definitions of high-risk disease even with dose-escalated EBRT. There is a subset of patients, characterized by multiple high-risk features or the presence of Gleason Pattern 5, who remain at significant risk for metastasis and PCSM despite current treatment.

  12. Incidence of Secondary Cancer Development After High-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Image-Guided Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Housman, Douglas M.; Pei Xin; Alicikus, Zumre; Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Dauer, Lawrence T.; St Germain, Jean; Yamada, Yoshiya; Kollmeier, Marisa; Cox, Brett; Zhang Zhigang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence and excess risk of second malignancy (SM) development compared with the general population after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2001, 1,310 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT (n = 897) or brachytherapy (n = 413). We compared the incidence of SMs in our patients with that of the general population extracted from the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data set combined with the 2000 census data. Results: The 10-year likelihood of SM development was 25% after EBRT and 15% after brachytherapy (p = .02). The corresponding 10-year likelihood for in-field SM development in these groups was 4.9% and 1.6% (p = .24). Multivariate analysis showed that EBRT vs. brachytherapy and older age were the only significant predictors for the development of all SMs (p = .037 and p = .030), with a trend for older patients to develop a SM. The increased incidence of SM for EBRT patients was explained by the greater incidence of skin cancer outside the radiation field compared with that after brachytherapy (10.6% and 3.3%, respectively, p = .004). For the EBRT group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate was 1.96% and 5.1% from out-of field cancer, respectively; for in-field SM, the corresponding mortality rates were 0.1% and 0.7%. Among the brachytherapy group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate related to out-of field SM was 0.8% and 2.7%, respectively. Our observed SM rates after prostate RT were not significantly different from the cancer incidence rates in the general population. Conclusions: Using modern sophisticated treatment techniques, we report low rates of in-field bladder and rectal SM risks after prostate cancer RT. Furthermore, the likelihood of mortality secondary to a SM was unusual. The greater rate of SM observed with EBRT vs. brachytherapy was related to a small, but significantly increased

  13. Tea, coffee and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andy H; Fraser, Michelle L; Binns, Colin W

    2009-02-01

    Worldwide, prostate cancer has the second highest incidence of all cancers in males with incidence and mortality being much higher in affluent developed countries. Risk and progression of the disease may be linked to both genetic and environmental factors, especially dietary factors. Tea and coffee are two of the most popular beverages in the world and have been investigated for possible effects on health outcomes, including cancer. However, very little dietary advice for their consumption exists. The evidence for a relationship between coffee or tea consumption and prostate cancer is reviewed in this paper. While current evidence indicates that coffee is a safe beverage, its consumption probably has no relationship with prostate cancer. Tea, especially green tea, has shown some potential in the prevention of prostate cancer. While evidence from epidemiologic studies is currently inconclusive, strong evidence has emerged from animal and in vitro studies. We also consider what level of evidence is required to make recommendations for preventive measures to the public. Although evidence on the relationship between coffee, tea and prostate cancer is not complete, we consider it strong enough to recommend tea as a healthier alternative to coffee.

  14. IGF-Regulated Genes in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberts, Charles

    2003-01-01

    We hypothesized that genes that are differentially expressed as a result of the decreased IGF-I receptor gene expression seen in metastatic prostate cancer contribute to prostate cancer progression...

  15. IGF-Regulated Genes in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberts, Charles T., Jr

    2005-01-01

    We hypothesized that genes that are differentially expressed as a result of the decreased IGF-I receptor gene expression seen in metastatic prostate cancer contribute to prostate cancer progression...

  16. Changes in Rectal Dose Due to Alterations in Beam Angles for Setup Uncertainty and Range Uncertainty in Carbon-Ion Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Kubota

    Full Text Available Carbon-ion radiotherapy of prostate cancer is challenging in patients with metal implants in one or both hips. Problems can be circumvented by using fields at oblique angles. To evaluate the influence of setup and range uncertainties accompanying oblique field angles, we calculated rectal dose changes with oblique orthogonal field angles, using a device with fixed fields at 0° and 90° and a rotating patient couch.Dose distributions were calculated at the standard angles of 0° and 90°, and then at 30° and 60°. Setup uncertainty was simulated with changes from -2 mm to +2 mm for fields in the anterior-posterior, left-right, and cranial-caudal directions, and dose changes from range uncertainty were calculated with a 1 mm water-equivalent path length added to the target isocenter in each angle. The dose distributions regarding the passive irradiation method were calculated using the K2 dose algorithm.The rectal volumes with 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° field angles at 95% of the prescription dose were 3.4±0.9 cm3, 2.8±1.1 cm3, 2.2±0.8 cm3, and 3.8±1.1 cm3, respectively. As compared with 90° fields, 30° and 60° fields had significant advantages regarding setup uncertainty and significant disadvantages regarding range uncertainty, but were not significantly different from the 90° field setup and range uncertainties.The setup and range uncertainties calculated at 30° and 60° field angles were not associated with a significant change in rectal dose relative to those at 90°.

  17. Comparison of PSA value at last follow-up of patients who underwent low-dose rate brachytherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Nobumichi; Asakawa, Isao; Nakai, Yasushi; Miyake, Makito; Anai, Satoshi; Fujii, Tomomi; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Konishi, Noboru; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2017-08-25

    To compare the PSA value at the last follow-up of patients who underwent prostate low-dose rate brachytherapy (LDR-BT) with that of patients who underwent intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). A total of 610 prostate cancer patients (cT1c-3bN0M0) were enrolled, and 445 of them underwent LDR-BT, while 165 received IMRT (74-76 Gy). The median follow-up period of these two groups was 75 months (LDR-BT) and 78 months (IMRT), respectively. We also evaluated the biochemical recurrence (BCR)-free rate using two definitions (Phoenix definition and PSA ≥ 0.2 ng/mL). The percentage of patients who achieved PSA LDR-BT group and 49.7% in the IMRT group (p LDR-BT group and 32.1% in the IMRT group (p LDR-BT groups was 89.5 and 95.0% (p LDR-BT groups, respectively (p LDR-BT was significantly lower than that of IMRT, and this result was particularly marked in patients with a normal testosterone level at the last follow-up.

  18. Promising Long-Term Health-Related Quality of Life After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlgren, Thomas; Nilsson, Sten; Lennernaes, Bo; Brandberg, Yvonne

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the long-term general and disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) >5 years after combined radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer, including a high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost and hormonal deprivation therapy. Methods and Materials: Of 196 eligible patients with localized prostate cancer (Stage T1-T3a) consecutively treated with curative radiotherapy at our institution between June 1998 and August 2000, 182 (93%) completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life questionnaires QLQ-C30 and QLQ-PR25, including specific questions on fecal incontinence >5 years after treatment in September 2005. A comparison with age-matched normative data was done, as well as a longitudinal analysis using HRQOL data from a previous study. Results: The analysis included 158 nonrecurrent patients. Comparisons made with normative data showed that physical and role functioning were significantly better statistically and social functioning was significantly worse. Diarrhea and sleep disturbances were more pronounced and pain less pronounced than in a normal male population. The longitudinal analysis of disease-specific HRQOL showed that urinary urgency and erectile problems persisted 5 years after treatment, and nocturia and hormonally dependent symptoms had declined significantly, with a statistically significant difference. Fecal incontinence was recognized by 25% of patients, of whom 80% considered it a minor problem. Conclusion: More than 5 years after combined radiotherapy, irritative urinary problems and erectile dysfunction remain concerns, although severe bowel disturbance and fecal incontinence seem to be minor problems. Longitudinally, a decline mainly in hormonally dependent symptoms was seen. Minor differences in general HRQOL compared with normative data were observed, possibly including 'response shift' effects

  19. Epigenetics of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Tawnya C; Tricoli, James V

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of novel technologies that can be applied to the investigation of the molecular underpinnings of human cancer has allowed for new insights into the mechanisms associated with tumor development and progression. They have also advanced the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of cancer. These technologies include microarray and other analysis methods for the generation of large-scale gene expression data on both mRNA and miRNA, next-generation DNA sequencing technologies utilizing a number of platforms to perform whole genome, whole exome, or targeted DNA sequencing to determine somatic mutational differences and gene rearrangements, and a variety of proteomic analysis platforms including liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis to survey alterations in protein profiles in tumors. One other important advancement has been our current ability to survey the methylome of human tumors in a comprehensive fashion through the use of sequence-based and array-based methylation analysis (Bock et al., Nat Biotechnol 28:1106-1114, 2010; Harris et al., Nat Biotechnol 28:1097-1105, 2010). The focus of this chapter is to present and discuss the evidence for key genes involved in prostate tumor development, progression, or resistance to therapy that are regulated by methylation-induced silencing.

  20. Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0226 TITLE: Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Rafael Fridman...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0226 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...response to collagen in prostate cancer. The project’s goal is to define the expression and therapeutic potential of DDRs in prostate cancer. During

  1. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon, C.; Galli, M.; Meoli, P.; Mariani, L.; Novelli, L.; Gonzalez, G.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To analyze the feasibility of high dose assessing acute and late toxicities both rectal and genitourinary in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. Material and methods: Between April 2006 and April 2008 90 patients diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with MRT technique in the Department of Radiotherapy. The analysis included 80 patients, 10 of them in treatment. The total dose received was 80 Gy. One patient received 70.2 Gy (because of previous pelvic radiotherapy). Age average: 65 (r 43-85 years). Stage: T1c: 43 p (53.75%), T2: 35 p (43.75%), T3: 1 p (1.25%). Score of Gleason 10 ng/ml and [es

  2. The link between benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsted, David Dynnes; Bojesen, Stig E

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer are among the most common diseases of the prostate gland and represent significant burdens for patients and health-care systems in many countries. The two diseases share traits such as hormone-dependent growth and response to antiandrogen...... therapy. Furthermore, risk factors such as prostate inflammation and metabolic disruption have key roles in the development of both diseases. Despite these commonalities, BPH and prostate cancer exhibit important differences in terms of histology and localization. Although large-scale epidemiological...... studies have shown that men with BPH have an increased risk of prostate cancer and prostate-cancer-related mortality, it remains unclear whether this association reflects a causal link, shared risk factors or pathophysiological mechanisms, or detection bias upon statistical analysis. Establishing BPH...

  3. Effect of Standard vs Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Patients With Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: The NRG Oncology RTOG 0126 Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Jeff M; Moughan, Jennifer; Purdy, James; Bosch, Walter; Bruner, Deborah W; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Lau, Harold; Duclos, Marie; Parliament, Matthew; Morton, Gerard; Hamstra, Daniel; Seider, Michael; Lock, Michael I; Patel, Malti; Gay, Hiram; Vigneault, Eric; Winter, Kathryn; Sandler, Howard

    2018-03-15

    Optimizing radiation therapy techniques for localized prostate cancer can affect patient outcomes. Dose escalation improves biochemical control, but no prior trials were powered to detect overall survival (OS) differences. To determine whether radiation dose escalation to 79.2 Gy compared with 70.2 Gy would improve OS and other outcomes in prostate cancer. The NRG Oncology/RTOG 0126 randomized clinical trial randomized 1532 patients from 104 North American Radiation Therapy Oncology Group institutions March 2002 through August 2008. Men with stage cT1b to T2b, Gleason score 2 to 6, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of 10 or greater and less than 20 or Gleason score of 7 and PSA less than 15 received 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to 79.2 Gy in 44 fractions or 70.2 Gy in 39 fractions. Time to OS measured from randomization to death due to any cause. American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO)/Phoenix definitions were used for biochemical failure. Acute (≤90 days of treatment start) and late radiation therapy toxic effects (>90 days) were graded using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0, and the RTOG/European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme, respectively. With a median follow-up of 8.4 (range, 0.02-13.0) years in 1499 patients (median [range] age, 71 [33-87] years; 70% had PSA <10 ng/mL, 84% Gleason score of 7, 57% T1 disease), there was no difference in OS between the 751 men in the 79.2-Gy arm and the 748 men in the 70.2-Gy arm. The 8-year rates of OS were 76% with 79.2 Gy and 75% with 70.2 Gy (hazard ratio [HR], 1.00; 95% CI, 0.83-1.20; P = .98). The 8-year cumulative rates of distant metastases were 4% for the 79.2-Gy arm and 6% for the 70.2-Gy arm (HR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.42-1.01; P = .05). The ASTRO and Phoenix biochemical failure rates at 5 and 8 years were 31% and 20% with 79.2 Gy

  4. Radiation dose delivered to the proximal penis as a predictor of the risk of erectile dysfunction after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wernicke, A. Gabriella; Valicenti, Richard; DiEva, Kelly; Houser, Christopher; Pequignot, Ed

    2004-01-01

    Purpose/objective: In this study, we evaluated in a serial manner whether radiation dose to the bulb of the penis is predictive of erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory difficulty (EJ), and overall satisfaction with sex life (quality of life) by using serial validated self-administered questionnaires. Methods and materials: Twenty-nine potent men with AJCC Stage II prostate cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy alone to a median dose 72.0 Gy (range: 66.6-79.2 Gy) were evaluated by determining the doses received by the penile bulb. The penile bulb was delineated volumetrically, and the dose-volume histogram was obtained on each patient. Results: The median follow-up time was 35 months (range, 16-43 months). We found that for D 30 , D 45 , D 60 , and D 75 (doses to a percent volume of PB: 30%, 45%, 60%, and 75%), higher than the corresponding median dose (defined as high-dose group) correlated with an increased risk of impotence (erectile dysfunction firmness score = 0) (odds ratio [OR] = 7.5, p = 0.02; OR = 7.5, p = 0.02; OR = 8.6, p = 0.008; and OR = 6.9, p = 0.015, respectively). Similarly, for EJD D 30 , D 45 , D 60 , and D 75 , doses higher than the corresponding median ones correlated with worsening ejaculatory function score (EJ = 0 or 1) (OR = 8, p = 0.013; OR = 8, p 0.013; OR = 9.2, p = 0.015; and OR = 8, p = 0.026, respectively). For quality of life, low (≤median dose) dose groups of patients improve over time, whereas high-dose groups of patients worsen. Conclusions: This study supports the existence of a penile bulb dose-volume relationship underlying the development of radiation-induced erectile dysfunction. Our data may guide the use of inverse treatment planning to maximize the probability of maintaining sexual potency after radiation therapy

  5. Baseline status and dose to the penile bulb predict impotence 1 year after radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzarini, Cesare; Badenchini, Fabio [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Radiotherapy, Milano (Italy); Rancati, Tiziana [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Prostate Cancer Program, Milan (Italy); Palorini, Federica; Improta, Ilaria; Fiorino, Claudio [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Medical Physics, Milan (Italy); Avuzzi, Barbara [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Radiation Oncology 1, Milan (Italy); Degli Esposti, Claudio [Ospedale Bellaria, Radiotherapy, Bologna (Italy); Girelli, Giuseppe [Ospedale ASL9, Radiotherapy, Ivrea (Italy); Vavassori, Vittorio [Cliniche Gavazzeni-Humanitas, Radiotherapy, Bergamo (Italy); Valdagni, Riccardo [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Prostate Cancer Program, Milan (Italy); Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Radiation Oncology 1, Milan (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    To assess the predictors of the onset of impotence 1 year after radiotherapy for prostate cancer. In a multi-centric prospective study, the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire-based potency of 91 hormone-naive and potent patients (IIEF1-5 > 11 before radiotherapy) was assessed. At the time of this analysis, information on potency 1 year after treatment was available for 62 of 91 patients (42 treated with hypofractionation: 2.35-2.65 Gy/fr, 70-74.2 Gy; 20 with conventional fractionation: 74-78 Gy). Prospectively collected individual information and D{sub max}/D{sub mean} to the penile bulb were available; the corresponding 2 Gy-equivalent values (EQD2 {sub max}/EQD2 {sub mean}) were also considered. Predictors of 1-year impotency were assessed through uni- and multi-variable backward logistic regression: The best cut-off values discriminating between potent and impotent patients were assessed by ROC analyses. The discriminative power of the models and goodness-of-fit were measured by AUC analysis and the Hosmer-Lemeshow (H and L) test. At 1-year follow-up, 26 of 62 patients (42 %) became impotent. The only predictive variables were baseline IIEF1-5 values (best cut-off baseline IIEF1-5 ≥ 19), D{sub max} ≥ 68.5 Gy and EQD2 {sub max} ≥ 74.2 Gy. The risk of 1-year impotence may be predicted by a two-variable model including baseline IIEF1-5 (OR: 0.80, p = 0.003) and EQD2 {sub max} ≥ 74.2 Gy (OR: 4.1, p = 0.022). The AUC of the model was 0.77 (95% CI: 0.64-0.87, p = 0.0007, H and L: p = 0.62). The 1-year risk of impotency after high-dose radiotherapy in potent men depends on the EQD2 {sub max} to the penile bulb and on baseline IIEF1-5 values. A significant reduction in the risk may be expected mainly when sparing the bulb in patients with no/mild baseline impotency (IIEF1-5 > 17). (orig.) [German] Beurteilung von Praediktoren fuer das Auftreten von Impotenz 1 Jahr nach Radiotherapie bei Prostatakrebs. In einer multizentrischen

  6. Prostate cancer may trigger paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jakob Kristian; Zakharia, Elias Raja; Boysen, Anders Kindberg Fossø

    2013-01-01

    -Hu antibody test the patient was diagnosed with paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis related to prostate cancer. The patient died within 6 months. We review the literature on prostate cancer-related paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis. High-risk prostate cancer can trigger paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis...

  7. Mitochondrial mutations drive prostate cancer aggression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hopkins, Julia F.; Sabelnykova, Veronica Y.; Weischenfeldt, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear mutations are well known to drive tumor incidence, aggression and response to therapy. By contrast, the frequency and roles of mutations in the maternally inherited mitochondrial genome are poorly understood. Here we sequence the mitochondrial genomes of 384 localized prostate cancer...... in prostate cancer, and suggest interplay between nuclear and mitochondrial mutational profiles in prostate cancer....

  8. Prostate-specific antigen density: correlation with histological diagnosis of prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Iersel, M. P.; Witjes, W. P.; de la Rosette, J. J.; Oosterhof, G. O.

    1995-01-01

    To assess the additional value of prostate-specific antigen density in the diagnosis of prostate cancer in patients who undergo prostate biopsies. The study comprised 376 patients with symptoms of prostatism who were undergoing prostate biopsy. Digital rectal examination (DRE) and transrectal

  9. Gleason Pattern 5 Is the Greatest Risk Factor for Clinical Failure and Death From Prostate Cancer After Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy and Hormonal Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabolch, Aaron [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Feng, Felix Y. [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veterans Administration Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Daignault-Newton, Stephanie [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Division of Biostatistics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Halverson, Schuyler; Blas, Kevin; Phelps, Laura [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Olson, Karin B. [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sandler, Howard M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The division of Gleason score (GS) into three categories (2-6, 7, 8-10) may not fully use its prognostic power, as revealed by recent reports demonstrating the presence of Gleason Pattern 5 (GP5) as a strong predictor for biochemical recurrence. Therefore, we analyzed the clinical outcomes in patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) based on the presence or absence of GP5. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed for 718 men treated for localized prostate cancer with external-beam RT to a minimum planning target volume dose of at least 75 Gy. We assessed the impact of GP5 and that of pretreatment- and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure, freedom from metastasis (FFM), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Results: At biopsy, 89% of patients had no GP5, and 11% (76/718) had GP5. There were no differences in age, comorbid illness, T stage, prostate-specific antigen, or the use or duration of androgen deprivation therapy between GS8 without GP5 and GS8-10 with GP5. The presence of GP5 predicted lower FFM (p < 0.002; hazard ratio [HR] 3.4 [1.7-7.1]); CSS (p < 0.0001; HR 12.9 [5.4-31]); and OS (p < 0.0001; HR 3.6 [2.0-6.5]) in comparison with GS8 (without GP5). The 8-year FFM, CSS, and OS were 89%, 98%, and 57%, respectively, for those with Gleason 8 prostate cancer without GP5 in comparison with 61%, 55%, and 31%, respectively, for those with GP5. In addition, both FFM and CSS were strongly influenced by androgen deprivation therapy given concurrently with RT. On multivariate analysis, GP5 was the strongest prognostic factor for all clinical endpoints, including OS. Conclusion: The presence of GP5 predicts for worse clinical behavior, which therefore needs to be accounted for by risk stratification schemes. Further intensification of local and/or systemic therapy may be appropriate for such patients.

  10. Gleason Pattern 5 Is the Greatest Risk Factor for Clinical Failure and Death From Prostate Cancer After Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy and Hormonal Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabolch, Aaron; Feng, Felix Y.; Daignault-Newton, Stephanie; Halverson, Schuyler; Blas, Kevin; Phelps, Laura; Olson, Karin B.; Sandler, Howard M.; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The division of Gleason score (GS) into three categories (2–6, 7, 8–10) may not fully use its prognostic power, as revealed by recent reports demonstrating the presence of Gleason Pattern 5 (GP5) as a strong predictor for biochemical recurrence. Therefore, we analyzed the clinical outcomes in patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) based on the presence or absence of GP5. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed for 718 men treated for localized prostate cancer with external-beam RT to a minimum planning target volume dose of at least 75 Gy. We assessed the impact of GP5 and that of pretreatment- and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure, freedom from metastasis (FFM), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Results: At biopsy, 89% of patients had no GP5, and 11% (76/718) had GP5. There were no differences in age, comorbid illness, T stage, prostate-specific antigen, or the use or duration of androgen deprivation therapy between GS8 without GP5 and GS8–10 with GP5. The presence of GP5 predicted lower FFM (p < 0.002; hazard ratio [HR] 3.4 [1.7–7.1]); CSS (p < 0.0001; HR 12.9 [5.4-31]); and OS (p < 0.0001; HR 3.6 [2.0-6.5]) in comparison with GS8 (without GP5). The 8-year FFM, CSS, and OS were 89%, 98%, and 57%, respectively, for those with Gleason 8 prostate cancer without GP5 in comparison with 61%, 55%, and 31%, respectively, for those with GP5. In addition, both FFM and CSS were strongly influenced by androgen deprivation therapy given concurrently with RT. On multivariate analysis, GP5 was the strongest prognostic factor for all clinical endpoints, including OS. Conclusion: The presence of GP5 predicts for worse clinical behavior, which therefore needs to be accounted for by risk stratification schemes. Further intensification of local and/or systemic therapy may be appropriate for such patients.

  11. Prostate Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing prostate cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  12. 3-D conformal treatment of prostate cancer to 74 Gy vs. high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost: A cross-sectional quality-of-life survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vordermark, Dirk [Univ. of Wuerzburg (DE). Dept. of Radiation Oncology] (and others)

    2006-09-15

    The effects of two modalities of dose-escalated radiotherapy on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) were compared. Forty-one consecutive patients were treated with a 3-D conformal (3-DC) boost to 74 Gy, and 43 with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost (2x9 Gy), following 3-D conformal treatment to 46 Gy. Median age was 70 years in both groups, median initial PSA was 7.9 {mu}g/l in 3-DC boost patients and 8.1 {mu}g/l in HDR boost patients. Stage was 7 in 52% and 47%, respectively. HRQOL was assessed cross-sectionally using EORTC QLQ-C30 and organ-specific PR25 modules 3-32 (median 19) and 4-25 (median 14) months after treatment, respectively. Questionnaires were completed by 93% and 97% of patients, respectively. Diarrhea and insomnia scores were significantly increased in both groups. In the PR25 module, scores of 3-DC boost and HDR boost patients for urinary, bowel and treatment-related symptoms were similar. Among responders, 34% of 3-DC boost patients and 86% of HDR boost patients had severe erectile problems. Dose escalation in prostate cancer by either 3-DC boost to 74 Gy or HDR brachytherapy boost appears to result in similar HRQOL profiles.

  13. 3-D conformal treatment of prostate cancer to 74 Gy vs. high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost: A cross-sectional quality-of-life survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vordermark, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    The effects of two modalities of dose-escalated radiotherapy on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) were compared. Forty-one consecutive patients were treated with a 3-D conformal (3-DC) boost to 74 Gy, and 43 with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost (2x9 Gy), following 3-D conformal treatment to 46 Gy. Median age was 70 years in both groups, median initial PSA was 7.9 μg/l in 3-DC boost patients and 8.1 μg/l in HDR boost patients. Stage was 7 in 52% and 47%, respectively. HRQOL was assessed cross-sectionally using EORTC QLQ-C30 and organ-specific PR25 modules 3-32 (median 19) and 4-25 (median 14) months after treatment, respectively. Questionnaires were completed by 93% and 97% of patients, respectively. Diarrhea and insomnia scores were significantly increased in both groups. In the PR25 module, scores of 3-DC boost and HDR boost patients for urinary, bowel and treatment-related symptoms were similar. Among responders, 34% of 3-DC boost patients and 86% of HDR boost patients had severe erectile problems. Dose escalation in prostate cancer by either 3-DC boost to 74 Gy or HDR brachytherapy boost appears to result in similar HRQOL profiles

  14. High-dose (70-78 GY) conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer; the relation between observed late bladder and rectum complications and parameters derived from the dose volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebesque, J.V.; Bruce, A.; Boersma, L.J.; Velde, A. te

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and to investigate the relation between these observed incidences and parameters derived from the Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) of rectum and bladder wall. Patients and Methods: Hundred and thirty patients with T 2-4 G 1-3 N 0 M 0 prostate cancer were treated with conformal radiotherapy with the simultaneous boost technique in a dose-escalating protocol; 78 patients received a total dose of 70 Gy, 11 patients 74 - 76 Gy and 41 patients 78 Gy, each with a dose of 2 Gy per fraction. DVHs of the rectal wall were used to calculate NTCPs according to the model of Kutcher et al. with the estimated parameter values (n = 0.12, m = 0.15, TD 50 = 80 Gy) according to Burman et al. The median follow-up was 17 months (range 6 - 72 months). The crude and actuarial incidence of late (> 6 months) GI and GU complications were determined using the RTOG/EORTC morbidity scoring system (Grade I to IV). Results: Neither for late GI nor for GU complaints, a grade IV complication was observed. GU complaints occurred in 90 patients (69%): 54 patients (42%) only experienced grade I toxicity, 26 patients (20%) had grade II toxicity, and 10 patients (8%) had grade III complications, of which 8 patients (6%) developed a urethral (7 pts) or ureteric stenosis (1 pt). The actuarial incidence of grade III GU complications was 10% at 2 years. Since bladder wall DVHs are unreliable and most grade III complications were not related to the bladder, the grade II and/or III complications were analyzed in terms of the total prescribed dose only, but no correlation could be demonstrated. GI complications occurred in 71 patients (55%): 59 patients (45%) developed a grade I complication, 11 a grade II complication and only 1 patient required laser treatment twice and blood transfusion because of rectal bleeding (grade III). The actuarial incidence of GI

  15. Acute genitourinary toxicity after high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer: Correlation between the urethral dose in HDR brachytherapy and the severity of acute genitourinary toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Ito, Kazuto; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Noda, Shin-ei; Harashima, Koichi; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Nakayama, Yuko; Yamamoto, Takumi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Nakano, Takashi; Niibe, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Several investigations have revealed that the α/β ratio for prostate cancer is atypically low, and that hypofractionation or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy regimens using appropriate radiation doses may be expected to yield tumor control and late sequelae rates that are better or at least as favorable as those achieved with conventional radiation therapy. In this setting, we attempted treating localized prostate cancer patients with HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using this approach, with special emphasis on the relationship between the severity of acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity and the urethral dose calculated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of HDR brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between September 2000 and December 2003, 70 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated by iridium-192 HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT at the Gunma University Hospital. Hypofractionated EBRT was administered in fraction doses of 3 Gy, three times per week; a total dose of 51 Gy was delivered to the prostate gland and the seminal vesicles using the four-field technique. No elective pelvic irradiation was performed. After the completion of EBRT, all the patients additionally received transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided HDR brachytherapy. The fraction size and the number of fractions in HDR brachytherapy were prospectively changed, whereas the total radiation dose for EBRT was fixed at 51 Gy. The fractionation in HDR brachytherapy was as follows: 5 Gy x 5, 7 Gy x 3, 9 Gy x 2, administered twice per day, although the biologic effective dose (BED) for HDR brachytherapy combined with EBRT, assuming that the α/β ratio is 3, was almost equal to 138 in each fractionation group. The planning target volume was defined as the prostate gland with 5-mm margin all around, and the planning was conducted based on

  16. Permanent LDR implants in treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skowronek, J.; Kanikowski, M.; Chichel, A.; Zwierzchowski, G.

    2009-01-01

    Low-dose rate brachytherapy (LDR-BT) is a radiation method known for several years in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. The main idea of this method is to implant small radioactive seeds directly into the prostate gland. LDR brachytherapy is applied as a monotherapy and also used along with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as a boost. In most cases it is used as a sole radical treatment modality, but not as a palliative treatment. The application of permanent seed implants is a curative treatment alternative in patients with organ- confined cancer, without extracapsular extension of the tumour. This technique is particularly popular in the United States. In Europe, however, high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) is more popular in early-stage prostate cancer treatment (as a boost). The aim of this publication is to describe methods, indications, complications and selected results of prostate cancer LDR brachytherapy. (authors)

  17. The feasibility and safety of high-intensity focused ultrasound combined with low-dose external beam radiotherapy as supplemental therapy for advanced prostate cancer following hormonal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rui-Yi; Wang, Guo-Min; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Bo-Heng; Xu, Ye-Qing; Zeng, Zhao-Chong; Chen, Bing

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with (+) low-dose external beam radiotherapy (LRT) as supplemental therapy for advanced prostate cancer (PCa) following hormonal therapy (HT). Our definition of HIFU+LRT refers to treating primary tumour lesions with HIFU in place of reduced field boost irradiation to the prostate, while retaining four-field box irradiation to the pelvis in conventional-dose external beam radiotherapy (CRT). We performed a prospective, controlled and non-randomized study on 120 patients with advanced PCa after HT who received HIFU, CRT, HIFU+LRT and HT alone, respectively. CT/MR imaging showed the primary tumours and pelvic lymph node metastases visibly shrank or even disappeared after HIFU+LRT treatment. There were significant differences among four groups with regard to overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) curves (P = 0.018 and 0.015). Further comparison between each pair of groups suggested that the long-term DSS of the HIFU+LRT group was higher than those of the other three groups, but there was no significant difference between the HIFU+LRT group and the CRT group. Multivariable Cox's proportional hazard model showed that both HIFU+LRT and CRT were independently associated with DSS (P = 0.001 and 0.035) and had protective effects with regard to the risk of death. Compared with CRT, HIFU+LRT significantly decreased incidences of radiation-related late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity grade ≥ II. In conclusion, long-term survival of patients with advanced PCa benefited from strengthening local control of primary tumour and regional lymph node metastases after HT. As an alternative to CRT, HIFU+LRT showed good efficacy and better safety.

  18. Synergistic interaction of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatitis on prostate cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, S-C; Lai, S-W; Tsai, P-Y; Chen, P-C; Wu, H-C; Lin, W-H; Sung, F-C

    2013-01-01

    Background: The incidence of prostate cancer is much lower in Asian men than in Western men. This study investigated whether prostate cancer is associated with prostatitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and other medical conditions in the low-incidence population. Methods: From the claims data obtained from the universal National Health Insurance of Taiwan, we identified 1184 patients with prostate cancer diagnosed from 1997 to 2008. Controls comprised 4736 men randomly selected from a cancer-free population. Both groups were 50 years of age or above. Medical histories between the two groups were compared. Results: Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that prostatitis and BPH had stronger association with prostate cancer than the other medical conditions tested. Compared with men without prostatitis and BPH, a higher odds ratio (OR) for prostate cancer was associated with BPH (26.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 20.8–33.0) than with prostatitis (10.5, 95% CI=3.36–32.7). Men with both conditions had an OR of 49.2 (95% CI=34.7–69.9). Conclusion: Men with prostate cancer have strong association with prostatitis and/or BPH. Prostatitis interacts with BPH, resulting in higher estimated relative risk of prostate cancer in men suffering from both conditions. PMID:23612451

  19. Gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-31

    Cancer remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in understanding, detection, and treatment, it accounts for almost one-fourth of all deaths per year in Western countries. Prostate cancer is currently the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in Europe and the United States, accounting for 15% of all cancers in men. As life expectancy of individuals increases, it is expected that there will also be an increase in the incidence and mortality of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer may be inoperable at initial presentation, unresponsive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, or recur following appropriate treatment. At the time of presentation, patients may already have metastases in their tissues. Preventing tumor recurrence requires systemic therapy; however, current modalities are limited by toxicity or lack of efficacy. For patients with such metastatic cancers, the development of alternative therapies is essential. Gene therapy is a realistic prospect for the treatment of prostate and other cancers, and involves the delivery of genetic information to the patient to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. Therapeutics can act directly (eg, by inducing tumor cells to produce cytotoxic agents) or indirectly by upregulating the immune system to efficiently target tumor cells or by destroying the tumor\\'s vasculature. However, technological difficulties must be addressed before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved (primarily by developing a means of delivering genes to the target cells or tissue safely and efficiently). A wealth of research has been carried out over the past 20 years, involving various strategies for the treatment of prostate cancer at preclinical and clinical trial levels. The therapeutic efficacy observed with many of these approaches in patients indicates that these treatment modalities will serve as an important component of urological malignancy treatment in the clinic, either in isolation or

  20. Bone Morphogenetic Proteins, Antagonists and Receptors in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reddi, A

    2003-01-01

    ...? The predominant site of prostate cancer is bone. However, unlike the osteolytic lesions of breast cancer, prostate cancer causes osteoblastic osteosclerosis which leads ultimately to morbidity and mortality...

  1. Pelvic Nodal Dosing With Registration to the Prostate: Implications for High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishan, Amar U.; Lamb, James M.; Jani, Shyam S.; Kang, Jung J.; Steinberg, Michael L.; King, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether image guidance with rigid registration (RR) to intraprostatic markers (IPMs) yields acceptable coverage of the pelvic lymph nodes in the context of a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) regimen. Methods and Materials: Four to seven kilovoltage cone-beam CTs (CBCTs) from 12 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were analyzed, allowing approximation of an SBRT regimen. The nodal clinical target volume (CTV N ) and bladder were contoured on all kilovoltage CBCTs. The V 100 CTV N , expressed as a ratio to the same parameter on the initial plan, and the magnitude of translational shift between RR to the IPMs versus RR to the pelvic bones, were computed. The ability of a multimodality bladder filling protocol to minimize bladder height variation was assessed in a separate cohort of 4 patients. Results: Sixty-five CBCTs were assessed. The average V 100 CTV N was 92.6%, but for a subset of 3 patients the average was 80.0%, compared with 97.8% for the others (P<.0001). The average overall and superior–inferior axis magnitudes of the bony-to-fiducial translations were significantly larger in the subgroup with suboptimal nodal coverage (8.1 vs 3.9 mm and 5.8 vs 2.4 mm, respectively; P<.0001). Relative bladder height changes were also significantly larger in the subgroup with suboptimal nodal coverage (42.9% vs 18.5%; P<.05). Use of a multimodality bladder-filling protocol minimized bladder height variation (P<.001). Conclusion: A majority of patients had acceptable nodal coverage after RR to IPMs, even when approximating SBRT. However, a subset of patients had suboptimal nodal coverage. These patients had large bony-to-fiducial translations and large variations in bladder height. Nodal coverage should be excellent if the superior–inferior axis bony-to-fiducial translation and the relative bladder height change (both easily measured on CBCT) are kept to a minimum. Implementation of a strict bladder filling protocol may achieve this

  2. Prostatic paracoccidioidomycosis: differential diagnosis of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lima Lopes

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic prostatic paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM is a very rare condition; however, it may express as a typical benign prostatic hyperplasia or a simulating prostatic adenocarcinoma. This case report presents PCM mimicking prostatic adenocarcinoma. The purpose of this paper is to call the general physician's attention to this important differential diagnosis.

  3. Inflammatory Genetic Markers of Prostate Cancer Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tindall, Elizabeth A.; Hayes, Vanessa M. [Cancer Genetics Group, Children’s Cancer Institute Australia for Medical Research, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, University of New South Wales, PO Box 81, Randwick, NSW 2031 (Australia); University of New South Wales, Kensington Campus, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Petersen, Desiree C., E-mail: dpetersen@ccia.unsw.edu.au [Cancer Genetics Group, Children’s Cancer Institute Australia for Medical Research, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, University of New South Wales, PO Box 81, Randwick, NSW 2031 (Australia)

    2010-06-08

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in Western society males, with incidence rates predicted to rise with global aging. Etiology of prostate cancer is however poorly understood, while current diagnostic tools can be invasive (digital rectal exam or biopsy) and/or lack specificity for the disease (prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing). Substantial histological, epidemiological and molecular genetic evidence indicates that inflammation is important in prostate cancer pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current status of inflammatory genetic markers influencing susceptibility to prostate cancer. The focus will be on inflammatory cytokines regulating T-helper cell and chemokine homeostasis, together with the Toll-like receptors as key players in the host innate immune system. Although association studies indicating a genetic basis for prostate cancer are presently limited mainly due to lack of replication, larger and more ethnically and clinically defined study populations may help elucidate the true contribution of inflammatory gene variants to prostate cancer risk.

  4. Inflammatory Genetic Markers of Prostate Cancer Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tindall, Elizabeth A.; Hayes, Vanessa M.; Petersen, Desiree C.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in Western society males, with incidence rates predicted to rise with global aging. Etiology of prostate cancer is however poorly understood, while current diagnostic tools can be invasive (digital rectal exam or biopsy) and/or lack specificity for the disease (prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing). Substantial histological, epidemiological and molecular genetic evidence indicates that inflammation is important in prostate cancer pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current status of inflammatory genetic markers influencing susceptibility to prostate cancer. The focus will be on inflammatory cytokines regulating T-helper cell and chemokine homeostasis, together with the Toll-like receptors as key players in the host innate immune system. Although association studies indicating a genetic basis for prostate cancer are presently limited mainly due to lack of replication, larger and more ethnically and clinically defined study populations may help elucidate the true contribution of inflammatory gene variants to prostate cancer risk

  5. Epigenetic Regulation in Prostate Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggero, Katia; Farran-Matas, Sonia; Martinez-Tebar, Adrian; Aytes, Alvaro

    2018-01-01

    An important number of newly identified molecular alterations in prostate cancer affect gene encoding master regulators of chromatin biology epigenetic regulation. This review will provide an updated view of the key epigenetic mechanisms underlying prostate cancer progression, therapy resistance, and potential actionable mechanisms and biomarkers. Key players in chromatin biology and epigenetic master regulators has been recently described to be crucially altered in metastatic CRPC and tumors that progress to AR independency. As such, epigenetic dysregulation represents a driving mechanism in the reprograming of prostate cancer cells as they lose AR-imposed identity. Chromatin integrity and accessibility for transcriptional regulation are key features altered in cancer progression, and particularly relevant in nuclear hormone receptor-driven tumors like prostate cancer. Understanding how chromatin remodeling dictates prostate development and how its deregulation contributes to prostate cancer onset and progression may improve risk stratification and treatment selection for prostate cancer patients.

  6. Oncological outcome, complications, lower urinary tract symptoms, and health-related quality of life after low-dose-rate salvage brachytherapy for recurrent prostate cancer following primary radiotherapy: a report of 8 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makito Miyake

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We evaluated our experience with low-dose-rate salvage brachytherapy for local recurrence after primary prostate radiotherapy, and described the changes in lower urinary tract symptoms and health-related quality of life. Material and methods: Between 2011 and 2016, eight men with local recurrence after primary prostate radiotherapy underwent iodine-125 salvage brachytherapy with a prescribed dose of 110 or 145 Gy. Recurrence-free survival was evaluated with a post-treatment prostate-specific antigen profile. The toxicity and changes in lower urinary tract symptoms and health-related quality of life during the follow-up were evaluated on the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0, International Prostate Symptom Score, Short Form-8, and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite, respectively. Results: The median follow-up was 12.2 months (range, 8.3-71.9 after salvage brachytherapy. Of all eight patients, two (25% experienced treatment failure, one of whom developed left seminal vesicle recurrence 36 months after salvage brachytherapy for the right seminal vesicle recurrence, while the other developed bone metastases after 6 months. The International Prostate Symptom Scores peaked at 3 months, and returned to baseline by 6 months. The scores of all domains of health-related quality of life remained unchanged during the 12-month follow-up after salvage brachytherapy. Early grade ≤ 2 genitourinary toxicity was observed in five patients (63%, and late grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity in one patient (13% having persistent diarrhea. No patient required intermittent catheterization and no grade 3 or greater toxicity occurred during follow-up. Conclusions: The present study is our experiment of eight patients undergoing salvage brachytherapy, suggesting that this modality is noninvasive, safe, and an effective salvage local treatment in selected patients. To our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate lower urinary

  7. Dosimetry and preliminary acute toxicity in the first 100 men treated for prostate cancer on a randomized hypofractionation dose escalation trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollack, Alan; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; Konski, Andre A.; Movsas, Benjamin; Greenberg, Richard E.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Ma, C.-M. Charlie; McNeeley, Shawn W.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Price, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The α/β ratio for prostate cancer is postulated to be between 1 and 3, giving rise to the hypothesis that there may be a therapeutic advantage to hypofractionation. The dosimetry and acute toxicity are described in the first 100 men enrolled in a randomized trial. Patients and Methods: The trial compares 76 Gy in 38 fractions (Arm I) to 70.2 Gy in 26 fractions (Arm II) using intensity modulated radiotherapy. The planning target volume (PTV) margins in Arms I and II were 5 mm and 3 mm posteriorly and 8 mm and 7 mm in all other dimensions. The PTV D95% was at least the prescription dose. Results: The mean PTV doses for Arms I and II were 81.1 and 73.8 Gy. There were no differences in overall maximum acute gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity acutely. However, there was a slight but significant increase in Arm II GI toxicity during Weeks 2, 3, and 4. In multivariate analyses, only the combined rectal DVH parameter of V65 Gy/V50 Gy was significant for GI toxicity and the bladder volume for GU toxicity. Conclusion: Hypofractionation at 2.7 Gy per fraction to 70.2 Gy was well tolerated acutely using the planning conditions described

  8. Hypofractionated High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Multi-Institutional Phase II Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonteyne, Valerie, E-mail: valerie.fonteyne@uzgent.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Soete, Guy [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Jette (Belgium); Arcangeli, Stefano [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Rappe, Bernard [Department of Urology, Algemeen Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Aalst (Belgium); Storme, Guy [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Jette (Belgium); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Arcangeli, Giorgio [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); De Meerleer, Gert [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To report late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity, biochemical and clinical outcomes, and overall survival after hypofractionated radiation therapy for prostate cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Three institutions included 113 patients with T1 to T3N0M0 PC in a phase II study. Patients were treated with 56 Gy in 16 fractions over 4 weeks. Late toxicity was scored using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria extended with additional symptoms. Biochemical outcome was reported according to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure. Results: The incidence of late GI and GU toxicity was low. The 3-year actuarial risk of developing late GU and GI toxicity of grade {>=}2 was 13% and 8% respectively. Five-year biochemical non-evidence of disease (bNED) was 94%. Risk group, T stage, and deviation from planned hormone treatment were significant predictive factors for bNED. Deviation from hormone treatment remained significant in multivariate analysis. Five-year clinical non evidence of disease and overall survival was 95% and 91% respectively. No patient died from PC. Conclusions: Hypofractionated high-dose radiation therapy is a valuable treatment option for patients with PC, with excellent biochemical and clinical outcome and low toxicity.

  9. Radiation therapy of newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer and hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Minoru; Fujiwara, Kazuhisa; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Hida, Shuichi

    1994-01-01

    Ten patients with newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer were treated with radiotherapy and hormone therapy to improve tumor control and survival. Eight patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer were treated with radiotherapy to improve their quality of life. Local control of the tumor was achieved in 9 of 10 patients with newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer. Five of eight patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer obtained improved quality of life. Combined radiotherapy and hormone therapy were effective in the treatment of newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer, and radiotherapy was useful for improving the quality of life of patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer. (author)

  10. BPH and prostate cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Saiful; Catto, James

    2014-04-01

    With the exclusion of non-melanomatous skin malignancy, prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most prevalent cancer in men globally. It has been reported that the majority of men will develop benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) by the time they reach their 60s. Together, these prostatic diseases have a significant morbidity and mortality affecting over a billion men throughout the world. The risk of developing prostate cancer of men suffering BPH is one that has resulted in a healthy debate amongst the urological community. Here, we try to address this conundrum with clinical and basic science evidence. Data from an online search and contemporary data presented at international urological congresses was reviewed. BPH and PCa can be linked together at a molecular and cellular level on genetic, hormonal, and inflammatory platforms suggesting that these prostatic diseases have common pathophysiological driving factors. Epidemiological studies are weighted towards the presence of BPH having a greater risk for a man to develop PCa in his lifetime; however, a conclusion of causality cannot be confidently stated. The future workload healthcare practitioners will face regarding BPH, and PCa will substantially increase. Further basic science and large epidemiological studies using a global cohort of men are required prior to the urological community confidently counseling their patients with BPH with regards to their PCa risk.

  11. BPH and prostate cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiful Miah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: With the exclusion of non-melanomatous skin malignancy, prostate cancer (PCa is the second most prevalent cancer in men globally. It has been reported that the majority of men will develop beni