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Sample records for proliferative responses induced

  1. T-cell proliferative responses following sepsis in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallal, Ousama; Ravindranath, Thyyar M; Choudhry, Mashkoor A; Kohn, Annamarie; Muraskas, Jonathan K; Namak, Shahla Y; Alattar, Mohammad H; Sayeed, Mohammed M

    2003-01-01

    Both experimental and clinical evidence suggest a suppression of T-cell function in burn and sepsis. The objective of the present study was to evaluate splenocyte and purified T-cell proliferative response and IL-2 production in septic neonatal rats. We also examined if alterations in T-cell proliferation and IL-2 production in neonatal sepsis is due to elevation in PGE2. PGE2 is known to play a significant role in T-cell suppression during sepsis in adults. Sepsis was induced in 15-day-old neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats by implanting 0.1 cm3 of fecal pellet impregnated with Escherichia coli (50 CFU) and Bacteroides fragilis (10(3) CFU). Animals receiving fecal pellets without the bacteria were designated as sterile. A group of septic and sterile rats were treated with PGE2 synthesis inhibitors, NS398 and resveratrol. These treatments of animals allowed us to evaluate the role of PGE2 in T-cell suppression during neonatal sepsis. Splenocytes as well as purified T cells were prepared and then proliferative response and IL-2 productive capacities were measured. A significant suppression of splenocyte proliferation and IL-2 production was noticed in both sterile and septic animals compared to the T cells from unoperated control rats. In contrast, the proliferation and IL-2 production by nylon wool purified T cells in sterile rats was not significantly different from control rats, whereas, a significant suppression in Con A-mediated T-cell proliferation and IL-2 production noticed in septic rat T cells compared to the sterile and control rat T cells. Such decrease in T-cell proliferation and IL-2 production was accompanied with 20-25% deaths in neonates implanted with septic pellets. No mortality was noted in sterile-implanted neonates. Treatment of animals with COX-1 inhibitor had no effect on T-cell proliferation response in both septic and sterile groups, whereas COX-2 inhibitor abrogated the decrease in T-cell proliferative response in the septic group. The treatment

  2. Dysregulation of T lymphocyte proliferative responses in autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydney K Elizer

    Full Text Available T cells are critically dependent on cellular proliferation in order to carry out their effector functions. Autoimmune strains are commonly thought to have uncontrolled T cell proliferation; however, in the murine model of autoimmune diabetes, hypo-proliferation of T cells leading to defective AICD was previously uncovered. We now determine whether lupus prone murine strains are similarly hyporesponsive. Upon extensive characterization of T lymphocyte activation, we have observed a common feature of CD4 T cell activation shared among three autoimmune strains-NOD, MRL, and NZBxNZW F1s. When stimulated with a polyclonal mitogen, CD4 T cells demonstrate arrested cell division and diminished dose responsiveness as compared to the non-autoimmune strain C57BL/6, a phenotype we further traced to a reliance on B cell mediated costimulation, which underscores the success of B cell directed immune therapies in preventing T cell mediated tissue injury. In turn, the diminished proliferative capacity of these CD4 T cells lead to a decreased, but activation appropriate, susceptibility to activation induced cell death. A similar decrement in stimulation response was observed in the CD8 compartment of NOD mice; NOD CD8 T cells were distinguished from lupus prone strains by a diminished dose-responsiveness to anti-CD3 mediated stimulation. This distinction may explain the differential pathogenetic pathways activated in diabetes and lupus prone murine strains.

  3. Lack of a differential radiation response for proliferative and non-proliferative rat thyroid cells (FRTL-5) in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosing, J.W.; Giese, W.L.; Mulcahy, R.T.

    1989-01-01

    FRTL-5 rat thyroid epithelial cells maintain normal thyroid function and morphology in vitro, exhibit an absolute requirement for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) for proliferation and display radiation dose response characteristics indistinguishable from those of rat thyroid epithelial cells in vivo. In TSH-free medium cells remain in a non-proliferative, yet viable, state for prolonged periods of time and respond to TSH re-stimulation by a return to exponential growth. Flow cytometric analysis using two-step acridine orange (AO) staining revealed an accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle accompanied by a pronounced reduction in red fluorescence (indicative of RNA content) in FRTL-5 cells cultured in the absence of TSH. The response of proliferative and non-proliferative FRTL-5 cells to single dose, split dose and fractionated radiation was compared to determine whether proliferative status was an important response determinant. The response of FRTL-5 cells was not influenced by proliferative status at the time of irradiation. Additionally, dose response was not altered by variable (12 hr-8 days) non-proliferative intervals before or after irradiation. As revealed by split dose experiments, the rate and extent of sublethal damage repair was likewise similar for proliferative and non-proliferative cells. Multifraction experiments employing three fractions separated by 6 hr intervals indicate that non-proliferative FRTL-5 cells completely repair sublethal damage between fractions. These results indicate that the radiation response of FRTL-5 cells is not influenced by the proliferative status of the cells prior to or post-irradiation

  4. Possible mechanisms for arsenic-induced proliferative diseases

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    Wetterhahn, K.E.; Dudek, E.J.; Shumilla, J.A. [Dartmouth College and Medical School, Hanover, NH (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Possible mechanisms for cardiovascular diseases and cancers which have been observed on chronic exposure to arsenic have been investigated. We tested the hypothesis that nonlethal levels of arsenic are mitogenic, cause oxidative stress, increase nuclear translocation of trans-acting factors, and increase expression of genes involved in proliferation. Cultured porcine vascular (from aorta) endothelial cells were used as a model cell system to study the effects of arsenic on the target cells for cardiovascular diseases. Treatment of postconfluent cell cultures with nonovertly toxic concentrations of arsenite increased DNA synthesis, similar to the mitogenic response observed with hydrogen peroxide. Within 1 hour of adding noncytotoxic concentrations of arsenite, cellular levels of oxidants increased relative to control levels, indicating that arsenite promotes cellular oxidations. Arsenite treatment increased nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B, an oxidative stress-responsive transcription factor, in a manner similar to that observed with hydrogen peroxide. Pretreatment of intact cells with the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and dimethylfumarate prevented the arsenite-induced increases in cellular oxidant formation and NF-KB translocation. Arsenite had little or no effect on binding of NF-KB to its DNA recognition sequence in vitro, indicating that it is unlikely that arsenite directly affects NF-KB. The steady-state mRNA levels of intracellular adhesion molecule and urokinase-like plasminogen activator, genes associated with the active endothelial phenotype in arteriosclerosis and cancer metastasis, were increased by nontoxic concentrations of arsenite. These data suggest that arsenite promotes proliferative diseases like heart disease and cancer by activating oxidant-sensitive endothelial cell signaling and gene expression. It is possible that antioxidant therapy would be useful in preventing arsenic-induced cardiovascular disease and cancer.

  5. OM-101 Decreases the Fibrotic Response Associated with Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvashi, Zeev; Ben-Yaakov, Keren; Weinberg, Tamir; Greenwald, Yoel

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to investigate the effect of OM-101 on the fibrotic response occurring in proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) in an animal model. Methods Antifibrotic effect of OM-101 was investigated in vivo. As control, eight weeks old c57black mice underwent intravitreal injection with Hepes (group A) or dispase (0.3 units), to induce retinal detachment (RD) and PVR. The dispase-injected mice were randomly divided into two groups B and C (N = 25 mice); in group C, the eyes were treated with intravitreal injection of OM-101 (3 μl), and group B with PBS, as a control. After additional five days, mice were injected with the same initial treatment. Three days later, mice were euthanized, and the eyes were enucleated and processed for histological analysis. Results Intravitreal injection of dispase caused RD in 64% of the mice in group B, and 93% of those mice had PVR. Only 32% of mice treated with OM-101 and dispase (group C) developed RD, and only 25% of those developed PVR. Conclusions OM-101 was found effective in reducing the incidence of RD and PVR maintaining the normal architecture of the retina. This study suggests that OM-101 is a potentially effective and safe drug for the treatment of PVR patients. PMID:29109865

  6. Administration of high doses of copper to capuchin monkeys does not cause liver damage but induces transcriptional activation of hepatic proliferative responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Magdalena; Núñez, Héctor; Pavez, Leonardo; Arredondo, Miguel; Méndez, Marco; Cisternas, Felipe; Pizarro, Fernando; Sierralta, Walter; Uauy, Ricardo; González, Mauricio

    2012-02-01

    Liver cells respond to copper loading upregulating protective mechanisms. However, to date, except for liver content, there are no good indicators that identify individuals with excess liver copper. We hypothesized that administering high doses of copper to young (5.5 mg Cu · kg⁻¹ . d⁻¹) and adult (7.5 mg Cu · kg⁻¹ . d⁻¹) capuchin monkeys would induce detectable liver damage. Study groups included adult monkeys (2 females, 2 males) 3-3.5 y old at enrollment treated with copper for 36 mo (ACu); age-matched controls (1 female, 3 males) that did not receive additional copper (AC); young monkeys (2 female, 2 males) treated from birth with copper for 36 mo (YCu); and young age-matched controls (2 female, 2 males) that did not receive additional copper (YC). We periodically assessed clinical, blood biochemical, and liver histological indicators and at 36 mo the hepatic mRNA abundance of MT2a, APP, DMT1, CTR1, HGF, TGFβ, and NFκΒ only in adult monkeys. After 36 mo, the liver copper concentration was 4-5 times greater in treated monkeys relative to controls. All monkeys remained healthy with normal routine serum biochemical indices and there was no evidence of liver tissue damage. Relative mRNA abundance of HGF, TGFβ and NFκB was significantly greater in ACu than in AC monkeys. In conclusion, capuchin monkeys exposed to copper at doses up to 50 times the current upper level enhanced expression of genes related to inflammation and injury without clinical, blood biochemical, or histological evidence of liver damage.

  7. Proliferative responses of blood mononuclear cells (BMNC) in a cohort of elderly humans: role of lymphocyte phenotype and cytokine production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruunsgaard, H.; Pedersen, Agnes Nadelmann; Schroll, M.

    2000-01-01

    Age-related impaired T cell function is associated with increased mortality risk. The purpose of the present study was therefore to identify factors associated with the age-related decreased phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-induced proliferative response of lymphocytes in a cohort of 174 81-year...

  8. Long-term nonprogression and broad HIV-1-specific proliferative T-cell responses

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    Nesrina eImami

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Complex mechanisms underlying the maintenance of fully functional, proliferative, HIV-1-specific T-cell responses involve processes from early T-cell development through to the final stages of T-cell differentiation and antigen recognition. Virus-specific proliferative CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses, important for the control of infection, are observed in some HIV-1+ patients during early stages of disease, and are maintained in long-term nonprogressing subjects. In the vast majority of HIV-1+ patients, full immune functionality is lost when proliferative HIV-1-specific T-cell responses undergo a variable progressive decline throughout the course of chronic infection. This appears irreparable despite administration of potent combination antiretroviral therapy, which to date is non-curative, necessitating life-long administration and the development of effective, novel, therapeutic interventions. While a sterilising cure, involving clearance of virus from the host, remains a primary aim, a functional cure may be a more feasible goal with considerable impact on worldwide HIV-1 infection. Such an approach would enable long-term co-existence of host and virus in the absence of toxic and costly drugs. Effective immune homeostasis coupled with a balanced response appropriately targeting conserved viral antigens, in a manner that avoids hyperactivation and exhaustion, may prove to be the strongest correlate of durable viral control. This review describes novel concepts underlying full immune functionality in the context of HIV-1 infection, which may be utilised in future strategies designed to improve upon existing therapy. The aim will be to induce long-term nonprogressor or elite controller status in every infected host, through immune-mediated control of viraemia and reduction of viral reservoirs, leading to lower HIV-1 transmission rates.

  9. Proliferative response of the murine esophageal epithelium to radiation: Modification by food consumption patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burholt, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The single layer of proliferative epithelial cells of the murine esophagus undergoes a sequence of damage and recovery following cytotoxic insult. The modification of both damage and proliferative recovery by the alteration of animal eating patterns was investigated following thoracic field irradiation through the determination of /sup 3/H-TdR incorporation into the esophagus along with selective counting of labeled nuclei and mitotic figures. Initial radiation-induced damage, as determined by /sup 3/H-TdR incorporation suppression and mitotic delay, is under normal conditions dependent on the time of day of treatment. This circadian sensitivity may be altered by changing the eating pattern of the animal. The proliferative recovery following single dose irradiation is also dependent on food consumption patterns: fasting immediately following treatment and then refeeding 2 days later results in a more rapid proliferative recovery than observed under control eating conditions, while reduced food consumption during the period of proliferative hyperplasia reduces the extent of recovery. During multifraction radiation schedules both the damage produced by a subsequent dose and recovery capacity are influenced by the food consumption pattern between fractions

  10. Synergy among rat T cells in the proliferative response to alloantigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, P.W.; Loop, S.M.; Bernstein, I.D.

    1979-01-01

    A synergistic interaction in the proliferative response to alloantigen is described for mixtures of rat thymus and lymph node cells. The optimal conditions for synergy are quantitatively defined. Regression analysis of the slope of the dose-response curve has been utilized to estimate the degree of interaction in thymus--lymph node cell mixtures. The slope of the response of cell mixtures was noted to be significantly greater than the slope for the response of lympth node cells alone. Irradiation was shown to have a differential effect on the response of thymus and lymph node cells in mixtures. Irradiated thymus cells retained the capacity for synergy in mixtures, whereas irradiated lymph node cells did not. Additional studies have demonstrated that both de novo protein synthesis and specific antigen recognition by both responding cell populations in mixtures was required for maximal synergy. These studies demonstrate that synergy cannot be explained as an artifact of altered cell density in vitro. They establish that thymus cells and lymph node cells represent distinct subsets which manifest qualitatively different functions in the proliferative response to alloantigen. Thymus cells can respond directly to alloantigen by proliferation but also have the capacity to amplify the proliferative response of lymph node cells, a capacity which is resistant to X irradiation but requires recognition of alloantigen and de novo protein synthesis. Lymph node cells may similarly respond by proliferation to alloantigen but lack the amplifier activity of thymus cells. Synergy for rat lymphoidcells, like mouse lymphoid cells, has been shown to involve an interaction of thymus-derived lymphocytes

  11. A synthetic cryptochrome inhibitor induces anti-proliferative effects and increases chemosensitivity in human breast cancer cells

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    Chun, Sung Kook [Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, Daegu-Gyeongbuk Institute of Science & Technology, Daegu, 711-873 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Sooyoung [Department of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul, 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Dae [Department of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju Hyung [Department of Systems Biology, Yonsei University College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jaebong [College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeongah; Kim, Doyeon [Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, Daegu-Gyeongbuk Institute of Science & Technology, Daegu, 711-873 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Gi Hoon [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul, 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Young J. [Department of Systems Biology, Yonsei University College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Young-Ger [College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Cheol Soon [Gachon Clinical Trials Center, Gachon University, Incheon, 417-842 (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-11-13

    Disruption of circadian rhythm is a major cause of breast cancer in humans. Cryptochrome (CRY), a circadian transcription factor, is a risk factor for initiation of breast cancer, and it is differentially expressed between normal and breast cancer tissues. Here, we evaluated the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity of KS15, a recently discovered small-molecule inhibitor of CRY, in human breast cancer cells. First, we investigated whether KS15 treatment could promote E-box-mediated transcription by inhibiting the activity of CRY in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Protein and mRNA levels of regulators of cell cycle and apoptosis, as well as core clock genes, were differentially modulated in response to KS15. Next, we investigated whether KS15 could inhibit proliferation and increase sensitivity to anti-tumor drugs in MCF-7 cells. We found that KS15 decreased the speed of cell growth and increased the chemosensitivity of MCF-7 cells to doxorubicin and tamoxifen, but had no effect on MCF-10A cells. These findings suggested that pharmacological inhibition of CRY by KS15 exerts an anti-proliferative effect and increases sensitivity to anti-tumor drugs in a specific type of breast cancer. - Highlights: • Cryptochrome inhibitor (KS15) has anti-tumor activity to human breast cancer cells. • KS15 induces differential changes in cell cycle regulators and pro-apoptotic genes. • KS15 inhibits MCF-7 cell growth and enhances susceptibility to anti-tumor drugs.

  12. A synthetic cryptochrome inhibitor induces anti-proliferative effects and increases chemosensitivity in human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Sung Kook; Chung, Sooyoung; Kim, Hee-Dae; Lee, Ju Hyung; Jang, Jaebong; Kim, Jeongah; Kim, Doyeon; Son, Gi Hoon; Oh, Young J.; Suh, Young-Ger; Lee, Cheol Soon

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythm is a major cause of breast cancer in humans. Cryptochrome (CRY), a circadian transcription factor, is a risk factor for initiation of breast cancer, and it is differentially expressed between normal and breast cancer tissues. Here, we evaluated the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity of KS15, a recently discovered small-molecule inhibitor of CRY, in human breast cancer cells. First, we investigated whether KS15 treatment could promote E-box-mediated transcription by inhibiting the activity of CRY in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Protein and mRNA levels of regulators of cell cycle and apoptosis, as well as core clock genes, were differentially modulated in response to KS15. Next, we investigated whether KS15 could inhibit proliferation and increase sensitivity to anti-tumor drugs in MCF-7 cells. We found that KS15 decreased the speed of cell growth and increased the chemosensitivity of MCF-7 cells to doxorubicin and tamoxifen, but had no effect on MCF-10A cells. These findings suggested that pharmacological inhibition of CRY by KS15 exerts an anti-proliferative effect and increases sensitivity to anti-tumor drugs in a specific type of breast cancer. - Highlights: • Cryptochrome inhibitor (KS15) has anti-tumor activity to human breast cancer cells. • KS15 induces differential changes in cell cycle regulators and pro-apoptotic genes. • KS15 inhibits MCF-7 cell growth and enhances susceptibility to anti-tumor drugs.

  13. Lymphocyte proliferative responses to mitogens in rats having an ancestry of a perinatal iodine-131 insult

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, R.H.; Cheng, H.F.

    1987-01-01

    The possible existence of a genealogical memory consisting of altered lymphocyte proliferative responses to a perinatal iodine-131 insult has been investigated in two generations of inbred Fischer F344 rat offspring. The studies which involved exposure to the radioiodine during late pregnancy with concentrations ranging from 1.85 MBq (50 μCi) to 7.4 MBq (200 μCi) revealed that only the peripheral blood T lymphocytes of the first generation male animals were significantly affected. These animals were found to possess T lymphocytes which exhibited increased proliferative responses expressed toward the mitogens concanavalin A and phytohemagglutin; however, no significant changes were noticeable in their B cell population following exposure to lipopolysaccharide. Neither the first generation females nor the male and female offspring of the second generation developed through sibling interbreeding seemed to be affected, this was unlike the cellular, humoral, and natural immunity which had previously been observed to be changed in both the second and third generation animals. These observations suggest that the effects of the radiation insult upon immunocompetency as measured by lymphocyte proliferation do not appear to be inherited

  14. Mitogenic Activity of a Water-Soluble Adjuvant (Bu-WSA) Obtained from Bacterionema matruchotii: IV. Synergistic Effects of Bu-WSA on Concanavalin A-Induced Proliferative Response of Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Toshimasa; Okumura, Seiichi; Tsushi, Masao; Nakano, Masayasu

    1982-07-01

    Butanol-extracted water-soluble adjuvant (Bu-WSA) obtained from Bacterionema matruchotii was cultured with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) in the presence of sub- and/or supra-optimal mitogenic concentrations of concanavalin A (Con A). The addition of Bu-WSA resulted in increased tritiated thymidine incorporation above that produced by Con A alone. Bu-WSA by itself is not mitogenic for PBM and in fact produced a decrease in thymidine uptake compared to the control. We investigated the response of subpopulation(s) of PBM to Bu-WSA, Con A and a mixture of Bu-WSA and Con A. Separation of PBM into purified T cells, B cells and macrophages showed that cell-cell cooperation of T cells with B cells or macrophages is necessary for the observed synergistic effect of Bu-WSA with Con A. A marked increase in thymidine incorporation by the mixture of T and B cell populations occurred, while only a small amount of thymidine was incorporated when the B cell population was absent. Mitomycin treatment revealed that the response could be ascribed to the T-cell response with a B-cell helper effect. Moreover, Con A and Bu-WSA appeared to act on the same T cell population. This model may provide unique information about the activation of human peripheral blood T cells compared with the activation of these cells by other mitogens. © owned by Center for Academic Publications Japan (Publisher).

  15. Mitogenic activity of a water-soluble adjuvant (Bu-WSA) obtained from Bacterionema matruchotii. IV. Synergistic effects of Bu-WSA on Concanavalin A-induced proliferative response of human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, T; Okumura, S; Tsushi, M; Nakano, M

    1982-01-01

    Butanol-extracted water-soluble adjuvant (Bu-WSA) obtained from Bacterionema matruchotii was cultured with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) in the presence of sub- and/or supra-optimal mitogenic concentrations of concanavalin A (Con A). The addition of Bu-WSA resulted in increased tritiated thymidine incorporation above that produced by Con A alone. Bu-WSA by itself is not mitogenic for PBM and in fact produced a decrease in thymidine uptake compared to the control. We investigated the response of subpopulation(s) of PBM to Bu-WSA, Con A and a mixture of Bu-WSA and Con A. Separation of PBM into purified T cells, B cells and macrophages showed that cell-cell cooperation of T cells with B cells or macrophages is necessary for the observed synergistic effect of Bu-WSA with Con A. A marked increase in thymidine incorporation by the mixture of T and B cell populations occurred, while only a small amount of thymidine was incorporated when the B cell population was absent. Mitomycin treatment revealed that the response could be ascribed to the T-cell response with a B-cell helper effect. Moreover, Con A and Bu-WSA appeared to act on the same T cell population. This model may provide unique information about the activation of human peripheral blood T cells compared with the activation of these cells by other mitogens.

  16. Postnatal weight gain modifies severity and functional outcome of oxygen-induced proliferative retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Andreas; Chen, Jing; Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Seaward, Molly R; Krah, Nathan M; Dennison, Roberta J; Favazza, Tara; Bucher, Felicitas; Löfqvist, Chatarina; Ong, Huy; Hellström, Ann; Chemtob, Sylvain; Akula, James D; Smith, Lois E H

    2010-12-01

    In clinical studies, postnatal weight gain is strongly associated with retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). However, animal studies are needed to investigate the pathophysiological mechanisms of how postnatal weight gain affects the severity of ROP. In the present study, we identify nutritional supply as one potent parameter that affects the extent of retinopathy in mice with identical birth weights and the same genetic background. Wild-type pups with poor postnatal nutrition and poor weight gain (PWG) exhibit a remarkably prolonged phase of retinopathy compared to medium weight gain or extensive weight gain pups. A high (r(2) = 0.83) parabolic association between postnatal weight gain and oxygen-induced retinopathy severity is observed, as is a significantly prolonged phase of proliferative retinopathy in PWG pups (20 days) compared with extensive weight gain pups (6 days). The extended retinopathy is concomitant with prolonged overexpression of retinal vascular endothelial growth factor in PWG pups. Importantly, PWG pups show low serum levels of nonfasting glucose, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor-1 as well as high levels of ghrelin in the early postoxygen-induced retinopathy phase, a combination indicative of poor metabolic supply. These differences translate into visual deficits in adult PWG mice, as demonstrated by impaired bipolar and proximal neuronal function. Together, these results provide evidence for a pathophysiological correlation between poor postnatal nutritional supply, slow weight gain, prolonged retinal vascular endothelial growth factor overexpression, protracted retinopathy, and reduced final visual outcome.

  17. Proliferative and Invasive Effects of Progesterone-Induced Blocking Factor in Human Glioblastoma Cells

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    Araceli Gutiérrez-Rodríguez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF is a progesterone (P4 regulated protein expressed in different types of high proliferative cells including astrocytomas, the most frequent and aggressive brain tumors. It has been shown that PIBF increases the number of human astrocytoma cells. In this work, we evaluated PIBF regulation by P4 and the effects of PIBF on proliferation, migration, and invasion of U87 and U251 cells, both derived from human glioblastomas. PIBF mRNA expression was upregulated by P4 (10 nM from 12 to 24 h. Glioblastoma cells expressed two PIBF isoforms, 90 and 57 kDa. The content of the shorter isoform was increased by P4 at 24 h, while progesterone receptor antagonist RU486 (10 μM blocked this effect. PIBF (100 ng/mL increased the number of U87 cells on days 4 and 5 of treatment and induced cell proliferation on day 4. Wound-healing assays showed that PIBF increased the migration of U87 (12–48 h and U251 (24 and 48 h cells. Transwell invasion assays showed that PIBF augmented the number of invasive cells in both cell lines at 24 h. These data suggest that PIBF promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of human glioblastoma cells.

  18. ARTEMIS stabilizes the genome and modulates proliferative responses in multipotent mesenchymal cells

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    Tompkins Kathleen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unrepaired DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs cause chromosomal rearrangements, loss of genetic information, neoplastic transformation or cell death. The nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ pathway, catalyzing sequence-independent direct rejoining of DSBs, is a crucial mechanism for repairing both stochastically occurring and developmentally programmed DSBs. In lymphocytes, NHEJ is critical for both development and genome stability. NHEJ defects lead to severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID and lymphoid cancer predisposition in both mice and humans. While NHEJ has been thoroughly investigated in lymphocytes, the importance of NHEJ in other cell types, especially with regard to tumor suppression, is less well documented. We previously reported evidence that the NHEJ pathway functions to suppress a range of nonlymphoid tumor types, including various classes of sarcomas, by unknown mechanisms. Results Here we investigate roles for the NHEJ factor ARTEMIS in multipotent mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs, as putative sarcomagenic cells of origin. We demonstrate a key role for ARTEMIS in sarcoma suppression in a sensitized mouse tumor model. In this context, we found that ARTEMIS deficiency led to chromosomal damage but, paradoxically, enhanced resistance and proliferative potential in primary MSCs subjected to various stresses. Gene expression analysis revealed abnormally regulated stress response, cell proliferation, and signal transduction pathways in ARTEMIS-defective MSCs. Finally, we identified candidate regulatory genes that may, in part, mediate a stress-resistant, hyperproliferative phenotype in preneoplastic ARTEMIS-deficient MSCs. Conclusions Our discoveries suggest that Art prevents genome damage and restrains proliferation in MSCs exposed to various stress stimuli. We propose that deficiency leads to a preneoplastic state in primary MSCs and is associated with aberrant proliferative control and cellular stress

  19. Immunoregulatory activities of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) proteins: Effect of HIV recombinant and synthetic peptides on immunoglobulin synthesis and proliferative responses by normal lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, M.P.N.; Pottathil, R.; Heimer, E.P.; Schwartz, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    Recombinant and synthetic peptides corresponding to envelope proteins of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were examined for their effects on the activities of lymphocytes from normal donors in vitro. Although lymphocytes cultured with env-gag peptides produced significant amounts of IgG, addition of env-gag peptides to a pokeweed mitogen-induced B-cell activation system resulted in suppression of immunoglobulin synthesis by normal lymphocytes. Recombinant antigens, env-gag and env-80 dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), produced a substantial proliferative response by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as determined by [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation. PBMC precultured with HIV synthetic peptide env 578-608 also manifested significant proliferative responses as compared to control cultures. CD3 + lymphocytes precultured with recombinant HIV antigens, env-gag and env-80 DHFR, and synthetic HIV peptide, env 487-511, showed moderate but significant proliferative responses. Both recombinant antigens and synthetic peptides also produced a dose-dependent stimulatory effect on proliferation by CD3 - lymphocytes. These studies demonstrate that recombinant and synthetic peptides of the HIV genome express immunoregulatory T- and B-cell epitopes. Identification of unique HIV epitopes with immunogenic and immunoregulatory activities is necessary for the development of an effective vaccine against HIV infection

  20. Cytokine, antibody and proliferative cellular responses elicited by Taenia solium calreticulin upon experimental infection in hamsters.

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    Fela Mendlovic

    Full Text Available Taenia solium causes two diseases in humans, cysticercosis and taeniosis. Tapeworm carriers are the main risk factor for neurocysticercosis. Limited information is available about the immune response elicited by the adult parasite, particularly the induction of Th2 responses, frequently associated to helminth infections. Calreticulin is a ubiquitous, multifunctional protein involved in cellular calcium homeostasis, which has been suggested to play a role in the regulation of immune responses. In this work, we assessed the effect of recombinant T. solium calreticulin (rTsCRT on the cytokine, humoral and cellular responses upon experimental infection in Syrian Golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus. Animals were infected with T. solium cysticerci and euthanized at different times after infection. Specific serum antibodies, proliferative responses in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen cells, as well as cytokines messenger RNA (mRNA were analyzed. The results showed that one third of the infected animals elicited anti-rTsCRT IgG antibodies. Interestingly, mesenteric lymph node (MLN cells from either infected or non-infected animals did not proliferate upon in vitro stimulation with rTsCRT. Additionally, stimulation with a tapeworm crude extract resulted in increased expression of IL-4 and IL-5 mRNA. Upon stimulation, rTsCRT increased the expression levels of IL-10 in spleen and MLN cells from uninfected and infected hamsters. The results showed that rTsCRT favors a Th2-biased immune response characterized by the induction of IL-10 in mucosal and systemic lymphoid organs. Here we provide the first data on the cytokine, antibody and cellular responses to rTsCRT upon in vitro stimulation during taeniasis.

  1. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) is a potential biomarker of angiogenesis in proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed M; Ahmad, Ajmal; Alam, Kaiser; Siddiquei, Mohammad Mairaj; Mohammad, Ghulam; Hertogh, Gert De; Mousa, Ahmed; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2017-11-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) promotes angiogenesis through matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production. We investigated the expression levels of EMMPRIN and correlated these levels with VEGF, MMP-1 and MMP-9 in proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). In addition, we examined the expression of EMMPRIN in the retinas of diabetic rats and the effect of EMMPRIN on the induction of angiogenesis regulatory factors in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMECs). Vitreous samples from 40 PDR and 19 non-diabetic patients, epiretinal membranes from 12 patients with PDR, retinas of rats and HRMECs were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, zymography analysis and RT-PCR. We showed a significant increase in the expression of EMMPRIN, VEGF, MMP-1 and MMP-9 in vitreous samples from PDR patients compared with non-diabetic controls (p EMMPRIN and the levels of VEGF (r = 0.38; p = 0.003), MMP-1 (r = 0.36; p = 0.005) and MMP-9 (r = 0.46; p = 0.003). In epiretinal membranes, EMMPRIN was expressed in vascular endothelial cells and stromal cells. Significant increase of EMMPRIN mRNA was detected in rat retinas after induction of diabetes. EMMPRIN induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, VEGF and MMP-1 expression in HRMEC. These results suggest that EMMPRIN/MMPs/VEGF pathway is involved in PDR angiogenesis. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Inhibition of human lymphocyte proliferative response by serum from Plasmodium falciparum infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theander, T G; Svenson, M; Bygbjerg, I C

    1987-01-01

    initiation of treatment suppressed the in vitro lymphocyte proliferative response to both Plasmodium-derived antigens and an unrelated antigen (PPD-tuberculin). The suppressive effect was lost if the serum was incubated at 56 degrees C for 30 min, and the effect was not HLA-restricted since the inhibition...

  3. T-dependence of human B lymphocyte proliferative response to mitogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochier, J; Samarut, C; Gueho, J P; Revillard, J P

    1976-01-01

    Human peripheral blood and tonsil lymphocytes were fractionated on anti-Ig-coated Sephadex columns or by centrifugation after rosetting with native sheep erythrocytes. Both methods allowed the recovery of B and T-enriched populations the purity of which was checked by fluorescein-labelled anti-Ig serum, E and EAC rosette formation, and heterologous antisera specific for B or T lymphocytes. The proliferative response of T cells to PHA, Con A, PWM, and ALS was not found different from that of unfractionated cells, whereas no response of the B cells could be observed to these mitogens providing that no contaminating T cells were present. Addition of T lymphocytes to these unresponsive B cells allowed them to respond to phytomitogens, but not to ALS. X-irradiated T cells could, to some extent, replace the diving T lymphocytes; no T-replacing factor could be found in cell-free supernatants from T cells, whether or not they had been activated by mitrogens. This model of B-T cooperation appears useful for studying the differentiation and maturation of human B lymphocytes.

  4. Feeding manipulation elicits different proliferative responses in the gastrointestinal tract of suckling and weanling rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palanch A.C.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Food deprivation has been found to stimulate cell proliferation in the gastric mucosa of suckling rats, whereas the weanling period has been reported to be unresponsive in terms of proliferative activity. In the present study we analyze regional differences in the effect of milk or food deprivation on cell proliferation of the epithelia of the esophagus and of five segments of small intestine in suckling, weanling and newly weaned Wistar rats of both sexes. DNA synthesis was determined using tritiated thymidine to obtain labeling indices (LI; crypt depth and villus height were also determined. Milk deprivation decreased LI by 50% in the esophagus (from 15 to 8.35% and small intestine (from 40 to 20% of 14-day-old rats. In 18-day-old rats, milk and food deprivation decreased LI in the esophagus (from 13 to 5% and in the distal segments of the small intestine (from 36-40 to 24-32%. In contrast, the LI of the epithelia of the esophagus (5% and of all small intestine segments (around 30% of 22-day-old rats were not modified by food deprivation. Crypt depth did not change after treatment (80 to 120 µm in 14- and 22-day-old rats, respectively. Villus height decreased in some small intestine segments of unfed 14- (from 400 to 300 µm and 18-day-old rats (from 480 to 360 µm. The results show that, contrary to the stomach response, milk deprivation inhibited cell proliferation in the esophagus and small intestine of suckling rats, demonstrating the regional variability of each segment of the gastrointestinal tract in suckling rats. In newly weaned rats, food deprivation did not alter the proliferation of these epithelia, similarly to the stomach, indicating that weanling is a period marked by the insensitivity of gastrointestinal epithelia to dietary alterations

  5. Inhibition of inflammatory and proliferative responses of human keratinocytes exposed to the sesquiterpene lactones dehydrocostuslactone and costunolide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Scarponi

    Full Text Available The imbalance of the intracellular redox state and, in particular, of the glutathione (GSH/GSH disulfide couple homeostasis, is involved in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. In many skin diseases, including psoriasis, oxidative stress plays an important role, as demonstrated by the observation that treatments leading to increase of the local levels of oxidant species ameliorate the disease. Recently, dehydrocostuslactone (DCE and costunolide (CS, two terpenes naturally occurring in many plants, have been found to exert various anti-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic effects on different human cell types. These compounds decrease the level of the intracellular GSH by direct interaction with it, and, therefore, can alter cellular redox state. DCE and CS can trigger S-glutathionylation of various substrates, including the transcription factor STAT3 and JAK1/2 proteins. In the present study, we investigated on the potential role of DCE and CS in regulating inflammatory and proliferative responses of human keratinocytes to cytokines. We demonstrated that DCE and CS decreased intracellular GSH levels in human keratinocytes, as well as inhibited STAT3 and STAT1 phosphorylation and activation triggered by IL-22 or IFN-γ, respectively. Consequently, DCE and CS decreased the IL-22- and IFN-γ-induced expression of inflammatory and regulatory genes in keratinocytes, including CCL2, CXCL10, ICAM-1 and SOCS3. DCE and CS also inhibited proliferation and cell-cycle progression-related gene expression, as well as they promoted cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In parallel, DCE and CS activated the anti-inflammatory EGFR and ERK1/2 molecules in keratinocytes, and, thus, wound healing in an in vitro injury model. In light of our findings, we can hypothesize that the employment of DCE and CS in psoriasis could efficiently counteract the pro-inflammatory effects of IFN-γ and IL-22 on keratinocytes, revert the apoptosis-resistant phenotype, as well as inhibit

  6. Adverse effects of reduced oxygen tension on the proliferative capacity of rat kidney and insulin-secreting cell lines involve DNA damage and stress responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jianhua; Jones, R. Huw; Tarry-Adkins, Jane; Smith, Noel H.; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2008-01-01

    Standard cell culture conditions do not reflect the physiological environment in terms of oxygen tension (20% vs 3%). The effects of lowering oxygen tension on cell proliferation in culture can be beneficial as well as detrimental depending on the cell line studied, but the molecular mechanism underlying such effects is not fully understood. We observed that the proliferative capacity of the rat cell lines NRK and INS-1 was inhibited when cultured under 3% oxygen as compared to 20% oxygen. Suppression of proliferation in NRK cells was accompanied by induction of DNA double strand breaks whereas in INS-1 cells it was accompanied by up-regulation of p53 and p27. Although Sirt1 was up-regulated in both cell lines by 3% oxygen the effects on antioxidant enzymes (MnSOD, CuZnSOD and catalase) were cell line specific. Marked up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was detected in both NRK and INS-1 cells when cultured in 3% oxygen. HO-1 expression can be readily induced by exposure to hydrogen peroxide in culture. These results suggest that reduced oxygen tension suppresses the proliferative capacity of these two cell lines through a stress response that is similar to an oxidative stress response but the molecular events that lead to the reduced cell proliferation are cell line specific

  7. Cell type-specific roles of Jak3 in IL-2-induced proliferative signal transduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Hodaka

    2007-01-01

    Binding of interleukin-2 (IL-2) to its specific receptor induces activation of two members of Jak family protein tyrosine kinases, Jak1 and Jak3. An IL-2 receptor (IL-2R)-reconstituted NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell line proliferates in response to IL-2 only when hematopoietic lineage-specific Jak3 is ectopically expressed. However, the mechanism of Jak3-dependent proliferation in the fibroblast cell line is not known. Here, I showed that Jak3 expression is dispensable for IL-2-induced activation of Jak1 and Stat proteins and expression of nuclear proto-oncogenes in the IL-2R-reconstituted fibroblast cell line. Jak3 expression markedly enhanced these IL-2-induced signaling events. In contrast, Jak3 expression was essential for induction of cyclin genes involved in the G1-S transition. These data suggest a critical role of Jak3 in IL-2 signaling in the fibroblast cell line and may provide further insight into the cell type-specific mechanism of cytokine signaling

  8. Cell type-specific roles of Jak3 in IL-2-induced proliferative signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hodaka

    2007-01-01

    Binding of IL-2 to its specific receptor induces activation of two members of Jak family protein tyrosine kinases, Jak1 and Jak3. An IL-2R-reconstituted NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell line proliferates in response to IL-2 only when hematopoietic lineage-specific Jak3 is ectopically expressed. However, the mechanism of Jak3-dependent proliferation in the fibroblast cell line is not known. Here, I showed that Jak3 expression is dispensable for IL-2-induced activation of Jak1 and Stat proteins and expression of nuclear proto-oncogenes in the IL-2R-reconstituted fibroblast cell line. However, Jak3 expression markedly enhanced these IL-2-induced signaling events. In contrast, Jak3 expression was essential for induction of cyclin genes involved in the G1-S transition. These data suggest a critical role of Jak3 in IL-2 signaling in the fibroblast cell line and may provide further insight into the cell type-specific mechanism of cytokine signaling. PMID:17266928

  9. Allopregnanolone-induced rise in intracellular calcium in embryonic hippocampal neurons parallels their proliferative potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinton Roberta

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Factors that regulate intracellular calcium concentration are known to play a critical role in brain function and neural development, including neural plasticity and neurogenesis. We previously demonstrated that the neurosteroid allopregnanolone (APα; 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one promotes neural progenitor proliferation in vitro in cultures of rodent hippocampal and human cortical neural progenitors, and in vivo in triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease mice dentate gyrus. We also found that APα-induced proliferation of neural progenitors is abolished by a calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, indicating a calcium dependent mechanism for the proliferation. Methods In the present study, we investigated the effect of APα on the regulation of intracellular calcium concentration in E18 rat hippocampal neurons using ratiometric Fura2-AM imaging. Results Results indicate that APα rapidly increased intracellular calcium concentration in a dose-dependent and developmentally regulated manner, with an EC50 of 110 ± 15 nM and a maximal response occurring at three days in vitro. The stereoisomers 3β-hydroxy-5α-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one, and 3β-hydroxy-5β-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one, as well as progesterone, were without significant effect. APα-induced intracellular calcium concentration increase was not observed in calcium depleted medium and was blocked in the presence of the broad spectrum calcium channel blocker La3+, or the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine. Furthermore, the GABAA receptor blockers bicuculline and picrotoxin abolished APα-induced intracellular calcium concentration rise. Conclusion Collectively, these data indicate that APα promotes a rapid, dose-dependent, stereo-specific, and developmentally regulated increase of intracellular calcium concentration in rat embryonic hippocampal neurons via a mechanism that requires both the GABAA receptor and L-type calcium channel. These data suggest that APα-induced

  10. A peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ligand MCC-555 imparts anti-proliferative response in pancreatic cancer cells by PPARgamma-independent up-regulation of KLF4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Kyung-Won [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Zhang, Xiaobo [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, 712100 (China); Imchen, Temjenmongla [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Baek, Seung Joon, E-mail: sbaek2@utk.edu [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    MCC-555 is a novel PPARα/γ dual ligand of the thiazolidinedione class and was recently developed as an anti-diabetic drug with unique properties. MCC-555 also has anti-proliferative activity through growth inhibition and apoptosis induction in several cancer cell types. Our group has shown that MCC-555 targets several proteins in colorectal tumorigenesis including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-activated gene (NAG-1) which plays an important role in chemoprevention responsible for chemopreventive compounds. NAG-1 is a member of the TGF-β superfamily and is involved in tumor progression and development; however, NAG-1's roles in pancreatic cancer have not been studied. In this report, we found that MCC-555 alters not only NAG-1 expression, but also p21 and cyclin D1 expression. NAG-1 and p21 expression was not blocked by PPARγ-specific antagonist GW9662, suggesting that MCC-555-induced NAG-1 and p21 expression is independent of PPARγ activation. However, decreasing cyclin D1 by MCC-555 seems to be affected by PPARγ activation. Further, we found that the GC box located in the NAG-1 promoter play an important role in NAG-1 transactivation by MCC-555. Subsequently, we screened several transcription factors that may bind to the GC box region in the NAG-1 promoter and found that KLF4 potentially binds to this region. Expression of KLF4 precedes NAG-1 and p21 expression in the presence of MCC-555, whereas blocking KLF4 expression using specific KLF4 siRNA showed that both NAG-1 and p21 expression by MCC-555 was blocked. In conclusion, MCC-555's actions on anti-proliferation involve both PPARγ-dependent and -independent pathways, thereby enhancing anti-tumorigenesis in pancreatic cancer cells. -- Highlights: ► PPARα/γ ligand MCC-555 exhibits anti-proliferative activity in pancreatic cancer cells. ► MCC-555 affects KLF4 expression following by NAG-1 and p21 expression in a PPARγ independent manner. ► MCC-555 also affects cyclin D1 down

  11. A peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ligand MCC-555 imparts anti-proliferative response in pancreatic cancer cells by PPARgamma-independent up-regulation of KLF4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Kyung-Won; Zhang, Xiaobo; Imchen, Temjenmongla; Baek, Seung Joon

    2012-01-01

    MCC-555 is a novel PPARα/γ dual ligand of the thiazolidinedione class and was recently developed as an anti-diabetic drug with unique properties. MCC-555 also has anti-proliferative activity through growth inhibition and apoptosis induction in several cancer cell types. Our group has shown that MCC-555 targets several proteins in colorectal tumorigenesis including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-activated gene (NAG-1) which plays an important role in chemoprevention responsible for chemopreventive compounds. NAG-1 is a member of the TGF-β superfamily and is involved in tumor progression and development; however, NAG-1's roles in pancreatic cancer have not been studied. In this report, we found that MCC-555 alters not only NAG-1 expression, but also p21 and cyclin D1 expression. NAG-1 and p21 expression was not blocked by PPARγ-specific antagonist GW9662, suggesting that MCC-555-induced NAG-1 and p21 expression is independent of PPARγ activation. However, decreasing cyclin D1 by MCC-555 seems to be affected by PPARγ activation. Further, we found that the GC box located in the NAG-1 promoter play an important role in NAG-1 transactivation by MCC-555. Subsequently, we screened several transcription factors that may bind to the GC box region in the NAG-1 promoter and found that KLF4 potentially binds to this region. Expression of KLF4 precedes NAG-1 and p21 expression in the presence of MCC-555, whereas blocking KLF4 expression using specific KLF4 siRNA showed that both NAG-1 and p21 expression by MCC-555 was blocked. In conclusion, MCC-555's actions on anti-proliferation involve both PPARγ-dependent and -independent pathways, thereby enhancing anti-tumorigenesis in pancreatic cancer cells. -- Highlights: ► PPARα/γ ligand MCC-555 exhibits anti-proliferative activity in pancreatic cancer cells. ► MCC-555 affects KLF4 expression following by NAG-1 and p21 expression in a PPARγ independent manner. ► MCC-555 also affects cyclin D1 down

  12. Disruption of sphingolipid biosynthesis in hepatocyte nodules: selective proliferative stimulus induced by fumonisin B1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westhuizen, Liana van der; Gelderblom, Wentzel C.A.; Shephard, Gordon S.; Swanevelder, Sonja

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of sphingolipid disruption in the cancer promoting potential of fumonisin B 1 (FB 1 ) in the development of hepatocyte nodules, male Fischer 344 rats were subjected to cancer initiation (FB 1 containing diet or diethylnitrosamine (DEN) by i.p. injection) and promotion (2-acetylaminofluorene with partial hepatectomy, 2-AAF/PH) treatments followed by a secondary FB 1 dietary regimen. Sphinganine (Sa) and sphingosine (So) levels were measured by high performance liquid chromatography in control, surrounding and nodular liver tissues of the rats. The disruption of sphingolipid biosynthesis by the secondary FB 1 treatment in the control rats was significantly (P 1 initiation and 2-AAF/PH promotion. When comparing the groups subjected to the secondary FB 1 treatment, the initiation effected by FB 1 was less (P 1 initiation was marginally increased in the nodules compared to the surrounding liver after 2-AAF/PH promotion and significantly (P 1 treatment. Although, the FB 1 -induced hepatocyte nodules were not resistant to the disruption of sphingolipid biosynthesis, the nodular So levels were increased and might provide a selective growth stimulus possibly induced by bio-active sphingoid intermediates such as sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)

  13. Characterization of the early proliferative response of the rodent bladder to subtotal cystectomy: a unique model of mammalian organ regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles C Peyton

    Full Text Available Subtotal cystectomy (STC; surgical removal of ∼75% of the rat urinary bladder elicits a robust proliferative response resulting in complete structural and functional bladder regeneration within 8-weeks. The goal of these studies was to characterize the early cellular response that mediates this regenerative phenomenon, which is unique among mammalian organ systems. STC was performed on eighteen 12-week-old female Fischer F344 rats. At 1, 3, 5 and 7-days post-STC, the bladder was harvested 2-hours after intraperitoneal injection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU. Fluorescent BrdU labeling was quantified in cells within the urothelium, lamina propria (LP, muscularis propria (MP and serosa. Cell location was confirmed with fluorescently co-labeled cytokeratin, vimentin or smooth muscle actin (SMA, to identify urothelial, interstitial and smooth muscle cells, respectively. Expression of sonic hedgehog (Shh, Gli-1 and bone morphogenic factor-4 (BMP-4 were evaluated with immunochemistry. Three non-operated rats injected with BrdU served as controls. Less than 1% of cells in the bladder wall were labeled with BrdU in control bladders, but this percentage significantly increased by 5-8-fold at all time points post-STC. The spatiotemporal characteristics of the proliferative response were defined by a significantly higher percentage of BrdU-labeled cells within the urothelium at 1-day than in the MP and LP. A time-dependent shift at 3 and 5-days post-STC revealed significantly fewer BrdU-labeled cells in the MP than LP or urothelium. By 7-days the percentage of BrdU-labeled cells was similar among urothelium, LP and MP. STC also caused an increase in immunostaining for Shh, Gli-1 and BMP-4. In summary, the early stages of functional bladder regeneration are characterized by time-dependent changes in the location of the proliferating cell population, and expression of several evolutionarily conserved developmental signaling proteins. This report extends

  14. Anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing activity of lycopene against three subtypes of human breast cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Mikako; Ono, Misaki; Higuchi, Takako; Chen, Chen; Hara, Takayuki; Nakano, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    Although lycopene, a major carotenoid component of tomatoes, has been suggested to attenuate the risk of breast cancer, the underlying preventive mechanism remains to be determined. Moreover, it is not known whether there are any differences in lycopene activity among different subtypes of human breast cancer cells. Using ER/PR positive MCF-7, HER2-positive SK-BR-3 and triple-negative MDA-MB-468 cell lines, we investigated the cellular and molecular mechanism of the anticancer activity of lycopene. Lycopene treatment for 168 consecutive hours exhibited a time-dependent and dose-dependent anti-proliferative activity against these cell lines by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase at physiologically achievable concentrations found in human plasma. The greatest growth inhibition was observed in MDA-MB-468 where the sub-G0/G1 apoptotic population was significantly increased, with demonstrable cleavage of PARP. Lycopene induced strong and sustained activation of the ERK1/2, with concomitant cyclin D1 suppression and p21 upregulation in these three cell lines. In triple negative cells, lycopene inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt and its downstream molecule mTOR, followed by subsequent upregulation of proapoptotic Bax without affecting anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL. Taken together, these data indicate that the predominant anticancer activity of lycopene in MDA-MB-468 cells suggests a potential role of lycopene for the prevention of triple negative breast cancer. PMID:24397737

  15. An inducible model of abacterial prostatitis induces antigen specific inflammatory and proliferative changes in the murine prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkamp, Jessica M.; Charbonneau, Bridget; Meyerholz, David K.; Cohen, Michael B.; Snyder, Paul W.; Svensson, Robert U.; Henry, Michael D.; Wang, Hsing- Hui

    2011-01-01

    Background Prostatitis is a poorly understood disease and increasing evidence suggests inflammation is involved in other prostatic diseases, including prostate cancer. Methods The ability of pre-activated CD8 T cells to induce prostatitis was examined by adoptive transfer into POET-3 mice or POET-3/Luc/Pten−/+ mice. Characterization of the inflammatory response was determined by examining leukocyte infiltration by histological analysis, flow cytometry and by evaluating cytokine and chemokine levels in prostate tissue. The impact of inflammation on the prostate was evaluated by monitoring epithelial cell proliferation over time. Results Initiation of inflammation by ovalbumin specific CD8+ T cells (OT-I cells) resulted in development of acute prostatitis in the anterior, dorsolateral and anterior prostate of POET-3 and POET-3/Luc/Pten−/+ mice. Acute prostatitis was characterized by recruitment of adoptively transferred OT-I cells and importantly, autologous CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and regulatory T cells (Treg). In concert with leukocyte infiltration elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were observed. Inflammation also resulted in marked epithelial cell proliferation that was sustained up to 80 days post adoptive-transfer of OT-I cells. Conclusions The POET-3 model represents a novel mouse model to study both acute and chronic prostate inflammation in an antigen-specific system. Further, the POET-3 mouse model can be crossed with other genetic models of disease such as the C57/Luc/Pten−/− model of prostate cancer, allowing the impact of prostatitis on other prostatic diseases to be evaluated. PMID:21656824

  16. Graphene oxide scaffold accelerates cellular proliferative response and alveolar bone healing of tooth extraction socket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Erika; Miyaji, Hirofumi; Kato, Akihito; Takita, Hiroko; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Momose, Takehito; Ogawa, Kosuke; Murakami, Shusuke; Sugaya, Tsutomu; Kawanami, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) consisting of a carbon monolayer has been widely investigated for tissue engineering platforms because of its unique properties. For this study, we fabricated a GO-applied scaffold and assessed the cellular and tissue behaviors in the scaffold. A preclinical test was conducted to ascertain whether the GO scaffold promoted bone induction in dog tooth extraction sockets. For this study, GO scaffolds were prepared by coating the surface of a collagen sponge scaffold with 0.1 and 1 µg/mL GO dispersion. Scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), physical testing, cell seeding, and rat subcutaneous implant testing. Then a GO scaffold was implanted into a dog tooth extraction socket. Histological observations were made at 2 weeks postsurgery. SEM observations show that GO attached to the surface of collagen scaffold struts. The GO scaffold exhibited an interconnected structure resembling that of control subjects. GO application improved the physical strength, enzyme resistance, and adsorption of calcium and proteins. Cytocompatibility tests showed that GO application significantly increased osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation. In addition, an assessment of rat subcutaneous tissue response revealed that implantation of 1 µg/mL GO scaffold stimulated cellular ingrowth behavior, suggesting that the GO scaffold exhibited good biocompatibility. The tissue ingrowth area and DNA contents of 1 µg/mL GO scaffold were, respectively, approximately 2.5-fold and 1.4-fold greater than those of the control. Particularly, the infiltration of ED2-positive (M2) macrophages and blood vessels were prominent in the GO scaffold. Dog bone-formation tests showed that 1 µg/mL GO scaffold implantation enhanced bone formation. New bone formation following GO scaffold implantation was enhanced fivefold compared to that in control subjects. These results suggest that GO was biocompatible and had high bone-formation capability for the scaffold

  17. Graphene oxide scaffold accelerates cellular proliferative response and alveolar bone healing of tooth extraction socket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida E

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Erika Nishida,1 Hirofumi Miyaji,1 Akihito Kato,1 Hiroko Takita,2 Toshihiko Iwanaga,3 Takehito Momose,1 Kosuke Ogawa,1 Shusuke Murakami,1 Tsutomu Sugaya,1 Masamitsu Kawanami11Department of Periodontology and Endodontology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Sapporo, Japan; 2Support Section for Education and Research, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Sapporo, Japan; 3Laboratory of Histology and Cytology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, JapanAbstract: Graphene oxide (GO consisting of a carbon monolayer has been widely investigated for tissue engineering platforms because of its unique properties. For this study, we fabricated a GO-applied scaffold and assessed the cellular and tissue behaviors in the scaffold. A preclinical test was conducted to ascertain whether the GO scaffold promoted bone induction in dog tooth extraction sockets. For this study, GO scaffolds were prepared by coating the surface of a collagen sponge scaffold with 0.1 and 1 µg/mL GO dispersion. Scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, physical testing, cell seeding, and rat subcutaneous implant testing. Then a GO scaffold was implanted into a dog tooth extraction socket. Histological observations were made at 2 weeks postsurgery. SEM observations show that GO attached to the surface of collagen scaffold struts. The GO scaffold exhibited an interconnected structure resembling that of control subjects. GO application improved the physical strength, enzyme resistance, and adsorption of calcium and proteins. Cytocompatibility tests showed that GO application significantly increased osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation. In addition, an assessment of rat subcutaneous tissue response revealed that implantation of 1 µg/mL GO scaffold stimulated cellular ingrowth behavior, suggesting that the GO scaffold exhibited good biocompatibility. The tissue ingrowth area and DNA contents of 1

  18. Hyperoxia-Induced Proliferative Retinopathy: Early Interruption of Retinal Vascular Development with Severe and Irreversible Neurovascular Disruption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Lajko

    Full Text Available Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD is a major cause of neonatal morbidity in premature infants, occurring as a result of arrested lung development combined with multiple postnatal insults. Infants with BPD exposed to supplemental oxygen are at risk of retinopathy of prematurity as well. Thus, we studied the effects of hyperoxia on the retinal vasculature in a murine model of BPD. The retinal phenotype of this model, which we termed hyperoxia-induced proliferative retinopathy (HIPR, shows severe disruption of retinal vasculature and loss of vascular patterning, disorganized intra-retinal angiogenesis, inflammation and retinal detachment. Neonatal mice were subjected to 75% oxygen exposure from postnatal day (P0 to P14 to model BPD, then allowed to recover in room air for 1 (P15, 7 (P21, or 14 days (P28. We quantified retinal thickness, protein levels of HIF-1α, NOX2, and VEGF, and examined the cellular locations of these proteins by immunohistochemistry. We examined the retinal blood vessel integrity and inflammatory markers, including macrophages (F4/80 and lymphocytes (CD45R. Compared to controls, normal retinal vascular development was severely disrupted and replaced by a disorganized sheet of intra-retinal angiogenesis in the HIPR mice. At all time-points, HIPR showed persistent hyaloidal vasculature and a significantly thinner central retina compared to controls. HIF-1α protein levels were increased at P15, while VEGF levels continued to increase until P21. Intra-retinal fibrinogen was observed at P21 followed by sub-retinal deposition in at P28. Inflammatory lymphocytes and macrophages were observed at P21 and P28, respectively. This model presents a severe phenotype of disrupted retinal vascular development, intra-retinal angiogenesis inflammation and retinal detachment.

  19. Increased T cell proliferative responses to islet antigens identify clinical responders to anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (rituximab) therapy in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Kevan C; Pescovitz, Mark D; McGee, Paula; Krause-Steinrauf, Heidi; Spain, Lisa M; Bourcier, Kasia; Asare, Adam; Liu, Zhugong; Lachin, John M; Dosch, H Michael

    2011-08-15

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is believed to be due to the autoimmune destruction of β-cells by T lymphocytes, but a single course of rituximab, a monoclonal anti-CD20 B lymphocyte Ab, can attenuate C-peptide loss over the first year of disease. The effects of B cell depletion on disease-associated T cell responses have not been studied. We compare changes in lymphocyte subsets, T cell proliferative responses to disease-associated target Ags, and C-peptide levels of participants who did (responders) or did not (nonresponders) show signs of β-cell preservation 1 y after rituximab therapy in a placebo-controlled TrialNet trial. Rituximab decreased B lymphocyte levels after four weekly doses of mAb. T cell proliferative responses to diabetes-associated Ags were present at baseline in 75% of anti-CD20- and 82% of placebo-treated subjects and were not different over time. However, in rituximab-treated subjects with significant C-peptide preservation at 6 mo (58%), the proliferative responses to diabetes-associated total (p = 0.032), islet-specific (p = 0.048), and neuronal autoantigens (p = 0.005) increased over the 12-mo observation period. This relationship was not seen in placebo-treated patients. We conclude that in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, anti-B cell mAb causes increased proliferative responses to diabetes Ags and attenuated β-cell loss. The way in which these responses affect the disease course remains unknown.

  20. High fructose-mediated attenuation of insulin receptor signaling does not affect PDGF-induced proliferative signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Islam; Poulose, Ninu; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Segar, Lakshman

    2016-11-15

    Insulin resistance is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis. Although high fructose is known to induce insulin resistance, it remains unclear as to how fructose regulates insulin receptor signaling and proliferative phenotype in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which play a major role in atherosclerosis. Using human aortic VSMCs, we investigated the effects of high fructose treatment on insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) serine phosphorylation, insulin versus platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced phosphorylation of Akt, S6 ribosomal protein, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and cell cycle proteins. In comparison with PDGF (a potent mitogen), neither fructose nor insulin enhanced VSMC proliferation and cyclin D1 expression. d-[ 14 C(U)]fructose uptake studies revealed a progressive increase in fructose uptake in a time-dependent manner. Concentration-dependent studies with high fructose (5-25mM) showed marked increases in IRS-1 serine phosphorylation, a key adapter protein in insulin receptor signaling. Accordingly, high fructose treatment led to significant diminutions in insulin-induced phosphorylation of downstream signaling components including Akt and S6. In addition, high fructose significantly diminished insulin-induced ERK phosphorylation. Nevertheless, high fructose did not affect PDGF-induced key proliferative signaling events including phosphorylation of Akt, S6, and ERK and expression of cyclin D1 protein. Together, high fructose dysregulates IRS-1 phosphorylation state and proximal insulin receptor signaling in VSMCs, but does not affect PDGF-induced proliferative signaling. These findings suggest that systemic insulin resistance rather than VSMC-specific dysregulation of insulin receptor signaling by high fructose may play a major role in enhancing atherosclerosis and neointimal hyperplasia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The G protein-coupled receptor GPR30 mediates the proliferative and invasive effects induced by hydroxytamoxifen in endometrial cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Gui-Qiang; Zhou, Long; Chen, Xiao-Yue [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital of the China Welfare Institute Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 910, Hengshan Road, Shanghai (China); Wan, Xiao-Ping, E-mail: wanxiaoping61@126.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital of the China Welfare Institute Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 910, Hengshan Road, Shanghai (China); He, Yin-Yan [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shanghai First People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We assessed hydroxytamoxifen (OHT) effects in two endometrial cancer cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GPR30 mediates the proliferative effects induced by OHT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GPR30 mediates the invasive effects induced by OHT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GPR30 expression was up-regulated by OHT in endometrial cancer cell line. -- Abstract: The selective ER modulator tamoxifen (TAM) is the most widely used ER antagonist for treatment of women with hormone-dependent breast tumor. However, long-term treatment is associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate new insight into the role of G-protein coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) in the activity of TAM, which promoted endometrial cancer. In endometrial cancer cell lines ISHIKAWA and KLE, the potential of 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT), the active metabolite of TAM, 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) and G1, a non-steroidal GPR30-specific agonist to promote cell proliferation and invasion was evaluated. All agents above induced high proliferative and invasive effects, while the down-regulation of GPR30 or the interruption of MAPK signal pathway partly or completely prevented the action of the regent. Moreover, the RNA and protein expression of GPR30 was up-regulated by G1, E2 or OHT in both cell lines. The present study provided a new insight into the mechanism involved in the agonistic activity exerted by TAM in the uterus.

  2. The G protein-coupled receptor GPR30 mediates the proliferative and invasive effects induced by hydroxytamoxifen in endometrial cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Gui-Qiang; Zhou, Long; Chen, Xiao-Yue; Wan, Xiao-Ping; He, Yin-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We assessed hydroxytamoxifen (OHT) effects in two endometrial cancer cell lines. ► GPR30 mediates the proliferative effects induced by OHT. ► GPR30 mediates the invasive effects induced by OHT. ► GPR30 expression was up-regulated by OHT in endometrial cancer cell line. -- Abstract: The selective ER modulator tamoxifen (TAM) is the most widely used ER antagonist for treatment of women with hormone-dependent breast tumor. However, long-term treatment is associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate new insight into the role of G-protein coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) in the activity of TAM, which promoted endometrial cancer. In endometrial cancer cell lines ISHIKAWA and KLE, the potential of 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT), the active metabolite of TAM, 17β-estradiol (E2) and G1, a non-steroidal GPR30-specific agonist to promote cell proliferation and invasion was evaluated. All agents above induced high proliferative and invasive effects, while the down-regulation of GPR30 or the interruption of MAPK signal pathway partly or completely prevented the action of the regent. Moreover, the RNA and protein expression of GPR30 was up-regulated by G1, E2 or OHT in both cell lines. The present study provided a new insight into the mechanism involved in the agonistic activity exerted by TAM in the uterus.

  3. Peripheral blood T cell proliferative response to chlamydial organisms in gonococcal and non-gonococcal urethritis and presumed pelvic inflammatory disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmanesh, M.; Brunst, M.; Sukthankar, A.; Pearce, J. H.; Gaston, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferative response to Chlamydia trachomatis elementary bodies in (a) controls, (b) various stages of gonococcal (c) and non-gonococcal urethritis, and (d) women with a clinical diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). METHODS: We categorised 102 men presenting to a GUM clinic with urethritis by organisms (C trachomatis (CT) or Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) (both by culture), and whether it was their first (urethritis naive) or subsequent (urethritis experienced) attack. 23 women presenting to the clinic with a clinical diagnosis of PID were also investigated. We measured PBMC proliferative responses to C trachomatis (DK20--an oculogenital strain, serovar E), lysate of McCoy cells (used to propagate chlamydiae), and the recall antigen PPD. Controls were 37 men and women without present or past history of urethritis or chlamydial infection. Results were expressed as the ratio of the stimulation index (SI) obtained with DK20 compared with McCoy cells (DK index), and the ratio of the SI obtained with DK20 compared with PPD (PPD index). RESULTS: The median SI to DK20 in the urethritis was 12.7 which was significantly higher than the controls (7.6, p urethritis patients (17.4) and the controls (22.4). All urethritis patient subgroups had a significantly higher DK index and PPD index than the controls. There was no difference in the PPD and DK index between urethritis naive and urethritis experienced patients and between the culture positive and culture negative urethritis subgroups. In PID patients only the PPD index was significantly higher than the controls. CONCLUSION: Men presenting with urethritis and women presenting with PID both have significantly greater peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferative responses to the DK20 strain of C trachomatis than controls. A similar T cell proliferative response pattern in urethritis naive patients with either gonococcal or non-gonococcal urethritis could

  4. Proliferative responses in the local lymph node assay associated with concomitant exposure to 1,4-phenylenediamine and methyldibromo glutaronitrile: evidence for synergy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jowsey, Ian R; Basketter, David A; Irwin, Anita

    2008-08-01

    A key consideration when undertaking risk assessments should be the potential for synergy between contact allergens. Previously, this concept has only been investigated during elicitation in contact allergic individuals. To determine whether there exists evidence for synergy between contact allergens during the induction phase of skin sensitization using the mouse local lymph node assay (LLNA) as a model system. Proliferative responses in draining lymph nodes were assessed with increasing concentrations of 1,4-phenylenediamine (PPD), methyldibromo glutaronitrile (MDBGN), and a combination of PPD and MDBGN. Data from each of two independent experiments show that lymph node cell proliferation associated with combined exposure to PPD and MDBGN was, in general, only modestly increased relative to that predicted from a simple summation of their individual responses. Although the increase in response is very modest, it does imply a relationship between this combination of sensitizers that may not be simply additive in terms of their ability to stimulate proliferative responses in draining lymph nodes. The reproducibility of this observation should be confirmed in future studies with additional pairs of contact allergens to ascertain whether or not this represents evidence of synergy.

  5. Serum level of expressed in renal carcinoma (ERC)/ mesothelin in rats with mesothelial proliferative lesions induced by multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Yoshimitsu; Dai, Nakae; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Satoh, Kanako; Ohashi, Norio; Fukamachi, Katsumi; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Akihiko; Nishimura, Tetsuji; Hino, Okio; Ogata, Akio

    2010-04-01

    Expressed in renal carcinoma (ERC)/mesothelin is a good biomarker for human mesothelioma and has been investigated for its mechanistic rationale during the mesothelioma development. Studies are thus ongoing in our laboratories to assess expression of ERC/mesothelin in sera and normal/proliferative/neoplastic mesothelial tissues of animals untreated or given potentially mesothelioma-inducible xenobiotics, by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for N- and C-(terminal fragments of) ERC/mesothelin and immunohistochemistry for C-ERC/mesothelin. In the present paper, we intend to communicate our preliminary data, because this is the first report to show how and from what stage the ERC/mesothelin expression changes during the chemical induction of mesothelial proliferative/neoplatic lesions. Serum N-ERC/mesothelin levels were 51.4 +/- 5.6 ng/ml in control male Fischer 344 rats, increased to 83.6 +/- 11.2 ng/ml in rats given a single intrascrotal administration of 1 mg/kg body weight of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and bearing mesothelial hyperplasia 52 weeks thereafter, and further elevated to 180 +/- 77 ng/ml in rats similarly treated and becoming moribund 40 weeks thereafter, or killed as scheduled at the end of week 52, bearing mesothelioma. While C-ERC/mesothelin was expressed in normal and hyperplastic mesothelia, the protein was detected only in epithelioid mesothelioma cells at the most superficial layer. It is thus suggested that ERC/mesothelin can be used as a biomarker of mesothelial proliferative lesions also in animals, and that the increase of levels may start from the early stage and be enhanced by the progression of the mesothelioma development.

  6. Herpes simplex virus (HSV)-specific proliferative and cytotoxic T-cell responses in humans immunized with an HSF type 2 glycoprotein subunit vaccine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarling, J.M.; Moran, P.A.; Brewer, L.; Ashley, R.; Corey, L.

    1988-12-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine whether immunization of humans with a herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein-subunit vaccine would result in the priming of both HSV-specific proliferating cells and cytotoxic T cells. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from all eight vaccinees studied responded by proliferating after stimulation with HSV-2, HSV-1, and glycoprotein gB-1. The PBL of five of these eight vaccinees proliferated following stimulation with gD-2, whereas stimulation with Gd-1 resulted in relatively low or no proliferative responses. T-cell clones were generated from HSV-2-stimulated PBL of three vaccinees who demonstrated strong proliferative responses to HSV-1 and HSV-2. Of 12 clones studied in lymphoproliferative assays, 9 were found to be cross-reactive for HSV-1 and HSV-2. Of the approximately 90 T-cell clones isolated, 14 demonstrated HSV-specific cytotoxic activity. Radioimmunoprecipitation-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses confirmed that the vaccinees had antibodies only to HSV glycoproteins, not to proteins which are absent in the subunit vaccine, indicating that these vaccinees had not become infected with HSV. Immunization of humans with an HSV-2 glycoprotein-subunit vaccine thus results in the priming of T cells that proliferate in response to stimulation with HSV and its glycoproteins and T cells that have cytotoxic activity against HSV-infected cells. Such HSV-specific memory T cells were detected as late as 2 years following the last boost with the subunit vaccine.

  7. Gene complementation. Neither Ir-GLphi gene need be present in the proliferative I cell to generate an immune response to Poly(Glu55Lys36Phe9)n

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longo, D.L.; Schwartz, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The cellular requirements for immune response (Ir) gene expression in a T cell proliferative response under dual Ir gene control were examined with radiation-induced bone marrow chimeras. The response to poly(Glu55Lys36Phe9)n (GLphi) requires two responder alleles that in the [B10.A x B10.A(18R)]F1 map in I-Ab and I-Ek/Cd. Chimeras in which a mixture of the nonresponder B10.A parental cells and the nonresponder B10.A(18R) parental cells were allowed to mature in a responder F1 environment did not respond to GLphi. When T cells from such A + 18R leads to F1 chimeras were primed in the presence of responder antigen-presenting cells (APC), the chimeric T cells responded to GLphi. When bone marrow cells from (B10.A X B10)F1 responder animals were allowed to mature in a low-responder B10 of B10.A parental environment, neither chimera could respond to GLphi. This demonstrated that the presence of high-responder APC, which derive from the donar bone marrow, was not sufficient to generate a GLphi response. Finally, B10.A(4R) T cells, which possess neither Ir-GLphi responder allele, could be educated to mount a GLphi-proliferative response provided that they matured in a responder environment and were primed with APC expressing both responder alleles. Therefore, the gene products of the complementing Ir-GLphi responder alleles appear to function as a single restriction element at the level of the APC

  8. Role of P-glycoprotein on CD69+CD4+ cells in the pathogenesis of proliferative lupus nephritis and non-responsiveness to immunosuppressive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Shizuyo; Adachi, Tomoko; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2017-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression on activated lymphocytes in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) plays a role in active efflux of intracellular drugs, resulting in drug resistance. The role of P-gp-expressing lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of SLE remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the importance of P-gp + CD4 + cells in organ manifestations in refractory SLE. The proportion of P-gp + CD4 + cells was determined by flow cytometry in peripheral blood of patients with SLE (n=116) and healthy adults (n=10). Renal biopsy specimens were examined by immunohistochemistry for P-gp expression. CD69 is a marker of CD4 cell activation. The proportion of both P-gp-expressing CD4 + cells and CD69-expressing CD4 + cells in peripheral blood was higher in SLE than control. The proportion of P-gp + CD69 + CD4 + cells correlated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index and was higher in poor responders to corticosteroids. Furthermore, the proportion of P-gp + CD69 + CD4 + cells was significantly higher in proliferative lupus nephritis (LN) with poor response to corticosteroids. The efficacy of immunosuppressive therapy depended on the regulation of the proportion of P-gp + CD69 + CD4 + cells. Marked accumulation of P-gp + CD4 + cells in renal interstitial tissue and high proportion of peripheral P-gp + CD69 + CD4 + cells were noted in patients with proliferative LN. The results showed high proportion of P-gp + CD69 + CD4 + cells in peripheral blood and their accumulation in renal tissue in patients with proliferative LN refractory to CS therapy, suggesting that P-gp expression on activated CD4 + T cells is a potentially useful marker for refractoriness to treatment and a novel target for treatment.

  9. The anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory response of COPD airway smooth muscle cells to hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Mark M; Tildy, Bernadett; Papi, Alberto; Casolari, Paolo; Caramori, Gaetano; Rempel, Karen Limbert; Halayko, Andrew J; Adcock, Ian; Chung, Kian Fan

    2018-05-09

    COPD is a common, highly debilitating disease of the airways, primarily caused by smoking. Chronic inflammation and structural remodelling are key pathological features of this disease caused, in part, by the aberrant function of airway smooth muscle (ASM). We have previously demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) can inhibit ASM cell proliferation and CXCL8 release, from cells isolated from non-smokers. We examined the effect of H 2 S upon ASM cells from COPD patients. ASM cells were isolated from non-smokers, smokers and patients with COPD (n = 9). Proliferation and cytokine release (IL-6 and CXCL8) of ASM was induced by FCS, and measured by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and ELISA, respectively. Exposure of ASM to H 2 S donors inhibited FCS-induced proliferation and cytokine release, but was less effective upon COPD ASM cells compared to the non-smokers and smokers. The mRNA and protein expression of the enzymes responsible for endogenous H 2 S production (cystathionine-β-synthase [CBS] and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulphur transferase [MPST]) were inhibited by H 2 S donors. Finally, we report that exogenous H 2 S inhibited FCS-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and p38 mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs), in the non-smoker and smoker ASM cells, with little effect in COPD cells. H 2 S production provides a novel mechanism for the repression of ASM proliferation and cytokine release. The ability of COPD ASM cells to respond to H 2 S is attenuated in COPD ASM cells despite the presence of the enzymes responsible for H 2 S production.

  10. Genetic control of murine T cell proliferative responses to Mycobacterium leprae. V. Evidence for cross-reactivity between host antigens and Mycobacterium leprae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, D.P.; Jones, A.G.; Wade, S.; Krahenbuhl, J.L.; Gillis, T.P.; Watson, J.D.

    1988-09-01

    T cell proliferative responses to Mycobacterium leprae were measured by immunization of mice at the base of the tail with Ag and challenging lymphocytes from draining lymph nodes in culture with M. leprae. C57BL/10J and B10.BR mice were identified as low responder mice and the congenic strains B10.M, B10.Q, and B10.AKM as high responders whereas F1 (high x low) hybrid mice were found to be low responders. The cellular basis of low responsiveness did not appear to result from a defect in Ag-presenting cells or the activation of suppressor T cells by M. leprae. The influence of the environment in which T cells developed on responsiveness to M. leprae was analyzed in chimeric mice prepared by irradiating F1(C57BL/10J x B10.M) mice and reconstituting with bone marrow from C57BL/10J, B10.M, or F1 donors. Six weeks later, chimeric mice were immunized with M. leprae, lymph node cells were subsequently prepared, and H-2 phenotyped and challenged in culture with M. leprae Ag. T cell proliferative responses were found to be low in all cases, similar to those observed using lymph node cells from F1 hybrid mice. These results suggested that high responder B10.M lymphocytes developing in the irradiated F1 mice became tolerized to antigenic determinants found on M. leprae. This implied cross-reactive epitopes existed between some mouse strains and M. leprae. Low responsiveness to M. leprae in low responder and F1 hybrid mice may result from tolerance to H-2-encoded Ag that show cross-reactivity with M. leprae.

  11. Transient nature of long-term nonprogression and broad virus-specific proliferative T-cell responses with sustained thymic output in HIV-1 controllers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha J Westrop

    Full Text Available HIV-1(+ individuals who, without therapy, conserve cellular anti-HIV-1 responses, present with high, stable CD4(+ T-cell numbers, and control viral replication, facilitate analysis of atypical viro-immunopathology. In the absence of universal definition, immune function in such HIV controllers remains an indication of non-progression.CD4 T-cell responses to a number of HIV-1 proteins and peptide pools were assessed by IFN-gamma ELISpot and lymphoproliferative assays in HIV controllers and chronic progressors. Thymic output was assessed by sjTRECs levels. Follow-up of 41 HIV-1(+ individuals originally identified as "Long-term non-progressors" in 1996 according to clinical criteria, and longitudinal analysis of two HIV controllers over 22 years, was also performed. HIV controllers exhibited substantial IFN-gamma producing and proliferative HIV-1-specific CD4 T-cell responses to both recombinant proteins and peptide pools of Tat, Rev, Nef, Gag and Env, demonstrating functional processing and presentation. Conversely, HIV-specific T-cell responses were limited to IFN-gamma production in chronic progressors. Additionally, thymic output was approximately 19 fold higher in HIV controllers than in age-matched chronic progressors. Follow-up of 41 HIV-1(+ patients identified as LTNP in 1996 revealed the transitory characteristics of this status. IFN-gamma production and proliferative T-cell function also declines in 2 HIV controllers over 22 years.Although increased thymic output and anti-HIV-1 T-cell responses are observed in HIV controllers compared to chronic progressors, the nature of nonprogressor/controller status appears to be transitory.

  12. Genetic control of murine T cell proliferative responses to Mycobacterium leprae. V. Evidence for cross-reactivity between host antigens and Mycobacterium leprae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.P.; Jones, A.G.; Wade, S.; Krahenbuhl, J.L.; Gillis, T.P.; Watson, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    T cell proliferative responses to Mycobacterium leprae were measured by immunization of mice at the base of the tail with Ag and challenging lymphocytes from draining lymph nodes in culture with M. leprae. C57BL/10J and B10.BR mice were identified as low responder mice and the congenic strains B10.M, B10.Q, and B10.AKM as high responders whereas F1 (high x low) hybrid mice were found to be low responders. The cellular basis of low responsiveness did not appear to result from a defect in Ag-presenting cells or the activation of suppressor T cells by M. leprae. The influence of the environment in which T cells developed on responsiveness to M. leprae was analyzed in chimeric mice prepared by irradiating F1(C57BL/10J x B10.M) mice and reconstituting with bone marrow from C57BL/10J, B10.M, or F1 donors. Six weeks later, chimeric mice were immunized with M. leprae, lymph node cells were subsequently prepared, and H-2 phenotyped and challenged in culture with M. leprae Ag. T cell proliferative responses were found to be low in all cases, similar to those observed using lymph node cells from F1 hybrid mice. These results suggested that high responder B10.M lymphocytes developing in the irradiated F1 mice became tolerized to antigenic determinants found on M. leprae. This implied cross-reactive epitopes existed between some mouse strains and M. leprae. Low responsiveness to M. leprae in low responder and F1 hybrid mice may result from tolerance to H-2-encoded Ag that show cross-reactivity with M. leprae

  13. Monitoring tumor proliferative response to radiotherapy using 18F-fluorothymidine in human head and neck cancer xenograft in comparison with Ki-67

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatema, Chowdhury Nusrat; Yu, Wenwen; Kitagawa, Yoshimasa; Zhao, Songji; Zhao, Yan; Murakami, Masahiro; Nishijima, Ken-ichi; Tamaki, Nagara; Kuge, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Although radiotherapy is an important treatment strategy for head and neck cancers, it induces tumor repopulation which adversely affects therapeutic outcome. In this regard, fractionated radiotherapy is widely applied to prevent tumor repopulation. Evaluation of tumor proliferative activity using 18 F-fluorothymidine (FLT), a noninvasive marker of tumor proliferation, may be useful for determining the optimal timing of and dose in the repetitive irradiation. Thus, to assess the potentials of FLT, we evaluated the sequential changes in intratumoral proliferative activity in head and neck cancer xenografts (FaDu) using FLT. FaDu tumor xenografts were established in nude mice and assigned to control and two radiation-treated groups (10 and 20 Gy). Tumor volume was measured daily. 3 H-FLT was injected intravenously 2 h before killing. Mice were killed 6, 24, 48 h, and 7 days after the radiation treatment. Intratumoral 3 H-FLT level was visually and quantitatively assessed by autoradiography. Ki-67 immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed. In radiation-treated mice, the tumor growth was significantly suppressed compared with the control group, but the tumor volume in these mice gradually increased with time. In the visual assessment, intratumoral 3 H-FLT level diffusely decreased 6 h after the radiation treatment and then gradually increased with time, whereas no apparent changes were observed in Ki-67 IHC. Six hours after the radiation treatment at 10 and 20 Gy, the intratumoral 3 H-FLT level markedly decreased to 45 and 40% of the control, respectively (P 3 H-FLT levels at 48 h and on day 7 were significantly higher than that at 6 h. The intratumoral 3 H-FLT levels in both treated groups were 68 and 60% at 24 h (P<0.001), 71 and 77% at 48 h (P<0.001), and 83 and 81% on day 7 (P=NS) compared with the control group. Intratumoral FLT uptake level markedly decreased at 6 h and then gradually increased with time. Sequential evaluation of intratumoral proliferative

  14. Sub-isotypic differences in the immunoglobulin G response to Lawsonia intracellularis in vaccinated, seropositive, and equine proliferative enteropathy-affected horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Allen E; Stills, Harold F; Horohov, David W

    2014-12-15

    In the horse, Lawsonia intracellularis infection results in equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). While upwards of 100% of weanlings on an endemic farm may seroconvert, only a small percentage (approximately 5%) will develop clinical disease. Cell-mediated immune mechanisms likely play a role in resistance to L. intracellularis and the absence of a L. intracellularis-specific IFN-γ response has been associated with the development of EPE. The goal of this study was to determine whether protection from clinical EPE is associated with the induction of a systemic IgG sub-isotypic response consistent with a Th1-type cytokine response. To describe their L. intracellularis/EPE status, horses enrolled in this study were placed into one of three categories: seropositive-only, vaccinated, and presumptive clinical EPE. An existing ELISA method was modified to detect L. intracellularis-specific IgG(a), IgG(b), and IgG(t) antibodies using the mouse anti-equine hybridomas CVS-48, CVS-39, and CVS-40, respectively. Additionally, the existing ELISA method was used to quantify total IgG antibodies specific for L. intracellularis for comparison between the groups. Total L. intracellularis-specific IgG was found to be significantly higher (pequine IgG sub-isotypes may provide additional information once these become commercially available. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Proliferative retinopathy predicts nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlberg, Charlotte; Falk, Christine; Green, Anders

    2012-01-01

    We wanted to examine proliferative retinopathy as a marker of incident nephropathy in a 25-year follow-up study of a population-based cohort of Danish type 1 diabetic patients and to examine cross-sectional associations between nephropathy and retinopathy in long-term surviving patients of the same...... cohort. All type 1 diabetic patients from Fyn County, Denmark, were identified as of 1 July 1973. One hundred and eighty four patients were examined in 1981-1982 (baseline) and in 2007-2008 (follow-up). The level of retinopathy was graded by ophthalmoscopy at baseline and nine-field digital colour fundus...... and proliferative retinopathy, respectively. In conclusion, proliferative retinopathy is an independent marker of long-term nephropathy in type 1 diabetes. Upcoming studies should examine whether these microvascular complications are also causally linked in type 1 diabetes....

  16. Resveratrol prevents oxidative stress-induced senescence and proliferative dysfunction by activating the AMPK-FOXO3 cascade in cultured primary human keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuo Ido

    Full Text Available The aging process is perceived as resulting from a combination of intrinsic factors such as changes in intracellular signaling and extrinsic factors, most notably environmental stressors. In skin, the relationship between intrinsic changes and keratinocyte function is not clearly understood. Previously, we found that increasing the activity of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK suppressed senescence in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-treated human primary keratinocytes, a model of oxidative stress-induced cellular aging. Using this model in the present study, we observed that resveratrol, an agent that increases the activities of both AMPK and sirtuins, ameliorated two age-associated phenotypes: cellular senescence and proliferative dysfunction. In addition, we found that treatment of keratinocytes with Ex527, a specific inhibitor of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1, attenuated the ability of resveratrol to suppress senescence. In keeping with the latter observation, we noted that compared to non-senescent keratinocytes, senescent cells lacked SIRT1. In addition to these effects on H2O2-induced senescence, resveratrol also prevented the H2O2-induced decrease in proliferation (as indicated by 3H-thymidine incorporation in the presence of insulin. This effect was abrogated by inhibition of AMPK but not SIRT1. Compared to endothelium, we found that human keratinocytes expressed relatively high levels of Forkhead box O3 (FOXO3, a downstream target of both AMPK and SIRT1. Treatment of keratinocytes with resveratrol transactivated FOXO3 and increased the expression of its target genes including catalase. Resveratrol's effects on both senescence and proliferation disappeared when FOXO3 was knocked down. Finally, we performed an exploratory study which showed that skin from humans over 50 years old had lower AMPK activity than skin from individuals under age 20. Collectively, these findings suggest that the effects of resveratrol on keratinocyte senescence and proliferation

  17. Polysaccharide peptide isolated from grass-cultured Ganoderma lucidum induces anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in the human U251 glioma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunhua; Lin, Dongmei; Chen, Quan; Lin, Shuqian; Shi, Songsheng; Chen, Chunmei

    2018-04-01

    The Ganoderma lucidum ( G. lucidum ) mushroom is one of the most extensively studied functional foods, known for its numerous health benefits, including the inhibition of tumor cell growth. The present study assessed the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity of a novel G. lucidum polysaccharide peptide (GL-PP) in human glioma U251 cells, which was purified from grass-cultured G. lucidum . GL-PP is a glycopeptide with an average molecular weight of 42,635 Da and a polysaccharide-to-peptide ratio of 88.70:11.30. The polysaccharides were composed of l-arabinose, d-mannose and d-glucose at a molar ratio of 1.329:0.372:2.953 and a total of 17 amino acids were detected. The results of the current study demonstrated that GL-PP significantly inhibited U251 cellular proliferation. The proportion of G 0 /G 1 phase cells and sub-G 1 phase cells significantly increased as the concentration of GL-PP increased, as did the activity of caspase-3. These results indicate that GL-PP directly inhibited human glioma U251 proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and promoting apoptosis.

  18. Ciliary derived neurotrophic factor protects oligodendrocytes against radiation induced damage in vitro by a mechanism independent of a proliferative effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Andrew J.; Mabie, Peter C.; Kessler, Jack A.; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Radiation-induced damage to the central nervous system in the from of myelopathy is a dose-limiting complication in the treatment of tumors situated in or close to the spinal cord. The target cell for this damage is not definitively identified, but demyelination due to oligodendrocyte damage is strongly implicated. Multiple neurotrophic factors have recently been identified which demonstrate a survival effect on oligodendrocytes. We investigated the effect of Ciliary Derived Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF), Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) on the radiosensitivity of oligodendrocytes in vitro to determine if this may ameliorate radiation damage, as a model for reducing myelopathy in vivo. Materials and Methods: Mature oligodendrocytes were cultured from the cortex of newborn Sprague-Dawley white rats and maintained on poly-d-lysine plates. The experimental arm was exposed to CNTF (0.01-100ng/ml), NGF (100ng/ml) or NT-3 (20ng/ml) for 24 hours prior to radiation, and control and experimental arms radiated using a cobalt 60 irradiator at a dose rate of .87 Gy/min with doses from 2 Gy to 10 Gy. Oligodendrocytes were identified using an O4 antibody, assessed for viability at 5 days using an MTT assay and counted using a phase contrast microscope. Combination studies of CNTF and NT-3 were also performed. BrdU studies were performed to determine if the various neurotrophins induced proliferation, with BrdU added for the 24 hour period prior to radiation only, for the 5 day period following radiation only, or for both periods combined. Results: The proportion of mature oligodendrocytes surviving 5 days after irradiation was not significantly increased by NGF, and was only modestly increased by NT-3. However, CNTF significantly increased the surviving proportion at all doses The addition of NT-3 to CNTF did not further increase the proportion of oligodendrocytes surviving. CNTF dose escalation studies confirmed 20ng/ml as an optimal dose. Brd

  19. Disruption of sphingolipid biosynthesis in hepatocyte nodules: selective proliferative stimulus induced by fumonisin B{sub 1}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westhuizen, Liana van der; Gelderblom, Wentzel C.A.; Shephard, Gordon S; Swanevelder, Sonja

    2004-07-15

    In order to investigate the role of sphingolipid disruption in the cancer promoting potential of fumonisin B{sub 1} (FB{sub 1}) in the development of hepatocyte nodules, male Fischer 344 rats were subjected to cancer initiation (FB{sub 1} containing diet or diethylnitrosamine (DEN) by i.p. injection) and promotion (2-acetylaminofluorene with partial hepatectomy, 2-AAF/PH) treatments followed by a secondary FB{sub 1} dietary regimen. Sphinganine (Sa) and sphingosine (So) levels were measured by high performance liquid chromatography in control, surrounding and nodular liver tissues of the rats. The disruption of sphingolipid biosynthesis by the secondary FB{sub 1} treatment in the control rats was significantly (P<0.05) enhanced by the 2-AAF/PH cancer promotion treatment. The nodular and surrounding Sa levels returned to baseline following FB{sub 1} initiation and 2-AAF/PH promotion. When comparing the groups subjected to the secondary FB{sub 1} treatment, the initiation effected by FB{sub 1} was less (P<0.01) sensitive to the accumulation of Sa in the nodular and surrounding tissues than DEN initiation and the 2-AAF/PH control treatment. In contrast, the So level of FB{sub 1} initiation was marginally increased in the nodules compared to the surrounding liver after 2-AAF/PH promotion and significantly (P<0.05) higher with the secondary FB{sub 1} treatment. Although, the FB{sub 1}-induced hepatocyte nodules were not resistant to the disruption of sphingolipid biosynthesis, the nodular So levels were increased and might provide a selective growth stimulus possibly induced by bio-active sphingoid intermediates such as sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)

  20. Reconstitution of active telomerase in primary human foreskin fibroblasts : effects on proliferative characteristics and response to ionizing radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampinga, H.H.; Waarde-Verhagen, M.A.W.H. van; Assen-Bolt, A.J. van; Rodemann, H.P.; Prowse, K.R.; Linskens, M.H.K.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Telomere shortening has been proposed to trigger senescence, and since most primary cells do not express active telomerase, reactivation of telomerase activity was proposed as a safe and non-transforming way of immortalizing cells. However, to study radiation responses, it is as yet unclear

  1. Impaired Upregulation of the Costimulatory Molecules, CD27 and CD28, on CD4+ T Cells from HIV Patients Receiving ART Is Associated with Poor Proliferative Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaskovic, Sara; Price, Patricia; French, Martyn A; Fernandez, Sonia

    2017-02-01

    HIV patients beginning antiretroviral therapy (ART) with advanced immunodeficiency often retain low CD4 + T cell counts despite virological control. We examined proliferative responses and upregulation of costimulatory molecules, following anti-CD3 stimulation, in HIV patients with persistent CD4 + T cell deficiency on ART. Aviremic HIV patients with nadir CD4 + T cell counts cells/μL and who had received ART for a median time of 7 (range 1-11) years were categorized into those achieving low (cells/μL; n = 13) or normal (>500 cells/μL; n = 20) CD4 + T cell counts. Ten healthy controls were also recruited. CD4 + T cell proliferation (Ki67) and upregulation of costimulatory molecules (CD27 and CD28) after anti-CD3 stimulation were assessed by flow cytometry. Results were related to proportions of CD4 + T cells expressing markers of T cell senescence (CD57), activation (HLA-DR), and apoptotic potential (Fas). Expression of CD27 and/or CD28 on uncultured CD4 + T cells was similar in patients with normal CD4 + T cell counts and healthy controls, but lower in patients with low CD4 + T cell counts. Proportions of CD4 + T cells expressing CD27 and/or CD28 correlated inversely with CD4 + T cell expression of CD57, HLA-DR, and Fas. After anti-CD3 stimulation, induction of CD27 hi CD28 hi expression was independent of CD4 + T cell counts, but lower in HIV patients than in healthy controls. Induction of CD27 hi CD28 hi expression correlated with induction of Ki67 expression in total, naïve, and CD31 + naïve CD4 + T cells from patients. In HIV patients responding to ART, impaired induction of CD27 and CD28 on CD4 + T cells after stimulation with anti-CD3 is associated with poor proliferative responses as well as greater CD4 + T cell activation and immunosenescence.

  2. The effect of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) on the proliferative response of blood lymphocytes and the phagocytic activity of blood monocytes and granulocytes in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, R; Małaczewska, J; Siwicki, A K; Miciński, J; Zwierzchowski, G

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of HMB on selected indicators of immunity in calves. The experiment was performed on 14 calves aged 30 +/- 2 days, divided into two equal groups of control (group I) and experimental (group II) animals. The feed administered to experimental group calves was supplemented with HMB at 40 mg/kg BW, whereas control calves were administered standard farm-made feed without supplementation. Blood was sampled from the jugular vein immediately before the experiment (day 0) and on experimental days 15, 30 and 60 to determine the following parameters of immunity: proliferative response of LPS- and ConA-stimulated lymphocytes (MTT), respiratory burst activity (RBA) and potential killing activity (PKA) of phagocytes. The results revealed a significant increase in RBA and MTT values in calves administered HMB in comparison with the control group throughout the experiment. In the group of animals receiving HMB, an increase in PKA values was noted only on day 30.

  3. Comparison of Pain Response of Patients Undergoing Panretinal Photocoagulation for Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy: 532 nm Standard Laser vs. Multispot Pattern Scan Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göktuğ Seymenoğlu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare pain response of patients undergoing panretinal photocoagulation (PRP for proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR using 532 nm standard laser versus multispot pattern scan laser and to evaluate the relationship between pain response and patient characteristics. Material and Method: Thirty-five patients had PRP with the Pascal system in a single session, while other 35 patients had PRP with conventional laser in 2 sessions. Parameters used in conventional laser were as follows: spot size 200 µm, exposure time 0.2 s, and power sufficient to produce visible grey-white burns. We used same spot size, 20-30 ms exposure time, and higher levels of laser power in order to get a similar endpoint in the Pascal system. The patients were required to evaluate the severity of pain on a visual analog scale (VAS and verbally 5 minutes after PRP with Pascal and 5 minutes after the first session of PRP with conventional laser. The relationship between pain experienced and patient characteristics was evaluated. Results: At baseline, both groups did not differ significantly (p >0.05, for all with respect to sex, age, duration of diabetes, most recent HbA1c, treatment regimen, or patient experience. The patients in the Pascal group had a mean pain score of 0.55±0.70 on verbal scale and 1.54±1.22 on VAS compared to 2.17±1.18 and 5.54±3.28, respectively in the conventional laser group which was, statistically, significantly different in both scales (p<0.05. Discussion: Our study confirms that new generation pattern scanning photocoagulators satisfactorily decrease the pain by shortening the exposure time while increasing the laser power. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 221-4

  4. Specific proliferative response of human lymphocytes to purified soluble antigens from Plasmodium falciparum in vitro cultures and to antigens from malaria patients' sera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygbjerg, I C; Jepsen, S; Theander, T G

    1985-01-01

    Antigens of Plasmodium falciparum, in supernatants of in vitro cultures of the parasite were affinity purified on columns prepared with the IgG fraction of the serum of an immune individual. The purified antigens induced proliferation of lymphocytes from persons who had recently had malaria....... The responses were strongest with lymphocytes from individuals infected with falciparum and ovale malaria; vivax malaria infections induced a lower level of response and lymphocytes of unsensitized individuals were little affected. Lymphocytes from unsensitized individuals did not respond to the affinity...

  5. The anti-proliferative effect of L-carnosine correlates with a decreased expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha in human colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Iovine

    Full Text Available In recent years considerable attention has been given to the use of natural substances as anticancer drugs. The natural antioxidant dipeptide L-carnosine belongs to this class of molecules because it has been proved to have a significant anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo. Previous studies have shown that L-carnosine inhibits the proliferation of human colorectal carcinoma cells by affecting the ATP and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS production. In the present study we identified the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α (HIF-1α as a possible target of L-carnosine in HCT-116 cell line. HIF-1α protein is over-expressed in multiple types of human cancer and is the major cause of resistance to drugs and radiation in solid tumours. Of particular interest are experimental data supporting the concept that generation of ROS provides a redox signal for HIF-1α induction, and it is known that some antioxidants are able to suppress tumorigenesis by inhibiting HIF-1α. In the current study we found that L-carnosine reduces the HIF-1α protein level affecting its stability and decreases the HIF-1 transcriptional activity. In addition, we demonstrated that L-carnosine is involved in ubiquitin-proteasome system promoting HIF-1α degradation. Finally, we compared the antioxidant activity of L-carnosine with that of two synthetic anti-oxidant bis-diaminotriazoles (namely 1 and 2, respectively. Despite these three compounds have the same ability in reducing intracellular ROS, 1 and 2 are more potent scavengers and have no effect on HIF-1α expression and cancer cell proliferation. These findings suggest that an analysis of L-carnosine antioxidant pathway will clarify the mechanism underlying the anti-proliferative effects of this dipeptide on colon cancer cells. However, although the molecular mechanism by which L-carnosine down regulates or inhibits the HIF-1α activity has not been yet elucidated, this ability may be promising in treating hypoxia

  6. An APC:WNT counter-current-like mechanism regulates cell division along the colonic crypt axis: a mechanism that explains how APC mutations induce proliferative abnormalities that drive colon cancer development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce M Boman

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available APC normally down-regulates WNT signaling in human colon, and APC mutations cause proliferative abnormalities in premalignant crypts leading to colon cancer, but the mechanisms are unclear at the level of spatial and functional organization of the crypt. Accordingly, we postulated a counter-current-like mechanism based on gradients of factors (APC;WNT that regulate colonocyte proliferation along the crypt axis. During crypt renewal, stem cells (SCs at the crypt bottom generate non-SC daughter cells that proliferate and differentiate while migrating upwards. The APC concentration is low at the crypt bottom and high at the top (where differentiated cells reside. WNT signaling, in contrast, is high at the bottom (where SCs reside and low at the top. Given that WNT and APC gradients are counter to one another, we hypothesized that a counter-current-like mechanism exists. Since both APC and WNT signaling components (e.g. survivin are required for mitosis, this mechanism establishes a zone in the lower crypt where conditions are optimal for maximal cell division and mitosis orientation (symmetric versus asymmetric. APC haploinsufficiency diminishes the APC gradient, shifts the proliferative zone upwards, and increases symmetric division, which causes SC overpopulation. In homozygote mutant crypts, these changes are exacerbated. Thus, APC-mutation-induced changes in the counter-current-like mechanism cause expansion of proliferative populations (SCs, rapidly-proliferating cells during tumorigenesis. We propose this mechanism also drives crypt fission, functions in the crypt cycle, and underlies adenoma development. Novel chemoprevention approaches designed to normalize the two gradients and readjust the proliferative zone downwards, might thwart progression of these premalignant changes.

  7. An APC:WNT Counter-Current-Like Mechanism Regulates Cell Division Along the Human Colonic Crypt Axis: A Mechanism That Explains How APC Mutations Induce Proliferative Abnormalities That Drive Colon Cancer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boman, Bruce M.; Fields, Jeremy Z.

    2013-01-01

    APC normally down-regulates WNT signaling in human colon, and APC mutations cause proliferative abnormalities in premalignant crypts leading to colon cancer, but the mechanisms are unclear at the level of spatial and functional organization of the crypt. Accordingly, we postulated a counter-current-like mechanism based on gradients of factors (APC;WNT) that regulate colonocyte proliferation along the crypt axis. During crypt renewal, stem cells (SCs) at the crypt bottom generate non-SC daughter cells that proliferate and differentiate while migrating upwards. The APC concentration is low at the crypt bottom and high at the top (where differentiated cells reside). WNT signaling, in contrast, is high at the bottom (where SCs reside) and low at the top. Given that WNT and APC gradients are counter to one another, we hypothesized that a counter-current-like mechanism exists. Since both APC and WNT signaling components (e.g., survivin) are required for mitosis, this mechanism establishes a zone in the lower crypt where conditions are optimal for maximal cell division and mitosis orientation (symmetric versus asymmetric). APC haploinsufficiency diminishes the APC gradient, shifts the proliferative zone upwards, and increases symmetric division, which causes SC overpopulation. In homozygote mutant crypts, these changes are exacerbated. Thus, APC-mutation-induced changes in the counter-current-like mechanism cause expansion of proliferative populations (SCs, rapidly proliferating cells) during tumorigenesis. We propose this mechanism also drives crypt fission, functions in the crypt cycle, and underlies adenoma development. Novel chemoprevention approaches designed to normalize the two gradients and readjust the proliferative zone downwards, might thwart progression of these premalignant changes. PMID:24224156

  8. Study on proliferative responses to host Ia antigens in allogeneic bone marrow chimera in mice: sequential analysis of the reactivity and characterization of the cells involved in the responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwabuchi, K.; Ogasawara, K.; Ogasawara, M.; Yasumizu, R.; Noguchi, M.; Geng, L.; Fujita, M.; Good, R.A.; Onoe, K.

    1987-01-01

    Irradiation bone marrow chimeras were established by reconstitution of lethally irradiated AKR mice with C57BL/10 marrow cells to permit serial analysis of the developing reactivities of lymphocytes from such chimeras, [B10----AKR], against donor, host, or third party antigens. We found that substantial proliferative responses to Ia antigens of the recipient strain and also to third party antigens were generated by the thymocytes obtained from the irradiation chimeras at an early stage after bone marrow reconstitution. The majority of the responding thymocytes had surfaces lacking demonstrable peanut agglutinin receptors and were donor type Thy-1+, Ly-2-, and L3T4+ in both anti-recipient and anti-third party MLR. In anti-host responses, however, Ly-2+ thymocytes seemed to be at least partially involved. This capacity of thymus cells to mount a response to antigens of the recipient strain declined shortly thereafter, whereas the capacity to mount MLR against third party antigens persisted. The spleen cells of [B10----AKR] chimeras at the same time developed a more durable capability to exhibit anti-host reactivities and a permanent capability of reacting to third party allo-antigens. The stimulator antigens were Ia molecules on the stimulator cells in both anti-recipient and anti-third party MLR. The responding splenocytes were of donor origin and most of them had Thy-1+, Ly-1+2-, and L3T4+ phenotype

  9. Radiation-induced gene responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Oryhon, J.

    1996-01-01

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5' region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression

  10. Melatonin modulates inflammatory response and suppresses burn-induced apoptotic injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganka Bekyarova

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Melatonin, the principal secretory product of the pineal gland, has antioxidant functions as a potent antioxidant and free radical scavenger. Objectives of the present study were to investigate the effect of melatonin against inflammatory response, burn-induced oxidative damage and apoptotic changes of rat liver. Methods: Melatonin (10 mg /kg, i.p. was applied immediately after 30% of total body surface area (TBSA burns on male Wistar rats. The level of malondialdehyde (MDA as a marker of an oxidative stress was quantified by thiobarbituric method. Hepatic TNFα and IL-10 as inflammatory markers were assayed by ELISA. Using light immunоchistochemistry the expression Ki67 proliferative marker was investigated. Results: Hepatic MDA and TNF-α levels increased significantly following burns without any change in IL-10 level. Intracellular vacuolization, hepatic cell degeneration and apoptosis occurred in rats after burns. The number of apoptotic cells was increased whereas no significant increase in Ki67 proliferative marker. Melatonin decreased the MDA and TNF-α content and increased the IL-10 level. It also limited the degenerative changes and formation of apoptotic cells in rat liver but did not increase expression of the marker of proliferation. In conclusion, our data show that melatonin relieves burn-induced hepatic damage associated with modulation of the proinflammatory/anti-inflammatory balance, mitigation of lipid peroxidation and hepatic apoptosis.

  11. Anti-proliferative and differentiation-inducing activities of the green tea catechin epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on the human eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, H L; Ip, W K; Wong, C K; Mak, N K; Chen, Z Y; Leung, K N

    2002-12-06

    A novel approach for the treatment of leukemia is the differentiation therapy in which immature leukemia cells are induced to attain a mature phenotype when exposed to differentiation inducers, either alone or in combinations with other chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive drugs. Over the past decade, numerous studies indicated that green tea catechins (GTC) could suppress the growth and induce apoptosis on a number of human cancer cell lines. However, the differentiation-inducing activity of GTC on human tumors remains poorly understood. In the present study, the effect of the major GTC epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on the proliferation and differentiation of a human eosinophilc leukemic cell line, EoL-1, was examined. Our results showed that EGCG suppressed the proliferation of the EoL-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner, with an estimated IC(50) value of 31.5 microM. On the other hand, EGCG at a concentration of 40 microM could trigger the EoL-1 cells to undergo morphological differentiation into mature eosinophil-like cells. Using RT-PCR and flow cytometry, it was found that EGCG upregulated the gene and protein expression of two eosinophil-specific granule proteins, the major basic protein (MBP) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), in EoL-1 cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that EGCG can exhibit anti-leukemic activity on a human eosinophilic cell line EoL-1 by suppressing the proliferation and by inducing the differentiation of the leukemia cells.

  12. Non-Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Oncology Oculoplastics/Orbit Refractive Management/Intervention Retina/Vitreous Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology ... Retinopathy Diagnosis Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator Non-Proliferative Diabetic ...

  13. Proliferative myositis: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Sook; Jeon, Ho Jong [Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-01

    We report a case of proliferative myositis arising in the pectoralis major muscle of a 59-year-old man who presented with palpable mass. The initial clinical impression was a malignant tumor. Ultrasonography revealed the lesion as a spindle-shaped hypoechoic mass, and MR imaging of the left pectoralis major muscle showed hypointensity at T1-weighted imaging, hyperintensity at T2-weighted imaging, and strong enhancement at contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging.

  14. Proliferative myositis: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Sook; Jeon, Ho Jong

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of proliferative myositis arising in the pectoralis major muscle of a 59-year-old man who presented with palpable mass. The initial clinical impression was a malignant tumor. Ultrasonography revealed the lesion as a spindle-shaped hypoechoic mass, and MR imaging of the left pectoralis major muscle showed hypointensity at T1-weighted imaging, hyperintensity at T2-weighted imaging, and strong enhancement at contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging

  15. Interleukin-4 inhibits both paracrine and autocrine tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced proliferation of B chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kooten, C.; Rensink, I.; Aarden, L.; van Oers, R.

    1992-01-01

    The proliferative response of purified malignant B cells from 26 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was investigated in vitro. In the majority of these patients, a proliferative response could be induced by the combination of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and PMA. The concentration

  16. Cetuximab-Associated Crescentic Diffuse Proliferative Glomerulonephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukesh Manthri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cetuximab-induced nephrotoxicity is very rare, occurring in less than 1% of colorectal cancer patients and not defined in other populations. We report a rare case of crescentic diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN that developed in close temporal association with cetuximab treatment. A 65-year-old female recently completed chemotherapy with cetuximab treatment for moderately differentiated oral squamous cell carcinoma. She was admitted with acute renal failure and nephrotic-range proteinuria. Laboratory data showed serum creatinine of 6.6 mg/dl and urinalysis showed proteinuria, moderate hemoglobinuria, hyaline casts (41/LPF, WBC (28/HPF, and RBC (81/HPF. Serologic studies were negative for ANA, anti-GBM, ANCA, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. Serum C3 and C4 level were normal. Renal biopsy showed crescentic diffuse proliferative GN with focal features of thrombotic microangiopathy. Patient was started on cyclophosphamide and steroids. Her renal function did not improve on day 8 and she was started on hemodialysis. Previous reports suggest that EGFR-targeting medications can possibly trigger or exacerbate an IgA-mediated glomerular process leading to renal failure. This case suggests that cetuximab therapy may have triggered or exacerbated a severe glomerular injury with an unfavorable outcome. Treating physicians should maintain a high degree of caution and monitor renal function in patients on EGFR inhibitors.

  17. Curcuminoids from Curcuma longaL. reduced intestinal mucositis induced by 5-fluorouracil in mice: Bioadhesive, proliferative, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvande Xavier dos Santos Filho

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intestinal mucositis is a frequent limiting factor in anticancer therapy and there is currently no broadly effective treatment targeted to cure this side effect. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a mucoadhesive formulation containing curcuminoids (MFC from Curcuma longa L. on the pathogenesis of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. Methods: Three intraperitoneal 5-FU injections (200 mg/kg were used to induce intestinal mucositis in adult Swiss male mice. Treatment was provided orally (MFC 3.75, 7.5 and 15 mg/kg, thirty minutes before 5-FU injections, daily until euthanasia. Duodenal samples were collected to perform morphometric and histopathological analysis, to investigate the expression of Ki-67, p53, Bax and Bcl-2 by immunohistochemistry, to evaluate neutrophil activity myeloperoxidase (MPO-mediated and oxidative stress by malondialdehyde (MDA determination. Mice body weight was assessed as well. Results: As expected, 5-FU induced a significant weight loss (∼17%, P < 0.001, shortening in villi height (∼55.4% and crypts depth (∼47%, and increased (∼64% the histological severity score when compared to other groups (P < 0.05. These pathological changes were markedly alleviated by the three MFC treatment doses (P < 0.05, in special with the dose MFC 15 mg/kg. This dose also stimulated cell proliferation by ∼90% in the epithelial cells lining from villi and crypts (P < 0.05, reduced MPO levels and MDA formation by 60% and 44%, respectively (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Our data suggest the therapeutic potential of the formulation for treating intestinal mucositis in mice. Supplementary studies are underway searching for the elucidation of mechanisms involved in the protective effects of MFC in order to make this formulation a clinical tool for mucositis treatment. Keywords: Mucoadhesive formulation, Curcuminoids, Curcuma longa L, Intestinal mucositis, 5-Fluorouracil

  18. In vitro assessment of anti-proliferative effect induced by α-mangostin from Cratoxylum arborescens on HeLa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    El habbash, Aisha I.; Ibrahim, Mohamed Yousif; Yahayu, Maizatulakmal; Omer, Fatima Abd Elmutaal; Abd Rahman, Mashitoh; Nordin, Noraziah; Lian, Gwendoline Ee Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Natural medicinal products possess diverse chemical structures and have been an essential source for drug discovery. Therefore, in this study, α-mangostin (AM) is a plant-derived compound was investigated for the apoptotic effect on human cervical cancer cells (HeLa). The cytotoxic effects of AM on the viability of HeLa and human normal ovarian cell line (SV40) were evaluated by using MTT assay. Results showed that AM inhibited HeLa cells viability at concentration- and time-dependent manner with IC50 value of 24.53 ± 1.48 µM at 24 h. The apoptogenic effects of AM on HeLa were assessed using fluorescence microscopy analysis. The effect of AM on cell proliferation was also studied through clonogenic assay. ROS production evaluation, flow cytometry (cell cycle) analysis, caspases 3/7, 8, and 9 assessment and multiple cytotoxicity assays were conducted to determine the mechanism of cell apoptosis. This was associated with G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and elevation in ROS production. AM induced mitochondrial apoptosis which was confirmed based on the significant increase in the levels of caspases 3/7 and 9 in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the MMP disruption and increased cell permeability, concurrent with cytochrome c release from the mitochondria to the cytosol provided evidence that AM can induce apoptosis via mitochondrial-dependent pathway. AM exerted a remarkable antitumor effect and induced characteristic apoptogenic morphological changes on HeLa cells, which indicates the occurrence of cell death. This study reveals that AM could be a potential antitumor compound on cervical cancer in vitro and can be considered for further cervical cancer preclinical and in vivo testing. PMID:28740747

  19. Physiological responses induced by pleasant stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanuki, Shigeki; Kim, Yeon-Kyu

    2005-01-01

    The specific physiological responses induced by pleasant stimuli were investigated in this study. Various physiological responses of the brain (encephaloelectrogram; EEG), autonomic nervous system (ANS), immune system and endocrine system were monitored when pleasant stimuli such as odors, emotional pictures and rakugo, a typical Japanese comical story-telling, were presented to subjects. The results revealed that (i) EEG activities of the left frontal brain region were enhanced by a pleasant odor; (ii) emotional pictures related to primitive element such as nudes and erotic couples elevated vasomotor sympathetic nervous activity; and (iii) an increase in secretory immunoglobulin A (s-IgA) and a decrease in salivary cortisol (s-cortisol) were induced by rakugo-derived linguistic pleasant emotion. Pleasant emotion is complicated state. However, by considering the evolutionary history of human being, it is possible to assess and evaluate pleasant emotion from certain physiological responses by appropriately summating various physiological parameters.

  20. Does troncular vagotomy modify the proliferative gastric lesions induced in rats by duodenogastric reflux? A vagotomia troncular modifica as lesões proliferativas gástricas induzidas em ratos pelo refluxo duodenogástrico?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Antônio Rodrigues

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: to investigate if combining VT to DGR through the pylorus can modulate the biological behavior of PL induced by DGR and to verify if TV alone can induce morphologic lesions in the gastric mucosa. METHODS: 62 male Wistar rats were assigned to four groups: 1 - Control (CT gastrotomy; 2 - Troncular Vagotomy (TV plus gastrotomy; 3 - Duodenogastric reflux through the pylorus (R and 4 - Troncular vagotomy plus DGR (RTV. The animals were killed at the 54 week of the experiment. DGR was obtained by anastomosing a proximal jejunal loop to the anterior gastric wall. TV was performed through isolation and division of the vagal trunks. Gastrotomy consisted of 1 cm incision at the anterior gastric wall. PL were analyzed gross and histologically in the antral mucosa, at the gastrojejunal stoma and at the squamous portion of the gastric mucosa. RESULTS: Groups R and RTV developed exophytic lesions in the antral mucosa (R=90.9%; RTV=100% and at the gastrojejunal stoma (R=54.54%; RTV=63.63%. Histologically they consisted of proliferative benign lesions, without cellular atypias, diagnosed as adenomatous hyperplasia. Both groups exposed to DGR presented squamous hyperplasia at the squamous portion of the gastric mucosa (R= 54.5%; RTV= 45.4%. TV, alone, did not induce gross or histological alterations in the gastric mucosa. TV did note change the morphologic pattern of the proliferative lesions induced by DGR. CONCLUSIONS: DGR induces the development of PL in the pyloric mucosa and at the gastrojejunal stoma. TV does not change the morphologic pattern of the proliferative lesions induced by DGR. TV alone is not able to induce morphologic lesions in the gastric mucosa.OBJETIVO: investigar se a adição da VT ao RDG através do piloro, interfere no comportamento biológico das LP induzidas pelo RDG e observar se a VT isoladamente leva ao desenvolvimento de lesões morfológicas na mucosa gástrica. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados 62 ratos Wistar machos, distribu

  1. Iodinated chlorin p6 copper complex induces anti-proliferative effect in oral cancer cells through elevation of intracellular reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbadhikary, Paromita; Dube, Alok

    2017-11-01

    We investigated the anticancer chemotoxicity of previously reported iodinated chlorin p 6 copper complex (ICp 6 -Cu), a novel chlorophyll derivative in which copper is attached to the side chain carboxylate groups via coordination. Human oral carcinoma cells NT8e, 4451 and the non-cancerous keratinocyte HaCaT cells were treated with ICp 6 -Cu for 48 h in dark and cell viability, proliferation and morphological alterations were examined. ICp 6 -Cu showed pronounced cytotoxicity in cancer cells with IC 50 ∼40 μM, whereas, the viability of HaCaT cells was not affected. Cell proliferation assay revealed that ICp 6 -Cu at IC 50 concentration led to complete inhibition of cell proliferation in both the cell lines. Cell morphology studied by confocal microscopy showed absence of cell death via necrosis or apoptosis. Instead, the treated cells displayed distinct features of non-apoptotic death such as highly vacuolated cytoplasm, lysosomal membrane permeabilization and damage to cytoskeleton F-actin filaments. In addition, ICp 6 -Cu treatment led to time dependent increase in the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the cytotoxicity of ICp 6 -Cu was significantly inhibited by pre-treatment of cells with antioxidants (glutathione and trolox). These findings revealed that ICp 6 -Cu is a potent chemotoxic agent which can induce cytotoxic effect in cancer cells through elevation of intracellular ROS. It is suggested that ICp 6 -Cu may provide tumor selective chemotoxicity by exploiting difference of redox environment in normal and cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Inducement and responsibility in the energy turnaround

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewer, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The book includes several contributions concerning the Bonn discussion on energy legislation (volume 7): inducement and responsibility -in terms of constitutional law; between Europe and re-regulation - what is the regulation framework? Continuity requirement as legislative action directive; the future of the nuclear fuel tax after the nuclear phaseout - problems of the constitutional finance and the European tax legislation, strategy and energy markets; regulatory challenges in the realization of the energy turnaround policy.

  3. Glomerular Damage in Experimental Proliferative Glomerulonephritis Under Glomerular Capillary Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Rong Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Immunologically and hemodynamically mediated the destruction of glomerular architecture is thought to be the major causes of end-stage renal failure. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of glomerular hypertension on glomerular injury and the progression of glomerular sclerosis after Thy-1 nephritis was induced. Method: Thy-1 nephritis was induced in the stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat strain (SHR-SP (group SP and in age-matched Wistar-Kyoto (WKY (group WKY rats, following unilateral nephrectomy (UNX, and a vehicle was injected alone in UNX SHR-SP as control (group SC. Result: The degree of glomerular damage in response to a single dose of anti-thy-1 antibody, and its functional consequences (eg. proteinuria, diminished GFR are more pronounced in group SP than normotensive group WKY and hypertensive group SC without mesangial cell injury. While normotensive group WKY rats recovered completely from mesangial cell injury on day 28-42, glomeruli in group SP kept on persistent macrophage infiltration, α-SMA expression on day 42-56. In addition, glomerular capillary repair with the GECs was rarely seen in pronouncedly proliferative and sclerostic areas. The incidence of glomerular sclerosis and the level of proteinuria were markedly increased by day 56 in the group SP. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that glomerular hypertension aggravate glomerular damage and glomerulosclerosis in this model of Thy 1 nephritis.

  4. Immunomodulatory effect of cimetidine on the proliferative responses of splenocytes from T. cruzi-infected rats Efeito imunomodulatório da cimetidina sobre a resposta blastogênica de esplenócitos de ratos infectados por T. cruzi

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    M.N. Sato

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available The immunomodulatory effect of cimetidine (CIM, a histamine type-2 receptor antagonist, was evaluated in respect to the blastogenic response to Con A of Wistar Furth (WF rats infected by the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi. Enhancement of blastogenesis of normal splenocytes was observed at a concentration of 10-3M. However, the splenocytes from infected animals responded to concentrations of CIM ranging from 10-8 to 10-3M. The mitogenic response to Con A of cells from infected animals was restored in the presence of CIM. The results show that CIM modulates the "in vitro" proliferative response of cells from T. cruzi-infected rats and suggest an immunoregulatory role of histamine and/or of cells that express H2 receptors in this infection.O efeito imunomodulatório da Cimetidine (CIM, um antagonista do receptor de histamina-tipo 2, foi avaliado na resposta blastogênica a Con A em células de ratos Wistar Furth (WF infectados pela cepa Y de Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi. Foi observado que apenas na concentração de 10-3M de Cimetidine houve amplificação da resposta blastogênica de esplenócitos normais a Con A. Entretanto, a capacidade mitogênica de esplenócitos de animais infectados foi restaurada na presença de molaridades da droga que variaram entre 10-8 a 10-3. Os resultados demonstraram que a CIM tem o potencial de modular a resposta mitogênica de células de animais infectados pelo T. cruzi, sugerindo um papel imunoregulatório da histamina e/ou células que expressam receptores H2 nesta infecção.

  5. Parvovirus infection-induced DNA damage response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yong; Qiu, Jianming

    2014-01-01

    Parvoviruses are a group of small DNA viruses with ssDNA genomes flanked by two inverted terminal structures. Due to a limited genetic resource they require host cellular factors and sometimes a helper virus for efficient viral replication. Recent studies have shown that parvoviruses interact with the DNA damage machinery, which has a significant impact on the life cycle of the virus as well as the fate of infected cells. In addition, due to special DNA structures of the viral genomes, parvoviruses are useful tools for the study of the molecular mechanisms underlying viral infection-induced DNA damage response (DDR). This review aims to summarize recent advances in parvovirus-induced DDR, with a focus on the diverse DDR pathways triggered by different parvoviruses and the consequences of DDR on the viral life cycle as well as the fate of infected cells. PMID:25429305

  6. Fire-Induced Response in Foam Encapsulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borek, T.T.; Chu, T.Y.; Erickson, K.L.; Gill, W.; Hobbs, M.L.; Humphries, L.L.; Renlund, A.M.; Ulibarri, T.A.

    1999-04-02

    The paper provides a concise overview of a coordinated experimental/theoretical/numerical program at Sandia National Laboratories to develop an experimentally validated model of fire-induced response of foam-filled engineered systems for nuclear and transportation safety applications. Integral experiments are performed to investigate the thermal response of polyurethane foam-filled systems exposed to fire-like heat fluxes. A suite of laboratory experiments is performed to characterize the decomposition chemistry of polyurethane. Mass loss and energy associated with foam decomposition and chemical structures of the virgin and decomposed foam are determined. Decomposition chemistry is modeled as the degradation of macromolecular structures by bond breaking followed by vaporization of small fragments of the macromolecule with high vapor pressures. The chemical decomposition model is validated against the laboratory data. Data from integral experiments is used to assess and validate a FEM foam thermal response model with the chemistry model developed from the decomposition experiments. Good agreement was achieved both in the progression of the decomposition front and the in-depth thermal response.

  7. Proliferative and non-proliferative lesions of the rat and mouse integument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecklenburg, Lars; Kusewitt, Donna; Kolly, Carine; Treumann, Silke; Adams, E Terence; Diegel, Kelly; Yamate, Jyoji; Kaufmann, Wolfgang; Müller, Susanne; Danilenko, Dimitry; Bradley, Alys

    2013-01-01

    The INHAND (International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria for Lesions in Rats and Mice) project is a joint initiative of the societies of toxicological pathology from Europe (ESTP), Great Britain (BSTP), Japan (JSTP) and North America (STP). Its aim is to develop an internationally-accepted nomenclature for proliferative and non-proliferative lesions in laboratory rodents. A widely accepted international harmonization of nomenclature in laboratory animals will decrease confusion among regulatory and scientific research organizations in different countries and will provide a common language to increase and enrich international exchanges of information among toxicologists and pathologists. The purpose of this publication is to provide a standardized nomenclature for classifying microscopical lesions observed in the integument of laboratory rats and mice. Example colour images are provided for most lesions. The standardized nomenclature presented in this document and additional colour images are also available electronically at http://www.goreni.org. The nomenclature presented herein is based on histopathology databases from government, academia, and industrial laboratories throughout the world, and covers lesions that develop spontaneously as well as those induced by exposure to various test materials. (DOI: 10.1293/tox.26.27S; J Toxicol Pathol 2013; 26: 27S-57S).

  8. Immune responses against SARS-coronavirus nucleocapsid protein induced by DNA vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Ping; Cao Jie; Zhao Lanjuan; Qin Zhaolin; Ke Jinshan; Pan Wei; Ren Hao; Yu Jianguo; Qi Zhongtian

    2005-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the key protein for the formation of the helical nucleocapsid during virion assembly. This protein is believed to be more conserved than other proteins of the virus, such as spike and membrane glycoprotein. In this study, the N protein of SARS-CoV was expressed in Escherichia coli DH5α and identified with pooled sera from patients in the convalescence phase of SARS. A plasmid pCI-N, encoding the full-length N gene of SARS-CoV, was constructed. Expression of the N protein was observed in COS1 cells following transfection with pCI-N. The immune responses induced by intramuscular immunization with pCI-N were evaluated in a murine model. Serum anti-N immunoglobulins and splenocytes proliferative responses against N protein were observed in immunized BALB/c mice. The major immunoglobulin G subclass recognizing N protein was immunoglobulin G2a, and stimulated splenocytes secreted high levels of gamma interferon and IL-2 in response to N protein. More importantly, the immunized mice produced strong delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and CD8 + CTL responses to N protein. The study shows that N protein of SARS-CoV not only is an important B cell immunogen, but also can elicit broad-based cellular immune responses. The results indicate that the N protein may be of potential value in vaccine development for specific prophylaxis and treatment against SARS

  9. Impairment of the transition from proliferative stage to prehypertrophic stage in chondrogenic differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells harboring the causative mutation of achondroplasia in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naohiro Horie

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: These results suggested that chondrocyte maturation was impaired between the proliferative stage and prehypertrophic stage in the chondrocytes of ACH. The development of chemical compounds which affect the specific maturation stage of chondrocytes is expected to contribute to the ACH treatment, and FGFR3 genome-edited hiPSCs will be a valuable tool in such research studies.

  10. Vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy

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    Chao Peng

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the clinical effect of vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR.METHODS: The clinical data of 55 cases(65 eyes, underwent vitrectomy, membrane peeling, endolaser photocoagulation and silicone oil or C3F8 injection, were retrospectively studied. During 6 months to 1 year follow-up period, visual acuity, intraocular pressure, retinal conditions and complications were observed.RESULTS: All 65 eyes received vitrectomy, of which silicone oil was tamponaded in 32 eyes, C3F8 was injected in 8 eyes, BBS was filled in 25 eyes. Visual improvement achieved in 42 eyes. Two eyes were manually vision, form count fingers to 0.05 in 18 eyes, >0.05-0.1 in 28 eyes, >0.1-0.3 in 12 eyes and >0.3 in 5 eyes. Retinal hole was occurred in 7 eyes, limitations fibrosis membrane remained in 8 eyes, retinal detachment appeared in 5 eyes, IOP increased in 18 eyes, vitreous hemorrhage relapsed in 12 eyes, 36 eyes received supplemental photocoagulation treatment 1-3 times after operation.CONCLUSION:Vitrectomy combined endophotocoagulation is an effective treatment for PDR. Silicone oil tamponade can limit the hemorrhage.

  11. Proliferative lifespan is conserved after nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A John; Ferrier, Patricia; Aslam, Samena; Burl, Sarah; Denning, Chris; Wylie, Diana; Ross, Arlene; de Sousa, Paul; Wilmut, Ian; Cui, Wei

    2003-06-01

    Cultured primary cells exhibit a finite proliferative lifespan, termed the Hayflick limit. Cloning by nuclear transfer can reverse this cellular ageing process and can be accomplished with cultured cells nearing senescence. Here we describe nuclear transfer experiments in which donor cell lines at different ages and with different proliferative capacities were used to clone foetuses and animals from which new primary cell lines were generated. The rederived lines had the same proliferative capacity and rate of telomere shortening as the donor cell lines, suggesting that these are innate, genetically determined, properties that are conserved by nuclear transfer.

  12. Sucralose induces biochemical responses in Daphnia magna.

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    Ann-Kristin Eriksson Wiklund

    Full Text Available The intense artificial sweetener sucralose has no bioconcentration properties, and no adverse acute toxic effects have been observed in standard ecotoxicity tests, suggesting negligible environmental risk. However, significant feeding and behavioural alterations have been reported in non-standard tests using aquatic crustaceans, indicating possible sublethal effects. We hypothesized that these effects are related to alterations in acetylcholinesterase (AChE and oxidative status in the exposed animals and investigated changes in AChE and oxidative biomarkers (oxygen radical absorbing capacity, ORAC, and lipid peroxidation, TBARS in the crustacean Daphnia magna exposed to sucralose (0.0001-5 mg L(-1. The sucralose concentration was a significant positive predictor for ORAC, TBARS and AChE in the daphnids. Moreover, the AChE response was linked to both oxidative biomarkers, with positive and negative relationships for TBARS and ORAC, respectively. These joint responses support our hypothesis and suggest that exposure to sucralose may induce neurological and oxidative mechanisms with potentially important consequences for animal behaviour and physiology.

  13. Arsenic-induced alterations in the contact hypersensitivity response in Balb/c mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, Rachel; Vega, Libia; Trouba, Kevin; Bortner, Carl; Germolec, Dori

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory indicate that arsenic alters secretion of growth promoting and inflammatory cytokines in the skin that can regulate the migration and maturation of Langerhans cells (LC) during allergic contact dermatitis. Therefore, we hypothesized that arsenic may modulate hypersensitivity responses to cutaneous sensitizing agents by altering cytokine production, LC migration, and T-cell proliferation. To investigate this hypothesis, we examined the induction and elicitation phases of dermal sensitization. Mice exposed to 50 mg/l arsenic in the drinking water for 4 weeks demonstrated a reduction in lymph node cell (LNC) proliferation and ear swelling following sensitization with 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB), compared to control mice. LC and T-cell populations in the draining lymph nodes of DNFB-sensitized mice were evaluated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting; activated LC were reduced in cervical lymph nodes, suggesting that LC migration may be altered following arsenic exposure. Lymphocytes from arsenic-treated animals sensitized with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) exhibited reduced proliferative responses following T-cell mitogen stimulation in vitro; however, lymphocyte proliferation from nonsensitized, arsenic-treated mice was comparable to controls. Arsenic exposure also reduced the number of thioglycollate-induced peritoneal macrophages and circulating neutrophils. These studies demonstrate that repeated, prolonged exposure to nontoxic concentrations of sodium arsenite alters immune cell populations and results in functional changes in immune responses, specifically attenuation of contact hypersensitivity

  14. In vitro anti-proliferative effect of interferon alpha in solid tumors: A potential predicative test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchsberger, N.; Kubes, M.; Kontsek, P.; Borecky, L.; Hornak, M.; Silvanova; Godal, A.; Svec, J.

    1993-01-01

    An in vitro test for the anti-proliferative effect of human leukocyte interferon (IFN-alpha) was performed in primary cultures of tumor cells obtained from 32 patients with either malignant melanoma (13), renal carcinoma (4) or bladder carcinoma (15). Our results demonstrated activity of IFN in all three groups of solid tumors. However, appreciable differences in sensitivity to anti-proliferative effect of IFN between individual tumors of the same type were found. The potential of this anti-proliferative test for prediction of treatment response in IFN-therapy is discussed. (author)

  15. Autologous proliferative therapies in recalcitrant lateral epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetschke, Elisa; Rudolf, Margit; Lohmann, Christoph H; Stärke, Christian

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the clinical effects of autologous conditioned plasma (ACP) injections and low-level laser application as therapy options for chronic lateral epicondylitis. A total of 52 patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis were evaluated in this study; 26 of these patients received three ACP injections and the control group, with 26 patients, received 12 laser applications, with standardized physical therapy for all patients afterward. Control examinations took place before treatment, after 2 and 6 mos, and in the 1 yr final follow-up. The control examination included the visual analog scale for pain and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand outcome measure scores. The analysis at final follow-up after 1 yr showed that both treatment options resulted in successful therapy outcome for the patients. In total, 63.5 % were successfully treated. Successful treatment was defined as more than 30% improvement in the visual analog score and more than 10.2 points in the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score. Both groups showed a significant improvement in time response. This study demonstrates the beneficial effects of autologous proliferative therapies in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis. The data show that laser application and ACP therapy lead to a clinical improvement in epicondylopathia. Especially the new treatment with ACP can be highlighted as an alternative and as an easy-to-apply therapy option for clinical practice.

  16. Proliferative reactive gliosis is compatible with glial metabolic support and neuronal function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fero Matthew

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The response of mammalian glial cells to chronic degeneration and trauma is hypothesized to be incompatible with support of neuronal function in the central nervous system (CNS and retina. To test this hypothesis, we developed an inducible model of proliferative reactive gliosis in the absence of degenerative stimuli by genetically inactivating the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 (p27 or Cdkn1b in the adult mouse and determined the outcome on retinal structure and function. Results p27-deficient Müller glia reentered the cell cycle, underwent aberrant migration, and enhanced their expression of intermediate filament proteins, all of which are characteristics of Müller glia in a reactive state. Surprisingly, neuroglial interactions, retinal electrophysiology, and visual acuity were normal. Conclusion The benign outcome of proliferative reactive Müller gliosis suggests that reactive glia display context-dependent, graded and dynamic phenotypes and that reactivity in itself is not necessarily detrimental to neuronal function.

  17. Achiral Mannich-Base Curcumin Analogs Induce Unfolded Protein Response and Mitochondrial Membrane Depolarization in PANC-1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor J. Szebeni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Achiral Mannich-type curcumin analogs have been synthetized and assayed for their cytotoxic activity. The anti-proliferative and cytotoxic activity of curcuminoids has been tested on human non-small-cell lung carcinoma (A549, hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2 and pancreatic cancer cell line (PANC-1. Based on the highest anti-proliferative activity nine drug candidates were further tested and proved to cause phosphatidylserine exposure as an early sign of apoptosis. Curcumin analogs with the highest apoptotic activity were selected for mechanistic studies in the most sensitive PANC-1 cells. Cytotoxic activity was accompanied by cytostatic effect since curcumin and analogs treatment led to G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Moreover, cytotoxic effect could be also detected via the accumulation of curcuminoids in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and the up-regulation of ER stress-related unfolded protein response (UPR genes: HSPA5, ATF4, XBP1, and DDIT3. The activated UPR induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization, caspase-3 activation and subsequent DNA breakdown in PANC-1 cells. Achiral curcumin analogs, C509, C521 and C524 possessed superior, 40-times more potent cytotoxic activity compared to natural dihydroxy-dimetoxycurcumin in PANC-1 cells.

  18. Achiral Mannich-Base Curcumin Analogs Induce Unfolded Protein Response and Mitochondrial Membrane Depolarization in PANC-1 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szebeni, Gábor J; Balázs, Árpád; Madarász, Ildikó; Pócz, Gábor; Ayaydin, Ferhan; Kanizsai, Iván; Fajka-Boja, Roberta; Alföldi, Róbert; Hackler, László; Puskás, László G

    2017-10-07

    Achiral Mannich-type curcumin analogs have been synthetized and assayed for their cytotoxic activity. The anti-proliferative and cytotoxic activity of curcuminoids has been tested on human non-small-cell lung carcinoma (A549), hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) and pancreatic cancer cell line (PANC-1). Based on the highest anti-proliferative activity nine drug candidates were further tested and proved to cause phosphatidylserine exposure as an early sign of apoptosis. Curcumin analogs with the highest apoptotic activity were selected for mechanistic studies in the most sensitive PANC-1 cells. Cytotoxic activity was accompanied by cytostatic effect since curcumin and analogs treatment led to G₀/G₁ cell cycle arrest. Moreover, cytotoxic effect could be also detected via the accumulation of curcuminoids in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the up-regulation of ER stress-related unfolded protein response (UPR) genes: HSPA5 , ATF4, XBP1 , and DDIT3 . The activated UPR induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization, caspase-3 activation and subsequent DNA breakdown in PANC-1 cells. Achiral curcumin analogs, C509, C521 and C524 possessed superior, 40-times more potent cytotoxic activity compared to natural dihydroxy-dimetoxycurcumin in PANC-1 cells.

  19. Proliferative and morphologic changes in rat colon following bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkla, D H; Tutton, P J

    1985-06-01

    In this study the proliferative and morphologic changes that occur in the colon of normal and dimethylhydrazine-treated rats following surgical bypass of the middle third of the colon are reported. Proliferative changes were measured by estimating accumulated mitotic indexes following vinblastine treatment and morphologic changes were observed with the use of light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Data were collected on Days 0, 7, 14, 30, and 72 after surgery. The results show that surgical bypass produces contrasting effects in the segments proximal to and distal to the suture line. In the proximal segment there was morphologic evidence of hyperplasia, although proliferative activity was unchanged except for an increase at 7 days in normal rats. In the distal segment there was a long-lived increase in the mitotic index, although morphologic changes were not seen. The results for DMH-treated rats were similar to those in normal rats. Groups of isolated dysplastic epithelial cells were often seen in the submucosa adjacent to sutures up to 72 days after surgery. Increased lymphoid infiltration was seen in segments proximal to but not distal to the suture line. It is hypothesized that the different responses of the proximal and distal segments may be related to the different embryologic origins of those segments. It is also hypothesized that the seeding of the submucosa with epithelial cells during suturing may be a factor in tumor recurrence.

  20. Proliferative capacity of murine hematopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellman, S.; Botnick, L.E.; Hannon, E.C.; Vigneulle, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    The present study demonstrates a decrease in self-renewal capacity with serial transfer of murine hematopoietic stem cells. Production of differentiated cell progeny is maintained longer than stem cell self-renewal. In normal animals the capacity for self-renewal is not decreased with increasing donor age. The stem cell compartment in normal animals, both young and old, appears to be proliferatively quiescent. After apparent recovery from the alkylating agent busulfan, the probability of stem cell self-renewal is decreased, there is a permanent defect in the capacity of the bone marrow for serial transplantation, and the stem cells are proliferatively active. These findings support a model of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment as a continuum of cells with decreasing capacities for self-renewal, increasing likelihood for differentiation, and increasing proliferative activity. Cells progress in the continuum in one direction and such progression is not reversible

  1. Proliferative and anti-proliferative effects of dietary levels of phytoestrogens in rat pituitary GH3/B6/F10 cells - the involvement of rapidly activated kinases and caspases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeng, Yow-Jiun; Watson, Cheryl S

    2009-01-01

    Phytoestogens are a group of lipophillic plant compounds that can have estrogenic effects in animals; both tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic effects have been reported. Prolactin-secreting adenomas are the most prevalent form of pituitary tumors in humans and have been linked to estrogen exposures. We examined the proliferative effects of phytoestrogens on a rat pituitary tumor cell line, GH 3 /B 6 /F 10 , originally subcloned from GH 3 cells based on its ability to express high levels of the membrane estrogen receptor-α. We measured the proliferative effects of these phytoestrogens using crystal violet staining, the activation of several mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and their downstream targets via a quantitative plate immunoassay, and caspase enzymatic activities. Four phytoestrogens (coumestrol, daidzein, genistein, and trans-resveratrol) were studied over wide concentration ranges. Except trans-resveratrol, all phytoestrogens increased GH 3 /B 6 /F 10 cell proliferation at some concentration relevant to dietary levels. All four phytoestrogens attenuated the proliferative effects of estradiol when administered simultaneously. All phytoestrogens elicited MAPK and downstream target activations, but with time course patterns that often differed from that of estradiol and each other. Using selective antagonists, we determined that MAPKs play a role in the ability of these phytoestrogens to elicit these responses. In addition, except for trans-resveratrol, a serum removal-induced extrinsic apoptotic pathway was blocked by these phytoestrogens. Phytoestrogens can block physiological estrogen-induced tumor cell growth in vitro and can also stimulate growth at high dietary concentrations in the absence of endogenous estrogens; these actions are correlated with slightly different signaling response patterns. Consumption of these compounds should be considered in strategies to control endocrine tumor cell growth, such as in the pituitary

  2. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Mediates Proliferative GN via CD74

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djudjaj, Sonja; Lue, Hongqi; Rong, Song; Papasotiriou, Marios; Klinkhammer, Barbara M.; Zok, Stephanie; Klaener, Ole; Braun, Gerald S.; Lindenmeyer, Maja T.; Cohen, Clemens D.; Bucala, Richard; Tittel, Andre P.; Kurts, Christian; Moeller, Marcus J.; Floege, Juergen; Ostendorf, Tammo

    2016-01-01

    Pathologic proliferation of mesangial and parietal epithelial cells (PECs) is a hallmark of various glomerulonephritides. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that mediates inflammation by engagement of a receptor complex involving the components CD74, CD44, CXCR2, and CXCR4. The proliferative effects of MIF may involve CD74 together with the coreceptor and PEC activation marker CD44. Herein, we analyzed the effects of local glomerular MIF/CD74/CD44 signaling in proliferative glomerulonephritides. MIF, CD74, and CD44 were upregulated in the glomeruli of patients and mice with proliferative glomerulonephritides. During disease, CD74 and CD44 were expressed de novo in PECs and colocalized in both PECs and mesangial cells. Stress stimuli induced MIF secretion from glomerular cells in vitro and in vivo, in particular from podocytes, and MIF stimulation induced proliferation of PECs and mesangial cells via CD74. In murine crescentic GN, Mif-deficient mice were almost completely protected from glomerular injury, the development of cellular crescents, and the activation and proliferation of PECs and mesangial cells, whereas wild-type mice were not. Bone marrow reconstitution studies showed that deficiency of both nonmyeloid and bone marrow–derived Mif reduced glomerular cell proliferation and injury. In contrast to wild-type mice, Cd74-deficient mice also were protected from glomerular injury and ensuing activation and proliferation of PECs and mesangial cells. Our data suggest a novel molecular mechanism and glomerular cell crosstalk by which local upregulation of MIF and its receptor complex CD74/CD44 mediate glomerular injury and pathologic proliferation in GN. PMID:26453615

  3. Significance and nature of bystander responses induced by various agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Neha; Tiku, Ashu Bhan

    2017-07-01

    Bystander effects in a biological system are the responses shown by non-targeted neighbouring cells/tissues/organisms. These responses are triggered by factors released from targeted cells when exposed to a stress inducing agent. The biological response to stress inducing agents is complex, owing to the diversity of mechanisms and pathways activated in directly targeted and bystander cells. These responses are highly variable and can be either beneficial or hazardous depending on the cell lines tested, dose of agent used, experimental end points and time course selected. Recently non-targeted cells have even been reported to rescue the directly exposed cells by releasing protective signals that might be induced by non-targeted bystander responses. The nature of bystander signal/s is not yet clear. However, there are evidences suggesting involvement of ROS, RNS, protein factors and even DNA molecules leading to the activation of a number of signaling pathways. These can act independently or in a cascade, to induce events leading to changes in gene expression patterns that could elicit detrimental or beneficial effects. Many review articles on radiation induced bystander responses have been published. However, to the best of our knowledge, a comprehensive review on bystander responses induced by other genotoxic chemicals and stress inducing agents has not been published so far. Therefore, the aim of the present review is to give an overview of the literature on different aspects of bystander responses: agents that induce these responses, factors that can modulate bystander responses and the mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Proliferative Activity and Neuroprotective Effect of Ligustrazene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proliferative Activity and Neuroprotective Effect of. Ligustrazene Derivative by Irritation of Vascular. Endothelial Growth Factor Expression in Middle Cerebral. Artery Occlusion Rats. Zhang Huazheng1, Wang Penglong2, Ren Liwei1, Wang Xiaobo2, Li Guoliang2,. Wang Mina1, Chu Fuhao2, Gong Yan2, Xu Bing2, Bi Siling1, ...

  5. Betahistine attenuates murine collagen-induced arthritis by suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kuo-Tung; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Chen, Der-Yuan; Lim, Yun-Ping; Chen, Yi-Ming; Li, Yi-Rong; Yang, Deng-Ho; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential therapeutic effects of betahistine dihydrochloride (betahistine) in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. CIA was induced in DBA/1 male mice by primary immunization with 100μl of emulsion containing 2mg/ml chicken type II collagen (CII) mixed with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in an 1:1 ratio, and booster immunization with 100μl of emulsion containing 2mg/ml CII mixed with incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) in an 1:1 ratio. Immunization was performed subcutaneously at the base of the tail. After being boosted on day 21, betahistine (1 and 5mg/kg) was orally administered daily for 2weeks. The severity of CIA was determined by arthritic scores and assessment of histopathological joint destruction. Expression of cytokines in the paw and anti-CII antibodies in the serum was evaluated by ELISA. The proliferative response against CII in the lymph node cells was measured by (3)H-thymidine incorporation assay. The frequencies of different CII specific CD4(+) T cell subsets in the lymph node were determined by flow-cytometric analysis. Betahistine treatment attenuated the severity of arthritis and reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6, IL-23 and IL-17A, in the paw tissues of CIA mice. Lymph node cells from betahistine-treated mice showed a decrease in proliferation, as well as a lower frequency of Th17 cells. In vitro, betahistine suppressed CD4(+) T cell differentiation into Th17 cells. These results indicate that betahistine is effective in suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 responses in mouse CIA and that it may have therapeutic value as an adjunct treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Chronic proliferative synovitis of the equine metacarpophalangeal joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannegieter, N.J.

    1990-01-01

    Chronic proliferative synovitis of 27 metacarpophalangeal joints in 16 horses is described. The diagnosis was based on a history of lameness and, or, poor performance, pain on flexion of the metacarpophalangeal joint, the response to intra-articular anaesthesia, and plain and contrast radiography. Radiographic findings included concavity of the distal dorsal metacarpus proximal to the sagittal ridge, and an increase in size of the synovial tissue adjacent to the proximal, dorsal attachment of the joint capsule. Mineralisation of the synovial tissue was present in some joints, and chip fractures from the dorsal aspect of the proximal phalanx were also occasionally seen. Treatment by arthroscopic resection of the tissue gave excellent results

  7. Proliferative and nonproliferative breast disease in atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Masayoshi; Land, C.E.; Aoki, Yoichiro; Yamamoto, Tsutomu; Asano, Masahide; Sato, Eiichi; Tokuoka, Shoji; Sakamoto, Goi; Page, D.L.

    1993-10-01

    The risk of female breast cancer in association with radiation exposure is well established, on the basis of follow-up studies of the atomic-bomb survivors and other exposed populations. This association is especially strong for women exposed before age 20 yr and appears to be much weaker among women exposed after age 40 yr. In this study, breast-tissue autopsy samples from high-dose and low-dose individuals in the Radiation Effects Research Foundation Life Span Study sample were examined in detail to determine whether nonproliferative or proliferative breast lesions are associated with radiation exposure. The results suggest that proliferative disease in general and atypical hyperplasia in particular are associated with radiation exposure and that the risk is strongest for subjects who were ages 40-49 yr at the time of the bombings. It is hypothesized that this finding may be related to the age dependence of radiation-induced breast cancer, in the sense that potential cancers reflecting early-stage changes induced at these ages by radiation exposure may receive too little hormonal promotion to progress to frank cancers. (author)

  8. Ebselen abrogates TNFα induced pro‐inflammatory response in glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Tewari, Richa; Sharma, Vivek; Koul, Nitin; Ghosh, Abhishek; Joseph, Christy; Hossain Sk, Ugir; Sen, Ellora

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the pro‐inflammatory response mediated by TNFα in glioblastoma and whether treatment with organoselenium Ebselen (2‐phenyl‐1,2‐benzisoselenazol‐3[2H]one) can affect TNFα induced inflammatory response. Exposure to TNFα increased the expression of pro‐inflammatory mediator interleukin IL‐6, IL‐8, monocyte chemoattractant protein‐1 (MCP‐1) and cyclooxygenase (COX‐2). Treatment with Ebselen abrogated TNFα induced increase in pro‐inflammatory mediators. Ebselen not only abrogated T...

  9. Electrical field stimulation-induced excitatory responses of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    effect of the endothelium on electrical field stimulation (EFS)-induced excitatory responses of pulmonary artery segments from pulmonary hypertensive rats. Methods: Pulmonary hypertension was induced in rats with a single dose of monocrotaline (60 mg/kg) and 21 days later, arterial rings were set up for isometric tension ...

  10. DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA FOR PROLIFERATIVE THYROID LESIONS IN BONY FISHES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid proliferative lesions are rather common in bony fishes but disagreement exists in the fish pathology community concerning diagnostic criteria for hyperplastic versus neoplastic lesions. To simplify the diagnosis of proliferative thyroid lesions and to reduce confusion reg...

  11. Proliferative myositis in a patient with AIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wlachovska, B.; Deux, J.F.; Marsault, C.; Le Breton, C. [Department of Radiology, Hopital Tenon, 4 rue de la Chine, 75020, Paris (France); Abraham, B. [Department of Tropical and Infectious Diseases, Hopital Tenon, Paris (France); Sibony, M. [Department of Anatomy, Hopital Tenon, Paris (France)

    2004-04-01

    We report a case of proliferative myositis in the right biceps of a 56-year-old man with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Imaging methods included sonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The diagnosis was made by a core-cut biopsy and fine needle aspiration biopsy with immunohistochemical analysis. The lesion disappeared after 2 months without treatment. It is particularly important to determine whether intramuscular masses arising in patients with AIDS are due to an infectious or malignant process. (orig.)

  12. Proliferative myositis in a patient with AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wlachovska, B.; Deux, J.F.; Marsault, C.; Le Breton, C.; Abraham, B.; Sibony, M.

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of proliferative myositis in the right biceps of a 56-year-old man with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Imaging methods included sonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The diagnosis was made by a core-cut biopsy and fine needle aspiration biopsy with immunohistochemical analysis. The lesion disappeared after 2 months without treatment. It is particularly important to determine whether intramuscular masses arising in patients with AIDS are due to an infectious or malignant process. (orig.)

  13. Correlation of proliferative and clonogenic tumor cells in multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karp, J.E.; Burke, P.J.; Saylor, P.L.; Humphrey, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    To expand on the findings from previous clinical trials that the growth of residual tumor is increased at a predictable time following initial drug administration, malignant plasma cells from bone marrows of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) were examined for changes in proliferation and clonogenicity induced in vivo by cyclophosphamide and in vitro by drug-induced humoral stimulatory activity. Peak plasma cell [ 3 H]thymidine labeling index (LI) occurred predictably following drug and paralleled changes in agar colony formation by marrow cells obtained during therapy. Colony-forming capacity of pretreatment MM marrow populations was enhanced when those cells were cultured with humoral stimulatory activity, similar to the increased colony formation detected in Day 9 postcyclophosphamide marrows at the time of peak plasma cell LI. To further define a relationship between proliferative plasma cells and colony-forming tumor cells, MM marrows were fractionated by sedimentation on an isokinetic gradient. Enrichment of a proliferative tumor cell cohort was achieved, evidenced by [ 3 H]thymidine LI. Colony-forming cells were also enriched by isokinetic gradient sedimentation, and agar colony formation by MM marrow cell fractions correlated with the kinetic characteristics of the isolated subpopulations. These studies of whole and fractionated human MM marrow cell populations suggest that the kinetically active cells which are induced to proliferate in vivo and in vitro are closely related to the clonogenic tumor cells which produce colonies in agar and which, like those cells measured by [ 3 H]thymidine LI, respond to growth stimulation by drug-induced humoral stimulatory activity

  14. Comments on 'Standard effective doses for proliferative tumours'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasu, Iuliana Livia; Dasu, Alexandru; Denekamp, Juliana; Fowler, Jack F.

    2000-01-01

    We should like to make some comments on the paper published by Jones et al (1999). The paper presents some interesting and useful contributions on the theoretical evaluation of different fractionated schedules used now. The use of the linear quadratic equation has been very useful in focusing attention on the differences in fractionation responses of fast and slow proliferating normal tissues and tumours. Unfortunately the BED 10 or BED 3 units for (α/β ratios of 10 Gy and 3 Gy respectively) do not directly relate to anything used in routine clinical practice. The purpose of the paper by Jones et al (1999) is to covert any new schedule into the equivalent total dose as if it was given in the same size fractions as are in common use in that department. They illustrate that, if proliferation is taken into account for the altered schedule, it can be compared in two ways with the standard conventional schedule: (a) the proliferative standard effective dose one (PSED 1 ) in which the proliferation correction is applied in the altered schedule, but not in the standard schedule; (b) the proliferative standard effective dose two (PSED 2 ) in which the proliferation correction is applied to both schedules using the same proliferation parameters. This is expected to provide a better evaluation of the response of a 'real' tumour (i.e. a tumour that also proliferates during the standard treatment). However, there seem to be two errors in the paper. First, the authors quoted a wrong equation for calculating the proliferative standard effective dose two (PSED 2 ) (equations (2) and (A6) in their paper). There are also some special cases with respect to the time available for proliferation and the duration of the treatment that have been neglected in their paper and which require further specification. Therefore, we should like to give the full mathematical derivation of the correct equations for calculating the proliferative standard effective doses. We would also like to make

  15. Standard effective doses for proliferative tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.C.; Hoban, P.

    1999-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the treatment schedules used clinically for highly proliferative tumours, particularly with reference to the effects of fraction size, fraction number and treatment duration. The linear quadratic model (with time component) is used here to compare non-standard treatment regimens (e.g. accelerated and hyperfractionated schedules), currently the focus of randomized trials, with each other and some common 'standard regimens'. To ensure easy interpretation of results, two parameters known as proliferative standard effective dose one (PSED 1 ) and proliferative standard effective dose two (PSED 2 ) have been calculated for each regimen. Graphs of PSED 1 and PSED 2 versus potential doubling time (T p ) have been generated for a range of fractionation regimens which are currently under trial in various randomized studies. From these graphs it can be seen that the highly accelerated schedules (such as CHART) only show advantages for tumours with very short potential doubling times. Calculations for most of the schedules considered showed at least equivalent tumour control expected for the trial schedule compared with the control arm used and these values agree quite well with clinical results. These calculations are in good agreement with clinical results available at present. The greater the PSED 1 or PSED 2 for the schedule considered the greater the tumour control, which can be expected. However, as has been seen with clinical trials, this higher cell kill also results in higher acute effects which have proved too great for some accelerated schedules to continue. (author)

  16. Behavioural responses to human-induced environmental change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomainen, Ulla; Candolin, Ulrika

    2011-08-01

    The initial response of individuals to human-induced environmental change is often behavioural. This can improve the performance of individuals under sudden, large-scale perturbations and maintain viable populations. The response can also give additional time for genetic changes to arise and, hence, facilitate adaptation to new conditions. On the other hand, maladaptive responses, which reduce individual fitness, may occur when individuals encounter conditions that the population has not experienced during its evolutionary history, which can decrease population viability. A growing number of studies find human disturbances to induce behavioural responses, both directly and by altering factors that influence fitness. Common causes of behavioural responses are changes in the transmission of information, the concentration of endocrine disrupters, the availability of resources, the possibility of dispersal, and the abundance of interacting species. Frequent responses are alterations in habitat choice, movements, foraging, social behaviour and reproductive behaviour. Behavioural responses depend on the genetically determined reaction norm of the individuals, which evolves over generations. Populations first respond with individual behavioural plasticity, whereafter changes may arise through innovations and the social transmission of behavioural patterns within and across generations, and, finally, by evolution of the behavioural response over generations. Only a restricted number of species show behavioural adaptations that make them thrive in severely disturbed environments. Hence, rapid human-induced disturbances often decrease the diversity of native species, while facilitating the spread of invasive species with highly plastic behaviours. Consequently, behavioural responses to human-induced environmental change can have profound effects on the distribution, adaptation, speciation and extinction of populations and, hence, on biodiversity. A better understanding of

  17. Antibacterial, antioxidant and cell proliferative properties of Coccinia grandis fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Sakharkar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Little knowledge is available on the antimicrobial and antioxidant properties of Coccina grandis fruits and no study has reported on its cell proliferative property. The aim of this study was to examine the antimicrobial, antioxidant and cell proliferative property of fruits of C. grandis. Material and Methods: Fruits of C. grandis were extracted using water; ethanol and acetone by cold and hot Soxhlet extraction. The antibacterial activities of the extracts were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa using the modified Kirby-Bauer diffusion method and compared against erythromycin. The antioxidant property was determined using Cayman's antioxidant assay; whereas cell proliferation/cytotoxic properties were evaluated using the Cell Titer 96 Aqueous One Solution Cell MTS assay with MDA-MB 321 breast cancer cells. Data were analyzed for correlation and differences using unpaired student's t-test and one-way ANOVA. A p value of Results: Both cold and hot ethanol and acetone extracts of C. grandis fruits showed some degree of bacterial growth inhibition. Acetone extracts exhibited higher antibacterial activity. Both ethanol extracts showed antioxidant property when compared with standard Trolox. In contrary to cytotoxicity, all four extracts showed cell proliferation compared to controls at different concentrations. However, acetone extracts exhibited greater cell proliferation compared to ethanol extracts and cold extracts performed better than the hot extracts. Conclusion: C. grandis fruits exhibited some degree of antimicrobial, antioxidant and cell proliferative properties. Further investigation is warranted to isolate, confirm and characterize phytochemicals that are responsible for the medicinal properties observed.

  18. Neonicotinoid insecticides induce salicylate-associated plant defense responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kevin A.; Casida, John E.; Chandran, Divya; Gulevich, Alexander G.; Okrent, Rachel A.; Durkin, Kathleen A.; Sarpong, Richmond; Bunnelle, Eric M.; Wildermuth, Mary C.

    2010-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides control crop pests based on their action as agonists at the insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, which accepts chloropyridinyl- and chlorothiazolyl-analogs almost equally well. In some cases, these compounds have also been reported to enhance plant vigor and (a)biotic stress tolerance, independent of their insecticidal function. However, this mode of action has not been defined. Using Arabidopsis thaliana, we show that the neonicotinoid compounds, imidacloprid (IMI) and clothianidin (CLO), via their 6-chloropyridinyl-3-carboxylic acid and 2-chlorothiazolyl-5-carboxylic acid metabolites, respectively, induce salicylic acid (SA)-associated plant responses. SA is a phytohormone best known for its role in plant defense against pathogens and as an inducer of systemic acquired resistance; however, it can also modulate abiotic stress responses. These neonicotinoids effect a similar global transcriptional response to that of SA, including genes involved in (a)biotic stress response. Furthermore, similar to SA, IMI and CLO induce systemic acquired resistance, resulting in reduced growth of a powdery mildew pathogen. The action of CLO induces the endogenous synthesis of SA via the SA biosynthetic enzyme ICS1, with ICS1 required for CLO-induced accumulation of SA, expression of the SA marker PR1, and fully enhanced resistance to powdery mildew. In contrast, the action of IMI does not induce endogenous synthesis of SA. Instead, IMI is further bioactivated to 6-chloro-2-hydroxypyridinyl-3-carboxylic acid, which is shown here to be a potent inducer of PR1 and inhibitor of SA-sensitive enzymes. Thus, via different mechanisms, these chloropyridinyl- and chlorothiazolyl-neonicotinoids induce SA responses associated with enhanced stress tolerance. PMID:20876120

  19. Diagnostic value of ductogalactography and cytology in the proliferative changes of the mammary ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessa, M.; Cerroni, L.; Bertolotti, A.

    1991-01-01

    Three hundred and thiyrty-six patients with nipple discharge and neither physical signs at breast examination nor pathological findings at mammography, were observed from 1984 to 1988 and studied by means of ductogalactography and cytology of discharge. Of this group, 76 patients (22%) underwent surgery and histology. In 65/76 cases proliferative pathologic conditions were demonstrated: 51 single/ multiple papillomas and 14 carcinomas. Ductogalactography suggested proliferative pathologic conditions in 59 cases and cytology of discharge showed blood in 44 patients, papillary clusters in 23, and atypical cells in 15 (both as single occurrences and in association). In cancer patients discharge appeared to be mostly spontaneous, monoductal and blood-stained. In papillomas, induced discharge was almost as frequent as spontaneous discharge, and milky discharge was also present. Ductogalactography confirmed its value in the diagnosis of proliferative pathologic conditions of the mammary ducts, being especially useful to detect carcinomas without palpable tumors. Cytology of discharge had poorer diagnostic significance

  20. Ozone-Induced Hypertussive Responses in Rabbits and Guinea Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Emlyn; Patacchini, Riccardo; Trevisani, Marcello; Preti, Delia; Branà, Maria Pia; Spina, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Cough remains a major unmet clinical need, and preclinical animal models are not predictive for new antitussive agents. We have investigated the mechanisms and pharmacological sensitivity of ozone-induced hypertussive responses in rabbits and guinea pigs. Ozone induced a significant increase in cough frequency and a decrease in time to first cough to inhaled citric acid in both conscious guinea pigs and rabbits. This response was inhibited by the established antitussive drugs codeine and levodropropizine. In contrast to the guinea pig, hypertussive responses in the rabbit were not inhibited by bronchodilator drugs (β2 agonists or muscarinic receptor antagonists), suggesting that the observed hypertussive state was not secondary to bronchoconstriction in this species. The ozone-induced hypertussive response in the rabbit was inhibited by chronic pretreatment with capsaicin, suggestive of a sensitization of airway sensory nerve fibers. However, we could find no evidence for a role of TRPA1 in this response, suggesting that ozone was not sensitizing airway sensory nerves via activation of this receptor. Whereas the ozone-induced hypertussive response was accompanied by a significant influx of neutrophils into the airway, the hypertussive response was not inhibited by the anti-inflammatory phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor roflumilast at a dose that clearly exhibited anti-inflammatory activity. In summary, our results suggest that ozone-induced hypertussive responses to citric acid may provide a useful model for the investigation of novel drugs for the treatment of cough, but some important differences were noted between the two species with respect to sensitivity to bronchodilator drugs. PMID:26837703

  1. Trauma-induced systemic inflammatory response versus exercise-induced immunomodulatory effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehrenbach, Elvira; Schneider, Marion E

    2006-01-01

    Accidental trauma and heavy endurance exercise, both induce a kind of systemic inflammatory response, also called systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Exercise-related SIRS is conditioned by hyperthermia and concomitant heat shock responses, whereas trauma-induced SIRS manifests concomitantly with tissue necrosis and immune activation, secondarily followed by fever. Inflammatory cytokines are common denominators in both trauma and exercise, although there are marked quantitative differences. Different anti-inflammatory cytokines may be involved in the control of inflammation in trauma- and exercise-induced stress. Exercise leads to a balanced equilibrium between inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses. Intermittent states of rest, as well as anti-oxidant capacity, are lacking or minor in trauma but are high in exercising individuals. Regular training may enhance immune competence, whereas trauma-induced SIRS often paves the way for infectious complications, such as sepsis.

  2. Cellular Responses to Cisplatin-Induced DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alakananda Basu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is one of the most effective anticancer agents widely used in the treatment of solid tumors. It is generally considered as a cytotoxic drug which kills cancer cells by damaging DNA and inhibiting DNA synthesis. How cells respond to cisplatin-induced DNA damage plays a critical role in deciding cisplatin sensitivity. Cisplatin-induced DNA damage activates various signaling pathways to prevent or promote cell death. This paper summarizes our current understandings regarding the mechanisms by which cisplatin induces cell death and the bases of cisplatin resistance. We have discussed various steps, including the entry of cisplatin inside cells, DNA repair, drug detoxification, DNA damage response, and regulation of cisplatin-induced apoptosis by protein kinases. An understanding of how various signaling pathways regulate cisplatin-induced cell death should aid in the development of more effective therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer.

  3. Allergen-induced changes in airway responsiveness are related to baseline airway responsiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBruinWeller, MS; Weller, FR; RijssenbeekNouwens, LHM; Jansen, HM; deMonchy, JGR

    In the literature, bronchial allergen challenge is usually reported to result in an increase in histamine-induced airway responsiveness (AR). The present study investigated the relation between baseline AR and allergen-induced changes in AR. The effect of allergen challenge on AR was investigated in

  4. The Relationship between Proliferative Scars and Endothelial Function in Surgically Revascularized Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Ziyrek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proliferative scars are benign fibrotic proliferations which demonstrate abnormal wound healing in response to skin injuries. As postulated in the “response to injury hypothesis”, atherosclerosis is also triggered by an endothelial injury. Keloid and atherosclerotic processes have many pathophysiological and cytological features in common. Aims: In this study, we investigated the relationship between proliferative scars and endothelial function in surgically revascularized patients. We aimed to test the hypothesis that atherosclerosis is a wound healing abnormality. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Consecutive patients who were admitted to the cardiology outpatient clinic with a history of coronary artery bypass grafting operation were evaluated. Thirty-three patients with proliferative scars at the median sternotomy site formed the keloid group, and 36 age- and sex-matched patients with no proliferative scar at the median sternotomy site formed the control group. Endothelial function was evaluated by flow-mediated vasodilatation of the brachial artery via ultrasonograhic examination. Results: There is no signicant difference according to the demographic data, biochemical parameters, clinical parameters and number of grafts between keloid and control groups. Endothelial-dependent vasodilatory response was lower in the keloid group than the control group (9.30±3.5 and 18.68±8.2, respectively; p=0.001. Conclusion: This study showed that endothalial dysfunction, which is strongly correlated with atherosclerosis, was more prominent in patients with proliferative scars. As proliferative scars and atherosclerosis have many features in common, we might conclude that atherosclerosis is a wound healing abnormality.

  5. Proliferative glomerulonephritis and primary antiphospholipid syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, H. Abdalla; Kfoury, Hala K.; Al-Khader, Abdulla A.; Al-Suleiman, M.

    2006-01-01

    Little is known regarding the association of primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APLS) and proliferative glomerulonephiritis (GN). We describe a biopsy-documented case with primary APLS and proliferative (GN) with no evidence of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), and in the absence of other manifestations of systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE). She presented initially with left popliteal deep venous thrombosis and nephrotic syndrome. Her first pregnancy at the age of 26 years resulted in the intra-uterine fetal death at term. Two subsequent pregnancies ended up with miscarriages at 3 and 4 months of gestation. Urinalysis revealed glomerular red blood cells of 1.0000.000/ml and granular cast; proteinuria of 13.4grams/24 hours, which was non-selective; hemoglobin 12 gm/dl, normal white blood cell and platelets; serum albumin 2.6gm/dl; anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and anti DNA were negative and complement levels normal. Lupus anticoagulant was positive leading to a diagnosis of primary APLS. The biopsy findings were consistent with membranoproliferative GN. She continued to have steroid-resistant proteinuria, but stable renal function after a 12-year follow up period. She had 2 pregnancies during this period and was delivered at term using caesarian section. She received heparin during the pregnancies. Later she developed hypertension easily controlled by atenolol. This case provides evidence that primary APLS can be associated with proliferative GN due to immune deposits and not only TMA as previously reported, and in the complete absence of SLE. Performing more renal biopsies in this group of patients may disclose a greater prevalence of proleferative GN and may help in devising a rationale for treatment. (author)

  6. Different protein of Echinococcus granulosus stimulates dendritic induced immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yana; Wang, Qiang; Lv, Shiyu; Zhang, Shengxiang

    2015-06-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is a chronic infectious disease that results from a host/parasite interaction. Vaccination with ferritin derived from Echinococcus granulosus is a potential preventative treatment. To understand whether ferritin is capable of inducing a host immune response, we investigated the response of dendritic cells (DCs) to both recombinant ferritin protein and the hydatid fluid (HF) of E. granulosus. We evaluated the immunomodulatory potential of these antigens by performing, immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy and in vivo imaging of monocyte-derived murine DCs. During antigen stimulation of DCs, ferritin cause DCs maturation and induced higher levels of surface marker expression and activated T-cell proliferation and migration. On contrary, HF failed to induce surface marker expression and to stimulate T-cell proliferation. In response to HF, DCs produced interleukin-6 (IL-6), but no IL-12 and IL-10. DCs stimulated with ferritin produced high levels of cytokines. Overall, HF appears to induce host immunosuppression in order to ensure parasite survival via inhibits DC maturation and promotes Th2-dependent secretion of cytokines. Although ferritin also promoted DC maturation and cytokine release, it also activates CD4+T-cell proliferation, but regard of the mechanism of the Eg.ferritin induce host to eradicate E. granulosus were not clear.

  7. Persistence of the immune response induced by BCG vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blitz Rose

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although BCG vaccination is recommended in most countries of the world, little is known of the persistence of BCG-induced immune responses. As novel TB vaccines may be given to boost the immunity induced by neonatal BCG vaccination, evidence concerning the persistence of the BCG vaccine-induced response would help inform decisions about when such boosting would be most effective. Methods A randomised control study of UK adolescents was carried out to investigate persistence of BCG immune responses. Adolescents were tested for interferon-gamma (IFN-γ response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis purified protein derivative (M.tb PPD in a whole blood assay before, 3 months, 12 months (n = 148 and 3 years (n = 19 after receiving teenage BCG vaccination or 14 years after receiving infant BCG vaccination (n = 16. Results A gradual reduction in magnitude of response was evident from 3 months to 1 year and from 1 year to 3 years following teenage vaccination, but responses 3 years after vaccination were still on average 6 times higher than before vaccination among vaccinees. Some individuals (11/86; 13% failed to make a detectable antigen-specific response three months after vaccination, or lost the response after 1 (11/86; 13% or 3 (3/19; 16% years. IFN-γ response to Ag85 was measured in a subgroup of adolescents and appeared to be better maintained with no decline from 3 to 12 months. A smaller group of adolescents were tested 14 years after receiving infant BCG vaccination and 13/16 (81% made a detectable IFN-γ response to M.tb PPD 14 years after infant vaccination as compared to 6/16 (38% matched unvaccinated controls (p = 0.012; teenagers vaccinated in infancy were 19 times more likely to make an IFN-γ response of > 500 pg/ml than unvaccinated teenagers. Conclusion BCG vaccination in infancy and adolescence induces immunological memory to mycobacterial antigens that is still present and measurable for at least 14 years in the

  8. Potato tuber wounding induces responses associated with various healing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wounding induces an avalanche of biological responses involved in the healing and protection of internal tuber tissues exposed by mechanical damage and seed cutting. Collectively, our studies have framed a portrait of the mechanisms and regulation of potato tuber wound-healing, but much more is req...

  9. Cytogenetic adaptive response induced by EMS or MMS in bone

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B.B. Dada Khalandar

    2016-01-14

    Jan 14, 2016 ... aberrations in both diabetic and non diabetic mice, but it is to be underlined that MMS is a ... nous agents and each cell receives about thousands of DNA ...... response to ionizing radiation induced by low doses of X rays to.

  10. Radiation-induced augmentation of the immune response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.E.; Lefkovits, I.; Troup, G.M.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation-induced augmentation of the immune response has been shown to occur both in vivo and in vitro. Evidence is presented to implicate injury to an extremely radiosensitive T cell in the expression of this phenomenon. Experiments are outlined which could be employed to support or reflect this hypothesis

  11. Cyclooxygenase inhibitors and the exercise-induced stress response

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) naproxen, and of the coxib, rofecoxib, on the exercise-induced stress response. Design. Eight subjects (age 20.9 ± 1.1 years, weight 70.4 ± 3.9 kg, height 170.9 ± 6.7 cm, body surface area 1.82 ± 0.09 m2, ...

  12. Phenobarbital induces cell cycle transcriptional responses in mouse liver humanized for constitutive androstane and pregnane x receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisier, Raphaëlle; Lempiäinen, Harri; Scherbichler, Nina; Braeuning, Albert; Geissler, Miriam; Dubost, Valerie; Müller, Arne; Scheer, Nico; Chibout, Salah-Dine; Hara, Hisanori; Picard, Frank; Theil, Diethilde; Couttet, Philippe; Vitobello, Antonio; Grenet, Olivier; Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun; Thomson, John P; Meehan, Richard R; Elcombe, Clifford R; Henderson, Colin J; Wolf, C Roland; Schwarz, Michael; Moulin, Pierre; Terranova, Rémi; Moggs, Jonathan G

    2014-06-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X receptor (PXR) are closely related nuclear receptors involved in drug metabolism and play important roles in the mechanism of phenobarbital (PB)-induced rodent nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogenesis. Here, we have used a humanized CAR/PXR mouse model to examine potential species differences in receptor-dependent mechanisms underlying liver tissue molecular responses to PB. Early and late transcriptomic responses to sustained PB exposure were investigated in liver tissue from double knock-out CAR and PXR (CAR(KO)-PXR(KO)), double humanized CAR and PXR (CAR(h)-PXR(h)), and wild-type C57BL/6 mice. Wild-type and CAR(h)-PXR(h) mouse livers exhibited temporally and quantitatively similar transcriptional responses during 91 days of PB exposure including the sustained induction of the xenobiotic response gene Cyp2b10, the Wnt signaling inhibitor Wisp1, and noncoding RNA biomarkers from the Dlk1-Dio3 locus. Transient induction of DNA replication (Hells, Mcm6, and Esco2) and mitotic genes (Ccnb2, Cdc20, and Cdk1) and the proliferation-related nuclear antigen Mki67 were observed with peak expression occurring between 1 and 7 days PB exposure. All these transcriptional responses were absent in CAR(KO)-PXR(KO) mouse livers and largely reversible in wild-type and CAR(h)-PXR(h) mouse livers following 91 days of PB exposure and a subsequent 4-week recovery period. Furthermore, PB-mediated upregulation of the noncoding RNA Meg3, which has recently been associated with cellular pluripotency, exhibited a similar dose response and perivenous hepatocyte-specific localization in both wild-type and CAR(h)-PXR(h) mice. Thus, mouse livers coexpressing human CAR and PXR support both the xenobiotic metabolizing and the proliferative transcriptional responses following exposure to PB.

  13. Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress Responses in the Pediatric Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Avloniti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adults demonstrate an upregulation of their pro- and anti-oxidant mechanisms in response to acute exercise while systematic exercise training enhances their antioxidant capacity, thereby leading to a reduced generation of free radicals both at rest and in response to exercise stress. However, less information exists regarding oxidative stress responses and the underlying mechanisms in the pediatric population. Evidence suggests that exercise-induced redox perturbations may be valuable in order to monitor exercise-induced inflammatory responses and as such training overload in children and adolescents as well as monitor optimal growth and development. The purpose of this review was to provide an update on oxidative stress responses to acute and chronic exercise in youth. It has been documented that acute exercise induces age-specific transient alterations in both oxidant and antioxidant markers in children and adolescents. However, these responses seem to be affected by factors such as training phase, training load, fitness level, mode of exercise etc. In relation to chronic adaptation, the role of training on oxidative stress adaptation has not been adequately investigated. The two studies performed so far indicate that children and adolescents exhibit positive adaptations of their antioxidant system, as adults do. More studies are needed in order to shed light on oxidative stress and antioxidant responses, following acute exercise and training adaptations in youth. Available evidence suggests that small amounts of oxidative stress may be necessary for growth whereas the transition to adolescence from childhood may promote maturation of pro- and anti-oxidant mechanisms. Available evidence also suggests that obesity may negatively affect basal and exercise-related antioxidant responses in the peripubertal period during pre- and early-puberty.

  14. Inheritance of proliferative breast disease in breast cancer kindreds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skolnick, M.H.; Cannon-Albright, L.A.; Goldgar, D.E.; Ward, J.H.; Marshall, C.J.; Schumann, G.B.; Hogle, H.; McWhorter, W.P.; Wright, E.C.; Tran, T.D.; Bishop, D.T.; Kushner, J.P.; Eyre, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have emphasized that genetic susceptibility to breast cancer is rare and is expressed primarily as premenopausal breast cancer, bilateral breast cancer, or both. Proliferative breast disease (PBD) is a significant risk factor for the development of breast cancer and appears to be a precursor lesion. PBD and breast cancer were studied in 103 women from 20 kindreds that were selected for the presence of two first degree relatives with breast cancer and in 31 control women. Physical examination, screening mammography, and four-quadrant fine-needle breast aspirates were performed. Cytologic analysis of breast aspirates revealed PBD in 35% of clinically normal female first degree relatives of breast cancer cases and in 13% of controls. Genetic analysis suggests that genetic susceptibility causes both PBD and breast cancer in these kindreds. This study supports the hypothesis that this susceptibility is responsible for a considerable portion of breast cancer, including unilateral and postmenopausal breast cancer

  15. A Predictive Model for Estimation Risk of Proliferative Lupus Nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Ni Chen

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: This study developed and validated a model including demographic and clinical indices to evaluate the probability of presenting proliferative LN to guide therapeutic decisions and outcomes.

  16. Body linear traits for identifying prolific goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avijit Haldar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was conducted on prolific goat breed to identify body linear type traits that might be associated with prolificacy trait in goats. Materials and Methods: Two-stage stratified random sample survey based data were collected from 1427 non-pregnant goats with the history of single, twin and triplet litter sizes (LZ between January 2008 to February 2011 for 3 years in 68 villages located in East and North East India. Data on sixteen body linear traits were analyzed using logistic regression model to do the step-wise selection for identifying the body linear traits that could determine LZ. An average value for each identified body linear trait was determined for classifying the goats into three categories: Goats having the history of single LZ, goats having the history of twin LZ and goats having the history of triplet LZ. Results: The LZ proportions for single, twin and triplet, were 29.50, 59.14 and 11.36%, respectively, with the prolificacy rate of 181.85% in Indian Black Bengal goats. A total of eight body linear traits that could determine LZ in prolific goats were identified. Heart girth (HG measurement (>60.90 cm, paunch girth (PG (>70.22 cm, wither height (WH (>49.75 cm, neck length (>21.45 cm, ear length (>12.80 cm and distance between trochanter major (DTM bones (>12.28 cm, pelvic triangle area (PTA (>572.25 cm2 and clearance at udder (CU (>23.16 cm showed an increase likelihood of multiple LZ when compared to single LZ. Further, HG measurement (>62.29 cm, WH (>50.54 cm, PG (>71.85 cm and ear length (>13.00 cm, neck length (>22.01 cm, PTA (>589.64 cm2, CU (>23.20 cm and DTM bones (>12.47 cm were associated with increased likelihood of triplet LZ, when compared with that of twin LZ. Conclusion: HG measurement was the best discriminating factor, while PG, neck length, DTM bones, CU, PTA, WH and ear length measurements were other important factors that could be used for identifying prolific goats to achieve economic

  17. Bone sarcoma in humans induced by radium: A threshold response?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowland, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    The radium 226 and radium 228 have induced malignancies in the skeleton (primarily bone sarcomas) of humans. They have also induced carcinomas in the paranasal sinuses and mastoid air cells. There is no evidence that any leukemias or any other solid cancers have been induced by internally deposited radium. This paper discuses a study conducted on the dial painter population. This study made a concerted effort to verify, for each of the measured radium cases, the published values of the skeletal dose and the initial intake of radium. These were derived from body content measurements made some 40 years after the radium intake. Corrections to the assumed radium retention function resulted in a considerable number of dose changes. These changes have changed the shape of the dose response function. It now appears that the induction of bone sarcomas is a threshold process

  18. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia induce distinct host responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Kevin W; McDunn, Jonathan E; Clark, Andrew T; Dunne, W Michael; Dixon, David J; Turnbull, Isaiah R; Dipasco, Peter J; Osberghaus, William F; Sherman, Benjamin; Martin, James R; Walter, Michael J; Cobb, J Perren; Buchman, Timothy G; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2010-01-01

    Pathogens that cause pneumonia may be treated in a targeted fashion by antibiotics, but if this therapy fails, then treatment involves only nonspecific supportive measures, independent of the inciting infection. The purpose of this study was to determine whether host response is similar after disparate infections with similar mortalities. Prospective, randomized controlled study. Animal laboratory in a university medical center. Pneumonia was induced in FVB/N mice by either Streptococcus pneumoniae or two different concentrations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from septic animals was assayed by a microarray immunoassay measuring 18 inflammatory mediators at multiple time points. The host response was dependent on the causative organism as well as kinetics of mortality, but the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses were independent of inoculum concentration or degree of bacteremia. Pneumonia caused by different concentrations of the same bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also yielded distinct inflammatory responses; however, inflammatory mediator expression did not directly track the severity of infection. For all infections, the host response was compartmentalized, with markedly different concentrations of inflammatory mediators in the systemic circulation and the lungs. Hierarchical clustering analysis resulted in the identification of five distinct clusters of the host response to bacterial infection. Principal components analysis correlated pulmonary macrophage inflammatory peptide-2 and interleukin-10 with progression of infection, whereas elevated plasma tumor necrosis factor sr2 and macrophage chemotactic peptide-1 were indicative of fulminant disease with >90% mortality within 48 hrs. Septic mice have distinct local and systemic responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Targeting specific host inflammatory responses induced by distinct bacterial infections could represent a

  19. Adaptive response induced by occupational exposures to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barquinero, J.F.; Caballin, M.R.; Barrios, L.; Murtra, P.; Egozcue, J.; Miro, R.; Ribas, M.

    1997-01-01

    We have found a significant decreased sensitivity to the cytogenetic effects of ionizing radiation (IR) and bleomycin (BLM) in lymphocytes from individuals occupationally exposed to IR when compared with a control population. These results suggest that occupational exposures to IR can induce adaptive response that can be detected by a subsequent treatment by IR or by BLM. However, no correlation between the results obtained with both treatments was observed. A great heterogeneity in the frequencies of chromatid aberrations induced by BLM was observed. The study of the influence of different harvesting times showed that there was no correlation with the frequencies of chromatid breaks. Our results indicate that the use of BLM to detect adaptive response has several difficulties at the individual level. (author)

  20. Fetal responses to induced maternal relaxation during pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Costigan, Kathleen A.; Nelson, Priscilla; Gurewitsch, Edith D.; Laudenslager, Mark L.

    2007-01-01

    Fetal responses to induced maternal relaxation during the 32nd week of pregnancy were recorded in 100 maternal-fetal pairs using a digitized data collection system. The 18-minute guided imagery relaxation manipulation generated significant changes in maternal heart rate, skin conductance, respiration period, and respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Significant alterations in fetal neurobehavior were observed, including decreased fetal heart rate (FHR), increased FHR variability, suppression of fetal...

  1. Fetal responses to induced maternal relaxation during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPietro, Janet A; Costigan, Kathleen A; Nelson, Priscilla; Gurewitsch, Edith D; Laudenslager, Mark L

    2008-01-01

    Fetal responses to induced maternal relaxation during the 32nd week of pregnancy were recorded in 100 maternal-fetal pairs using a digitized data collection system. The 18-min guided imagery relaxation manipulation generated significant changes in maternal heart rate, skin conductance, respiration period, and respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Significant alterations in fetal neurobehavior were observed, including decreased fetal heart rate (FHR), increased FHR variability, suppression of fetal motor activity (FM), and increased FM-FHR coupling. Attribution of the two fetal cardiac responses to the guided imagery procedure itself, as opposed to simple rest or recumbency, is tempered by the observed pattern of response. Evaluation of correspondence between changes within individual maternal-fetal pairs revealed significant associations between maternal autonomic measures and fetal cardiac patterns, lower umbilical and uterine artery resistance and increased FHR variability, and declining salivary cortisol and FM activity. Potential mechanisms that may mediate the observed results are discussed.

  2. Changes of brain response induced by simulated weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jinhe; Yan, Gongdong; Guan, Zhiqiang

    The characteristics change of brain response was studied during 15° head-down tilt (HDT) comparing with 45° head-up tilt (HUT). The brain responses evaluated included the EEG power spectra change at rest and during mental arithmetic, and the event-related potentials (ERPs) of somatosensory, selective attention and mental arithmetic activities. The prominent feature of brain response change during HDT revealed that the brain function was inhibited to some extent. Such inhibition included that the significant increment of "40Hz" activity during HUT arithmetic almost disappeared during HDT arithmetic, and that the positive-potential effect induced by HDT presented in all kinds of ERPs measured, but the slow negative wave reflecting mental arithmetic and memory process was elongated. These data suggest that the brain function be affected profoundly by the simulated weightlessness, therefore, the brain function change during space flight should be studied systematically.

  3. A Drosophila immune response against Ras-induced overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hauling

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Our goal is to characterize the innate immune response against the early stage of tumor development. For this, animal models where genetic changes in specific cells and tissues can be performed in a controlled way have become increasingly important, including the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. Many tumor mutants in Drosophila affect the germline and, as a consequence, also the immune system itself, making it difficult to ascribe their phenotype to a specific tissue. Only during the past decade, mutations have been induced systematically in somatic cells to study the control of tumorous growth by neighboring cells and by immune cells. Here we show that upon ectopic expression of a dominant-active form of the Ras oncogene (RasV12, both imaginal discs and salivary glands are affected. Particularly, the glands increase in size, express metalloproteinases and display apoptotic markers. This leads to a strong cellular response, which has many hallmarks of the granuloma-like encapsulation reaction, usually mounted by the insect against larger foreign objects. RNA sequencing of the fat body reveals a characteristic humoral immune response. In addition we also identify genes that are specifically induced upon expression of RasV12. As a proof-of-principle, we show that one of the induced genes (santa-maria, which encodes a scavenger receptor, modulates damage to the salivary glands. The list of genes we have identified provides a rich source for further functional characterization. Our hope is that this will lead to a better understanding of the earliest stage of innate immune responses against tumors with implications for mammalian immunity.

  4. Proliferative activity of elastin-like-peptides depends on charge and phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuan; Koria, Piyush

    2016-03-01

    Elastin-like-peptides (ELPs) are stimulus-responsive protein-based polymers and are attractive biomaterials due to their biocompatibility and unique properties. This study shows that in addition to their physical properties, ELPs have biological activities that are conducive to tissue regeneration. Specifically, we found that ELPs induce fibroblast proliferation via cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG). Furthermore, our data suggests that ELP based materials with differential proliferative potential can be designed by controlling the interaction of ELPs with HSPGs by incorporating either hydrophobic or positively charged residues within the ELP sequence. Fibroblast proliferation is important for granulation tissue formation which is important in chronic wounds as well as in healing of other tissues. The customizable biological activity of ELPs coupled with their unique physical properties will enable us to design novel, sustainable and cost effective therapies for different tissue regeneration applications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 697-706, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Anti-proliferative effects of Bifidobacterium adolescentis SPM0212 extract on human colon cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Do Kyung; Jang, Seok; Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Jung Hyun; Chung, Myung Jun; Kim, Kyung Jae; Ha, Nam Joo

    2008-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are beneficial probiotic organisms that contribute to improved nutrition, microbial balance, and immuno-enhancement of the intestinal tract, as well as anti-tumor activity. The aim of the present work was to study the growth inhibition of tumor cells by butanol extract of Bifidobacterium adolescentis isolated from healthy young Koreans. The anti-proliferative activity of B. adolescentis isolates was assessed by XTT assays on three human colon cancer cell lines (Caco-2, HT-29, and SW480). The effects of B. adolescentis SPM0212 butanol extract on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nitric oxide (NO) production were tested using the murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cell line. The butanol extract of B. adolescentis SPM0212 dose-dependently inhibited the growth of Caco-2, HT-29, and SW480 cells by 70%, 30%, and 40%, respectively, at 200 μg/mL. Additionally, the butanol extract of B. adolescentis SPM0212 induced macrophage activation and significantly increased the production of TNF-α and NO, which regulate immune modulation and are cytotoxic to tumor cells. The butanol extract of B. adolescentis SPM0212 increased activity of the host immune system and may improve human health by helping to prevent colon cancer as a biological response modifier

  6. Adaptive response induced by occupational exposures to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barquinero, J.F.; Caballin, M.R.; Barrios, L.; Egozcue, J.; Miro, R.; Ribas, M.

    1997-01-01

    We have found a significant decreased sensitivity to the cytogenetic effects of both ionizing radiation (IR) (2 Gy of γ rays) and bleomycin (BLM, 0,03 U/ml), in lymphocytes from individuals occupationally exposed to IR when compared with controls. These results suggest that occupational exposures to IR can induce adaptive response that can be detected by a subsequent treatment either by IR or by BLM. When a comparison is made between the cytogenetic effects of both treatments, no correlation was observed at the individual level. On the other hand, the individual frequencies of chromosome aberrations induced by a challenge dose of IR were negatively correlated with the occupationally received doses during the last three years. This correlation was not observed after the challenge treatment of BLM. Moreover, the individual frequencies of chromosome aberrations induced by IR treatment were homogeneous. This is not the case of the individual frequencies of chromatid aberrations induced by BLM, where a great heterogeneity was observed. (authors)

  7. Leptin: A proliferative factor for breast cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldefie-Chezet, F.; Damez, M.; Latour, M. de; Konska, G.; Mishellani, F.; Fusillier, C.; Guerry, M.; Penault-Llorca, F.; Guillot, J.; Vasson, M.-P.

    2005-01-01

    Mammary adipose tissue is an important source of paracrine mitogens and anti-mitogens, including insulin-like growth factor, transforming growth factors, and cytokines (especially, TNFα and IL-1β). Nevertheless, it is also an important source of the adipocytokine, leptin. Recently, leptin was reported to stimulate the proliferation of various cell types (pancreatic β cells, prostate, colorectal, lung, etc.) as a new growth factor. It was also shown to stimulate the proliferation of breast cancer cell lines. In this study, we conducted an immunohistochemical analysis of leptin expression in normal tissue and benign and malignant ductal breast cell, representing the different states of the invasion process. We determined for the first time that leptin is expressed both by ductal breast tumors and by benign lesions as atypical hyperplasia. This suggests that leptin may be taken up or synthesized by all modified ductal breast cells, and may prove a proliferative factor. Moreover, leptin is unexpressed by normal tissue in the healthy breast but is exhibited by the normal tissue in near vicinity of the malignant ductal breast lesions. We also postulated that leptin may be a prognostic or diagnostic factor for ductal breast cancer. These putative hypotheses require further study

  8. Radiation-Induced Bystander Response: Mechanism and Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Absorption of energy from ionizing radiation (IR) to the genetic material in the cell gives rise to damage to DNA in a dose-dependent manner. There are two types of DNA damage; by a high dose (causing acute or deterministic effects) and by a low dose (related to chronic or stochastic effects), both of which induce different health effects. Among radiation effects, acute cutaneous radiation syndrome results from cell killing as a consequence of high-dose exposure. Recent advances: Recent advances in radiation biology and oncology have demonstrated that bystander effects, which are emerged in cells that have never been exposed, but neighboring irradiated cells, are also involved in radiation effects. Bystander effects are now recognized as an indispensable component of tissue response related to deleterious effects of IR. Critical issues: Evidence has indicated that nonapoptotic premature senescence is commonly observed in various tissues and organs. Senesced cells were found to secrete various proteins, including cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors, most of which are equivalent to those identified as bystander factors. Secreted factors could trigger cell proliferation, angiogenesis, cell migration, inflammatory response, etc., which provide a tissue microenvironment assisting tissue repair and remodeling. Future directions: Understandings of the mechanisms and physiological relevance of radiation-induced bystander effects are quite essential for the beneficial control of wound healing and care. Further studies should extend our knowledge of the mechanisms of bystander effects and mode of cell death in response to IR. PMID:24761341

  9. Natural and Induced Humoral Responses to MUC1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mensdorff-Pouilly, Silvia von; Moreno, Maria; Verheijen, René H. M.

    2011-01-01

    MUC1 is a membrane-tethered mucin expressed on the ductal cell surface of glandular epithelial cells. Loss of polarization, overexpression and aberrant glycosylation of MUC1 in mucosal inflammation and in adenocarcinomas induces humoral immune responses to the mucin. MUC1 IgG responses have been associated with a benefit in survival in patients with breast, lung, pancreatic, ovarian and gastric carcinomas. Antibodies bound to the mucin may curb tumor progression by restoring cell-cell interactions altered by tumor-associated MUC1, thus preventing metastatic dissemination, as well as counteracting the immune suppression exerted by the molecule. Furthermore, anti-MUC1 antibodies are capable of effecting tumor cell killing by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Although cytotoxic T cells are indispensable to achieve anti-tumor responses in advanced disease, abs to tumor-associated antigens are ideally suited to address minimal residual disease and may be sufficient to exert adequate immune surveillance in an adjuvant setting, destroying tumor cells as they arise or maintaining occult disease in an equilibrium state. Initial evaluation of MUC1 peptide/glycopeptide mono and polyvalent vaccines has shown them to be immunogenic and safe; anti-tumor responses are scarce. Progress in carbohydrate synthesis has yielded a number of sophisticated substrates that include MUC1 glycopeptide epitopes that are at present in preclinical testing. Adjuvant vaccination with MUC1 glycopeptide polyvalent vaccines that induce strong humoral responses may prevent recurrence of disease in patients with early stage carcinomas. Furthermore, prophylactic immunotherapy targeting MUC1 may be a strategy to strengthen immune surveillance and prevent disease in subjects at hereditary high risk of breast, ovarian and colon cancer

  10. Natural and Induced Humoral Responses to MUC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mensdorff-Pouilly, Silvia von, E-mail: s.vonmensdorff@vumc.nl; Moreno, Maria [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, Amsterdam 1081 HV (Netherlands); Verheijen, René H. M. [Department of Woman & Baby, Division of Surgical & Oncological Gynaecology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht 3508 GA (Netherlands)

    2011-07-29

    MUC1 is a membrane-tethered mucin expressed on the ductal cell surface of glandular epithelial cells. Loss of polarization, overexpression and aberrant glycosylation of MUC1 in mucosal inflammation and in adenocarcinomas induces humoral immune responses to the mucin. MUC1 IgG responses have been associated with a benefit in survival in patients with breast, lung, pancreatic, ovarian and gastric carcinomas. Antibodies bound to the mucin may curb tumor progression by restoring cell-cell interactions altered by tumor-associated MUC1, thus preventing metastatic dissemination, as well as counteracting the immune suppression exerted by the molecule. Furthermore, anti-MUC1 antibodies are capable of effecting tumor cell killing by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Although cytotoxic T cells are indispensable to achieve anti-tumor responses in advanced disease, abs to tumor-associated antigens are ideally suited to address minimal residual disease and may be sufficient to exert adequate immune surveillance in an adjuvant setting, destroying tumor cells as they arise or maintaining occult disease in an equilibrium state. Initial evaluation of MUC1 peptide/glycopeptide mono and polyvalent vaccines has shown them to be immunogenic and safe; anti-tumor responses are scarce. Progress in carbohydrate synthesis has yielded a number of sophisticated substrates that include MUC1 glycopeptide epitopes that are at present in preclinical testing. Adjuvant vaccination with MUC1 glycopeptide polyvalent vaccines that induce strong humoral responses may prevent recurrence of disease in patients with early stage carcinomas. Furthermore, prophylactic immunotherapy targeting MUC1 may be a strategy to strengthen immune surveillance and prevent disease in subjects at hereditary high risk of breast, ovarian and colon cancer.

  11. Silver nanoparticles induce endoplasmatic reticulum stress response in zebrafish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christen, Verena [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Capelle, Martinus [Crucell, P.O. Box 2048, NL-2301 Leiden (Netherlands); Fent, Karl, E-mail: karl.fent@fhnw.ch [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zürich, Department of Environmental Systems Science, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2013-10-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) find increasing applications, and therefore humans and the environment are increasingly exposed to them. However, potential toxicological implications are not sufficiently known. Here we investigate effects of AgNPs (average size 120 nm) on zebrafish in vitro and in vivo, and compare them to human hepatoma cells (Huh7). AgNPs are incorporated in zebrafish liver cells (ZFL) and Huh7, and in zebrafish embryos. In ZFL cells AgNPs lead to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress response, and TNF-α. Transcriptional alterations also occur in pro-apoptotic genes p53 and Bax. The transcriptional profile differed in ZFL and Huh7 cells. In ZFL cells, the ER stress marker BiP is induced, concomitant with the ER stress marker ATF-6 and spliced XBP-1 after 6 h and 24 h exposure to 0.5 g/L and 0.05 g/L AgNPs, respectively. This indicates the induction of different pathways of the ER stress response. Moreover, AgNPs induce TNF-α. In zebrafish embryos exposed to 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 5 mg/L AgNPs hatching was affected and morphological defects occurred at high concentrations. ER stress related gene transcripts BiP and Synv are significantly up-regulated after 24 h at 0.1 and 5 mg/L AgNPs. Furthermore, transcriptional alterations occurred in the pro-apoptotic genes Noxa and p21. The ER stress response was strong in ZFL cells and occurred in zebrafish embryos as well. Our data demonstrate for the first time that AgNPs lead to induction of ER stress in zebrafish. The induction of ER stress can have several consequences including the activation of apoptotic and inflammatory pathways. - Highlights: • Effects of silver nanoparticles (120 nm AgNPs) are investigated in zebrafish. • AgNPs induce all ER stress reponses in vitro in zebrafish liver cells. • AgNPs induce weak ER stress in zebrafish embryos. • AgNPs induce oxidative stress and transcripts of pro-apoptosis genes.

  12. Silver nanoparticles induce endoplasmatic reticulum stress response in zebrafish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christen, Verena; Capelle, Martinus; Fent, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) find increasing applications, and therefore humans and the environment are increasingly exposed to them. However, potential toxicological implications are not sufficiently known. Here we investigate effects of AgNPs (average size 120 nm) on zebrafish in vitro and in vivo, and compare them to human hepatoma cells (Huh7). AgNPs are incorporated in zebrafish liver cells (ZFL) and Huh7, and in zebrafish embryos. In ZFL cells AgNPs lead to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress response, and TNF-α. Transcriptional alterations also occur in pro-apoptotic genes p53 and Bax. The transcriptional profile differed in ZFL and Huh7 cells. In ZFL cells, the ER stress marker BiP is induced, concomitant with the ER stress marker ATF-6 and spliced XBP-1 after 6 h and 24 h exposure to 0.5 g/L and 0.05 g/L AgNPs, respectively. This indicates the induction of different pathways of the ER stress response. Moreover, AgNPs induce TNF-α. In zebrafish embryos exposed to 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 5 mg/L AgNPs hatching was affected and morphological defects occurred at high concentrations. ER stress related gene transcripts BiP and Synv are significantly up-regulated after 24 h at 0.1 and 5 mg/L AgNPs. Furthermore, transcriptional alterations occurred in the pro-apoptotic genes Noxa and p21. The ER stress response was strong in ZFL cells and occurred in zebrafish embryos as well. Our data demonstrate for the first time that AgNPs lead to induction of ER stress in zebrafish. The induction of ER stress can have several consequences including the activation of apoptotic and inflammatory pathways. - Highlights: • Effects of silver nanoparticles (120 nm AgNPs) are investigated in zebrafish. • AgNPs induce all ER stress reponses in vitro in zebrafish liver cells. • AgNPs induce weak ER stress in zebrafish embryos. • AgNPs induce oxidative stress and transcripts of pro-apoptosis genes

  13. Uric acid stimulates proliferative pathways in vascular smooth muscle cells through the activation of p38 MAPK, p44/42 MAPK and PDGFRβ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kırça, M; Oğuz, N; Çetin, A; Uzuner, F; Yeşilkaya, A

    2017-04-01

    Hyperuricemia and angiotensin II (Ang II) may have a pathogenetic role in the development of hypertension and atherosclerosis as well as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its prognosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether uric acid can induce proliferative pathways of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) that are thought to be responsible for the development of CVD. The phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p44/42 MAPK) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) was measured by Elisa and Western blot techniques to determine the activation of proliferative pathways in primary cultured VSMCs from rat aorta. Results demonstrated that uric acid can stimulate p38 MAPK, p44/42 MAPK and PDGFRβ phosphorylation in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, treatment of VSMCs with the angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) inhibitor losartan suppressed p38 MAPK and p44/42 MAPK induction by uric acid. The stimulatory effect of uric acid on p38 MAPK was higher compared to that of Ang II. The results of this study show for the first time that uric acid-induced PDGFRβ phosphorylation plays a crucial role in the development of CVDs and that elevated uric acid levels could be a potential therapeutical target in CVD patients.

  14. Proliferative and inflammatory factors in the vitreous of patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V V Chernykh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose was to measure the concentrations of various cytokines and growth factors (including vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF] and pigment epithelium-derived factor [PEDF] in the vitreous of patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR and to investigate interaction between inflammatory and proliferative factors in the genesis of PDR. Materials and Methods : Vitreous samples from 32 eyes with PDR and 25 eyes without diabetes mellitus and signs of DR (control were collected. Vitreous concentrations of VEGF, PEDF, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, interleukin-4 (IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-17A, and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA were simultaneously measured using enzyme-linked immunoassay. Results : Vitreous levels of VEGF, PEDF, IL-17A, IL-6, IL-8, IL-4, and sIgA were significantly (Π < 0.05 higher in eyes with PDR compared to control. The concentration of VEGF was more than 17-times higher than in control, and the concentration of PEDF was not changed oppositely and was also higher (1.45-times compared to control, that may indicate disturbances of compensatory mechanisms in angiogenesis regulation in PDR. Significant (Π < 0.05 positive correlations were observed between vitreous concentrations of VEGF and IL-17ΐ (r = 0.45, VEGF and IL-8 (r = 0.48, VEGF and IL-4 (r = 0.51, PEDF and IL-17ΐ (r = 0.48, PEDF and IL-8 (r = 0.59, MCP-1 and PEDF (r = 0.72, MCP-1 and IL-8 (r0 = 0.45, IL-4 and IL-17ΐ (r = 0.65, IL-4 and IL-8 (r = 0.71, IL-8 and IL-17ΐ (r = 0.59. Conclusions: Significantly raised levels of inflammatory and proliferative factors and numerous positive correlations between them may demonstrate a significant role of activation of vascular proliferation and local inflammation in the pathogenesis of PDR.

  15. Molecular Analysis of a Multistep Lung Cancer Model Induced by Chronic Inflammation Reveals Epigenetic Regulation of p16, Activation of the DNA Damage Response Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Blanco

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The molecular hallmarks of inflammation-mediated lung carcinogenesis have not been fully clarified, mainly due to the scarcity of appropriate animal models. We have used a silica-induced multistep lung carcinogenesis model driven by chronic inflammation to study the evolution of molecular markers, genetic alterations. We analyzed markers of DNA damage response (DDR, proliferative stress, telomeric stress: δ-H2AX, p16, p53, TERT. Lung cancer-related epigenetic, genetic alterations, including promoter hypermethylation status of p16(CDKN2A, APC, CDH13, Rassf1, Nore1A, as well as mutations of Tp53, epidermal growth factor receptor, K-ras, N-ras, c-H-ras, have been also studied. Our results showed DDR pathway activation in preneoplastic lesions, in association with inducible nitric oxide synthase, p53 induction. p16 was also induced in early tumorigenic progression, was inactivated in bronchiolar dysplasias, tumors. Remarkably, lack of mutations of Ras, epidermal growth factor receptor, a very low frequency of Tp53 mutations suggest that they are not required for tumorigenesis in this model. In contrast, epigenetic alterations in p16(CDKN2A, CDH13, APC, but not in Rassf1, Nore1A, were clearly observed. These data suggest the existence of a specific molecular signature of inflammation-driven lung carcinogenesis that shares some, but not all, of the molecular landmarks of chemically induced lung cancer.

  16. Intravitreal methotrexate infusion for proliferative vitreoretinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadaka A

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ama Sadaka,1 Robert A Sisk,1–3 James M Osher,1,3 Okan Toygar,4 Melinda K Duncan,5 Christopher D Riemann1,3 1Department of Ophthalmology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 2Department of Opthalmology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, 3Cincinnati Eye Institute, Cincinnati, OH, USA; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Bahcesehir University Medical Faculty, Istanbul, Turkey; 5Department of Biological Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate intravitreal methotrexate infusion (IMI during pars plana vitrectomy (PPV for retinal detachment in patients with high risk for the development of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR.Methods: Patients presenting with severe recurrent PVR with tractional retinal detachment and/or a history of severe ocular inflammation were treated with IMI. Clinical outcomes were determined from a retrospective medical chart review.Results: Twenty-nine eyes presenting with either tractional retinal detachment and recurrent PVR (n=22 or a history of severe inflammation associated with high PVR risk (n=7 received IMI during PPV. Best-corrected visual acuity at 6 months was ≥20/200 in 19 of 29 eyes (66% and remained stable or improved compared with initial presentation in 24 of 29 eyes (83%. At the last follow-up examination, the retinas of 26 of 29 eyes (90% remained attached after IMI while three eyes required another reattachment procedure. Three additional eyes (10% developed recurrent limited PVR without recurrent RD and were observed. No complications attributable to IMI occurred during a mean follow-up of 27 months.Conclusion: Eyes at high risk for PVR development due to a history of prior PVR or intraocular inflammation had a low incidence of PVR following IMI at the time of PPV for RD repair. No significant safety issues from IMI were observed in this series. Keywords: tractional retinal detachment, recurrent retinal detachment, pars

  17. Tourniquet-induced systemic inflammatory response in extremity surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wakai, A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Tourniquet-induced reperfusion injury in animals produces significant systemic inflammatory effects. This study investigated whether a biologic response occurs in a clinically relevant model of tourniquet-induced reperfusion injury. METHODS: Patients undergoing elective knee arthroscopy were prospectively randomized into controls (no tourniquet) and subjects (tourniquet-controlled). The effects of tourniquet-induced reperfusion on monocyte activation state, neutrophil activation state, and transendothelial migration (TEM) were studied. Changes in the cytokines implicated in reperfusion injury, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, and IL-10 were also determined. RESULTS: After 15 minutes of reperfusion, neutrophil and monocyte activation were significantly increased. Pretreatment of neutrophils with pooled subject (ischemia-primed) plasma significantly increased TEM. In contrast, TEM was not significantly altered by ischemia-primed plasma pretreatment of the endothelial monolayer. Significant elevation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-1beta were observed in subjects compared with controls after 15 minutes of reperfusion. There was no significant difference in serum IL-10 levels between the groups at all the time points studied. CONCLUSION: These results indicate a transient neutrophil and monocyte activation after tourniquet-ischemia that translates into enhanced neutrophil transendothelial migration with potential for tissue injury.

  18. Assessing Cd-induced stress from plant spectral response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kancheva, Rumiana; Georgiev, Georgi

    2014-10-01

    Remote sensing plays a significant role in local, regional and global monitoring of land covers. Ecological concerns worldwide determine the importance of remote sensing applications for the assessment of soil conditions, vegetation health and identification of stress-induced changes. The extensive industrial growth and intensive agricultural land-use arise the serious ecological problem of environmental pollution associated with the increasing anthropogenic pressure on the environment. Soil contamination is a reason for degradation processes and temporary or permanent decrease of the productive capacity of land. Heavy metals are among the most dangerous pollutants because of their toxicity, persistent nature, easy up-take by plants and long biological half-life. This paper takes as its focus the study of crop species spectral response to Cd pollution. Ground-based experiments were performed, using alfalfa, spring barley and pea grown in Cd contaminated soils and in different hydroponic systems under varying concentrations of the heavy metal. Cd toxicity manifested itself by inhibition of plant growth and synthesis of photosynthetic pigments. Multispectral reflectance, absorbance and transmittance, as well as red and far red fluorescence were measured and examined for their suitability to detect differences in plant condition. Statistical analysis was performed and empirical relationships were established between Cd concentration, plant growth variables and spectral response Various spectral properties proved to be indicators of plant performance and quantitative estimators of the degree of the Cd-induced stress.

  19. Checkpoint responses to replication stalling: inducing tolerance and preventing mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kai, Mihoko; Wang, Teresa S.-F

    2003-11-27

    Replication mutants often exhibit a mutator phenotype characterized by point mutations, single base frameshifts, and the deletion or duplication of sequences flanked by homologous repeats. Mutation in genes encoding checkpoint proteins can significantly affect the mutator phenotype. Here, we use fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) as a model system to discuss the checkpoint responses to replication perturbations induced by replication mutants. Checkpoint activation induced by a DNA polymerase mutant, aside from delay of mitotic entry, up-regulates the translesion polymerase DinB (Pol{kappa}). Checkpoint Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex, which is loaded onto chromatin by the Rad17-Rfc2-5 checkpoint complex in response to replication perturbation, recruits DinB onto chromatin to generate the point mutations and single nucleotide frameshifts in the replication mutator. This chain of events reveals a novel checkpoint-induced tolerance mechanism that allows cells to cope with replication perturbation, presumably to make possible restarting stalled replication forks. Fission yeast Cds1 kinase plays an essential role in maintaining DNA replication fork stability in the face of DNA damage and replication fork stalling. Cds1 kinase is known to regulate three proteins that are implicated in maintaining replication fork stability: Mus81-Eme1, a hetero-dimeric structure-specific endonuclease complex; Rqh1, a RecQ-family helicase involved in suppressing inappropriate recombination during replication; and Rad60, a protein required for recombinational repair during replication. These Cds1-regulated proteins are thought to cooperatively prevent mutagenesis and maintain replication fork stability in cells under replication stress. These checkpoint-regulated processes allow cells to survive replication perturbation by preventing stalled replication forks from degenerating into deleterious DNA structures resulting in genomic instability and cancer development.

  20. Checkpoint responses to replication stalling: inducing tolerance and preventing mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Mihoko; Wang, Teresa S.-F.

    2003-01-01

    Replication mutants often exhibit a mutator phenotype characterized by point mutations, single base frameshifts, and the deletion or duplication of sequences flanked by homologous repeats. Mutation in genes encoding checkpoint proteins can significantly affect the mutator phenotype. Here, we use fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) as a model system to discuss the checkpoint responses to replication perturbations induced by replication mutants. Checkpoint activation induced by a DNA polymerase mutant, aside from delay of mitotic entry, up-regulates the translesion polymerase DinB (Polκ). Checkpoint Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex, which is loaded onto chromatin by the Rad17-Rfc2-5 checkpoint complex in response to replication perturbation, recruits DinB onto chromatin to generate the point mutations and single nucleotide frameshifts in the replication mutator. This chain of events reveals a novel checkpoint-induced tolerance mechanism that allows cells to cope with replication perturbation, presumably to make possible restarting stalled replication forks. Fission yeast Cds1 kinase plays an essential role in maintaining DNA replication fork stability in the face of DNA damage and replication fork stalling. Cds1 kinase is known to regulate three proteins that are implicated in maintaining replication fork stability: Mus81-Eme1, a hetero-dimeric structure-specific endonuclease complex; Rqh1, a RecQ-family helicase involved in suppressing inappropriate recombination during replication; and Rad60, a protein required for recombinational repair during replication. These Cds1-regulated proteins are thought to cooperatively prevent mutagenesis and maintain replication fork stability in cells under replication stress. These checkpoint-regulated processes allow cells to survive replication perturbation by preventing stalled replication forks from degenerating into deleterious DNA structures resulting in genomic instability and cancer development

  1. Changes in the Proliferative Program Limit Astrocyte Homeostasis in the Aged Post-Traumatic Murine Cerebral Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimann, Gábor; Canhos, Luisa L; Frik, Jesica; Jäger, Gabriele; Lepko, Tjasa; Ninkovic, Jovica; Götz, Magdalena; Sirko, Swetlana

    2017-08-01

    Aging leads to adverse outcomes after traumatic brain injury. The mechanisms underlying these defects, however, are not yet clear. In this study, we found that astrocytes in the aged post-traumatic cerebral cortex develop a significantly reduced proliferative response, resulting in reduced astrocyte numbers in the penumbra. Moreover, experiments of reactive astrocytes in vitro reveal that their diminished proliferation is due to an age-related switch in the division mode with reduced cell-cycle re-entry rather than changes in cell-cycle length. Notably, reactive astrocytes in vivo and in vitro become refractory to stimuli increasing their proliferation during aging, such as Sonic hedgehog signaling. These data demonstrate for the first time that age-dependent, most likely intrinsic changes in the proliferative program of reactive astrocytes result in their severely hampered proliferative response to traumatic injury thereby affecting astrocyte homeostasis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Bilateral proliferative retinopathy in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devesh Kumawat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 4-year-old child with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with vitreous hemorrhage due to proliferative retinopathy in both eyes. Pars plana vitrectomy was performed in both eyes to clear nonresolving vitreous hemorrhage after systemic stabilization. Visual recovery was limited by the disc drag in the right eye and subfoveal exudation in the left eye. Etiopathogenesis and management of proliferative retinopathy in acute leukemias are discussed.

  3. Benign Proliferative Breast Lesions and Risk of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serap Erel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Benign breast lesions (BBL includes a wide variety of histologic entities, which have been broadly classified into non-proliferative lesions, proliferative lesions without atypia, and hyperplasia with atypia. With the increased use of mammography, more benign lesions are being detected, and in order to estimate the risk of breast cancer for specific histologic categories is of great importance to guide clinical management. Women with proliferative lesions without atypia are at slightly increased risk of subsequent breast cancer, whereas women with proliferative lesions with atypia have a higher risk. The risk is 1.5- 2-fold in women with proliferative lesions without atypia, 4-5-fold in women with proliferative lesions with atypia, and 8-10 fold in women with ductal carcinoma in situ. Age at diagnosis of BBL, menopausal status, family history of breast cancer in a first-degree relative, and time since BBL diagnosis on risk of breast cancer are important for risk evaluation. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2010; 19(3.000: 155-167

  4. Tenascin-C in the extracellular matrix promotes the selection of highly proliferative and tubulogenesis-defective endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Tercia Rodrigues [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biologia Celular, Laboratorio de Biologia da Celula Endotelial e da Angiogenese (LabAngio), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Programa de Biologia Celular e do Desenvolvimento, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, INNT/INCT/MCT, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Carvalho da Fonseca, Anna Carolina [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Programa de Biologia Celular e do Desenvolvimento, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, INNT/INCT/MCT, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Nunes, Sara Santana; Oliveira da Silva, Aline [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biologia Celular, Laboratorio de Biologia da Celula Endotelial e da Angiogenese (LabAngio), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Dubois, Luiz Gustavo Feijo; Faria, Jane; Kahn, Suzana Assad [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Programa de Biologia Celular e do Desenvolvimento, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, INNT/INCT/MCT, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Viana, Nathan Bessa [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Laboratorio de Pincas Oticas, Coordenacao de Programas de Estudos Avancados, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Marcondes, Jorge [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Servico de Neurocirurgia, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Legrand, Chantal [Institut Universitaire d' Hematologie, Universite Paris-Diderot, Paris 7, INSERM U553, Paris (France); Moura-Neto, Vivaldo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Programa de Biologia Celular e do Desenvolvimento, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, INNT/INCT/MCT, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); and others

    2011-09-10

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) contains important cues for tissue homeostasis and morphogenesis. The matricellular protein tenascin-C (TN-C) is overexpressed in remodeling tissues and cancer. In the present work, we studied the effect of different ECM-which exhibited a significant diversity in their TN-C content-in endothelial survival, proliferation and tubulogenic differentiation: autologous (endothelial) ECM devoid of TN-C, but bearing large amounts of FN; fibroblast ECM, bearing both high TN-C and FN contents; and finally, glioma-derived matrices, usually poor in FN, but very rich in TN-C. HUVECs initially adhered to the immobilized matrix produced by U373 MG glioma cells, but significantly detached and died by anoikis (50 to 80%) after 24 h, as compared with cells incubated with endothelial and fibroblast matrices. Surviving endothelial cells (20 to 50%) became up to 6-fold more proliferative and formed 74-97% less tube-like structures in vitro than cells grown on non-tumoral matrices. An antibody against the EGF-like repeats of tenascin-C (TN-C) partially rescued cells from the tubulogenic defect, indicating that this molecule is responsible for the selection of highly proliferative and tubulogenic defective endothelial cells. Interestingly, by using defined substrata, in conditions that mimic glioma and normal cell ECM composition, we observed that fibronectin (FN) modulates the TN-C-induced selection of endothelial cells. Our data show that TN-C is able to modulate endothelial branching morphogenesis in vitro and, since it is prevalent in matrices of injured and tumor tissues, also suggest a role for this protein in vascular morphogenesis, in these physiological contexts.

  5. Tenascin-C in the extracellular matrix promotes the selection of highly proliferative and tubulogenesis-defective endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Tercia Rodrigues; Carvalho da Fonseca, Anna Carolina; Nunes, Sara Santana; Oliveira da Silva, Aline; Dubois, Luiz Gustavo Feijo; Faria, Jane; Kahn, Suzana Assad; Viana, Nathan Bessa; Marcondes, Jorge; Legrand, Chantal; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo

    2011-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) contains important cues for tissue homeostasis and morphogenesis. The matricellular protein tenascin-C (TN-C) is overexpressed in remodeling tissues and cancer. In the present work, we studied the effect of different ECM-which exhibited a significant diversity in their TN-C content-in endothelial survival, proliferation and tubulogenic differentiation: autologous (endothelial) ECM devoid of TN-C, but bearing large amounts of FN; fibroblast ECM, bearing both high TN-C and FN contents; and finally, glioma-derived matrices, usually poor in FN, but very rich in TN-C. HUVECs initially adhered to the immobilized matrix produced by U373 MG glioma cells, but significantly detached and died by anoikis (50 to 80%) after 24 h, as compared with cells incubated with endothelial and fibroblast matrices. Surviving endothelial cells (20 to 50%) became up to 6-fold more proliferative and formed 74-97% less tube-like structures in vitro than cells grown on non-tumoral matrices. An antibody against the EGF-like repeats of tenascin-C (TN-C) partially rescued cells from the tubulogenic defect, indicating that this molecule is responsible for the selection of highly proliferative and tubulogenic defective endothelial cells. Interestingly, by using defined substrata, in conditions that mimic glioma and normal cell ECM composition, we observed that fibronectin (FN) modulates the TN-C-induced selection of endothelial cells. Our data show that TN-C is able to modulate endothelial branching morphogenesis in vitro and, since it is prevalent in matrices of injured and tumor tissues, also suggest a role for this protein in vascular morphogenesis, in these physiological contexts.

  6. NLRP3 inflammasome activation is associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukovaara, Sirpa; Piippo, Niina; Kinnunen, Kati; Hytti, Maria; Kaarniranta, Kai; Kauppinen, Anu

    2017-12-01

    Innate immunity and dysregulation of inflammatory processes play a role in vascular diseases like atherosclerosis or diabetes. Nucleotide-binding domain and Leucine-rich repeat Receptor containing a Pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3) inflammasomes are pro-inflammatory signalling complexes that were found in 2002. In addition to pathogens and other extracellular threats, they can be activated by various endogenous danger signals. The purpose of this study was to find out whether NLRP3 activation occurs in patients with sight-threatening forms of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Inflammasome components NLRP3 and caspase-1, inflammasome-related pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), acute-phase cytokines TNF-α and IL-6, as well as adaptive immunity-related cytokine interferon gamma (IFN-γ) were measured from the vitreous samples of 15 non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (non-PDR) and 23 proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) patients using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. The adaptor protein apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) was determined using the Western blot technique. Inflammasome components were present in the vitreous of DR patients. Along with VEGF, the levels of caspase-1 and IL-18 were significantly increased, especially in PDR eyes. Interestingly, clearly higher levels of NLRP3 were found in the PDR eyes with tractional retinal detachment (TRD) than from PDR eyes with fully attached retina. There were no significant differences in the amounts of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and IFN-γ that were detectable in the vitreous of both non-PDR and PDR patients. Our results suggest that NLRP3 inflammasome activation can be associated especially with the pathogenesis of PDR. The lack of differences in TNF-α, IL-6, and IFN-γ also alludes that acute inflammation or T-cell-mediated responses do not dominate in PDR pathogenesis. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation

  7. Health assessment of environmental pollutants: proliferative and degenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, B.O.

    1988-01-01

    In order to achieve a balanced approach to risk assessment between carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic health effects one must examine the risk of disease or death in the general population exposed to a particular air pollutant that can be related quantitatively to intensity and duration of exposures (National Academy of Sciences, 1983). Such risk assessment should be based upon careful evaluation of scientific findings of dose-response relationships in the chronically exposed population. Quantitative assessment of environmentally produced disease in man has proven to be complex and demanding. A variety of factors play important roles in this task. As an example, there are induction-latency periods for chronic diseases, including cancer, which may range from five to twenty-five years. The diseases themselves, whether proliferative or degenerative, may follow several stages of progression. There is only sparse epidemiological data on serious health effects that may be due to environmental as compared to occupational exposures. Exposures to chemical or radiological air contaminants do not occur singly but to a multiplicity of agents, and disease processes are frequently markedly affected by the interaction of a variety of factors, particularly that of cigarette smoking. There is growing recognition of potentially sensitive subpopulations, including the elderly and the very young, but adequate techniques for assessing the magnitude of increased risks to these groups have not yet been developed

  8. Onconase-induced changes in radiation response and physiological parameters in solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, I.; Shui, C.; Shogen, K.; Mikulski, S.M.; Nunno, M.; Wallner, P.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Onconase (ONC), previously known as P-30 protein, is a novel basic amphibian protein isolated from eggs of the leopard frog. The original study conducted by Darzynkiewicz et al. (Cell Tissue Kinetics, 1988) demonstrated that ONC shows anti-proliferative and cytotoxic activities against several tumor cell lines in vitro. Since then, to our knowledge, no studies regarding the inhibitory effect of ONC in solid tumor models were performed. ONC is also known to inhibit cell-cycle progression from the radiation-sensitive G 1 phase to the radiation-resistant S phase. Thus, we examined the effect of ONC as a potential radiation sensitizer. The radiation response and physiological parameters were evaluated in C3H mice and/or nude mice bearing various (murine and/or human) tumor models. Materials and Method: First, we examined the effect of ONC on the cellular proliferative, as well as the clonogenic, response of various cell lines (i.e., H4IIE rat hepatoma, AsPC-1 human pancreas adenocarcinoma, DU145 human prostate carcinoma, LS174T human colon adenocarcinoma, A549 human lung carcinoma, MCaIV murine adenocarcinoma, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma, and CCL-209 bovine artery pulmonary endothelial cells) by using the MTT and clonogenic cell survival assays. Second, we determined the enhancement of radiation response before, during, and after treatment with ONC in several cell lines. Third, we determined whether ONC can inhibit the growth of solid tumors in vivo (i.e., FSaII and MCaIV in C3H mice, LS174T in nude mice). Fourth, we examined whether minocycline, an antiangiogenic agent, could amplify the tumoricidal efficacy of ONC in solid tumors. To test our hypothesis: if ONC could eradicate the outgrowth of tumor cells in confined spaces, it could lower the elevated pressure in solid tumors, we measured tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) using the wick-in-needle method, and systemic pressure using the right carotid artery cannulation method after treatment with ONC

  9. An investigation of response competition in retrieval-induced forgetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina A. Glanc

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that retrieval practice on a subset of studied items can cause forgetting of different related studied items. This retrieval-induced forgetting (the RIF effect has been demonstrated in a variety of recall studies and has been attributed to an inhibitory mechanism activated during retrieval practice by competition for a shared retrieval cue. The current study generalizes the RIF effect to recognition memory and investigates this competition assumption. Experiment 1 demonstrated an effect of RIF effect in item recognition with incidental encoding of category-exemplar association during the study phase. Experiment 2 demonstrated evidence of RIF with use of an independent retrieval cue during retrieval practice. Results from this study indicate that response competition may occur outside of the retrieval-practice phase, or may not be limited to situations where there is an overt link to a shared category cue.

  10. Response of the pulmonary system to exercise in proliferative phase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The role of estrogen on pulmonary function test (PFT) was well known in the normal course of the menstrual cycle. Significant increase in both progesterone (37%) and estradiol (13.5%), whereas no change in plasma follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) & leutinizing hormone [LH] was observed in exercising ...

  11. Responses of pink salmon to CO2-induced aquatic acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Michelle; Hamilton, Trevor J.; Eom, Junho; Lyall, Emily M.; Gallup, Joshua; Jiang, Amy; Lee, Jason; Close, David A.; Yun, Sang-Seon; Brauner, Colin J.

    2015-10-01

    Ocean acidification negatively affects many marine species and is predicted to cause widespread changes to marine ecosystems. Similarly, freshwater ecosystems may potentially be affected by climate-change-related acidification; however, this has received far less attention. Freshwater fish represent 40% of all fishes, and salmon, which rear and spawn in freshwater, are of immense ecosystem, economical and cultural importance. In this study, we investigate the impacts of CO2-induced acidification during the development of pink salmon, in freshwater and following early seawater entry. At this critical and sensitive life stage, we show dose-dependent reductions in growth, yolk-to-tissue conversion and maximal O2 uptake capacity; as well as significant alterations in olfactory responses, anti-predator behaviour and anxiety under projected future increases in CO2 levels. These data indicate that future populations of pink salmon may be at risk without mitigation and highlight the need for further studies on the impact of CO2-induced acidification on freshwater systems.

  12. Patterns of Sympathetic Responses Induced by Different Stress Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechir, M; Schlereth, T; Purat, T; Kritzmann, S; Geber, C; Eberle, T; Gamer, M; Birklein, F

    2008-01-01

    Stress tasks are used to induce sympathetic nervous system (SNS) arousal. However, the efficacy and the patterns of SNS activation have not been systematically compared between different tasks. Therefore, we analyzed SNS activation during the following stress tasks: Presentation of negative, positive, and – as a control – neutral affective pictures, Color-Word interference test (CWT), mental arithmetic under time limit, singing a song aloud, and giving a spontaneous talk. We examined 11 healthy subjects and recorded the following SNS parameters: Activation of emotional sweating by quantitative sudometry, skin vasoconstriction by laser-Doppler flowmetry, heart rate by ECG, blood pressure by determination of pulse wave transit time (PWTT), and electromyographic (EMG) activity of the trapezius muscle. Moreover, subjective stress ratings were acquired for each task using a visual analog scale. All tasks were felt significantly stressful when compared to viewing neutral pictures. However, SNS activation was not reliable: Affective pictures did not induce a significant SNS response; singing, giving a talk and mental arithmetic selectively increased heart rate and emotional sweating. Only the CWT globally activated the SNS. Regarding all tasks, induction of emotional sweating, increase of heart rate and blood pressure significantly correlated with subjective stress ratings, in contrast to EMG and skin vasoconstriction. Our results show that the activation of the SNS widely varies depending on the stress task. Different stress tasks differently activate the SNS, which is an important finding when considering sympathetic reactions - in clinical situations and in research. PMID:19018304

  13. Vitreous vascular endothelial growth factor concentrations in proliferative diabetic retinopathy versus proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citirik, Mehmet; Kabatas, Emrah Utku; Batman, Cosar; Akin, Kadir Okhan; Kabatas, Naciye

    2012-01-01

    To assess vitreous vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations in proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) in comparison to proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Vitreous samples were collected from 69 eyes of 69 patients with traumatic lens dislocation (n = 10), grade B PVR with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (n = 13), grade C PVR with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (n = 14), PDR with vitreous hemorrhage (n = 18), and PDR with vitreous hemorrhage and tractional retinal detachment (n = 14). Vitreous fluid samples were obtained at vitrectomy, and the levels of VEGF were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean vitreous level of VEGF was 15.14 ± 5.22 pg/ml in eyes with grade B PVR, 99.15 ± 38.58 pg/ml in eyes with grade C PVR, 4,534.01 ± 1,193.28 pg/ml in eyes with vitreous hemorrhage secondary to PDR, 5,157.29 ± 969.44 pg/ml in eyes with vitreous hemorrhage and tractional retinal detachment secondary to PDR, and 16.19 ± 5.76 pg/ml in eyes of the control group with traumatic lens dislocation. Vitreous VEGF concentrations were significantly higher in the patients with grade C PVR, PDR with vitreous hemorrhage and PDR with vitreous hemorrhage and tractional retinal detachment in comparison to the control patients (p < 0.05). A significant alteration was not observed in patients with grade B PVR (p = 0.55). Vitreous VEGF concentrations are increased in PDR and grade C PVR. The high VEGF concentrations could suggest a possible effect of VEGF on advanced PVR. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. In vivo effects of monoclonal anti-L3T4 antibody on immune responsiveness of mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni. Reduction of irradiated cercariae-induced resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, E.A.; Colley, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    Mice can be partially protected against challenge infections of Schistosoma mansoni cercariae by either single or multiple exposure to irradiated cercariae (x-cerc). The participation of L3T4+ lymphocytes on this resistance phenomenon was evaluated by selectively depleting this cell population through in vivo administration of mAb anti-L3T4 at three different times in relationship to the challenge infections. Treatment with anti-L3T4 before challenge such that depletion was effective during the time of cercarial skin penetration and dermal/s.c. residence significantly reduced the level of resistance induced by x-cerc sensitization. When treatment was delayed until after challenge, depletion of L3T4+ cells coincided with either the lung or post-lung/liver phases of schistosomular migration, and normal levels of x-cerc-induced resistance were induced. In contrast to once-immunized mice, mice hyperimmunized by five exposures to x-cerc and then depleted of L3T4+ cells at the time of challenge still expressed resistance to the challenge. These data suggest that when mice are sensitized only once with x-cerc the challenge infection provides a necessary immunologic boost which requires L3T4+ cells for effective expression of resistance. The requirement for this anamnestic effect by the challenge infection can be circumvented by hyperimmunization. Evaluation of the immune response of one-time sensitized or hyperimmunized mice demonstrated that cellular Ag-specific proliferative responses and mitogen-induced lymphokine production were abrogated after any of the various in vivo regimens of anti-L3T4 antibody. In contrast, immunoblot analysis of humoral responsiveness revealed a correlation between the expression of resistance and the ability of sera from immunized and anti-L3T4 treated mice to recognize a 75-kDa parasite antigenic component

  15. Antibody response is required for protection from Theiler's virus-induced encephalitis in C57BL/6 mice in the absence of CD8+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, B.-S.; Palma, Joann P.; Lyman, Michael A.; Dal Canto, Mauro; Kim, Byung S.

    2005-01-01

    Intracerebral infection of susceptible mice with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) induces immune-mediated demyelinating disease and this system serves as a relevant infectious model for human multiple sclerosis. It was previously shown that β 2 M-deficient C57BL/6 mice lacking functional CD8 + T cells display increased viral persistence and enhanced susceptibility to TMEV-induced demyelination, and yet the majority of mice are free of clinical signs. To understand the mechanisms involved in this general resistance of C57BL/6 mice in the absence of CTL responses, mice (μMT) deficient in the B-cell compartment lacking membrane IgM molecules were treated with anti-CD8 antibody and then infected with TMEV. Although little difference in the proliferative responses of peripheral T cells to UV-inactivated TMEV and the resistance to demyelinating disease was observed between virus-infected μMT and control B6 mice, the levels of CD4 + T cells were higher in the CNS of μMT mice. However, after treatment with anti-CD8 antibody, 100% of the mice displayed clinical gray matter disease and prolonged viral persistence in μMT mice, while only 10% of B6 mice showed clinical symptoms and very low viral persistence. Transfusion of sera from TMEV-infected B6 mice into anti-CD8 antibody-treated μMT mice partially restored resistance to virus-induced encephalitis. These results indicate that the early anti-viral antibody response is also important in the protection from TMEV-induced encephalitis particularly in the absence of CD8 + T cells

  16. Antioxidant Responses Induced by UVB Radiation in Deschampsia antarctica Desv.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Köhler

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Deschampsia antarctica Desv. is one of two vascular plants that live in the Maritime Antarctic Territory and is exposed to high levels of ultraviolet-B (UVB radiation. In this work, antioxidant physiology of D. antarctica was studied in response to UVB induced oxidative changes. Samples were collected from Antarctica and maintained in vitro culture during 2 years. Plants were sub-cultured in a hydroponic system and exposed to 21.4 kJ m-2 day-1, emulating summer Antarctic conditions. Results showed rapid and significant increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS at 3 h, which rapidly decreased. No dramatic changes were observed in photosynthetic efficiency, chlorophyll content, and level of thiobarbituric acid reactive species (MDA. The enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, SOD and total peroxidases, POD and non-enzymatic antioxidant activity (total phenolic increased significantly in response to UVB treatment. These findings suggest that tolerance of D. antarctica to UVB radiation could be attributed to its ability to activate both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems.

  17. Genistein-induced alterations of radiation-responsive gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, M.B. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)], E-mail: grace@afrri.usuhs.mil; Blakely, W.F.; Landauer, M.R. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    In order to clarify the molecular mechanism of radioprotection and understand biological dosimetry in the presence of medical countermeasure-radioprotectants, their effects on ionizing radiation (IR)-responsive molecular biomarkers must be examined. We used genistein in a radiation model system and measured gene expression by multiplex QRT-PCR assay in drug-treated healthy human blood cultures. Genistein has been demonstrated to be a radiosensitizer of malignant cells and a radioprotector against IR-induced lethality in a mouse model. Whole-blood cultures were supplemented with 50, 100, and 200{mu}M concentrations of genistein, 16 h prior to receiving a 2-Gy ({sup 60}Co-{gamma} rays, 10 cGy/min) dose of IR. Total RNA was isolated from whole blood 24 h postirradiation for assessments. Combination treatments of genistein and IR resulted in no significant genistein effects on ddb2 and bax downstream transcripts to p53, or proliferating cell-nuclear antigen, pcna, necessary for DNA synthesis and cell-cycle progression. Use of these radiation-responsive targets would be recommended for dose-assessment applications. We also observed decreased expression of pro-survival transcript, bcl-2. Genistein and IR-increased expression of cdkn1a and gadd45a, showing that genistein also stimulates p53 transcriptional activity. These results confirm published molecular signatures for genistein in numerous in vitro models. Evaluation of gene biomarkers may be further exploited for devising novel radiation countermeasure and/or therapeutic strategies.

  18. Protein oxidation and degradation during proliferative senescence of human MRC-5 fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitte, N; Merker, K; von Zglinicki, T; Grune, T

    2000-03-01

    One of the highlights of age-related changes of cellular metabolism is the accumulation of oxidized proteins. The aging process on a cellular level can be treated either as the ongoing proliferation until a certain number of cell divisions is reached (the Hayflick limit) or as the aging of nondividing cells, that is, the age-related changes in cells without proliferation. The present investigation was undertaken to reveal the changes in protein turnover, proteasome activity, and protein oxidation status during proliferative senescence. We were able to demonstrate that the activity of the cytosolic proteasomal system declines dramatically during the proliferative senescence of human MRC-5 fibroblasts. Regardless of the loss in activity, it could be demonstrated that there are no changes in the transcription and translation of proteasomal subunits. This decline in proteasome activity was accompanied by an increased concentration of oxidized proteins. Cells at higher proliferation stages were no longer able to respond with increased degradation of endogenous [(35)S]-Met-radiolabeled proteins after hydrogen peroxide- or quinone-induced oxidative stress. It could be demonstrated that oxidized proteins in senescent human MRC-5 fibroblasts are not as quickly removed as they are in young cells. Therefore, our study demonstrates that the accumulation of oxidized proteins and decline in protein turnover and activity of the proteasomal system are not only a process of postmitotic aging but also occur during proliferative senescence and result in an increased half-life of oxidized proteins.

  19. Structural impact response for assessing railway vibration induced on buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouroussis, Georges; Mouzakis, Harris P.; Vogiatzis, Konstantinos E.

    2018-03-01

    Over the syears, the rapid growth in railway infrastructure has led to numerous environmental challenges. One such significant issue, particularly in urban areas, is ground-borne vibration. A common source of ground-borne vibration is caused by local defects (e.g. rail joints, switches, turnouts, etc.) that generate large amplitude excitations at isolated locations. Modelling these excitation sources is particularly challenging and requires the use of complex and extensive computational efforts. For some situations, the use of experiments and measured data offers a rapid way to estimate the effect of such defects and to evaluate the railway vibration levels using a scoping approach. In this paper, the problem of railway-induced ground vibrations is presented along with experimental studies to assess the ground vibration and ground borne noise levels, with a particular focus on the structural response of sensitive buildings. The behaviour of particular building foundations is evaluated through experimental data collected in Brussels Region, by presenting the expected frequency responses for various types of buildings, taking into account both the soil-structure interaction and the tramway track response. A second study is dedicated to the Athens metro, where transmissibility functions are used to analyse the effect of various Athenian building face to metro network trough comprehensive measurement campaigns. This allows the verification of appropriate vibration mitigation measures. These benchmark applications based on experimental results have been proved to be efficient to treat a complex problem encountered in practice in urban areas, where the urban rail network interacts with important local defects and where the rise of railway ground vibration problems has clearly been identified.

  20. Dynamics of GATA1 binding and expression response in a GATA1-induced erythroid differentiation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Jain

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available During the maturation phase of mammalian erythroid differentiation, highly proliferative cells committed to the erythroid lineage undergo dramatic changes in morphology and function to produce circulating, enucleated erythrocytes. These changes are caused by equally dramatic alterations in gene expression, which in turn are driven by changes in the abundance and binding patterns of transcription factors such as GATA1. We have studied the dynamics of GATA1 binding by ChIP-seq and the global expression responses by RNA-seq in a GATA1-dependent mouse cell line model for erythroid maturation, in both cases examining seven progressive stages during differentiation. Analyses of these data should provide insights both into mechanisms of regulation (early versus late targets and the consequences in cell physiology (e.g., distinctive categories of genes regulated at progressive stages of differentiation. The data are deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus, series GSE36029, GSE40522, GSE49847, and GSE51338.

  1. Histological and morphological evaluation of condylar cartilage of young rats in response to stimulation of mandibular protrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Peixoto Nogueira de Sá

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the histogical and morphological aspects of the condyle in response to mandibular protrusion induced by composite resin occlusal planes. Thirty five-week-old male Wistar rats were selected and randomly divided in two groups. One group received a composite resin type of oclusal plane that induced mandibular protrusion, and the other was the control group, without treatment. Animals were euthanized after experimental time intervals of 7, 21 and 30 days. For histological analysis, thickness of the proliferative, serial and hypertrophic layers was measured, as well as each layer separately. The highest difference in cartilage thickness was observed at day 21, showing a significant increase of the proliferative layer. There were also other histomorphological changes related to occlusal plane interference. Condylar forward repositioning induced by composite occlusal planes influenced the endochondral ossification, increasing the proliferative layer.

  2. Polar lipids of Burkholderia pseudomallei induce different host immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Gonzalez-Juarrero

    Full Text Available Melioidosis is a disease in tropical and subtropical regions of the world that is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. In endemic regions the disease occurs primarily in humans and goats. In the present study, we used the goat as a model to dissect the polar lipids of B. pseudomallei to identify lipid molecules that could be used for adjuvants/vaccines or as diagnostic tools. We showed that the lipidome of B. pseudomallei and its fractions contain several polar lipids with the capacity to elicit different immune responses in goats, namely rhamnolipids and ornithine lipids which induced IFN-γ, whereas phospholipids and an undefined polar lipid induced strong IL-10 secretion in CD4(+ T cells. Autologous T cells co-cultured with caprine dendritic cells (cDCs and polar lipids of B. pseudomallei proliferated and up-regulated the expression of CD25 (IL-2 receptor molecules. Furthermore, we demonstrated that polar lipids were able to up-regulate CD1w2 antigen expression in cDCs derived from peripheral blood monocytes. Interestingly, the same polar lipids had only little effect on the expression of MHC class II DR antigens in the same caprine dendritic cells. Finally, antibody blocking of the CD1w2 molecules on cDCs resulted in decreased expression for IFN-γ by CD4(+ T cells. Altogether, these results showed that polar lipids of B. pseudomallei are recognized by the caprine immune system and that their recognition is primarily mediated by the CD1 antigen cluster.

  3. Polar Lipids of Burkholderia pseudomallei Induce Different Host Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Mima, Naoko; Trunck, Lily A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.; Bowen, Richard A.; Dascher, Kyle; Mwangi, Waithaka; Eckstein, Torsten M.

    2013-01-01

    Melioidosis is a disease in tropical and subtropical regions of the world that is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. In endemic regions the disease occurs primarily in humans and goats. In the present study, we used the goat as a model to dissect the polar lipids of B. pseudomallei to identify lipid molecules that could be used for adjuvants/vaccines or as diagnostic tools. We showed that the lipidome of B. pseudomallei and its fractions contain several polar lipids with the capacity to elicit different immune responses in goats, namely rhamnolipids and ornithine lipids which induced IFN-γ, whereas phospholipids and an undefined polar lipid induced strong IL-10 secretion in CD4+ T cells. Autologous T cells co-cultured with caprine dendritic cells (cDCs) and polar lipids of B. pseudomallei proliferated and up-regulated the expression of CD25 (IL-2 receptor) molecules. Furthermore, we demonstrated that polar lipids were able to up-regulate CD1w2 antigen expression in cDCs derived from peripheral blood monocytes. Interestingly, the same polar lipids had only little effect on the expression of MHC class II DR antigens in the same caprine dendritic cells. Finally, antibody blocking of the CD1w2 molecules on cDCs resulted in decreased expression for IFN-γ by CD4+ T cells. Altogether, these results showed that polar lipids of B. pseudomallei are recognized by the caprine immune system and that their recognition is primarily mediated by the CD1 antigen cluster. PMID:24260378

  4. Proliferative changes in nonpalpable breast lesions detected by mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega, A.; Delgado, A.; Ortega, E.; Garijo, F.; Mosquera, J.; Sogo, C.; Alvarez, A.

    2000-01-01

    To analyze retrospectively the radiological findings in nonpalpable breast lesions detected by mammography that lead to the performance of surgical biopsy, resulting in a histological diagnosis of proliferative breast disease with and without atypia. From two Spanish hospitals, 421 women with 429 biopsies indicative of the presence of proliferative breast disease with and without atypia were selected out of a total of 1252 surgical biopsies in nonpalpable lesions that proved to be benign. Age, personal and familial history of breast cancer, reason for requesting the mammography and radiological findings that had indicated the need for surgical biopsy were recorded for each patient. The diagnosis was proliferative breast disease (epithelial hyperplasia) in 347 women with 354 biopsies and atypical hyperplasia in the remaining 74 women with 75 biopsies, representing 28% and 6%, respectively, of the 1252 biopsies of lesions found to be benign. In 221 of the 354 cases of epithelial hyperplasia (62%) and 45 of the 75 cases of atypical hyperplasia (60%), the presence of calcifications was the most common radiological findings leading to biopsy (p<0.05). Parenchymal distortion, with or without calcifications, was the second most common radiological sign. The histological study revealed a close relationship between these proliferative events and radial scars. Calcifications are the radiological finding that most frequently indicate the need for surgical biopsy in nonpalpable lesions that results in a diagnosis of proliferative breast disease with and without atypia. (Author) 12 refs

  5. Lifespan extension by preserving proliferative homeostasis in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Biteau

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative processes are critical to maintain tissue homeostasis in high-turnover tissues. At the same time, proliferation of stem and progenitor cells has to be carefully controlled to prevent hyper-proliferative diseases. Mechanisms that ensure this balance, thus promoting proliferative homeostasis, are expected to be critical for longevity in metazoans. The intestinal epithelium of Drosophila provides an accessible model in which to test this prediction. In aging flies, the intestinal epithelium degenerates due to over-proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISCs and mis-differentiation of ISC daughter cells, resulting in intestinal dysplasia. Here we show that conditions that impair tissue renewal lead to lifespan shortening, whereas genetic manipulations that improve proliferative homeostasis extend lifespan. These include reduced Insulin/IGF or Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK signaling activities, as well as over-expression of stress-protective genes in somatic stem cell lineages. Interestingly, proliferative activity in aging intestinal epithelia correlates with longevity over a range of genotypes, with maximal lifespan when intestinal proliferation is reduced but not completely inhibited. Our results highlight the importance of the balance between regenerative processes and strategies to prevent hyperproliferative disorders and demonstrate that promoting proliferative homeostasis in aging metazoans is a viable strategy to extend lifespan.

  6. Oxidized DNA induces an adaptive response in human fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostyuk, Svetlana V., E-mail: svet.kostyuk@gmail.com [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tabakov, Viacheslav J.; Chestkov, Valerij V.; Konkova, Marina S.; Glebova, Kristina V.; Baydakova, Galina V.; Ershova, Elizaveta S.; Izhevskaya, Vera L. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baranova, Ancha, E-mail: abaranov@gmu.edu [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Center for the Study of Chronic Metabolic Diseases, School of System Biology, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Veiko, Natalia N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • We describe the effects of gDNAOX on human fibroblasts cultivated in serum withdrawal conditions. • gDNAOX evokes an adaptive response in human fibroblasts. • gDNAOX increases the survival rates in serum starving cell populations. • gDNAOX enhances the survival rates in cell populations irradiated at 1.2 Gy dose. • gDNAOX up-regulates NRF2 and inhibits NF-kappaB-signaling. - Abstract: Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) released from dying cells contains a substantial proportion of oxidized nucleotides, thus, forming cfDNA{sup OX}. The levels of cfDNA{sup OX} are increased in the serum of patients with chronic diseases. Oxidation of DNA turns it into a stress signal. The samples of genomic DNA (gDNA) oxidized by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}in vitro (gDNA{sup OX}) induce effects similar to that of DNA released from damaged cells. Here we describe the effects of gDNA{sup OX} on human fibroblasts cultivated in the stressful conditions of serum withdrawal. In these cells, gDNA{sup OX} evokes an adaptive response that leads to an increase in the rates of survival in serum starving cell populations as well as in populations irradiated at the dose of 1.2 Gy. These effects are not seen in control populations of fibroblasts treated with non-modified gDNA. In particular, the exposure to gDNA{sup OX} leads to a decrease in the expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67 and an increase in levels of PSNA, a decrease in the proportion of subG1- and G2/M cells, a decrease in proportion of cells with double strand breaks (DSBs). Both gDNA{sup OX} and gDNA suppress the expression of DNA sensors TLR9 and AIM2 and up-regulate nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (NRF2), while only gDNA{sup OX} inhibits NF-κB signaling. gDNA{sup OX} is a model for oxidized cfDNA{sup OX} that is released from the dying tumor cells and being carried to the distant organs. The systemic effects of oxidized DNA have to be taken into account when treating tumors. In particular, the damaged DNA

  7. Induced dynamic nonlinear ground response at Gamer Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Z.; Bodin, P.; Langston, C.A.; Pearce, F.; Gomberg, J.; Johnson, P.A.; Menq, F.-Y.; Brackman, T.

    2008-01-01

    We present results from a prototype experiment in which we actively induce, observe, and quantify in situ nonlinear sediment response in the near surface. This experiment was part of a suite of experiments conducted during August 2004 in Garner Valley, California, using a large mobile shaker truck from the Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) facility. We deployed a dense accelerometer array within meters of the mobile shaker truck to replicate a controlled, laboratory-style soil dynamics experiment in order to observe wave-amplitude-dependent sediment properties. Ground motion exceeding 1g acceleration was produced near the shaker truck. The wave field was dominated by Rayleigh surface waves and ground motions were strong enough to produce observable nonlinear changes in wave velocity. We found that as the force load of the shaker increased, the Rayleigh-wave phase velocity decreased by as much as ???30% at the highest frequencies used (up to 30 Hz). Phase velocity dispersion curves were inverted for S-wave velocity as a function of depth using a simple isotropic elastic model to estimate the depth dependence of changes to the velocity structure. The greatest change in velocity occurred nearest the surface, within the upper 4 m. These estimated S-wave velocity values were used with estimates of surface strain to compare with laboratory-based shear modulus reduction measurements from the same site. Our results suggest that it may be possible to characterize nonlinear soil properties in situ using a noninvasive field technique.

  8. Beryllium-induced immune response in C3H mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, J.M.; Bice, D.E.; Nikula, K.J. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Studies conducted at ITRI over the past several years have investigated whether Beagle dogs, monkeys, and mice are suitable models for human chronic beryllium-induced lung disease (CBD). Recent studies have focused on the histopathological and immunopathological changes occurring in A/J and C3H/HeJ mice acutely exposed by inhalation to Be metal. Lung lesions in both strains of mice included focal lymphocyte aggregates comprised primarily of B lymphocytes and lesser amounts of T-helper lymphocytes and microgranulomas consisting chiefly of macrophages and T-helper lymphocytes. The distribution of proliferating cells within the microgranulomas was similar to the distribution of T-helper cells. These results strongly suggested that A/J and C3H/HeJ mice responded to inhaled Be metal in a fashion similar to humans in terms of pulmonary lesions and the apparent in situ proliferation of T-helper cells. Results of these studies confirm lymphocyte involvement in the pulmonary response to inhaled Be metal.

  9. Marrow fat cell: response to x-ray induced aplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathija, A.; Ohanian, M.; Davis, S.; Trubowitz, S.

    1979-01-01

    Adipose tissue is an integral structural component of normal rabbit marrow and is believed to behave primarily as a cushion in response to hemopoietic proliferation, accommodating to changes in hemopoiesis by change in either size or number or both of the fat cells in order to maintain constancy of the marrow volume. To test this hypothesis, aplasia of the right femur of New Zealand white rabbits was induced by x irradiation with 8000 rads; the left unirradiated limb served as control. Twenty-four hours before sacrifice 50 μCi of palmitate-114C was administered intravenously and the marrow of both femurs removed. Samples of perinephric fat were taken for comparison. Fat cell volume, C14 palmitate turnover and fatty acid composition were determined. The total number of fat cells in the entire marrow of both femurs was calculated. The measurements showed no difference in size or fatty acid turnover of the fat cells in the irradiated aplastic marrow from the cells of the control marrow. The number of fat cells in both the irradiated and the unirradiated control femurs was essentially the same. These findings do not support the view that marrow fat cells respond to diminished hematopoiesis by either increase in their volume or number. In addition, the findings suggest that both marrow and subcutaneous fat cells are fairly resistant to high doses of x-ray irradiation

  10. Local and Systemic Inflammatory Responses to Experimentally Induced Gingivitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leishman, Shaneen J.; Seymour, Gregory J.; Ford, Pauline J.

    2013-01-01

    This study profiled the local and systemic inflammatory responses to experimentally induced gingivitis. Eight females participated in a 21-day experimental gingivitis model followed by a 14-day resolution phase. Bleeding on probing and plaque index scores were assessed before, during, and after resolution of gingival inflammation, and samples of saliva, GCF, and plasma were collected. Samples were assessed for biomarkers of inflammation using the BioPlex platform and ELISA. There were no significant changes in GCF levels of cytokines during the experimental phase; however, individual variability in cytokine profiles was noted. During resolution, mean GCF levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α decreased and were significantly lower than baseline levels (P = 0.003, P = 0.025, and P = 0.007, resp.). Furthermore, changes in GCF levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α during resolution correlated with changes in plaque index scores (r = 0.88, P = 0.004; r = 0.72, P = 0.042; r = 0.79, P = 0.019, resp.). Plasma levels of sICAM-1 increased significantly during the experimental phase (P = 0.002) and remained elevated and significantly higher than baseline levels during resolution (P gingivitis adds to the systemic inflammatory burden of an individual. PMID:24227893

  11. Proliferative myositis of the latissimus dorsi presenting in a 20-year-old male athlete

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mc Hugh, N

    2017-08-01

    We describe the case of a 20-year-old rower presenting with an uncommon condition of Proliferative Myositis (PM) affecting the Latissimus Dorsi (LD). PM is a rare, benign tumour infrequently developing in the upper back. Its rapid growth and firm consistency may mistake it for sarcoma at presentation. Therefore, careful multidisciplinary work-up is crucial, and should involve appropriate radiological and histopathological investigations. Here, we propose the aetiology of LD PM to be persistent myotrauma induced by repetitive rowing motions. Symptoms and rate of progression ultimately determine the management which includes surveillance and\\/or conservative resection. There have been no documented cases of recurrence or malignant transformation.

  12. Estrogen signaling in the proliferative endometrium: implications in endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Pereira da Costa e Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Even though the physiological role of estrogen in the female reproductive cycle and endometrial proliferative phase is well established, the signaling pathways by which estrogen exerts its action in the endometrial tissue are still little known. In this regard, advancements in cell culture techniques and maintenance of endometrial cells in cultures enabled the discovery of new signaling mechanisms activated by estrogen in the normal endometrium and in endometriosis. This review aims to present the recent findings in the genomic and non-genomic estrogen signaling pathways in the proliferative human endometrium specifically associated with the pathogenesis and development of endometriosis.

  13. COMPARISONS BETWEEN THE NON-PROLIFERATIVE AND PROLIFERATIVE THERAPY IN FIBROCYSTIC MASTOSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carauleanu, A; Socolov, R; Rugina, V; Gabia, O; Carauleanu, Daniela Mihaela; Lupascu, Ivona Anghlcelache; Socolov, Demetra

    2016-01-01

    Fibrocystic mastosis (FCM) is the most frequent benign breast lesion. Most treatments for fibrocystic mastosis are: hormonl, with beneficial results and non-hormonal, with fluctuating results. A number of 210 cases were studied, which were divided into 7 groups. The study lasted for 9 months and it was carried out on the basis of a personal examination sheet. The following were monitored: age groups, mastodynia, reducing breast nodules, a significant reduction in the volume of the mastosic cysts, reducion of the fibrous tissue, medication tolerance. Mastodynia has declined by 90% in the cases treated with Tamoxifen and Danazol, by 70% in the case of Lynestrenol and Bromocriptine, by 50% in the 15 patients who were given Utrogestan. Knowing the advantages and disadvantages of drugs (contraindications, side effects), age category, breast pain reduction, antiproliferative activity, tolerability, relapse allow us to assess the benefit-risk. Even in those circumstances that remained incompletely clarified for objective reasons, related to the inaccurate/incorrect reporting by the patients, there is a significant difference (p < 0.05) between the frequency of relapses following the treatment with Tamoxifen and the other categories of drugs who were administered. Our study shows that in the groups that were administered Logest, Utrogestan and Bromocriptine, only antalgic effects were achieved (disappearance or only decrease of mastodynia) and no anti-proliferative effects were obtained. Basically, hormone treatment should be made based on a histopathological examination.

  14. Crossfit analysis: a novel method to characterize the dynamics of induced plant responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.J.; Van Dam, N.M.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Smilde, A.K.

    2009-01-01

    Background Many plant species show induced responses that protect them against exogenous attacks. These responses involve the production of many different bioactive compounds. Plant species belonging to the Brassicaceae family produce defensive glucosinolates, which may greatly influence their

  15. Crossfit analysis: a novel method to characterize the dynamics of induced plant responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.J.; van Dam, N.M.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Smilde, A.K.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Many plant species show induced responses that protect them against exogenous attacks. These responses involve the production of many different bioactive compounds. Plant species belonging to the Brassicaceae family produce defensive glucosinolates, which may greatly influence their

  16. Role of Stromal Paracrine Signals in Proliferative Diseases of the Aging Human Prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichiro Ishii

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Androgens are essential for the development, differentiation, growth, and function of the prostate through epithelial–stromal interactions. However, androgen concentrations in the hypertrophic human prostate decrease significantly with age, suggesting an inverse correlation between androgen levels and proliferative diseases of the aging prostate. In elderly males, age- and/or androgen-related stromal remodeling is spontaneously induced, i.e., increased fibroblast and myofibroblast numbers, but decreased smooth muscle cell numbers in the prostatic stroma. These fibroblasts produce not only growth factors, cytokines, and extracellular matrix proteins, but also microRNAs as stromal paracrine signals that stimulate prostate epithelial cell proliferation. Surgical or chemical castration is the standard systemic therapy for patients with advanced prostate cancer. Androgen deprivation therapy induces temporary remission, but the majority of patients eventually progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer, which is associated with a high mortality rate. Androgen deprivation therapy-induced stromal remodeling may be involved in the development and progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer. In the tumor microenvironment, activated fibroblasts stimulating prostate cancer cell proliferation are called carcinoma-associated fibroblasts. In this review, we summarize the role of stromal paracrine signals in proliferative diseases of the aging human prostate and discuss the potential clinical applications of carcinoma-associated fibroblast-derived exosomal microRNAs as promising biomarkers.

  17. Differential expression of follistatin and FLRG in human breast proliferative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaral Vania F

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activins are growth factors acting on cell growth and differentiation. Activins are expressed in high grade breast tumors and they display an antiproliferative effect inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in breast cancer cell lines. Follistatin and follistatin- related gene (FLRG bind and neutralize activins. In order to establish if these activin binding proteins are involved in breast tumor progression, the present study evaluated follistatin and FLRG pattern of mRNA and protein expression in normal human breast tissue and in different breast proliferative diseases. Methods Paraffin embedded specimens of normal breast (NB - n = 8; florid hyperplasia without atypia (FH - n = 17; fibroadenoma (FIB - n = 17; ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS - n = 10 and infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC - n = 15 were processed for follistatin and FLRG immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. The area and intensity of chromogen epithelial and stromal staining were analyzed semi-quantitatively. Results Follistatin and FLRG were expressed both in normal tissue and in all the breast diseases investigated. Follistatin staining was detected in the epithelial cytoplasm and nucleus in normal, benign and malignant breast tissue, with a stronger staining intensity in the peri-alveolar stromal cells of FIB at both mRNA and protein levels. Conversely, FLRG area and intensity of mRNA and protein staining were higher both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus of IDC epithelial cells when compared to NB, while no significant changes in the stromal intensity were observed in all the proliferative diseases analyzed. Conclusion The present findings suggest a role for follistatin in breast benign disease, particularly in FIB, where its expression was increased in stromal cells. The up regulation of FLRG in IDC suggests a role for this protein in the progression of breast malignancy. As activin displays an anti-proliferative effect in human mammary cells, the

  18. Spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of mine tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placencia-Gómez, Edmundo; Parviainen, Annika; Slater, Lee; Leveinen, Jussi

    2015-02-01

    Mine tailings impoundments are a source of leachates known as acid mine drainage (AMD) which can pose a contamination risk for surrounding surface and groundwater. Methodologies which can help management of this environmental issue are needed. We carried out a laboratory study of the spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of tailings from the Haveri Au-Cu mine, SW Finland. The primary objectives were, (1) to determine possible correlations between SIP parameters and textural properties associated with oxidative-weathering mechanisms, mineralogical composition and metallic content, and (2) to evaluate the effects of the pore water chemistry on SIP parameters associated with redox-inactive and redox-active electrolytes varying in molar concentration, conductivity and pH. The Haveri tailings exhibit well defined relaxation spectra between 100 and 10,000Hz. The relaxation magnitudes are governed by the in-situ oxidative-weathering conditions on sulphide mineral surfaces contained in the tailings, and decrease with the oxidation degree. The oxidation-driven textural variation in the tailings results in changes to the frequency peak of the phase angle, the imaginary conductivity and chargeability, when plotted versus the pore water conductivity. In contrast, the real and the formation electrical conductivity components show a single linear dependence on the pore water conductivity. The increase of the pore water conductivity (dominated by the increase of ions concentration in solution) along with a transition to acidic conditions shifts the polarization peak towards higher frequencies. These findings show the unique sensitivity of the SIP method to potentially discriminate AMD discharges from reactive oxidation zones in tailings, suggesting a significant advantage for monitoring threatened aquifers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiation-induced adaptive response and intracellular signal transduction pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Akira

    2009-01-01

    As an essential biological function, cells can sense the radiation even at low dose and respond to it, and which is one of bases of the radiation-induced adaptive response (AR) where effects caused by high dose radiation are reduced by prior exposure to low dose radiation (LDR). Here described are studies of AR in well established m5S cells on the intracellular signal transduction that involves sensing of LDR and transmitting of its signal within the cell network. The first signal for AR yielded by LDR on the cell membrane is exactly unknown though hydrogen peroxide and phorbol ester (PMA) can reportedly cause AR. As PMA activates protein kinase C (PKC) and its inhibitors suppress AR, participation of PKC in AR has been suggested and supported by studies showing PKCα activation by LDR. In addition, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is shown to participate in AR by those facts that the enzyme is activated by LDR, a p38 MAPK inhibitor suppresses AR, and PKC inhibitors suppress the enzyme activation, which also suggesting that the signaling from PKC to p38 MAPK can become operative by LDR. However, the possible reverse signaling is also suggested, and thus the activation of positive feedback mechanism is postulated in PKC/p38 MAPK/phospholipase δ1/ PKC pathway. Cells introduced with siRNA against Prkca gene (coding PKCs) produce reduced amount of the enzyme, particularly, of PKCα. In those cells, AR by 5 Gy X-ray is not observed and thereby PKCα is involved in AR. The signaling in AR is only partly elucidated at present as above, and more detailed studies including identification of more PKC subtypes and signaling to DNA repair system are considered necessary. (K.T.)

  20. Radiation-induced adaptive response in human lymphoblast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatagai, Fumio; Sugasawa, Kaoru

    2009-01-01

    Described are the genetic analysis of variant strains obtained by the optimal condition for radiation-induced adaptive response (AR), and molecular elucidation of the suppression of concomitant mutation. The TK6 cells (heterozygous thymidine kinase, +/-) were used for detection of mutation by loss of heterozygosity (LOH). The optimal conditions for reducing the mutation by subsequent irradiation (SI) to its rate of about 60% (vs control 100%, no PI) were found to be 5 cGy of pre-irradiation (PI) of X-ray and 2 Gy of SI with the interval of 6 hr, where mutated cells were of non-LOH type in around 25% and homo-LOH type by homologous recombination (HR) in 60%. By cDNA sequencing, the former cells having changed bases were found to be in variant strain ratio of 1/8 vs control 7/18, suggesting that the mutation was decreased mainly by suppression of base change. Expression of XPC protein, an important component for recognition of the base damage in global genome nucleotide excision repair, was studied by Western blotting as the possible mechanism of suppressing the mutation, which revealed different time dynamics of the protein in cells with PI+SI and SI alone (control). To see the effect of PI on the double strand break (DSB) repair, cells with PI were infected with restriction enzyme I-SceI vector to yield DSB instead of SI, which revealed more efficient repair (70% increase) by HR than control, without significant difference in non-homologous end-joining repair. Micro-array analysis to study the gene expression in the present experimental conditions for AR is in progress. The TK6 cells used here were thought useful for additional studies of the mechanism of AR as mutation by direct or indirect irradiation can be tested. (K.T.)

  1. Proliferative signaling initiated in ACTH receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.F.P. Lotfi

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent results of studies aiming to elucidate modes of integrating signals initiated in ACTH receptors and FGF2 receptors, within the network system of signal transduction found in Y1 adrenocortical cells. These modes of signal integration should be central to the mechanisms underlying the regulation of the G0->G1->S transition in the adrenal cell cycle. FGF2 elicits a strong mitogenic response in G0/G1-arrested Y1 adrenocortical cells, that includes a rapid and transient activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases-mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK-MAPK (2 to 10 min, b transcription activation of c-fos, c-jun and c-myc genes (10 to 30 min, c induction of c-Fos and c-Myc proteins by 1 h and cyclin D1 protein by 5 h, and d onset of DNA synthesis stimulation within 8 h. ACTH, itself a weak mitogen, interacts with FGF2 in a complex manner, blocking the FGF2 mitogenic response during the early and middle G1 phase, keeping ERK-MAPK activation and c-Fos and cyclin D1 induction at maximal levels, but post-transcriptionally inhibiting c-Myc expression. c-Fos and c-Jun proteins are mediators in both the strong and the weak mitogenic responses respectively triggered by FGF2 and ACTH. Induction of c-Fos and stimulation of DNA synthesis by ACTH are independent of PKA and are inhibited by the PKC inhibitor GF109203X. In addition, ACTH is a poor activator of ERK-MAPK, but c-Fos induction and DNA synthesis stimulation by ACTH are strongly inhibited by the inhibitor of MEK1 PD98059.

  2. Anti-proliferative effect of Moringa oleifera Lam (Moringaceae) leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the in vitro anti-proliferative effect and mechanism of action of Moringa oleifera Lam. leaf extract on human colon carcinoma HCT116 cell line. Methods: M. oleifera leaves were extracted with methanol. It was fractionated by Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography. Several fractions were identified ...

  3. Evaluation of the anti-proliferative and cytotoxic potentials of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The partitioned aqueous and chloroform fractions obtained from the methanol extract of the leaf of Cnidoscolus aconitifolius were examined for anti-proliferative (1-30 mg/mL) and cytotoxic activities (20-400 μg/mL) using the seed radicle inhibition and tadpole mortality assays over a period of 24 and 96 h respectively.

  4. Treatment and prevention of porcine proliferative enteropathy with oral tiamulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McOrist, S; Smith, S H; Shearn, M F; Carr, M M; Miller, D J

    The effect of an oral treatment or prevention programme, incorporating the antibiotic tiamulin, on the development of proliferative enteropathy in experimentally challenged pigs was studied. Twenty weaner pigs were challenged orally with a virulent inoculum of Lawsonia intracellularis strain LR189/5/83, a British isolate of the causative agent of porcine proliferative enteropathy, and seven control pigs were dosed with a buffer solution. Seven of the 20 challenged pigs were left untreated; they gained less weight than the controls and three of them developed mild to moderate diarrhoea two weeks after the challenge. All seven developed lesions, six visible grossly, of proliferative enteropathy, and numerous intracellular L intracellularis were detected in sections of the intestines examined three weeks after the challenge. To test a 'prevention' dosing strategy for tiamulin, six of the challenged pigs were dosed orally with 50 ppm tiamulin, incorporated in a 2 per cent stabilised premix, given from two days before the challenge until they were euthanased. To test a 'treatment' strategy, the remaining group of seven challenged pigs were dosed orally with 150 ppm tiamulin given in the premix from seven days after challenge until they were euthanased. All the control pigs and the 13 pigs treated with tiamulin, either before or after challenge, remained clinically normal and had no specific lesions of proliferative enteropathy in sections of the intestines examined post mortem.

  5. Proliferative verrucous leukoplakia; a critical appraisal of the diagnostic criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carrard, V.C.; Brouns, E.R.E.A.; van der Waal, I.

    2013-01-01

    Since its introduction in the literature in 1985, the term proliferative verrucous leukoplakia (PVL) has been the subject of an ongoing discussion with regard to its definition. Widespread or multifocal occurrence of oral leukoplakia is not just synonymous to PVL. In the present treatise the

  6. Anti-proliferative activity of recombinant melittin expressed in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recombinant melittin was then successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. The activity of affinity-purified recombinant melittin was determined in human leukemic U937 cells. Results show that the recombinant melittin had the same anti-proliferative activity in human leukemic U937 cells in vitro as natural one. This shows the ...

  7. Dutch guidelines for diagnosis and therapy of proliferative lupus nephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tellingen, A.; Voskuyl, A. E.; Vervloet, M. G.; Bijl, M.; de Sevaux, R. G. L.; Berger, S. P.; Derksen, R. H. W. M.; Berden, J. H. M.

    Proliferative lupus nephritis is a strong predictor of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Despite improvements in the management of lupus nephritis, a significant number of the patients do not respond to immunosuppressive therapy and progress to end-stage renal

  8. Antioxidant and Anti-proliferative Activities of Flavonoids from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the chemical composition of Bidens pilosa L. var. radiata. Sch Bip. (BP), as well as its antioxidant and anti-proliferative activities. Methods: The whole herb of BP was extracted with 95 % ethanol, which was then partitioned sequentially with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and n-butyl alcohol to obtain ...

  9. Inducing magneto-electric response in topological insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Lunwu; Song, Runxia; Zeng, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing electric potential and magnetic scalar potential formulas, which contain zero-order Bessel functions of the first kind and the constitutive relations of topological insulators, we obtained the induced magnetic scalar potentials and induced magnetic monopole charges which are induced by a point charge in topological insulators. The results show that infinite image magnetic monopole charges are generated by a point electric charge. The magnitude of the induced magnetic monopole charges are determined not only by the point electric charge, but also by the material parameters. - Highlights: ► Electric potential and magnetic scalar potential which contain zero-order Bessel function of the first kind were derived. ► Boundary conditions of topological insulator were built. ► Induced monopole charges were worked out.

  10. Inducing magneto-electric response in topological insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Lunwu, E-mail: 163.sin@163.com [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Intelligent Agricultural Equipment, College of Engineering, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210031 (China); Song, Runxia [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Intelligent Agricultural Equipment, College of Engineering, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210031 (China); Zeng, Jing [Faculty of Business and Economics, Macquarie University, NSW 2122 (Australia)

    2013-02-15

    Utilizing electric potential and magnetic scalar potential formulas, which contain zero-order Bessel functions of the first kind and the constitutive relations of topological insulators, we obtained the induced magnetic scalar potentials and induced magnetic monopole charges which are induced by a point charge in topological insulators. The results show that infinite image magnetic monopole charges are generated by a point electric charge. The magnitude of the induced magnetic monopole charges are determined not only by the point electric charge, but also by the material parameters. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electric potential and magnetic scalar potential which contain zero-order Bessel function of the first kind were derived. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Boundary conditions of topological insulator were built. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Induced monopole charges were worked out.

  11. The truncated splice variant of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, PPARα-tr, autonomously regulates proliferative and pro-inflammatory genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Maria; Bayha, Christine; Klein, Kathrin; Müller, Simon; Weiss, Thomas S.; Schwab, Matthias; Zanger, Ulrich M.

    2015-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) controls lipid/energy homeostasis and inflammatory responses. The truncated splice variant PPARα-tr was suggested to exert a dominant negative function despite being unable to bind consensus PPARα DNA response elements. The distribution and variability factor of each PPARα variant were assessed in the well-characterized cohort of human liver samples (N = 150) on the mRNA and protein levels. Specific siRNA-mediated downregulation of each transcript as well as specific overexpression with subsequent qRT-PCR analysis of downstream genes was used for investigation of specific functional roles of PPARα-wt and PPARα-tr forms in primary human hepatocytes. Bioinformatic analyses of genome-wide liver expression profiling data suggested a possible role of PPARα-tr in downregulating proliferative and pro-inflammatory genes. Specific gene silencing of both forms in primary human hepatocytes showed that induction of metabolic PPARα-target genes by agonist WY14,643 was prevented by PPARα-wt knock-down but neither prevented nor augmented by PPARα-tr knock-down. WY14,643 treatment did not induce proliferative genes including MYC, CDK1, and PCNA, and knock-down of PPARα-wt had no effect, while PPARα-tr knock-down caused up to 3-fold induction of these genes. Similarly, induction of pro-inflammatory genes IL1B, PTGS2, and CCL2 by IL-6 was augmented by knock-down of PPARα-tr but not of PPARα-wt. In contrast to human proliferative genes, orthologous mouse genes were readily inducible by WY14,643 in PPARα-tr non-expressing AML12 mouse hepatocytes. Induction was augmented by overexpression of PPARα-wt and attenuated by overexpression of PPARα-tr. Pro-inflammatory genes including IL-1β, CCL2 and TNFα were induced by WY14,643 in mouse and human cells and both PPARα forms attenuated induction. As potential mechanism of PPARα-tr inhibitory action we suggest crosstalk with WNT/β-catenin pathway. Finally

  12. Inducible defences in Acacia sieberiana in response to giraffe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . The resultant browsing pressure has led to the evolution of both physical and chemical responses in Acacia trees. In an observational study, we investigated the physical and chemical defenses in Acacia sieberiana var. woodii in response to ...

  13. Radiation-induced adaptive response in the intact mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Morio

    2009-01-01

    The author and coworkers have revealed that radiation adaptive response (AR) is seen also in the bone marrow of the intact mouse, of which details are described here. First, SPF ICR mice were pre-irradiated (PI) with 0-0.1 Gy of X-ray and after 2 months, subsequently irradiated (SI) with 7.75 Gy. Survival rates at 30 days after SI were about 14% in mice with PI 0-0.025 Gy whereas 40% or more in animals with PI 0.05-0.1 Gy: bone marrow death was found significantly suppressed in this effective PI dose range. The death 2 weeks after SI was found also inhibited at PI 0.3-0.5 Gy. Second, PI doses and interval between PI and SI for acquiring the radio-resistance (RR) were studied and third, the PI 0.3-0.5 Gy with SI 8.0 Gy at 9-17 days later revealed that regional PI of the head (central nervous system) was found unnecessary for RR and of abdomen (systems of hemopoiesis, immunity and digestion), essential. Fourth, strain difference of RR was shown by the fact that RR was observed only in C57BL mouse as well, but neither in BALB/c nor C3H strain. Next, at 12 days after SI 4.25-6.75 Gy (PI 0.5 Gy at 14 days before), mouse spleen cells were subjected to colony formation analysis by counting the endogenous hemopoietic stem cells, which revealed that those cells were increased to about 5 times by PI. Suppression of SI-induced hemorrhage was found in mice with PI by the decreased fecal hemoglobin content. Finally, AR was similarly studied in p53 +/+ and its knockout C57BL mice and was not found in the latter animal, indicating the participation of p53 in AR of the intact mouse. Elucidation of AR mechanisms in the intact animal seems to require somewhat different aspect from that in cells. The results were controvertible to the general concept that radiation risk is proportional to cumulative dose, suggesting that low dose radiation differs from high dose one in biological effect. (K.T.)

  14. Karyopherin alpha2 is essential for rRNA transcription and protein synthesis in proliferative keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Umegaki-Arao

    Full Text Available Karyopherin proteins mediate nucleocytoplasmic trafficking and are critical for protein and RNA subcellular localization. Recent studies suggest KPNA2 expression is induced in tumor cells and is strongly associated with prognosis, although the precise roles and mechanisms of KPNA2 overexpression in proliferative disorders have not been defined. We found that KPNA2 expression is induced in various proliferative disorders of the skin such as psoriasis, Bowen's disease, actinic keratosis, squamous cell carcinoma, Paget's disease, Merkel cell carcinoma, and mycosis fungoides. siRNA-mediated KPNA suppression revealed that KPNA2 is essential for significant suppression of HaCaT proliferation under starvation conditions. Ribosomal RNA transcription and protein synthesis were suppressed by starvation combined with knockdown of KPNA (including KPNA2 expression. KPNA2 localized to the nucleolus and interacted with proteins associated with mRNA processing, ribonucleoprotein complex biogenesis, chromatin modification, and transcription, as demonstrated by tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry. KPNA2 may be an important promoter of ribosomal RNA and protein synthesis in tumor cells.

  15. HIV-induced immunodeficiency. Relatively preserved phytohemagglutinin as opposed to decreased pokeweed mitogen responses may be due to possibly preserved responses via CD2/phytohemagglutinin pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, B; Jakobsen, K D; Odum, N

    1989-01-01

    and eight controls were chosen for the following studies. Expression of T3, Ti, delta receptors, and CD2 was investigated and showed an increased percentage of CD2 receptors positive cells in HIV seropositive subjects without AIDS. The proliferative responses of PBL to stimulation with PHA, PWM, antibodies....... In patients, these responses were less suppressed than the responses to PWM indicating that stimulation with mitogens is more complex than a simple stimulation of Ti/T3 and CD2 receptors. Further investigations were done on resting T cells, i.e., lymphocytes depleted of macrophages and pre-activated cells....... Addition of PHA to these cells resulted in preactivation with expression of IL-2R (CD25) but not in proliferation. In contrast, addition of PHA plus SRBC, which bind to the CD2 receptors caused IL-2R expression, IL-2 production, and proliferation. Addition of PWM + SRBC did not result in proliferation...

  16. Anti-proliferative activity of the quassinoid NBT-272 in childhood medulloblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helson Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With current treatment strategies, nearly half of all medulloblastoma (MB patients die from progressive tumors. Accordingly, the identification of novel therapeutic strategies remains a major goal. Deregulation of c-MYC is evident in numerous human cancers. In MB, over-expression of c-MYC has been shown to correlate with anaplasia and unfavorable prognosis. In neuroblastoma – an embryonal tumor with biological similarities to MB – the quassinoid NBT-272 has been demonstrated to inhibit cellular proliferation and to down-regulate c-MYC protein expression. Methods To study MB cell responses to NBT-272 and their dependence on the level of c-MYC expression, DAOY (wild-type, empty vector transfected or c-MYC transfected, D341 (c-MYC amplification and D425 (c-MYC amplification human MB cells were used. The cells were treated with different concentrations of NBT-272 and the impact on cell proliferation, apoptosis and c-MYC expression was analyzed. Results NBT-272 treatment resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cellular proliferation (IC50 in the range of 1.7 – 9.6 ng/ml and in a dose-dependent increase in apoptotic cell death in all human MB cell lines tested. Treatment with NBT-272 resulted in up to 90% down-regulation of c-MYC protein, as demonstrated by Western blot analysis, and in a significant inhibition of c-MYC binding activity. Anti-proliferative effects were slightly more prominent in D341 and D425 human MB cells with c-MYC amplification and slightly more pronounced in c-MYC over-expressing DAOY cells compared to DAOY wild-type cells. Moreover, treatment of synchronized cells by NBT-272 induced a marked cell arrest at the G1/S boundary. Conclusion In human MB cells, NBT-272 treatment inhibits cellular proliferation at nanomolar concentrations, blocks cell cycle progression, induces apoptosis, and down-regulates the expression of the oncogene c-MYC. Thus, NBT-272 may represent a novel drug candidate to inhibit

  17. Contribution of radiation-induced, nitric oxide-mediated bystander effect to radiation-induced adaptive response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, H.; Ohnishi, T.

    There has been a recent upsurge of interest in radiation-induced adaptive response and bystander effect which are specific modes in stress response to low-dose low-dose rate radiation Recently we found that the accumulation of inducible nitric oxide NO synthase iNOS in wt p53 cells was induced by chronic irradiation with gamma rays followed by acute irradiation with X-rays but not by each one resulting in an increase in nitrite concentrations of medium It is suggested that the accumulation of iNOS may be due to the depression of acute irradiation-induced p53 functions by pre-chronic irradiation In addition we found that the radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells against acute irradiation with X-rays was reduced after chronic irradiation with gamma rays This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells was nearly completely suppressed by the addition of NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO to the medium This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells is just radiation-induced adaptive response suggesting that NO-mediated bystander effect may considerably contribute to adaptive response induced by radiation

  18. Halofuginone has anti-proliferative effects in acute promyelocytic leukemia by modulating the transforming growth factor beta signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena L de Figueiredo-Pontes

    Full Text Available Promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor alpha (PML-RARα expression in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL impairs transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ signaling, leading to cell growth advantage. Halofuginone (HF, a low-molecular-weight alkaloid that modulates TGFβ signaling, was used to treat APL cell lines and non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID mice subjected to transplantation with leukemic cells from human chorionic gonadotrophin-PML-RARα transgenic mice (TG. Cell cycle analysis using incorporated bromodeoxyuridine and 7-amino-actinomycin D showed that, in NB4 and NB4-R2 APL cell lines, HF inhibited cellular proliferation (P<0.001 and induced apoptosis (P = 0.002 after a 24-hour incubation. Addition of TGFβ revealed that NB4 cells were resistant to its growth-suppressive effects and that HF induced these effects in the presence or absence of the cytokine. Cell growth inhibition was associated with up-regulation of TGFβ target genes involved in cell cycle regulation (TGFB, TGFBRI, SMAD3, p15, and p21 and down-regulation of MYC. Additionally, TGFβ protein levels were decreased in leukemic TG animals and HF in vivo could restore TGFβ values to normal. To test the in vivo anti-leukemic activity of HF, we transplanted NOD/SCID mice with TG leukemic cells and treated them with HF for 21 days. HF induced partial hematological remission in the peripheral blood, bone marrow, and spleen. Together, these results suggest that HF has anti-proliferative and anti-leukemic effects by reversing the TGFβ blockade in APL. Since loss of the TGFβ response in leukemic cells may be an important second oncogenic hit, modulation of TGFβ signaling may be of therapeutic interest.

  19. The effect of irradiation on function in self-renewing normal tissues with differing proliferative organisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheldon, T.E.; Michalowski, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    The primary effect of irradiation on self-renewing normal tissues is sterilisation of their proliferative cells, but how this translates into failure of tissue function depends on the mode of organisation of the tissue concerned. It has recently been suggested (Michalowski, 1981) that proliferative normal tissues may be classed as ''hierarchical'' (like haemopoietic tissues) or as ''flexible'' (like liver parenchyma) and that radiation injury to tissue function develops by different pathways in these tissues. Mathematical model studies confirm the different radiation responses of differently organized tissues. Tissues of the ''flexible'' or ''F-type'' category display a variety of novel radiobiological properties, different from those of the more familiar ''hierarchical'' or ''H-type'' tissues. The ''F-type'' responses are strongly influenced by radiation-sterilised (''doomed'') cells, and is is suggested that the role of ''doomed'' cells has been undervalued relative to that of clonogenic survivors. Since ''F-type'' tissues have characteristically low rates of cell renewal, it is possible that these tissues are preferentially responsible for late effects of irradiation in clinical radiotherapy. (author)

  20. Different proliferative capacity of lung fibroblasts obtained from control subjects and patients with emphysema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordhoek, JA; Postma, DS; Chong, LL; Vos, JTWM; Kauffman, HF; Timens, W; van Straaten, JFM

    2003-01-01

    To characterize the possible role of a dysregulated proliferative capacity of pulmonary fibroblasts in insufficient tissue repair in lungs from patients with pulmonary emphysema, the authors undertook in vitro proliferative studies with pulmonary fibroblasts obtained from lung tissue of patients

  1. Metabolic and adaptive immune responses induced in mice infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated metabolic and immuno-inflammatory responses of mice infected with tissue-dwelling larvae of Trichinella zimbabwensis and explored the relationship between infection, metabolic parameters and Th1/Th17 immune responses. Sixty (60) female BALB/c mice aged between 6 to 8 weeks old were ...

  2. Carbon dioxide induces erratic respiratory responses in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon, Dean F; Craighead, Brandie; Lorenz, Laura

    2009-01-01

    CO(2) respiration stimulates both anxiety and dyspnea ("air hunger") and has long been used to study panic vulnerability and respiratory control. High comorbidity with panic attacks suggests individuals with bipolar disorder may also mount a heightened anxiety response to CO(2). Moreover, problems in the arousal and modulation of appetites are central to the clinical syndromes of mania and depression; hence CO(2) may arouse an abnormal respiratory response to "air hunger". 72 individuals (34 bipolar I, 25 depressive and bipolar spectrum, 13 with no major affective diagnosis) breathed air and air with 5% CO(2) via facemask for up to 15 min each; subjective and respiratory responses were recorded. Nearly half the subjects diverged from the typical response to a fixed, mildly hypercapneic environment, which is to increase breathing acutely, and then maintain a hyperpneic plateau. The best predictors of an abnormal pattern were bipolar diagnosis and anxiety from air alone. 25 individuals had a panic response; panic responses from CO(2) were more likely in subjects with bipolar I compared to other subjects, however the best predictors of a panic response overall were anxiety from air alone and prior history of panic attacks. Heterogeneous sample, liberal definition of panic attack. Carbon dioxide produces abnormal respiratory and heightened anxiety responses among individuals with bipolar and depressive disorders. These may be due to deficits in emotional conditioning related to fear and appetite. Although preliminary, this work suggests a potentially useful test of a specific functional deficit in bipolar disorder.

  3. Mitochondrial localization of the low level p53 protein in proliferative cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferecatu, Ioana; Bergeaud, Marie; Rodriguez-Enfedaque, Aida; Le Floch, Nathalie [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France); Oliver, Lisa [INSERM U601, Universite de Nantes, Faculte de Medecine, Nantes Cedex (France); Rincheval, Vincent; Renaud, Flore [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France); Vallette, Francois M. [INSERM U601, Universite de Nantes, Faculte de Medecine, Nantes Cedex (France); Mignotte, Bernard [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France); Vayssiere, Jean-Luc, E-mail: jean-luc.vayssiere@uvsq.fr [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France)

    2009-10-02

    p53 protein plays a central role in suppressing tumorigenesis by inducing cell cycle arrest or apoptosis through transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Emerging publications suggest that following stress, a fraction of p53 translocates to mitochondria to induce cytochrome c release and apoptosis. However, the localization of p53 under unstressed conditions remains largely unexplored. Here we show that p53 is localized at mitochondria in absence of apoptotic stimuli, when cells are proliferating, localization observed in various cell types (rodent and human). This is also supported by acellular assays in which p53 bind strongly to mitochondria isolated from rat liver. Furthermore, the mitochondria subfractionation study and the alkaline treatment of the mitochondrial p53 revealed that the majority of mitochondrial p53 is present in the membranous compartments. Finally, we identified VDAC, a protein of the mitochondrial outer-membrane, as a putative partner of p53 in unstressed/proliferative cells.

  4. Mitochondrial localization of the low level p53 protein in proliferative cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferecatu, Ioana; Bergeaud, Marie; Rodriguez-Enfedaque, Aida; Le Floch, Nathalie; Oliver, Lisa; Rincheval, Vincent; Renaud, Flore; Vallette, Francois M.; Mignotte, Bernard; Vayssiere, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    p53 protein plays a central role in suppressing tumorigenesis by inducing cell cycle arrest or apoptosis through transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Emerging publications suggest that following stress, a fraction of p53 translocates to mitochondria to induce cytochrome c release and apoptosis. However, the localization of p53 under unstressed conditions remains largely unexplored. Here we show that p53 is localized at mitochondria in absence of apoptotic stimuli, when cells are proliferating, localization observed in various cell types (rodent and human). This is also supported by acellular assays in which p53 bind strongly to mitochondria isolated from rat liver. Furthermore, the mitochondria subfractionation study and the alkaline treatment of the mitochondrial p53 revealed that the majority of mitochondrial p53 is present in the membranous compartments. Finally, we identified VDAC, a protein of the mitochondrial outer-membrane, as a putative partner of p53 in unstressed/proliferative cells.

  5. The use of analogy in pro-life argumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Mazilu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper is concerned with how analogy is strategically used in pro-life argumentation on abortion. Pragma-dialectics (van Eemeren and Grootendorst 1992 offers a set of critical questions by means of which I will evaluate the use of the argumentation based on a relation of analogy in terms of dialectical soundness. Examining various pro-life texts, I have noticed that the analogies employed remain unexplained. Therefore, despite the apparent similarities between abortion and the German holocaust or slavery, for instance, there are essential differences which are not mentioned. I claim that these analogies mainly have a rhetorical function, to operate what has been called by Micheli (2007: 960 “a transfer of emotional consensus”.

  6. Scoring radiologic characteristics to predict proliferative potential in meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashiba, Tetsuo; Hashimoto, Naoya; Maruno, Motohiko; Izumoto, Shuichi; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Kagawa, Naoki; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of using radiologic characteristics to predict the proliferative potential in meningiomas. Our statistical analysis revealed that the presence of peritumoral edema, an ambiguous brain-tumor border, and irregular tumor shape were significantly correlated with a higher MIB-1 staining index (SI) value. We developed the following scoring system for specific features in each tumor: peritumoral edema (tumor with edema=1, tumor without edema=0); brain-tumor border (tumor with any ambiguous border=1, tumor circumscribed by a distinct rim=0); and tumor shape (tumor with irregular shape=1, tumor with smooth shape=0). Using Spearman's correlation coefficient analysis, we found a significant correlation (P<0.005) between total score calculated for each patient and SI value. Our findings suggest that the proliferative potential of meningiomas can be predicted using a less invasive preoperative examination focusing on the presence of peritumoral edema, ambiguous brain-tumor border, and irregular tumor shape. (author)

  7. Attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Shigella flexneri 2a strains mucosally deliver DNA vaccines encoding measles virus hemagglutinin, inducing specific immune responses and protection in cotton rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasetti, Marcela F; Barry, Eileen M; Losonsky, Genevieve; Singh, Mahender; Medina-Moreno, Sandra M; Polo, John M; Ulmer, Jeffrey; Robinson, Harriet; Sztein, Marcelo B; Levine, Myron M

    2003-05-01

    Measles remains a leading cause of child mortality in developing countries. Residual maternal measles antibodies and immunologic immaturity dampen immunogenicity of the current vaccine in young infants. Because cotton rat respiratory tract is susceptible to measles virus (MV) replication after intranasal (i.n.) challenge, this model can be used to assess the efficacy of MV vaccines. Pursuing a new measles vaccine strategy that might be effective in young infants, we used attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi CVD 908-htrA and Shigella flexneri 2a CVD 1208 vaccines to deliver mucosally to cotton rats eukaryotic expression plasmid pGA3-mH and Sindbis virus-based DNA replicon pMSIN-H encoding MV hemagglutinin (H). The initial i.n. dose-response with bacterial vectors alone identified a well-tolerated dosage (1 x 10(9) to 7 x 10(9) CFU) and a volume (20 micro l) that elicited strong antivector immune responses. Animals immunized i.n. on days 0, 28, and 76 with bacterial vectors carrying DNA plasmids encoding MV H or immunized parenterally with these naked DNA vaccine plasmids developed MV plaque reduction neutralizing antibodies and proliferative responses against MV antigens. In a subsequent experiment of identical design, cotton rats were challenged with wild-type MV 1 month after the third dose of vaccine or placebo. MV titers were significantly reduced in lung tissue of animals immunized with MV DNA vaccines delivered either via bacterial live vectors or parenterally. Since attenuated serovar Typhi and S. flexneri can deliver measles DNA vaccines mucosally in cotton rats, inducing measles immune responses (including neutralizing antibodies) and protection, boosting strategies can now be evaluated in animals primed with MV DNA vaccines.

  8. Proliferative verrucous leukoplakia: an aggressive form of oral leukoplakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shopper, Thomas P; Brannon, Robert B; Stalker, William H

    2004-01-01

    Proliferative verrucous leukoplakia (PVL) is an aggressive form of oral leukoplakia that is persistent, often multifocal, and refractory to treatment with a high risk of recurrence and malignant transformation. This article describes the clinical aspects and histologic features of a case that demonstrated the typical behavior pattern in a long-standing, persistent lesion of PVL of the mandibular gingiva and that ultimately developed into squamous cell carcinoma. Prognosis is poor for this seemingly harmless-appearing white lesion of the oral mucosa.

  9. Prolific plant regeneration through organogenesis from scalps of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four types of potting media comprising of sand, peat, sand + top soil + goat dung (3:2:1 v/v) and top soil + sand (1:1 v/v) were evaluated during acclimatization of the plantlets. Prolific shoot regeneration from scalps was obtained on MS medium containing 2.5 mM BAP, at 9.61 and 40.6 shoots per explant after 4 and 8 weeks ...

  10. SjCRT, a recombinant Schistosoma japonicum calreticulin, induces maturation of dendritic cells and a Th1-polarized immune response in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhen Ma

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known that immunization of radiation-attenuated (RA schistosoma cercariae or schistosomula can induce high levels of protective immunity against schistosoma cercariae reinfection in many animals. Many studies have shown that the Th1 cellular immune response is crucial for the protective effect elicited by RA schistosomula. However, the molecular mechanism of this strong protective immunity remains unclear. Methods The expression profiles of Schistosoma japonicum calreticulin (SjCRT in RA and normal schistosoma-derived cells were investigated by flow cytometry. The effect of recombinant SjCRT (rSjCRT on mouse dendritic cells (DCs was determined by FACS, ELISA and RT-PCR analysis. We also analyzed the effects of SjCRT on the activation of spleen cells from mice immunized with rSjCRT by detecting lymphocyte proliferation and the cytokine profiles of splenocytes. Results We found that the expression level of SjCRT in the cells from RA larvae was significantly higher than that in cells from normal schistosomula at early stages of development (day 4. The results of effect of rSjCRT on mouse DCs showed that rSjCRT could induce phenotypic and functional maturation of DCs, and SjCRT bound to the surface of DCs through the CD91 receptor and could be engulfed by DCs. The results of activation of splenocytes from mice immunized with rSjCRT also demonstrate that rSjCRT can effectively stimulate the proliferative response of splenic lymphocytes, elicit splenocytes from immunized mice to secrete high levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-4, and activate CD4+ T cells to produce high levels of IFN-γ. Conclusion SjCRT is one of the immunostimulatory molecules released from RA schistosomula cells, might play a crucial role in conferring a Th1-polarized immune response induced by RA cercariae/schistosomula in mice, and is a candidate molecule responsible for the high levels of protective immunity induced by RA schistosomula.

  11. Nitric oxide mediated bystander responses induced by microbeam targeted cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, C.; Prise, K.M.; Folkard, M.; Michael, B.D.

    2003-01-01

    Considerable evidence has recently been accumulated in support of the existence of a 'bystander effect', which cells having received no irradiation show biological consequences from their vicinal irradiated cells. The application of microbeams is providing new insights into the radiation-induced bystander effect. The present study found that when a fraction of radioresistant human glioblastoma cells were individually targeted with a precise number of helium ions generated from the Gray Cancer Institute Charged Particle Microbeam, micronucleus (MN) induction significantly exceeded the expected value that was calculated from the number of MN observed when all of the cells were targeted assuming no bystander effect occurring. Even when only a single cell within a population was hit by one helium ion, the MN induction in the population could be increased by 16%. These results provide direct evidence of radiation-induced bystander effect. Moreover, MN was effectively induced in the unirradiated primary human fibroblasts and glioblastoma cells either co-cultured with irradiated cells or treated with the medium harvested from irradiated cells, indicating a signal molecule was produced from the irradiated cells. However, when c-PTIO, a nitric oxide (NO)-specific scavenger, was present in the medium during and after irradiation until MN analysis, the production of MN in all of the above cases was reduced to low levels. Consequently, NO plays an important role in the radiation-induced bystander effect

  12. Atypical hyperplasia, proliferative fibrocystic change, and exogenous hormone use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zera, R T; Danielson, D; Van Camp, J M; Schmidt-Steinbrunn, B; Hong, J; McCoy, M; Anderson, W R; Linzie, B M; Rodriguez, J L

    2001-10-01

    The association between breast cancer development and exogenous hormone use (EHU) is suggested by indirect clinical evidence. We undertook this study to better define the relationship that EHU has with proliferative fibrocystic change (PFC) and atypical hyperplasia (AH). Women diagnosed with AH without associated carcinoma from January 1990 to December 1999 were compared with control subjects who underwent breast biopsy procedures during the same interval and who were diagnosed with either a proliferative fibrocystic change (PFC) or a nonproliferative fibrocystic change (NPFC). EHU was defined as the use of estrogen or progesterone taken together or separately within 3 months of biopsy. EHU was significantly higher in patients with AH compared with women with NPFC (P =.01). This observation was also significant if all proliferative change (both AH and PFC) was compared with NPFC (P =.03); it was not significant when PFC alone was compared with NPFC. No significant difference in EHU was demonstrated between women with AH and those with PFC. There is strong association between AH and EHU. These results support the theory that a continuum exists between hyperplasia and carcinoma and that EHU may influence the transition from one to the other in an undefined subset of women. We encourage our patients with AH to discontinue EHU.

  13. Proliferation Index and Karyometric Features of Pancreatic Intraductal Proliferative Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romana Tomaszewska

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing frequency and poor prognosis in pancreatic cancer prompt us to search for morphological lesions being a substrate for its development. Studies of autopsy and surgically resected material as well as recent molecular studies have proved that one of the possible pathways of pancreatic neoplasia is the intraepithelial proliferation – dysplasia – cancer sequence. In the present paper we studied the proliferative activity (Ki‐67 index in pancreatic intraepithelial proliferative lesions and its correlation with geometric features of cell nuclei as signs of increasing dysplasia. The studies were carried out in a group of 35 patients operated on for pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis and other conditions not associated with the pancreas. We used immunohistochemical methods and basic morphometric parameters. The results of our studies indicate that the cell proliferative activity depends both on the type of epithelial proliferation and underlying pancreatic disease. The values of Ki‐67 index are significantly different in low‐grade proliferation (flat and papillary hyperplasia and high‐grade proliferation (atypical papillary hyperplasia and carcinoma in situ. A set of karyometric features correlates with Ki‐67 index but there is no single feature which would have a diagnostic value.

  14. Understanding the role of p53 in adaptive response to radiation-induced germline mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlois, N.L.; Quinn, J.S.; Somers, C.M.; Boreham, D.R.; Mitchel, R.E.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Radiation-induced adaptive response is now a widely studied area of radiation biology. Studies have demonstrated reduced levels of radiation-induced biological damage when an 'adaptive dose' is given before a higher 'challenge dose' compared to when the challenge dose is given alone. It has been shown in some systems to be a result of inducible cellular repair systems. The adaptive response has been clearly demonstrated in many model systems, however its impact on heritable effects in the mammalian germline has never been studied. Expanded Simple Tandem Repeat (ESTR) loci have been used as markers demonstrating that induced heritable mutations in mice follow a dose-response relationship. Recent data in our laboratory show preliminary evidence of radiation-induced adaptive response suppressing germline mutations at ESTR loci in wild type mice. The frequency of heritable mutations was significantly reduced when a priming dose of 0.1 Gy was given 24 hours prior to a 1 Gy acute challenging dose. We are now conducting a follow-up study to attempt to understand the mechanism of this adaptive response. P53 is known to play a significant role in governing apoptosis, DNA repair and cancer induction. In order to determine what function p53 has in the adaptive response for heritable mutations, we have mated radiation treated Trp53+/- male mice (C57Bl) to untreated, normal females (C57Bl). Using DNA fingerprinting, we are investigating the rate of inherited radiation-induced mutations on pre- and post-meiotic radiation-treated gametocytes by examining mutation frequencies in offspring DNA. If p53 is integral in the mechanism of adaptive response, we should not see an adaptive response in radiation-induced heritable mutations in these mice. This research is significant in that it will provide insight to understanding the mechanism behind radiation-induced adaptive response in the mammalian germline

  15. Ionizing radiation induced biological response and its public health implication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeteles, Gy.

    1994-01-01

    Several sources of ionizing radiation exist in natural and artificial environment of humanity. An overview of their biological effects and the biological response of man is present. Emphasize is given to the differences caused by high and low doses. The interrelation of radiology, radiation hygiene and public health is pointed out. Especially, the physical and biological effects of radiation on cells and their responses are discussed in more detail. (R.P.)

  16. A test of genotypic variation in specificity of herbivore-induced responses in Solidago altissima L. (Asteraceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uesugi, A.; Poelman, E.H.; Kessler, A.

    2013-01-01

    Plant-induced responses to multiple herbivores can mediate ecological interactions among herbivore species, thereby influencing herbivore community composition in nature. Several studies have indicated high specificity of induced responses to different herbivore species. In addition, there may be

  17. Dichotomy of the human T cell response to Leishmania antigens. II. Absent or Th2-like response to gp63 and Th1-like response to lipophosphoglycan-associated protein in cells from cured visceral leishmaniasis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurtzhals, J A; Hey, A S; Jardim, A

    1994-01-01

    -gamma) production in PBMC from cured patients, while cells from non-exposed donors gave weak responses. A similar pattern was induced by lipophosphoglycan-associated protein (LPGAP). By contrast, the major surface protease of Leishmania, gp63, induced only a weak proliferative response without IFN-gamma production...... in five of 17 samples from cured patients. Four of the five responding cultures produced IL-4, i.e. the response to this antigen was of the Th2 type. Furthermore, sera from acutely ill visceral leishmaniasis patients contained high levels of IgG antibodies to gp63. The Th2-like response to gp63...

  18. THE BIOTIC FACTOR OF TREMATOD OPISTHORHIS FELINEUS INVASION INFLUENCE ON HOST IMMUNE STATUS AND SOMATIC CELLS PROLIFERATIVE ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Rybka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper confirms long-time opisthorhis invasion role as a risk factor of host immune system reconstitution as well as an important factor in holangiocarcinomas development. It was shown that opisthorhosis invasion primal stage induce host immune system reconstitution. Host immune B-cells system is activated by metacercaria antigens, while the same antigens inhibits T-cells activity. Opisthorhis metabolites stimulate proliferative mithogen-induced T-cells acti vity. Chronic opisthorchis invasion leads to immune system disbalance. It means: decrease of specific and non-speci fic natural killers activity, number of high proliferative activity T-lymphocytes and the shift of regulatory T-cells subset to suppressors prevalence. At the same time specific as well as non-specific T-suppressors functional ability is very low. It was shown T-cells helper-amplifier activation. Despite of circulating B-cells decrease the antibody produced cells number is spleen increases significantly at the same time with circulating immune complexes accumulation. Even 3–6 month after dehelmintisation the immune system disbalance decreases but lefts. In addition, chronic opisthorhis invasion leads to the proliferative processes activation in ductal epithelium, liver, lymph nodes and in other organs which leads to cancer proliferation. According to the results obtained the opisthorhis infected patients needs to be immunocorrected before as well as after dehelmintisation for holangiocancerogenesis profylaxis.

  19. Interleukin-12 induces a Th1-like response to Burkholderia mallei and limited protection in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amemiya, Kei; Meyers, Jennifer L; Trevino, Sylvia R; Chanh, Tran C; Norris, Sarah L; Waag, David M

    2006-02-27

    We evaluated the effect of interleukin (IL)-12 on the immune response to Burkholderia mallei in BALB/c mice. Mice were vaccinated with non-viable B. mallei cells with or without IL-12. There was a seven- to nine-fold increase in IgG2a levels, and a significant increase in the proliferative response and interferon (IFN)-gamma production by splenocytes from mice that received B. mallei and IL-12. We saw an increase in survivors in the groups of mice that received B. mallei and IL-12 when challenged, compared to mice that received only B. mallei or IL-12. The results suggest that IL-12 can enhance the Th1-like immune response to B. mallei and mediate limited protection from a lethal challenge.

  20. Apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects of all-trans retinoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamora, Monica; Ortega, Juan Alberto; Alana, Lide; Vinas, Octavi; Mampel, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    We examined the apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects of all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) in HeLa cells. Our results demonstrated that HeLa cells were more sensitive to the anti-proliferative effects of atRA than to its apoptotic effects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that caspase inhibition attenuates cell death but does not alter the atRA-dependent reduction in cell proliferation, which suggests that atRA-induced apoptosis is independent of the arrest in cell proliferation. To check whether ANT proteins mediated these atRA effects, we transiently transfected cells with expression vectors encoding for individual ANT (adenine nucleotide translocase 1-3). Our results revealed that ANT1 and ANT3 over-expressing HeLa cells increased their atRA sensitivity. Thus, our results not only demonstrate the different functional activities of ANT isoforms, but also contribute to a better understanding of the properties of atRA as an anti-tumoral agent used in cancer therapy

  1. Synthesis and Anti-Proliferative Effects of Mono- and Bis-Purinomimetics Targeting Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bistrović

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of mono-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidines 4a–4k, unsymmetrical bis-purine isosteres 5a–5e and symmetrical bis-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidines 6a and 6b connected via di(1,2,3-triazolylphenyl linker were synthesized by click chemistry. Whereas mono- 4g and bis-pseudopurine 5e showed selective inhibitory activities on cervical carcinoma (HeLa cells, bis-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine 6b exhibited potent and selective anti-proliferative effect in the nanomolar range on pancreatic carcinoma (CFPAC-1 cells. Among these, compound 6b induced a significant reduction in the expression level of CDK9 (cyclin-dependent kinase 9/cyclin T1 in CFPAC-1 cells concomitant with attenuation of proliferative signaling mediated by c-Raf (rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma and p38 MAP (mitogen-activated protein kinases. Our findings encourage further development of novel structurally related analog of 6b to obtain more selective anticancer agent for treating pancreatic cancer.

  2. Evaluation of in vitro anti-proliferative and immunomodulatory activities of compounds isolated from Curcuma longa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Grace G. L.; Chan, Ben C. L.; Hon, Po-Ming; Lee, Mavis Y. H.; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Ping-Chung; Lau, Clara B. S.

    2010-01-01

    The rhizome of Curcuma longa (CL) has been commonly used in Asia as a potential candidate for the treatment of different diseases, including inflammatory disorders and cancers. The present study evaluated the anti-proliferative activities of the isolated compounds (3 curcuminoids and 2 turmerones) from CL, using human cancer cell lines HepG2, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. The immunomodulatory activities of turmerones (α and aromatic) isolated from CL were also examined using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Our results showed that the curcuminoids (curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin) and α-turmerone significantly inhibited proliferation of cancer cells in dose-dependent manner. The IC50 values of these compounds in cancer cells ranged from 11.0–41.8 μg/ml. Alpha-turmerone induced MDA-MB-231 cells to undergo apoptosis, which was confirmed by annexin-V & propidium iodide staining, and DNA fragmentation assay. The caspase cascade was activated as shown by a significant decrease of procaspases-3, -8 and -9 in α-turmerone treated cells. Both α-turmerone and aromatic-turmerone showed stimulatory effects on PBMC proliferation and cytokine production. The anti-proliferative effect of α-turmerone and immunomodulatory activities of ar-turmerone were shown for the first time. The findings revealed the potential use of CL crude extract (containing curcuminoids and volatile oil including turmerones) as chemopreventive agent. PMID:20438793

  3. Sulfasalazine Attenuates Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B-Induced Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Krakauer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB and related exotoxins are important virulence factors produced by Staphylococcus aureus as they cause human diseases such as food poisoning and toxic shock. These toxins bind directly to cells of the immune system resulting in hyperactivation of both T lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages. The excessive release of proinflammatory cytokines from these cells mediates the toxic effects of SEB. This study examined the inhibitory activities of an anti-inflammatory drug, sulfasalazine, on SEB-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Sulfasalazine dose-dependently inhibited tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1 (IL-1 β, IL-2, IL-6, interferon γ (IFNγ, and various chemotactic cytokines from SEB-stimulated human PBMC. Sulfasalazine also potently blocked SEB-induced T cell proliferation and NFκB activation. These results suggest that sulfasalazine might be useful in mitigating the toxic effects of SEB by blocking SEB-induced host inflammatory cascade and signaling pathways.

  4. The AID-induced DNA damage response in chromatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniel, Jeremy A; Nussenzweig, André

    2013-01-01

    Chemical modifications to the DNA and histone protein components of chromatin can modulate gene expression and genome stability. Understanding the physiological impact of changes in chromatin structure remains an important question in biology. As one example, in order to generate antibody diversity...... with somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, chromatin must be made accessible for activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-mediated deamination of cytosines in DNA. These lesions are recognized and removed by various DNA repair pathways but, if not handled properly, can lead to formation...... of oncogenic chromosomal translocations. In this review, we focus the discussion on how chromatin-modifying activities and -binding proteins contribute to the native chromatin environment in which AID-induced DNA damage is targeted and repaired. Outstanding questions remain regarding the direct roles...

  5. Radiation-Induced Bystander Response: Mechanism and Clinical Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Absorption of energy from ionizing radiation (IR) to the genetic material in the cell gives rise to damage to DNA in a dose-dependent manner. There are two types of DNA damage; by a high dose (causing acute or deterministic effects) and by a low dose (related to chronic or stochastic effects), both of which induce different health effects. Among radiation effects, acute cutaneous radiation syndrome results from cell killing as a consequence of high-dose exposure.

  6. Ventilation and Perfusion Lung Scintigraphy of Allergen-Induced Airway Responses in Atopic Asthmatic Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Parameswaran

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Both ventilation (V and perfusion (Q of the lungs are altered in asthma, but their relationships with allergen-induced airway responses and gas exchange are not well described.

  7. Memory B-Cell and Antibody Responses Induced by Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoite Immunization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nahrendorf, W.; Scholzen, A.; Bijker, E.M.; Teirlinck, A.C.; Bastiaens, G.J.H.; Schats, R.; Hermsen, C.C.; Visser, L.G.; Langhorne, J.; Sauerwein, R.W.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immunization of healthy volunteers during receipt of chemoprophylaxis with Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites (CPS-immunization) induces sterile protection from malaria. Antibody responses have long been known to contribute to naturally acquired immunity against malaria, but their

  8. Transient cardio-respiratory responses to visually induced tilt illusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. J.; Ramsdell, C. D.; Mullen, T. J.; Oman, C. M.; Harm, D. L.; Paloski, W. H.

    2000-01-01

    Although the orthostatic cardio-respiratory response is primarily mediated by the baroreflex, studies have shown that vestibular cues also contribute in both humans and animals. We have demonstrated a visually mediated response to illusory tilt in some human subjects. Blood pressure, heart and respiration rate, and lung volume were monitored in 16 supine human subjects during two types of visual stimulation, and compared with responses to real passive whole body tilt from supine to head 80 degrees upright. Visual tilt stimuli consisted of either a static scene from an overhead mirror or constant velocity scene motion along different body axes generated by an ultra-wide dome projection system. Visual vertical cues were initially aligned with the longitudinal body axis. Subjective tilt and self-motion were reported verbally. Although significant changes in cardio-respiratory parameters to illusory tilts could not be demonstrated for the entire group, several subjects showed significant transient decreases in mean blood pressure resembling their initial response to passive head-up tilt. Changes in pulse pressure and a slight elevation in heart rate were noted. These transient responses are consistent with the hypothesis that visual-vestibular input contributes to the initial cardiovascular adjustment to a change in posture in humans. On average the static scene elicited perceived tilt without rotation. Dome scene pitch and yaw elicited perceived tilt and rotation, and dome roll motion elicited perceived rotation without tilt. A significant correlation between the magnitude of physiological and subjective reports could not be demonstrated.

  9. Visual-induced expectations modulate auditory cortical responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie evan Wassenhove

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Active sensing has important consequences on multisensory processing (Schroeder et al. 2010. Here, we asked whether in the absence of saccades, the position of the eyes and the timing of transient colour changes of visual stimuli could selectively affect the excitability of auditory cortex by predicting the where and the when of a sound, respectively. Human participants were recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG while maintaining the position of their eyes on the left, right, or centre of the screen. Participants counted colour changes of the fixation cross while neglecting sounds which could be presented to the left, right or both ears. First, clear alpha power increases were observed in auditory cortices, consistent with participants’ attention directed to visual inputs. Second, colour changes elicited robust modulations of auditory cortex responses (when prediction seen as ramping activity, early alpha phase-locked responses, and enhanced high-gamma band responses in the contralateral side of sound presentation. Third, no modulations of auditory evoked or oscillatory activity were found to be specific to eye position. Altogether, our results suggest that visual transience can automatically elicit a prediction of when a sound will occur by changing the excitability of auditory cortices irrespective of the attended modality, eye position or spatial congruency of auditory and visual events. To the contrary, auditory cortical responses were not significantly affected by eye position suggesting that where predictions may require active sensing or saccadic reset to modulate auditory cortex responses, notably in the absence of spatial orientation to sounds.

  10. Estimation of induced secondary metabolites in chickpea tissues in response to elicitor preparation of seaweeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, F.; Iqbal, S.

    2000-01-01

    Disease response of plants in terms of induced browning and phytoalexin (induced secondary metabolites) production were recorded in the tissues of Cicer arietinum (Chick pea) treated with the High Molecular Crude Elicitor Preparations, HMWCEP 'Polysaccharides' of Hypnea musciformis (red algae), Padina tetrastromatica (brown algae) and Ulva lactulus (green algae). A UV-visible spectrophotometric method has been developed for the quantification of induced secondary metabolites with time. (author)

  11. Imatinib mesylate exerts anti-proliferative effects on osteosarcoma cells and inhibits the tumour growth in immunocompetent murine models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bérengère Gobin

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant bone tumour characterized by osteoid production and/or osteolytic lesions of bone. A lack of response to chemotherapeutic treatments shows the importance of exploring new therapeutic methods. Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec, Novartis Pharma, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was originally developed for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. Several studies revealed that imatinib mesylate inhibits osteoclast differentiation through the M-CSFR pathway and activates osteoblast differentiation through PDGFR pathway, two key cells involved in the vicious cycle controlling the tumour development. The present study investigated the in vitro effects of imatinib mesylate on the proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, and migration ability of five osteosarcoma cell lines (human: MG-63, HOS; rat: OSRGA; mice: MOS-J, POS-1. Imatinib mesylate was also assessed as a curative and preventive treatment in two syngenic osteosarcoma models: MOS-J (mixed osteoblastic/osteolytic osteosarcoma and POS-1 (undifferentiated osteosarcoma. Imatinib mesylate exhibited a dose-dependent anti-proliferative effect in all cell lines studied. The drug induced a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in most cell lines, except for POS-1 and HOS cells that were blocked in the S phase. In addition, imatinib mesylate induced cell death and strongly inhibited osteosarcoma cell migration. In the MOS-J osteosarcoma model, oral administration of imatinib mesylate significantly inhibited the tumour development in both preventive and curative approaches. A phospho-receptor tyrosine kinase array kit revealed that PDGFRα, among 7 other receptors (PDFGFRβ, Axl, RYK, EGFR, EphA2 and 10, IGF1R, appears as one of the main molecular targets for imatinib mesylate. In the light of the present study and the literature, it would be particularly interesting to revisit therapeutic evaluation of imatinib mesylate in osteosarcoma according to the tyrosine-kinase receptor

  12. Allergen immunotherapy induces a suppressive memory response mediated by IL-10 in a mouse asthma model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, Joost L. M.; van Esch, Betty C. A. M.; Hofman, Gerard A.; Kapsenberg, Martien L.; Weller, Frank R.; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Human studies have demonstrated that allergen immunotherapy induces memory suppressive responses and IL-10 production by allergen-specific T cells. Previously, we established a mouse model in which allergen immunotherapy was effective in the suppression of allergen-induced asthma

  13. Wave-induced Hydroelastic response of fast monohull ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    1996-01-01

    High-speed ships are weight sensitive structures and high strength steel, aluminium or composites are preferred building materials. it is characteristic for these materials that they result in larger hull flexibility than more conventional materials. Therefore, for large fast ships the lowest...... of a quadratic strip theory formulated in the frequency domain. The springing response is thereby excited partly be resonance and partly by non-linear excitation. Special emphasis is given to the influence of springing on fatigue damage as the extreme responses even for very flexible ships are quite insensitive...

  14. Sertraline inhibits formalin-induced nociception and cardiovascular responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santuzzi, C.H. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Futuro Neto, H.A. [Departamento de Morfologia, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Escola de Medicina da Empresa Brasileira de Ensino, Pesquisa e Extensão, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Escola Superior de Ciências da Saúde, Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Vitória, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Pires, J.G.P. [Escola de Medicina da Empresa Brasileira de Ensino, Pesquisa e Extensão, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Centro Universitário do Espírito Santo, Colatina, ES (Brazil); Gonçalves, W.L.S. [Centro Universitário do Espírito Santo, Colatina, ES (Brazil); Tiradentes, R.V.; Gouvea, S.A.; Abreu, G.R. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil)

    2011-11-18

    The objective of the present study was to determine the antihyperalgesic effect of sertraline, measured indirectly by the changes of sciatic afferent nerve activity, and its effects on cardiorespiratory parameters, using the model of formalin-induced inflammatory nociception in anesthetized rats. Serum serotonin (5-HT) levels were measured in order to test their correlation with the analgesic effect. Male Wistar rats (250-300 g) were divided into 4 groups (N = 8 per group): sertraline-treated group (Sert + Saline (Sal) and Sert + Formalin (Form); 3 mg·kg{sup −1}·day{sup −1}, ip, for 7 days) and saline-treated group (Sal + Sal and Sal + Form). The rats were injected with 5% (50 µL) formalin or saline into the right hind paw. Sciatic nerve activity was recorded using a silver electrode connected to a NeuroLog apparatus, and cardiopulmonary parameters (mean arterial pressure, heart rate and respiratory frequency), assessed after arterial cannulation and tracheotomy, were monitored using a Data Acquisition System. Blood samples were collected from the animals and serum 5-HT levels were determined by ELISA. Formalin injection induced the following changes: sciatic afferent nerve activity (+50.8 ± 14.7%), mean arterial pressure (+1.4 ± 3 mmHg), heart rate (+13 ± 6.8 bpm), respiratory frequency (+4.6 ± 5 cpm) and serum 5-HT increased to 1162 ± 124.6 ng/mL. Treatment with sertraline significantly reduced all these parameters (respectively: +19.8 ± 6.9%, -3.3 ± 2 mmHg, -13.1 ± 10.8 bpm, -9.8 ± 5.7 cpm) and serum 5-HT level dropped to 634 ± 69 ng/mL (P < 0.05). These results suggest that sertraline plays an analgesic role in formalin-induced nociception probably through a serotonergic mechanism.

  15. Response of Tomato Genotypes to Induced Salt Stress | Agong ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirteen tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) genotypes were subjected to salt treatment under hydroponics and their responses monitored in a set of two experiments with the objective of advancing them as potential salt tolerant tomato scion and/or rootstocks. Salt applications ranged from 0 to 2% NaCl, with the resultant ...

  16. Physiological responses of Vallisneria spiraslis L. induced by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A two-flume experiment with submerged plant Vallisneria spiraslis L. was conducted to investigate the effects of different hydraulic conditions on physiological responses when exposed to water polluted with copper (Cu) and nitrogen (N). Plants were divided into two groups and grown for 120 h in hydrodynamic and ...

  17. Stochastic procedures for extreme wave induced responses in flexible ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Andersen, Ingrid Marie Vincent; Seng, Sopheak

    2014-01-01

    Different procedures for estimation of the extreme global wave hydroelastic responses in ships are discussed. Firstly, stochastic procedures for application in detailed numerical studies (CFD) are outlined. The use of the First Order Reliability Method (FORM) to generate critical wave episodes...

  18. PPARγ Ligand-Induced Unfolded Protein Responses in Monocytes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High levels of oxLDL lead to cell dysfunction and apoptosis, a phenomenon known as lipotoxicity. Disturbing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) function results in ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR), which tends to restore ER homeostasis but switches to apoptosis when ER stress is prolonged. In the present study the ...

  19. Functional MRI of food-induced brain responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this research was to find central biomarkers of satiety, i.e., physiological measures in the brain that relate to subjectively rated appetite, actual food intake, or both. This thesis describes the changes in brain activity in response to food stimuli as measured by functional

  20. PPARγ Ligand-Induced Unfolded Protein Responses in Monocytes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    Disturbing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) function results in ER stress and unfolded protein response. (UPR), which tends to ... in mnocyte/macrophage cell lines as evident of the activation/up-regulation of ER stress/UPR genes. Cholesterol does not seem to exert ... inflammation (Tiwari et al., 2008). One prominent feature of ...

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells induce dermal fibroblast responses to injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Andria N.; Willis, Elise; Chan, Vincent T.; Muffley, Lara A.; Isik, F. Frank; Gibran, Nicole S.; Hocking, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    Although bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to promote repair when applied to cutaneous wounds, the mechanism for this response remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of paracrine signaling from mesenchymal stem cells on dermal fibroblast responses to injury including proliferation, migration and expression of genes important in wound repair. Dermal fibroblasts were co-cultured with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells grown in inserts, which allowed for paracrine interactions without direct cell contact. In this co-culture model, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells regulate dermal fibroblast proliferation, migration and gene expression. When co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts show increased proliferation and accelerated migration in a scratch assay. A chemotaxis assay also demonstrated that dermal fibroblasts migrate towards bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A PCR array was used to analyze the effect of mesenchymal stem cells on dermal fibroblast gene expression. In response to mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts up-regulate integrin alpha 7 expression and down-regulate expression of ICAM1, VCAM1 and MMP11. These observations suggest that mesenchymal stem cells may provide an important early signal for dermal fibroblast responses to cutaneous injury.

  2. Adipokinetic hormone-induced antioxidant response in Spodoptera littoralis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Večeřa, Josef; Krishnan, N.; Mithöfer, A.; Vogel, H.; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 155, č. 2 (2012), s. 389-395 ISSN 1532-0456 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/1215 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : adipokinetic hormone * antioxidant response * antioxidant enzymes Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.707, year: 2012

  3. Bending-induced electromechanical coupling and large piezoelectric response in a micromachined diaphragm

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhihong

    2013-11-04

    We investigated the dependence of electromechanical coupling and the piezoelectric response of a micromachined Pb(Zr 0.52 Ti 0.48)O 3 (PZT) diaphragm on its curvature by observing the impedance spectrum and central deflection responses to a small AC voltage. The curvature of the diaphragm was controlled by applying air pressure to its back. We found that a depolarized flat diaphragm does not initially exhibit electromechanical coupling or the piezoelectric response. However, upon the application of static air pressure to the diaphragm, both electromechanical coupling and the piezoelectric response can be induced in the originally depolarized diaphragm. The piezoelectric response increases as the curvature increases and a giant piezoelectric response can be obtained from a bent diaphragm. The obtained results clearly demonstrate that a high strain gradient in a diaphragm can polarize a PZT film through a flexoelectric effect, and that the induced piezoelectric response of the diaphragm can be controlled by adjusting its curvature.

  4. Ethanol cellular defense induce unfolded protein response in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet eNavarro-Tapia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol is a valuable industrial product and a common metabolite used by many cell types. However, this molecule produces high levels of cytotoxicity affecting cellular performance at several levels. In the presence of ethanol, cells must adjust some of their components, such as the membrane lipids to maintain homeostasis. In the case of microorganism as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ethanol is one of the principal products of their metabolism and is the main stress factor during fermentation. Although many efforts have been made, mechanisms of ethanol tolerance are not fully understood and very little evidence is available to date for specific signaling by ethanol in the cell. This work studied two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, CECT10094 and Temohaya-MI26, isolated from flor wine and agave fermentation (a traditional fermentation from Mexico respectively, which differ in ethanol tolerance, in order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the ethanol stress response and the reasons for different ethanol tolerance. The transcriptome was analyzed after ethanol stress and, among others, an increased activation of genes related with the unfolded protein response (UPR and its transcription factor, Hac1p, was observed in the tolerant strain CECT10094. We observed that this strain also resist more UPR agents than Temohaya-MI26 and the UPR-ethanol stress correlation was corroborated observing growth of 15 more strains and discarding UPR correlation with other stresses as thermal or oxidative stress. Furthermore, higher activation of UPR pathway in the tolerant strain CECT10094 was observed using a UPR mCherry reporter. Finally, we observed UPR activation in response to ethanol stress in other S. cerevisiae ethanol tolerant strains as the wine strains T73 and EC1118. This work demonstrates that the UPR pathway is activated under ethanol stress occurring in a standard fermentation and links this response to an enhanced ethanol tolerance. Thus

  5. Intranasal administration of a therapeutic HIV vaccine (Vacc-4x induces dose-dependent systemic and mucosal immune responses in a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Brekke

    Full Text Available Vacc-4x, a Gag p24-based therapeutic HIV vaccine, has been shown to reduce viral load set-points after intradermal administration. In this randomized controlled pilot study we investigate intranasal administration of Vacc-4x with Endocine as adjuvant.Safety and immunogenicity were tested in patients on effective ART. They were randomized to low, medium or high dose Vacc-4x or adjuvant alone, administered four times at weekly intervals with no booster. Vacc-4x-specific T cell responses were measured in vitro by proliferation and in vivo by a single DTH skin test at the end of study. Nasal and rectal mucosal secretions were analyzed for Vacc-4x-specific antibodies by ELISA. Immune regulation induced by Vacc-4x was assessed by functional blockade of the regulatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-β.Vacc-4x proliferative T cell responses increased only among the vaccinated (p ≤ 0.031. The low dose group showed the greatest increase in Vacc-4x CD8+T cell responses (p = 0.037 and developed larger DTH (p = 0.005 than the adjuvant group. Rectal (distal Vacc-4x IgA and IgG antibodies also increased (p = 0.043 in this group. In contrast, the high dose generated higher nasal (local Vacc-4x IgA (p = 0.028 and serum IgG (p = 0.030 antibodies than the adjuvant. Irrespective of dose, increased Vacc-4x CD4+T cell responses were associated with low proliferation (r = -0.82, p < 0.001 and high regulation (r = 0.61, p = 0.010 at baseline.Intranasal administration of Vacc-4x with Endocine was safe and induced dose-dependent vaccine-specific T cell responses and both mucosal and systemic humoral responses. The clinical significance of dose, immune regulation and mucosal immunity warrants further investigation.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01473810.

  6. Serotoninergic Modulation of Basal Cardiovascular Responses and Responses Induced by Isotonic Extracellular Volume Expansion in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semionatto, Isadora Ferraz; Raminelli, Adrieli Oliveira; Alves, Angelica Cristina; Capitelli, Caroline Santos; Chriguer, Rosangela Soares

    2017-02-01

    Isotonic blood volume expansion (BVE) induced alterations of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity in the heart and blood vessels, which can be modulated by serotonergic pathways. To evaluate the effect of saline or serotonergic agonist (DOI) administration in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) on cardiovascular responses after BVE. We recorded pulsatile blood pressure through the femoral artery to obtain the mean arterial pressure (MAP), systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR) and the sympathetic-vagal ratio (LF/HF) of Wistar rats before and after they received bilateral microinjections of saline or DOI into the PVN, followed by BVE. No significant differences were observed in the values of the studied variables in the different treatments from the control group. However, when animals are treated with DOI followed by BVE there is a significant increase in relation to the BE control group in all the studied variables: MBP (114.42±7.85 vs 101.34±9.17); SBP (147.23±14.31 vs 129.39±10.70); DBP (98.01 ±4.91 vs 87.31±8.61); HR (421.02±43.32 vs 356.35±41.99); and LF/HF ratio (2.32±0.80 vs 0.27±0.32). The present study showed that the induction of isotonic BVE did not promote alterations in MAP, HR and LF/HF ratio. On the other hand, the injection of DOI into PVN of the hypothalamus followed by isotonic BVE resulted in a significant increase of all variables. These results suggest that serotonin induced a neuromodulation in the PVN level, which promotes an inhibition of the baroreflex response to BVE. Therefore, the present study suggests the involvement of the serotonergic system in the modulation of vagal reflex response at PVN in the normotensive rats. Expansão de volume extracelular (EVEC) promove alterações da atividade simpática e parassimpática no coração e vasos sanguíneos, os quais podem ser moduladas por vias serotoninérgicas. Avaliar o efeito da administração de salina ou agonista serotonin

  7. Ventilatory response to induced auditory arousals during NREM sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, M S; Morgan, B J; Finn, L; Toiber, F S; Crabtree, D C; Puleo, D S; Skatrud, J B

    1997-09-01

    Sleep state instability is a potential mechanism of central apnea/hypopnea during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. To investigate this postulate, we induced brief arousals by delivering transient (0.5 second) auditory stimuli during stable NREM sleep in eight normal subjects. Arousal was determined according to American Sleep Disorders Association (ASDA) criteria. A total of 96 trials were conducted; 59 resulted in cortical arousal and 37 did not result in arousal. In trials associated with arousal, minute ventilation (VE) increased from 5.1 +/- 1.24 minutes to 7.5 +/- 2.24 minutes on the first posttone breath (p = 0.001). However, no subsequent hypopnea or apnea occurred as VE decreased gradually to 4.8 +/- 1.5 l/minute (p > 0.05) on the fifth posttone breath. Trials without arousal did not result in hyperpnea on the first breath nor subsequent hypopnea. We conclude that 1) auditory stimulation resulted in transient hyperpnea only if associated with cortical arousal; 2) hypopnea or apnea did not occur following arousal-induced hyperpnea in normal subjects; 3) interaction with fluctuating chemical stimuli or upper airway resistance may be required for arousals to cause sleep-disordered breathing.

  8. The ovarian DNA damage repair response is induced prior to phosphoramide mustard-induced follicle depletion, and ataxia telangiectasia mutated inhibition prevents PM-induced follicle depletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesan, Shanthi, E-mail: shanthig@iastate.edu; Keating, Aileen F., E-mail: akeating@iastate.edu

    2016-02-01

    Phosphoramide mustard (PM) is an ovotoxic metabolite of cyclophosphamide and destroys primordial and primary follicles potentially by DNA damage induction. The temporal pattern by which PM induces DNA damage and initiation of the ovarian response to DNA damage has not yet been well characterized. This study investigated DNA damage initiation, the DNA repair response, as well as induction of follicular demise using a neonatal rat ovarian culture system. Additionally, to delineate specific mechanisms involved in the ovarian response to PM exposure, utility was made of PKC delta (PKCδ) deficient mice as well as an ATM inhibitor (KU 55933; AI). Fisher 344 PND4 rat ovaries were cultured for 12, 24, 48 or 96 h in medium containing DMSO ± 60 μM PM or KU 55933 (48 h; 10 nM). PM-induced activation of DNA damage repair genes was observed as early as 12 h post-exposure. ATM, PARP1, E2F7, P73 and CASP3 abundance were increased but RAD51 and BCL2 protein decreased after 96 h of PM exposure. PKCδ deficiency reduced numbers of all follicular stages, but did not have an additive impact on PM-induced ovotoxicity. ATM inhibition protected all follicle stages from PM-induced depletion. In conclusion, the ovarian DNA damage repair response is active post-PM exposure, supporting that DNA damage contributes to PM-induced ovotoxicity. - Highlights: • PM exposure induces DNA damage repair gene expression. • Inhibition of ATM prevented PM-induced follicle depletion. • PKCδ deficiency did not impact PM-induced ovotoxicity.

  9. High doses of salicylate causes prepulse facilitation of onset-gap induced acoustic startle response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Doolittle, Lauren; Flowers, Elizabeth; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Qiuju

    2014-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle reflex (PPI), a well-established method for evaluating sensorimotor gating function, has been used to detect tinnitus in animal models. Reduced gap induced PPI (gap-PPI) was considered as a sign of tinnitus. The silent gap used in the test contains both onset and offset signals. Tinnitus may affect these cues differently. In this experiment, we studied the effects of a high dose of salicylate (250 mg/kg, i.p.), an inducer of reversible tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss, on gap-PPI induced by three different gaps: an onset-gap with 0.1 ms onset and 25 ms offset time, an offset-gap with 25 ms onset and 0.1 ms offset time, and an onset-offset-gap with 0.1 ms onset and offset time. We found that the onset-gaps induced smaller inhibitions than the offset-gaps before salicylate treatment. The offset-gap induced PPI was significantly reduced 1-3h after salicylate treatment. However, the onset-gap caused a facilitation of startle response. These results suggest that salicylate induced reduction of gap-PPI was not only caused by the decrease of offset-gap induced PPI, but also by the facilitation induced by the onset-gap. Since the onset-gap induced PPI is caused by neural offset response, our results suggest that salicylate may cause a facilitation of neural response to an offset acoustical signal. Treatment of vigabatrin (60 mg/kg/day, 14 days), which elevates the GABA level in the brain, blocked the offset-gap induced PPI and onset-gap induced facilitation caused by salicylate. These results suggest that enhancing GABAergic activities can alleviate salicylate induced tinnitus. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Compensatory responses induced by oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULA I MOREIRA

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress occurs early in the progression of Alzheimer disease, significantly before the development of the pathologic hallmarks, neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. In the first stage of development of the disease, amyloid-β deposition and hyperphosphorylated tau function as compensatory responses and downstream adaptations to ensure that neuronal cells do not succumb to oxidative damage. These findings suggest that Alzheimer disease is associated with a novel balance in oxidant homeostasis.

  11. Host response in bovine mastitis experimentally induced with Staphylococcus chromogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simojoki, H; Orro, T; Taponen, S; Pyörälä, S

    2009-02-16

    An experimental infection model was developed to study host response to intramammary infection in cows caused by Staphylococcus chromogenes. CNS intramammary infections have become very common in modern dairy herds, and they can remain persistent in the mammary gland. More information would be needed about the pathophysiology of CNS mastitis, and an experimental mastitis model is a means for this research. Six primiparous Holstein-Friesian cows were challenged with S. chromogenes 4 weeks after calving. One udder quarter of each cow was inoculated with 2.1 x 10(6)cfu of S. chromogenes. All cows became infected and clinical signs were mild. Milk production of the challenged quarter decreased on average by 16.3% during 7 days post-challenge. Cows eliminated bacteria in a few days, except for one cow which developed persistent mastitis. Milk indicators of inflammation, SCC and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAGase) returned to normal within a week. Milk NAGase activity increased moderately, which reflects minor tissue damage in the udder. Concentrations of serum amyloid A (SAA) and milk amyloid A (MAA) were both elevated at 12h PC. MAA was affected by the milking times, and was at its highest before the morning milking. In our experimental model, systemic acute phase protein response with SAA occurred as an on-off type reaction. In conclusion, this experimental model could be used to study host response in CNS mastitis caused by the main CNS species and also for comparison of the host response in a mild intramammary infection and in more severe mastitis models.

  12. Antimicrobial and Anti-Proliferative Effects of Skin Mucus Derived from Dasyatis pastinaca (Linnaeus, 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Fuochi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to chemotherapy occurs in various diseases (i.e., cancer and infection, and for this reason, both are very difficult to treat. Therefore, novel antimicrobial and chemotherapic drugs are needed for effective antibiotic therapy. The aim of the present study was to assess the antimicrobial and anti-proliferative effects of skin mucus derived from Dasyatis pastinaca (Linnaeus, 1758. Our results showed that skin mucus exhibited a significant and specific antibacterial activity against Gram-negative bacteria but not against Gram-positive bacteria. Furthermore, we also observed a significant antifungal activity against some strains of Candida spp. Concerning anti-proliferative activity, we showed that fish mucus was specifically toxic for acute leukemia cells (HL60 with an inhibition of proliferation in a dose dependent manner (about 52% at 1000 μg/mL of fish skin mucous, FSM. Moreover, we did not observe effects in healthy cells, in neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y, and multiple myeloma cell lines (MM1, U266. Finally, it exhibited strong expression and activity of chitinase which may be responsible, at least in part, for the aforementioned results.

  13. Genomic counter-stress changes induced by the relaxation response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery A Dusek

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Mind-body practices that elicit the relaxation response (RR have been used worldwide for millennia to prevent and treat disease. The RR is characterized by decreased oxygen consumption, increased exhaled nitric oxide, and reduced psychological distress. It is believed to be the counterpart of the stress response that exhibits a distinct pattern of physiology and transcriptional profile. We hypothesized that RR elicitation results in characteristic gene expression changes that can be used to measure physiological responses elicited by the RR in an unbiased fashion.We assessed whole blood transcriptional profiles in 19 healthy, long-term practitioners of daily RR practice (group M, 19 healthy controls (group N(1, and 20 N(1 individuals who completed 8 weeks of RR training (group N(2. 2209 genes were differentially expressed in group M relative to group N(1 (p<0.05 and 1561 genes in group N(2 compared to group N(1 (p<0.05. Importantly, 433 (p<10(-10 of 2209 and 1561 differentially expressed genes were shared among long-term (M and short-term practitioners (N(2. Gene ontology and gene set enrichment analyses revealed significant alterations in cellular metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, generation of reactive oxygen species and response to oxidative stress in long-term and short-term practitioners of daily RR practice that may counteract cellular damage related to chronic psychological stress. A significant number of genes and pathways were confirmed in an independent validation set containing 5 N(1 controls, 5 N(2 short-term and 6 M long-term practitioners.This study provides the first compelling evidence that the RR elicits specific gene expression changes in short-term and long-term practitioners. Our results suggest consistent and constitutive changes in gene expression resulting from RR may relate to long term physiological effects. Our study may stimulate new investigations into applying transcriptional profiling for accurately measuring

  14. Perillyl alcohol suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Oh; Okunishi, Katsuhide; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Harada, Hiroaki; Kawahata, Kimito; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Dohi, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits the mevalonate pathway. •We examined whether POH suppresses immune responses with a mouse model of asthma. •POH treatment during sensitization suppressed Ag-induced priming of CD4 + T cells. •POH suppressed airway eosinophila and cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes. -- Abstract: Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits farnesyl transferase and geranylgeranyl transferase, key enzymes that induce conformational and functional changes in small G proteins to conduct signal production for cell proliferation. Thus, it has been tried for the treatment of cancers. However, although it affects the proliferation of immunocytes, its influence on immune responses has been examined in only a few studies. Notably, its effect on antigen-induced immune responses has not been studied. In this study, we examined whether POH suppresses Ag-induced immune responses with a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. POH treatment of sensitized mice suppressed proliferation and cytokine production in Ag-stimulated spleen cells or CD4 + T cells. Further, sensitized mice received aerosolized OVA to induce allergic airway inflammation, and some mice received POH treatment. POH significantly suppressed indicators of allergic airway inflammation such as airway eosinophilia. Cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes was also significantly suppressed. These results demonstrate that POH suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung. Considering that it exists naturally, POH could be a novel preventive or therapeutic option for immunologic lung disorders such as asthma with minimal side effects

  15. Innate responses of the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis to a herbivore-induced plant volatile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sznajder, B.; Sabelis, M.W.; Egas, M.

    2011-01-01

    The responses of the predatory mite P. persimilis to herbivore-induced plant volatiles are at least partly genetically determined. Thus, there is potential for the evolution of this behaviour by natural selection. We tested whether distinct predator genotypes with contrasting responses to a specific

  16. Blood flow response to electrically induced twitch and tetanic lower-limb muscle contractions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, T.W.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the effect of electric stimulation (ES)-induced twitch with tetanic leg muscle contractions on blood flow responses and to assess blood flow responses in the contralateral inactive leg. DESIGN: Intervention with within-subject comparisons. SETTING: University research

  17. Vaccine-induced inflammation attenuates the vascular responses to mental stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paine, N.J.; Ring, C.; Bosch, J.A.; Drayson, M.T.; Aldred, S.; Veldhuijzen van Zanten, J.J.C.S.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is associated with poorer vascular function, with evidence to suggest that inflammation can also impair the vascular responses to mental stress. This study examined the effects of vaccine-induced inflammation on vascular responses to mental stress in healthy participants. Eighteen male

  18. Leptin Inhibits the Proliferation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Induced by Angiotensin II through Nitric Oxide-Dependent Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaia Rodríguez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study was designed to investigate whether leptin modifies angiotensin (Ang II-induced proliferation of aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs from 10-week-old male Wistar and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, and the possible role of nitric oxide (NO. Methods. NO and NO synthase (NOS activity were assessed by the Griess and 3H-arginine/citrulline conversion assays, respectively. Inducible NOS (iNOS and NADPH oxidase subutnit Nox2 expression was determined by Western-blot. The proliferative responses to Ang II were evaluated through enzymatic methods. Results. Leptin inhibited the Ang II-induced proliferative response of VSMCs from control rats. This inhibitory effect of leptin was abolished by NOS inhibitor, NMMA, and iNOS selective inhibitor, L-NIL, and was not observed in leptin receptor-deficient fa/fa rats. SHR showed increased serum leptin concentrations and lipid peroxidation. Despite a similar leptin-induced iNOS up-regulation, VSMCs from SHR showed an impaired NOS activity and NO production induced by leptin, and an increased basal Nox2 expression. The inhibitory effect of leptin on Ang II-induced VSMC proliferation was attenuated. Conclusion. Leptin blocks the proliferative response to Ang II through NO-dependent mechanisms. The attenuation of this inhibitory effect of leptin in spontaneous hypertension appears to be due to a reduced NO bioavailability in VSMCs.

  19. VISUAL OUTCOME FOLLOWING PANRETINAL PHOTOCOAGULATION IN PROLIFERATIVE DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nellaye Mani Sindhu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetes mellitus can be called as a noninfectious pandemic and the incidence of diabetic retinopathy is also uncontrollable. This vision-threatening complication can be treated by early diagnosis and effective treatment like panretinal photocoagulation. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of panretinal photocoagulation on visual acuity, colour vision, contrast sensitivity and severity of visual field changes. MATERIALS AND METHODS Prospective study of visual outcome following panretinal photocoagulation in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy conducted in Retina Clinic, RIO, Trivandrum, during the time period one year from April 2008. Inclusion Criteria- Eyes with proliferative diabetic retinopathy, visual acuity better than or equal to 6/60, a follow up of at least 6 months after panretinal photocoagulation. Exclusion Criteria- Eyes with cataractous changes in the lens, eyes, which would be undergoing or have undergone focal photocoagulation eyes, which undergone barrage or sectoral retinal photocoagulation, patients with colour blindness, eyes with vitreous haemorrhage and macular preretinal haemorrhage, glaucomatous patients with peripheral field loss. RESULTS The mean age of the patients was 52 years. Male patients (30 outnumbered the female patients (23. Mean duration of diabetes was 14.42 years. Though, there is a statistically significant reduction in visual acuity in the first followup, which was improved and stabilised by 6 months. There is a statistically significant reduction in the contrast sensitivity, which was stabilised after 3 months. Only, 9.5% patients had peripheral constrictions of visual field and no significant change in the colour vision. CONCLUSION We recommend panretinal photocoagulation for all patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

  20. Inducing in situ, nonlinear soil response applying an active source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P.A.; Bodin, P.; Gomberg, J.; Pearce, F.; Lawrence, Z.; Menq, F.-Y.

    2009-01-01

    [1] It is well known that soil sites have a profound effect on ground motion during large earthquakes. The complex structure of soil deposits and the highly nonlinear constitutive behavior of soils largely control nonlinear site response at soil sites. Measurements of nonlinear soil response under natural conditions are critical to advancing our understanding of soil behavior during earthquakes. Many factors limit the use of earthquake observations to estimate nonlinear site response such that quantitative characterization of nonlinear behavior relies almost exclusively on laboratory experiments and modeling of wave propagation. Here we introduce a new method for in situ characterization of the nonlinear behavior of a natural soil formation using measurements obtained immediately adjacent to a large vibrator source. To our knowledge, we are the first group to propose and test such an approach. Employing a large, surface vibrator as a source, we measure the nonlinear behavior of the soil by incrementally increasing the source amplitude over a range of frequencies and monitoring changes in the output spectra. We apply a homodyne algorithm for measuring spectral amplitudes, which provides robust signal-to-noise ratios at the frequencies of interest. Spectral ratios are computed between the receivers and the source as well as receiver pairs located in an array adjacent to the source, providing the means to separate source and near-source nonlinearity from pervasive nonlinearity in the soil column. We find clear evidence of nonlinearity in significant decreases in the frequency of peak spectral ratios, corresponding to material softening with amplitude, observed across the array as the source amplitude is increased. The observed peak shifts are consistent with laboratory measurements of soil nonlinearity. Our results provide constraints for future numerical modeling studies of strong ground motion during earthquakes.

  1. Shock induced response of structural systems analytical and experimental investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stangenberg, F.

    1984-01-01

    This contribution refers to the behaviour of reinforced concrete structures impacted by deformable missiles. The difference with hard missile impact problems, about which generally more knowledge exists, are point out. Structural response effects beyond the immediate contact face vicinity, beyond the local load introduction zone - i.e. effects of punching shear, of bending, of vibration transmission etc. - are emphasized. Two- and three-dimensional analytical approaches verified by experimental evaluations are discussed, and typical phenomena of the behaviour of reinforced concrete structures subjected to impact loads are demonstrated. (Author) [pt

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) transient responses induced by hypercapnia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    CSF transient responses to CO 2 inhalation were measured before and after facilitated perfusate flow through subarachnoid spaces of anesthetized cats during ventriculocisternal perfusion with artificial CSF containing 14 C-dextran. Convective mixing of perfusate in subarachnoid spaces was augmented while infusion constant, either by impeding cisternal efflux of perfusate by raising the cisternal outflow cannula (high CSF pressure), or by preventing CSF outflow by clamping the cisternal outflow cannula (stopflow; S-F). CSF transients were also measured before and after systemic administration of phenoxybenzamine (PBZ) in order to evaluate the contribution of sympatho-adrenergic activity to craniospinal CSF redistribution and mixing. Results from high CSF pressure and S-F experiments indicate that unequilibrated CSF contributes significantly to the reduced tracer concentration in CSF volume (Vd) since SCF effluent tracer concentration (Cd) was decreased after subarachnoid facilitated flow. Further, results from S-F studies indicate that at least 50% of Cd is due to craniospinal fluid redistribution, a process which, along with CSF outflow transients, was unaffected by PBZ. Conversely, PBZ administration decreased steady state SCF formation and absorption through alpha-mediated cerebrovascular responses and/or through beta-adrenoceptor inhibition of metabolism of CSF secretory epithelium

  3. Seeds of Brassicaceae weeds have an inherent or inducible response to the germination stimulant karrikinolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Rowena L; Stevens, Jason C; Griffiths, Erin M; Adamek, Markus; Gorecki, Marta J; Powles, Stephen B; Merritt, David J

    2011-10-01

    Karrikinolide (KAR(1)) is a smoke-derived chemical that can trigger seeds to germinate. A potential application for KAR(1) is for synchronizing the germination of weed seeds, thereby enhancing the efficiency of weed control efforts. Yet not all species germinate readily with KAR(1), and it is not known whether seemingly non-responsive species can be induced to respond. Here a major agronomic weed family, the Brassicaceae, is used to test the hypothesis that a stimulatory response to KAR(1) may be present in physiologically dormant seeds but may not be expressed under all circumstances. Seeds of eight Brassicaceae weed species (Brassica tournefortii, Raphanus raphanistrum, Sisymbrium orientale, S. erysimoides, Rapistrum rugosum, Lepidium africanum, Heliophila pusilla and Carrichtera annua) were tested for their response to 1 µm KAR(1) when freshly collected and following simulated and natural dormancy alleviation, which included wet-dry cycling, dry after-ripening, cold and warm stratification and a 2 year seed burial trial. Seven of the eight Brassicaceae species tested were stimulated to germinate with KAR(1) when the seeds were fresh, and the remaining species became responsive to KAR(1) following wet-dry cycling and dry after-ripening. Light influenced the germination response of seeds to KAR(1), with the majority of species germinating better in darkness. Germination with and without KAR(1) fluctuated seasonally throughout the seed burial trial. KAR(1) responses are more complex than simply stating whether a species is responsive or non-responsive; light and temperature conditions, dormancy state and seed lot all influence the sensitivity of seeds to KAR(1), and a response to KAR(1) can be induced. Three response types for generalizing KAR(1) responses are proposed, namely inherent, inducible and undetected. Given that responses to KAR(1) were either inherent or inducible in all 15 seed lots included in this study, the Brassicaceae may be an ideal target for

  4. Allyl isothiocyanate induced stress response in Caenorhabditis elegans

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    Saini AkalRachna K

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allyl isothiocyanate (AITC from mustard is cytotoxic; however the mechanism of its toxicity is unknown. We examined the effects of AITC on heat shock protein (HSP 70 expression in Caenorhabditis elegans. We also examined factors affecting the production of AITC from its precursor, sinigrin, a glucosinolate, in ground Brassica juncea cv. Vulcan seed as mustard has some potential as a biopesticide. Findings An assay to determine the concentration of AITC in ground mustard seed was improved to allow the measurement of AITC release in the first minutes after exposure of ground mustard seed to water. Using this assay, we determined that temperatures above 67°C decreased sinigrin conversion to AITC in hydrated ground B. juncea seed. A pH near 6.0 was found to be necessary for AITC release. RT-qPCR revealed no significant change in HSP70A mRNA expression at low concentrations of AITC ( 1.0 μM resulted in a four- to five-fold increase in expression. A HSP70 ELISA showed that AITC toxicity in C. elegans was ameliorated by the presence of ground seed from low sinigrin B. juncea cv. Arrid. Conclusions • AITC induced toxicity in C. elegans, as measured by HSP70 expression. • Conditions required for the conversion of sinigrin to AITC in ground B. juncea seed were determined. • The use of C. elegans as a bioassay to test AITC or mustard biopesticide efficacy is discussed.

  5. Responsiveness of entomopathogenic fungi to menadione-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Rosana F F; Souza, Roberta K F; Braga, Gilberto U L; Rangel, Drauzio E N

    2014-12-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi are predisposed to ROS induced by heat and UV-A radiation when outside the insect host. When inside the host, they are subject to phagocytic cells that generate ROS to eliminate invading pathogens. The oxidative stress tolerance of the entomopathogenic fungi Aschersonia aleyrodis (ARSEF 430 and 10276), Aschersonia placenta (ARSEF 7637), Beauveria bassiana (ARSEF 252), Isaria fumosorosea (ARSEF 3889), Lecanicillium aphanocladii (ARSEF 6433), Metarhizium acridum (ARSEF 324), Metarhizium anisopliae (ARSEF 5749), Metarhizium brunneum (ARSEF 1187 and ARSEF 5626), Metarhizium robertsii (ARSEF 2575), Tolypocladium cylindrosporum (ARSEF 3392), Tolypocladium inflatum (ARSEF 4877), and Simplicillium lanosoniveum (ARSEF 6430 and ARSEF 6651) was studied based on conidial germination on a medium supplemented with menadione. Conidial germination was evaluated 24 h after inoculation on potato dextrose agar (PDA) (control) or PDA supplemented with menadione. The two Aschersonia species (ARSEF 430, 7637, and 10276) were the most susceptible fungi, followed by the two Tolypocladium species (ARSEF 3392 and 4877) and the M. acridum (ARSEF 324). Metarhizium brunneum (ARSEF 5626) and M. anisopliae (ARSEF 5749) were the most tolerant isolates with MIC 0.28 mM. All fungal isolates, except ARSEF 5626 and ARSEF 5749, were not able to germinate at 0.20 mM. Copyright © 2014 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Induced responses to herbivory and jasmonate in three milkweed species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmann, Sergio; Johnson, M Daisy; Agrawal, Anurag A

    2009-11-01

    We studied constitutive and induced defensive traits (latex exudation, cardenolides, proteases, and C/N ratio) and resistance to monarch caterpillars (Danaus plexippus) in three closely related milkweed species (Asclepias angustifolia, A. barjoniifolia and A. fascicularis). All traits showed significant induction in at least one of the species. Jasmonate application only partially mimicked the effect of monarch feeding. We found some correspondence between latex and cardenolide content and reduced larval growth. Larvae fed cut leaves of A. angustifolia grew better than larvae fed intact plants. Addition of the cardenolide digitoxin to cut leaves reduced larval growth but ouabain (at the same concentration) had no effect. We, thus, confirm that latex and cardenolides are major defenses in milkweeds, effective against a specialist herbivore. Other traits such as proteases and C/N ratio additionally may be integrated in the defense scheme of those plants. Induction seems to play an important role in plants that have an intermediate level of defense, and we advocate incorporating induction as an additional axis of the plant defense syndrome hypothesis.

  7. Exercise-induced stress responses of amenorrheic and eumenorrheic runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, A B; Horvath, S M

    1984-12-01

    The role of stress in exercise-associated amenorrhea was investigated. Sex hormones [FSH, LH, androstenedione (A), testosterone, estrone, and 17 beta-estradiol (E2)], stress hormones [dehydroepiandrosterone, cortisol (F), PRL, norepinephrine, and epinephrine] and psychological status (Profile of Mood States and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) were measured at rest and in response to a 40-min 80% of maximal aerobic power (VO2max) run in highly trained eumenorrheic (n = 8) and amenorrheic (n = 7) women runners matched for fatness [eumenorrheic, 16.5 +/- 2.3% (+/- SD); amenorrheic, 14.9 +/- 4.8] and maximal aerobic power (eumenorrheic, 58.9 +/- 5.7 ml/kg X min; amenorrheic, 59.8 +/- 4.6). Eumenorrheic runners were tested between days 3 and 8 of the follicular phase. At rest, decreased plasma FSH, LH, and E2 concentrations were found in amenorrheic women [eumenorrheic FSH, 10.5 +/- 4.1 mIU/ml; amenorrheic FSH, 4.9 +/- 1.6 (P less than 0.01); eumenorrheic LH, 14.1 +/- 6.1 mIU/ml; amenorrheic LH, 5.1 +/- 1.7 (P less than 0.01); eumenorrheic E2, 20 +/- 9 pg/ml; amenorrheic E2, 7 +/- 6 (P less than 0.05)]. Other sex and stress hormones and psychological measurements were similar in the two groups and were within the normal range. Ventilatory, cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, and psychological responses to the submaximal run were identical. Among eumenorrheic women, all stress hormones and A increased after exercise, but PRL, F, and A were unchanged among amenorrheic women. Estrone, E2, and testosterone did not change in either group. These observations are inconsistent with a general stress hypothesis of exercise-associated amenorrhea as well as with more specific hyperprolactinemic and hyperandrogenic hypotheses. In amenorrheic women, failure of PRL to increase in response to exercise may be due to their lack of E2, while failure of F and A to increase may indicate reduced adrenal 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/isomerase activity.

  8. In vitro anti-proliferative activity of clove extract on human gastric carcinoma

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    A. Karimi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Cancer cell resistance to common chemotherapy agents is on rise. Plants are considered valuable sources of herbal drugs for cancer therapy. The present study was conducted to investigate the in vitro antioxidant, anti-proliferative, and apoptosis-inducing properties of clove (Syzygium aromaticum L. extract in human gastric carcinoma (AGS. Methods: Crude ethanol extract of S. aromaticum dried buds was prepared and  in vitro anti-proliferative effects of the extract on AGS and normal Human dermal fibroblasts (HDF cell lines were studied by MTT assay. To examine apoptosis induction, AGS cells were incubated with IC50 concentrations of the extract, stained with propidium iodide (PI and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC, and analyzed by flow cytometry. Antioxidant activity and total phenolics and flavonoids contents were evaluated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assay, Folin-Ciocalteu method, and aluminum chloride colorimetric method, respectively. Results: The IC50 of DPPH and total phenolics and flavonoids contents of the extract were 10.05±1.93 μg/mL, 225.6±40 mg GAE/g, and 29.30±2.35 mgRUT/g, respectively. The IC50 of the extract against HDFs was 649 µg/mL, higher than AGS cells, which was 118.7 g/mL at 48 h after treatment. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the extract induced cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Crude ethanol S. aromaticum extract had high total phenolics content, and suppressed the proliferation of human gastric cancer cells, likely due to apoptosis induction. Further studies should be conducted to determine the mechanisms of its anticancer effects.

  9. Isoliquiritigenin exhibits anti-proliferative properties in the pituitary independent of estrogen receptor function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weis, Karen E.; Raetzman, Lori T.

    2016-01-01

    The plant flavonoid isoliquiritigenin (ISL) is a botanical estrogen widely taken as an herbal supplement to ease the symptoms of menopause. ISL has been also shown to have anti-tumor properties in a number of cancer cell backgrounds. However, the effects of ISL on normal cells are less well known and virtually unstudied in the context of the pituitary gland. We have established a pituitary explant culture model to screen chemical agents for gene expression changes within the pituitary gland during a period of active proliferation and differentiation. Using this whole-organ culture system we found ISL to be weakly estrogenic based on its ability to induce Cckar mRNA expression, an estrogen receptor (ER) mediated gene. Using a range of ISL from 200 nM to 200 μM, we discovered that ISL promoted cell proliferation at a low concentration, yet potently inhibited proliferation at the highest concentration. ICI 182,780 failed to antagonize ISL's repression of pituitary cell proliferation, indicating the effect is independent of ER signaling. Coincident with a decrease in proliferating cells, we observed down-regulation of transcript for cyclin D2 and E2 and a strong induction of mRNA and protein for the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor Cdkn1a (p21). Importantly, high dose ISL did not alter the balance of progenitor vs. differentiated cell types within the pituitary explants and they seemed otherwise healthy; however, TUNEL staining revealed an increase in apoptotic cell death in ISL treated cultures. Our results merit further examination of ISL as an anti-tumor agent in the pituitary gland. - Highlights: • Isoliquiritigenin possesses weak estrogenic activity based on induction of Cckar. • ISL can be anti-proliferative in pituitary explants without altering cell lineages. • Anti-proliferative behavior of ISL is not estrogen receptor mediated. • ISL induces p21 expression leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  10. Isoliquiritigenin exhibits anti-proliferative properties in the pituitary independent of estrogen receptor function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis, Karen E.; Raetzman, Lori T., E-mail: raetzman@life.illinois.edu

    2016-12-15

    The plant flavonoid isoliquiritigenin (ISL) is a botanical estrogen widely taken as an herbal supplement to ease the symptoms of menopause. ISL has been also shown to have anti-tumor properties in a number of cancer cell backgrounds. However, the effects of ISL on normal cells are less well known and virtually unstudied in the context of the pituitary gland. We have established a pituitary explant culture model to screen chemical agents for gene expression changes within the pituitary gland during a period of active proliferation and differentiation. Using this whole-organ culture system we found ISL to be weakly estrogenic based on its ability to induce Cckar mRNA expression, an estrogen receptor (ER) mediated gene. Using a range of ISL from 200 nM to 200 μM, we discovered that ISL promoted cell proliferation at a low concentration, yet potently inhibited proliferation at the highest concentration. ICI 182,780 failed to antagonize ISL's repression of pituitary cell proliferation, indicating the effect is independent of ER signaling. Coincident with a decrease in proliferating cells, we observed down-regulation of transcript for cyclin D2 and E2 and a strong induction of mRNA and protein for the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor Cdkn1a (p21). Importantly, high dose ISL did not alter the balance of progenitor vs. differentiated cell types within the pituitary explants and they seemed otherwise healthy; however, TUNEL staining revealed an increase in apoptotic cell death in ISL treated cultures. Our results merit further examination of ISL as an anti-tumor agent in the pituitary gland. - Highlights: • Isoliquiritigenin possesses weak estrogenic activity based on induction of Cckar. • ISL can be anti-proliferative in pituitary explants without altering cell lineages. • Anti-proliferative behavior of ISL is not estrogen receptor mediated. • ISL induces p21 expression leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  11. Dose-response relationships for radium-induced bone sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowland, R.E.; Stehney, A.F.; Lucas, H.F. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The incidence of bone sarcomas among 3055 female radium-dial workers who entered the dial industry before 1950 was used to determine dose-response relationships for the induction of bone sarcomas by radium. Two subpopulations were analyzed: all measured cases who survived at last five years after the start of employment and all cases who survived at least two years after first measurement. The first constituted a group based on year of entry; it contained 1468 women who experienced 42 bone sarcomas; the expected number was 0.4. The second comprised a group based on first measurement; it contained 1257 women who experienced 13 bone sarcomas; the expected number was 0.2. The dose-response function, I = (C + αD + #betta#D 2 )e/sup -#betta#D/, and simplifications of this general form, were fit to each data set. Two functions, I = (C + αD + #betta#D 2 )e/sup -#betta#D/ and I = (C + #betta#D 2 )e/sup -#betta#D/, fit the data for year of entry (p greater than or equal to 0.05); both these functions and I = (C + αD) fit the data for first measurement. The function I = (C + #betta#D 2 )e/sup -#betta#D/ was used to predict the number of bone sarcomas in all other pre-1950 radium cases (medical, laboratory, and other exposure); fewer were actually observed than the fit of this function to the female dial workers predicted

  12. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome increases immobility-induced neuromuscular weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Heidrun; Helming, Marc; Unterbuchner, Christoph; Lenz, Andrea; Neff, Frauke; Martyn, J A Jeevendra; Blobner, Manfred

    2008-03-01

    Inflammation and immobility are comorbid etiological factors inducing muscle weakness in critically ill patients. This study establishes a rat model to examine the effect of inflammation and immobilization alone and in combination on muscle contraction, histology, and acetylcholine receptor regulation. Prospective, randomized, experimental study. Animal laboratory of a university hospital. Sprague-Dawley rats. To produce systemic inflammation, rats (n = 34) received three consecutive intravenous injections of Corynebacterium parvum on days 0, 4, and 8. Control rats (n = 21) received saline. Both groups were further divided to have one hind limb either immobilized by pinning of knee and ankle joints or sham-immobilized (surgical leg). The contralateral nonsurgical leg of each animal served as control (nonsurgical leg). After 12 days, body weight and muscle mass were significantly reduced in all C. parvum animals compared with saline-injected rats. Immobilization led to local muscle atrophy. Normalized to muscle mass, tetanic contraction was reduced in the surgical leg after immobilization (7.64 +/- 1.91 N/g) and after inflammation (8.71 +/- 2.0 N/g; both p < .05 vs. sham immobilization and saline injection, 11.03 +/- 2.26 N/g). Histology showed an increase in inflammatory cells in all C. parvum-injected animals. Immobilization in combination with C. parvum injection had an additive effect on inflammation. Acetylcholine receptors were increased in immobilized muscles and in all muscles of C. parvum-injected animals. The muscle weakness in critically ill patients can be replicated in our novel rat model. Inflammation and immobilization independently lead to muscle weakness.

  13. Neoplastic and proliferative disorders of the perinephric space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, M.T.; Haarer, K.A.; Thomas, E.; Thaete, F.L.

    2012-01-01

    The perinephric space is a well-marginated central compartment of the retroperitoneum, located between the anterior and posterior pararenal spaces. Various neoplastic and proliferative disorders can affect the perinephric space, and there is a wide array of imaging findings. Although many perinephric lesions may extend directly from the kidney and adrenal gland, other lesions occur in the perinephric space due to haematogenous spread, as part of a systemic disease, or by extension from an adjacent retroperitoneal compartment. Imaging plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis of perinephric diseases, as many of the disease processes affecting this space will not result in clinical signs or symptoms until the disease is at an advanced stage. Despite the often shared non-specific clinical and imaging findings among these disease processes, application of a categorical differential diagnosis based on the imaging characteristics will serve to narrow the differential diagnosis and direct further evaluation and treatment. In this article, the lesions have been categorized as soft-tissue rind [nephroblastomatosis, fibrosis, Erdheim–Chester disease (ECD), extramedullary haematopoiesis, lymphoma, infiltrating metastases], focal solid lesions (extension of renal or adrenal malignancies, melanoma metastases, treated lymphoma), fat-containing lesions (angiomyolipoma, liposarcoma, myelolipoma), and cystic lesions (lymphangiomas, abscesses). The aim of this article is to demonstrate and describe the key imaging features of several neoplastic and proliferative disorders that affect the perinephric space.

  14. Amniocar as a proliferative medium for mesenchymal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Chestkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To develop the Amniocar nutrient medium that contains fetal calf serum (FCS and growth factors cocktail for mass cultivation of human fibroblasts. To study proliferative activity of the medium on cultures of HUVEC cells of mesenchymal origin and mesenchymal stromal cells, as well as on cell culture of human amniotic fluid.Materials and methods. Determination of the rate of accumulation of the cellular mass and cell morphology in the course of cultivation of cells of various histogenesis in the Amniocar medium and nutrient medium that contains 10 % of FCS.Results. It has been demonstrated that the Amniocar medium is prevalent as compared to the standard DMEM medium with 10 % of FCS by 2 to 5 times for cultivation of skin fibroblasts, HUVEC, and mesenchymal stem cells. The Amniocar medium increased the quantity of endothelial cells that enter mitosis and maintained the culture of HUVEC cells with prolonged passaging in vitro. Clonal cultivation of human amniotic fluid cells in the Amniocar medium secured development of colonies of both fibroblast and epithelial type.Conclusions. Proliferative Amniocar medium is efficient for mass cultivation of various cells of mesenchymal origin and can be used for diagnostic purposes in medical genetics, oncology, etc.

  15. Oral proliferative verrucous leukoplakia: A case report with an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhi Issrani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available White lesions both physiologic as well as pathologic are relatively frequent in the oral cavity, the most common pathology being oral leukoplakia (OL. There are many variants of OL, one of which is oral proliferative verrucous leukoplakia (OPVL. OPVL is a rare clinico-pathological entity, which is slow growing, long-term progressive lesion, but remains an enigmatic and difficult to define. The etiology of OPVL remains still unclear. Tobacco use does not seem to have a significant influence on the appearance of OPVL. These lesions may occur both in smokers and non-smokers. It is observed more frequently in women and elderly patients over 60 years at the time of diagnosis. The buccal mucosa and tongue are the most frequently involved sites. It develops initially as a white plaque of hyperkeratosis that eventually becomes a multifocal disease with confluent, exophytic and proliferative features. Various published case series have presented OPVL as a disease with aggressive biological behavior due to its high probability of recurrence and a high rate of malignant transformation. Prognosis is poor for this seemingly harmless-appearing white lesion of the oral mucosa. This article describes the clinical aspects and histologic features of an OPVL case that demonstrated the typical behavior pattern in a long-standing, persistent lesion and discusses this relatively rare entity in light of current information.

  16. A synthetic peptide blocking TRPV1 activation inhibits UV-induced skin responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, So Min; Han, Sangbum; Oh, Jang-Hee; Lee, Young Mee; Park, Chi-Hyun; Shin, Chang-Yup; Lee, Dong Hun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2017-10-01

    Transient receptor potential type 1 (TRPV1) can be activated by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, and mediates UV-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and proinflammatory cytokines in keratinocytes. Various chemicals and compounds targeting TRPV1 activation have been developed, but are not in clinical use mostly due to their safety issues. We aimed to develop a novel TRPV1-targeting peptide to inhibit UV-induced responses in human skin. We designed and generated a novel TRPV1 inhibitory peptide (TIP) which mimics the specific site in TRPV1 (aa 701-709: Gln-Arg-Ala-Ile-Thr-Ile-Leu-Asp-Thr, QRAITILDT), Thr 705 , and tested its efficacy of blocking UV-induced responses in HaCaT, mouse, and human skin. TIP effectively inhibited capsaicin-induced calcium influx and TRPV1 activation. Treatment of HaCaT with TIP prevented UV-induced increases of MMP-1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α. In mouse skin in vivo, TIP inhibited UV-induced skin thickening and prevented UV-induced expression of MMP-13 and MMP-9. Moreover, TIP attenuated UV-induced erythema and the expression of MMP-1, MMP-2, IL-6, and IL-8 in human skin in vivo. The novel synthetic peptide targeting TRPV1 can ameliorate UV-induced skin responses in vitro and in vivo, providing a promising therapeutic approach against UV-induced inflammation and photoaging. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Estradiol-induced antinociceptive responses on formalin-induced nociception are independent of COX and HPA activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Deirtra A; Barr, Gordon A; Amador, Nicole; Shivers, Kai-Yvonne; Kemen, Lynne; Kreiter, Christopher M; Jenab, Shirzad; Inturrisi, Charles E; Quinones-Jenab, Vanya

    2011-07-01

    Estrogen modulates pain perception but how it does so is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to determine if estradiol reduces nociceptive responses in part via hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1/COX-2 activity. The first study examined the effects of estradiol (20%) or vehicle with concurrent injection nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on formalin-induced nociceptive responding (flinching) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The drugs were ibuprofen (COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitor), SC560 (COX-1 inhibitor), or NS398 (COX-2 inhibitor). In a second study, estradiol's effects on formalin-induced nociception were tested in adrenalectomized (ADX), OVX, and ADX+OVX rats. Serum levels of prostaglandins (PG) PGE(2) and corticosterone were measured. Estradiol significantly decreased nociceptive responses in OVX rats with effects during both the first and the second phase of the formalin test. The nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) did not alter nociception at the doses used here. Adrenalectomy neither altered flinching responses in female rats nor reversed estradiol-induced antinociceptive responses. Estradiol alone had no effect on corticosterone (CORT) or prostaglandin levels after the formalin test, dissociating the effects of estradiol on behavior and these serum markers. Ibuprofen and NS398 significantly reduced PGE2 levels. CORT was not decreased by OVX surgery or by estradiol below that of ADX. Only IBU significantly increased corticosterone levels. Taken together, our results suggest that estradiol-induced antinociception in female rats is independent of COX activity and HPA axis activation. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Body awareness and responses to experimentally Induced pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Minev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE. The aim of this study is to discuss personal and demographic factors that influence the relationship between physical activity and awareness of one's own body, as well as the pain response (threshold and tolerance of pain, situational anxiety and personality. In the study 38 healthy individual- volunteers, students in Trakia University - Stara Zagora were selected. All participants were divided into two groups: actively involved in individual or team sport (n = 19 and healthy normaly active subjects (non-athletes, n = 19. The age of the study participants ranged between 18 and 39 years, while the gender breakdown was as follows: men - 22 women – 16. Methods: Psychological Questionnaires: Body Awareness Questionnaire that asks subjects to rate, on a 4 point scale, the degree to which they were currently experiencing symptoms of sympathetic arousal, State Trait Anger Scale, and State Trait Anxiety Scale. Objective methods (cold pressure test are used only to determine the pain sensation and pain tolerance thresholds. The results of investigation support significant differences between athletes and non-athletes in pain thershold, body awareness and anxiety. The study conclusions discuss body awareness as an increasing factor for pain resistance in athletes and as an integral part of the learning process among them.

  19. Heme oxygenase is not involved in the anti-proliferative effects of statins on pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanova, K.; Boukalova, S.; Gbelcova, H.; Muchova, L.; Neuzil, J.; Gurlich, R.; Ruml, T.; Vitek, L.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is recognized as one of the most fatal tumors due to its aggressiveness and resistance to therapy. Statins were previously shown to inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells via various signaling pathways. In healthy tissues, statins activate the heme oxygenase pathway, nevertheless the role of heme oxygenase in pancreatic cancer is still controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate, whether anti-proliferative effects of statins in pancreatic cancer cells are mediated via the heme oxygenase pathway. In vitro effects of various statins and hemin, a heme oxygenase inducer, on cell proliferation were evaluated in PA-TU-8902, MiaPaCa-2 and BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer cell lines. The effect of statins on heme oxygenase activity was assessed and heme oxygenase-silenced cells were used for pancreatic cancer cell proliferation studies. Cell death rate and reactive oxygen species production were measured in PA-TU-8902 cells, followed by evaluation of the effect of cerivastatin on GFP-K-Ras trafficking and expression of markers of invasiveness, osteopontin (SPP1) and SOX2. While simvastatin and cerivastatin displayed major anti-proliferative properties in all cell lines tested, pravastatin did not affect the cell growth at all. Strong anti-proliferative effect was observed also for hemin. Co-treatment of cerivastatin and hemin increased anti-proliferative potential of these agents, via increased production of reactive oxygen species and cell death compared to individual treatment. Heme oxygenase silencing did not prevent pancreatic cancer cells from the tumor-suppressive effect of cerivastatin or hemin. Cerivastatin, but not pravastatin, protected Ras protein from trafficking to the cell membrane and significantly reduced expressions of SPP1 (p < 0.05) and SOX2 (p < 0.01). Anti-proliferative effects of statins and hemin on human pancreatic cancer cell lines do not seem to be related to the heme oxygenase pathway. While hemin triggers reactive

  20. Studies on adaptive response of lymphocyte transformation induced by low-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Zeji; Su Liaoyuan; Tian Hailin; Zou Huawei

    1995-10-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes stimulated by mitogen in vitro for 24 h were exposed to low-dose γ-ray irradiation (0.5∼4.0 cGy, adaptive dose). They showed an adaptive response to the inhibition of 3 H-TdR incorporation by subsequent higher acute doses of γ-ray (challenge dose). At the interval of 24 h between adaptive dose and challenge dose, the strongest adaptive response induced by low-dose irradiation was found. It is also found that the response induced by 1.0 cGy of adaptive dose was more obvious than that by other doses and that 3.0 Gy of challenge dose produced the strongest adaptive response. As the challenge doses increased, the adaptive response reduced. (2 figs., 2 tabs.)

  1. Stress- and glucocorticoid-induced priming of neuroinflammatory responses: potential mechanisms of stress-induced vulnerability to drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Matthew G; Watkins, Linda R; Maier, Steven F

    2011-06-01

    Stress and stress-induced glucocorticoids (GCs) sensitize drug abuse behavior as well as the neuroinflammatory response to a subsequent pro-inflammatory challenge. Stress also predisposes or sensitizes individuals to develop substance abuse. There is an emerging evidence that glia and glia-derived neuroinflammatory mediators play key roles in the development of drug abuse. Drugs of abuse such as opioids, psychostimulants, and alcohol induce neuroinflammatory mediators such as pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. interleukin (IL)-1β), which modulate drug reward, dependence, and tolerance as well as analgesic properties. Drugs of abuse may directly activate microglial and astroglial cells via ligation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which mediate the innate immune response to pathogens as well as xenobiotic agents (e.g. drugs of abuse). The present review focuses on understanding the immunologic mechanism(s) whereby stress primes or sensitizes the neuroinflammatory response to drugs of abuse and explores whether stress- and GC-induced sensitization of neuroimmune processes predisposes individuals to drug abuse liability and the role of neuroinflammatory mediators in the development of drug addiction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Similar cold stress induces sex-specific neuroendocrine and working memory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solianik, Rima; Skurvydas, Albertas; Urboniene, Daiva; Eimantas, Nerijus; Daniuseviciute, Laura; Brazaitis, Marius

    2015-01-01

    Men have higher cold-induced neuroendocrine response than women; nevertheless, it is not known whether a different stress hormone rise elicits different effects on cognition during whole body cooling. The objective was to compare the effect of cold-induced neuroendocrine responses on the performance of working memory sensitive tasks between men and women. The cold stress continued until rectal temperature reached 35.5 degree C or for a maximum of 170 min. Working memory performance and stress hormone concentrations were monitored. During cold stress, body temperature variables dropped in all subjects (P < 0.001) and did not differ between sexes. Cold stress raised plasma epinephrine and serum cortisol levels only in men (P < 0.05). Cold stress adversely affected memory performance in men but not in women (P < 0.05). The present study indicated that similar moderate cold stress in men and women induces sex-specific neuroendocrine and working memory responses.

  3. Dai-Kenchu-To, a Herbal Medicine, Attenuates Colorectal Distention-induced Visceromotor Responses in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Nakaya, Kumi; Nagura, Yohko; Hasegawa, Ryoko; Ito, Hitomi; Fukudo, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Dai-kenchu-to (DKT), a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, is known to increase gastrointestinal motility and improve ileal function. We tested our hypotheses that (1) pretreatment with DKT would block the colorectal distention-induced visceromotor response in rats, and (2) pretreatment with DKT would attenuate colorectal distention-induced adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release and anxiety-related behavior. Methods Rats were pretreated with vehicle or DKT (300 mg/kg/5 m...

  4. Unfolded Protein Response Signaling and MAP Kinase Pathways Underlie Pathogenesis of Arsenic-induced Cutaneous Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Changzhao; Xu, Jianmin; Li, Fugui; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Weng, Zhiping; Wen, Jianming; Elmets, Craig A.; Ahsan, Habibul; Athar, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic exposure through drinking water is a major global public health problem and is associated with an enhanced risk of various cancers including skin cancer. In human skin, arsenic induces precancerous melanosis and keratosis, which may progress to basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma. However, the mechanism by which these pathophysiological alterations occur remains elusive. In this study, we showed that sub-chronic arsenic exposure to SKH-1 mice induced unfolded protein response (UPR)...

  5. Atypical proliferative myositis: original MR description with pathologic correlation: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarraya, Mohamed; Guermazi, Ali [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Section, Boston, MA (United States); Parva, Pedram [VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA (United States); Stone, Michael [Stamford Hospital, Department of Surgery, Stamford, CT (United States); Klein, Michael J. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Proliferative myositis (PM) along with proliferative fasciitis and nodular fasciitis are a group of pseudosarcomatous myofibroblastic proliferations. Although the histologic presentation of each is almost identical, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of proliferative myositis is closer to that of inflammatory myopathies. We report a case of PM in which the imaging and histologic features combine typical findings of PM with unusual imaging features, suggesting of reactive (or nodular) fasciitis. (orig.)

  6. Atypical proliferative myositis: original MR description with pathologic correlation: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarraya, Mohamed; Guermazi, Ali; Parva, Pedram; Stone, Michael; Klein, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Proliferative myositis (PM) along with proliferative fasciitis and nodular fasciitis are a group of pseudosarcomatous myofibroblastic proliferations. Although the histologic presentation of each is almost identical, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of proliferative myositis is closer to that of inflammatory myopathies. We report a case of PM in which the imaging and histologic features combine typical findings of PM with unusual imaging features, suggesting of reactive (or nodular) fasciitis. (orig.)

  7. Evidence of an evolutionary hourglass pattern in herbivory-induced transcriptomic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrant, Matthew; Boyer, Justin; Zhou, Wenwu; Baldwin, Ian T; Xu, Shuqing

    2017-08-01

    Herbivory-induced defenses are specific and activated in plants when elicitors, frequently found in the herbivores' oral secretions, are introduced into wounds during attack. While complex signaling cascades are known to be involved, it remains largely unclear how natural selection has shaped the evolution of these induced defenses. We analyzed herbivory-induced transcriptomic responses in wild tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata, using a phylotranscriptomic approach that measures the origin and sequence divergence of herbivory-induced genes. Highly conserved and evolutionarily ancient genes of primary metabolism were activated at intermediate time points (2-6 h) after elicitation, while less constrained and young genes associated with defense signaling and biosynthesis of specialized metabolites were activated at early (before 2 h) and late (after 6 h) stages of the induced response, respectively - a pattern resembling the evolutionary hourglass pattern observed during embryogenesis in animals and the developmental process in plants and fungi. The hourglass patterns found in herbivory-induced defense responses and developmental process are both likely to be a result of signaling modularization and differential evolutionary constraints on the modules involved in the signaling cascade. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. Surgical management of fibrotic encapsulation of the fluocinolone acetonide implant in CAPN5-associated proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlucek, Paul S; Folk, James C; Sobol, Warren M; Mahajan, Vinit B

    2013-01-01

    To review fibrosis of fluocinolone acetonide (FA) implants in subjects with CAPN5 autosomal dominant neovascular inflammatory vitreoretinopathy (ADNIV). A retrospective case series was assembled from ADNIV patients in which there was fibrotic encapsulation of a fluocinolone acetonide implant. CAPN5 genotypes and surgical repair techniques were reviewed. Two eyes of two ADNIV patients developed a fibrotic capsule over the fluocinolone acetonide implant. Both patients had Stage IV disease. Patient A had a c.731T > C mutation in the CAPN5 gene and patient B had a c.728G > T mutation. The fibrotic membrane was surgically excised and the implant function was restored. The exuberant fibrotic response in later stages of ADNIV may be resistant to local immunosuppression with steroids. Surgical excision of fibrotic membranes over FA implants can reestablish local steroid delivery in cases of severe proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

  9. The Role of MKP-1 in the Anti-Proliferative Effects of Glucocorticoids in Primary Rat Pre-Osteoblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micheline Sanderson

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid (GC-induced osteoporosis has been attributed to a GC-induced suppression of pre-osteoblast proliferation. Our previous work identified a critical role for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1 in mediating the anti-proliferative effects of GCs in immortalized pre-osteoblasts, but we subsequently found that MKP-1 null mice were not protected against the pathological effects of GCs on bone. In order to reconcile this discrepancy, we have assessed the effects of GCs on proliferation, activation of the MAPK ERK1/2 and MKP-1 expression in primary adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs and ADSC-derived pre-osteoblasts (ADSC-OBs. ADSCs were isolated by means of collagenase digestion from adipose tissue biopsies harvested from adult male Wistar rats. ADSC-OBs were prepared by treating ADSCs with osteoblast differentiation media for 7 days. The effects of increasing concentrations of the GC dexamethasone on basal and mitogen-stimulated cell proliferation were quantified by tritiated thymidine incorporation. ERK1/2 activity was measured by Western blotting, while MKP-1 expression was quantified on both RNA and protein levels, using semi-quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. GCs were strongly anti-proliferative in both naïve ADSCs and ADSC-OBs, but had very little effect on mitogen-induced ERK1/2 activation and did not upregulate MKP-1 protein expression. These findings suggest that the anti-proliferative effects of GCs in primary ADSCs and ADSC-OBs in vitro do not require the inhibition of ERK1/2 activation by MKP-1, which is consistent with our in vivo findings in MKP-1 null mice.

  10. Full scale monitoring of wind and traffic induced response of a suspension bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheynet Etienne

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a full-scale analysis of wind and traffic-induced vibrations of a long-span suspension bridge in complex terrain. Several wind and acceleration sensors have been installed along the main span on Lysefjord Bridge in Norway. In the present study, three days of continuous records are analysed. Traffic-induced vibrations are dominant at low and moderated wind speed, with non-negligible effects on the overall bridge response for heavy vehicles only. Traffic and wind-induced vibrations are compared in terms of root mean square of the acceleration response, and three simples approaches are proposed to isolate records dominated by wind-induced vibration. The first one relies on the separation of nocturnal and diurnal samples. The second one is based on the evaluation of the time-varying root mean square of the acceleration response. The last one evaluates the relative importance of the high frequency domain of the acceleration bridge response. It appears that traffic-induced vibrations may have to be taken into account for the buffeting analysis of long-span bridge under moderated wind.

  11. Divergent induced responses to an invasive predator in marine mussel populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Aaren S; Byers, James E

    2006-08-11

    Invasive species may precipitate evolutionary change in invaded communities. In southern New England (USA) the invasive Asian shore crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, preys on mussels (Mytlius edulis), but the crab has not yet invaded northern New England. We show that southern New England mussels express inducible shell thickening when exposed to waterborne cues from Hemigrapsus, whereas naïve northern mussel populations do not respond. Yet, both populations thicken their shells in response to a long-established crab, Carcinus maenas. Our findings are consistent with the rapid evolution of an inducible morphological response to Hemigrapsus within 15 years of its introduction.

  12. Suppressive effects of coffee on the SOS responses induced by UV and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obana, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Sei-ichi; Tanaka, Ryou-ichi

    1986-01-01

    SOS-inducing activity of UV or chemical mutagens was strongly suppressed by instant coffee in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002. As decaffeinated instant coffee showed a similarly strong suppressive effect, it would seem that caffeine, a known inhibitor of SOS responses, is not responsible for the effect observed. The suppression was also shown by freshly brewed coffee extracts. However, the suppression was absent in green coffee-bean extracts. These results suggest that coffee contains some substance(s) which, apart from caffeine, suppresses SOS-inducing activity of UV or chemical mutagens and that the suppressive substance(s) are produced by roasting coffee beans. (Auth.)

  13. Study of the immune response to thyroglobulin through a model of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Castro, M. dos.

    1981-01-01

    The cellular and humoral immune response to thyroglobulin of different species was studied in guinea pigs. The experiments described suggested that the immune system can be activated against self-determinants. Human and pork thyroglobulin were able to induce the experimental thyroiditis as well as some immune responses, such as in vitro proliferative response, delayed hypersensitivity and antibodies. Although guinea pig thyroglobulin was unable to induce specific T-lymphocyte proliferation in vitro, delayed hypersensitivity response and antibodies, it was very efficient in inducing the autoimmune thyroiditis. On the contrary, bovine thyroglobulin did not induce experimental autoimmune thyroiditis despite producing good responses as determined by similar in vitro proliferative response, delayed hypersensitivity and on the humoral level. These results suggest that the assays utilised were not able to evaluate the relevant immune response to genesis of the thyroiditis. The determinant selection mechanisms operating in these immune responses are probably selecting determinants not responsible for self-recognition in vivo. It was suggested that the macrophage could be the cell responsible for the presentation of these determinants to the lymphocyte in an immunogenic form. (Author) [pt

  14. Crossfit analysis: a novel method to characterize the dynamics of induced plant responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jeroen J; van Dam, Nicole M; Hoefsloot, Huub C J; Smilde, Age K

    2009-12-16

    Many plant species show induced responses that protect them against exogenous attacks. These responses involve the production of many different bioactive compounds. Plant species belonging to the Brassicaceae family produce defensive glucosinolates, which may greatly influence their favorable nutritional properties for humans. Each responding compound may have its own dynamic profile and metabolic relationships with other compounds. The chemical background of the induced response is therefore highly complex and may therefore not reveal all the properties of the response in any single model. This study therefore aims to describe the dynamics of the glucosinolate response, measured at three time points after induction in a feral Brassica, by a three-faceted approach, based on Principal Component Analysis. First the large-scale aspects of the response are described in a 'global model' and then each time-point in the experiment is individually described in 'local models' that focus on phenomena that occur at specific moments in time. Although each local model describes the variation among the plants at one time-point as well as possible, the response dynamics are lost. Therefore a novel method called the 'Crossfit' is described that links the local models of different time-points to each other. Each element of the described analysis approach reveals different aspects of the response. The crossfit shows that smaller dynamic changes may occur in the response that are overlooked by global models, as illustrated by the analysis of a metabolic profiling dataset of the same samples.

  15. Crossfit analysis: a novel method to characterize the dynamics of induced plant responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smilde Age K

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many plant species show induced responses that protect them against exogenous attacks. These responses involve the production of many different bioactive compounds. Plant species belonging to the Brassicaceae family produce defensive glucosinolates, which may greatly influence their favorable nutritional properties for humans. Each responding compound may have its own dynamic profile and metabolic relationships with other compounds. The chemical background of the induced response is therefore highly complex and may therefore not reveal all the properties of the response in any single model. Results This study therefore aims to describe the dynamics of the glucosinolate response, measured at three time points after induction in a feral Brassica, by a three-faceted approach, based on Principal Component Analysis. First the large-scale aspects of the response are described in a 'global model' and then each time-point in the experiment is individually described in 'local models' that focus on phenomena that occur at specific moments in time. Although each local model describes the variation among the plants at one time-point as well as possible, the response dynamics are lost. Therefore a novel method called the 'Crossfit' is described that links the local models of different time-points to each other. Conclusions Each element of the described analysis approach reveals different aspects of the response. The crossfit shows that smaller dynamic changes may occur in the response that are overlooked by global models, as illustrated by the analysis of a metabolic profiling dataset of the same samples.

  16. Role of X-ray-inducible genes and proteins in adaptive survival responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, M.; Schea, R.A.; Petrowski, A.E.; Seabury, H.; McLaughlin, P.W.; Lee, I.; Lee, S.W.; Boothman, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    Certain X-ray-inducible genes and their corresponding protein products, appearing following low priming doses of ionizing radiation may subsequently give rise to an adaptive survival response, ultimately leading to increased radioresistance. Further, this adaptive radioresistance may be due to increased DNA repair (or misrepair) processes. Ultimately, the function of low-dose-induced cDNA clones within the cell is hoped to elucidate to follow the effects of specific gene turn-off on adaptive responses. Future research must determine the various functions of adaptive response gene products so that the beneficial or deleterious consequences of adaptive responses, which increases resistance to ionizing radiation, can be determined. (author). 19 refs., 1 fig

  17. Cranberry and Grape Seed Extracts Inhibit the Proliferative Phenotype of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourt Chatelain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Proanthocyanidins, compounds highly concentrated in dietary fruits, such as cranberries and grapes, demonstrate significant cancer prevention potential against many types of cancer. The objective of this study was to evaluate cranberry and grape seed extracts to quantitate and compare their anti-proliferative effects on the most common type of oral cancer, oral squamous cell carcinoma. Using two well-characterized oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, CAL27 and SCC25, assays were performed to evaluate the effects of cranberry and grape seed extract on phenotypic behaviors of these oral cancers. The proliferation of both oral cancer cell lines was significantly inhibited by the administration of cranberry and grape seed extracts, in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, key regulators of apoptosis, caspase-2 and caspase-8, were concomitantly up-regulated by these treatments. However, cranberry and grape seed extracts elicited differential effects on cell adhesion, cell morphology, and cell cycle regulatory pathways. This study represents one of the first comparative investigations of cranberry and grape seed extracts and their anti-proliferative effects on oral cancers. Previous findings using purified proanthocyanidin from grape seed extract demonstrated more prominent growth inhibition, as well as apoptosis-inducing, properties on CAL27 cells. These observations provide evidence that cranberry and grape seed extracts not only inhibit oral cancer proliferation but also that the mechanism of this inhibition may function by triggering key apoptotic regulators in these cell lines. This information will be of benefit to researchers interested in elucidating which dietary components are central to mechanisms involved in the mediation of oral carcinogenesis and progression.

  18. The proliferative human monocyte subpopulation contains osteoclast precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lari, Roya; Kitchener, Peter D; Hamilton, John A

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Immediate precursors of bone-resorbing osteoclasts are cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. Particularly during clinical conditions showing bone loss, it would appear that osteoclast precursors are mobilized from bone marrow into the circulation prior to entering tissues undergoing such loss. The observed heterogeneity of peripheral blood monocytes has led to the notion that different monocyte subpopulations may have special or restricted functions, including as osteoclast precursors. Methods Human peripheral blood monocytes were sorted based upon their degree of proliferation and cultured in macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF or CSF-1) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa-B ligand (RANKL). Results The monocyte subpopulation that is capable of proliferation gave rise to significantly more multinucleated, bone-resorbing osteoclasts than the bulk of the monocytes. Conclusions Human peripheral blood osteoclast precursors reside in the proliferative monocyte subpopulation. PMID:19222861

  19. Analysis and Enhancements of a Prolific Macroscopic Model of Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Fietkiewicz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Macroscopic models of epilepsy can deliver surprisingly realistic EEG simulations. In the present study, a prolific series of models is evaluated with regard to theoretical and computational concerns, and enhancements are developed. Specifically, we analyze three aspects of the models: (1 Using dynamical systems analysis, we demonstrate and explain the presence of direct current potentials in the simulated EEG that were previously undocumented. (2 We explain how the system was not ideally formulated for numerical integration of stochastic differential equations. A reformulated system is developed to support proper methodology. (3 We explain an unreported contradiction in the published model specification regarding the use of a mathematical reduction method. We then use the method to reduce the number of equations and further improve the computational efficiency. The intent of our critique is to enhance the evolution of macroscopic modeling of epilepsy and assist others who wish to explore this exciting class of models further.

  20. Proliferative activity of stomach cancer and assessment of individual radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chissov, V.I.; Sergeeva, N.S.; Dar'yalova, S.L.; Petrov, A.N.; Repina, A.G.; Belous, T.A.; Pelevina, I.I.

    1991-01-01

    An indirect immunofluorescent method with polyclonal antibodies to thymidine was used to assess the proliferative activity (PA-percent of cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle) of 79 stomach tumors from primary cancer patients. Stomach cancer PA was shown to vary from 0.1 to 69.7%. Stomach cancer PA did not depend either on a tumor size or a degree of the involvement of regional lymph nodes. The mean PA of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma was slightly lower (14.9±4.7%) than that of low differentiated ones. Of 79 patients a tumor process was interpreted as a resectable one in 62. They were given preoperative irradiation at a total focal dose of 36 Gy followed by operation. It was shown that tumor radioresistance could be predicted in unchanged PA indices of their increase at the beginning of a course of irradiation with the probability of 95%

  1. Anticardiolipin antibodies in proliferative diabetic retinopathy: An additional risk factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahin, Maha; ElDiasty, Amany M; Mabed, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    To report the prevalence of anticardiolipin antibodies in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) having high-risk criteria (HRC). Diabetic patients having PDR with HRC and diabetics free of retinopathy were compared for the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies. Among the 34 patients, 6 (17.7%) of diabetics having PDR with HRC were positive for anticardiolipin antibodies. There was no significant association of aCL antibodies with sex or type of diabetes. Using Pearson's correlation test, no significant associations of aCL antibodies with duration of diabetes or age of patients were found. All patients who were positive for anticardiolipin antibodies had PDR with HRC. The difference was statistically significant. Presence of anticardiolipin antibodies may represent an additional risk factor for PDR. (author)

  2. Accounting for treatment delays when treating highly proliferative tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.; Metcalfe, P.; Hoban, P.

    1999-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the possibility of increasing the dose per fraction or increasing the number of fractions to account for treatment delays occurring during radiotherapy treatments for highly proliferative tumours. The linear quadratic model with time was used to determine the difference in biological effective dose (BED) for the original schedule and the schedule including a treatment delay. Tables of extra fractions and extra dose per fraction required to account for a number of possible delays have been determined. It has been shown that for tumours with very short potential doubling times it is best to deliver the extra dose as an increase in dose per fraction rather than an increase in the number of fractions, while for tumours with moderately short potential doubling times (above 7 days) the reverse is true. The equivalent uninterrupted schedules, which would have delivered the same effects to the tumour, have also been determined. (author)

  3. Perillyl alcohol suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Oh; Okunishi, Katsuhide; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Harada, Hiroaki; Kawahata, Kimito; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko [Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Dohi, Makoto, E-mail: mdohi-tky@umin.ac.jp [Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Institute of Respiratory Immunology, Shibuya Clinic for Respiratory Diseases and Allergology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits the mevalonate pathway. •We examined whether POH suppresses immune responses with a mouse model of asthma. •POH treatment during sensitization suppressed Ag-induced priming of CD4{sup +} T cells. •POH suppressed airway eosinophila and cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes. -- Abstract: Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits farnesyl transferase and geranylgeranyl transferase, key enzymes that induce conformational and functional changes in small G proteins to conduct signal production for cell proliferation. Thus, it has been tried for the treatment of cancers. However, although it affects the proliferation of immunocytes, its influence on immune responses has been examined in only a few studies. Notably, its effect on antigen-induced immune responses has not been studied. In this study, we examined whether POH suppresses Ag-induced immune responses with a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. POH treatment of sensitized mice suppressed proliferation and cytokine production in Ag-stimulated spleen cells or CD4{sup +} T cells. Further, sensitized mice received aerosolized OVA to induce allergic airway inflammation, and some mice received POH treatment. POH significantly suppressed indicators of allergic airway inflammation such as airway eosinophilia. Cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes was also significantly suppressed. These results demonstrate that POH suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung. Considering that it exists naturally, POH could be a novel preventive or therapeutic option for immunologic lung disorders such as asthma with minimal side effects.

  4. Intermittent hypercapnia induces long-lasting ventilatory plasticity to enhance CO2 responsiveness to overcome dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Bryan Patrick

    The ability of the brain to detect (central CO2 chemosensitivity) and respond to (central CO2 chemoresponsiveness) changes in tissue CO2/pH, is a homeostatic process essential for mammalian life. Dysfunction of the serotonin (5-HT) mechanisms compromises ventilatory CO 2 chemosensitivity/responsiveness and may enhance vulnerability to pathologies such as the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The laboratory of Dr. Michael Harris has shown medullary raphe contributions to central chemosensitivity involving both 5-HT- and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated mechanisms. I tested the hypothesis that postnatal exposure to mild intermittent hypercapnia (IHc) induces respiratory plasticity, due in part to strengthening of bicuculline- and saclofen-sensitive mechanisms (GABAA and GABAB receptor antagonists respectively). Rats were exposed to IHc-pretreatment (8 cycles of 5 % CO2) for 5 days beginning at postnatal day 12 (P12). I subsequently assessed CO2 responsiveness using an in situ perfused brainstem preparation. Hypercapnic responses were determined with and without pharmacological manipulation. In addition, IHc-pretreatment effectiveness was tested for its ability to overcome dysfunction in the CO2 responsiveness induced by a dietary tryptophan restriction. This dysfunctional CO2 responsiveness has been suggested to arise from a chronic, partial 5-HT reduction imparted by the dietary restriction. Results show IHc-pretreatment induced plasticity sufficient for CO2 responsiveness despite removal of otherwise critical ketanserin-sensitive mechanisms. CO2 responsiveness following IHc-pretreatment was absent if ketanserin was combined with bicuculline and saclofen, indicating that the plasticity was dependent upon bicuculline- and saclofen-sensitive mechanisms. IHc--induced plasticity was also capable of overcoming the ventilatory defects associated with maternal dietary restriction. Duration of IHc-induced plasticity was also investigated and found to last far into

  5. In vitro studies of cellular response to DNA damage induced by boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perona, M.; Pontiggia, O.; Carpano, M.; Thomasz, L.; Thorp, S.; Pozzi, E.; Simian, M.; Kahl, S.; Juvenal, G.; Pisarev, M.; Dagrosa, A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of these studies was to evaluate the mechanisms of cellular response to DNA damage induced by BNCT. Thyroid carcinoma cells were incubated with 10 BPA or 10 BOPP and irradiated with thermal neutrons. The surviving fraction, the cell cycle distribution and the expression of p53 and Ku70 were analyzed. Different cellular responses were observed for each irradiated group. The decrease of Ku70 in the neutrons +BOPP group could play a role in the increase of sensitization to radiation.

  6. Escherichia coli DinB inhibits replication fork progression without significantly inducing the SOS response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Okazaki, Naoto; Furukohri, Asako; Maki, Hisaji; Akiyama, Masahiro Tatsumi

    2012-01-01

    The SOS response is readily triggered by replication fork stalling caused by DNA damage or a dysfunctional replicative apparatus in Escherichia coli cells. E. coli dinB encodes DinB DNA polymerase and its expression is upregulated during the SOS response. DinB catalyzes translesion DNA synthesis in place of a replicative DNA polymerase III that is stalled at a DNA lesion. We showed previously that DNA replication was suppressed without exogenous DNA damage in cells overproducing DinB. In this report, we confirm that this was due to a dose-dependent inhibition of ongoing replication forks by DinB. Interestingly, the DinB-overproducing cells did not significantly induce the SOS response even though DNA replication was perturbed. RecA protein is activated by forming a nucleoprotein filament with single-stranded DNA, which leads to the onset of the SOS response. In the DinB-overproducing cells, RecA was not activated to induce the SOS response. However, the SOS response was observed after heat-inducible activation in strain recA441 (encoding a temperature-sensitive RecA) and after replication blockage in strain dnaE486 (encoding a temperature-sensitive catalytic subunit of the replicative DNA polymerase III) at a non-permissive temperature when DinB was overproduced in these cells. Furthermore, since catalytically inactive DinB could avoid the SOS response to a DinB-promoted fork block, it is unlikely that overproduced DinB takes control of primer extension and thus limits single-stranded DNA. These observations suggest that DinB possesses a feature that suppresses DNA replication but does not abolish the cell's capacity to induce the SOS response. We conclude that DinB impedes replication fork progression in a way that does not activate RecA, in contrast to obstructive DNA lesions and dysfunctional replication machinery.

  7. Changes in thermal nociceptive responses in dairy cows following experimentally induced Esherichia coli mastitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ditte B.; Fogsgaard, Katrine; Røntved, Christine Maria

    2011-01-01

    Mastitis is a high incidence disease in dairy cows. The acute stage is considered painful and inflammation can lead to hyperalgesia and thereby contribute to decreased welfare. The aim of this study was to examine changes in nociceptive responses toward cutaneous nociceptive laser stimulation (NLS......) in dairy cows with experimentally induced Escherichia coli mastitis, and correlate behavioral changes in nociceptive responses to clinical and paraclinical variables....

  8. A critique of response strategies: Measures to induce a paradigmatic shift in response to student writing

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    Spencer, Brenda

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores response to student writing in entry-level English modules in an Open and Distance Learning (ODL context at the University of South Africa (UNISA. After an evaluation of the research undertaken by Spencer (1999 and Lephalala and Pienaar (2008, both conducted in this specific teaching context, the argument is put forward that the predominantly formalist orientation of the marking can be described as an attractor (Weideman, 2009, since it seems that the system is attracted into this state and has maintained it over a number of years. There is a need to shift towards a cognitive, reader-based orientation. The author uses the categories defined in Lephalala and Pienaar (2008 to describe feedback styles. The categories are L1 (minimal feedback, L2 (general and non-text-specific feedback and L3 (feedback with a focus on content and organisation. Four amendments are proposed to the existing marking code which will encourage markers to operate in the desired L3 feedback category. This paper argues that these additions to the marking code will address limitations inherent in the marking code. At present, marked scripts contain a jumble of recommendations relating to content/form and global/local issues and there is little indication of the relative importance of an error. The marking code is inherently negative in orientation and promotes a formalist L1 style of response. A qualitative investigation into the reaction to the proposed changes was obtained from 33 marked samples of response to student writing provided by external markers. Compared to the data given in Lephalala and Pienaar (2008, the changes tested in this study were unable to influence the dominant L1 response strategy, but caused a shift away from L2 formulaic responses and an increase in the desired L3 feedback. There is a need for intensive investigation into feedback in this ODL teaching context and into measures to promote L3 feedback.

  9. Oral squamous cell carcinoma proliferative phenotype is modulated by proanthocyanidins: a potential prevention and treatment alternative for oral cancer

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    Swapp Aaron

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the recently reported drop in the overall death rate from cancer, the estimated survival rate and number of deaths from oral cancer remain virtually unchanged. Early detection efforts, in combination with strategies for prevention and risk-reduction, have the potential to dramatically improve clinical outcomes. The identification of non-toxic, effective treatments, including complementary and alternative therapies, is critical if the survival rate is to be improved. Epidemiologic studies have suggested a protective effect from certain plant-derived foods and extracts; however, it has been difficult to isolate and identify the compounds most responsible for these observations. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the response of human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC to proanthocyanidin (PAC, a plant-derived compound that may inhibit the progression of several other cancers. Methods Using a series of in vitro assays, we sought to quantify the effects of PAC on OSCC, cervical carcinoma, and non-cancerous cell lines, specifically the effects of PAC on cell proliferation. Recent data suggest that infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV may also modulate the proliferative potential of OSCC; therefore, we also measured the effects of PAC administration on HPV-transfected OSCC proliferation. Results Our results demonstrated that PAC administration was sufficient to significantly suppress cellular proliferation of OSCC in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the increased proliferation of OSCC after transfection with HPV 16 was reduced by the administration of PAC, as was the proliferation of the cervical cancer and non-cancerous cell lines tested. Our results also provide preliminary evidence that PAC administration may induce apoptosis in cervical and oral cancer cell lines, while acting merely to suppress proliferation of the normal cell line control. Conclusion These results signify that PAC may be

  10. Anti-Myeloperoxidase Antibodies Associate with Future Proliferative Lupus Nephritis

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    S. W. Olson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The subclinical pathophysiology of proliferative lupus nephritis (PLN has not been fully elucidated. Myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA is associated with PLN, but prediagnostic levels have not been reported. Methods. We performed a retrospective case-control Department of Defense Serum Repository (DoDSR study comparing MPO-ANCA levels in longitudinal prediagnostic serum samples for 23 biopsy confirmed proliferative lupus nephritis (PLN patients to DoDSR identified age, sex, race, and age of serum matched healthy and SLE without LN disease controls. We also compared the temporal relationship of MPO-ANCA to anti-double stranded DNA antibodies (dsDNAab. Results. A greater proportion of PLN patients had prediagnostic MPO-ANCA levels above ≥3 U/mL and ≥6 U/mL compared to SLE without LN (91% versus 43%, p<0.001; 57% versus 5%, p<0.001, resp.. In subgroup analysis, the MPO-ANCA threshold of ≥3 U/mL was significant at <1 year (88% versus 39%, p=0.007 and 1–4 years (87% versus 38%, p=0.009 prior to diagnosis. Statistically significant subclinical MPO-ANCA levels (≥3 U/mL occurred prior to statistically significant dsDNAab ≥ 3 IU/ml (89% versus 11%, p=0.003. Conclusions. Subclinical MPO-ANCA levels could distinguish future PLN from SLE without LN. MPO-ANCA manifests prior to clinical disease and subclinical dsDNAab to suggest that it may contribute directly to PLN pathogenicity.

  11. Maternal immunity enhances Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccination induced cell-mediated immune responses in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrick, Meggan; Theis, Kara; Molitor, Thomas W

    2014-06-05

    Passively acquired maternal derived immunity (MDI) is a double-edged sword. Maternal derived antibody-mediated immunity (AMI) and cell-mediated immunity (CMI) are critical immediate defenses for the neonate; however, MDI may interfere with the induction of active immunity in the neonate, i.e. passive interference. The effect of antigen-specific MDI on vaccine-induced AMI and CMI responses to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) was assessed in neonatal piglets. To determine whether CMI and AMI responses could be induced in piglets with MDI, piglets with high and low levels of maternal M. hyopneumoniae-specific immunity were vaccinated against M. hyopneumoniae at 7 d of age. Piglet M. hyopneumoniae-specific antibody, lymphoproliferation, and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were measured 7 d and 14 d post vaccination. Piglets with M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI failed to show vaccine-induced AMI responses; there was no rise in M. hyopneumoniae antibody levels following vaccination of piglets in the presence of M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI. However, piglets with M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI had primary (antigen-specific lymphoproliferation) and secondary (DTH) M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI responses following vaccination. In this study neonatal M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI was not subject to passive interference by MDI. Further, it appears that both maternal derived and endogenous CMI contribute to M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI responses in piglets vaccinated in the face of MDI.

  12. The Effect of Tracheal Intubation-Induced Autonomic Response on Photoplethysmography

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    Pekka Talke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intraoperative stress responses and postoperative pain can be monitored using photoplethysmography (PPG. PPG signal has two components, AC and DC. Effects of noxious stimuli-induced stress responses have not been studied on the DC component of PPG. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a known noxious stimulus (endotracheal intubation on both the AC and DC components of PPG. Methods. 15 surgical patients having general anesthesia were enrolled into this clinical study. PPG was recorded electronically from a pulse oximeter. Maximum changes in the AC and DC components of the PPG and pulse rate were determined in response to endotracheal intubation from high frequency (62.5 Hz PPG recordings. Results. Endotracheal intubation-induced autonomic stress response resulted in a significant decrease in the AC component of the PPG and an increase in pulse rate in every subject (p<0.05 for all. The decrease in the AC component of the PPG was 50±12% (p<0.05 and the increase in pulse rate was 26±10 bpm (p<0.05. The response of the DC component was variable (p = NS. Conclusion. Endotracheal intubation-induced stress response resulted in a significant and consistent change in the AC, but not the DC component of the PPG. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT03032939.

  13. How predictable are the behavioral responses of insects to herbivore induced changes in plants? Responses of two congeneric thrips to induced cotton plants.

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    Rehan Silva

    Full Text Available Changes in plants following insect attack are referred to as induced responses. These responses are widely viewed as a form of defence against further insect attack. In the current study we explore whether it is possible to make generalizations about induced plant responses given the unpredictability and variability observed in insect-plant interactions. Experiments were conducted to test for consistency in the responses of two congeneric thrips, Frankliniella schultzei Trybom and Frankliniella occidentalis Pergrande (Thysanoptera: Thripidae to cotton seedlings (Gossypium hirsutum Linneaus (Malvales: Malvaceae damaged by various insect herbivores. In dual-choice experiments that compared intact and damaged cotton seedlings, F. schultzei was attracted to seedlings damaged by Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, Tetranychus urticae (Koch (Trombidiforms: Tetranychidae, Tenebrio molitor Linnaeus (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae, F. schultzei and F. occidentalis but not to mechanically damaged seedlings. In similar tests, F. occidentalis was attracted to undamaged cotton seedlings when simultaneously exposed to seedlings damaged by H. armigera, T. molitor or F. occidentalis. However, when exposed to F. schultzei or T. urticae damaged plants, F. occidentalis was more attracted towards damaged plants. A quantitative relationship was also apparent, F. schultzei showed increased attraction to damaged seedlings as the density of T. urticae or F. schultzei increased. In contrast, although F. occidentalis demonstrated increased attraction to plants damaged by higher densities of T. urticae, there was a negative relationship between attraction and the density of damaging conspecifics. Both species showed greater attraction to T. urticae damaged seedlings than to seedlings damaged by conspecifics. Results demonstrate that the responses of both species of thrips were context dependent, making generalizations difficult to formulate.

  14. Autophagy is induced by resistance exercise in young men but unfolded protein response is induced regardless of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentilä, Jaakko; Ahtiainen, Juha P; Paulsen, Gøran; Raastad, Truls; Häkkinen, Keijo; Mero, Antti A; Hulmi, Juha J

    2018-04-02

    Autophagy and unfolded protein response (UPR) appear to be important for skeletal muscle homeostasis and may be altered by exercise. Our aim was to investigate the effects of resistance exercise and training on indicators of UPR and autophagy in healthy untrained young men (n = 12, 27 ± 4 years) and older men (n = 8, 61 ± 6 years) as well as in resistance-trained individuals (n = 15, 25 ± 5 years). Indicators of autophagy and UPR were investigated from the muscle biopsies after a single resistance exercise bout and after 21 weeks of resistance training. Lipidated LC3II as an indicator of autophagosome content increased at 48 hours post resistance exercise (P resistance-training period (P resistance exercise in untrained young and older men (P resistance-training period regardless of age. UPR was unchanged within the first few hours after the resistance exercise bout regardless of the training status. Changes in autophagy and UPR ER indicators did not correlate with a resistance-training-induced increase in muscle strength and size. Autophagosome content is increased by resistance training in young previously untrained men, but this response may be blunted by aging. However, unfolded protein response is induced by an unaccustomed resistance exercise bout in a delayed manner regardless of age. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Data set of Aspergillus flavus induced alterations in tear proteome: Understanding the pathogen-induced host response to fungal infection

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    Jeyalakshmi Kandhavelu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fungal keratitis is one of the leading causes of blindness in the tropical countries affecting individuals in their most productive age. The host immune response during this infection is poorly understood. We carried out comparative tear proteome analysis of Aspergillus flavus keratitis patients and uninfected controls. Proteome was separated into glycosylated and non-glycosylated fractions using lectin column chromatography before mass spectrometry. The data revealed the major processes activated in the human host in response to fungal infection and reflected in the tear. Extended analysis of this dataset presented here complements the research article entitled “Aspergillus flavus induced alterations in tear protein profile reveal pathogen-induced host response to fungal infection [1]” (Jeyalakhsmi Kandhavelu, Naveen Luke Demonte, Venkatesh Prajna Namperumalsamy, Lalitha Prajna, Chitra Thangavel, Jeya Maheshwari Jayapal, Dharmalingam Kuppamuthu, 2016. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PRIDE:PXD003825.

  16. The Yeast Environmental Stress Response Regulates Mutagenesis Induced by Proteotoxic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Erika; Fox, Catherine A.; Broach, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Conditions of chronic stress are associated with genetic instability in many organisms, but the roles of stress responses in mutagenesis have so far been elucidated only in bacteria. Here, we present data demonstrating that the environmental stress response (ESR) in yeast functions in mutagenesis induced by proteotoxic stress. We show that the drug canavanine causes proteotoxic stress, activates the ESR, and induces mutagenesis at several loci in an ESR-dependent manner. Canavanine-induced mutagenesis also involves translesion DNA polymerases Rev1 and Polζ and non-homologous end joining factor Ku. Furthermore, under conditions of chronic sub-lethal canavanine stress, deletions of Rev1, Polζ, and Ku-encoding genes exhibit genetic interactions with ESR mutants indicative of ESR regulating these mutagenic DNA repair processes. Analyses of mutagenesis induced by several different stresses showed that the ESR specifically modulates mutagenesis induced by proteotoxic stress. Together, these results document the first known example of an involvement of a eukaryotic stress response pathway in mutagenesis and have important implications for mechanisms of evolution, carcinogenesis, and emergence of drug-resistant pathogens and chemotherapy-resistant tumors. PMID:23935537

  17. Acetic Acid Causes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Induces the Unfolded Protein Response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Nozomi Kawazoe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Since acetic acid inhibits the growth and fermentation ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it is one of the practical hindrances to the efficient production of bioethanol from a lignocellulosic biomass. Although extensive information is available on yeast response to acetic acid stress, the involvement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER and unfolded protein response (UPR has not been addressed. We herein demonstrated that acetic acid causes ER stress and induces the UPR. The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER and activation of Ire1p and Hac1p, an ER-stress sensor and ER stress-responsive transcription factor, respectively, were induced by a treatment with acetic acid stress (>0.2% v/v. Other monocarboxylic acids such as propionic acid and sorbic acid, but not lactic acid, also induced the UPR. Additionally, ire1Δ and hac1Δ cells were more sensitive to acetic acid than wild-type cells, indicating that activation of the Ire1p-Hac1p pathway is required for maximum tolerance to acetic acid. Furthermore, the combination of mild acetic acid stress (0.1% acetic acid and mild ethanol stress (5% ethanol induced the UPR, whereas neither mild ethanol stress nor mild acetic acid stress individually activated Ire1p, suggesting that ER stress is easily induced in yeast cells during the fermentation process of lignocellulosic hydrolysates. It was possible to avoid the induction of ER stress caused by acetic acid and the combined stress by adjusting extracellular pH.

  18. Dopamine D1 receptors are responsible for stress-induced emotional memory deficit in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongfu; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Bi; Li, Chaocui; Cai, Jing-Xia

    2012-03-01

    It is established that stress impairs spatial learning and memory via the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis response. Dopamine D1 receptors were also shown to be responsible for a stress-induced deficit of working memory. However, whether stress affects the subsequent emotional learning and memory is not elucidated yet. Here, we employed the well-established one-trial step-through task to study the effect of an acute psychological stress (induced by tail hanging for 5, 10, or 20 min) on emotional learning and memory, and the possible mechanisms as well. We demonstrated that tail hanging induced an obvious stress response. Either an acute tail-hanging stress or a single dose of intraperitoneally injected dopamine D1 receptor antagonist (SCH23390) significantly decreased the step-through latency in the one-trial step-through task. However, SCH23390 prevented the acute tail-hanging stress-induced decrease in the step-through latency. In addition, the effects of tail-hanging stress and/or SCH23390 on the changes in step-through latency were not through non-memory factors such as nociceptive perception and motor function. Our data indicate that the hyperactivation of dopamine D1 receptors mediated the stress-induced deficit of emotional learning and memory. This study may have clinical significance given that psychological stress is considered to play a role in susceptibility to some mental diseases such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder.

  19. Withdrawal of repeated morphine enhances histamine-induced scratching responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Kenji; Kobayashi, Kanayo; Yoshino, Saori; Taguchi, Kyoji; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    An itch is experientially well known that the scratching response of conditions such as atopic dermatitis is enhanced under psychological stress. Morphine is typical narcotic drug that induces a scratching response upon local application as an adverse drug reaction. Although long-term treatment with morphine will cause tolerance and dependence, morphine withdrawal can cause psychologically and physiologically stressful changes in humans. In this study, we evaluated the effects of morphine withdrawal on histamine-induced scratching behavior in mice. Administration of morphine with progressively increasing doses (10-50 mg/kg, i.p.) was performed for 5 consecutive days. At 3, 24, 48, and 72 hr after spontaneous withdrawal from the final morphine dose, histamine was intradermally injected into the rostral part of the back and then the number of bouts of scratching in 60 min was recorded and summed. We found that at 24 hr after morphine withdrawal there was a significant increase in histamine-induced scratching behavior. The spinal c-Fos positive cells were also significantly increased. The relative adrenal weight increased and the relative thymus weight decreased, both significantly. Moreover, the plasma corticosterone levels changed in parallel with the number of scratching bouts. These results suggest that morphine withdrawal induces a stressed state and enhances in histamine-induced scratching behavior. Increased reaction against histamine in the cervical vertebrae will participate in this stress-induced itch enhancement.

  20. Circumvention of camptothecin-induced resistance during the adaptive cellular stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiligada, Ekaterini; Papamichael, Konstantinos; Vovou, Ioanna; Delitheos, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Camptothecin-11 (CPT-11) induces the adaptive stress response in yeast, conferring resistance via not fully characterized mechanisms. This study aimed at exploring, pharmacologically, the mechanisms underlying the CPT-11-induced resistance in yeast. Post-logarithmic yeast cultures were submitted to heat shock following preconditioning with suramin and with CPT-11, either alone or in combination with suramin, cycloheximide, sodium molybdate, okadaic acid, or verapamil. The stress response was evaluated by determining cell viability after heat shock. Preconditioning with CPT-11 or suramin conferred thermotolerance to yeast cells. Co-administration of CPT-11 with suramin, cycloheximide or okadaic acid reversed the CPT-11-induced thermotolerant phenotype, while sodium molybdate and verapamil had no effect on CPT-11-induced resistance. The antagonistic effect of the thermotolerance-inducers and the possible contribution of topoisomerase II activity and post-translational modifications mediated by the phosphatases PP1/2A in CPT-11-induced resistance may have important implications on the acquisition of resistance to stress in eukaryotic cells.

  1. Distinct cellular responses differentiating alcohol- and hepatitis C virus-induced liver cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boix Loreto

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known at the molecular level concerning the differences and/or similarities between alcohol and hepatitis C virus induced liver disease. Global transcriptional profiling using oligonucleotide microarrays was therefore performed on liver biopsies from patients with cirrhosis caused by either chronic alcohol consumption or chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV. Results Global gene expression patterns varied significantly depending upon etiology of liver disease, with a greater number of differentially regulated genes seen in HCV-infected patients. Many of the gene expression changes specifically observed in HCV-infected cirrhotic livers were expectedly associated with activation of the innate antiviral immune response. We also compared severity (CTP class of cirrhosis for each etiology and identified gene expression patterns that differentiated ethanol-induced cirrhosis by class. CTP class A ethanol-cirrhotic livers showed unique expression patterns for genes implicated in the inflammatory response, including those related to macrophage activation and migration, as well as lipid metabolism and oxidative stress genes. Conclusion Stages of liver cirrhosis could be differentiated based on gene expression patterns in ethanol-induced, but not HCV-induced, disease. In addition to genes specifically regulating the innate antiviral immune response, mechanisms responsible for differentiating chronic liver damage due to HCV or ethanol may be closely related to regulation of lipid metabolism and to effects of macrophage activation on deposition of extracellular matrix components.

  2. Increasing Humidity Blocks Continuous Positive Airflow-induced Apnea Responses in Rats

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    Ching-Ting Tan

    2010-07-01

    Conclusion: Laryngeal cold dry air stimulation triggered an apneic response, which could be eliminated by humidification but not by the heating of air. These results suggest that using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP with humidified air decreases CPAP-induced apnea.

  3. Cardiovascular and ventilatory responses to electrically induced cycling with complete epidural anaesthesia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, M; Perko, G; Secher, N H

    1994-01-01

    Cardiovascular and ventilatory responses to electrically induced dynamic exercise were investigated in eight healthy young males with afferent neural influence from the legs blocked by epidural anaesthesia (25 ml 2% lidocaine) at L3-L4. This caused cutaneous sensory anaesthesia below T8-T9 and co...

  4. Response function for the characterization of photo-induced anisotropy in azobenzene containing polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sajti, S.; Kerekes, Á.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    2002-01-01

    A response function is derived for the description of photo-induced birefringence and dichroism in case of materials where the underlying process is photo-isomerization. Our result explains the usefulness of the theoretical formulae derived earlier by Kakichashvili for photo-anisotropic materials...

  5. Host-selective toxins of Pyrenophora tritici-repentis induce common responses associated with host susceptibility.

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    Iovanna Pandelova

    Full Text Available Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Ptr, a necrotrophic fungus and the causal agent of tan spot of wheat, produces one or a combination of host-selective toxins (HSTs necessary for disease development. The two most studied toxins produced by Ptr, Ptr ToxA (ToxA and Ptr ToxB (ToxB, are proteins that cause necrotic or chlorotic symptoms respectively. Investigation of host responses induced by HSTs provides better insight into the nature of the host susceptibility. Microarray analysis of ToxA has provided evidence that it can elicit responses similar to those associated with defense. In order to evaluate whether there are consistent host responses associated with susceptibility, a similar analysis of ToxB-induced changes in the same sensitive cultivar was conducted. Comparative analysis of ToxA- and ToxB-induced transcriptional changes showed that similar groups of genes encoding WRKY transcription factors, RLKs, PRs, components of the phenylpropanoid and jasmonic acid pathways are activated. ROS accumulation and photosystem dysfunction proved to be common mechanism-of-action for these toxins. Despite similarities in defense responses, transcriptional and biochemical responses as well as symptom development occur more rapidly for ToxA compared to ToxB, which could be explained by differences in perception as well as by differences in activation of a specific process, for example, ethylene biosynthesis in ToxA treatment. Results of this study suggest that perception of HSTs will result in activation of defense responses as part of a susceptible interaction and further supports the hypothesis that necrotrophic fungi exploit defense responses in order to induce cell death.

  6. Vaccination of horses with Lyme vaccines for dogs induces short-lasting antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Cassandra; Asbie, Sanda; Rohde, Jennifer; Glaser, Amy; Wagner, Bettina

    2017-07-24

    Borrelia burgdorferi can induce Lyme disease. Approved Lyme vaccines for horses are currently not available. In an effort to protect horses, veterinarians are using Lyme vaccines licensed for dogs. However, data to assess the response of horses to, or determine the efficacy of this off-label vaccine use are missing. Here, antibodies against outer surface protein A (OspA), OspC, and OspF were quantified in diagnostic serum submissions from horses with a history of vaccination with canine Lyme vaccines. The results suggested that many horses respond with low and often short-lasting antibody responses. Subsequently, four experimental vaccination trials were performed. First, we investigated antibody responses to three canine vaccines in B. burgdorferi-naïve horses. One killed bacterin vaccine induced antibodies against OspC. OspA antibodies were low for all three vaccines and lasted less than 16weeks. The second trial tested the impact of the vaccine dose using the OspA/OspC inducing bacterin vaccine in horses. A 2mL dose produced higher OspA and OspC antibody values than a 1mL dose. However, the antibody response again quickly declined, independent of dose. Third, the horses were vaccinated with 2 doses of a recombinant OspA vaccine. Previous vaccination and/or environmental exposure enhanced the magnitude and longevity of the OspA antibody response to about 20weeks. Last, the influence of intramuscular versus subcutaneous vaccine administration was investigated for the recombinant OspA vaccine. OspA antibody responses were not influenced by injection route. The current work highlights that commercial Lyme vaccines for dogs induce only transient antibody responses in horses which can also be of low magnitude. Protection from infection with B. burgdorferi should not be automatically assumed after vaccinating horses with Lyme vaccines for dogs. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Transcutaneous immunization with a novel imiquimod nanoemulsion induces superior T cell responses and virus protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Pamela Aranda; Denny, Mark; Hartmann, Ann-Kathrin; Alflen, Astrid; Probst, Hans Christian; von Stebut, Esther; Tenzer, Stefan; Schild, Hansjörg; Stassen, Michael; Langguth, Peter; Radsak, Markus P

    2017-09-01

    Transcutaneous immunization (TCI) is a novel vaccination strategy utilizing the skin associated lymphatic tissue to induce immune responses. TCI using a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope and the Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) agonist imiquimod mounts strong CTL responses by activation and maturation of skin-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and their migration to lymph nodes. However, TCI based on the commercial formulation Aldara only induces transient CTL responses that needs further improvement for the induction of durable therapeutic immune responses. Therefore we aimed to develop a novel imiquimod solid nanoemulsion (IMI-Sol) for TCI with superior vaccination properties suited to induce high quality T cell responses for enhanced protection against infections. TCI was performed by applying a MHC class I or II restricted epitope along with IMI-Sol or Aldara (each containing 5% Imiquimod) on the shaved dorsum of C57BL/6, IL-1R, Myd88, Tlr7 or Ccr7 deficient mice. T cell responses as well as DC migration upon TCI were subsequently analyzed by flow cytometry. To determine in vivo efficacy of TCI induced immune responses, CTL responses and frequency of peptide specific T cells were evaluated on day 8 or 35 post vaccination and protection in a lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection model was assessed. TCI with the imiquimod formulation IMI-Sol displayed equal skin penetration of imiquimod compared to Aldara, but elicited superior CD8 + as well as CD4 + T cell responses. The induction of T-cell responses induced by IMI-Sol TCI was dependent on the TLR7/MyD88 pathway and independent of IL-1R. IMI-Sol TCI activated skin-derived DCs in skin-draining lymph nodes more efficiently compared to Aldara leading to enhanced protection in a LCMV infection model. Our data demonstrate that IMI-Sol TCI can overcome current limitations of previous imiquimod based TCI approaches opening new perspectives for transcutaneous vaccination strategies and allowing the use of this

  8. Hydrogen-peroxide-induced oxidative stress responses in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, A.; He, Z.; Redding-Johanson, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hemme, C.L.; Joachimiak, M.P.; Bender, K.S.; Keasling, J.D.; Stahl, D.A.; Fields, M.W.; Hazen, T.C.; Arkin, A.P.; Wall, J.D.; Zhou, J.; Luo, F.; Deng, Y.; He, Q.

    2010-07-01

    To understand how sulphate-reducing bacteria respond to oxidative stresses, the responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stresses were investigated with transcriptomic, proteomic and genetic approaches. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and induced chemical species (e.g. polysulfide, ROS) and redox potential shift increased the expressions of the genes involved in detoxification, thioredoxin-dependent reduction system, protein and DNA repair, and decreased those involved in sulfate reduction, lactate oxidation and protein synthesis. A gene coexpression network analysis revealed complicated network interactions among differentially expressed genes, and suggested possible importance of several hypothetical genes in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress. Also, most of the genes in PerR and Fur regulons were highly induced, and the abundance of a Fur regulon protein increased. Mutant analysis suggested that PerR and Fur are functionally overlapped in response to stresses induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and reaction products, and the upregulation of thioredoxin-dependent reduction genes was independent of PerR or Fur. It appears that induction of those stress response genes could contribute to the increased resistance of deletion mutants to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stresses. In addition, a conceptual cellular model of D. vulgaris responses to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress was constructed to illustrate that this bacterium may employ a complicated molecular mechanism to defend against the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stresses.

  9. Nociceptive Response to L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia in Hemiparkinsonian Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, G C; Bariotto-Dos-Santos, K; Leite-Panissi, C R A; Del-Bel, E A; Bortolanza, M

    2018-04-02

    Non-motor symptoms are increasingly identified to present clinical and diagnostic importance for Parkinson's disease (PD). The multifactorial origin of pain in PD makes this symptom of great complexity. The dopamine precursor, L-DOPA (L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine), the classic therapy for PD, seems to be effective in pain threshold; however, there are no studies correlating L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) and nociception development in experimental Parkinsonism. Here, we first investigated nociceptive responses in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease to a hind paw-induced persistent inflammation. Further, the effect of L-DOPA on nociception behavior at different times of treatment was investigated. Pain threshold was determined using von Frey and Hot Plate/Tail Flick tests. Dyskinesia was measured by abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) induced by L-DOPA administration. This data is consistent to show that 6-OHDA-lesioned rats had reduced nociceptive thresholds compared to non-lesioned rats. Additionally, when these rats were exposed to a persistent inflammatory challenge, we observed increased hypernociceptive responses, namely hyperalgesia. L-DOPA treatment alleviated pain responses on days 1 and 7 of treatment, but not on day 15. During that period, we observed an inverse relationship between LID and nociception threshold in these rats, with a high LID rate corresponding to a reduced nociception threshold. Interestingly, pain responses resulting from CFA-induced inflammation were significantly enhanced during established dyskinesia. These data suggest a pro-algesic effect of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia, which is confirmed by the correlation founded here between AIMs and nociceptive indexes. In conclusion, our results are consistent with the notion that central dopaminergic mechanism is directly involved in nociceptive responses in Parkinsonism condition.

  10. Serum deprivation induces glucose response and intercellular coupling in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma PANC-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiram-Bab, Sahar; Shapira, Yuval; Gershengorn, Marvin C; Oron, Yoram

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether the previously described differentiating islet-like aggregates of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells (PANC-1) develop glucose response and exhibit intercellular communication. Fura 2-loaded PANC-1 cells in serum-free medium were assayed for changes in cytosolic free calcium ([Ca]i) induced by depolarization, tolbutamide inhibition of K(ATP) channels, or glucose. Dye transfer, assayed by confocal microscopy or by FACS, was used to detect intercellular communication. Changes in messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of genes of interest were assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Proliferation was assayed by the MTT method. Serum-deprived PANC-1 cell aggregates developed [Ca]i response to KCl, tolbutamide, or glucose. These responses were accompanied by 5-fold increase in glucokinase mRNA level and, to a lesser extent, of mRNAs for K(ATP) and L-type calcium channels, as well as increase in mRNA levels of glucagon and somatostatin. Trypsin, a proteinase-activated receptor 2 agonist previously shown to enhance aggregation, modestly improved [Ca]i response to glucose. Glucose-induced coordinated [Ca]i oscillations and dye transfer demonstrated the emergence of intercellular communication. These findings suggest that PANC-1 cells, a pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line, can be induced to express a differentiated phenotype in which cells exhibit response to glucose and form a functional syncytium similar to those observed in pancreatic islets.

  11. PAMP-induced defense responses in potato require both salicylic acid and jasmonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Vincentius A; Altmann, Simone; Ellinger, Dorothea; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Miersch, Otto; Scheel, Dierk; Rosahl, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-induced defense responses in potato (Solanum tuberosum), the role of the signaling compounds salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) was analyzed. Pep-13, a PAMP from Phytophthora, induces the accumulation of SA, JA and hydrogen peroxide, as well as the activation of defense genes and hypersensitive-like cell death. We have previously shown that SA is required for Pep-13-induced defense responses. To assess the importance of JA, RNA interference constructs targeted at the JA biosynthetic genes, allene oxide cyclase and 12-oxophytodienoic acid reductase, were expressed in transgenic potato plants. In addition, expression of the F-box protein COI1 was reduced by RNA interference. Plants expressing the RNA interference constructs failed to accumulate the respective transcripts in response to wounding or Pep-13 treatment, neither did they contain significant amounts of JA after elicitation. In response to infiltration of Pep-13, the transgenic plants exhibited a highly reduced accumulation of reactive oxygen species as well as reduced hypersensitive cell death. The ability of the JA-deficient plants to accumulate SA suggests that SA accumulation is independent or upstream of JA accumulation. These data show that PAMP responses in potato require both SA and JA and that, in contrast to Arabidopsis, these compounds act in the same signal transduction pathway. Despite their inability to fully respond to PAMP treatment, the transgenic RNA interference plants are not altered in their basal defense against Phytophthora infestans.

  12. The RAB2B-GARIL5 Complex Promotes Cytosolic DNA-Induced Innate Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahama, Michihiro; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Kozaki, Tatsuya; Misawa, Takuma; Okamoto, Toru; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Akira, Shizuo; Saitoh, Tatsuya

    2017-09-19

    Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is a cytosolic DNA sensor that induces the IFN antiviral response. However, the regulatory mechanisms that mediate cGAS-triggered signaling have not been fully explored. Here, we show the involvement of a small GTPase, RAB2B, and its effector protein, Golgi-associated RAB2B interactor-like 5 (GARIL5), in the cGAS-mediated IFN response. RAB2B-deficiency affects the IFN response induced by cytosolic DNA. Consistent with this, RAB2B deficiency enhances replication of vaccinia virus, a DNA virus. After DNA stimulation, RAB2B colocalizes with stimulator of interferon genes (STING), the downstream signal mediator of cGAS, on the Golgi apparatus. The GTP-binding activity of RAB2B is required for its localization on the Golgi apparatus and for recruitment of GARIL5. GARIL5 deficiency also affects the IFN response induced by cytosolic DNA and enhances replication of vaccinia virus. These findings indicate that the RAB2B-GARIL5 complex promotes IFN responses against DNA viruses by regulating the cGAS-STING signaling axis. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The RAB2B-GARIL5 Complex Promotes Cytosolic DNA-Induced Innate Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiro Takahama

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS is a cytosolic DNA sensor that induces the IFN antiviral response. However, the regulatory mechanisms that mediate cGAS-triggered signaling have not been fully explored. Here, we show the involvement of a small GTPase, RAB2B, and its effector protein, Golgi-associated RAB2B interactor-like 5 (GARIL5, in the cGAS-mediated IFN response. RAB2B-deficiency affects the IFN response induced by cytosolic DNA. Consistent with this, RAB2B deficiency enhances replication of vaccinia virus, a DNA virus. After DNA stimulation, RAB2B colocalizes with stimulator of interferon genes (STING, the downstream signal mediator of cGAS, on the Golgi apparatus. The GTP-binding activity of RAB2B is required for its localization on the Golgi apparatus and for recruitment of GARIL5. GARIL5 deficiency also affects the IFN response induced by cytosolic DNA and enhances replication of vaccinia virus. These findings indicate that the RAB2B-GARIL5 complex promotes IFN responses against DNA viruses by regulating the cGAS-STING signaling axis.

  14. Maize Prolamins Could Induce a Gluten-Like Cellular Immune Response in Some Celiac Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Sánchez, Juan P.; Cabrera-Chávez, Francisco; Calderón de la Barca, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune-mediated enteropathy triggered by dietary gluten in genetically prone individuals. The current treatment for CD is a strict lifelong gluten-free diet. However, in some CD patients following a strict gluten-free diet, the symptoms do not remit. These cases may be refractory CD or due to gluten contamination; however, the lack of response could be related to other dietary ingredients, such as maize, which is one of the most common alternatives to wheat used in the gluten-free diet. In some CD patients, as a rare event, peptides from maize prolamins could induce a celiac-like immune response by similar or alternative pathogenic mechanisms to those used by wheat gluten peptides. This is supported by several shared features between wheat and maize prolamins and by some experimental results. Given that gluten peptides induce an immune response of the intestinal mucosa both in vivo and in vitro, peptides from maize prolamins could also be tested to determine whether they also induce a cellular immune response. Hypothetically, maize prolamins could be harmful for a very limited subgroup of CD patients, especially those that are non-responsive, and if it is confirmed, they should follow, in addition to a gluten-free, a maize-free diet. PMID:24152750

  15. p18(Hamlet) mediates different p53-dependent responses to DNA-damage inducing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafarga, Vanesa; Cuadrado, Ana; Nebreda, Angel R

    2007-10-01

    Cells organize appropriate responses to environmental cues by activating specific signaling networks. Two proteins that play key roles in coordinating stress responses are the kinase p38alpha (MAPK14) and the transcription factor p53 (TP53). Depending on the nature and the extent of the stress-induced damage, cells may respond by arresting the cell cycle or by undergoing cell death, and these responses are usually associated with the phosphorylation of particular substrates by p38alpha as well as the activation of specific target genes by p53. We recently characterized a new p38alpha substrate, named p18(Hamlet) (ZNHIT1), which mediates p53-dependent responses to different genotoxic stresses. Thus, cisplatin or UV light induce stabilization of the p18(Hamlet) protein, which then enhances the ability of p53 to bind to and activate the promoters of pro-apoptotic genes such as NOXA and PUMA leading to apoptosis induction. In a similar way, we report here that p18(Hamlet) can also mediate the cell cycle arrest induced in response to gamma-irradiation, by participating in the p53-dependent upregulation of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(Cip1) (CDKN1A).

  16. Proliferative activity as a prognostic factor of a human tumor radiation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakulov, R.K.; Pelevina, I.I.

    1986-01-01

    The following questions are considered: 1) whether cell proliferation initial parameters can serve for predicting the tumor radial reaction; 2) whether proliferative activity change can be a criterion for estimating the treatment efficiency; 3) acquisition of data on biological peculiarities of different types of tumors. Connection between proliferative activity drop and clinical reaction under tumor radiotherapy is ascertained

  17. Study on cellular survival adaptive response induced by low dose irradiation of 153Sm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shoupeng; Xiao Dong

    1999-01-01

    The present study engages in determining whether low dose irradiation of 153 Sm could cut down the responsiveness of cellular survival to subsequent high dose exposure of 153 Sm so as to make an inquiry into approach the protective action of adaptive response by second irradiation of 153 Sm. Experimental results indicate that for inductive low dose of radionuclide 153 Sm 3.7 kBq/ml irradiated beforehand to cells has obvious resistant effect in succession after high dose irradiation of 153 Sm 3.7 x 10 2 kBq/ml was observed. Cells exposed to low dose irradiation of 153 Sm become adapted and therefore the subsequent cellular survival rate induced by high dose of 153 Sm is sufficiently higher than high dose of 153 Sm merely. It is evident that cellular survival adaptive response could be induced by pure low dose irradiation of 153 Sm only

  18. Correlation between proliferative activity and cellular thickness of human mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsube, Yoshihiro; Hirose, Motohiro; Nakamura, Chikashi; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2008-01-01

    A cell's shape is known to be related to its proliferative activity. In particular, large and flat mammalian adult stem cells seem to show slow proliferation, however using quantitative analysis to prove the phenomenon is difficult. We measured the proliferation and cellular thickness of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by atomic force microscopy and found that MSCs with high proliferative activity were thick while those with low proliferative activity were thin, even though these MSCs were early passage cells. Further, low proliferative MSCs contained many senescence-associated β-galactosidase positive cells together with high senescence-associated gene expression. These findings suggest that the measurement of cellular thickness is useful for estimating the proliferative activity of human MSCs and is expected to be a practical tool for MSC applications in regenerative medicine

  19. Anti-proliferative effect of 20-hydroxyecdysone in a lepidopteran cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auzoux-Bordenave, Stéphanie; Hatt, Philippe-Jacques; Porcheron, Patrick

    2002-02-01

    Ecdysteroids are steroid hormones involved in the epidermal growth of arthropods, controlling cell proliferation and further differentiation of target cells. The epidermal cell line IAL-PID2, established from imaginal discs of the Indian meal moth Plodia interpunctella kept its sensitivity to ecdysteroids in vitro, cells being able to respond to them by cytological and biochemical changes. When added to the culture medium, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) stopped cell proliferation and induced formation of epithelial-like aggregates. In order to better understand the cellular sequence of ecdysteroids signalling in epidermal cells we used the IAL-PID2 cell line for in vitro investigations of cytological events induced by the moulting hormone. After a 40 h serum deprivation, formazan assay (XTT) was routinely used to evaluate anti-proliferative effects of 20E during cell cycle. We established a more precise timing of the period of cell sensitivity to the hormone during the cell cycle, by the use of the mitotic index and the BrdU incorporation test. These in vitro assays were performed in parallel with the description of some hormone dependant cytological events, using immunofluorescent labelling with anti-beta tubulin/FITC antibodies and DNA staining.

  20. Identification of anti-proliferative kinase inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents to treat canine osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauchle, Ulrike; Selvarajah, Gayathri T; Mol, Jan A; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; Verheije, Monique H

    2015-08-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumour in dogs but various forms of therapy have not significantly improved clinical outcomes. As dysregulation of kinase activity is often present in tumours, kinases represent attractive molecular targets for cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to identify novel compounds targeting kinases with the potential to induce cell death in a panel of canine osteosarcoma cell lines. The ability of 80 well-characterized kinase inhibitor compounds to inhibit the proliferation of four canine osteosarcoma cell lines was investigated in vitro. For those compounds with activity, the mechanism of action and capability to potentiate the activity of doxorubicin was further evaluated. The screening showed 22 different kinase inhibitors that induced significant anti-proliferative effects across the four canine osteosarcoma cell lines investigated. Four of these compounds (RO 31-8220, 5-iodotubercidin, BAY 11-7082 and an erbstatin analog) showed significant cell growth inhibitory effects across all cell lines in association with variable induction of apoptosis. RO 31-8220 and 5-iodotubercidin showed the highest ability to potentiate the effects of doxorubicin on cell viability. In conclusion, the present study identified several potent kinase inhibitors targeting the PKC, CK1, PKA, ErbB2, mTOR and NF-κB pathways, which may warrant further investigations for the treatment of osteosarcoma in dogs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Equine colostral carbohydrates reduce lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrig, J C; Coffeng, L E; Fink-Gremmels, J

    2012-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that reactions to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), particularly in the gut, can be partly or completely mitigated by colostrum- and milk-derived oligosaccharides. Confirmation of this hypothesis could lead to the development of new therapeutic concepts. To demonstrate the influence of equine colostral carbohydrates on the inflammatory response in an in vitro model with equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Carbohydrates were extracted from mare colostrum, and then evaluated for their influence on LPS-induced inflammatory responses in PBMCs isolated from the same mares, mRNA expression of tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 was measured as well as the protein levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-10 (IL-10). Equine colostral carbohydrates significantly reduced LPS-induced TNF-alpha protein at both times measured and significantly reduced LPS-induced TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10 mRNA expression by PBMCs. Moreover, cell viability significantly increased in the presence of high concentrations of colostral carbohydrates. Carbohydrates derived from equine colostrum reduce LPS-induced inflammatory responses of equine PBMCs. Colostrum and milk-derived carbohydrates are promising candidates for new concepts in preventive and regenerative medicine.

  2. Isoliquiritigenin protects against sepsis-induced lung and liver injury by reducing inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiong; Cai, Xueding; Le, Rongrong; Zhang, Man; Gu, Xuemei; Shen, Feixia; Hong, Guangliang; Chen, Zimiao

    2018-02-05

    Sepsis, one of the most fatal diseases worldwide, often leads to multiple organ failure, mainly due to uncontrolled inflammatory responses. Despite accumulating knowledge obtained in recent years, effective drugs to treat sepsis in the clinic are still urgently needed. Isoliquiritigenin (ISL), a chalcone compound, has been reported to exert anti-inflammatory properties. However, little is known about the effects of ISL on sepsis and its related complications. In this study, we investigated the potential protective effects of ISL on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced injuries and identified the mechanisms underlying these effects. ISL inhibited inflammatory cytokine expression in mouse primary peritoneal macrophages (MPMs) exposed to LPS. In an acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model, ISL prevented LPS-induced structural damage and inflammatory cell infiltration. Additionally, pretreatment with ISL attenuated sepsis-induced lung and liver injury, accompanied by a reduction in inflammatory responses. Moreover, these protective effects were mediated by the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway-mediated inhibition of inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. Our study suggests that ISL may be a potential therapeutic agent for sepsis-induced injuries. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Rotavirus nonstructural protein 1 antagonizes innate immune response by interacting with retinoic acid inducible gene I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Lan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nonstructural protein 1 (NSP1 of rotavirus has been reported to block interferon (IFN signaling by mediating proteasome-dependent degradation of IFN-regulatory factors (IRFs and (or the β-transducin repeat containing protein (β-TrCP. However, in addition to these targets, NSP1 may subvert innate immune responses via other mechanisms. Results The NSP1 of rotavirus OSU strain as well as the IRF3 binding domain truncated NSP1 of rotavirus SA11 strain are unable to degrade IRFs, but can still inhibit host IFN response, indicating that NSP1 may target alternative host factor(s other than IRFs. Overexpression of NSP1 can block IFN-β promoter activation induced by the retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I, but does not inhibit IFN-β activation induced by the mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS, indicating that NSP1 may target RIG-I. Immunoprecipitation experiments show that NSP1 interacts with RIG-I independent of IRF3 binding domain. In addition, NSP1 induces down-regulation of RIG-I in a proteasome-independent way. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that inhibition of RIG-I mediated type I IFN responses by NSP1 may contribute to the immune evasion of rotavirus.

  4. Fenspiride inhibits histamine-induced responses in a lung epithelial cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartulli, F; Pinelli, E; Broué-Chabbert, A; Gossart, S; Girard, V; Pipy, B

    1998-05-08

    Using the human lung epithelial WI26VA4 cell line, we investigated the capacity of fenspiride, an anti-inflammatory drug with anti-bronchoconstrictor properties, to interfere with histamine-induced intracellular Ca2+ increase and eicosanoid formation. Histamine and a histamine H1 receptor agonist elicited a rapid and transient intracellular Ca2+ increase (0-60 s) in fluo 3-loaded WI26VA4 cells. This response was antagonized by the histamine H1 receptor antagonist, diphenhydramine, the histamine H2 receptor antagonist, cimetidine, having no effect. Fenspiride (10(-7)-10(-5) M) inhibited the histamine H1 receptor-induced Ca2+ increase. In addition, histamine induced a biphasic increase in arachidonic acid release. The initial rise (0-30 s), a rapid and transient arachidonic acid release, was responsible for the histamine-induced intracellular Ca2+ increase. In the second phase release (15-60 min), a sustained arachidonic acid release appeared to be associated with the formation of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase metabolites. Fenspiride (10(-5) M) abolished both phases of histamine-induced arachidonic acid release. These results suggest that anti-inflammatory and antibronchoconstrictor properties of fenspiride may result from the inhibition of these effects of histamine.

  5. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gefei Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i. but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy.

  6. Organic honey supplementation reverses pesticide-induced genotoxicity by modulating DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleva, Renata; Manzella, Nicola; Gaetani, Simona; Ciarapica, Veronica; Bracci, Massimo; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza; Pasini, Federica; Monaco, Federica; Amati, Monica; Borghi, Battista; Tomasetti, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Glyphosate (GLY) and organophosphorus insecticides such as chlorpyrifos (CPF) may cause DNA damage and cancer in exposed individuals through mitochondrial dysfunction. Polyphenols ubiquitously present in fruits and vegetables, have been viewed as antioxidant molecules, but also influence mitochondrial homeostasis. Here, honey containing polyphenol compounds was evaluated for its potential protective effect on pesticide-induced genotoxicity. Honey extracts from four floral organic sources were evaluated for their polyphenol content, antioxidant activity, and potential protective effects on pesticide-related mitochondrial destabilization, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species formation, and DNA damage response in human bronchial epithelial and neuronal cells. The protective effect of honey was, then evaluated in a residential population chronically exposed to pesticides. The four honey types showed a different polyphenol profile associated with a different antioxidant power. The pesticide-induced mitochondrial dysfunction parallels ROS formation from mitochondria (mtROS) and consequent DNA damage. Honey extracts efficiently inhibited pesticide-induced mtROS formation, and reduced DNA damage by upregulation of DNA repair through NFR2. Honey supplementation enhanced DNA repair activity in a residential population chronically exposed to pesticides, which resulted in a marked reduction of pesticide-induced DNA lesions. These results provide new insight regarding the effect of honey containing polyphenols on pesticide-induced DNA damage response. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Purine receptor P2Y_6 mediates cellular response to γ-ray-induced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Shunta; Nishimaki, Naoko; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi; Kojima, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    We previously showed that nucleotide P2 receptor agonists such as ATP and UTP amplify γ-ray-induced focus formation of phosphorylated histone H2A variant H2AX (γH2AX), which is considered to be an indicator of DNA damage so far, by activating purine P2Y_6 and P2Y_1_2 receptors. Therefore, we hypothesized that these P2 receptors play a role in inducing the repair response to γ-ray-induced DNA damage. In the present study, we tested this idea by using human lung cancer A549 cells. First, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed that P2Y_6 receptor is highly expressed in A549 cells, but P2Y_1_2 receptor is only weakly expressed. Next, colony formation assay revealed that P2Y_6 receptor antagonist MRS2578 markedly reduced the survival rate of γ-ray-exposed A549 cells. The survival rate was also significantly reduced in P2Y_6-knock-down cells, compared with scramble siRNA-transfected cells. Since it has reported that phosphorylation of ERK1/2 after activation of EGFR via P2Y_6 and P2Y_1_2 receptors is involved in the repair response to γ-ray-induced DNA damage, we next examined whether γ-ray-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was also inhibited by MRS2578 in A549 cells. We found that it was. Taken together, these findings indicate that purinergic signaling through P2Y_6 receptor, followed by ERK1/2 activation, promotes the cellular repair response to γ-ray-induced DNA damage. (author)

  8. Treatment effects of captopril on non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ning; ZHENG Zhi; JIN Hui-yi; XU Xun

    2012-01-01

    Background Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the most common complications of diabetes.Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor is thought to play an important role in preventing and treating retinal diseases in animal models of DR.The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI,captopril) in the treatment of patients with non-proliferative DR.Methods Three hundred and seventeen type 2 diabetic patients (88.05% of participants) without or with mild to moderate non-proliferative retinopathy were randomly divided into captopril group (n=202) and placebo group (n=115).All subjects received 24-month follow-up.General clinical examinations,including blood pressure and glycated hemoglobin,as well as comprehensive standardized ophthalmic examinations were performed.Color fundus photography and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used to grade diabetic retinopathy and detect macular edema respectively.Results The levels of blood pressure and glycated hemoglobin in the two groups of patients remained within the normal range during the entire follow-up and no significant difference was found between the initial and last visits,suggesting that ACEI drugs play a protective role on the DR patients independent of its anti-blood pressure role.DR classification showed that 169 eyes (83.66%) remained unchanged and the DR grade of 33 eyes (16.34%) increased in captopril group,while 84 eyes (73.04%) remained unchanged and the grade of 31 eyes (26.96%) increased in placebo group (P=0.024).Captopril treatment improved macular edema in 55.45% eyes,which was significantly higher than the 37.39% improvement in placebo group (P=0.002).No significant difference was found in the visual acuity between the two groups (P=0.271).Conclusion Captopril can improve or delay the development of DR and macular edema,which can be used in the early treatment of DR patients with type 2 diabetic mellitus.

  9. Proliferative diabetic retinopathy after vitrectomy early factors affect IOP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Bo Liu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To explore possible causes of early postoperative elevated intraocular pressure caused by proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDRvitrectomy. METHODS:Totally 72 cases(100 eyeswhich have performed vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy were retrospectively analyzed to observe the incidence of postoperative ocular hypertension, and the relevant factors that caused postoperative high intraocular pressure were statistically analyzed. Early postoperative ocular hypertension diagnostic criteria: any time after 2 weeks of non-contact tonometer measured IOP> 25mmHg(1mmHg=0.133kPa. RESULTS:High intraocular pressure after vitrectomy occurred in 27 eyes(27%, the incidence of male and female were 27.27%, 26.79%, the difference was not statistically significant(P>0.05. Eyes filled with balanced liquid filling incidence rate of 30.95%, 6.25%, and the difference was statistically significant(P0.05. Incidences of intraoperative panretinal photocoagulation and additional retinal photocoagulation group were 41%, 20%, and the difference was statistically significant(P<0.05. Preoperative retinopathy of four, five, six groups of incidence were 9.52%, 23.81%, 40.56%, and the groups were statistically significant(P<0.05. Unconsolidated preoperative retinal detachment and retinal detachment incidence rate of 19%, 41%, and the difference was statistically significant(P<0.05. Surgery in the united lens resection with intraoperative unfederated lens the resection group's incidence rate of 34%, 15%, the difference was statistically significant(P<0.05. Logistic regression analysis showed that retinal detachment preoperative and intraoperative intraocular filling were independent risk factors that caused early postoperative ocular hypertension after vitrectomy. CONCLUSION:Post-operative ocular hypertension after PDR vitrectomy is related to preoperative retinal detachment, intraoperative lensectomy, intraoperative intraocular filling, and intraoperative

  10. Public speaking stress-induced neuroendocrine responses and circulating immune cell redistribution in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Lucas, Ayscha; Holtmann, Gerald; Haag, Sebastian; Gerken, Guido; Riemenschneider, Natalie; Langhorst, Jost; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J; Schedlowski, Manfred

    2006-10-01

    Augmented neuroendocrine stress responses and altered immune functions may play a role in the manifestation of functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. We tested the hypothesis that IBS patients would demonstrate enhanced psychological and endocrine responses, as well as altered stress-induced redistribution of circulating leukocytes and lymphocytes, in response to an acute psychosocial stressor when compared with healthy controls. Responses to public speaking stress were analyzed in N = 17 IBS patients without concurrent psychiatric conditions and N = 12 healthy controls. At baseline, immediately following public speaking, and after a recovery period, state anxiety, acute GI symptoms, cardiovascular responses, serum cortisol and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were measured, and numbers of circulating leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations were analyzed by flow cytometry. Public speaking led to significant cardiovascular activation, a significant increase in ACTH, and a redistribution of circulating leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations, including significant increases in natural killer cells and cytotoxic/suppressor T cells. IBS patients demonstrated significantly greater state anxiety both at baseline and following public speaking. However, cardiovascular and endocrine responses, as well as the redistribution of circulating leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations after public speaking stress, did not differ for IBS patients compared with controls. In IBS patients without psychiatric comorbidity, the endocrine response as well as the circulation pattern of leukocyte subpopulations to acute psychosocial stress do not differ from healthy controls in spite of enhanced emotional responses. Future studies should discern the role of psychopathology in psychological and biological stress responses in IBS.

  11. The effects of chronic resveratrol treatment on vascular responsiveness of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silan, Coskun

    2008-05-01

    Deficiency in the vasorelaxant capacity is a result of an oxidative stress in diabetic animals and seems to be an etiological factor of vascular complications of diabetes. The present study was designed to examine whether resveratrol (RSV), a polyphenolic compound which is naturally present in grape and red wine, has a protective effect on diabetic aorta. Resveratrol (5 mg/kg/d, i.p.) was administered for 42 d to streptozotocin (STZ) (60 mg/kg) induced diabetic rats. Loss of weight, hyperglycemia, and elevated levels of plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) were observed in diabetic rats. Resveratrol treatment was significantly effective for these metabolic and biochemical abnormalities. The contractile responses of the aorta were recorded. Compared with control subjects, the aorta showed significantly enhanced contractile responses to noradrenaline (NA), but not to potassium chloride (KCl), in diabetic rats. Treatment of diabetic rats with resveratrol significantly reversed the increases in responsiveness and sensitivity of aorta to noradrenaline. In diabetic aorta, the relaxation response to acetylcholine (Ach) was found to be significantly decreased compared with control subjects, and resveratrol treatment reversed this; no such change was observed in the relaxation response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP). These results indicated that resveratrol significantly improved not only glucose metabolism and oxidative injury but also impaired vascular responses in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

  12. Immunologic and hematologic responses in ponies with experimentally induced Strongylus vulgaris infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, M; Martin, S C; Lloyd, S

    1989-08-01

    Immunologic and hematologic responses were examined in 4 ponies with experimentally induced Strongylus vulgaris infection and in 5 helminth-free ponies. Two ponies were inoculated with 200 larvae and 2 were inoculated with 700 larvae of S vulgaris and then were reinoculated with the same numbers of larvae 34 weeks later. Initial response of the ponies inoculated with S vulgaris was S vulgaris antigen-induced lymphocyte response that developed 1.5 to 3 weeks after inoculation and did not persist. Development of antigen-reactive lymphocytes was followed sequentially by a biphasic complement-fixing antibody response, then biphasic eosinophilia. Antibody titer to S vulgaris antigen was higher in ponies inoculated with 700 larvae, compared with that in ponies given 200 larvae of S vulgaris. Also, the second peak in antibody titer and in absolute number of eosinophils was observed earlier in ponies inoculated with 700 larvae, compared with ponies inoculated with 200 S vulgaris larvae, and subsided before or from about 24 weeks after inoculation. The prepatent period for S vulgaris infection was 24 to 25 weeks. After reinoculation with S vulgaris, a degree of increased lymphocyte responsiveness was apparent but, by 17 weeks after reinoculation, only the primary peak in the absolute number of eosinophils indicated an anamnestic response. Essentially, antibody was not detectable after reinoculation.

  13. Control of light scattering by nanoparticles with optically-induced magnetic responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional approaches to control and shape the scattering patterns of light generated by different nanostructures are mostly based on engineering of their electric response due to the fact that most metallic nanostructures support only electric resonances in the optical frequency range. Recently, fuelled by the fast development in the fields of metamaterials and plasmonics, artificial optically-induced magnetic responses have been demonstrated for various nanostructures. This kind of response can be employed to provide an extra degree of freedom for the efficient control and shaping of the scattering patterns of nanoparticles and nanoantennas. Here we review the recent progress in this research direction of nanoparticle scattering shaping and control through the interference of both electric and optically-induced magnetic responses. We discuss the magnetic resonances supported by various structures in different spectral regimes, and then summarize the original results on the scattering shaping involving both electric and magnetic responses, based on the interference of both spectrally separated (with different resonant wavelengths) and overlapped dipoles (with the same resonant wavelength), and also other higher-order modes. Finally, we discuss the scattering control utilizing Fano resonances associated with the magnetic responses. (topical review - plasmonics and metamaterials)

  14. Transcriptional profiling of the bovine hepatic response to experimentally induced E. coli mastitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Hanne Birgitte Hede; Buitenhuis, Bart; Røntved, Christine Maria

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian liver works to keep the body in a state of homeostasis and plays an important role in systemic acute phase response to infections. In this study we investigated the bovine hepatic acute phase response at the gene transcription level in dairy cows with experimentally E. coli-induced ......The mammalian liver works to keep the body in a state of homeostasis and plays an important role in systemic acute phase response to infections. In this study we investigated the bovine hepatic acute phase response at the gene transcription level in dairy cows with experimentally E. coli......-induced mastitis. At time = 0, each of 16 periparturient dairy cows received 20-40 CFU of live E. coli in one front quarter of the udder. A time series of liver biopsies was collected at -144, 12, 24 and 192 hours relative to time of inoculation. Changes in transcription levels in response to E. coli inoculation...... were analyzed using the Bovine Genome Array and tested significant for 408 transcripts over the time series (adjusted p0.05; abs(fold-change)>2). After 2-D clustering, transcripts represented three distinct transcription profiles: 1) regulation of gene transcription and apoptosis, 2) responses...

  15. Regularity increases middle latency evoked and late induced beta brain response following proprioceptive stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse M.; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, Josef

    2008-01-01

    as an indication of increased readiness. This is achieved through detailed analysis of both evoked and induced responses in the time-frequency domain. Electroencephalography in a 64 channels montage was recorded in four-teen healthy subjects. Two paradigms were explored: A Regular alternation between hand......). After initial exploration of the AvVVT and Induced collapsed files of all subjects using two-way factor analyses (Non-Negative Matrix Factorization), further data decomposition was performed in restricted windows of interest (WOI). Main effects of side of stimulation, onset or offset, regularity...

  16. Familial factors responsible for persistent crying-induced asthma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, A G

    1987-10-01

    Crying behavior of the asthmatic child may induce wheezing symptoms. This may be a clinical problem for families with asthmatic children who exhibit frequent and persistent crying behavior. This case report identifies behaviors by the child and parents that may be responsible for continual crying. Child factors include (1) "spoiled" personality, (2) poor self-image, (3) biologic sensitivity to foods, medication, and environmental allergens producing irritability. Parental factors include poor disciplinary practices secondary to (1) disrupted home life, (2) guilt, and (3) overprotective behavior. Identification of these factors may be helpful in establishing clinical management strategies to reduce crying-induced asthma.

  17. Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling mediates aldosterone-induced profibrotic responses in kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Lili; Yang, Min; Ding, Wei [Department of Nephrology, Shanghai Fifth People' s Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang, Minmin [Department of Nephrology, Shanghai Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Niu, Jianying [Department of Nephrology, Shanghai Fifth People' s Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Qiao, Zhongdong [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Gu, Yong, E-mail: yonggu@vip.163.com [Department of Nephrology, Shanghai Fifth People' s Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Department of Nephrology, Shanghai Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2016-08-01

    Aldosterone has been recognized as a risk factor for the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Studies have indicated that enhanced activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with the development and progression of renal fibrosis. But if EGFR is involved in aldosterone-induced renal fibrosis is less investigated. In the present study, we examined the effect of erlotinib, an inhibitor of EGFR tyrosine kinase activity, on the progression of aldosterone-induced renal profibrotic responses in a murine model underwent uninephrectomy. Erlotinib-treated rats exhibited relieved structural lesion comparing with rats treated with aldosterone alone, as characterized by glomerular hypertrophy, mesangial cell proliferation and expansion. Also, erlotinib inhibited the expression of TGF-β, α-SMA and mesangial matrix proteins such as collagen Ⅳ and fibronectin. In cultured mesangial cells, inhibition of EGFR also abrogated aldosterone-induced expression of extracellular matrix proteins, cell proliferation and migration. We also demonstrated that aldosterone induced the phosphorylation of EGFR through generation of ROS. And the activation of EGFR resulted in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, leading to the activation of profibrotic pathways. Taken together, we concluded that aldosterone-mediated tissue fibrosis relies on ROS induced EGFR/ERK activation, highlighting EGFR as a potential therapeutic target for modulating renal fibrosis. - Highlights: • EGFR was involved in aldosterone-induced renal profibrotic responses. • Aldosterone-induced EGFR activation was mediated by MR-dependent ROS generation. • EGFR activated the MAPK/ERK1/2 signaling to promote renal fibrosis.

  18. Protective immunization with B16 melanoma induces antibody response and not cytotoxic T cell response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarzotti, M.; Sriyuktasuth, P.; Klimpel, G.R.; Cerny, J.

    1986-01-01

    C57BL/6 mice immunized with three intraperitoneal injections of syngeneic, irradiated B16 melanoma cells, became resistant to B16 tumor challenge. Immunized mice had high levels of serum antibody against a membrane antigen of B16 cells. The B16 antigen recognized by the anti-B16 sera formed a major band of 90 KD in gel electrophoresis. The anti-B16 antibody was partially protective when mixed with B16 cells and injected into normal recipient mice. Surprisingly, B16 resistance mice were incapable of generating cytotoxic T cells (CTL) specific for the B16 tumor. Both spleen and lymph node cell populations from immunized mice did not generate B16-specific CTL. Allogeneic mice (DBA/2 or C3H) were also unable to generate B16-specific CTL: however, alloreactive CTL produced in these strains of mice by immunization with C57BL/6 lymphocytes, did kill B16 target cells. Interestingly, spleen cells from syngeneic mice immunized with B16 tumor produced 6-fold more interleukin-2 (IL-2) than normal spleen cells, in vitro. These data suggest that immunization with B16 tumor activates a helper subset of T cells (for antibody and IL-2 production) but not the effector CTL response

  19. Radiogenic responses of normal cells induced by fractionated irradiation -a simulation study. Pt. 2. Late responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duechting, W.; Ulmer, W.; Ginsberg, T.; Kikhounga-N'Got, O.; Saile, C.

    1995-01-01

    Based on controlled theory, a computed simulation model has been constructed which describes the time course of slowly responding normal cells after irradiation exposure. Subsequently, different clinical irradiation schemes are compared in regard to their delayed radiogenic responses referred to as late effects in radiological terminology. A cybernetic model of a paraenchymal tissue consisting of dominantly resting functional cells has been developed and transferred into a computer model. The radiation effects are considered by characteristic cell parameters as well as by the linear-quadratic model. Three kinds of tissue (brain and lung parenchym of the mouse, liver parenchym of rat) have been irradiated in the model according to standard-, super-, hyperfractionation and a single high dose per week. The simulation studies indicate that the late reaction of brain parenchym to hyperfractionation (3 x 1.5 Gy per day) and of lung parenchym tissue with regard to all fractionation schemes applied is particularly severe. The behavior of liver parenchym is not unique. A comparison of the simulation results basing to the survival of cell numbers with clinical experience and practice shows that the clinical reality can qualitatively be represented by the model. This opens the door for connecting side effects to normal tissue with the corresponding tumor efficacy (discussed in previous papers). The model is open to further refinement and to discussions referring to the phenomenon of late effects. (orig.) [de

  20. Plant methyl salicylate induces defense responses in the rhizobacterium Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuo

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a rhizobacterium that promotes plant growth and health. Cultivation of B. subtilis with an uprooted weed on solid medium produced pleat-like architectures on colonies near the plant. To test whether plants emit signals that affect B. subtilis colony morphology, we examined the effect of plant-related compounds on colony morphology. Bacillus subtilis formed mucoid colonies specifically in response to methyl salicylate, which is a plant-defense signal released in response to pathogen infection. Methyl salicylate induced mucoid colony formation by stimulating poly-γ-glutamic acid biosynthesis, which formed enclosing capsules that protected the cells from exposure to antimicrobial compounds. Poly-γ-glutamic acid synthesis depended on the DegS-DegU two-component regulatory system, which activated DegSU-dependent gene transcription in response to methyl salicylate. Bacillus subtilis did not induce plant methyl salicylate production, indicating that the most probable source of methyl salicylate in the rhizosphere is pathogen-infected plants. Methyl salicylate induced B. subtilis biosynthesis of the antibiotics bacilysin and fengycin, the latter of which exhibited inhibitory activity against the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum. We propose that B. subtilis may sense plants under pathogen attack via methyl salicylate, and express defense responses that protect both B. subtilis and host plants in the rhizosphere. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A noninvasive brain computer interface using visually-induced near-infrared spectroscopy responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng-Hsuan; Ho, Ming-Shan; Shyu, Kuo-Kai; Hsu, Kou-Cheng; Wang, Kuo-Wei; Lee, Po-Lei

    2014-09-19

    Visually-induced near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) response was utilized to design a brain computer interface (BCI) system. Four circular checkerboards driven by distinct flickering sequences were displayed on a LCD screen as visual stimuli to induce subjects' NIRS responses. Each flickering sequence was a concatenated sequence of alternative flickering segments and resting segments. The flickering segment was designed with fixed duration of 3s whereas the resting segment was chosen randomly within 15-20s to create the mutual independencies among different flickering sequences. Six subjects were recruited in this study and subjects were requested to gaze at the four visual stimuli one-after-one in a random order. Since visual responses in human brain are time-locked to the onsets of visual stimuli and the flicker sequences of distinct visual stimuli were designed mutually independent, the NIRS responses induced by user's gazed targets can be discerned from non-gazed targets by applying a simple averaging process. The accuracies for the six subjects were higher than 90% after 10 or more epochs being averaged. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Total Leishmania antigens with Poly(I:C) induce Th1 protective response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, M V; Eliçabe, R J; Di Genaro, M S; Germanó, M J; Gea, S; García Bustos, M F; Salomón, M C; Scodeller, E A; Cargnelutti, D E

    2017-11-01

    Our proposal was to develop a vaccine based on total Leishmania antigens (TLA) adjuvanted with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [Poly(I:C)] able to induce a Th1 response which can provide protection against Leishmania infection. Mice were vaccinated with two doses of TLA-Poly(I:C) administered by subcutaneous route at 3-week interval. Humoral and cellular immune responses induced by the immunization were measured. The protective efficacy of the vaccine was evaluated by challenging mice with infective promastigotes of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis into the footpad. Mice vaccinated with TLA-Poly(I:C) showed a high anti-Leishmania IgG titre, as well as increased IgG1 and IgG2a subclass titres compared with mice vaccinated with the TLA alone. The high IgG2a indicated a Th1 bias response induced by the TLA-Poly(I:C) immunization. Accordingly, the cellular immune response elicited by the formulation was characterized by an increased production of IFN-γ and no significant production of IL-4. The TLA-Poly(I:C) immunization elicited good protection, which was associated with decreased footpad swelling, a lower parasite load and a reduced histopathological alteration in the footpad. Our findings demonstrate a promising vaccine against cutaneous leishmaniasis that is relatively economic and easy to develop and which should be taken into account for preventing leishmaniasis in developing countries. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Drought and flooding have distinct effects on herbivore-induced responses and resistance in Solanum dulcamara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duy; D'Agostino, Nunzio; Tytgat, Tom O G; Sun, Pulu; Lortzing, Tobias; Visser, Eric J W; Cristescu, Simona M; Steppuhn, Anke; Mariani, Celestina; van Dam, Nicole M; Rieu, Ivo

    2016-07-01

    In the field, biotic and abiotic stresses frequently co-occur. As a consequence, common molecular signalling pathways governing adaptive responses to individual stresses can interact, resulting in compromised phenotypes. How plant signalling pathways interact under combined stresses is poorly understood. To assess this, we studied the consequence of drought and soil flooding on resistance of Solanum dulcamara to Spodoptera exigua and their effects on hormonal and transcriptomic profiles. The results showed that S. exigua larvae performed less well on drought-stressed plants than on well-watered and flooded plants. Both drought and insect feeding increased abscisic acid and jasmonic acid (JA) levels, whereas flooding did not induce JA accumulation. RNA sequencing analyses corroborated this pattern: drought and herbivory induced many biological processes that were repressed by flooding. When applied in combination, drought and herbivory had an additive effect on specific processes involved in secondary metabolism and defence responses, including protease inhibitor activity. In conclusion, drought and flooding have distinct effects on herbivore-induced responses and resistance. Especially, the interaction between abscisic acid and JA signalling may be important to optimize plant responses to combined drought and insect herbivory, making drought-stressed plants more resistant to insects than well-watered and flooded plants. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Effect and adaptive response of lymphocytes DNA induced by low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Zeji; Su Liaoyuan; Tian Hailin

    1994-09-01

    Fluorometric analysis of DNA unwinding (FADU) was conducted and was proved to be an optimal method for studying DNA strand breaks induced by low dose irradiation. The linear dose response curve was obtained. The minimum detected dose was 0.3 Gy. There was no effect of low dose γ-rays (0.5∼8.0 cGy) on DNA strand breaks of quiescent and mitogen-induced lymphocytes. The 0.5∼4.0 cGy γ-rats could induce adaptive response of lymphocytes' DNA strand breaks, especially, at the doses of 2.0 and 4.0 cGy. The challenge doses of 5∼20 Gy could make the adaptive response appearance, and the 15 Gy was the best one. The 3-AB could powerfully inhibit the adaptive response. The repair of DNA strand breaks (37 degree C, 15∼60 min) caused by 15 Gy γ-rays could be promoted by the low dose γ-ray irradiation (2.0 cGy), but no difference was found at 37 degree C, 120 min

  5. Polysaccharides isolated from Açaí fruit induce innate immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Holderness

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The Açaí (Acai fruit is a popular nutritional supplement that purportedly enhances immune system function. These anecdotal claims are supported by limited studies describing immune responses to the Acai polyphenol fraction. Previously, we characterized γδ T cell responses to both polyphenol and polysaccharide fractions from several plant-derived nutritional supplements. Similar polyphenol and polysaccharide fractions are found in Acai fruit. Thus, we hypothesized that one or both of these fractions could activate γδ T cells. Contrary to previous reports, we did not identify agonist activity in the polyphenol fraction; however, the Acai polysaccharide fraction induced robust γδ T cell stimulatory activity in human, mouse, and bovine PBMC cultures. To characterize the immune response to Acai polysaccharides, we fractionated the crude polysaccharide preparation and tested these fractions for activity in human PBMC cultures. The largest Acai polysaccharides were the most active in vitro as indicated by activation of myeloid and γδ T cells. When delivered in vivo, Acai polysaccharide induced myeloid cell recruitment and IL-12 production. These results define innate immune responses induced by the polysaccharide component of Acai and have implications for the treatment of asthma and infectious disease.

  6. Dai-Kenchu-To, a Herbal Medicine, Attenuates Colorectal Distention-induced Visceromotor Responses in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Kumi; Nagura, Yohko; Hasegawa, Ryoko; Ito, Hitomi; Fukudo, Shin

    2016-10-30

    Dai-kenchu-to (DKT), a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, is known to increase gastrointestinal motility and improve ileal function. We tested our hypotheses that (1) pretreatment with DKT would block the colorectal distention-induced visceromotor response in rats, and (2) pretreatment with DKT would attenuate colorectal distention-induced adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release and anxiety-related behavior. Rats were pretreated with vehicle or DKT (300 mg/kg/5 mL, per os). Visceromotor responses were analyzed using electromyography in response to colorectal distention (10, 20, 40, 60, and 80 mmHg for 20 seconds at 3-minutes intervals). Anxiety-related behavior was measured during exposure to an elevated-plus maze after colorectal distention. Plasma ACTH and serum corticosterone levels were measured after exposure to the elevated-plus maze. Colorectal distention produced robust contractions of the abdominal musculature, graded according to stimulus intensity, in vehicle-treated rats. At 40, 60, and 80 mmHg of colorectal distention, the visceromotor responses of DKT-treated rats was significantly lower than that of vehicle-treated rats. At 80 mmHg, the amplitude was suppressed to approximately one-third in DKT-treated rats, compared with that in vehicle-treated rats. Smooth muscle compliance and the velocity of accommodation to 60 mmHg of stretching did not significantly differ between the vehicle-treated and DKT-treated rats. Similarly, the DKT did not influence colorectal distention-induced ACTH release, corticosterone levels, or anxiety-related behavior in rats. Our results suggest that DKT attenuates the colorectal distention-induced visceromotor responses, without increasing smooth muscle compliance, ACTH release or anxiety-related behavior in rats.

  7. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce an adaptive inflammatory response and invasion and proliferation of lung epithelial cells in chorioallantoic membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina-Reyes, Estefany I.; Déciga-Alcaraz, Alejandro; Freyre-Fonseca, Verónica; Delgado-Buenrostro, Norma L.; Flores-Flores, José O.; Gutiérrez-López, Gustavo F.; Sánchez-Pérez, Yesennia; García-Cuéllar, Claudia M.

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO 2 NPs) studies have been performed using relatively high NPs concentration under acute exposure and limited studies have compared shape effects. We hypothesized that midterm exposure to low TiO 2 NPs concentration in lung epithelial cells induces carcinogenic characteristics modulated partially by NPs shape. To test our hypothesis we synthesized NPs shaped as belts (TiO 2 -B) using TiO 2 spheres (TiO 2 -SP) purchased from Sigma Aldrich Co. Then, lung epithelial A549 cells were low-exposed (10 µg/cm 2 ) to both shapes during 7 days and internalization, cytokine release and invasive potential were determined. Results showed greater TiO 2 -B effect on agglomerates size, cell size and granularity than TiO 2 -SP. Agglomerates size in cell culture medium was 310 nm and 454 nm for TiO 2 -SP and TiO 2 -B, respectively; TiO 2 -SP and TiO 2 -B induced 23% and 70% cell size decrease, respectively, whilst TiO 2 -SP and TiO 2 -B induced 7 and 14-fold of granularity increase. NO x production was down-regulated (31%) by TiO 2 -SP and up-regulated (70%) by TiO 2 -B. Both NPs induced a transient cytokine release (IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-4, IFN-γ, and TNF-α) after 4 days, but cytokines returned to basal levels in TiO 2 -SP exposed cells while TiO 2 -B induced a down-regulation after 7 days. Midterm exposure to both shapes of NPs induced capability to degrade cellular extracellular matrix components from chorioallantoic membrane and Ki-67 marker showed that TiO 2 -B had higher proliferative potential than TiO 2 -SP. We conclude that midterm exposure to low NPs concentration of NPs has an impact in the acquisition of new characteristics of exposed cells and NPs shape influences cellular outcome. - Graphical abstract: (A) Lung epithelial cells were low exposed (below 10 µg/cm 2 ) to titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO 2 -NPs) shaped as spheres (TiO 2 -SP) and belts (TiO 2 -B) for midterm (7 continuous days) separately. (B) Then, cells from each cell

  8. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce an adaptive inflammatory response and invasion and proliferation of lung epithelial cells in chorioallantoic membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina-Reyes, Estefany I.; Déciga-Alcaraz, Alejandro [Unidad de Biomedicina, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Iztacala, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CP 54059 Estado de México (Mexico); Freyre-Fonseca, Verónica [Unidad de Biomedicina, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Iztacala, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CP 54059 Estado de México (Mexico); Doctorado en Ciencias en Alimentos, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, CP 11340 México, DF (Mexico); Delgado-Buenrostro, Norma L. [Unidad de Biomedicina, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Iztacala, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CP 54059 Estado de México (Mexico); Flores-Flores, José O. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior S/N, Ciudad Universitaria AP 70-186, CP 04510 México, DF (Mexico); Gutiérrez-López, Gustavo F. [Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, CP 11340 México, DF (Mexico); Sánchez-Pérez, Yesennia; García-Cuéllar, Claudia M. [Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, Subdirección de Investigación Básica, San Fernando 22, Tlalpan, CP 14080 México, DF (Mexico); and others

    2015-01-15

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO{sub 2} NPs) studies have been performed using relatively high NPs concentration under acute exposure and limited studies have compared shape effects. We hypothesized that midterm exposure to low TiO{sub 2} NPs concentration in lung epithelial cells induces carcinogenic characteristics modulated partially by NPs shape. To test our hypothesis we synthesized NPs shaped as belts (TiO{sub 2}-B) using TiO{sub 2} spheres (TiO{sub 2}-SP) purchased from Sigma Aldrich Co. Then, lung epithelial A549 cells were low-exposed (10 µg/cm{sup 2}) to both shapes during 7 days and internalization, cytokine release and invasive potential were determined. Results showed greater TiO{sub 2}-B effect on agglomerates size, cell size and granularity than TiO{sub 2}-SP. Agglomerates size in cell culture medium was 310 nm and 454 nm for TiO{sub 2}-SP and TiO{sub 2}-B, respectively; TiO{sub 2}-SP and TiO{sub 2}-B induced 23% and 70% cell size decrease, respectively, whilst TiO{sub 2}-SP and TiO{sub 2}-B induced 7 and 14-fold of granularity increase. NO{sub x} production was down-regulated (31%) by TiO{sub 2}-SP and up-regulated (70%) by TiO{sub 2}-B. Both NPs induced a transient cytokine release (IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-4, IFN-γ, and TNF-α) after 4 days, but cytokines returned to basal levels in TiO{sub 2}-SP exposed cells while TiO{sub 2}-B induced a down-regulation after 7 days. Midterm exposure to both shapes of NPs induced capability to degrade cellular extracellular matrix components from chorioallantoic membrane and Ki-67 marker showed that TiO{sub 2}-B had higher proliferative potential than TiO{sub 2}-SP. We conclude that midterm exposure to low NPs concentration of NPs has an impact in the acquisition of new characteristics of exposed cells and NPs shape influences cellular outcome. - Graphical abstract: (A) Lung epithelial cells were low exposed (below 10 µg/cm{sup 2}) to titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO{sub 2}-NPs) shaped as spheres (TiO{sub 2

  9. Heavy Metals Induce Iron Deficiency Responses at Different Hierarchic and Regulatory Levels1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    In plants, the excess of several heavy metals mimics iron (Fe) deficiency-induced chlorosis, indicating a disturbance in Fe homeostasis. To examine the level at which heavy metals interfere with Fe deficiency responses, we carried out an in-depth characterization of Fe-related physiological, regulatory, and morphological responses in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) exposed to heavy metals. Enhanced zinc (Zn) uptake closely mimicked Fe deficiency by leading to low chlorophyll but high ferric-chelate reductase activity and coumarin release. These responses were not caused by Zn-inhibited Fe uptake via IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER (IRT1). Instead, Zn simulated the transcriptional response of typical Fe-regulated genes, indicating that Zn affects Fe homeostasis at the level of Fe sensing. Excess supplies of cobalt and nickel altered root traits in a different way from Fe deficiency, inducing only transient Fe deficiency responses, which were characterized by a lack of induction of the ethylene pathway. Cadmium showed a rather inconsistent influence on Fe deficiency responses at multiple levels. By contrast, manganese evoked weak Fe deficiency responses in wild-type plants but strongly exacerbated chlorosis in irt1 plants, indicating that manganese antagonized Fe mainly at the level of transport. These results show that the investigated heavy metals modulate Fe deficiency responses at different hierarchic and regulatory levels and that the interaction of metals with physiological and morphological Fe deficiency responses is uncoupled. Thus, this study not only emphasizes the importance of assessing heavy metal toxicities at multiple levels but also provides a new perspective on how Fe deficiency contributes to the toxic action of individual heavy metals. PMID:28500270

  10. Plant natriuretic peptides induce proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to stress

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona; Marondedze, Claudius; Wheeler, Janet I.; Gehring, Christoph A; Irving, Helen R.

    2014-01-01

    In plants, structural and physiological evidence has suggested the presence of biologically active natriuretic peptides (PNPs). PNPs are secreted into the apoplast, are systemically mobile and elicit a range of responses signaling via cGMP. The PNP-dependent responses include tissue specific modifications of cation transport and changes in stomatal conductance and the photosynthetic rate. PNP also has a critical role in host defense responses. Surprisingly, PNP-homologs are produced by several plant pathogens during host colonization suppressing host defense responses. Here we show that a synthetic peptide representing the biologically active fragment of the Arabidopsis thaliana PNP (AtPNP-A) induces the production of reactive oxygen species in suspension-cultured A. thaliana (Col-0) cells. To identify proteins whose expression changes in an AtPNP-A dependent manner, we undertook a quantitative proteomic approach, employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling, to reveal temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM PNP at two different time-points post-treatment. Both concentrations yield a distinct differential proteome signature. Since only the higher (1 nM) concentration induces a ROS response, we conclude that the proteome response at the lower concentration reflects a ROS independent response. Furthermore, treatment with 1 nM PNP results in an over-representation of the gene ontology (GO) terms “oxidation-reduction process,” “translation” and “response to salt stress” and this is consistent with a role of AtPNP-A in the adaptation to environmental stress conditions.

  11. Heavy Metals Induce Iron Deficiency Responses at Different Hierarchic and Regulatory Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lešková, Alexandra; Giehl, Ricardo F H; Hartmann, Anja; Fargašová, Agáta; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2017-07-01

    In plants, the excess of several heavy metals mimics iron (Fe) deficiency-induced chlorosis, indicating a disturbance in Fe homeostasis. To examine the level at which heavy metals interfere with Fe deficiency responses, we carried out an in-depth characterization of Fe-related physiological, regulatory, and morphological responses in Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) exposed to heavy metals. Enhanced zinc (Zn) uptake closely mimicked Fe deficiency by leading to low chlorophyll but high ferric-chelate reductase activity and coumarin release. These responses were not caused by Zn-inhibited Fe uptake via IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER (IRT1). Instead, Zn simulated the transcriptional response of typical Fe-regulated genes, indicating that Zn affects Fe homeostasis at the level of Fe sensing. Excess supplies of cobalt and nickel altered root traits in a different way from Fe deficiency, inducing only transient Fe deficiency responses, which were characterized by a lack of induction of the ethylene pathway. Cadmium showed a rather inconsistent influence on Fe deficiency responses at multiple levels. By contrast, manganese evoked weak Fe deficiency responses in wild-type plants but strongly exacerbated chlorosis in irt1 plants, indicating that manganese antagonized Fe mainly at the level of transport. These results show that the investigated heavy metals modulate Fe deficiency responses at different hierarchic and regulatory levels and that the interaction of metals with physiological and morphological Fe deficiency responses is uncoupled. Thus, this study not only emphasizes the importance of assessing heavy metal toxicities at multiple levels but also provides a new perspective on how Fe deficiency contributes to the toxic action of individual heavy metals. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Plant natriuretic peptides induce proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to stress

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2014-11-26

    In plants, structural and physiological evidence has suggested the presence of biologically active natriuretic peptides (PNPs). PNPs are secreted into the apoplast, are systemically mobile and elicit a range of responses signaling via cGMP. The PNP-dependent responses include tissue specific modifications of cation transport and changes in stomatal conductance and the photosynthetic rate. PNP also has a critical role in host defense responses. Surprisingly, PNP-homologs are produced by several plant pathogens during host colonization suppressing host defense responses. Here we show that a synthetic peptide representing the biologically active fragment of the Arabidopsis thaliana PNP (AtPNP-A) induces the production of reactive oxygen species in suspension-cultured A. thaliana (Col-0) cells. To identify proteins whose expression changes in an AtPNP-A dependent manner, we undertook a quantitative proteomic approach, employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling, to reveal temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM PNP at two different time-points post-treatment. Both concentrations yield a distinct differential proteome signature. Since only the higher (1 nM) concentration induces a ROS response, we conclude that the proteome response at the lower concentration reflects a ROS independent response. Furthermore, treatment with 1 nM PNP results in an over-representation of the gene ontology (GO) terms “oxidation-reduction process,” “translation” and “response to salt stress” and this is consistent with a role of AtPNP-A in the adaptation to environmental stress conditions.

  13. Proliferative vitreo-retinal disorders: experimental models in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, B

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the present thesis was to develop, refine, and assess experimental models for the study of proliferative vitreo-retinal disorders. An intravitreal injection of a colloidal solution of microparticles was used in the primate eye to produce pathologic changes including intraocular cell invasion, cell proliferation, neovascularization, collagen synthesis, and tractional retinal detachment. In a separate primate model for laser-induced subretinal neovascularization, the origin and the occurrence of macrophages was evaluated. Examinations were performed using ophthalmoscopy, slit-lamp microscopy, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Cell cultures were employed to study the effects of vitreous humor and macrophages on the proliferation of cultured retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and cultured fibroblasts using a Coulter counter. Morphologic changes were documented by phase micrography. A quantitative estimation of the extracellular matrix deposition of fibrous proteins by macrophage-modulated RPE cells as well as by vitreous-modulated RPE cells was done using enzymatic digestion and radioactive labeling techniques. A qualitative analysis of the types of collagen that was deposited in the extracellular matrices by vitreous modulated cultures was also made using indirect immunofluorescence. Using a newly developed RPE cell specific monoclonal antibody, the avidin-biotin-peroxidase labeling technique was finally employed to test the phenotypic epitope expression of macrophage-modulated and non-modulated RPE cells. A new experimental in vivo model for pathologic changes that characterize proliferative vitreo-retinal disorders was developed in the primate eye. In the model for laser-induced subretinal neovascularization, macrophages were shown to be principally recruited from the systemic circulation. Using cell cultures, it was found that both macrophage-conditioned medium and vitreous humor, separately or combined, exert mitogenic effects

  14. Subretinal Perfluorocarbon Liquid for Dissection of Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Dalma-Weiszhausz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR is a frequent condition following complex retinal detachments or trauma, and subretinal PVR is a common cause of retinal redetachment. Subretinal PVR removal is challenging and may require creating multiple or large retinotomies, making manipulation of the retina difficult and sometimes hazardous. We propose a novel surgical technique that may facilitate subretinal removal of PVR. After peripheral retinotomy of 180 degrees or greater, perfluorocarbon liquid (PFCL is carefully introduced into the subretinal space as a single bubble which provides space to perform the maneuvers. The PFCL serves as a second hand which folds the retina over, thereby allowing better visualization for safer and easier subretinal PVR removal. PFCL in then removed by direct aspiration as a single bubble while still under balanced salt solution, taking advantage of its high surface tension which prevents leaving bubbles behind. The described technique allows adequate exposure of the subretinal space for proper dissection of difficult-to-reach subretinal PVR. We applied this technique in five patients with chronic retinal detachment, extensive subretinal PVR and poor visual potential. The utilization of subretinal PFCL can assist dissection of subretinal PVR and may be useful in eyes with complicated retinal detachment and poor visual prognosis.

  15. Subretinal Perfluorocarbon Liquid for Dissection of Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalma-Weiszhausz, Jose; Franco-Cardenas, Valentina; Dalma, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is a frequent condition following complex retinal detachments or trauma, and subretinal PVR is a common cause of retinal redetachment. Subretinal PVR removal is challenging and may require creating multiple or large retinotomies, making manipulation of the retina difficult and sometimes hazardous. We propose a novel surgical technique that may facilitate subretinal removal of PVR. After peripheral retinotomy of 180 degrees or greater, perfluorocarbon liquid (PFCL) is carefully introduced into the subretinal space as a single bubble which provides space to perform the maneuvers. The PFCL serves as a second hand which folds the retina over, thereby allowing better visualization for safer and easier subretinal PVR removal. PFCL in then removed by direct aspiration as a single bubble while still under balanced salt solution, taking advantage of its high surface tension which prevents leaving bubbles behind. The described technique allows adequate exposure of the subretinal space for proper dissection of difficult-to-reach subretinal PVR. We applied this technique in five patients with chronic retinal detachment, extensive subretinal PVR and poor visual potential. The utilization of subretinal PFCL can assist dissection of subretinal PVR and may be useful in eyes with complicated retinal detachment and poor visual prognosis. PMID:23502847

  16. Coordination Skills during Vitrectomy in Treatment of Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuehong Chen; Shanshan Luo; Yanchan Liu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:.To discuss effective nursing and coordination skills for vitrectomy in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy. Methods: Fifty patients (51 eyes) with diabetic retinopathy required vitrectomy were enrolled in this study..Individual nursing service was delivered by strengthening preoperative preparation, providing psychological nursing, and intraopera-tive observation of the severity of diseases by circulating nurses;meticulous nursing was given postoperatively. Results:All 50 patients underwent surgery successfully..Intra-operatively,.patients had stable physical signs..Five patients had postoperative visual acuity0.3..No complicated infection was seen. Conclusion: For patients diagnosed with proliferative diabetic retinopathy requiring vitrectomy,.full preparations should be made and psychological nursing should be delivered preopera-tively, the severity of diseases and clinical reactions should be closely observed intraoperatively,.and proper processing and nursing measures should be taken postoperatively,.which col-lectively enhance surgical success rate,.decrease surgical com-plications,.and attain favorable treatment efficacy.(Eye Science 2014; 29:55-58).

  17. Automated detection of neovascularization for proliferative diabetic retinopathy screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychowdhury, Sohini; Koozekanani, Dara D; Parhi, Keshab K

    2016-08-01

    Neovascularization is the primary manifestation of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) that can lead to acquired blindness. This paper presents a novel method that classifies neovascularizations in the 1-optic disc (OD) diameter region (NVD) and elsewhere (NVE) separately to achieve low false positive rates of neovascularization classification. First, the OD region and blood vessels are extracted. Next, the major blood vessel segments in the 1-OD diameter region are classified for NVD, and minor blood vessel segments elsewhere are classified for NVE. For NVD and NVE classifications, optimal region-based feature sets of 10 and 6 features, respectively, are used. The proposed method achieves classification sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for NVD and NVE of 74%, 98.2%, 87.6%, and 61%, 97.5%, 92.1%, respectively. Also, the proposed method achieves 86.4% sensitivity and 76% specificity for screening images with PDR from public and local data sets. Thus, the proposed NVD and NVE detection methods can play a key role in automated screening and prioritization of patients with diabetic retinopathy.

  18. Mechanisms of Inflammation in Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy: From Bench to Bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavros N. Moysidis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR is a vision-threatening disease and a common complication of surgery to correct rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD. Several models of the pathogenesis of this disease have been described with some of these models focusing on the role of inflammatory cells and other models focusing on the role of growth factors and cytokines in the vitreous which come into contact with intraretinal and retinal pigment epithelial cells. New experiments have shed light on the pathogenesis of PVR and offer promising avenues for clinical intervention before PVR develops. One such target is the indirect pathway of activation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGRα, which plays an important role in PVR. Clinical trials assessing the efficacy of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU and low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH, daunorubicin, and 13-cis-retinoic acid, among other therapies, have yielded mixed results. Here we review inflammatory and other mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of PVR, we highlight important clinical trials, and we discuss how findings at the bench have the potential to be translated to the bedside.

  19. Wingless promotes proliferative growth in a gradient-independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena-Lopez, Luis Alberto; Franch-Marro, Xavier; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2009-10-06

    Morphogens form concentration gradients that organize patterns of cells and control growth. It has been suggested that, rather than the intensity of morphogen signaling, it is its gradation that is the relevant modulator of cell proliferation. According to this view, the ability of morphogens to regulate growth during development depends on their graded distributions. Here, we describe an experimental test of this model for Wingless, one of the key organizers of wing development in Drosophila. Maximal Wingless signaling suppresses cellular proliferation. In contrast, we found that moderate and uniform amounts of exogenous Wingless, even in the absence of endogenous Wingless, stimulated proliferative growth. Beyond a few cell diameters from the source, Wingless was relatively constant in abundance and thus provided a homogeneous growth-promoting signal. Although morphogen signaling may act in combination with as yet uncharacterized graded growth-promoting pathways, we suggest that the graded nature of morphogen signaling is not required for proliferation, at least in the developing Drosophila wing, during the main period of growth.

  20. IL-12 and GM-CSF in DNA/MVA immunizations against HIV-1 CRF12_BF Nef induced T-cell responses with an enhanced magnitude, breadth and quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Rodríguez

    Full Text Available In Argentina, the HIV epidemic is characterized by the co-circulation of subtype B and BF recombinant viral variants. Nef is an HIV protein highly variable among subtypes, making it a good tool to study the impact of HIV variability in the vaccine design setting. We have previously reported a specific cellular response against NefBF with low cross-reactivity to NefB in mice. The aim of this work was to analyze whether the co-administration of IL-12 and GM-CSF, using DNA and MVA vaccine vectors, could improve the final cellular response induced. Mice received three DNA priming doses of a plasmid that express NefBF plus DNAs expressing IL-12 and/or GM-CSF. Afterwards, all the groups were boosted with a MVAnefBF dose. The highest increase in the magnitude of the NefBF response, compared to that induced in the control was found in the IL-12 group. Importantly, a response with higher breadth was detected in groups which received IL-12 or GM-CSF, evidenced as an increased frequency of recognition of homologous (BF and heterologous (B Nef peptides, as well as a higher number of other Nef peptide pools representing different viral subtypes. However, these improvements were lost when both DNA cytokines were simultaneously administered, as the response was focused against the immunodominant peptide with a detrimental response towards subdominant epitopes. The pattern of cytokines secreted and the specific-T-cell proliferative capacity were improved in IL-12 and IL-12+GM-CSF groups. Importantly IL-12 generated a significant higher T-cell avidity against a B heterologous peptide.This study indicates that the incorporation of DNA expressing IL-12 in DNA/MVA schemes produced the best results in terms of improvements of T-cell-response key properties such as breadth, cross-reactivity and quality (avidity and pattern of cytokines secreted. These relevant results contribute to the design of strategies aimed to induce T-cell responses against HIV antigens with

  1. Proliferative Retinopathy in Type 1 Diabetes Is Associated With Cerebral Microbleeds, Which Is Part of Generalized Microangiopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woerdeman, J.P.; van Duinkerken, E.; Wattjes, M.P.; Barkhof, F.; Snoek, F.J.; Moll, A.C.; Klein, M.; de Boer, M.P.; IJzerman, R.G.; Serne, E.H.; Diamant, M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether proliferative diabetic retinopathy in type 1 diabetic patients can be generalized to cerebral small vessel disease and whether it is associated with impaired peripheral microvascular function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Thirty-three patients with proliferative

  2. Effects of Potassium Channel Blockers on the Negative Inotropic Responses Induced by Cromakalim and Pinacidil in Guinea Pig Atrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    RD-A2•4 875 EFFECTS OF POTASSIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS ON THE NEGATIVE 1/1 INOTROPIC RESPONSES INDUCED BY CRONAKALIM RND PINACIDIL IN GUINEA PIG ATRIUM(U...INOTROPICTRSPONSES INDUCED BY CROMAKAUM AND PINACIDILIN GUINEA PIG ATRIUM a AUTHOR WAI-MAN LAU 7 FORMING ORG NAMES/ADDRESSES DEFENCE SCIENCE AND a...and Technology Organisaio Aot Val. Negative Inotropic Responses Victoria. Australia Induced by Cromakalim and Pinacidil in Guinea Pig Atrium Key

  3. Tunicamycin-induced unfolded protein response in the developing mouse brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Haiping; Wang, Xin; Ke, Zun-Ji; Comer, Ashley L.; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress, resulting in the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress and UPR are associated with many neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. The developing brain is particularly susceptible to environmental insults which may cause ER stress. We evaluated the UPR in the brain of postnatal mice. Tunicamycin, a commonly used ER stress inducer, was administered subcutaneously to mice of postnatal days (PDs) 4, 12 and 25. Tunicamycin caused UPR in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of mice of PD4 and PD12, which was evident by the upregulation of ATF6, XBP1s, p-eIF2α, GRP78, GRP94 and MANF, but failed to induce UPR in the brain of PD25 mice. Tunicamycin-induced UPR in the liver was observed at all stages. In PD4 mice, tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was observed in layer II of the parietal and optical cortex, CA1–CA3 and the subiculum of the hippocampus, the cerebellar external germinal layer and the superior/inferior colliculus. Tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was also shown on PD12 but to a much lesser degree and mainly located in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, deep cerebellar nuclei and pons. Tunicamycin did not activate caspase-3 in the brain of PD25 mice and the liver of all stages. Similarly, immature cerebellar neurons were sensitive to tunicamycin-induced cell death in culture, but became resistant as they matured in vitro. These results suggest that the UPR is developmentally regulated and the immature brain is more susceptible to ER stress. - Highlights: • Tunicamycin caused a development-dependent UPR in the mouse brain. • Immature brain was more susceptible to tunicamycin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. • Tunicamycin caused more neuronal death in immature brain than mature brain. • Tunicamycin-induced neuronal death is region-specific

  4. Tunicamycin-induced unfolded protein response in the developing mouse brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haiping; Wang, Xin [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Ke, Zun-Ji [Department of Biochemistry, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 1200 Cailun Road, Shanghai 201203 (China); Comer, Ashley L.; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A. [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Luo, Jia, E-mail: jialuo888@uky.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress, resulting in the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress and UPR are associated with many neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. The developing brain is particularly susceptible to environmental insults which may cause ER stress. We evaluated the UPR in the brain of postnatal mice. Tunicamycin, a commonly used ER stress inducer, was administered subcutaneously to mice of postnatal days (PDs) 4, 12 and 25. Tunicamycin caused UPR in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of mice of PD4 and PD12, which was evident by the upregulation of ATF6, XBP1s, p-eIF2α, GRP78, GRP94 and MANF, but failed to induce UPR in the brain of PD25 mice. Tunicamycin-induced UPR in the liver was observed at all stages. In PD4 mice, tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was observed in layer II of the parietal and optical cortex, CA1–CA3 and the subiculum of the hippocampus, the cerebellar external germinal layer and the superior/inferior colliculus. Tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was also shown on PD12 but to a much lesser degree and mainly located in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, deep cerebellar nuclei and pons. Tunicamycin did not activate caspase-3 in the brain of PD25 mice and the liver of all stages. Similarly, immature cerebellar neurons were sensitive to tunicamycin-induced cell death in culture, but became resistant as they matured in vitro. These results suggest that the UPR is developmentally regulated and the immature brain is more susceptible to ER stress. - Highlights: • Tunicamycin caused a development-dependent UPR in the mouse brain. • Immature brain was more susceptible to tunicamycin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. • Tunicamycin caused more neuronal death in immature brain than mature brain. • Tunicamycin-induced neuronal death is region-specific.

  5. Role of MicroRNAs in Obesity-Induced Metabolic Disorder and Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In all living organisms, metabolic homeostasis and the immune system are the most fundamental requirements for survival. Recently, obesity has become a global public health issue, which is the cardinal risk factor for metabolic disorder. Many diseases emanating from obesity-induced metabolic dysfunction are responsible for the activated immune system, including innate and adaptive responses. Of note, inflammation is the manifest accountant signal. Deeply studied microRNAs (miRNAs have participated in many pathways involved in metabolism and immune responses to protect cells from multiple harmful stimulants, and they play an important role in determining the progress through targeting different inflammatory pathways. Thus, immune response and metabolic regulation are highly integrated with miRNAs. Collectively, miRNAs are the new targets for therapy in immune dysfunction.

  6. Role of MicroRNAs in Obesity-Induced Metabolic Disorder and Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hong; Ma, Minjuan; Liang, Tingming; Guo, Li

    2018-01-01

    In all living organisms, metabolic homeostasis and the immune system are the most fundamental requirements for survival. Recently, obesity has become a global public health issue, which is the cardinal risk factor for metabolic disorder. Many diseases emanating from obesity-induced metabolic dysfunction are responsible for the activated immune system, including innate and adaptive responses. Of note, inflammation is the manifest accountant signal. Deeply studied microRNAs (miRNAs) have participated in many pathways involved in metabolism and immune responses to protect cells from multiple harmful stimulants, and they play an important role in determining the progress through targeting different inflammatory pathways. Thus, immune response and metabolic regulation are highly integrated with miRNAs. Collectively, miRNAs are the new targets for therapy in immune dysfunction.

  7. Immune markers and correlates of protection for vaccine induced immune responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thakur, Aneesh; Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Jungersen, Gregers

    2012-01-01

    of an appropriate humoral response currently remain the best validated correlates of protective immunity after vaccination. Despite advancements in the field of immunology over the past few decades currently there are, however, no sufficiently validated immune correlates of vaccine induced protection against......-specific production of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) has been promoted as a quantitative marker of protective cell-mediated immune responses over the past couple of decades. More recently, however, evidence from several infections has pointed towards the quality of the immune response, measured through increased levels...... of antigen-specific polyfunctional T cells capable of producing a triad of relevant cytokines, as a better correlate of sustained protective immunity against this type of infections. Also the possibilities to measure antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTL) during infection or in response to vaccination...

  8. In vivo study of the adaptive response induced by radiation of different types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klokov, D.Yu.; Zaichkina, S.I.; Rozanova, O.M.; Aptikaeva, G.F.; Akhmadieva, A.Kh.; Smirnova, E.N.; Surkenova, G.N.; Kuzin, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Low doses of X- and gamma-rays are known to induce the adaptive response (AR), i.e. a reduction in the damage caused by subsequent high doses. Using micronucleus test, we investigated the in vivo induction of AR in mouse bone marrow cells by low doses of radiation of different types. In our experiments we used low-LET gamma-radiation, high-LET secondary radiation from 70 GeV protons and secondary biogenic radiation. The latter is a novel type of radiation discovered only recently. Secondary biogenic radiation is known to be induced in biological objects after exposure to radiation and thought to be responsible for stimulating and protecting effects in cells in response to external irradiation. To expose mice to the secondary biogenic radiation, animals were housed in plastic cages containing gamma-irradiated oat seeds as bedding and food for 2 weeks before challenging with a high dose (1.5 Gy at a dose rate of 1 Gy/min) of 60 Co gamma-radiation. It was found that the yield of cytogenetic damage in mice exposed to both secondary biogenic and gamma-radiation was significantly reduced as compared to that in animals exposed to the challenge dose alone, i.e. the AR was induced. Pretreatment of animals with a low dose of gamma-radiation (0.1 Gy at a dose rate of 0.125 Gy/min) also induced the AR. In contrast, preliminary exposure of mice to a low dose (0.09 Gy at a dose rate of 1 Gy/min) of secondary radiation from 70 GeV protons induced no AR, suggesting that triggering the cascade of events leading to the AR induction depends on the DNA single-strand to double- strand breaks ratio. The precise mechanisms underlying the AR are of great importance since the phenomenon of AR can be used for medical benefits and in assessment of risks for carcinogens. But they have not been elucidated well at present. Taken together, our results suggest the crucial role of particular types of initial DNA lesions and the secondary biogenic radiation induced in cells in response to external

  9. Viral oncogene-induced DNA damage response is activated in Kaposi sarcoma tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Koopal

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi sarcoma is a tumor consisting of Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV-infected tumor cells that express endothelial cell (EC markers and viral genes like v-cyclin, vFLIP, and LANA. Despite a strong link between KSHV infection and certain neoplasms, de novo virus infection of human primary cells does not readily lead to cellular transformation. We have studied the consequences of expression of v-cyclin in primary and immortalized human dermal microvascular ECs. We show that v-cyclin, which is a homolog of cellular D-type cyclins, induces replicative stress in ECs, which leads to senescence and activation of the DNA damage response. We find that antiproliferative checkpoints are activated upon KSHV infection of ECs, and in early-stage but not late-stage lesions of clinical Kaposi sarcoma specimens. These are some of the first results suggesting that DNA damage checkpoint response also functions as an anticancer barrier in virally induced cancers.

  10. Low-loss metamaterial electromagnetically induced transparency based on electric toroidal dipolar response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hai-ming; Liu, Shao-bin, E-mail: lsb@nuaa.edu.cn; Liu, Si-yuan; Ding, Guo-wen; Yang, Hua; Yu, Zhi-yang; Zhang, Hai-feng [Key Laboratory of Radar Imaging and Microwave Photonics, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, 210016 (China); Wang, Shen-yun [Research Center of Applied Electromagnetic, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing, 210044 (China)

    2015-02-23

    In this paper, a low-loss and high transmission analogy of electromagnetically induced transparency based on electric toroidal dipolar response is numerically and experimentally demonstrated. It is obtained by the excitation of the low-loss electric toroidal dipolar response, which confines the magnetic field inside a dielectric substrate with toroidal geometry. The metamaterial electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) structure is composed of the cut wire and asymmetric split-ring resonators. The transmission level is as high as 0.88, and the radiation loss is greatly suppressed, which can be proved by the surface currents distributions, the magnetic field distributions, and the imaginary parts of the effective permeability and permittivity. It offers an effective way to produce low-loss and high transmission metamaterial EIT.

  11. Ion beam induced charge and cathodoluminescence imaging of response uniformity of CVD diamond radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sellin, P J; Galbiati, A; Maghrabi, M; Townsend, P D

    2002-01-01

    The uniformity of response of CVD diamond radiation detectors produced from high quality diamond film, with crystallite dimensions of >100 mu m, has been studied using ion beam induced charge imaging. A micron-resolution scanning alpha particle beam was used to produce maps of pulse height response across the device. The detectors were fabricated with a single-sided coplanar electrode geometry to maximise their sensitivity to the surface region of the diamond film where the diamond crystallites are highly ordered. High resolution ion beam induced charge images of single crystallites were acquired that demonstrate variations in intra-crystallite charge transport and the termination of charge transport at the crystallite boundaries. Cathodoluminescence imaging of the same crystallites shows an inverse correlation between the density of radiative centres and regions of good charge transport.

  12. The Stringent Response Induced by Phosphate Limitation Promotes Purine Salvage in Agrobacterium fabrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapragasam, Smitha; Deochand, Dinesh K; Meariman, Jacob K; Grove, Anne

    2017-10-31

    Agrobacterium fabrum induces tumor growth in susceptible plant species. The upregulation of virulence genes that occurs when the bacterium senses plant-derived compounds is enhanced by acidic pH and limiting inorganic phosphate. Nutrient starvation may also trigger the stringent response, and purine salvage is among the pathways expected to be favored under such conditions. We show here that phosphate limitation induces the stringent response, as evidenced by production of (p)ppGpp, and that the xdhCSML operon encoding the purine salvage enzyme xanthine dehydrogenase is upregulated ∼15-fold. The xdhCSML operon is under control of the TetR family transcription factor XdhR; direct binding of ppGpp to XdhR attenuates DNA binding, and the enhanced xdhCSML expression correlates with increased cellular levels of (p)ppGpp. Xanthine dehydrogenase may also divert purines away from salvage pathways to form urate, the ligand for the transcription factor PecS, which in the plant pathogen Dickeya dadantii is a key regulator of virulence gene expression. However, urate levels remain low under conditions that produce increased levels of xdhCSML expression, and neither acidic pH nor limiting phosphate results in induction of genes under control of PecS. Instead, expression of such genes is induced only by externally supplemented urate. Taken together, our data indicate that purine salvage is favored during the stringent response induced by phosphate starvation, suggesting that control of this pathway may constitute a novel approach to modulating virulence. Because bacterial purine catabolism appears to be unaffected, as evidenced by the absence of urate accumulation, we further propose that the PecS regulon is induced by only host-derived urate.

  13. Bioanalytical evidence that chemicals in tattoo ink can induce adaptive stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Peta A; Stalter, Daniel; Tang, Janet Y M; Escher, Beate I

    2015-10-15

    Tattooing is becoming increasingly popular, particularly amongst young people. However, tattoo inks contain a complex mixture of chemical impurities that may pose a long-term risk for human health. As a first step towards the risk assessment of these complex mixtures we propose to assess the toxicological hazard potential of tattoo ink chemicals with cell-based bioassays. Targeted modes of toxic action and cellular endpoints included cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and adaptive stress response pathways. The studied tattoo inks, which were extracted with hexane as a proxy for the bioavailable fraction, caused effects in all bioassays, with the red and yellow tattoo inks having the greatest response, particularly inducing genotoxicity and oxidative stress response endpoints. Chemical analysis revealed the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the tested black tattoo ink at concentrations twice the recommended level. The detected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons only explained 0.06% of the oxidative stress response of the black tattoo ink, thus the majority of the effect was caused by unidentified components. The study indicates that currently available tattoo inks contain components that induce adaptive stress response pathways, but to evaluate the risk to human health further work is required to understand the toxicokinetics of tattoo ink chemicals in the body. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Methyltestosterone-induced changes in electro-olfactogram responses and courtship behaviors of cyprinids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Rachelle M; Pachkowski, Melanie D; Stacey, Norm E

    2010-01-01

    In the tinfoil barb (Barbonymus schwanenfeldii; family Cyprinidae), we previously found that increased olfactory sensitivity to a female prostaglandin pheromone could induce sexual behavior display in juvenile fish treated with androgens. Here, we determined if this phenomenon is widespread among cyprinid fishes by adding 17alpha-methyltestosterone (MT) to aquaria containing juveniles of 4 cyprinid species (tinfoil barbs; redtail sharkminnows, Epalzeorhynchos bicolor; goldfish, Carassius auratus; zebrafish, Danio rerio) and then using electro-olfactogram (EOG) recordings and behavioral assays to determine if androgen treatment enhances pheromone detection and male sex behaviors. In all 4 cyprinids, MT treatment increased the magnitudes and sensitivities of EOG response to prostaglandins and, consistent with our initial study on tinfoil barbs, did not affect EOG responses to the free and conjugated steroid to which each species is most sensitive. In zebrafish, EOG responses to prostaglandins were similar in MT-treated juveniles and adult males, whereas responses of control (ethanol exposed) fish were similar to those of adult females. Finally, as previously observed in tinfoil barbs, MT treatment of juvenile redtail sharkminnows increased courtship behaviors (nuzzling and quivering) with a stimulus fish. We conclude that androgen-induced increase in olfactory responsiveness to pheromonal prostaglandins is common among the family Cyprinidae. This phenomenon will help us unravel the development of sexually dimorphic olfactory-mediated behavior.

  15. Neutralizing effects of polyvalent antivenom on severe inflammatory response induced by Mesobuthus eupeus scorpion venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zayerzadeh1 E.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effects of Mesobuthus eupeus (Me scorpion venom on inflammatory response following injection. Additionally, the present study examined whether immunotherapy at specific time intervals would be effective on inflammatory response after Me venom inoculation. Animals were divided randomly into four groups: the first group received LD50 of venom and the second and third groups of animals; immunotherapy was performed in different time intervals and fourth group was considered as control group. Me venom inoculation is caused respiratory perturbations such as respiratory distress, respiration with open mouth, crepitation and finally respiratory arrest. Me inoculation is resulted in increased pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and IL-1. Venom injection also induced inflammatory response, characterized by significant increase in serum white blood cells and neutrophils at 30, 60 and 180 min following envenomation. Simultaneous administration of antivenom and venom prevented entirely clinical sings, cytokines and hematological changes. Delayed immunotherapy gradually ameliorated clinical features, cytokines changes and hematological abnormalities related to the envenomation. In conclusion, our observations indicate injection of M. eupeus scorpion venom induces severe inflammatory response which can be one of the causes of clinical complications. Additionally, immunotherapy beyond 1 h after envenomation with appropriate dose and route in victims with severe inflammatory response related to the M.eupeus scorpion envenomation is beneficial.

  16. Sorbitol treatment extends lifespan and induces the osmotic stress response in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devon eChandler-Brown

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The response to osmotic stress is a highly conserved process for adapting to changing environmental conditions. Prior studies have shown that hyperosmolarity by addition of sorbitol to the growth medium is sufficient to increase both chronological and replicative lifespan in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we report a similar phenomenon in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Addition of sorbitol to the nematode growth medium induces an adaptive osmotic response and increases C. elegans lifespan by about 35%. Lifespan extension from 5% sorbitol behaves similarly to dietary restriction in a variety of genetic backgrounds, increasing lifespan additively with mutation of daf-2(e1370 and independently of daf-16(mu86, sir-2.1(ok434, aak-2(ok524, and hif-1(ia04. Dietary restriction by bacterial deprivation or mutation of eat-2(ad1113 fails to further extend lifespan in the presence of 5% sorbitol. Two mutants with constitutive activation of the osmotic response, osm-5(p813 and osm-7(n1515, were found to be long-lived, and lifespan extension from sorbitol required the glycerol biosynthetic enzymes GPDH-1 and GPDH-2. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that exposure to sorbitol at levels sufficient to induce an adaptive osmotic response extends lifespan in worms and define the osmotic stress response pathway as a longevity pathway conserved between yeast and nematodes.

  17. Behavioural responses to human-induced change: Why fishing should not be ignored.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Pauli, Beatriz; Sih, Andrew

    2017-03-01

    Change in behaviour is usually the first response to human-induced environmental change and key for determining whether a species adapts to environmental change or becomes maladapted. Thus, understanding the behavioural response to human-induced changes is crucial in the interplay between ecology, evolution, conservation and management. Yet the behavioural response to fishing activities has been largely ignored. We review studies contrasting how fish behaviour affects catch by passive (e.g., long lines, angling) versus active gears (e.g., trawls, seines). We show that fishing not only targets certain behaviours, but it leads to a multitrait response including behavioural, physiological and life-history traits with population, community and ecosystem consequences. Fisheries-driven change (plastic or evolutionary) of fish behaviour and its correlated traits could impact fish populations well beyond their survival per se , affecting predation risk, foraging behaviour, dispersal, parental care, etc., and hence numerous ecological issues including population dynamics and trophic cascades . In particular, we discuss implications of behavioural responses to fishing for fisheries management and population resilience. More research on these topics, however, is needed to draw general conclusions, and we suggest fruitful directions for future studies.

  18. RAD9 deficiency enhances radiation induced bystander DNA damage and transcriptomal response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghandhi, Shanaz A; Ponnaiya, Brian; Panigrahi, Sunil K; Hopkins, Kevin M; Cui, Qingping; Hei, Tom K; Amundson, Sally A; Lieberman, Howard B

    2014-01-01

    Radiation induced bystander effects are an important component of the overall response of cells to irradiation and are associated with human health risks. The mechanism responsible includes intra-cellular and inter-cellular signaling by which the bystander response is propagated. However, details of the signaling mechanism are not well defined. We measured the bystander response of Mrad9 +/+ and Mrad9 −/− mouse embryonic stem cells, as well as human H1299 cells with inherent or RNA interference-mediated reduced RAD9 levels after exposure to 1 Gy α particles, by scoring chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei formation, respectively. In addition, we used microarray gene expression analyses to profile the transcriptome of directly irradiated and bystander H1299 cells. We demonstrated that Mrad9 null enhances chromatid aberration frequency induced by radiation in bystander mouse embryonic stem cells. In addition, we found that H1299 cells with reduced RAD9 protein levels showed a higher frequency of radiation induced bystander micronuclei formation, compared with parental cells containing inherent levels of RAD9. The enhanced bystander response in human cells was associated with a unique transcriptomic profile. In unirradiated cells, RAD9 reduction broadly affected stress response pathways at the mRNA level; there was reduction in transcript levels corresponding to genes encoding multiple members of the UVA-MAPK and p38MAPK families, such as STAT1 and PARP1, suggesting that these signaling mechanisms may not function optimally when RAD9 is reduced. Using network analysis, we found that differential activation of the SP1 and NUPR1 transcriptional regulators was predicted in directly irradiated and bystander H1299 cells. Transcription factor prediction analysis also implied that HIF1α (Hypoxia induced factor 1 alpha) activation by protein stabilization in irradiated cells could be a negative predictor of the bystander response, suggesting that local hypoxic stress

  19. Wind-induced response of CN-Tower: comparison of model and full scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monbaliu, J.; Ruigrok, C.; Isyumov, N.

    1985-01-01

    The approximately 555-m high CN Communications Tower in Toronto has now been operational for nearly a decade. The action of wind on this tower was extensively tested at the Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel Laboratory during the design of the tower. This study provided information on the overall wind loads and responses of the structure, the action of wind on various components, and its effects on the tower performance including transmission quality. A program of monitoring and recording the wind induced response and various meteorological data was started in 1977. This paper presents some results of that program and makes comparisons with wind tunnel model data. (author)

  20. Ghost responses of the FitzHugh–Nagumo system induced by colored noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordet, M.; Morfu, S.; Marquié, P.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate both numerically and experimentally how the triggering of Ghost Stochastic Resonance is affected by colored noise in a FitzHugh–Nagumo circuit. It is experimentally shown that when the circuit is excited with a bichromatic signal, weak colored noise can induce a response with a main ghost frequency which is not present in the excitation. We analyze the occurrence of this ghost frequency versus the noise intensity and the correlation time of the colored noise. Numerical simulations and experiments confirm that for larger noise correlation time, submultiples of this ghost frequency dominate the system response while the previous expected ghost frequency is less observed

  1. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte activity is enhanced in tumors with low IL-10 production in HBV-induced hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yang; Song, Qingwei; Hu, Dianhe; Zhuang, Xiaohu; Yu, Shengcai

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers and can be induced by chronic HBV infection. The role of HBV-specific immune responses in mediating tumorigenesis and HCC prognosis is debated. The effect of intratumoral microenvironment on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) is also unclear. Here, we examined resected tumor tissue from 36 patients with HBV-induced HCC. We categorized study cohort based on ex vivo IL-10 secretion by tumor cells into high IL-10-secreting (Hi10) and low IL-10-secreting (Lo10) groups, and found that the Lo10 group was less sensitive to TLR ligand stimulation. TILs from the Lo10 group contained higher frequencies of HBV-specific IFN-g-producing cells and total IFN-g-producing cells, and possessed higher proliferative capacity. Moreover, the proliferative capacity of TILs from the Hi10 group was negatively correlated with IL-10 secretion from tumor cells. Together, our data demonstrated that low IL-10-producing capacity in HBV-induced HCC tumors is associated with enhanced TIL activity. - Highlights: • We examined intratumoral IL-10 production in HBV-induced HCC. • We grouped HCC tumors into Hi10 and Lo10 groups based on their IL-10 production. • Lo10 groups had better IFN-g response by TILs. • Lo10 groups had better TIL proliferative capacity. • Lo10 group tumor cells were refractory to TLR ligand stimulation

  2. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte activity is enhanced in tumors with low IL-10 production in HBV-induced hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yang, E-mail: yangshi_xz@126.com; Song, Qingwei; Hu, Dianhe; Zhuang, Xiaohu; Yu, Shengcai

    2015-05-22

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers and can be induced by chronic HBV infection. The role of HBV-specific immune responses in mediating tumorigenesis and HCC prognosis is debated. The effect of intratumoral microenvironment on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) is also unclear. Here, we examined resected tumor tissue from 36 patients with HBV-induced HCC. We categorized study cohort based on ex vivo IL-10 secretion by tumor cells into high IL-10-secreting (Hi10) and low IL-10-secreting (Lo10) groups, and found that the Lo10 group was less sensitive to TLR ligand stimulation. TILs from the Lo10 group contained higher frequencies of HBV-specific IFN-g-producing cells and total IFN-g-producing cells, and possessed higher proliferative capacity. Moreover, the proliferative capacity of TILs from the Hi10 group was negatively correlated with IL-10 secretion from tumor cells. Together, our data demonstrated that low IL-10-producing capacity in HBV-induced HCC tumors is associated with enhanced TIL activity. - Highlights: • We examined intratumoral IL-10 production in HBV-induced HCC. • We grouped HCC tumors into Hi10 and Lo10 groups based on their IL-10 production. • Lo10 groups had better IFN-g response by TILs. • Lo10 groups had better TIL proliferative capacity. • Lo10 group tumor cells were refractory to TLR ligand stimulation.

  3. Increased sensitivity of DNA damage response-deficient cells to stimulated microgravity-induced DNA lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Li

    Full Text Available Microgravity is a major stress factor that astronauts have to face in space. In the past, the effects of microgravity on genomic DNA damage were studied, and it seems that the effect on genomic DNA depends on cell types and the length of exposure time to microgravity or simulated microgravity (SMG. In this study we used mouse embryonic stem (MES and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF cells to assess the effects of SMG on DNA lesions. To acquire the insight into potential mechanisms by which cells resist and/or adapt to SMG, we also included Rad9-deleted MES and Mdc1-deleted MEF cells in addition to wild type cells in this study. We observed significant SMG-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in Rad9-/- MES and Mdc1-/- MEF cells but not in their corresponding wild type cells. A similar pattern of DNA single strand break or modifications was also observed in Rad9-/- MES. As the exposure to SMG was prolonged, Rad9-/- MES cells adapted to the SMG disturbance by reducing the induced DNA lesions. The induced DNA lesions in Rad9-/- MES were due to SMG-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS. Interestingly, Mdc1-/- MEF cells were only partially adapted to the SMG disturbance. That is, the induced DNA lesions were reduced over time, but did not return to the control level while ROS returned to a control level. In addition, ROS was only partially responsible for the induced DNA lesions in Mdc1-/- MEF cells. Taken together, these data suggest that SMG is a weak genomic DNA stress and can aggravate genomic instability in cells with DNA damage response (DDR defects.

  4. Endothelin-1 is associated with fibrosis in proliferative diabetic retinopathy membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, William; Lajko, Michelle; Fawzi, Amani A

    2018-01-01

    To characterize the relationship between endothelin-1 and fibrosis in epiretinal membranes in proliferative diabetic retinopathy and explore the role of endothelial-mesenchymal transition in these membranes. Membranes were obtained from eyes undergoing pars plana vitrectomy for complicated proliferative diabetic retinopathy or idiopathic epiretinal membrane. Through standard immunohistochemical techniques, we labeled membranes to explore the distribution of endothelin-1 and endothelin receptor B, comparing proliferative diabetic retinopathy and idiopathic epiretinal membranes. In addition, membranes were also labeled with markers for fibroblasts, endothelial, and glial cells and studied with confocal laser scanning microscopy. The intensity of endothelin-1 labeling was quantified using standard image analysis software. Fourteen membranes were included in the analysis, nine from eyes with proliferative diabetic retinopathy and five idiopathic membranes. Flatmount diabetic membranes showed co-localization of endothelin-1 with S100A4 and CD31. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative analysis of cross-sectional membranes showed significantly higher endothelin-1 labeling in proliferative diabetic retinopathy membranes compared to idiopathic membranes (pmembranes showed more elements staining positive for S100A4 compared to idiopathic membranes. Epiretinal membrane formation in proliferative diabetic retinopathy involves higher tissue levels of endothelin-1 and fibroblastic activity. Furthermore, endothelin-1, endothelial and fibroblastic staining appear to be correlated, suggestive of endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

  5. Diet-Induced Obesity Reprograms the Inflammatory Response of the Murine Lung to Inhaled Endotoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilton, Susan C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Karin, Norman J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Zangar, Richard C.; Lee, Monika K.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Corley, Richard A.

    2013-03-01

    The co-occurrence of environmental factors is common in complex human diseases and, as such, understanding the molecular responses involved is essential to determine risk and susceptibility to disease. We have investigated the key biological pathways that define susceptibility for pulmonary infection during obesity in diet-induced obese (DIO) and regular weight (RW) C57BL/6 mice exposed to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS induced a strong inflammatory response in all mice as indicated by elevated cell counts of macrophages and neutrophils and levels of proinflammatory cytokines (MDC, MIP-1γ, IL-12, RANTES) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Additionally, DIO mice exhibited 50% greater macrophage cell counts, but decreased levels of the cytokines, IL-6, TARC, TNF-α, and VEGF relative to RW mice. Microarray analysis of lung tissue showed over half of the LPS-induced expression in DIO mice consisted of genes unique for obese mice, suggesting that obesity reprograms how the lung responds to subsequent insult. In particular, we found that obese animals exposed to LPS have gene signatures showing increased inflammatory and oxidative stress response and decreased antioxidant capacity compared with RW. Because signaling pathways for these responses can be common to various sources of environmentally induced lung damage, we further identified biomarkers that are indicative of specific toxicant exposure by comparing gene signatures after LPS exposure to those from a parallel study with cigarette smoke. These data show obesity may increase sensitivity to further insult and that co-occurrence of environmental stressors result in complex biosignatures that are not predicted from analysis of individual exposures.

  6. Diet-induced obesity reprograms the inflammatory response of the murine lung to inhaled endotoxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilton, Susan C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Karin, Norman J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Zangar, Richard C.; Lee, K. Monica; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Corley, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    The co-occurrence of environmental factors is common in complex human diseases and, as such, understanding the molecular responses involved is essential to determine risk and susceptibility to disease. We have investigated the key biological pathways that define susceptibility for pulmonary infection during obesity in diet-induced obese (DIO) and regular weight (RW) C57BL/6 mice exposed to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS induced a strong inflammatory response in all mice as indicated by elevated cell counts of macrophages and neutrophils and levels of proinflammatory cytokines (MDC, MIP-1γ, IL-12, RANTES) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Additionally, DIO mice exhibited 50% greater macrophage cell counts, but decreased levels of the cytokines, IL-6, TARC, TNF-α, and VEGF relative to RW mice. Microarray analysis of lung tissue showed over half of the LPS-induced expression in DIO mice consisted of genes unique for obese mice, suggesting that obesity reprograms how the lung responds to subsequent insult. In particular, we found that obese animals exposed to LPS have gene signatures showing increased inflammatory and oxidative stress response and decreased antioxidant capacity compared with RW. Because signaling pathways for these responses can be common to various sources of environmentally induced lung damage, we further identified biomarkers that are indicative of specific toxicant exposure by comparing gene signatures after LPS exposure to those from a parallel study with cigarette smoke. These data show obesity may increase sensitivity to further insult and that co-occurrence of environmental stressors result in complex biosignatures that are not predicted from analysis of individual exposures. - Highlights: ► Obesity modulates inflammatory markers in BAL fluid after LPS exposure. ► Obese animals have a unique transcriptional signature in lung after LPS exposure. ► Obesity elevates inflammatory stress and reduces antioxidant capacity in the lung

  7. Radiation effect and response of DNA synthesis in lymphocytes induced by low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yujie; Su Liaoyuan; Zou Huawei; Kong Xiangrong

    1999-01-01

    The ability of DNA synthesis in lymphocytes were measured by using 3 H-TdR incorporation method. This method was used to observe the damage of lymphocytes irradiated by several challenge doses (0.5-0.8 Gy) and adaptive response induced by previous low dose irradiation. The results show that DNA synthesis was inhibited by challenge dose of radiation and was adapted by previous 0.048 Gy irradiation

  8. Cytogenetic adaptive response induced by pre-exposure in human lymphocytes and marrow cells of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lianzhen; Deng Zhicheng

    1993-01-01

    The cytogenetic adaptive response induced by pre-exposure in human lymphocytes and marrow cells of mice were studied. The results of this study showed that human lymphocytes in vitro and mouse marrow cells in vivo can become adapted to low-level irradiation from 3 H-TdR or exposure to a low dose of X-or γ-irradiation, so that they become less sensitive to the chromosomal damage effects of subsequent exposures. (4 tabs.)

  9. Experimentally induced spermatophore production and immune responses reveal a trade-off in crickets

    OpenAIRE

    Angela M. Kerr; Susan N. Gershman; Scott K. Sakaluk

    2010-01-01

    The energetic demands of the immune system and reproduction are often high and can lead to trade-offs between these 2 life-history traits. In decorated crickets, Gryllodes sigillatus, much of a male's reproductive effort is devoted to calling, and to the synthesis of a spermatophylax, a large, gelatinous, non--sperm-containing mass forming part of the spermatophore and consumed by the female after mating. We employed a reciprocal design in which we experimentally induced an immune response in...

  10. Diet-induced obesity reprograms the inflammatory response of the murine lung to inhaled endotoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilton, Susan C., E-mail: susan.tilton@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Waters, Katrina M.; Karin, Norman J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Zangar, Richard C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Lee, K. Monica [Battelle Toxicology Northwest, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Corley, Richard A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    The co-occurrence of environmental factors is common in complex human diseases and, as such, understanding the molecular responses involved is essential to determine risk and susceptibility to disease. We have investigated the key biological pathways that define susceptibility for pulmonary infection during obesity in diet-induced obese (DIO) and regular weight (RW) C57BL/6 mice exposed to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS induced a strong inflammatory response in all mice as indicated by elevated cell counts of macrophages and neutrophils and levels of proinflammatory cytokines (MDC, MIP-1γ, IL-12, RANTES) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Additionally, DIO mice exhibited 50% greater macrophage cell counts, but decreased levels of the cytokines, IL-6, TARC, TNF-α, and VEGF relative to RW mice. Microarray analysis of lung tissue showed over half of the LPS-induced expression in DIO mice consisted of genes unique for obese mice, suggesting that obesity reprograms how the lung responds to subsequent insult. In particular, we found that obese animals exposed to LPS have gene signatures showing increased inflammatory and oxidative stress response and decreased antioxidant capacity compared with RW. Because signaling pathways for these responses can be common to various sources of environmentally induced lung damage, we further identified biomarkers that are indicative of specific toxicant exposure by comparing gene signatures after LPS exposure to those from a parallel study with cigarette smoke. These data show obesity may increase sensitivity to further insult and that co-occurrence of environmental stressors result in complex biosignatures that are not predicted from analysis of individual exposures. - Highlights: ► Obesity modulates inflammatory markers in BAL fluid after LPS exposure. ► Obese animals have a unique transcriptional signature in lung after LPS exposure. ► Obesity elevates inflammatory stress and reduces antioxidant capacity in the lung

  11. Dysregulation of the unfolded protein response in db/db mice with diet induced steatohepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Rinella, Mary E.; Siddiqui, M. Shaddab; Gardikiotes, Konstantina; Gottstein, Jeanne; Elias, Marc; Green, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    In humans with non-alcoholic fatty liver, diabetes is associated with more advanced disease. We have previously shown that diabetic db/db mice are highly susceptible to methionine choline deficient diet (MCD) induced hepatic injury. Since activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) is an important adaptive cellular mechanism in diabetes, obesity and fatty liver, we hypothesized that dysregulation of the UPR may partially explain how diabetes could promote liver injury.

  12. Inducement and responsibility in the energy turnaround; Veranlassung und Verantwortung bei der Energiewende

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewer, Wolfgang (ed.)

    2013-07-01

    The book includes several contributions concerning the Bonn discussion on energy legislation (volume 7): inducement and responsibility -in terms of constitutional law; between Europe and re-regulation - what is the regulation framework? Continuity requirement as legislative action directive; the future of the nuclear fuel tax after the nuclear phaseout - problems of the constitutional finance and the European tax legislation, strategy and energy markets; regulatory challenges in the realization of the energy turnaround policy.

  13. Impact induced response spectrum for the safety evaluation of the high flux isotope reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    The dynamic impact to the nearby HFIR reactor vessel caused by heavy load drop is analyzed. The impact calculation is carried out by applying the ABAQUS computer code. An impact-induced response spectrum is constructed in order to evaluate whether the HFIR vessel and the shutdown mechanism may be disabled. For the frequency range less than 10 Hz, the maximum spectral velocity of impact is approximately equal to that of the HFIR seismic design-basis spectrum. For the frequency range greater than 10 Hz, the impact-induced response spectrum is shown to cause no effect to the control rod and the shutdown mechanism. An earlier seismic safety assessment for the HFIR control and shutdown mechanism was made by EQE. Based on EQE modal solution that is combined with the impact-induced spectrum, it is concluded that the impact will not cause any damage to the shutdown mechanism, even while the reactor is in operation. The present method suggests a general approach for evaluating the impact induced damage to the reactor by applying the existing finite element modal solution that has been carried out for the seismic evaluation of the reactor

  14. Dataset of red light induced pupil constriction superimposed on post-illumination pupil response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaobo Lei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We collected and analyzed pupil diameter data from of 7 visually normal participants to compare the maximum pupil constriction (MPC induced by “Red Only” vs. “Blue+Red” visual stimulation conditions.The “Red Only” condition consisted of red light (640±10 nm stimuli of variable intensity and duration presented to dark-adapted eyes with pupils at resting state. This condition stimulates the cone-driven activity of the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC. The “Blue+Red” condition consisted of the same red light stimulus presented during ongoing blue (470±17 nm light-induced post-illumination pupil response (PIPR, representing the cone-driven ipRGC activity superimposed on the melanopsin-driven intrinsic activity of the ipRGCs (“The Absence of Attenuating Effect of Red light Exposure on Pre-existing Melanopsin-Driven Post-illumination Pupil Response” Lei et al. (2016 [1].MPC induced by the “Red Only” condition was compared with the MPC induced by the “Blue+Red” condition by multiple paired sample t-tests with Bonferroni correction. Keywords: Pupil light reflex, Chromatic pupillometry, Melanopsin, Post-illumination pupil response

  15. Bee Venom Decreases LPS-Induced Inflammatory Responses in Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Chang Hee; Cheng, Wei Nee; Bae, Hyojin; Lee, Kyung Woo; Han, Sang Mi; Petriello, Michael C; Lee, Hong Gu; Seo, Han Geuk; Han, Sung Gu

    2017-10-28

    The world dairy industry has long been challenged by bovine mastitis, an inflammatory disease, which causes economic loss due to decreased milk production and quality. Attempts have been made to prevent or treat this disease with multiple approaches, primarily through increased abuse of antibiotics, but effective natural solutions remain elusive. Bee venom (BV) contains a variety of peptides ( e.g. , melittin) and shows multiple bioactivities, including prevention of inflammation. Thus, in the current study, it was hypothesized that BV can reduce inflammation in bovine mammary epithelial cells (MAC-T). To examine the hypothesis, cells were treated with LPS (1 μg/ml) to induce an inflammatory response and the anti-inflammatory effects of BV (2.5 and 5 μg/ml) were investigated. The cellular mechanisms of BV against LPS-induced inflammation were also investigated. Results showed that BV can attenuate expression of an inflammatory protein, COX2, and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 and TNF-α. Activation of NF-κB, an inflammatory transcription factor, was significantly downregulated by BV in cells treated with LPS, through dephosphorylation of ERK1/2. Moreover, pretreatment of cells with BV attenuated LPS-induced production of intracellular reactive oxygen species ( e.g. , superoxide anion). These results support our hypothesis that BV can decrease LPS-induced inflammatory responses in bovine mammary epithelial cells through inhibition of oxidative stress, NF-κB, ERK1/2, and COX-2 signaling.

  16. The candidate TB vaccine, MVA85A, induces highly durable Th1 responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Tameris

    Full Text Available Vaccination against tuberculosis (TB should provide long-term protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb. The current TB vaccine, Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG, protects against disseminated childhood TB, but protection against lung TB in adolescents and adults is variable and mostly poor. One potential reason for the limited durability of protection may be waning of immunity through gradual attrition of BCG-induced T cells. We determined if a MVA85A viral-vector boost could enhance the durability of mycobacteria-specific T cell responses above those induced by BCG alone.We describe a long-term follow-up study of persons previously vaccinated with MVA85A. We performed a medical history and clinical examination, a tuberculin skin test and measured vaccine-specific T cell responses in persons previously enrolled as adults, adolescents, children or infants into three different Phase II trials, between 2005 and 2011.Of 252 potential participants, 183 (72.6% consented and completed the study visit. Vaccine-induced Ag85A-specific CD4+ T cell responses were remarkably persistent in healthy, HIV-uninfected adults, adolescents, children and infants, up to 6 years after MVA85A vaccination. Specific CD4+ T cells expressed surface markers consistent with either CD45RA-CCR7+ central memory or CD45RA-CCR7- effector memory T cells. Similarly durable Ag85A-specific CD4+ T cell responses were detected in HIV-infected persons who were on successful antiretroviral therapy when MVA85A was administered. By contrast, Ag85A-specific CD4+ T cell frequencies in untreated MVA85A-vaccinated HIV-infected persons were mostly undetectable 3-5 years after vaccination.MVA85A induces remarkably durable T cell responses in immunocompetent persons. However, results from a recent phase IIb trial of MVA85A, conducted in infants from the same geographic area and study population, showed no vaccine efficacy, suggesting that these durable T cell responses do not

  17. Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Induces an Innate Immune Response In vivo via TLR4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yun Lai

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV, a member of the Filoviridae family, causes the most severe form of viral hemorrhagic fever. Although no FDA licensed vaccine or treatment against Ebola virus disease (EVD is currently available, Ebola virus glycoprotein (GP is the major antigen used in all candidate Ebola vaccines. Recent reports of protection as quickly as within 6 days of administration of the rVSV-based vaccine expressing EBOV GP before robust humoral responses were generated suggests that the innate immune responses elicited early after vaccination may contribute to the protection. However, the innate immune responses induced by EBOV GP in the absence of viral vectors or adjuvants have not been fully characterized in vivo. Our recent studies demonstrated that immunization with highly purified recombinant GP in the absence of adjuvants induced a robust IgG response and partial protection against EBOV infection suggesting that GP alone can induce protective immunity. In this study we investigated the early immune response to purified EBOV GP alone in vitro and in vivo. We show that GP was efficiently internalized by antigen presenting cells and subsequently induced production of key inflammatory cytokines. In vivo, immunization of mice with EBOV GP triggered the production of key Th1 and Th2 innate immune cytokines and chemokines, which directly governed the recruitment of CD11b+ macrophages and CD11c+ dendritic cells to the draining lymph nodes (DLNs. Pre-treatment of mice with a TLR4 antagonist inhibited GP-induced cytokine production and recruitment of immune cells to the DLN. EBOV GP also upregulated the expression of costimulatory molecules in bone marrow derived macrophages suggesting its ability to enhance APC stimulatory capacity, which is critical for the induction of effective antigen-specific adaptive immunity. Collectively, these results provide the first in vivo evidence that early innate immune responses to EBOV GP are mediated via the TLR4

  18. Comparison of immune responses against foot-and-mouth disease virus induced by fusion proteins using the swine IgG heavy chain constant region or β-galactosidase as a carrier of immunogenic epitopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guangjin; Chen Weizao; Yan Weiyao; Zhao Kai; Liu Mingqiu; Zhang Jun; Fei Liang; Xu Quanxing; Sheng Zutian; Lu Yonggan; Zheng Zhaoxin

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that a fusion protein (Gal-FMDV) consisting of β-galactosidase and an immunogenic peptide, amino acids (141-160)-(21-40)-(141-160), of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) VP1 protein induced protective immune responses in guinea pigs and swine. We now designed a new potential recombinant protein vaccine against FMDV in swine. The immunogenic peptide, amino acids (141-160)-(21-40)-(141-160) from the VP1 protein of serotype O FMDV, was fused to the carboxy terminus of a swine immunoglobulin G single heavy chain constant region and expressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed fusion protein (IgG-FMDV) was purified and emulsified with oil adjuvant. Vaccination twice at an interval of 3 weeks with the emulsified IgG-FMDV fusion protein induced an FMDV-specific spleen proliferative T-cell response in guinea pigs and elicited high levels of neutralizing antibody in guinea pigs and swine. All of the immunized animals were efficiently protected against FMDV challenge. There was no significant difference between IgG-FMDV and Gal-FMDV in eliciting immunity after vaccination twice in swine. However, when evaluating the efficacy of a single inoculation of the fusion proteins, we found that IgG-FMDV could elicit a protective immune response in swine, while Gal-FMDV only elicited a weak neutralizing activity and could not protect the swine against FMDV challenge. Our results suggest that the IgG-FMDV fusion protein is a promising vaccine candidate for FMD in swine

  19. Emphysema induced by elastase enhances acute inflammatory pulmonary response to intraperitoneal LPS in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, Lídia Maria Carneiro; Reboredo, Maycon Moura; Lucinda, Leda Marília Fonseca; Fazza, Thaís Fernanda; Rabelo, Maria Aparecida Esteves; Fonseca, Adenilson Souza; de Paoli, Flavia; Pinheiro, Bruno Valle

    2016-12-01

    Abnormalities in lungs caused by emphysema might alter their response to sepsis and the occurrence of acute lung injury (ALI). This study compared the extension of ALI in response to intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection in Wistar rats with and without emphysema induced by elastase. Adult male Wistar rats were randomized into four groups: control, emphysema without sepsis, normal lung with sepsis and emphysema with sepsis. Sepsis was induced, and 24 h later the rats were euthanised. The following analysis was performed: blood gas measurements, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), lung permeability and histology. Animals that received LPS showed significant increase in a lung injury scoring system, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and IL-6, TNF-α and CXCL2 mRNA expression in lung tissue. Animals with emphysema and sepsis showed increased alveolocapillary membrane permeability, demonstrated by higher BAL/serum albumin ratio. In conclusion, the presence of emphysema induced by elastase increases the inflammatory response in the lungs to a systemic stimulus, represented in this model by the intraperitoneal injection of LPS. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2016 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  20. Strong Antibody Responses Induced by Protein Antigens Conjugated onto the Surface of Lecithin-Based Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloat, Brian R.; Sandoval, Michael A.; Hau, Andrew M.; He, Yongqun; Cui, Zhengrong

    2009-01-01

    An accumulation of research over the years has demonstrated the utility of nanoparticles as antigen carriers with adjuvant activity. Herein we defined the adjuvanticity of a novel lecithin-based nanoparticle engineered from emulsions. The nanoparticles were spheres of around 200 nm. Model protein antigens, bovine serum albumin (BSA) or Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) protein, were covalently conjugated onto the nanoparticles. Mice immunized with the BSA-conjugated nanoparticles developed strong anti-BSA antibody responses comparable to that induced by BSA adjuvanted with incomplete Freund's adjuvant and 6.5-fold stronger than that induced by BSA adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide. Immunization of mice with the PA-conjugated nanoparticles elicited a quick, strong, and durable anti-PA antibody response that afforded protection of the mice against a lethal dose of anthrax lethal toxin challenge. The potent adjuvanticity of the nanoparticles was likely due to their ability to move the antigens into local draining lymph nodes, to enhance the uptake of the antigens by antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and to activate APCs. This novel nanoparticle system has the potential to serve as a universal protein-based vaccine carrier capable of inducing strong immune responses. PMID:19729045

  1. Hemin activation of innate cellular response blocks human immunodeficiency virus type-1-induced osteoclastogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Kazuyo [Microscopy and Imaging Core Facility, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Adhikari, Rewati [Division of Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yamada, Kenneth M. [National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Dhawan, Subhash, E-mail: subhash.dhawan@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-08-14

    The normal skeletal developmental and homeostatic process termed osteoclastogenesis is exacerbated in numerous pathological conditions and causes excess bone loss. In cancer and HIV-1-infected patients, this disruption of homeostasis results in osteopenia and eventual osteoporesis. Counteracting the factors responsible for these metabolic disorders remains a challenge for preventing or minimizing this co-morbidity associated with these diseases. In this report, we demonstrate that a hemin-induced host protection mechanism not only suppresses HIV-1 associated osteoclastogenesis, but it also exhibits anti-osteoclastogenic activity for non-infected cells. Since the mode of action of hemin is both physiological and pharmacological through induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an endogenous host protective response to an FDA-licensed therapeutic used to treat another disease, our study suggests an approach to developing novel, safe and effective therapeutic strategies for treating bone disorders, because hemin administration in humans has previously met required FDA safety standards. - Highlights: • HIV-1 infection induced osteoclastogenesis in primary human macrophages. • Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction inhibited HIV-1-induced osteoclastogenesis in macrophages. • HO-1 induction suppressed RANKL-enhanced osteoclastogenesis in HIV-1-infected macrophages. • This inverse relationship between HO-1 and HIV-1 pathogenesis may define a novel host defense response against HIV-1 infection.

  2. Intelligent control for braking-induced longitudinal vibration responses of floating-type railway bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Wei-Lian; Qin, Shun-Quan; Tu, Jian-Weia; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Qiang; Cheng, Haibin; Pi, Yong-Lin

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents an intelligent control method and its engineering application in the control of braking-induced longitudinal vibration of floating-type railway bridges. Equations of motion for the controlled floating-type railway bridges have been established based on the analysis of the longitudinal vibration responses of floating-type railway bridges to train braking and axle-loads of moving trains. For engineering applications of the developed theory, a full-scale 500 kN smart magnetorheologic (MR) damper has been designed, fabricated and used to carry out experiments on the intelligent control of braking-induced longitudinal vibration. The procedure for using the developed intelligent method in conjunction with the full-scale 500 kN MR dampers has been proposed and used to control the longitudinal vibration responses of the deck of floating-type railway bridges induced by train braking and axle-loads of moving trains. This procedure has been applied to the longitudinal vibration control of the Tian Xingzhou highway and railway cable-stayed bridge over the Yangtze River in China. The simulated results have shown that the intelligent control system using the smart MR dampers can effectively control the longitudinal response of the floating-type railway bridge under excitations of braking and axle-loads of moving trains.

  3. Hemin activation of innate cellular response blocks human immunodeficiency virus type-1-induced osteoclastogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Kazuyo; Adhikari, Rewati; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2015-01-01

    The normal skeletal developmental and homeostatic process termed osteoclastogenesis is exacerbated in numerous pathological conditions and causes excess bone loss. In cancer and HIV-1-infected patients, this disruption of homeostasis results in osteopenia and eventual osteoporesis. Counteracting the factors responsible for these metabolic disorders remains a challenge for preventing or minimizing this co-morbidity associated with these diseases. In this report, we demonstrate that a hemin-induced host protection mechanism not only suppresses HIV-1 associated osteoclastogenesis, but it also exhibits anti-osteoclastogenic activity for non-infected cells. Since the mode of action of hemin is both physiological and pharmacological through induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an endogenous host protective response to an FDA-licensed therapeutic used to treat another disease, our study suggests an approach to developing novel, safe and effective therapeutic strategies for treating bone disorders, because hemin administration in humans has previously met required FDA safety standards. - Highlights: • HIV-1 infection induced osteoclastogenesis in primary human macrophages. • Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction inhibited HIV-1-induced osteoclastogenesis in macrophages. • HO-1 induction suppressed RANKL-enhanced osteoclastogenesis in HIV-1-infected macrophages. • This inverse relationship between HO-1 and HIV-1 pathogenesis may define a novel host defense response against HIV-1 infection

  4. Indirect effects of human-induced environmental change on offspring production mediated by behavioural responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candolin, Ulrika; Nieminen, Anne; Nyman, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    Human-induced rapid environmental changes often cause behavioural alterations in animals. The consequences that these alterations in turn have for the viability of populations are, however, poorly known. We used a population of threespine sticklebacks Gasterosteus aculeatus in the Baltic Sea to investigate the consequences of behavioural responses to human-induced eutrophication for offspring production. The investigated population has been growing during the last decades, and one cause could be increased offspring production. We combined field-based surveys with laboratory-based experiments, and found that an enhanced growth of macroalgae relaxed agonistic interactions among males. This allowed more males to nest, improved hatching success, and increased the number of reproductive cycles that males completed. Thus, the behavioural responses were adaptive at the individual level and increased offspring production. However, a larger proportion of small males of low competitive ability reproduced in dense vegetation. As male size and dominance are heritable, this could influence the genetic composition of the offspring. Together with a higher number of offspring produced, this could influence natural selection and the rate of adaptation to the changing environment. Thus, behavioural responses to a rapid human-induced environmental change can influence offspring production, with potential consequences for population dynamics and evolutionary processes.

  5. Transferrin-derived synthetic peptide induces highly conserved pro-inflammatory responses of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, George; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2009-02-01

    We examined the induction of macrophage pro-inflammatory responses by transferrin-derived synthetic peptide originally identified following digestion of transferrin from different species (murine, bovine, human N-lobe and goldfish) using elastase. The mass spectrometry analysis of elastase-digested murine transferrin identified a 31 amino acid peptide located in the N2 sub-domain of the transferrin N-lobe, that we named TMAP. TMAP was synthetically produced and shown to induce a number of pro-inflammatory genes by quantitative PCR. TMAP induced chemotaxis, a potent nitric oxide response, and TNF-alpha secretion in different macrophage populations; P338D1 macrophage-like cells, mouse peritoneal macrophages, mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and goldfish macrophages. The treatment of BMDM cultures with TMAP stimulated the production of nine cytokines and chemokines (IL-6, MCP-5, MIP-1 alpha, MIP-1 gamma, MIP-2, GCSF, KC, VEGF, and RANTES) that was measured using cytokine antibody array and confirmed by Western blot. Our results indicate that transferrin-derived peptide, TMAP, is an immunomodulating molecule capable of inducing pro-inflammatory responses in lower and higher vertebrates.

  6. Neurotoxicity induced by arsenic in Gallus Gallus: Regulation of oxidative stress and heat shock protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Panpan; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Wen; Chai, Hongliang; Xing, Houjuan; Xing, Mingwei

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic, a naturally occurring heavy metal pollutant, is one of the functioning risk factors for neurological toxicity in humans. However, little is known about the effects of arsenic on the nervous system of Gallus Gallus. To investigate whether arsenic induce neurotoxicity and influence the oxidative stress and heat shock proteins (Hsps) response in chickens, seventy-two 1-day-old male Hy-line chickens were treated with different doses of arsenic trioxide (As 2 O 3 ). The histological changes, antioxidant enzyme activity, and the expressions of Hsps were detected. Results showed slightly histology changes were obvious in the brain tissues exposure to arsenic. The activities of Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT) were decreased compared to the control, whereas the malondialdehyde (MDA) content was increased gradually along with increase in diet-arsenic. The mRNA levels of Hsps and protein expressions of Hsp60 and Hsp70 were up-regulated. These results suggested that sub-chronic exposure to arsenic induced neurotoxicity in chickens. Arsenic exposure disturbed the balance of oxidants and antioxidants. Increased heat shock response tried to protect chicken brain tissues from tissues damage caused by oxidative stress. The mechanisms of neurotoxicity induced by arsenic include oxidative stress and heat shock protein response in chicken brain tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Intelligent control for braking-induced longitudinal vibration responses of floating-type railway bridges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, Wei-Lian; Tu, Jian-Weia; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Qiang; Qin, Shun-Quan; Cheng, Haibin; Pi, Yong-Lin

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an intelligent control method and its engineering application in the control of braking-induced longitudinal vibration of floating-type railway bridges. Equations of motion for the controlled floating-type railway bridges have been established based on the analysis of the longitudinal vibration responses of floating-type railway bridges to train braking and axle-loads of moving trains. For engineering applications of the developed theory, a full-scale 500 kN smart magnetorheologic (MR) damper has been designed, fabricated and used to carry out experiments on the intelligent control of braking-induced longitudinal vibration. The procedure for using the developed intelligent method in conjunction with the full-scale 500 kN MR dampers has been proposed and used to control the longitudinal vibration responses of the deck of floating-type railway bridges induced by train braking and axle-loads of moving trains. This procedure has been applied to the longitudinal vibration control of the Tian Xingzhou highway and railway cable-stayed bridge over the Yangtze River in China. The simulated results have shown that the intelligent control system using the smart MR dampers can effectively control the longitudinal response of the floating-type railway bridge under excitations of braking and axle-loads of moving trains

  8. Inducible protective processes in animal systems XV: Hyperthermia enhances the Ethyl methanesulfonate induced adaptive response in meiotic cells of grasshopper Poecilocerus pictus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Venu

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: There is a protection against EMS induced anomalies by hyperthermia in in vivo P. pictus. As far as our knowledge is concerned, this is the first report to demonstrate that hyperthermia enhances the EMS induced adaptive response in in vivo meiotic cells.

  9. Extrinsic and Intrinsic Apoptotic Responses Induced by Shiitake Culinary-Medicinal Mushroom Lentinus edodes (Agaricomycetes) Aqueous Extract against a Larynx Carcinoma Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finimundy, Tiane C; Scola, Gustavo; Scariot, Fernando J; Dillon, Aldo J P; Moura, Sidnei; Echeverrigaray, Sérgio; Henriques, João Pegas; Roesch-Ely, Mariana

    2018-01-01

    Cumulative evidence from research studies has shown that the shiitake culinary-medicinal mushroom, Lentinus edodes, is an excellent source of natural antitumor agents and is capable of inhibiting cancer cell growth. However, the cell signaling pathway that leads tumor cells to apoptosis is not well understood because many chemical compounds may be acting. This study investigated the chemopreventive effects of an L. edodes aqueous extract on human HEp-2 epithelial larynx carcinoma cells and normal human MRC-5 lung fibroblasts by identifying proliferative and apoptotic pathways. The chemical characterization of the dry powder was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects induced by the extract were evaluated by assessing proliferative markers, cell sorting through flow cytometry, and expression levels of apoptotic proteins with Western blotting. The results suggest that inhibition of cell proliferation was more prominent in HEp-2 than in MRC-5 cells. Cell death analysis showed the appearance of cell populations in the sub-G1 phase, with late apoptotic signal increased in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the aqueous extract induced depolarization of mitochondria, activating the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species in HEp-2 cells. These observations suggest that L. edodes extract may exert a chemopreventive effect, regulating mitotic induction of apoptogenic signals. These findings highlight the mushroom's pharmacological potential in cancer treatment.

  10. Inducible Major Vault Protein Plays a Pivotal Role in Double-Stranded RNA- or Virus-Induced Proinflammatory Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Nanfang; Liu, Shi; Xia, Zhangchuan; Ren, Sheng; Feng, Jian; Jing, Mingzhen; Gao, Xin; Wiemer, Erik A C; Zhu, Ying

    2016-03-15

    Pathogen invasion triggers robust antiviral cytokine production via different transcription factor signaling pathways. We have previously demonstrated that major vault protein (MVP) induces type I IFN production during viral infection; however, little is known about the role of MVP in proinflammatory responses. In this study, we found in vitro that expression of MVP, IL-6, and IL-8 was inducible upon dsRNA stimulation or viral infection. Moreover, MVP was essential for the induction of IL-6 and IL-8, as impaired expression of IL-6 and IL-8 in MVP-deficient human PBMCs, human lung epithelial cells (A549), and THP-1 monocytes, as well as in murine splenocytes, peritoneal macrophages, and PBMCs from MVP-knockout (MVP(-/-)) mice, was observed. Upon investigation of the underlying mechanisms, we demonstrated that MVP acted in synergy with AP-1 (c-Fos) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP)β-liver-enriched transcriptional activating protein to activate the IL6 and IL8 promoters. Introduction of mutations into the AP-1 and C/EBPβ binding sites on the IL6 and IL8 promoters resulted in the loss of synergistic activation with MVP. Furthermore, we found that MVP interacted with both c-Fos and C/EBPβ. The interactions promoted nuclear translocation and recruitment of these transcription factors to IL6 and IL8 promoter regions. In the MVP(-/-) mouse model, significantly decreased expression of early antiviral cytokines resulted in higher viral titer in the lung, higher mortality, and heavier lung damage after infection with lethal influenza A virus. Taken together, our findings help to delineate a novel role of MVP in host proinflammatory response. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. Berberine ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in rats by suppressing Th17 cell responses via inducing cortistatin in the gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Mengfan; Xia, Yufeng; Shi, Can; Guan, Chunge; Li, Yunfan; Liu, Rui; Wei, Zhifeng; Dai, Yue

    2017-09-01

    Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, has been reported to ameliorate various autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis by oral administration. However, its mechanism remains mysterious due to an extremely low bioavailability. The fact that berberine readily accumulates in the gut, the largest endocrine organ in the body, attracted us to explore its anti-arthritic mechanism in view of the induction of intestinal immunosuppressive neuropeptides. In this study, berberine (200 mg·kg -1 , i.g.) was shown to ameliorate collagen-induced arthritis in rats, which was manifested by the reduction of clinical signs and joint destruction, as well as marked down-regulation of Th17 cell frequency and interleukin-17 level in blood. In contrast, an intravenous injection of berberine failed to affect arthritis in rats, implying that its anti-arthritic effect was gut-dependent. Further studies revealed that oral berberine selectively elevated the levels of cortistatin, of five gut-derived neuropeptides tested, in the intestines and sera of arthrititic rats. Antagonists of ghrelin/growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1 (a subtype of cortistatin receptor) almost completely abolished the ameliorative effect of berberine on arthritis and Th17 cell responses in rats. In vitro, berberine showed a moderate ability to promote the expression of cortistatin in nerve cells, which was strengthened when the nerve cells were cocultured with enteroendocrine cells to induce an autocrine/paracrine environment. In summary, oral berberine exerted anti-arthritic effect through inhibiting the Th17 cell response, which was closely associated with the induction of cortistatin generation from gut through augmenting autocrine/paracrine action between enteric nerve cells and endocrine cells. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  12. Cascading effects of thermally-induced anemone bleaching on associated anemonefish hormonal stress response and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beldade, Ricardo; Blandin, Agathe; O'Donnell, Rory; Mills, Suzanne C

    2017-10-10

    Organisms can behaviorally, physiologically, and morphologically adjust to environmental variation via integrative hormonal mechanisms, ultimately allowing animals to cope with environmental change. The stress response to environmental and social changes commonly promotes survival at the expense of reproduction. However, despite climate change impacts on population declines and diversity loss, few studies have attributed hormonal stress responses, or their regulatory effects, to climate change in the wild. Here, we report hormonal and fitness responses of individual wild fish to a recent large-scale sea warming event that caused widespread bleaching on coral reefs. This 14-month monitoring study shows a strong correlation between anemone bleaching (zooxanthellae loss), anemonefish stress response, and reproductive hormones that decreased fecundity by 73%. These findings suggest that hormone stress responses play a crucial role in changes to population demography following climate change and plasticity in hormonal responsiveness may be a key mechanism enabling individual acclimation to climate change.Elevated temperatures can cause anemones to bleach, with unknown effects on their associated symbiotic fish. Here, Beldade and colleagues show that climate-induced bleaching alters anemonefish hormonal stress response, resulting in decreased reproductive hormones and severely impacted reproduction.

  13. MicroRNA-302 Cluster Downregulates Enterovirus 71-Induced Innate Immune Response by Targeting KPNA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Nanfang; Yang, Xuecheng; Zhu, Chengliang; Zhou, Li; Yu, Haisheng; Li, Mengqi; Lin, Yong; Wang, Xueyu; Li, Qian; She, Yinglong; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Qian; Lu, Mengji; Zhu, Ying; Liu, Shi

    2018-05-18

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) induces significantly elevated levels of cytokines and chemokines, leading to local or systemic inflammation and severe complications. As shown in our previous study, microRNA (miR) 302c regulates influenza A virus-induced IFN expression by targeting NF-κB-inducing kinase. However, little is known about the role of the miR-302 cluster in EV71-mediated proinflammatory responses. In this study, we found that the miR-302 cluster controls EV71-induced cytokine expression. Further studies demonstrated that karyopherin α2 (KPNA2) is a direct target of the miR-302 cluster. Interestingly, we also found that EV71 infection upregulates KPNA2 expression by downregulating miR-302 cluster expression. Upon investigating the mechanisms behind this event, we found that KPNA2 intracellularly associates with JNK1/JNK2 and p38, leading to translocation of those transcription factors from the cytosol into the nucleus. In EV71-infected patients, miR-302 cluster expression was downregulated and KPNA2 expression was upregulated compared with controls, and their expression levels were closely correlated. Taken together, our work establishes a link between the miR-302/ KPNA2 axis and EV71-induced cytokine expression and represents a promising target for future antiviral therapy. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. Radiation-induced attenuation in polarization maintaining fibers: low dose rate response, stress, and materials effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gingerich, M.E.; Friebele, E.J.; Hickey, S.J.; Brambani, L.A.; Onstott, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The loss induced in polarization-maintaining (PM) fibers by low dose rate <0.01 Gy/h, where 1 Gy = 100 rads(Si) radiation exposure has been found to vary from <0.4 to ∼6 dB/km-10 Gy, depending on the wavelength of measurement and the fiber. Correlations have been established between low dose rate response and the ''permanent'' induced loss determined by fitting the recovery of the induced loss following high dose rate exposure to nth-order kinetics. Using this technique, both 0.85- and 1.3-μm PM fibers have been found which show virtually no permanent incremental loss and would therefore appear to be resistant to low dose rate radiation environments. The asymmetric stress inherent in PM fibers has been shown to reduce the permanent induced loss, while the recovery of the radiation-induced attenuation was found to be enhanced in fibers with Ge-F-doped silica clads

  15. Characterisation of antibody responses in pigs induced by recombinant oncosphere antigens from Taenia solium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayashi, César M; Gonzalez, Armando E; Castillo Neyra, Ricardo; Kyngdon, Craig T; Gauci, Charles G; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2012-12-14

    Recombinant antigens cloned from the oncosphere life cycle stage of the cestode parasite Taenia solium (T. solium) have been proven to be effective as vaccines for protecting pigs against infections with T. solium. Previous studies have defined three different host protective oncosphere antigens, TSOL18, TSOL16 and TSOL45. In this study, we evaluated the potential for combining the antigens TSOL16 and TSOL18 as a practical vaccine. Firstly, in a laboratory trial, we compared the immunogenicity of the combined antigens (TSOL16/18) versus the immunogenicity of the antigens separately. Secondly, in a field trial, we tested the ability of the TSOL16/18 vaccine to induce detectable antibody responses in animals living under environmental stress and traditionally reared in areas where T. solium cysticercosis is endemic; and finally, we characterised the immune response of the study population. Pigs of 8-16 weeks of age were vaccinated with 200 μg each of TSOL16 and TSOL18, plus 5mg of Quil-A. Specific total IgG, IgG(1) and IgG(2) antibody responses induced by TSOL16 and TSOL18 were determined with ELISA. The immunogenicity of both antigens was retained in the combined TSOL16/18 vaccine. The combined vaccine TSOL16/18 induced detectable specific anti-TSOL18 antibody responses in 100% (113/113) and specific anti-TSOL16 in 99% (112/113) of the vaccinated animals measured at 2 weeks following the booster vaccination. From the two IgG antibody subtypes analysed we found there was stronger response to IgG(2). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Retinal vessel caliber as a potential marker of treatment outcome in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergmann, Anna Stage; Torp, Thomas Lee; Lundberg, Kristian

    Title of abstract: Retinal vessel caliber as a potential marker of treatment outcome in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy Design of study: Three months prospective, interventional clinical study. Purpose: The retinal vascular tree can be measured non-invasively and summarized...... into the central retinal artery and vein equivalent (CRAE and CRVE). The purpose of this study was to evaluate retinal calibers as biomarkers for disease activity 3 months after panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Methods: Fifty one eyes from 40 newly...... with proliferative diabetic retinopathy....

  17. Innate responses of the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis to a herbivore-induced plant volatile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sznajder, B; Sabelis, M W; Egas, M

    2011-06-01

    The responses of the predatory mite P. persimilis to herbivore-induced plant volatiles are at least partly genetically determined. Thus, there is potential for the evolution of this behaviour by natural selection. We tested whether distinct predator genotypes with contrasting responses to a specific herbivore-induced plant volatile, i.e. methyl salicylate (MeSa), could be found in a base population collected in the field (Sicily). To this end, we imposed purifying selection on individuals within iso-female lines of P. persimilis such that the lines were propagated only via the individual that showed either a preference or avoidance of MeSa. The responses of the lines were characterized as the mean proportion of individuals choosing MeSa when given a choice between MeSa and clean air. Significant variation in predator responses was detected among iso-female lines, thus confirming the presence of a genetic component for this behaviour. Nevertheless, we did not find a significant difference in the response to MeSa between the lines that were selected to avoid MeSa and the lines selected to prefer MeSa. Instead, in the course of selection the lines selected to avoid MeSa shifted their mean response towards a preference for MeSa. An inverse, albeit weaker, shift was detected for the lines selected to prefer MeSa. We discuss the factors that may have caused the apparent lack of a response to selection within iso-female line in this study and propose experimental approaches that address them.

  18. Immunologic responses in corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus) after experimentally induced infection with ferlaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neul, Annkatrin; Schrödl, Wieland; Marschang, Rachel E; Bjick, Tina; Truyen, Uwe; von Buttlar, Heiner; Pees, Michael

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To measure immunologic responses of snakes after experimentally induced infection with ferlaviruses. ANIMALS 42 adult corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus) of both sexes. PROCEDURES Snakes were inoculated intratracheally with genogroup A (n = 12), B (12), or C (12) ferlavirus (infected groups) or cell-culture supernatant (6; control group) on day 0. Three snakes from each infected group were euthanized on days 4, 16, 28, and 49, and 3 snakes from the control group were euthanized on day 49. Blood samples were collected from live snakes on days -6 (baseline), 4, 16, 28, and 49. Hematologic tests were performed and humoral responses assessed via hemagglutination-inhibition assays and ELISAs. Following euthanasia, gross pathological and histologic evaluations and virus detection were performed. RESULTS Severity of clinical signs of and immunologic responses to ferlavirus infection differed among snake groups. Hematologic values, particularly WBC and monocyte counts, increased between days 4 and 16 after infection. A humoral response was identified between days 16 and 28. Serum IgM concentrations increased from baseline earlier than IgY concentrations, but the IgY relative increase was higher at the end of the study. The hemagglutination-inhibition assay revealed that the strongest reactions in all infected groups were against the strain with which they had been infected. Snakes infected with genogroup A ferlavirus had the strongest immune response, whereas those infected with genogroup B had the weakest responses. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results of this experimental study suggested that the ferlavirus strain with the highest virulence induced the weakest immune response in snakes.

  19. Structurally distinct polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons induce differential transcriptional responses in developing zebrafish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodale, Britton C.; Tilton, Susan C.; Corvi, Margaret M.; Wilson, Glenn R.; Janszen, Derek B.; Anderson, Kim A.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous in the environment as components of fossil fuels and by-products of combustion. These multi-ring chemicals differentially activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in a structurally dependent manner, and induce toxicity via both AHR-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PAH exposure is known to induce developmental malformations in zebrafish embryos, and recent studies have shown cardiac toxicity induced by compounds with low AHR affinity. Unraveling the potentially diverse molecular mechanisms of PAH toxicity is essential for understanding the hazard posed by complex PAH mixtures present in the environment. We analyzed transcriptional responses to PAH exposure in zebrafish embryos exposed to benz(a)anthracene (BAA), dibenzothiophene (DBT) and pyrene (PYR) at concentrations that induced developmental malformations by 120 h post-fertilization (hpf). Whole genome microarray analysis of mRNA expression at 24 and 48 hpf identified genes that were differentially regulated over time and in response to the three PAH structures. PAH body burdens were analyzed at both time points using GC–MS, and demonstrated differences in PAH uptake into the embryos. This was important for discerning dose-related differences from those that represented unique molecular mechanisms. While BAA misregulated the least number of transcripts, it caused strong induction of cyp1a and other genes known to be downstream of the AHR, which were not induced by the other two PAHs. Analysis of functional roles of misregulated genes and their predicted regulatory transcription factors also distinguished the BAA response from regulatory networks disrupted by DBT and PYR exposure. These results indicate that systems approaches can be used to classify the toxicity of PAHs based on the networks perturbed following exposure, and may provide a path for unraveling the toxicity of complex PAH mixtures. - Highlights: • Defined global mRNA expression

  20. Neurotrophins and Neurotrophin Receptors in Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed M.; Mohammad, Ghulam; De Hertogh, Gert; Nawaz, Mohd Imtiaz; Van Den Eynde, Kathleen; Siddiquei, Mohammad Mairaj; Struyf, Sofie; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Geboes, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Neurotrophins (NTs) are emerging as important mediators of angiogenesis and fibrosis. We investigated the expression of the NTs nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) and their receptors TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC in proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). As a comparison, we examined the expression of NTs and their receptors in the retinas of diabetic rats. Vitreous samples from 16 PDR and 15 nondiabetic patients were studied by Western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Epiretinal membranes from 17 patients with PDR were studied by immunohistochemistry. Rats were made diabetic with a single high dose of streptozotocin and retinas of rats were examined by Western blot analysis. Western blot analysis revealed a significant increase in the expression of NT-3 and NT-4 and the shedding of receptors TrkA and TrkB in vitreous samples from PDR patients compared to nondiabetic controls, whereas NGF and BDNF and the receptor TrkC were not detected with the use of Western blot analysis and ELISA. In epiretinal membranes, vascular endothelial cells and myofibroblasts expressed NT-3 and the receptors TrkA, TrkB and TrkC in situ, whereas NT-4 was not detected. The expression levels of NT-3 and NT-4 and the receptors TrkA and TrkB, both in intact and solubilized forms, were upregulated in the retinas of diabetic rats, whereas the receptor TrkC was not detected. Co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed binding between NT-3 and the receptors TrkA and TrkB in the retinas of diabetic rats. Our findings in diabetic eyes from humans and rats suggest that the increased expression levels within the NT-3 and NT-4/Trk axis are associated with the progression of PDR. PMID:23762379