WorldWideScience

Sample records for prominent scientist gifted

  1. Birth of prominent scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes Gonzalez, Leonardo; Veloso, Francisco

    2018-01-01

    This paper analyzes the influence key scientists have in the development of a science and technology system. In particular, this work appraises the influence that star scientists have on the productivity and impact of young faculty, as well as on the likelihood that these young researchers become a leading personality in science. Our analysis confirms previous results that eminent scientist have a prime role in the development of a scientific system, especially within the context of an emerging economy like Mexico. In particular, in terms of productivity and visibility, this work shows that between 1984 and 2001 the elite group of physicists in Mexico (approximate 10% of all scientists working in physics and its related fields) published 42% of all publications, received 50% of all citations and bred 18% to 26% of new entrants. In addition our work shows that scientists that enter the system by the hand of a highly productive researcher increased their productivity on average by 28% and the ones that did it by the hand of a highly visible scientist received on average 141% more citations, vis-à-vis scholars that did not published their first manuscripts with an eminent scientist. Furthermore, scholars that enter the system by the hand of a highly productive researcher were on average 2.5 more likely to also become a star. PMID:29543855

  2. Birth of prominent scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes Gonzalez, Leonardo; González Brambila, Claudia N; Veloso, Francisco

    2018-01-01

    This paper analyzes the influence key scientists have in the development of a science and technology system. In particular, this work appraises the influence that star scientists have on the productivity and impact of young faculty, as well as on the likelihood that these young researchers become a leading personality in science. Our analysis confirms previous results that eminent scientist have a prime role in the development of a scientific system, especially within the context of an emerging economy like Mexico. In particular, in terms of productivity and visibility, this work shows that between 1984 and 2001 the elite group of physicists in Mexico (approximate 10% of all scientists working in physics and its related fields) published 42% of all publications, received 50% of all citations and bred 18% to 26% of new entrants. In addition our work shows that scientists that enter the system by the hand of a highly productive researcher increased their productivity on average by 28% and the ones that did it by the hand of a highly visible scientist received on average 141% more citations, vis-à-vis scholars that did not published their first manuscripts with an eminent scientist. Furthermore, scholars that enter the system by the hand of a highly productive researcher were on average 2.5 more likely to also become a star.

  3. Gifted and Talented Students’ Images of Scientists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sezen Camcı-Erdoğan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate gifted students’ images of scientists. The study involved 25 students in grades 7 and 8. The Draw-a-Scientist Test (DAST (Chamber, 183 was used to collect data. Drawings were eval-uated using certain criterion such as a scien-tist’s appearance and investigation, knowledge and technology symbols and gender and working style, place work, expressions, titles-captions-symbols and alternative images and age. The results showed that gifted students’ perceptions about scientists were stereotypical, generally with glasses and laboratory coats and working with experiment tubes, beakers indoors and using books, technological tools and dominantly lonely males. Most gifted stu-dents drew male scientists. Although females drew male scientists, none of the boys drew female scientist.

  4. Do Perceptions of Gifted Intelligence and Normal Intelligence Participants Differ about Social Science and Social Scientists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvi, Sezgin; Demir, Selçuk Besir

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study was conducted to compare the perceptions of students with gifted intelligence and students with those of normal intelligence about social science and social scientists. The data obtained from 23 gifted intelligent and 23 normal participants within the same age group was analysed using content analysis and results were…

  5. Solar prominences

    CERN Document Server

    Engvold, Oddbjørn

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents the latest research results on solar prominences, including new developments on e.g. chirality, fine structure, magnetism, diagnostic tools and relevant solar plasma physics. In 1875 solar prominences, as seen out of the solar limb, were described by P.A. Secchi in his book Le Soleil as "gigantic pink or peach-flower coloured flames". The development of spectroscopy, coronagraphy and polarimetry brought tremendous observational advances in the twentieth century. The authors present and discuss exciting new challenges (resulting from observations made by space and ground-based telescopes in the 1990s and the first decade of the 21st century) concerning the diagnostics of prominences, their formation, their life time and their eruption along with their impact in the heliosphere (including the Earth). The book starts with a general introduction of the prominence “object” with some historical background on observations and instrumentation. In the next chapter, the various forms of promine...

  6. [Prominence in the media, renown in the sciences: the construction of a paradigmatic feminist and a scientist at Rio de Janeiro's Museu Nacional].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Maria Margaret

    2008-06-01

    Bertha Lutz was one of the women of her generation who enjoyed indisputable political and scientific authority. She wrote much and even more was written about her, especially during her day. The newspaper chronicles by Lima Barreto, countless letters, scientific papers, and unpublished texts by Bertha herself that are surveyed in this article indicate how much her feminism--inseparable from other dimensions of her life--fostered her professional career. Her feminism earned her a carefully constructed renown and visibility that interlocked with her professional performance. Science lent her social prestige and guaranteed legitimacy for her causes. During a period when the scientific community itself was engaged in publicizing its own activities, Bertha's feminist prominence in the media helped her make a name in the sciences.

  7. The Gift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komter, Aafke E.

    1996-01-01

    What moves us to give gifts to other people? The Gift brings together perspectives on gift exchange and reciprocity from different social scientific disciplines. The first part of this book contains anthropological and sociological 'classics' on gift giving and reciprocity. In the second part the

  8. Geoscience Information for Teachers (GIFT) Workshops at the European Geoscience Union General Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macko, S. A.; Arnold, E. M.; Laj, C. E.; Barnikel, F.; Berenguer, J. L.; Schwarz, A.; Cifelli, F.; Smith, P.; Funiciello, F.; Summesberger, H.

    2017-12-01

    GIFT workshops are teacher enhancement workshops organized by the EGU Committee on Education and held in conjunction with the EGU annual General Assembly. The program focuses on a different general theme each year. Past themes have included, for example, "Energy and Sustainable Development", "The Carbon Cycle", "Mineral Resources", "The Solar System And Beyond" and "The Mediterranean". These workshops combine scientific presentations on current research in Earth and Space Sciences, given by prominent scientists attending EGU General Assemblies, with hands-on, inquiry-based activities that can be used by the teachers in their classrooms to explain related scientific principles or topics. Participating teachers are also invited to present their own classroom activities to their colleagues, regardless of the scientific topic. The main objective of these workshops is to communicate first-hand scientific information to teachers in primary and secondary schools, significantly shortening the time between discovery and textbook. The GIFT workshop provides the teachers with materials that can be directly incorporated into their classroom, as well as those of their colleagues at home institutions. In addition, the full immersion of science teachers in a truly scientific context (EGU General Assemblies) and the direct contact with leading geoscientists stimulates curiosity towards research that the teachers can transmit to their pupils. In addition to their scientific content, the GIFT workshops are of high societal value. The value of bringing teachers from many nations together includes the potential for networking and collaborations, the sharing of experiences and an awareness of science education as it is presented in other countries. Since 2003, the EGU GIFT workshops have brought together more than 700 teachers from more than 25 nations. At all previous EGU GIFT workshops teachers mingled with others from outside their own country and informally interacted with the

  9. Gifting from the Closet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uth Thomsen, Thyra; Zaichkowsky, Judith Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – This study aims to investigate the random collection of items for gifting which are stored in one’s home in a special place. Traditional gift-giving models suggest gift givers buy gifts for certain recipients on certain occasions. This study ' s journey into gift storage finds that some....../value – Due to the unexplored nature of gift storage, the results reported in this paper represent a first exploratory account of gift storage and its possible effects on the relationship-building capacity of gifts....

  10. Geoscience Information for Teachers (GIFT) Workshops at the European Geoscience Union General Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Eve; Barnikel, Friedrich; Berenguer, Jean-Luc; Cifelli, Francesca; Funiciello, Francesca; Laj, Carlo; Macko, Stephen; Schwarz, Annegret; Smith, Phil; Summesberger, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    GIFT workshops are a two-and-a-half-day teacher enhancement workshops organized by the EGU Committee on Education and held in conjunction with the EGU annual General Assembly. The program of each workshop focuses on a different general theme each year. Past themes have included, for example, "Mineral Resources", "Our changing Planet", "Natural Hazards", "Water", "Evolution and Biodiversity" and "Energy and Sustainable Development". These workshops combine scientific presentations on current research in the Earth and Space Sciences, given by prominent scientists attending EGU General Assemblies, with hands-on, inquiry-based activities that can be used by the teachers in their classrooms to explain related scientific principles or topics. Participating teachers are also invited to present their own classroom activities to their colleagues, even when not directly related to the current program. The main objective of these workshops is to communicate first-hand scientific information to teachers in primary and secondary schools, significantly shortening the time between discovery and textbook. The GIFT workshop provides the teachers with materials that can be directly incorporated into their classroom, as well as those of their colleagues at home institutions. In addition, the full immersion of science teachers in a truly scientific context (EGU General Assemblies) and the direct contact with leading geoscientists stimulates curiosity towards research that the teachers can transmit to their pupils. In addition to their scientific content, the GIFT workshops are of high societal value. The value of bringing teachers from many nations together includes the potential for networking and collaborations, the sharing of experiences and an awareness of science education as it is presented in other countries. Since 2003, the EGU GIFT workshops have brought together more than 700 teachers from more than 25 nations. At all previous EGU GIFT workshops teachers mingled with others

  11. Geoscience Information for Teachers (GIFT) Workshops of the European Geoscience Union General Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Eve; Barnikel, Friedrich; Berenguer, Jean-Luc; Cifelli, Francesca; Funiciello, Francesca; King, Chris; Laj, Carlo; Macko, Stephen; Schwarz, Annegret; Smith, Phil; Summesberger, Herbert

    2017-04-01

    GIFT workshops are a two-and-a-half-day teacher enhancement workshops organized by the EGU Committee on Education and held in conjunction with the EGU annual General Assembly in Vienna, and also elsewhere in the world usually associated with large geoscience conferences. The program of each workshop focuses on a different general theme each year. Past themes have included, for example, "The solar system and beyond", "Mineral Resources", "Our changing Planet", "Natural Hazards", "Water" and "Evolution and Biodiversity". These workshops combine scientific presentations on current research in the Earth and Space Sciences, given by prominent scientists, with hands-on, inquiry-based activities that can be used by the teachers in their classrooms to explain related scientific principles or topics. Participating teachers are also invited to present their own classroom activities to their colleagues, even when not directly related to the current program. The main objective of these workshops is to communicate first-hand scientific information to teachers in primary and secondary schools, significantly shortening the time between discovery and textbook. The GIFT workshop provides the teachers with materials that can be directly incorporated into their classroom, as well as those of their colleagues at home institutions. In addition, the full immersion of science teachers in a truly scientific context (EGU General Assemblies) and the direct contact with leading geoscientists stimulates curiosity towards research that the teachers can transmit to their pupils. In addition to their scientific content, the GIFT workshops are of high societal value. The value of bringing teachers from many nations together includes the potential for networking and collaborations, the sharing of experiences and an awareness of science education as it is presented in other countries. Since 2003, the EGU GIFT workshops have brought together more than 800 teachers from more than 25 nations. At all

  12. The Gift of Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, D. Jackson

    2009-01-01

    There are many opportunities each year for children to receive gifts from adults. Parents, teachers, and community members often ask school librarians for suggestions concerning educational gifts for children. Literacy, however, is the greatest gift any adult can give a child. The gift of literacy can take many paths and use many different tools.…

  13. Brandburg Prominance, Namibia, Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Brandburg Prominance, Namibia (21.0S, 14.5E) is a round basaltic plug and is the highest feature (over 8,000 ft) in the country. Wind streaks on the surface of the coastal desert, aligned northeast to southwest, are the result of frequent sand storms. Coastal stratus clouds provide most of the life supporting moisture as fog droplets in this arid land where annual rainfall may be less than a quarter of an inch for decades at a time.

  14. Formation and support of prominence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forbes, T.G.

    1986-01-01

    A short introduction is given to the concepts discussed by the group on the formation and support of prominences. Only quiescent and long-lived active region prominences were considered, since transient prominence phenomena, such as sprays, surges, H alpha flare-loops, and coronal rain, are dynamically distinct from long-lived, prominences. Stable prominences (which are often referred to as filaments when seen against the disk) can be subdivided into three categories, namely active region prominences, quiescent prominences and polar crown prominences. The third category is closely related to the second since a quiescent prominence will eventually evolve into a polar crown prominence if it lasts long enough. The distinction between the first and second categories is not sharp either since intermediates exist here as well (Martin, 1973)

  15. Meeting the gifted

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Arne; Westphael, Henning

    2013-01-01

    In the article we give a presentation of different understandings of the notion of being a gifted mathematics student.......In the article we give a presentation of different understandings of the notion of being a gifted mathematics student....

  16. Markets: Gift Cards

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer Pate Offenberg

    2007-01-01

    The Mobil Oil Company introduced the first retail gift card that recorded value on a magnetic strip in 1995. In under a decade, such gift cards replaced apparel as the number one item sold during the Christmas season. This study will discuss the reasons for the strong surge in the gift card market. It will then consider the value of gift cards as an intermediate option between two alternatives: purchasing a physical gift, which could possibly be returned or exchanged, versus giving cash. Empi...

  17. Solar Features - Prominences and Filaments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Prominences and filaments are two manifestations of the same phenomenon. Both prominences and filaments are features formed above the chromosphere by cool dense...

  18. Presence of the gift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Game, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Philosophers, social theorists and cultural theorists have generally followed Mauss in assuming that gifts entail obligatory exchanges between distinct parties who give, receive and reciprocate, and, that the social emerges through this sequence of obligations. It is the obligation to reciprocate, for example, that led Derrida to claim that the gift is impossible. We consider the alternative ideas that non-exchange gifts are not only possible but the basis of social life: that the social arises from the nonsequential giving-and-receiving of a gift relation. To develop this claim, we draw on a research project on the phenomenology of teaching. While many interviewees, teachers and students, spoke of the gift in exchange terms, many also spoke of classroom experiences in which there is a giving and receiving that is neither sequential nor locatable. Through the resonances of the concept of presence, we draw out the time, space and ontology of the gift.

  19. Presence of the Gift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Game

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Philosophers, social theorists and cultural theorists have generally followed Mauss in assuming that gifts entail obligatory exchanges between distinct parties who give, receive and reciprocate, and, that the social emerges through this sequence of obligations. It is the obligation to reciprocate, for example, that led Derrida to claim that the gift is impossible. We consider the alternative ideas that non-exchange gifts are not only possible but the basis of social life: that the social arises from the nonsequential giving-and-receiving of a gift relation. To develop this claim, we draw on a research project on the phenomenology of teaching. While many interviewees, teachers and students, spoke of the gift in exchange terms, many also spoke of classroom experiences in which there is a giving and receiving that is neither sequential nor locatable. Through the resonances of the concept of presence, we draw out the time, space and ontology of the gift.

  20. New perspectives on solar prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, B.; Aulanier, G.

    2012-06-01

    Recent observations of prominences obtained with high spatial and temporal resolution instruments, on board satellites (Hinode, SDO) as well as on the ground (SST) have provided very intriguing movies and open a new area for understanding the nature of prominences. The main topics are still debate: formation, dynamics, and characteristics of the plasma in the core and in the transition zone between the prominence and corona. We will review briefly the recent advances made in these topics, observationally as well as theoretically.

  1. Gifted Childreen and BILSEM

    OpenAIRE

    ÇELİKTEN, Yeliz

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: In addition to biological factors, various environmental factors such as school, family, teacher and friend environment influence the education and intelligence of gifted children. The cognitive and emotional development of these gifted children forms via interacting with these environmental factors . In addition to supporting and strengthening the social and emotional development of a gifted child, the need for guidance about issues such as parental sense of responsibility, lonelin...

  2. Gifted Disadvantaged Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, Clifford

    Presented are guidelines to help teachers effectively identify and educate gifted students from urban environments. It is said that the one consistent criteria that teachers may use to identify gifted students is the depth to which students respond to environmental items (recall of street signs or types of automobiles found on the block and…

  3. Gifted Education in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyringer, Sieglinde

    2013-01-01

    In Austria, gifted education and the education of highly gifted and talented children have been receiving an increasing public awareness and social acceptance over the past decade. The article highlights the existing ideas of giftedness in Austria, and it presents several initiatives having triggered and influenced this positive development. The…

  4. Is Giftedness Truly a Gift?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Janet E.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines whether giftedness is actually a gift for those who receive it. The following attributes of a true gift are described as: (1) an understanding of what the gift is and who owns it; (2) realizing that it needs maintenance; (3) knowing what to do with the gift; (4) the giver expects nothing in return; and (5) the receiver…

  5. Leadership qualities in prominent neurosurgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, M

    1997-01-01

    Our questionnaire provided a unique occasion to unravel the characteristics of leading neurosurgeons. As is also the case for successful leaders in other fields, neurosurgical leaders are good at school, used to being confronted with dilemmas, truthloving, ambitious, and, of course, gifted. They constitute a hardworking elite. The key to success is awareness. Awareness of oneself awareness of one's surroundings, awareness of the message to be delivered, awareness of the difficulties to be overcome and of their solutions. Awareness requires mental readiness, and this is directly linked to performance excellence in surgery [6].

  6. Space Odyssey Gift Shop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The Space Odyssey Gift Shop located in StenniSphere at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., offers every visitor the opportunity to go home with 'the right stuff' from his or her StenniSphere visit. The gift shop is located just inside the front doors to StenniSphere and offers a wide range of space-related apparel, memorabilia, toys, books, mission patches and more.

  7. Robust Scientists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorm Hansen, Birgitte

    their core i nterests, 2) developing a selfsupply of industry interests by becoming entrepreneurs and thus creating their own compliant industry partner and 3) balancing resources within a larger collective of researchers, thus countering changes in the influx of funding caused by shifts in political...... knowledge", Danish research policy seems to have helped develop politically and economically "robust scientists". Scientific robustness is acquired by way of three strategies: 1) tasting and discriminating between resources so as to avoid funding that erodes academic profiles and push scientists away from...

  8. Multiple Intelligence Theory for Gifted Education: Criticisms and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calik, Basak; Birgili, Bengi

    2013-01-01

    This paper scrutinizes giftedness and gifted learners under the implications of multiple intelligence theory with regard to coaching young scientists. It is one of the pluralistic theories toward intelligence while supporting to view individuals as active participants during teaching and learning processes which correspond with the applications of…

  9. Mere Gifting: Liking a Gift More Because It Is Shared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polman, Evan; Maglio, Sam J

    2017-11-01

    We investigated a type of mere similarity that describes owning the same item as someone else. Moreover, we examined this mere similarity in a gift-giving context, whereby givers gift something that they also buy for themselves (a behavior we call "companionizing"). Using a Heiderian account of balancing unit-sentiment relations, we tested whether gift recipients like gifts more when gifts are companionized. Akin to mere ownership, which describes people liking their possessions more merely because they own them, we tested a complementary prediction: whether people like their possessions more merely because others own them too. Thus, in a departure from previous work, we examined a type of similarity based on two people sharing the same material item. We find that this type of sharing causes gift recipients to like their gifts more, and feel closer to gift givers.

  10. Creativity in gifted identification: increasing accuracy and diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Sarah R; O'Brien, Rebecca L; Kaufman, James C

    2016-08-01

    Many federal definitions and popular theories of giftedness specify creativity as a core component. Nevertheless, states rely primarily on measures of intelligence for giftedness identification. As minority and culturally diverse students continue to be underrepresented in gifted programs, it is reasonable to ask if increasing the prominence of creativity in gifted identification may help increase balance and equity. In this paper, we explore both layperson and psychometric conceptions of bias and suggest that adding creativity measures to the identification process alleviates both perceptions and the presence of bias. We recognize, however, the logistic and measurement-related challenges to including creativity assessments. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  11. The most prominent safety guarantees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucenet, G.

    1978-01-01

    The Creys-Malville Nuclear Centre has been designed using the safety analysis implemented since the beginning of the developments of breeder reactors in France and the Super Phenix follows almost the same safety regulations as its predecessor the Phenix reactor. These regulations are based on: 'Recommendations for the safety standards of the Super Phenix' drawn up by the French Safety Authorities in July 1973. The prominent points are summarised. (C.F.)

  12. CERN Holiday Gift Guide

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Do you have last-minute gifts to get? Stuck for ideas? The CERN Shop and the ATLAS and CMS secretariats have some wonderfully unique gifts and stocking-fillers for sale this year - perfect for the physics fanatics in your life. Let's take a look...   1. CERN Notebook, 10 CHF - 2. CERN Pop-up book, 30 CHF - 3. USB Stick 8GB, 25 CHF - 4. CERN Tumbler, 12 CHF 5. ATLAS 3D Viewer, 5 CHF - 6. ATLAS Puzzle, 15 CHF - 7. CMS Umbrella, 25 CHF   These gifts are all available at the CERN Shop, with the exception of the ATLAS 3D Viewer and the CMS umbrella, which are only available from the respective secretariats. Don’t forget! If you’re from CERN, you still have time to take advantage of a 10% off discount at the CERN shop. Offer ends 20 December.

  13. What’s in Your Gift Closet?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uth Thomsen, Thyra; Zaichkowsky, Judith

    Gift closets are a dedicated space in one’s home in which potential gifts are stored, for which either the recipient or the exact timing of the gift giving is not known at the time the item is stored or acquired. Based on a questionnaire (n=111), including a free elicitation process of words...... associated with gift closets, we describe the content of gift closets, the intended recipients of the stored potential gifts, and perception of gift closet owners actions. Finally, we theorize how the perception of gift closets may affect the value creation process in gift giving rituals....

  14. Gifted Children and Divorce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, John; Karnes, Frances A.

    2011-01-01

    Divorce is often a contentious process with multiple issues to decide, especially in cases in which there are children involved. Divorce raises several legal issues when considering the well-being of children, including those who are gifted. In this article, the authors discuss these issues which include school choice, child support, and custody…

  15. Gifts, Talents and Meritocracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radnor, Hilary; Koshy, Valsa; Taylor, Alexis

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates aspects of policy implementation that relate to "Excellence in Cities", a UK government initiative. Local Education Authority (LEA) personnel and school teachers, responsible for implementing the Gifted and Talented (G&T) strand of that initiative, were interviewed. These co-ordinators were involved in the…

  16. The Gift of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todor Hristov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The traumatic question “what has Bulgarian literature given to the world” acquired particular intensity in periods of crisis such as the Balkan Wars, and after 1989 and the subsequent Bulgarian EU accession. It is generally accepted that the value that Bulgarian literature transmits to the world lies in the identity it represented. The goal of the paper is to show that Bulgarian literature was constituted as a gift responding to the gift of world literature, yet ever unable to repay the debt incurred by its initial gift, and trying to alleviate its indebtedness by means of a specific language of exchange. Hristov believes that studying the literature on the value of Bulgarian literature will demonstrate that the notions of identity, recognition, value, translation, national and world literature have been inscribed in a scriptural economy blending gift and exchange in a peculiar way. He hopes that this economy emerged as a modification of the scriptural economy in which the notion of world literature had been embedded, and that it has been globalised into a universal literary economy.

  17. [Oleksandr Solomonovych Tsyperovych--gifted enzymologist, scientist and practician].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vynohradova, R P; Kolodzeĭs'ka, M V

    2007-01-01

    Professor O. S. Tsyperovich (15.12.1910-20.12.1976), Doctor of biology, was born in the city of Odessa, graduated from the Faculty of Chemistry of Shevchenko Kyiv State University as a specialist in organic chemistry (1930-1935). In 1935-1941 he worked at the Institute of Biochemistry of the Academy of Sciences of the Ukr.SSR (Kyiv) as a junior research worker, and then as a senior research worker at the Department of Enzymology. In 1941 O. S. Tsyperovich defended the thesis for the Candidate's degree dedicated to the investigation of synthetic effect of proteolytic enzymes, and he was awarded the title of the senior research worker. In 1941-1945 O. S. Tsyperovich struggled in the ranks of the Soviet Army, was awarded the Red Star Order, medals For Defense of Caucasus, For the Victory over Germany in the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945. In 1946-1976 O. S. Tsyperovich worked at the Institute of Biochemistry of the Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. When investigating the mechanism of proteins denaturation he discovered the phenomenon of their "denaturational stabilization". New technological schemes of production of pepsin preparations were elaborated on the basis of the method of autholysis proposed by him. In 1954 O. S. Tsyperovich defended the thesis for the Doctor's Degree and was awarded the order The Badge of Honor. Beginning from 1963 he headed the laboratory, and from 1966 -- the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry of Enzymes, in 1969 the title of professor was conferred on him. In the 60-70's O. S. Tsyperovich investigated hydrolytic enzymes of microorganisms with the purpose of their use in industry. Thus, the method of production of the preparation "pronasa" from Streptomyces griseus was developed, aminopeptidases, dipeptidases, a-amylase, cellulases, were investigated. Investigations in the field of preparative enzymology resulted in the development of technological scheme for creation of the following drugs for the purposes of medicine: medical pepsin, preparation gastric juice, crystalline trypsin, highly purified chemotrypsin, highly purified trypsin, highly purified amylase which were introduced into industry. New methods of silver regeneration from photographic and cinema films with the use of proteinase of S. griseus were developed, as well as the enzyme-antibiotic preparation protezym for hydrolysis of fodder proteins which gave positive results in breeding calves and in feeding adult animals. O. S. Tsyperovich has proposed two simple structures of automatic collector of fractions for the column chromatography, published 178 scientific works including 3 monographs, 10 author's certificates; 12 candidates of science were brought up under his supervision.

  18. A gifted teacher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugenholtz, N.M.

    1991-01-01

    Notwithstanding his many and important papers on basic problems in physics, it may well be that Léon Van Hove's influence on the physics community is in a large part due to the fact that he was a gifted and devoted teacher. It is perhaps unfortunate that the period of his life during which he was a university professor and gave basic training to young students in theoretical physics was rather short

  19. A gifted teacher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugenholtz, N. M.

    1991-03-15

    Notwithstanding his many and important papers on basic problems in physics, it may well be that Léon Van Hove's influence on the physics community is in a large part due to the fact that he was a gifted and devoted teacher. It is perhaps unfortunate that the period of his life during which he was a university professor and gave basic training to young students in theoretical physics was rather short.

  20. Limits of the Gift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bill, Frederic; Olaison, Lena

    2011-01-01

    . In analysing our material, we argue that every meeting between antiquarian and bookshop visitor results in liminal ceremonies that produce a space (what we, adopted from Lefebvre, call a representational space) for their interaction. Such analysis suggests that the interactions are taking place somewhere...... on a continuum of spaces stretching from commodity to gift. The role of the antiquarian thus stretches from seller to giver, the visitor, from buyer to receiver, and the bookshop, from shop to collection....

  1. Re-interpreting Prominences Classified as Tornadoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sara F.; Venkataramanasastry, Aparna

    2015-04-01

    Some papers in the recent literature identify tornado prominences with barbs of quiescent prominences while papers in the much older historic literature include a second category of tornado prominence that does not correspond to a barb of a quiescent prominence. The latter are described as prominence mass rotating around a nearly vertical axis prior to its eruption and the rotation was verified by spectral measurements. From H alpha Doppler-shifted mass motions recorded at Helio Research or the Dutch Open Telescope, we illustrate how the apparent tornado-like motions, identified with barbs, are illusions in our mind’s eye resulting from poorly resolved counterstreaming threads of mass in the barbs of quiescent prominences. In contrast, we confirm the second category of rotational motion in prominences shortly before and during eruption. In addition, we identify this second category as part of the late phase of a phenomenon called the roll effect in erupting prominences. In these cases, the eruption begins with the sideways rolling of the top of a prominence. As the eruption proceeds the rolling motion propagates down one leg or both legs of the prominence depending on whether the eruption is asymmetric or symmetric respectively. As an asymmetric eruption continues, the longer lasting leg becomes nearly vertical and its rotational motion also continues. If only this phase of the eruption was observed, as in some historic cases, it was called a tornado prominence. However, when we now observe entire eruptions in time-lapse sequences, the similarity to terrestrial tornadoes is lost. We conclude that neither prominence barbs, that give the illusion of rotation, nor the cases of true rotational motion, in the legs of erupting prominences, are usefully described as tornado prominences when the complete prominence structure or complete erupting event is observed.

  2. Giving Gifts with a Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Douglas E.

    1987-01-01

    Gifts can link class discussions to the real world while involving children in reading, travel, or a search for information. They make children more receptive to the teacher, school in general, and ultimately to the subject. Ways to find cheap or free gifts for students are discussed. (MT)

  3. Culture, Ethics, Scripts, and Gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerschmitt, Dorothy; Hafernik, Johnnie Johnson; Vandrick, Stephanie

    1997-01-01

    Discusses gift-giving patterns in different cultures, particularly in relation to teacher-student interactions in English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instruction. Situations in which gift-giving can raise ethical questions and how to teach culturally diverse students about this issue are highlighted. Script theory provides a theoretical basis for…

  4. Identifying the Gifted Child Humorist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fern, Tami L.

    1991-01-01

    This study attempted to identify gifted child humorists among 1,204 children in grades 3-6. Final identification of 13 gifted child humorists was determined through application of such criteria as funniness, originality, and exemplary performance or product. The influence of intelligence, development, social factors, sex differences, family…

  5. Stress Management and Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vidisha A.

    2009-01-01

    Stress can affect anyone, and gifted children are no exception. Giftedness can sometimes be the cause of the stress. Perfectionism, sensitivity, and intensity are characteristics of gifted children that may exacerbate stress. Stress can be constructive. Prolonged stress, however, with no time to recover becomes detrimental. Continued stress upsets…

  6. Gifted Education in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boer, Greet C.; Minnaert, Alexander E. M. G.; Kamphof, Gert

    2013-01-01

    In the summer of 2011, the Dutch Minister of Education, Culture, and Science presented a letter to the Cabinet, containing the policy objectives for the education of talented, gifted, and highly gifted students. In action plans for primary, secondary, and higher education, in addition to the development of teacher skills, specific measures were…

  7. Educational justice and the gifted

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merry, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines two basic questions: first, what constitutes a gifted person, and secondly, is there justification in making special educational provision for gifted children, where special provision involves spending more on their education than on the education of 'normal' children? I

  8. Educational Justice and the Gifted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merry, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines two basic questions: first, what constitutes a gifted person, and secondly, is there justification in making special educational provision for gifted children, where special provision involves spending more on their education than on the education of "normal" children? I consider a hypothetical case for allocating extra…

  9. Identifying Stressors and Reactions to Stressors in Gifted and Non-Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Marzieh

    2005-01-01

    Using the Student Life Stress Inventory and the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory, stressors and reactions to stressors were identified in gifted high school students and compared with non-gifted students. Altogether, 340 boys and girls (156 gifted and 184 non-gifted students) from four high schools in Shiraz (two high schools for gifted and two…

  10. Apparent Solar Tornado-Like Prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasenco, Olga; Martin, Sara F.; Velli, Marco

    2014-02-01

    Recent high-resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) have reawakened interest in the old and fascinating phenomenon of solar tornado-like prominences. This class of prominences was first introduced by Pettit ( Astrophys. J. 76, 9, 1932), who studied them over many years. Observations of tornado prominences similar to the ones seen by SDO had already been documented by Secchi ( Le Soleil, 1877). High-resolution and high-cadence multiwavelength data obtained by SDO reveal that the tornado-like appearance of these prominences is mainly an illusion due to projection effects. We discuss two different cases where prominences on the limb might appear to have a tornado-like behavior. One case of apparent vortical motions in prominence spines and barbs arises from the (mostly) 2D counterstreaming plasma motion along the prominence spine and barbs together with oscillations along individual threads. The other case of apparent rotational motion is observed in a prominence cavity and results from the 3D plasma motion along the writhed magnetic fields inside and along the prominence cavity as seen projected on the limb. Thus, the "tornado" impression results either from counterstreaming and oscillations or from the projection on the plane of the sky of plasma motion along magnetic-field lines, rather than from a true vortical motion around an (apparent) vertical or horizontal axis. We discuss the link between tornado-like prominences, filament barbs, and photospheric vortices at their base.

  11. 33 CFR 17.05-1 - Gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gifts. 17.05-1 Section 17.05-1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL UNITED STATES COAST GUARD GENERAL GIFT FUND Administration § 17.05-1 Gifts. The gifts or bequests may be in money or...

  12. Proeminência na mídia, reputação em ciências: a construção de uma feminista paradigmática e cientista normal no Museu Nacional do Rio de Janeiro Prominence in the media, renown in the sciences: the construction of a paradigmatic feminist and a scientist at Rio de Janeiro's Museu Nacional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Margaret Lopes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Bertha Lutz foi uma das mulheres de sua geração que desfrutaram de incontestável autoridade política e científica. Escreveu muito, e mais ainda se escreveu sobre ela, especialmente em sua época. Notícias de jornais, crônicas de Lima Barreto, inúmeras cartas, artigos científicos e textos inéditos da própria Bertha, comentados neste artigo, nos permitem observar que seu feminismo emprestou-lhe notoriedade e visibilidade - cuidadosamente construídas -, que se articulariam com seu desempenho profissional, impulsionando-o. A ciência lhe conferia prestígio social e garantia legitimidade para suas causas. Nesse período em que a comunidade científica tomou para si a tarefa de tornar públicas as suas conquistas, a proeminência feminista de Bertha na mídia emprestou-lhe reputação em ciências.Bertha Lutz was one of the women of her generation who enjoyed indisputable political and scientific authority. She wrote much and even more was written about her, especially during her day. The newspaper chronicles by Lima Barreto, countless letters, scientific papers, and unpublished texts by Bertha herself that are surveyed in this article indicate how much her feminism - inseparable from other dimensions of her life - fostered her professional career. Her feminism earned her a carefully constructed renown and visibility that interlocked with her professional performance. Science lent her social prestige and guaranteed legitimacy for her causes. During a period when the scientific community itself was engaged in publicizing its own activities, Bertha's feminist prominence in the media helped her make a name in the sciences.

  13. Prominence mass supply and the cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmit, Donald J.; Innes, D. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Gibson, S. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Luna, M. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Karpen, J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    A prevalent but untested paradigm is often used to describe the prominence-cavity system: the cavity is under-dense because it is evacuated by supplying mass to the condensed prominence. The thermal non-equilibrium (TNE) model of prominence formation offers a theoretical framework to predict the thermodynamic evolution of the prominence and the surrounding corona. We examine the evidence for a prominence-cavity connection by comparing the TNE model with diagnostics of dynamic extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission surrounding the prominence, specifically prominence horns. Horns are correlated extensions of prominence plasma and coronal plasma which appear to connect the prominence and cavity. The TNE model predicts that large-scale brightenings will occur in the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 171 Å bandpass near the prominence that are associated with the cooling phase of condensation formation. In our simulations, variations in the magnitude of footpoint heating lead to variations in the duration, spatial scale, and temporal offset between emission enhancements in the other EUV bandpasses. While these predictions match well a subset of the horn observations, the range of variations in the observed structures is not captured by the model. We discuss the implications of our one-dimensional loop simulations for the three-dimensional time-averaged equilibrium in the prominence and the cavity. Evidence suggests that horns are likely caused by condensing prominence plasma, but the larger question of whether this process produces a density-depleted cavity requires a more tightly constrained model of heating and better knowledge of the associated magnetic structure.

  14. An Extravagant Gift From a Grateful Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Akshay; Johnson, Liza-Marie; Caruso Brown, Amy; Unguru, Yoram; Lantos, John D

    2018-05-04

    Gift giving is psychologically and culturally complex. In any context, a gift can have multiple meanings. In the context of the doctor-patient relationship, the giving of gifts and decisions about whether to accept gifts raise complex ethical issues. In this essay, a number of pediatric oncologists discuss the ethical considerations that should guide physicians as they decide how to respond to an extravagant gift from a family. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF GIFTED CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Nikola Stankovska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Giftedness is a multidimensional phenomenon that despite numerous studies and different approaches remains underexplored. It is known that there is different views about gifted children in psychological theory and practice. Giftedness represents general intellectual ability, general creative ability, productive and creative ability, the sum of specific skills, the ability of thinking, specific area of intelligence and creativity.Gifted child is a child who has above average skills and specific characteristics, which play an important role in the growth, development and education of these children. Researchers confirm the importance of early socialization, family and the primary teachers in the continually development of the gifted child on intellectual, social, emotional and somatic plan.It is known that e gifted child has specific characteristics and properties, such as originality, individuality, emotional stability, a high degree of intellectual capacity, independence, verbal fluency, perfectionism.Development and manifestation of creativity in gifted children depends of their cognitive component, personality traits, motivation. Gifted child early showed a specific interest in a particular area.This kind of child has a positive self-image, high self-esteem, self-confidence, high goals, a sense of self-worth, greater independence which manifests across the non-conformism and initiative.Every child deserves the special attention of parents, school and society, especially a gifted child which is a child with special needs about their average ability and special educational needs.

  16. Suggestions for Christmas gifts.

    CERN Document Server

    Connie Potter; Markus Nordberg

    Have you been working long hours lately? Stuck in meetings too long to make it in time before the shops close? No need to worry. The ATLAS secretariat has plenty of items that will make great Christmas gifts for friends and family. Here are some of the items in stock. Note that you can negotiate a good price for bulk order. ATLAS caps (new item), 12 chf ATLAS t-shirts designed by Alan Alda, 20 chf ATLAS fleece jackets in several sizes and colors, 30 chf grey or dark blue in men's sizes pale blue for women's sizes (limited quantity) red for children (limited quantity) ATLAS puzzles with 500 pieces made by the Ravensburger company 15 chf for 1 box (price is less when purchasing more boxes) 50 chf for 5 boxes or more can also be purchased in boxes of 24, ready to ship to your institute ATLAS 3-D viewers, 5 chf ATLAS DVD, 5 chf CERN playing cards, 2 chf Make sure to get several boxes of the ATLAS puzzle for Christmas gifts. Offer hours of entertainement to friends and family! We tak...

  17. Prominence Mass Supply and the Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, Donald J.; Gibson, S.; Luna, M.; Karpen, J.; Innes, D.

    2013-01-01

    A prevalent but untested paradigm is often used to describe the prominence-cavity system; the cavity is under-dense because it it evacuated by supplying mass to the condensed prominence. The thermal non-equilibrium (TNE) model of prominence formation offers a theoretical framework to predict the thermodynamic evolutin of the prominence and the surrounding corona. We examine the evidence for a prominence-cavity connection by comparing the TNE model and diagnostics of dynamic extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission surrounding the prominence, specifically prominence horns. Horns are correlated extensions of prminence plasma and coronal plasma which appear to connect the prominence and cavity. The TNE model predicts that large-scale brightenings will occur in the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 171 A badpass near he prominence that are associated with the cooling phase of condensation formation. In our simulations, variations in the magnitude of footpoint heating lead to variations in the duration, spatial scale, and temporal offset between emission enhancements in the other EUV bandpasses. While these predictions match well a subset of the horn observations, the range of variations in the observed structures is not captured by the model. We discuss the implications of one-dimensional loop simulations for the three-dimensional time-averaged equilibrium in the prominence and the cavity. Evidence suggests that horns are likely caused by condensing prominence plasma, but the larger question of whether this process produces a density-depleted cavity requires a more tightly constrained model of heating and better knowledge of the associated magnetic structure.

  18. The Gift Relationship: Discovering Gift Exchange in Interpersonal Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher Basil

    2016-03-01

    Encountering the deeper flows of human experience and glimpsing the touch of the divine on the human soul offer guides and companions rich reflective content for their ongoing formation. This is a precious gift which pilgrims constantly place before their companions, though at times it remains 'unwrapped'. Through offering a supervision narrative, this paper provides a phenomenological description of such a gift exchange. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Working with artistically gifted students

    OpenAIRE

    Dedukić, Sanja

    2014-01-01

    The thesis deals with the problem of detection, identification and the educational work of art gifted students. It is very important that these students are detected early and regarded as a separate group that has exceptional potential in the field of art and are thusly entitled to individualized adaptation within the primary education program. Namely, when working with gifted students, teachers are expected to utilize different forms of work in the classroom, which will encourage such studen...

  20. TANGLED MAGNETIC FIELDS IN SOLAR PROMINENCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Cranmer, S. R.

    2010-01-01

    Solar prominences are an important tool for studying the structure and evolution of the coronal magnetic field. Here we consider so-called hedgerow prominences, which consist of thin vertical threads. We explore the possibility that such prominences are supported by tangled magnetic fields. A variety of different approaches are used. First, the dynamics of plasma within a tangled field is considered. We find that the contorted shape of the flux tubes significantly reduces the flow velocity compared to the supersonic free fall that would occur in a straight vertical tube. Second, linear force-free models of tangled fields are developed, and the elastic response of such fields to gravitational forces is considered. We demonstrate that the prominence plasma can be supported by the magnetic pressure of a tangled field that pervades not only the observed dense threads but also their local surroundings. Tangled fields with field strengths of about 10 G are able to support prominence threads with observed hydrogen density of the order of 10 11 cm -3 . Finally, we suggest that the observed vertical threads are the result of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Simulations of the density distribution within a prominence thread indicate that the peak density is much larger than the average density. We conclude that tangled fields provide a viable mechanism for magnetic support of hedgerow prominences.

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of solar prominence formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, J.

    1987-01-01

    Formation of Kippenhahn-Schluter type solar prominences by chromospheric mass injection is studied via numerical simulation. The numerical model is based on a two-dimensional, time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. In addition, an analysis of gravitational thermal MHD instabilities related to condensation is performed by using the small-perturbation method. The conclusions are: (1) Both quiescent and active-region prominences can be formed by chromospheric mass injection, provided certain optimum conditions are satisfied. (2) Quiescent prominences cannot be formed without condensation, though enough mass is supplied from chromosphere. The mass of a quiescent prominence is composed of both the mass injected from the chromosphere and the mass condensed from the corona. On the other hand, condensation is not important to active region prominence formation. (3) In addition to channeling and supporting effects, the magnetic field plays another important role, i.e. containing the prominence material. (4) In the model cases, prominences are supported by the Lorentz force, the gas-pressure gradient and the mass-injection momentum. (5) Due to gravity, more MHD condensation instability modes appear in addition to the basic condensation mode

  2. Nonlinear MHD Waves in a Prominence Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.; Knizhnik, K.; Kucera, T.; Schmieder, B.

    2015-11-01

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using a 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope in Ca ii emission of a prominence on 2012 October 10 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of Hα intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However, the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits a unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity (δI/I ˜ δn/n). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with a typical period in the range of 5-11 minutes and wavelengths <2000 km. Recent Doppler shift observations show the transverse displacement of the propagating waves. The magnetic field was measured with the THEMIS instrument and was found to be 5-14 G. For the typical prominence density the corresponding fast magnetosonic speed is ˜20 km s-1, in qualitative agreement with the propagation speed of the detected waves. The 2.5D MHD numerical model is constrained with the typical parameters of the prominence waves seen in observations. Our numerical results reproduce the nonlinear fast magnetosonic waves and provide strong support for the presence of these waves in the prominence foot. We also explore gravitational MHD oscillations of the heavy prominence foot material supported by dipped magnetic field structure.

  3. NONLINEAR MHD WAVES IN A PROMINENCE FOOT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ofman, L. [Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Knizhnik, K.; Kucera, T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Schmieder, B. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Univ. Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cit, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France)

    2015-11-10

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using a 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope in Ca ii emission of a prominence on 2012 October 10 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of Hα intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However, the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits a unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity (δI/I ∼ δn/n). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with a typical period in the range of 5–11 minutes and wavelengths <2000 km. Recent Doppler shift observations show the transverse displacement of the propagating waves. The magnetic field was measured with the THEMIS instrument and was found to be 5–14 G. For the typical prominence density the corresponding fast magnetosonic speed is ∼20 km s{sup −1}, in qualitative agreement with the propagation speed of the detected waves. The 2.5D MHD numerical model is constrained with the typical parameters of the prominence waves seen in observations. Our numerical results reproduce the nonlinear fast magnetosonic waves and provide strong support for the presence of these waves in the prominence foot. We also explore gravitational MHD oscillations of the heavy prominence foot material supported by dipped magnetic field structure.

  4. ACTOG - AUTOCAD TO GIFTS TRANSLATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A.

    1994-01-01

    The AutoCad TO Gifts Translator program, ACTOG, was developed to facilitate quick generation of small finite element models using the CASA/Gifts finite element modeling program. ACTOG reads the geometric data of a drawing from the Data Exchange File (DXF) used in AutoCAD and other PC based drafting programs. The geometric entities recognized by ACTOG include POINTs, LINEs, ARCs, SOLIDs, 3DLINEs and 3DFACEs. From this information ACTOG creates a GIFTS SRC file which can then be read into the GIFTS preprocessor BULKM or can be modified and read into EDITM to create a finite element model. The GIFTS commands created include KPOINTs, SLINEs, CARCs, GRID3s and GRID4s. The SRC file can be used as is (using the default parameters) or edited for any number of uses. It is assumed that the user has at least a working knowledge of AutoCAD and GIFTS. ACTOG was written in Microsoft QuickBasic (Version 2.0). The program was developed for the IBM PC and has been implemented on an IBM PC compatible under DOS 3.21. ACTOG was developed in 1988.

  5. 26 CFR 25.2503-2 - Exclusions from gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusions from gifts. 25.2503-2 Section 25... GIFT TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1954 Determination of Tax Liability § 25.2503-2 Exclusions from gifts. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (f) of this section (involving gifts to a...

  6. Topic prominence in Chinese EFL learners’ interlanguage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaopeng Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to investigate the general characteristics of topicprominent typological interlanguage development of Chinese learners of English in terms of acquiring subject-prominent English structures from a discourse perspective. Topic structures mainly appear in Chinese discourse in the form of topic chains (Wang, 2002; 2004. The research target are the topic chain, which is the main topic-prominent structure in Chinese discourse, and zero anaphora, which is the most common topic anaphora in the topic chain. Two important findings emerged from the present study. First, the characteristics of Chinese topic chains are transferrable to the interlanguage of Chinese EFL learners, thus resulting in overgeneralization of the zero anaphora. Second, the interlanguage discourse of Chinese EFL learners reflects a change of the second language acquisition process from topic-prominence to subject-prominence, thus lending support to the discourse transfer hypothesis.

  7. EUV observations of quiescent prominences from Skylab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moe, O.K.

    1979-01-01

    The authors report measurements of line intensities and line widths for three quiescent prominences observed with the Naval Research Laboratory slit spectrograph on ATM/Skylab. The wavelengths of the observed lines cover the range 1175 A to 1960 A. The measured intensities have been calibrated to within approximately a factor 2 and are average intensities over a 2 arc sec by 60 arc set slit. Nonthermal velocities are derived from the measured line widths. The nonthermal velocity is found to increase with temperature in the prominence transition zone. Electron densities and pressures are derived from density sensitive line ratios. Electron pressures for two of the prominences are found to lie in the range 0.04-0.08 dyn cm -2 , while values for the third and most intense and active of the three prominences are in the range 0.07-0.22 dyn cm -2 . (Auth.)

  8. Scientists: Engage the Public!

    OpenAIRE

    Shugart, Erika C.; Racaniello, Vincent R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Scientists must communicate about science with public audiences to promote an understanding of complex issues that we face in our technologically advanced society. Some scientists may be concerned about a social stigma or ?Sagan effect? associated with participating in public communication. Recent research in the social sciences indicates that public communication by scientists is not a niche activity but is widely done and can be beneficial to a scientist?s career. There are a varie...

  9. Why Try? Factors that Differentiate Underachieving Gifted Students from High Achieving Gifted Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoach, D. Betsy; Siegle, Del

    This report discusses the outcomes of a study that investigated the relationship between student scores on the five sub-scales of the School Attitude Assessment Survey-Revised (SAAS-R) and the academic achievement of known groups of gifted achievers and gifted underachievers. The study examined whether gifted achievers and gifted underachievers…

  10. Is Being Gifted a Social Handicap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Laurence J.; Cross, Tracy L.

    1988-01-01

    Interviews with 15 gifted/talented adolescents indicated that many of them experienced giftedness as a social handicap. Some students coped with this by managing information about themselves to minimize their visibility as gifted students to others. (Author/JDD)

  11. Home Environment of Selected Filipino Gifted Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawilen, Greg Tabios

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the home environment of selected Filipino gifted individuals. It aims to answer two research questions: (1) what is the giftedness profile of the selected Filipino gifted?; (2) what types of home environments do Filipino gifted have? This study uses qualitative methods, specifically narrative research strategy, to provide a…

  12. Personality and Perceptions of the Gifted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamessinis, Nicholas P.

    1980-01-01

    The article reviews the recent literature on the personality attributes and self-perceptions of the gifted, and the attitudes and perceptions held about them. Among the conclusions are that the gifted appear to have higher self-esteem than others, and that gifted students are more popular with their peers than others. (Author/DLS)

  13. How Finland Serves Gifted and Talented Pupils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirri, Kirsi; Kuusisto, Elina

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the ways gifted and talented pupils are served in Finland. The trend toward individualism and freedom of choice as well as national policy affecting gifted education are discussed. Empirical research on Finnish teachers' attitudes toward gifted education with respect to the national…

  14. 7 CFR 905.140 - Gift packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Gift packages. 905.140 Section 905.140 Agriculture... TANGELOS GROWN IN FLORIDA Rules and Regulations Non-Regulated Fruit § 905.140 Gift packages. Any handler..., ship any varieties for the following purpose and types of shipment: (a) To any person gift packages...

  15. Gifted Education in the Australian Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Rosalind L.; Jolly, Jennifer L.

    2018-01-01

    The context in which gifted education operates in Australia provides for differing levels of identification and services. Lacking a federal mandate or funding, states and territories are responsible for addressing the needs of gifted students. Australia contributes to the gifted education research literature, focusing on acceleration, gifted…

  16. Federal Tax Implications of Charitable Gift Annuities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitell, Conrad

    1975-01-01

    Surveys the federal tax implications of "immediate" charitable gift annuities (annuity payments beginning within one year of transfer) and "deferred payment" charitable gift annuities (beginning at a specified date), both of which enable individuals to make a charitable gift, retain a form of life income, and achieve federal…

  17. The Gift Relationship Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearmur, Jeremy Frank

    2015-12-01

    If unremunerated blood donors are willing to participate, and if the use of them is economical from the perspective of those collecting blood, I can see no objection to their use. But there seems to me no good reason, moral or practical, why they should be used. The system of paid plasmapheresis as it currently operates in the United States and in Canada would seem perfectly adequate, and while there may always be ways in which the safety and efficiency of supply could be increased, there seems no reason whatever to think that there would be an improvement if the current system changed so as to rely entirely on unpaid donors. Further, given the adequacy of paid plasmapheresis, I could see no problem if the collection of whole blood were to take place on a similar, fully-commercial, basis. Such a view is controversial. To argue for it, this paper offers just one strand in a complex argument: a critique of Richard Titmuss's Gift Relationship, which holds an iconic position in the critical literature on the paid provision of blood. As I conclude: all told, there seems no good basis for rejecting supply of whole blood for money--let alone the supply of blood plasma.

  18. Drawings of Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    experiment can be reduplicated. He/she must check and double-check all of his/her work. A scientist is very , environment, nutrition, and other aspects of our daily and future life." . . . Marisa The scientists

  19. Scientists must speak

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walters, D. Eric; Walters, Gale Climenson

    2011-01-01

    .... Scientists Must Speak: Bringing Presentations to Life helps readers do just that. At some point in their careers, the majority of scientists have to stand up in front of an inquisitive audience or board and present information...

  20. Automated image based prominent nucleoli detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Choon K; Kalaw, Emarene M; Singh, Malay; Chong, Kian T; Giron, Danilo M; Huang, Chao-Hui; Cheng, Li; Law, Yan N; Lee, Hwee Kuan

    2015-01-01

    Nucleolar changes in cancer cells are one of the cytologic features important to the tumor pathologist in cancer assessments of tissue biopsies. However, inter-observer variability and the manual approach to this work hamper the accuracy of the assessment by pathologists. In this paper, we propose a computational method for prominent nucleoli pattern detection. Thirty-five hematoxylin and eosin stained images were acquired from prostate cancer, breast cancer, renal clear cell cancer and renal papillary cell cancer tissues. Prostate cancer images were used for the development of a computer-based automated prominent nucleoli pattern detector built on a cascade farm. An ensemble of approximately 1000 cascades was constructed by permuting different combinations of classifiers such as support vector machines, eXclusive component analysis, boosting, and logistic regression. The output of cascades was then combined using the RankBoost algorithm. The output of our prominent nucleoli pattern detector is a ranked set of detected image patches of patterns of prominent nucleoli. The mean number of detected prominent nucleoli patterns in the top 100 ranked detected objects was 58 in the prostate cancer dataset, 68 in the breast cancer dataset, 86 in the renal clear cell cancer dataset, and 76 in the renal papillary cell cancer dataset. The proposed cascade farm performs twice as good as the use of a single cascade proposed in the seminal paper by Viola and Jones. For comparison, a naive algorithm that randomly chooses a pixel as a nucleoli pattern would detect five correct patterns in the first 100 ranked objects. Detection of sparse nucleoli patterns in a large background of highly variable tissue patterns is a difficult challenge our method has overcome. This study developed an accurate prominent nucleoli pattern detector with the potential to be used in the clinical settings.

  1. Automated image based prominent nucleoli detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon K Yap

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nucleolar changes in cancer cells are one of the cytologic features important to the tumor pathologist in cancer assessments of tissue biopsies. However, inter-observer variability and the manual approach to this work hamper the accuracy of the assessment by pathologists. In this paper, we propose a computational method for prominent nucleoli pattern detection. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five hematoxylin and eosin stained images were acquired from prostate cancer, breast cancer, renal clear cell cancer and renal papillary cell cancer tissues. Prostate cancer images were used for the development of a computer-based automated prominent nucleoli pattern detector built on a cascade farm. An ensemble of approximately 1000 cascades was constructed by permuting different combinations of classifiers such as support vector machines, eXclusive component analysis, boosting, and logistic regression. The output of cascades was then combined using the RankBoost algorithm. The output of our prominent nucleoli pattern detector is a ranked set of detected image patches of patterns of prominent nucleoli. Results: The mean number of detected prominent nucleoli patterns in the top 100 ranked detected objects was 58 in the prostate cancer dataset, 68 in the breast cancer dataset, 86 in the renal clear cell cancer dataset, and 76 in the renal papillary cell cancer dataset. The proposed cascade farm performs twice as good as the use of a single cascade proposed in the seminal paper by Viola and Jones. For comparison, a naive algorithm that randomly chooses a pixel as a nucleoli pattern would detect five correct patterns in the first 100 ranked objects. Conclusions: Detection of sparse nucleoli patterns in a large background of highly variable tissue patterns is a difficult challenge our method has overcome. This study developed an accurate prominent nucleoli pattern detector with the potential to be used in the clinical settings.

  2. Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annesley, Thomas M.; Cooks, Robert G.; Herold, David A.; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.

    2016-01-04

    Each year the journal Clinical Chemistry publishes a January special issue on a topic that is relevant to the laboratory medicine community. In January 2016 the topic is mass spectrometry, and the issue is entitled “Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine”. One popular feature in our issues is a Q&A on a topic, clearly in this case mass spectrometry. The journal is assembling a panel of 5-6 experts from various areas of mass spectrometry ranging from instrument manufacturing to practicing clinical chemists. Dick Smith is one of the scientist requested to participate in this special issue Q&A on Mass Spectrometry. The Q&A Transcript is attached

  3. Entrepreneurship for Creative Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Dawood; Raghu, Surya; Brooks, Richard

    2018-05-01

    Through patenting and commercialization, scientists today can develop their work beyond a publication in a learned journal. Indeed, universities and governments are encouraging today's scientists and engineers to break their research out of the laboratory and into the commercial world. However, doing so is complicated and can be daunting for those more used to a research seminar than a board room. This book, written by experienced scientists and entrepreneurs, deals with businesses started by scientists based on innovation and sets out to clarify for scientists and engineers the steps necessary to take an idea along the path to commercialization and maximise the potential for success, regardless of the path taken.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic interpretation of the motion of prominences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Takashi

    1976-01-01

    We study three types of prominence eruptions, which we will call the arch type, the loop type, and the gigantic arch type, respectively, from their shapes. If we regard the prominence as a magnetic flux tube, the onset of its ascending motion can be interpreted as the motion due to the screw-mode instability, which is the most unstable mode of instabilities of a magnetofluid column (pinch). The growth rate of this mode is evaluated and is shown to be consistent with the time scale of the initial stage of the eruption. In order to study the nonlinear stage of the instability, we propose a method of numerical calculation based on a variational technique known as Ritz's method. The result shows that the characteristic motion of the arch-, loop-, and gigantic arch-type eruptions may be reproduced by perturbing a model sequence with decreasing pitch angles of the unperturbed helical magnetic field lines. This conclusion seems to be supported by the pitch angles of observed threads in each type of prominence and also by the fact that the observed time profiles of the rising velocity of the prominences of each type agree well with those predicted from model calculations. (auth.)

  5. Topic Prominence in Chinese EFL Learners' Interlanguage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaopeng; Yang, Lianrui

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the general characteristics of topicprominent typological interlanguage development of Chinese learners of English in terms of acquiring subject-prominent English structures from a discourse perspective. Topic structures mainly appear in Chinese discourse in the form of topic chains (Wang, 2002; 2004). The…

  6. PROMINENCE ACTIVATION BY CORONAL FAST MODE SHOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Takuya [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Asai, Ayumi [Unit of Synergetic Studies for Space, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Shibata, Kazunari, E-mail: takahashi@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)

    2015-03-01

    An X5.4 class flare occurred in active region NOAA11429 on 2012 March 7. The flare was associated with a very fast coronal mass ejection (CME) with a velocity of over 2500 km s{sup −1}. In the images taken with the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-B/COR1, a dome-like disturbance was seen to detach from an expanding CME bubble and propagated further. A Type-II radio burst was also observed at the same time. On the other hand, in extreme ultraviolet images obtained by the Solar Dynamic Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), the expanding dome-like structure and its footprint propagating to the north were observed. The footprint propagated with an average speed of about 670 km s{sup −1} and hit a prominence located at the north pole and activated it. During the activation, the prominence was strongly brightened. On the basis of some observational evidence, we concluded that the footprint in AIA images and the ones in COR1 images are the same, that is, the MHD fast mode shock front. With the help of a linear theory, the fast mode Mach number of the coronal shock is estimated to be between 1.11 and 1.29 using the initial velocity of the activated prominence. Also, the plasma compression ratio of the shock is enhanced to be between 1.18 and 2.11 in the prominence material, which we consider to be the reason for the strong brightening of the activated prominence. The applicability of linear theory to the shock problem is tested with a nonlinear MHD simulation.

  7. Multispacecraft observations of a prominence eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bemporad

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available On 9 May 2007 a prominence eruption occurred at the West limb. Remarkably, the event was observed by the STEREO/EUVI telescopes and by the HINODE/EIS and SOHO/UVCS spectrometers. We present results from all these instruments. High-cadence (~37 s data from STEREO/EUVI A and B in the He II λ304 line were used to study the 3-D shape and expansion of the prominence. The high spatial resolution EUVI images (~1.5"/pixel have been used to infer via triangulation the 3-D shape and orientation of the prominence 12 min after the eruption onset. At this time the prominence has mainly the shape of a "hook" highly inclined southward, has an average thickness of 0.068 R⊙, a length of 0.43 R⊙ and lies, in first approximation, on a plane. Hence, the prominence is mainly a 2-D structure and there is no evidence for a twisted flux rope configuration. HINODE/EIS was scanning with the 2" slit the region where the filament erupted. The EIS spectra show during the eruption remarkable non-thermal broadening (up to ~100 km s−1 in the region crossed by the filament in spectral lines emitted at different temperatures, possibly with differences among lines from higher Fe ionization stages. The CME was also observed by the SOHO/UVCS instrument: the spectrograph slit was centered at 1.7 R⊙, at a latitude of 5° SW and recorded a sudden increase in the O VI λλ1032–1037 and Si XII λ520 spectral line intensities, representative of the CME front transit.

  8. 26 CFR 25.2702-6 - Reduction in taxable gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reduction in taxable gifts. 25.2702-6 Section... AND GIFT TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1954 Special Valuation Rules § 25.2702-6 Reduction in taxable gifts. (a) Transfers of retained interests in trust—(1) Inter vivos transfers. If an...

  9. 13 CFR 106.500 - What is SBA's Gift authority?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is SBA's Gift authority? 106... AND NON-FEE BASED SBA-SPONSORED ACTIVITIES AND GIFTS Gifts § 106.500 What is SBA's Gift authority? This section covers SBA's Gift acceptance authority under sections 4(g), 8(b)(1)(G), 5(b)(9) and 7(k)(2...

  10. Metacognitive Awareness and Math Anxiety in Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saricam, Hakan; Ogurlu, Üzeyir

    2015-01-01

    The basic purpose of this study has been to examine the relationships between metacognitive awareness and maths anxiety in gifted students. The second aim was to compare with gifted and non-gifted students' metacognitive awareness and maths anxiety levels. The participants were 300 (150 gifted, 150 non-gifted) volunteer secondary school students…

  11. An Update on Gifted Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Carolyn M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses selected issues and literature concerning gifted female students, examining achievement and aptitude, career choice, self-perceptions of ability, course taking, parental influences, the glamorization of sex differences, stereotyping, effects of classroom groupings and teaching strategies, and effects of single-sex schools and…

  12. Creative Education for Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piske, Fernanda Hellen Ribeiro; Stoltz, Tania; Machado, Jarci

    2014-01-01

    Creativity is an essential attribute for the development of creative potential. However, it is not always developed properly in the school context, especially when it is about gifted students education. Because these children need a specialized service to attend their special needs. In this sense, this study aims to contribute in order that…

  13. USA's gift aids radiation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    On 8 December 1969, the anniversary of President Eisenhower's speech which led to the foundation of the Agency, the United States of America handed over a $25 000 gift which will assist considerably the promotion of world-wide standardization in the measurement of radiation. (author)

  14. American Policy in Gifted Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanTassel-Baska, Joyce

    2018-01-01

    This article explores the history of gifted education policy and practice in the United States over the last five decades, documenting the lack of sustained progress in obtaining sustained federal support. It also highlights two case examples, one at the state level and a second at the national level of where a policy in a specific aspect of…

  15. 26 CFR 301.7477-1 - Declaratory judgments relating to the value of certain gifts for gift tax purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... certain gifts for gift tax purposes. 301.7477-1 Section 301.7477-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... value of certain gifts for gift tax purposes. (a) In general. If the adjustment(s) proposed by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) will not result in any deficiency in or refund of the donor's gift tax...

  16. 26 CFR 25.6075-1 - Returns, time for filing gift tax returns for gifts made after December 31, 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Returns, time for filing gift tax returns for gifts made after December 31, 1981. 25.6075-1 Section 25.6075-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER...

  17. Aesthetic Refinements in Patients with Prominent Eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Dirk F; Schwaiger, Nina; Wiedner, Maria

    2015-12-01

    The treatment of prominent eyes is still a challenging task. As well as the surgery, proper preoperative diagnosis differentiating between patients with and without Graves ophthalmopathy plays an important role. In functionally asymptomatic patients with Graves disease suffering from the aesthetic impairment of prominent eyes, the transpalpebral decompression by intraorbital fat removal technique has been proved to be reliable, effective, safe, and easily performed by a trained and experienced oculoplastic surgeon. This technique provides long-lasting results, leading to improvement not only in visual function but also in personal well-being and in the patient's social life, with a high benefit-to-risk ratio. The most powerful tool to treat the lower lid deformity and malar bags in patients without Graves disease is the subperiosteal midface lift. It shortens the lid-cheek junction and blends the retaining periorbital ligaments. Furthermore, it adds volume to the lower lid and gives a stable support. By the nature of the procedure, it also turns a negative into a positive vector. In experienced hands, Olivari's orbital decompression and Hester's midface lift are ideal options for the treatment of prominent eyes. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. Creativity in the regular classroom: perceptions of gifted and non-gifted students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda do Carmo Gonçalves

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare the perception of gifted and non-gifted students with respect to the climate for creativity in the classroom, in the disciplines of Mathematics and Portuguese Language, and to investigate the relationship between creativity and perception of classroom climate for creativity. Twenty-one gifted and 27 non-gifted 6th grade students who attended a public school in Brazil participated in the study. The gifted students evaluated teacher’s support to the students’ expression of ideas in Mathematics in a more satisfactory way compared to non-gifted, and they also showed greater interest in learning Mathematics in comparison to Portuguese Language. A positive correlation between creativity and perception of classroom climate was found for gifted students, and negative correlation for non-gifted students.

  19. Geosciences Information for Teachers (GIFT) in Catalonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerlenghi, Angelo; Cacho, Isabel; Calvo, Eva; Demol, Ben; Sureda, Catalina; Artigas, Carme; Vilaplana, Miquel; Porbellini, Danilo; Rubio, Eduard

    2010-05-01

    CATAGIFT is the acronym of the project supported by the Catalan Government (trough the AGAUR agency) to support the activities of the EGU Committee on Education in Catalonia. The objective of this project is two-fold: 1) To establish a coordinated action to support the participation of three Catalan science teachers of primary and secondary schools in the GIFT Symposium, held each year during the General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union (EGU). 2) To produce a video documentary each year on hot topics in geosciences. The documentary is produced in Catalan, Spanish and English and is distributed to the Catalan science teachers attending the annual meeting organized by the Institute of Education Sciences and the Faculty of Geology of the University together with the CosmoCaixa Museum of Barcelona, to the international teachers attending the EGU GIFT Workshop, and to other schools in the Spanish territory. In the present-day context of science dissemination through documentaries and television programs there is a dominance of products of high technical quality and very high costs sold and broadcasted world wide. The wide spread of such products tends to standardize scientific information, not only in its content, but also in the format used for communicating science to the general public. In the field of geosciences in particular, there is a scarcity of products that combine high scientific quality and accessible costs to illustrate aspects of the natural life of our planet Earth through the results of the work of individual researchers and / or research groups. The scientific documentaries produced by CATAGIFT pursue the objective to support primary and secondary school teachers to critically interpret scientific information coming from the different media (television, newspapers, magazines, audiovisual products), in a way that they can transmit to their students. CataGIFT has created a series of documentaries called MARENOSTRUM TERRANOSTRA designed and

  20. Scientists Shaping the Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, J. A.; Weymann, R.; Mandia, S. A.; Ashley, M.

    2011-12-01

    Scientific studies which directly impact the larger society require an engagement between the scientists and the larger public. With respect to research on climate change, many third-party groups report on scientific findings and thereby serve as an intermediary between the scientist and the public. In many cases, the third-party reporting misinterprets the findings and conveys inaccurate information to the media and the public. To remedy this, many scientists are now taking a more active role in conveying their work directly to interested parties. In addition, some scientists are taking the further step of engaging with the general public to answer basic questions related to climate change - even on sub-topics which are unrelated to scientists' own research. Nevertheless, many scientists are reluctant to engage the general public or the media. The reasons for scientific reticence are varied but most commonly are related to fear of public engagement, concern about the time required to properly engage the public, or concerns about the impact to their professional reputations. However, for those scientists who are successful, these engagement activities provide many benefits. Scientists can increase the impact of their work, and they can help society make informed choices on significant issues, such as mitigating global warming. Here we provide some concrete steps that scientists can take to ensure that their public engagement is successful. These steps include: (1) cultivating relationships with reporters, (2) crafting clear, easy to understand messages that summarize their work, (3) relating science to everyday experiences, and (4) constructing arguments which appeal to a wide-ranging audience. With these steps, we show that scientists can efficiently deal with concerns that would otherwise inhibit their public engagement. Various resources will be provided that allow scientists to continue work on these key steps.

  1. Identifying Gifted Students in Puerto Rico: Validation of a Spanish Translation of the Gifted Rating Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Javier I.; Pfeiffer, Steven; Petscher, Yaacov

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of correctly identifying gifted students is a critical issue. Gifted education in Puerto Rico is marked by insufficient support and a lack of appropriate identification methods. This study examined the reliability and validity of a Spanish translation of the "Gifted Rating Scales-School Form" (GRS) with a sample of 618…

  2. 19 CFR 148.44 - Gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gifts. 148.44 Section 148.44 Customs Duties U.S...) PERSONAL DECLARATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS Exemptions for Nonresidents § 148.44 Gifts. (a) Exemption. An arriving... and are to be disposed of by him as bona fide gifts. See § 148.43(b) for limitations on cigars under...

  3. Fishy Gifts: Bribing with Shame and Guilt

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, David

    2008-01-01

    Gifts are often used where the institutions of contracting do not exist, or are underdeveloped, as in emerging markets, or otherwise unenforceable, as with illicit transactions in developed markets. The following is an analysis of gifts in the context of belief preferences with unobservable reciprocation. I show that if recipients are heterogeneously shame and guilt averse, the beliefs implied by a gift can induce a self-fulfilling reputation through their interaction. In particular, I show h...

  4. Young Scientist Wetenschapskalender 2018

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalen-Oskam, K.H.; van Zundert, Joris J.; Koolen, Corina

    2017-01-01

    Bijdragen scheurkalender Young Scientist Wetenschapskalender 2018. Karina van Dalen-Oskam, Belangrijk woord: Wat is het belangrijkste woord in de Nederlandse taal? In: Young Scientist Wetenschapskalender 2018, 1 september Corina Koolen, Op naar het boekenbal: Hoe wordt je beroemd als schrijver? In:

  5. Making Lists, Enlisting Scientists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Bruun

    2011-01-01

    was the indicator conceptualised? How were notions of scientific knowledge and collaboration inscribed and challenged in the process? The analysis shows a two-sided process in which scientists become engaged in making lists but which is simultaneously a way for research policy to enlist scientists. In conclusion...

  6. LARGE-SCALE FLOWS IN PROMINENCE CAVITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmit, D. J.; Gibson, S. E.; Tomczyk, S.; Reeves, K. K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Brooks, D. H.; Williams, D. R.; Tripathi, D.

    2009-01-01

    Regions of rarefied density often form cavities above quiescent prominences. We observed two different cavities with the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter on 2005 April 21 and with Hinode/EIS on 2008 November 8. Inside both of these cavities, we find coherent velocity structures based on spectral Doppler shifts. These flows have speeds of 5-10 km s -1 , occur over length scales of tens of megameters, and persist for at least 1 hr. Flows in cavities are an example of the nonstatic nature of quiescent structures in the solar atmosphere.

  7. Spiritual gifts for biblical church growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A. DeVries

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the use of spiritual gifts for church growth, particularly in relation to the sovereign work of the Holy Spirit. The article begins with a definition of spiritual gifts and by highlighting their purpose for growing the church. This is followed by two practical considerations: How should Christian believers use spiritual gifts for church growth, and how should church leaders motivate gift use for this purpose? Since the Holy Spirit works though believers to build up the body of Christ, advocates of biblical church growth should seek to employ his means to motivate spiritual giftedness in the church.

  8. Gifts and exchanges problems, frustrations, and triumphs

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Linda S; Denning, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    This important book explores the many questions challenging librarians who work with gifts and exchanges (G&E) as part of their daily responsibilities. Too often, because of shrinking library budgets, library gifts are considered burdensome and unprofitable drains on both financial and personnel resources. However, Gifts and Exchanges: Problems, Frustrations, . . . and Triumphs gives you solutions that will allow you to embrace your library's gifts as rewards. In this book, you will discover the latest ways of disposing unwanted materials, planning and holding book sales and auctions, and oper

  9. Hydrogen line formation in the quescent prominences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsovookhuu, Ch.

    1980-01-01

    Equations of transfer and statistical equilibrium for hydronen atom with eight bound levels and continuum are solved simultaneously. A plane-parallel layer located perpendicular to the Sun surface is taken as a geometrical model. Input parameters of the physical model are optical thickness in the center of Hsub(α) line, electron temperature and concentration in the layer center are well as temperature and density gradients. Functions of sources, line profiles, total energies and the Balmer decrements, which are compared with observations and theoretical calculations made by other authors, have been calculated. The comparison shows that the results are quite acceptable and can be used when analyzing the spectrum and determining physical parameters of solar prominences. Dependence of different performances of the line (equivalent width, central intensity, halfwidth, depth of central depression etc.) on values of initial model parameters is investigated. Line halfwidth is more sensitive to the temperatuu value in the layer center, while central intensity - to the value of temperature gradient and a depth of central depression - to electron concentration. Calculated were shares of primary sources responsible for different excitation mechanism depending on total optical thickness as well as mean probabilities of quantum yield out of a medium which can be used during parametric accountancy of radiation diffusion in solar prominences [ru

  10. Gifted Programs Cannot Be Successful without Gifted Research and Theory: Evidence From Practice With Gifted Students of Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the educational provision for mathematically gifted students offered in primary (elementary) schools in England (United Kingdom) just before the abandonment of the government's Gifted and Talented (G&T) program. Through a questionnaire within five Educational Authorities and four in-depth case studies in different…

  11. A gift of prophecy essays in celebration of the life of Robert Eugene Marshak

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    Robert Eugene Marshak (1916-92) devoted much of his life to helping other people carry out scientific research and gather to discuss their work. In addition to his scientific statesmanship, he was an extraordinarily gifted research scientist, and many of his scientific contributions have been prophetic. This book pays homage to his creativity and continuing work, with contributions from many of the people whose lives have been influenced by him.

  12. Scientists planning new internet

    CERN Multimedia

    Cookson, C

    2000-01-01

    British scientists are preparing to build the next generation internet - 'The Grid'. The government is expected to announce about 100 million pounds of funding for the project, to be done in collaboration with CERN (1/2 p).

  13. Scientists must speak

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walters, D. Eric; Walters, Gale Climenson

    2011-01-01

    .... This can be a stressful experience for many. For scientists, the experience may be further complicated by the specialist nature of the data and the fact that most self-help books are aimed at business or social situations...

  14. Scientists vs. the administration

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Article denouncing the supposed impartiality of signatories of a report released by the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), which accused the Bush administration of systemically suborning objective science to a political agenda (1 page).

  15. Flotation process control optimisation at Prominent Hill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardi, Josephine; Muhamad, Nur; Weidenbach, M.

    2012-01-01

    OZ Minerals' Prominent Hill copper- gold concentrator is located 130 km south east of the town of Coober Pedy in the Gawler Craton of South Australia. The concentrator was built in 2008 and commenced commercial production in early 2009. The Prominent Hill concentrator is comprised of a conventional grinding and flotation processing plant with a 9.6 Mtpa ore throughput capacity. The flotation circuit includes six rougher cells, an IseMill for regrinding the rougher concentrate and a Jameson cell heading up the three stage conventional cell cleaner circuit. In total there are four level controllers in the rougher train and ten level controllers in the cleaning circuit for 18 cells. Generic proportional — integral and derivative (PID) control used on the level controllers alone propagated any disturbances downstream in the circuit that were generated from the grinding circuit, hoppers, between cells and interconnected banks of cells, having a negative impact on plant performance. To better control such disturbances, FloatStar level stabiliser was selected for installation on the flotation circuit to account for the interaction between the cells. Multivariable control was also installed on the five concentrate hoppers to maintain consistent feed to the cells and to the IsaMill. An additional area identified for optimisation in the flotation circuit was the mass pull rate from the rougher cells. FloatStar flow optimiser was selected to be installed subsequent to the FloatStar level stabiliser. This allowed for a unified, consistent and optimal approach to running the rougher circuit. This paper describes the improvement in the stabilisation of the circuit achieved by the FloatStar level stabiliser by using the interaction matrix between cell level controllers and the results and benefits of implementing the FloatStar flow optimiser on the rougher train.

  16. Scientists as writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yore, Larry D.; Hand, Brian M.; Prain, Vaughan

    2002-09-01

    This study attempted to establish an image of a science writer based on a synthesis of writing theory, models, and research literature on academic writing in science and other disciplines and to contrast this image with an actual prototypical image of scientists as writers of science. The synthesis was used to develop a questionnaire to assess scientists' writing habits, beliefs, strategies, and perceptions about print-based language. The questionnaire was administered to 17 scientists from science and applied science departments of a large Midwestern land grant university. Each respondent was interviewed following the completion of the questionnaire with a custom-designed semistructured protocol to elaborate, probe, and extend their written responses. These data were analyzed in a stepwise fashion using the questionnaire responses to establish tentative assertions about the three major foci (type of writing done, criteria of good science writing, writing strategies used) and the interview responses to verify these assertions. Two illustrative cases (a very experienced, male physical scientist and a less experienced, female applied biological scientist) were used to highlight diversity in the sample. Generally, these 17 scientists are driven by the academy's priority of publishing their research results in refereed, peer-reviewed journals. They write their research reports in isolation or as a member of a large research team, target their writing to a few journals that they also read regularly, use writing in their teaching and scholarship to inform and persuade science students and other scientists, but do little border crossing into other discourse communities. The prototypical science writer found in this study did not match the image based on a synthesis of the writing literature in that these scientists perceived writing as knowledge telling not knowledge building, their metacognition of written discourse was tacit, and they used a narrow array of genre

  17. The Celebrity Scientists

    OpenAIRE

    Fahy, Declan

    2010-01-01

    This collective case study examines how four contemporary British scientists and popular science writers, Stephen Hawking, Richard Dawkins, Susan Greenfield and James Lovelock, are portrayed in mass media as celebrities. It finds that the scientists’ private and public lives merge in their representations, their images commodified and marketed by the cultural industries, their mediated personae embodying abstract ideas of truth and reason. The celebrity scientists base their authority on thei...

  18. Oestrogen supplementation in gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    2005-02-06

    Feb 6, 2005 ... intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) — a prospective randomised study. ARTICLE. Objective. To investigate the impact of oestrogen supplementation from the early luteal to the late proliferative phase on biochemical and ongoing pregnancy rates in gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT). Methods. Ninety-five ...

  19. Gifted-Child Pedagogy: Meaningful Chimera?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Laurence J.

    2003-01-01

    This article explores the concept of gifted-child pedagogy (GCP) and consequences of adopting a GCP model. It argues that use of the term GCP can create a faux reality that GCP exists and that teachers who do not have this particular pedagogy cannot help gifted children. (Contains 7 references.) (CR)

  20. Examining the Fears of Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippey, Jacalyn G.; Burnham, Joy J.

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have considered the fears of gifted children. Using the American Fear Survey Schedule for Children (FSSC-AM; Burnham, 1995), a modified version of the Australian Fear Survey Schedule for Children-II (Gullone & King, 1992, 1993), this study focused on the fears of 287 gifted children ages 7-10. This study is a first step in…

  1. The Interest Issues of Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bildiren, Ahmet

    2018-01-01

    Gifted and talented children show differences in many respects compared to normal developing children. It is expected that these differences may also arise in daily life of all these children. In this research, it is aimed to investigate that whether the responses of three wishes questions of the gifted and talented and normal developing children…

  2. Gifted and Talented Students at Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Ken

    2004-01-01

    The issue of underachievement among the gifted has captured the interest of educators sporadically over the past thirty years. In the most basic definition, an underachiever is a student who does not achieve in the academic areas at a level consistent with his or her capability. When underachievement is applied to the gifted, it becomes a more…

  3. Sports That Work for Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutostanski, Scott

    2018-01-01

    Finding an enjoyable, exciting, and engaging activity for gifted students can be a challenging balancing act. While parents want their children to become active and involved, they may face setbacks as they try to find the right fit, with some gifted children grappling with poor fine and gross motor abilities. While a high percentage of gifted…

  4. Social emotional consequences of accelerating gifted students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeveen, A.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    This dissertations reports four studies on the social-emotional effects of accelerating gifted students. The research concentrated on how and to what extent educational programs, in interaction with environmental and personal factors, influence the functioning of gifted students, in the short and

  5. Special Classes for Gifted Students? Absolutely!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton-Szabo, Sally

    1996-01-01

    This article makes a case for special classes for gifted students and answers objections to special classes raised by the middle school movement and the cooperative learning movement. A sample "Celebration of Me" unit taught to gifted seventh graders which involved poetry, literature, personal development, art, music, and physical fitness is…

  6. Intellectually Gifted Rural-to-Urban Migrant Children's Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; He, Yunfeng; Tao, Ting; Shi, Jian-Nong

    2016-01-01

    The term "intellectually gifted rural-to-urban migrant children" refers to intellectually gifted children who are in migration from rural to urban areas. We compared performances on seven attention tasks among intellectually gifted (n = 26) and average (n = 30) rural-to-urban migrant and intellectually gifted urban children (n = 31). Our…

  7. 12 CFR 264b.4 - Gifts of minimal value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... RULES REGARDING FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS § 264b.4 Gifts of minimal value. (a) Board employees may... occur on the same day. (b) Board employees may determine at the time a gift is offered whether it is of... for valuation. (c) Disagreements over whether a gift is of minimal value will be resolved by an...

  8. Simple and Complex Gift Exchange in the Laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, E.C.M.; Nelissen, J.H.M.; Potters, J.J.M.; Verbon, H.A.A.

    1999-01-01

    We examine an experimental gift exchange game in which the players can improve upon the unique no-gifts equilibrium through cooperative gift giving. The main feature of the study is that there are two different types of gift exchange, which we call simple and complex exchange, respectively. Complex

  9. Korean Gifted Education: Domain-Specific Developmental Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seokhee; Suh, Yewon

    2016-01-01

    The current Korean gifted education system is designed to help gifted children have a balance between excellence and emotional and social wellbeing. In this article, the current status of Korean gifted education is presented, reflecting on the history, purpose, theoretical foundation, infrastructure, and state of art of gifted education with…

  10. 5 CFR 2634.304 - Gifts and reimbursements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... manners: (1) If the gift has been newly purchased or is readily available in the market, the value shall... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Gifts and reimbursements. 2634.304....304 Gifts and reimbursements. (a) Gifts. Except as indicated in § 2634.308(b), each financial...

  11. 41 CFR 109-50.4801 - Equipment Gift Agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment Gift Agreement... 50-SPECIAL DOE DISPOSAL AUTHORITIES 50.48-Exhibits § 109-50.4801 Equipment Gift Agreement. (a) The following Equipment Gift Agreement format will be used to provide gifts of excess and/or surplus equipment...

  12. 33 CFR 17.01-10 - Authority to receive gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authority to receive gifts. 17.01... GENERAL UNITED STATES COAST GUARD GENERAL GIFT FUND General Provisions § 17.01-10 Authority to receive gifts. (a) The Commandant, United States Coast Guard, may accept, receive, hold, or administer gifts...

  13. 5 CFR 2601.301 - Accounting of gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accounting of gifts. 2601.301 Section... IMPLEMENTATION OF OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS STATUTORY GIFT ACCEPTANCE AUTHORITY Accounting Requirements § 2601.301 Accounting of gifts. (a) The Administration Division shall ensure that gifts are properly...

  14. 5 CFR 2635.205 - Proper disposition of prohibited gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Proper disposition of prohibited gifts... STANDARDS OF ETHICAL CONDUCT FOR EMPLOYEES OF THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH Gifts From Outside Sources § 2635.205 Proper disposition of prohibited gifts. (a) An employee who has received a gift that cannot be accepted...

  15. The Selection of Gifted Students: Did Malcolm Gladwell Overstate the Role of Relative Age in the Gifted Program Selection Process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Frances L.; Matt, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Both gifted educators and parents need to be vigilant as to how gifted education is characterized in the popular media. Gifted educators spend countless resources to meet the needs of gifted students using very limited fiscal resources, and it is imperative that those efforts are not undermined in the popular media by unsubstantiated statements.…

  16. Metacognitive awareness and math anxiety in gifted students

    OpenAIRE

    Hakan Sarıcam; Üzeyir Ogurlu

    2015-01-01

    The basic purpose of this study has been to examine the relationships between metacognitive awareness and maths anxiety in gifted students. The second aim was to compare with gifted and non-gifted students’ metacognitive awareness and maths anxiety levels. The participants were 300 (150 gifted, 150 non-gifted) volunteer secondary school students in Turkey. The mean age of the participants was 12.56 years ranging from 12 to 13 years. For gathering data, the Maths Anxiety Scale for Elementary S...

  17. Hidden persuaders: Do small gifts lubricate business negotiations?

    OpenAIRE

    Maréchal, Michel André; Thöni, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Gift-giving customs are ubiquitous in social, political, and business life. Legal regulation and industry guidelines for gifts are often based on the assumption that large gifts have the potential to influence behavior and create conflicts of interest, but small gifts do not. However, scientific evidence on the impact of small gifts on business relationships is scarce. We conducted a controlled field experiment in collaboration with sales agents of a multinational consumer products company to...

  18. Marketing for scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Kuchner, Marc J

    2012-01-01

    It's a tough time to be a scientist: universities are shutting science departments, funding organisations are facing flat budgets, and many newspapers have dropped their science sections altogether. But according to Marc Kuchner, this anti-science climate doesn't have to equal a career death knell - it just means scientists have to be savvier about promoting their work and themselves. In "Marketing for Scientists", he provides clear, detailed advice about how to land a good job, win funding, and shape the public debate. As an astrophysicist at NASA, Kuchner knows that "marketing" can seem like a superficial distraction, whether your daily work is searching for new planets or seeking a cure for cancer. In fact, he argues, it's a critical component of the modern scientific endeavour, not only advancing personal careers but also society's knowledge. Kuchner approaches marketing as a science in itself. He translates theories about human interaction and sense of self into methods for building relationships - one o...

  19. Half a Gift Is Not Half-Hearted: A Giver-Receiver Asymmetry in the Thoughtfulness of Partial Gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupor, Daniella; Flynn, Frank; Norton, Michael I

    2017-12-01

    Four studies document an asymmetry in givers' and receivers' evaluations of gifts: Givers underestimate the extent to which receivers perceive partial (but more desirable) gifts to be thoughtful, valuable, and worthy of appreciation. Study 1 documents this asymmetry and suggests that givers underestimate the extent to which partial gifts signal thoughtfulness to receivers. Study 2 replicates this asymmetry in the context of a real gift exchange among friends. Study 3 shows that this asymmetry arises because givers believe that purchasing partial gifts is a greater violation of gift-giving norms than do receivers, leading givers to expect that partial gifts will damage receivers' perceptions of a gift's value. Study 4 offers an intervention that induces givers to select the (partial) gifts that receivers prefer more than givers expect: framing a gift's separate components as complete units.

  20. Responsability of scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Harigel, G G

    1997-01-01

    This seminar is intended to give some practical help for CERN guides,who are confronted with questions from visitors concerning the purpose of research in general and - in paticular - of the work in our laboratory, its possible application and benefits.The dual use of scientific results will be emphasised by examples across natural sciences. Many investigations were neutral,others aimed at peaceful and beneficial use for humanity, a few were made for destructive purposes. Researchers have no or very little influence on the application of their results. The interplay between natural scientists ,social scientists,politicians,and their dependence on economic factors will be discussed.

  1. Gift-giving and network structure in rural China: utilizing long-term spontaneous gift records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi

    2014-01-01

    The tradition of keeping written records of gift received during household ceremonies in many countries offers researchers an underutilized means of data collection for social network analysis. This paper first summarizes unique features of the gift record data that circumvent five prevailing sampling and measurement issues in the literature, and we discuss their advantages over existing studies at both the individual level and the dyadic link level using previous data sources. We then document our research project in rural China that implements a multiple wave census-type household survey and a long-term gift record collection. The pattern of gift-giving in major household social events and its recent escalation is analyzed. There are significantly positive correlations between gift network centrality and various forms of informal insurance. Finally, economic inequality and competitive marriage market are among the main demographic and socioeconomic determinants of the observed gift network structure.

  2. The Computational Processing of Intonational Prominence: A Functional Prosody Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Nakatani, Christine Hisayo

    1997-01-01

    Intonational prominence, or accent, is a fundamental prosodic feature that is said to contribute to discourse meaning. This thesis outlines a new, computational theory of the discourse interpretation of prominence, from a FUNCTIONAL PROSODY perspective. Functional prosody makes the following two important assumptions: first, there is an aspect of prominence interpretation that centrally concerns discourse processes, namely the discourse focusing nature of prominence; and second, the role of p...

  3. Talk Like a Scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum-Dietrich, Nanette

    2010-01-01

    In the scientific community, the symposium is one formal structure of conversation. Scientists routinely hold symposiums to gather and talk about a common topic. To model this method of communication in the classroom, the author designed an activity in which students conduct their own science symposiums. This article presents the science symposium…

  4. Ethics for life scientists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korthals, M.J.J.A.A.; Bogers, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    In this book we begin with two contributions on the ethical issues of working in organizations. A fruitful side effect of this start is that it gives a good insight into business ethics, a branch of applied ethics that until now is far ahead of ethics for life scientists. In the second part, ethics

  5. Developing Scientists' "Soft" Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Wendy

    2014-02-01

    A great deal of professional advice directed at undergraduates, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and even early-career scientists focuses on technical skills necessary to succeed in a complex work environment in which problems transcend disciplinary boundaries. Collaborative research approaches are emphasized, as are cross-training and gaining nonacademic experiences [Moslemi et al., 2009].

  6. Prominent Optic Disc Featured in Inherited Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorova, M G; Bojinova, R I; Valmaggia, C; Schorderet, D F

    2017-04-01

    Background We investigated the relationship between prominent optic disc (POD) and inherited retinal dystrophy (IRD). Patients and Methods A cross-sectional consecutive study was performed in 10 children and 11 adults of 7 non-related families. We performed clinical phenotyping, including a detailed examination, fundus autofluorescence, and colour fundus and OCT imaging. Genetic testing was subsequently performed for all family members presenting retinal pathology. Results In 4 members of a 3-generation family, hyperfluorescent deposits on the surface of POD were related to a p.(L224M) heterozygous mutation in BEST1 . In the second family, one member presented deposits located on the surface on hyperaemic OD and a compound p.(R141H);(A195V) mutation in BEST1 . In the third family, POD was observed in father and child with early onset cone-rod dystrophy and a novel autosomal recessive p.(W31*) homozygous mutation in ABCA4 . In the fourth family, POD with "mulberry-like" deposits and attenuated vessels were observed in a 7-year old girl, with a mutation in USH1A , and with early onset rod-cone dystrophy, associated with hearing loss. In the fifth family, blurry OD with tortuous vessels was observed in 4 consanguineous female carriers and a hemizygous boy with a p.(R200H) mutation in the X-linked retinoschisis RS1 . In the sixth family, a mother and her son were both affected with POD and attenuated peripapillary vessels, and presented with a p.(Y836C) heterozygous mutation in TOPORS , thus confirming autosomal dominant RP. In the seventh family, in 3 family members with POD, compound p.(L541P;A1038 V);(G1961E) mutations in ABCA4 confirmed the diagnosis of Stargardt disease. Conclusions A variety of OD findings are found in a genetically heterogeneous group of IRDs. In the presence of POD, an inherited progressive photoreceptor disease should be ruled out. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. One More Legacy of Paul F. Brandwein: Creating Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Deborah C.

    2011-06-01

    This paper studies the influence of Paul F. Brandwein, author, scientist, teacher and mentor, publisher, humanist, and environmentalist, on gifted youngsters who later became scientists, based primarily on information gathered from surveys completed by 25 of his students and one colleague. It also traces his profound interactions with science educators. It illuminates the theories of Brandwein and his protégés and colleagues about the interaction of environment, schooling, and education and Brandwein's belief in having students do original research (that is, research whose results are unknown) on their way to discovering their future scientific paths. It tests Brandwein's 1955 hypothesis on the characteristics typical of the young who eventually become scientists, namely: Three factors are considered as being significant in the development of future scientists: a Genetic Factor with a primary base in heredity (general intelligence, numerical ability, and verbal ability); a Predisposing Factor, with a primary base in functions which are psychological in nature; an Activating Factor, with a primary base in the opportunities offered in school and in the special skills of the teacher. High intelligence alone does not make a youngster a scientist (p xix).

  8. Developing and Implementing School for Highly Gifted, Exceptionally Gifted, and Profoundly Gifted Students: An Interview with Lynette Breedlove

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin KARADUMAN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available According to research, while moderately gifted students can often fit in the regular classrooms with differentiated instructions, pull-out programs, or acceleration options, highly gifted students do better when they are grouped with other intellectually-advanced peers in accordance with their strengths, interests, and background knowledge of a topic. Each of these students requires special attention and management strategies to develop better cognitive, social, emotional, and physical skills. Thanks to the grouping strategy, highly gifted students can study concepts at the appropriate pace, depth, and complexity so that these students feel valued and normal (Neville, 2007; Rogers, 2007. In order to fully meet these students’ needs, creating a school for highly, exceptionally, and profoundly gifted students would be a more beneficial plan compared to requiring them to stay within the regular classroom, accelerating, or grade skipping. Rogers (2002 pointed out that these students showed more academic growth by studying with other intellectual peers in separate classrooms. According to VanTassel-Baska (2006, identification, curriculum, program design, staff development, parental involvement assessment, and evaluation areas were essential for gifted program development. In accordance with the program development guidelines noted above, in this presentation, the process of developing and implementing a program for highly gifted students in Science, Math, Reading, and Social Studies will be provided based on an interview with Lynette Breedlove, Ph.D. who is the director of Advanced Academic Studies & Secondary Counseling at Spring Branch Independent School District in Houston, TX.

  9. Signs of helicity in solar prominences and related features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S.

    This review illustrates several ways to identify the chirality (handedness) of solar prominences (filaments) from their structure and the structure of their surrounding magnetic fields in the chromosphere and corona. For prominences, these structural elements include the axial magnetic field direction, orientation of barbs, and direction of the prominence fine structure. The surrounding structures include the pattern of fibrils beneath the prominences and the pattern of coronal loops above the prominences. These ways of identifying chirality are then interpreted in terms of the formal definitions of helicity to yield a consistent set of one-to-one helicity relationships for all features. The helicity of some prominences can also be independently determined during their eruption by their fine structure, apparent crossings in the line-of-sight of different parts of the same prominence, and by large- scale twist of the prominence structure. Unlike observations of prominences (filaments) observed prior to eruption, in some cases evidence of both signs of helicity are found within the same erupting prominence. This indicates the continued application of forces on the prominences during the eruption process or the possible introduction of force(s) not present during earlier stages of their evolution.

  10. Terminal investment in the gustatory appeal of nuptial food gifts in crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, K R; Hunt, J; Rapkin, J; Sadd, B M; Sakaluk, S K

    2015-10-01

    Investment in current versus future reproduction represents a prominent trade-off in life-history theory and is likely dependent on an individual's life expectancy. The terminal investment hypothesis posits that a reduction in residual reproductive value (i.e. potential for future offspring) will result in increased investment in current reproduction. We tested the hypothesis that male decorated crickets (Gryllodes sigillatus), when cued to their impending mortality, should increase their reproductive effort by altering the composition of their nuptial food gifts (i.e. spermatophylaxes) to increase their gustatory appeal to females. Using a repeated-measures design, we analysed the amino acid composition of spermatophylaxes derived from males both before and after injection of either a saline control or a solution of heat-killed bacteria. The latter, although nonpathogenic, represents an immune challenge that may signal an impending survival threat. One principal component explaining amino acid variation in spermatophylaxes, characterized by a high loading to histidine, was significantly lower in immune-challenged versus control males. The relevance of this difference for the gustatory appeal of gifts to females was assessed by mapping spermatophylax composition onto a fitness surface derived in an earlier study identifying the amino acid composition of spermatophylaxes preferred by females. We found that immune-challenged males maintained the level of attractiveness of their gifts post-treatment, whereas control males produced significantly less attractive gifts post-injection. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that cues of a survival-threatening infection stimulate terminal investment in male decorated crickets with respect to the gustatory appeal of their nuptial food gifts. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  11. Nurturing gifted learners in Mainland China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Jiannong; Zhang, X.; Chen, N.

    2013-01-01

    -socio-intellectual model, illustrated the nature of human being and the nature of gifted learners. From the perspective of the BSI model, the authors suggested three aspects are very critical to curriculum design to meet the needs of gifted education: physical maturation or physical development, social maturation......In this article, based on the previous researches on the development of gifted learners, the authors summarized the problems in nurturing gifted learners due to lacking of the appropriate educational philosophy and educational methodology in Mainland China. The authors proposed the Bio...... or social and interpersonal development, and mental maturation or intellectual development. It was proved that BSI model has its theoretical rationality and practical validity in Mainland China...

  12. Spelling Lessons for Gifted Language Arts Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Janet C.; Gipe, Joan P.

    1993-01-01

    These strategies for teaching spelling to gifted students focus on student choice of words, personal dictionaries, cloze passages, categorizing or word sorting, words borrowed from other languages, word etymology, multiple meaning words, and onomatopoetic words. (JDD)

  13. Consultation for Parents of Young Gifted Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Joan S.

    1989-01-01

    The article describes private evaluation and consultation services provided to parents of young gifted children, and discusses the benefits of private consultation and the potential role of school personnel in meeting the needs of this population. (Author/JDD)

  14. AutoCAD-To-GIFTS Translator Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew

    1989-01-01

    AutoCAD-to-GIFTS translator program, ACTOG, developed to facilitate quick generation of small finite-element models using CASA/GIFTS finite-element modeling program. Reads geometric data of drawing from Data Exchange File (DXF) used in AutoCAD and other PC-based drafting programs. Geometric entities recognized by ACTOG include points, lines, arcs, solids, three-dimensional lines, and three-dimensional faces. From this information, ACTOG creates GIFTS SRC file, which then reads into GIFTS preprocessor BULKM or modified and reads into EDITM to create finite-element model. SRC file used as is or edited for any number of uses. Written in Microsoft Quick-Basic (Version 2.0).

  15. GIFT: an HEP project for file transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, M.L.; Mirabelli, G.; Valente, E.

    1986-01-01

    Started in autumn 1983, GIFT (General Internetwork File Transfer) is a collaboration among several HEP centers, including CERN, Frascati, Oslo, Oxford, RAL and Rome. The collaboration was initially set up with the aim of studying the feasibility of a software system to allow direct file exchange between computers which do not share a common Virtual File Protocol. After the completion of this first phase, an implementation phase started and, since March 1985, an experimental service based on this system has been running at CERN between DECnet, CERNET and the UK Coloured Book protocols. The authors present the motivations that, together with previous gateway experiences, led to the definition of GIFT specifications and to the implementation of the GIFT Kernel system. The position of GIFT in the overall development framework of the networking facilities needed by large international collaborations within the HEP community is explained. (Auth.)

  16. Growing Up Gifted in the Soviet Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    A review of the educational program for gifted students in the Soviet Union discusses student responsibilities, program admission, and specialized schools featuring foreign languages, mathematics and physics, music, ballet and arts, sports, and "little academics" (advanced studies). (CB)

  17. A three-dimensional model for solar prominences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demoulin, P.; Priest, E.R.; Anzer, U.

    1989-01-01

    Prominences have been modelled largely as one-or two-dimensional structures, and yet observations show them to possess important variations in the third dimension along the prominence axis with great arches with feet reaching down towards the solar surface. As an initial attempt to understand this structure we consider a three-dimensional linear force-free field model for the global magnetic field around a quiescent prominence. It consists of a fundamental together with a harmonic that is periodic along the prominence. At the solar surface there is a series of flux concentrations spaced out periodically on both sides of the prominence. Between a pair of oppositely directed flux concentration, the magnetic field in the prominence is stronger and tends to be less highly sheared than elsewhere. This modulation of the field strength and shear angle along the prominence decreases with height and almost disappears above 10 Mm. Prominence fields that increase with height occur when the shear is large and the length-scale for field variations perpendicular to the prominence exceeds that along it. The variation of the prominence height along the prominence is calculated and it is suggested that feet occur where the prominence sags down to low heights. For prominences of Normal polarity this tends to occur near supergranule centres where the transverse field is least, whereas for those of Inverse polarity it usually takes place near the chromospheric network where the transverse field is greatest. The effect of concentrating the base flux by including extra harmonics is also included. For Normal polarity prominences it tends to make the foot wider, and for Inverse polarity configurations, it usually creates deeper and narrower feet

  18. Geosciences Information for Teachers (GIFT) Workshops held in Conjunction with Alexander von Humboldt (AvH) EGU Conferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laj, Carlo; Cifelli, Francesca

    2015-04-01

    The Alexander von Humboldt Conference Series of the European Geosciences Union are a series of meetings held outside of Europe, in particular in South America, Africa or Asia, on selected topics of geosciences with a socio-economic impact for regions on these continents, jointly organised with the scientists and their institutes and the institutions of these regions. Given the increasing success of the GIFT workshops held in conjunction with the General Assemblies, since 2010 EGU has also developed a series of GIFT workshops held in conjunction with AvH conferences. Associated GIFT workshops were held in Merida, Yucatan, on the theme of Climate Change, Natural Hazards and Societies (March 2010), then in Penang, Malaysia (June 2011) on the theme of Ocean Acidification, in November 2012 in Cusco (Peru) on the theme of Natural Disasters, Global Change and the Preservation of World Heritage Sites, finally in Istanbul (March 2014) on "High Impact Natural Hazards Related to the Euro-Mediterranean Region. The next GIFT workshop is already planned for October 2015 in Adis Ababa (Ethiopia) on the theme "Water". In each case, the GIFT workshop was held on the last two days of the AvH conference and reunited 40-45 teachers from the nation where the AvH was held. Keynote speakers from AvH were speakers to the GIFT workshops which also included hands-on activities animated by sciences educators. These GIFT workshops represented the first workshops specifically aimed at teachers held in the country, and therefore represents a significant Earth Sciences contribution to secondary education in non European countries.

  19. Patterns of computer use amoung gifted children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sesko, S.C.

    1998-03-20

    This study investigated patterns of computer interaction by gifted children who use computers extensively. There were two objectives: (a) To examine how these particular children came to learn various computer applications and programming, where they began, and how; and (b) To explore the number and variety of uses these gifted children have for their various computer interactions. The study led to several conjectures about the interactions of gifted children and computers. There is evidence that schools do not well serve gifted children regarding computer use. As a result, many gifted children learn what they know about computers and computer applications at home or elsewhere. Further evidence indicates that, without formal instruction in school, these children have constructed their own ideas of what computers are for and what they are able to do with them. Though many of these uses are no different from the ones that other children and adults have discovered, the study found some idiosyncratic uses and meanings. Along with the `what` of research, there is the question of `why` it is important and worth pursuing. This research has the promise of contributing to knowledge in the area of gifted and talented education, in that by understanding better how gifted children come to learn various computer applications and computer programming, and by understanding better the uses they have for these interactions, educators may be able to develop curricula, environments, and instruction to enhance these learning experiences in technology. This study establishes, to the best of the my knowledge, a precedent in the field of research into gifted and talented children and their use of computers.

  20. Scientists want more children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Howard Ecklund

    Full Text Available Scholars partly attribute the low number of women in academic science to the impact of the science career on family life. Yet, the picture of how men and women in science--at different points in the career trajectory--compare in their perceptions of this impact is incomplete. In particular, we know little about the perceptions and experiences of junior and senior scientists at top universities, institutions that have a disproportionate influence on science, science policy, and the next generation of scientists. Here we show that having fewer children than wished as a result of the science career affects the life satisfaction of science faculty and indirectly affects career satisfaction, and that young scientists (graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who have had fewer children than wished are more likely to plan to exit science entirely. We also show that the impact of science on family life is not just a woman's problem; the effect on life satisfaction of having fewer children than desired is more pronounced for male than female faculty, with life satisfaction strongly related to career satisfaction. And, in contrast to other research, gender differences among graduate students and postdoctoral fellows disappear. Family factors impede talented young scientists of both sexes from persisting to research positions in academic science. In an era when the global competitiveness of US science is at risk, it is concerning that a significant proportion of men and women trained in the select few spots available at top US research universities are considering leaving science and that such desires to leave are related to the impact of the science career on family life. Results from our study may inform university family leave policies for science departments as well as mentoring programs in the sciences.

  1. Scientists want more children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecklund, Elaine Howard; Lincoln, Anne E

    2011-01-01

    Scholars partly attribute the low number of women in academic science to the impact of the science career on family life. Yet, the picture of how men and women in science--at different points in the career trajectory--compare in their perceptions of this impact is incomplete. In particular, we know little about the perceptions and experiences of junior and senior scientists at top universities, institutions that have a disproportionate influence on science, science policy, and the next generation of scientists. Here we show that having fewer children than wished as a result of the science career affects the life satisfaction of science faculty and indirectly affects career satisfaction, and that young scientists (graduate students and postdoctoral fellows) who have had fewer children than wished are more likely to plan to exit science entirely. We also show that the impact of science on family life is not just a woman's problem; the effect on life satisfaction of having fewer children than desired is more pronounced for male than female faculty, with life satisfaction strongly related to career satisfaction. And, in contrast to other research, gender differences among graduate students and postdoctoral fellows disappear. Family factors impede talented young scientists of both sexes from persisting to research positions in academic science. In an era when the global competitiveness of US science is at risk, it is concerning that a significant proportion of men and women trained in the select few spots available at top US research universities are considering leaving science and that such desires to leave are related to the impact of the science career on family life. Results from our study may inform university family leave policies for science departments as well as mentoring programs in the sciences.

  2. On Responsibility of Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdyuzha, Vladimir

    The situation of modern world is analised. It is impossible for our Civilization when at least half of the World Scientists are engaged in research intended to solve military problems. Civilization cannot be called reasonable so long as it spends a huge portion of national incomes on armaments. For resolution of our global problems International Scientific Center - Brain Trust of planet must be created, the status of which should be defined and sealed by the UN organization.

  3. Generalized Intelligent Framework for Tutoring (GIFT) Cloud/Virtual Open Campus Quick-Start Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The GIFT Account allows users to log into GIFT Cloud , manage their personal storage in GIFT Cloud , download GIFT Local, and access resources...ARL-CR-0796 ● MAR 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Generalized Intelligent Framework for Tutoring (GIFT) Cloud / Virtual Open...originator. ARL-CR-0796 ● MAR 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Generalized Intelligent Framework for Tutoring (GIFT) Cloud / Virtual

  4. 26 CFR 25.2701-3 - Determination of amount of gift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of amount of gift. 25.2701-3... AND GIFT TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1954 Special Valuation Rules § 25.2701-3 Determination of amount of gift. (a) Overview—(1) In general. The amount of the gift resulting from any transfer...

  5. 26 CFR 25.2523(a)-1 - Gift to spouse; in general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gift to spouse; in general. 25.2523(a)-1...) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1954 Deductions § 25.2523(a)-1 Gift to spouse; in general. (a) In general. In determining the amount of taxable gifts for the calendar quarter...

  6. 26 CFR 25.6324-1 - Special lien for gift tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special lien for gift tax. 25.6324-1 Section 25... GIFT TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1954 Procedure and Administration § 25.6324-1 Special lien for gift tax. For regulations concerning the special lien for the gift tax, see § 301.6324-1...

  7. Administrative Guidelines: Education of Gifted Students [and] Plan for Education of the Gifted in South Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Dakota State Dept. of Education and Cultural Affairs, Pierre.

    This document is intended to assist South Dakota schools in the development and implementation of Gifted Education Plans, and includes state laws and rules pertaining to gifted education, guidelines for reporting, and explanations of the necessary components of a district's written plan. A brief statement of philosophy addresses characteristics of…

  8. Is It Good to Be Gifted? The Social Construction of the Gifted Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Jane

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence that children labelled as academically gifted are subjected to negative attitudes from others and that this impacts on their self-esteem and motivation to succeed. Through an analysis of British newspaper stories about gifted children, this article explores the socially constructed nature of the concept of the "gifted…

  9. Star Power: Providing for the Gifted & Talented. Module 1. Characteristics of the Gifted/Talented.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Alison

    The document presents Module 1, characteristics of the gifted/talented student, of the Star Power modules, developed for school personnel who have an interest in or a need to explore the area of gifted and talented education. It is explained in an introductory section that the modules can be used for independent study, for small group interaction,…

  10. Star Power: Providing for the Gifted & Talented. Module 6. Underachievers Among the Gifted/Talented.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Alison

    The document presents Module 6, underachievers among the gifted/talented, of the Star Power modules developed for school personnel who have an interest in or a need to explore the area of gifted and talented education. It is explained in an introductory section that the modules can be used for independent study, for small group interaction, or for…

  11. Star Power: Providing for the Gifted & Talented. Module 9. Programs for the Gifted/Talented.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallis, Jackie; Heinemann, Alison

    The document presents Module 9, programs for the gifted/talented, of the Star Power modules developed for school personnel who have an interest in or a need to explore the area of gifted and talented education. It is explained in an introductory section that the modules can be used for independent study, for small group interaction, or for a large…

  12. Is Being Gifted Always an Advantage? Peer Relations and Self-Concept of Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košir, Katja; Horvat, Marina; Aram, Urška; Jurinec, Nina

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences between identified gifted adolescents and adolescents not identified as gifted in terms of social acceptance and self-concept (peer relations, academic, and general). In addition, we aimed to investigate the differences between two groups of students identified according to different…

  13. ECNS '99 - Young scientists forum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceretti, M.; Janssen, S.; McMorrow, D.F.

    2000-01-01

    The Young Scientists Forum is a new venture for ECNS and follows the established tradition of an active participation by young scientists in these conferences. At ECNS '99 the Young Scientists Forum brought together 30 young scientists from 13 European countries. In four working groups, they disc......The Young Scientists Forum is a new venture for ECNS and follows the established tradition of an active participation by young scientists in these conferences. At ECNS '99 the Young Scientists Forum brought together 30 young scientists from 13 European countries. In four working groups......, they discussed emerging scientific trends in their areas of expertise and the instrumentation required to meet the scientific challenges. The outcome was presented in the Young Scientists Panel on the final day of ECNS '99. This paper is a summary of the four working group reports prepared by the Group Conveners...

  14. Analysis on the effectiveness of gifted education by studying perceptions of science gifted education recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyun-Chul; Ryu, Chun-Ryol; Choi, Jinsu; Park, Kyeong-Jin

    2016-04-01

    The necessity of science gifted education is persistently emphasized in the aspect of developing individuals' potential abilities and enhancing national competitiveness. In the case of Korea, gifted education has been conducted on a national level ever since the country established legal and institutional strategies for gifted education in 2000. Even though 15 years has passed since a full-scale implementation of gifted education has started, there are few researches on the effectiveness of gifted education. Therefore, considering the splashdown effect, that a long period of time is needed to obtain reliable assessments on education effectiveness, this research surveyed gifted education recipients to study the effectiveness of gifted education. For this cause, we developed an questionnaire and conducted a survey of university students who had experience of receiving science gifted education. We deduced the following from the analysis. First, generally the recipients were satisfied with their gifted education experiences, but thought that not enough opportunities were provided on problem solving ability enhancement and career related aspects. Second, schools considered 'experiments' as the most effective teaching method, regardless to the stage of education. In addition, they perceived 'discussions and presentations' as effective education methods for elementary school students; 'theme investigating classes' for middle school students; and lectures for high school students. It could be seen that various experiences were held important for elementary school students and as students went into high school education, more emphasis was placed on the importance of understanding mathematical and scientific facts. Third, on gifted education teaching staffs, satisfaction of professionalism on specialities were high but satisfaction of variety of teaching methods were relatively low. In this research, to encourage science gifted students to meet their potentials, we propose

  15. Neutral Atom Diffusion in a Partially Ionized Prominence Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2010-01-01

    The support of solar prominences is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized. it is necessary to consider in addition the support of the neutral component of the prominence plasma. This support is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material,

  16. Ernest Rutherford: scientist supreme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.

    1998-01-01

    One hundred years ago this month, Ernest Rutherford a talented young New Zealander who had just spent three years as a postgraduate student in Britain left for Canada, where he was to do the work that won him a Nobel prize. All three countries can justifiably claim this great scientist as their own. Ernest Rutherford is one of the most illustrious scientists that the world has ever seen. He achieved enduring international fame because of an incredibly productive life, during which he altered our view of nature on three separate occasions. Combining brilliantly conceived experiments with much hard work and special insight, he explained the perplexing problem of naturally occurring radioactivity, determined the structure of the atom, and was the world's first successful alchemist, changing nitrogen into oxygen. Rutherford received a Nobel prize for the first discovery, but the other two would have been equally worthy candidates, had they been discovered by someone else. Indeed, any one of his other secondary achievements many of which are now almost forgotten would have been enough to bring fame to a lesser scientist. For example, he invented an electrical method for detecting individual ionizing radiations, he dated the age of the Earth, and briefly held the world record for the distance over which wireless waves could be detected. He predicted the existence of neutrons, he oversaw the development of large-scale particle accelerators, and, during the First World War, he led the allied research into the detection of submarines. In this article the author describes the life and times of Ernest Rutherford. (UK)

  17. Chemistry for environmental scientists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, Detlev [Brandenburgische Technische Univ., Berlin (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Luftchemie und Luftreinhaltung

    2015-07-01

    Non-chemists in environmental sciences and engineering (e.g. physicists, biologists, ecologists, geographers, soil scientists, hydrologists, meteorologists, economists, engineers) need chemical basic knowledge for understanding chemical processes in the environment. This book focuses on general and fundamental chemistry (including required physics) such as properties and bonding of matter, chemical kinetics and mechanisms, phase and chemical equilibrium, the basic features of air (gases), water (liquids) and soil (solids) and the most important substances and their reactions in the environment. Selected key environmental chemical processes are shortly characterised in the light of multi-component and multiphase chemistry. This book is also useful for chemists who are beginning work on environmental issues.

  18. Soviet scientists speak out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holloway, D.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, Russian bomb designers answer the KGB's claim that espionage, not science, produced the Soviet bomb. Yuli Khariton and Yuri Smirnov wholly reject the argument that Soviet scientists can claim little credit for the first Soviet bomb. In a lecture delivered at the Kurchatov Institute, established in 1943 when Igor Kurchatov became the director of the Soviet nuclear weapons project, Khariton and Smironov point to the work done by Soviet nuclear physicists before 1941 and refute assertions that have been made in Western literature regarding the hydrogen bomb

  19. Chemistry for environmental scientists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, Detlev

    2015-01-01

    Non-chemists in environmental sciences and engineering (e.g. physicists, biologists, ecologists, geographers, soil scientists, hydrologists, meteorologists, economists, engineers) need chemical basic knowledge for understanding chemical processes in the environment. This book focuses on general and fundamental chemistry (including required physics) such as properties and bonding of matter, chemical kinetics and mechanisms, phase and chemical equilibrium, the basic features of air (gases), water (liquids) and soil (solids) and the most important substances and their reactions in the environment. Selected key environmental chemical processes are shortly characterised in the light of multi-component and multiphase chemistry. This book is also useful for chemists who are beginning work on environmental issues.

  20. Medical laboratory scientist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Julie; Qvist, Camilla Christine; Jacobsen, Katja Kemp

    2017-01-01

    Previously, biomarker research and development was performed by laboratory technicians working as craftsmen in laboratories under the guidance of medical doctors. This hierarchical structure based on professional boundaries appears to be outdated if we want to keep up with the high performance...... of our healthcare system, and take advantage of the vast potential of future biomarkers and personalized medicine. We ask the question; does our healthcare system benefit from giving the modern medical laboratory scientist (MLS) a stronger academic training in biomarker research, development...

  1. Meandering Musings by Linus Pauling: "American Scientists and the Spirit of the Frontier".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bause, George S

    2016-04-01

    Hoping to raise funds in 1975 for his namesake institute, Linus Pauling submitted to Esquire magazine a 32-page handwritten manuscript, "American Scientists and the Spirit of the Frontier." Angered when his submission for publication was declined, Pauling eventually gifted the original manuscript in 1986 to his friend, Linus Pauling Institute fundraiser Stephen Maddox, who would sell it in 2004 to the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology. Published accurately here for the first time, the manuscript captures not only Pauling's sweeping metaphor of scientists as frontiersmen but also the creative process by which Pauling formulated his hydrate microcrystal theory of general anesthesia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. WFIRST CGI Adjutant Scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasdin, N.

    One of the most exciting developments in exoplanet science is the inclusion of a coronagraph instrument on WFIRST. After more than 20 years of research and development on coronagraphy and wavefront control, the technology is ready for a demonstration in space and to be used for revolutionary science. Good progress has already been made at JPL and partner institutions on the coronagraph technology and instrument design and test. The next five years as we enter Phase A will be critical for raising the TRL of the coronagraph to the needed level for flight and for converging on a design that is robust, low risk, and meets the science requirements. In addition, there is growing excitement over the possibility of rendezvousing an occulter with WFIRST/AFTA as a separate mission; this would both demonstrate that important technology and potentially dramatically enhance the science reach, introducing the possibility of imaging Earth-like planets in the habitable zone of nearby stars. In this proposal I will be applying for the Coronagraph Adjutant Scientist (CAS) position. I bring to the position the background and skills needed to be an effective liaison between the project office, the instrument team, and the Science Investigation Team (SIT). My background in systems engineering before coming to Princeton (I was Chief Systems Engineer for the Gravity Probe-B mission) and my 15 years of working closely with NASA on both coronagraph and occulter technology make me well-suited to the role. I have been a lead coronagraph scientist for the WFIRST mission from the beginning, including as a member of the SDT. Together with JPL and NASA HQ, I helped organize the process for selecting the coronagraphs for the CGI, one of which, the shaped pupil, has been developed in my lab. All of the key algorithms for wavefront control (including EFC and Stroke Minimization) were originally developed by students or post-docs in my lab at Princeton. I am thus in a unique position to work with

  3. Promoting business with corporate gifts: major issues and empirical evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Y

    2006-01-01

    Corporate gifts are an important tool in the marketing communication mix. This paper is divided into two parts. It first reviews the literature of corporate gifts and incentives, focusing on major issues in the use of corporate gifts: marketing issues, practical considerations, and ethical and cultural concerns. In the second part, it presents a survey in the UK airline industry. Corporate gifts are found to be used mainly as a means of enhancing corporate image and creating goodwill. They ar...

  4. MIFT: GIFT Combinatorial Geometry Input to VCS Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-03-01

    r-w w-^ H ^ß0318is CQ BRL °RCUMr REPORT NO. 1967 —-S: ... MIFT: GIFT COMBINATORIAL GEOMETRY INPUT TO VCS CODE Albert E...TITLE (and Subtitle) MIFT: GIFT Combinatorial Geometry Input to VCS Code S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED FINAL 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER...Vehicle Code System (VCS) called MORSE was modified to accept the GIFT combinatorial geometry package. GIFT , as opposed to the geometry package

  5. 19 CFR 10.152 - Bona-fide gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bona-fide gifts. 10.152 Section 10.152 Customs... and Bona Fide Gifts § 10.152 Bona-fide gifts. Subject to the conditions in § 10.153 of this part, the port director shall pass free of duty and tax any article sent as a bona-fide gift from a person in a...

  6. How Scientists Can Become Entrepreneurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thon, Jonathan N; Karlsson, Sven

    2017-05-01

    Translating basic research discoveries through entrepreneurship must be scientist driven and institutionally supported to be successful (not the other way around). Here, we describe why scientists should engage in entrepreneurship, where institutional support for scientist-founders falls short, and how these challenges can be overcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. QUIESCENT PROMINENCES IN THE ERA OF ALMA: SIMULATED OBSERVATIONS USING THE 3D WHOLE-PROMINENCE FINE STRUCTURE MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunár, Stanislav; Heinzel, Petr [Astronomical Institute, The Czech Academy of Sciences, 25165 Ondřejov (Czech Republic); Mackay, Duncan H. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Anzer, Ulrich [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85740 Garching bei München (Germany)

    2016-12-20

    We use the detailed 3D whole-prominence fine structure model to produce the first simulated high-resolution ALMA observations of a modeled quiescent solar prominence. The maps of synthetic brightness temperature and optical thickness shown in the present paper are produced using a visualization method for synthesis of the submillimeter/millimeter radio continua. We have obtained the simulated observations of both the prominence at the limb and the filament on the disk at wavelengths covering a broad range that encompasses the full potential of ALMA. We demonstrate here extent to which the small-scale and large-scale prominence and filament structures will be visible in the ALMA observations spanning both the optically thin and thick regimes. We analyze the relationship between the brightness and kinetic temperature of the prominence plasma. We also illustrate the opportunities ALMA will provide for studying the thermal structure of the prominence plasma from the cores of the cool prominence fine structure to the prominence–corona transition region. In addition, we show that detailed 3D modeling of entire prominences with their numerous fine structures will be important for the correct interpretation of future ALMA observations of prominences.

  8. Why Are Economists Evaluating the Impact of Gifted Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettler, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Bui, Craig, and Imberman assessed the impact of gifted and talented programs on student achievement using regression discontinuity and random assignment to gifted magnet schools. In both analyses, they found minimal impact of the gifted and talented programs on student achievement. This commentary addresses two concerns associated with the study.…

  9. Are Black Girls Not Gifted? Race, Gender, and Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Winters, Venus E.

    2014-01-01

    Current research and theoretical models that address racial inequity or gender disparities in gifted education often overlook the underrepresentation of Black girls in gifted programs. Race-based conceptual frameworks and methodologies that focus on gifted education often fail to critically examine and interpret the multiple identities of Black…

  10. Building Gifted Education: One State at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    The "Marland" Report was the impetus and structure to provide a more systematic approach to building state and regional gifted programs. One of the strategies used to proliferate the spread of programming for gifted students throughout the states was the National/State Leadership Training Institute on the Gifted and Talented…

  11. Guiding the Gifted Reader. ERIC Digest #E481.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsted, Judith Wynn

    This digest offers guidelines in providing challenging reading opportunities for gifted students. Research findings concerning the characteristics of the gifted child as reader (e.g., they read earlier, better and more) are noted. Specific needs of gifted learners can be met by: using literature as a supplement to the readings in basal texts;…

  12. 38 CFR 38.603 - Gifts and donations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gifts and donations. 38...) NATIONAL CEMETERIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS § 38.603 Gifts and donations. (a) Gifts and donations will be accepted only after it has been determined that the donor has a clear understanding that...

  13. 76 FR 3180 - Market Test of Gift Cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... are very similar to money orders. Id. at 7. The Postal Service asserts that gift cards purchased from... POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. MT2011-2; Order No. 647] Market Test of Gift Cards AGENCY... Service proposal to conduct a 2-year market test involving the sale of gift cards. This document describes...

  14. 11 CFR 7.20 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 7.20 Section... of Special Commission Employees § 7.20 Gifts, entertainment, and favors. Except as provided at 11 CFR... a gift, gratuity, loan, entertainment, or favor for himself or herself, or for another person...

  15. Gifted Male Readers: Current Understandings and Suggestions for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnani, Alexander R.

    2013-01-01

    Research literature concerning gifted male readers relies primarily on more extensive bodies of work regarding gifted males and male readers. Studied as a whole, the two halves portray a worrisome state of affairs for gifted male readers, who lag behind their female counterparts in the same patterns found across the ability spectrum. This literacy…

  16. High Reading Skills Mask Dyslexia in Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Viersen, Sietske; Kroesbergen, Evelyn H.; Slot, Esther M.; de Bree, Elise H.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated how gifted children with dyslexia might be able to mask literacy problems and the role of possible compensatory mechanisms. The sample consisted of 121 Dutch primary school children that were divided over four groups (typically developing [TD] children, children with dyslexia, gifted children, gifted children with…

  17. 7 CFR 906.41 - Gift fruit shipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Gift fruit shipments. 906.41 Section 906.41... LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Regulation § 906.41 Gift fruit shipments. The handling to any person of gift packages of fruit individually addressed to such person, in quantities...

  18. 78 FR 39020 - Market Test on Gift Cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. MT2011-2; Order No. 1755] Market Test on Gift Cards... Service filing requesting a temporary extension of a market test on gift cards. This notice informs the... INFORMATION: On June 18, 2013, the United States Postal Service moved to temporarily extend its Gift Card...

  19. 43 CFR 19.7 - Private contributions and gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Private contributions and gifts. 19.7... National Wilderness Preservation System § 19.7 Private contributions and gifts. (a) The Secretary is... contributions and gifts to be used to further the purposes of the act. The Secretary, under the authorization of...

  20. 19 CFR 145.32 - Bona-fide gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bona-fide gifts. 145.32 Section 145.32 Customs... (CONTINUED) MAIL IMPORTATIONS Special Classes of Merchandise § 145.32 Bona-fide gifts. The port director... as bona-fide gifts from persons in foreign countries to persons in the United States having an...

  1. 22 CFR 1203.735-214 - Transmitting communications and gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Transmitting communications and gifts. 1203.735....735-214 Transmitting communications and gifts. (a) Correspondence. In corresponding with anyone other... it to be clearly in the public interest to do so. (c) Gifts. An employee shall not act as an agent...

  2. 7 CFR 927.121 - Pears for gift purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pears for gift purposes. 927.121 Section 927.121... WASHINGTON Rules and Regulations Exemptions and Safeguards § 927.121 Pears for gift purposes. There are exempted from the provisions of the order any and all pears which, in individual gift packages, are shipped...

  3. Reporting Deferred Gifts: CASE-NACUBO Guidelines Ensure Consistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridenour, James F.; Munger, Peter L.

    1983-01-01

    Three methods for reporting the value of a deferred gift are described: the tax method, net realizable value, and fair market value. Three major categories of deferred gifts are identified: pooled income funds, charitable remainder trusts, and charitable gift annuities. (MLW)

  4. 26 CFR 20.2012-1 - Credit for gift tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Credit for gift tax. 20.2012-1 Section 20.2012... TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Credits Against Tax § 20.2012-1 Credit for gift tax. (a) In general. With respect to gifts made before 1977, a credit is allowed under...

  5. How to Develop Innovators? Innovation Education for the Gifted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavinina, Larisa

    2013-01-01

    Many people correctly believe that a majority of innovators come from the population of gifted and talented children. If we want to develop innovative abilities of the gifted, then a special, new direction in gifted education is needed: innovation education. This article introduces innovation education, which refers to a wide range of educational…

  6. Gifted Kids Curriculum: What Do the Students Say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bate, Joanne; Clark, Deb; Riley, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    Gifted students have different learning, social and emotional needs to their peers. The needs of some gifted students can be met within their mainstream school. Other gifted students need learning, social and emotional support beyond the school gates. The New Zealand Ministry of Education (2000) advocates for a continuum of provisions for gifted…

  7. Educational Provision for the Academically Gifted: Rhetoric or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some gifted people have made invaluable contributions to the world that shaped the destiny of humanity. Identification and development of gifts and talents of gifted children has been viewed as critical in tapping this valuable human resource. This study investigated the extent to which children who had demonstrated ...

  8. Laboratory facilities increased by gifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    As a result of gifts from two Member States facilities at the Agency's research centre at Seibersdorf, Austria, have been increased. New equipment has been provided by France and Romania. The French equipment is a coincidence counter to be operated in conjunction with a computer and is valued at $35 000. It can give automatically an exact measurement of radioactivity in a chemical solution containing radioisotopes. This means that a sample of the solution can be sent to another laboratory to be used for calibrating instruments and checking results of research work. Since 1963 nearly 8 000 radioactive solutions to be used as standards have been sent from Seibersdorf to research laboratories and hospitals in 56 countries. The demand continues to grow, and in order to meet it the equipment was developed by the Saclay Research Centre of the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique in collaboration with Seibersdorf. From Romania have come six electronic measuring instruments worth $6 000 to assist nuclear research, surveying and prospecting. Three are electronic scalers for experimental work involving the counting of radioactive emissions, and three are survey meters for detecting the presence of radioactivity in geological samples. (author)

  9. The price of a gift: an approach to receiving gifts from patients in psychiatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendel, David H; Chu, James; Radden, Jennifer; Leeper, Howard; Pope, Harrison G; Samson, Jacqueline; Tsimprea, Gail; Bodkin, J Alexander

    2007-01-01

    When a patient or patient's family presents a psychiatrist with a gift, the clinician is challenged to maintain appropriate professional boundaries but have the flexibility to respond with warmth and appreciation. The psychiatrist must consider such factors as the intention of the gift, its value to the patient, and the anticipated effect of accepting or refusing it on the patient and the treatment. Psychiatric practitioners are ethically obligated to consider patients' best interests when deciding about how to handle the offer of a gift. Ethical deliberations about such situations occur on a case-by-case basis and require careful analysis of how to promote the patient's best interest while adhering to professional ethics. In this article, members of the McLean Hospital Ethics Committee present a pragmatic model for managing the presentation of a gift from a patient or a patient's family member. The pragmatic model, which focuses on the practical results of accepting or declining the gift, minimizes the risk of exploiting the patient by accepting a gift or hurting the patient by declining it. We present five clinical cases that raise ethical dilemmas concerning patient gift giving in psychiatry and discuss each case from the standpoint of the pragmatic model.

  10. Study of a Large Helical Eruptive Prominence Associated with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2001-04-21

    Apr 21, 2001 ... morphology of the event, energy budget of the prominence and associated. CMEs. ... magnetically driven and internally powered. Key words. ... Solar prominences are ribbons of cool (∼8000 K) dense gas (∼10. −11 gcm. −3. ) ...

  11. Python for scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, John M

    2017-01-01

    Scientific Python is a significant public domain alternative to expensive proprietary software packages. This book teaches from scratch everything the working scientist needs to know using copious, downloadable, useful and adaptable code snippets. Readers will discover how easy it is to implement and test non-trivial mathematical algorithms and will be guided through the many freely available add-on modules. A range of examples, relevant to many different fields, illustrate the language's capabilities. The author also shows how to use pre-existing legacy code (usually in Fortran77) within the Python environment, thus avoiding the need to master the original code. In this new edition, several chapters have been re-written to reflect the IPython notebook style. With an extended index, an entirely new chapter discussing SymPy and a substantial increase in the number of code snippets, researchers and research students will be able to quickly acquire all the skills needed for using Python effectively.

  12. Voices of Romanian scientists

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    As Romania has now become a Member State of CERN, Romanian scientists share their thoughts about this new era of partnership for their community.   Members of ATLAS from Romanian institutes at CERN (from left to right): Dan Ciubotaru, Michele Renda, Bogdan Blidaru, Alexandra Tudorache, Marina Rotaru, Ana Dumitriu, Valentina Tudorache, Adam Jinaru, Calin Alexa. On 17 July 2016, Romania became the twenty-second Member State of CERN, 25 years after the first cooperation agreement with the country was signed. “CERN and Romania already have a long history of strong collaboration”, says Emmanuel Tsesmelis, head of Relations with Associate Members and Non-Member States. “We very much look forward to strengthening this collaboration as Romania becomes CERN’s twenty-second Member State, which promises the development of mutual interests in scientific research, related technologies and education,” he affirms. Romania&...

  13. Forgotten women the scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Tsjeng, Zing

    2018-01-01

    The women who shaped and were erased from our history. The Forgotten Women series will uncover the lost histories of the influential women who have refused over hundreds of years to accept the hand they've been dealt and, as a result, have formed, shaped and changed the course of our futures. The Scientists celebrates 48* unsung scientific heroines whose hugely important, yet broadly unacknowledged or incorrectly attributed, discoveries have transformed our understanding of the scientific world. Mary Anning, the amateur paleontologist whose fossil findings changed scientific thinking about prehistoric life Emmy Noether, dubbed "The Mighty Mathematician You've Never Heard Of" Ynés Mexía, the Mexican-American botanist who discovered over 500 new plant species Wangari Maathai, who started an environmental and ecological revolution in Kenya Margaret Sanger, the maverick nurse who paved the way for the legalization of contraception Chapters including Earth & Universe; Biology & N...

  14. A Serendipitous Scientist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2018-01-06

    Growing up in a middle-class Jewish home in the Bronx, I had only one professional goal: to become a physician. However, as with most of my Vietnam-era MD colleagues, I found my residency training interrupted by the Doctor Draft in 1968. Some of us who were academically inclined fulfilled this obligation by serving in the US Public Health Service as commissioned officers stationed at the National Institutes of Health. This experience would eventually change the entire trajectory of my career. Here I describe how, over a period of years, I transitioned from the life of a physician to that of a physician-scientist; my 50 years of work on cellular receptors; and some miscellaneous thoughts on subjects as varied as Nobel prizes, scientific lineages, mentoring, publishing, and funding.

  15. Radiation Technician Scientist service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto Miranda, Enrique; Barrera Gonzalez, Gisela; Guerra Torres, Mercedes; Mora Lopez, Leonor; Altanes Valentin, Sonia; Rapado Paneque, Manuel; Plasencia Gutierrez, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    The irradiation service is part of the specialized technician scientist services of the Center of Technological Applications and Nuclear Development it belonging to the Radiobiological Department it provides a self shielded laboratory irradiator, PX y 30 type with Cobalt 60 sources, it destined for searches studies, so much basic as applying, in several branches of the science, like the radiobiology, the radiation chemistry, the solid state physics, the medicine, the agriculture and the Pharmaceutical- Medical Industry and besides offering the irradiation service properly with the which have been gotten significant economical outputs. The radiation processing is controlled by means of the dosimetric systems of Freckle, ceric cerous sulfate, Perspex (red, clear and Amber) and dose indicators

  16. MAGNETIC FIELD IN ATYPICAL PROMINENCE STRUCTURES: BUBBLE, TORNADO, AND ERUPTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levens, P. J.; Labrosse, N. [SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Schmieder, B. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); López Ariste, A. [IRAP—CNRS UMR 5277, 14, Av. E. Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Dalmasse, K. [CISL/HAO, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Gelly, B., E-mail: p.levens.1@research.gla.ac.uk, E-mail: brigitte.schmieder@obspm.fr [CNRS UMR 3718 THEMIS, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2016-08-01

    Spectropolarimetric observations of prominences have been obtained with the THEMIS telescope during four years of coordinated campaigns. Our aim is now to understand the conditions of the cool plasma and magnetism in “atypical” prominences, namely when the measured inclination of the magnetic field departs, to some extent, from the predominantly horizontal field found in “typical” prominences. What is the role of the magnetic field in these prominence types? Are plasma dynamics more important in these cases than the magnetic support? We focus our study on three types of “atypical” prominences (tornadoes, bubbles, and jet-like prominence eruptions) that have all been observed by THEMIS in the He i D{sub 3} line, from which the Stokes parameters can be derived. The magnetic field strength, inclination, and azimuth in each pixel are obtained by using the inversion method of principal component analysis on a model of single scattering in the presence of the Hanle effect. The magnetic field in tornadoes is found to be more or less horizontal, whereas for the eruptive prominence it is mostly vertical. We estimate a tendency toward higher values of magnetic field strength inside the bubbles than outside in the surrounding prominence. In all of the models in our database, only one magnetic field orientation is considered for each pixel. While sufficient for most of the main prominence body, this assumption appears to be oversimplified in atypical prominence structures. We should consider these observations as the result of superposition of multiple magnetic fields, possibly even with a turbulent field component.

  17. The Challenge of Providing Gifted Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Dole

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction to Volume 4, No of Global Education Review Although there is a lack of universal consensus on a definition of giftedness there is some agreement that giftedness involves multiple qualities, not just intellectual ones. Gifted education programs vary both among and within countries and who is served in these programs depends largely on the definitions used. The topics explored in this issue include perceptions and policies of gifted education in cultures and countries across the globe; the presumed dichotomy of equity and excellence in countries as different in ideologies as the United States and China; underrepresentation of culturally diverse students, a problem that has plagued the field for decades; gifted education in rural communities; and using a virtual environment for students to pose and share mathematical problems.

  18. Scientists feature their work in Arctic-focused short videos by FrontierScientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L.; O'Connell, E.

    2013-12-01

    Whether they're guiding an unmanned aerial vehicle into a volcanic plume to sample aerosols, or documenting core drilling at a frozen lake in Siberia formed 3.6 million years ago by a massive meteorite impact, Arctic scientists are using video to enhance and expand their science and science outreach. FrontierScientists (FS), a forum for showcasing scientific work, produces and promotes radically different video blogs featuring Arctic scientists. Three- to seven- minute multimedia vlogs help deconstruct researcher's efforts and disseminate stories, communicating scientific discoveries to our increasingly connected world. The videos cover a wide range of current field work being performed in the Arctic. All videos are freely available to view or download from the FrontierScientists.com website, accessible via any internet browser or via the FrontierScientists app. FS' filming process fosters a close collaboration between the scientist and the media maker. Film creation helps scientists reach out to the public, communicate the relevance of their scientific findings, and craft a discussion. Videos keep audience tuned in; combining field footage, pictures, audio, and graphics with a verbal explanation helps illustrate ideas, allowing one video to reach people with different learning strategies. The scientists' stories are highlighted through social media platforms online. Vlogs grant scientists a voice, letting them illustrate their own work while ensuring accuracy. Each scientific topic on FS has its own project page where easy-to-navigate videos are featured prominently. Video sets focus on different aspects of a researcher's work or follow one of their projects into the field. We help the scientist slip the answers to their five most-asked questions into the casual script in layman's terms in order to free the viewers' minds to focus on new concepts. Videos are accompanied by written blogs intended to systematically demystify related facts so the scientists can focus

  19. Examining of the Gifted Students’ Teacher Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feyzullah SAHIN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gifted students differ from their peers in terms of motivations, learning, social and emotional needs. Because of these differences, it is indispensible that their teachers have to have a number of different characteristics. Because, teachers’ personality tratis and professional qualifications affects gifted students’ academic, cognitive and affective development. The main aim of this study is to examine that whether gifted students’ preferences of characteristics that teachers should have, differs according to type of educational institution, student's gender and level of meeting their educational needs or not. The study was designed as descriptive, one of the survey models. The study group consists of 1077 gifted students who are enrolled at five Science High School state schools, a private gifted school and three Science and Art Centers in Thracia Region in Turkey. As a means of data collection, Gifted Students’ Teacher Preferences Scale (GSTPS developed by Sahin & Tortop (2013 was used. In the calculation of internal consistency reliability of research data, Cronbach's α value was calculated. Cronbach alfa realibity cofficients were found to be .92 for Personality Traits sub-scale, .89 Professional Qualification sub-scale and .94 GSTPS, respectively. Besides, it was seen that based on the gender of participants, there was no difference in the characteristics they want to see in teachers and the opinions of students in High Schools and at SACs differed from the ones who were in the private school. Moreover, it was determined that the scores of the ones who thought the schools met their educational needs fully and the ones who thought the schools met their educational needs partially varied significantly.

  20. Impact of Closed-Loop Gift Card Promotions By Businesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn W. Ernstberger

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available At their inception, gift cards were sold by businesses to customers to give as gifts to others. More recently, gift cards are beingused strategically by businesses to manage and transform their relationships with customers. Of particular interest here is the closed-loop gift card that can only be redeemed at the business whose name is on it. This analysis discusses the impact of closed-loop gift card promotions and evaluates the impact of these promotions ontotal spending, lift and redemption rates.

  1. Psychological perspectives on gifted education – selected problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sękowski Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article reviews the psychological literature on selected problems of gifted education. It discusses issues which are particularly important from the point of view of the skills and tools used by psychologists, educational specialists, teachers and tutors in their daily work with gifted children and adolescents. The problems described include diagnosis of giftedness in education, types of educational support provided to the gifted, and the requirements placed on teachers of gifted students. A particular emphasis is put on the contemporary research-related and practical challenges faced by gifted support specialists in schools.

  2. Ivan Yakovych Gorbachevsky – Scientist, Patriot, Citizen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Danilova

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the facts about life and research activity of Ivan Ya. Gorbachevsky (1854-1942, the prominent scientist, Ukrainian by origin, doctor of medical sciences, professor, dean of the medical faculty and the rector of Charles University in Prague, member of the health board of the Czech Kingdom, a member of the Supreme Council of Health of Austria-Hungary in Vienna, a lifelong member of the House of Lords of the Austrian Parliament, first health minister of Austria-Hungary, rector of the Ukrainian Free University in Prague, professor of chemistry at the Padebradsk Economic Academy and the Ukrainian Pedagogical Dragomanov University, AUAS member in 1925, member of the Shevchenko Scientific Society. His research works were devoted to digestion of proteins, public and food hygiene. He was the first who synthesized uric acid (1882 and discovered xanthine oxidase (1889.

  3. The Performative Gift: A Feminist Materialist Conceptual Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörgen Skågeby

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Gifting (or gift-giving is a particularly interesting form of communication that envelops both material and social dimensions. Objects are transformed into gifts through particular socio-material practices. While these practices are, of course, interesting in themselves, this paper will take a step back and revisit attempts to define and theorize the gift as a concept. In a time when the gift economy is often called upon as a potential candidate for more “participatory alternatives to capitalist totality”, particularly in relation to theorizing of labour on and through the Internet, theories of gifting provide an important foundation for discussing the boundaries of alternative futures and economies. So far, little effort has been taken to advance gift theory into a new materialist or posthumanist thinking. In an attempt to take that first step, this paper provides two contributions. First, it highlights how feminist theorizing of the gift comprises interesting forerunners in a new materialist conception of the gift. Second, it explores the analytical traction that can be gained from interlocking theories of the gift, feminist materialism and digital media, the result being a conceptual model that addresses the gift as a form of virtual-digital-material communication.

  4. History and Outcomes of 50 Years of Physician-Scientist Training in Medical Scientist Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Clifford V; Akabas, Myles H; Andersen, Olaf S

    2017-10-01

    Physician-scientists are needed to continue the great pace of recent biomedical research and translate scientific findings to clinical applications. MD-PhD programs represent one approach to train physician-scientists. MD-PhD training started in the 1950s and expanded greatly with the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP), launched in 1964 by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) at the National Institutes of Health. MD-PhD training has been influenced by substantial changes in medical education, science, and clinical fields since its inception. In 2014, NIGMS held a 50th Anniversary MSTP Symposium highlighting the program and assessing its outcomes. In 2016, there were over 90 active MD-PhD programs in the United States, of which 45 were MSTP supported, with a total of 988 trainee slots. Over 10,000 students have received MSTP support since 1964. The authors present data for the demographic characteristics and outcomes for 9,683 MSTP trainees from 1975-2014. The integration of MD and PhD training has allowed trainees to develop a rigorous foundation in research in concert with clinical training. MSTP graduates have had relative success in obtaining research grants and have become prominent leaders in many biomedical research fields. Many challenges remain, however, including the need to maintain rigorous scientific components in evolving medical curricula, to enhance research-oriented residency and fellowship opportunities in a widening scope of fields targeted by MSTP graduates, to achieve greater racial diversity and gender balance in the physician-scientist workforce, and to sustain subsequent research activities of physician-scientists.

  5. A 35-year comparison of children labelled as gifted, unlabelled as gifted and average-ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Freeman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1984686X14273Why are some children seen as gifted while others of identical ability are not?  To find out why and what the consequences might be, in 1974 I began in England with 70 children labelled as gifted.  Each one was matched for age, sex and socio-economic level with two comparison children in the same school class. The first comparison child had an identical gift, and the second taken at random.  Investigation was by a battery of tests and deep questioning of pupils, teachers and parents in their schools and homes which went on for 35 years. A major significant difference was that those labelled gifted had significantly more emotional problems than either the unlabelled but identically gifted or the random controls.  The vital aspects of success for the entire sample, whether gifted or not, have been hard work, emotional support and a positive personal outlook.  But in general, the higher the individual’s intelligence the better their chances in life. 

  6. Social Coping of Gifted and LGBTQ Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Virginia H.; Tieso, Carol L.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study used critical ethnography as a theoretical framework to investigate the social coping strategies of gifted and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) students in middle and high school. Twelve LGBTQ college students from a selective Southeastern university were interviewed and asked to retrospectively…

  7. Parenting Styles and Adjustment in Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilarinos, Vassiliki; Solomon, C. R.

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between parenting styles and the psychosocial adjustment of 48 children aged 7 to 11 years, each of whom had been identified as gifted on the basis of a score of 130 or above on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children--Fourth Edition. Parenting styles and child psychosocial adjustment were measured…

  8. Gifted Education in German-Speaking Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Albert; Stoeger, Heidrun; Harder, Bettina; Balestrini, Daniel Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The authors first briefly describe how the concepts of talents and giftedness found in German-speaking Europe have evolved in the school system and in general over the past two centuries, and how the variety of gifted-education efforts found within and beyond schools as well as counseling efforts attest to these changes. They then discuss four…

  9. The Best Kept Secret in Gifted Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvino, James

    2004-01-01

    It is perhaps one of the best-kept secrets in educating gifted high school youth, and yet for 45 years, Hugh O'Brian Youth Leadership (HOBY) has been going strong, "Motivating Tomorrow's Leaders Today." After spending nine inspirational days in 1958 with Albert Schweitzer (Nobel Prize physician and philosopher) at his clinic in the African jungle,…

  10. Word Magic: Shakespeare's Rhetoric for Gifted Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kester, Ellen S.

    Intended for teachers of gifted students in grades 4-12, the curriculum uses six of Shakespeare's comedies ("The Taming of the Shrew,""The Tempest,""Twelfth Night,""The Comedy of Errors,""As You Like It," and "A Midsummer Night's Dream") as materials for nurturing intellectual and…

  11. Temporal Stability of Gifted Children's Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Robert S.; Sabatino, David A.

    1995-01-01

    The longitudinal stability of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised was examined for consistency in determining eligibility for gifted programs among 66 elementary children. All subtest scales except one remained extremely stable, producing less than one scale score point difference across three test administrations. Children…

  12. Desktop Publishing for the Gifted/Talented.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Wayne

    1987-01-01

    Examines the nature of desktop publishing and how it can be used in the classroom for gifted/talented students. Characteristics and special needs of such students are identified, and it is argued that desktop publishing addresses those needs, particularly with regard to creativity. Twenty-six references are provided. (MES)

  13. Gifted Students and Logo: Teacher's Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flickinger, Gayle Glidden

    1987-01-01

    The Logo computer program is well-suited to gifted students' learning style characteristics (independence, fluency, persistence); learning style preferences (learning alone, use of tactile and kinesthetic senses, and sound in the learning environment); and teaching method preferences (independent projects, discussion, flexibility, and traditional…

  14. Communication Skills among Gifted Students in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfarah, Yacoub Fareed

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the communication skills among gifted students in Jordan and to investigate the effect of gender and the level of students in acquiring these communication skills. A questionnaire was distributed among the sample of the study which comprised of (240) tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grade students from Al…

  15. Marital and Life Satisfaction among Gifted Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone-McGovern, Kristin M.; Boo, Jenelle N.; Vannatter, Aarika

    2012-01-01

    Spousal giftedness, dual-career status, and gender were studied in relation to marital and life satisfaction among gifted adults. The data for the present study were collected twice over a 5-year period in order to examine the stability of the findings over time. Results indicated that marital satisfaction was significantly related to life…

  16. Towards a Systemic Theory of Gifted Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Albert; Phillipson, Shane N.

    2012-01-01

    In this target article, we argue that current approaches to gifted education are based on the erroneous view that to understand the development of exceptionality we need to understand firstly the components of giftedness, including cognitive such as intelligence and non-cognitive factors such as motivation. In contrast, systemic approaches to…

  17. The Museum and the Gifted Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Karen B.

    1985-01-01

    The article presents questioning strategies that can be used when introducing gifted children to the art museum. The strategies utilize eight creative processes and seventeen content, process, and product modifications, based on the differentiation models of Frank Williams and June Maker. A single work of art is used and examples of questions…

  18. Coupons from Deal Sites as Gifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlicek, Antonin; Sudzina, Frantisek

    2017-01-01

    There already exist studies on what influences use of deal sites. But there is a gap in literature when it comes to purchasing coupons from deal sites and then using them as gifts. The paper analyzes whether gender, age and personality traits influence such behavior. Big Five Inventory traits...

  19. Mixed Age Grouping for Gifted Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Lorraine L.

    1991-01-01

    The application of mixed-age grouping at Rainard School (Houston, Texas), a private school for gifted students, is described. Discussed are advantages (such as encouraging cooperation instead of competition), the optimum age spread, the differentiated and individualized curriculum, parent reactions, teacher reactions, and difficulties. (DB)

  20. Some Thoughts on Gifted Education and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    This article serves as commentary on the papers featured in the issue. Accordingly, these papers and the questions raised in them form the basis of its discussion. The papers, in turn, are addressing numerous aspects of creativity and working with the mathematically gifted, an area of study that has attracted considerable scholarly attention in…

  1. Mental Attention in Gifted and Nongifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Jose I.; Ramiro, Pedro; Lopez, Jose M.; Aguilar, Manuel; Acosta, Manuel; Montero, Juan

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between the construct of mental attention and "giftedness" is not well established. Gifted individuals could make effective use of their executive functions and this could be related to their mental attentional capacity. The dialectic constructivist model developed by Pascual-Leone introduced the concept of mental…

  2. The Talent Search Model of Gifted Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouline, Susan G.; Lupkowski-Shoplik, Ann

    2012-01-01

    The Talent Search model, founded at Johns Hopkins University by Dr. Julian C. Stanley, is fundamentally an above-level testing program. This simplistic description belies the enduring impact that the Talent Search model has had on the lives of hundreds of thousands of gifted students as well as their parents and teachers. In this article, we…

  3. The Gifts of the 20th Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Kathy

    1999-01-01

    This article describes critical events that have shaped gifted education, including: intelligence testing, the concept of intelligence, the construct of creativity, greater understanding of brain functions, the work of John Dewey, Jerome Bruner, and Leta Hollingworth, school reform, world change, and the shift from identification to meeting…

  4. A STATISTICAL STUDY OF TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS IN A QUIESCENT PROMINENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillier, A. [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Morton, R. J. [Mathematics and Information Science, Northumbria University, Pandon Building, Camden Street, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8ST (United Kingdom); Erdélyi, R., E-mail: andrew@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-20

    The launch of the Hinode satellite has allowed for seeing-free observations at high-resolution and high-cadence making it well suited to study the dynamics of quiescent prominences. In recent years it has become clear that quiescent prominences support small-amplitude transverse oscillations, however, sample sizes are usually too small for general conclusions to be drawn. We remedy this by providing a statistical study of transverse oscillations in vertical prominence threads. Over a 4 hr period of observations it was possible to measure the properties of 3436 waves, finding periods from 50 to 6000 s with typical velocity amplitudes ranging between 0.2 and 23 km s{sup –1}. The large number of observed waves allows the determination of the frequency dependence of the wave properties and derivation of the velocity power spectrum for the transverse waves. For frequencies less than 7 mHz, the frequency dependence of the velocity power is consistent with the velocity power spectra generated from observations of the horizontal motions of magnetic elements in the photosphere, suggesting that the prominence transverse waves are driven by photospheric motions. However, at higher frequencies the two distributions significantly diverge, with relatively more power found at higher frequencies in the prominence oscillations. These results highlight that waves over a large frequency range are ubiquitous in prominences, and that a significant amount of the wave energy is found at higher frequency.

  5. A STATISTICAL STUDY OF TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS IN A QUIESCENT PROMINENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillier, A.; Morton, R. J.; Erdélyi, R.

    2013-01-01

    The launch of the Hinode satellite has allowed for seeing-free observations at high-resolution and high-cadence making it well suited to study the dynamics of quiescent prominences. In recent years it has become clear that quiescent prominences support small-amplitude transverse oscillations, however, sample sizes are usually too small for general conclusions to be drawn. We remedy this by providing a statistical study of transverse oscillations in vertical prominence threads. Over a 4 hr period of observations it was possible to measure the properties of 3436 waves, finding periods from 50 to 6000 s with typical velocity amplitudes ranging between 0.2 and 23 km s –1 . The large number of observed waves allows the determination of the frequency dependence of the wave properties and derivation of the velocity power spectrum for the transverse waves. For frequencies less than 7 mHz, the frequency dependence of the velocity power is consistent with the velocity power spectra generated from observations of the horizontal motions of magnetic elements in the photosphere, suggesting that the prominence transverse waves are driven by photospheric motions. However, at higher frequencies the two distributions significantly diverge, with relatively more power found at higher frequencies in the prominence oscillations. These results highlight that waves over a large frequency range are ubiquitous in prominences, and that a significant amount of the wave energy is found at higher frequency

  6. Two Categories of Apparent Tornado-like Prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sara F.; Venkataramanasastry, Aparna

    2014-06-01

    Two categories of solar prominences have been described in the literature as having a pattern of mass motions and/or a shape similar to terrestrial tornados. We first identify the two categories associated with prominences in the historic literature and then show that counterparts do exist for both in recent literature but one has not been called a tornado prominence. One category described as being similar to tornados is associated with the barbs of quiescent filaments but barbs appear to have rotational motion only under special conditions. H alpha Doppler observations from Helio Research confirm that this category is an illusion in our mind’s eye resulting from counterstreaming in the large barbs of quiescent filaments. The second category is a special case of rotational motion occurring during the early stages of some erupting prominences, in recent years called the roll effect in erupting prominences. In these cases, the eruption begins with the sideways rolling of the top of a prominence. As the eruption proceeds the rolling motion propagates down one leg or both legs of an erupting prominence depending on whether the eruption is asymmetric or symmetric respectively. As an asymmetric eruption proceeds, the longer lasting leg becomes nearly vertical and has true rotational motion. If only this phase of the eruption was observed, as in the historic cases, it was called a tornado prominence and spectra recorded in these cases provide proof of the rotational motion. When one observes an entire eruption which exhibits the rolling motion, as accomplished at Helio Research, the similarity to a tornado is lost because the event as a whole has quite a different nature and the analogy to a terrestrial tornado not longer appears suitable or helpful in understanding the observed and deduced physical processes. Our conclusion is that there are no solar prominences with motions that are usefully described as tornado or tornado-like events aside from the fun of observing

  7. Metacognitive awareness and math anxiety in gifted students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Sarıcam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The basic purpose of this study has been to examine the relationships between metacognitive awareness and maths anxiety in gifted students. The second aim was to compare with gifted and non-gifted students’ metacognitive awareness and maths anxiety levels. The participants were 300 (150 gifted, 150 non-gifted volunteer secondary school students in Turkey. The mean age of the participants was 12.56 years ranging from 12 to 13 years. For gathering data, the Maths Anxiety Scale for Elementary School Students and The Metacognitive Awareness Inventory for Children were used. For analysing the data, Spearman correlation analysis, the Mann Whitney U test, and linear regression analysis were used. According to the findings: firstly, gifted students’ metacognitive awareness scores were higher than those of non-gifted students. On the other hand, non-gifted students’ maths anxiety levels were higher than those of gifted students. Secondly, there was negative correlation between metacognitive awareness and math anxiety. Finally, the findings of linear regression analysis indicated that metacognitive awareness is explained by 48% total variance of maths anxiety in gifted students.

  8. Seven scientists advise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    The Scientific Advisory Committee of the International Atomic Energy Agency held its second series of meetings in Vienna on 4-5 June 1959. The members of the Committee are seven distinguished scientists from different countries: Dr. H.J. Bhabha (India), Sir John Cockcroft (UK), Professor V.S. Emelyanov (USSR), Dr. B. Goldschmidt (France), Dr. B. Gross (Brazil), Dr. W.B. Lewis (Canada) and Professor I.I. Rabi (USA). The function of the Committee is to provide the Director General and through him the Board of Governors with scientific and technical advice on questions relating to the Agency's activities. Subjects for consideration by the Committee can be submitted by the Director General either on his own behalf or on behalf of the Board. At its recent session, the Committee considered several aspects of the Agency's scientific programme, including the proposed conferences, symposia and seminars for 1960, scientific and technical publications, and the research contracts which had been or were to be awarded by the Agency. The programme of conferences for the current year had been approved earlier by the Board of Governors on the recommendation of the Committee. A provisional list of 17 conferences, symposia and seminars for 1960 was examined by the Committee and recommendations were made to the Director General. The Committee also examined the Agency's policy on the award of contracts for research work and studies. An important subject before the Committee was the principles and regulations for the application of Agency safeguards. Another subject considered by the Committee was the possibility of a project for an exchange of knowledge on controlled thermonuclear fusion. The Committee also examined a proposal for the determination of the world-wide distribution of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in water. Exact information on the distribution of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in rain, in rivers, in ground water and in oceans would be important for areas with limited water

  9. Seven scientists advise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-07-15

    The Scientific Advisory Committee of the International Atomic Energy Agency held its second series of meetings in Vienna on 4-5 June 1959. The members of the Committee are seven distinguished scientists from different countries: Dr. H.J. Bhabha (India), Sir John Cockcroft (UK), Professor V.S. Emelyanov (USSR), Dr. B. Goldschmidt (France), Dr. B. Gross (Brazil), Dr. W.B. Lewis (Canada) and Professor I.I. Rabi (USA). The function of the Committee is to provide the Director General and through him the Board of Governors with scientific and technical advice on questions relating to the Agency's activities. Subjects for consideration by the Committee can be submitted by the Director General either on his own behalf or on behalf of the Board. At its recent session, the Committee considered several aspects of the Agency's scientific programme, including the proposed conferences, symposia and seminars for 1960, scientific and technical publications, and the research contracts which had been or were to be awarded by the Agency. The programme of conferences for the current year had been approved earlier by the Board of Governors on the recommendation of the Committee. A provisional list of 17 conferences, symposia and seminars for 1960 was examined by the Committee and recommendations were made to the Director General. The Committee also examined the Agency's policy on the award of contracts for research work and studies. An important subject before the Committee was the principles and regulations for the application of Agency safeguards. Another subject considered by the Committee was the possibility of a project for an exchange of knowledge on controlled thermonuclear fusion. The Committee also examined a proposal for the determination of the world-wide distribution of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in water. Exact information on the distribution of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in rain, in rivers, in ground water and in oceans would be important for areas with limited water

  10. Frontier Scientists use Modern Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'connell, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    Engaging Americans and the international community in the excitement and value of Alaskan Arctic discovery is the goal of Frontier Scientists. With a changing climate, resources of polar regions are being eyed by many nations. Frontier Scientists brings the stories of field scientists in the Far North to the public. With a website, an app, short videos, and social media channels; FS is a model for making connections between the public and field scientists. FS will demonstrate how academia, web content, online communities, evaluation and marketing are brought together in a 21st century multi-media platform, how scientists can maintain their integrity while engaging in outreach, and how new forms of media such as short videos can entertain as well as inspire.

  11. ON THE MAGNETISM AND DYNAMICS OF PROMINENCE LEGS HOSTING TORNADOES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez González, M. J.; Ramos, A. Asensio; Arregui, I.; Collados, M.; Beck, C.; Rodríguez, J. de la Cruz

    2016-01-01

    Solar tornadoes are dark vertical filamentary structures observed in the extreme ultraviolet associated with prominence legs and filament barbs. Their true nature and relationship to prominences requires an understanding of their magnetic structure and dynamic properties. Recently, a controversy has arisen: is the magnetic field organized forming vertical, helical structures or is it dominantly horizontal? And concerning their dynamics, are tornadoes really rotating or is it just a visual illusion? Here we analyze four consecutive spectro-polarimetric scans of a prominence hosting tornadoes on its legs, which helps us shed some light on their magnetic and dynamical properties. We show that the magnetic field is very smooth in all the prominence, which is probably an intrinsic property of the coronal field. The prominence legs have vertical helical fields that show slow temporal variation that is probably related to the motion of the fibrils. Concerning the dynamics, we argue that (1) if rotation exists, it is intermittent, lasting no more than one hour, and (2) the observed velocity pattern is also consistent with an oscillatory velocity pattern (waves).

  12. ON THE MAGNETISM AND DYNAMICS OF PROMINENCE LEGS HOSTING TORNADOES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez González, M. J.; Ramos, A. Asensio; Arregui, I.; Collados, M. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Beck, C. [National Solar Observatory, Sacramento Peak P.O. Box 62, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Rodríguez, J. de la Cruz [Institute for Solar Physics, Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, Albanova University Center, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-07-10

    Solar tornadoes are dark vertical filamentary structures observed in the extreme ultraviolet associated with prominence legs and filament barbs. Their true nature and relationship to prominences requires an understanding of their magnetic structure and dynamic properties. Recently, a controversy has arisen: is the magnetic field organized forming vertical, helical structures or is it dominantly horizontal? And concerning their dynamics, are tornadoes really rotating or is it just a visual illusion? Here we analyze four consecutive spectro-polarimetric scans of a prominence hosting tornadoes on its legs, which helps us shed some light on their magnetic and dynamical properties. We show that the magnetic field is very smooth in all the prominence, which is probably an intrinsic property of the coronal field. The prominence legs have vertical helical fields that show slow temporal variation that is probably related to the motion of the fibrils. Concerning the dynamics, we argue that (1) if rotation exists, it is intermittent, lasting no more than one hour, and (2) the observed velocity pattern is also consistent with an oscillatory velocity pattern (waves).

  13. Solar Tornado Prominences: Plasma Motions Along Filament Barbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasenco, Olga; Velli, Marco; Martin, Sara F.; Rappazzo, Franco

    2013-03-01

    Recent high-resolution observations from the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) have reawakened interest in the old and fascinating phenomenon of solar tornado prominences. This class of prominences was first introduced by E. Pettit in 1932, who studied them over many years up to 1950. High resolution and high cadence multi-wavelength data obtained by SDO reveal that the tornado-like properties of these prominences are mainly an illusion due to projection effects. We show that counterstreaming plasma motions with projected velocities up to +/- 45 km/sec along the prominence spine and barbs create a tornado-like impression when viewed at the limb. We demonstrate that barbs are often rooted at the intersection between 4-5 supergranular cells. We discuss the observed oscillations along the vertical parts of barbs and whether they may be related to vortex flows coming from the convection downdrafts at the intersection of supergranules (and possibly smaller convective cells) in the photosphere and their entrained magnetic field. The unwinding of magnetic threads near the photosphere via reconnection might be a source of the waves which are observed as oscillations in prominence barbs.

  14. When Marcel Mauss's Essai sur le Don becomes The Gift: variations on the theme of solidarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Simone

    2016-12-01

    Since the early 1970s, Marcel Mauss's Essai sur le Don (1923), translated into English as The Gift in 1954, has been a standard reference in the social science and bioethical literature on the use of human body parts and substances for medical and research purposes. At that time, three social scientists-political scientist Richard Titmuss in the United Kingdom and sociologist Renée C. Fox working with historian Judith Swazey in the United States-had the idea of using this concept to highlight the fundamental structure of the biomedical practices they were studying, respectively, blood donation, and hemodialysis and organ transplantation. The fact that these first applications of Mauss's essay should emerge in English- rather than in French-speaking countries raises the question of what the translation of the essay, and notably of the word don as gift, may have to do with this fact. Reading Mauss in translation undoubtedly inspired a seminal approach to interpreting medical and research practices based on bodily giving. This article posits that something may have also been lost: a much broader concept of giving with unquestionable links to the Durkheimian concept of solidarity, which Mauss conceptualizes not only as an obligation but also as a liberty to give.

  15. Review of dissertation «The Relationship Between Identified Gifted and Talented Children and Their Parents» by Brian J. Welsh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florova N.B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This review points out that experts still do not clearly understand the perception of gifted children be their parents and the way the last build relations in the «parent-children " system. Parents of gifted children clearly need special family resources that might contribute to the progress of their children in future. Such resources are a key to the success of these children at the family level and are commonly - family habits, strategies, values, and ways of life. This study is phenomenological because it describes the qualitative parameters-internal mutual coupling of a certain number of factors in the system, «families with gifted children». It was held in families with gifted children of the middle school age, with the help of interviews and archival data. The author of the research studied the totality of the factors affecting the life experiences of the participants. It discovered that parents are the most powerful force in ensuring the successful training, socialization, emotional well-being of children. Such methods can be showcased on the educational process, in which gifted students are the potential leaders, researchers, physicians, and scientists. The author emphasizes that in the course of work on the topic he himself deeper realized the role of parents' experiences in educational, social and emotional formation of children. The basis for the concept of the study are the following determined groups of factors: a emotional (positive and negative aspects and feeling, b social, (academic achievements

  16. Nurturing Gifted and Talented Students to Become Future Leaders: The Innovative Curriculum for the Gifted and/or Talented at GT College in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Raymond Kwok-Wai

    2017-01-01

    In the previous literature on gifted education in Hong Kong, there has been little mention of special schools for gifted and/or talented students in Hong Kong except for GT College, Hong Kong's first college for the gifted. Some notable researchers in gifted education in Hong Kong have described the college briefly with regard to its admission…

  17. Reconnection–Condensation Model for Solar Prominence Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, Takafumi [Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Yokoyama, Takaaki, E-mail: kaneko@isee.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2017-08-10

    We propose a reconnection–condensation model in which topological change in a coronal magnetic field via reconnection triggers radiative condensation, thereby resulting in prominence formation. Previous observational studies have suggested that reconnection at a polarity inversion line of a coronal arcade field creates a flux rope that can sustain a prominence; however, they did not explain the origin of cool dense plasmas of prominences. Using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, including anisotropic nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiative cooling, we demonstrate that reconnection can lead not only to flux rope formation but also to radiative condensation under a certain condition. In our model, this condition is described by the Field length, which is defined as the scale length for thermal balance between radiative cooling and thermal conduction. This critical condition depends weakly on the artificial background heating. The extreme ultraviolet emissions synthesized with our simulation results have good agreement with observational signatures reported in previous studies.

  18. Static current-sheet models of quiescent prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, F.; Low, B. C.

    1986-12-01

    A particular class of theoretical models idealize the prominence to be a discrete flat electric-current sheet suspended vertically in a potential magnetic field. The weight of the prominence is supported by the Lorentz force in the current sheet. These models can be extended to have curved electric-current sheets and to vary three-dimensionally. The equation for force balance is 1 over 4 pi (del times B) times Bdel p- p9 z=zero. Using Cartesian coordinates we take, for simplicity, a uniform gravity with constant acceleration g in the direction -z. If we are interested not in the detailed internal structure of the prominence, but in the global magnetic configuration around the prominence, we may take prominence plasma to be cold. Consideration is given to how such equilibrium states can be constructed. To simplify the mathematical problem, suppose there is no electric current in the atmosphere except for the discrete currents in the cold prominence sheet. Let us take the plane z =0 to be the base of the atmosphere and restrict our attention to the domain z greater than 0. The task we have is to solve for a magnetic field which is everywhere potential except on some free surface S, subject to suit able to boundary conditions. The surface S is determined by requiring that it possesses a discrete electric current density such that the Lorentz force on it is everywhere vertically upward to balance the weight of the material m(S). Since the magnetic field is potential in the external atmosphere, the latter is decoupled from the magnetic field and its plane parallel hydrostatic pressure and density can be prescribed.

  19. Solar Prominence Modelling and Plasma Diagnostics at ALMA Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Andrew; Labrosse, Nicolas

    2017-09-01

    Our aim is to test potential solar prominence plasma diagnostics as obtained with the new solar capability of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We investigate the thermal and plasma diagnostic potential of ALMA for solar prominences through the computation of brightness temperatures at ALMA wavelengths. The brightness temperature, for a chosen line of sight, is calculated using the densities of electrons, hydrogen, and helium obtained from a radiative transfer code under non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) conditions, as well as the input internal parameters of the prominence model in consideration. Two distinct sets of prominence models were used: isothermal-isobaric fine-structure threads, and large-scale structures with radially increasing temperature distributions representing the prominence-to-corona transition region. We compute brightness temperatures over the range of wavelengths in which ALMA is capable of observing (0.32 - 9.6 mm), however, we particularly focus on the bands available to solar observers in ALMA cycles 4 and 5, namely 2.6 - 3.6 mm (Band 3) and 1.1 - 1.4 mm (Band 6). We show how the computed brightness temperatures and optical thicknesses in our models vary with the plasma parameters (temperature and pressure) and the wavelength of observation. We then study how ALMA observables such as the ratio of brightness temperatures at two frequencies can be used to estimate the optical thickness and the emission measure for isothermal and non-isothermal prominences. From this study we conclude that for both sets of models, ALMA presents a strong thermal diagnostic capability, provided that the interpretation of observations is supported by the use of non-LTE simulation results.

  20. When accepting a gift can be professional misconduct and theft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard

    2016-07-01

    Gifts are often given as tokens of gratitude by grateful patients to district nurses. However, there are circumstances where the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC), as the professional regulator, and the courts, have held that accepting gifts, large or small, from vulnerable adults is dishonest and amounts to professional misconduct and even theft. Richard Griffith discusses the circumstances where a district nurse who accepts a gift can face a fitness-to-practise investigation and an allegation of theft.

  1. 26 CFR 301.6019-1 - Gift tax returns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gift tax returns. 301.6019-1 Section 301.6019-1... ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Information and Returns Returns and Records § 301.6019-1 Gift tax returns. For provisions relating to requirement of gift tax returns, see §§ 25.6019-1 to 25.6019-4...

  2. Prominent crista terminalis mimicking a right atrial mass: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lange Peter

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The crista terminalis is a normal anatomical structure within the right atrium that is not normally visualised in the standard views obtained while performing a transthoracic echocardiogram. In this case report, transthoracic echocardiography suggested the presence of a right atrial mass in a patient with end stage renal disease. However, subsequent transesophageal echocardiography revealed that the right atrial mass was actually a thick muscular bridge in the right atrium consistent with a prominent crista terminalis. An understanding of the anatomy and the echocardiographic appearance of a prominent crista terminalis will minimize the misdiagnosis of this structure avoiding unnecessary expensive additional tests.

  3. UNDERSTANDING SELF-GIFT CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR IN INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Arora, Gautam

    2007-01-01

    Self-gift is a particularly complex class of self-directed consumption or self-indulgence that is hedonistic, special, symbolic, justified and context bound. A self-gift is what it represents to the individual and can be any product, service or experience. It challenges the very fundamental notion of gift giving as a dyadic enterprise and involves a plethora of varied emotions. Research from various studies has suggested that self-gift behaviour may be fairly common in Western society. This e...

  4. Moving as a gift: relocation in older adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Tam E

    2014-12-01

    While discussions of accessibility, mobility and activities of daily living frame relocation studies, in older adulthood, the paper explores the emotional motivation of gift giving as a rationale for moving. This ethnographic study investigates the processes of household disbandment and decision-making of older adults in the Midwestern United States relocating in post-Global Financial Crisis contexts. In this study, relationships are created and sustained through the process of moving, linking older adults (n=81), their kin (n=49), and professionals (n=46) in the Midwestern United States. Using Marcel Mauss' The Gift (1925/1990) as a theoretical lens, relocation in older adulthood is conceptualized as a gift in two ways: to one's partner, and one's kin. Partners may consider gift-giving in terms of the act of moving to appease and honor their partner. Kin who were not moving themselves were also recipients of the gift of moving. These gifts enchain others in relationships of reciprocity. However these gifts, like all gifts, are not without costs or danger, so this paper examines some of the challenges that emerge along with gift-giving. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. AID as Gift: an initial approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Cristiane da Silva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The article proposes that some of the key practices in the area of international cooperation for development can be better understood in terms of a gift regime. To this end, it compares ethnographic data relating to the modus operandi of the aid sector in East Timor with the legacies of Marcel Mauss and the recent production of M.A.U.S.S. International aid policies are shown to be important means for establishing hegemony in glocal negotiation spaces in which different actors construct identities and relations of alliance, honor and precedence. In this debate, it is argued that East Timor's biggest counter-gift to the international community has been to function as an instrument through which values cherished by aid donors, expressed in Western myths of good society, can once again be cultivated in the process of building a new national state.

  6. Interview with Albert Ziegler about Gifted Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilena Z. Leana-Tascilar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prof. Albert Ziegler is the chair of Educational Psychology and Research on Excellence at the Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nurnberg and one of the most productive and cited academicians in gifted education in Europe and also all over the world. Prof. Ziegler has contributed different theories about gifted education and education in general. One of his well-known theories is The Actiotope Model of Giftedness and the 7-Step-Cycle of Self-Regulated Learning. Since last year I had the chance to be with him and his colleagues in Germany, thus I decided to share with you the interview that we had about his theories and his recommendations for Turkey.

  7. A reading enrichment program for gifted adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Morales Silva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This descriptive research examines the performance on reading comprehension of four gifted adolescents participating in a reading enrichment program. This performance is related to the variables associated to the gifted performance following the model developed by Mönks: motivation, creativity, high ability, school, peers and family. Results showed that school does not satisfy the cognitive needs of these students and it does not offer the required social support either. The family provides the main social support. The motivation, creativity, the high level of language and concentration of the participants facilitate learning. The reading program is described by the participants as motivating due to the subject-matters and methodology; furthermore, due to the opportunity to deal with peers who have a similar cognitive level.

  8. The Hidden Gifts of Quiet Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trierweiler, Hannah

    2006-01-01

    The author relates that she was an introvert child. It has always taken her time and energy to find her place in a group. As a grown-up, she still needed quiet time to regroup during a busy day. In this article, the author presents an interview with Marti Olsen Laney, author of "The Hidden Gifts of the Introverted Child." During the interview,…

  9. Refugee scientists under the spotlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extance, Andy

    2017-07-01

    Thousands of people are forced to flee war-torn regions every year, but the struggles of scientists who have to leave their homeland often goes under the radar. Andy Extance reports on initiatives to help

  10. Alternative hospital gift bags and breastfeeding exclusivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yeon; Wunderlich, Shahla M; Kashdan, Rickie

    2013-01-01

    The type of gift bags given to new mothers at the time of discharge from the hospital can influence their confidence in breastfeeding. Most hospitals in the US continue to distribute commercial gift bags containing formula samples despite the reported negative influence of commercial bags on the duration of breastfeeding. This study compared breastfeeding outcomes in women receiving three different kinds of gift bags at discharge. A prospective intervention study was conducted during 2009-2010 in New Jersey. Three breastfeeding cohorts were recruited and assigned to three groups: COMMERCIAL received discharge bags containing formula samples, BF-INFO received breastfeeding information and supplies, and PUMP received breastfeeding information/supplies plus a manual breast pump. Follow-up contacts were at 2, 4, and 12 postpartum weeks to determine breastfeeding outcome. The mean durations of exclusive (EBF) and partial breastfeeding were compared between groups using ANOVA. A total of 386 participants completed the study. The mean EBF duration (weeks) in the PUMP (n = 138, 8.28 ± 4.86) and BF-INFO (n = 121, 7.87 ± 4.63) were significantly longer (P < 0.01) than COMMERCIAL (n = 127, 6.12 ± 4.49). The rate of EBF through 12 weeks in PUMP was most consistent. The mean duration of partial breastfeeding showed similar results: significantly longer in PUMP and BF-INFO than COMMERCIAL (P < 0.01).

  11. PATTERNS OF FLOWS IN AN INTERMEDIATE PROMINENCE OBSERVED BY HINODE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Kwangsu; Chae, Jongchul; Cao Wenda; Goode, Philip R.

    2010-01-01

    The investigation of plasma flows in filaments/prominences gives us clues to understanding their magnetic structures. We studied the patterns of flows in an intermediate prominence observed by Hinode/SOT. By examining a time series of Hα images and Ca II H images, we have found horizontal flows in the spine and vertical flows in the barb. Both of these flows have a characteristic speed of 10-20 km s -1 . The horizontal flows displayed counterstreaming. Our detailed investigation revealed that most of the moving fragments in fact reversed direction at the end point of the spine near a footpoint close to the associated active region. These returning flows may be one possible explanation of the well-known counterstreaming flows in prominences. In contrast, we have found vertical flows-downward and upward-in the barb. Most of the horizontal flows in the spine seem to switch into vertical flows when they approach the barb, and vice versa. We propose that the net force resulting from a small deviation from magnetohydrostatic equilibrium, where magnetic fields are predominantly horizontal, may drive these patterns of flow. In the prominence studied here, the supposed magnetohydrostatic configuration is characterized by magnetic field lines sagging with angles of 13 0 and 39 0 in the spine and the barb, respectively.

  12. The Most Prominent Roles of an ESP Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafournia, Narjes; Sabet, Shokoofeh Ahmadian

    2014-01-01

    One prominent feature of many ESP (English for Specific Purposes) courses, which make them rather different from EGP (English for General Purposes) courses, is the presence of adult learners, who are primary workers and secondary learners. As ESP is a highly learner-cantered approach, paying close attention to the multidimensional needs of…

  13. On Lyman-line asymmetries in quiescent prominences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gunár, Stanislav; Heinzel, Petr; Anzer, U.; Schmieder, B.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 490, č. 1 (2008), s. 307-313 ISSN 0004-6361 Grant - others:EU(XE) ESA-PECS project No. 98030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : Sun prominences * radiative transfer * line profiles Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.153, year: 2008

  14. Unintended exposure in radiotherapy: Identification of prominent causes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boadu, Mary; Rehani, Madan Mohan

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Unintended exposures in radiotherapy are likely to occur when certain conditions that favour such exposures exist. Based on the frequency of occurrence of various causes of 100 events of unintended exposures in radiotherapy as derived from the analysis of published reports, a checklist for assessing the vulnerability of radiotherapy facilities for potential accidents has been prepared. The list presents items to be considered for safety critical assessments of a radiotherapy department for the improvement of patient safety and the entire radiotherapy processes. Materials and methods: The resources used for this paper consist of 100 unintended radiotherapy exposures and were derived from existing published reports. The analysis was performed by forming two templates: one consisting of 10 initiating events and another of 35 contributing factors. Results: Four most prominent initiating events were identified and together accounted for about 70% of all the unintended exposure events. Ten most prominent contributing factors were also identified and together accounted for about 70% of all the radiotherapy unintended exposure events covered under this study. Conclusion: With this knowledge of high frequency of occurrences, the identified four prominent initiating events and the 10 most prominent contributing factors must be checked and dealt with as a matter of priority when assessing the safety of a radiotherapy facility. A simple checklist for checking the quality assurance programmes of a radiotherapy department for every aspect of the design and delivery of radiation have been provided.

  15. Further Validation of the Coach Identity Prominence Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, J. Paige; Hall, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to examine select psychometric properties of the Coach Identity Prominence Scale (CIPS), including the reliability, factorial validity, convergent validity, discriminant validity, and predictive validity. Coaches (N = 338) who averaged 37 (SD = 12.27) years of age, had a mean of 13 (SD = 9.90) years of coaching experience,…

  16. Whole genome microarray analysis of chicken embryo facial prominences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buchtová, Marcela; Kuo, W. P.; Nimmagadda, S.; Benson, S. L.; Geetha-Loganathan, P.; Logan, C.; Au-Yeung, T.; Chiang, E.; Fu, K.; Richman, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 239, - (2010), s. 574-591 ISSN 1058-8388 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : pharyngeal arch * mandibular arch * maxillary prominence Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.864, year: 2010

  17. Prominence modelling: from observed emission measures to temperature profiles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Anzer, U.; Heinzel, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 480, č. 2 (2008), s. 537-542 ISSN 0004-6361 Grant - others:EU(XE) ESA-PECS Project No. 98030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : Sun * prominences * transition region Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.153, year: 2008

  18. Holdaway's analysis of the nose prominence of an adult Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nose prominence was assessed using Holdaway's analysis. Twenty radiographs randomly selected, were retraced to assess for errors. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, Student's t‑tests and analysis of variance using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Results: The mean value recorded for the nose ...

  19. Eruptive prominences and long-delay geomagnetic storms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, C.S.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between disappearing solar fragments and geomagnetic disturbances was investigated. It is shown that long-delay storms are associated with filaments well removed from the disc centre, and particularly in the case of large filaments and prominences, the proportion of events that produce long-delay storms increases with angular distance from the centre

  20. Cylindrical prominences and the magnetic influence of the photospheric boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, I.; Chicago Univ., IL; Low, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    We construct exact, non-linear, solutions for an horizontal, cylindrical, current-carrying, prominence supported against solar gravity by the action of a Lorentz force. The solutions incorporate the photosphere boundary condition, proposed by van Tend and Kuperus (1978), and analyzed by them for line filaments. Our solutions have finite radius for the prominence material and, as well as satisfying the equations of magnetostatic equilibrium, they allow for the continuity of gas pressure, and of the normal and tangential components of magnetic field across the circular prominence boundary. We show that an infinity of solutions is possible and we illustrate the basic behavior by investigation of a special case. We also give a prescription for constructing equilibrium fields for any horizontal prominence with arbitrary cross-section and with an arbitrary external magnetic field. The prescription is ideally suited for numerical codes and we suggest that both the equilibrium of such shapes can easily be accomplished numerically together with their evolutionary history. (orig.)

  1. Lines of MgI Detected in Solar Prominences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heinzel, Petr; Kupryakov, Yu. A.; Schwartz, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 1 (2016), s. 87-91 ISSN 1845-8319. [Hvar Astrophysical Colloquium /14./. Hvar, 26.09.2016-30.09.2016] Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : prominences * limb-flare * MgI emession Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  2. Topics and topic prominence in two sign languages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimmelman, V.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe topic marking in Russian Sign Language (RSL) and Sign Language of the Netherlands (NGT) and discuss whether these languages should be considered topic prominent. The formal markers of topics in RSL are sentence-initial position, a prosodic break following the topic, and

  3. Multi-Wavelength Eclipse Observations of a Quiescent Prominence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jejčič, S.; Heinzel, Petr; Zapiór, M.; Druckmüller, M.; Gunár, Stanislav; Kotrč, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 289, č. 7 (2014), s. 2487-2501 ISSN 0038-0938 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/12/0906 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : eclipse observations * prominences * quiescent Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.039, year: 2014

  4. Electron densities in quiescent prominences derived from eclipse observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jejčič, S.; Heinzel, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 254, č. 1 (2009), s. 89-100 ISSN 0038-0938 Grant - others:EU(XE) ESA-PECS project No. 98030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : prominences quiescent * eclipse observations * visible spectrum Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.628, year: 2009

  5. An Earth System Scientist Network for Student and Scientist Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledley, T. S.

    2001-05-01

    Successful student and scientist partnerships require that there is a mutual benefit from the partnership. This means that the scientist needs to be able to see the advantage of having students work on his/her project, and the students and teachers need to see that the students contribute to the project and develop the skills in inquiry and the content knowledge in the geosciences that are desired. Through the Earth System Scientist Network (ESSN) for Student and Scientist Partnerships project we are working toward developing scientific research projects for the participation of high school students. When these research projects are developed they will be posted on the ESSN web site that will appear in the Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE). In DLESE teachers and students who are interested in participating in a research program will be able to examine the criteria for each project and select the one that matches their needs and situation. In this paper we will report on how the various ESSN research projects are currently being developed to assure that both the scientist and the students benefit from the partnership. The ESSN scientists are working with a team of scientists and educators to 1) completely define the research question that the students will be addressing, 2) determine what role the students will have in the project, 3) identify the data that the students and teachers will work with, 4) map out the scientific protocols that the students will follow, and 5) determine the background and support materials needed to facilitate students successfully participating in the project. Other issues that the team is addressing include 1) identifying the selection criteria for the schools, 2) identifying rewards and recognition for the students and teacher by the scientist, and 3) identifying issues in Earth system science, relevant to the scientists data, that the students and teachers could use as a guide help develop students investigative

  6. Professional Ethics for Climate Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, K.; Mann, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Several authors have warned that climate scientists sometimes exhibit a tendency to "err on the side of least drama" in reporting the risks associated with fossil fuel emissions. Scientists are often reluctant to comment on the implications of their work for public policy, despite the fact that because of their expertise they may be among those best placed to make recommendations about such matters as mitigation and preparedness. Scientists often have little or no training in ethics or philosophy, and consequently they may feel that they lack clear guidelines for balancing the imperative to avoid error against the need to speak out when it may be ethically required to do so. This dilemma becomes acute in cases such as abrupt ice sheet collapse where it is easier to identify a risk than to assess its probability. We will argue that long-established codes of ethics in the learned professions such as medicine and engineering offer a model that can guide research scientists in cases like this, and we suggest that ethical training could be regularly incorporated into graduate curricula in fields such as climate science and geology. We recognize that there are disanalogies between professional and scientific ethics, the most important of which is that codes of ethics are typically written into the laws that govern licensed professions such as engineering. Presently, no one can legally compel a research scientist to be ethical, although legal precedent may evolve such that scientists are increasingly expected to communicate their knowledge of risks. We will show that the principles of professional ethics can be readily adapted to define an ethical code that could be voluntarily adopted by scientists who seek clearer guidelines in an era of rapid climate change.

  7. Special Issues in Working with Gifted Minority Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Rena R.; Van Sant, Sondra

    1986-01-01

    Gifted adolescents from minority groups face the same issues all gifted young people face, but the addition of racial and cultural factors increases the complexity of these issues. Discusses individual versus cultural pressures that affect identity, issues related to assisting students with long-range planning, and two models for programming.…

  8. Career decision-making of the gifted and talented

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eleven gifted and talented high school students, studying in congregative gifted ... that all students have supports and guidance to promote successful ... The career or vocational counselling issues most discussed in the broader ... They suggest that the Theory of Work Adjustment (TWA; Dawis & ..... International handbook of.

  9. 26 CFR 1.102-1 - Gifts and inheritances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gifts and inheritances. 1.102-1 Section 1.102-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Specifically Excluded from Gross Income § 1.102-1 Gifts and inheritances...

  10. Environmental Influence on the Writing of Gifted High School Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Rae

    1988-01-01

    Compared essays of gifted adolescent girls in the files of the Guidance Institute for the Talented (GIFTS), on "Dominant forces that have directed my life" and "The future as I see it and my place in the future," for girls born in 1944 and 1957. Found essays reflected changes in attitudes occurring in the United States during…

  11. Parents vs. Theorists: Dealing with the Exceptionally Gifted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolan, Stephanie S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper explores the fundamental rift between parents raising exceptionally gifted children and theorists who dismiss this population as "statistically insignificant." The role of intelligence tests in identifying the highly unusual mind is examined. The paper concludes that exceptionally gifted children are suffering intellectual…

  12. Gift and Self-Giving in the Relationship of Communion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magari Simonetta

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Psychology doesn’t seem to be really interested in the theme of gift; in the last decades it focus on the central role of recognition in the psyche building up. The authors underline Chiara Lubich’s original intuition linking profoundly the them of gift and recognition.

  13. Vocational Interests of Intellectually Gifted and Highly Achieving Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vock, Miriam; Koller, Olaf; Nagy, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Background: Vocational interests play a central role in the vocational decision-making process and are decisive for the later job satisfaction and vocational success. Based on Ackerman's (1996) notion of "trait complexes," specific interest profiles of gifted high-school graduates can be expected. Aims: Vocational interests of gifted and…

  14. 36 CFR 905.735-202 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... restriction of paragraph (a) of that section are authorized. Employees may: (a) Accept gifts and other things of value under circumstances which arise from an obvious family or personal relationship(s) (such as... DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Conduct and Responsibilities of Employees § 905.735-202 Gifts...

  15. Gift politics : Exposure and surveillance in the anthropocene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuilenburg, Marc; Peeters, Rik

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the role of gift relations in the Anthropocene. We reinterpret Mauss’s original concept of the gift to understand its application and transformation in a social context that increasingly sees human behavior as a resource for the realization of governmental and corporate

  16. Perfectionism in Gifted Adolescents: A Replication and Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margot, Kelly C.; Rinn, Anne N.

    2016-01-01

    To provide further generalizability for the results garnered by two previous studies, the authors conducted a methodological replication. In addition to adding to the body of replication research done with gifted students, the purpose of this study was to examine perfectionism differences among gifted adolescents in regards to gender, birth order,…

  17. Using Technology to Assist Gifted Children's Musical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroth, Stephen T.; Helfer, Jason A.; Dammers, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Many gifted children are exposed to music as listeners or performers or both. Children who are sophisticated listeners recognize the importance of and differences between the various works they hear and are knowledgeable about a sometimes large and significant repertoire. Children who are gifted performers are able to make a musical composition…

  18. Language Learning of Gifted Individuals: A Content Analysis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokaydin, Beria; Baglama, Basak; Uzunboylu, Huseyin

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to carry out a content analysis of the studies on language learning of gifted individuals and determine the trends in this field. Articles on language learning of gifted individuals published in the Scopus database were examined based on certain criteria including type of publication, year of publication, language, research…

  19. Social-Perspective Coordination and Gifted Adolescents' Friendship Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masden, Catherine A.; Leung, Olivia N.; Shore, Bruce M.; Schneider, Barry H.; Udvari, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    This research examined links among academic ability, social-perspective coordination, and friendship quality, within the context of gifted adolescents' friendships. The sample consisted of 120 early adolescents (59 girls, 61 boys), 81 of whom were identified as gifted. Academic ability, sex, and grade significantly predicted social-perspective…

  20. Bright Not Broken: Gifted Kids, ADHD, and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Diane M.; Banks, Rebecca S.; Grandin, Temple

    2011-01-01

    The future of our society depends on our gifted children--the population in which we'll find our next Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein, or Virginia Woolf. Yet the gifts and talents of some of our most brilliant kids may never be recognized because these children fall into a group known as twice exceptional, or "2e." Twice exceptional kids are both…

  1. Determining and Analyzing Public Support for Gifted Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnes, Frances A.; Riley, Tracy L.

    1997-01-01

    Statewide support for gifted education was assessed through a public opinion telephone survey with 400 respondents in one state. Results indicated general support for specialized programs, except residential schools, for gifted children. Appropriate public relations strategies utilizing such survey results are suggested. (DB)

  2. The University and the Gift: A Problem Definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Emelianov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors suggest introducing the notion of the gift into the theory and practice of the University life. They believe that the relationship of gift in transmission of knowledge is immanent to the management organization of the University. If knowledge is given as a gift and in the situation of gift-giving, then the University milieu should have the relationship of gift. The gift is described here as a theological and anthropological category and then juxtaposed with educational concepts of certain theologians and with ideas of modern economists. Proceeding from the notion of gift, the authors formulate the problem of today’s University which consists in its economical conditionality and in the penetration of market ideology into the scholarly milieu. Transfer of knowledge, which is considered as an absolute value, when circulating within the process of gift-giving, in practice is often identified with utilitarian exchange: the knowledge acquires its price, what inevitably reflects the relationship between professors, students and University’s administration.

  3. A Model for the Education of Gifted Learners in Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarouphim, Ketty M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a model for developing a comprehensive system of education for gifted learners in Lebanon. The model consists of three phases and includes key elements for establishing gifted education in the country, such as raising community awareness, adopting valid identification measures, and developing effective…

  4. 50 CFR 20.40 - Gift of migratory game birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gift of migratory game birds. 20.40... (CONTINUED) TAKING, POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Possession § 20.40 Gift of migratory game birds. No...

  5. The Importance of Decision Making: A Gifted Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauta, Noks; Ronner, Sieuwke; Groeneveld, Benno

    2009-01-01

    In this article the story of a fictional young university-educated woman is presented who struggles with making choices in her career and in her life. In this case report background information on gifted people at work is provided. In addition to that jobs and companies which are appropriate for highly gifted are mentioned. Besides that…

  6. Mathematically Gifted Adolescent Females' Mixed Sentiment toward Gender Stereotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chen-yao

    2015-01-01

    There has been a paucity of research on gifted individuals' perceptions of gender stereotypes. The purpose of this study was to explore mathematically gifted adolescent females' perceptions of gender stereotypes through a research design of the qualitative multiple case study involving the constant comparison and the Three C's analysis scheme.…

  7. Understanding Depression among Gifted Adolescent Females: Feminist Therapy Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Toni; Howard-Hamilton, Mary

    1995-01-01

    Research on depression among gifted adolescent females is reviewed. A psychotherapeutic model drawing on established feminist therapy strategies is presented for counselors working with gifted adolescent females. The model emphasizes recognizing harmful effects of patriarchal society, supporting females in self-exploration, and pursuing nonsexist…

  8. Malaysian Gifted Students' Use of English Language Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Melor Md; Sulaiman, Nur Ainil; Embi, Mohammed Amin

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have been done on language learning strategies employed by different type of learners and in various contexts. However, very little studies have been done on gifted students regarding language learning. Gifted students have unique characteristics and have different ways of thinking and learning. These characteristics affect how they…

  9. Charlie's Words: Supporting Gifted Male Athletes Using Athletes' Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A gifted student-athlete, Charlie Bloomfield is introduced to athlete's journals by his coaches at Burke Mountain Academy (Vermont), an elite American ski school. Used by Olympians and professionals alike, journals provide athletes with ways to organize and reflect on training and competitions. Athlete's journals help gifted male athletes address…

  10. Gift Planning: You Can't Afford Not to

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Richard H.; Gaudette, Mike

    2009-01-01

    The process of reaching out to donors and securing gifts from alumni and other community members presents its share of challenges for community colleges. But, as funding experts Richard H. Morley and Mike Gaudette of the Council for Resource Development write in "Gift Planning: You Can't Afford Not To," there exists a huge financial incentive for…

  11. [Gift giving and the ethics of the caregiver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassin, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Modern societies establish relationships on a contract basis, but the caregiver relationship invariably involves the notion of a gift. Caring engages the giving / receiving / giving back circle of reciprocity. The caregiving relationship requires a gift ethic which gives meaning to the nurse/patient contract.

  12. Gifted Students in Transition: A Grounded Theory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Jodi J.

    2017-01-01

    Gifted students in transition to college may be at risk for underachievement, difficult transition, or even attrition. Giftedness by itself is not always sufficient for academic success in college. The purpose of this grounded theory study was to construct a theory regarding the process of transition to college for high-achieving gifted high…

  13. Common Core State Standards for Students with Gifts and Talents

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanTassel-Baska, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    As many states have adopted the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), teachers can look to these standards as a framework for supporting students with gifts and talents. Differentiation of curriculum and instruction to address the CCSS will be necessary to meet the unique learning needs of learners with high ability and those with gifts and talents.…

  14. Drawing out Understanding: Arts-Based Learning and Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiserman, Jennifer; Lai, Heather; Rushton, Chelsea

    2017-01-01

    Dabrowski recognized that the creative process is important in the personality development of the gifted and talented. Given the intrinsically creative nature of learning in an arts-infused context, we hypothesize that interdisciplinary approaches to curriculum address the unique needs of the gifted. First, we will summarize Dabrowski's theory of…

  15. 27 CFR 10.23 - Gifts or payments to wholesalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gifts or payments to wholesalers. 10.23 Section 10.23 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS COMMERCIAL BRIBERY Commercial Bribery § 10.23 Gifts or...

  16. Counseling Gifted Women: Becoming the Heroes of Our Own Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Kathleen D.

    1989-01-01

    Many gifted women are unaware of or ambivalent about their potential, due to interpersonal obstacles, socio-cultural barriers, and intrapersonal factors. Guidelines and resources are offered for counseling gifted women to recognize and externalize cultural and familial devaluation and to envision new possibilities for personal fulfillment.…

  17. Standards in Gifted Education and Their Effects on Professional Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Susan K.

    2012-01-01

    Educators need to know the professional standards in their field to maintain high levels of professional competence. This article focuses on four sets of teacher preparation standards in gifted education. They address initial and advanced preparation of educators who teach students with gifts and talents. Initial preparation standards include the…

  18. Identifying learning characteristics of the gifted Students in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The failure of schools, teachers and counsellors to identify gifted students as well as responding to their unique characteristics and learning needs give rise to this paper. Gifted learners possess high level of intelligence than their peers, but are disadvantaged in the sense that they are not given the opportunity to reach their ...

  19. Gifted and Talented Education in Turkey: Critics and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uğur Sak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is a review and critics of gifted education in Turkey. Gifted education in Turkey has undergone dramatic changes in recent years. Innovations and regulations in the education of gifted and talented students have emerged and been formed as a result of a global agenda of the country. New steps such as the establishment of science high schools have been taken at specific critical point in history. With the beginning of the 21st century, the education of gifted students has gained momentum with the national strategic plan on gifted education and establishment of gifted education departments in universities. In the last fifteen years, the number of special programs and scientific publications has multiplied. Even though gifted education in Turkey has progressed notably over years, certain problems still remain unsolved, such as inconsistencies in definitions and contradictions between definitions and practices, inefficiency in nationwide identification, inadequate number of program types, recruitment of untrained teachers and lack of expertise in program development, and opposition against gifted education.

  20. Identifying and Nurturing the Gifted: An International Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Kurt A., Ed.; Feldhusen, John F., Ed.

    The volume consists of papers from the 1985 symposium "Identification of the Gifted" at the Sixth World Conference on Gifted and Talented Children in Hamburg (Federal Republic of Germany). Twelve chapters have the following titles and authors: (1) "Introduction" (J. F. Feldhusen and K. A. Heller); (2) "A Conception of…

  1. Examining the Computer Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Abdullah; Öztürk, Mesut; Doruk, Muhammet; Yilmaz, Alper

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to determine the computer self-efficacy perceptions of gifted students. The research group of this study is composed of gifted students (N = 36) who were studying at the Science and Arts Center in Gümüshane province in the spring semester of the 2012-2013 academic year. The "Computer Self-Efficacy Perception…

  2. Gifted and Talented Education: A National Test Case in Peoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterman, David M.

    1986-01-01

    This article presents a study of a program in Peoria, Illinois, for the gifted and talented that serves as a national test case for gifted education and minority enrollment. It was concluded that referral, identification, and selection were appropriate for the program model but that inequalities resulted from socioeconomic variables. (Author/LMO)

  3. A Systemic Approach: The Ultimate Choice for Gifted Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ting; Shi, Jiannong

    2012-01-01

    In "Towards a systemic theory of gifted education," A. Ziegler and S.N. Phillipson have proposed a systemic approach to gifted education. For this approach, they built a model that they call an "actiotope" model. As they explained in the article, an actiotope consists of the acting individual and the environment with which he or she interacts. The…

  4. Student-Created Public Relations for Gifted Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisland, Amy

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the benefits of student participation in a gifted public relations campaign, including creating public support for gifted programming and developing leadership skills. Steps for developing a formal unit of instruction on public relations are described, along with ideas for public relations activities. (Contains references.)…

  5. Sowing the Seeds for Strong Relations: Seeds and Plants as Diplomatic Gifts for the Russian Empress Maria Fedorovna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Heath

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the role of botany in diplomatic relationships between Britain and Russia around the turn of the nineteenth century by looking at three gifts of exotic seeds and plants sent by different British diplomats and officials to the Russian Empress Maria Fedorovna, wife of Tsar Paul I. Gifts of live plants were a new category of diplomatic presents fuelled by the rapidly growing popularity of botany across Europe. These gifts represented British imperial ambitions and desire to build a self-sufficient economy. They also indicated an element of Britain’s anxiety about its navy’s dependence on Russian natural resources and later on about Russia’s successes in the exploration of the Antarctic regions. Empress Maria Fedorovna displayed these plants in a prominent part of her garden at Pavlovsk, next to the plants from North America that she had procured independently. This was a deliberate strategy that worked to boost her prestige at court by showcasing her international relationships.

  6. Head turning as a prominent motor symptom in status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Gerhard; Broessner, Gregor; Unterberger, Iris; Walser, Gerald; Pfausler, Bettina; Trinka, Eugen

    2008-06-01

    Head and eye turning is frequently observed during seizures. Versions with tonic and/or clonic symptoms can be differentiated from smooth head deviations. Head turning as a prominent symptom of status epilepticus has not previously been reported. We present eight case reports, (7 women/1 man, mean age 41 years, median 41.5, range 10 to 74), of status epilepticus (SE), with head turning as a prominent motor symptom. Six were accompanied by continuous frontal, occipital and temporal ictal epileptiform discharges. Furthermore, two patients had absence status with rhythmic and clonic head versions. While the localizing significance of head turnings in SE is low, in our cases, the direction was away from the discharging hemisphere in all cases of focal SE regardless of whether the turning was classified as version (three cases) or deviation (three cases). In this small series of SE, the classical observation of a patient looking away from the discharging hemisphere is still valid.

  7. Non-LTE hydrogen-line formation in moving prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzel, P.; Rompolt, B.

    1986-01-01

    The behavior of hydrogen-line brightness variations, depending on the prominence-velocity changes were investigated. By solving the NON-Local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) problem for hydrogen researchers determine quantitatively the effect of Doppler brightening and/or Doppler dimming (DBE, DDE) in the lines of Lyman and Balmer series. It is demonstrated that in low-density prominence plasmas, DBE in H alpha and H beta lines can reach a factor of three for velocities around 160 km/sec, while the L alpha line exhibits typical DDE. L beta brightness variations follow from a combined DBE in the H alpha and DDE in L alpha and L beta itself, providing that all relevant multilevel interlocking processes are taken into account.

  8. Gifted Achievers and Gifted Underachievers: The Impact of Learning Style Preferences in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayneri, Letty J.; Gerber, Brian L.; Wiley, Larry P.

    2003-01-01

    A study involving 62 gifted students (grades 6-8) found many low-achievers (n=16) showed a strong need for tactile and kinesthetic modalities; intake of food, drinks, or both; sound in the learning environment; informal seating design; and dim lighting. The low achievers did not perceive themselves to be persistent. (Contains references.)…

  9. Gifted Education in Korea: Three Korean High Schools for the Mathematically Gifted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyong Mi; Hon, Dae Sik

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a brief history of three Korean high schools for mathematically gifted students. It describes how these schools operate, how their mathematics curricula differ compared to those of regular high schools, the admissions criteria, curriculum offered, and the student and teacher population. This review of specialized, science,…

  10. STRUCTURE OF PROMINENCE LEGS: PLASMA AND MAGNETIC FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levens, P. J.; Labrosse, N. [SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Schmieder, B. [Observatoire de Paris, Meudon, F-92195 (France); Ariste, A. López, E-mail: p.levens.1@research.gla.ac.uk [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie, Toulouse (France)

    2016-02-10

    We investigate the properties of a “solar tornado” observed on 2014 July 15, and aim to link the behavior of the plasma to the internal magnetic field structure of the associated prominence. We made multi-wavelength observations with high spatial resolution and high cadence using SDO/AIA, the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) spectrograph, and the Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) instrument. Along with spectropolarimetry provided by the Télescope Héliographique pour l’Etude du Magnétisme et des Instabilités Solaires telescope we have coverage of both optically thick emission lines and magnetic field information. AIA reveals that the two legs of the prominence are strongly absorbing structures which look like they are rotating, or oscillating in the plane of the sky. The two prominence legs, which are both very bright in Ca ii (SOT), are not visible in the IRIS Mg ii slit-jaw images. This is explained by the large optical thickness of the structures in Mg ii, which leads to reversed profiles, and hence to lower integrated intensities at these locations than in the surroundings. Using lines formed at temperatures lower than 1 MK, we measure relatively low Doppler shifts on the order of ±10 km s{sup −1} in the tornado-like structure. Between the two legs we see loops in Mg ii, with material flowing from one leg to the other, as well as counterstreaming. It is difficult to interpret our data as showing two rotating, vertical structures that are unrelated to the loops. This kind of “tornado” scenario does not fit with our observations. The magnetic field in the two legs of the prominence is found to be preferentially horizontal.

  11. Beat gestures and prosodic prominence: impact on learning

    OpenAIRE

    Kushch, Olga

    2018-01-01

    Previous research has shown that gestures are beneficial for language learning. This doctoral thesis centers on the effects of beat gestures– i.e., hand and arm gestures that are typically associated with prosodically prominent positions in speech - on such processes. Little is known about how the two central properties of beat gestures, namely how they mark both information focus and rhythmic positions in speech, can be beneficial for learning either a first or a second language. The main go...

  12. Observations of apparent superslow wave propagation in solar prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raes, J. O.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Baes, M.; Wright, A. N.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Phase mixing of standing continuum Alfvén waves and/or continuum slow waves in atmospheric magnetic structures such as coronal arcades can create the apparent effect of a wave propagating across the magnetic field. Aims: We observe a prominence with SDO/AIA on 2015 March 15 and find the presence of oscillatory motion. We aim to demonstrate that interpreting this motion as a magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) wave is faulty. We also connect the decrease of the apparent velocity over time with the phase mixing process, which depends on the curvature of the magnetic field lines. Methods: By measuring the displacement of the prominence at different heights to calculate the apparent velocity, we show that the propagation slows down over time, in accordance with the theoretical work of Kaneko et al. We also show that this propagation speed drops below what is to be expected for even slow MHD waves for those circumstances. We use a modified Kippenhahn-Schlüter prominence model to calculate the curvature of the magnetic field and fit our observations accordingly. Results: Measuring three of the apparent waves, we get apparent velocities of 14, 8, and 4 km s-1. Fitting a simple model for the magnetic field configuration, we obtain that the filament is located 103 Mm below the magnetic centre. We also obtain that the scale of the magnetic field strength in the vertical direction plays no role in the concept of apparent superslow waves and that the moment of excitation of the waves happened roughly one oscillation period before the end of the eruption that excited the oscillation. Conclusions: Some of the observed phase velocities are lower than expected for slow modes for the circumstances, showing that they rather fit with the concept of apparent superslow propagation. A fit with our magnetic field model allows for inferring the magnetic geometry of the prominence. The movie attached to Fig. 1 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  13. George Gamow: a most talented and creative scientist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Qingyu

    2002-01-01

    As one of the most prominent scientists of the 20th century, George Gamow made notable contributions to many fields of science in his life time. In nuclear physics he proposed the well known 'nuclear potential barrier channel effect' and the Gamow-Teller transition probability of beta decay. In cosmology he did his almost to advocate the 'big bang' theory. Through extraordinary intuition he proposed a theory about how genetic codes work in molecular biology, which was later verified by Watson, Crick and Nirenbery. Gamow's unique style of research and his spirit of bringing forth new ideas in interdisciplinary subjects has greatly benefited scientific research

  14. International MultiConference of Engineers and Computer Scientists 2016

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Haeng; Huang, Xu; Castillo, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    This volume contains selected revised and extended research articles written by prominent researchers who participated in the International MultiConference of Engineers and Computer Scientists 2016, held in Hong Kong, 16-18 March 2016. Topics covered include engineering physics, communications systems, control theory, automation, engineering mathematics, scientific computing, electrical engineering, and industrial applications. The book showcases the tremendous advances in engineering technologies and applications, and also serves as an excellent reference work for researchers and graduate students working on engineering technologies, physical sciences and their applications.

  15. International MultiConference of Engineers and Computer Scientists 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Ao, Sio-Iong; Huang, Xu; Castillo, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    This volume comprises selected extended papers written by prominent researchers participating in the International MultiConference of Engineers and Computer Scientists 2015, Hong Kong, 18-20 March 2015. The conference served as a platform for discussion of frontier topics in theoretical and applied engineering and computer science, and subjects covered include communications systems, control theory and automation, bioinformatics, artificial intelligence, data mining, engineering mathematics, scientific computing, engineering physics, electrical engineering, and industrial applications. The book describes the state-of-the-art in engineering technologies and computer science and its applications, and will serve as an excellent reference for industrial and academic researchers and graduate students working in these fields.

  16. THE GREAT RUSSIAN SCIENTIST M.V. LOMONOSOV

    OpenAIRE

    G.L. Mikirtichan

    2011-01-01

    This article presents reflections on the contribution of the great Russian scientist, one of the most prominent world science stars Mikhail Lomonosov (8/19.11.1711–4/15.04.1765) in connection with the 300th anniversary of his birth celebrated in 2011. Particular attention is paid to his role as an advocate for the development of domestic education and science, and his views on medicine. In the same year we are celebrating the 250 years anniversary since M. Lomonosov’s writing the letter to I....

  17. Gifts and corporate influence in doctor of pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Peggy; Bernard, Daphne; Madhavan, Suresh; Sorensen, Todd D; Stoner, Steve C; TenHoeve, Tom

    2007-08-15

    To explore the nature of corporate gifts directed at PharmD programs and pharmacy student activities and the perceptions of administrators about the potential influences of such gifts. A verbally administered survey of administrative officials at 11 US colleges and schools of pharmacy was conducted and responses were analyzed. All respondents indicated accepting corporate gifts or sponsorships for student-related activities in the form of money, grants, scholarships, meals, trinkets, and support for special events, and cited many advantages to corporate partner relationships. Approximately half of the respondents believed that real or potential problems could occur from accepting corporate gifts. Forty-four percent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that corporate contributions could influence college or school administration. Sixty-one percent agreed or strongly agreed that donations were likely to influence students. Corporate gifts do influence college and school of administration and students. Policies should be in place to manage this influence appropriately.

  18. The notion of gift-giving and organ donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrand, Nicole

    1994-04-01

    The analogy between gift-giving and organ donation was first suggested at the beginning of the transplantation era, when policy makers and legislators were promoting voluntary organ donation as the preferred procurement procedure. It was believed that the practice of gift-giving had some features which were also thought to be necessary to ensure that an organ procurement procedure would be morally acceptable, namely voluntarism and altruism. Twenty-five years later, the analogy between gift-giving and organ donation is still being made in the literature and used in organ donation awareness campaigns. In this paper I want to challenge this analogy. By examining a range of circumstances in which gift-giving occurs, I argue that the significant differences between the various types of gift-giving and organ donation makes any analogy between the two very general and superficial, and I suggest that a more appropriate analogy can be found elsewhere.

  19. Do scientists trace hot topics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tian; Li, Menghui; Wu, Chensheng; Yan, Xiao-Yong; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru; Wu, Jinshan

    2013-01-01

    Do scientists follow hot topics in their scientific investigations? In this paper, by performing analysis to papers published in the American Physical Society (APS) Physical Review journals, it is found that papers are more likely to be attracted by hot fields, where the hotness of a field is measured by the number of papers belonging to the field. This indicates that scientists generally do follow hot topics. However, there are qualitative differences among scientists from various countries, among research works regarding different number of authors, different number of affiliations and different number of references. These observations could be valuable for policy makers when deciding research funding and also for individual researchers when searching for scientific projects.

  20. Prominence and tornado dynamics observed with IRIS and THEMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, Brigitte; Levens, Peter; Labrosse, Nicolas; Mein, Pierre; Lopez Ariste, Arturo; Zapior, Maciek

    2017-08-01

    Several prominences were observed during campaigns in September 2013 and July 2014 with the IRIS spectrometer and the vector magnetograph THEMIS (Tenerife). SDO/AIA and IRIS provided images and spectra of prominences and tornadoes corresponding to different physical conditions of the transition region between the cool plasma and the corona. The vector magnetic field was derived from THEMIS observations by using the He D3 depolarisation due to the magnetic field. The inversion code (PCA) takes into account the Hanle and Zeeman effects and allows us to compute the strength and the inclination of the magnetic field which is shown to be mostly horizontal in prominences as well as in tornadoes. Movies from SDO/AIA in 304 A and Hinode/SOT in Ca II show the highly dynamic nature of the fine structures. From spectra in Mg II and Si IV lines provided by IRIS and H-alpha observed by the Multi-channel Subtractive Double Pass (MSDP) spectrograph in the Meudon Solar Tower we derived the Doppler shifts of the fine structures and reconstructed the 3D structure of tornadoes. We conclude that the apparent rotation of AIA tornadoes is due to large-scale quasi-periodic oscillations of the plasma along more or less horizontal magnetic structures.

  1. Challenges Raising a Gifted Child: Stress and Resilience Factors within the Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renati, Roberta; Bonfiglio, Natale Salvatore; Pfeiffer, Steven

    2017-01-01

    The research on families of the gifted is extremely limited. In the past, families of the gifted have been studied mainly for two reasons: to discover how family life creates or supports giftedness or eminence, or to understand how one gifted child affects siblings. Few studies, however, have examined the impact of gifted children on the lives of…

  2. Enrichment Programs and Counselling at the Budapest Centre for the Gifted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herskovits, Maria

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the development of gifted education in Hungary and the special counseling services for gifted children available at the Centre for the Gifted in Budapest. The Centre provides professional help from psychologists, counseling for choosing an appropriate school and/or supplementary programs for gifted children (ages 3-14), and…

  3. 17 CFR 140.735-4 - Receipt and disposition of foreign gifts and decorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... currency, except that which has an historical or numismatic value; (3) Accept gifts of travel or gifts of expenses for travel, such as transportation, food and lodging, from foreign governments, other than those... to accept from a foreign government gifts of travel or gifts of expenses for travel taking place...

  4. Give me your self: Gifts are liked more when they match the giver's characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paolacci, G.; Straeter, L.; Hooge, de I.E.

    2015-01-01

    Research on gift giving has devoted considerable attention to understanding whether and how givers succeed in choosing gifts that match recipients' tastes. On the contrary, this article focuses on how recipients' appreciation for a gift depends on the match between the gift and the giver. Four

  5. 26 CFR 1.672(f)-4 - Recharacterization of purported gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recharacterization of purported gifts. 1.672(f...)-4 Recharacterization of purported gifts. (a) In general—(1) Purported gifts from partnerships... purported gift or bequest (as defined in paragraph (d) of this section) from a partnership, the purported...

  6. Worthless donations: male deception and female counter play in a nuptial gift-giving spider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albo, Maria J; Winther, Gudrun; Tuni, Cristina; Toft, Søren; Bilde, Trine

    2011-11-14

    In nuptial gift-giving species, benefits of acquiring a mate may select for male deception by donation of worthless gifts. We investigated the effect of worthless gifts on mating success in the spider Pisaura mirabilis. Males usually offer an insect prey wrapped in silk; however, worthless gifts containing inedible items are reported. We tested male mating success in the following experimental groups: protein enriched fly gift (PG), regular fly gift (FG), worthless gift (WG), or no gift (NG). Males that offered worthless gifts acquired similar mating success as males offering nutritional gifts, while males with no gift experienced reduced mating success. The results suggest that strong selection on the nuptial gift-giving trait facilitates male deception by donation of worthless gifts. Females terminated matings faster when males offered worthless donations; this demonstrate a cost of deception for the males as shorter matings lead to reduced sperm transfer and thus give the deceiving males a disadvantage in sperm competition. We propose that the gift wrapping trait allows males to exploit female foraging preference by disguising the gift content thus deceiving females into mating without acquiring direct benefits. Female preference for a genuine prey gift combined with control over mating duration, however, counteracts the male deception.

  7. Sibling Relationships among Eilat Families with at Least One Gifted Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Hanna; Gil, Mali; Raviv, Idit

    2009-01-01

    A most common belief is that giftedness is the cause of problems in sibling relationships when the family is "mixed", has at least one gifted child, and at least one non-gifted one. This belief has been accepted not only by parents and educators of the gifted, but also by researchers in the area of gifted education in general and…

  8. The Local-Cosmopolitan Scientist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney G. Glaser, Ph.D., Hon. Ph.D.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to previous discussions in the literature treating cosmopolitan and local as two distinct groups of scientists, this paperi demonstrates the notion of cosmopolitan and local as a dual orientation of highly motivated scientists. This dual orientation is derived from institutional motivation, which is a determinant of both high quality basic research and accomplishment of non-research organizational activities. The dual orientation arises in a context of similarity of the institutional goal of science with the goal of the organization; the distinction between groups of locals and cosmopolitans derives from a conflict between two goals.

  9. Scientists, government, and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Scientists in less-developed countries (LDCs) that undertake nuclear programs become involved in political decisions on manpower and resource allocations that will preclude other options. Controversy over the adoption of sophisticated technology has put those who see science as the servant of society in conflict with those who see the pursuit of science as a social service. The role model which LDC scientists present in this issue has given them increasing power, which can be either in accord with or in conflict with the perceived national interest. 29 references

  10. The Possibilities and Limitations of Gifted Education in Korea: A Look at the ISEP Science-Gifted Education Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ki-Soon

    2007-01-01

    Education for gifted children is currently one of the hottest educational issues in Korea. Much money and effort are being invested in this area of education. Recent announcements by the Korean Ministry of Education state that all children should be educated to the level of which they are capable, and the current program for gifted students should…

  11. A Comparison of a Gifted Education Program among Eighth Grade Gifted Students at a Georgia Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Jerry Clark

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships that may exist among mean scores on the math and reading portions of the Iowa Test of Basic Skills (ITBS) of eighth grade gifted students of different gender, race, and socioeconomic status. Significant changes have been made to Georgia's gifted identification procedures over the last…

  12. Females of a gift-giving spider do not trade sex for food gifts: a consequence of male deception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandulli-Alonso, Irene; Quaglia, Agustín; Albo, Maria J

    2017-05-15

    Polyandry is commonly maintained by direct benefits in gift-giving species, so females may remate as an adaptive foraging strategy. However, the assumption of a direct benefit fades in mating systems where male gift-giving behaviour has evolved from offering nutritive to worthless (non-nutritive) items. In the spider Paratrechalea ornata, 70% of gifts in nature are worthless. We therefore predicted female receptivity to be independent of hunger in this species. We exposed poorly-fed and well-fed females to multiple males offering nutritive gifts and well-fed females to males offering worthless gifts. Though the treatments strongly affected fecundity, females of all groups had similar number of matings. This confirms that female receptivity is independent of their nutritional state, i.e. polyandry does not prevail as a foraging strategy. In the spider Pisaura mirabilis, in which the majority (62%) of gifts in nature are nutritive, female receptivity depends on hunger. We therefore propose that the dependence of female receptivity on hunger state may have evolved in species with predominantly nutritive gifts but is absent in species with predominantly worthless gifts.

  13. Opening the gift: social inclusion, professional codes and gift-giving in long-term mental healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ootes, S T C; Pols, A J; Tonkens, E H; Willems, D L

    2013-03-01

    Deinstitutionalisation has not only made the social inclusion of clients a key objective in long-term mental healthcare, it may also affect the role of the care professional. This article investigates whether the social inclusion objective clashes with other long-standing professional values, specifically when clients give gifts to care professionals. In making a typology of gifts, we compare the literature on gift-giving with professional codes for gifts and relate both to the objective of social inclusion of clients. Our typology draws on an analysis of ethnographic fieldwork carried out in 2007/2008 at a Dutch mental healthcare centre. We identify four types of gifts for professionals in long-term mental healthcare, each relating individually to professional codes and the objective of social inclusion of clients. Only the 'personal gift' directly supports social inclusion, by fostering personal relationships between professionals and clients. Acceptance of this type of gift is advocated only for long-term care professionals. We suggest that professional codes need to consider this typology of gifts, and we advocate promoting reflexivity as a means of accounting for professional behaviour in deinstitutionalised care settings.

  14. Star Power: Providing for the Gifted & Talented. Module 4. Applications of Theories of Creativity to the Gifted/Talented.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Alison; Mallis, Jackie

    The document presents Module 4, applications of theories of creativity to the gifted/talented, of the Star Power modules developed for school personnel who have an interest in or a need to explore the area of gifted and talented education. It is explained in an introductory section that the modules can be used for independent study, for small…

  15. Star Power: Providing for the Gifted & Talented. Module 10. Guidance and Counseling for the Gifted/Talented.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Alison; Mallis, Jackie

    The document presents Module 10, guidance and counseling for the gifted/talented, of the Star Power modules developed for school personnel who have an interest in or a need to explore the area of gifted and talented education. It is explained in an introductory section that the module can be used for independent study, for small group interaction,…

  16. Star Power: Providing for the Gifted & Talented. Module 3. Applications of Theories of Intelligence to the Gifted/Talented.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Alison; Mallis, Jackie

    The document presents Module 3, applications of theories of intelligence to the gifted/talented, of the Star Power modules developed for school personnel who have an interest in or a need to explore the area of gifted and talented education. It is explained in an introductory section that the modules can be used for independent study, for small…

  17. Gifted and Non-Gifted Lebanese Adolescents: Gender Differences in Self-Concept, Self-Esteem and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarouphim, Ketty M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate gender differences in self-concept, self-esteem, and depression among gifted (n = 68) and non-gifted (n = 174) adolescents in Lebanon. Participants were 242 adolescents (110 males and 132 females), with a mean age of 13.9 years. Four measures were used: DISCOVER assessment, Piers-Harris 2 self-concept…

  18. The Manhattan Project and its Effects on American Women Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Samuel

    2008-04-01

    There have been many detailed historical accounts of the Manhattan Project, but few have recognized the technical role women scientists and engineers crucially played in the Project's success. Despite their absence from these prominent accounts, recent studies have revealed that, in fact, women participated in every non-combat operation associated with the Manhattan Project. With such extensive participation of women and such a former lack of historical attention upon them, little analysis has been done on how the Manhattan Project might have influenced the prospectus of women scientists after the war. This talk has two aims: 1) to recount some of the technical and scientific contributions of women to the Manhattan Project, and 2) to examine what effects these contributions had on the women's careers as scientists. In other words, I intend offer a preliminary explanation of the extent to which the Manhattan Project acted both as a boon and as a detriment to American women scientists. And finally, I will address what this historical analysis could imply about the effects of current efforts to recruit women into science.

  19. Synthetic differential emission measure curves of prominence fine structures. II. The SoHO/SUMER prominence of 8 June 2004

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gunár, Stanislav; Parenti, S.; Anzer, U.; Heinzel, Petr; Vial, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 535, November (2011), A122/1-A122/11 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP205/09/P554; GA ČR GA205/09/1705; GA ČR GAP209/10/1706 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : Sun * filaments * prominences Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.587, year: 2011

  20. Introductory mathematics for earth scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xin-She

    2009-01-01

    Any quantitative work in earth sciences requires mathematical analysis and mathematical methods are essential to the modelling and analysis of the geological, geophysical and environmental processes involved. This book provides an introduction to the fundamental mathematics that all earth scientists need.

  1. ARE GIANT TORNADOES THE LEGS OF SOLAR PROMINENCES?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedemeyer, Sven; Scullion, Eamon; Rouppe van der Voort, Luc; Bosnjak, Antonija [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Antolin, Patrick, E-mail: sven.wedemeyer@astro.uio.no [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, bus 2400, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-09-10

    Observations in the 171 A channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of the space-borne Solar Dynamics Observatory show tornado-like features in the atmosphere of the Sun. These giant tornadoes appear as dark, elongated, and apparently rotating structures in front of a brighter background. This phenomenon is thought to be produced by rotating magnetic field structures that extend throughout the atmosphere. We characterize giant tornadoes through a statistical analysis of properties such as spatial distribution, lifetimes, and sizes. A total number of 201 giant tornadoes are detected in a period of 25 days, suggesting that, on average, about 30 events are present across the whole Sun at a time close to solar maximum. Most tornadoes appear in groups and seem to form the legs of prominences, thus serving as plasma sources/sinks. Additional H{alpha} observations with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope imply that giant tornadoes rotate as a structure, although they clearly exhibit a thread-like structure. We observe tornado groups that grow prior to the eruption of the connected prominence. The rotation of the tornadoes may progressively twist the magnetic structure of the prominence until it becomes unstable and erupts. Finally, we investigate the potential relation of giant tornadoes to other phenomena, which may also be produced by rotating magnetic field structures. A comparison to cyclones, magnetic tornadoes, and spicules implies that such events are more abundant and short-lived the smaller they are. This comparison might help to construct a power law for the effective atmospheric heating contribution as a function of spatial scale.

  2. ARE GIANT TORNADOES THE LEGS OF SOLAR PROMINENCES?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedemeyer, Sven; Scullion, Eamon; Rouppe van der Voort, Luc; Bosnjak, Antonija; Antolin, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Observations in the 171 Å channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of the space-borne Solar Dynamics Observatory show tornado-like features in the atmosphere of the Sun. These giant tornadoes appear as dark, elongated, and apparently rotating structures in front of a brighter background. This phenomenon is thought to be produced by rotating magnetic field structures that extend throughout the atmosphere. We characterize giant tornadoes through a statistical analysis of properties such as spatial distribution, lifetimes, and sizes. A total number of 201 giant tornadoes are detected in a period of 25 days, suggesting that, on average, about 30 events are present across the whole Sun at a time close to solar maximum. Most tornadoes appear in groups and seem to form the legs of prominences, thus serving as plasma sources/sinks. Additional Hα observations with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope imply that giant tornadoes rotate as a structure, although they clearly exhibit a thread-like structure. We observe tornado groups that grow prior to the eruption of the connected prominence. The rotation of the tornadoes may progressively twist the magnetic structure of the prominence until it becomes unstable and erupts. Finally, we investigate the potential relation of giant tornadoes to other phenomena, which may also be produced by rotating magnetic field structures. A comparison to cyclones, magnetic tornadoes, and spicules implies that such events are more abundant and short-lived the smaller they are. This comparison might help to construct a power law for the effective atmospheric heating contribution as a function of spatial scale

  3. Teaching English Activities for the Gifted And Talented Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigdem CELIK-SAHIN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the literature and recommends activities that can be used to teach English to gifted and talented students. It includes the responsibilities that teachers of the gifted and talented have in teaching the English language. Strategies for teaching the language in a natural and flowing way to increase intake and usage are also presented. Also discussed are the pressures on gifted and talented students when they are learning a new subject such as the English language and how these pressures occur because of beliefs about giftedness and how gifted learners learn. Teachers need to also be aware of the linguistic and cultural backgrounds of their students. This information can be used to help students speak English more naturally during informal talks/discussions in class about their different lifestyles and/or cultural features. The special and different learning characteristics of gifted students are important for their teachers to know. Teachers of gifted students should then use that knowledge when they differentiate curriculum. To be a teacher of these special children means being open to ongoing professional development and always focusing on the learner rather than the learning. Finally, the teachers of the gifted need to shift their approaches in order to become counsellors and guides more than instructors and directors of learning.

  4. Higher Education as a Gift and as a Commons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Wittel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper takes as a starting point Lewis Hyde’s (2007, xvi assertion that art is a gift and not a commodity: “Works of art exist simultaneously in two ‘economies’, a market economy and a gift economy. Only one of these is essential, however: a work of art can survive without a market, but where there is no gift there is no art.” I want to argue that the same claim should be made for those aspects of academic labour that refer to teaching and education. Education can survive without a market, but where there is no gift there is no education. However the gift that is part of all educational processes gets rather obscured in regimes where higher education is either a public good or a private good. In regimes of higher education as public good the gift gets obscured by the provision of a service by the state. In regimes of higher education as a private good (e.g. higher education in the UK the gift gets even more obscured, obviously so. It is only in a third educational regime, where education is a common good (e.g. the recent rise of the free universities, that the gift character of education can properly shine. Whilst this should be celebrated, the notion of a higher education commons poses some severe challenges. The paper ends with an examination of possibilities of academic activists to rescue or even strengthen the gift-like character of education.

  5. Perceptions of Social Responsibility of Prominent Animal Welfare Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmar, Nicole J Olynk; Morgan, Carissa J; Croney, Candace C

    2018-01-01

    Nonhuman animal welfare is an increasingly important component of consumer expectations of corporate social responsibility (CSR). The extent to which prominent animal welfare or protection organizations may influence people's perceptions of food industry CSR may be related to an organization's perceived social responsibility. Data from an online survey of 300 U.S. residents were used to explore relationships between demographics/lifestyle choices and perceptions of prominent animal welfare organizations (using best-worst scaling methodology). Overall, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was perceived to be the most socially responsible organization analyzed, followed by the Humane Society of the United States and the American Humane Association (AHA). Results suggest that the perceived social responsibility of animal protection organizations in this study was not strongly linked to personally (financially) supporting them, with 2 exceptions: the perceptions of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals and AHA. Improved understanding of the perception of animal welfare or protection organizations can inform decision making by organizations interested in furthering animal welfare causes.

  6. Word-level prominence in Persian: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Vahid

    2017-12-01

    Previous literature on the phonetics of stress in Persian has reported that fundamental frequency is the only reliable acoustic correlate of stress, and that stressed and unstressed syllables are not differentiated from each other in the absence of accentuation. In this study, the effects of lexical stress on duration, overall intensity and spectral tilt were examined in Persian both in the accented and unaccented conditions. Results showed that syllable duration is consistently affected by stress in Persian in both the accented and unaccented conditions across all vowel types. Unlike duration, the results for overall intensity and spectral tilt were significant only in the accented condition, suggesting that measures of intensity are not a correlate of stress in Persian but they are mainly caused by the presence of a pitch movement. The findings are phonologically interpreted as suggesting that word-level prominence in Persian is typologically similar to 'stress accent' languages, in which multiple phonetic cues are used to signal the prominence contrast in the accented condition, and stressed and unstressed syllables are different from each other even when the word is not pitch-accented.

  7. Magnetic field re-arrangement after prominence eruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, R.A.; Poletto, G.

    1986-01-01

    It has long been known that magnetic reconnection plays a fundamental role in a variety of solar events. Although mainly invoked in flare problems, large-scale loops interconnecting active regions, evolving coronal hole boundaries, the solar magnetic cycle itself, provide different evidence of phenomena which involve magnetic reconnection. A further example might be given by the magnetic field rearrangement which occurs after the eruption of a prominence. Since most often a prominence reforms after its disappearance and may be observed at about the same position it occupied before erupting, the magnetic field has to undergo a temporary disruption to relax back, via reconnection, to a configuration similar to the previous one. The above sequence of events is best observable in the case of two-ribbon (2-R) flares but most probably is associated with all filament eruptions. Even if the explanation of the magnetic field rearrangement after 2-R flares in terms of reconnection is generally accepted, the lack of a three-dimensional model capable of describing the field reconfiguration, has prevented, up to now, a thorough analysis of its topology as traced by Hα/x-ray loops. The purpose of the present work is to present a numerical technique which enables one to predict and visualize the reconnected configuration, at any time t, and therefore allows one to make a significant comparison of observations and model predictions throughout the whole process. 5 refs., 3 figs

  8. Fine-art gifted pupils in art classes

    OpenAIRE

    Vogrin, Oto

    2011-01-01

    Fine arts gift is an inborn quality yet the potential can easily be wasted if not developed. The development of a child’s gift is affected by his/her surroundings and conditions, adapted to an individual’s needs. Among the individual capabilities of fine arts gifted student our special attention goes to the ones which an individual uses to assimilate his/her experience and reactions to it, to visual memory, manual skills and aesthetic intelligence. They all enable us to determine aesthetic va...

  9. Talented Students' Satisfaction with the Performance of the Gifted Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail Mamoud Al–Zoubi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to identify talented students' levels of satisfaction with the performance of the gifted centers. The sample of the study consisted of (142 gifted and talented students enrolled in the Najran Centers for Gifted in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was developed and distributed to the sample of the study. The results revealed that talented students were highly satisfied with the administration and teachers, whereas they were only moderately satisfied with enrichment activities, teaching methods, student relationships and facilities and equipment. Moreover, results also showed that there were no significant differences could be attributed to gender or to the level of schooling.

  10. Language Learning of Gifted Individuals: A Content Analysis Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beria Gokaydin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to carry out a content analysis of the studies on language learning of gifted individuals and determine the trends in this field. Articles on language learning of gifted individuals published in the Scopus database were examined based on certain criteria including type of publication, year of publication, language, research discipline, countries of research, institutions of authors, key words, and resources. Data were analyzed with the content analysis method. Results showed that the number of studies on language learning of gifted individuals has increased throughout the years. Recommendations for further research and practices are provided.

  11. Poll of radiation health scientists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    A sampling of 210 university-employed radiation health scientists randomly selected from the membership lists of the Health Physics Society and the Radiation Research Society was polled in a secret ballot. The results support the positions that the public's fear of radiation is substantially greater than realistic, that TV, newspapers and magazines substantially exaggerate the dangers of radiation, that the amount of money now being spent on radiation protection is sufficient, and that the openness and honesty of U.S. government agencies about dangers of radiation were below average before 1972 but have been above average since then. Respondents give very high credibility ratings to BEIR, UNSCEAR, ICRP, and NCRP and to the individual scientists associated with their reports, and very low credibility ratings to those who have disputed them

  12. Mathematics for the Student Scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauten, A. Darien; Lauten, Gary N.

    1998-03-01

    The Earth Day:Forest Watch Program, introduces elementary, middle, and secondary students to field laboratory, and satellite-data analysis methods for assessing the health of Eastern White Pine ( Pinus strobus). In this Student-Scientist Partnership program, mathematics, as envisioned in the NCTM Standards, arises naturally and provides opportunities for science-mathematics interdisciplinary student learning. School mathematics becomes the vehicle for students to quantify, represent, analyze, and interpret meaningful, real data.

  13. Thermodynamics for scientists and engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Gyeong Hui

    2011-02-01

    This book deals with thermodynamics for scientists and engineers. It consists of 11 chapters, which are concept and background of thermodynamics, the first law of thermodynamics, the second law of thermodynamics and entropy, mathematics related thermodynamics, properties of thermodynamics on pure material, equilibrium, stability of thermodynamics, the basic of compound, phase equilibrium of compound, excess gibbs energy model of compound and activity coefficient model and chemical equilibrium. It has four appendixes on properties of pure materials and thermal mass.

  14. The Scientist as Sentinel (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreskes, N.

    2013-12-01

    Scientists have been warning the world for some time about the risks of anthropogenic interference in the climate system. But we struggle with how, exactly, to express that warning. The norms of scientific behavior enjoin us from the communication strategies normally associated with warnings. If a scientist sounds excited or emotional, for example, it is often assumed that he has lost his capac¬ity to assess data calmly and therefore his conclusions are suspect. If the scientist is a woman, the problem is that much worse. In a recently published article my colleagues and I have shown that scientists have systematically underestimated the threat of climate change (Brysse et al., 2012). We suggested that this occurs for norma¬tive reasons: The scientific values of rationality, dispassion, and self-restraint lead us to demand greater levels of evidence in support of surprising, dramatic, or alarming conclusions than in support of less alarming conclusions. We call this tendency 'err¬ing on the side of least drama.' However, the problem is not only that we err on the side of least drama in our assessment of evidence, it's also that we speak without drama, even when our conclusions are dramatic. We speak without the emotional cadence that people expect to hear when the speaker is worried. Even when we are worried, we don't sound as if we are. In short, we are trying to act as sentinels, but we lack the register with which to do so. Until we find those registers, or partner with colleagues who are able to speak in the cadences that communicating dangers requires, our warnings about climate change will likely continue to go substantially unheeded.

  15. Physics of solar prominences. Proceedings of the Colloquium, Oslo, Norway, August 14-18, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, E; Maltby, P

    1979-01-01

    These papers deal with recent theoretical and observational studies of the physics of solar prominences. Specific topics include reviews of prominence spectra and their interpretation, polarimetric observations and magnetic-field determination in prominences, observations of the prominence-corona interface, theories on the formation and stability of quiescent prominences, prominence classifications, observations of active prominences, observations and interpretations of coronal manifestations of eruptive prominences, and models of prominence structure and dynamics. Other contributions discuss simultaneous observations of Ca II and hydrogen Balmer lines in quiescent prominences, recent results in quiescent-prominence spectroscopy, the solar helium abundance obtained from optical spectra of quiescent prominences, and Stokes polarimetry of quiescent prominences in the He I D3 line. Magnetic-field determination based on the Hanle effect is also examined, along with the orientation of prominence microstructure relative to magnetic-field direction, radio observations of quiescent-prominence filaments at centimeter and millimeter wavelengths, EUV observations of filaments, and a magnetic-field reconnection model of quiescent prominences.

  16. Automatic detection of prominence (as defined by listeners' judgements) in read aloud Dutch sentences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Streefkerk, B.M.; Pols, L.C.W.; ten Bosch, L.F.M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a first step towards the automatic classification of prominence (as defined by native listeners). As a result of a listening experiment each word in 500 sentences was marked with a rating scale between `0' (non-prominent) and `10' (very prominent). These prominence labels are

  17. The talent process of successful academic women scientists at elite research universities in New York state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaenzig, Lisa M.

    The importance of science in our society continues to increase, as the needs of the global culture and the problems of the world's growing populations affect resources internationally (DeLisi, 2008; Fischman, 2007; Park, 2008). The need for qualified and experienced scientists to solve complex problems is important to the future of the United States. Models of success for women in STEM disciplines are important to improve the recruitment and retention of women in academic science. This study serves as an examination of the facilitators and barriers---including external factors and internal characteristics---on the talent development process of successful women academic scientists. Since there are few studies relating specifically to the career experiences of successful women in academic science careers (Ceci & Williams, 2007; Wasserman, 2000; Xie & Shauman, 2003), a literature review was conducted that examined the (1) the gifted literature on women, including the eminence literature; (2) the higher education literature on women faculty and academic science, and (3) the literature related to the internal characteristics and external factors that influence the talent development process. The final section of the literature review includes a literature map (Creswell, 2009) outlining the major studies cited in this chapter. The conclusion, based on a critical analysis of the literature review, outlines the need for this study. The current study utilizes the framework of Gagne's differentiated talent development model for gifted individuals (Gagne, 1985, 1991) to examine the themes cited in multiple studies that influence the talent development process. Through a mixed-design methodology (Creswell, 2009) that incorporates quantitative and qualitative analysis using a survey and follow-up interviews with selected participants, this study seeks to explore the effects of internal characteristics, external influences, significant events, and experiences on the success of

  18. Our Gifted: Our Future. Proceedings of the Annual Northern Virginia Conference on Gifted/Talented Education (5th, Alexandria, VA, March 7-8, 1980).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orloff, Jeffrey H., Ed.

    The document contains 13 selected papers from a conference on working with gifted students. Titles and authors include the following: "A Metacurriculum for the Future" (B. Hubbard); "Building a Curriculum to Train Leadership Abilities" (L. Addison); "Gifted Boys, Gifted Girls--What's the Difference" (B. Becker);…

  19. Teachers' Views about the Education of Gifted Students in Regular Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neşe Kutlu Abu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate classroom teachers’ views about the education of gifted students in regular classrooms. The sample of the study is composed of ten primary school teachers working in the city of Amasya and had gifted students in their classes. In the present study, phenomenological research design was used. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed descriptively in the QSR N-Vivo package program. The findings showed that teachers did not believe a need for differentiating curriculum for gifted students; rather they expressed that regular curriculum was enough for gifted students. Based on the findings, it is clear that teachers need training both on the need of differentiated education for gifted students and strategies and approaches about how to educate gifted students. Teachers’ attitudes towards gifted students in regular classrooms should be investigated so that teachers’ unsupportive beliefs about differentiation for gifted students also influence their attitudes towards gifted students.

  20. Vaccination elicits a prominent acute phase response in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Susanne A; Petersen, Henrik H; Ersbøll, Annette K; Falk-Rønne, Jørgen; Jacobsen, Stine

    2012-02-01

    European and American guidelines for vaccination against tetanus and influenza in horses recommend annual and annual/semi-annual vaccinations, respectively, against the two pathogens. Too-frequent vaccination may, however, have adverse effects, among other things because an inflammatory response is elicited with subsequent alterations in homeostasis. The objective of the study was to compare the acute phase response (APR) in 10 horses following administration of two different types of vaccines, namely, an inactivated Immune Stimulating COMplex (ISCOM) vaccine and a live recombinant vector vaccine. Blood was sampled before and after vaccination to measure levels of serum amyloid A (SAA), fibrinogen, white blood cell counts (WBC) and iron. Vaccination induced a prominent APR with increased WBC, elevated blood levels of SAA and fibrinogen, and decreased serum iron concentrations. The ISCOM vaccine caused significantly (Phorse owners about convalescence after vaccination. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Old World frog and bird vocalizations contain prominent ultrasonic harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narins, Peter M.; Feng, Albert S.; Lin, Wenyu; Schnitzler, Hans-Ulrich; Denzinger, Annette; Suthers, Roderick A.; Xu, Chunhe

    2004-02-01

    Several groups of mammals such as bats, dolphins and whales are known to produce ultrasonic signals which are used for navigation and hunting by means of echolocation, as well as for communication. In contrast, frogs and birds produce sounds during night- and day-time hours that are audible to humans; their sounds are so pervasive that together with those of insects, they are considered the primary sounds of nature. Here we show that an Old World frog (Amolops tormotus) and an oscine songbird (Abroscopus albogularis) living near noisy streams reliably produce acoustic signals that contain prominent ultrasonic harmonics. Our findings provide the first evidence that anurans and passerines are capable of generating tonal ultrasonic call components and should stimulate the quest for additional ultrasonic species.

  2. Motivating the Gifted: An Untapped Source of Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Martha R.

    1984-01-01

    The professor of a graduate gifted education course invited three high school football coaches for a panel on motivation techniques. The techniques included sermons, appeals, rise of emotion, attention-getting devices, intimidation, and competition. (MC)

  3. Distant education of gifted children in the USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogozhkina I. B.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Distant teaching which helps to realize the main principles of contemporary education: «teaching throughout» and «lifelong teaching» becomes more and more indemand. The possibility to get education for the residents of remote districts, excess to contemporary data bases, scientific libraries and learning materials of high quality, possibility to study at a time convenient for a student and in a tempo acceptable to the one makes distant education one of the most effective form of work with gifted children. System of distant education in the USA which is one of the most sophisticated one involves a big variety of programs and courses for both ordinary and gifted students. The article analyzes the existing in the USA on-line programs for gifted children, reveals their advantages and disadvantages, discusses the distant forms of work applicable to teaching of gifted children in Russia.

  4. African Gifts of the Spirit: Pentecostalism & the Rise of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Gifts of the Spirit: Pentecostalism & the Rise of a Zimbabwean Transnational Religious Movement by David Maxwell (Ohio: Ohio University Press, 2006) – XI + 250 pp., ISBN 13:978-0-8124-1738-6, Paperback.

  5. Beijing Model of Gifted Education and Talent Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Zhongxiong; Zhang, Yi; Du, Xiangyun

    In China, talent development has been one of the key points in national plans for the development of science and technology, education, and other areas over the last three decades and is especially emphasized in the national outline for medium- and long-term educational reform and development....... Beijing is the leading city in educational reform, especially in the area of gifted education in mainland China. Over the past 35 years, through constant exploration and research, a comprehensive gifted education system called the Beijing Model of Gifted Education and Talent Development (BMGETD) has...... gradually been developed. This book is a summary of the educational practices used in and research done on the BMGETD over the decades. These include several patterns for gifted education, such as acceleration in special classes, special classes without acceleration, enrichment within regular classes...

  6. Recent Development of Education for Gifted Students in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Den-Mo

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews the historical development of special education for gifted students in Taiwan; provides an overview of three chronological stages in the development of programming; describes educational opportunities and problems; and proposes recommendations for program development. (JDD)

  7. Vendors: Gifts Are the Exception to the Rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Jo Anna

    1992-01-01

    Informal interviews with several people working in different industries reveal that, without exception, the vendors say companies do not routinely offer school officials gifts and entertainment to sway purchasing decisions, but that it does happen. (MLF)

  8. Managing Motivational Needs of the Gifted and Talented.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Deanna E.

    1986-01-01

    A. Maslow's theory of motivation is described, five levels of needs are identified (physiological, safety, love, esteem, and self-actualization), and implications of each level for parents and teachers of gifted students are noted. (CL)

  9. Information Processing Theories and the Education of the Gifted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawl, Ruth K.; O'Tuel, Frances S.

    1983-01-01

    The basic assumptions of information processing theories in cognitive psychology are reviewed, and the application of this approach to problem solving in gifted education is considered. Specific implications are cited on problem selection and instruction giving. (CL)

  10. Personality Dimensions of Gifted and Talented Junior High Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Howard S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Compared to a peer group of average abilities, gifted and talented junior high school students appeared more outgoing, participating, insightful, fast-learning, intellectually adaptable, conscientious, persistent, and moralistic, thus indicating significant between-group differences. (SB)

  11. Multiple meanings of "gift" and its value for organ donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Rhonda M; Webb, Robert

    2015-05-01

    The "gift of life" metaphor is used to promote organ donation where commercialization is prohibited. In this article, we explore how multiple parties involved in organ transfer procedures think of gift terminology by drawing on interview data with transplantation specialists, organ transplant recipients, living directed donors and living nondirected donors. The interviews took place across New Zealand between October 2008 and May 2012, in participants' homes and hospital workplaces. The interviews were transcribed verbatim, coded manually, and thematically analyzed. Although gift language is often viewed as clear-cut, the gift trope has multiple meanings for different constituent and cultural groups, ranging from positive descriptors to obscuring and romanticizing the complexities of transplantation processes. To account for these multiple perspectives, we suggest new ethical models to capture the nuanced phenomenon of organ transfer in ways that recognize the full range of donation and reception experiences. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Examining of Perceptions of Gifted Students toward Mathematics Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut ÖZTÜRK

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study bring out owned intellectual image interested in mathematics concept of gifted students. Participant of twenty-eight gifted students that they selected via WISC-R intelligent test. A phenomenology design that one of qualitative research methods was adopted and data collection focus group interview. Data analysis consisted of content analysis. Students who participant made up different sixteen metaphor. The most widely used of them kainite. When examined justifications lie behind of metaphor gifted students have different three perception such as affected with people of math, influence toward math of the nature, the nature of math. The result of examine of math perception according to grade level when grade level increased, gifted students more interested the nature of math whereas depended on needed of people more interested math concept.

  13. Insights into the Gifted & Talented through Biographical Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Ann

    1978-01-01

    Biographical information of 32 men and 5 women chosen as gifted or talented by university students is cited to discuss birth order, family background, supportive help, early evidence of giftedness, academic record, and particular difficulties. (CL)

  14. Three-Dimensional Morphology of a Coronal Prominence Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, S. E.; Kucera, T. A.; Rastawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hill, S.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional density model of coronal prominence cavities, and a morphological fit that has been tightly constrained by a uniquely well-observed cavity. Observations were obtained as part of an International Heliophysical Year campaign by instruments from a variety of space- and ground-based observatories, spanning wavelengths from radio to soft-X-ray to integrated white light. From these data it is clear that the prominence cavity is the limb manifestation of a longitudinally-extended polar-crown filament channel, and that the cavity is a region of low density relative to the surrounding corona. As a first step towards quantifying density and temperature from campaign spectroscopic data, we establish the three-dimensional morphology of the cavity. This is critical for taking line-of-sight projection effects into account, since cavities are not localized in the plane of the sky and the corona is optically thin. We have augmented a global coronal streamer model to include a tunnel-like cavity with elliptical cross-section and a Gaussian variation of height along the tunnel length. We have developed a semi-automated routine that fits ellipses to cross-sections of the cavity as it rotates past the solar limb, and have applied it to Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) observations from the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. This defines the morphological parameters of our model, from which we reproduce forward-modeled cavity observables. We find that cavity morphology and orientation, in combination with the viewpoints of the observing spacecraft, explains the observed variation in cavity visibility for the east vs. west limbs

  15. Medea's Nuptial Gifts: Myth and Biomedical Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamandopoulos, Athanasios

    2016-12-01

    In all art forms, Medea is mainly represented as the tragic witch from Colchis (contemporary Georgia), who slaughtered her sons and killed her erotic rival Glauke and her father, King Creon of Corinth, by offering an elaborate poisonous nuptial garment. Euripides described the victims' symptoms as a sudden extreme inflammation, leading anyone coming into contact with the garment to death. In other version, the inflammation is described as pure fire. The symptoms resemble what current medical knowledge describes as an immune contact sensitivity reaction. The passages with medical interest from the opera based on this tragedy are presented in the original musical form as well as some similar film and theater scenes. Magnified images of harmful insect's Medea's nuptial gifts are shown and their action is discussed.

  16. Gifted education and talent development for all

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph S. Renzulli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditional methods of schooling can fail to bring about schools as places for developing the broadest and richest experiences for creating talent in the young. The field of gifted education has put forward many innovations that have become mainstays of the American educational system. The Schoolwide Enrichment Model comprises strategies for increasing student effort, enjoyment, and performance, and for integrating a range of advanced-level learning experiences and thinking skills into all curricular areas. Every school has students within it who possess the highest potential for advanced-level learning, creative problem solving, and the motivation to pursue rigorous and rewarding work. Rather than being sources for the acquisition of information, schools should be places for developing the talents of all students.

  17. Quantum field theory for the gifted amateur

    CERN Document Server

    Lancaster, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Quantum field theory is arguably the most far-reaching and beautiful physical theory ever constructed, with aspects more stringently tested and verified to greater precision than any other theory in physics. Unfortunately, the subject has gained a notorious reputation for difficulty, with forbidding looking mathematics and a peculiar diagrammatic language described in an array of unforgiving, weighty textbooks aimed firmly at aspiring professionals. However, quantum field theory is too important, too beautiful, and too engaging to be restricted to the professionals. This book on quantum field theory is designed to be different. It is written by experimental physicists and aims to provide the interested amateur with a bridge from undergraduate physics to quantum field theory. The imagined reader is a gifted amateur, possessing a curious and adaptable mind, looking to be told an entertaining and intellectually stimulating story, but who will not feel patronised if a few mathematical niceties are spelled out in ...

  18. Depression In Gifted Intelligence As Compared With Normal Persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raeisi F

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression is a common problem and reduces function of persons. Evaluation of this matter in Gifted Intelligence– because superior their beneficial ness– have more importance. Our aim in this study is to determine relative frequency of depression in Gifted Intelligence as compared with Normal persons. Materials and Methods: In the context of a case – control study 90 Normal volunteers and 56 very superior volunteers – aged between 20 and 30 years, so that matched in respect of gender – were investigated by Beck Depression Inventory. IQ identification was performed by both Wechsler Adult Intelligence scaling and Ravens progressive Matrices. Results: out of 90 Normal persons, 36 were depressed (40% and among 56 Gifted Intelligence, 35 were depressed. (62.5% In other words relative frequency of depression in Gifted Intelligence– with significant differences– is more.(P<0.05. Conclusion: Although Gifted Intelligence have more ability in opposition to stress- because higher level of IQ-but in this study was observed that prevalence of depression in Gifted Intelligence is more. This finding may be by reason of higher perception of them and the result of it– actually– more meeting of stress.

  19. A scientist at the seashore

    CERN Document Server

    Trefil, James S

    2005-01-01

    ""A marvelous excursion from the beach to the ends of the solar system . . . captivating.""-The New York Times""So easy to understand yet so dense with knowledge that you'll never look at waves on a beach the same way again.""-San Francisco Chronicle""One of the best popular science books.""-The Kansas City Star""Perfect for the weekend scientist.""-The Richmond News-LeaderA noted physicist and popular science writer heads for the beach to answer common and uncommon questions about the ocean. James S. Trefil, author of Dover Publications' The Moment of Creation: Big Bang Physics from Before th

  20. Give Young Scientists a Break

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiley, H. S.

    2009-11-01

    There has been much concern about the impact of tight funding on the careers of young scientists. When only a small percentage of grants are approved, even the smallest problem or error with an application can push it out of the funding range. Unfortunately, the relative lack of grant writing skills by new investigators often has this effect. To avoid a situation where only experienced investigators with polished writing skills are funded, the National Institutes of Health has instituted a more generous ranking scale for new investigators. Not surprisingly, some senior investigators have protested, calling it reverse discrimination. I say that their anger is misplaced. New investigators do deserve a break.

  1. [The gift in caregiving. Is it possible for a gift to be a purely free, no-strings act?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svandra, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    It is not easy to answer this philosophical and moral question. Care situations however unfold in a place where the spontaneity of a gift can be expressed in all simplicity through the gestures of care.

  2. Personality Preferences in Students Identified as Gifted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjercke, Carol

    2006-01-01

    School achievement and even intelligence have been linked to personality styles. Extroversion (the desire to be surrounded by people) and introversion (the desire to be alone in a quiet area) are two of these styles. More students and teachers tend to be extroverted, so this style is more prominent in schools. Extroverts and introverts have almost…

  3. Clinico-Epidemiological Comparison of Delusion-Prominent and Hallucination-Prominent Clinical Subgroups of Paranoid Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreinin, Anatoly; Krishtul, Vladimir; Kirsh, Zvi; Menuchin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Though hallucinations and delusions are prominent basic impairments in schizophrenia, reports of the relationship between hallucinatory and delusional symptoms among schizophrenia patients are scant. To examine the epidemiological and clinical differences between mainly hallucinatory and mainly delusional subgroups of paranoid schizophrenia patients. One hundred schizophrenia patients, paranoid type, were recruited. In a cross-sectional study, participants were divided into Mainly Hallucinatory (H) and Mainly Delusional (D) subgroups. Demographic variables were compared and clinical characteristics were evaluated using the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms, the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms, and the Clinical Global Impression Scale. The Quality-of-Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire-18 was used to assess quality of life. Clinically, the H group was more heterogeneous as expressed by the broader range of scores that described the clinical picture of patients in that subgroup (in 43 of 78 variables, 55.13%) and similar ranges of scores (31 of 78 variables, 39.74%) for patients in the D group. Duration of hospitalization was significantly longer in group H than in group D (p=0.047). There was no statistically significant difference between the H and D subgroups in demographic characteristics. There are distinct epidemiological and clinical differences between the H and D subgroups, with more severe positive and negative symptoms and greater functional impairment in the H group. Paranoid schizophrenia patients with prominent hallucinations have poorer prognosis and need intensive therapeutic rehabilitation beginning with onset-of-illness. Further genetic studies and comparisons of fMRI and/or PET findings are warranted to investigate additional distinctive characteristics of these subgroups.

  4. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information Optical Illusions Printables Ask a Scientist Video Series Why can’t you see colors well in ... and more with our Ask a Scientist video series. Dr. Sheldon Miller answers questions about color blindness, ...

  5. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ask a Scientist Video Series Listen All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series ... Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun ...

  6. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Stuff Cool Eye Tricks Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Ask a Scientist Video Series Why can’ ... a scientist? Click to Watch What is an optical illusion? Click to Watch What is color blindness? Click ...

  7. Young scientists in the making

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2011-01-01

    Some 700 local primary-school children will be trying out the scientific method for themselves from February to June. After "Draw me a physicist", the latest project "Dans la peau d’un chercheur" ("Be a scientist for a day") is designed to give children a taste of what it's like to be a scientist. Both schemes are the fruit of a partnership between CERN, "PhysiScope" (University of Geneva) and the local education authorities in the Pays de Gex and the Canton of Geneva.   Juliette Davenne (left) and Marie Bugnon (centre) from CERN's Communication Group prepare the mystery boxes for primary schools with Olivier Gaumer (right) of PhysiScope. Imagine a white box that rattles and gives off a strange smell when you shake it… How would you go about finding out what's inside it without opening it? Thirty primary-school teachers from the Pays de Gex and the Canton of Geneva tried out this exercise on Wednesday 26 ...

  8. Scientists Discover Sugar in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    The prospects for life in the Universe just got sweeter, with the first discovery of a simple sugar molecule in space. The discovery of the sugar molecule glycolaldehyde in a giant cloud of gas and dust near the center of our own Milky Way Galaxy was made by scientists using the National Science Foundation's 12 Meter Telescope, a radio telescope on Kitt Peak, Arizona. "The discovery of this sugar molecule in a cloud from which new stars are forming means it is increasingly likely that the chemical precursors to life are formed in such clouds long before planets develop around the stars," said Jan M. Hollis of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. Hollis worked with Frank J. Lovas of the University of Illinois and Philip R. Jewell of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, WV, on the observations, made in May. The scientists have submitted their results to the Astrophysical Journal Letters. "This discovery may be an important key to understanding the formation of life on the early Earth," said Jewell. Conditions in interstellar clouds may, in some cases, mimic the conditions on the early Earth, so studying the chemistry of interstellar clouds may help scientists understand how bio-molecules formed early in our planet's history. In addition, some scientists have suggested that Earth could have been "seeded" with complex molecules by passing comets, made of material from the interstellar cloud that condensed to form the Solar System. Glycolaldehyde, an 8-atom molecule composed of carbon, oxygen and hydrogen, can combine with other molecules to form the more-complex sugars Ribose and Glucose. Ribose is a building block of nucleic acids such as RNA and DNA, which carry the genetic code of living organisms. Glucose is the sugar found in fruits. Glycolaldehyde contains exactly the same atoms, though in a different molecular structure, as methyl formate and acetic acid, both of which were detected previously in interstellar clouds

  9. Helping Young People Engage with Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, Maggie; Sykes, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    There can be multiple benefits of scientists engaging with young people, including motivation and inspiration for all involved. But there are risks, particularly if scientists do not consider the interests and needs of young people or listen to what they have to say. We argue that "dialogue" between scientists, young people and teachers…

  10. Radiologic comparison of erosive polyarthritis with prominent interphalangeal involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.H.; Bassett, L.W.; Theros, E.G.

    1982-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis, Reiter's disease, and multicentric reticulohistiocytosis may manifest prominent interphalangeal joint and cutaneous involvement. All three disorders may also affect the sacroiliac joints and spine. Despite these similarities, there are basic radiologic differences enabling distinction between the three disorders. Erosive osteoarthritis must also be considered in the differential diagnosis of interphalangeal erosive arthritis. Psoriatic erosions are characteristically ill defined, often bilaterally asymmetrical, usually unaccompanied by significant osteoporosis, and frequently associated with florid proliferation of subperiosteal new bone. An unilateral polyarticular pattern, which often occurs in a single ray, is the most prevalent of several patterns of involvement. Reiter's disease exhibits many clinical and radiologic similarities to psoriatic arthritis, but in the former there tends to be selective involvement of the joints of the lower limbs and particularly the feet, with relative sparing of the hands and wrists, while in the latter the joints of the upper and lower limbs tend to be involved to an equal extent. Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis (MR). Lesions predominate in skin and synovium and result in sharply circumscribed, rapidly progressive, strikingly bilaterally symmetrical erosions spreading from joint margins to articular surfaces. Most or all of the diarthrodial joints may be affected, but interphalangeal joint predominance and early and severe atlanto-axial involvement are characteristic. Erosive osteoarthritis is characterized by interphalangeal subchondral erosions, accompanying periosteal new bone that is more subtle than that of psoriatic arthritis, and interphalangeal bony ankylosis that occurs with the same frequency as that of psoriatic arthritis. (orig.)

  11. Quantifying the cepstral peak prominence, a measure of dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heman-Ackah, Yolanda D; Sataloff, Robert T; Laureyns, Griet; Lurie, Deborah; Michael, Deirdre D; Heuer, Reinhardt; Rubin, Adam; Eller, Robert; Chandran, Swapna; Abaza, Mona; Lyons, Karen; Divi, Venu; Lott, Joanna; Johnson, Jennifer; Hillenbrand, James

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish normative values for the smoothed cepstral peak prominence (CPPS) and its sensitivity and specificity as a measure of dysphonia. Prospective cohort study. Voice samples of running speech were obtained from 835 patients and 50 volunteers. Eight laryngologists and four speech-language pathologists performed perceptual ratings of the voice samples on the degree of dysphonia/normality using an analog scale. The mean of their perceptual ratings was used as the gold standard for the detection of the presence or absence of dysphonia. CPPS was measured using the CPPS algorithm of Hillenbrand, and the cut-off value for positivity that has the highest sensitivity and specificity for discriminating between normal and severely dysphonia voices was determined based on ROC-curve analysis. The cut-off value for normal for CPPS was set at 4.0 or higher, which gave a sensitivity of 92.4%, a specificity of 79%, a positive predictive value of 82.5%, and a negative predictive value of 90.8%. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.937 (P dysphonia, with the normal value of CPPS (Hillenbrand algorithm) of a running speech sample being defined as a value of 4.0 or higher. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. All rights reserved.

  12. Porcine CD38 exhibits prominent secondary NAD(+) cyclase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Kai Yiu; Leung, Christina F P; Graeff, Richard M; Lee, Hon Cheung; Hao, Quan; Kotaka, Masayo

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) mobilizes intracellular Ca(2+) stores and activates Ca(2+) influx to regulate a wide range of physiological processes. It is one of the products produced from the catalysis of NAD(+) by the multifunctional CD38/ADP-ribosyl cyclase superfamily. After elimination of the nicotinamide ring by the enzyme, the reaction intermediate of NAD(+) can either be hydrolyzed to form linear ADPR or cyclized to form cADPR. We have previously shown that human CD38 exhibits a higher preference towards the hydrolysis of NAD(+) to form linear ADPR while Aplysia ADP-ribosyl cyclase prefers cyclizing NAD(+) to form cADPR. In this study, we characterized the enzymatic properties of porcine CD38 and revealed that it has a prominent secondary NAD(+) cyclase activity producing cADPR. We also determined the X-ray crystallographic structures of porcine CD38 and were able to observe conformational flexibility at the base of the active site of the enzyme which allow the NAD(+) reaction intermediate to adopt conformations resulting in both hydrolysis and cyclization forming linear ADPR and cADPR respectively. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  13. Prominent feature extraction for review analysis: an empirical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Basant; Mittal, Namita

    2016-05-01

    Sentiment analysis (SA) research has increased tremendously in recent times. SA aims to determine the sentiment orientation of a given text into positive or negative polarity. Motivation for SA research is the need for the industry to know the opinion of the users about their product from online portals, blogs, discussion boards and reviews and so on. Efficient features need to be extracted for machine-learning algorithm for better sentiment classification. In this paper, initially various features are extracted such as unigrams, bi-grams and dependency features from the text. In addition, new bi-tagged features are also extracted that conform to predefined part-of-speech patterns. Furthermore, various composite features are created using these features. Information gain (IG) and minimum redundancy maximum relevancy (mRMR) feature selection methods are used to eliminate the noisy and irrelevant features from the feature vector. Finally, machine-learning algorithms are used for classifying the review document into positive or negative class. Effects of different categories of features are investigated on four standard data-sets, namely, movie review and product (book, DVD and electronics) review data-sets. Experimental results show that composite features created from prominent features of unigram and bi-tagged features perform better than other features for sentiment classification. mRMR is a better feature selection method as compared with IG for sentiment classification. Boolean Multinomial Naïve Bayes) algorithm performs better than support vector machine classifier for SA in terms of accuracy and execution time.

  14. Combined surgical management of mandibular angle prominence and microgenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portelles Masso, Ayelen Maria; Berger Kohn, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Chin play a very important role in facial aesthetics. Different deformities of volume and of position may occur at this level and it is the microgenia one of the more frequent. Treatment options include the use of silicone, alloplasty materials and autologous bone graft. Authors report the use of the bone removed from mandibular angle to increase the chin. This is the case of a white female patient aged 18 seen by the Orthognathics Multidisciplinary Staff of 'V. I. Lenin' Hospital due to its uncommon face width. The corresponding physical examination as well as the complementary ones diagnosed a bilateral prominence of mandibular angle associated with a microgenia. Surgery carried out was of remodeling type of both mandibular angles and genioplasty of height increase and a discrete advancement using the bone removed from the gonion. There were satisfactory aesthetic results without evidence of bone reabsorption. We conclude that use of autologous graft of mandibular angle is an effective treatment alternative for correction of microgenia. (author)

  15. The coordination of boundary tones and its interaction with prominence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsika, Argyro; Krivokapić, Jelena; Mooshammer, Christine; Tiede, Mark; Goldstein, Louis

    2014-05-01

    This study investigates the coordination of boundary tones as a function of stress and pitch accent. Boundary tone coordination has not been experimentally investigated previously, and the effect of prominence on this coordination, and whether it is lexical (stress-driven) or phrasal (pitch accent-driven) in nature is unclear. We assess these issues using a variety of syntactic constructions to elicit different boundary tones in an Electromagnetic Articulography (EMA) study of Greek. The results indicate that the onset of boundary tones co-occurs with the articulatory target of the final vowel. This timing is further modified by stress, but not by pitch accent: boundary tones are initiated earlier in words with non-final stress than in words with final stress regardless of accentual status. Visual data inspection reveals that phrase-final words are followed by acoustic pauses during which specific articulatory postures occur. Additional analyses show that these postures reach their achievement point at a stable temporal distance from boundary tone onsets regardless of stress position. Based on these results and parallel findings on boundary lengthening reported elsewhere, a novel approach to prosody is proposed within the context of Articulatory Phonology: rather than seeing prosodic (lexical and phrasal) events as independent entities, a set of coordination relations between them is suggested. The implications of this account for prosodic architecture are discussed.

  16. Prominent Determinants of Consumer-Based Brand Equity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Battistoni

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate the most prominent drivers of brand equity, from a consumerbased point of view. We present a new approach for measuring brand equity, which can be applied regardless of the brand sector and is based on the Analytic Hierarchy Process. This approach has the main advantage of allowing for comparisons to be made between non‐directly measurable elements and also has the advantage of enabling the ranking of intangible criteria, such as consumers’ feelings or purchase intentions. We focus on the fashion industry, since we believe in the higher value of our approach when applied to brands which offer products with less tangible characteristics. Thanks to a case study – which involved about 250 interviewees – we succeed in finding and prioritizing the elements which can have an impact on the brand value. We also provide a global ranking for three apparel brands: Gap, H&M and Zara. The results from our model are consistent with other popular ratings and can be extremely useful for brand managers.

  17. Is evaluation of scientist's objective

    CERN Document Server

    Wold, A

    2000-01-01

    There is ample data demonstrating that female scientists advance at a far slower rate than their male colleagues. The low numbers of female professors in European and North American universities is, thus, not solely an effect of few women in the recruitment pool but also to obstacles specific to the female gender. Together with her colleague Christine Wennerås, Agnes Wold conducted a study of the evaluation process at the Swedish Medical Research Council. Evaluators judged the "scientific competence", "research proposal" and "methodology" of applicants for post-doctoral positions in 1995. By relating the scores for "scientific competence" to the applicants' scientific productivity and other factors using multiple regression, Wennerås and Wold demonstrated that the applicant's sex exerted a strong influence on the "competence" score so that male applicants were perceived as being more competent than female applicants of equal productivity. The study was published in Nature (vol 387, p 341-3, 1997) and inspir...

  18. Refugee scientists and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segre, E.

    1985-01-01

    The coming together of many of the world's experts in nuclear physics in the 1930's was largely the result of the persecution of Jews in Germany and later in Italy. Initially this meant there were no jobs for young physicists to go into as the senior scientists had been sacked. Later, it resulted in the assembly of many of the world's foremost physicists in the United States, specifically at the Los Alamos Laboratory to work on the Manhattan Project. The rise of antisemitism in Italy (to where many physicists had fled at first) provoked the emigration of Fermi, the leading expert on neutrons at that time. The politics, physics and personalities in the 1930's, relevant to the development of nuclear energy, are discussed. (UK)

  19. LHCb Early Career Scientist Awards

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrick Koppenburg for the LHCb Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    On 15 September 2016, the LHCb collaboration awarded the first set of prizes for outstanding contributions of early career scientists.   From left to right: Guy Wilkinson (LHCb spokesperson), Sascha Stahl, Kevin Dungs, Tim Head, Roel Aaij, Conor Fitzpatrick, Claire Prouvé, Patrick Koppenburg (chair of committee) and Sean Benson. Twenty-five nominations were submitted and considered by the committee, and 5 prizes were awarded to teams or individuals for works that had a significant impact within the last year. The awardees are: Roel Aaij, Sean Benson, Conor Fitzpatrick, Rosen Matev and Sascha Stahl for having implemented and commissioned the revolutionary changes to the LHC Run-2 high-level-trigger, including the first widespread deployment of real-time analysis techniques in High Energy Physics;   Kevin Dungs and Tim Head for having launched the Starterkit initiative, a new style of software tutorials based on modern programming methods. “Starterkit is a group of ph...

  20. All About School People Who Accept "Gifts' from School Suppliers and Manufacturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monks, Robert

    1974-01-01

    A survey reveals that the school officials all over the country are being offered gifts by people who do business with schools. Most gift offering and accepting is done subtly and probably unconsciously. (Author/WM)

  1. Universities Earth System Scientists Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, John E.

    1995-01-01

    This document constitutes the final technical report for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Grant NAGW-3172. This grant was instituted to provide for the conduct of research under the Universities Space Research Association's (USRA's) Universities Earth System Scientist Program (UESSP) for the Office of Mission to Planet Earth (OMTPE) at NASA Headquarters. USRA was tasked with the following requirements in support of the Universities Earth System Scientists Programs: (1) Bring to OMTPE fundamental scientific and technical expertise not currently resident at NASA Headquarters covering the broad spectrum of Earth science disciplines; (2) Conduct basic research in order to help establish the state of the science and technological readiness, related to NASA issues and requirements, for the following, near-term, scientific uncertainties, and data/information needs in the areas of global climate change, clouds and radiative balance, sources and sinks of greenhouse gases and the processes that control them, solid earth, oceans, polar ice sheets, land-surface hydrology, ecological dynamics, biological diversity, and sustainable development; (3) Evaluate the scientific state-of-the-field in key selected areas and to assist in the definition of new research thrusts for missions, including those that would incorporate the long-term strategy of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). This will, in part, be accomplished by study and evaluation of the basic science needs of the community as they are used to drive the development and maintenance of a global-scale observing system, the focused research studies, and the implementation of an integrated program of modeling, prediction, and assessment; and (4) Produce specific recommendations and alternative strategies for OMTPE that can serve as a basis for interagency and national and international policy on issues related to Earth sciences.

  2. Piecewise mass flows within a solar prominence observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongbo; Liu, Yu; Tam, Kuan Vai; Zhao, Mingyu; Zhang, Xuefei

    2018-06-01

    The material of solar prominences is often observed in a state of flowing. These mass flows (MF) are important and useful for us to understand the internal structure and dynamics of prominences. In this paper, we present a high resolution Hα observation of MFs within a quiescent solar prominence. From the observation, we find that the plasma primarily has a circular motion and a downward motion separately in the middle section and legs of the prominence, which creates a piecewise mass flow along the observed prominence. Moreover, the observation also shows a clear displacement of MF's velocity peaks in the middle section of the prominence. All of these provide us with a detailed record of MFs within a solar prominence and show a new approach to detecting the physical properties of prominence.

  3. PREFACE: FAIRNESS 2014: FAIR Next Generation ScientistS 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    FAIRNESS 2014 was the third edition in a series of workshops designed to bring together excellent international young scientists with research interests focused on physics at FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) and was held on September 22-27 2014 in Vietri sul Mare, Italy. The topics of the workshops cover a wide range of aspects in both theoretical developments and current experimental status, concentrated around the four scientific pillars of FAIR. FAIR is a new accelerator complex with brand new experimental facilities, that is currently being built next to the existing GSI Helmholtzzentrum for Schwerionenforschung close to Darmstadt, Germany. The spirit of the conference is to bring together young scientists, e.g. advanced PhD students and postdocs and young researchers without permanent position to present their work, to foster active informal discussions and build up of networks. Every participant in the meeting with the exception of the organizers gives an oral presentation, and all sessions are followed by an hour long discussion period. During the talks, questions are anonymously collected in a box to stimulate discussions. The broad physics program at FAIR is reflected in the wide range of topics covered by the workshop: • Physics of hot and dense nuclear matter, QCD phase transitions and critical point • Nuclear structure, astrophysics and reactions • Hadron Spectroscopy, Hadrons in matter and Hypernuclei • New developments in atomic and plasma physics • Special emphasis is put on the experiments CBM, HADES, PANDA, NUSTAR, APPA and related experiments For each of these different areas one invited speaker was selected to give a longer introductory presentation. The write-ups of the talks presented at FAIRNESS 2014 are the content of this issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series and have been refereed according to the IOP standard for peer review. This issue constitutes therefore a collection of the forefront of research that

  4. Prominent central spinal canal on MRI - normal variant or pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugal, T.P.; Brazier, D.; Roche, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The sensitivity of MRI can make differentiation of normal from abnormal challenging.The study investigates whether a visible central spinal canal is pathological or a normal variant. We review eight MRI (mostly on a 1.5 Tesla unit) cases where there is a visible central cavity in keeping with a central canal and review the literature. The central canal is a space in the medial part of the grey-matter commissure between the anterior and posterior horns. Histopathological studies show that the canal is present at birth with the majority showing subsequent involution but is uncommonly imaged on MRI. The main differential diagnosis is syringomyelia which usually presents with deficits in pain and sensation corresponding to the appropriate level often with a demonstrable aetiology. Two thirds of our patients were female with an average age of thirty-six years (range 26-45). The patients were largely asymptomatic or their symptoms appeared unrelated to the imaging findings. Three patients had minor previous trauma and two others had non-bacterial meningitis up to twenty years earlier. No patient had known spinal surgery or trauma.The cavity corresponded tomographically to the expected site of the central canal. The canal was in the thoracic location. The canal diameter ranged from one to five millimetres and its length varied from one half a vertebral body height to extending over the entire thoracic region. Its configuration was either filiform or fusiform, with smooth contours. No predisposing features to suggest syringomyelia or other structural abnormalities were noted. Where Gadolinium was given no abnormal enhancement was observed. These cases add to the literature and suggest that these prominent canals are largely asymptomatic and should be viewed as normal variants. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  5. 29 CFR 778.212 - Gifts, Christmas and special occasion bonuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gifts, Christmas and special occasion bonuses. 778.212... COMPENSATION Payments That May Be Excluded From the âRegular Rateâ Bonuses § 778.212 Gifts, Christmas and... “regular rate” shall not be deemed to include “sums paid as gifts; payments in the nature of gifts made at...

  6. Mating promotes lactic-acid gut bacteria in a gift-giving insect

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Chad; Mueller, Ulrich; Dietrich, Emma; Smith, C.; Srygley, R.; Dietrich, E.; Mueller, U.; Srygley, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Mating is a ubiquitous social interaction with the potential to influence the microbiome by facilitating transmission, modifying host physiology, and in species where males donate nuptial gifts to females, altering diet. We manipulated mating and nuptial gift consumption in two insects that differ in nuptial gift size, the Mormon cricket Anabrus simplex and the decorated cricket Gryllodes sigillatus, with the expectation that larger gifts are more likely to affect the gut microbiome. Surprisi...

  7. Examination of Gifted Students' Probability Problem Solving Process in Terms of Mathematical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltaci, Serdal

    2016-01-01

    It is a widely known fact that gifted students have different skills compared to their peers. However, to what extent gifted students use mathematical thinking skills during probability problem solving process emerges as a significant question. Thence, the main aim of the present study is to examine 8th grade gifted students' probability…

  8. 36 CFR Appendix A to Part 79 - Example of a Deed of Gift

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Example of a Deed of Gift A Appendix A to Part 79 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... 79—Example of a Deed of Gift DEED OF GIFT TO THE (Name of the Federal agency) Whereas, the (name of...

  9. Inquiry-Based Instruction within a Community of Practice for Gifted-ADHD College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Olivia; Shore, Bruce M.; Makarova, Evgeniya

    2014-01-01

    A number of characteristics are shared between attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and gifted populations. They include issues with sustaining attention, following directions, and completing tasks. When an individual is both gifted and has ADHD (gifted-ADHD) he has unique educational needs that may put him at risk for underachievement.…

  10. Self-Esteem of Gifted, Normal, and Mild Mentally Handicapped Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Lian-Hwang

    1990-01-01

    Administered Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (SEI) Form B to elementary school students (N=450) identified as gifted, normal, and mild mentally handicapped (MiMH). Results indicated that both the gifted and normal children had significantly higher self-esteem than did the MiMH children, but there were no differences between gifted and normal…

  11. Equity in Cross-Cultural Gifted Screening from a Philippine Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vista, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses issues on cross-cultural gifted screening from a Philippine perspective. Research on gifted education in the Philippines, and Southeast Asia in general, is still nascent. The main focus of this review of literature is on equity of the gifted education screening process across wide socioeconomic, cultural, and linguistic…

  12. Gift Giving and Receiving in Child-Centered Play Therapy: An Ethical Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Pedro J.; Sheely-Moore, Angela I.

    2012-01-01

    Child-centered play therapists are often confronted with the challenge of receiving gifts from clients. This article highlights recommended strategies when faced with gift receiving, exemplified by actual ethical dilemmas encountered by child-centered play therapists. Ethical and therapeutic considerations of therapist gift giving to child clients…

  13. Biosamples as gifts? How participants in biobanking projects talk about donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locock, Louise; Boylan, Anne-Marie R

    2016-08-01

    In the UK, altruism has featured explicitly as an underpinning principle for biobanking. However, conceptualizing donation as altruistic downplays the role of reciprocity and personal or family benefit. To investigate how biosample donors talk about their donation and whether they regard samples as 'gifts'. In this qualitative study, 21 people, both healthy volunteers and people with health conditions, who had been invited to give biosamples took part in semi-structured narrative interviews. The data were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. The term 'gift' was considered appropriate by some, but it also evoked puzzlement, especially in relation to 'waste' material (e.g. urine or tumour samples). Whilst 'giving' or 'donating' were commonly mentioned, the noun 'gift' signified something more special and deliberate. Analysis suggested biosamples could be interpreted as gifts in several different ways, including unreserved gift; reciprocal gift; collective gift; unwanted/low-value gift; and gift as an exaggeration. Although people describe a network of exchange consistent with anthropological understandings of gift relationships, lay (and biomedical) understandings of the term 'gift' may differ from anthropological definitions. For donors (and researchers), value is attached to the information derived from the sample, rather than the sample itself. Consequently, when asking people for biosamples, we should avoid using the term 'gift'. Acknowledging the value of participation and the information the sample holds may mean more to potential donors. © 2015 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Counseling Gifted Children in Singapore: Implications for Evidence-Based Treatment with a Multicultural Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Lay See; Pfeiffer, Steven I.

    2018-01-01

    Gifted education (GE) in Singapore is entering its third decade. However, local research into the gifted is typically undertaken by graduate students and left as unpublished data. Internationally, there is also very little if any research on counseling models that have been empirically validated for use with gifted children irrespective of their…

  15. Three Myths? The Over-Representation of the Gifted among Dropouts, Delinquents, and Suicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajoie, Susanne P.; Shore, Bruce M.

    1981-01-01

    From findings, it is concluded that: the proportion of gifted dropouts may be average, existing literature on delinquency suggests underrepresentation of the gifted, and suicide statistics and theories about the causes of suicide are the most accommodating to the idea of overrepresentation of the gifted. (SB)

  16. From Bystander to Upstander Teacher for Gifted Black Students Accused of Acting White

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantham, Tarek C.; Biddle, Winfred H.

    2014-01-01

    Gifted Black students experience many barriers that contribute to their under-representation in gifted and advanced programs. One of the greatest negative influences comes from peer accusations of acting White that undermine gifted and high-achieving Black students' academic motivation and their interest in challenging courses and programs.…

  17. 31 CFR 0.203 - Gifts or gratuities from foreign governments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gifts or gratuities from foreign... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EMPLOYEE RULES OF CONDUCT Rules of Conduct § 0.203 Gifts or gratuities from foreign governments. (a) The United States Constitution prohibits employees from accepting gifts...

  18. 14 CFR 300.8 - Gifts and hospitality and other conduct affecting DOT employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Gifts and hospitality and other conduct... CHAPTER § 300.8 Gifts and hospitality and other conduct affecting DOT employees. (a) No person, otherwise... for persons interested in the business of DOT to provide hospitality, gifts, entertainment, or favors...

  19. 10 CFR 1050.201 - Policy against accepting foreign gifts or decorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... DECORATIONS Guidelines for Acceptance of Foreign Gifts or Decorations § 1050.201 Policy against accepting foreign gifts or decorations. (a) The Constitution of the United States, Article I, section 9, clause 8... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Policy against accepting foreign gifts or decorations...

  20. Can Personal Goal Setting Tap the Potential of the Gifted Underachiever?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisano, Dominique; Shore, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    Although underachieving gifted students have been largely ignored in empirical research, there has been a modest surge of interest in describing and "treating" this population in recent years. It is estimated that nearly half of gifted youth achieve significantly below their potential. In the realm of school psychology, gifted children have…

  1. 20 CFR 416.1250 - How we count grants, scholarships, fellowships or gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., fellowships or gifts. 416.1250 Section 416.1250 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... grants, scholarships, fellowships or gifts. (a) When we determine your resources (or your spouse's, if any), we will exclude for 9 months any portion of any grant, scholarship, fellowship, or gift that you...

  2. Exaggerated, Mispredicted, and Misplaced: When "It's the Thought That Counts" in Gift Exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Epley, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Gift-giving involves both the objective value of a gift and the symbolic meaning of the exchange. The objective value is sometimes considered of secondary importance as when people claim, "It's the thought that counts." We evaluated when and how mental state inferences count in gift exchanges. Because considering another's thoughts requires…

  3. 26 CFR 301.7517-1 - Furnishing on request of statement explaining estate or gift valuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... estate or gift valuation. 301.7517-1 Section 301.7517-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... estate or gift valuation. (a) In general. Section 7517 requires the Service to furnish to a taxpayer, at the request of that taxpayer, a statement explaining the estate, gift or generation-skipping transfer...

  4. The Gift Code User Manual. Volume I. Introduction and Input Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-01

    REPORT & PERIOD COVERED ‘TII~ GIFT CODE USER MANUAL; VOLUME 1. INTRODUCTION AND INPUT REQUIREMENTS FINAL 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER ?. AuTHOR(#) 8...reverua side if neceaeary and identify by block number] (k St) The GIFT code is a FORTRANcomputerprogram. The basic input to the GIFT ode is data called

  5. 26 CFR 1.274-1 - Disallowance of certain entertainment, gift and travel expenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disallowance of certain entertainment, gift and... certain entertainment, gift and travel expenses. Section 274 disallows in whole, or in part, certain expenditures for entertainment, gifts and travel which would otherwise be allowable under Chapter 1 of the Code...

  6. 26 CFR 1.356-5 - Transactions involving gift or compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transactions involving gift or compensation. 1... involving gift or compensation. With respect to transactions described in sections 354, 355, or 356, but which— (a) Result in a gift, see section 2501 and following, and the regulations pertaining thereto, or...

  7. 26 CFR 1.274-3 - Disallowance of deduction for gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disallowance of deduction for gifts. 1.274-3... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Items Not Deductible § 1.274-3 Disallowance of deduction for gifts. (a) In general. No deduction shall be allowed under section 162 or 212 for any expense for a gift made...

  8. 33 CFR 17.05-5 - Acceptance and disbursement of gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gifts. 17.05-5 Section 17.05-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL UNITED STATES COAST GUARD GENERAL GIFT FUND Administration § 17.05-5 Acceptance and disbursement of gifts. (a) The immediate receiving person shall give a proper receipt on the proper form used...

  9. 26 CFR 301.6861-1 - Jeopardy assessments of income, estate, gift, and certain excise taxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Jeopardy assessments of income, estate, gift..., Bankruptcy, and Receiverships Jeopardy § 301.6861-1 Jeopardy assessments of income, estate, gift, and certain... that the assessment or collection of a deficiency in income, estate, gift, or chapter 41, 42, 43, or 44...

  10. 22 CFR 64.10 - Grant not to constitute a gift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Grant not to constitute a gift. 64.10 Section... EMPLOYEES IN CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS OF FOREIGN COUNTRIES § 64.10 Grant not to constitute a gift. A grant made under an approved program shall not constitute a gift for purposes of 22 CFR 10.735-203 and...

  11. 26 CFR 301.6075-1 - Time for filing estate and gift tax returns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Time for filing estate and gift tax returns... Records § 301.6075-1 Time for filing estate and gift tax returns. For provisions relating to time for filing estate tax returns and gift tax returns, see § 20.6075-1 of this chapter (Estate Tax Regulations...

  12. 25 CFR 152.23 - Applications for sale, exchange or gift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applications for sale, exchange or gift. 152.23 Section..., Exchanges and Conveyances of Trust Or Restricted Lands § 152.23 Applications for sale, exchange or gift. Applications for the sale, exchange or gift of trust or restricted land shall be filed in the form approved by...

  13. 26 CFR 1.1015-5 - Increased basis for gift tax paid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Increased basis for gift tax paid. 1.1015-5... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Basis Rules of General Application § 1.1015-5 Increased basis for gift tax paid. (a) General rule in the case of gifts made on or before December 31, 1976. (1)(i) Subject to...

  14. The Magic of the Personal Touch : Field Experimental Evidence on Money and Appreciation as Gifts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Bradler (Christiane); S. Neckermann (Susanne)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis paper makes use of two field experiments to explore individual effort responses to gifts. We extend the literature by looking at non-financial gifts and gifts that combine financial and non-financial elements with or without adding a "personal touch". We find that non-pecuniary

  15. The Magic of the Personal Touch : Field Experimental Evidence on Money Appreciation as Gifts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Bradler (Christiane); S. Neckermann (Susanne)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis paper makes use of two field experiments to explore individual effort responses to gifts. We extend the literature by looking at non-financial gifts and gifts that combine financial and non-financial elements with or without adding a “personal touch.” We find that non-pecuniary

  16. The Relationships between Critical Thinking Skills and Learning Styles of Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilekli, Yalçin

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigates the relationship between critical thinking skills and learning styles of mentally gifted students. The participants were 225 gifted students in Turkey attending Science and Art Centres which are after-school activity centers for mentally gifted students. Participants were 9-15 years old and were attending secondary…

  17. An Examination of Articles in Gifted Education and Multicultural Education Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of gifted education and multicultural education journals was performed to identify the number of multicultural education articles in gifted education journals and the number of gifted education articles in multicultural education journals. Journals reviewed were "Multicultural Education", "Multicultural Perspectives," "Urban…

  18. Gender-Fair Assessment of Young Gifted Students' Scientific Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dori, Y. J.; Zohar, A.; Fischer-Shachor, D.; Kohan-Mass, J.; Carmi, M.

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes an Israeli national-level research examining the extent to which admissions of elementary school students to the gifted programmes based on standardised tests are gender-fair. In the research, the gifted students consisted of 275 boys, 128 girls, and additional 80 girls who were admitted to the gifted programme through…

  19. The influence of relationship beliefs on gift giving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rai Dipankar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available People have fundamental beliefs about what constitutes a good relationship, known as implicit theories of relationship, where some people have destiny beliefs whereas others have growth beliefs. People with destiny beliefs believe that potential partners are meant either for each other or not, whereas people with growth beliefs believe that successful relationships are cultivated and developed. This research shows that different implicit theories of relationship influence consumers’ gift choice to their significant others. We demonstrate, through two studies, that consumers with destiny beliefs prefer giving gifts that are more feasible in nature, whereas consumers with growth beliefs prefer giving gifts that are more desirable in nature. We show that this effect is mediated by desirability-feasibility considerations. Specifically, consumers with destiny beliefs focus on feasibility considerations, which leads them to choose a highly feasible gift. Conversely, consumers with growth beliefs focus on desirability considerations, which leads them to choose a highly desirable gift. We also discuss the theoretical and managerial implications of our research.

  20. Woolf’s Weighty Gifts: The Measure of Modernist Autonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Colesworthy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own (1929 provides a critical counterpoint to a cluster of recent discourses on the gift, autonomy, and the changing nature of labor in the contemporary creative economy. From Lewis Hyde’s best-selling The Gift to neo-Marxist accounts of post-Fordism, these discourses routinely adopt modernist notions of autonomy in order to characterize creative labor today. Woolf’s feminist vision of autonomy in A Room of One’s Own at once dovetails with and complicates these discourses. In suggesting that feminine creative power, or “gifts,” both are and are not measurable by a monetary standard, she reinforces a familiar tension between gifts and commodities. But in her attentiveness to the material conditions of creativity, she also refuses to let the ideal of autonomy become an alibi for precarity, as is so often the case with feminized labor in our own creative economy. Ultimately, I argue that A Room of One’s Own reads as notes toward the possibility of a measure of the value of the gift as a gift—a measure that need not come at the expense of economic equality.

  1. EGU's Early Career Scientists Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts Artal, L.; Rietbroek, R.

    2017-12-01

    The EGU encourages early career scientists (ECS) to become involved in interdisciplinary research in the Earth, planetary and space sciences, through sessions, social events and short courses at the annual General Assembly in April and throughout the year. Through division-level representatives, all ECS members can have direct input into matters of the division. A Union-wide representative, who sits on the EGU Council, ensures that ECS are heard at a higher level in the Union too. After a brief introduction as to how the network is organised and structured, this presentation will discuss how EGU ECS activities have been tailored to the needs of ECS members and how those needs have been identified. Reaching and communicating opportunities to ECS remains an ongoing challenge; they will be discussed in this presentation too, as well as some thoughts on how to make them more effective. Finally, the service offered to EGU ECS members would certainly benefit from building links and collaboration with other early career networks in the geosciences. This presentation will outline some of our efforts in that direction and the challenges that remain.

  2. EPTS Curriculum Model in the Education of Gifted Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Sak

    Full Text Available In this article, the author reviews the EPTS Model (Education Programs for Talented Students and discuss how it was developed through multiple stages, the ways it is used to develop programs for gifted students, and then presents research carried out on the effectiveness of this model in the education of gifted students. The EPTS Model has two dimensions: ability and content. The ability dimension has a hierarchical structure composed of three levels of cognitive skills. The content dimension is the extension of the regular curriculum but organized at four levels: data, concept, generalization and theory. Included in the article also is a brief critics of the current state of curricular programs in gifted education.

  3. 31 CFR 363.100 - What are the rules for purchasing and delivering gift savings bonds to minors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... TreasuryDirect Gifts § 363.100 What are the rules for purchasing and delivering gift savings bonds to minors? (a) A TreasuryDirect ® account owner can purchase a savings bond as a gift with a minor as the recipient. (b) An account owner can deliver a bond purchased as a gift to a minor. The account owner must...

  4. 13 CFR 106.503 - Are there types of Gifts which SBA may not solicit and/or accept?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of or for (or use cash Gifts to purchase or engage in) the following: (a) Alcohol products; (b... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Are there types of Gifts which SBA... ADMINISTRATION COSPONSORSHIPS, FEE AND NON-FEE BASED SBA-SPONSORED ACTIVITIES AND GIFTS Gifts § 106.503 Are there...

  5. Morphology and Dynamics of Solar Prominences from 3D MHD Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terradas, J.; Soler, R.; Luna, M.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a numerical study of the time evolution of solar prominences embedded in sheared magnetic arcades. The prominence is represented by a density enhancement in a background-stratified atmosphere and is connected to the photosphere through the magnetic field. By solving the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations in three dimensions, we study the dynamics for a range of parameters representative of real prominences. Depending on the parameters considered, we find prominences that are suspended above the photosphere, i.e., detached prominences, but also configurations resembling curtain or hedgerow prominences whose material continuously connects to the photosphere. The plasma-β is an important parameter that determines the shape of the structure. In many cases magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and oscillatory phenomena develop. Fingers and plumes are generated, affecting the whole prominence body and producing vertical structures in an essentially horizontal magnetic field. However, magnetic shear is able to reduce or even to suppress this instability.

  6. MORPHOLOGY AND DYNAMICS OF SOLAR PROMINENCES FROM 3D MHD SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terradas, J.; Soler, R.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L. [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Luna, M., E-mail: jaume.terradas@uib.es [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-01-20

    In this paper we present a numerical study of the time evolution of solar prominences embedded in sheared magnetic arcades. The prominence is represented by a density enhancement in a background-stratified atmosphere and is connected to the photosphere through the magnetic field. By solving the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations in three dimensions, we study the dynamics for a range of parameters representative of real prominences. Depending on the parameters considered, we find prominences that are suspended above the photosphere, i.e., detached prominences, but also configurations resembling curtain or hedgerow prominences whose material continuously connects to the photosphere. The plasma-β is an important parameter that determines the shape of the structure. In many cases magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and oscillatory phenomena develop. Fingers and plumes are generated, affecting the whole prominence body and producing vertical structures in an essentially horizontal magnetic field. However, magnetic shear is able to reduce or even to suppress this instability.

  7. Frederic Joliot-Curie, a tormented scientist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinault, M.

    2000-01-01

    This article is a short biography of the French scientist Frederic Joliot-Curie. His fight for a peaceful use of atomic energy, his responsibilities as nuclear physicist and as the first director of the French atomic commission (CEA) have led him to face contradictions very difficult to manage. All along his career as a scientist and as a high ranked civil servant, F.Joliot-Curie tried to find an ethical way for scientists in modern societies. (A.C.)

  8. Exploring Scientists' Working Timetable: A Global Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xianwen; Peng, Lian; Zhang, Chunbo; Xu, Shenmeng; Wang, Zhi; Wang, Chuanli; Wang, Xianbing

    2013-01-01

    In our previous study (Wang et al., 2012), we analyzed scientists' working timetable of 3 countries, using realtime downloading data of scientific literatures. In this paper, we make a through analysis about global scientists' working habits. Top 30 countries/territories from Europe, Asia, Australia, North America, Latin America and Africa are selected as representatives and analyzed in detail. Regional differences for scientists' working habits exists in different countries. Besides differen...

  9. Gift-giving in the medical student--patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Yassar Abdullah S

    2012-08-01

    There is paucity in the published literature that provides any ethical guidance guiding gift-giving within the student--patient relationship. This is perhaps because the dynamics of the medical student--patient relationship have not yet been explored as extensively as the doctor--patient relationship. More importantly, however, gift--giving in the doctor-patient relationship has traditionally been from the patient to the doctor and not vice versa. This article examines the literature published in this vicinity reflecting on an encounter with a patient.

  10. Frederic Joliot-Curie the history of a civic-minded scientist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    The year 2000 marks the hundredth anniversary of the birth of Frederic Joliot-Curie, who can be safely termed as one of the most prominent figures of the twentieth century. The scientist and his wife Irene discovered artificial radioactivity at the Radium Institute; in 1935, they received the Nobel Chemistry Prize for their discovery. At the College de France four years later, Frederic Joliot-Curie uncovered the conditions required for a chain reaction in uranium. He gave meaning to the word civic-minded citizen. His many deeds were a statement that a scientist should offer more than his research and its possible applications to society; that he should not shrink from committing to political and social struggles. That is why this exceptional man is a model of a committed scientist. (author)

  11. Nuptial gifts of male spiders: sensory exploitation of the female's maternal care instinct or foraging motivation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilde, T.; Tuni, Cristina; Elsayed, Rehab

    2007-01-01

    by producing a nuptial gift that resembles the female's eggsac. In mating experiments we examined whether males exploit the female's foraging motivation or the female's maternal care instinct. We carried out a gift-switching experiment, where males presented an eggsac, a wrapped fly or an unwrapped fly...... as nuptial gifts. Females fed on eggsacs as well as on prey gifts. Mating success was similar for males with both wrapped and unwrapped gifts, indicating that wrapping per se does not increase male mating success. In a food manipulation experiment, we investigated the effect of the female's hunger level...... on male mating success. Hungry females were more likely to accept a gift and copulate; hence the female's hunger state is decisive for male mating success. Our results strongly suggest that the female's foraging motivation is the true context for the maintenance of the nuptial gift....

  12. Social Networks and Externalities from Gift Exchange: Evidence from A Field Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Janet; Lin, Wanchuan; Meng, Juanjuan

    2013-11-01

    This paper asks whether gift exchange generates externalities for people outside of the bilateral relationship between the gift giver and recipient, and whether the nature of this relationship is affected by social networks. We examine this question in the context of a field experiment in urban Chinese hospital outpatient clinics. We first show that when patients give a small gift, doctors reciprocate with better service and a fewer unnecessary prescriptions of antibiotics. We then show that gift giving creates externalities for third parties. If two patients, A and B are perceived as unrelated, B receives worse care when A gives a gift. However, if A identifies B as a friend, then both A and B benefit from A's gift giving. Hence, we show that gift giving can create positive or negative externalities, depending on the giver's social distance to the third party.

  13. Social Networks and Externalities from Gift Exchange: Evidence from A Field Experiment☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Janet; Lin, Wanchuan; Meng, Juanjuan

    2016-01-01

    This paper asks whether gift exchange generates externalities for people outside of the bilateral relationship between the gift giver and recipient, and whether the nature of this relationship is affected by social networks. We examine this question in the context of a field experiment in urban Chinese hospital outpatient clinics. We first show that when patients give a small gift, doctors reciprocate with better service and a fewer unnecessary prescriptions of antibiotics. We then show that gift giving creates externalities for third parties. If two patients, A and B are perceived as unrelated, B receives worse care when A gives a gift. However, if A identifies B as a friend, then both A and B benefit from A’s gift giving. Hence, we show that gift giving can create positive or negative externalities, depending on the giver’s social distance to the third party. PMID:26949272

  14. 31 CFR 363.96 - What do I need to know if I initially purchase a bond as a gift?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... purchase a bond as a gift? 363.96 Section 363.96 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money...Direct Gifts § 363.96 What do I need to know if I initially purchase a bond as a gift? (a) An entity may not purchase a gift savings bond. (b) The gift bond will be registered in the name of the recipient(s...

  15. Chinese Scientists | Women in Science | Initiatives | Indian Academy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Initiatives; Women in Science; Chinese Scientists. Chinese Scientists. One third Chinese scientists are women [What about India?] ... scientists, at a young age of 52, after a valiant battle with cancer, today on 29th March 2016 in Delhi.

  16. Worthless and Nutritive Nuptial Gifts: Mating Duration, Sperm Stored and Potential Female Decisions in Spiders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J Albo

    Full Text Available In nuptial gift-giving species females sometimes select their potential mates based on the presence and size of the gift. But in some species, such as the Neotropical polyandrous spider Paratrechalea ornate male gifts vary in quality, from nutritive to worthless, and this male strategy can be in conflict with female nutritional benefits. In this species, males without gifts experience a reduction in mating success and duration, while males that offer worthless or genuine nutritive gifts mate with similar frequencies and durations. The female apparently controls the duration of copulation. Thus, there is scope for females to favour males offering gifts and further if these are nutritious, via post-copulatory processes. We first tested whether females differentially store sperm from males that offer the highest nutritional benefits by experimentally presenting females with males that offer either nutritive or worthless gifts (uninterrupted matings. Second, we carried out another set of experiments to examine whether females can select sperm based only on gift presence. This time we interrupted matings after the first pedipalp insertion, thus matching number of insertions and mating duration for males that: offered and did not offer gift. Our results showed that the amount of sperm stored is positive related to mating duration in all groups, except in matings with worthless gifts. Gift presence itself did not affect the sperm stored by females, while they store similar number of sperm in matings with males offering either nutritive or worthless gifts. We discuss whether females prefer males with gifts regardless, if content, because it represents an attractive and/or reliable signal. Or alternatively, they prefer nutritive nuptial gifts, as they are an important source of food supply and/or signal of male donor ability.

  17. Chinese, US scientists find new particle

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Chinese and US scientists have discovered a new particle at the Beijing Electron Position Collider, which is hard to be explained with any known particles, according to scientists from the Institute of High Energy Physics under the Chinese Academy of Sciences Wednesday" (1/2 page).

  18. Student Pugwash Conference Probes Scientists' Individual Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, Richard J.

    1985-01-01

    Students from 25 nations and senior scientists examined ethical and social dimensions of decision making about science and technology during the 1985 Student Pugwash Conference on scientists' individual responsibilities. Working groups focused on toxic wastes, military uses of space, energy and poverty, genetic engineering, and individual rights.…

  19. Scientists Like Me: Faces of Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enevoldsen, A. A. G.; Culp, S.; Trinh, A.

    2010-08-01

    During the International Year of Astronomy, Pacific Science Center is hosting a photography exhibit: Scientists Like Me: Faces of Discovery. The exhibit contains photographs of real, current astronomers and scientists working in astronomy and aerospace-related fields from many races, genders, cultural affiliations and walks of life. The photographs were taken and posters designed by Alyssa Trinh and Sarah Culp, high school interns in Discovery Corps, Pacific Science Center's youth development program. The direct contact between the scientists and the interns helps the intended audience of teachers and families personally connect with scientists. The finished posters from this exhibit are available online (http://pacificsciencecenter.org/scientists) for teachers to use in their classrooms, in addition to being displayed at Pacific Science Center and becoming part of Pacific Science Center's permanent art rotation. The objective of this project was to fill a need for representative photographs of scientists in the world community. It also met two of the goals of International Year of Astronomy: to provide a modern image of science and scientists, and to improve the gender-balanced representation of scientists at all levels and promote greater involvement by all people in scientific and engineering careers. We would like to build on the success of this project and create an annual summer internship, with different interns, focusing on creating posters for different fields of science.

  20. Preparing Planetary Scientists to Engage Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupla, C. B.; Shaner, A. J.; Hackler, A. S.

    2017-12-01

    While some planetary scientists have extensive experience sharing their science with audiences, many can benefit from guidance on giving presentations or conducting activities for students. The Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) provides resources and trainings to support planetary scientists in their communication efforts. Trainings have included sessions for students and early career scientists at conferences (providing opportunities for them to practice their delivery and receive feedback for their poster and oral presentations), as well as separate communication workshops on how to engage various audiences. LPI has similarly begun coaching planetary scientists to help them prepare their public presentations. LPI is also helping to connect different audiences and their requests for speakers to planetary scientists. Scientists have been key contributors in developing and conducting activities in LPI education and public events. LPI is currently working with scientists to identify and redesign short planetary science activities for scientists to use with different audiences. The activities will be tied to fundamental planetary science concepts, with basic materials and simple modifications to engage different ages and audience size and background. Input from the planetary science community on these efforts is welcome. Current results and resources, as well as future opportunities will be shared.

  1. Tens of Romanian scientists work at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Silian, Sidonia

    2007-01-01

    "The figures regarding the actual number of Romanian scientists working at the European Center for Nuclear Research, or CERN, differ. The CERN data base lists some 30 Romanians on its payroll, while the scientists with the Nuclear Center at Magurele, Romania, say they should be around 50." (1 page)

  2. How Middle Schoolers Draw Engineers and Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fralick, Bethany; Kearn, Jennifer; Thompson, Stephen; Lyons, Jed

    2009-01-01

    The perceptions young students have of engineers and scientists are often populated with misconceptions and stereotypes. Although the perceptions that young people have of engineers and of scientists have been investigated separately, they have not been systematically compared. The research reported in this paper explores the question "How are…

  3. Communicating Like a Scientist with Multimodal Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Mark; Kuhn, Mason

    2012-01-01

    If students are to accurately model how scientists use written communication, they must be given opportunities to use creative means to describe science in the classroom. Scientists often integrate pictures, diagrams, charts, and other modes within text and students should also be encouraged to use multiple modes of communication. This article…

  4. Code of conduct for scientists (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khurshid, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of advanced technologies in the last three decades and extraordinary progress in our knowledge on the basic Physical, Chemical and Biological properties of living matter has offered tremendous benefits to human beings but simultaneously highlighted the need of higher awareness and responsibility by the scientists of 21 century. Scientist is not born with ethics, nor science is ethically neutral, but there are ethical dimensions to scientific work. There is need to evolve an appropriate Code of Conduct for scientist particularly working in every field of Science. However, while considering the contents, promulgation and adaptation of Codes of Conduct for Scientists, a balance is needed to be maintained between freedom of scientists and at the same time some binding on them in the form of Code of Conducts. The use of good and safe laboratory procedures, whether, codified by law or by common practice must also be considered as part of the moral duties of scientists. It is internationally agreed that a general Code of Conduct can't be formulated for all the scientists universally, but there should be a set of 'building blocks' aimed at establishing the Code of Conduct for Scientists either as individual researcher or responsible for direction, evaluation, monitoring of scientific activities at the institutional or organizational level. (author)

  5. How Scientists Develop Competence in Visual Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostergren, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    Visuals (maps, charts, diagrams and illustrations) are an important tool for communication in most scientific disciplines, which means that scientists benefit from having strong visual communication skills. This dissertation examines the nature of competence in visual communication and the means by which scientists acquire this competence. This…

  6. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun Stuff Cool Eye Tricks Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Ask a Scientist Video Series ...

  7. Magnetic Field-Vector Measurements in Quiescent Prominences via the Hanle Effect: Analysis of Prominences Observed at Pic-Du-Midi and at Sacramento Peak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommier, V.; Leroy, J. L.; Sahal-Brechot, S.

    1985-01-01

    The Hanle effect method for magnetic field vector diagnostics has now provided results on the magnetic field strength and direction in quiescent prominences, from linear polarization measurements in the He I E sub 3 line, performed at the Pic-du-Midi and at Sacramento Peak. However, there is an inescapable ambiguity in the field vector determination: each polarization measurement provides two field vector solutions symmetrical with respect to the line-of-sight. A statistical analysis capable of solving this ambiguity was applied to the large sample of prominences observed at the Pic-du-Midi (Leroy, et al., 1984); the same method of analysis applied to the prominences observed at Sacramento Peak (Athay, et al., 1983) provides results in agreement on the most probable magnetic structure of prominences; these results are detailed. The statistical results were confirmed on favorable individual cases: for 15 prominences observed at Pic-du-Midi, the two-field vectors are pointing on the same side of the prominence, and the alpha angles are large enough with respect to the measurements and interpretation inaccuracies, so that the field polarity is derived without any ambiguity.

  8. 26 CFR 25.2503-1 - General definitions of “taxable gifts” and of “total amount of gifts.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... âtotal amount of gifts.â 25.2503-1 Section 25.2503-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1954 Determination of Tax Liability § 25.2503-1 General definitions of “taxable gifts” and of “total amount of gifts...

  9. Reading, Writing, and "Rhythmetics" for the Verbally Gifted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilon, A. Barbara

    The monograph presents a variety of language arts teaching ideas for use with gifted students. Teachers are encouraged to expose children to much literature including poetry, folk tales, riddles, fairy tales, "pourquoi" tales, myths and legends, fantasy, science fiction, and biographies and autobiographies. The document offers the SIMMER theory of…

  10. Martial Arts and Critical Thinking in the Gifted Education Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Lay Hiok; Jewell, Paul D.

    This paper examines similarities between the goals of Aikido, a martial art, and critical thinking and argues that Aikido promotes the development of thinking in its training and practice. It applies these ideas to the gifted education curriculum. First the paper introduces characteristics of Aikido, Aikido movement and techniques. It equates…

  11. Career Counseling for the Gifted: Assessments and Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Barbara A.

    1986-01-01

    Compared (a) three vocational assessment batteries, (b) structured individual counseling and unstructured individual counseling, and (c) mixed-sex versus same sex career groups in terms of their usefulness, educational value, and enjoyability as perceived by gifted adolescents. Students preferred a test battery consisting of the Self-Directed…

  12. 30 CFR 879.13 - Acceptance of gifts of land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acceptance of gifts of land. 879.13 Section 879.13 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION ACQUISITION, MANAGEMENT, AND DISPOSITION OF LANDS AND WATER § 879.13...

  13. Evaluating Gifted Identification Practice: Aptitude Testing and Linguistically Diverse Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Michael S.; Kirsch, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined individually administered IQ scores from an entire K-5 population (N = 432) of Limited English Proficient students referred for gifted program eligibility determination in a single large urban district in the southeastern United States. Of 8 IQ tests compared, only 1, the Stanford-Binet V, had scores appreciably lower than…

  14. Gift exchange and the separation of ownership and control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maximiano, S.; Sloof, R.; Sonnemans, J.

    2006-01-01

    Numerous gift exchange experiments have found a positive relationship between employers' wage offers and workers' effort levels. In (almost) all these experiments the employer both owns and controls the firm. Yet in reality many firms are characterized by the separation of ownership and control. In

  15. High reading skills mask dyslexia in gifted children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Viersen, Sietske; Kroesbergen, Evelyn|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/241607949; Slot, Esther|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413578526; de Bree, Elise|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/292748868

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated how gifted children with dyslexia might be able to mask literacy problems and the role of possible compensatory mechanisms. The sample consisted of 121 Dutch primary school children that were divided over four groups (typically developing [TD] children, children with

  16. 77 FR 74513 - Folding Gift Boxes From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject five-year review, the... boxes from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury to an industry... Publication 4365 (November 2012), entitled Folding Gift Boxes from China: Investigation No. 731-TA-921 (Second...

  17. Blazing New Trails: Strengthening Policy Research in Gifted Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plucker, Jonathan A.; Makel, Matthew C.; Matthews, Michael S.; Peters, Scott J.; Rambo-Hernandez, Karen E.

    2017-01-01

    Policy research in gifted education has occurred at much lower rates than other areas of research within the field, such as identification and talent development. However, without changes and implementation of these policies, systematic change is unlikely to occur. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to argue that policy research should be a…

  18. Checkmate: Capturing Gifted Students' Logical Thinking Using Chess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifner, Philip J.; Feldhusen, John F.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the use of chess instruction to develop abstract thinking skills and problem solving among gifted students. Offers suggestions for starting school chess programs, teaching and evaluating chess skills, and measuring the success of both student-players and the program in general. (PB)

  19. Comparisons and Analyses of Gifted Students' Characteristics and Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiamei; Li, Daqi; Stevens, Carla; Ye, Renmin

    2017-01-01

    Using PISA 2009, an international education database, this study compares gifted and talented (GT) students in three groups with normal (non-GT) students by examining student characteristics, reading, schooling, learning methods, and use of strategies for understanding and memorizing. Results indicate that the GT and non-GT gender distributions…

  20. Creativity in Gifted Education: Contributions from Vygotsky and Piaget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltz, Tania; Piske, Fernanda Hellen Ribeiro; de Fátima Quintal de Freitas, Maria; D'Aroz, Marlene Schüssler; Machado, Járci Maria

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to highlight the importance of developing creativity in the school environment by promoting quality education to gifted students, with contributions from Vygotsky and Piaget. For Vygotsky creativity is inherent in the human condition, and it is the most important activity because it is the expression of consciousness, thought…