WorldWideScience

Sample records for projection reconstruction mri

  1. An iterative reconstruction method of complex images using expectation maximization for radial parallel MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Joonsung; Kim, Dongchan; Oh, Changhyun; Han, Yeji; Park, HyunWook

    2013-01-01

    In MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), signal sampling along a radial k-space trajectory is preferred in certain applications due to its distinct advantages such as robustness to motion, and the radial sampling can be beneficial for reconstruction algorithms such as parallel MRI (pMRI) due to the incoherency. For radial MRI, the image is usually reconstructed from projection data using analytic methods such as filtered back-projection or Fourier reconstruction after gridding. However, the quality of the reconstructed image from these analytic methods can be degraded when the number of acquired projection views is insufficient. In this paper, we propose a novel reconstruction method based on the expectation maximization (EM) method, where the EM algorithm is remodeled for MRI so that complex images can be reconstructed. Then, to optimize the proposed method for radial pMRI, a reconstruction method that uses coil sensitivity information of multichannel RF coils is formulated. Experiment results from synthetic and in vivo data show that the proposed method introduces better reconstructed images than the analytic methods, even from highly subsampled data, and provides monotonic convergence properties compared to the conjugate gradient based reconstruction method. (paper)

  2. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-10-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP) provides technical direction. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates):Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates

  3. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1991-04-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from released to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; and, environmental pathways and dose estimates

  4. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-06-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories under contract with the Centers for Disease Control. The independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP) provides technical direction. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption, and agriculture; environmental pathways and dose estimates

  5. MRI reconstruction with joint global regularization and transform learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanc, A Korhan; Eksioglu, Ender M

    2016-10-01

    Sparsity based regularization has been a popular approach to remedy the measurement scarcity in image reconstruction. Recently, sparsifying transforms learned from image patches have been utilized as an effective regularizer for the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) reconstruction. Here, we infuse additional global regularization terms to the patch-based transform learning. We develop an algorithm to solve the resulting novel cost function, which includes both patchwise and global regularization terms. Extensive simulation results indicate that the introduced mixed approach has improved MRI reconstruction performance, when compared to the algorithms which use either of the patchwise transform learning or global regularization terms alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. Progress is discussed

  7. Cine-MRI swallowing evaluation after tongue reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartl, Dana M. [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Institute Gustave Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)], E-mail: dmhartl@aol.com; Kolb, Frederic; Bretagne, Evelyne [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Institute Gustave Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Bidault, Francois; Sigal, Robert [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)

    2010-01-15

    Objective: To determine the feasibility of cine-MRI for non-invasive swallowing evaluation after surgery for lingual carcinoma with reconstruction using microvascular free flaps. Methods: Ten patients with stage IV carcinoma of the mobile tongue and/or tongue base treated by surgical resection and reconstruction with a free flap were evaluated after an average of 4.3 years (range: 1.5-11 years), using cine-MRI in 'single-shot fast spin echo' (SSFSE) mode. Fiberoptic laryngoscopy of swallowing was performed before MRI to detect aspiration. The tolerance and ability to complete the exam were noted. The mobilities of the oral and pharyngeal structures visualized were evaluated as normal, reduced or increased. Results: Cine-MRI was well tolerated in all cases; 'dry' swallow was performed for the 2 patients with clinical aspiration. Tongue base-pharyngeal wall contact was observed in 5 cases. An increased anterior tongue recoil, increased mandibular recoil, increased posterior oropharyngeal wall advancement and an increased laryngeal elevation were observed in 4 cases. One case of a passive 'slide' mechanism was observed. Conclusions: Cine-MRI is a safe, non-invasive technique for the evaluation of the mobility of oral and oropharyngeal structures after free-flap reconstruction of the tongue. For selected cases, it may be complementary to clinical examination for evaluation of dysphagia after surgery and free-flap reconstruction. Further technical advances will be necessary before cine-MRI can replace videofluoroscopy, however.

  8. Cine-MRI swallowing evaluation after tongue reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartl, Dana M.; Kolb, Frederic; Bretagne, Evelyne; Bidault, Francois; Sigal, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the feasibility of cine-MRI for non-invasive swallowing evaluation after surgery for lingual carcinoma with reconstruction using microvascular free flaps. Methods: Ten patients with stage IV carcinoma of the mobile tongue and/or tongue base treated by surgical resection and reconstruction with a free flap were evaluated after an average of 4.3 years (range: 1.5-11 years), using cine-MRI in 'single-shot fast spin echo' (SSFSE) mode. Fiberoptic laryngoscopy of swallowing was performed before MRI to detect aspiration. The tolerance and ability to complete the exam were noted. The mobilities of the oral and pharyngeal structures visualized were evaluated as normal, reduced or increased. Results: Cine-MRI was well tolerated in all cases; 'dry' swallow was performed for the 2 patients with clinical aspiration. Tongue base-pharyngeal wall contact was observed in 5 cases. An increased anterior tongue recoil, increased mandibular recoil, increased posterior oropharyngeal wall advancement and an increased laryngeal elevation were observed in 4 cases. One case of a passive 'slide' mechanism was observed. Conclusions: Cine-MRI is a safe, non-invasive technique for the evaluation of the mobility of oral and oropharyngeal structures after free-flap reconstruction of the tongue. For selected cases, it may be complementary to clinical examination for evaluation of dysphagia after surgery and free-flap reconstruction. Further technical advances will be necessary before cine-MRI can replace videofluoroscopy, however.

  9. SPECT data acquisition and image reconstruction in a stationary small animal SPECT/MRI system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingyan; Chen, Si; Yu, Jianhua; Meier, Dirk; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2010-04-01

    The goal of the study was to investigate data acquisition strategies and image reconstruction methods for a stationary SPECT insert that can operate inside an MRI scanner with a 12 cm bore diameter for simultaneous SPECT/MRI imaging of small animals. The SPECT insert consists of 3 octagonal rings of 8 MR-compatible CZT detectors per ring surrounding a multi-pinhole (MPH) collimator sleeve. Each pinhole is constructed to project the field-of-view (FOV) to one CZT detector. All 24 pinholes are focused to a cylindrical FOV of 25 mm in diameter and 34 mm in length. The data acquisition strategies we evaluated were optional collimator rotations to improve tomographic sampling; and the image reconstruction methods were iterative ML-EM with and without compensation for the geometric response function (GRF) of the MPH collimator. For this purpose, we developed an analytic simulator that calculates the system matrix with the GRF models of the MPH collimator. The simulator was used to generate projection data of a digital rod phantom with pinhole aperture sizes of 1 mm and 2 mm and with different collimator rotation patterns. Iterative ML-EM reconstruction with and without GRF compensation were used to reconstruct the projection data from the central ring of 8 detectors only, and from all 24 detectors. Our results indicated that without GRF compensation and at the default design of 24 projection views, the reconstructed images had significant artifacts. Accurate GRF compensation substantially improved the reconstructed image resolution and reduced image artifacts. With accurate GRF compensation, useful reconstructed images can be obtained using 24 projection views only. This last finding potentially enables dynamic SPECT (and/or MRI) studies in small animals, one of many possible application areas of the SPECT/MRI system. Further research efforts are warranted including experimentally measuring the system matrix for improved geometrical accuracy, incorporating the co

  10. Regional absolute conductivity reconstruction using projected current density in MREIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajib, Saurav Z K; Kim, Hyung Joong; Woo, Eung Je; Kwon, Oh In

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is a non-invasive technique for imaging the internal conductivity distribution in tissue within an MRI scanner, utilizing the magnetic flux density, which is introduced when a current is injected into the tissue from external electrodes. This magnetic flux alters the MRI signal, so that appropriate reconstruction can provide a map of the additional z-component of the magnetic field (B z ) as well as the internal current density distribution that created it. To extract the internal electrical properties of the subject, including the conductivity and/or the current density distribution, MREIT techniques use the relationship between the external injection current and the z-component of the magnetic flux density B = (B x , B y , B z ). The tissue studied typically contains defective regions, regions with a low MRI signal and/or low MRI signal-to-noise-ratio, due to the low density of nuclear magnetic resonance spins, short T 2 or T* 2 relaxation times, as well as regions with very low electrical conductivity, through which very little current traverses. These defective regions provide noisy B z data, which can severely degrade the overall reconstructed conductivity distribution. Injecting two independent currents through surface electrodes, this paper proposes a new direct method to reconstruct a regional absolute isotropic conductivity distribution in a region of interest (ROI) while avoiding the defective regions. First, the proposed method reconstructs the contrast of conductivity using the transversal J-substitution algorithm, which blocks the propagation of severe accumulated noise from the defective region to the ROI. Second, the proposed method reconstructs the regional projected current density using the relationships between the internal current density, which stems from a current injection on the surface, and the measured B z data. Combining the contrast conductivity distribution in the entire imaging

  11. An iterative reconstruction from truncated projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Various methods have been proposed for tomographic reconstruction from truncated projection data. In this paper, a reconstructive method is discussed which consists of iterations of filtered back-projection, reprojection and some nonlinear processings. First, the method is so constructed that it converges to a fixed point. Then, to examine its effectiveness, comparisons are made by computer experiments with two existing reconstructive methods for truncated projection data, that is, the method of extrapolation based on the smooth assumption followed by filtered back-projection, and modified additive ART

  12. Nonlocal Regularized Algebraic Reconstruction Techniques for MRI: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We attempt to revitalize researchers' interest in algebraic reconstruction techniques (ART by expanding their capabilities and demonstrating their potential in speeding up the process of MRI acquisition. Using a continuous-to-discrete model, we experimentally study the application of ART into MRI reconstruction which unifies previous nonuniform-fast-Fourier-transform- (NUFFT- based and gridding-based approaches. Under the framework of ART, we advocate the use of nonlocal regularization techniques which are leveraged from our previous research on modeling photographic images. It is experimentally shown that nonlocal regularization ART (NR-ART can often outperform their local counterparts in terms of both subjective and objective qualities of reconstructed images. On one real-world k-space data set, we find that nonlocal regularization can achieve satisfactory reconstruction from as few as one-third of samples. We also address an issue related to image reconstruction from real-world k-space data but overlooked in the open literature: the consistency of reconstructed images across different resolutions. A resolution-consistent extension of NR-ART is developed and shown to effectively suppress the artifacts arising from frequency extrapolation. Both source codes and experimental results of this work are made fully reproducible.

  13. Fetal brain volumetry through MRI volumetric reconstruction and segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estroff, Judy A.; Barnewolt, Carol E.; Connolly, Susan A.; Warfield, Simon K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Fetal MRI volumetry is a useful technique but it is limited by a dependency upon motion-free scans, tedious manual segmentation, and spatial inaccuracy due to thick-slice scans. An image processing pipeline that addresses these limitations was developed and tested. Materials and methods The principal sequences acquired in fetal MRI clinical practice are multiple orthogonal single-shot fast spin echo scans. State-of-the-art image processing techniques were used for inter-slice motion correction and super-resolution reconstruction of high-resolution volumetric images from these scans. The reconstructed volume images were processed with intensity non-uniformity correction and the fetal brain extracted by using supervised automated segmentation. Results Reconstruction, segmentation and volumetry of the fetal brains for a cohort of twenty-five clinically acquired fetal MRI scans was done. Performance metrics for volume reconstruction, segmentation and volumetry were determined by comparing to manual tracings in five randomly chosen cases. Finally, analysis of the fetal brain and parenchymal volumes was performed based on the gestational age of the fetuses. Conclusion The image processing pipeline developed in this study enables volume rendering and accurate fetal brain volumetry by addressing the limitations of current volumetry techniques, which include dependency on motion-free scans, manual segmentation, and inaccurate thick-slice interpolation. PMID:20625848

  14. A Support-Based Reconstruction for SENSE MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley S. Peterson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel, rapid algorithm to speed up and improve the reconstruction of sensitivity encoding (SENSE MRI was proposed in this paper. The essence of the algorithm was that it iteratively solved the model of simple SENSE on a pixel-by-pixel basis in the region of support (ROS. The ROS was obtained from scout images of eight channels by morphological operations such as opening and filling. All the pixels in the FOV were paired and classified into four types, according to their spatial locations with respect to the ROS, and each with corresponding procedures of solving the inverse problem for image reconstruction. The sensitivity maps, used for the image reconstruction and covering only the ROS, were obtained by a polynomial regression model without extrapolation to keep the estimation errors small. The experiments demonstrate that the proposed method improves the reconstruction of SENSE in terms of speed and accuracy. The mean square errors (MSE of our reconstruction is reduced by 16.05% for a 2D brain MR image and the mean MSE over the whole slices in a 3D brain MRI is reduced by 30.44% compared to those of the traditional methods. The computation time is only 25%, 45%, and 70% of the traditional method for images with numbers of pixels in the orders of 103, 104, and 105–107, respectively.

  15. Anisotropic Diffusion based Brain MRI Segmentation and 3D Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    M. Arfan Jaffar; Sultan Zia; Ghaznafar Latif; AnwarM. Mirza; Irfan Mehmood; Naveed Ejaz; Sung Wook Baik

    2012-01-01

    In medical field visualization of the organs is very imperative for accurate diagnosis and treatment of any disease. Brain tumor diagnosis and surgery also required impressive 3D visualization of the brain to the radiologist. Detection and 3D reconstruction of brain tumors from MRI is a computationally time consuming and error-prone task. Proposed system detects and presents a 3D visualization model of the brain and tumor inside which greatly helps the radiologist to effectively diagnose and ...

  16. Instrument Variables for Reducing Noise in Parallel MRI Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchou Chang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition (GRAPPA has been a widely used parallel MRI technique. However, noise deteriorates the reconstructed image when reduction factor increases or even at low reduction factor for some noisy datasets. Noise, initially generated from scanner, propagates noise-related errors during fitting and interpolation procedures of GRAPPA to distort the final reconstructed image quality. The basic idea we proposed to improve GRAPPA is to remove noise from a system identification perspective. In this paper, we first analyze the GRAPPA noise problem from a noisy input-output system perspective; then, a new framework based on errors-in-variables (EIV model is developed for analyzing noise generation mechanism in GRAPPA and designing a concrete method—instrument variables (IV GRAPPA to remove noise. The proposed EIV framework provides possibilities that noiseless GRAPPA reconstruction could be achieved by existing methods that solve EIV problem other than IV method. Experimental results show that the proposed reconstruction algorithm can better remove the noise compared to the conventional GRAPPA, as validated with both of phantom and in vivo brain data.

  17. Normative biometrics for fetal ocular growth using volumetric MRI reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-Annis, Clemente; Gholipour, Ali; Afacan, Onur; Prabhu, Sanjay P; Estroff, Judy A; Warfield, Simon K

    2015-04-01

    To determine normative ranges for fetal ocular biometrics between 19 and 38 weeks gestational age (GA) using volumetric MRI reconstruction. The 3D images of 114 healthy fetuses between 19 and 38 weeks GA were created using super-resolution volume reconstructions from MRI slice acquisitions. These 3D images were semi-automatically segmented to measure fetal orbit volume, binocular distance (BOD), interocular distance (IOD), and ocular diameter (OD). All biometry correlated with GA (Volume, Pearson's correlation coefficient (CC) = 0.9680; BOD, CC = 0.9552; OD, CC = 0.9445; and IOD, CC = 0.8429), and growth curves were plotted against linear and quadratic growth models. Regression analysis showed quadratic models to best fit BOD, IOD, and OD and a linear model to best fit volume. Orbital volume had the greatest correlation with GA, although BOD and OD also showed strong correlation. The normative data found in this study may be helpful for the detection of congenital fetal anomalies with more consistent measurements than are currently available. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, S.M.

    1991-10-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doeses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; environmental pathways and dose estimates

  19. Anisotropic Diffusion based Brain MRI Segmentation and 3D Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Arfan Jaffar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In medical field visualization of the organs is very imperative for accurate diagnosis and treatment of any disease. Brain tumor diagnosis and surgery also required impressive 3D visualization of the brain to the radiologist. Detection and 3D reconstruction of brain tumors from MRI is a computationally time consuming and error-prone task. Proposed system detects and presents a 3D visualization model of the brain and tumor inside which greatly helps the radiologist to effectively diagnose and analyze the brain tumor. We proposed a multi-phase segmentation and visualization technique which overcomes the many problems of 3D volume segmentation methods like lake of fine details. In this system segmentation is done in three different phases which reduces the error chances. The system finds contours for skull, brain and tumor. These contours are stacked over and two novel methods are used to find the 3D visualization models. The results of these techniques, particularly of interpolation based, are impressive. Proposed system is tested against publically available data set [41] and MRI datasets available from MRI aamp; CT center Rawalpindi, Pakistan [42].

  20. Dynamic MRI reconstruction as a moment problem. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwaan, M.

    1989-03-01

    This paper deals with some mathematical aspects of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) concerning the beating heart. Some of the basic theory behind magnetic resonance is given. Of special interest is the mathematical theory concerning MRI and the ideas and problems in mathematical terms will be formulated. If one uses MRI to measure and display a so colled 'dynamic' organ, like the beating heart, the situation is more complex than the case of a static organ. Strategy is described how a cross section of a beating human heart is measured in practice and how the measurements are arranged before an image can be made. This technique is called retrospective synchronization. If the beating heart is measured and displayed with help of this method, artefacts often deteriorate the image quality. Some of these artefacts have a physical cause, while others are caused by the reconstruction algorithm. Perhaps mathematical techniques may be used to improve these algorithms hich are currently used in practice. The aim of this paper is not to solve problems, but to give an adequate mathematical formulation of the inversion problem concerning retrospective synchronization. (author). 3 refs.; 4 figs

  1. Hanford environmental dose reconstruction project - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipler, D.B.; Napier, B.A.; Farris, W.T.

    1996-01-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project was initiated because of public interest in the historical releases of radioactive materials from the Hanford Site, located in southcentral Washington State. By 1986, over 38,000 pages of environmental monitoring documentation from the early years of Hanford operations had been released. Special committees reviewing the documents recommended initiation of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, which began in October 1987, and is conducted by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories. The technical approach taken was to reconstruct releases of radioactive materials based on facility operating information; develop and/or adapt transport, pathway, and dose models and computer codes; reconstruct environmental, meterological, and hydrological monitoring information; reconstruct demographic, agricultural, and lifestyle characteristics; apply statistical methods to all forms of uncertainty in the information, parameters, and models; and perform scientific investigation that were technically defensible. The geographic area for the study includes ∼2 x 10 5 km 2 (75,000 mi 2 ) in eastern Washington, western Idaho, and northeastern Oregon (essentially the Mid-columbia Basin of the Pacific Northwest). Three exposure pathways were considered: the atmosphere, the Columbia River, and ground water

  2. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-12-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have been have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; and environmental pathways and dose estimates. 3 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Benefits of sagittal-oblique MRI reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenezić, D.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: MRI examination of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee gives valuable information for conventional, physiatrist and/or arthroscopic microinvasiv treatment. three planar MRI examination and 3D reconstructions are highly precise in the analysis of the intra and periarticular structures, with exceptions of anterior cruciate ligament. Direct contact with the roof of the intercondilar fossa (in the full extension during the examination) and its specific orientation makes visualization of ACL diagnostically problematic. In a one year period precise protocol for MRI visualization of ACL was tested and applied as “Sagittal Oblique MRI Reconstruction”. In short, it has been Angled biplanar reconstruction in the parasagital and paratransversal planes (patientrelated and arbitrary selected in full extension), on T2, 2mm slice and 0,2 mm gap. 153 MRI examinations of the patients with lesions of the ACL were included in the study in the Clinical Center of Montenegro during 2005 year. Beside standard Knee MRI protocol all patients had the Sagittal Oblique MRI reconstruction of ACL and the Flexion MRI examination, to compare with. The Sagittal Oblique MRI reconstruction of ACL it is adapted to the concrete morphology of the patients ACL and it does not depend of the volume of the examined knee. In comparison with the Standard Knee MRI protocol and with the Flexion MRI examination, the Sagittal Oblique MRI reconstruction of ACL takes less time to perform, and the ligament is shown in fool length at three to five slices, which is more than with the both compared protocols. Sagittal Oblique MRI Reconstruction of ACL is therefore patient dependable, orientated in shape of concrete ligament of the patient’s knee. In combination with age, occupation, physical activity and level of patients while to contribute in healing process, the Sagittal Oblique MRI reconstruction of ACL contribute to scholastic approach, as highest benefit to patients with

  4. The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haerer, H.A.; Freshley, M.D.; Gilbert, R.O.; Morgan, L.G.; Napier, B.A.; Rhoads, R.E.; Woodruff, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    In 1988, researchers began a multiyear effort to estimate radiation doses that people could have received since 1944 at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The study was prompted by increasing concern about potential health effects to the public from more than 40 yr of nuclear activities. We will provide an overview of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project and its technical approach. The work has required development of new methods and tools for dealing with unique technical and communication challenges. Scientists are using a probabilistic, rather than the more typical deterministic, approach to generate dose distributions rather than single-point estimates. Uncertainties in input parameters are reflected in dose results. Sensitivity analyses are used to optimize project resources and define the project's scope. An independent technical steering panel directs and approves the work in a public forum. Dose estimates are based on review and analysis of historical data related to operations, effluents, and monitoring; determination of important radionuclides; and reconstruction of source terms, environmental conditions that affected transport, concentrations in environmental media, and human elements, such as population distribution, agricultural practices, food consumption patterns, and lifestyles. A companion paper in this volume, The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Technical Approach, describes the computational framework for the work

  5. MRI isotropic resolution reconstruction from two orthogonal scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamez-Pena, Jose G.; Totterman, Saara; Parker, Kevin J.

    2001-07-01

    An algorithm for the reconstructions of ISO-resolution volumetric MR data sets from two standard orthogonal MR scans having anisotropic resolution has been developed. The reconstruction algorithm starts by registering a pair of orthogonal volumetric MR data sets. The registration is done by maximizing the correlation between the gradient magnitude using a simple translation-rotation model in a multi-resolution approach. Then algorithm assumes that the individual voxels on the MR data are an average of the magnetic resonance properties of an elongated imaging volume. Then, the process is modeled as the projection of MR properties into a single sensor. This model allows the derivation of a set of linear equations that can be used to recover the MR properties of every single voxel in the SO-resolution volume given only two orthogonal MR scans. Projections on convex sets (POCS) was used to solve the set of linear equations. Experimental results show the advantage of having a ISO-resolution reconstructions for the visualization and analysis of small and thin muscular structures.

  6. Edge-oriented dual-dictionary guided enrichment (EDGE) for MRI-CT image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Wang, Bigong; Wang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we formulate the joint/simultaneous X-ray CT and MRI image reconstruction. In particular, a novel algorithm is proposed for MRI image reconstruction from highly under-sampled MRI data and CT images. It consists of two steps. First, a training dataset is generated from a series of well-registered MRI and CT images on the same patients. Then, an initial MRI image of a patient can be reconstructed via edge-oriented dual-dictionary guided enrichment (EDGE) based on the training dataset and a CT image of the patient. Second, an MRI image is reconstructed using the dictionary learning (DL) algorithm from highly under-sampled k-space data and the initial MRI image. Our algorithm can establish a one-to-one correspondence between the two imaging modalities, and obtain a good initial MRI estimation. Both noise-free and noisy simulation studies were performed to evaluate and validate the proposed algorithm. The results with different under-sampling factors show that the proposed algorithm performed significantly better than those reconstructed using the DL algorithm from MRI data alone.

  7. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMakin, A.H., Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction MDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in envirorunental pathways. epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering. radiation dosimetry. and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms; Environmental Transport; Environmental Monitoring Data Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture; and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates

  8. Three-dimensional dictionary-learning reconstruction of (23)Na MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Nicolas G R; Gnahm, Christine; Bachert, Peter; Ladd, Mark E; Nagel, Armin M

    2016-04-01

    To reduce noise and artifacts in (23)Na MRI with a Compressed Sensing reconstruction and a learned dictionary as sparsifying transform. A three-dimensional dictionary-learning compressed sensing reconstruction algorithm (3D-DLCS) for the reconstruction of undersampled 3D radial (23)Na data is presented. The dictionary used as the sparsifying transform is learned with a K-singular-value-decomposition (K-SVD) algorithm. The reconstruction parameters are optimized on simulated data, and the quality of the reconstructions is assessed with peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity (SSIM). The performance of the algorithm is evaluated in phantom and in vivo (23)Na MRI data of seven volunteers and compared with nonuniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) and other Compressed Sensing reconstructions. The reconstructions of simulated data have maximal PSNR and SSIM for an undersampling factor (USF) of 10 with numbers of averages equal to the USF. For 10-fold undersampling, the PSNR is increased by 5.1 dB compared with the NUFFT reconstruction, and the SSIM by 24%. These results are confirmed by phantom and in vivo (23)Na measurements in the volunteers that show markedly reduced noise and undersampling artifacts in the case of 3D-DLCS reconstructions. The 3D-DLCS algorithm enables precise reconstruction of undersampled (23)Na MRI data with markedly reduced noise and artifact levels compared with NUFFT reconstruction. Small structures are well preserved. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Bessel Fourier orientation reconstruction: an analytical EAP reconstruction using multiple shell acquisitions in diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinbor, Ameer Pasha; Chung, Moo K; Wu, Yu-Chien; Alexander, Andrew L

    2011-01-01

    The estimation of the ensemble average propagator (EAP) directly from q-space DWI signals is an open problem in diffusion MRI. Diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) is one common technique to compute the EAP directly from the diffusion signal, but it is burdened by the large sampling required. Recently, several analytical EAP reconstruction schemes for multiple q-shell acquisitions have been proposed. One, in particular, is Diffusion Propagator Imaging (DPI) which is based on the Laplace's equation estimation of diffusion signal for each shell acquisition. Viewed intuitively in terms of the heat equation, the DPI solution is obtained when the heat distribution between temperatuere measurements at each shell is at steady state. We propose a generalized extension of DPI, Bessel Fourier Orientation Reconstruction (BFOR), whose solution is based on heat equation estimation of the diffusion signal for each shell acquisition. That is, the heat distribution between shell measurements is no longer at steady state. In addition to being analytical, the BFOR solution also includes an intrinsic exponential smootheing term. We illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method by showing results on both synthetic and real MR datasets.

  10. In vivo reconstruction of lumbar erector spinae architecture using diffusion tensor MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieben, Judith M.; Van Otten, Ilse; Lataster, Arno; Froeling, Martijn; Nederveen, Aart J.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Drost, Maarten R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design: Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTMRI) reconstruction of lumbar erector spinae (ES) compared with cadaver dissection. Objective: The aim of this study was to reconstruct the human lumbar ES from in vivo DT-MRI measurements and to compare the results with literature and

  11. Projection computation based on pixel in simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xu; Chen Zhiqiang; Xiong Hua; Zhang Li

    2005-01-01

    SART is an important arithmetic of image reconstruction, in which the projection computation takes over half of the reconstruction time. An efficient way to compute projection coefficient matrix together with memory optimization is presented in this paper. Different from normal method, projection lines are located based on every pixel, and the following projection coefficient computation can make use of the results. Correlation of projection lines and pixels can be used to optimize the computation. (authors)

  12. Feasibility study on 3D image reconstruction from 2D orthogonal cine-MRI for MRI-guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Chiara; Lee, Danny; Kipritidis, John; Whelan, Brendan; Greer, Peter B; Baroni, Guido; Riboldi, Marco; Keall, Paul

    2018-02-11

    In-room MRI is a promising image guidance strategy in external beam radiotherapy to acquire volumetric information for moving targets. However, limitations in spatio-temporal resolution led several authors to use 2D orthogonal images for guidance. The aim of this work is to present a method to concurrently compensate for non-rigid tumour motion and provide an approach for 3D reconstruction from 2D orthogonal cine-MRI slices for MRI-guided treatments. Free-breathing sagittal/coronal interleaved 2D cine-MRI were acquired in addition to a pre-treatment 3D volume in two patients. We performed deformable image registration (DIR) between cine-MRI slices and corresponding slices in the pre-treatment 3D volume. Based on an extrapolation of the interleaved 2D motion fields, the 3D motion field was estimated and used to warp the pre-treatment volume. Due to the lack of a ground truth for patients, the method was validated on a digital 4D lung phantom. On the phantom, the 3D reconstruction method was able to compensate for tumour motion and compared favourably to the results of previously adopted strategies. The difference in the 3D motion fields between the phantom and the extrapolated motion was 0.4 ± 0.3 mm for tumour and 0.8 ± 1.5 mm for whole anatomy, demonstrating feasibility of performing a 3D volumetric reconstruction directly from 2D orthogonal cine-MRI slices. Application of the method to patient data confirmed the feasibility of utilizing this method in real world scenarios. Preliminary results on phantom and patient cases confirm the feasibility of the proposed approach in an MRI-guided scenario, especially for non-rigid tumour motion compensation. © 2018 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  13. Distributed MRI reconstruction using Gadgetron-based cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Hui; Inati, Souheil; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Kellman, Peter; Hansen, Michael S

    2015-03-01

    To expand the open source Gadgetron reconstruction framework to support distributed computing and to demonstrate that a multinode version of the Gadgetron can be used to provide nonlinear reconstruction with clinically acceptable latency. The Gadgetron framework was extended with new software components that enable an arbitrary number of Gadgetron instances to collaborate on a reconstruction task. This cloud-enabled version of the Gadgetron was deployed on three different distributed computing platforms ranging from a heterogeneous collection of commodity computers to the commercial Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud. The Gadgetron cloud was used to provide nonlinear, compressed sensing reconstruction on a clinical scanner with low reconstruction latency (eg, cardiac and neuroimaging applications). The proposed setup was able to handle acquisition and 11 -SPIRiT reconstruction of nine high temporal resolution real-time, cardiac short axis cine acquisitions, covering the ventricles for functional evaluation, in under 1 min. A three-dimensional high-resolution brain acquisition with 1 mm(3) isotropic pixel size was acquired and reconstructed with nonlinear reconstruction in less than 5 min. A distributed computing enabled Gadgetron provides a scalable way to improve reconstruction performance using commodity cluster computing. Nonlinear, compressed sensing reconstruction can be deployed clinically with low image reconstruction latency. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The generalized back projection theorem for cone beam reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrin, F.C.

    1985-01-01

    The use of cone beam scanners raises the problem of three dimensional reconstruction from divergent projections. After a survey on bidimensional analytical reconstruction methods we examine their application to the 3D problem. Finally, it is shown that the back projection theorem can be generalized to cone beam projections. This allows to state a new inversion formula suitable for both the 4 π parallel and divergent geometries. It leads to the generalization of the ''rho-filtered back projection'' algorithm which is outlined

  15. Research on reconstruction of steel tube section from few projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Shuaijun; Wu Haifeng; Wang Kai

    2007-01-01

    Most parameters of steel tube can be acquired from CT image of the section so as to evaluate its quality. But large numbers of projections are needed in order to reconstruct the section image, so the collection and calculation of the projections consume lots of time. In order to solve the problem, reconstruction algorithms of steel tube from few projections are researched and the results are validated with simulation data in the paper. Three iterative algorithms, ART, MAP and OSEM, are attempted to reconstruct the section of steel tube by using the simulation model. Considering the prior information distributing of steel tube, we improve the algorithms and get better reconstruction images. The results of simulation experiment indicate that ART, MAP and OSEM can reconstruct accurate section images of steel tube from less than 20 projections and approximate images from 10 projections. (authors)

  16. Utility of reconstructed image from 3-D MRI in the region of oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Shumei; Kakimoto, Naoya; Nakatani, Atsutoshi; Furuya, Shigeo; Furukawa, Shouhei; Fuchihata, Hajime

    1998-01-01

    The 3-D MRI with short TR was performed in the region of oral cavity, jaw and face, and utility of the reconstructed image was examined. Subjects were 8 healthy volunteers and 12 patients. The 3-D MRI was performed using SPGR with the following parameters; TR: 8 or 9 msec, TE: 2 or 3 msec, and FA: 20-30 degrees. Imaging direction was vertical to body axis. The matrix number was 256 x 192, slice thickness was 1 mm, slice interval was 0 and slice number was 128. The obtained image was reconstructed using software Reformat''. Detectability of temporomandibular joint disc was not enough in 8 of 20 cases. Detectability of mandibular canal was clear in 18 of 20 cases. In panorama MRI, soft tissue such as submandibular gland was detected. But, in hard tissue such as teeth or maxilla, there was a more little information in panorama MRI than in panorama X-ray photography. (K.H.)

  17. A wavelet-based regularized reconstruction algorithm for SENSE parallel MRI with applications to neuroimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaari, L.; Pesquet, J.Ch.; Chaari, L.; Ciuciu, Ph.; Benazza-Benyahia, A.

    2011-01-01

    To reduce scanning time and/or improve spatial/temporal resolution in some Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) applications, parallel MRI acquisition techniques with multiple coils acquisition have emerged since the early 1990's as powerful imaging methods that allow a faster acquisition process. In these techniques, the full FOV image has to be reconstructed from the resulting acquired under sampled k-space data. To this end, several reconstruction techniques have been proposed such as the widely-used Sensitivity Encoding (SENSE) method. However, the reconstructed image generally presents artifacts when perturbations occur in both the measured data and the estimated coil sensitivity profiles. In this paper, we aim at achieving accurate image reconstruction under degraded experimental conditions (low magnetic field and high reduction factor), in which neither the SENSE method nor the Tikhonov regularization in the image domain give convincing results. To this end, we present a novel method for SENSE-based reconstruction which proceeds with regularization in the complex wavelet domain by promoting sparsity. The proposed approach relies on a fast algorithm that enables the minimization of regularized non-differentiable criteria including more general penalties than a classical l 1 term. To further enhance the reconstructed image quality, local convex constraints are added to the regularization process. In vivo human brain experiments carried out on Gradient-Echo (GRE) anatomical and Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) functional MRI data at 1.5 T indicate that our algorithm provides reconstructed images with reduced artifacts for high reduction factors. (authors)

  18. Coordinate reconstruction using box reconstruction and projection of X-ray photo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achmad Suntoro

    2011-01-01

    Some mathematical formula have been derived for a process of reconstruction to define the coordinate of any point relative to a pre set coordinate system. The process of reconstruction uses a reconstruction box in which each edge's length of the box is known, each top-bottom face and left-right face of the box having a cross marker, and the top face and the right face of the box as plane projections by X-ray source in perspective projection -system. Using the data of the two X-ray projection images, any point inside the reconstruction box, as long as its projection is recorded in the two photos, will be determined its coordinate relative to the midpoint of the reconstruction box as the central point coordinates. (author)

  19. A computationally efficient OMP-based compressed sensing reconstruction for dynamic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usman, M; Prieto, C; Schaeffter, T; Batchelor, P G; Odille, F; Atkinson, D

    2011-01-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) methods in MRI are computationally intensive. Thus, designing novel CS algorithms that can perform faster reconstructions is crucial for everyday applications. We propose a computationally efficient orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP)-based reconstruction, specifically suited to cardiac MR data. According to the energy distribution of a y-f space obtained from a sliding window reconstruction, we label the y-f space as static or dynamic. For static y-f space images, a computationally efficient masked OMP reconstruction is performed, whereas for dynamic y-f space images, standard OMP reconstruction is used. The proposed method was tested on a dynamic numerical phantom and two cardiac MR datasets. Depending on the field of view composition of the imaging data, compared to the standard OMP method, reconstruction speedup factors ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 are achieved. (note)

  20. Adaptive wavelet tight frame construction for accelerating MRI reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genjiao Zhou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The sparsity regularization approach, which assumes that the image of interest is likely to have sparse representation in some transform domain, has been an active research area in image processing and medical image reconstruction. Although various sparsifying transforms have been used in medical image reconstruction such as wavelet, contourlet, and total variation (TV etc., the efficiency of these transforms typically rely on the special structure of the underlying image. A better way to address this issue is to develop an overcomplete dictionary from the input data in order to get a better sparsifying transform for the underlying image. However, the general overcomplete dictionaries do not satisfy the so-called perfect reconstruction property which ensures that the given signal can be perfectly represented by its canonical coefficients in a manner similar to orthonormal bases, resulting in time consuming in the iterative image reconstruction. This work is to develop an adaptive wavelet tight frame method for magnetic resonance image reconstruction. The proposed scheme incorporates the adaptive wavelet tight frame approach into the magnetic resonance image reconstruction by solving a l0-regularized minimization problem. Numerical results show that the proposed approach provides significant time savings as compared to the over-complete dictionary based methods with comparable performance in terms of both peak signal-to-noise ratio and subjective visual quality.

  1. Automated processing pipeline for neonatal diffusion MRI in the developing Human Connectome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiani, Matteo; Andersson, Jesper L R; Cordero-Grande, Lucilio; Murgasova, Maria; Hutter, Jana; Price, Anthony N; Makropoulos, Antonios; Fitzgibbon, Sean P; Hughes, Emer; Rueckert, Daniel; Victor, Suresh; Rutherford, Mary; Edwards, A David; Smith, Stephen M; Tournier, Jacques-Donald; Hajnal, Joseph V; Jbabdi, Saad; Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N

    2018-05-28

    The developing Human Connectome Project is set to create and make available to the scientific community a 4-dimensional map of functional and structural cerebral connectivity from 20 to 44 weeks post-menstrual age, to allow exploration of the genetic and environmental influences on brain development, and the relation between connectivity and neurocognitive function. A large set of multi-modal MRI data from fetuses and newborn infants is currently being acquired, along with genetic, clinical and developmental information. In this overview, we describe the neonatal diffusion MRI (dMRI) image processing pipeline and the structural connectivity aspect of the project. Neonatal dMRI data poses specific challenges, and standard analysis techniques used for adult data are not directly applicable. We have developed a processing pipeline that deals directly with neonatal-specific issues, such as severe motion and motion-related artefacts, small brain sizes, high brain water content and reduced anisotropy. This pipeline allows automated analysis of in-vivo dMRI data, probes tissue microstructure, reconstructs a number of major white matter tracts, and includes an automated quality control framework that identifies processing issues or inconsistencies. We here describe the pipeline and present an exemplar analysis of data from 140 infants imaged at 38-44 weeks post-menstrual age. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Generalized Filtered Back-Projection for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erhard, K.; Grass, M.; Hitziger, S.; Iske, A.; Nielsen, T.

    2012-01-01

    Filtered back-projection (FBP) has been commonly used as an efficient and robust reconstruction technique in tomographic X-ray imagingduring the last decades. For limited angle tomography acquisitions such as digital breast tomosynthesis, however, standard FBP reconstruction algorithms provide poor

  3. Incomplete projection reconstruction of computed tomography based on the modified discrete algebraic reconstruction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fuqiang; Zhang, Dinghua; Huang, Kuidong; Gao, Zongzhao; Yang, YaFei

    2018-02-01

    Based on the discrete algebraic reconstruction technique (DART), this study aims to address and test a new improved algorithm applied to incomplete projection data to generate a high quality reconstruction image by reducing the artifacts and noise in computed tomography. For the incomplete projections, an augmented Lagrangian based on compressed sensing is first used in the initial reconstruction for segmentation of the DART to get higher contrast graphics for boundary and non-boundary pixels. Then, the block matching 3D filtering operator was used to suppress the noise and to improve the gray distribution of the reconstructed image. Finally, simulation studies on the polychromatic spectrum were performed to test the performance of the new algorithm. Study results show a significant improvement in the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and average gradients (AGs) of the images reconstructed from incomplete data. The SNRs and AGs of the new images reconstructed by DART-ALBM were on average 30%-40% and 10% higher than the images reconstructed by DART algorithms. Since the improved DART-ALBM algorithm has a better robustness to limited-view reconstruction, which not only makes the edge of the image clear but also makes the gray distribution of non-boundary pixels better, it has the potential to improve image quality from incomplete projections or sparse projections.

  4. Accelerated high-frame-rate mouse heart cine-MRI using compressed sensing reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Motaal, Abdallah G.; Coolen, Bram F.; Abdurrachim, Desiree; Castro, Rui M.; Prompers, Jeanine J.; Florack, Luc M. J.; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new protocol to obtain very high-frame-rate cinematographic (Cine) MRI movies of the beating mouse heart within a reasonable measurement time. The method is based on a self-gated accelerated fast low-angle shot (FLASH) acquisition and compressed sensi ng reconstruction. Key to our

  5. A Total Variation-Based Reconstruction Method for Dynamic MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germana Landi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, total variation (TV regularization has become a popular and powerful tool for image restoration and enhancement. In this work, we apply TV minimization to improve the quality of dynamic magnetic resonance images. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging is an increasingly popular clinical technique used to monitor spatio-temporal changes in tissue structure. Fast data acquisition is necessary in order to capture the dynamic process. Most commonly, the requirement of high temporal resolution is fulfilled by sacrificing spatial resolution. Therefore, the numerical methods have to address the issue of images reconstruction from limited Fourier data. One of the most successful techniques for dynamic imaging applications is the reduced-encoded imaging by generalized-series reconstruction method of Liang and Lauterbur. However, even if this method utilizes a priori data for optimal image reconstruction, the produced dynamic images are degraded by truncation artifacts, most notably Gibbs ringing, due to the spatial low resolution of the data. We use a TV regularization strategy in order to reduce these truncation artifacts in the dynamic images. The resulting TV minimization problem is solved by the fixed point iteration method of Vogel and Oman. The results of test problems with simulated and real data are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in reducing the truncation artifacts of the reconstructed images.

  6. Kuwaiti reconstruction project unprecedented in size, complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tippee, B.

    1993-03-15

    There had been no challenge like it: a desert emirate ablaze; its main city sacked; the economically crucial oil industry devastated; countryside shrouded in smoke from oil well fires and littered with unexploded ordnance, disabled military equipment, and unignited crude oil. Like the well-documented effort that brought 749 burning wells under control in less than 7 months, Kuwaiti reconstruction had no precedent. Unlike the firefight, reconstruction is no-where complete. It nevertheless has placed two of three refineries back on stream, restored oil production to preinvasion levels, and repaired or rebuilt 17 of 26 oil field gathering stations. Most of the progress has come since the last well fire went out on Nov. 6, 1991. Expatriates in Kuwait since the days of Al-Awda- the return,' in Arabic- attribute much of the rapid progress under Al-Tameer- the reconstruction'- to decisions and preparations made while the well fires still raged. The article describes the planning for Al-Awda, reentering the country, drilling plans, facilities reconstruction, and special problems.

  7. MRI and Stereo Vision Surface Reconstruction and Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    El Chemaly, Trishia; Siepel, Françoise Jeanette; Rihana, Sandy; Groenhuis, Vincent; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer, the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women worldwide, is mostly detected through a biopsy where tissue is extracted and chemically examined or pathologist assessed. Medical imaging plays a valuable role in targeting malignant tissue accurately and guiding the radiologist during needle insertion in a biopsy. This paper proposes a computer software that can process and combine 3D reconstructed surfaces from different imaging modalities, particularly Magnetic Resonance Imaging (M...

  8. MRI Reconstructions of Human Phrenic Nerve Anatomy and Computational Modeling of Cryoballoon Ablative Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Ryan P; Spencer, Julianne H; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2016-04-01

    The primary goal of this computational modeling study was to better quantify the relative distance of the phrenic nerves to areas where cryoballoon ablations may be applied within the left atria. Phrenic nerve injury can be a significant complication of applied ablative therapies for treatment of drug refractory atrial fibrillation. To date, published reports suggest that such injuries may occur more frequently in cryoballoon ablations than in radiofrequency therapies. Ten human heart-lung blocs were prepared in an end-diastolic state, scanned with MRI, and analyzed using Mimics software as a means to make anatomical measurements. Next, generated computer models of ArticFront cryoballoons (23, 28 mm) were mated with reconstructed pulmonary vein ostias to determine relative distances between the phrenic nerves and projected balloon placements, simulating pulmonary vein isolation. The effects of deep seating balloons were also investigated. Interestingly, the relative anatomical differences in placement of 23 and 28 mm cryoballoons were quite small, e.g., the determined difference between mid spline distance to the phrenic nerves between the two cryoballoon sizes was only 1.7 ± 1.2 mm. Furthermore, the right phrenic nerves were commonly closer to the pulmonary veins than the left, and surprisingly tips of balloons were further from the nerves, yet balloon size choice did not significantly alter calculated distance to the nerves. Such computational modeling is considered as a useful tool for both clinicians and device designers to better understand these associated anatomies that, in turn, may lead to optimization of therapeutic treatments.

  9. MRI reconstruction of multi-image acquisitions using a rank regularizer with data reordering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adluru, Ganesh, E-mail: gadluru@gmail.com; Anderson, Jeffrey [UCAIR, Department of Radiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108 (United States); Gur, Yaniv [IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose, California 95120 (United States); Chen, Liyong; Feinberg, David [Advanced MRI Technologies, Sebastpool, California, 95472 (United States); DiBella, Edward V. R. [UCAIR, Department of Radiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108 and Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: To improve rank constrained reconstructions for undersampled multi-image MRI acquisitions. Methods: Motivated by the recent developments in low-rank matrix completion theory and its applicability to rapid dynamic MRI, a new reordering-based rank constrained reconstruction of undersampled multi-image data that uses prior image information is proposed. Instead of directly minimizing the nuclear norm of a matrix of estimated images, the nuclear norm of reordered matrix values is minimized. The reordering is based on the prior image estimates. The method is tested on brain diffusion imaging data and dynamic contrast enhanced myocardial perfusion data. Results: Good quality images from data undersampled by a factor of three for diffusion imaging and by a factor of 3.5 for dynamic cardiac perfusion imaging with respiratory motion were obtained. Reordering gave visually improved image quality over standard nuclear norm minimization reconstructions. Root mean squared errors with respect to ground truth images were improved by ∼18% and ∼16% with reordering for diffusion and perfusion applications, respectively. Conclusions: The reordered low-rank constraint is a way to inject prior image information that offers improvements over a standard low-rank constraint for undersampled multi-image MRI reconstructions.

  10. MRI reconstruction of multi-image acquisitions using a rank regularizer with data reordering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adluru, Ganesh; Anderson, Jeffrey; Gur, Yaniv; Chen, Liyong; Feinberg, David; DiBella, Edward V. R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To improve rank constrained reconstructions for undersampled multi-image MRI acquisitions. Methods: Motivated by the recent developments in low-rank matrix completion theory and its applicability to rapid dynamic MRI, a new reordering-based rank constrained reconstruction of undersampled multi-image data that uses prior image information is proposed. Instead of directly minimizing the nuclear norm of a matrix of estimated images, the nuclear norm of reordered matrix values is minimized. The reordering is based on the prior image estimates. The method is tested on brain diffusion imaging data and dynamic contrast enhanced myocardial perfusion data. Results: Good quality images from data undersampled by a factor of three for diffusion imaging and by a factor of 3.5 for dynamic cardiac perfusion imaging with respiratory motion were obtained. Reordering gave visually improved image quality over standard nuclear norm minimization reconstructions. Root mean squared errors with respect to ground truth images were improved by ∼18% and ∼16% with reordering for diffusion and perfusion applications, respectively. Conclusions: The reordered low-rank constraint is a way to inject prior image information that offers improvements over a standard low-rank constraint for undersampled multi-image MRI reconstructions

  11. The accuracy of MRI in assessing graft integrity after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Yoshihito; Shirai, Yasumasa; Narita, Tetsuya; Mori, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Kaoru

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of MRI in assessing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction graft integrity, we compared MRI findings with arthroscopic findings in 52 patients who had undergone arthroscopically assisted ACL reconstruction using semitendinosus and gracilis tendons augmented by woven polyester. MRI and arthroscopy were carried out 12 months after the operation. The MR appearance of ACL grafts was categorized into 3 types by signal intensity and continuity of the ligament according to Rak's method: well-defined type: the graft was visualized as a smoothly continuous band with low signal over the entire course; intermediate type: signal intensity increased and a low-signal band was visualized only in part of the graft; indiscernible type: the graft was not identified through the joint cavity due to markedly increased signal intensity. When the MR appearance of intermediate or indiscernible types was defined as torn, the grafts were presumed to be torn in 9 patients whose arthroscopic findings were 7 intact and 2 torn grafts. All cases with intact MRI findings were intact on arthroscopic examination. Thus, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI as an evaluative tool for ACL graft tears were 100%, 86% and 86.5%, respectively. (author)

  12. CT reconstruction and MRI fusion of 3D rotational angiography in the evaluation of pediatric cerebrovascular lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthusami, Prakash; Rea, Vanessa; Shroff, Manohar [The Hospital for Sick Children, Pediatric Neuroradiology and Image Guided Therapy, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Shkumat, Nicholas [The Hospital for Sick Children, Medical Physics, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chiu, Albert H. [Institute of Neurological Sciences, Prince of Wales Hospital, Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Randwick, NSW (Australia)

    2017-06-15

    Complex neurovascular lesions in children require precise anatomic understanding for treatment planning. Although 3DRA is commonly employed for volumetric reformation in neurointerventional procedures, the ability to reconstruct this data into CT-like images (3DRA-CT) is not widely utilized. This study demonstrates the feasibility and usefulness of 3DRA-CT and subsequent MRI fusion for problem solving in pediatric neuroangiography. This retrospective study includes 18 3DRA-CT studies in 16 children (age 9.6 ± 3.8 years, range 2-16 years) over 1 year. After biplane 2D-digital subtraction angiography (DSA), 5-second 3DRA was performed with selective vessel injection either with or without subtraction. Images were reconstructed into CT sections which were post-processed to generate multiplanar reformation (MPR) and maximum intensity projection (MIP) images. Fusion was performed with 3D T1 MRI images to precisely demonstrate neurovascular relationships. Quantitative radiation metrics were extracted and compared against those for the entire examination and for corresponding biplane 2D-DSA acquisitions. In all 18 cases, the 3DRA procedure and MRI fusion were technically successful and provided clinically useful information relevant to management. The unsubtracted and subtracted 3DRA acquisitions were measured to deliver 5.9 and 132.2%, respectively, of the mean radiation dose of corresponding biplane 2D-DSA acquisitions and contributed 1.2 and 12.5%, respectively, to the total procedure dose. Lower radiation doses, high spatial resolution, and multiplanar reformatting capability make 3DRA-CT a useful adjunct to evaluate neurovascular lesions in children. Fusing 3DRA-CT data with MRI is an additional capability that can further enhance diagnostic information. (orig.)

  13. Comparison of power spectra for tomosynthesis projections and reconstructed images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engstrom, Emma; Reiser, Ingrid; Nishikawa, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Burgess et al. [Med. Phys. 28, 419-437 (2001)] showed that the power spectrum of mammographic breast background follows a power law and that lesion detectability is affected by the power-law exponent β which measures the amount of structure in the background. Following the study of Burgess et al., the authors measured and compared the power-law exponent of mammographic backgrounds in tomosynthesis projections and reconstructed slices to investigate the effect of tomosynthesis imaging on background structure. Our data set consisted of 55 patient cases. For each case, regions of interest (ROIs) were extracted from both projection images and reconstructed slices. The periodogram of each ROI was computed by taking the squared modulus of the Fourier transform of the ROI. The power-law exponent was determined for each periodogram and averaged across all ROIs extracted from all projections or reconstructed slices for each patient data set. For the projections, the mean β averaged across the 55 cases was 3.06 (standard deviation of 0.21), while it was 2.87 (0.24) for the corresponding reconstructions. The difference in β for a given patient between the projection ROIs and the reconstructed ROIs averaged across the 55 cases was 0.194, which was statistically significant (p<0.001). The 95% CI for the difference between the mean value of β for the projections and reconstructions was [0.170, 0.218]. The results are consistent with the observation that the amount of breast structure in the tomosynthesis slice is reduced compared to projection mammography and that this may lead to improved lesion detectability.

  14. The value of MRI three-dimensional reconstruction in diagnosis and therapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Feiyu; Wang Xiaoying; Xu Yufeng; Xiao Jiangxi; Jiang Xuexiang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate three-dimensional reconstruction of MRI images in diagnosis and therapy of prostate cancer. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with proven prostate cancers were recruited in this study. Seventeen of them were diagnosed as having prostate cancer according to the ultrasound guided systemic biopsy. Their MR examinations showed fourteen lesions in the peripheral zone and three in the central gland of the prostate. The other eleven patients underwent MR examination after a period of treatment, including endocrinetherapy and brachytherapy. Using endorectal coil, a series of T 2 -weighted images were acquired on the axial plane. These source images were processed by 3D-Doctor software to reconstruct into three-dimensional images. Results: In the fourteen patients with peripheral zone cancer, reconstruction images could display the 3D regions of cancer and the involvement of capsular. The outspread of central gland and the compression of peripheral zone in patients with central gland cancer could be revealed in the same way. The volumetric changes of the lesion and the prostate after endocrinetherapy could also be perceived through these 3 D images. Similarly, radioactive seeds were revealed in a spatial manner that could be easily evaluated. Conclusion: Three-dimensional reconstruction images were obtained in all patients. They were able to provide stereotyped information about the lesions and their surrounding tissues. MRI three-dimensional reconstruction can be an adjunctive tool in the evaluation of prostate lesions. (authors)

  15. Image reconstruction technique using projection data from neutron tomography system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Abd el Bar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neutron tomography is a very powerful technique for nondestructive evaluation of heavy industrial components as well as for soft hydrogenous materials enclosed in heavy metals which are usually difficult to image using X-rays. Due to the properties of the image acquisition system, the projection images are distorted by several artifacts, and these reduce the quality of the reconstruction. In order to eliminate these harmful effects the projection images should be corrected before reconstruction. This paper gives a description of a filter back projection (FBP technique, which is used for reconstruction of projected data obtained from transmission measurements by neutron tomography system We demonstrated the use of spatial Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT and the 2D Inverse DFT in the formulation of the method, and outlined the theory of reconstruction of a 2D neutron image from a sequence of 1D projections taken at different angles between 0 and π in MATLAB environment. Projections are generated by applying the Radon transform to the original image at different angles.

  16. Parametric image reconstruction using spectral analysis of PET projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meikle, Steven R.; Matthews, Julian C.; Cunningham, Vincent J.; Bailey, Dale L.; Livieratos, Lefteris; Jones, Terry; Price, Pat

    1998-01-01

    Spectral analysis is a general modelling approach that enables calculation of parametric images from reconstructed tracer kinetic data independent of an assumed compartmental structure. We investigated the validity of applying spectral analysis directly to projection data motivated by the advantages that: (i) the number of reconstructions is reduced by an order of magnitude and (ii) iterative reconstruction becomes practical which may improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A dynamic software phantom with typical 2-[ 11 C]thymidine kinetics was used to compare projection-based and image-based methods and to assess bias-variance trade-offs using iterative expectation maximization (EM) reconstruction. We found that the two approaches are not exactly equivalent due to properties of the non-negative least-squares algorithm. However, the differences are small ( 1 and, to a lesser extent, VD). The optimal number of EM iterations was 15-30 with up to a two-fold improvement in SNR over filtered back projection. We conclude that projection-based spectral analysis with EM reconstruction yields accurate parametric images with high SNR and has potential application to a wide range of positron emission tomography ligands. (author)

  17. Reconstruction for limited-projection fluorescence molecular tomography based on projected restarted conjugate gradient normal residual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xu; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Fei; Wang, Xin; Bai, Jing

    2011-12-01

    Limited-projection fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) can greatly reduce the acquisition time, which is suitable for resolving fast biology processes in vivo but suffers from severe ill-posedness because of the reconstruction using only limited projections. To overcome the severe ill-posedness, we report a reconstruction method based on the projected restarted conjugate gradient normal residual. The reconstruction results of two phantom experiments demonstrate that the proposed method is feasible for limited-projection FMT. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  18. MRI of double-bundle ACL reconstruction: evaluation of graft findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiekara, Tommi; Paakkala, Antti [Tampere University Hospital, Medical Imaging Centre, Tampere (Finland); Jaervelae, Timo [Sports Clinic and Hospital Mehilaeinen, Tampere (Finland); Huhtala, Heini [University of Tampere, School of Health Sciences, Tampere (Finland)

    2012-07-15

    To demonstrate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of double-bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction grafts. Sixty-six patients with DB ACL reconstruction were evaluated with MRI 2 years postoperatively. Graft thickness was measured separately by two musculoskeletal radiologists. The MRI findings of graft disruption, signal intensity (SI) changes, cystic degeneration, arthrofibrosis, and impingement were analyzed. The statistical significance of the association between MRI findings was calculated. The mean anteromedial (AM) graft thickness was reduced 9% and the mean posterolateral (PL) graft thickness was reduced 18% from the original graft thickness. Disruption was seen in 3% of AM grafts and 6% of PL grafts and a partial tear in 8 and 23%, respectively. Both grafts were disrupted in 3% of patients. Increased SI was seen in 14% of intact AM grafts and in 60% of partially torn AM grafts (p = 0.032). In PL grafts the increased SI was seen in 51% of the intact grafts and in 93% of the partially torn grafts (p = 0.005). Cystic degeneration was seen in 8% of AM grafts and in 5% of PL grafts. Diffuse arthrofibrosis was seen in 5% of patients and a localized cyclops lesion in 3% of patients. Impingement of the AM graft was seen in 8% of patients. Both grafts were disrupted in 3% of patients. Also, the frequencies of other complications were low. The use of orthogonal sequences in the evaluation of the PL graft SI seems to cause volume-averaging artefacts. (orig.)

  19. Reconstruction of CT images by the Bayes- back projection method

    CERN Document Server

    Haruyama, M; Takase, M; Tobita, H

    2002-01-01

    In the course of research on quantitative assay of non-destructive measurement of radioactive waste, the have developed a unique program based on the Bayesian theory for reconstruction of transmission computed tomography (TCT) image. The reconstruction of cross-section images in the CT technology usually employs the Filtered Back Projection method. The new imaging reconstruction program reported here is based on the Bayesian Back Projection method, and it has a function of iterative improvement images by every step of measurement. Namely, this method has the capability of prompt display of a cross-section image corresponding to each angled projection data from every measurement. Hence, it is possible to observe an improved cross-section view by reflecting each projection data in almost real time. From the basic theory of Baysian Back Projection method, it can be not only applied to CT types of 1st, 2nd, and 3rd generation. This reported deals with a reconstruction program of cross-section images in the CT of ...

  20. Developing milk industry estimates for dose reconstruction projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, D.M.; Darwin, R.F.

    1991-01-01

    One of the most important contributors to radiation doses from hanford during the 1944-1947 period was radioactive iodine. Consumption of milk from cows that ate vegetation contaminated with iodine is likely the dominant pathway of human exposure. To estimate the doses people could have received from this pathway, it is necessary to reconstruct the amount of milk consumed by people living near Hanford, the source of the milk, and the type of feed that the milk cows ate. This task is challenging because the dairy industry has undergone radical changes since the end of World War 2, and records that document the impact of these changes on the study area are scarce. Similar problems are faced by researchers on most dose reconstruction efforts. The purpose of this work is to document and evaluate the methods used on the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project to reconstruct the milk industry and to present preliminary results

  1. Accuracy of applicator tip reconstruction in MRI-guided interstitial 192Ir-high-dose-rate brachytherapy of liver tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wybranski, Christian; Eberhardt, Benjamin; Fischbach, Katharina; Fischbach, Frank; Walke, Mathias; Hass, Peter; Röhl, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Kosiek, Ortrud; Kaiser, Mandy; Pech, Maciej; Lüdemann, Lutz; Ricke, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the reconstruction accuracy of brachytherapy (BT) applicators tips in vitro and in vivo in MRI-guided 192 Ir-high-dose-rate (HDR)-BT of inoperable liver tumors. Materials and methods: Reconstruction accuracy of plastic BT applicators, visualized by nitinol inserts, was assessed in MRI phantom measurements and in MRI 192 Ir-HDR-BT treatment planning datasets of 45 patients employing CT co-registration and vector decomposition. Conspicuity, short-term dislocation, and reconstruction errors were assessed in the clinical data. The clinical effect of applicator reconstruction accuracy was determined in follow-up MRI data. Results: Applicator reconstruction accuracy was 1.6 ± 0.5 mm in the phantom measurements. In the clinical MRI datasets applicator conspicuity was rated good/optimal in ⩾72% of cases. 16/129 applicators showed not time dependent deviation in between MRI/CT acquisition (p > 0.1). Reconstruction accuracy was 5.5 ± 2.8 mm, and the average image co-registration error was 3.1 ± 0.9 mm. Vector decomposition revealed no preferred direction of reconstruction errors. In the follow-up data deviation of planned dose distribution and irradiation effect was 6.9 ± 3.3 mm matching the mean co-registration error (6.5 ± 2.5 mm; p > 0.1). Conclusion: Applicator reconstruction accuracy in vitro conforms to AAPM TG 56 standard. Nitinol-inserts are feasible for applicator visualization and yield good conspicuity in MRI treatment planning data. No preferred direction of reconstruction errors were found in vivo

  2. Overview of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipler, D.B.; Napier, B.A.; Ikenberry, T.A.

    1992-04-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that specific and representative individuals and populations may have received as a result of releases of radioactive materials from historical operations at the Hanford Site. These dose estimates would account for the uncertainties of information regarding facilities operations, environmental monitoring, demography, food consumption and lifestyles, and the variability of natural phenomena. Other objectives of the HEDR Project include: supporting the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS), declassifying Hanford-generated information and making it available to the public, performing high-quality, credible science, and conducting the project in an open, public forum. The project is briefly described

  3. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report, August 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography; food consumption; and agriculture; and environmental pathway and dose estimates

  4. Project RAMA: Reconstructing Asteroids Into Mechanical Automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Jason; Fagin, Max; Snyder, Michael; Joyce, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Many interesting ideas have been conceived for building space-based infrastructure in cislunar space. From O'Neill's space colonies, to solar power satellite farms, and even prospecting retrieved near earth asteroids. In all the scenarios, one thing remained fixed - the need for space resources at the outpost. To satisfy this need, O'Neill suggested an electromagnetic railgun to deliver resources from the lunar surface, while NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission called for a solar electric tug to deliver asteroid materials from interplanetary space. At Made In Space, we propose an entirely new concept. One which is scalable, cost effective, and ensures that the abundant material wealth of the inner solar system becomes readily available to humankind in a nearly automated fashion. We propose the RAMA architecture, which turns asteroids into self-contained spacecraft capable of moving themselves back to cislunar space. The RAMA architecture is just as capable of transporting conventional-sized asteroids on the 10-meter length scale as transporting asteroids 100 meters or larger, making it the most versatile asteroid retrieval architecture in terms of retrieved-mass capability. This report describes the results of the Phase I study funded by the NASA NIAC program for Made In Space to establish the concept feasibility of using space manufacturing to convert asteroids into autonomous, mechanical spacecraft. Project RAMA, Reconstituting Asteroids into Mechanical Automata, is designed to leverage the future advances of additive manufacturing (AM), in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) and in-situ manufacturing (ISM) to realize enormous efficiencies in repeated asteroid redirect missions. A team of engineers at Made In Space performed the study work with consultation from the asteroid mining industry, academia, and NASA. Previous studies for asteroid retrieval have been constrained to studying only asteroids that are both large enough to be discovered, and small enough to be

  5. Communication tools for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blazek, Mary Lou; Power, Max S.

    1992-01-01

    From 1944 to 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy produced plutonium at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. In the early days of operation, large amounts of radioactive materials were released to the environment. Documents about the releases were made public in 1986. The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project began in 1987. The Project will determine how much radioactive material was released, how that material may have exposed people, and what radiation doses people may have received. The Project will be complete in 1995. The federal government pays for the work. The scientific work on the study is done by Battelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Public credibility and valid science are equally important to those directing the dose reconstruction work. A number of tools are used to inform the public and encourage public participation. These tools are examined in this paper. (author)

  6. Compressed sensing reconstruction of cardiac cine MRI using golden angle spiral trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolouee, Azar; Alirezaie, Javad; Babyn, Paul

    2015-11-01

    In dynamic cardiac cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), the spatiotemporal resolution is limited by the low imaging speed. Compressed sensing (CS) theory has been applied to improve the imaging speed and thus the spatiotemporal resolution. The purpose of this paper is to improve CS reconstruction of under sampled data by exploiting spatiotemporal sparsity and efficient spiral trajectories. We extend k-t sparse algorithm to spiral trajectories to achieve high spatio temporal resolutions in cardiac cine imaging. We have exploited spatiotemporal sparsity of cardiac cine MRI by applying a 2D+time wavelet-Fourier transform. For efficient coverage of k-space, we have used a modified version of multi shot (interleaved) spirals trajectories. In order to reduce incoherent aliasing artifact, we use different random undersampling pattern for each temporal frame. Finally, we have used nonuniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) algorithm to reconstruct the image from the non-uniformly acquired samples. The proposed approach was tested in simulated and cardiac cine MRI data. Results show that higher acceleration factors with improved image quality can be obtained with the proposed approach in comparison to the existing state-of-the-art method. The flexibility of the introduced method should allow it to be used not only for the challenging case of cardiac imaging, but also for other patient motion where the patient moves or breathes during acquisition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. SU-G-JeP2-14: MRI-Based HDR Prostate Brachytherapy: A Phantom Study for Interstitial Catheter Reconstruction with 0.35T MRI Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S; Kamrava, M; Yang, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of interstitial catheter reconstruction with 0.35T MRI images for MRI-based HDR prostate brachytherapy. Methods: Recently, a real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy system combining a 0.35T MRI system and three cobalt 60 heads (MRIdian System, ViewRay, Cleveland, OH, USA) was installed in our department. A TrueFISP sequence for MRI acquisition at lower field on Viewray was chosen due to its fast speed and high signal-to-noise efficiency. Interstitial FlexiGuide needles were implanted into a tissue equivalent ultrasound prostate phantom (CIRS, Norfolk, Virginia, USA). After an initial 15s pilot MRI to confirm the location of the phantom, planning MRI was acquired with a 172s TrueFISP sequence. The pulse sequence parameters included: flip angle = 60 degree, echo time (TE) =1.45 ms, repetition time (TR) = 3.37 ms, slice thickness = 1.5 mm, field of view (FOV) =500 × 450mm. For a reference image, a CT scan was followed. The CT and MR scans were then fused with the MIM Maestro (MIM software Inc., Cleveland, OH, USA) and sent to the Oncentra Brachy planning system (Elekta, Veenendaal, Netherlands). Automatic catheter reconstruction using CT and MR image intensities followed by manual reconstruction was used to digitize catheters. The accuracy of catheter reconstruction was evaluated from the catheter tip location. Results: The average difference between the catheter tip locations reconstructed from the CT and MR in the transverse, anteroposterior, and craniocaudal directions was −0.1 ± 0.1 mm (left), 0.2 ± 0.2 mm (anterior), and −2.3 ± 0.5 mm (cranio). The average distance in 3D was 2.3 mm ± 0.5 mm. Conclusion: This feasibility study proved that interstitial catheters can be reconstructed with 0.35T MRI images. For more accurate catheter reconstruction which can affect final dose distribution, a systematic shift should be applied to the MR based catheter reconstruction in HDR prostate brachytherapy.

  8. Towards open sharing of task-based fMRI data: The OpenfMRI project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell A Poldrack

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The large-scale sharing of task-based functional neuroimaging data has the potential to allow novel insights into the organization of mental function in the brain, but the field of neuroimaging has lagged behind other areas of bioscience in the development of data sharing resources. This paper describes the OpenFMRI project (accessible online at http://www.openfmri.org, which aims to provide the neuroimaging community with a resource to support open sharing of task-based fMRI studies. We describe the motivation behind the project, focusing particularly on how this project addresses some of the well-known challenges to sharing of task-based fMRI data. Results from a preliminary analysis of the current database are presented, which demonstrate the ability to classify between task contrasts with high generalization accuracy across subjects, and the ability to identify individual subjects from their activation maps with moderately high accuracy. Clustering analyses show that the similarity relations between statistical maps have a somewhat orderly relation to the mental functions engaged by the relevant tasks. These results highlight the potential of the project to support large-scale multivariate analyses of the relation between mental processes and brain function.

  9. Automated segmentation and reconstruction of patient-specific cardiac anatomy and pathology from in vivo MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringenberg, Jordan; Deo, Makarand; Devabhaktuni, Vijay; Filgueiras-Rama, David; Pizarro, Gonzalo; Ibañez, Borja; Berenfeld, Omer; Boyers, Pamela; Gold, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an automated method to segment left ventricle (LV) tissues from functional and delayed-enhancement (DE) cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans using a sequential multi-step approach. First, a region of interest (ROI) is computed to create a subvolume around the LV using morphological operations and image arithmetic. From the subvolume, the myocardial contours are automatically delineated using difference of Gaussians (DoG) filters and GSV snakes. These contours are used as a mask to identify pathological tissues, such as fibrosis or scar, within the DE-MRI. The presented automated technique is able to accurately delineate the myocardium and identify the pathological tissue in patient sets. The results were validated by two expert cardiologists, and in one set the automated results are quantitatively and qualitatively compared with expert manual delineation. Furthermore, the method is patient-specific, performed on an entire patient MRI series. Thus, in addition to providing a quick analysis of individual MRI scans, the fully automated segmentation method is used for effectively tagging regions in order to reconstruct computerized patient-specific 3D cardiac models. These models can then be used in electrophysiological studies and surgical strategy planning. (paper)

  10. Preconditioned alternating projection algorithms for maximum a posteriori ECT reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Li, Si; Shen, Lixin; Xu, Yuesheng

    2012-01-01

    We propose a preconditioned alternating projection algorithm (PAPA) for solving the maximum a posteriori (MAP) emission computed tomography (ECT) reconstruction problem. Specifically, we formulate the reconstruction problem as a constrained convex optimization problem with the total variation (TV) regularization. We then characterize the solution of the constrained convex optimization problem and show that it satisfies a system of fixed-point equations defined in terms of two proximity operators raised from the convex functions that define the TV-norm and the constraint involved in the problem. The characterization (of the solution) via the proximity operators that define two projection operators naturally leads to an alternating projection algorithm for finding the solution. For efficient numerical computation, we introduce to the alternating projection algorithm a preconditioning matrix (the EM-preconditioner) for the dense system matrix involved in the optimization problem. We prove theoretically convergence of the PAPA. In numerical experiments, performance of our algorithms, with an appropriately selected preconditioning matrix, is compared with performance of the conventional MAP expectation-maximization (MAP-EM) algorithm with TV regularizer (EM-TV) and that of the recently developed nested EM-TV algorithm for ECT reconstruction. Based on the numerical experiments performed in this work, we observe that the alternating projection algorithm with the EM-preconditioner outperforms significantly the EM-TV in all aspects including the convergence speed, the noise in the reconstructed images and the image quality. It also outperforms the nested EM-TV in the convergence speed while providing comparable image quality. (paper)

  11. Reconstruction of MRI/CT compatible ring and tandem applicators in CT or MRI images used for treatment planning in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surendran, N.; Kim, Hayeon; Beriwal, Sushil; Saiful Huq, M.

    2008-01-01

    Brachytherapy (BT) plays a crucial role in the management of invasive cervix cancer from stage I to IV. Intracavitary techniques are based on afterloading devices, with different types of applicators. CT and/or MRI compatible applicators allow a sectional image based approach with a better assessment of gross tumour volume (GTV) and definition and delineation of target volume (CTV) compared to traditional approaches. To evaluate reconstruction of MRI/CT compatible ring and tandem applicators in 3D CT or MRI images used for treatment planning in Brachytherapy

  12. The NIOSH Radiation Dose Reconstruction Project: managing technical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Matthew P; Townsend, Ronald D; Dooley, David A

    2008-07-01

    Approximately two years after promulgation of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Office of Compensation and Analysis Support selected a contractor team to perform many aspects of the radiation dose reconstruction process. The project scope and schedule necessitated the development of an organization involving a comparatively large number of health physicists. From the initial stages, there were many technical and managerial challenges that required continuous planning, integration, and conflict resolution. This paper identifies those challenges and describes the resolutions and lessons learned. These insights are hopefully useful to managers of similar scientific projects, especially those requiring significant data, technical methods, and calculations. The most complex challenge has been to complete defensible, individualized dose reconstructions that support timely compensation decisions at an acceptable production level. Adherence to applying claimant-favorable and transparent science consistent with the requirements of the Act has been the key to establishing credibility, which is essential to this large and complex project involving tens of thousands of individual stakeholders. The initial challenges included garnering sufficient and capable scientific staff, developing an effective infrastructure, establishing necessary methods and procedures, and integrating activities to ensure consistent, quality products. The continuing challenges include maintaining the project focus on recommending a compensation determination (rather than generating an accurate dose reconstruction), managing the associated very large data and information management challenges, and ensuring quality control and assurance in the presence of an evolving infrastructure. The lessons learned concern project credibility, claimant favorability, project priorities, quality and consistency, and critical

  13. Image reconstruction from multiple fan-beam projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelinek, J.; Overton, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    Special-purpose third-generation fan-beam CT systems can be greatly simplified by limiting the number of detectors, but this requires a different mode of data collection to provide a set of projections appropriate to the required spatial resolution in the reconstructed image. Repeated rotation of the source-detector fan, combined with shift of the detector array and perhaps offset of the source with respect to the fan's axis after each 360 0 rotation(cycle), provides a fairly general pattern of projection space filling. The authors' investigated the problem of optimal data-collection geometry for a multiple-rotation fan-beam scanner and of corresponding reconstruction algorithm

  14. 3D MRI findings of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction at follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Jun; Liang Biling; Chen Jianyu; Huang Suiqiao; Zhong Jinglian; Li Xiao

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the postoperative 3D MRI appearances and their evolvement patterns of ACL grafts and bone tunnels at follow-up. Methods: There were 2,6 double bundles ACL reconstructions and 16 single bundle ACL reconstructions, and a total of 56 follow-up 3D MR Imaging. MR images were reconstructed with MPR technique to evaluate grafts, bone tunnels, fixers and associated complications. Proportions of grafts with hypointensity or hyperintensity and occurrence rates of marrow edema around bone tunnels were calculated respectively among groups of different periods after operation. Results: There were 2, 4 grafts of hypointensity and 32 grafts of hyperintensity. Grafts of 2 cases were suspended with cross pins within femoral tunnels, graft of 1 case was suspended with an endobutton within the femoral tunnel, and grafts of other sites were fixed with interference screws. In the three periods as 3 months, 6 to 9 months and over 12 months after cruciate ligament reconstruction, proportions of hypointensive grafts were 20/25, 0/14 and 4/10 respectively, while proportions of hyperintensive grafts were 5/25, 14/14 and 6/10 respectively, occurrence proportions of marrow edema around bone tunnels were 54/54, 10/32 and 4/26 respectively. There was 1 tear graft, 4 tibial tunnels placed anteriorly with ACL graft impingement on the intercondylar roof, 3 femoral tunnels placed anteriorly, and 2 bone tunnels with mismatching interference screws. Conclusion: 3D MRI can accurately demonstrate the state of ACL grafts, bone tunnels, fixers and associated complications. Intensity of grafts presented a rise and reduce pattern after operation. (authors)

  15. PVR: Patch-to-Volume Reconstruction for Large Area Motion Correction of Fetal MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alansary, Amir; Rajchl, Martin; McDonagh, Steven G; Murgasova, Maria; Damodaram, Mellisa; Lloyd, David F A; Davidson, Alice; Rutherford, Mary; Hajnal, Joseph V; Rueckert, Daniel; Kainz, Bernhard

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method for the correction of motion artifacts that are present in fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the whole uterus. Contrary to current slice-to-volume registration (SVR) methods, requiring an inflexible anatomical enclosure of a single investigated organ, the proposed patch-to-volume reconstruction (PVR) approach is able to reconstruct a large field of view of non-rigidly deforming structures. It relaxes rigid motion assumptions by introducing a specific amount of redundant information that is exploited with parallelized patchwise optimization, super-resolution, and automatic outlier rejection. We further describe and provide an efficient parallel implementation of PVR allowing its execution within reasonable time on commercially available graphics processing units, enabling its use in the clinical practice. We evaluate PVR's computational overhead compared with standard methods and observe improved reconstruction accuracy in the presence of affine motion artifacts compared with conventional SVR in synthetic experiments. Furthermore, we have evaluated our method qualitatively and quantitatively on real fetal MRI data subject to maternal breathing and sudden fetal movements. We evaluate peak-signal-to-noise ratio, structural similarity index, and cross correlation with respect to the originally acquired data and provide a method for visual inspection of reconstruction uncertainty. We further evaluate the distance error for selected anatomical landmarks in the fetal head, as well as calculating the mean and maximum displacements resulting from automatic non-rigid registration to a motion-free ground truth image. These experiments demonstrate a successful application of PVR motion compensation to the whole fetal body, uterus, and placenta.

  16. Questions of uniqueness and resolution in reconstruction from projections

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Myron Bernard

    1978-01-01

    Reconstruction from projections has revolutionized radiology and as now become one of the most important tools of medical diagnosi- he E. M. I. Scanner is one example. In this text, some fundamental heoretical and practical questions are resolved. Despite recent research activity in the area, the crucial subject ·f the uniqueness of the reconstruction and the effect of noise in the ata posed some unsettled fundamental questions. In particular, Kennan mith proved that if we describe an object by a C~ function, i. e. , nfinitely differentiable with compact support, then there are other bjects with the same shape, i. e. , support, which can differ almost rhitrarily and still have the same projections in finitely many direc­ ions. On the other hand, he proved that objects in finite dimensional unction spaces are uniquely determined by a single projection for almost 11 angles, i. e. , except on a set of measure zero. Along these lines, erman and Rowland in [41) showed that reconstructions obtained from he common...

  17. Application of the fractional Fourier transform to image reconstruction in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parot, Vicente; Sing-Long, Carlos; Lizama, Carlos; Tejos, Cristian; Uribe, Sergio; Irarrazaval, Pablo

    2012-07-01

    The classic paradigm for MRI requires a homogeneous B(0) field in combination with linear encoding gradients. Distortions are produced when the B(0) is not homogeneous, and several postprocessing techniques have been developed to correct them. Field homogeneity is difficult to achieve, particularly for short-bore magnets and higher B(0) fields. Nonlinear magnetic components can also arise from concomitant fields, particularly in low-field imaging, or intentionally used for nonlinear encoding. In any of these situations, the second-order component is key, because it constitutes the first step to approximate higher-order fields. We propose to use the fractional Fourier transform for analyzing and reconstructing the object's magnetization under the presence of quadratic fields. The fractional fourier transform provides a precise theoretical framework for this. We show how it can be used for reconstruction and for gaining a better understanding of the quadratic field-induced distortions, including examples of reconstruction for simulated and in vivo data. The obtained images have improved quality compared with standard Fourier reconstructions. The fractional fourier transform opens a new paradigm for understanding the MR signal generated by an object under a quadratic main field or nonlinear encoding. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Decision management for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberds, W.J.; Haerer, H.A. [Golder Associates, Inc., Redmond, WA (United States); Winterfeldt, D.V. [Decision Insights, Laguna Beach, CA (United States)

    1992-04-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is in the process of developing estimates for the radiation doses that individuals and population groups may have received as a result of past activities at the Hanford Reservation in Eastern Washington. A formal decision-aiding methodology has been developed to assist the HEDR Project in making significant and defensible decisions regarding how this study will be conducted. These decisions relate primarily to policy (e.g., the appropriate level of public participation in the study) and specific technical aspects (e.g., the appropriate domain and depth of the study), and may have significant consequences with respect to technical results, costs, and public acceptability.

  19. Decision management for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberds, W.J.; Haerer, H.A.; Winterfeldt, D.V.

    1992-04-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is in the process of developing estimates for the radiation doses that individuals and population groups may have received as a result of past activities at the Hanford Reservation in Eastern Washington. A formal decision-aiding methodology has been developed to assist the HEDR Project in making significant and defensible decisions regarding how this study will be conducted. These decisions relate primarily to policy (e.g., the appropriate level of public participation in the study) and specific technical aspects (e.g., the appropriate domain and depth of the study), and may have significant consequences with respect to technical results, costs, and public acceptability

  20. Work plan for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-01

    The primary objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944, with descriptions of uncertainties inherent in such estimates. The secondary objective is to make project records--information that HEDR staff members used to estimate radiation doses--available to the public. Preliminary dose estimates for a limited geographic area and time period, certain radionuclides, and certain populations are planned to be available in 1990; complete results are planned to be reported in 1993. Project reports and references used in the reports are available to the public in the DOE Public Reading Room in Richland, Washington. Project progress is documented in monthly reports, which are also available to the public in the DOE Public Reading Room.

  1. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project independent direction and oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blazek, M.L.; Power, M.

    1991-01-01

    Hanford was selected in 1942 as one of the sites for the Manhattan Project. It produced plutonium for one of the world's first nuclear weapons. The US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors continued to make plutonium for nuclear weapons at Hanford for more than four decades. In the early days of Hanford operations, radioactive materials routinely were released to the environment by many processes. The DOE disclosed documents about these releases in 1986. In 1987, Washington, Oregon, and regional Indian tribes gathered an independent panel of experts. This group recommended dose reconstruction and health effects feasibility studies. Later that year, DOE hired Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to reconstruct potential public radiation doses from Hanford's past releases of radioactive material. The DOE agreed with the states and tribes that project direction would come from an independent technical steering panel (TSP). This approach was critical to gain public credibility for the project and the science. The TSP directs the project and makes policy. That is now clear - but, it was hard-earned. Conducting science in an open public process is new, challenging, and clearly worthwhile. The panel's product is good science that is believed and accepted by the public - our client

  2. Could new reconstruction CT techniques challenge MRI for the detection of brain metastases in the context of initial lung cancer staging?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millon, Domitille; Byl, David; Coche, Emmanuel E. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Cliniques Universitaires Saint Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Collard, Philippe [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Pneumology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Cambier, Samantha E.; Maanen, Aline G. van [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Statistic Unit, King Albert II Cancer Institute, Brussels (Belgium); Vlassenbroek, Alain [Philips Healthcare, Brussels (Belgium)

    2018-02-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of brain CT images reconstructed with a model-based iterative algorithm performed at usual and reduced dose. 115 patients with histologically proven lung cancer were prospectively included over 15 months. Patients underwent two CT acquisitions at the initial staging, performed on a 256-slice MDCT, at standard (CTDIvol: 41.4 mGy) and half dose (CTDIvol: 20.7 mGy). Both image datasets were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative model-based reconstruction (IMR) algorithms. Brain MRI was considered as the reference. Two blinded independent readers analysed the images. Ninety-three patients underwent all examinations. At the standard dose, eight patients presented 17 and 15 lesions on IMR and FBP CT images, respectively. At half-dose, seven patients presented 15 and 13 lesions on IMR and FBP CT images, respectively. The test could not highlight any significant difference between the standard dose IMR and the half-dose FBP techniques (p-value = 0.12). MRI showed 46 metastases on 11 patients. Specificity, negative and positive predictive values were calculated (98.9-100 %, 93.6-94.6 %, 75-100 %, respectively, for all CT techniques). No significant difference could be demonstrated between the two CT reconstruction techniques. (orig.)

  3. Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    The work described in this report was prompted by the public's concern about potential effect from the radioactive materials released from the Hanford Site. The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established to estimate radiation dose the public might have received from the Hanford Site since 1944, when facilities began operating. Phase 1 of the HEDR Project is a ''pilot'' or ''demonstration'' phase. The objectives of this initial phase were to determine whether enough historical information could be found or reconstructed to be used for dose estimation and develop and test conceptual and computational models for calculating credible dose estimates. Preliminary estimates of radiation doses were produced in Phase 1 because they are needed to achieve these objectives. The reader is cautioned that the dose estimates provided in this and other Phase 1 HEDR reports are preliminary. As the HEDR Project continues, the dose estimates will change for at least three reasons: more complete input information for models will be developed; the models themselves will be refined; and the size and shape of the geographic study area will change. This is one of three draft reports that summarize the first phase of the four-phased HEDR Project. This, the Summary Report, is directed to readers who want a general understanding of the Phase 1 work and preliminary dose estimates. The two other reports -- the Air Pathway Report and the Columbia River Pathway Report -- are for readers who understand the radiation dose assessment process and want to see more technical detail. Detailed descriptions of the dose reconstruction process are available in more than 20 supporting reports listed in Appendix A. 32 refs., 46 figs

  4. MGH-USC Human Connectome Project datasets with ultra-high b-value diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qiuyun; Witzel, Thomas; Nummenmaa, Aapo; Van Dijk, Koene R A; Van Horn, John D; Drews, Michelle K; Somerville, Leah H; Sheridan, Margaret A; Santillana, Rosario M; Snyder, Jenna; Hedden, Trey; Shaw, Emily E; Hollinshead, Marisa O; Renvall, Ville; Zanzonico, Roberta; Keil, Boris; Cauley, Stephen; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Tisdall, Dylan; Buckner, Randy L; Wedeen, Van J; Wald, Lawrence L; Toga, Arthur W; Rosen, Bruce R

    2016-01-01

    The MGH-USC CONNECTOM MRI scanner housed at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) is a major hardware innovation of the Human Connectome Project (HCP). The 3T CONNECTOM scanner is capable of producing a magnetic field gradient of up to 300 mT/m strength for in vivo human brain imaging, which greatly shortens the time spent on diffusion encoding, and decreases the signal loss due to T2 decay. To demonstrate the capability of the novel gradient system, data of healthy adult participants were acquired for this MGH-USC Adult Diffusion Dataset (N=35), minimally preprocessed, and shared through the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging Image Data Archive (LONI IDA) and the WU-Minn Connectome Database (ConnectomeDB). Another purpose of sharing the data is to facilitate methodological studies of diffusion MRI (dMRI) analyses utilizing high diffusion contrast, which perhaps is not easily feasible with standard MR gradient system. In addition, acquisition of the MGH-Harvard-USC Lifespan Dataset is currently underway to include 120 healthy participants ranging from 8 to 90 years old, which will also be shared through LONI IDA and ConnectomeDB. Here we describe the efforts of the MGH-USC HCP consortium in acquiring and sharing the ultra-high b-value diffusion MRI data and provide a report on data preprocessing and access. We conclude with a demonstration of the example data, along with results of standard diffusion analyses, including q-ball Orientation Distribution Function (ODF) reconstruction and tractography. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Direct Patlak Reconstruction From Dynamic PET Data Using the Kernel Method With MRI Information Based on Structural Similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Kuang; Cheng-Liao, Jinxiu; Wang, Guobao; Chen, Kevin T; Catana, Ciprian; Qi, Jinyi

    2018-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a functional imaging modality widely used in oncology, cardiology, and neuroscience. It is highly sensitive, but suffers from relatively poor spatial resolution, as compared with anatomical imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). With the recent development of combined PET/MR systems, we can improve the PET image quality by incorporating MR information into image reconstruction. Previously, kernel learning has been successfully embedded into static and dynamic PET image reconstruction using either PET temporal or MRI information. Here, we combine both PET temporal and MRI information adaptively to improve the quality of direct Patlak reconstruction. We examined different approaches to combine the PET and MRI information in kernel learning to address the issue of potential mismatches between MRI and PET signals. Computer simulations and hybrid real-patient data acquired on a simultaneous PET/MR scanner were used to evaluate the proposed methods. Results show that the method that combines PET temporal information and MRI spatial information adaptively based on the structure similarity index has the best performance in terms of noise reduction and resolution improvement.

  6. Forensic facial reconstruction: Nasal projection in Brazilian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi-Oliveira, Silvia Virginia; Beaini, Thiago Leite; Melani, Rodolfo Francisco Haltenhoff

    2016-09-01

    The nose has a marked cognitive influence on facial image; however, it loses its shape during cadaveric decomposition. The known methods of estimating nasal projection using Facial Reconstruction are lacking in practicality and reproducibility. We attempted to relate the points Rhinion, Pronasale and Prosthion by studying the angle formed by straight lines that connect them. Two examiners measured this angle with the help of analysis and image-processing software, Image J, directly from cephalometric radiographs. The sample consisted of 300 males, aged between 24 and 77 years, and 300 females, aged 24 to 69 years. The proposed angle ranged from 80° to 100° in both sexes and all ages. It was considered possible to use a 90° angle from projections of the Rhinion and Prosthion points in order to determine the Pronasale position, as well as to estimate the nasal projection of Brazilian adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Reducing acquisition time in clinical MRI by data undersampling and compressed sensing reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Kieren Grant

    2015-11-01

    MRI is often the most sensitive or appropriate technique for important measurements in clinical diagnosis and research, but lengthy acquisition times limit its use due to cost and considerations of patient comfort and compliance. Once an image field of view and resolution is chosen, the minimum scan acquisition time is normally fixed by the amount of raw data that must be acquired to meet the Nyquist criteria. Recently, there has been research interest in using the theory of compressed sensing (CS) in MR imaging to reduce scan acquisition times. The theory argues that if our target MR image is sparse, having signal information in only a small proportion of pixels (like an angiogram), or if the image can be mathematically transformed to be sparse then it is possible to use that sparsity to recover a high definition image from substantially less acquired data. This review starts by considering methods of k-space undersampling which have already been incorporated into routine clinical imaging (partial Fourier imaging and parallel imaging), and then explains the basis of using compressed sensing in MRI. The practical considerations of applying CS to MRI acquisitions are discussed, such as designing k-space undersampling schemes, optimizing adjustable parameters in reconstructions and exploiting the power of combined compressed sensing and parallel imaging (CS-PI). A selection of clinical applications that have used CS and CS-PI prospectively are considered. The review concludes by signposting other imaging acceleration techniques under present development before concluding with a consideration of the potential impact and obstacles to bringing compressed sensing into routine use in clinical MRI.

  8. Accelerated high-frame-rate mouse heart cine-MRI using compressed sensing reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaal, Abdallah G; Coolen, Bram F; Abdurrachim, Desiree; Castro, Rui M; Prompers, Jeanine J; Florack, Luc M J; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2013-04-01

    We introduce a new protocol to obtain very high-frame-rate cinematographic (Cine) MRI movies of the beating mouse heart within a reasonable measurement time. The method is based on a self-gated accelerated fast low-angle shot (FLASH) acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction. Key to our approach is that we exploit the stochastic nature of the retrospective triggering acquisition scheme to produce an undersampled and random k-t space filling that allows for compressed sensing reconstruction and acceleration. As a standard, a self-gated FLASH sequence with a total acquisition time of 10 min was used to produce single-slice Cine movies of seven mouse hearts with 90 frames per cardiac cycle. Two times (2×) and three times (3×) k-t space undersampled Cine movies were produced from 2.5- and 1.5-min data acquisitions, respectively. The accelerated 90-frame Cine movies of mouse hearts were successfully reconstructed with a compressed sensing algorithm. The movies had high image quality and the undersampling artifacts were effectively removed. Left ventricular functional parameters, i.e. end-systolic and end-diastolic lumen surface areas and early-to-late filling rate ratio as a parameter to evaluate diastolic function, derived from the standard and accelerated Cine movies, were nearly identical. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Evaluating contextual processing in diffusion MRI: application to optic radiation reconstruction for epilepsy surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal M W Tax

    Full Text Available Diffusion MRI and tractography allow for investigation of the architectural configuration of white matter in vivo, offering new avenues for applications like presurgical planning. Despite the promising outlook, there are many pitfalls that complicate its use for (clinical application. Amongst these are inaccuracies in the geometry of the diffusion profiles on which tractography is based, and poor alignment with neighboring profiles. Recently developed contextual processing techniques, including enhancement and well-posed geometric sharpening, have shown to result in sharper and better aligned diffusion profiles. However, the research that has been conducted up to now is mainly of theoretical nature, and so far these techniques have only been evaluated by visual inspection of the diffusion profiles. In this work, the method is evaluated in a clinically relevant application: the reconstruction of the optic radiation for epilepsy surgery. For this evaluation we have developed a framework in which we incorporate a novel scoring procedure for individual pathways. We demonstrate that, using enhancement and sharpening, the extraction of an anatomically plausible reconstruction of the optic radiation from a large amount of probabilistic pathways is greatly improved in three healthy controls, where currently used methods fail to do so. Furthermore, challenging reconstructions of the optic radiation in three epilepsy surgery candidates with extensive brain lesions demonstrate that it is beneficial to integrate these methods in surgical planning.

  10. Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction Project Summary Report; Reports of the Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction, Vol. 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Widner; et. al.

    1999-07-01

    In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel of individuals appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. The panel requested that the principal investigator for the project prepare the following report, ''Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction Project Summary Report,'' to serve the following purposes: (1) summarize in a single, less technical report, the methods and results of the various investigations that comprised the Phase II of the dose reconstruction; (2) describe the systematic searching of classified and unclassified historical records that was a vital component of the project; and (3) summarize the less detailed, screening-level assessments that were performed to evaluate the potential health significance of a number of materials, such a uranium, whose priority did not require a complete dose reconstruction effort. This report describes each major step of the dose reconstruction study: (1) the review of thousands of historical records to obtain information relating to past operations at each facility; (2) estimation of the quantity and timing of releases of radioiodines from X-10, of mercury from Y-12, of PCB's from all facilities, and of cesium-137 and other radionuclides from White Oak Creek; (3) evaluation of the routes taken by these contaminants through the environment to nearby populations; and (4) estimation of doses and health risks to exposed groups. Calculations found the highest excess cancer risks for a female born in 1952 who drank goat milk; the highest non-cancer health risk was for children in a farm family exposed to PCBs in and near

  11. Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction Project Summary Report; Reports of the Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction, Vol. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widner, Thomas E.; email = twidner@jajoneses.com

    1999-01-01

    In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel of individuals appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. The panel requested that the principal investigator for the project prepare the following report, ''Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction Project Summary Report,'' to serve the following purposes: (1) summarize in a single, less technical report, the methods and results of the various investigations that comprised the Phase II of the dose reconstruction; (2) describe the systematic searching of classified and unclassified historical records that was a vital component of the project; and (3) summarize the less detailed, screening-level assessments that were performed to evaluate the potential health significance of a number of materials, such a uranium, whose priority did not require a complete dose reconstruction effort. This report describes each major step of the dose reconstruction study: (1) the review of thousands of historical records to obtain information relating to past operations at each facility; (2) estimation of the quantity and timing of releases of radioiodines from X-10, of mercury from Y-12, of PCB's from all facilities, and of cesium-137 and other radionuclides from White Oak Creek; (3) evaluation of the routes taken by these contaminants through the environment to nearby populations; and (4) estimation of doses and health risks to exposed groups. Calculations found the highest excess cancer risks for a female born in 1952 who drank goat milk; the highest non-cancer health risk was for children in a farm family exposed to PCBs in and near East Fork Poplar Creek. More detailed

  12. Patient-adapted reconstruction and acquisition dynamic imaging method (PARADIGM) for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Nitin; Bresler, Yoram

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a challenging problem because the MR data acquisition is often not fast enough to meet the combined spatial and temporal Nyquist sampling rate requirements. Current approaches to this problem include hardware-based acceleration of the acquisition, and model-based image reconstruction techniques. In this paper we propose an alternative approach, called PARADIGM, which adapts both the acquisition and reconstruction to the spatio-temporal characteristics of the imaged object. The approach is based on time-sequential sampling theory, addressing the problem of acquiring a spatio-temporal signal under the constraint that only a limited amount of data can be acquired at a time instant. PARADIGM identifies a model class for the particular imaged object using a scout MR scan or auxiliary data. This object-adapted model is then used to optimize MR data acquisition, such that the imaging constraints are met, acquisition speed requirements are minimized, essentially perfect reconstruction of any object in the model class is guaranteed, and the inverse problem of reconstructing the dynamic object has a condition number of one. We describe spatio-temporal object models for various dynamic imaging applications including cardiac imaging. We present the theory underlying PARADIGM and analyze its performance theoretically and numerically. We also propose a practical MR imaging scheme for 2D dynamic cardiac imaging based on the theory. For this application, PARADIGM is predicted to provide a 10–25 × acceleration compared to the optimal non-adaptive scheme. Finally we present generalized optimality criteria and extend the scheme to dynamic imaging with three spatial dimensions

  13. Integration of models for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The objective of phase 1 of the project was to demonstrate through calculations that adequate models and support data exist or could be developed to allow realistic estimations of doses to individuals from releases of radionuclides to the environment that occurred as long as 45 years ago. Much of the data used in phase 1 was preliminary; therefore, the doses calculated must be considered preliminary approximations. This paper describes the integration of various models that was implemented for initial computer calculations. Models were required for estimating the quantity of radioactive material released, for evaluating its transport through the environment, for estimating human exposure, and for evaluating resultant doses

  14. Abducens nerve enhancement demonstrated by multiplanar reconstruction of contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoya, T.; Adachi, M.; Sugai, Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Yamagata University School of Medicine (Japan); Yamaguchi, K.; Yamaguchi, K. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Yamagata University School of Medicine (Japan); Kato, T. [3. Dept. of Internal Medicine, Yamagata University School of Medicine (Japan)

    2001-04-01

    We describe contrast enhancement of the cisternal portion of the abducens nerve and discuss its clinical significance. We examined 67 patients with ophthalmoplegia using contrast-enhanced 3-dimensional (3D) MRI with multiplanar reconstruction along the nerves and found 16 patients (ten men, six women), aged 10-73 years (mean 34.4 years), with contrast enhancement of the abducens nerve. Of the 36 patients who had an abducens palsy, 14 (39 %) showed contrast enhancement. In the 16 patients, 23 abducens nerves enhanced; 13 were symptomatic and 10 asymptomatic at the time. The causes were disseminated tumour (1), an inflammatory process (3), trauma (2), ischaemia (2) and autoimmune diseases (8), such as the Miller Fisher syndrome, acute ophthalmoparesis, polyneuropathy and multiple sclerosis. Abducens and/or oculomotor nerve enhancement was the only abnormality on MRI in the patients with traumatic or ischaemic neuropathy or autoimmune diseases. There were 14 patients who recovered fully within 1-6 months after treatment, and resolution of the enhancement correlated well with recovery. (orig.)

  15. Abducens nerve enhancement demonstrated by multiplanar reconstruction of contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoya, T.; Adachi, M.; Sugai, Y.; Yamaguchi, K.; Yamaguchi, K.; Kato, T.

    2001-01-01

    We describe contrast enhancement of the cisternal portion of the abducens nerve and discuss its clinical significance. We examined 67 patients with ophthalmoplegia using contrast-enhanced 3-dimensional (3D) MRI with multiplanar reconstruction along the nerves and found 16 patients (ten men, six women), aged 10-73 years (mean 34.4 years), with contrast enhancement of the abducens nerve. Of the 36 patients who had an abducens palsy, 14 (39 %) showed contrast enhancement. In the 16 patients, 23 abducens nerves enhanced; 13 were symptomatic and 10 asymptomatic at the time. The causes were disseminated tumour (1), an inflammatory process (3), trauma (2), ischaemia (2) and autoimmune diseases (8), such as the Miller Fisher syndrome, acute ophthalmoparesis, polyneuropathy and multiple sclerosis. Abducens and/or oculomotor nerve enhancement was the only abnormality on MRI in the patients with traumatic or ischaemic neuropathy or autoimmune diseases. There were 14 patients who recovered fully within 1-6 months after treatment, and resolution of the enhancement correlated well with recovery. (orig.)

  16. MRI of broken bioabsorbable crosspin fixation in hamstring graft reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhru, Prashant; Park, Brian; Umans, Hilary; DiFelice, Gregory S.; Tobin, Keith

    2011-01-01

    To report seven cases of broken bioabsorbable femoral crosspins identified by MRI in evaluation of hamstring grafts of the anterior cruciate ligament. Seven cases of broken bioabsorbable crosspins utilized in femoral fixation of ACL hamstring grafts were identified prospectively and retrospectively from our PACs database during a period from 9/1/08 to 8/31/09. All imaging was performed using 1.5 or 3.0 Tesla MRI and were evaluated for T2 signal within and surrounding the crosspin, osteolysis surrounding the fragments, displacement of fragments, and graft integrity. Time from surgery was also recorded. Seven cases of hamstring grafts with broken bioabsorbable crosspins were imaged 4 months to 3 years following grafting. There was osteolysis surrounding the crosspin in all but one case in which the graft was intact but a pin fragment was displaced into the joint. One graft failed due to aseptic foreign-body reaction to the fixation with aggressive osteolysis at 9 months post surgery. In the remaining five, the ACL graft was either completely torn, partially torn, lax, or degenerative and frayed. Of these, the crosspins were broken and angulated with osteolysis surrounding the apex of the angulated fragment or demonstrated lateral extrusion of the peripheral fragment. Bioabsorbable crosspins utilized in femoral fixation of hamstring graft reconstruction of the ACL may become fractured. While the natural history of osteo-integration of these devices as demonstrated by MRI has not been defined, osteolysis surrounding the fragments, extrusion or displacement of the fragments, and graft laxity or failure would suggest that these are abnormal findings that should be reported. (orig.)

  17. MRI of broken bioabsorbable crosspin fixation in hamstring graft reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhru, Prashant [Department of Radiology Jacobi Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Park, Brian [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Umans, Hilary [Department of Radiology Jacobi Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Lenox Hill Radiology and Imaging Associates, P.C., New York, NY (United States); DiFelice, Gregory S. [Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Tobin, Keith [Lenox Hill Radiology and Imaging Associates, P.C., New York, NY (United States)

    2011-06-15

    To report seven cases of broken bioabsorbable femoral crosspins identified by MRI in evaluation of hamstring grafts of the anterior cruciate ligament. Seven cases of broken bioabsorbable crosspins utilized in femoral fixation of ACL hamstring grafts were identified prospectively and retrospectively from our PACs database during a period from 9/1/08 to 8/31/09. All imaging was performed using 1.5 or 3.0 Tesla MRI and were evaluated for T2 signal within and surrounding the crosspin, osteolysis surrounding the fragments, displacement of fragments, and graft integrity. Time from surgery was also recorded. Seven cases of hamstring grafts with broken bioabsorbable crosspins were imaged 4 months to 3 years following grafting. There was osteolysis surrounding the crosspin in all but one case in which the graft was intact but a pin fragment was displaced into the joint. One graft failed due to aseptic foreign-body reaction to the fixation with aggressive osteolysis at 9 months post surgery. In the remaining five, the ACL graft was either completely torn, partially torn, lax, or degenerative and frayed. Of these, the crosspins were broken and angulated with osteolysis surrounding the apex of the angulated fragment or demonstrated lateral extrusion of the peripheral fragment. Bioabsorbable crosspins utilized in femoral fixation of hamstring graft reconstruction of the ACL may become fractured. While the natural history of osteo-integration of these devices as demonstrated by MRI has not been defined, osteolysis surrounding the fragments, extrusion or displacement of the fragments, and graft laxity or failure would suggest that these are abnormal findings that should be reported. (orig.)

  18. Simultaneous reconstruction of attenuation and activity in ToF PET/MRI with additional transmission data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D’Hoe, Ester [MEDISIP Medical Imaging and Signal Processing Group, Ghent University, IBBT-IBiTech, iMinds Medical IT, Ghent (Belgium); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Mollet, Pieter; Mikhaylova, Ekaterina [MEDISIP Medical Imaging and Signal Processing Group, Ghent University, IBBT-IBiTech, iMinds Medical IT, Ghent (Belgium); Defrise, Michel [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Vandenberghe, Stefaan [MEDISIP Medical Imaging and Signal Processing Group, Ghent University, IBBT-IBiTech, iMinds Medical IT, Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-05-18

    In Time-of-Flight PET/MRI systems accurate attenuation correction, based on the MRI image, is not straight forward. An alternative is attenuation correction based on emission data only. This is for instance done by simultaneous reconstruction of attenuation and activity with the MLAA algorithm, but the method as originally proposed has certain limits. The attenuation can only be determined up to a constant and in regions of low tracer uptake, the method results in less accurate attenuation values. An adapted MLAA algorithm has been proposed to overcome this issues and was successfully applied on simulation studies. The so called MLAA+ algorithm uses regular PET emission data as well as transmission data. This transmission data is acquired after insertion of an annulus shaped transmission source into the scanner bore. The Time-of-Flight information allows to separate transmission and emission data in a simultaneous acquisition. With the transmission data, an MLTR-based reference attenuation image is reconstructed. Afterwards, this attenuation image is used in the MLAA+ simultaneous reconstruction of attenuation and emission as a reference. We here propose the results of the reconstruction of patient data, based on the MLAA+ algorithm. In total, seven patients were scanned in a sequential PET/MRI scanner and afterwards in a CT scanner. The CT scan is used as an attenuation map to reconstruct the PET emission data with the well established MLEM algorithm. This reconstruction can be seen as the gold standard to which we can compare the MLAA and MLAA+ reconstructions. A preliminary study on one patient indicates that the MLAA+ algorithm results in better reconstructed emission and attenuation images as compared to the MLAA algorithm. If we compare the MLAA+ method to the gold standard, there is still room for improvement.

  19. Simultaneous reconstruction of attenuation and activity in ToF PET/MRI with additional transmission data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Hoe, Ester; Mollet, Pieter; Mikhaylova, Ekaterina; Defrise, Michel; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2015-01-01

    In Time-of-Flight PET/MRI systems accurate attenuation correction, based on the MRI image, is not straight forward. An alternative is attenuation correction based on emission data only. This is for instance done by simultaneous reconstruction of attenuation and activity with the MLAA algorithm, but the method as originally proposed has certain limits. The attenuation can only be determined up to a constant and in regions of low tracer uptake, the method results in less accurate attenuation values. An adapted MLAA algorithm has been proposed to overcome this issues and was successfully applied on simulation studies. The so called MLAA+ algorithm uses regular PET emission data as well as transmission data. This transmission data is acquired after insertion of an annulus shaped transmission source into the scanner bore. The Time-of-Flight information allows to separate transmission and emission data in a simultaneous acquisition. With the transmission data, an MLTR-based reference attenuation image is reconstructed. Afterwards, this attenuation image is used in the MLAA+ simultaneous reconstruction of attenuation and emission as a reference. We here propose the results of the reconstruction of patient data, based on the MLAA+ algorithm. In total, seven patients were scanned in a sequential PET/MRI scanner and afterwards in a CT scanner. The CT scan is used as an attenuation map to reconstruct the PET emission data with the well established MLEM algorithm. This reconstruction can be seen as the gold standard to which we can compare the MLAA and MLAA+ reconstructions. A preliminary study on one patient indicates that the MLAA+ algorithm results in better reconstructed emission and attenuation images as compared to the MLAA algorithm. If we compare the MLAA+ method to the gold standard, there is still room for improvement.

  20. Processing of MRI images weighted in TOF for blood vessels analysis: 3-D reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez D, J.; Cordova F, T. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Campus Leon, Departamento de Ingenieria Fisica, Loma del Bosque No. 103, Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Cruz A, I., E-mail: hernandezdj.gto@gmail.com [CONACYT, Centro de Investigacion en Matematicas, A. C., Jalisco s/n, Col. Valenciana, 36000 Guanajuato, Gto. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents a novel presents an approach based on differences of intensities for the identification of vascular structures in medical images from MRI studies of type time of flight method (TOF). The plating method hypothesis gave high intensities belonging to the vascular system image type TOF can be segmented by thresholding of the histogram. The enhanced vascular structures is performed using the filter Vesselness, upon completion of a decision based on fuzzy thresholding minimizes error in the selection of vascular structures. It will give a brief introduction to the vascular system problems and how the images have helped diagnosis, is summarized the physical history of the different imaging modalities and the evolution of digital images with computers. Segmentation and 3-D reconstruction became image type time of flight; these images are typically used in medical diagnosis of cerebrovascular diseases. The proposed method has less error in segmentation and reconstruction of volumes related to the vascular system, clear images and less noise compared with edge detection methods. (Author)

  1. Processing of MRI images weighted in TOF for blood vessels analysis: 3-D reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez D, J.; Cordova F, T.; Cruz A, I.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a novel presents an approach based on differences of intensities for the identification of vascular structures in medical images from MRI studies of type time of flight method (TOF). The plating method hypothesis gave high intensities belonging to the vascular system image type TOF can be segmented by thresholding of the histogram. The enhanced vascular structures is performed using the filter Vesselness, upon completion of a decision based on fuzzy thresholding minimizes error in the selection of vascular structures. It will give a brief introduction to the vascular system problems and how the images have helped diagnosis, is summarized the physical history of the different imaging modalities and the evolution of digital images with computers. Segmentation and 3-D reconstruction became image type time of flight; these images are typically used in medical diagnosis of cerebrovascular diseases. The proposed method has less error in segmentation and reconstruction of volumes related to the vascular system, clear images and less noise compared with edge detection methods. (Author)

  2. Tibial and Femoral Tunnel Changes After ACL Reconstruction: A Prospective 2-Year Longitudinal MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Alexander E; Delos, Demetris; Oltean, Hanna N; Vadasdi, Katherine; Cavanaugh, John; Potter, Hollis G; Rodeo, Scott A

    2015-05-01

    Tunnel widening after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) is a well-accepted and frequent phenomenon, yet little is known regarding its origin or natural history. To prospectively evaluate the cross-sectional area (CSA) changes in tibial and femoral bone tunnels after ACL-R with serial MRI. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Patients underwent arthroscopic ACL-R with the same surgeon, surgical technique, and rehabilitation protocol. Each patient underwent preoperative dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and clinical evaluation, as well as postoperative time zero MRI followed by subsequent MRI and clinical examination, including functional and subjective outcome tests, at 6, 12, 24, 52, and 104 weeks. Tibial and femoral tunnel CSA was measured on each MRI at tunnel aperture (ttA and ftA), midsection (ttM and ftM), and exit (ttE and ftE). Logistic regression modeling was used to examine the predictive value of demographic data and preoperative bone quality (as measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) on functional outcome scores, manual and instrumented laxity measurements, and changes in tunnel area over time. Eighteen patients (including 12 men), mean age 35.5±8.7 years, underwent ACL-R. There was significant tunnel expansion at ttA and ftA sites 6 weeks postoperatively (P=.024 and .0045, respectively). Expansion continued for 24 weeks, with progressive tunnel narrowing thereafter. Average ttA CSA was significantly larger than ftA CSA at all times. The ttM significantly expanded after 6 weeks (P=.06); continued expansion to week 12 was followed by 21 months of reduction in tunnel diameter. The ftM and both ttE and ftE sites decreased in CSA over the 2 years. Median Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee scores significantly improved at final follow-up (P=.0083 and 1 year from time of injury) predicted increased tunnel widening and accelerated expansion in CSA (Pclinical outcome. Younger age, male sex, and delay from injury to ACL

  3. FY 1991 project plan for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project was designed to develop and demonstrate a method for estimating radiation doses people may have received from Hanford Site operations since 1944. The method researchers developed relied on a variety of measured and reconstructed data as input to a modular computer model that generates dose estimates and their uncertainties. As part of Phase 1, researchers used the reconstructed data and computer model to calculate preliminary dose estimates for populations in a limited geographical area and time period. Phase 2, now under way, is designed to evaluate the Phase 1 data and model and improve them to calculate more accurate and precise dose estimates. Phase 2 will also be used to obtain preliminary estimates of two categories of doses: for Native American tribes and for individuals included in the pilot phase of the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS). TSP Directive 90-1 required HEDR staff to develop Phase 2 task plans for TSP approval. Draft task plans for Phase 2 were submitted to the TSP at the October 11--12, 1990 public meeting, and, after discussions of each activity and associated budget needs, the TSP directed HEDR staff to proceed with a slate of specific project activities for FY 1991 of Phase 2. This project plan contains detailed information about those activities. Phase 2 is expected to last 15--18 months. In mid-FY 1991, project activities and budget will be reevaluated to determine whether technical needs or priorities have changed. Separate from, but related to, this project plan, will be an integrated plan for the remainder of the project. HEDR staff will work with the TSP to map out a strategy that clearly describes ''end products'' for the project and the work necessary to complete them. This level of planning will provide a framework within which project decisions in Phases 2, 3, and 4 can be made

  4. Experimental study of sector and linear array ultrasound accuracy and the influence of navigated 3D-reconstruction as compared to MRI in a brain tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siekmann, Max; Lothes, Thomas; König, Ralph; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Coburger, Jan

    2018-03-01

    Currently, intraoperative ultrasound in brain tumor surgery is a rapidly propagating option in imaging technology. We examined the accuracy and resolution limits of different ultrasound probes and the influence of 3D-reconstruction in a phantom and compared these results to MRI in an intraoperative setting (iMRI). An agarose gel phantom with predefined gel targets was examined with iMRI, a sector (SUS) and a linear (LUS) array probe with two-dimensional images. Additionally, 3D-reconstructed sweeps in perpendicular directions were made of every target with both probes, resulting in 392 measurements. Statistical calculations were performed, and comparative boxplots were generated. Every measurement of iMRI and LUS was more precise than SUS, while there was no apparent difference in height of iMRI and 3D-reconstructed LUS. Measurements with 3D-reconstructed LUS were always more accurate than in 2D-LUS, while 3D-reconstruction of SUS showed nearly no differences to 2D-SUS in some measurements. We found correlations of 3D-reconstructed SUS and LUS length and width measurements with 2D results in the same image orientation. LUS provides an accuracy and resolution comparable to iMRI, while SUS is less exact than LUS and iMRI. 3D-reconstruction showed the potential to distinctly improve accuracy and resolution of ultrasound images, although there is a strong correlation with the sweep direction during data acquisition.

  5. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of reconstructed images using projections with noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, R.T.; Assis, J.T. de

    1988-01-01

    The reconstruction of a two-dimencional image from one-dimensional projections in an analytic algorithm ''convolution method'' is simulated on a microcomputer. In this work it was analysed the effects caused in the reconstructed image in function of the number of projections and noise level added to the projection data. Qualitative and quantitative (distortion and image noise) comparison were done with the original image and the reconstructed images. (author) [pt

  6. A Novel Nipple Reconstruction Technique for Maintaining Nipple Projection: The Boomerang Flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Eun; Hong, Ki Yong; Minn, Kyung Won; Jin, Ung Sik

    2016-09-01

    Nipple-areolar complex (NAC) reconstruction is the final step in the long journey of breast reconstruction for mastectomy patients. Successful NAC reconstruction depends on the use of appropriate surgical techniques that are simple and reliable. To date, numerous techniques have been used for nipple reconstruction, including contralateral nipple sharing and various local flaps. Recently, it has been common to utilize local flaps. However, the most common nipple reconstruction problem encountered with local flaps is the loss of nipple projection; there can be approximately 50% projection loss in reconstructed nipples over long-term follow-up. Several factors might contribute to nipple projection loss, and we tried to overcome these factors by performing nipple reconstructions using a boomerang flap technique, which is a modified C-V flap that utilizes the previous mastectomy scar to maintain long-term nipple projection.

  7. A Novel Nipple Reconstruction Technique for Maintaining Nipple Projection: The Boomerang Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Eun Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nipple-areolar complex (NAC reconstruction is the final step in the long journey of breast reconstruction for mastectomy patients. Successful NAC reconstruction depends on the use of appropriate surgical techniques that are simple and reliable. To date, numerous techniques have been used for nipple reconstruction, including contralateral nipple sharing and various local flaps. Recently, it has been common to utilize local flaps. However, the most common nipple reconstruction problem encountered with local flaps is the loss of nipple projection; there can be approximately 50% projection loss in reconstructed nipples over long-term follow-up. Several factors might contribute to nipple projection loss, and we tried to overcome these factors by performing nipple reconstructions using a boomerang flap technique, which is a modified C–V flap that utilizes the previous mastectomy scar to maintain long-term nipple projection.

  8. WE-G-18C-08: Real Time Tumor Imaging Using a Novel Dynamic Keyhole MRI Reconstruction Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Whelan, B; Keall, P; Greer, P; Kim, T

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the novel Dynamic Keyhole MRI reconstruction technique can accelerate image acquisition whilst maintaining high image quality for lung cancer patients. Methods: 18 MRI datasets from 5 lung cancer patients were acquired using a 3T MRI scanner. These datasets were retrospectively reconstructed using (A) The novel Dynamic Keyhole technique, (B) The conventional keyhole technique and (C) the conventional zero filling technique. The dynamic keyhole technique in MRI refers to techniques in which previously acquired k-space data is used to supplement under sampled data obtained in real time. The novel Dynamic Keyhole technique utilizes a previously acquired a library of kspace datasets in conjunction with central k-space datasets acquired in realtime. A simultaneously acquired respiratory signal is utilized to sort, match and combine the two k-space streams with respect to respiratory displacement. Reconstruction performance was quantified by (1) comparing the keyhole size (which corresponds to imaging speed) required to achieve the same image quality, and (2) maintaining a constant keyhole size across the three reconstruction methods to compare the resulting image quality to the ground truth image. Results: (1) The dynamic keyhole method required a mean keyhole size which was 48% smaller than the conventional keyhole technique and 60% smaller than the zero filling technique to achieve the same image quality. This directly corresponds to faster imaging. (2) When a constant keyhole size was utilized, the Dynamic Keyhole technique resulted in the smallest difference of the tumor region compared to the ground truth. Conclusion: The dynamic keyhole is a simple and adaptable technique for clinical applications requiring real-time imaging and tumor monitoring such as MRI guided radiotherapy. Based on the results from this study, the dynamic keyhole method could increase the imaging frequency by a factor of five compared with full k

  9. XD-GRASP: Golden-angle radial MRI with reconstruction of extra motion-state dimensions using compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li; Axel, Leon; Chandarana, Hersh; Block, Kai Tobias; Sodickson, Daniel K; Otazo, Ricardo

    2016-02-01

    To develop a novel framework for free-breathing MRI called XD-GRASP, which sorts dynamic data into extra motion-state dimensions using the self-navigation properties of radial imaging and reconstructs the multidimensional dataset using compressed sensing. Radial k-space data are continuously acquired using the golden-angle sampling scheme and sorted into multiple motion-states based on respiratory and/or cardiac motion signals derived directly from the data. The resulting undersampled multidimensional dataset is reconstructed using a compressed sensing approach that exploits sparsity along the new dynamic dimensions. The performance of XD-GRASP is demonstrated for free-breathing three-dimensional (3D) abdominal imaging, two-dimensional (2D) cardiac cine imaging and 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI of the liver, comparing against reconstructions without motion sorting in both healthy volunteers and patients. XD-GRASP separates respiratory motion from cardiac motion in cardiac imaging, and respiratory motion from contrast enhancement in liver DCE-MRI, which improves image quality and reduces motion-blurring artifacts. XD-GRASP represents a new use of sparsity for motion compensation and a novel way to handle motions in the context of a continuous acquisition paradigm. Instead of removing or correcting motion, extra motion-state dimensions are reconstructed, which improves image quality and also offers new physiological information of potential clinical value. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. [The further development of the 3D-MRI reconstruction technic for the head-neck area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grevers, G; Wilimzig, C; Vogl, T; Laub, G

    1990-12-01

    Twenty-one healthy volunteers and seventeen patients with head and neck lesions were examined with 3D MR imaging since the end of 1988. A new kind of reconstruction mode was used, which shows the structures of the region of interest by overlaying a predetermined window within the three-dimensional reconstruction of the head. Using this mode, the morphology of the lesion could be evaluated more precisely than by using individual two-dimensional slices. With regard to preoperative surgery planning, the previous results were insufficient. With the new development and increased capacity of the MRI-technique and improvement of the reconstruction mode it is now possible to "cut" several slices in different orientations into the head achieving higher resolution of the images. The innovation of the method and its actual clinical value is discussed in the example of a meningioma of the sphenoid which has been examined by both reconstruction modes.

  11. Optimization and validation of accelerated golden-angle radial sparse MRI reconstruction with self-calibrating GRAPPA operator gridding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkert, Thomas; Tian, Ye; Huang, Chenchan; DiBella, Edward V R; Chandarana, Hersh; Feng, Li

    2018-07-01

    Golden-angle radial sparse parallel (GRASP) MRI reconstruction requires gridding and regridding to transform data between radial and Cartesian k-space. These operations are repeatedly performed in each iteration, which makes the reconstruction computationally demanding. This work aimed to accelerate GRASP reconstruction using self-calibrating GRAPPA operator gridding (GROG) and to validate its performance in clinical imaging. GROG is an alternative gridding approach based on parallel imaging, in which k-space data acquired on a non-Cartesian grid are shifted onto a Cartesian k-space grid using information from multicoil arrays. For iterative non-Cartesian image reconstruction, GROG is performed only once as a preprocessing step. Therefore, the subsequent iterative reconstruction can be performed directly in Cartesian space, which significantly reduces computational burden. Here, a framework combining GROG with GRASP (GROG-GRASP) is first optimized and then compared with standard GRASP reconstruction in 22 prostate patients. GROG-GRASP achieved approximately 4.2-fold reduction in reconstruction time compared with GRASP (∼333 min versus ∼78 min) while maintaining image quality (structural similarity index ≈ 0.97 and root mean square error ≈ 0.007). Visual image quality assessment by two experienced radiologists did not show significant differences between the two reconstruction schemes. With a graphics processing unit implementation, image reconstruction time can be further reduced to approximately 14 min. The GRASP reconstruction can be substantially accelerated using GROG. This framework is promising toward broader clinical application of GRASP and other iterative non-Cartesian reconstruction methods. Magn Reson Med 80:286-293, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project: Technical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, B.A.; Freshley, M.D.; Gilbert, R.O.; Haerer, H.A.; Morgan, L.G.; Rhoads, R.E.; Woodruff, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    Historical measurements and current assessment techniques are being combined to estimate potential radiation doses to people from radioactive releases to the air, the Columbia River, soils, and ground water at the Hanford Site since 1944. Environmental contamination from these releases has been monitored, at varying levels of detail, for 45 yr. Phase I of the Hanford Environmental Reconstruction Project will estimate the magnitude of potential doses, their areal extends, and their associated uncertainties. The Phase I study area comprises 10 counties in eastern Washington and northern Oregon, within a 100-mi radius of the site, including a stretch of the Columbia River that was most significantly affected. These counties contain a range of projected and measured contaminant levels, environmental exposure pathways, and population groups. Phase I dose estimates are being developed for the periods 1944 through 1947 for air pathways and 1964 through 1966 for river pathways. Important radionuclide/pathway combinations include fission products, such as 131 I, in milk for early atmospheric releases and activation products, such as 32 P and 65 Zn, in fish for releases to the river. Potential doses range over several orders of magnitude within the study area. We will expand the time periods and study are in three successive phases, as warranted by results of Phase I

  13. A comparative study between matched and mis-matched projection/back projection pairs used with ASIRT reconstruction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedouar, R.; Zarrad, B.

    2010-01-01

    For algebraic reconstruction techniques both forward and back projection operators are needed. The ability to perform accurate reconstruction relies fundamentally on the forward projection and back projection methods which are usually, the transpose of each other. Even though the mis-matched pairs may introduce additional errors during the iterative process, the usefulness of mis-matched projector/back projector pairs has been proved in image reconstruction. This work investigates the performance of matched and mis-matched reconstruction pairs using popular forward projectors and their transposes when used in reconstruction tasks with additive simultaneous iterative reconstruction techniques (ASIRT) in a parallel beam approach. Simulated noiseless phantoms are used to compare the performance of the investigated pairs in terms of the root mean squared errors (RMSE) which are calculated between reconstructed slices and the reference in different regions. Results show that mis-matched projection/back projection pairs can promise more accuracy of reconstructed images than matched ones. The forward projection operator performance seems independent of the choice of the back projection operator and vice versa.

  14. A comparative study between matched and mis-matched projection/back projection pairs used with ASIRT reconstruction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guedouar, R., E-mail: raja_guedouar@yahoo.f [Higher School of Health Sciences and Techniques of Monastir, Av. Avicenne, 5060 Monastir, B.P. 128 (Tunisia); Zarrad, B., E-mail: boubakerzarrad@yahoo.f [Higher School of Health Sciences and Techniques of Monastir, Av. Avicenne, 5060 Monastir, B.P. 128 (Tunisia)

    2010-07-21

    For algebraic reconstruction techniques both forward and back projection operators are needed. The ability to perform accurate reconstruction relies fundamentally on the forward projection and back projection methods which are usually, the transpose of each other. Even though the mis-matched pairs may introduce additional errors during the iterative process, the usefulness of mis-matched projector/back projector pairs has been proved in image reconstruction. This work investigates the performance of matched and mis-matched reconstruction pairs using popular forward projectors and their transposes when used in reconstruction tasks with additive simultaneous iterative reconstruction techniques (ASIRT) in a parallel beam approach. Simulated noiseless phantoms are used to compare the performance of the investigated pairs in terms of the root mean squared errors (RMSE) which are calculated between reconstructed slices and the reference in different regions. Results show that mis-matched projection/back projection pairs can promise more accuracy of reconstructed images than matched ones. The forward projection operator performance seems independent of the choice of the back projection operator and vice versa.

  15. A Unifying model of perfusion and motion applied to reconstruction of sparsely sampled free-breathing myocardial perfusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik; Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Larsen, Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    The clinical potential of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is currently limited by respiratory induced motion of the heart. This paper presents a unifying model of perfusion and motion in which respiratory motion becomes an integral part of myocardial perfusion...... quantification. Hence, the need for tedious manual motion correction prior to perfusion quantification is avoided. In addition, we demonstrate that the proposed framework facilitates the process of reconstructing DCEMRI from sparsely sampled data in the presence of respiratory motion. The paper focuses primarily...... on the underlying theory of the proposed framework, but shows in vivo results of respiratory motion correction and simulation results of reconstructing sparsely sampled data....

  16. High-resolution whole-brain DCE-MRI using constrained reconstruction: Prospective clinical evaluation in brain tumor patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yi; Zhu, Yinghua; Lingala, Sajan Goud; Nayak, Krishna; Lebel, R. Marc; Shiroishi, Mark S.; Law, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To clinically evaluate a highly accelerated T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI technique that provides high spatial resolution and whole-brain coverage via undersampling and constrained reconstruction with multiple sparsity constraints. Methods: Conventional (rate-2 SENSE) and experimental DCE-MRI (rate-30) scans were performed 20 minutes apart in 15 brain tumor patients. The conventional clinical DCE-MRI had voxel dimensions 0.9 × 1.3 × 7.0 mm 3 , FOV 22 × 22 × 4.2 cm 3 , and the experimental DCE-MRI had voxel dimensions 0.9 × 0.9 × 1.9 mm 3 , and broader coverage 22 × 22 × 19 cm 3 . Temporal resolution was 5 s for both protocols. Time-resolved images and blood–brain barrier permeability maps were qualitatively evaluated by two radiologists. Results: The experimental DCE-MRI scans showed no loss of qualitative information in any of the cases, while achieving substantially higher spatial resolution and whole-brain spatial coverage. Average qualitative scores (from 0 to 3) were 2.1 for the experimental scans and 1.1 for the conventional clinical scans. Conclusions: The proposed DCE-MRI approach provides clinically superior image quality with higher spatial resolution and coverage than currently available approaches. These advantages may allow comprehensive permeability mapping in the brain, which is especially valuable in the setting of large lesions or multiple lesions spread throughout the brain.

  17. Model-free and analytical EAP reconstruction via spherical polar Fourier diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian; Ghosh, Aurobrata; Jiang, Tianzi; Deriche, Rachid

    2010-01-01

    How to estimate the diffusion Ensemble Average Propagator (EAP) from the DWI signals in q-space is an open problem in diffusion MRI field. Many methods were proposed to estimate the Orientation Distribution Function (ODF) that is used to describe the fiber direction. However, ODF is just one of the features of the EAP. Compared with ODF, EAP has the full information about the diffusion process which reflects the complex tissue micro-structure. Diffusion Orientation Transform (DOT) and Diffusion Spectrum Imaging (DSI) are two important methods to estimate the EAP from the signal. However, DOT is based on mono-exponential assumption and DSI needs a lot of samplings and very large b values. In this paper, we propose Spherical Polar Fourier Imaging (SPFI), a novel model-free fast robust analytical EAP reconstruction method, which almost does not need any assumption of data and does not need too many samplings. SPFI naturally combines the DWI signals with different b-values. It is an analytical linear transformation from the q-space signal to the EAP profile represented by Spherical Harmonics (SH). We validated the proposed methods in synthetic data, phantom data and real data. It works well in all experiments, especially for the data with low SNR, low anisotropy, and non-exponential decay.

  18. The reconstruction of HT-7 superconducting tokamak and the present status of HT-7U project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, P.D.

    2000-01-01

    The first Chinese superconducting tokamak HT-7 was reconstructed from T-7. The main purposes of reconstruction are to improve the accessibility of the device and to provide a possibility of long pulse operation with high performance. The reconstruction has been done successfully. The HT-7U project has been approved and funded as a National Project, the engineering design and R and D are on the way. (author)

  19. A reconstruction algorithm for coherent scatter computed tomography based on filtered back-projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevendaal, U. van; Schlomka, J.-P.; Harding, A.; Grass, M.

    2003-01-01

    Coherent scatter computed tomography (CSCT) is a reconstructive x-ray imaging technique that yields the spatially resolved coherent-scatter form factor of the investigated object. Reconstruction from coherently scattered x-rays is commonly done using algebraic reconstruction techniques (ART). In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on filtered back-projection. For the first time, a three-dimensional (3D) filtered back-projection technique using curved 3D back-projection lines is applied to two-dimensional coherent scatter projection data. The proposed algorithm is tested with simulated projection data as well as with projection data acquired with a demonstrator setup similar to a multi-line CT scanner geometry. While yielding comparable image quality as ART reconstruction, the modified 3D filtered back-projection algorithm is about two orders of magnitude faster. In contrast to iterative reconstruction schemes, it has the advantage that subfield-of-view reconstruction becomes feasible. This allows a selective reconstruction of the coherent-scatter form factor for a region of interest. The proposed modified 3D filtered back-projection algorithm is a powerful reconstruction technique to be implemented in a CSCT scanning system. This method gives coherent scatter CT the potential of becoming a competitive modality for medical imaging or nondestructive testing

  20. Computed Tomography Image Quality Evaluation of a New Iterative Reconstruction Algorithm in the Abdomen (Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction-V) a Comparison With Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction, Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction, and Filtered Back Projection Reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenberger, Martin H; Wagner-Bartak, Nicolaus A; Gupta, Shiva; Liu, Xinming; Yap, Ramon Q; Sun, Jia; Tamm, Eric P; Jensen, Corey T

    The purpose of this study was to compare abdominopelvic computed tomography images reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V (ASIR-V) with model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo 3.0), ASIR, and filtered back projection (FBP). Abdominopelvic computed tomography scans for 36 patients (26 males and 10 females) were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR (80%), Veo 3.0, and ASIR-V (30%, 60%, 90%). Mean ± SD patient age was 32 ± 10 years with mean ± SD body mass index of 26.9 ± 4.4 kg/m. Images were reviewed by 2 independent readers in a blinded, randomized fashion. Hounsfield unit, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) values were calculated for each reconstruction algorithm for further comparison. Phantom evaluation of low-contrast detectability (LCD) and high-contrast resolution was performed. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V 30%, ASIR-V 60%, and ASIR 80% were generally superior qualitatively compared with ASIR-V 90%, Veo 3.0, and FBP (P ASIR-V 60% with respective CNR values of 5.54 ± 2.39, 8.78 ± 3.15, and 3.49 ± 1.77 (P ASIR 80% had the best and worst spatial resolution, respectively. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V 30% and ASIR-V 60% provided the best combination of qualitative and quantitative performance. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction 80% was equivalent qualitatively, but demonstrated inferior spatial resolution and LCD.

  1. Neural network algorithm for image reconstruction using the grid friendly projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cierniak, R.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The presented paper describes a development of original approach to the reconstruction problem using a recurrent neural network. Particularly, the 'grid-friendly' angles of performed projections are selected according to the discrete Radon transform (DRT) concept to decrease the number of projections required. The methodology of our approach is consistent with analytical reconstruction algorithms. Reconstruction problem is reformulated in our approach to optimization problem. This problem is solved in present concept using method based on the maximum likelihood methodology. The reconstruction algorithm proposed in this work is consequently adapted for more practical discrete fan beam projections. Computer simulation results show that the neural network reconstruction algorithm designed to work in this way improves obtained results and outperforms conventional methods in reconstructed image quality. (author)

  2. Real-time image reconstruction and display system for MRI using a high-speed personal computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haishi, T; Kose, K

    1998-09-01

    A real-time NMR image reconstruction and display system was developed using a high-speed personal computer and optimized for the 32-bit multitasking Microsoft Windows 95 operating system. The system was operated at various CPU clock frequencies by changing the motherboard clock frequency and the processor/bus frequency ratio. When the Pentium CPU was used at the 200 MHz clock frequency, the reconstruction time for one 128 x 128 pixel image was 48 ms and that for the image display on the enlarged 256 x 256 pixel window was about 8 ms. NMR imaging experiments were performed with three fast imaging sequences (FLASH, multishot EPI, and one-shot EPI) to demonstrate the ability of the real-time system. It was concluded that in most cases, high-speed PC would be the best choice for the image reconstruction and display system for real-time MRI. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  3. On proton CT reconstruction using MVCT-converted virtual proton projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Dongxu; Mackie, T. Rockwell; Tome, Wolfgang A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Morgridge Institute of Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53715 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Oncophysics Institute, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: To describe a novel methodology of converting megavoltage x-ray projections into virtual proton projections that are otherwise missing due to the proton range limit. These converted virtual proton projections can be used in the reconstruction of proton computed tomography (pCT). Methods: Relations exist between proton projections and multispectral megavoltage x-ray projections for human tissue. Based on these relations, these tissues can be categorized into: (a) adipose tissue; (b) nonadipose soft tissues; and (c) bone. These three tissue categories can be visibly identified on a regular megavoltage x-ray computed tomography (MVCT) image. With an MVCT image and its projection data available, the x-ray projections through heterogeneous anatomy can be converted to the corresponding proton projections using predetermined calibration curves for individual materials, aided by a coarse segmentation on the x-ray CT image. To show the feasibility of this approach, mathematical simulations were carried out. The converted proton projections, plotted on a proton sinogram, were compared to the simulated ground truth. Proton stopping power images were reconstructed using either the virtual proton projections only or a blend of physically available proton projections and virtual proton projections that make up for those missing due to the range limit. These images were compared to a reference image reconstructed from theoretically calculated proton projections. Results: The converted virtual projections had an uncertainty of {+-}0.8% compared to the calculated ground truth. Proton stopping power images reconstructed using a blend of converted virtual projections (48%) and physically available projections (52%) had an uncertainty of {+-}0.86% compared with that reconstructed from theoretically calculated projections. Reconstruction solely from converted virtual proton projections had an uncertainty of {+-}1.1% compared with that reconstructed from theoretical projections

  4. On proton CT reconstruction using MVCT-converted virtual proton projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dongxu; Mackie, T. Rockwell; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a novel methodology of converting megavoltage x-ray projections into virtual proton projections that are otherwise missing due to the proton range limit. These converted virtual proton projections can be used in the reconstruction of proton computed tomography (pCT). Methods: Relations exist between proton projections and multispectral megavoltage x-ray projections for human tissue. Based on these relations, these tissues can be categorized into: (a) adipose tissue; (b) nonadipose soft tissues; and (c) bone. These three tissue categories can be visibly identified on a regular megavoltage x-ray computed tomography (MVCT) image. With an MVCT image and its projection data available, the x-ray projections through heterogeneous anatomy can be converted to the corresponding proton projections using predetermined calibration curves for individual materials, aided by a coarse segmentation on the x-ray CT image. To show the feasibility of this approach, mathematical simulations were carried out. The converted proton projections, plotted on a proton sinogram, were compared to the simulated ground truth. Proton stopping power images were reconstructed using either the virtual proton projections only or a blend of physically available proton projections and virtual proton projections that make up for those missing due to the range limit. These images were compared to a reference image reconstructed from theoretically calculated proton projections. Results: The converted virtual projections had an uncertainty of ±0.8% compared to the calculated ground truth. Proton stopping power images reconstructed using a blend of converted virtual projections (48%) and physically available projections (52%) had an uncertainty of ±0.86% compared with that reconstructed from theoretically calculated projections. Reconstruction solely from converted virtual proton projections had an uncertainty of ±1.1% compared with that reconstructed from theoretical projections. If

  5. Reconstruction of Undersampled Big Dynamic MRI Data Using Non-Convex Low-Rank and Sparsity Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Wen Liu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been extensively utilized for enhancing medical living environment visualization, however, in clinical practice it often suffers from long data acquisition times. Dynamic imaging essentially reconstructs the visual image from raw (k,t-space measurements, commonly referred to as big data. The purpose of this work is to accelerate big medical data acquisition in dynamic MRI by developing a non-convex minimization framework. In particular, to overcome the inherent speed limitation, both non-convex low-rank and sparsity constraints were combined to accelerate the dynamic imaging. However, the non-convex constraints make the dynamic reconstruction problem difficult to directly solve through the commonly-used numerical methods. To guarantee solution efficiency and stability, a numerical algorithm based on Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers (ADMM is proposed to solve the resulting non-convex optimization problem. ADMM decomposes the original complex optimization problem into several simple sub-problems. Each sub-problem has a closed-form solution or could be efficiently solved using existing numerical methods. It has been proven that the quality of images reconstructed from fewer measurements can be significantly improved using non-convex minimization. Numerous experiments have been conducted on two in vivo cardiac datasets to compare the proposed method with several state-of-the-art imaging methods. Experimental results illustrated that the proposed method could guarantee the superior imaging performance in terms of quantitative and visual image quality assessments.

  6. MRI-based multiscale models for the hemodynamic and structural evaluation of surgically reconstructed aortic arches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pittaccio, S; Migliavacca, F; Balossino, R

    2007-01-01

    ) geometries of a porcine aortic arch were derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images. Inlet conditions were derived from MRI velocimetry. A multiscale approach was used for the imposition of outlet conditions, wherein a lumped parameter net provided an active afterload. Evidence was found that ring...

  7. Angular integration and inter-projection correlation effects in CT reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, C.R.; Pele, N.J.

    1987-01-01

    CT reconstruction algorithms require snap-shot projections of an object. In order to minimize scan times, CT scanners rotate continuously which, in turn, prevents the acquisition of snap-shot projections. Acquired projections are integrals over angular position and may be correlated inter-projection. This paper shows that angular integration and inter-projection correlation introduce a radially dependent degradation of the spatial resolution and cause the image noise to vary non-linearly with radial position

  8. MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus; Gianolio, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MRI followed by a survey on the major classes of MRI contrast agents (CA), their modes of action, and some of the most significative applications. The two more established classes of MRI-CA are represented by paramagnetic...... been attained that markedly increase the number and typology of systems with CEST properties. Currently much attention is also devoted to hyperpolarized molecules that display a sensitivity enhancement sufficient for their direct exploitation for the formation of the MR image. A real breakthrough...

  9. Surface-based reconstruction and diffusion MRI in the assessment of gray and white matter damage in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffini, Matteo; Bergsland, Niels; LaganÃ, Marcella; Tavazzi, Eleonora; Tortorella, Paola; Rovaris, Marco; Baselli, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Despite advances in the application of nonconventional MRI techniques in furthering the understanding of multiple sclerosis pathogenic mechanisms, there are still many unanswered questions, such as the relationship between gray and white matter damage. We applied a combination of advanced surface-based reconstruction and diffusion tensor imaging techniques to address this issue. We found significant relationships between white matter tract integrity indices and corresponding cortical structures. Our results suggest a direct link between damage in white and gray matter and contribute to the notion of gray matter loss relating to clinical disability.

  10. Can the Diagnostics of Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Lesions Be Improved by MRI-Based Soft-Tissue Reconstruction? An Imaging-Based Workup and Case Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Niels; Hirschfeld, Ulrich; Strunz, Hendrik; Werner, Michael; Wolfskämpf, Thomas; Löffler, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Introduction . The triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) provides both mobility and stability of the radiocarpal joint. TFCC lesions are difficult to diagnose due to the complex anatomy. The standard treatment for TFCC lesions is arthroscopy, posing surgery-related risks onto the patients. This feasibility study aimed at developing a workup for soft-tissue reconstruction using clinical imaging, to verify these results in retrospective patient data. Methods . Microcomputed tomography ( μ -CT), 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and plastination were used to visualize the TFCC in cadaveric specimens applying segmentation-based 3D reconstruction. This approach further trialed the MRI dataset of a patient with minor radiological TFCC alterations but persistent pain. Results . TFCC reconstruction was impossible using μ -CT only but feasible using MRI, resulting in an appreciation of its substructures, as seen in the plastinates. Applying this approach allowed for visualizing a Palmer 2C lesion in a patient, confirming ex postum the arthroscopy findings, being markedly different from MRI (Palmer 1B). Discussion . This preliminary study showed that image-based TFCC reconstruction may help to identify pathologies invisible in standard MRI. The combined approach of μ -CT, MRI, and plastination allowed for a three-dimensional appreciation of the TFCC. Image quality and time expenditure limit the approach's usefulness as a diagnostic tool.

  11. Can the Diagnostics of Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Lesions Be Improved by MRI-Based Soft-Tissue Reconstruction? An Imaging-Based Workup and Case Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Hammer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC provides both mobility and stability of the radiocarpal joint. TFCC lesions are difficult to diagnose due to the complex anatomy. The standard treatment for TFCC lesions is arthroscopy, posing surgery-related risks onto the patients. This feasibility study aimed at developing a workup for soft-tissue reconstruction using clinical imaging, to verify these results in retrospective patient data. Methods. Microcomputed tomography (μ-CT, 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and plastination were used to visualize the TFCC in cadaveric specimens applying segmentation-based 3D reconstruction. This approach further trialed the MRI dataset of a patient with minor radiological TFCC alterations but persistent pain. Results. TFCC reconstruction was impossible using μ-CT only but feasible using MRI, resulting in an appreciation of its substructures, as seen in the plastinates. Applying this approach allowed for visualizing a Palmer 2C lesion in a patient, confirming ex postum the arthroscopy findings, being markedly different from MRI (Palmer 1B. Discussion. This preliminary study showed that image-based TFCC reconstruction may help to identify pathologies invisible in standard MRI. The combined approach of μ-CT, MRI, and plastination allowed for a three-dimensional appreciation of the TFCC. Image quality and time expenditure limit the approach’s usefulness as a diagnostic tool.

  12. MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the room. Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items can distort the images. Removable dental work ... an MRI can cause heart pacemakers and other implants not to work as well. The magnets can ...

  13. Iterative reconstruction with attenuation compensation from cone-beam projections acquired via nonplanar orbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, G.L.; Weng, Y.; Gullberg, G.T.

    1997-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging with cone-beam collimators provides improved sensitivity and spatial resolution for imaging small objects with large field-of-view detectors. It is known that Tuy's cone-beam data sufficiency condition must be met to obtain artifact-free reconstructions. Even though Tuy's condition was derived for an attenuation-free situation, the authors hypothesize that an artifact-free reconstruction can be obtained even if the cone-beam data are attenuated, provided the imaging orbit satisfies Tuy's condition and the exact attenuation map is known. In the authors' studies, emission data are acquired using nonplanar circle-and-line orbits to acquire cone-beam data for tomographic reconstructions. An extended iterative ML-EM (maximum likelihood-expectation maximization) reconstruction algorithm is derived and used to reconstruct projection data with either a pre-acquired or assumed attenuation map. Quantitative accuracy of the attenuation corrected emission reconstruction is significantly improved

  14. Intensity-based bayesian framework for image reconstruction from sparse projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashed, E.A.; Kudo, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a Bayesian framework for iterative image reconstruction from projection data measured over a limited number of views. The classical Nyquist sampling rule yields the minimum number of projection views required for accurate reconstruction. However, challenges exist in many medical and industrial imaging applications in which the projection data is undersampled. Classical analytical reconstruction methods such as filtered backprojection (FBP) are not a good choice for use in such cases because the data undersampling in the angular range introduces aliasing and streak artifacts that degrade lesion detectability. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian framework for maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM)-based iterative reconstruction methods that incorporates a priori knowledge obtained from expected intensity information. The proposed framework is based on the fact that, in tomographic imaging, it is often possible to expect a set of intensity values of the reconstructed object with relatively high accuracy. The image reconstruction cost function is modified to include the l 1 norm distance to the a priori known information. The proposed method has the potential to regularize the solution to reduce artifacts without missing lesions that cannot be expected from the a priori information. Numerical studies showed a significant improvement in image quality and lesion detectability under the condition of highly undersampled projection data. (author)

  15. Comparison of tomography reconstruction by maximum entropy and filtered retro projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdala, F.J.P.; Simpson, D.M.; Roberty, N.C.

    1992-01-01

    The tomographic reconstruction with few projections is studied, comparing the maximum entropy method with filtered retro projection. Simulations with and without the presence of noise and also with the presence of an object of high density inside of the skull are showed. (C.G.C.)

  16. Pain following double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: Correlation with morphological graft findings and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y.-C.; Mhuircheartaigh, J.N.; Cheung, Y.-C.; Juan, Y.-H.; Chiu, C.-H.; Yeh, W.-L.; Wu, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To determine the relationship between knee pain following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft placement with morphological graft findings and dynamic contrast enhancement as assessed at MRI. Material and methods: Following institutional review board approval, 37 consecutive patients with double-bundle ACL reconstruction were enrolled. Thirteen patients had pain and 24 were asymptomatic. Imaging was performed using a 1.5 T MRI machine an average of 7.6 months after surgery. Graft-related (increase signal intensity, abnormal orientation, discontinuity, cystic degeneration, anterior translation of lateral tibia, arthrofibrosis), and non-graft related causes of knee pain (meniscal tear, cartilage injury, loose bodies, and synovitis) were evaluated. During dynamic contrast enhancement analysis, peak enhancement (ePeak) was calculated by placing a region of interest at the osteoligamentous interface of each bundle. Student's t-test was used for continuous variables analysis and chi-square or Fisher's exact test was used for categorical variables analysis. Results: There was no difference between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients regarding morphological graft-related or non-graft-related causes of knee pain. For dynamic contrast enhancement analysis, symptomatic patients had significantly lower ePeak values than asymptomatic patients in the anteromedial (p = 0.008) and posterolateral (p = 0.001) bundles or when using the higher ePeak value in either bundle (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Morphological ACL graft findings as assessed at MRI could not be used to distinguish between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. However, lower ePeak values had a significant association with knee pain. This may indicate poor neovascularization of the graft, potentially leading to graft failure. - Highlights: • Morphologic graft findings of MRI are poorly associated with knee pain. • Lower contrast enhancement values are significantly associated with knee pain

  17. PRIM: An Efficient Preconditioning Iterative Reweighted Least Squares Method for Parallel Brain MRI Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zheng; Wang, Sheng; Li, Yeqing; Zhu, Feiyun; Huang, Junzhou

    2018-02-08

    The most recent history of parallel Magnetic Resonance Imaging (pMRI) has in large part been devoted to finding ways to reduce acquisition time. While joint total variation (JTV) regularized model has been demonstrated as a powerful tool in increasing sampling speed for pMRI, however, the major bottleneck is the inefficiency of the optimization method. While all present state-of-the-art optimizations for the JTV model could only reach a sublinear convergence rate, in this paper, we squeeze the performance by proposing a linear-convergent optimization method for the JTV model. The proposed method is based on the Iterative Reweighted Least Squares algorithm. Due to the complexity of the tangled JTV objective, we design a novel preconditioner to further accelerate the proposed method. Extensive experiments demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed algorithm for pMRI regarding both accuracy and efficiency compared with state-of-the-art methods.

  18. Quantitative estimation of brain atrophy and function with PET and MRI two-dimensional projection images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Reiko; Uemura, Koji; Uchiyama, Akihiko; Toyama, Hinako; Ishii, Kenji; Senda, Michio

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to estimate the extent of atrophy and the decline in brain function objectively and quantitatively. Two-dimensional (2D) projection images of three-dimensional (3D) transaxial images of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were made by means of the Mollweide method which keeps the area of the brain surface. A correlation image was generated between 2D projection images of MRI and cerebral blood flow (CBF) or 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET images and the sulcus was extracted from the correlation image clustered by K-means method. Furthermore, the extent of atrophy was evaluated from the extracted sulcus on 2D-projection MRI and the cerebral cortical function such as blood flow or glucose metabolic rate was assessed in the cortex excluding sulcus on 2D-projection PET image, and then the relationship between the cerebral atrophy and function was evaluated. This method was applied to the two groups, the young and the aged normal subjects, and the relationship between the age and the rate of atrophy or the cerebral blood flow was investigated. This method was also applied to FDG-PET and MRI studies in the normal controls and in patients with corticobasal degeneration. The mean rate of atrophy in the aged group was found to be higher than that in the young. The mean value and the variance of the cerebral blood flow for the young are greater than those of the aged. The sulci were similarly extracted using either CBF or FDG PET images. The purposed method using 2-D projection images of MRI and PET is clinically useful for quantitative assessment of atrophic change and functional disorder of cerebral cortex. (author)

  19. SYRMEP Tomo Project: a graphical user interface for customizing CT reconstruction workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Francesco; Massimi, Lorenzo; Fratini, Michela; Dreossi, Diego; Billé, Fulvio; Accardo, Agostino; Pugliese, Roberto; Cedola, Alessia

    2017-01-01

    When considering the acquisition of experimental synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray CT data, the reconstruction workflow cannot be limited to the essential computational steps of flat fielding and filtered back projection (FBP). More refined image processing is often required, usually to compensate artifacts and enhance the quality of the reconstructed images. In principle, it would be desirable to optimize the reconstruction workflow at the facility during the experiment (beamtime). However, several practical factors affect the image reconstruction part of the experiment and users are likely to conclude the beamtime with sub-optimal reconstructed images. Through an example of application, this article presents SYRMEP Tomo Project (STP), an open-source software tool conceived to let users design custom CT reconstruction workflows. STP has been designed for post-beamtime (off-line use) and for a new reconstruction of past archived data at user's home institution where simple computing resources are available. Releases of the software can be downloaded at the Elettra Scientific Computing group GitHub repository https://github.com/ElettraSciComp/STP-Gui.

  20. PR-CALC: A Program for the Reconstruction of NMR Spectra from Projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggins, Brian E.; Zhou Pei

    2006-01-01

    Projection-reconstruction NMR (PR-NMR) has attracted growing attention as a method for collecting multidimensional NMR data rapidly. The PR-NMR procedure involves measuring lower-dimensional projections of a higher-dimensional spectrum, which are then used for the mathematical reconstruction of the full spectrum. We describe here the program PR-CALC, for the reconstruction of NMR spectra from projection data. This program implements a number of reconstruction algorithms, highly optimized to achieve maximal performance, and manages the reconstruction process automatically, producing either full spectra or subsets, such as regions or slices, as requested. The ability to obtain subsets allows large spectra to be analyzed by reconstructing and examining only those subsets containing peaks, offering considerable savings in processing time and storage space. PR-CALC is straightforward to use, and integrates directly into the conventional pipeline for data processing and analysis. It was written in standard C+ + and should run on any platform. The organization is flexible, and permits easy extension of capabilities, as well as reuse in new software. PR-CALC should facilitate the widespread utilization of PR-NMR in biomedical research

  1. An eigenvalue approach for the automatic scaling of unknowns in model-based reconstructions: Application to real-time phase-contrast flow MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhengguo; Hohage, Thorsten; Kalentev, Oleksandr; Joseph, Arun A; Wang, Xiaoqing; Voit, Dirk; Merboldt, K Dietmar; Frahm, Jens

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an automatic method for the scaling of unknowns in model-based nonlinear inverse reconstructions and to evaluate its application to real-time phase-contrast (RT-PC) flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Model-based MRI reconstructions of parametric maps which describe a physical or physiological function require the solution of a nonlinear inverse problem, because the list of unknowns in the extended MRI signal equation comprises multiple functional parameters and all coil sensitivity profiles. Iterative solutions therefore rely on an appropriate scaling of unknowns to numerically balance partial derivatives and regularization terms. The scaling of unknowns emerges as a self-adjoint and positive-definite matrix which is expressible by its maximal eigenvalue and solved by power iterations. The proposed method is applied to RT-PC flow MRI based on highly undersampled acquisitions. Experimental validations include numerical phantoms providing ground truth and a wide range of human studies in the ascending aorta, carotid arteries, deep veins during muscular exercise and cerebrospinal fluid during deep respiration. For RT-PC flow MRI, model-based reconstructions with automatic scaling not only offer velocity maps with high spatiotemporal acuity and much reduced phase noise, but also ensure fast convergence as well as accurate and precise velocities for all conditions tested, i.e. for different velocity ranges, vessel sizes and the simultaneous presence of signals with velocity aliasing. In summary, the proposed automatic scaling of unknowns in model-based MRI reconstructions yields quantitatively reliable velocities for RT-PC flow MRI in various experimental scenarios. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Comparison of maximum intensity projection and digitally reconstructed radiographic projection for carotid artery stenosis measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyde, Derek E.; Habets, Damiaan F.; Fox, Allan J.; Gulka, Irene; Kalapos, Paul; Lee, Don H.; Pelz, David M.; Holdsworth, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Digital subtraction angiography is being supplanted by three-dimensional imaging techniques in many clinical applications, leading to extensive use of maximum intensity projection (MIP) images to depict volumetric vascular data. The MIP algorithm produces intensity profiles that are different than conventional angiograms, and can also increase the vessel-to-tissue contrast-to-noise ratio. We evaluated the effect of the MIP algorithm in a clinical application where quantitative vessel measurement is important: internal carotid artery stenosis grading. Three-dimensional computed rotational angiography (CRA) was performed on 26 consecutive symptomatic patients to verify an internal carotid artery stenosis originally found using duplex ultrasound. These volumes of data were visualized using two different postprocessing projection techniques: MIP and digitally reconstructed radiographic (DRR) projection. A DRR is a radiographic image simulating a conventional digitally subtracted angiogram, but it is derived computationally from the same CRA dataset as the MIP. By visualizing a single volume with two different projection techniques, the postprocessing effect of the MIP algorithm is isolated. Vessel measurements were made, according to the NASCET guidelines, and percentage stenosis grades were calculated. The paired t-test was used to determine if the measurement difference between the two techniques was statistically significant. The CRA technique provided an isotropic voxel spacing of 0.38 mm. The MIPs and DRRs had a mean signal-difference-to-noise-ratio of 30:1 and 26:1, respectively. Vessel measurements from MIPs were, on average, 0.17 mm larger than those from DRRs (P<0.0001). The NASCET-type stenosis grades tended to be underestimated on average by 2.4% with the MIP algorithm, although this was not statistically significant (P=0.09). The mean interobserver variability (standard deviation) of both the MIP and DRR images was 0.35 mm. It was concluded that the MIP

  3. GPU accelerated iterative SENSE reconstruction of radial phase encoded whole-heart MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Prieto, Claudia; Atkinson, David

    2010-01-01

    Isotropic whole-heart imaging has become an important protocol in simplifying cardiac MRI. The acquisition time can however be a prohibiting factor. To reduce acquisition times a 3D scheme combining Cartesian sampling in the readout direction with radial sampling in the phase encoding plane was r...... time can be brought to a clinically acceptable level using commodity graphics hardware (GPUs)....

  4. Super-resolution reconstruction in frequency, image, and wavelet domains to reduce through-plane partial voluming in MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholipour, Ali, E-mail: ali.gholipour@childrens.harvard.edu; Afacan, Onur; Scherrer, Benoit; Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Warfield, Simon K. [Department of Radiology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Aganj, Iman [Radiology Department, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02129 and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Sahin, Mustafa [Department of Neurology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To compare and evaluate the use of super-resolution reconstruction (SRR), in frequency, image, and wavelet domains, to reduce through-plane partial voluming effects in magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: The reconstruction of an isotropic high-resolution image from multiple thick-slice scans has been investigated through techniques in frequency, image, and wavelet domains. Experiments were carried out with thick-slice T2-weighted fast spin echo sequence on the Academic College of Radiology MRI phantom, where the reconstructed images were compared to a reference high-resolution scan using peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), structural similarity image metric (SSIM), mutual information (MI), and the mean absolute error (MAE) of image intensity profiles. The application of super-resolution reconstruction was then examined in retrospective processing of clinical neuroimages of ten pediatric patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) to reduce through-plane partial voluming for improved 3D delineation and visualization of thin radial bands of white matter abnormalities. Results: Quantitative evaluation results show improvements in all evaluation metrics through super-resolution reconstruction in the frequency, image, and wavelet domains, with the highest values obtained from SRR in the image domain. The metric values for image-domain SRR versus the original axial, coronal, and sagittal images were PSNR = 32.26 vs 32.22, 32.16, 30.65; SSIM = 0.931 vs 0.922, 0.924, 0.918; MI = 0.871 vs 0.842, 0.844, 0.831; and MAE = 5.38 vs 7.34, 7.06, 6.19. All similarity metrics showed high correlations with expert ranking of image resolution with MI showing the highest correlation at 0.943. Qualitative assessment of the neuroimages of ten TSC patients through in-plane and out-of-plane visualization of structures showed the extent of partial voluming effect in a real clinical scenario and its reduction using SRR. Blinded expert evaluation of image resolution in

  5. Super-resolution reconstruction in frequency, image, and wavelet domains to reduce through-plane partial voluming in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gholipour, Ali; Afacan, Onur; Scherrer, Benoit; Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Warfield, Simon K.; Aganj, Iman; Sahin, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare and evaluate the use of super-resolution reconstruction (SRR), in frequency, image, and wavelet domains, to reduce through-plane partial voluming effects in magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: The reconstruction of an isotropic high-resolution image from multiple thick-slice scans has been investigated through techniques in frequency, image, and wavelet domains. Experiments were carried out with thick-slice T2-weighted fast spin echo sequence on the Academic College of Radiology MRI phantom, where the reconstructed images were compared to a reference high-resolution scan using peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), structural similarity image metric (SSIM), mutual information (MI), and the mean absolute error (MAE) of image intensity profiles. The application of super-resolution reconstruction was then examined in retrospective processing of clinical neuroimages of ten pediatric patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) to reduce through-plane partial voluming for improved 3D delineation and visualization of thin radial bands of white matter abnormalities. Results: Quantitative evaluation results show improvements in all evaluation metrics through super-resolution reconstruction in the frequency, image, and wavelet domains, with the highest values obtained from SRR in the image domain. The metric values for image-domain SRR versus the original axial, coronal, and sagittal images were PSNR = 32.26 vs 32.22, 32.16, 30.65; SSIM = 0.931 vs 0.922, 0.924, 0.918; MI = 0.871 vs 0.842, 0.844, 0.831; and MAE = 5.38 vs 7.34, 7.06, 6.19. All similarity metrics showed high correlations with expert ranking of image resolution with MI showing the highest correlation at 0.943. Qualitative assessment of the neuroimages of ten TSC patients through in-plane and out-of-plane visualization of structures showed the extent of partial voluming effect in a real clinical scenario and its reduction using SRR. Blinded expert evaluation of image resolution in

  6. Isotropic 3D cardiac cine MRI allows efficient sparse segmentation strategies based on 3D surface reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odille, Freddy; Bustin, Aurélien; Liu, Shufang; Chen, Bailiang; Vuissoz, Pierre-André; Felblinger, Jacques; Bonnemains, Laurent

    2018-05-01

    Segmentation of cardiac cine MRI data is routinely used for the volumetric analysis of cardiac function. Conventionally, 2D contours are drawn on short-axis (SAX) image stacks with relatively thick slices (typically 8 mm). Here, an acquisition/reconstruction strategy is used for obtaining isotropic 3D cine datasets; reformatted slices are then used to optimize the manual segmentation workflow. Isotropic 3D cine datasets were obtained from multiple 2D cine stacks (acquired during free-breathing in SAX and long-axis (LAX) orientations) using nonrigid motion correction (cine-GRICS method) and super-resolution. Several manual segmentation strategies were then compared, including conventional SAX segmentation, LAX segmentation in three views only, and combinations of SAX and LAX slices. An implicit B-spline surface reconstruction algorithm is proposed to reconstruct the left ventricular cavity surface from the sparse set of 2D contours. All tested sparse segmentation strategies were in good agreement, with Dice scores above 0.9 despite using fewer slices (3-6 sparse slices instead of 8-10 contiguous SAX slices). When compared to independent phase-contrast flow measurements, stroke volumes computed from four or six sparse slices had slightly higher precision than conventional SAX segmentation (error standard deviation of 5.4 mL against 6.1 mL) at the cost of slightly lower accuracy (bias of -1.2 mL against 0.2 mL). Functional parameters also showed a trend to improved precision, including end-diastolic volumes, end-systolic volumes, and ejection fractions). The postprocessing workflow of 3D isotropic cardiac imaging strategies can be optimized using sparse segmentation and 3D surface reconstruction. Magn Reson Med 79:2665-2675, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. Reconstruction of a cone-beam CT image via forward iterative projection matching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, R. Scott; Docef, Alen; Murphy, Martin J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of reconstructing a cone-beam CT (CBCT) image by deformably altering a prior fan-beam CT (FBCT) image such that it matches the anatomy portrayed in the CBCT projection data set. Methods: A prior FBCT image of the patient is assumed to be available as a source image. A CBCT projection data set is obtained and used as a target image set. A parametrized deformation model is applied to the source FBCT image, digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) that emulate the CBCT projection image geometry are calculated and compared to the target CBCT projection data, and the deformation model parameters are adjusted iteratively until the DRRs optimally match the CBCT projection data set. The resulting deformed FBCT image is hypothesized to be an accurate representation of the patient's anatomy imaged by the CBCT system. The process is demonstrated via numerical simulation. A known deformation is applied to a prior FBCT image and used to create a synthetic set of CBCT target projections. The iterative projection matching process is then applied to reconstruct the deformation represented in the synthetic target projections; the reconstructed deformation is then compared to the known deformation. The sensitivity of the process to the number of projections and the DRR/CBCT projection mismatch is explored by systematically adding noise to and perturbing the contrast of the target projections relative to the iterated source DRRs and by reducing the number of projections. Results: When there is no noise or contrast mismatch in the CBCT projection images, a set of 64 projections allows the known deformed CT image to be reconstructed to within a nRMS error of 1% and the known deformation to within a nRMS error of 7%. A CT image nRMS error of less than 4% is maintained at noise levels up to 3% of the mean projection intensity, at which the deformation error is 13%. At 1% noise level, the number of projections can be reduced to 8 while maintaining

  8. Feasibility study of Pridneprovskaya Thermal Power Plant reconstruction project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    With objectives of saving energy and reducing greenhouse gas emission at the Pridneprovskaya power plant in Ukraine, a scrap and build project has been discussed. This project will abolish the unit No.12 among the eight units in the existing coal burning power generation facilities, and install a natural gas burning combined cycle plant comprising of three units each with an output of 100 MW. The new plant facilities will consist of gas turbines, steam turbines, HRSG and auxiliary devices, and an air-cooled synchronous power generator with a capacity of 119 MVA. Use of natural gas as fuel reduces generation of soot, sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, and CO. In addition, the hot effluent and waste liquor effluent will decrease from those at the present plant. The required fund will be 30,107 million yen. The energy saving effect of this project is reduction of about 7.5 million tons of crude oil equivalent as a total in 40 years. The greenhouse effect gas will decrease by about 39 million tons as a total in 40 years. The profitability estimation calls for the number of investment recovery year of 16 years, and internal profit rate of 7.32%, wherein the implementation of the project cannot be expected as a project to be carried out by private funds. (NEDO)

  9. Quasi Gradient Projection Algorithm for Sparse Reconstruction in Compressed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Meng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Compressed sensing is a novel signal sampling theory under the condition that the signal is sparse or compressible. The existing recovery algorithms based on the gradient projection can either need prior knowledge or recovery the signal poorly. In this paper, a new algorithm based on gradient projection is proposed, which is referred as Quasi Gradient Projection. The algorithm presented quasi gradient direction and two step sizes schemes along this direction. The algorithm doesn’t need any prior knowledge of the original signal. Simulation results demonstrate that the presented algorithm cans recovery the signal more correctly than GPSR which also don’t need prior knowledge. Meanwhile, the algorithm has a lower computation complexity.

  10. Optimized image acquisition for breast tomosynthesis in projection and reconstruction space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, Amarpreet S.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Baker, Jay A.; Samei, Ehsan

    2009-01-01

    Breast tomosynthesis has been an exciting new development in the field of breast imaging. While the diagnostic improvement via tomosynthesis is notable, the full potential of tomosynthesis has not yet been realized. This may be attributed to the dependency of the diagnostic quality of tomosynthesis on multiple variables, each of which needs to be optimized. Those include dose, number of angular projections, and the total angular span of those projections. In this study, the authors investigated the effects of these acquisition parameters on the overall diagnostic image quality of breast tomosynthesis in both the projection and reconstruction space. Five mastectomy specimens were imaged using a prototype tomosynthesis system. 25 angular projections of each specimen were acquired at 6.2 times typical single-view clinical dose level. Images at lower dose levels were then simulated using a noise modification routine. Each projection image was supplemented with 84 simulated 3 mm 3D lesions embedded at the center of 84 nonoverlapping ROIs. The projection images were then reconstructed using a filtered backprojection algorithm at different combinations of acquisition parameters to investigate which of the many possible combinations maximizes the performance. Performance was evaluated in terms of a Laguerre-Gauss channelized Hotelling observer model-based measure of lesion detectability. The analysis was also performed without reconstruction by combining the model results from projection images using Bayesian decision fusion algorithm. The effect of acquisition parameters on projection images and reconstructed slices were then compared to derive an optimization rule for tomosynthesis. The results indicated that projection images yield comparable but higher performance than reconstructed images. Both modes, however, offered similar trends: Performance improved with an increase in the total acquisition dose level and the angular span. Using a constant dose level and angular

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of residual breast tissue following mastectomy and reconstruction with silicone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippel, Douglas; Tsehmaister-Abitbol, Vered; Rundstein, Arie; Shalmon, Anat; Zbar, Andrew; Nardini, Gil; Novikov, Ilya; Sklair-Levy, Miri

    2015-01-01

    We present our use of magnetic resonance (MR) measurement to determine the amount of residual breast tissue (RBT) following total mastectomy with reconstruction. Breast MR images of 45 women who underwent surgery between January and November 2011 were reviewed. The cohort included therapeutic and prophylactic mastectomies. RBT was evaluated at four points with a digital caliper assessing T2-weighted and T1-weighted images. Patients undergoing mastectomy for carcinoma tended to have less RBT than in prophylactic surgery. Greater age and recent surgery both correlated with larger RBT. Variable thickness of RBT is demonstrable following mastectomy and implant reconstruction using MR imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Framework for 3D histologic reconstruction and fusion with in vivo MRI: Preliminary results of characterizing pulmonary inflammation in a mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusu, Mirabela, E-mail: mirabela.rusu@gmail.com; Wang, Haibo; Madabhushi, Anant [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Golden, Thea; Gow, Andrew [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Pulmonary inflammation is associated with a variety of diseases. Assessing pulmonary inflammation on in vivo imaging may facilitate the early detection and treatment of lung diseases. Although routinely used in thoracic imaging, computed tomography has thus far not been compellingly shown to characterize inflammation in vivo. Alternatively, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a nonionizing radiation technique to better visualize and characterize pulmonary tissue. Prior to routine adoption of MRI for early characterization of inflammation in humans, a rigorous and quantitative characterization of the utility of MRI to identify inflammation is required. Such characterization may be achieved by considering ex vivo histology as the ground truth, since it enables the definitive spatial assessment of inflammation. In this study, the authors introduce a novel framework to integrate 2D histology, ex vivo and in vivo imaging to enable the mapping of the extent of disease from ex vivo histology onto in vivo imaging, with the goal of facilitating computerized feature analysis and interrogation of disease appearance on in vivo imaging. The authors’ framework was evaluated in a preclinical preliminary study aimed to identify computer extracted features on in vivo MRI associated with chronic pulmonary inflammation. Methods: The authors’ image analytics framework first involves reconstructing the histologic volume in 3D from individual histology slices. Second, the authors map the disease ground truth onto in vivo MRI via coregistration with 3D histology using the ex vivo lung MRI as a conduit. Finally, computerized feature analysis of the disease extent is performed to identify candidate in vivo imaging signatures of disease presence and extent. Results: The authors evaluated the framework by assessing the quality of the 3D histology reconstruction and the histology—MRI fusion, in the context of an initial use case involving characterization of chronic

  13. Framework for 3D histologic reconstruction and fusion with in vivo MRI: Preliminary results of characterizing pulmonary inflammation in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusu, Mirabela; Wang, Haibo; Madabhushi, Anant; Golden, Thea; Gow, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Pulmonary inflammation is associated with a variety of diseases. Assessing pulmonary inflammation on in vivo imaging may facilitate the early detection and treatment of lung diseases. Although routinely used in thoracic imaging, computed tomography has thus far not been compellingly shown to characterize inflammation in vivo. Alternatively, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a nonionizing radiation technique to better visualize and characterize pulmonary tissue. Prior to routine adoption of MRI for early characterization of inflammation in humans, a rigorous and quantitative characterization of the utility of MRI to identify inflammation is required. Such characterization may be achieved by considering ex vivo histology as the ground truth, since it enables the definitive spatial assessment of inflammation. In this study, the authors introduce a novel framework to integrate 2D histology, ex vivo and in vivo imaging to enable the mapping of the extent of disease from ex vivo histology onto in vivo imaging, with the goal of facilitating computerized feature analysis and interrogation of disease appearance on in vivo imaging. The authors’ framework was evaluated in a preclinical preliminary study aimed to identify computer extracted features on in vivo MRI associated with chronic pulmonary inflammation. Methods: The authors’ image analytics framework first involves reconstructing the histologic volume in 3D from individual histology slices. Second, the authors map the disease ground truth onto in vivo MRI via coregistration with 3D histology using the ex vivo lung MRI as a conduit. Finally, computerized feature analysis of the disease extent is performed to identify candidate in vivo imaging signatures of disease presence and extent. Results: The authors evaluated the framework by assessing the quality of the 3D histology reconstruction and the histology—MRI fusion, in the context of an initial use case involving characterization of chronic

  14. Influence of sampling interval and number of projections on the quality of SR-XFMT reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Biao; Yu Xiaohan; Xu Hongjie

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron Radiation based X-ray Fluorescent Microtomography (SR-XFMT) is a nondestructive technique for detecting elemental composition and distribution inside a specimen with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. In this paper, computer simulation of SR-XFMT experiment is performed. The influence of the sampling interval and the number of projections on the quality of SR-XFMT image reconstruction is analyzed. It is found that the sampling interval has greater effect on the quality of reconstruction than the number of projections. (authors)

  15. A quality improvement project to reduce hypothermia in infants undergoing MRI scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalal, Priti G.; Parekh, Uma; Dhar, Padmani; McQuillan, Patrick M.; Porath, Janelle; Mujsce, Dennis; Wang, Ming; Hulse, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia prevention strategies during MRI scanning under general anesthesia in infants may pose a challenge due to the MRI scanner's technical constraints. Previous studies have demonstrated conflicting results related to increase or decrease in post-scan temperatures in children. We noted occurrences of post-scan hypothermia in anesthetized infants despite the use of routine passive warming techniques. The aims of our quality improvement project were (a) to identify variables associated with post-scan hypothermia in infants and (b) to develop and implement processes to reduce occurrence of hypothermia in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) infants undergoing MRI. One hundred sixty-four infants undergoing MRI scanning were prospectively audited for post-scan body temperatures. A multidisciplinary team identified potential variables associated with post-scan hypothermia and designed preventative strategies: protocol development, risk factor identification, vigilance and use of a vacuum immobilizer. Another audit was performed, specifically focusing on NICU infants. In the initial phase, we found that younger age (P = 0.002), lower weight (P = 0.005), lower pre-scan temperature (P < 0.01), primary anesthetic technique with propofol (P < 0.01), advanced airway devices (P = 0.02) and being in the NICU (P < 0.01) were associated with higher odds for developing post-scan decrease in body temperature. Quality improvement processes decreased the occurrence of hypothermia in NICU infants undergoing MRI scanning from 65% to 18% (95% confidence interval for the difference, 26-70%, P < 0.001). Several variables, including being in the NICU, are associated with a decrease in post-scan temperature in infants undergoing MRI scanning under sedation/general anesthesia. Implementation of strategies to prevent hypothermia in infants may be challenging in the high-risk MRI environment. We were able to minimize this problem in clinical practice by applying quality improvement

  16. The Acquarossa Memory Project : Reconstructing an Etruscan Town

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lulof, P.S.; Sepers, M.H.

    2017-01-01

    Digital techniques and cultural heritage connect, in an innovative way, new and old within the Humanities. In this new project, an Etruscan townscape will be recreated; modelled results created by the 4D Research Lab will be integrated in an Archaeological Park and Museum in such a way that

  17. THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT OF INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS REENGINEERING (RECONSTRUCTION AND COMPLETION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kolesnikova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Creative element fate of any activity may not fall to zero because of the turbulent environment in which these activities are carried out, always prevents this. Environment that makes each building unique, that is, provides the main basis of the project. When we are talking about complex construction, the share of the creative component becomes very significant. First and foremost, this is explained by the duration of the construction work, during which time to happen risk events. The article analyses the processes of construction from the point of view of their conformity to the concept of project activities. It is shown that with increasing degree of difficulty of construction or time of the last share of creative activities in the overall project grows. In recent times more and more widespread work on re-engineering complex systems, for example, building constructions. This means repair of the building, but not a simple repair with restoration of the original, incorporated in the design of building elements and their interfaces, and partial or full replacement of items that fail or are outdated, new ones require first, a new design of their structures and production technologies, as well as the design of the accessories for the installation and technology is reshaping the object. Combining the two above-mentioned factors of growth of the share of creative activities during the project management of the re-engineering of building structures: complexity and construction time, received a cognitive model of such growth. Introduced the concept of "reengineering in construction" as a combination of the processes of adjustment and worn or completion of unfinished buildings. It is proved that any re-engineering in construction is the project activities. Provisions are tested in a real reengineering of industrial buildings with a positive technical and economic effect.

  18. THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT OF INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS REENGINEERING (RECONSTRUCTION AND COMPLETION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Kolesikova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Creative element fate of any activity may not fall to zero because of the turbulent environment in which these activities are carried out, always prevents this. Environment that makes each building unique, that is, provides the main basis of the project. When we are talking about complex construction, the share of the creative component becomes very significant. First and foremost, this is explained by the duration of the construction work, during which time to happen risk events. The article analyses the processes of construction from the point of view of their conformity to the concept of project activities. It is shown that with increasing degree of difficulty of construction or time of the last share of creative activities in the overall project grows. In recent times more and more widespread work on re-engineering complex systems, for example, building constructions. This means repair of the building, but not a simple repair with restoration of the original, incorporated in the design of building elements and their interfaces, and partial or full replacement of items that fail or are outdated, new ones require first, a new design of their structures and production technologies, as well as the design of the accessories for the installation and technology is reshaping the object. Combining the two above-mentioned factors of growth of the share of creative activities during the project management of the re-engineering of building structures: complexity and construction time, received a cognitive model of such growth. Introduced the concept of "reengineering in construction" as a combination of the processes of adjustment and worn or completion of unfinished buildings. It is proved that any re-engineering in construction is the project activities. Provisions are tested in a real reengineering of industrial buildings with a positive technical and economic effect.

  19. 3D reconstruction of laser projective point with projection invariant generated from five points on 2D target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Yuan, Jing; Li, Xiaotao; Su, Jian

    2017-08-01

    Vision measurement on the basis of structured light plays a significant role in the optical inspection research. The 2D target fixed with a line laser projector is designed to realize the transformations among the world coordinate system, the camera coordinate system and the image coordinate system. The laser projective point and five non-collinear points that are randomly selected from the target are adopted to construct a projection invariant. The closed form solutions of the 3D laser points are solved by the homogeneous linear equations generated from the projection invariants. The optimization function is created by the parameterized re-projection errors of the laser points and the target points in the image coordinate system. Furthermore, the nonlinear optimization solutions of the world coordinates of the projection points, the camera parameters and the lens distortion coefficients are contributed by minimizing the optimization function. The accuracy of the 3D reconstruction is evaluated by comparing the displacements of the reconstructed laser points with the actual displacements. The effects of the image quantity, the lens distortion and the noises are investigated in the experiments, which demonstrate that the reconstruction approach is effective to contribute the accurate test in the measurement system.

  20. 3-T MRI assessment of osteophyte formation in patients with unilateral anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panzer, Stephanie [Department of Radiology, Trauma Center Murnau, Murnau (Germany); Augat, Peter [Trauma Center Murnau and Paracelsus Medical University, Institute of Biomechanics, Murnau (Germany); Atzwanger, Joerg; Hergan, Klaus [University Hospital Salzburg, Paracelsus Medical University, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria)

    2012-12-15

    To define the number and distribution of osteophytes (OPs) in bilateral knee MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) of patients with unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Bilateral knee MRIs of 20 patients with unilateral ACL rupture and reconstruction were retrospectively analyzed for OPs. OPs were graded following the KOSS (knee OA scoring system) classification and their compartmental distribution was assessed following the WORMS (Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score) classification. All examined knees revealed OPs. Knees with ACL rupture showed significant (p < 0.001) higher total numbers of OPs (mean 11.6; SD {+-} 4.4) than knees with intact ACL (mean 5.1; SD {+-} 2.3). Knees with ACL rupture showed increased OP formation in all knee compartments with predominance of marginal OPs in the lateral femorotibial compartment especially on the tibia. Our results show that after knee injury with ACL rupture and reconstruction, all knee compartments were involved in post-traumatic increase of OP formation. The most affected compartment was the lateral femorotibial compartment on the tibial side. (orig.)

  1. 3-T MRI assessment of osteophyte formation in patients with unilateral anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panzer, Stephanie; Augat, Peter; Atzwanger, Joerg; Hergan, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    To define the number and distribution of osteophytes (OPs) in bilateral knee MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) of patients with unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Bilateral knee MRIs of 20 patients with unilateral ACL rupture and reconstruction were retrospectively analyzed for OPs. OPs were graded following the KOSS (knee OA scoring system) classification and their compartmental distribution was assessed following the WORMS (Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score) classification. All examined knees revealed OPs. Knees with ACL rupture showed significant (p < 0.001) higher total numbers of OPs (mean 11.6; SD ± 4.4) than knees with intact ACL (mean 5.1; SD ± 2.3). Knees with ACL rupture showed increased OP formation in all knee compartments with predominance of marginal OPs in the lateral femorotibial compartment especially on the tibia. Our results show that after knee injury with ACL rupture and reconstruction, all knee compartments were involved in post-traumatic increase of OP formation. The most affected compartment was the lateral femorotibial compartment on the tibial side. (orig.)

  2. Depiction of lower limb venous anatomy in patients undergoing interventional deep venous reconstruction-the role of balanced steady state free precession MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helyar, Vincent G; Gupta, Yuri; Blakeway, Lyndall; Charles-Edwards, Geoff; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Karunanithy, Narayan

    2018-02-01

    This study evaluates the use of balanced steady-state free precession MRI (bSSFP-MRI) in the diagnostic work-up of patients undergoing interventional deep venous reconstruction (I-DVR). Intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IVDSA) was used as the gold-standard for comparison to assess disease extent and severity. A retrospective comparison of bSSFP-MRI to IVDSA was performed in all patients undergoing both examinations for treatment planning prior to I-DVR. The severity of disease in each venous segment was graded by two board-certified radiologists working independently, according to a predetermined classification system. In total, 44 patients (225 venous segments) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A total of 156 abnormal venous segments were diagnosed using bSSFP-MRI compared with 151 using IVDSA. The prevalence of disease was higher in the iliac and femoral segments (range, 79.6-88.6%). Overall sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio and the diagnostic ratio for bSSFP-MRI were 99.3%, 91.9%, 12.3, 0.007 and 1700, respectively. This study supports the use of non-contrast balanced SSFP-MRI in the assessment of the deep veins of the lower limb prior to I-DVR. The technique offers an accurate, fast and non-invasive alternative to IVDSA. Advances in Knowledge: Although balanced SSFP-MRI is commonly used in cardiac imaging, its use elsewhere is limited and its use in evaluating the deep veins prior to interventional reconstruction is not described. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of this technique in the work-up of patients awaiting interventional venous reconstruction compared with the current gold standard.

  3. CT and MRI post-processing reconstructions in maxillo-facial trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszycki, M.; Grzelak, P.; Stanczyk, L.; Kozakiewicz, M.; Arkuszewski, P.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the reliability of CT and MR imaging and their post-processing reconstructions in the cases of facial trauma. CT studies were performed in 34 patients: 13 suspected of sinus fractures, 20 with orbital fractures and 1 with broken supraorbital bone fragment. MR imaging was also performed in 16 of these patients. The CT data were reconstructed in the 2D and 3D mode. The CT and MR images were digitally fused using an own program. The CT and MR images, their reconstructions and their fusion were evaluated according to the quality of visualization of a pathological lesions. Surgery was the method of reference. The reconstructed CT images allowed to recognize properly maxillary-oral fenestration in 5 cases. In 20 patients with orbital fracture, CT 3D reformations visualized well the morphology of the fissure. In 13 of these patients,the small bone fragments and orbital soft tissues prolapsed towards the maxillary sinus were depicted. Among the 16 patients who underwent MR examination, in 6 cases we revealed dislocation of the inferior rectus muscle towards the sinus, whereas in 9 cases MR images clearly excluded this pathology. In 1 patient, the digitally fused CT/MR images allowed to determine the actual position of small bone fragment within the muscle. In 1 patient with broken supraorbital bone fragment, evaluation of the 3D model allowed to exclude communication with intracranial space. In the next 8 patients with maxillo-zygomatic injures, the CT reconstructions did not support the diagnosis. The surgery correlated well with the post-processing CT and CT/MR fused images, contrary to the original CT ones which often were diagnostically insufficient. Spiral CT 2D and 3D-reconstructed images of the face allow to depict clearly the anatomical spatial relationships and the position, course and displacement of fractured fragments; thus, they support the surgery. The MR images of these patients reveal soft tissues clearly. The digital

  4. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Quarterly report, September--November 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates); Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates

  5. Radionuclide releases to the atmosphere from Hanford Operations, 1944--1972. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeb, C.M.

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of radionuclide emissions since 1944 from the Hanford Site. The first step in determining dose is to estimate the amount and timing of radionuclide releases to air and water. This report provides the air release information.

  6. A Prospective Analysis of Dynamic Loss of Breast Projection in Tissue Expander-Implant Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren M Mioton

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundBreast projection is a critical element of breast reconstruction aesthetics, but little has been published regarding breast projection as the firm expander is changed to a softer implant. Quantitative data representing this loss in projection may enhance patient education and improve our management of patient expectations.MethodsFemale patients who were undergoing immediate tissue-expander breast reconstruction with the senior author were enrolled in this prospective study. Three-dimensional camera software was used for all patient photographs and data analysis. Projection was calculated as the distance between the chest wall and the point of maximal projection of the breast form. Values were calculated for final tissue expander expansion and at varying intervals 3, 6, and 12 months after implant placement.ResultsFourteen breasts from 12 patients were included in the final analysis. Twelve of the 14 breasts had a loss of projection at three months following the implant placement or beyond. The percentage of projection lost in these 12 breasts ranged from 6.30% to 43.4%, with an average loss of projection of 21.05%.ConclusionsThis study is the first prospective quantitative analysis of temporal changes in breast projection after expander-implant reconstruction. By prospectively capturing projection data with three-dimensional photographic software, we reveal a loss of projection in this population by three months post-implant exchange. These findings will not only aid in managing patient expectations, but our methodology provides a foundation for future objective studies of the breast form.

  7. External force back-projective composition and globally deformable optimization for 3-D coronary artery reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jian; Cong, Weijian; Fan, Jingfan; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yongtian; Chen, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The clinical value of the 3D reconstruction of a coronary artery is important for the diagnosis and intervention of cardiovascular diseases. This work proposes a method based on a deformable model for reconstructing coronary arteries from two monoplane angiographic images acquired from different angles. First, an external force back-projective composition model is developed to determine the external force, for which the force distributions in different views are back-projected to the 3D space and composited in the same coordinate system based on the perspective projection principle of x-ray imaging. The elasticity and bending forces are composited as an internal force to maintain the smoothness of the deformable curve. Second, the deformable curve evolves rapidly toward the true vascular centerlines in 3D space and angiographic images under the combination of internal and external forces. Third, densely matched correspondence among vessel centerlines is constructed using a curve alignment method. The bundle adjustment method is then utilized for the global optimization of the projection parameters and the 3D structures. The proposed method is validated on phantom data and routine angiographic images with consideration for space and re-projection image errors. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method for the reconstruction of coronary arteries from two monoplane angiographic images. The proposed method can achieve a mean space error of 0.564 mm and a mean re-projection error of 0.349 mm. (paper)

  8. Reconstruction of tomographic image from x-ray projections of a few views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Fujio; Yamaguchi, Shoichiro

    1982-01-01

    Computer tomographs have progressed rapidly, and in the latest high performance types, the photographing time has been shortened to less than 5 sec, but the clear images of hearts have not yet been obtained. The X-ray tomographs used so far irradiate X-ray from many directions and measure the projected data, but by limiting projection direction to a small number, it was planned to shorter the X-ray photographing time and to reduce X-ray exposure as the objective of this study. In this paper, a method is proposed, by which tomographic images are reconstructed from projected data in a small number of direction by generalized inverse matrix penalty method. This method is the calculation method newly devised by the authors for this purpose. It is a kind of the nonlinear planning method added with the restrictive condition using a generalized inverse matrix, and it is characterized by the simple calculation procedure and rapid convergence. Moreover, the effect on reconstructed images when errors are included in projected data was examined. Also, the simple computer simulation to reconstruct tomographic images using the projected data in four directions was performed, and the usefulness of this method was confirmed. It contributes to the development of superhigh speed tomographs in future. (Kako, I.)

  9. The developing human connectome project: A minimal processing pipeline for neonatal cortical surface reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makropoulos, Antonios; Robinson, Emma C; Schuh, Andreas; Wright, Robert; Fitzgibbon, Sean; Bozek, Jelena; Counsell, Serena J; Steinweg, Johannes; Vecchiato, Katy; Passerat-Palmbach, Jonathan; Lenz, Gregor; Mortari, Filippo; Tenev, Tencho; Duff, Eugene P; Bastiani, Matteo; Cordero-Grande, Lucilio; Hughes, Emer; Tusor, Nora; Tournier, Jacques-Donald; Hutter, Jana; Price, Anthony N; Teixeira, Rui Pedro A G; Murgasova, Maria; Victor, Suresh; Kelly, Christopher; Rutherford, Mary A; Smith, Stephen M; Edwards, A David; Hajnal, Joseph V; Jenkinson, Mark; Rueckert, Daniel

    2018-06-01

    The Developing Human Connectome Project (dHCP) seeks to create the first 4-dimensional connectome of early life. Understanding this connectome in detail may provide insights into normal as well as abnormal patterns of brain development. Following established best practices adopted by the WU-MINN Human Connectome Project (HCP), and pioneered by FreeSurfer, the project utilises cortical surface-based processing pipelines. In this paper, we propose a fully automated processing pipeline for the structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the developing neonatal brain. This proposed pipeline consists of a refined framework for cortical and sub-cortical volume segmentation, cortical surface extraction, and cortical surface inflation, which has been specifically designed to address considerable differences between adult and neonatal brains, as imaged using MRI. Using the proposed pipeline our results demonstrate that images collected from 465 subjects ranging from 28 to 45 weeks post-menstrual age (PMA) can be processed fully automatically; generating cortical surface models that are topologically correct, and correspond well with manual evaluations of tissue boundaries in 85% of cases. Results improve on state-of-the-art neonatal tissue segmentation models and significant errors were found in only 2% of cases, where these corresponded to subjects with high motion. Downstream, these surfaces will enhance comparisons of functional and diffusion MRI datasets, supporting the modelling of emerging patterns of brain connectivity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bias field inconsistency correction of motion-scattered multislice MRI for improved 3D image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kio; Habas, Piotr A; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia A; Corbett-Detig, James M; Rousseau, Francois; Barkovich, A James; Glenn, Orit A; Studholme, Colin

    2011-09-01

    A common solution to clinical MR imaging in the presence of large anatomical motion is to use fast multislice 2D studies to reduce slice acquisition time and provide clinically usable slice data. Recently, techniques have been developed which retrospectively correct large scale 3D motion between individual slices allowing the formation of a geometrically correct 3D volume from the multiple slice stacks. One challenge, however, in the final reconstruction process is the possibility of varying intensity bias in the slice data, typically due to the motion of the anatomy relative to imaging coils. As a result, slices which cover the same region of anatomy at different times may exhibit different sensitivity. This bias field inconsistency can induce artifacts in the final 3D reconstruction that can impact both clinical interpretation of key tissue boundaries and the automated analysis of the data. Here we describe a framework to estimate and correct the bias field inconsistency in each slice collectively across all motion corrupted image slices. Experiments using synthetic and clinical data show that the proposed method reduces intensity variability in tissues and improves the distinction between key tissue types.

  11. FY 1992 revised task plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipler, D.B.

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses from Hanford Site operations since 1944 to populations and individuals. The primary objectives of work to be performed in FY 1992 is to determine the appropriate scope (space, time, and radionuclides, pathways and individuals/population groups) and accuracy (level of uncertainty in dose estimates) for the project. Another objective is to use a refined computer model to estimate Native American tribal doses and individual doses for the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS). Project scope and accuracy requirements defined in FY 1992 can translated into model and data requirements that must be satisfied during FY 1993

  12. Quantitative evaluation of the tibial tunnel after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using diffusion weighted and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI: a follow-up feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rupreht, Mitja; Seruga, Tomaz; Jevsek, Marko [University Medical Centre Maribor, Radiology Department, Maribor (Slovenia); Jevtic, Vladimir [University of Ljubljana, Medical Faculty, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sersa, Igor [Jozef Stefan Institute, MRI Laboratory, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vogrin, Matjaz [University of Medical Centre of Maribor, Department of Orthopaedics, Maribor (Slovenia)

    2012-05-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of two quantitative MRI methods: diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and dynamic contrast enhanced imaging (DCEI), for follow-up assessment of the tibial tunnel after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Twenty-three patients were examined by MRI at 1 and 6 months following ACL reconstruction. DWI and DCEI were utilized for evaluating the region of interest (ROI) within the proximal part of the tibial tunnel. From the resulting apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps, ADC values were calculated. DCEI data were used to extract the enhancement factor (f{sub enh}) and the enhancement gradient (g{sub enh}) for the same ROI. Calculated ADC as well as the f{sub enh} and g{sub enh} had diminished to a statistically significant extent by 6 months after ACL reconstruction. The average ADC value diminished from 1.48 (10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) at 1 month to 1.30 (10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) at 6 months after reconstruction. The average f{sub enh} value decreased from 1.21 at 1 month to 0.50 at 6 months and the average g{sub enh} value decreased from 2.01%/s to 1.15%/s at 6 months, respectively. The study proved feasibility of DWI and DCEI for quantitative assessment of the tibial tunnel at 1 and 6 months after ACL reconstruction. Both methods have the potential for use as an additional tool in the evaluation of new methods of ACL reconstruction. To our knowledge, this is the first time quantitative MRI has been used in the follow-up to the ACL graft healing process. (orig.)

  13. A Dictionary Learning Method with Total Generalized Variation for MRI Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongyang; Wei, Jingbo; Liu, Qiegen; Wang, Yuhao; Deng, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing images from their noisy and incomplete measurements is always a challenge especially for medical MR image with important details and features. This work proposes a novel dictionary learning model that integrates two sparse regularization methods: the total generalized variation (TGV) approach and adaptive dictionary learning (DL). In the proposed method, the TGV selectively regularizes different image regions at different levels to avoid oil painting artifacts largely. At the same time, the dictionary learning adaptively represents the image features sparsely and effectively recovers details of images. The proposed model is solved by variable splitting technique and the alternating direction method of multiplier. Extensive simulation experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method consistently recovers MR images efficiently and outperforms the current state-of-the-art approaches in terms of higher PSNR and lower HFEN values.

  14. A Dictionary Learning Method with Total Generalized Variation for MRI Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyang Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstructing images from their noisy and incomplete measurements is always a challenge especially for medical MR image with important details and features. This work proposes a novel dictionary learning model that integrates two sparse regularization methods: the total generalized variation (TGV approach and adaptive dictionary learning (DL. In the proposed method, the TGV selectively regularizes different image regions at different levels to avoid oil painting artifacts largely. At the same time, the dictionary learning adaptively represents the image features sparsely and effectively recovers details of images. The proposed model is solved by variable splitting technique and the alternating direction method of multiplier. Extensive simulation experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method consistently recovers MR images efficiently and outperforms the current state-of-the-art approaches in terms of higher PSNR and lower HFEN values.

  15. Surgical outcomes and nipple projection using the modified skate flap for nipple-areolar reconstruction in a series of 422 implant reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Toni; Antony, Anu; Cordeiro, Peter

    2009-05-01

    Numerous techniques have been used in an attempt to achieve long-term nipple projection following nipple-areolar reconstruction (NAR). A common setback, however, is the diminution of projection over time; this phenomenon is particularly evident following implant based breast reconstruction. The purpose of this report was thus to evaluate surgical outcomes and long-term nipple projection with the use of "modified skate flap" technique in exclusively implant based postmastectomy reconstructions. A retrospective review was performed for the period between 1993 and 2007. All consecutive patients with 2-staged tissue expander/implant reconstructions followed by NAR using the modified skate flap technique performed by the senior author (P.C.) were identified in a prospectively maintained breast reconstruction database. Only patients with a minimum of 1-year follow-up were included in the study. Patients with a history of irradiation to the breast were excluded from nipple projection assessment. Clinical outcome measurements included long-term nipple projection as well as incidence of complications from the NAR procedure using the modified skate flap technique. Over the 15-year study period, 475 patients underwent 2-staged tissue expander/implant reconstruction followed by NAR using the modified skate flap technique. Of these, there was a total of 292 patients with the minimum requirement of 1-year follow-up post NAR (61% follow-up rate). The total number of reconstructed nipple areolar complexes evaluated in this series was 422 (130 bilateral and 162 unilateral NAR). Forty patients (28 unilateral and 12 bilateral NAR) who received radiation to their breasts were excluded from nipple projection assessment. At a median follow-up of 44 months (range: 12-84 months), mean nipple projection was 2.5 mm (range: 1-4 mm). Minor complications occurred in 7.2% of the patients (n = 292). Skin graft donor site dehiscence was the most common complication (3.1%) followed by partial skin

  16. Quantitative analysis of emphysema and airway measurements according to iterative reconstruction algorithms: comparison of filtered back projection, adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and model-based iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Ji Yung; Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Chang Min; Park, Sang Joon; Lee, Chang Hyun; Shim, Mi-Suk

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate filtered back projection (FBP) and two iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms and their effects on the quantitative analysis of lung parenchyma and airway measurements on computed tomography (CT) images. Low-dose chest CT obtained in 281 adult patients were reconstructed using three algorithms: FBP, adaptive statistical IR (ASIR) and model-based IR (MBIR). Measurements of each dataset were compared: total lung volume, emphysema index (EI), airway measurements of the lumen and wall area as well as average wall thickness. Accuracy of airway measurements of each algorithm was also evaluated using an airway phantom. EI using a threshold of -950 HU was significantly different among the three algorithms in decreasing order of FBP (2.30 %), ASIR (1.49 %) and MBIR (1.20 %) (P < 0.01). Wall thickness was also significantly different among the three algorithms with FBP (2.09 mm) demonstrating thicker walls than ASIR (2.00 mm) and MBIR (1.88 mm) (P < 0.01). Airway phantom analysis revealed that MBIR showed the most accurate value for airway measurements. The three algorithms presented different EIs and wall thicknesses, decreasing in the order of FBP, ASIR and MBIR. Thus, care should be taken in selecting the appropriate IR algorithm on quantitative analysis of the lung. (orig.)

  17. Quantitative analysis of emphysema and airway measurements according to iterative reconstruction algorithms: comparison of filtered back projection, adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and model-based iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Ji Yung [Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan-si, Department of Radiology, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Chang Min; Park, Sang Joon [Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang Hyun; Shim, Mi-Suk [Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    To evaluate filtered back projection (FBP) and two iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms and their effects on the quantitative analysis of lung parenchyma and airway measurements on computed tomography (CT) images. Low-dose chest CT obtained in 281 adult patients were reconstructed using three algorithms: FBP, adaptive statistical IR (ASIR) and model-based IR (MBIR). Measurements of each dataset were compared: total lung volume, emphysema index (EI), airway measurements of the lumen and wall area as well as average wall thickness. Accuracy of airway measurements of each algorithm was also evaluated using an airway phantom. EI using a threshold of -950 HU was significantly different among the three algorithms in decreasing order of FBP (2.30 %), ASIR (1.49 %) and MBIR (1.20 %) (P < 0.01). Wall thickness was also significantly different among the three algorithms with FBP (2.09 mm) demonstrating thicker walls than ASIR (2.00 mm) and MBIR (1.88 mm) (P < 0.01). Airway phantom analysis revealed that MBIR showed the most accurate value for airway measurements. The three algorithms presented different EIs and wall thicknesses, decreasing in the order of FBP, ASIR and MBIR. Thus, care should be taken in selecting the appropriate IR algorithm on quantitative analysis of the lung. (orig.)

  18. MR neurography with multiplanar reconstruction of 3D MRI datasets: an anatomical study and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, Wolfgang; Aschoff, Andrik J.; Stuber, Gregor; Schmitz, Bernd; Brinkmann, Alexander; Wagner, Florian; Dinse, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Extracranial MR neurography has so far mainly been used with 2D datasets. We investigated the use of 3D datasets for peripheral neurography of the sciatic nerve. A total of 40 thighs (20 healthy volunteers) were examined with a coronally oriented magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequence with isotropic voxels of 1 x 1 x 1 mm and a field of view of 500 mm. Anatomical landmarks were palpated and marked with MRI markers. After MR scanning, the sciatic nerve was identified by two readers independently in the resulting 3D dataset. In every volunteer, the sciatic nerve could be identified bilaterally over the whole length of the thigh, even in areas of close contact to isointense muscles. The landmark of the greater trochanter was falsely palpated by 2.2 cm, and the knee joint by 1 cm. The mean distance between the bifurcation of the sciatic nerve and the knee-joint gap was 6 cm (±1.8 cm). The mean results of the two readers differed by 1-6%. With the described method of MR neurography, the sciatic nerve was depicted reliably and objectively in great anatomical detail over the whole length of the thigh. Important anatomical information can be obtained. The clinical applications of MR neurography for the brachial plexus and lumbosacral plexus/sciatic nerve are discussed. (orig.)

  19. Exact Reconstruction From Uniformly Attenuated Helical Cone-Beam Projections in SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullberg, Grant T.; Huang, Qiu; You, Jiangsheng; Zeng, Gengsheng L.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years the development of cone-beam reconstruction algorithms has been an active research area in x-ray computed tomography (CT), and significant progress has been made in the advancement of algorithms. Theoretically exact and computationally efficient analytical algorithms can be found in the literature. However, in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), published cone-beam reconstruction algorithms are either approximate or involve iterative methods. The SPECT reconstruction problem is more complicated due to degradations in the imaging detection process, one of which is the effect of attenuation of gamma ray photons. Attenuation should be compensated for to obtain quantitative results. In this paper, an analytical reconstruction algorithm for uniformly attenuated cone-beam projection data is presented for SPECT imaging. The algorithm adopts the DBH method, a procedure consisting of differentiation and backprojection followed by a finite inverse cosh-weighted Hilbert transform. The significance of the proposed approach is that a selected region of interest can be reconstructed even with a detector with a reduced field of view. The algorithm is designed for a general trajectory. However, to validate the algorithm, a numerical study was performed using a helical trajectory. The implementation is efficient and the simulation result is promising

  20. Interactive local super-resolution reconstruction of whole-body MRI mouse data: a pilot study with applications to bone and kidney metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleh Dzyubachyk

    Full Text Available In small animal imaging studies, when the locations of the micro-structures of interest are unknown a priori, there is a simultaneous need for full-body coverage and high resolution. In MRI, additional requirements to image contrast and acquisition time will often make it impossible to acquire such images directly. Recently, a resolution enhancing post-processing technique called super-resolution reconstruction (SRR has been demonstrated to improve visualization and localization of micro-structures in small animal MRI by combining multiple low-resolution acquisitions. However, when the field-of-view is large relative to the desired voxel size, solving the SRR problem becomes very expensive, in terms of both memory requirements and computation time. In this paper we introduce a novel local approach to SRR that aims to overcome the computational problems and allow researchers to efficiently explore both global and local characteristics in whole-body small animal MRI. The method integrates state-of-the-art image processing techniques from the areas of articulated atlas-based segmentation, planar reformation, and SRR. A proof-of-concept is provided with two case studies involving CT, BLI, and MRI data of bone and kidney tumors in a mouse model. We show that local SRR-MRI is a computationally efficient complementary imaging modality for the precise characterization of tumor metastases, and that the method provides a feasible high-resolution alternative to conventional MRI.

  1. Interactive local super-resolution reconstruction of whole-body MRI mouse data: a pilot study with applications to bone and kidney metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzyubachyk, Oleh; Khmelinskii, Artem; Plenge, Esben; Kok, Peter; Snoeks, Thomas J A; Poot, Dirk H J; Löwik, Clemens W G M; Botha, Charl P; Niessen, Wiro J; van der Weerd, Louise; Meijering, Erik; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F

    2014-01-01

    In small animal imaging studies, when the locations of the micro-structures of interest are unknown a priori, there is a simultaneous need for full-body coverage and high resolution. In MRI, additional requirements to image contrast and acquisition time will often make it impossible to acquire such images directly. Recently, a resolution enhancing post-processing technique called super-resolution reconstruction (SRR) has been demonstrated to improve visualization and localization of micro-structures in small animal MRI by combining multiple low-resolution acquisitions. However, when the field-of-view is large relative to the desired voxel size, solving the SRR problem becomes very expensive, in terms of both memory requirements and computation time. In this paper we introduce a novel local approach to SRR that aims to overcome the computational problems and allow researchers to efficiently explore both global and local characteristics in whole-body small animal MRI. The method integrates state-of-the-art image processing techniques from the areas of articulated atlas-based segmentation, planar reformation, and SRR. A proof-of-concept is provided with two case studies involving CT, BLI, and MRI data of bone and kidney tumors in a mouse model. We show that local SRR-MRI is a computationally efficient complementary imaging modality for the precise characterization of tumor metastases, and that the method provides a feasible high-resolution alternative to conventional MRI.

  2. Zooming in on vibronic structure by lowest-value projection reconstructed 4D coherent spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Elad

    2018-05-01

    A fundamental goal of chemical physics is an understanding of microscopic interactions in liquids at and away from equilibrium. In principle, this microscopic information is accessible by high-order and high-dimensionality nonlinear optical measurements. Unfortunately, the time required to execute such experiments increases exponentially with the dimensionality, while the signal decreases exponentially with the order of the nonlinearity. Recently, we demonstrated a non-uniform acquisition method based on radial sampling of the time-domain signal [W. O. Hutson et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 9, 1034 (2018)]. The four-dimensional spectrum was then reconstructed by filtered back-projection using an inverse Radon transform. Here, we demonstrate an alternative reconstruction method based on the statistical analysis of different back-projected spectra which results in a dramatic increase in sensitivity and at least a 100-fold increase in dynamic range compared to conventional uniform sampling and Fourier reconstruction. These results demonstrate that alternative sampling and reconstruction methods enable applications of increasingly high-order and high-dimensionality methods toward deeper insights into the vibronic structure of liquids.

  3. Robust water fat separated dual-echo MRI by phase-sensitive reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romu, Thobias; Dahlström, Nils; Leinhard, Olof Dahlqvist; Borga, Magnus

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop and evaluate a robust water-fat separation method for T1-weighted symmetric two-point Dixon data. A method for water-fat separation by phase unwrapping of the opposite-phase images by phase-sensitive reconstruction (PSR) is introduced. PSR consists of three steps; (1), identification of clusters of tissue voxels; (2), unwrapping of the phase in each cluster by solving Poisson's equation; and (3), finding the correct sign of each unwrapped opposite-phase cluster, so that the water-fat images are assigned the correct identities. Robustness was evaluated by counting the number of water-fat swap artifacts in a total of 733 image volumes. The method was also compared to commercial software. In the water-fat separated image volumes, the PSR method failed to unwrap the phase of one cluster and misclassified 10. One swap was observed in areas affected by motion and was constricted to the affected area. Twenty swaps were observed surrounding susceptibility artifacts, none of which spread outside the artifact affected regions. The PSR method had fewer swaps when compared to commercial software. The PSR method can robustly produce water-fat separated whole-body images based on symmetric two-echo spoiled gradient echo images, under both ideal conditions and in the presence of common artifacts. Magn Reson Med 78:1208-1216, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. MRI-three dimensional reconstruction of biliary system in choledochal cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaji, Tatsuru; Takamatsu, Hideo; Noguchi, Hiroyuki; Tahara, Hiroyuki; Fukushige, Takahiko; Kajiya, Hiroshi; Kajiya, Yoshiki

    1995-01-01

    We report a trial of MR cholangiography in children with choledochal cyst. Recently, three-dimensional reconstruction using magnetic resolution imaging of biliary system (MR cholangiography) has been reported as the less-invasive diagnostic method for obstructive lesions of biliary system. Forty-eight cases of choledochal cyst were treated at Kagoshima University Hospital in the past ten years. In 22 of them, intrahepatic duct dilatation was revealed by preoperative or operative cholangiogram. We tried MR cholangiography in nine cases of 22 cases pre- and/or post-operatively. Five cases had MR cholangiography preoperatively. Intrahepatic biliary dilatation was revealed in all of them and intrahepatic biliary stenosis was revealed in two cases. These findings were almost the same as those by preoperative or operative cholangiogram. MR cholangiography was applied on seven cases postoperatively: 3 cases had fine construction of biliary system, because they still had intrahepatic biliary dilatation, and no dilatation was seen in 4 cases, because of good operative results. This method has advantages of less-invasive in children, no need of contrast dye, and fair delineation of biliary system as samely as endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC). In cases of huge biliary dilatation, MR cholangiography provides more information concerning intrahepatic biliary than ERCP. (author)

  5. Neural network CT image reconstruction method for small amount of projection data

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, X F; Takeda, T

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for two-dimensional image reconstruction by using a multi-layer neural network. Though a conventionally used object function of such a neural network is composed of a sum of squared errors of the output data, we define an object function composed of a sum of squared residuals of an integral equation. By employing an appropriate numerical line integral for this integral equation, we can construct a neural network which can be used for CT image reconstruction for cases with small amount of projection data. We applied this method to some model problems and obtained satisfactory results. This method is especially useful for analyses of laboratory experiments or field observations where only a small amount of projection data is available in comparison with the well-developed medical applications.

  6. Neural network CT image reconstruction method for small amount of projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, X.F.; Fukuhara, M.; Takeda, T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for two-dimensional image reconstruction by using a multi-layer neural network. Though a conventionally used object function of such a neural network is composed of a sum of squared errors of the output data, we define an object function composed of a sum of squared residuals of an integral equation. By employing an appropriate numerical line integral for this integral equation, we can construct a neural network which can be used for CT image reconstruction for cases with small amount of projection data. We applied this method to some model problems and obtained satisfactory results. This method is especially useful for analyses of laboratory experiments or field observations where only a small amount of projection data is available in comparison with the well-developed medical applications

  7. Projection matrix acquisition for cone-beam computed tomography iterative reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fuqiang; Zhang, Dinghua; Huang, Kuidong; Shi, Wenlong; Zhang, Caixin; Gao, Zongzhao

    2017-02-01

    Projection matrix is an essential and time-consuming part in computed tomography (CT) iterative reconstruction. In this article a novel calculation algorithm of three-dimensional (3D) projection matrix is proposed to quickly acquire the matrix for cone-beam CT (CBCT). The CT data needed to be reconstructed is considered as consisting of the three orthogonal sets of equally spaced and parallel planes, rather than the individual voxels. After getting the intersections the rays with the surfaces of the voxels, the coordinate points and vertex is compared to obtain the index value that the ray traversed. Without considering ray-slope to voxel, it just need comparing the position of two points. Finally, the computer simulation is used to verify the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  8. Image reconstruction from projections and its application in emission computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuba, Attila; Csernay, Laszlo

    1989-01-01

    Computer tomography is an imaging technique for producing cross sectional images by reconstruction from projections. Its two main branches are called transmission and emission computer tomography, TCT and ECT, resp. After an overview of the theory and practice of TCT and ECT, the first Hungarian ECT type MB 9300 SPECT consisting of a gamma camera and Ketronic Medax N computer is described, and its applications to radiological patient observations are discussed briefly. (R.P.) 28 refs.; 4 figs

  9. Reconstructing sea level from paleo and projected temperatures 200 to 2100 AD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grinsted, Aslak; Moore, John; Jevrejeva, Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    -proxy reconstructions assuming that the established relationship between temperature and sea level holds from 200 to 2100 ad. Over the last 2,000 years minimum sea level (-19 to -26 cm) occurred around 1730 ad, maximum sea level (12–21 cm) around 1150 AD. Sea level 2090–2099 is projected to be 0.9 to 1.3 m for the A1B...

  10. The CHT2 Project: Diachronic 3d Reconstruction of Historic Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, G.; Micoli, L.; Gonizzi Barsanti, S.; Malik, U.

    2017-08-01

    Digital modelling archaeological and architectural monuments in their current state and in their presumed past aspect has been recognized not only as a way for explaining to the public the genesis of a historical site, but also as an effective tool for research. The search for historical sources, their proper analysis and interdisciplinary relationship between technological disciplines and the humanities are fundamental for obtaining reliable hypothetical reconstructions. This paper presents an experimental activity defined by the project Cultural Heritage Through Time - CHT2 (http://cht2-project.eu), funded in the framework of the Joint Programming Initiative on Cultural Heritage (JPI-CH) of the European Commission. Its goal is to develop time-varying 3D products, from landscape to architectural scale, deals with the implementation of the methodology on one of the case studies: the late Roman circus of Milan, built in the era when the city was the capital of the Western Roman Empire (286-402 A.D). The work presented here covers one of the cases in which the physical evidences have now been almost entirely disappeared. The diachronic reconstruction is based on a proper mix of quantitative data originated by 3D surveys at present time, and historical sources like ancient maps, drawings, archaeological reports, archaeological restrictions decrees and old photographs. Such heterogeneous sources have been first georeferenced and then properly integrated according to the methodology defined in the framework of the CHT2 project, to hypothesize a reliable reconstruction of the area in different historical periods.

  11. An electron tomography algorithm for reconstructing 3D morphology using surface tangents of projected scattering interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, T. C.; Ringer, S. P.

    2010-03-01

    Upon discerning the mere shape of an imaged object, as portrayed by projected perimeters, the full three-dimensional scattering density may not be of particular interest. In this situation considerable simplifications to the reconstruction problem are possible, allowing calculations based upon geometric principles. Here we describe and provide an algorithm which reconstructs the three-dimensional morphology of specimens from tilt series of images for application to electron tomography. Our algorithm uses a differential approach to infer the intersection of projected tangent lines with surfaces which define boundaries between regions of different scattering densities within and around the perimeters of specimens. Details of the algorithm implementation are given and explained using reconstruction calculations from simulations, which are built into the code. An experimental application of the algorithm to a nano-sized Aluminium tip is also presented to demonstrate practical analysis for a real specimen. Program summaryProgram title: STOMO version 1.0 Catalogue identifier: AEFS_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFS_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2988 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 191 605 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C/C++ Computer: PC Operating system: Windows XP RAM: Depends upon the size of experimental data as input, ranging from 200 Mb to 1.5 Gb Supplementary material: Sample output files, for the test run provided, are available. Classification: 7.4, 14 External routines: Dev-C++ ( http://www.bloodshed.net/devcpp.html) Nature of problem: Electron tomography of specimens for which conventional back projection may fail and/or data for which there is a limited angular

  12. WE-EF-BRD-03: I Want It Now!: Advances in MRI Acquisition, Reconstruction and the Use of Priors to Enable Fast Anatomic and Physiologic Imaging to Inform Guidance and Adaptation Decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Y. [Mayo Clinic Arizona (United States)

    2015-06-15

    MRI-guided treatment is a growing area of medicine, particularly in radiotherapy and surgery. The exquisite soft tissue anatomic contrast offered by MRI, along with functional imaging, makes the use of MRI during therapeutic procedures very attractive. Challenging the utility of MRI in the therapy room are many issues including the physics of MRI and the impact on the environment and therapeutic instruments, the impact of the room and instruments on the MRI; safety, space, design and cost. In this session, the applications and challenges of MRI-guided treatment will be described. The session format is: Past, present and future: MRI-guided radiotherapy from 2005 to 2025: Jan Lagendijk Battling Maxwell’s equations: Physics challenges and solutions for hybrid MRI systems: Paul Keall I want it now!: Advances in MRI acquisition, reconstruction and the use of priors to enable fast anatomic and physiologic imaging to inform guidance and adaptation decisions: Yanle Hu MR in the OR: The growth and applications of MRI for interventional radiology and surgery: Rebecca Fahrig Learning Objectives: To understand the history and trajectory of MRI-guided radiotherapy To understand the challenges of integrating MR imaging systems with linear accelerators To understand the latest in fast MRI methods to enable the visualisation of anatomy and physiology on radiotherapy treatment timescales To understand the growing role and challenges of MRI for image-guided surgical procedures My disclosures are publicly available and updated at: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/radiation-physics/about-us/disclosures.php.

  13. Methods of X-ray CT image reconstruction from few projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.

    2011-01-01

    To improve the safety (low dose) and the productivity (fast acquisition) of a X-ray CT system, we want to reconstruct a high quality image from a small number of projections. The classical reconstruction algorithms generally fail since the reconstruction procedure is unstable and suffers from artifacts. A new approach based on the recently developed 'Compressed Sensing' (CS) theory assumes that the unknown image is in some sense 'sparse' or 'compressible', and the reconstruction is formulated through a non linear optimization problem (TV/l1 minimization) by enhancing the sparsity. Using the pixel (or voxel in 3D) as basis, to apply the CS framework in CT one usually needs a 'sparsifying' transform, and combines it with the 'X-ray projector' which applies on the pixel image. In this thesis, we have adapted a 'CT-friendly' radial basis of Gaussian family called 'blob' to the CS-CT framework. The blob has better space-frequency localization properties than the pixel, and many operations, such as the X-ray transform, can be evaluated analytically and are highly parallelizable (on GPU platform). Compared to the classical Kaisser-Bessel blob, the new basis has a multi-scale structure: an image is the sum of dilated and translated radial Mexican hat functions. The typical medical objects are compressible under this basis, so the sparse representation system used in the ordinary CS algorithms is no more needed. 2D simulations show that the existing TV and l1 algorithms are more efficient and the reconstructions have better visual quality than the equivalent approach based on the pixel or wavelet basis. The new approach has also been validated on 2D experimental data, where we have observed that in general the number of projections can be reduced to about 50%, without compromising the image quality. (author) [fr

  14. Fast cross-projection algorithm for reconstruction of seeds in prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayanan, Sreeram; Cho, Paul S.; Marks, Robert J. II

    2002-01-01

    A fast method of seed matching and reconstruction in prostrate brachytherapy is proposed. Previous approaches have required all seeds to be matched with all other seeds in other projections. The fast cross-projection algorithm for the reconstruction of seeds (Fast-CARS) allows for matching of a given seed with a subset of seeds in other projections. This subset lies in a proximal region centered about the projection of a line, connecting the seed to its source, onto other projection planes. The proposed technique permits a significant reduction in computational overhead, as measured by the required number of matching tests. The number of multiplications and additions is also vastly reduced at no trade-off in accuracy. Because of its speed, Fast-CARS can be used in applications requiring real-time performance such as intraoperative dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy. Furthermore, the proposed method makes practical the use of a larger number of views as opposed to previous techniques limited to a maximum use of three views

  15. Direct image reconstruction with limited angle projection data for computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inouye, T.

    1980-01-01

    Discussions are made on the minimum angle range for projection data necessary to reconstruct the complete CT image. As is easily shown from the image reconstruction theorem, the lack of projection angle provides no data for the Fourier transformed function of the object on the corresponding angular directions, where the projections are missing. In a normal situation, the Fourier transformed function of an object image holds an analytic characteristic with respect to two-dimensional orthogonal parameters. This characteristic enables uniquely prolonging the function outside the obtained region employing a sort of analytic continuation with respect to both parameters. In the method reported here, an object pattern, which is confined within a finite range, is shifted to a specified region to have complete orthogonal function expansions without changing the projection angle directions. These orthogonal functions are analytically extended to the missing projection angle range and the whole function is determined. This method does not include any estimation process, whose effectiveness is often seriously jeopardized by the presence of a slight fluctuation component. Computer simulations were carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method

  16. Improving temporal resolution in fMRI using a 3D spiral acquisition and low rank plus sparse (L+S) reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Andrii Y; Herbst, Michael; Andrew Stenger, V

    2017-08-15

    Rapid whole-brain dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is of particular interest in Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI). Faster acquisitions with higher temporal sampling of the BOLD time-course provide several advantages including increased sensitivity in detecting functional activation, the possibility of filtering out physiological noise for improving temporal SNR, and freezing out head motion. Generally, faster acquisitions require undersampling of the data which results in aliasing artifacts in the object domain. A recently developed low-rank (L) plus sparse (S) matrix decomposition model (L+S) is one of the methods that has been introduced to reconstruct images from undersampled dynamic MRI data. The L+S approach assumes that the dynamic MRI data, represented as a space-time matrix M, is a linear superposition of L and S components, where L represents highly spatially and temporally correlated elements, such as the image background, while S captures dynamic information that is sparse in an appropriate transform domain. This suggests that L+S might be suited for undersampled task or slow event-related fMRI acquisitions because the periodic nature of the BOLD signal is sparse in the temporal Fourier transform domain and slowly varying low-rank brain background signals, such as physiological noise and drift, will be predominantly low-rank. In this work, as a proof of concept, we exploit the L+S method for accelerating block-design fMRI using a 3D stack of spirals (SoS) acquisition where undersampling is performed in the k z -t domain. We examined the feasibility of the L+S method to accurately separate temporally correlated brain background information in the L component while capturing periodic BOLD signals in the S component. We present results acquired in control human volunteers at 3T for both retrospective and prospectively acquired fMRI data for a visual activation block-design task. We show that a SoS fMRI acquisition with an

  17. Exact fan-beam image reconstruction algorithm for truncated projection data acquired from an asymmetric half-size detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leng Shuai; Zhuang Tingliang; Nett, Brian E; Chen Guanghong

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new algorithm designed for a specific data truncation problem in fan-beam CT. We consider a scanning configuration in which the fan-beam projection data are acquired from an asymmetrically positioned half-sized detector. Namely, the asymmetric detector only covers one half of the scanning field of view. Thus, the acquired fan-beam projection data are truncated at every view angle. If an explicit data rebinning process is not invoked, this data acquisition configuration will reek havoc on many known fan-beam image reconstruction schemes including the standard filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm and the super-short-scan FBP reconstruction algorithms. However, we demonstrate that a recently developed fan-beam image reconstruction algorithm which reconstructs an image via filtering a backprojection image of differentiated projection data (FBPD) survives the above fan-beam data truncation problem. Namely, we may exactly reconstruct the whole image object using the truncated data acquired in a full scan mode (2π angular range). We may also exactly reconstruct a small region of interest (ROI) using the truncated projection data acquired in a short-scan mode (less than 2π angular range). The most important characteristic of the proposed reconstruction scheme is that an explicit data rebinning process is not introduced. Numerical simulations were conducted to validate the new reconstruction algorithm

  18. Simultaneous static and cine nonenhanced MR angiography using radial sampling and highly constrained back projection reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koktzoglou, Ioannis; Mistretta, Charles A; Giri, Shivraman; Dunkle, Eugene E; Amin, Parag; Edelman, Robert R

    2014-10-01

    To describe a pulse sequence for simultaneous static and cine nonenhanced magnetic resonance angiography (NEMRA) of the peripheral arteries. The peripheral arteries of 10 volunteers and 6 patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) were imaged with the proposed cine NEMRA sequence on a 1.5 Tesla (T) system. The impact of multi-shot imaging and highly constrained back projection (HYPR) reconstruction was examined. The propagation rate of signal along the length of the arterial tree in the cine nonenhanced MR angiograms was quantified. The cine NEMRA sequence simultaneously provided a static MR angiogram showing vascular anatomy as well as a cine display of arterial pulse wave propagation along the entire length of the peripheral arteries. Multi-shot cine NEMRA improved temporal resolution and reduced image artifacts. HYPR reconstruction improved image quality when temporal reconstruction footprints shorter than 100 ms were used (P cine NEMRA was slower in patients with PAD than in volunteers. Simultaneous static and cine NEMRA of the peripheral arteries is feasible. Multi-shot acquisition and HYPR reconstruction can be used to improve arterial conspicuity and temporal resolution. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Minimizing image noise in on-board CT reconstruction using both kilovoltage and megavoltage beam projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Junan; Yin Fangfang

    2007-01-01

    We studied a recently proposed aggregated CT reconstruction technique which combines the complementary advantages of kilovoltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) x-ray imaging. Various phantoms were imaged to study the effects of beam orientations and geometry of the imaging object on image quality of reconstructed CT. It was shown that the quality of aggregated CT was correlated with both kV and MV beam orientations and the degree of this correlation depended upon the geometry of the imaging object. The results indicated that the optimal orientations were those when kV beams pass through the thinner portion and MV beams pass through the thicker portion of the imaging object. A special preprocessing procedure was also developed to perform contrast conversions between kV and MV information prior to image reconstruction. The performance of two reconstruction methods, one filtered backprojection method and one iterative method, were compared. The effects of projection number, beam truncation, and contrast conversion on the CT image quality were investigated

  20. Rigid-body motion correction of the liver in image reconstruction for golden-angle stack-of-stars DCE MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Adam; Balter, James; Cao, Yue

    2018-03-01

    Respiratory motion can affect pharmacokinetic perfusion parameters quantified from liver dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Image registration can be used to align dynamic images after reconstruction. However, intra-image motion blur remains after alignment and can alter the shape of contrast-agent uptake curves. We introduce a method to correct for inter- and intra-image motion during image reconstruction. Sixteen liver dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI examinations of nine subjects were performed using a golden-angle stack-of-stars sequence. For each examination, an image time series with high temporal resolution but severe streak artifacts was reconstructed. Images were aligned using region-limited rigid image registration within a region of interest covering the liver. The transformations resulting from alignment were used to correct raw data for motion by modulating and rotating acquired lines in k-space. The corrected data were then reconstructed using view sharing. Portal-venous input functions extracted from motion-corrected images had significantly greater peak signal enhancements (mean increase: 16%, t-test, P <  0.001) than those from images aligned using image registration after reconstruction. In addition, portal-venous perfusion maps estimated from motion-corrected images showed fewer artifacts close to the edge of the liver. Motion-corrected image reconstruction restores uptake curves distorted by motion. Motion correction also reduces motion artifacts in estimated perfusion parameter maps. Magn Reson Med 79:1345-1353, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  1. Initial communication survey results for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, D.M.

    1991-03-01

    To support the public communication efforts of the Technical Steering Panel of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, a public survey was conducted. The survey was intended to provide information about the public's knowledge and interest in the project and the best ways to communicate project results. Questions about the project were included as part of an omnibus survey conducted by Washington State University. The survey was conducted by phone to Washington State residents in the spring of 1990. This report gives the HEDR-related questions and summary data of responses. Questions associated with the HEDR Project were grouped into four categories: knowledge of the HEDR Project; interest in the project; preferred ways of receiving information about the project (including public information meetings, a newsletter mailed to homes, presentations to civic groups in the respondent's community, a computer bulletin board respondent could access with a modem, information displays at public buildings and shopping malls, and an information video sent to respondent); and level of concern over past exposure from Hanford operations. Questions abut whom state residents are most likely to trust about radiation issues were also part of the omnibus survey, and responses are included in this report

  2. Restoration of the analytically reconstructed OpenPET images by the method of convex projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tashima, Hideaki; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Katsunuma, Takayuki; Suga, Mikio [Chiba Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering; Kinouchi, Shoko [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Chiba Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering; Obi, Takashi [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan). Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering; Kudo, Hiroyuki [Tsukuba Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Systems and Information Engineering

    2011-07-01

    We have proposed the OpenPET geometry which has gaps between detector rings and physically opened field-of-view. The image reconstruction of the OpenPET is classified into an incomplete problem because it does not satisfy the Orlov's condition. Even so, the simulation and experimental studies have shown that applying iterative methods such as the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM) algorithm successfully reconstruct images in the gap area. However, the imaging process of the iterative methods in the OpenPET imaging is not clear. Therefore, the aim of this study is to analytically analyze the OpenPET imaging and estimate implicit constraints involved in the iterative methods. To apply explicit constraints in the OpenPET imaging, we used the method of convex projections for restoration of the images reconstructed by the analytical way in which low-frequency components are lost. Numerical simulations showed that the similar restoration effects are involved both in the ML-EM and the method of convex projections. Therefore, the iterative methods have advantageous effect of restoring lost frequency components of the OpenPET imaging. (orig.)

  3. Analytical algorithm for the generation of polygonal projection data for tomographic reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    Tomographic reconstruction algorithms and filters can be tested using a mathematical phantom, that is, a computer program which takes numerical data as its input and outputs derived projection data. The input data is usually in the form of pixel ''densities'' over a regular grid, or position and dimensions of simple, geometrical objects. The former technique allows a greater variety of objects to be simulated, but is less suitable in the case when very small (relative to the ray-spacing) features are to be simulated. The second technique is normally used to simulate biological specimens, typically a human skull, modelled as a number of ellipses. This is not suitable for simulating non-biological specimens with features such as straight edges and fine cracks. We have therefore devised an algorithm for simulating objects described as a series of polygons. These polygons, or parts of them, may be smaller than the ray-spacing and there is no limit, except that imposed by computing resources, on the complexity, number or superposition of polygons. A simple test of such a phantom, reconstructed using the filtered back-projection method, revealed reconstruction artefacts not normally seen with ''biological'' phantoms. (orig.)

  4. SU-D-207B-04: Morphological Features of MRI as a Correlate of Capsular Contracture in Breast Cancer Patients with Implant-Based Reconstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, N; Sutton, E; Hunt, M; Apte, A; Zhang, J; Oh, J; Mechalakos, J; Mehrara, B; Matros, E; Ho, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Capsular contracture (CC) is a serious complication in patients receiving implant-based reconstruction for breast cancer. The goal of this study was to identify image-based correlates of CC using MRI imaging in breast cancer patients who received both MRI and clinical evaluation following reconstructive surgery. Methods: We analyzed a retrospective dataset of 50 patients who had both a diagnostic MR and a plastic surgeon’s evaluations of CC score (Baker’s score) within a six month period following mastectomy and reconstructive surgery. T2w sagittal MRIs (TR/TE = 3500/102 ms, slice thickness = 4 mm) were used for morphological shape features (roundness, eccentricity, solidity, extent and ratio-length) and histogram features (median, skewness and kurtosis) of the implant and the pectoralis muscle overlying the implant. Implant and pectoralis muscles were segmented in 3D using Computation Environment for Radiological Research (CERR) and shape and histogram features were calculated as a function of Baker’s score. Results: Shape features such as roundness and eccentricity were statistically significant in differentiating grade 1 and grade 2 (p = 0.009; p = 0.06) as well as grade 1 and grade 3 CC (p = 0.001; p = 0.006). Solidity and extent were statistically significant in differentiating grade 1 and grade 3 CC (p = 0.04; p = 0.04). Ratio-length was statistically significant in differentiating all grades of CC except grade 2 and grade 3 that showed borderline significance (p = 0.06). The muscle thickness, median intensity and kurtosis were significant in differentiating between grade 1 and grade 3 (p = 0.02), grade 1 and grade 2 (p = 0.03) and grade 1 and grade 3 (p = 0.01) respectively. Conclusion: Morphological shape features described on MR images were associated with the severity of CC. MRI may be important in objectively evaluating outcomes in breast cancer patients who undergo implant reconstruction.

  5. Revisiting a Dramatic Triangle: The State, Villagers, and Social Activists in Chinese Rural Reconstruction Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stig Thøgersen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of the movement to “construct a new socialist countryside”, Chinese officials and social activists are experimenting with transforming rural social and economic relations. They often draw on discourses dating back to the Rural Reconstruction Movement of the 1920s and 1930s, which saw urban intellectuals making similar efforts to modernize the villages and their inhabitants. This paper analyses the different types of relationships between the state, social activists, and villagers in a number of rural reconstruction projects. The state is still the major player in this field, but traditional top-down procedures are often perceived to be unproductive when it comes to micro-level community building, so state actors are forced to find allies among village elites and social activists.

  6. Comparison of adaptive statistical iterative and filtered back projection reconstruction techniques in brain CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Qingguo; Dewan, Sheilesh Kumar; Li, Ming; Li, Jianying; Mao, Dingbiao; Wang, Zhenglei; Hua, Yanqing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare image quality and visualization of normal structures and lesions in brain computed tomography (CT) with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction techniques in different X-ray tube current–time products. Materials and methods: In this IRB-approved prospective study, forty patients (nineteen men, twenty-one women; mean age 69.5 ± 11.2 years) received brain scan at different tube current–time products (300 and 200 mAs) in 64-section multi-detector CT (GE, Discovery CT750 HD). Images were reconstructed with FBP and four levels of ASIR-FBP blending. Two radiologists (please note that our hospital is renowned for its geriatric medicine department, and these two radiologists are more experienced in chronic cerebral vascular disease than in neoplastic disease, so this research did not contain cerebral tumors but as a discussion) assessed all the reconstructed images for visibility of normal structures, lesion conspicuity, image contrast and diagnostic confidence in a blinded and randomized manner. Volume CT dose index (CTDI vol ) and dose-length product (DLP) were recorded. All the data were analyzed by using SPSS 13.0 statistical analysis software. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between the image qualities at 200 mAs with 50% ASIR blending technique and 300 mAs with FBP technique (p > .05). While between the image qualities at 200 mAs with FBP and 300 mAs with FBP technique a statistically significant difference (p < .05) was found. Conclusion: ASIR provided same image quality and diagnostic ability in brain imaging with greater than 30% dose reduction compared with FBP reconstruction technique

  7. Comparison of adaptive statistical iterative and filtered back projection reconstruction techniques in brain CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Qingguo, E-mail: renqg83@163.com [Department of Radiology, Hua Dong Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Dewan, Sheilesh Kumar, E-mail: sheilesh_d1@hotmail.com [Department of Geriatrics, Hua Dong Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Li, Ming, E-mail: minli77@163.com [Department of Radiology, Hua Dong Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Li, Jianying, E-mail: Jianying.Li@med.ge.com [CT Imaging Research Center, GE Healthcare China, Beijing (China); Mao, Dingbiao, E-mail: maodingbiao74@163.com [Department of Radiology, Hua Dong Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Wang, Zhenglei, E-mail: Williswang_doc@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Electricity Hospital, Shanghai 200050 (China); Hua, Yanqing, E-mail: cjr.huayanqing@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Hua Dong Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To compare image quality and visualization of normal structures and lesions in brain computed tomography (CT) with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction techniques in different X-ray tube current–time products. Materials and methods: In this IRB-approved prospective study, forty patients (nineteen men, twenty-one women; mean age 69.5 ± 11.2 years) received brain scan at different tube current–time products (300 and 200 mAs) in 64-section multi-detector CT (GE, Discovery CT750 HD). Images were reconstructed with FBP and four levels of ASIR-FBP blending. Two radiologists (please note that our hospital is renowned for its geriatric medicine department, and these two radiologists are more experienced in chronic cerebral vascular disease than in neoplastic disease, so this research did not contain cerebral tumors but as a discussion) assessed all the reconstructed images for visibility of normal structures, lesion conspicuity, image contrast and diagnostic confidence in a blinded and randomized manner. Volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and dose-length product (DLP) were recorded. All the data were analyzed by using SPSS 13.0 statistical analysis software. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between the image qualities at 200 mAs with 50% ASIR blending technique and 300 mAs with FBP technique (p > .05). While between the image qualities at 200 mAs with FBP and 300 mAs with FBP technique a statistically significant difference (p < .05) was found. Conclusion: ASIR provided same image quality and diagnostic ability in brain imaging with greater than 30% dose reduction compared with FBP reconstruction technique.

  8. An accelerated threshold-based back-projection algorithm for Compton camera image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundy, Daniel W.; Herman, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Compton camera imaging (CCI) systems are currently under investigation for radiotherapy dose reconstruction and verification. The ability of such a system to provide real-time images during dose delivery will be limited by the computational speed of the image reconstruction algorithm. In this work, the authors present a fast and simple method by which to generate an initial back-projected image from acquired CCI data, suitable for use in a filtered back-projection algorithm or as a starting point for iterative reconstruction algorithms, and compare its performance to the current state of the art. Methods: Each detector event in a CCI system describes a conical surface that includes the true point of origin of the detected photon. Numerical image reconstruction algorithms require, as a first step, the back-projection of each of these conical surfaces into an image space. The algorithm presented here first generates a solution matrix for each slice of the image space by solving the intersection of the conical surface with the image plane. Each element of the solution matrix is proportional to the distance of the corresponding voxel from the true intersection curve. A threshold function was developed to extract those pixels sufficiently close to the true intersection to generate a binary intersection curve. This process is repeated for each image plane for each CCI detector event, resulting in a three-dimensional back-projection image. The performance of this algorithm was tested against a marching algorithm known for speed and accuracy. Results: The threshold-based algorithm was found to be approximately four times faster than the current state of the art with minimal deficit to image quality, arising from the fact that a generically applicable threshold function cannot provide perfect results in all situations. The algorithm fails to extract a complete intersection curve in image slices near the detector surface for detector event cones having axes nearly

  9. GPU-based fast cone beam CT reconstruction from undersampled and noisy projection data via total variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Xun; Lou Yifei; Li Ruijiang; Song, William Y.; Jiang, Steve B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) plays an important role in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). However, the large radiation dose from serial CBCT scans in most IGRT procedures raises a clinical concern, especially for pediatric patients who are essentially excluded from receiving IGRT for this reason. The goal of this work is to develop a fast GPU-based algorithm to reconstruct CBCT from undersampled and noisy projection data so as to lower the imaging dose. Methods: The CBCT is reconstructed by minimizing an energy functional consisting of a data fidelity term and a total variation regularization term. The authors developed a GPU-friendly version of the forward-backward splitting algorithm to solve this model. A multigrid technique is also employed. Results: It is found that 20-40 x-ray projections are sufficient to reconstruct images with satisfactory quality for IGRT. The reconstruction time ranges from 77 to 130 s on an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 (NVIDIA, Santa Clara, CA) GPU card, depending on the number of projections used, which is estimated about 100 times faster than similar iterative reconstruction approaches. Moreover, phantom studies indicate that the algorithm enables the CBCT to be reconstructed under a scanning protocol with as low as 0.1 mA s/projection. Comparing with currently widely used full-fan head and neck scanning protocol of ∼360 projections with 0.4 mA s/projection, it is estimated that an overall 36-72 times dose reduction has been achieved in our fast CBCT reconstruction algorithm. Conclusions: This work indicates that the developed GPU-based CBCT reconstruction algorithm is capable of lowering imaging dose considerably. The high computation efficiency in this algorithm makes the iterative CBCT reconstruction approach applicable in real clinical environments.

  10. GPU-based fast cone beam CT reconstruction from undersampled and noisy projection data via total variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xun; Lou, Yifei; Li, Ruijiang; Song, William Y; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-04-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) plays an important role in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). However, the large radiation dose from serial CBCT scans in most IGRT procedures raises a clinical concern, especially for pediatric patients who are essentially excluded from receiving IGRT for this reason. The goal of this work is to develop a fast GPU-based algorithm to reconstruct CBCT from undersampled and noisy projection data so as to lower the imaging dose. The CBCT is reconstructed by minimizing an energy functional consisting of a data fidelity term and a total variation regularization term. The authors developed a GPU-friendly version of the forward-backward splitting algorithm to solve this model. A multigrid technique is also employed. It is found that 20-40 x-ray projections are sufficient to reconstruct images with satisfactory quality for IGRT. The reconstruction time ranges from 77 to 130 s on an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 (NVIDIA, Santa Clara, CA) GPU card, depending on the number of projections used, which is estimated about 100 times faster than similar iterative reconstruction approaches. Moreover, phantom studies indicate that the algorithm enables the CBCT to be reconstructed under a scanning protocol with as low as 0.1 mA s/projection. Comparing with currently widely used full-fan head and neck scanning protocol of approximately 360 projections with 0.4 mA s/projection, it is estimated that an overall 36-72 times dose reduction has been achieved in our fast CBCT reconstruction algorithm. This work indicates that the developed GPU-based CBCT reconstruction algorithm is capable of lowering imaging dose considerably. The high computation efficiency in this algorithm makes the iterative CBCT reconstruction approach applicable in real clinical environments.

  11. A work bibliography on native food consumption, demography and lifestyle. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, C.E.; Lee, W.J.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a bibliography for the Native American tribe participants in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project to use. The HEDR Project`s primary objective is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Eight Native American tribes are responsible for estimating daily and seasonal consumption of traditional foods, demography, and other lifestyle factors that could have affected the radiation dose received by tribal members. This report provides a bibliography of recorded accounts that tribal researchers may use to verify their estimates. The bibliographic citations include references to information on the specific tribes, Columbia River plateau ethnobotany, infant feeding practices and milk consumption, nutritional studies and radiation, tribal economic and demographic characteristics (1940--1970), research methods, primary sources from the National Archives, regional archives, libraries, and museums.

  12. Use of the geometric mean of opposing planar projections in pre-reconstruction restoration of SPECT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulfelfel, D.; Rangayyan, R.M.; Hahn, L.J.; Kloiber, R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a restoration scheme for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images that performs restoration before reconstruction (pre-reconstruction restoration) from planar (projection) images. In this scheme, the pixel-by-pixel geometric mean of each pair of opposing (conjugate) planar projections is computed prior to the reconstruction process. The averaging process is shown to help in making the degradation phenomenon less dependent on the distance of each point of the object from the camera. The restoration filters investigated are the Wiener and power spectrum equalization filters. (author)

  13. GPU acceleration of 3D forward and backward projection using separable footprints for X-ray CT image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Meng; Fessler, Jeffrey A. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

    2011-07-01

    Iterative 3D image reconstruction methods can improve image quality over conventional filtered back projection (FBP) in X-ray computed tomography. However, high computational costs deter the routine use of iterative reconstruction clinically. The separable footprint method for forward and back-projection simplifies the integrals over a detector cell in a way that is quite accurate and also has a relatively efficient CPU implementation. In this project, we implemented the separable footprints method for both forward and backward projection on a graphics processing unit (GPU) with NVDIA's parallel computing architecture (CUDA). This paper describes our GPU kernels for the separable footprint method and simulation results. (orig.)

  14. Columbia River pathway report: phase I of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes the river-pathway portion of the first phase of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The HEDR Project is estimating radiation doses that could have been received by the public from the Department of Energy's Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the river-pathway dose reconstruction effort sought to determine whether dose estimates could be calculated for populations in the area from above the Hanford Site at Priest Rapids Dam to below the site at McNary Dam from January 1964 to December 1966. Of the potential sources of radionuclides from the river, fish consumption was the most important. Doses from drinking water were lower at Pasco than at Richland and lower at Kennewick than at Pasco. The median values of preliminary dose estimates calculated by HEDR are similar to independent, previously published estimates of average doses to Richland residents. Later phases of the HEDR Project will address dose estimates for periods other than 1964--1966 and for populations downstream of McNary Dam. 17 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Development of an image reconstruction algorithm for a few number of projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Wilson S.; Brandao, Luiz E.; Braz, Delson

    2007-01-01

    An image reconstruction algorithm was developed for specific cases of radiotracer applications in industry (rotating cylindrical mixers), involving a very few number of projection data. The algorithm was planned for imaging radioactive isotope distributions around the center of circular planes. The method consists of adapting the original expectation maximization algorithm (EM) to solve the ill-posed emission tomography inverse problem in order to reconstruct transversal 2D images of an object with only four projections. To achieve this aim, counts of photons emitted by selected radioactive sources in the plane, after they had been simulated using the commercial software MICROSHIELD 5.05, constitutes the projections and a computational code (SPECTEM) was developed to generate activity vectors or images related to those sources. SPECTEM is flexible to support simultaneous changes of the detectors's geometry, the medium under investigation and the properties of the gamma radiation. As a consequence of the code had been followed correctly the proposed method, good results were obtained and they encouraged us to continue the next step of the research: the validation of SPECTEM utilizing experimental data to check its real performance. We aim this code will improve considerably radiotracer methodology, making easier the diagnosis of fails in industrial processes. (author)

  16. Development of an image reconstruction algorithm for a few number of projection data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Wilson S.; Brandao, Luiz E. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN-CNEN/RJ), Rio de Janeiro , RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: wilson@ien.gov.br; brandao@ien.gov.br; Braz, Delson [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programa de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear]. E-mail: delson@mailhost.lin.ufrj.br

    2007-07-01

    An image reconstruction algorithm was developed for specific cases of radiotracer applications in industry (rotating cylindrical mixers), involving a very few number of projection data. The algorithm was planned for imaging radioactive isotope distributions around the center of circular planes. The method consists of adapting the original expectation maximization algorithm (EM) to solve the ill-posed emission tomography inverse problem in order to reconstruct transversal 2D images of an object with only four projections. To achieve this aim, counts of photons emitted by selected radioactive sources in the plane, after they had been simulated using the commercial software MICROSHIELD 5.05, constitutes the projections and a computational code (SPECTEM) was developed to generate activity vectors or images related to those sources. SPECTEM is flexible to support simultaneous changes of the detectors's geometry, the medium under investigation and the properties of the gamma radiation. As a consequence of the code had been followed correctly the proposed method, good results were obtained and they encouraged us to continue the next step of the research: the validation of SPECTEM utilizing experimental data to check its real performance. We aim this code will improve considerably radiotracer methodology, making easier the diagnosis of fails in industrial processes. (author)

  17. Myocardial perfusion magnetic resonance imaging using sliding-window conjugate-gradient highly constrained back-projection reconstruction for detection of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Heng; Yang, Jun; Liu, Jing; Ge, Lan; An, Jing; Tang, Qing; Li, Han; Zhang, Yu; Chen, David; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jiabin; Liang, Zhigang; Lin, Kai; Jin, Lixin; Bi, Xiaoming; Li, Kuncheng; Li, Debiao

    2012-04-15

    Myocardial perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with sliding-window conjugate-gradient highly constrained back-projection reconstruction (SW-CG-HYPR) allows whole left ventricular coverage, improved temporal and spatial resolution and signal/noise ratio, and reduced cardiac motion-related image artifacts. The accuracy of this technique for detecting coronary artery disease (CAD) has not been determined in a large number of patients. We prospectively evaluated the diagnostic performance of myocardial perfusion MRI with SW-CG-HYPR in patients with suspected CAD. A total of 50 consecutive patients who were scheduled for coronary angiography with suspected CAD underwent myocardial perfusion MRI with SW-CG-HYPR at 3.0 T. The perfusion defects were interpreted qualitatively by 2 blinded observers and were correlated with x-ray angiographic stenoses ≥50%. The prevalence of CAD was 56%. In the per-patient analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of SW-CG-HYPR was 96% (95% confidence interval 82% to 100%), 82% (95% confidence interval 60% to 95%), 87% (95% confidence interval 70% to 96%), 95% (95% confidence interval 74% to100%), and 90% (95% confidence interval 82% to 98%), respectively. In the per-vessel analysis, the corresponding values were 98% (95% confidence interval 91% to 100%), 89% (95% confidence interval 80% to 94%), 86% (95% confidence interval 76% to 93%), 99% (95% confidence interval 93% to 100%), and 93% (95% confidence interval 89% to 97%), respectively. In conclusion, myocardial perfusion MRI using SW-CG-HYPR allows whole left ventricular coverage and high resolution and has high diagnostic accuracy in patients with suspected CAD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The cerebellar development in chinese children-a study by voxel-based volume measurement of reconstructed 3D MRI scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kuan-Hsun; Chen, Chia-Yuan; Shen, Ein-Yiao

    2011-01-01

    Cerebellar disorder was frequently reported to have relation with structural brain volume alteration and/or morphology change. In dealing with such clinical situations, we need a convenient and noninvasive imaging tool to provide clinicians with a means of tracing developmental changes in the cerebellum. Herein, we present a new daily practice method for cerebellum imaging that uses a work station and a software program to process reconstructed 3D neuroimages after MRI scanning. In a 3-y period, 3D neuroimages reconstructed from MRI scans of 50 children aged 0.2-12.7 y were taken. The resulting images were then statistically analyzed against a growth curve. We observed a remarkable increase in the size of the cerebellum in the first 2 y of life. Furthermore, the unmyelinated cerebellum grew mainly between birth and 2 y of age in the postnatal stage. In contrast, the postnatal development of the brain mainly depended on the growth of myelinated cerebellum from birth through adolescence. This study presents basic data from a study of ethnic Chinese children's cerebellums using reconstructed 3D brain images. Based on the technique we introduce here, clinicians can evaluate the growth of the brain.

  19. Improved correlation of histological data with DCE MRI parameter maps by 3D reconstruction, reslicing and parameterization of the histological images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiessling, Fabian; Le-Huu, Martin; Semmler, Wolfhard; Kunert, Tobias; Thorn, Matthias; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Vosseler, Silvia; Fusenig, Norbert E.; Schmidt, Kerstin; Hoffend, Johannes

    2005-01-01

    Due to poor correlation of slice thickness and orientation, verification of radiological methods with histology is difficult. Thus, a procedure for three-dimensional reconstruction, reslicing and parameterization of histological data was developed, enabling a proper correlation with radiological data. Two different subcutaneous tumors were examined by MR microangiography and DCE-MRI, the latter being post-processed using a pharmacokinetic two-compartment model. Subsequently, tumors were serially sectioned and vessels stained with immunofluorescence markers. A ray-tracing algorithm performed three-dimensional visualization of the histological data, allowing virtually reslicing to thicker sections analogous to MRI slice geometry. Thick slices were processed as parameter maps color coding the marker density in the depth of the slice. Histological 3D reconstructions displayed the diffuse angioarchitecture of malignant tumors. Resliced histological images enabled specification of high enhancing areas seen on MR microangiography as large single vessels or vessel assemblies. In orthogonally reconstructed histological slices, single vessels were delineated. ROI analysis showed significant correlation between histological parameter maps of vessel density and MR parameter maps (r=0.83, P=0.05). The 3D approach to histology improves correlation of histological and radiological data due to proper matching of slice geometry. This method can be used with any histological stain, thus enabling a multivariable correlation of non-invasive data and histology. (orig.)

  20. The Avignon Bridge: a 3d Reconstruction Project Integrating Archaeological, Historical and Gemorphological Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, M.; Nony, N.; Gugi, L.; Bishop, A.; De Luca, L.

    2015-02-01

    The history and identity of the Avignon's bridge is inseparable from that of the Rhône river. Therefore, in order to share the history and memory of the Rhône, it is essential to get to know this bridge and especially to identify and make visible the traces of its past, its construction, its interaction with the river dynamics, which greatly influenced his life. These are the objectives of the PAVAGE project that focuses on digitally surveying, modelling and re-visiting a heritage site of primary importance with the aim of virtually restoring the link between the two sides which, after the disappearance of the Roman bridge of Arles, constituted for a long time the only connection between Lyon or Vienna and the sea. Therefore, this project has an important geo-historical dimension for which geo-morphological and paleoenvironmental studies were implemented in connection with the latest digital simulation methods exploiting geographic information systems. By integrating knowledge and reflections of archaeologists, historians, geomorphologists, environmentalists, architects, engineers and computer scientists, the result of this project (which involved 5 laboratories during 4 years) is a 3D digital model covering an extension of 50 km2 achieved by integrating satellite imagery, UAV-based acquisitions, terrestrial laser scanning and photogrammetry, etc. Beyond the actions of scientific valorisation concerning the historical and geomorphological dimensions of the project, the results of this work of this interdisciplinary investigation and interpretation of this site are today integrated within a location-based augmented reality application allowing tourists to exploring the virtual reconstruction of the bridge and its environment through tablets inside the portion of territory covered by this project (between Avignon and Villeneuve-lez-Avignon). This paper presents the main aspects of the 3D virtual reconstruction approach.

  1. Sub-sequence Factorization-an Effective Approach for Projective Reconstruction under Occlusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Le; HU Zhanyi

    2001-01-01

    Projective reconstruction is a key step for 3D metric reconstruction from a sequence of images captured by an uncalibrated camera. Due to its inherent robustness, the factorization method is widely used in literatures. However, the main shortcoming of the standard factorization method is that it requires the corresponding points to appear across ALL the images. When large changes of view angles occur in the image sequence, or the scene is easy to be self-occluded, nearly it will be very difficult to have some corresponding points visible across all the images. But it is much easier for only several images to have enough correspondences required by factorization method. These images are called as a subsequence in the whole image set. In this paper,a sub-sequence factorization method is proposed to cope with the problem. The basic principle of the sub-sequence factorization method is to divide a long image sequence into several short subsequences according to its spatial continuity, and the standard factorization method is employed for each subsequence.Then, a novel alignment process is invoked to transform different reconstructions under different subsequences into one reference coordinates system. It is more practical as it only demands that there are enough correspondences in each subsequence, not the whole sequence. The proposed sub-sequence factorization method preserves the robustness aspect embedded in the standard factorization method. The experiments on synthetic and real images validate our proposed new method.

  2. Block matching sparsity regularization-based image reconstruction for incomplete projection data in computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ailong; Li, Lei; Zheng, Zhizhong; Zhang, Hanming; Wang, Linyuan; Hu, Guoen; Yan, Bin

    2018-02-01

    In medical imaging many conventional regularization methods, such as total variation or total generalized variation, impose strong prior assumptions which can only account for very limited classes of images. A more reasonable sparse representation frame for images is still badly needed. Visually understandable images contain meaningful patterns, and combinations or collections of these patterns can be utilized to form some sparse and redundant representations which promise to facilitate image reconstructions. In this work, we propose and study block matching sparsity regularization (BMSR) and devise an optimization program using BMSR for computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction for an incomplete projection set. The program is built as a constrained optimization, minimizing the L1-norm of the coefficients of the image in the transformed domain subject to data observation and positivity of the image itself. To solve the program efficiently, a practical method based on the proximal point algorithm is developed and analyzed. In order to accelerate the convergence rate, a practical strategy for tuning the BMSR parameter is proposed and applied. The experimental results for various settings, including real CT scanning, have verified the proposed reconstruction method showing promising capabilities over conventional regularization.

  3. Comparison of adaptive statistical iterative and filtered back projection reconstruction techniques in quantifying coronary calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masahiro; Kimura, Fumiko; Umezawa, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Yusuke; Ogawa, Harumi

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) has been used to reduce radiation dose in cardiac computed tomography. However, change of image parameters by ASIR as compared to filtered back projection (FBP) may influence quantification of coronary calcium. To investigate the influence of ASIR on calcium quantification in comparison to FBP. In 352 patients, CT images were reconstructed using FBP alone, FBP combined with ASIR 30%, 50%, 70%, and ASIR 100% based on the same raw data. Image noise, plaque density, Agatston scores and calcium volumes were compared among the techniques. Image noise, Agatston score, and calcium volume decreased significantly with ASIR compared to FBP (each P ASIR reduced Agatston score by 10.5% to 31.0%. In calcified plaques both of patients and a phantom, ASIR decreased maximum CT values and calcified plaque size. In comparison to FBP, adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) may significantly decrease Agatston scores and calcium volumes. Copyright © 2016 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A technique for on-board CT reconstruction using both kilovoltage and megavoltage beam projections for 3D treatment verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Fangfang; Guan Huaiqun; Lu Wenkai

    2005-01-01

    The technologies with kilovoltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) imaging in the treatment room are now available for image-guided radiation therapy to improve patient setup and target localization accuracy. However, development of strategies to efficiently and effectively implement these technologies for patient treatment remains challenging. This study proposed an aggregated technique for on-board CT reconstruction using combination of kV and MV beam projections to improve the data acquisition efficiency and image quality. These projections were acquired in the treatment room at the patient treatment position with a new kV imaging device installed on the accelerator gantry, orthogonal to the existing MV portal imaging device. The projection images for a head phantom and a contrast phantom were acquired using both the On-Board Imager TM kV imaging device and the MV portal imager mounted orthogonally on the gantry of a Varian Clinac TM 21EX linear accelerator. MV projections were converted into kV information prior to the aggregated CT reconstruction. The multilevel scheme algebraic-reconstruction technique was used to reconstruct CT images involving either full, truncated, or a combination of both full and truncated projections. An adaptive reconstruction method was also applied, based on the limited numbers of kV projections and truncated MV projections, to enhance the anatomical information around the treatment volume and to minimize the radiation dose. The effects of the total number of projections, the combination of kV and MV projections, and the beam truncation of MV projections on the details of reconstructed kV/MV CT images were also investigated

  5. Weighted regularized statistical shape space projection for breast 3D model reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Guillermo; Ramon, Eduard; García, Jaime; Sukno, Federico M; Ballester, Miguel A González

    2018-05-02

    The use of 3D imaging has increased as a practical and useful tool for plastic and aesthetic surgery planning. Specifically, the possibility of representing the patient breast anatomy in a 3D shape and simulate aesthetic or plastic procedures is a great tool for communication between surgeon and patient during surgery planning. For the purpose of obtaining the specific 3D model of the breast of a patient, model-based reconstruction methods can be used. In particular, 3D morphable models (3DMM) are a robust and widely used method to perform 3D reconstruction. However, if additional prior information (i.e., known landmarks) is combined with the 3DMM statistical model, shape constraints can be imposed to improve the 3DMM fitting accuracy. In this paper, we present a framework to fit a 3DMM of the breast to two possible inputs: 2D photos and 3D point clouds (scans). Our method consists in a Weighted Regularized (WR) projection into the shape space. The contribution of each point in the 3DMM shape is weighted allowing to assign more relevance to those points that we want to impose as constraints. Our method is applied at multiple stages of the 3D reconstruction process. Firstly, it can be used to obtain a 3DMM initialization from a sparse set of 3D points. Additionally, we embed our method in the 3DMM fitting process in which more reliable or already known 3D points or regions of points, can be weighted in order to preserve their shape information. The proposed method has been tested in two different input settings: scans and 2D pictures assessing both reconstruction frameworks with very positive results. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantitative MRI T2 relaxation time evaluation of knee cartilage: comparison of meniscus-intact and -injured knees after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Chen, Shuang; Tao, Hongyue; Chen, Shiyi

    2015-04-01

    Associated meniscal injury is well recognized at anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, and it is a known risk factor for osteoarthritis. To evaluate and characterize the postoperative appearance of articular cartilage after different meniscal treatment in ACL-reconstructed knees using T2 relaxation time evaluation on MRI. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 62 consecutive patients who under ACL reconstruction were recruited in this study, including 23 patients undergoing partial meniscectomy (MS group), 21 patients undergoing meniscal repair (MR group), and 18 patients with intact menisci (MI group) at time of surgery. Clinical evaluation, including subjective functional scores and physical examination, was performed on the same day as the MRI examination and at follow-up times ranging from 2 to 4.2 years. The MRI multiecho sagittal images were segmented to determine the T2 relaxation time value of each meniscus and articular cartilage plate. Differences in each measurement were compared among groups. No patient had joint-line tenderness or reported pain or clicking on McMurray test or instability. There were also no statistically significant differences in functional scores or medial or lateral meniscus T2 values among the 3 groups (P > .05 for both). There was a significantly higher articular cartilage T2 value in the medial femorotibial articular cartilage for the MS group (P T2 value between the MS and MR groups (P > .05) in each articular cartilage plate. The medial tibial articular cartilage T2 value had a significant positive correlation with medial meniscus T2 value (r = 0.287; P = .024) CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that knees with meniscectomy or meniscal repair had articular cartilage degeneration at 2 to 4 years postoperatively, with higher articular cartilage T2 relaxation time values compared with the knees with an intact meniscus. © 2015 The Author(s).

  7. Summary of literature review of risk communication: Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byram, S.J.

    1991-05-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project will estimate radiation exposures people may have received from radioactive materials released during past operations at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The project is being conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) will use HEDR dose estimates in studies to investigate a potential link between thyroid disease and historical Hanford emissions. The HEDR Project was initiated to address public concerns about the possible health impacts from past releases of radioactive materials from Hanford. The TSP recognized early in the project that special mechanisms would be required to communicate effectively to the many different concerned audiences. To identify and develop these mechanisms, the TSP issued Directive 89-7 to PNL in May 1989. The TSP directed PNL to examine methods to communicate the causes and effects of uncertainties in the dose estimates. A literature review was conducted as the first activity in response to the TSP's directive. This report presents the results of the literature review. The objective of the literature review was to identify ''key principles'' that could be applied to develop communications strategies for the project. 26 refs., 6 figs

  8. Integrated task plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, June 1992 through May 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipler, D.B.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses from Hanford Site operations since 1944 to representative individuals. The primary objective of work to be performed through May 1994 is to determine the project's appropriate scope: space, time, radionuclides, pathways and representative individuals; determine the project's appropriate level of accuracy/level of uncertainty in dose estimates; complete model and data development; and estimate doses for the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study and representative individuals. A major objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate doses to the thyroid of individuals who were exposed to iodine-131. A principal pathway for many of these individuals was milk from cows that ate vegetation contaminated by iodine-131 released into the air from Hanford facilities. The plan for June 1992 through May 1994 has been prepared based on activities and budgets approved by the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) at its meetings on January 7--9, 1993 and February 25--26, 1993. The activities can be divided into three broad categories: (1) computer code and data development activities, (2) calculation of doses, and (3) technical and communication support to the TSP and the TSP Native American Working Group (NAWG). The following activities will be conducted to accomplish project objectives through May 1994

  9. PROJECT OF THE TRANS-SIBERIAN RAILWAY RECONSTRUCTION AS AN OBJECT OF SOCIAL EFFICIENCY EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kibalov E. B.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of social efficiency evaluation concerning the project of the Trans-Siberian Railway reconstruction. This project is to be realized in the situation of strategic (fundamental uncertainty. Existing tools are not sufficient for solving this problem (because of qualitatively different nature of the project as compared with those abroad, much higher degree of uncertainty, and the lack of estimates for a number of necessary norms. Our study aims at development of an approach that would be adequate to the problem under consideration. We developed a two-level model for investment decision-making for appraisal and selection of a variant of the large-scale project. The upper level of this model bases on the macroeconomic approach (with the use of a specialized version of the Inter-Sector Inter-Region Optimization Model; the lower level bases on the microeconomic approach. As opposed to the foreign practice, the efficiency evaluation and selection of a variant of the transport project is top-down. End-to-end taking uncertainty into account is implemented. A tool for this is the scenario approach on the upper level, and the fuzzy set theory at the lower one.

  10. FY 1991 Task plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses from Hanford Site operations since 1944 to populations and individuals. The objectives of work in Fiscal Year (FY) 1991 are to analyze data and models used in Phase 1 and restructure the models to increase accuracy and reduce uncertainty in dose estimation capability. Databases will be expanded and efforts will begin to determine the appropriate scope (space, time, radionuclides, pathways and individuals/population groups) and accuracy (level of uncertainty in dose estimates) for the project. Project scope and accuracy requirements, once defined, can be translated into additional model and data requirements later in the project. Task plans for FY 1991 have been prepared based on activities approved by the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) in October 1990 and mid-year revisions discussed at the TSP planning/budget workshop in February 1991. The activities can be divided into two broad categories: (1) model and data development and evaluation, (2) project, technical and communication support. 3 figs., 1 tab

  11. Image reconstruction for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) by using projection-angle-dependent filter functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yeonok; Park, Chulkyu; Cho, Hyosung; Je, Uikyu; Hong, Daeki; Lee, Minsik; Cho, Heemoon; Choi, Sungil; Koo, Yangseo [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is considered in clinics as a standard three-dimensional imaging modality, allowing the earlier detection of cancer. It typically acquires only 10-30 projections over a limited angle range of 15 - 60 .deg. with a stationary detector and typically uses a computationally-efficient filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm for image reconstruction. However, a common FBP algorithm yields poor image quality resulting from the loss of average image value and the presence of severe image artifacts due to the elimination of the dc component of the image by the ramp filter and to the incomplete data, respectively. As an alternative, iterative reconstruction methods are often used in DBT to overcome these difficulties, even though they are still computationally expensive. In this study, as a compromise, we considered a projection-angle dependent filtering method in which one-dimensional geometry-adapted filter kernels are computed with the aid of a conjugate-gradient method and are incorporated into the standard FBP framework. We implemented the proposed algorithm and performed systematic simulation works to investigate the imaging characteristics. Our results indicate that the proposed method is superior to a conventional FBP method for DBT imaging and has a comparable computational cost, while preserving good image homogeneity and edge sharpening with no serious image artifacts.

  12. Regional sea level projections with observed gauge, altimeter and reconstructed data along China coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, L.; Shi, H.; Zhang, S.

    2017-12-01

    Acting as the typical shelf seas in northwest Pacific Ocean, regional sea level along China coasts exhibits complicated and multiscale spatial-temporal characteristics under circumstance of global change. In this paper, sea level variability is investigated with tide gauges records, satellite altimetry data, reconstructed sea surface height, and CMIP simulation fields. Sea level exhibits the interannual variability imposing on a remarkable sea level rising in the China seas and coastal region, although its seasonal signals are significant as the results of global ocean. Sea level exhibits faster rising rate during the satellite altimetry era, nearly twice to the rate during the last sixty years. AVISO data and reconstructed sea surface heights illustrate good correlation coefficient, more than 0.8. Interannual sea level variation is mainly modulated by the low-frequency variability of wind fields over northern Pacific Ocean by local and remote processes. Meanwhile sea level varies obviously by the transport fluctuation and bimodality path of Kuroshio. Its variability possibly linked to internal variability of the ocean-atmosphere system influenced by ENSO oscillation. China Sea level have been rising during the 20th century, and are projected to continue to rise during this century. Sea level can reach the highest extreme level in latter half of 21st century. Modeled sea level including regional sea level projection combined with the IPCC climate scenarios play a significant role on coastal storm surge evolution. The vulnerable regions along the ECS coast will suffer from the increasing storm damage with sea level variations.

  13. Draft Air Pathway Report: Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-20

    This report summarizes the air pathway portion of the first phase of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, conducted by Battelle staff at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel. The HEDR Project is estimating historical radiation doses that could have been received by populations near the Department of Energy's Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the air-pathway dose reconstruction sought to determine whether dose estimates could be calculated for populations in the 10 counties nearest the Hanford Site from atmospheric releases of iodine-131 from the site from 1944--1947. Phase 1 demonstrated the following: HEDR-calculated source-term estimates of iodine-131 releases to the atmosphere were within 20% of previously published estimates; calculated vegetation concentrations of iodine-131 agree well with previously published measurements; the highest of the Phase 1 preliminary dose estimates to the thyroid are consistent with independent, previously published estimates of doses to maximally exposed individuals; and relatively crude, previously published measurements of thyroid burdens for Hanford workers are in the range of average burdens that the HEDR model estimated for similar reference individuals'' for the period 1944--1947. 4 refs., 10 figs., 9 tabs.

  14. Fully three-dimensional reconstruction from data collected on concentric cubes in Fourier space: implementation and a sample application to MRI [magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, G.T.; Roberts, D.; Axel, L.

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm is proposed for rapid and accurate reconstruction from data collected in Fourier space at points arranged on a grid of concentric cubes. The whole process has computational complexity of the same order as required for the 3D fast Fourier transform and so (for medically relevant sizes of the data set) it is faster than backprojection into the same size rectangular grid. The design of the algorithm ensures that no interpolations are needed, in contrast to methods involving backprojection with their unavoidable interpolations. As an application, a 3D data collection method for MRI has been designed which directly samples the Fourier transform of the object to be reconstructed on concentric cubes as needed for the algorithm. (author)

  15. Coronary CT angiography: Comparison of a novel iterative reconstruction with filtered back projection for reconstruction of low-dose CT—Initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takx, Richard A.P.; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Moscariello, Antonio; Das, Marco; Rowe, Garrett; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Fink, Christian; Henzler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively compare subjective and objective image quality in 20% tube current coronary CT angiography (cCTA) datasets between an iterative reconstruction algorithm (SAFIRE) and traditional filtered back projection (FBP). Materials and methods: Twenty patients underwent a prospectively ECG-triggered dual-step cCTA protocol using 2nd generation dual-source CT (DSCT). CT raw data was reconstructed using standard FBP at full-dose (Group 1 a) and 80% tube current reduced low-dose (Group 1 b). The low-dose raw data was additionally reconstructed using iterative raw data reconstruction (Group 2 ). Attenuation and image noise were measured in three regions of interest and signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) as well as contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) was calculated. Subjective diagnostic image quality was evaluated using a 4-point Likert scale. Results: Mean image noise of group 2 was lowered by 22% on average when compared to group 1 b (p 2 compared to group 1 b (p 2 (1.88 ± 0.63) was also rated significantly higher when compared to group 1 b (1.58 ± 0.63, p = 0.004). Conclusions: Image quality of 80% tube current reduced iteratively reconstructed cCTA raw data is significantly improved when compared to standard FBP and consequently may improve the diagnostic accuracy of cCTA

  16. Integrated Task Plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, FY 1992 through May 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipler, D.B.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses from Hanford Site operations since 1944 to populations and individuals. The primary objective of work to be performed through May 1994 is to (1) determine the project's appropriate scope (space, time, radionuclides, pathways and individuals/population groups), (2) determine the project's appropriate level of accuracy (level of uncertainty in dose estimates) for the project, (3) complete model and data development, and (4) estimate doses for the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS), representative individuals, and special populations as described herein. The plan for FY 1992 through May 1994 has been prepared based on activities and budgets approved by the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) at its meetings on August 19--20, 1991, and April 23--25, 1992. The activities can be divided into four broad categories: (1) model and data evaluation activities, (2)additional dose estimates, (3) model and data development activities, and (4)technical and communication support

  17. [Reconstruction and measurement of a digital dental model using grating projection and reverse engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhenzhen, Wang; Yi, Lu; Jun, Song; Jun, Chen; Qin, Zhou

    2015-02-01

    This work lays the foundation for establishing a digital model database with normal occlusion. A digital dental cast is acquired through grating projection, and model features are measured through reverse engineering. The grating projection system controlled by a computer was projected onto the surface of a normal dental model. Three-dimensional contour data were obtained through multi-angle shooting. A three-dimensional model was constructed, and the model features were analyzed by using reverse engineering. The digital model was compared with the plaster model to determine the accuracy of the measurement system. The structure of three-dimensional reconstruction model was clear. The digital models of two measurements exhibited no significant difference (P > 0.05). When digital and plaster models were measured, we found that the crown length and arch width were not statistically different (P > 0.05), whereas the difference between the crown width and arch length was statistically significant (P model by using the grating projection technique and reverse engineering can be used for dental model measurement in clinic al and scientific research and can provide a scientific method for establishing a digital model database with normal occlusion.

  18. Precise 3D track reconstruction algorithm for the ICARUS T600 liquid argon time projection chamber detector

    CERN Document Server

    Antonello, M

    2013-01-01

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) detectors offer charged particle imaging capability with remarkable spatial resolution. Precise event reconstruction procedures are critical in order to fully exploit the potential of this technology. In this paper we present a new, general approach of three-dimensional reconstruction for the LAr TPC with a practical application to track reconstruction. The efficiency of the method is evaluated on a sample of simulated tracks. We present also the application of the method to the analysis of real data tracks collected during the ICARUS T600 detector operation with the CNGS neutrino beam.

  19. Precise 3D Track Reconstruction Algorithm for the ICARUS T600 Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Antonello

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC detectors offer charged particle imaging capability with remarkable spatial resolution. Precise event reconstruction procedures are critical in order to fully exploit the potential of this technology. In this paper we present a new, general approach to 3D reconstruction for the LAr TPC with a practical application to the track reconstruction. The efficiency of the method is evaluated on a sample of simulated tracks. We present also the application of the method to the analysis of stopping particle tracks collected during the ICARUS T600 detector operation with the CNGS neutrino beam.

  20. Comparison analysis between filtered back projection and algebraic reconstruction technique on microwave imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadhan, Rifqi; Prabowo, Rian Gilang; Aprilliyani, Ria; Basari

    2018-02-01

    Victims of acute cancer and tumor are growing each year and cancer becomes one of the causes of human deaths in the world. Cancers or tumor tissue cells are cells that grow abnormally and turn to take over and damage the surrounding tissues. At the beginning, cancers or tumors do not have definite symptoms in its early stages, and can even attack the tissues inside of the body. This phenomena is not identifiable under visual human observation. Therefore, an early detection system which is cheap, quick, simple, and portable is essensially required to anticipate the further development of cancer or tumor. Among all of the modalities, microwave imaging is considered to be a cheaper, simple, and portable system method. There are at least two simple image reconstruction algorithms i.e. Filtered Back Projection (FBP) and Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART), which have been adopted in some common modalities. In this paper, both algorithms will be compared by reconstructing the image from an artificial tissue model (i.e. phantom), which has two different dielectric distributions. We addressed two performance comparisons, namely quantitative and qualitative analysis. Qualitative analysis includes the smoothness of the image and also the success in distinguishing dielectric differences by observing the image with human eyesight. In addition, quantitative analysis includes Histogram, Structural Similarity Index (SSIM), Mean Squared Error (MSE), and Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR) calculation were also performed. As a result, quantitative parameters of FBP might show better values than the ART. However, ART is likely more capable to distinguish two different dielectric value than FBP, due to higher contrast in ART and wide distribution grayscale level.

  1. FY 1993 task plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipler, D.B.

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses from Hanford Site operations since 1944 to individuals and populations. The primary objective of work to be performed in FY 1993 is to complete the source term estimates and dose estimates for key radionuclides for the air and river pathways. At the end of FY 1993, the capability will be in place to estimate doses for individuals in the extended (32-county) study area, 1944--1991. Native American research will continue to provide input for tribal dose estimates. In FY 1993, the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) will decide whether demographic and river pathways data collection should be extended beyond FY 1993 levels. The FY 1993 work scopes and milestones in this document are based on the work plan discussed at the TSP Budget/Fiscal Subcommittee meeting on August 19--20, 1991. Table 1 shows the FY 1993 milestones; Table 2 shows estimated costs. The subsequent work scope descriptions are based on the milestones. This document and the FY 1992 task plans will form the basis for a contract with Battelle and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). The 2-year dose reconstruction contract is expected to begin in February 1992. This contract will replace the current arrangement, whereby the US Department of Energy directly funds the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to conduct dose reconstruction work. In late FY 1992, the FY 1993 task plans will be more fully developed with detailed technical approaches, data quality objectives, and budgeted labor hours. The task plans will be updated again in July 1993 to reflect any scope, milestone, or cost changes directed during the year by the TSP. 2 tabs

  2. Study of reconstruction methods for a time projection chamber with GEM gas amplification system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diener, R.

    2006-12-15

    A new e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider with an energy range up to 1TeV is planned in an international collaboration: the International Linear Collider (ILC). This collider will be able to do precision measurements of the Higgs particle and of physics beyond the Standard Model. In the Large Detector Concept (LDC) - which is one proposal for a detector at the ILC - a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is foreseen as the main tracking device. To meet the requirements on the resolution and to be able to work in the environment at the ILC, the application of new gas amplification technologies in the TPC is necessary. One option is an amplification system based on Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs). Due to the - in comparison with older technologies - small spatial width of the signals, this technology poses new requirements on the readout structures and the reconstruction methods. In this work, the performance and the systematics of different reconstruction methods have been studied, based on data measured with a TPC prototype in high magnetic fields of up to 4T and data from a Monte Carlo simulation. The latest results of the achievable point resolution are presented and their limitations have been investigated. (orig.)

  3. Study of reconstruction methods for a time projection chamber with GEM gas amplification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diener, R.

    2006-12-01

    A new e + e - linear collider with an energy range up to 1TeV is planned in an international collaboration: the International Linear Collider (ILC). This collider will be able to do precision measurements of the Higgs particle and of physics beyond the Standard Model. In the Large Detector Concept (LDC) - which is one proposal for a detector at the ILC - a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is foreseen as the main tracking device. To meet the requirements on the resolution and to be able to work in the environment at the ILC, the application of new gas amplification technologies in the TPC is necessary. One option is an amplification system based on Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs). Due to the - in comparison with older technologies - small spatial width of the signals, this technology poses new requirements on the readout structures and the reconstruction methods. In this work, the performance and the systematics of different reconstruction methods have been studied, based on data measured with a TPC prototype in high magnetic fields of up to 4T and data from a Monte Carlo simulation. The latest results of the achievable point resolution are presented and their limitations have been investigated. (orig.)

  4. Imaging reconstruction based on improved wavelet denoising combined with parallel-beam filtered back-projection algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhong; Liu, Guodong; Huang, Zhen

    2012-11-01

    The image reconstruction is a key step in medical imaging (MI) and its algorithm's performance determinates the quality and resolution of reconstructed image. Although some algorithms have been used, filter back-projection (FBP) algorithm is still the classical and commonly-used algorithm in clinical MI. In FBP algorithm, filtering of original projection data is a key step in order to overcome artifact of the reconstructed image. Since simple using of classical filters, such as Shepp-Logan (SL), Ram-Lak (RL) filter have some drawbacks and limitations in practice, especially for the projection data polluted by non-stationary random noises. So, an improved wavelet denoising combined with parallel-beam FBP algorithm is used to enhance the quality of reconstructed image in this paper. In the experiments, the reconstructed effects were compared between the improved wavelet denoising and others (directly FBP, mean filter combined FBP and median filter combined FBP method). To determine the optimum reconstruction effect, different algorithms, and different wavelet bases combined with three filters were respectively test. Experimental results show the reconstruction effect of improved FBP algorithm is better than that of others. Comparing the results of different algorithms based on two evaluation standards i.e. mean-square error (MSE), peak-to-peak signal-noise ratio (PSNR), it was found that the reconstructed effects of the improved FBP based on db2 and Hanning filter at decomposition scale 2 was best, its MSE value was less and the PSNR value was higher than others. Therefore, this improved FBP algorithm has potential value in the medical imaging.

  5. Atmospheric transport and dispersion modeling for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdell, J.V.

    1991-07-01

    Radiation doses that may have resulted from operations at the Hanford Site are being estimated in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. One of the project subtasks, atmospheric transport, is responsible for estimating the transport, diffusion and deposition of radionuclides released to the atmosphere. This report discusses modeling transport and diffusion in the atmospheric pathway. It is divided into three major sections. The first section of the report presents the atmospheric modeling approach selected following discussion with the Technical Steering Panel that directs the HEDR Project. In addition, the section discusses the selection of the MESOI/MESORAD suite of atmospheric dispersion models that form the basis for initial calculations and future model development. The second section of the report describes alternative modeling approaches that were considered. Emphasis is placed on the family of plume and puff models that are based on Gaussian solution to the diffusion equations. The final portion of the section describes the performance of various models. The third section of the report discusses factors that bear on the selection of an atmospheric transport modeling approach for HEDR. These factors, which include the physical setting of the Hanford Site and the available meteorological data, serve as constraints on model selection. Five appendices are included in the report. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Accelerated perturbation-resilient block-iterative projection methods with application to image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikazad, T; Davidi, R; Herman, G T

    2012-03-01

    We study the convergence of a class of accelerated perturbation-resilient block-iterative projection methods for solving systems of linear equations. We prove convergence to a fixed point of an operator even in the presence of summable perturbations of the iterates, irrespective of the consistency of the linear system. For a consistent system, the limit point is a solution of the system. In the inconsistent case, the symmetric version of our method converges to a weighted least squares solution. Perturbation resilience is utilized to approximate the minimum of a convex functional subject to the equations. A main contribution, as compared to previously published approaches to achieving similar aims, is a more than an order of magnitude speed-up, as demonstrated by applying the methods to problems of image reconstruction from projections. In addition, the accelerated algorithms are illustrated to be better, in a strict sense provided by the method of statistical hypothesis testing, than their unaccelerated versions for the task of detecting small tumors in the brain from X-ray CT projection data.

  7. A preliminary examination of audience-related communications issues for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, C.W.

    1991-04-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project will estimate radiation doses people may have received from exposure to radioactive materials released during past operations at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The HEDR Project was initiated in response to public concerns about possible health impacts from past releases of radioactive materials from Hanford. The TSP recognized early in the project that special mechanisms would be required to effectively communicate to the many different concerned audiences. Accordingly, the TSP directed PNL to examine methods for communicating causes and effects of uncertainties in the dose estimates. After considering the directive and discussing it with the Communications Subcommittee of the TSP, PNL undertook a broad investigation of communications methods to consider for inclusion in the TSP's current communications program. As part of this investigation, a literature review was conducted regarding risk communications. A key finding was that, in order to successfully communicate risk-related information, a thorough understanding of the knowledge level, concerns and information needs of the intended recipients (i.e., the audience) is necessary. Hence, a preliminary audience analysis was conducted as part of the present research. This report summarizes the results of this analysis. 1 ref., 9 tabs.

  8. Computational model design specification for Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, B.A.

    1991-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emission from nuclear operations at Hanford since their inception in 1944. The purpose of this report is to outline the basic algorithm and necessary computer calculations to be used to calculate radiation doses specific and hypothetical individuals in the vicinity of Hanford. The system design requirements, those things that must be accomplished, are defined. The system design specifications, the techniques by which those requirements are met, are outlined. Included are the basic equations, logic diagrams, and preliminary definition of the nature of each input distribution. 4 refs., 10 figs., 9 tabs

  9. EFFECT OF DIGITAL FRINGE PROJECTION PARAMETERS ON 3D RECONSTRUCTION ACCURACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Babaei

    2013-09-01

    This paper aims to evaluate different parameters which affect the accuracy of the final results. For this purpose, some test were designed and implemented. These tests assess the number of phase shifts, spatial frequency of the fringe pattern, light condition, noise level of images, and the color and material of target objects on the quality of resulted phase map. The evaluation results demonstrate that digital fringe projection method is capable of obtaining depth map of complicated object with high accuracy. The contrast test results showed that this method is able to work under different ambient light condition; although at places with high light condition will not work properly. The results of implementation on different objects with various materials, color and shapes demonstrate the high capability of this method of 3D reconstruction.

  10. Computational model design specification for Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, B.A.

    1991-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emission from nuclear operations at Hanford since their inception in 1944. The purpose of this report is to outline the basic algorithm and necessary computer calculations to be used to calculate radiation doses specific and hypothetical individuals in the vicinity of Hanford. The system design requirements, those things that must be accomplished, are defined. The system design specifications, the techniques by which those requirements are met, are outlined. Included are the basic equations, logic diagrams, and preliminary definition of the nature of each input distribution. 4 refs., 10 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. Dynamic SPECT reconstruction from few projections: a sparsity enforced matrix factorization approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qiaoqiao; Zan, Yunlong; Huang, Qiu; Zhang, Xiaoqun

    2015-02-01

    The reconstruction of dynamic images from few projection data is a challenging problem, especially when noise is present and when the dynamic images are vary fast. In this paper, we propose a variational model, sparsity enforced matrix factorization (SEMF), based on low rank matrix factorization of unknown images and enforced sparsity constraints for representing both coefficients and bases. The proposed model is solved via an alternating iterative scheme for which each subproblem is convex and involves the efficient alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). The convergence of the overall alternating scheme for the nonconvex problem relies upon the Kurdyka-Łojasiewicz property, recently studied by Attouch et al (2010 Math. Oper. Res. 35 438) and Attouch et al (2013 Math. Program. 137 91). Finally our proof-of-concept simulation on 2D dynamic images shows the advantage of the proposed method compared to conventional methods.

  12. FY 1992 task plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    Phase 1 of the HEDR Project was designed to develop and demonstrate a method for estimating radiation doses people may have received from Hanford Site operations since 1944. The method researchers developed relied on a variety of measured and reconstructed data as input to a modular computer model that generates dose estimates and their uncertainties. As part of Phase 1, researchers used the reconstructed data and computer model to calculate preliminary dose estimates for populations from limited radionuclides, in a limited geographical area and time period. Phase 1 ended in FY 1990. In February 1991, the TSP decided to shift the project planning approach away from phases--which were centered around completion of major portions of technical activities--to individual fiscal years (FYs), which span October of one year through September of the next. Therefore, activities that were previously designated to occur in phases are now designated in an integrated schedule to occur in one or more of the next fiscal years into FY 1995. Task plans are updated every 6 months. In FY 1992, scientists will continue to improve Phase 1 data and models to calculate more accurate and precise dose estimates. The plan for FY 1992 has been prepared based on activities and budgets approved by the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) at its meeting on August 19--20, 1991. The activities can be divided into four categories: (1) model and data evaluation activities, (2) additional dose estimates, (3) model and data development activities, and (4) technical and communication support. 3 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Breast EIT using a new projected image reconstruction method with multi-frequency measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunjung; Ts, Munkh-Erdene; Seo, Jin Keun; Woo, Eung Je

    2012-05-01

    We propose a new method to produce admittivity images of the breast for the diagnosis of breast cancer using electrical impedance tomography(EIT). Considering the anatomical structure of the breast, we designed an electrode configuration where current-injection and voltage-sensing electrodes are separated in such a way that internal current pathways are approximately along the tangential direction of an array of voltage-sensing electrodes. Unlike conventional EIT imaging methods where the number of injected currents is maximized to increase the total amount of measured data, current is injected only twice between two pairs of current-injection electrodes attached along the circumferential side of the breast. For each current injection, the induced voltages are measured from the front surface of the breast using as many voltage-sensing electrodes as possible. Although this electrode configurational lows us to measure induced voltages only on the front surface of the breast,they are more sensitive to an anomaly inside the breast since such an injected current tends to produce a more uniform internal current density distribution. Furthermore, the sensitivity of a measured boundary voltage between two equipotential lines on the front surface of the breast is improved since those equipotential lines are perpendicular to the primary direction of internal current streamlines. One should note that this novel data collection method is different from those of other frontal plane techniques such as the x-ray projection and T-scan imaging methods because we do not get any data on the plane that is perpendicular to the current flow. To reconstruct admittivity images using two measured voltage data sets, a new projected image reconstruction algorithm is developed. Numerical simulations demonstrate the frequency-difference EIT imaging of the breast. The results show that the new method is promising to accurately detect and localize small anomalies inside the breast.

  14. Breast EIT using a new projected image reconstruction method with multi-frequency measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eunjung; Ts, Munkh-Erdene; Seo, Jin Keun; Woo, Eung Je

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new method to produce admittivity images of the breast for the diagnosis of breast cancer using electrical impedance tomography (EIT). Considering the anatomical structure of the breast, we designed an electrode configuration where current-injection and voltage-sensing electrodes are separated in such a way that internal current pathways are approximately along the tangential direction of an array of voltage-sensing electrodes. Unlike conventional EIT imaging methods where the number of injected currents is maximized to increase the total amount of measured data, current is injected only twice between two pairs of current-injection electrodes attached along the circumferential side of the breast. For each current injection, the induced voltages are measured from the front surface of the breast using as many voltage-sensing electrodes as possible. Although this electrode configuration allows us to measure induced voltages only on the front surface of the breast, they are more sensitive to an anomaly inside the breast since such an injected current tends to produce a more uniform internal current density distribution. Furthermore, the sensitivity of a measured boundary voltage between two equipotential lines on the front surface of the breast is improved since those equipotential lines are perpendicular to the primary direction of internal current streamlines. One should note that this novel data collection method is different from those of other frontal plane techniques such as the x-ray projection and T-scan imaging methods because we do not get any data on the plane that is perpendicular to the current flow. To reconstruct admittivity images using two measured voltage data sets, a new projected image reconstruction algorithm is developed. Numerical simulations demonstrate the frequency-difference EIT imaging of the breast. The results show that the new method is promising to accurately detect and localize small anomalies inside the breast. (paper)

  15. Reconstruction of computed tomographic image from a few x-ray projections by means of accelerative gradient method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Fujio; Yamaguchi, Shoichiro

    1982-01-01

    A method of the reconstruction of computed tomographic images was proposed to reduce the exposure dose to X-ray. The method is the small number of X-ray projection method by accelerative gradient method. The procedures of computation are described. The algorithm of these procedures is simple, the convergence of the computation is fast, and the required memory capacity is small. Numerical simulation was carried out to conform the validity of this method. A sample of simple shape was considered, projection data were given, and the images were reconstructed from 6 views. Good results were obtained, and the method is considered to be useful. (Kato, T.)

  16. Multi-slice CT (MSCT) in cardiac function imaging: threshold-value-supported 3D volume reconstructions to determine the left ventricular ejection fraction in comparison to MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhard, K.; Oberholzer, K.; Gast, K.; Mildenberger, P.; Kreitner, K.F.; Thelen, M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To assess MSCT of the heart to determining left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) based on threshold-value-supported 3D volume reconstructions compared to MRI. Methods: Cardiac MSCT was performed in 7 patients. Images were reconstructed during end-systolic and end-diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle and transformed to 3D volumes to determine end-systolic (ESV) and end-diastolic volume (EDV) by using different lower threshold values: besides fixed lower threshold values, identical for each image sequence, individual lower threshold values dependent on contrast enhancement of the left ventricle were applied. The latter represent the mean value calculated by combining the average CT-density of the myocardium and the contrast-enhanced blood in the left ventricle. The EF derived from ESV and EDV. Results: The best correlation with MR imaging was obtained for ESV and EDV by using the individual lower threshold values for the respective sequence. The correlation coefficient for ESV was 0.95 and for EDV it was 0.93. On average, the ESV was overestimated by 3.72 ml, while the ESD was underestimated by 2.85 ml. The respective standard deviation for the ESV was 14,87 ml, for the EDV it was 26.83 ml. On average, the EF was underestimated by 3.57% with a standard deviation of 9.43% and a correlation coefficient of 0.83 in comparison to MRI. Conclusion: The threshold-value-supported 3D volume reconstruction of the left ventricle represents a good method to determine the left ventricular function parameters. Due to the differences in the contrast enhancement, the use of an individual lower threshold value for every image sequence is of particular importance. (orig.) [de

  17. Comparison of the image qualities of filtered back-projection, adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction, and model-based iterative reconstruction for CT venography at 80 kVp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Hyeok; Choo, Ki Seok; Moon, Tae Yong; Lee, Jun Woo; Jeon, Ung Bae; Kim, Tae Un; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Yun, Myeong-Ja; Jeong, Dong Wook; Lim, Soo Jin

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the subjective and objective qualities of computed tomography (CT) venography images at 80 kVp using model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) and to compare these with those of filtered back projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) using the same CT data sets. Forty-four patients (mean age: 56.1 ± 18.1) who underwent 80 kVp CT venography (CTV) for the evaluation of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) during 4 months were enrolled in this retrospective study. The same raw data were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Objective and subjective image analysis were performed at the inferior vena cava (IVC), femoral vein, and popliteal vein. The mean CNR of MBIR was significantly greater than those of FBP and ASIR and images reconstructed using MBIR had significantly lower objective image noise (p <.001). Subjective image quality and confidence of detecting DVT by MBIR group were significantly greater than those of FBP and ASIR (p <.005), and MBIR had the lowest score for subjective image noise (p <.001). CTV at 80 kVp with MBIR was superior to FBP and ASIR regarding subjective and objective image qualities. (orig.)

  18. Jini service to reconstruct tomographic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Peter; Mirzaei, S.; Koriska, K.; Koehn, H.

    2002-06-01

    A number of imaging systems rely on the reconstruction of a 3- dimensional model from its projections through the process of computed tomography (CT). In medical imaging, for example magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and Single Computer Tomography (SPECT) acquire two-dimensional projections of a three dimensional projections of a three dimensional object. In order to calculate the 3-dimensional representation of the object, i.e. its voxel distribution, several reconstruction algorithms have been developed. Currently, mainly two reconstruct use: the filtered back projection(FBP) and iterative methods. Although the quality of iterative reconstructed SPECT slices is better than that of FBP slices, such iterative algorithms are rarely used for clinical routine studies because of their low availability and increased reconstruction time. We used Jini and a self-developed iterative reconstructions algorithm to design and implement a Jini reconstruction service. With this service, the physician selects the patient study from a database and a Jini client automatically discovers the registered Jini reconstruction services in the department's Intranet. After downloading the proxy object the this Jini service, the SPECT acquisition data are reconstructed. The resulting transaxial slices are visualized using a Jini slice viewer, which can be used for various imaging modalities.

  19. Fan-beam and cone-beam image reconstruction via filtering the backprojection image of differentiated projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Tingliang; Leng Shuai; Nett, Brian E; Chen Guanghong

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a new image reconstruction scheme is presented based on Tuy's cone-beam inversion scheme and its fan-beam counterpart. It is demonstrated that Tuy's inversion scheme may be used to derive a new framework for fan-beam and cone-beam image reconstruction. In this new framework, images are reconstructed via filtering the backprojection image of differentiated projection data. The new framework is mathematically exact and is applicable to a general source trajectory provided the Tuy data sufficiency condition is satisfied. By choosing a piece-wise constant function for one of the components in the factorized weighting function, the filtering kernel is one dimensional, viz. the filtering process is along a straight line. Thus, the derived image reconstruction algorithm is mathematically exact and efficient. In the cone-beam case, the derived reconstruction algorithm is applicable to a large class of source trajectories where the pi-lines or the generalized pi-lines exist. In addition, the new reconstruction scheme survives the super-short scan mode in both the fan-beam and cone-beam cases provided the data are not transversely truncated. Numerical simulations were conducted to validate the new reconstruction scheme for the fan-beam case

  20. Future Projections of Precipitation Characteristics in East Asia Simulated by the MRI CGCM2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akio KITOH; Masahiro HOSAKA; Yukimasa ADACHI; Kenji KAMIGUCHI

    2005-01-01

    Projected changes in precipitation characteristics around the mid-21st century and end-of-the-century are analyzed using the daily precipitation output of the 3-member ensemble Meteorological Research Institute global ocean-atmosphere coupled general circulation model (MRI-CGCM2) simulations under the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) A2 and B2 scenarios. It is found that both the frequency and intensity increase in about 40% of the globe, while both the frequency and intensity decrease in about 20% of the globe. These numbers differ only a few percent from decade to decade of the 21st century and between the A2 and B2 scenarios. Over the rest of the globe (about one third), the precipitation frequency decreases but its intensity increases, suggesting a shift of precipitation distribution toward more intense events by global warming. South China is such a region where the summertime wet-day frequency decreases but the precipitation intensity increases. This is related to increased atmospheric moisture content due to global warming and an intensified and more westwardly extended North Pacific subtropical anticyclone,which may be related with an El Ni(n)o-like mean sea surface temperature change. On the other hand, a decrease in summer precipitation is noted in North China, thus augmenting a south-to-north precipit ation contrast more in the future.

  1. 3D virtual character reconstruction from projections: a NURBS-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triki, Olfa; Zaharia, Titus B.; Preteux, Francoise J.

    2004-05-01

    This work has been carried out within the framework of the industrial project, so-called TOON, supported by the French government. TOON aims at developing tools for automating the traditional 2D cartoon content production. This paper presents preliminary results of the TOON platform. The proposed methodology concerns the issues of 2D/3D reconstruction from a limited number of drawn projections, and 2D/3D manipulation/deformation/refinement of virtual characters. Specifically, we show that the NURBS-based modeling approach developed here offers a well-suited framework for generating deformable 3D virtual characters from incomplete 2D information. Furthermore, crucial functionalities such as animation and non-rigid deformation can be also efficiently handled and solved. Note that user interaction is enabled exclusively in 2D by achieving a multiview constraint specification method. This is fully consistent and compliant with the cartoon creator traditional practice and makes it possible to avoid the use of 3D modeling software packages which are generally complex to manipulate.

  2. Selection of dominant radionuclides for Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, B.A.

    1991-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions from nuclear operations at Hanford since their inception in 1944. A vital step in the estimation of radiation doses is the determination of the source term,'' that is, the quantities of radionuclides that were released to the environment from the various Hanford operations. Hanford operations have at various times involved hundreds of different radionuclides, some in relatively large quantities. Those radionuclides present in the largest quantities, although significant from an operational handling point of view, may not necessarily have been those of greatest concern for offsite radiation dose. This report documents the selection of the dominant radionuclides (those that may have resulted in the largest portion of the received doses) in the source term for Phase 1 of the HEDR Project, that is, for atmospheric releases from 1944 through 1947 and for surface water releases from 1964 through 1966. 15 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  3. CT image reconstruction of steel pipe section from few projections using the method of rotating polar-coordinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Shuaijun; Wu Zhifang

    2008-01-01

    Fast online inspection in steel pipe production is a big challenge. Radiographic CT imaging technology, a high performance non-destructive testing method, is quite appropriate for inspection and quality control of steel pipes. The method of rotating polar-coordinate is used to reconstruct the steel pipe section from few projections with the purpose of inspecting it online. It reduces the projection number needed and the data collection time, and accelerates the reconstruction algorithm and saves the inspection time evidently. The results of simulation experiment and actual experiment indicate that the image quality and reconstruction time of rotating polar-coordinate method meet the requirements of inspecting the steel tube section online basically. The study is of some theoretical significance and the method is expected to be widely used in practice. (authors)

  4. Systematic Error in Lung Nodule Volumetry : Effect of Iterative Reconstruction Versus Filtered Back Projection at Different CT Parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, Martin J.; Leiner, Tim; Budde, Ricardo P. J.; de Kort, Freek P. L.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; de Jong, Pim A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Iterative reconstruction potentially can reduce radiation dose compared with filtered back projection (FBP) for chest CT. This is especially important for repeated CT scanning, as is the case in patients with indeterminate lung nodules. It is currently unknown whether absolute nodule

  5. Reconstruction of brachytherapy seed positions and orientations from cone-beam CT x-ray projections via a novel iterative forward projection matching method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Damodar; Murphy, Martin J; Todor, Dorin A; Weiss, Elisabeth; Williamson, Jeffrey F

    2011-01-01

    To generalize and experimentally validate a novel algorithm for reconstructing the 3D pose (position and orientation) of implanted brachytherapy seeds from a set of a few measured 2D cone-beam CT (CBCT) x-ray projections. The iterative forward projection matching (IFPM) algorithm was generalized to reconstruct the 3D pose, as well as the centroid, of brachytherapy seeds from three to ten measured 2D projections. The gIFPM algorithm finds the set of seed poses that minimizes the sum-of-squared-difference of the pixel-by-pixel intensities between computed and measured autosegmented radiographic projections of the implant. Numerical simulations of clinically realistic brachytherapy seed configurations were performed to demonstrate the proof of principle. An in-house machined brachytherapy phantom, which supports precise specification of seed position and orientation at known values for simulated implant geometries, was used to experimentally validate this algorithm. The phantom was scanned on an ACUITY CBCT digital simulator over a full 660 sinogram projections. Three to ten x-ray images were selected from the full set of CBCT sinogram projections and postprocessed to create binary seed-only images. In the numerical simulations, seed reconstruction position and orientation errors were approximately 0.6 mm and 5 degrees, respectively. The physical phantom measurements demonstrated an absolute positional accuracy of (0.78 +/- 0.57) mm or less. The theta and phi angle errors were found to be (5.7 +/- 4.9) degrees and (6.0 +/- 4.1) degrees, respectively, or less when using three projections; with six projections, results were slightly better. The mean registration error was better than 1 mm/6 degrees compared to the measured seed projections. Each test trial converged in 10-20 iterations with computation time of 12-18 min/iteration on a 1 GHz processor. This work describes a novel, accurate, and completely automatic method for reconstructing seed orientations, as well as

  6. Reconstruction of brachytherapy seed positions and orientations from cone-beam CT x-ray projections via a novel iterative forward projection matching method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhrel, Damodar; Murphy, Martin J.; Todor, Dorin A.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Williamson, Jeffrey F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To generalize and experimentally validate a novel algorithm for reconstructing the 3D pose (position and orientation) of implanted brachytherapy seeds from a set of a few measured 2D cone-beam CT (CBCT) x-ray projections. Methods: The iterative forward projection matching (IFPM) algorithm was generalized to reconstruct the 3D pose, as well as the centroid, of brachytherapy seeds from three to ten measured 2D projections. The gIFPM algorithm finds the set of seed poses that minimizes the sum-of-squared-difference of the pixel-by-pixel intensities between computed and measured autosegmented radiographic projections of the implant. Numerical simulations of clinically realistic brachytherapy seed configurations were performed to demonstrate the proof of principle. An in-house machined brachytherapy phantom, which supports precise specification of seed position and orientation at known values for simulated implant geometries, was used to experimentally validate this algorithm. The phantom was scanned on an ACUITY CBCT digital simulator over a full 660 sinogram projections. Three to ten x-ray images were selected from the full set of CBCT sinogram projections and postprocessed to create binary seed-only images. Results: In the numerical simulations, seed reconstruction position and orientation errors were approximately 0.6 mm and 5 deg., respectively. The physical phantom measurements demonstrated an absolute positional accuracy of (0.78{+-}0.57) mm or less. The {theta} and {phi} angle errors were found to be (5.7{+-}4.9) deg. and (6.0{+-}4.1) deg., respectively, or less when using three projections; with six projections, results were slightly better. The mean registration error was better than 1 mm/6 deg. compared to the measured seed projections. Each test trial converged in 10-20 iterations with computation time of 12-18 min/iteration on a 1 GHz processor. Conclusions: This work describes a novel, accurate, and completely automatic method for reconstructing

  7. Reconstructed anterior cruciate ligaments using patellar tendon ligament grafts: diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced MRI in a 2-year follow-up regimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Schmitt, J.; Lubrich, J.; Hochmuth, K.; Diebold, T. [Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt Univ. (Germany); Del Tredici, K. [Dept. of Clinical Neuroanatomy, Frankfurt Univ. (Germany); Suedkamp, N. [Dept. of Traumatology and Orthopedics, Humboldt University, Berlin (Germany)

    2001-08-01

    We analyzed prospectively the diagnostic efficacy of contrast-enhanced MRI following anterior cruciate neoligament (ACL) reconstruction. One hundred fifty-six MR examinations were performed 2, 12, 52, 76, and 104 weeks post-operatively on 68 patients with ACL transplants. Sagittal, parasagittal, and coronal images using unenhanced T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences, and post-contrast images utilizing T1-weighted spin-echo and fat-saturated sequences, were acquired. Results were correlated with those of the pivot shift, Lachman, and a mechanical test. The MR examination criteria included morphological analysis, signal intensity, transplant contrast enhancement, secondary signs (e.g., elongation of normal ligaments), and comparison with clinically standardized test results. Two weeks post-operatively all neoligaments showed homogeneous low signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences indistinguishable from that of normal cruciate or patellar ligaments [contrast-to-noise ratio (C/N) on T1:1.6], with a 9% percentile enhancement. At 12-52 weeks, signal intensity increased (C/N:6.7), with a mean 50% percentile enhancement. The 1-year follow-up allowed no definite assessment of the neoligament's course. At 76 and 104 weeks, significant decrements in signal intensity (C/N:3.0) and ligamentous percentile enhancement (25%) occurred. All patients tested displayed stable transplants 2 years post-operatively. Contrast-enhanced MRI allows accurate evaluation of morphology and function up to 3 months post-operatively and 1-2 years following ACL reconstructive surgery. (orig.)

  8. Phase reconstruction from velocity-encoded MRI measurements – A survey of sparsity-promoting variational approaches

    KAUST Repository

    Benning, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there has been significant developments in the reconstruction of magnetic resonance velocity images from sub-sampled k-space data. While showing a strong improvement in reconstruction quality compared to classical approaches, the vast number of different methods, and the challenges in setting them up, often leaves the user with the difficult task of choosing the correct approach, or more importantly, not selecting a poor approach. In this paper, we survey variational approaches for the reconstruction of phase-encoded magnetic resonance velocity images from sub-sampled k-space data. We are particularly interested in regularisers that correctly treat both smooth and geometric features of the image. These features are common to velocity imaging, where the flow field will be smooth but interfaces between the fluid and surrounding material will be sharp, but are challenging to represent sparsely. As an example we demonstrate the variational approaches on velocity imaging of water flowing through a packed bed of solid particles. We evaluate Wavelet regularisation against Total Variation and the relatively recent second order Total Generalised Variation regularisation. We combine these regularisation schemes with a contrast enhancement approach called Bregman iteration. We verify for a variety of sampling patterns that Morozov\\'s discrepancy principle provides a good criterion for stopping the iterations. Therefore, given only the noise level, we present a robust guideline for setting up a variational reconstruction scheme for MR velocity imaging. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Phase reconstruction from velocity-encoded MRI measurements – A survey of sparsity-promoting variational approaches

    KAUST Repository

    Benning, Martin; Gladden, Lynn; Holland, Daniel; Schö nlieb, Carola-Bibiane; Valkonen, Tuomo

    2014-01-01

    for the reconstruction of phase-encoded magnetic resonance velocity images from sub-sampled k-space data. We are particularly interested in regularisers that correctly treat both smooth and geometric features of the image. These features are common to velocity imaging

  10. Accelerated dynamic cardiac MRI exploiting sparse-Kalman-smoother self-calibration and reconstruction (k  −  t SPARKS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Suhyung; Park, Jaeseok

    2015-01-01

    Accelerated dynamic MRI, which exploits spatiotemporal redundancies in k  −  t space and coil dimension, has been widely used to reduce the number of signal encoding and thus increase imaging efficiency with minimal loss of image quality. Nonetheless, particularly in cardiac MRI it still suffers from artifacts and amplified noise in the presence of time-drifting coil sensitivity due to relative motion between coil and subject (e.g. free breathing). Furthermore, a substantial number of additional calibrating signals is to be acquired to warrant accurate calibration of coil sensitivity. In this work, we propose a novel, accelerated dynamic cardiac MRI with sparse-Kalman-smoother self-calibration and reconstruction (k  −  t SPARKS), which is robust to time-varying coil sensitivity even with a small number of calibrating signals. The proposed k  −  t SPARKS incorporates Kalman-smoother self-calibration in k  −  t space and sparse signal recovery in x  −   f space into a single optimization problem, leading to iterative, joint estimation of time-varying convolution kernels and missing signals in k  −  t space. In the Kalman-smoother calibration, motion-induced uncertainties over the entire time frames were included in modeling state transition while a coil-dependent noise statistic in describing measurement process. The sparse signal recovery iteratively alternates with the self-calibration to tackle the ill-conditioning problem potentially resulting from insufficient calibrating signals. Simulations and experiments were performed using both the proposed and conventional methods for comparison, revealing that the proposed k  −  t SPARKS yields higher signal-to-error ratio and superior temporal fidelity in both breath-hold and free-breathing cardiac applications over all reduction factors. (paper)

  11. Operational report, basics of the preliminary project for reconstruction of the RA reactor ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinc, R.

    1982-01-01

    This report presents the summary of results needed for designing the reconstruction of the RA reactor ventilation system. The final complete report will published later, including results of possible additional analyses according to the needs of main detailed project. Due to the size of the facility the need of filters for particulates is expected in systems V-1 and V-2, as well as revision of the system V-4. Adsorption filters are not needed in case of operation under regular working conditions. It would be favorable, but not indispensable to construct an adsorption filter that could be used occasionally at the input of V-2 system under the upper water shielding. This filter would be switched on when dehermetization of the reactor is planned and increased radioactivity is indicated in the gas system or experimental space of the RA reactor as well as in case of fuel elements failure. The aim of applying filters is shortening the time these elements would spend in the hermetized reactor i.e. their fast removal from the reactor. It is indispensable to build-in 'emergency' highly efficient adsorption filters in the V-2 system which would be switched on in case of accidents that would cause fuel elements meltdown (with simultaneous accident dehermetization of the heavy water system) [sr

  12. Short-TE projection reconstruction MR microscopy in the evaluation of articular cartilage thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cova, M.; Pozzi-Mucelli, R.S.; Dalla-Palma, L.; Toffanin, R.; Szomolanyi, P.; Vittur, F.; Jellus, V.; Silvestri, F.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of projection-reconstruction (PR) MR microscopy in the accurate measurement of cartilage thickness. Short-TE PR microimages were acquired at 7.05 T on bone-cartilage cylindrical plugs excised from four regions of two disarticulated femoral heads (i. e. superior, inferior, posterior and anterior), using an NMR instrument equipped with a microimaging accessory. The PR microimages were then correlated with conventional spin-echo (SE) microimages and with histology. On PR microimages, acquired with an echo time of 3.2 ms, the cartilage signal was increased, allowing an accurate delineation of the cartilage from the tidemark/cortical bone region. As a consequence, by the PR method a more precise measurement of cartilage thickness compared with that performed by the conventional SE approach was feasible. An excellent correlation between PR microimages and histology was also obtained (r=0.90). By the proposed method it is possible to accurately determine the cartilage thickness better than with the conventional SE sequences. (orig.)

  13. Commercial milk distribution profiles and production locations. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deonigi, D.E.; Anderson, D.M.; Wilfert, G.L.

    1994-04-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established to estimate radiation doses that people could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. For this period iodine-131 is the most important offsite contributor to radiation doses from Hanford operations. Consumption of milk from cows that ate vegetation contaminated by iodine-131 is the dominant radiation pathway for individuals who drank milk (Napier 1992). Information has been developed on commercial milk cow locations and commercial milk distribution during 1945 and 1951. The year 1945 was selected because during 1945 the largest amount of iodine-131 was released from Hanford facilities in a calendar year (Heeb 1993); therefore, 1945 was the year in which an individual was likely to have received the highest dose. The year 1951 was selected to provide data for comparing the changes that occurred in commercial milk flows (i.e., sources, processing locations, and market areas) between World War II and the post-war period. To estimate the doses people could have received from this milk flow, it is necessary to estimate the amount of milk people consumed, the source of the milk, the specific feeding regime used for milk cows, and the amount of iodine-131 contamination deposited on feed.

  14. Enhancing breast projection in autologous reconstruction using the St Andrew's coning technique and 3D volumetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Michael P; Rozen, Warren Matthew; Patel, Nakul Gamanlal; Hunter-Smith, David J; Ramakrishnan, Venkat

    2017-12-01

    An increasing number of women undergo mastectomy for breast cancer and post-mastectomy autologous breast reconstruction has been shown to significantly improve the psychosexual wellbeing of the patients. A goal of treatment is to achieve symmetry and projection to match the native breast, and/or the contralateral breast in the case of a unilateral reconstruction. Autologous reconstruction, particularly with the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap, is particularly advantageous as it can be manipulated to mimic the shape and turgor of the native breast. However, very few techniques of shaping the breast conus when insetting the DIEP flap to enhance aesthetic outcome have been reported to date. With the aide of three-dimension (3D) photography and 3D-printed mirrored image of the contralateral breast as a guide intraoperatively, we describe our St Andrew's coning technique to create a personalized flap projection. We report a prospective case series of 3 delayed unilateral breast reconstructions where symmetrization procedure to the contralateral breast was not indicated. Using a commercial 3D scanner (VECTRA XR, Canfield Scientific), the breast region was imaged. The mirrored image was 3D-printed in-house using a desktop 3D printer. In all cases, projection of the breast mound was able to be safely achieved, with a demonstrated central volume (or 'cone') able to be highlighted on imaging and a 3D printed breast. A 3D print of the contralateral breast was able to be used intraoperatively to guide the operative approach. The St Andrew's coning technique is a useful aesthetic maneuver for achieving breast projection during DIEP flap breast reconstruction, with 3D imaging techniques able to assist in perioperative assessment of breast volume.

  15. Early Articular Cartilage MRI T2 Changes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Correlate With Later Changes in T2 and Cartilage Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ashley; Winalski, Carl S.; Chu, Constance R.

    2018-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a known risk factor for future development of osteoarthritis (OA). This human clinical study seeks to determine if early changes to cartilage MRI T2 maps between baseline and 6 months following ACL reconstruction (ACLR) are associated with changes to cartilage T2 and cartilage thickness between baseline and 2 years after ACLR. Changes to T2 texture metrics and T2 mean values in medial knee cartilage of 17 human subjects 6 months after ACLR were compared to 2-year changes in T2 and in cartilage thickness of the same areas. T2 texture and mean assessments were also compared to that of 11 uninjured controls. In ACLR subjects, six-month changes in mean T2 correlated to 2-year changes in mean T2 (R = 0.80, p = 0.0001), and 6-month changes to T2 texture metrics, but not T2 mean, correlated with 2-year changes in medial femoral cartilage thickness in 9 of the 20 texture features assessed (R = 0.48–0.72, p ≤ 0.05). Both mean T2 and texture differed (p evaluation of T2 map and textural changes may provide early warning of cartilage at risk for progressive degeneration after ACL injury and reconstruction. PMID:27381512

  16. Computer-assisted three-dimensional reconstruction of the corticospinal system as a reference for CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhmann, C. [Department of Neuroanatomy, Hannover Medical School (Germany)]|[University Hospital Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Kretschmann, H.J. [Department of Neuroanatomy, Hannover Medical School (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) anatomical computer-graphics model of the corticospinal system acquired from equidistant serial anatomical slices of six intracranially-fixed human brains. This model is part of a neuroanatomical reference system (NeuRef) which enables 3D visualization of the brain and shows the relationship of its components such as anatomical structures, functional fibre tracts and arteries. Sections through the models can be matched with corresponding CT or MR images. This allows the probable localisation of corticospinal fibres on CT or MRI. (orig.) (orig.) With 18 figs., 3 tabs., 40 refs.

  17. Computer-assisted three-dimensional reconstruction of the corticospinal system as a reference for CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhmann, C.; Kretschmann, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) anatomical computer-graphics model of the corticospinal system acquired from equidistant serial anatomical slices of six intracranially-fixed human brains. This model is part of a neuroanatomical reference system (NeuRef) which enables 3D visualization of the brain and shows the relationship of its components such as anatomical structures, functional fibre tracts and arteries. Sections through the models can be matched with corresponding CT or MR images. This allows the probable localisation of corticospinal fibres on CT or MRI. (orig.) (orig.)

  18. Analysis of Variance of the Effects of a Project’s Location on Key Issues and Challenges in Post-Disaster Reconstruction Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzulkarnaen Ismail

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available After a disaster, the reconstruction phase is driven by immediate challenges. One of the main challenges in the post-disaster period is the way that reconstruction projects are implemented. Reconstruction cannot move forward until some complex issues are settled. The purposes of this research are to highlight the issues and challenges in post-disaster reconstruction (PDR projects and to determine the significant differences between the issues and challenges in different locations where PDR projects are carried out. The researchers collected data within international non-governmental organisations (INGOs on their experience of working with PDR projects. The findings of this research provide the foundation on which to build strategies for avoiding project failures; this may be useful for PDR project practitioners in the future.

  19. Image quality of ct angiography using model-based iterative reconstruction in infants with congenital heart disease: Comparison with filtered back projection and hybrid iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Qianjun, E-mail: jiaqianjun@126.com [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Radiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Catheterization Lab, Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of South China Structural Heart Disease, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Zhuang, Jian, E-mail: zhuangjian5413@tom.com [Department of Cardiac Surgery, Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of South China Structural Heart Disease, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Jiang, Jun, E-mail: 81711587@qq.com [Department of Radiology, Shenzhen Second People’s Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong (China); Li, Jiahua, E-mail: 970872804@qq.com [Department of Catheterization Lab, Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of South China Structural Heart Disease, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Huang, Meiping, E-mail: huangmeiping_vip@163.com [Department of Catheterization Lab, Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of South China Structural Heart Disease, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Liang, Changhong, E-mail: cjr.lchh@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2017-01-15

    Purpose: To compare the image quality, rate of coronary artery visualization and diagnostic accuracy of 256-slice multi-detector computed tomography angiography (CTA) with prospective electrocardiographic (ECG) triggering at a tube voltage of 80 kVp between 3 reconstruction algorithms (filtered back projection (FBP), hybrid iterative reconstruction (iDose{sup 4}) and iterative model reconstruction (IMR)) in infants with congenital heart disease (CHD). Methods: Fifty-one infants with CHD who underwent cardiac CTA in our institution between December 2014 and March 2015 were included. The effective radiation doses were calculated. Imaging data were reconstructed using the FBP, iDose{sup 4} and IMR algorithms. Parameters of objective image quality (noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR)); subjective image quality (overall image quality, image noise and margin sharpness); coronary artery visibility; and diagnostic accuracy for the three algorithms were measured and compared. Results: The mean effective radiation dose was 0.61 ± 0.32 mSv. Compared to FBP and iDose{sup 4}, IMR yielded significantly lower noise (P < 0.01), higher SNR and CNR values (P < 0.01), and a greater subjective image quality score (P < 0.01). The total number of coronary segments visualized was significantly higher for both iDose{sup 4} and IMR than for FBP (P = 0.002 and P = 0.025, respectively), but there was no significant difference in this parameter between iDose{sup 4} and IMR (P = 0.397). There was no significant difference in the diagnostic accuracy between the FBP, iDose{sup 4} and IMR algorithms (χ{sup 2} = 0.343, P = 0.842). Conclusions: For infants with CHD undergoing cardiac CTA, the IMR reconstruction algorithm provided significantly increased objective and subjective image quality compared with the FBP and iDose{sup 4} algorithms. However, IMR did not improve the diagnostic accuracy or coronary artery visualization compared with iDose{sup 4}.

  20. Retrospective Reconstruction of High Temporal Resolution Cine Images from Real-Time MRI using Iterative Motion Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Schacht; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Arai, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    acquisitions in 10 (N = 10) subjects. Acceptable image quality was obtained in all motion-corrected reconstructions, and the resulting mean image quality score was (a) Cartesian real-time: 2.48, (b) Golden Angle real-time: 1.90 (1.00–2.50), (c) Cartesian motion correction: 3.92, (d) Radial motion correction: 4...... and motion correction based on nonrigid registration and can be applied to arbitrary k-space trajectories. The method is demonstrated with real-time Cartesian imaging and Golden Angle radial acquisitions, and the motion-corrected acquisitions are compared with raw real-time images and breath-hold cine...

  1. Accelerated Brain DCE-MRI Using Iterative Reconstruction With Total Generalized Variation Penalty for Quantitative Pharmacokinetic Analysis: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunhao; Yin, Fang-Fang; Kirkpatrick, John P; Chang, Zheng

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using undersampled k-space data and an iterative image reconstruction method with total generalized variation penalty in the quantitative pharmacokinetic analysis for clinical brain dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Eight brain dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging scans were retrospectively studied. Two k-space sparse sampling strategies were designed to achieve a simulated image acquisition acceleration factor of 4. They are (1) a golden ratio-optimized 32-ray radial sampling profile and (2) a Cartesian-based random sampling profile with spatiotemporal-regularized sampling density constraints. The undersampled data were reconstructed to yield images using the investigated reconstruction technique. In quantitative pharmacokinetic analysis on a voxel-by-voxel basis, the rate constant K trans in the extended Tofts model and blood flow F B and blood volume V B from the 2-compartment exchange model were analyzed. Finally, the quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters calculated from the undersampled data were compared with the corresponding calculated values from the fully sampled data. To quantify each parameter's accuracy calculated using the undersampled data, error in volume mean, total relative error, and cross-correlation were calculated. The pharmacokinetic parameter maps generated from the undersampled data appeared comparable to the ones generated from the original full sampling data. Within the region of interest, most derived error in volume mean values in the region of interest was about 5% or lower, and the average error in volume mean of all parameter maps generated through either sampling strategy was about 3.54%. The average total relative error value of all parameter maps in region of interest was about 0.115, and the average cross-correlation of all parameter maps in region of interest was about 0.962. All investigated pharmacokinetic parameters had no significant differences between

  2. MO-FG-204-08: Optimization-Based Image Reconstruction From Unevenly Distributed Sparse Projection Views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Huiqiao; Yang, Yi; Tang, Xiangyang; Niu, Tianye; Ren, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Optimization-based reconstruction has been proposed and investigated for reconstructing CT images from sparse views, as such the radiation dose can be substantially reduced while maintaining acceptable image quality. The investigation has so far focused on reconstruction from evenly distributed sparse views. Recognizing the clinical situations wherein only unevenly sparse views are available, e.g., image guided radiation therapy, CT perfusion and multi-cycle cardiovascular imaging, we investigate the performance of optimization-based image reconstruction from unevenly sparse projection views in this work. Methods: The investigation is carried out using the FORBILD and an anthropomorphic head phantoms. In the study, 82 views, which are evenly sorted out from a full (360°) axial CT scan consisting of 984 views, form sub-scan I. Another 82 views are sorted out in a similar manner to form sub-scan II. As such, a CT scan with sparse (164) views at 1:6 ratio are formed. By shifting the two sub-scans relatively in view angulation, a CT scan with unevenly distributed sparse (164) views at 1:6 ratio are formed. An optimization-based method is implemented to reconstruct images from the unevenly distributed views. By taking the FBP reconstruction from the full scan (984 views) as the reference, the root mean square (RMS) between the reference and the optimization-based reconstruction is used to evaluate the performance quantitatively. Results: In visual inspection, the optimization-based method outperforms the FBP substantially in the reconstruction from unevenly distributed, which are quantitatively verified by the RMS gauged globally and in ROIs in both the FORBILD and anthropomorphic head phantoms. The RMS increases with increasing severity in the uneven angular distribution, especially in the case of anthropomorphic head phantom. Conclusion: The optimization-based image reconstruction can save radiation dose up to 12-fold while providing acceptable image quality

  3. Dustfall design of open coal yard in the power plant-a case study on the closed reconstruction project of coal storage yard in shengli power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kunpeng; Ji, Weidong; Zhang, Feifei; Yu, Wei; Zheng, Runqing

    2018-02-01

    This thesis, based on the closed reconstruction project of the coal storage yard of Shengli Power Plant which is affiliated to Sinopec Shengli Petroleum Administration, first makes an analysis on the significance of current dustfall reconstruction of open coal yard, then summarizes the methods widely adopted in the dustfall of large-scale open coal storage yard of current thermal power plant as well as their advantages and disadvantages, and finally focuses on this project, aiming at providing some reference and assistance to the future closed reconstruction project of open coal storage yard in thermal power plant.

  4. Cyclops lesions detected by MRI are frequent findings after ACL surgical reconstruction but do not impact clinical outcome over 2 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facchetti, Luca [University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); University of Brescia, Department of Radiology, Brescia (Italy); Schwaiger, Benedikt J.; Gersing, Alexandra S.; Nardo, Lorenzo; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M.; Li, Xiaojuan [University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Guimaraes, Julio Brandao [University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ma, Benjamin C. [University of California, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA (United States); Collaboration: UCSF-P50-ACL Consortium; AF-ACL Consortium

    2017-08-15

    To assess the impact of cyclops lesions with MRI in patients treated for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears on clinical outcome. In 113 patients (age 29.8 ± 10.5y; 55 females; BMI 24.8 ± 3.7 kg/m{sup 2}) with complete ACL tear, 3 T-MRI scans were obtained before, 6-months, 1-year (n = 75) and 2-years (n = 33) after ACL reconstruction. Presence and volume of cyclops lesions were assessed. Clinical outcomes were measured using the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and differences between time points (∇KOOS) were calculated. Changes of KOOS subscales were compared between patients with and without cyclops lesion. KOOS was also correlated with lesion volume. Cyclops lesions were found in 25% (28/113), 27% (20/75) and 33% (11/33) of patients after 6-months, 1- and 2-years, respectively. The lesion volume did not change significantly (P > 0.05) between time points, measuring 0.65 ± 0.59, 0.81 ± 0.70 and 0.72.9 ± 0.96 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Clinical outcomes based on KOOS subscales were not significantly different in patients with cyclops lesions compared to those without cyclops lesions (each comparison P > 0.05), and no significant associations of clinical outcomes with lesion volume were found (P > 0.05). Neither presence nor size of cyclops lesions within the first 2-years after ACL surgery were associated with inferior clinical outcome. (orig.)

  5. An FDK-like cone-beam SPECT reconstruction algorithm for non-uniform attenuated projections acquired using a circular trajectory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Q; Zeng, G L; You, J; Gullberg, G T

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, Novikov's inversion formula of the attenuated two-dimensional (2D) Radon transform is applied to the reconstruction of attenuated fan-beam projections acquired with equal detector spacing and of attenuated cone-beam projections acquired with a flat planar detector and circular trajectory. The derivation of the fan-beam algorithm is obtained by transformation from parallel-beam coordinates to fan-beam coordinates. The cone-beam reconstruction algorithm is an extension of the fan-beam reconstruction algorithm using Feldkamp-Davis-Kress's (FDK) method. Computer simulations indicate that the algorithm is efficient and is accurate in reconstructing slices close to the central slice of the cone-beam orbit plane. When the attenuation map is set to zero the implementation is equivalent to the FDK method. Reconstructed images are also shown for noise corrupted projections

  6. Technical Note: Interleaved Bipolar Acquisition and Low-rank Reconstruction for Water-Fat Separation in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, JaeJin; Park, HyunWook

    2018-05-17

    To acquire interleaved bipolar data and reconstruct the full data using low-rank property for water fat separation. Bipolar acquisition suffers from issues related to gradient switching, the opposite gradient polarities, and other system imperfections, which prevent accurate water-fat separation. In this study, an interleaved bipolar acquisition scheme and a low-rank reconstruction method were proposed to reduce issues from the bipolar gradients while achieving a short imaging time. The proposed interleaved bipolar acquisition scheme collects echo-time signals from both gradient polarities; however, the sequence increases the imaging time. To reduce the imaging time, the signals were subsampled at every dimension of k-space. The low-rank property of the bipolar acquisition was defined and exploited to estimate the full data from the acquired subsampled data. To eliminate the bipolar issues, in the proposed method, the water-fat separation was performed separately for each gradient polarity, and the results for the positive and negative gradient polarities were combined after the water-fat separation. A phantom study and in-vivo experiments were conducted on a 3T Siemens Verio system. The results for the proposed method were compared with the results of the fully sampled interleaved bipolar acquisition and Soliman's method, which was the previous water-fat separation approach for reducing the issues of bipolar gradients and accelerating the interleaved bipolar acquisition. The proposed method provided accurate water and fat images without the issues of bipolar gradients and demonstrated a better performance compared with the results of the previous methods. The water-fat separation using the bipolar acquisition has several benefits including a short echo-spacing time. However, it suffers from bipolar-gradient issues such as strong gradient switching, system imperfection, and eddy current effects. This study demonstrated that accurate water-fat separated images can

  7. Comparison of pure and hybrid iterative reconstruction techniques with conventional filtered back projection: Image quality assessment in the cervicothoracic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsura, Masaki; Sato, Jiro; Akahane, Masaaki; Matsuda, Izuru; Ishida, Masanori; Yasaka, Koichiro; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the impact on image quality of three different image reconstruction techniques in the cervicothoracic region: model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), and filtered back projection (FBP). Methods: Forty-four patients underwent unenhanced standard-of-care clinical computed tomography (CT) examinations which included the cervicothoracic region with a 64-row multidetector CT scanner. Images were reconstructed with FBP, 50% ASIR-FBP blending (ASIR50), and MBIR. Two radiologists assessed the cervicothoracic region in a blinded manner for streak artifacts, pixilated blotchy appearances, critical reproduction of visually sharp anatomical structures (thyroid gland, common carotid artery, and esophagus), and overall diagnostic acceptability. Objective image noise was measured in the internal jugular vein. Data were analyzed using the sign test and pair-wise Student's t-test. Results: MBIR images had significant lower quantitative image noise (8.88 ± 1.32) compared to ASIR images (18.63 ± 4.19, P 0.9 for ASIR vs. FBP for both readers). MBIR images were all diagnostically acceptable. Unique features of MBIR images included pixilated blotchy appearances, which did not adversely affect diagnostic acceptability. Conclusions: MBIR significantly improves image noise and streak artifacts of the cervicothoracic region over ASIR and FBP. MBIR is expected to enhance the value of CT examinations for areas where image noise and streak artifacts are problematic

  8. Effect of number of of projections on inverse radon transform based image reconstruction by using filtered back-projection for parallel beam transmission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, S.A.; Mirza, S.M.; Arif, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper present the effect of number of projections on inverse Radon transform (IRT) estimation using filtered back-projection (FBP) technique for parallel beam transmission tomography. The head phantom and the lung phantom have been used in this work. Various filters used in this study include Ram-Lak, Shepp-Logan, Cosin, Hamming and Hanning filters. The slices have been reconstructed by increasing the number of projections through parallel beam transmission tomography keeping the projections uniformly distributed. The Euclidean and Mean Squared errors and peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) have been analyzed for their sensitiveness as functions of number of projections. It has found that image quality improves with the number of projections but at the cost of the computer time. The error has been minimized to get the best approximation of inverse Radon transform (IRT) as the number of projections is enhanced. The value of PSNR has been found to increase from 8.20 to 24.53 dB as the number of projections is raised from 5 to 180 for head phantom. (author)

  9. Novel Fourier-based iterative reconstruction for sparse fan projection using alternating direction total variation minimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Zhao; Zhang Han-Ming; Yan Bin; Li Lei; Wang Lin-Yuan; Cai Ai-Long

    2016-01-01

    Sparse-view x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging is an interesting topic in CT field and can efficiently decrease radiation dose. Compared with spatial reconstruction, a Fourier-based algorithm has advantages in reconstruction speed and memory usage. A novel Fourier-based iterative reconstruction technique that utilizes non-uniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) is presented in this work along with advanced total variation (TV) regularization for a fan sparse-view CT. The proposition of a selective matrix contributes to improve reconstruction quality. The new method employs the NUFFT and its adjoin to iterate back and forth between the Fourier and image space. The performance of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated through a series of digital simulations and experimental phantom studies. Results of the proposed algorithm are compared with those of existing TV-regularized techniques based on compressed sensing method, as well as basic algebraic reconstruction technique. Compared with the existing TV-regularized techniques, the proposed Fourier-based technique significantly improves convergence rate and reduces memory allocation, respectively. (paper)

  10. Projected potential profiles across interfaces obtained by reconstructing the exit face wave function from through focal series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, Somnath; Koch, Christoph T.; Ruehle, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    An iterative method for reconstructing the exit face wave function from a through focal series of transmission electron microscopy image line profiles across an interface is presented. Apart from high-resolution images recorded with small changes in defocus, this method works also well for a large defocus range as used for Fresnel imaging. Using the phase-object approximation the projected electrostatic as well as the absorptive potential profiles across an interface are determined from this exit face wave function. A new experimental image alignment procedure was developed in order to align images with large relative defocus shift. The performance of this procedure is shown to be superior to other image alignment procedures existing in the literature. The reconstruction method is applied to both simulated and experimental images

  11. Reconstruction of tomographic images from projections of a small number of views by means of mathematical programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Fujio; Yamaguchi, Shoichiro

    1985-01-01

    Fundamental studies have been made on the application of mathematical programming to the reconstruction of tomographic images from projections of a small number of views without requiring any circular symmetry nor periodicity. Linear programming and quadratic programming were applied to minimize the quadratic sum of the residue and to finally obtain optimized reconstruction images. The mathematical algorithms were verified by the method of computer simulation, and the relationship between the number of picture elements and the number of iterations necessary for convergence was also investigated. The methods of linear programming and quadratic programming require fairly simple mathematical procedures, and strict solutions can be obtained within a finite number of iterations. Their only draw back is the requirement of a large quantity of computer memory. But this problem will be desolved by the advent of large fast memory devices in the near future. (Aoki, K.)

  12. MR-guided PET motion correction in LOR space using generic projection data for image reconstruction with PRESTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheins, J.; Ullisch, M.; Tellmann, L.; Weirich, C.; Rota Kops, E.; Herzog, H.; Shah, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    The BrainPET scanner from Siemens, designed as hybrid MR/PET system for simultaneous acquisition of both modalities, provides high-resolution PET images with an optimum resolution of 3 mm. However, significant head motion often compromises the achievable image quality, e.g. in neuroreceptor studies of human brain. This limitation can be omitted when tracking the head motion and accurately correcting measured Lines-of-Response (LORs). For this purpose, we present a novel method, which advantageously combines MR-guided motion tracking with the capabilities of the reconstruction software PRESTO (PET Reconstruction Software Toolkit) to convert motion-corrected LORs into highly accurate generic projection data. In this way, the high-resolution PET images achievable with PRESTO can also be obtained in presence of severe head motion

  13. Building credibility in public studies: Lessons learned from the Hanford environmental Dose Reconstruction project may apply to all public studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the process by which the author came to recognize the importance of openness to the public in environmental studies, during the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Using the Dose reconstruction public involvement, the article goes on to describe a general guide to the construction of a new, positive framework for conducting future public studies. The steps include the following: putting the public in the study; building credibility into a public study (1 -search for proof in historical records; 2-define the domain and the exposed population; 3-characterize the material released; 4-identify key materials, pathways and receptors; 5-encouraging public participation; 6 -explaining the meaning of the results) and reconciling scientific and public issues

  14. Building credibility in public studies: Lessons learned from the Hanford environmental Dose Reconstruction project may apply to all public studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Till, J.E. [Radiological Assessment Corp., Neeses, SC (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This article describes the process by which the author came to recognize the importance of openness to the public in environmental studies, during the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Using the Dose reconstruction public involvement, the article goes on to describe a general guide to the construction of a new, positive framework for conducting future public studies. The steps include the following: putting the public in the study; building credibility into a public study (1 -search for proof in historical records; 2-define the domain and the exposed population; 3-characterize the material released; 4-identify key materials, pathways and receptors; 5-encouraging public participation; 6 -explaining the meaning of the results) and reconciling scientific and public issues.

  15. A PET reconstruction formulation that enforces non-negativity in projection space for bias reduction in Y-90 imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hongki; Dewaraja, Yuni K.; Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    2018-02-01

    Most existing PET image reconstruction methods impose a nonnegativity constraint in the image domain that is natural physically, but can lead to biased reconstructions. This bias is particularly problematic for Y-90 PET because of the low probability positron production and high random coincidence fraction. This paper investigates a new PET reconstruction formulation that enforces nonnegativity of the projections instead of the voxel values. This formulation allows some negative voxel values, thereby potentially reducing bias. Unlike the previously reported NEG-ML approach that modifies the Poisson log-likelihood to allow negative values, the new formulation retains the classical Poisson statistical model. To relax the non-negativity constraint embedded in the standard methods for PET reconstruction, we used an alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). Because choice of ADMM parameters can greatly influence convergence rate, we applied an automatic parameter selection method to improve the convergence speed. We investigated the methods using lung to liver slices of XCAT phantom. We simulated low true coincidence count-rates with high random fractions corresponding to the typical values from patient imaging in Y-90 microsphere radioembolization. We compared our new methods with standard reconstruction algorithms and NEG-ML and a regularized version thereof. Both our new method and NEG-ML allow more accurate quantification in all volumes of interest while yielding lower noise than the standard method. The performance of NEG-ML can degrade when its user-defined parameter is tuned poorly, while the proposed algorithm is robust to any count level without requiring parameter tuning.

  16. In-process 3D geometry reconstruction of objects produced by direct light projection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulrik Vølcker; Pedersen, David Bue; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2013-01-01

    al. 2011), this method has shown its potential with 3D printing (3DP) and selective laser sintering additive manufacturing processes, where it is possible to directly capture the geometrical features of each individual layer during a build job using a digital camera. When considering the process...... equipment such as coordinate measuring machines cannot be verified easily. This problem is addressed by developing an in-line reverse engineering and 3D reconstruction method that allows a true-to-scale reconstruction of a part being additively manufactured. In earlier works (Pedersen et al. 2010; Hansen et...

  17. Multi-sheet surface rebinning methods for reconstruction from asymmetrically truncated cone beam projections: I. Approximation and optimality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betcke, Marta M; Lionheart, William R B

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical motion of the gantry in conventional cone beam CT scanners restricts the speed of data acquisition in applications with near real time requirements. A possible resolution of this problem is to replace the moving source detector assembly with static parts that are electronically activated. An example of such a system is the Rapiscan Systems RTT80 real time tomography scanner, with a static ring of sources and axially offset static cylinder of detectors. A consequence of such a design is asymmetrical axial truncation of the cone beam projections resulting, in the sense of integral geometry, in severely incomplete data. In particular we collect data only in a fraction of the Tam–Danielsson window, hence the standard cone beam reconstruction techniques do not apply. In this work we propose a family of multi-sheet surface rebinning methods for reconstruction from such truncated projections. The proposed methods combine analytical and numerical ideas utilizing linearity of the ray transform to reconstruct data on multi-sheet surfaces, from which the volumetric image is obtained through deconvolution. In this first paper in the series, we discuss the rebinning to multi-sheet surfaces. In particular we concentrate on the underlying transforms on multi-sheet surfaces and their approximation with data collected by offset multi-source scanning geometries like the RTT. The optimal multi-sheet surface and the corresponding rebinning function are found as a solution of a variational problem. In the case of the quadratic objective, the variational problem for the optimal rebinning pair can be solved by a globally convergent iteration. Examples of optimal rebinning pairs are computed for different trajectories. We formulate the axial deconvolution problem for the recovery of the volumetric image from the reconstructions on multi-sheet surfaces. Efficient and stable solution of the deconvolution problem is the subject of the second paper in this series (Betcke and

  18. WE-G-207-02: Full Sequential Projection Onto Convex Sets (FS-POCS) for X-Ray CT Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L; Han, Y; Jin, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an iterative reconstruction method for X-ray CT, in which the reconstruction can quickly converge to the desired solution with much reduced projection views. Methods: The reconstruction is formulated as a convex feasibility problem, i.e. the solution is an intersection of three convex sets: 1) data fidelity (DF) set – the L2 norm of the difference of observed projections and those from the reconstructed image is no greater than an error bound; 2) non-negativity of image voxels (NN) set; and 3) piecewise constant (PC) set - the total variation (TV) of the reconstructed image is no greater than an upper bound. The solution can be found by applying projection onto convex sets (POCS) sequentially for these three convex sets. Specifically, the algebraic reconstruction technique and setting negative voxels as zero are used for projection onto the DF and NN sets, respectively, while the projection onto the PC set is achieved by solving a standard Rudin, Osher, and Fatemi (ROF) model. The proposed method is named as full sequential POCS (FS-POCS), which is tested using the Shepp-Logan phantom and the Catphan600 phantom and compared with two similar algorithms, TV-POCS and CP-TV. Results: Using the Shepp-Logan phantom, the root mean square error (RMSE) of reconstructed images changing along with the number of iterations is used as the convergence measurement. In general, FS- POCS converges faster than TV-POCS and CP-TV, especially with fewer projection views. FS-POCS can also achieve accurate reconstruction of cone-beam CT of the Catphan600 phantom using only 54 views, comparable to that of FDK using 364 views. Conclusion: We developed an efficient iterative reconstruction for sparse-view CT using full sequential POCS. The simulation and physical phantom data demonstrated the computational efficiency and effectiveness of FS-POCS

  19. A sparsity-based iterative algorithm for reconstruction of micro-CT images from highly undersampled projection datasets obtained with a synchrotron X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melli, S. Ali; Wahid, Khan A.; Babyn, Paul; Cooper, David M. L.; Gopi, Varun P.

    2016-12-01

    Synchrotron X-ray Micro Computed Tomography (Micro-CT) is an imaging technique which is increasingly used for non-invasive in vivo preclinical imaging. However, it often requires a large number of projections from many different angles to reconstruct high-quality images leading to significantly high radiation doses and long scan times. To utilize this imaging technique further for in vivo imaging, we need to design reconstruction algorithms that reduce the radiation dose and scan time without reduction of reconstructed image quality. This research is focused on using a combination of gradient-based Douglas-Rachford splitting and discrete wavelet packet shrinkage image denoising methods to design an algorithm for reconstruction of large-scale reduced-view synchrotron Micro-CT images with acceptable quality metrics. These quality metrics are computed by comparing the reconstructed images with a high-dose reference image reconstructed from 1800 equally spaced projections spanning 180°. Visual and quantitative-based performance assessment of a synthetic head phantom and a femoral cortical bone sample imaged in the biomedical imaging and therapy bending magnet beamline at the Canadian Light Source demonstrates that the proposed algorithm is superior to the existing reconstruction algorithms. Using the proposed reconstruction algorithm to reduce the number of projections in synchrotron Micro-CT is an effective way to reduce the overall radiation dose and scan time which improves in vivo imaging protocols.

  20. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction versus filtered back projection in the same patient: 64 channel liver CT image quality and patient radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsumori, Lee M.; Shuman, William P.; Busey, Janet M.; Kolokythas, Orpheus; Koprowicz, Kent M.

    2012-01-01

    To compare routine dose liver CT reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) versus low dose images reconstructed with FBP and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). In this retrospective study, patients had a routine dose protocol reconstructed with FBP, and again within 17 months (median 6.1 months), had a low dose protocol reconstructed twice, with FBP and ASIR. These reconstructions were compared for noise, image quality, and radiation dose. Nineteen patients were included. (12 male, mean age 58). Noise was significantly lower in low dose images reconstructed with ASIR compared to routine dose images reconstructed with FBP (liver: p <.05, aorta: p < 0.001). Low dose FBP images were scored significantly lower for subjective image quality than low dose ASIR (2.1 ± 0.5, 3.2 ± 0.8, p < 0.001). There was no difference in subjective image quality scores between routine dose FBP images and low dose ASIR images (3.6 ± 0.5, 3.2 ± 0.8, NS).Radiation dose was 41% less for the low dose protocol (4.4 ± 2.4 mSv versus 7.5 ± 5.5 mSv, p < 0.05). Our initial results suggest low dose CT images reconstructed with ASIR may have lower measured noise, similar image quality, yet significantly less radiation dose compared with higher dose images reconstructed with FBP. (orig.)

  1. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction versus filtered back projection in the same patient: 64 channel liver CT image quality and patient radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsumori, Lee M.; Shuman, William P.; Busey, Janet M.; Kolokythas, Orpheus; Koprowicz, Kent M. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-01-15

    To compare routine dose liver CT reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) versus low dose images reconstructed with FBP and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). In this retrospective study, patients had a routine dose protocol reconstructed with FBP, and again within 17 months (median 6.1 months), had a low dose protocol reconstructed twice, with FBP and ASIR. These reconstructions were compared for noise, image quality, and radiation dose. Nineteen patients were included. (12 male, mean age 58). Noise was significantly lower in low dose images reconstructed with ASIR compared to routine dose images reconstructed with FBP (liver: p <.05, aorta: p < 0.001). Low dose FBP images were scored significantly lower for subjective image quality than low dose ASIR (2.1 {+-} 0.5, 3.2 {+-} 0.8, p < 0.001). There was no difference in subjective image quality scores between routine dose FBP images and low dose ASIR images (3.6 {+-} 0.5, 3.2 {+-} 0.8, NS).Radiation dose was 41% less for the low dose protocol (4.4 {+-} 2.4 mSv versus 7.5 {+-} 5.5 mSv, p < 0.05). Our initial results suggest low dose CT images reconstructed with ASIR may have lower measured noise, similar image quality, yet significantly less radiation dose compared with higher dose images reconstructed with FBP. (orig.)

  2. Sequential MRI Study of Graft Integrity and Signal Following Pediatric All-epiphyseal ACL Reconstruction: Does the “Sharp Turn” at the Socket of the Distal Femoral Aperture Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuca, Maria; Greditzer, Harry Gus; Gausden, Elizabeth Bishop; Uppstrom, Tyler J.; Potter, Hollis G.; Cordasco, Frank A.; Green, Daniel W.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze graft structure and signal with particular emphasis on the distal femoral socket aperture following all-epiphyseal ACLR using hamstring autografts with sequential MRI in skeletally immature athletes. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of 23 skeletally immature patients who underwent ACLR by the same surgical team at a tertiary center during 2011-2013. Athletes had at least two follow-up MRIs, the first MRI 6-12 months after surgery and the second MRI >18 months, were included. Exclusion criteria included those athletes with inMRI follow-up (6) or with a failure of their reconstructions (1). All athletes were treated with an arthroscopic all-inside, all-epiphyseal ACLR, using hamstring autograft, secured with adjustable loop cortical buttons on both tibia and femur. MRI images were analyzed independently and blinded by an orthopaedic surgery fellow and a musculoskeletal radiology fellow. Using a GE Functional Analysis Software, the signal intensity (SI) of the graft was measured in 5 different locations: 1) femoral tunnel, 2) intra-articular proximal turn, 3) midsubstance, 4) intra-articular distal turn, and 5) tibial tunnel. Values were normalized to cortical bone density. The amount of perigraft scarring and synovitis was analyzed. An intraclass correlation coefficient was used to quantify inter-rater reliability, non-parametric Wilcoxon test for perigraft scarring and synovitis, one-way ANOVA to test if significant differences of SI were seen between the different graft locations, and a 2-tailed student t-test for SI changes from 1st to 2nd MRI. Results: The study included 16 patients (5 girls and 11 boys), with an average age at surgery of 11.9 years (range 10-15). The first follow-up MRI was on average at 8.4 months (range 6-12 months), while the 2nd MRI was on average 30.7 months (range 18-40) after surgery. Intra-class correlation coefficients were above 0.7 for all measurements, indicating an excellent concordance between observers

  3. Medical image reconstruction. A conceptual tutorial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Gengsheng Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    ''Medical Image Reconstruction: A Conceptual Tutorial'' introduces the classical and modern image reconstruction technologies, such as two-dimensional (2D) parallel-beam and fan-beam imaging, three-dimensional (3D) parallel ray, parallel plane, and cone-beam imaging. This book presents both analytical and iterative methods of these technologies and their applications in X-ray CT (computed tomography), SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography), PET (positron emission tomography), and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). Contemporary research results in exact region-of-interest (ROI) reconstruction with truncated projections, Katsevich's cone-beam filtered backprojection algorithm, and reconstruction with highly undersampled data with l 0 -minimization are also included. (orig.)

  4. Estimation of 1945 to 1957 food consumption. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, D.M.; Bates, D.J.; Marsh, T.L.

    1993-03-01

    This report details the methods used and the results of the study on the estimated historic levels of food consumption by individuals in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) study area from 1945--1957. This period includes the time of highest releases from Hanford and is the period for which data are being collected in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. These estimates provide the food-consumption inputs for the HEDR database of individual diets. This database will be an input file in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Code (HEDRIC) computer model that will be used to calculate the radiation dose. The report focuses on fresh milk, eggs, lettuce, and spinach. These foods were chosen because they have been found to be significant contributors to radiation dose based on the Technical Steering Panel dose decision level.

  5. Estimation of 1945 to 1957 food consumption. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, D.M.; Bates, D.J.; Marsh, T.L.

    1993-07-01

    This report details the methods used and the results of the study on the estimated historic levels of food consumption by individuals in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) study area from 1945--1957. This period includes the time of highest releases from Hanford and is the period for which data are being collected in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. These estimates provide the food-consumption inputs for the HEDR database of individual diets. This database will be an input file in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Code (HEDRIC) computer model that will be used to calculate the radiation dose. The report focuses on fresh milk, eggs, lettuce, and spinach. These foods were chosen because they have been found to be significant contributors to radiation dose based on the Technical Steering Panel dose decision level.

  6. Techniques for the reconstruction of two-dimensional images from projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauthoff, N.R.; Von Goeler, S.

    1978-08-01

    Several plasma diagnostics techniques measure the line integrals of quantities such as densities and optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray emission. Some approaches for reconstructing the local quantities from their line integrals, based on methods utilized in computerized tomography, electron microscopy, holographic interferometry, and radio astromony, are derived and presented. Results for the special cases with source functions posessing helical symmetry--ranging from DNA to MHD--are emphasized

  7. Comparison of pure and hybrid iterative reconstruction techniques with conventional filtered back projection: Image quality assessment in the cervicothoracic region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsura, Masaki, E-mail: mkatsura-tky@umin.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Sato, Jiro; Akahane, Masaaki; Matsuda, Izuru; Ishida, Masanori; Yasaka, Koichiro; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    Objectives: To evaluate the impact on image quality of three different image reconstruction techniques in the cervicothoracic region: model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), and filtered back projection (FBP). Methods: Forty-four patients underwent unenhanced standard-of-care clinical computed tomography (CT) examinations which included the cervicothoracic region with a 64-row multidetector CT scanner. Images were reconstructed with FBP, 50% ASIR-FBP blending (ASIR50), and MBIR. Two radiologists assessed the cervicothoracic region in a blinded manner for streak artifacts, pixilated blotchy appearances, critical reproduction of visually sharp anatomical structures (thyroid gland, common carotid artery, and esophagus), and overall diagnostic acceptability. Objective image noise was measured in the internal jugular vein. Data were analyzed using the sign test and pair-wise Student's t-test. Results: MBIR images had significant lower quantitative image noise (8.88 ± 1.32) compared to ASIR images (18.63 ± 4.19, P < 0.01) and FBP images (26.52 ± 5.8, P < 0.01). Significant improvements in streak artifacts of the cervicothoracic region were observed with the use of MBIR (P < 0.001 each for MBIR vs. the other two image data sets for both readers), while no significant difference was observed between ASIR and FBP (P > 0.9 for ASIR vs. FBP for both readers). MBIR images were all diagnostically acceptable. Unique features of MBIR images included pixilated blotchy appearances, which did not adversely affect diagnostic acceptability. Conclusions: MBIR significantly improves image noise and streak artifacts of the cervicothoracic region over ASIR and FBP. MBIR is expected to enhance the value of CT examinations for areas where image noise and streak artifacts are problematic.

  8. Heart MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  9. Three-dimensional inversion recovery manganese-enhanced MRI of mouse brain using super-resolution reconstruction to visualize nuclei involved in higher brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Dana S; Plenge, Esben; Poot, Dirk H J; Lakke, Egbert A J F; Niessen, Wiro J; Meijering, Erik; van der Weerd, Louise

    2014-07-01

    The visualization of activity in mouse brain using inversion recovery spin echo (IR-SE) manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) provides unique contrast, but suffers from poor resolution in the slice-encoding direction. Super-resolution reconstruction (SRR) is a resolution-enhancing post-processing technique in which multiple low-resolution slice stacks are combined into a single volume of high isotropic resolution using computational methods. In this study, we investigated, first, whether SRR can improve the three-dimensional resolution of IR-SE MEMRI in the slice selection direction, whilst maintaining or improving the contrast-to-noise ratio of the two-dimensional slice stacks. Second, the contrast-to-noise ratio of SRR IR-SE MEMRI was compared with a conventional three-dimensional gradient echo (GE) acquisition. Quantitative experiments were performed on a phantom containing compartments of various manganese concentrations. The results showed that, with comparable scan times, the signal-to-noise ratio of three-dimensional GE acquisition is higher than that of SRR IR-SE MEMRI. However, the contrast-to-noise ratio between different compartments can be superior with SRR IR-SE MEMRI, depending on the chosen inversion time. In vivo experiments were performed in mice receiving manganese using an implanted osmotic pump. The results showed that SRR works well as a resolution-enhancing technique in IR-SE MEMRI experiments. In addition, the SRR image also shows a number of brain structures that are more clearly discernible from the surrounding tissues than in three-dimensional GE acquisition, including a number of nuclei with specific higher brain functions, such as memory, stress, anxiety and reward behavior. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Ultra-Fast Image Reconstruction of Tomosynthesis Mammography Using GPU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefan, D; Talebpour, A; Ahmadinejhad, N; Kamali Asl, A

    2015-06-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is a technology that creates three dimensional (3D) images of breast tissue. Tomosynthesis mammography detects lesions that are not detectable with other imaging systems. If image reconstruction time is in the order of seconds, we can use Tomosynthesis systems to perform Tomosynthesis-guided Interventional procedures. This research has been designed to study ultra-fast image reconstruction technique for Tomosynthesis Mammography systems using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). At first, projections of Tomosynthesis mammography have been simulated. In order to produce Tomosynthesis projections, it has been designed a 3D breast phantom from empirical data. It is based on MRI data in its natural form. Then, projections have been created from 3D breast phantom. The image reconstruction algorithm based on FBP was programmed with C++ language in two methods using central processing unit (CPU) card and the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). It calculated the time of image reconstruction in two kinds of programming (using CPU and GPU).

  11. Methods of X-ray CT image reconstruction from few projections; Methodes de reconstruction d'images a partir d'un faible nombre de projections en tomographie par rayons X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.

    2011-10-24

    To improve the safety (low dose) and the productivity (fast acquisition) of a X-ray CT system, we want to reconstruct a high quality image from a small number of projections. The classical reconstruction algorithms generally fail since the reconstruction procedure is unstable and suffers from artifacts. A new approach based on the recently developed 'Compressed Sensing' (CS) theory assumes that the unknown image is in some sense 'sparse' or 'compressible', and the reconstruction is formulated through a non linear optimization problem (TV/l1 minimization) by enhancing the sparsity. Using the pixel (or voxel in 3D) as basis, to apply the CS framework in CT one usually needs a 'sparsifying' transform, and combines it with the 'X-ray projector' which applies on the pixel image. In this thesis, we have adapted a 'CT-friendly' radial basis of Gaussian family called 'blob' to the CS-CT framework. The blob has better space-frequency localization properties than the pixel, and many operations, such as the X-ray transform, can be evaluated analytically and are highly parallelizable (on GPU platform). Compared to the classical Kaisser-Bessel blob, the new basis has a multi-scale structure: an image is the sum of dilated and translated radial Mexican hat functions. The typical medical objects are compressible under this basis, so the sparse representation system used in the ordinary CS algorithms is no more needed. 2D simulations show that the existing TV and l1 algorithms are more efficient and the reconstructions have better visual quality than the equivalent approach based on the pixel or wavelet basis. The new approach has also been validated on 2D experimental data, where we have observed that in general the number of projections can be reduced to about 50%, without compromising the image quality. (author) [French] Afin d'ameliorer la surete (faible dose) et la productivite (acquisition rapide) du

  12. 3D reconstruction of tensors and vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defrise, Michel; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2005-01-01

    Here we have developed formulations for the reconstruction of 3D tensor fields from planar (Radon) and line-integral (X-ray) projections of 3D vector and tensor fields. Much of the motivation for this work is the potential application of MRI to perform diffusion tensor tomography. The goal is to develop a theory for the reconstruction of both Radon planar and X-ray or line-integral projections because of the flexibility of MRI to obtain both of these type of projections in 3D. The development presented here for the linear tensor tomography problem provides insight into the structure of the nonlinear MRI diffusion tensor inverse problem. A particular application of tensor imaging in MRI is the potential application of cardiac diffusion tensor tomography for determining in vivo cardiac fiber structure. One difficulty in the cardiac application is the motion of the heart. This presents a need for developing future theory for tensor tomography in a motion field. This means developing a better understanding of the MRI signal for diffusion processes in a deforming media. The techniques developed may allow the application of MRI tensor tomography for the study of structure of fiber tracts in the brain, atherosclerotic plaque, and spine in addition to fiber structure in the heart. However, the relations presented are also applicable to other fields in medical imaging such as diffraction tomography using ultrasound. The mathematics presented can also be extended to exponential Radon transform of tensor fields and to other geometric acquisitions such as cone beam tomography of tensor fields

  13. Demonstration of a forward iterative method to reconstruct brachytherapy seed configurations from x-ray projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Martin J; Todor, Dorin A [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond VA 23298 (United States)

    2005-06-07

    By monitoring brachytherapy seed placement and determining the actual configuration of the seeds in vivo, one can optimize the treatment plan during the process of implantation. Two or more radiographic images from different viewpoints can in principle allow one to reconstruct the configuration of implanted seeds uniquely. However, the reconstruction problem is complicated by several factors: (1) the seeds can overlap and cluster in the images; (2) the images can have distortion that varies with viewpoint when a C-arm fluoroscope is used; (3) there can be uncertainty in the imaging viewpoints; (4) the angular separation of the imaging viewpoints can be small owing to physical space constraints; (5) there can be inconsistency in the number of seeds detected in the images; and (6) the patient can move while being imaged. We propose and conceptually demonstrate a novel reconstruction method that handles all of these complications and uncertainties in a unified process. The method represents the three-dimensional seed and camera configurations as parametrized models that are adjusted iteratively to conform to the observed radiographic images. The morphed model seed configuration that best reproduces the appearance of the seeds in the radiographs is the best estimate of the actual seed configuration. All of the information needed to establish both the seed configuration and the camera model is derived from the seed images without resort to external calibration fixtures. Furthermore, by comparing overall image content rather than individual seed coordinates, the process avoids the need to establish correspondence between seed identities in the several images. The method has been shown to work robustly in simulation tests that simultaneously allow for unknown individual seed positions, uncertainties in the imaging viewpoints and variable image distortion.

  14. Demons Registration of CT Volume and CBCT Projections for Adaptive Radiotherapy: Avoiding CBCT Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Troels; Aznar, M.; Munck af Rosenschöld, P.

    2012-01-01

    with adaptive fluidity (smoothing kernel width). For forward/back-projection, the separable footprints algorithm with trapezoid functions was applied. The similarity between the simulated and measured projections was measured as the SSD. Results: The figure shows a slice of; the CT volume (reference), the CT...

  15. Adaptive algebraic reconstruction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Wenkai; Yin Fangfang

    2004-01-01

    Algebraic reconstruction techniques (ART) are iterative procedures for reconstructing objects from their projections. It is proven that ART can be computationally efficient by carefully arranging the order in which the collected data are accessed during the reconstruction procedure and adaptively adjusting the relaxation parameters. In this paper, an adaptive algebraic reconstruction technique (AART), which adopts the same projection access scheme in multilevel scheme algebraic reconstruction technique (MLS-ART), is proposed. By introducing adaptive adjustment of the relaxation parameters during the reconstruction procedure, one-iteration AART can produce reconstructions with better quality, in comparison with one-iteration MLS-ART. Furthermore, AART outperforms MLS-ART with improved computational efficiency

  16. Why do commercial CT scanners still employ traditional, filtered back-projection for image reconstruction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Xiaochuan; Sidky, Emil Y; Vannier, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Despite major advances in x-ray sources, detector arrays, gantry mechanical design and especially computer performance, one component of computed tomography (CT) scanners has remained virtually constant for the past 25 years—the reconstruction algorithm. Fundamental advances have been made in the solution of inverse problems, especially tomographic reconstruction, but these works have not been translated into clinical and related practice. The reasons are not obvious and seldom discussed. This review seeks to examine the reasons for this discrepancy and provides recommendations on how it can be resolved. We take the example of field of compressive sensing (CS), summarizing this new area of research from the eyes of practical medical physicists and explaining the disconnection between theoretical and application-oriented research. Using a few issues specific to CT, which engineers have addressed in very specific ways, we try to distill the mathematical problem underlying each of these issues with the hope of demonstrating that there are interesting mathematical problems of general importance that can result from in depth analysis of specific issues. We then sketch some unconventional CT-imaging designs that have the potential to impact on CT applications, if the link between applied mathematicians and engineers/physicists were stronger. Finally, we close with some observations on how the link could be strengthened. There is, we believe, an important opportunity to rapidly improve the performance of CT and related tomographic imaging techniques by addressing these issues. (topical review)

  17. Image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT: A sensitivity analysis of respiratory signal, binning method, reconstruction algorithm, and projection angular spacing

    OpenAIRE

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Kipritidis, John; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory signal, binning method, and reconstruction algorithm are three major controllable factors affecting image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT), which is widely used in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Previous studies have investigated each of these factors individually, but no integrated sensitivity analysis has been performed. In addition, projection angular spacing is also a key factor in reconstruction, but how it affects image quality is not obvious. An inv...

  18. Optimized image acquisition for breast tomosynthesis in projection and reconstruction space

    OpenAIRE

    Chawla, Amarpreet S.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Baker, Jay A.; Samei, Ehsan

    2009-01-01

    Breast tomosynthesis has been an exciting new development in the field of breast imaging. While the diagnostic improvement via tomosynthesis is notable, the full potential of tomosynthesis has not yet been realized. This may be attributed to the dependency of the diagnostic quality of tomosynthesis on multiple variables, each of which needs to be optimized. Those include dose, number of angular projections, and the total angular span of those projections. In this study, the authors investigat...

  19. Dipy, a library for the analysis of diffusion MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garyfallidis, Eleftherios; Brett, Matthew; Amirbekian, Bagrat; Rokem, Ariel; van der Walt, Stefan; Descoteaux, Maxime; Nimmo-Smith, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion Imaging in Python (Dipy) is a free and open source software project for the analysis of data from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) experiments. dMRI is an application of MRI that can be used to measure structural features of brain white matter. Many methods have been developed to use dMRI data to model the local configuration of white matter nerve fiber bundles and infer the trajectory of bundles connecting different parts of the brain. Dipy gathers implementations of many different methods in dMRI, including: diffusion signal pre-processing; reconstruction of diffusion distributions in individual voxels; fiber tractography and fiber track post-processing, analysis and visualization. Dipy aims to provide transparent implementations for all the different steps of dMRI analysis with a uniform programming interface. We have implemented classical signal reconstruction techniques, such as the diffusion tensor model and deterministic fiber tractography. In addition, cutting edge novel reconstruction techniques are implemented, such as constrained spherical deconvolution and diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) with deconvolution, as well as methods for probabilistic tracking and original methods for tractography clustering. Many additional utility functions are provided to calculate various statistics, informative visualizations, as well as file-handling routines to assist in the development and use of novel techniques. In contrast to many other scientific software projects, Dipy is not being developed by a single research group. Rather, it is an open project that encourages contributions from any scientist/developer through GitHub and open discussions on the project mailing list. Consequently, Dipy today has an international team of contributors, spanning seven different academic institutions in five countries and three continents, which is still growing.

  20. Image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT: A sensitivity analysis of respiratory signal, binning method, reconstruction algorithm, and projection angular spacing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Kipritidis, John; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Keall, Paul J.; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory signal, binning method, and reconstruction algorithm are three major controllable factors affecting image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT), which is widely used in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Previous studies have investigated each of these factors individually, but no integrated sensitivity analysis has been performed. In addition, projection angular spacing is also a key factor in reconstruction, but how it affects image quality is not obvious. An investigation of the impacts of these four factors on image quality can help determine the most effective strategy in improving 4D-CBCT for IGRT. Methods: Fourteen 4D-CBCT patient projection datasets with various respiratory motion features were reconstructed with the following controllable factors: (i) respiratory signal (real-time position management, projection image intensity analysis, or fiducial marker tracking), (ii) binning method (phase, displacement, or equal-projection-density displacement binning), and (iii) reconstruction algorithm [Feldkamp–Davis–Kress (FDK), McKinnon–Bates (MKB), or adaptive-steepest-descent projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS)]. The image quality was quantified using signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio, and edge-response width in order to assess noise/streaking and blur. The SNR values were also analyzed with respect to the maximum, mean, and root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) projection angular spacing to investigate how projection angular spacing affects image quality. Results: The choice of respiratory signals was found to have no significant impact on image quality. Displacement-based binning was found to be less prone to motion artifacts compared to phase binning in more than half of the cases, but was shown to suffer from large interbin image quality variation and large projection angular gaps. Both MKB and ASD-POCS resulted in noticeably improved image quality almost 100% of the time relative to FDK. In addition, SNR

  1. Image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT: A sensitivity analysis of respiratory signal, binning method, reconstruction algorithm, and projection angular spacing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shieh, Chun-Chien [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kipritidis, John; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Keall, Paul J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kuncic, Zdenka [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Respiratory signal, binning method, and reconstruction algorithm are three major controllable factors affecting image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT), which is widely used in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Previous studies have investigated each of these factors individually, but no integrated sensitivity analysis has been performed. In addition, projection angular spacing is also a key factor in reconstruction, but how it affects image quality is not obvious. An investigation of the impacts of these four factors on image quality can help determine the most effective strategy in improving 4D-CBCT for IGRT. Methods: Fourteen 4D-CBCT patient projection datasets with various respiratory motion features were reconstructed with the following controllable factors: (i) respiratory signal (real-time position management, projection image intensity analysis, or fiducial marker tracking), (ii) binning method (phase, displacement, or equal-projection-density displacement binning), and (iii) reconstruction algorithm [Feldkamp–Davis–Kress (FDK), McKinnon–Bates (MKB), or adaptive-steepest-descent projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS)]. The image quality was quantified using signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio, and edge-response width in order to assess noise/streaking and blur. The SNR values were also analyzed with respect to the maximum, mean, and root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) projection angular spacing to investigate how projection angular spacing affects image quality. Results: The choice of respiratory signals was found to have no significant impact on image quality. Displacement-based binning was found to be less prone to motion artifacts compared to phase binning in more than half of the cases, but was shown to suffer from large interbin image quality variation and large projection angular gaps. Both MKB and ASD-POCS resulted in noticeably improved image quality almost 100% of the time relative to FDK. In addition, SNR

  2. Three-dimensional optical reconstruction of vocal fold kinematics using high-speed video with a laser projection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luegmair, Georg; Mehta, Daryush D.; Kobler, James B.; Döllinger, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Vocal fold kinematics and its interaction with aerodynamic characteristics play a primary role in acoustic sound production of the human voice. Investigating the temporal details of these kinematics using high-speed videoendoscopic imaging techniques has proven challenging in part due to the limitations of quantifying complex vocal fold vibratory behavior using only two spatial dimensions. Thus, we propose an optical method of reconstructing the superior vocal fold surface in three spatial dimensions using a high-speed video camera and laser projection system. Using stereo-triangulation principles, we extend the camera-laser projector method and present an efficient image processing workflow to generate the three-dimensional vocal fold surfaces during phonation captured at 4000 frames per second. Initial results are provided for airflow-driven vibration of an ex vivo vocal fold model in which at least 75% of visible laser points contributed to the reconstructed surface. The method captures the vertical motion of the vocal folds at a high accuracy to allow for the computation of three-dimensional mucosal wave features such as vibratory amplitude, velocity, and asymmetry. PMID:26087485

  3. Portable MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  4. Portable MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  5. Conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation, 1945--1947. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mart, E.I.; Denham, D.H.; Thiede, M.E.

    1993-12-01

    This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project whose goal is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from emissions since 1944 at the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The HEDR Project is conducted by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BNW). One of the radionuclides emitted that would affect the radiation dose was iodine-131. This report describes in detail the reconstructed conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation which was collected from the beginning of October 1945 through the end of December 1947.

  6. Reconstructing Masculinity in the Locker Room: The Mentors in Violence Prevention Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jackson

    1995-01-01

    The Mentors in Violence Prevention Project seeks to reduce violence against women by inspiring male athletes and other models of traditional masculinity to challenge norms that equate strength in men with dominance over women and to use their influence for positive behavior change. (SK)

  7. Reconstruction of implanted marker trajectories from cone-beam CT projection images using interdimensional correlation modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hyekyun; Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Keall, Paul J.; Cho, Seungryong; Cho, Byungchul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is a widely used imaging modality for image-guided radiotherapy. Most vendors provide CBCT systems that are mounted on a linac gantry. Thus, CBCT can be used to estimate the actual 3-dimensional (3D) position of moving respiratory targets in the thoracic/abdominal region using 2D projection images. The authors have developed a method for estimating the 3D trajectory of respiratory-induced target motion from CBCT projection images using interdimensional correlation modeling. Methods: Because the superior–inferior (SI) motion of a target can be easily analyzed on projection images of a gantry-mounted CBCT system, the authors investigated the interdimensional correlation of the SI motion with left–right and anterior–posterior (AP) movements while the gantry is rotating. A simple linear model and a state-augmented model were implemented and applied to the interdimensional correlation analysis, and their performance was compared. The parameters of the interdimensional correlation models were determined by least-square estimation of the 2D error between the actual and estimated projected target position. The method was validated using 160 3D tumor trajectories from 46 thoracic/abdominal cancer patients obtained during CyberKnife treatment. The authors’ simulations assumed two application scenarios: (1) retrospective estimation for the purpose of moving tumor setup used just after volumetric matching with CBCT; and (2) on-the-fly estimation for the purpose of real-time target position estimation during gating or tracking delivery, either for full-rotation volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in 60 s or a stationary six-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a beam delivery time of 20 s. Results: For the retrospective CBCT simulations, the mean 3D root-mean-square error (RMSE) for all 4893 trajectory segments was 0.41 mm (simple linear model) and 0.35 mm (state-augmented model). In the on-the-fly simulations, prior

  8. Reconstruction of implanted marker trajectories from cone-beam CT projection images using interdimensional correlation modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hyekyun [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 34141, South Korea and Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Poulsen, Per Rugaard [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Nørrebrogade 44, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Keall, Paul J. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cho, Seungryong [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Byungchul, E-mail: cho.byungchul@gmail.com, E-mail: bcho@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is a widely used imaging modality for image-guided radiotherapy. Most vendors provide CBCT systems that are mounted on a linac gantry. Thus, CBCT can be used to estimate the actual 3-dimensional (3D) position of moving respiratory targets in the thoracic/abdominal region using 2D projection images. The authors have developed a method for estimating the 3D trajectory of respiratory-induced target motion from CBCT projection images using interdimensional correlation modeling. Methods: Because the superior–inferior (SI) motion of a target can be easily analyzed on projection images of a gantry-mounted CBCT system, the authors investigated the interdimensional correlation of the SI motion with left–right and anterior–posterior (AP) movements while the gantry is rotating. A simple linear model and a state-augmented model were implemented and applied to the interdimensional correlation analysis, and their performance was compared. The parameters of the interdimensional correlation models were determined by least-square estimation of the 2D error between the actual and estimated projected target position. The method was validated using 160 3D tumor trajectories from 46 thoracic/abdominal cancer patients obtained during CyberKnife treatment. The authors’ simulations assumed two application scenarios: (1) retrospective estimation for the purpose of moving tumor setup used just after volumetric matching with CBCT; and (2) on-the-fly estimation for the purpose of real-time target position estimation during gating or tracking delivery, either for full-rotation volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in 60 s or a stationary six-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a beam delivery time of 20 s. Results: For the retrospective CBCT simulations, the mean 3D root-mean-square error (RMSE) for all 4893 trajectory segments was 0.41 mm (simple linear model) and 0.35 mm (state-augmented model). In the on-the-fly simulations, prior

  9. A novel background field removal method for MRI using projection onto dipole fields (PDF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian; Khalidov, Ildar; de Rochefort, Ludovic; Spincemaille, Pascal; Liu, Jing; Tsiouris, A John; Wang, Yi

    2011-11-01

    For optimal image quality in susceptibility-weighted imaging and accurate quantification of susceptibility, it is necessary to isolate the local field generated by local magnetic sources (such as iron) from the background field that arises from imperfect shimming and variations in magnetic susceptibility of surrounding tissues (including air). Previous background removal techniques have limited effectiveness depending on the accuracy of model assumptions or information input. In this article, we report an observation that the magnetic field for a dipole outside a given region of interest (ROI) is approximately orthogonal to the magnetic field of a dipole inside the ROI. Accordingly, we propose a nonparametric background field removal technique based on projection onto dipole fields (PDF). In this PDF technique, the background field inside an ROI is decomposed into a field originating from dipoles outside the ROI using the projection theorem in Hilbert space. This novel PDF background removal technique was validated on a numerical simulation and a phantom experiment and was applied in human brain imaging, demonstrating substantial improvement in background field removal compared with the commonly used high-pass filtering method. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. PROJECTS PORTOFOLIO FOR ECOLOGICAL RECONSTRUCTION OF THE IER VALLEZ AND THEIR FUNDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doru Ioan Ardelean

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Ier Valley has been taken into the survey as it is drained by a polluted river and strongly affected by sewerages and inning, with the aim to establish ecological reabilitation measures. In this view, a SWOT analysis was carried out, which highlighted a number of weaknessess regarding the ecological status of the river, and in order to remove them, a portofolio of 14 environment projects was drawn. Their implementation would require over than 40 millions lei that means in a proportion of 91% other resources, especially European Funds. The environment investment projects were evaluated at a total economical value of about 40 millions lei. Their funding was conceived in partnership terms and accessing funds from several sources, mainly on short term.

  11. Effective noise-suppressed and artifact-reduced reconstruction of SPECT data using a preconditioned alternating projection algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Si; Xu, Yuesheng, E-mail: yxu06@syr.edu [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Science, School of Mathematics and Computational Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Zhang, Jiahan; Lipson, Edward [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244 (United States); Krol, Andrzej; Feiglin, David [Department of Radiology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York 13210 (United States); Schmidtlein, C. Ross [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Vogelsang, Levon [Carestream Health, Rochester, New York 14608 (United States); Shen, Lixin [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Science, School of Mathematics and Computational Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275, China and Department of Mathematics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: The authors have recently developed a preconditioned alternating projection algorithm (PAPA) with total variation (TV) regularizer for solving the penalized-likelihood optimization model for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction. This algorithm belongs to a novel class of fixed-point proximity methods. The goal of this work is to investigate how PAPA performs while dealing with realistic noisy SPECT data, to compare its performance with more conventional methods, and to address issues with TV artifacts by proposing a novel form of the algorithm invoking high-order TV regularization, denoted as HOTV-PAPA, which has been explored and studied extensively in the present work. Methods: Using Monte Carlo methods, the authors simulate noisy SPECT data from two water cylinders; one contains lumpy “warm” background and “hot” lesions of various sizes with Gaussian activity distribution, and the other is a reference cylinder without hot lesions. The authors study the performance of HOTV-PAPA and compare it with PAPA using first-order TV regularization (TV-PAPA), the Panin–Zeng–Gullberg one-step-late method with TV regularization (TV-OSL), and an expectation–maximization algorithm with Gaussian postfilter (GPF-EM). The authors select penalty-weights (hyperparameters) by qualitatively balancing the trade-off between resolution and image noise separately for TV-PAPA and TV-OSL. However, the authors arrived at the same penalty-weight value for both of them. The authors set the first penalty-weight in HOTV-PAPA equal to the optimal penalty-weight found for TV-PAPA. The second penalty-weight needed for HOTV-PAPA is tuned by balancing resolution and the severity of staircase artifacts. The authors adjust the Gaussian postfilter to approximately match the local point spread function of GPF-EM and HOTV-PAPA. The authors examine hot lesion detectability, study local spatial resolution, analyze background noise properties, estimate mean

  12. Effective noise-suppressed and artifact-reduced reconstruction of SPECT data using a preconditioned alternating projection algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Si; Xu, Yuesheng; Zhang, Jiahan; Lipson, Edward; Krol, Andrzej; Feiglin, David; Schmidtlein, C. Ross; Vogelsang, Levon; Shen, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The authors have recently developed a preconditioned alternating projection algorithm (PAPA) with total variation (TV) regularizer for solving the penalized-likelihood optimization model for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction. This algorithm belongs to a novel class of fixed-point proximity methods. The goal of this work is to investigate how PAPA performs while dealing with realistic noisy SPECT data, to compare its performance with more conventional methods, and to address issues with TV artifacts by proposing a novel form of the algorithm invoking high-order TV regularization, denoted as HOTV-PAPA, which has been explored and studied extensively in the present work. Methods: Using Monte Carlo methods, the authors simulate noisy SPECT data from two water cylinders; one contains lumpy “warm” background and “hot” lesions of various sizes with Gaussian activity distribution, and the other is a reference cylinder without hot lesions. The authors study the performance of HOTV-PAPA and compare it with PAPA using first-order TV regularization (TV-PAPA), the Panin–Zeng–Gullberg one-step-late method with TV regularization (TV-OSL), and an expectation–maximization algorithm with Gaussian postfilter (GPF-EM). The authors select penalty-weights (hyperparameters) by qualitatively balancing the trade-off between resolution and image noise separately for TV-PAPA and TV-OSL. However, the authors arrived at the same penalty-weight value for both of them. The authors set the first penalty-weight in HOTV-PAPA equal to the optimal penalty-weight found for TV-PAPA. The second penalty-weight needed for HOTV-PAPA is tuned by balancing resolution and the severity of staircase artifacts. The authors adjust the Gaussian postfilter to approximately match the local point spread function of GPF-EM and HOTV-PAPA. The authors examine hot lesion detectability, study local spatial resolution, analyze background noise properties, estimate mean

  13. Prediction of optimal deployment projection for transcatheter aortic valve replacement: angiographic 3-dimensional reconstruction of the aortic root versus multidetector computed tomography.

    OpenAIRE

    Binder Ronald K; Leipsic Jonathon; Wood David; Moore Teri; Toggweiler Stefan; Willson Alex; Gurvitch Ronen; Freeman Melanie; Webb John G

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Identifying the optimal fluoroscopic projection of the aortic valve is important for successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Various imaging modalities including multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) have been proposed for prediction of the optimal deployment projection. We evaluated a method that provides 3 dimensional angiographic reconstructions (3DA) of the aortic root for prediction of the optimal deployment angle and compared it with MDCT. METHODS AND RES...

  14. Real-time volumetric image reconstruction and 3D tumor localization based on a single x-ray projection image for lung cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruijiang; Jia, Xun; Lewis, John H; Gu, Xuejun; Folkerts, Michael; Men, Chunhua; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-06-01

    To develop an algorithm for real-time volumetric image reconstruction and 3D tumor localization based on a single x-ray projection image for lung cancer radiotherapy. Given a set of volumetric images of a patient at N breathing phases as the training data, deformable image registration was performed between a reference phase and the other N-1 phases, resulting in N-1 deformation vector fields (DVFs). These DVFs can be represented efficiently by a few eigenvectors and coefficients obtained from principal component analysis (PCA). By varying the PCA coefficients, new DVFs can be generated, which, when applied on the reference image, lead to new volumetric images. A volumetric image can then be reconstructed from a single projection image by optimizing the PCA coefficients such that its computed projection matches the measured one. The 3D location of the tumor can be derived by applying the inverted DVF on its position in the reference image. The algorithm was implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs) to achieve real-time efficiency. The training data were generated using a realistic and dynamic mathematical phantom with ten breathing phases. The testing data were 360 cone beam projections corresponding to one gantry rotation, simulated using the same phantom with a 50% increase in breathing amplitude. The average relative image intensity error of the reconstructed volumetric images is 6.9% +/- 2.4%. The average 3D tumor localization error is 0.8 +/- 0.5 mm. On an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 GPU card, the average computation time for reconstructing a volumetric image from each projection is 0.24 s (range: 0.17 and 0.35 s). The authors have shown the feasibility of reconstructing volumetric images and localizing tumor positions in 3D in near real-time from a single x-ray image.

  15. Fast backprojection-based reconstruction of spectral-spatial EPR images from projections with the constant sweep of a magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, Denis A; Hirata, Hiroshi

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we introduce a procedure for the reconstruction of spectral-spatial EPR images using projections acquired with the constant sweep of a magnetic field. The application of a constant field-sweep and a predetermined data sampling rate simplifies the requirements for EPR imaging instrumentation and facilitates the backprojection-based reconstruction of spectral-spatial images. The proposed approach was applied to the reconstruction of a four-dimensional numerical phantom and to actual spectral-spatial EPR measurements. Image reconstruction using projections with a constant field-sweep was three times faster than the conventional approach with the application of a pseudo-angle and a scan range that depends on the applied field gradient. Spectral-spatial EPR imaging with a constant field-sweep for data acquisition only slightly reduces the signal-to-noise ratio or functional resolution of the resultant images and can be applied together with any common backprojection-based reconstruction algorithm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A simple method for 3D lesion reconstruction from two projected angiographic images: implementation to a stereotactic radiotherapy treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theodorou, K.; Kappas, C.; Gaboriaud, G.; Mazal, A.D.; Petrascu, O.; Rosenwald, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Introduction: The most used imaging modality for diagnosis and localisation of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) treated with stereotactic radiotherapy is angiography. The fact that the angiographic images are projected images imposes the need of the 3D reconstruction of the lesion. This, together with the 3D head anatomy from CT images could provide all the necessary information for stereotactic treatment planning. We have developed a method to combine the complementary information provided by angiography and 2D computerized tomography, matching the reconstructed AVM structure with the reconstructed head of the patient. Materials and methods: The ISIS treatment planning system, developed at Institute Curie, has been used for image acquisition, stereotactic localisation and 3D visualisation. A series of CT slices are introduced in the system as well as two orthogonal angiographic projected images of the lesion. A simple computer program has been developed for the 3D reconstruction of the lesion and for the superposition of the target contour on the CT slices of the head. Results and conclusions: In our approach we consider that the reconstruction can be made if the AVM is approximated with a number of adjacent ellipses. We assessed the method comparing the values of the reconstructed and the actual volumes of the target using linear regression analysis. For treatment planning purposes we overlapped the reconstructed AVM on the CT slices of the head. The above feature is to our knowledge a feature that the majority of the commercial stereotactic radiotherapy treatment planning system could not provide. The implementation of the method into ISIS TPS shows that we can reliably approximate and visualize the target volume

  17. Clinical applications of iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberl, S.

    1998-01-01

    Expectation maximisation (EM) reconstruction largely eliminates the hot and cold streaking artifacts characteristic of filtered-back projection (FBP) reconstruction around localised hot areas, such as the bladder. It also substantially reduces the problem of decreased inferior wall counts in MIBI myocardial perfusion studies due to ''streaking'' from high liver uptake. Non-uniform attenuation and scatter correction, resolution recovery, anatomical information, e.g. from MRI or CT tracer kinetic modelling, can all be built into the EM reconstruction imaging model. The properties of ordered subset EM (OSEM) have also been used to correct for known patient motion as part of the reconstruction process. These uses of EM are elaborated more fully in some of the other abstracts of this meeting. Currently we use OSEM routinely for: (i) studies where streaking is a problem, including all MIBI myocardial perfusion studies, to avoid hot liver inferior wall artifact, (ii) all whole body FDG PET, all lung V/Q SPECT (which have a short acquisition time) and all gated 201 TI myocardial perfusion studies due to improved noise characteristics of OSEM in these studies; (iii) studies with measured, non-uniform attenuation correction. With the accelerated OSEM algorithm, iterative reconstruction is practical for routine clinical applications and we have found OSEM to provide clearly superior reconstructions for the areas listed above and are investigating its application to other studies. In clinical use, we have not found OSEM to introduce artifacts which would not also occur with FBP, e.g. uncorrected patient motion will cause artifacts with both OSEM and FBP

  18. Characterization of masses in digital breast tomosynthesis: comparison of machine learning in projection views and reconstructed slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Heang-Ping; Wu, Yi-Ta; Sahiner, Berkman; Wei, Jun; Helvie, Mark A; Zhang, Yiheng; Moore, Richard H; Kopans, Daniel B; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Way, Ted

    2010-07-01

    In digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), quasi-three-dimensional (3D) structural information is reconstructed from a small number of 2D projection view (PV) mammograms acquired over a limited angular range. The authors developed preliminary computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) methods for classification of malignant and benign masses and compared the effectiveness of analyzing lesion characteristics in the reconstructed DBT slices and in the PVs. A data set of MLO view DBT of 99 patients containing 107 masses (56 malignant and 51 benign) was collected at the Massachusetts General Hospital with IRB approval. The DBTs were obtained with a GE prototype system which acquired 11 PVs over a 50 degree arc. The authors reconstructed the DBTs at 1 mm slice interval using a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique. The region of interest (ROI) containing the mass was marked by a radiologist in the DBT volume and the corresponding ROIs on the PVs were derived based on the imaging geometry. The subsequent processes were fully automated. For classification of masses using the DBT-slice approach, the mass on each slice was segmented by an active contour model initialized with adaptive k-means clustering. A spiculation likelihood map was generated by analysis of the gradient directions around the mass margin and spiculation features were extracted from the map. The rubber band straightening transform (RBST) was applied to a band of pixels around the segmented mass boundary. The RBST image was enhanced by Sobel filtering in the horizontal and vertical directions, from which run-length statistics texture features were extracted. Morphological features including those from the normalized radial length were designed to describe the mass shape. A feature space composed of the spiculation features, texture features, and morphological features extracted from the central slice alone and seven feature spaces obtained by averaging the corresponding features from three to 19 slices centered

  19. Characterization of masses in digital breast tomosynthesis: Comparison of machine learning in projection views and reconstructed slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Heang-Ping; Wu Yita; Sahiner, Berkman; Wei, Jun; Helvie, Mark A.; Zhang Yiheng; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Way, Ted

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), quasi-three-dimensional (3D) structural information is reconstructed from a small number of 2D projection view (PV) mammograms acquired over a limited angular range. The authors developed preliminary computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) methods for classification of malignant and benign masses and compared the effectiveness of analyzing lesion characteristics in the reconstructed DBT slices and in the PVs. Methods: A data set of MLO view DBT of 99 patients containing 107 masses (56 malignant and 51 benign) was collected at the Massachusetts General Hospital with IRB approval. The DBTs were obtained with a GE prototype system which acquired 11 PVs over a 50 deg. arc. The authors reconstructed the DBTs at 1 mm slice interval using a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique. The region of interest (ROI) containing the mass was marked by a radiologist in the DBT volume and the corresponding ROIs on the PVs were derived based on the imaging geometry. The subsequent processes were fully automated. For classification of masses using the DBT-slice approach, the mass on each slice was segmented by an active contour model initialized with adaptive k-means clustering. A spiculation likelihood map was generated by analysis of the gradient directions around the mass margin and spiculation features were extracted from the map. The rubber band straightening transform (RBST) was applied to a band of pixels around the segmented mass boundary. The RBST image was enhanced by Sobel filtering in the horizontal and vertical directions, from which run-length statistics texture features were extracted. Morphological features including those from the normalized radial length were designed to describe the mass shape. A feature space composed of the spiculation features, texture features, and morphological features extracted from the central slice alone and seven feature spaces obtained by averaging the corresponding features from three to 19

  20. Polynomial reconstruction of radial catalyst concentration distribution in an experimental type FCC riser for a low number of transversal projections in gamma ray tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, Silvio B.; Simoes, Francisco P.M.; Oliveira, Eric F. de; Santos, Maria das Gracas dos; Dantas, Carlos C.

    2007-01-01

    In the FCC - Fluid Catalytic Cracking process the Riser is an opaque cylinder, so that, in order to investigate the catalyst concentration inside, a gamma- ray based tomography is employed. Each section is submitted to a parallel beam and by means of the Beer-Lambert transmission is calculated. This tomography session is repeated from different angles, in manual tomographic experiments where the source/detector pair is rotated, producing in each direction what we called a transversal projection. In order to reconstruct the concentration of the present catalyst in a given moment some methods use successfully the inverse Radon transform through the filtered back-projection algorithm. The results are fully satisfactory for a large number of projections, widely seen as better than those produced by the algebraic methods. For a low number of projections, however, the algebraic methods become more competitive. In practice, simple experimental set-ups work with less than 10 projections, due to the time taken by the whole process. In this work, we present an investigation of polynomial reconstructions by using Bezier surfaces of arbitrary degree, adjusted to the experimental data through a least squares method. A computational algorithm was developed to implement the mathematical reconstruction for the 3D graphics presentation. (author)

  1. 3D RECONSTRUCTION AND MODELING OF SUBTERRANEAN LANDSCAPES IN COLLABORATIVE MINING ARCHEOLOGY PROJECTS: TECHNIQUES, APPLICATIONS AND EXPERIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arles

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mining and underground archaeology are two domains of expertise where three-dimensional data take an important part in the associated researches. Up to now, archaeologists study mines and underground networks from line-plot surveys, cross-section of galleries, and from tool marks surveys. All this kind of information can be clearly recorded back from the field from threedimensional models with a more cautious and extensive approach. Besides, the volumes of the underground structures that are very important data to explain the mining activities are difficult to evaluate from "traditional" hand-made recordings. They can now be calculated more accurately from a 3D model. Finally, reconstructed scenes are a powerful tool as thinking aid to look back again to a structure in the office or in future times. And the recorded models, rendered photo-realistically, can also be used for cultural heritage documentation presenting inaccessible and sometimes dangerous places to the public. Nowadays, thanks to modern computer technologies and highly developed software tools paired with sophisticated digital camera equipment, complex photogrammetric processes are available for moderate costs for research teams. Recognizing these advantages the authors develop and utilize image-based workflows in order to document ancient mining monuments and underground sites as a basis for further historical and archaeological researches, performed in collaborative partnership during recent projects on medieval silver mines and preventive excavations of undergrounds in France.

  2. A Dynamic Multi-Projection-Contour Approximating Framework for the 3D Reconstruction of Buildings by Super-Generalized Optical Stereo-Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yiming; Su, Nan; Zhao, Chunhui; Wang, Liguo

    2017-09-19

    In this paper, a novel framework of the 3D reconstruction of buildings is proposed, focusing on remote sensing super-generalized stereo-pairs (SGSPs). As we all know, 3D reconstruction cannot be well performed using nonstandard stereo pairs, since reliable stereo matching could not be achieved when the image-pairs are collected at a great difference of views, and we always failed to obtain dense 3D points for regions of buildings, and cannot do further 3D shape reconstruction. We defined SGSPs as two or more optical images collected in less constrained views but covering the same buildings. It is even more difficult to reconstruct the 3D shape of a building by SGSPs using traditional frameworks. As a result, a dynamic multi-projection-contour approximating (DMPCA) framework was introduced for SGSP-based 3D reconstruction. The key idea is that we do an optimization to find a group of parameters of a simulated 3D model and use a binary feature-image that minimizes the total differences between projection-contours of the building in the SGSPs and that in the simulated 3D model. Then, the simulated 3D model, defined by the group of parameters, could approximate the actual 3D shape of the building. Certain parameterized 3D basic-unit-models of typical buildings were designed, and a simulated projection system was established to obtain a simulated projection-contour in different views. Moreover, the artificial bee colony algorithm was employed to solve the optimization. With SGSPs collected by the satellite and our unmanned aerial vehicle, the DMPCA framework was verified by a group of experiments, which demonstrated the reliability and advantages of this work.

  3. Transverse Position Reconstruction in a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber using Principal Component Analysis and Multi-Dimensional Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew William

    2017-08-01

    One of the most enduring questions in modern physics is the dark matter problem. Measurements of galactic rotation curves taken in the middle of the twentieth century suggest that there are large spherical halos of unseen matter permeating and surrounding most galaxies, stretching far beyond their visible extents. Although some of this mass discrepancy can be attributed to sources like primordial black holes or Massive Astrophysical Compact Halo Objects (MACHOs), these theories can only explain a small percentage of this "missing matter". One approach which could account for the entirety of this missing mass is the theory of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or "WIMPs". As their name suggests, WIMPs interact only through the weak nuclear force and gravity and are quite massive (100 GeV/c2 to 1 TeV/c2). These particles have very small cross sections ( ≈ 10-39 cm2) with nucleons and therefore interact only very rarely with "normal" baryonic matter. To directly detect a dark matter particle, one needs to overcome this small cross-section barrier. In many experiments, this is achieved by utilizing detectors filled with liquid noble elements, which have excellent particle identification capabilities and are very low-background, allowing potential WIMP signals to be more easily distinguished from detector noise. These experiments also often apply uniform electric fields across their liquid volumes, turning the apparatus into Time Projection Chambers or "TPCs". TPCs can accurately determine the location of an interaction in the liquid volume (often simply called an "event") along the direction of the electric field. In DarkSide-50 ("DS-50" for short), the electric field is aligned antiparallel to the z-axis of the detector, and so the depth of an event can be determined to a considerable degree of accuracy by measuring the time between the first and second scintillation signals ("S1" and "S2"), which are generated at the interaction point itself and in a small gas

  4. Dipy, a library for the analysis of diffusion MRI data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftherios eGaryfallidis

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion Imaging in Python (Dipy is a free and open source software projectfor the analysis of data from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRIexperiments. dMRI is an application of MRI that can be used to measurestructural features of brain white matter. Many methods have been developed touse dMRI data to model the local configuration of white matter nerve fiberbundles and infer the trajectory of bundles connecting different parts of thebrain.Dipy gathers implementations of many different methods in dMRI, including:diffusion signal pre-processing; reconstruction of diffusion distributions inindividual voxels; fiber tractography and fiber track post-processing, analysisand visualization. Dipy aims to provide transparent implementations forall the different steps of dMRI analysis with a uniform programming interface.We have implemented classical signal reconstruction techniques, such as thediffusion tensor model and deterministic fiber tractography. In addition,cutting edge novel reconstruction techniques are implemented, such asconstrained spherical deconvolution and diffusion spectrum imaging withdeconvolution, as well as methods for probabilistic tracking and originalmethods for tractography clustering. Many additional utility functions areprovided to calculate various statistics, informative visualizations, as wellas file-handling routines to assist in the development and use of noveltechniques.In contrast to many other scientific software projects, Dipy is not beingdeveloped by a single research group. Rather, it is an open project thatencourages contributions from any scientist/developer through GitHub and opendiscussions on the project mailing list. Consequently, Dipy today has aninternational team of contributors, spanning seven different academic institutionsin five countries and three continents, which is still growing.

  5. Interactive local super-resolution reconstruction of whole-body MRI mouse data : A pilot study with applications to bone and kidney metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dzyubachyk, O.; Khmelinskii, A.; Plenge, E.; Kok, P.; Snoeks, T.J.; Poot, D.H.; Löwik, C.W.; Botha, C.P.; Niessen, W.J.; Van der Weerd, L.; Meijering, E.; Lelieveldt, B.P.F.

    2014-01-01

    In small animal imaging studies, when the locations of the micro-structures of interest are unknown a priori, there is a simultaneous need for full-body coverage and high resolution. In MRI, additional requirements to image contrast and acquisition time will often make it impossible to acquire such

  6. Interactive local super-resolution reconstruction of whole-body MRI mouse data: A pilot study with applications to bone and kidney metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.M. Dzyubachyk (Oleh); A. Khmelinskii (Artem); E. Plenge (Esben); P. Kok (Peter); T.J.A. Snoeks (Thomas); D.H.J. Poot; C.W.G.M. Löwik (Clemens); C.P. Botha (Charl); W.J. Niessen (Wiro); L. van der Weerd; E. Meijering (Erik); B.P.F. Lelieveldt (Boudewijn)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIn small animal imaging studies, when the locations of the micro-structures of interest are unknown a priori, there is a simultaneous need for full-body coverage and high resolution. In MRI, additional requirements to image contrast and acquisition time will often make it impossible to

  7. Sensitivity of whole-body CT and MRI versus projection radiography in the detection of osteolyses in patients with monoclonal plasma cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Maya B., E-mail: m.mueller-wolf@dkfz.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (Dkfz), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Murray, Fritz, E-mail: fritz.murray@hotmail.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); Kilk, Kerstin, E-mail: k_fechtner@hotmail.com [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); Hillengass, Jens, E-mail: jens.hillengass@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Haematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Delorme, Stefan, E-mail: s.delorme@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (Dkfz), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Heiss, Christiane, E-mail: c.heiss@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Department of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center (Dkfz), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Neben, Kai, E-mail: k.neben@klinikum-mittelbaden.de [Department of Haematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Goldschmidt, Hartmut, E-mail: hartmut.goldschmidt@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Haematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, University Hospital Heidelberg and National Center for Tumour Diseases, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich, E-mail: hu.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To compare sensitivity of whole-body Computed Tomography (wb-CT) and whole-body Magnetic Resonance Imaging (wb-MRI) with Projection Radiography (PR) regarding each method's ability to detect osteolyses in patients with monoclonal plasma cell disease. Patients and methods: The bone status of 171 patients was evaluated. All patients presented with multiple myeloma (MM) of all stages, monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) or solitary plasmacytoma. Two groups were formed. Group A consisted of 52 patients (26 females, 26 males) with an average age of 62 years (range, 45–89 years) who received, both, PR and wb-CT as part of their diagnostic work-up. Group B comprised 119 patients (58 females, 61 males) averaging 57 years of age (range, 20–80 years) who received, both, PR and wb-MRI. Two experienced radiologists were blinded regarding the disease status and assessed the number and location of osteolyses in consensus. A distinction was made between axial and extra-axial lesions. Results: In group A, wb-CT revealed osteolyses in 12 patients (23%) that were not detected in PR. CT was superior in detecting lesions in patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis. Compared with PR, wb-CT was significantly more sensitive in detecting osteolyses than PR (p < 0.001). This was particularly true for axial lesions. Additionally, CT revealed clinically relevant incidental findings in 33 patients (63%). In group B, wb-MRI revealed lesions in 19 patients (16%) that were not detected in PR. All lesions detected by PR were also detected by wb-MRI and wb-CT. Wb-MRI and wb-CT are each superior to PR in detecting axial lesions. Conclusion: Wb-CT can detect 23% more focal lesions than PR, especially in the axial skeleton. Therefore, this imaging method should be preferred over PR in the diagnostic work-up and staging of patients with monoclonal plasma cell disease.

  8. Virtual patient 3D dose reconstruction using in air EPID measurements and a back-projection algorithm for IMRT and VMAT treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Rozendaal, Roel; van Oers, René F M; Mijnheer, Ben; Mans, Anton

    2017-05-01

    At our institute, a transit back-projection algorithm is used clinically to reconstruct in vivo patient and in phantom 3D dose distributions using EPID measurements behind a patient or a polystyrene slab phantom, respectively. In this study, an extension to this algorithm is presented whereby in air EPID measurements are used in combination with CT data to reconstruct 'virtual' 3D dose distributions. By combining virtual and in vivo patient verification data for the same treatment, patient-related errors can be separated from machine, planning and model errors. The virtual back-projection algorithm is described and verified against the transit algorithm with measurements made behind a slab phantom, against dose measurements made with an ionization chamber and with the OCTAVIUS 4D system, as well as against TPS patient data. Virtual and in vivo patient dose verification results are also compared. Virtual dose reconstructions agree within 1% with ionization chamber measurements. The average γ-pass rate values (3% global dose/3mm) in the 3D dose comparison with the OCTAVIUS 4D system and the TPS patient data are 98.5±1.9%(1SD) and 97.1±2.9%(1SD), respectively. For virtual patient dose reconstructions, the differences with the TPS in median dose to the PTV remain within 4%. Virtual patient dose reconstruction makes pre-treatment verification based on deviations of DVH parameters feasible and eliminates the need for phantom positioning and re-planning. Virtual patient dose reconstructions have additional value in the inspection of in vivo deviations, particularly in situations where CBCT data is not available (or not conclusive). Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. WE-EF-207-08: Improve Cone Beam CT Using a Synchronized Moving Grid, An Inter-Projection Sensor Fusion and a Probability Total Variation Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H; Kong, V; Jin, J [Georgia Regents University Cancer Center, Augusta, GA (Georgia); Ren, L; Zhang, Y; Giles, W [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system, which uses a synchronized moving grid (SMOG) to reduce and correct scatter, an inter-projection sensor fusion (IPSF) algorithm to estimate the missing information blocked by the grid, and a probability total variation (pTV) algorithm to reconstruct the CBCT image. Methods: A prototype SMOG-equipped CBCT system was developed, and was used to acquire gridded projections with complimentary grid patterns in two neighboring projections. Scatter was reduced by the grid, and the remaining scatter was corrected by measuring it under the grid. An IPSF algorithm was used to estimate the missing information in a projection from data in its 2 neighboring projections. Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm was used to reconstruct the initial CBCT image using projections after IPSF processing for pTV. A probability map was generated depending on the confidence of estimation in IPSF for the regions of missing data and penumbra. pTV was finally used to reconstruct the CBCT image for a Catphan, and was compared to conventional CBCT image without using SMOG, images without using IPSF (SMOG + FDK and SMOG + mask-TV), and image without using pTV (SMOG + IPSF + FDK). Results: The conventional CBCT without using SMOG shows apparent scatter-induced cup artifacts. The approaches with SMOG but without IPSF show severe (SMOG + FDK) or additional (SMOG + TV) artifacts, possibly due to using projections of missing data. The 2 approaches with SMOG + IPSF removes the cup artifacts, and the pTV approach is superior than the FDK by substantially reducing the noise. Using the SMOG also reduces half of the imaging dose. Conclusion: The proposed technique is promising in improving CBCT image quality while reducing imaging dose.

  10. Prediction of optimal deployment projection for transcatheter aortic valve replacement: angiographic 3-dimensional reconstruction of the aortic root versus multidetector computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Ronald K; Leipsic, Jonathon; Wood, David; Moore, Teri; Toggweiler, Stefan; Willson, Alex; Gurvitch, Ronen; Freeman, Melanie; Webb, John G

    2012-04-01

    Identifying the optimal fluoroscopic projection of the aortic valve is important for successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Various imaging modalities, including multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), have been proposed for prediction of the optimal deployment projection. We evaluated a method that provides 3-dimensional angiographic reconstructions (3DA) of the aortic root for prediction of the optimal deployment angle and compared it with MDCT. Forty patients undergoing transfemoral TAVR at St Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada, were evaluated. All underwent preimplant 3DA and 68% underwent preimplant MDCT. Three-dimensional angiographic reconstructions were generated from images of a C-arm rotational aortic root angiogram during breath-hold, rapid ventricular pacing, and injection of 32 mL contrast medium at 8 mL/s. Two independent operators prospectively predicted perpendicular valve projections. The implant angle was chosen at the discretion of the physician performing TAVR. The angles from 3DA, from MDCT, the implant angle, and the postdeployment perpendicular prosthesis view were compared. The shortest distance from the postdeployment perpendicular prosthesis projection to the regression line of predicted perpendicular projections was calculated. All but 1 patient had adequate image quality for reproducible angle predictions. There was a significant correlation between 3DA and MDCT for prediction of perpendicular valve projections (r=0.682, Pregression line of predicted angles to the postdeployment prosthesis view was 5.1±4.6° for 3DA and 7.9±4.9° for MDCT (P=0.01). Three-dimensional angiographic reconstructions and MDCT are safe, practical, and accurate imaging modalities for identifying the optimal perpendicular valve deployment projection during TAVR.

  11. WE-EF-207-08: Improve Cone Beam CT Using a Synchronized Moving Grid, An Inter-Projection Sensor Fusion and a Probability Total Variation Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H; Kong, V; Jin, J; Ren, L; Zhang, Y; Giles, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To present a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system, which uses a synchronized moving grid (SMOG) to reduce and correct scatter, an inter-projection sensor fusion (IPSF) algorithm to estimate the missing information blocked by the grid, and a probability total variation (pTV) algorithm to reconstruct the CBCT image. Methods: A prototype SMOG-equipped CBCT system was developed, and was used to acquire gridded projections with complimentary grid patterns in two neighboring projections. Scatter was reduced by the grid, and the remaining scatter was corrected by measuring it under the grid. An IPSF algorithm was used to estimate the missing information in a projection from data in its 2 neighboring projections. Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm was used to reconstruct the initial CBCT image using projections after IPSF processing for pTV. A probability map was generated depending on the confidence of estimation in IPSF for the regions of missing data and penumbra. pTV was finally used to reconstruct the CBCT image for a Catphan, and was compared to conventional CBCT image without using SMOG, images without using IPSF (SMOG + FDK and SMOG + mask-TV), and image without using pTV (SMOG + IPSF + FDK). Results: The conventional CBCT without using SMOG shows apparent scatter-induced cup artifacts. The approaches with SMOG but without IPSF show severe (SMOG + FDK) or additional (SMOG + TV) artifacts, possibly due to using projections of missing data. The 2 approaches with SMOG + IPSF removes the cup artifacts, and the pTV approach is superior than the FDK by substantially reducing the noise. Using the SMOG also reduces half of the imaging dose. Conclusion: The proposed technique is promising in improving CBCT image quality while reducing imaging dose

  12. Vascular diameter measurement in CT angiography: comparison of model-based iterative reconstruction and standard filtered back projection algorithms in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Machida, Haruhiko; Tanaka, Isao; Ueno, Eiko

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in measurement of the inner diameter of models of blood vessels and compare performance between MBIR and a standard filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm. Vascular models with wall thicknesses of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mm were scanned with a 64-MDCT unit and densities of contrast material yielding 275, 396, and 542 HU. Images were reconstructed images by MBIR and FBP, and the mean diameter of each model vessel was measured by software automation. Twenty separate measurements were repeated for each vessel, and variance among the repeated measures was analyzed for determination of measurement error. For all nine model vessels, CT attenuation profiles were compared along a line passing through the luminal center on axial images reconstructed with FBP and MBIR, and the 10-90% edge rise distances at the boundary between the vascular wall and the lumen were evaluated. For images reconstructed with FBP, measurement errors were smallest for models with 1.5-mm wall thickness, except those filled with 275-HU contrast material, and errors grew as the density of the contrast material decreased. Measurement errors with MBIR were comparable to or less than those with FBP. In CT attenuation profiles of images reconstructed with MBIR, the 10-90% edge rise distances at the boundary between the lumen and vascular wall were relatively short for each vascular model compared with those of the profile curves of FBP images. MBIR is better than standard FBP for reducing reconstruction blur and improving the accuracy of diameter measurement at CT angiography.

  13. Complementary frame reconstruction: a low-biased dynamic PET technique for low count density data in projection space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Inki; Cho, Sanghee; Michel, Christian J; Casey, Michael E; Schaefferkoetter, Joshua D

    2014-01-01

    A new data handling method is presented for improving the image noise distribution and reducing bias when reconstructing very short frames from low count dynamic PET acquisition. The new method termed ‘Complementary Frame Reconstruction’ (CFR) involves the indirect formation of a count-limited emission image in a short frame through subtraction of two frames with longer acquisition time, where the short time frame data is excluded from the second long frame data before the reconstruction. This approach can be regarded as an alternative to the AML algorithm recently proposed by Nuyts et al, as a method to reduce the bias for the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) reconstruction of count limited data. CFR uses long scan emission data to stabilize the reconstruction and avoids modification of algorithms such as MLEM. The subtraction between two long frame images, naturally allows negative voxel values and significantly reduces bias introduced in the final image. Simulations based on phantom and clinical data were used to evaluate the accuracy of the reconstructed images to represent the true activity distribution. Applicability to determine the arterial input function in human and small animal studies is also explored. In situations with limited count rate, e.g. pediatric applications, gated abdominal, cardiac studies, etc., or when using limited doses of short-lived isotopes such as 15 O-water, the proposed method will likely be preferred over independent frame reconstruction to address bias and noise issues. (paper)

  14. Comparison of the effects of model-based iterative reconstruction and filtered back projection algorithms on software measurements in pulmonary subsolid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Julien G; Kim, Hyungjin; Park, Su Bin; van Ginneken, Bram; Ferretti, Gilbert R; Lee, Chang Hyun; Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Chang Min

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the differences between filtered back projection (FBP) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithms on semi-automatic measurements in subsolid nodules (SSNs). Unenhanced CT scans of 73 SSNs obtained using the same protocol and reconstructed with both FBP and MBIR algorithms were evaluated by two radiologists. Diameter, mean attenuation, mass and volume of whole nodules and their solid components were measured. Intra- and interobserver variability and differences between FBP and MBIR were then evaluated using Bland-Altman method and Wilcoxon tests. Longest diameter, volume and mass of nodules and those of their solid components were significantly higher using MBIR (p algorithms with respect to the diameter, volume and mass of nodules and their solid components. There were no significant differences in intra- or interobserver variability between FBP and MBIR (p > 0.05). Semi-automatic measurements of SSNs significantly differed between FBP and MBIR; however, the differences were within the range of measurement variability. • Intra- and interobserver reproducibility of measurements did not differ between FBP and MBIR. • Differences in SSNs' semi-automatic measurement induced by reconstruction algorithms were not clinically significant. • Semi-automatic measurement may be conducted regardless of reconstruction algorithm. • SSNs' semi-automated classification agreement (pure vs. part-solid) did not significantly differ between algorithms.

  15. The cerebral network’s reconstruction by MRI methods and the hemodynamics study of small laboratory animal in type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akulov, A.; Cherevko, A.; Parshin, D.; Tur, D.; Yankova, G.

    2017-08-01

    The blood realizes the transport of substances, which are necessary for livelihoods, throughout the body. The assumption about the relationship some disease and structure of vasculature (in particular of brain) is natural. In the paper we consider models of Willis’ circle for two groups of laboratory mice - one control group and another with diabetes. Vascular net obtained as a result of preprocessing MRI data. The purpose of the work is to determine the effect of type 1 diabetes on the properties of the laboratory mice vasculature.

  16. 3D computed tomography using a microfocus X-ray source: Analysis of artifact formation in the reconstructed images using simulated as well as experimental projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krimmel, S.; Stephan, J.; Baumann, J.

    2005-01-01

    The scope of this contribution is to identify and to quantify the influence of different parameters on the formation of image artifacts in X-ray computed tomography (CT) resulting for example, from beam hardening or from partial lack of information using 3D cone beam CT. In general, the reconstructed image quality depends on a number of acquisition parameters concerning the X-ray source (e.g. X-ray spectrum), the geometrical setup (e.g. cone beam angle), the sample properties (e.g. absorption characteristics) and the detector properties. While it is difficult to distinguish the influence of different effects clearly in experimental projection data, they can be selected individually with the help of simulated projection data by varying the parameter set. The reconstruction of the 3D data set is performed with the filtered back projection algorithm according to Feldkamp, Davis and Kress for experimental as well as for simulated projection data. The experimental data are recorded with an industrial microfocus CT system which features a focal spot size of a few micrometers and uses a digital flat panel detector for data acquisition

  17. Comparison of iterative model, hybrid iterative, and filtered back projection reconstruction techniques in low-dose brain CT: impact of thin-slice imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakaura, Takeshi; Iyama, Yuji; Kidoh, Masafumi; Yokoyama, Koichi [Amakusa Medical Center, Diagnostic Radiology, Amakusa, Kumamoto (Japan); Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Oda, Seitaro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Tokuyasu, Shinichi [Philips Electronics, Kumamoto (Japan); Harada, Kazunori [Amakusa Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of iterative model reconstruction (IMR) in brain CT especially with thin-slice images. This prospective study received institutional review board approval, and prior informed consent to participate was obtained from all patients. We enrolled 34 patients who underwent brain CT and reconstructed axial images with filtered back projection (FBP), hybrid iterative reconstruction (HIR) and IMR with 1 and 5 mm slice thicknesses. The CT number, image noise, contrast, and contrast noise ratio (CNR) between the thalamus and internal capsule, and the rate of increase of image noise in 1 and 5 mm thickness images between the reconstruction methods, were assessed. Two independent radiologists assessed image contrast, image noise, image sharpness, and overall image quality on a 4-point scale. The CNRs in 1 and 5 mm slice thickness were significantly higher with IMR (1.2 ± 0.6 and 2.2 ± 0.8, respectively) than with FBP (0.4 ± 0.3 and 1.0 ± 0.4, respectively) and HIR (0.5 ± 0.3 and 1.2 ± 0.4, respectively) (p < 0.01). The mean rate of increasing noise from 5 to 1 mm thickness images was significantly lower with IMR (1.7 ± 0.3) than with FBP (2.3 ± 0.3) and HIR (2.3 ± 0.4) (p < 0.01). There were no significant differences in qualitative analysis of unfamiliar image texture between the reconstruction techniques. IMR offers significant noise reduction and higher contrast and CNR in brain CT, especially for thin-slice images, when compared to FBP and HIR. (orig.)

  18. The use of 3D contrast-enhanced CT reconstructions to project images of vascular rings and coarctation of the aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sessa, Thomas G; Di Sessa, Peter; Gregory, Bill; Vranicar, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Aortic arch and pulmonary artery anomalies make up a group of vascular structures that have complex three-dimensional (3D) shapes. Tortuosity as well as hypoplasia or atresia of segments of the aortic arch or pulmonary artery makes the conventional two-dimensional (2D) imaging difficult. Nine patients with native coarctation or recoarctation and 4 patients with a vascular ring had a CT scan as a part of their clinical evaluation. There were 7 males. The mean age was 11.7 years. (range 19 days to 29 years) The mean weight was 22.7 kg (range 3.3-139.0 kg). The dicom data from contrast CT scans were converted by the Amira software package into a 3D image. The areas of interest were selected. The images were then projected in 3D on a standard video monitor and could be rotated 360 degrees in any dimension. Adequate CT scans and 3D reconstructions were obtained in 12 of 13 patients. There were 85-1,044 slices obtained in the adequate studies. We could not reconstruct a 3D image from a patient's CT scan that had only 22 slices. The anatomy defined by 3D was compared to 2D CT imaging and confirmed by cardiac catheterization or direct visualization in the operating room in the 12 patients with adequate 3D reconstructions. In 5 of 12 patients, 3D reconstructions provided valuable spatial information not observed in the conventional 2D scans. We believe that 3D reconstruction of contrast-enhanced CT scans of these complex structures provides additional valuable information that is helpful in the decision-making process.

  19. Application of 3D documentation and geometric reconstruction methods in traffic accident analysis: with high resolution surface scanning, radiological MSCT/MRI scanning and real data based animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Ursula; Naether, Silvio; Braun, Marcel; Bolliger, Stephan; Friederich, Hans; Jackowski, Christian; Aghayev, Emin; Christe, Andreas; Vock, Peter; Dirnhofer, Richard; Thali, Michael J

    2007-07-20

    The examination of traffic accidents is daily routine in forensic medicine. An important question in the analysis of the victims of traffic accidents, for example in collisions between motor vehicles and pedestrians or cyclists, is the situation of the impact. Apart from forensic medical examinations (external examination and autopsy), three-dimensional technologies and methods are gaining importance in forensic investigations. Besides the post-mortem multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the documentation and analysis of internal findings, highly precise 3D surface scanning is employed for the documentation of the external body findings and of injury-inflicting instruments. The correlation of injuries of the body to the injury-inflicting object and the accident mechanism are of great importance. The applied methods include documentation of the external and internal body and the involved vehicles and inflicting tools as well as the analysis of the acquired data. The body surface and the accident vehicles with their damages were digitized by 3D surface scanning. For the internal findings of the body, post-mortem MSCT and MRI were used. The analysis included the processing of the obtained data to 3D models, determination of the driving direction of the vehicle, correlation of injuries to the vehicle damages, geometric determination of the impact situation and evaluation of further findings of the accident. In the following article, the benefits of the 3D documentation and computer-assisted, drawn-to-scale 3D comparisons of the relevant injuries with the damages to the vehicle in the analysis of the course of accidents, especially with regard to the impact situation, are shown on two examined cases.

  20. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-11-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the period 1964 through 1966. This report summarizes the literature and database reviews and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  1. VIRTOPSY--scientific documentation, reconstruction and animation in forensic: individual and real 3D data based geo-metric approach including optical body/object surface and radiological CT/MRI scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thali, Michael J; Braun, Marcel; Buck, Ursula; Aghayev, Emin; Jackowski, Christian; Vock, Peter; Sonnenschein, Martin; Dirnhofer, Richard

    2005-03-01

    Until today, most of the documentation of forensic relevant medical findings is limited to traditional 2D photography, 2D conventional radiographs, sketches and verbal description. There are still some limitations of the classic documentation in forensic science especially if a 3D documentation is necessary. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate new 3D real data based geo-metric technology approaches. This paper present approaches to a 3D geo-metric documentation of injuries on the body surface and internal injuries in the living and deceased cases. Using modern imaging methods such as photogrammetry, optical surface and radiological CT/MRI scanning in combination it could be demonstrated that a real, full 3D data based individual documentation of the body surface and internal structures is possible in a non-invasive and non-destructive manner. Using the data merging/fusing and animation possibilities, it is possible to answer reconstructive questions of the dynamic development of patterned injuries (morphologic imprints) and to evaluate the possibility, that they are matchable or linkable to suspected injury-causing instruments. For the first time, to our knowledge, the method of optical and radiological 3D scanning was used to document the forensic relevant injuries of human body in combination with vehicle damages. By this complementary documentation approach, individual forensic real data based analysis and animation were possible linking body injuries to vehicle deformations or damages. These data allow conclusions to be drawn for automobile accident research, optimization of vehicle safety (pedestrian and passenger) and for further development of crash dummies. Real 3D data based documentation opens a new horizon for scientific reconstruction and animation by bringing added value and a real quality improvement in forensic science.

  2. Projections onto Convex Sets Super-Resolution Reconstruction Based on Point Spread Function Estimation of Low-Resolution Remote Sensing Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Fan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available To solve the problem on inaccuracy when estimating the point spread function (PSF of the ideal original image in traditional projection onto convex set (POCS super-resolution (SR reconstruction, this paper presents an improved POCS SR algorithm based on PSF estimation of low-resolution (LR remote sensing images. The proposed algorithm can improve the spatial resolution of the image and benefit agricultural crop visual interpolation. The PSF of the highresolution (HR image is unknown in reality. Therefore, analysis of the relationship between the PSF of the HR image and the PSF of the LR image is important to estimate the PSF of the HR image by using multiple LR images. In this study, the linear relationship between the PSFs of the HR and LR images can be proven. In addition, the novel slant knife-edge method is employed, which can improve the accuracy of the PSF estimation of LR images. Finally, the proposed method is applied to reconstruct airborne digital sensor 40 (ADS40 three-line array images and the overlapped areas of two adjacent GF-2 images by embedding the estimated PSF of the HR image to the original POCS SR algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed method yields higher quality of reconstructed images than that produced by the blind SR method and the bicubic interpolation method.

  3. Summer Student Project Report. Parallelization of the path reconstruction algorithm for the inner detector of the ATLAS experiment.

    CERN Document Server

    Maldonado Puente, Bryan Patricio

    2014-01-01

    The inner detector of the ATLAS experiment has two types of silicon detectors used for tracking: Pixel Detector and SCT (semiconductor tracker). Once a proton-proton collision occurs, the result- ing particles pass through these detectors and these are recorded as hits on the detector surfaces. A medium to high energy particle passes through seven different surfaces of the two detectors, leaving seven hits, while lower energy particles can leave many more hits as they circle through the detector. For a typical event during the expected operational conditions, there are 30 000 hits in average recorded by the sensors. Only high energy particles are of interest for physics analysis and are taken into account for the path reconstruction; thus, a filtering process helps to discard the low energy particles produced in the collision. The following report presents a solution for increasing the speed of the filtering process in the path reconstruction algorithm.

  4. MRI of normal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and reconstructed ACL: comparison of when the knee is extended with when the knee is flexed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, K.; Horibe, S.; Shiozaki, Y.; Ishida, T.; Narumi, Y.; Ikezoe, J.; Nakamura, H.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate, using MRI, the morphology of normal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and ACL grafts when the knee was extended compared with when the knee was flexed. Eighteen normal controls and 22 ACL graft patients were studied. Spin-echo (SE) T1-weighted images (TR 330 ms/TE 15 ms, NEX 1) were obtained with a slice thickness of 3 mm. Oblique sagittal images parallel to the ACL were obtained at various flexed angles of the knee joint. In 12 of the 18 normal controls the ACL appeared convex toward the posterior side when the knee was extended and gradually became straight when the knee was flexed. In 15 of the 22 ACL graft patients the grafts appeared straight when the knee was extended and became convex toward the anterior side when the knee was flexed. It is concluded that the morphological changes seen on MR images of ACL grafts from when the knee is extended to when the knee is flexed are different from those in the normal ACL. (orig.). With 7 figs., 1 tab

  5. 3D reconstruction of coronary arteries from 2D angiographic projections using non-uniform rational basis splines (NURBS for accurate modelling of coronary stenoses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Galassi

    Full Text Available Assessment of coronary stenosis severity is crucial in clinical practice. This study proposes a novel method to generate 3D models of stenotic coronary arteries, directly from 2D coronary images, and suitable for immediate assessment of the stenosis severity.From multiple 2D X-ray coronary arteriogram projections, 2D vessels were extracted. A 3D centreline was reconstructed as intersection of surfaces from corresponding branches. Next, 3D luminal contours were generated in a two-step process: first, a Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS circular contour was designed and, second, its control points were adjusted to interpolate computed 3D boundary points. Finally, a 3D surface was generated as an interpolation across the control points of the contours and used in the analysis of the severity of a lesion. To evaluate the method, we compared 3D reconstructed lesions with Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT, an invasive imaging modality that enables high-resolution endoluminal visualization of lesion anatomy.Validation was performed on routine clinical data. Analysis of paired cross-sectional area discrepancies indicated that the proposed method more closely represented OCT contours than conventional approaches in luminal surface reconstruction, with overall root-mean-square errors ranging from 0.213mm2 to 1.013mm2, and maximum error of 1.837mm2. Comparison of volume reduction due to a lesion with corresponding FFR measurement suggests that the method may help in estimating the physiological significance of a lesion.The algorithm accurately reconstructed 3D models of lesioned arteries and enabled quantitative assessment of stenoses. The proposed method has the potential to allow immediate analysis of the stenoses in clinical practice, thereby providing incremental diagnostic and prognostic information to guide treatments in real time and without the need for invasive techniques.

  6. Renal Cyst Pseudoenhancement: Intraindividual Comparison Between Virtual Monochromatic Spectral Images and Conventional Polychromatic 120-kVp Images Obtained During the Same CT Examination and Comparisons Among Images Reconstructed Using Filtered Back Projection, Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction, and Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yoshitake; Yamada, Minoru; Sugisawa, Koichi; Akita, Hirotaka; Shiomi, Eisuke; Abe, Takayuki; Okuda, Shigeo; Jinzaki, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to compare renal cyst pseudoenhancement between virtual monochromatic spectral (VMS) and conventional polychromatic 120-kVp images obtained during the same abdominal computed tomography (CT) examination and among images reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR). Our institutional review board approved this prospective study; each participant provided written informed consent. Thirty-one patients (19 men, 12 women; age range, 59–85 years; mean age, 73.2 ± 5.5 years) with renal cysts underwent unenhanced 120-kVp CT followed by sequential fast kVp-switching dual-energy (80/140 kVp) and 120-kVp abdominal enhanced CT in the nephrographic phase over a 10-cm scan length with a random acquisition order and 4.5-second intervals. Fifty-one renal cysts (maximal diameter, 18.0 ± 14.7 mm [range, 4–61 mm]) were identified. The CT attenuation values of the cysts as well as of the kidneys were measured on the unenhanced images, enhanced VMS images (at 70 keV) reconstructed using FBP and ASIR from dual-energy data, and enhanced 120-kVp images reconstructed using FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. The results were analyzed using the mixed-effects model and paired t test with Bonferroni correction. The attenuation increases (pseudoenhancement) of the renal cysts on the VMS images reconstructed using FBP/ASIR (least square mean, 5.0/6.0 Hounsfield units [HU]; 95% confidence interval, 2.6–7.4/3.6–8.4 HU) were significantly lower than those on the conventional 120-kVp images reconstructed using FBP/ASIR/MBIR (least square mean, 12.1/12.8/11.8 HU; 95% confidence interval, 9.8–14.5/10.4–15.1/9.4–14.2 HU) (all P < .001); on the other hand, the CT attenuation values of the kidneys on the VMS images were comparable to those on the 120-kVp images. Regardless of the reconstruction algorithm, 70-keV VMS images showed

  7. A research project with students of Information and Communication Technology in obligatory secondary education: virtual reconstruction of the thermal area of the roman villa of Balazote (Albacete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Mediano Serrano

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The optional subject Information and Communication Technology (ICT in obligatory secondary education is fundamentally about how to use applications. The software related to this subject is based on: photo editing programs, 3D constructions, sound editing and video editing. These can be viewed in isolation and independently or as a part of a comprehensive project in which students have to handle all of them at once. This article will explain a project with students: the virtual reconstruction of the thermal area of the roman villa of Balazote (Albacete. The goal was to improve student motivation and get actively involved in their learning process. Students used computers and classes of the course to conduct such research. First, the necessary information was sought, and then, based on that information and using different software about virtual reconstruction and recording and editing films: Gimp, SketchUP, Movie Maker, etc., our film was made. The result of this work is a film consisting of a virtual tour inside the roman villa.

  8. Partial volume correction in SPECT reconstruction with OSEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlandsson, Kjell, E-mail: k.erlandsson@ucl.ac.uk [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London and University College London Hospital, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Thomas, Ben; Dickson, John; Hutton, Brian F. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London and University College London Hospital, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-21

    SPECT images suffer from poor spatial resolution, which leads to partial volume effects due to cross-talk between different anatomical regions. By utilising high-resolution structural images (CT or MRI) it is possible to compensate for these effects. Traditional partial volume correction (PVC) methods suffer from various limitations, such as correcting a single region only, returning only regional mean values, or assuming a stationary point spread function (PSF). We recently presented a novel method in which PVC was combined with the reconstruction process in order to take into account the distance dependent PSF in SPECT, which was based on filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction. We now present a new method based on the iterative OSEM algorithm, which has advantageous noise properties compared to FBP. We have applied this method to a series of 10 brain SPECT studies performed on healthy volunteers using the DATSCAN tracer. T1-weighted MRI images were co-registered to the SPECT data and segmented into 33 anatomical regions. The SPECT data were reconstructed using OSEM, and PVC was applied in the projection domain at each iteration. The correction factors were calculated by forward projection of a piece-wise constant image, generated from the segmented MRI. Images were also reconstructed using FBP and standard OSEM with and without resolution recovery (RR) for comparison. The images were evaluated in terms of striatal contrast and regional variability (CoV). The mean striatal contrast obtained with OSEM, OSEM-RR and OSEM-PVC relative to FBP were 1.04, 1.42 and 1.53, respectively, and the mean striatal CoV values are 1.05, 1.53, 1.07. Both OSEM-RR and OSEM-PVC results in images with significantly higher contrast as compared to FBP or OSEM, but OSEM-PVC avoids the increased regional variability of OSEM-RR due to improved structural definition.

  9. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI Patient Instructions ... Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden JF, Elicker BM. Thoracic radiology. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  10. Total Variation-Based Reduction of Streak Artifacts, Ring Artifacts and Noise in 3D Reconstruction from Optical Projection Tomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michálek, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 6 (2015), s. 1602-1615 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH13028; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-12412S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : optical projection tomography * microscopy * artifacts * total variation * data mismatch Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2015

  11. Parameters used in the environmental pathways (DESCARTES) and radiological dose (CIDER) modules of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes (HEDRIC) for the air pathway. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, S.F.; Farris, W.T.; Napier, B.A.; Ikenberry, T.A.; Gilbert, R.O.

    1992-09-01

    This letter report is a description of work performed for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The HEDR Project was established to estimate the radiation doses to individuals resulting from releases of radionuclides from the Hanford Site since 1944. This work is being done by staff at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories (Battelle) under a contract with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) with technical direction provided by an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The objective of this report is to-document the environmental accumulation and dose-assessment parameters that will be used to estimate the impacts of past Hanford Site airborne releases. During 1993, dose estimates made by staff at Battelle will be used by the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center as part of the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS). This document contains information on parameters that are specific to the airborne release of the radionuclide iodine-131. Future versions of this document will include parameter information pertinent to other pathways and radionuclides.

  12. Clinical evaluation of image quality and radiation dose reduction in upper abdominal computed tomography using model-based iterative reconstruction; comparison with filtered back projection and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamoto, Atsushi; Kim, Tonsok; Hori, Masatoshi; Onishi, Hiromitsu; Tsuboyama, Takahiro; Sakane, Makoto; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • MBIR significantly improves objective image quality. • MBIR reduces the radiation dose by 87.5% without increasing objective image noise. • A half dose will be needed to maintain the subjective image quality. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the image quality of upper abdominal CT images reconstructed with model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in comparison with filtered back projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) on scans acquired with various radiation exposure dose protocols. Materials and methods: This prospective study was approved by our institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from all 90 patients who underwent both control-dose (CD) and reduced-dose (RD) CT of the upper abdomen (unenhanced: n = 45, contrast-enhanced: n = 45). The RD scan protocol was randomly selected from three protocols; Protocol A: 12.5% dose, Protocol B: 25% dose, Protocol C: 50% dose. Objective image noise, signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio for the liver parenchyma, visual image score and lesion conspicuity were compared among CD images of FBP and RD images of FBP, ASIR and MBIR. Results: RD images of MBIR yielded significantly lower objective image noise and higher SNR compared with RD images of FBP and ASIR for all protocols (P < .01) and CD images of FBP for Protocol C (P < .05). Although the subjective image quality of RD images of MBIR was almost acceptable for Protocol C, it was inferior to that of CD images of FBP for Protocols A and B (P < .0083). The conspicuity of the small lesions in RD images of MBIR tended to be superior to that in RD images of FBP and ASIR and inferior to that in CD images for Protocols A and B, although the differences were not significant (P > .0083). Conclusion: Although 12.5%-dose MBIR images (mean size-specific dose estimates [SSDE] of 1.13 mGy) yielded objective image noise and SNR comparable to CD-FBP images, at least a 50% dose (mean SSDE of 4.63 mGy) would be needed to

  13. Clinical evaluation of image quality and radiation dose reduction in upper abdominal computed tomography using model-based iterative reconstruction; comparison with filtered back projection and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamoto, Atsushi, E-mail: a-nakamoto@radiol.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Kim, Tonsok, E-mail: kim@radiol.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Hori, Masatoshi, E-mail: mhori@radiol.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Onishi, Hiromitsu, E-mail: h-onishi@radiol.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Tsuboyama, Takahiro, E-mail: t-tsuboyama@radiol.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Sakane, Makoto, E-mail: m-sakane@radiol.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki, E-mail: m-tatsumi@radiol.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Tomiyama, Noriyuki, E-mail: tomiyama@radiol.med.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • MBIR significantly improves objective image quality. • MBIR reduces the radiation dose by 87.5% without increasing objective image noise. • A half dose will be needed to maintain the subjective image quality. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the image quality of upper abdominal CT images reconstructed with model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in comparison with filtered back projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) on scans acquired with various radiation exposure dose protocols. Materials and methods: This prospective study was approved by our institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from all 90 patients who underwent both control-dose (CD) and reduced-dose (RD) CT of the upper abdomen (unenhanced: n = 45, contrast-enhanced: n = 45). The RD scan protocol was randomly selected from three protocols; Protocol A: 12.5% dose, Protocol B: 25% dose, Protocol C: 50% dose. Objective image noise, signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio for the liver parenchyma, visual image score and lesion conspicuity were compared among CD images of FBP and RD images of FBP, ASIR and MBIR. Results: RD images of MBIR yielded significantly lower objective image noise and higher SNR compared with RD images of FBP and ASIR for all protocols (P < .01) and CD images of FBP for Protocol C (P < .05). Although the subjective image quality of RD images of MBIR was almost acceptable for Protocol C, it was inferior to that of CD images of FBP for Protocols A and B (P < .0083). The conspicuity of the small lesions in RD images of MBIR tended to be superior to that in RD images of FBP and ASIR and inferior to that in CD images for Protocols A and B, although the differences were not significant (P > .0083). Conclusion: Although 12.5%-dose MBIR images (mean size-specific dose estimates [SSDE] of 1.13 mGy) yielded objective image noise and SNR comparable to CD-FBP images, at least a 50% dose (mean SSDE of 4.63 mGy) would be needed to

  14. Ultra-Fast Image Reconstruction of Tomosynthesis Mammography Using GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arefan D

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT is a technology that creates three dimensional (3D images of breast tissue. Tomosynthesis mammography detects lesions that are not detectable with other imaging systems. If image reconstruction time is in the order of seconds, we can use Tomosynthesis systems to perform Tomosynthesis-guided Interventional procedures. This research has been designed to study ultra-fast image reconstruction technique for Tomosynthesis Mammography systems using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU. At first, projections of Tomosynthesis mammography have been simulated. In order to produce Tomosynthesis projections, it has been designed a 3D breast phantom from empirical data. It is based on MRI data in its natural form. Then, projections have been created from 3D breast phantom. The image reconstruction algorithm based on FBP was programmed with C++ language in two methods using central processing unit (CPU card and the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU. It calculated the time of image reconstruction in two kinds of programming (using CPU and GPU.

  15. Image quality and radiation dose of low dose coronary CT angiography in obese patients: Sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction versus filtered back projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Rui; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Wu, Runze; Reddy, Ryan P.; Zhang, Chuanchen; Yu, Wei; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Zhaoqi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the image quality and radiation dose of low radiation dose CT coronary angiography (CTCA) using sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) compared with standard dose CTCA using filtered back-projection (FBP) in obese patients. Materials and methods: Seventy-eight consecutive obese patients were randomized into two groups and scanned using a prospectively ECG-triggered step-and-shot (SAS) CTCA protocol on a dual-source CT scanner. Thirty-nine patients (protocol A) were examined using a routine radiation dose protocol at 120 kV and images were reconstructed with FBP (protocol A). Thirty-nine patients (protocol B) were examined using a low dose protocol at 100 kV and images were reconstructed with SAFIRE. Two blinded observers independently assessed the image quality of each coronary segment using a 4-point scale (1 = non-diagnostic, 4 = excellent) and measured the objective parameters image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Radiation dose was calculated. Results: The coronary artery image quality scores, image noise, SNR and CNR were not significantly different between protocols A and B (all p > 0.05), with image quality scores of 3.51 ± 0.70 versus 3.55 ± 0.47, respectively. The effective radiation dose was significantly lower in protocol B (4.41 ± 0.83 mSv) than that in protocol A (8.83 ± 1.74 mSv, p < 0.01). Conclusion: Compared with standard dose CTCA using FBP, low dose CTCA using SAFIRE can maintain diagnostic image quality with 50% reduction of radiation dose.

  16. Measurement of vascular wall attenuation: Comparison of CT angiography using model-based iterative reconstruction with standard filtered back-projection algorithm CT in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Machida, Haruhiko; Tanaka, Isao; Ueno, Eiko

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the performance of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) with that of standard filtered back projection (FBP) for measuring vascular wall attenuation. Study design: After subjecting 9 vascular models (actual attenuation value of wall, 89 HU) with wall thickness of 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 mm that we filled with contrast material of 275, 396, or 542 HU to scanning using 64-detector computed tomography (CT), we reconstructed images using MBIR and FBP (Bone, Detail kernels) and measured wall attenuation at the center of the wall for each model. We performed attenuation measurements for each model and additional supportive measurements by a differentiation curve. We analyzed statistics using analyzes of variance with repeated measures. Results: Using the Bone kernel, standard deviation of the measurement exceeded 30 HU in most conditions. In measurements at the wall center, the attenuation values obtained using MBIR were comparable to or significantly closer to the actual wall attenuation than those acquired using Detail kernel. Using differentiation curves, we could measure attenuation for models with walls of 1.0- or 1.5-mm thickness using MBIR but only those of 1.5-mm thickness using Detail kernel. We detected no significant differences among the attenuation values of the vascular walls of either thickness (MBIR, P = 0.1606) or among the 3 densities of intravascular contrast material (MBIR, P = 0.8185; Detail kernel, P = 0.0802). Conclusions: Compared with FBP, MBIR reduces both reconstruction blur and image noise simultaneously, facilitates recognition of vascular wall boundaries, and can improve accuracy in measuring wall attenuation.

  17. Measurement of vascular wall attenuation: comparison of CT angiography using model-based iterative reconstruction with standard filtered back-projection algorithm CT in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Machida, Haruhiko; Tanaka, Isao; Ueno, Eiko

    2012-11-01

    To compare the performance of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) with that of standard filtered back projection (FBP) for measuring vascular wall attenuation. After subjecting 9 vascular models (actual attenuation value of wall, 89 HU) with wall thickness of 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 mm that we filled with contrast material of 275, 396, or 542 HU to scanning using 64-detector computed tomography (CT), we reconstructed images using MBIR and FBP (Bone, Detail kernels) and measured wall attenuation at the center of the wall for each model. We performed attenuation measurements for each model and additional supportive measurements by a differentiation curve. We analyzed statistics using analyzes of variance with repeated measures. Using the Bone kernel, standard deviation of the measurement exceeded 30 HU in most conditions. In measurements at the wall center, the attenuation values obtained using MBIR were comparable to or significantly closer to the actual wall attenuation than those acquired using Detail kernel. Using differentiation curves, we could measure attenuation for models with walls of 1.0- or 1.5-mm thickness using MBIR but only those of 1.5-mm thickness using Detail kernel. We detected no significant differences among the attenuation values of the vascular walls of either thickness (MBIR, P=0.1606) or among the 3 densities of intravascular contrast material (MBIR, P=0.8185; Detail kernel, P=0.0802). Compared with FBP, MBIR reduces both reconstruction blur and image noise simultaneously, facilitates recognition of vascular wall boundaries, and can improve accuracy in measuring wall attenuation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of the effects of model-based iterative reconstruction and filtered back projection algorithms on software measurements in pulmonary subsolid nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Julien G. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Radiologie et Imagerie Medicale (CURIM), Universite Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Kim, Hyungjin; Park, Su Bin [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ginneken, Bram van [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Ferretti, Gilbert R. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Radiologie et Imagerie Medicale (CURIM), Universite Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Institut A Bonniot, INSERM U 823, La Tronche (France); Lee, Chang Hyun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Chang Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    To evaluate the differences between filtered back projection (FBP) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithms on semi-automatic measurements in subsolid nodules (SSNs). Unenhanced CT scans of 73 SSNs obtained using the same protocol and reconstructed with both FBP and MBIR algorithms were evaluated by two radiologists. Diameter, mean attenuation, mass and volume of whole nodules and their solid components were measured. Intra- and interobserver variability and differences between FBP and MBIR were then evaluated using Bland-Altman method and Wilcoxon tests. Longest diameter, volume and mass of nodules and those of their solid components were significantly higher using MBIR (p < 0.05) with mean differences of 1.1% (limits of agreement, -6.4 to 8.5%), 3.2% (-20.9 to 27.3%) and 2.9% (-16.9 to 22.7%) and 3.2% (-20.5 to 27%), 6.3% (-51.9 to 64.6%), 6.6% (-50.1 to 63.3%), respectively. The limits of agreement between FBP and MBIR were within the range of intra- and interobserver variability for both algorithms with respect to the diameter, volume and mass of nodules and their solid components. There were no significant differences in intra- or interobserver variability between FBP and MBIR (p > 0.05). Semi-automatic measurements of SSNs significantly differed between FBP and MBIR; however, the differences were within the range of measurement variability. (orig.)

  19. Local detection of prostate cancer by positron emission tomography with 2-fluorodeoxyglucose comparison of filtered back projection and iterative reconstruction with segmented attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turlakow, A.; Larson, S. M.; Coakley, F.; Akhurst, T.; Macapinlac, H. A.; Hricak, H.; Gonen, M.; Kelly, W.; Scher, H.; Leibel, S.; Humm, J.; Scardino, P.

    2001-01-01

    To compare filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction with segmented attenuation correction (IRSAC) in the local imaging of prostate cancer by positron emission tomography with 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET). 13 patients with primary (n=7) or recurrent (n=6) prostate cancer who had increased uptake in the prostate on FDG-PET performed without urinary catheterization, contemporaneous biopsy confirming the presence of active tumor in the prostate, were retrospectively identified. Two independent nuclear medicine physicians separately rated FBP and IRSAC images for visualization of prostatic activity on a 4-point scale. Results were compared using biopsy and cross-sectional imaging findings as the standard of reference. IRSAC images were significantly better that FBP in terms of visualization of prostatic activity in 12 of 13 patients, and were equivalent in 1 patient (p<0.001, Wilcoxon signed ranks test). In particular, 2 foci of tumor activity in 2 different patients seen on IRSAC images were not visible on FBP images. In 11 patients who had a gross tumor mass evident on cross-sectional imaging, there was good agreement between PET and cross-sectional anatomic imaging with respect to tumor localization. In selected patients, cancer can be imaged within the prostate using FDG-PET, and IRSAC is superior to FBP in image reconstruction for local tumor visualization

  20. Explaining MRI examinations DVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatsu, Yasuo; Komeda, Takuya

    2010-01-01

    When conducting MRI examinations, there are various things to be careful of. There is often stress related to the MRI examinations, so in order to perform an examination safely and smoothly, sufficient explanation must be given. An explanation of what to do and what not to do during an examination should be outlined in a brochure given to patients before the examination. There may be many patients who have misgivings about their MRI examinations, so to reduce their anxiousness and deepen their understanding of MRI examinations and to improve the safety and effiency of MRI examinations,; we created a DVD about MRI examinations. We gathered MRI-related safety information and instructions, and assessed the effect that the information might have on patients. We started a workgroup for a project to plan and record a video according to the Storyboard. When editing, we reviewed the length of each segment, the amount of information on screen, and the overall length of the DVD. We discussed the issue within the workgroup and had hospital approval. It was possible for us to complete it without depending on the supplier and the cost was kept to a minimum. Finally, we decided on a viewing location. We asked a hospital volunteers to see a complete DVD and we evaluated their responses by questionnaires. As the result, their understanding and anxieties related to MRI examinations were alleviated, as expected. Their anxiety seemed to be eased. Patients also seemed to have a deeper understanding of MRI examinations having seen an examination being conducted. (author)

  1. Comparing reconstructed past variations and future projections of the Baltic Sea ecosystem—first results from multi-model ensemble simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, H E Markus; Andersson, Helén C; Arheimer, Berit

    2012-01-01

    Multi-model ensemble simulations for the marine biogeochemistry and food web of the Baltic Sea were performed for the period 1850–2098, and projected changes in the future climate were compared with the past climate environment. For the past period 1850–2006, atmospheric, hydrological and nutrient...... forcings were reconstructed, based on historical measurements. For the future period 1961–2098, scenario simulations were driven by regionalized global general circulation model (GCM) data and forced by various future greenhouse gas emission and air- and riverborne nutrient load scenarios (ranging from...... a pessimistic ‘business-as-usual’ to the most optimistic case). To estimate uncertainties, different models for the various parts of the Earth system were applied. Assuming the IPCC greenhouse gas emission scenarios A1B or A2, we found that water temperatures at the end of this century may be higher...

  2. Entropy and transverse section reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullberg, G.T.

    1976-01-01

    A new approach to the reconstruction of a transverse section using projection data from multiple views incorporates the concept of maximum entropy. The principle of maximizing information entropy embodies the assurance of minimizing bias or prejudice in the reconstruction. Using maximum entropy is a necessary condition for the reconstructed image. This entropy criterion is most appropriate for 3-D reconstruction of objects from projections where the system is underdetermined or the data are limited statistically. This is the case in nuclear medicine time limitations in patient studies do not yield sufficient projections

  3. Tomographic reconstruction of binary fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, Stéphane; Leclerc, Hugo; Hild, François

    2012-01-01

    A novel algorithm is proposed for reconstructing binary images from their projection along a set of different orientations. Based on a nonlinear transformation of the projection data, classical back-projection procedures can be used iteratively to converge to the sought image. A multiscale implementation allows for a faster convergence. The algorithm is tested on images up to 1 Mb definition, and an error free reconstruction is achieved with a very limited number of projection data, saving a factor of about 100 on the number of projections required for classical reconstruction algorithms.

  4. Atmospheric showers reconstruction and air fluorescence measurement for the study of ultra-energetic cosmic rays in the framework of EUSO project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colin, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    The EUSO project (Extreme Universe Space Observatory) is an innovative concept to measure the UHECR (Ultra High Energy Cosmic ray) spectrum by observing from space the light (air fluorescence and Cerenkov radiation) produced in the atmosphere by EAS (Extensive Air Shower). After an overview of the scientific context and an EUSO project description, a reconstruction method of EAS seen from space is presented. This new method enable one to reconstruct the UHECR parameters (Energy, direction, X_m_a_x) using only the fluorescence signal shape (without extra information). This method is very efficient for the horizontal EAS. The second part of this thesis deals with the study and the measurement of the air fluorescence with the MACFLY experiment (Measurement of Air Cerenkov and Fluorescence Light Yield). After a state of the art on the air fluorescence knowledge, a model of FLY (Florescence Light Yield) proportional to the Energy released in air is proposed. The experiment MACFLY and the data analysis method are described in detail. The experiment is composed of two devices. The first (Macfly1) which measures the fluorescence produced by only one particle measure the FLY of electron of 1.5 MeV (radioactive source), 20 GeV and 50 GeV (CERN test beam). The second (Macfly2) which measure the fluorescence produced by an electromagnetic shower, was the first experiment to measure the shower age dependence of the FLY. The pressure dependence was also measured by the two devices. Thanks to a GEANT4 simulation program, we compare our measurements with the FLY models. The assumption of the proportionality between the FLY and the energy deposited has been checked. One finds the same result with Macfly1 and Macfly2. In the air at 950 hPa, 23 deg. C and 0% of moisture one obtains: FLY=19 ± 4 photons/MeV. (author) [fr

  5. Glacial evolution in King George and Livingston Islands (Antarctica) since the Last Glacial Maximum based on cosmogenic nuclide dating and glacier surface reconstruction - CRONOANTAR project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Fernández, Jesús; Oliva, Marc; Fernández Menéndez, Susana del Carmen; García Hernández, Cristina; Menéndez Duarte, Rosa Ana; Pellitero Ondicol, Ramón; Pérez Alberti, Augusto; Schimmelpfennig, Irene

    2017-04-01

    CRONOANTAR brings together researchers from Spain, Portugal, France and United Kingdom with the objective of spatially and temporally reconstruct the deglaciation process at the two largest islands in the South Shetlands Archipelago (Maritime Antarctica), since the Global Last Glacial Maximum. Glacier retreat in polar areas has major implications at a local, regional and even planetary scale. Global average sea level rise is the most obvious and socio-economically relevant, but there are others such as the arrival of new fauna to deglaciated areas, plant colonisation or permafrost formation and degradation. This project will study the ice-free areas in Byers and Hurd peninsulas (Livingston Island) and Fildes and Potter peninsulas (King George Island). Ice-cap glacier retreat chronology will be revealed by the use of cosmogenic isotopes (mainly 36Cl) on glacially originated sedimentary and erosive records. Cosmogenic dating will be complemented by other dating methods (C14 and OSL), which will permit the validation of these methods in regions with cold-based glaciers. Given the geomorphological evidences and the obtained ages, a deglaciation calendar will be proposed and we will use a GIS methodology to reconstruct the glacier extent and the ice thickness. The results emerging from this project will allow to assess whether the high glacier retreat rates observed during the last decades were registered in the past, or if they are conversely the consequence (and evidence) of the Global Change in Antarctica. Acknowledgements This work has been funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy, Industry and Competitiveness (Reference: CTM2016-77878-P).

  6. Quaternary glaciation and hydrologic variation in the South American tropics as reconstructed from the Lake Titicaca drilling project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Sherilyn C.; Baker, Paul A.; Seltzer, Geoffrey O.; Ballantyne, Ashley; Tapia, Pedro; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence

    2007-11-01

    A 136-m-long drill core of sediments was recovered from tropical high-altitude Lake Titicaca, Bolivia-Peru, enabling a reconstruction of past climate that spans four cycles of regional glacial advance and retreat and that is estimated to extend continuously over the last 370,000 yr. Within the errors of the age model, the periods of regional glacial advance and retreat are concordant respectively with global glacial and interglacial stages. Periods of ice advance in the southern tropical Andes generally were periods of positive water balance, as evidenced by deeper and fresher conditions in Lake Titicaca. Conversely, reduced glaciation occurred during periods of negative water balance and shallow closed-basin conditions in the lake. The apparent coincidence of positive water balance of Lake Titicaca and glacial growth in the adjacent Andes with Northern Hemisphere ice sheet expansion implies that regional water balance and glacial mass balance are strongly influenced by global-scale temperature changes, as well as by precessional forcing of the South American summer monsoon.

  7. The Transeurope Footrace Project: longitudinal data acquisition in a cluster randomized mobile MRI observational cohort study on 44 endurance runners at a 64-stage 4,486km transcontinental ultramarathon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schütz Uwe HW

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The TransEurope FootRace 2009 (TEFR09 was one of the longest transcontinental ultramarathons with an extreme endurance physical load of running nearly 4,500 km in 64 days. The aim of this study was to assess the wide spectrum of adaptive responses in humans regarding the different tissues, organs and functional systems being exposed to such chronic physical endurance load with limited time for regeneration and resulting negative energy balance. A detailed description of the TEFR project and its implemented measuring methods in relation to the hypotheses are presented. Methods The most important research tool was a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scanner mounted on a mobile unit following the ultra runners from stage to stage each day. Forty-four study volunteers (67% of the participants were cluster randomized into two groups for MRI measurements (22 subjects each according to the project protocol with its different research modules: musculoskeletal system, brain and pain perception, cardiovascular system, body composition, and oxidative stress and inflammation. Complementary to the diverse daily mobile MR-measurements on different topics (muscle and joint MRI, T2*-mapping of cartilage, MR-spectroscopy of muscles, functional MRI of the brain, cardiac and vascular cine MRI, whole body MRI other methods were also used: ice-water pain test, psychometric questionnaires, bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA, skinfold thickness and limb circumference measurements, daily urine samples, periodic blood samples and electrocardiograms (ECG. Results Thirty volunteers (68% reached the finish line at North Cape. The mean total race speed was 8.35 km/hour. Finishers invested 552 hours in total. The completion rate for planned MRI investigations was more than 95%: 741 MR-examinations with 2,637 MRI sequences (more than 200,000 picture data, 5,720 urine samples, 244 blood samples, 205 ECG, 1,018 BIA, 539 anthropological

  8. Changes in Soil Dissolved Organic Carbon Affect Reconstructed History and Projected Future Trends in Surface Water Acidification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hruška, Jakub; Krám, Pavel; Moldan, Filip; Oulehle, Filip; Evans, C. D.; Wright, R. F.; Cosby, B. J.; Kopáček, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 225, č. 7 (2014), s. 2015 ISSN 0049-6979 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : acidification * surface waters * soils * dissolved organic carbon * magic model * preindustrial water chemistry Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour; DA - Hydrology ; Limnology (BC-A) Impact factor: 1.554, year: 2014

  9. Overview of image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marr, R.B.

    1980-04-01

    Image reconstruction (or computerized tomography, etc.) is any process whereby a function, f, on R/sup n/ is estimated from empirical data pertaining to its integrals, ∫f(x) dx, for some collection of hyperplanes of dimension k < n. The paper begins with background information on how image reconstruction problems have arisen in practice, and describes some of the application areas of past or current interest; these include radioastronomy, optics, radiology and nuclear medicine, electron microscopy, acoustical imaging, geophysical tomography, nondestructive testing, and NMR zeugmatography. Then the various reconstruction algorithms are discussed in five classes: summation, or simple back-projection; convolution, or filtered back-projection; Fourier and other functional transforms; orthogonal function series expansion; and iterative methods. Certain more technical mathematical aspects of image reconstruction are considered from the standpoint of uniqueness, consistency, and stability of solution. The paper concludes by presenting certain open problems. 73 references

  10. Complex Wavelet transform for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junor, P.; Janney, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: There is a perpetual compromise encountered in magnetic resonance (MRl) image reconstruction, between the traditional elements of image quality (noise, spatial resolution and contrast). Additional factors exacerbating this trade-off include various artifacts, computational (and hence time-dependent) overhead, and financial expense. This paper outlines a new approach to the problem of minimizing MRI image acquisition and reconstruction time without compromising resolution and noise reduction. The standard approaches for reconstructing magnetic resonance (MRI) images from raw data (which rely on relatively conventional signal processing) have matured but there are a number of challenges which limit their use. A major one is the 'intrinsic' signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reconstructed image that depends on the strength of the main field. A typical clinical MRI almost invariably uses a super-cooled magnet in order to achieve a high field strength. The ongoing running cost of these super-cooled magnets prompts consideration of alternative magnet systems for use in MRIs for developing countries and in some remote regional installations. The decrease in image quality from using lower field strength magnets can be addressed by improvements in signal processing strategies. Conversely, improved signal processing will obviously benefit the current conventional field strength MRI machines. Moreover, the 'waiting time' experienced in many MR sequences (due to the relaxation time delays) can be exploited by more rigorous processing of the MR signals. Acquisition often needs to be repeated so that coherent averaging may partially redress the shortfall in SNR, at the expense of further delay. Wavelet transforms have been used in MRI as an alternative for encoding and denoising for over a decade. These have not supplanted the traditional Fourier transform methods that have long been the mainstay of MRI reconstruction, but have some inflexibility. The dual

  11. CT imaging of bronchus related to solitary pulmonary lesion: comparison of minimum intensity projection and multi-planar reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jun; Shan Fei; Zhang Zhiyong; Yang Shan; Zhang Xingwei; Wu Dong; Zhan Songhua

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of 64-slice computed tomography with MinIP and MPR for imaging the bronchus related to a solitary pulmonary lesion (SPL). Methods: Seventy-five subjects with solitary pulmonary lesions underwent chest 64-slice CT and their bronchi were analyzed retrospectively. All images of thin-section (0.625 mm) were reconstructed with MPR and MinIP into images of 1, 2, 3, and 5 mm thickness and 1 mm gap in two orthogonal planes along the long axis of bronchus related to the SPL. The image quality of four series of MinIP and MPR images was evaluated in the aspect of bronchus visibility and pulmonary vascular masking. One-way ANOVA with Bonferroni correction and interclass correlation coefficient were used in the statistical analysis. Results: (1) The mean scores of display of the bronchi on MinIP images of four series (4.85, 4.77 and 4.84, 4.63 and 4.67, 4.25 and 4.28, in 1, 2, 3, and 5 mm thickness, respectively) and on MPR images of 1 or 2 mm thickness (4.77 and 4.76, 4.04 and 4.27, in 1 and 2 mm thickness, respectively) were good or excellent. MPR images of 1 mm thickness and MinIP images of 1-3 mm thickness showed no significant differences (t=0.318, P> 0.05 for all), but they were superior to MinIP images of 5 mm thickness (t=6.318 and 6.610, P 0.05). (2) The effect of suppression of pulmonary vascular markings on MinIP images was better with the increase of slice thickness (F= 45.312 and 40.415, P<0.01). The mean scores of MinIP images of 3 mm and 5 mm thickness (4.67 and 4.64, 5.00 and 4.97, for 3 and 5 mm thickness, respectively) were good or excellent, but MinIP images of 2 mm thickness were just acceptable. Conclusion: MinIP images of 3 mm thickness may display the bronchus related to SPL more clearly. (authors)

  12. Image Reconstruction. Chapter 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuyts, J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Research Center, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Matej, S. [Medical Image Processing Group, Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-12-15

    This chapter discusses how 2‑D or 3‑D images of tracer distribution can be reconstructed from a series of so-called projection images acquired with a gamma camera or a positron emission tomography (PET) system [13.1]. This is often called an ‘inverse problem’. The reconstruction is the inverse of the acquisition. The reconstruction is called an inverse problem because making software to compute the true tracer distribution from the acquired data turns out to be more difficult than the ‘forward’ direction, i.e. making software to simulate the acquisition. There are basically two approaches to image reconstruction: analytical reconstruction and iterative reconstruction. The analytical approach is based on mathematical inversion, yielding efficient, non-iterative reconstruction algorithms. In the iterative approach, the reconstruction problem is reduced to computing a finite number of image values from a finite number of measurements. That simplification enables the use of iterative instead of mathematical inversion. Iterative inversion tends to require more computer power, but it can cope with more complex (and hopefully more accurate) models of the acquisition process.

  13. [THE RESULTS OF IMPLEMENTATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT LOAN PROJECT "PREVENTION, DIAGNOSIS, AND TREATMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS AND AIDS", A "TUBERCULOSIS" COMPONENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Due to the implementation of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) loan project "Prevention, diagnosis, treatment of tuberculosis and AIDS", a "Tuberculosis" component that is an addition to the national tuberculosis control program in 15 subjects of the Russian Federation, followed up by the Central Research Institute of Tuberculosis, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, the 2005-2008 measures stipulated by the Project have caused substantial changes in the organization of tuberculosis control: implementation of Orders Nos. 109, 50, and 690 and supervision of their implementation; modernization of the laboratories of the general medical network and antituberbulosis service (404 kits have been delivered for clinical diagnostic laboratories and 12 for bacteriological laboratories, including BACTEC 960 that has been provided in 6 areas); 91 training seminars have been held at the federal and regional levels; 1492 medical workers have been trained in the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with tuberculosis; 8 manuals and guidelines have been prepared and sent to all areas. In the period 2005-2008, the tuberculosis morbidity and mortality rates in the followed-up areas reduced by 1.2 and 18.6%, respectively. The analysis of patient cohorts in 2007 and 2005 revealed that the therapeutic efficiency evaluated from sputum smear microscopy increased by 16.3%; there were reductions in the proportion of patients having ineffective chemotherapy (from 16.1 to 11.1%), patients who died from tuberculosis (from 11.6 to 9.9%), and those who interrupted therapy ahead of time (from 11.8 to 7.8%). Implementation of the IBR project has contributed to the improvement of the national strategy and the enhancement of the efficiency of tuberculosis control.

  14. Segmentation-DrivenTomographic Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongskov, Rasmus Dalgas

    such that the segmentation subsequently can be carried out by use of a simple segmentation method, for instance just a thresholding method. We tested the advantages of going from a two-stage reconstruction method to a one stage segmentation-driven reconstruction method for the phase contrast tomography reconstruction......The tomographic reconstruction problem is concerned with creating a model of the interior of an object from some measured data, typically projections of the object. After reconstructing an object it is often desired to segment it, either automatically or manually. For computed tomography (CT...

  15. MRI based volumetric assessment of knee cartilage after ACL-reconstruction, correlated with qualitative morphologic changes in the joint and with clinical outcome. Is there evidence for early posttraumatic degeneration?; MRT-basierte Knorpelvolumetrie nach Kreuzbandersatzplastik in Korrelation mit qualitativen Gelenkveraenderungen und dem klinischen Outcome. Gibt es Hinweise auf fruehzeitige posttraumatische degenerative Veraenderungen?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnoldi, A.P.; Weckbach, S.; Horng, A.; Reiser, M. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology; Nussbickel, C. [Klinikum Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany). Dept. of Internal Medicine; Noebauer, I. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien (Austria). Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik; Zysk, S. [Orthopaedie Zentrum Groebenzell (Germany). Center of Orthopaedics; Glaser, C. [NYU Medical Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze potential quantitative and qualitative changes of the knee cartilage and joint indicative of early posttraumatic OA 4 years after ACL-reconstruction and to correlate the MRI-findings with the clinical outcome (CO). Materials and Methods: 1.5 T MRI-scans were performed on 9 patients post-op and 4 years later. Using a high-resolution T 1-w-fs-FLASH-3D-sequence cartilage volume (cVol) and thickness (mTh) were quantified. Using standard PD-w fs and T 1-w sequences qualitative changes of the joint structures were analyzed based on the WORMS-score. CO was rated by an orthopaedic surgeon using Lysholm-score, OAK-score, Tegner-activity-score (TAS), and Arthrometer KT-1000 testing. Results: Mean changes of cVol were -1.8 % (range: -5.9 %; + 0.7 %) and of mTh -0.8 % (range: -3.0 %; + 1.1 %). No significant change (95 %-CI) could be identified for any compartment. Three patients developed new peripatellar ostheophytes, acute trauma related changes mostly decreased. Mean outcome of Lysholm-score and OAK-score were 90 pts and 86 pts, mean TAS was 4.3 pts. Average maximum tibial translation reached 5.2 mm comparing to 6.7 mm on the healthy contralateral side. Conclusion: Despite a tendency towards decreased cVol and mTh 4 years after ACL-reconstruction qMRI revealed no significant cartilage loss. Newly developing osteophytes did not match with the observed good CO. This small pilot study motivates future quantitative and qualitative-structural MRI-based assessment of articular cartilage and other joint structures in order to improve diagnostic tools for the detection of early OA. (orig.)

  16. Comparison of applied dose and image quality in staging CT of neuroendocrine tumor patients using standard filtered back projection and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Böning, G.; Schäfer, M.; Grupp, U.; Kaul, D.; Kahn, J.; Pavel, M.; Maurer, M.; Denecke, T.; Hamm, B.; Streitparth, F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Iterative reconstruction (IR) in staging CT provides equal objective image quality compared to filtered back projection (FBP). • IR delivers excellent subjective quality and reduces effective dose compared to FBP. • In patients with neuroendocrine tumor (NET) or may other hypervascular abdominal tumors IR can be used without scarifying diagnostic confidence. - Abstract: Objective: To investigate whether dose reduction via adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) affects image quality and diagnostic accuracy in neuroendocrine tumor (NET) staging. Methods: A total of 28 NET patients were enrolled in the study. Inclusion criteria were histologically proven NET and visible tumor in abdominal computed tomography (CT). In an intraindividual study design, the patients underwent a baseline CT (filtered back projection, FBP) and follow-up CT (ASIR 40%) using matched scan parameters. Image quality was assessed subjectively using a 5-grade scoring system and objectively by determining signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Applied volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI vol ) of each scan was taken from the dose report. Results: ASIR 40% significantly reduced CTDI vol (10.17 ± 3.06 mGy [FBP], 6.34 ± 2.25 mGy [ASIR] (p < 0.001) by 37.6% and significantly increased CNRs (complete tumor-to-liver, 2.76 ± 1.87 [FBP], 3.2 ± 2.32 [ASIR]) (p < 0.05) (complete tumor-to-muscle, 2.74 ± 2.67 [FBP], 4.31 ± 4.61 [ASIR]) (p < 0.05) compared to FBP. Subjective scoring revealed no significant changes for diagnostic confidence (5.0 ± 0 [FBP], 5.0 ± 0 [ASIR]), visibility of suspicious lesion (4.8 ± 0.5 [FBP], 4.8 ± 0.5 [ASIR]) and artifacts (5.0 ± 0 [FBP], 5.0 ± 0 [ASIR]). ASIR 40% significantly decreased scores for noise (4.3 ± 0.6 [FBP], 4.0 ± 0.8 [ASIR]) (p < 0.05), contrast (4.4 ± 0.6 [FBP], 4.1 ± 0.8 [ASIR]) (p < 0.001) and visibility of small structures (4.5 ± 0.7 [FBP], 4.3 ± 0.8 [ASIR]) (p < 0

  17. Comparison of applied dose and image quality in staging CT of neuroendocrine tumor patients using standard filtered back projection and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Böning, G., E-mail: georg.boening@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Humboldt-University Medical School, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Schäfer, M.; Grupp, U. [Department of Radiology, Charité, Humboldt-University Medical School, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Kaul, D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité, Humboldt-University Medical School, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Kahn, J. [Department of Radiology, Charité, Humboldt-University Medical School, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Pavel, M. [Department of Gastroenterology, Charité, Humboldt-University Medical School, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Maurer, M.; Denecke, T.; Hamm, B.; Streitparth, F. [Department of Radiology, Charité, Humboldt-University Medical School, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Iterative reconstruction (IR) in staging CT provides equal objective image quality compared to filtered back projection (FBP). • IR delivers excellent subjective quality and reduces effective dose compared to FBP. • In patients with neuroendocrine tumor (NET) or may other hypervascular abdominal tumors IR can be used without scarifying diagnostic confidence. - Abstract: Objective: To investigate whether dose reduction via adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) affects image quality and diagnostic accuracy in neuroendocrine tumor (NET) staging. Methods: A total of 28 NET patients were enrolled in the study. Inclusion criteria were histologically proven NET and visible tumor in abdominal computed tomography (CT). In an intraindividual study design, the patients underwent a baseline CT (filtered back projection, FBP) and follow-up CT (ASIR 40%) using matched scan parameters. Image quality was assessed subjectively using a 5-grade scoring system and objectively by determining signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Applied volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) of each scan was taken from the dose report. Results: ASIR 40% significantly reduced CTDI{sub vol} (10.17 ± 3.06 mGy [FBP], 6.34 ± 2.25 mGy [ASIR] (p < 0.001) by 37.6% and significantly increased CNRs (complete tumor-to-liver, 2.76 ± 1.87 [FBP], 3.2 ± 2.32 [ASIR]) (p < 0.05) (complete tumor-to-muscle, 2.74 ± 2.67 [FBP], 4.31 ± 4.61 [ASIR]) (p < 0.05) compared to FBP. Subjective scoring revealed no significant changes for diagnostic confidence (5.0 ± 0 [FBP], 5.0 ± 0 [ASIR]), visibility of suspicious lesion (4.8 ± 0.5 [FBP], 4.8 ± 0.5 [ASIR]) and artifacts (5.0 ± 0 [FBP], 5.0 ± 0 [ASIR]). ASIR 40% significantly decreased scores for noise (4.3 ± 0.6 [FBP], 4.0 ± 0.8 [ASIR]) (p < 0.05), contrast (4.4 ± 0.6 [FBP], 4.1 ± 0.8 [ASIR]) (p < 0.001) and visibility of small structures (4.5 ± 0.7 [FBP], 4.3 ± 0.8 [ASIR]) (p < 0

  18. MRI Primer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldendorf, W.; Oldendorf, W. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Designed for studies, radiologists, and clinicians at all levels of training, this book provides a basic introduction to the principles, physics, and instrumentation of magnetic resonance imaging. The fundamental concepts that are essential for the optimal clinical use of MRI are thoroughly explained in easily accessible terms. To facilitate the reader's comprehension, the material is presented nonmathematically, using no equations and a minimum of symbols and abbreviations. MRI Primer presents a clear account of the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and the use of gradient magnetic fields to create clinically useful images of cross-sectional slices. Close attention is given to the magnetization vector as a means of expressing nuclear behavior, the role of T 1 and T 2 weighing in imaging, the use of contrast agents, and the pulse sequences most often used in clinical practice, as well as to the relative capabilities and limitations of MRI and CT. The basic hardware components of an MRI scanner are described in detail. Sample MRI scans illustrate how MRI characterizes tissue. An appendix provides a brief introduction to quantum processes in MRI

  19. ICDP project DeepCHALLA: reconstructing East African climate change and environmental history over the past 250,000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuren, Dirk; Van Daele, Maarten; Wolff, Christian; Waldmann, Nicolas; Meyer, Inka; Ombori, Titus; Peterse, Francien; O'Grady, Ryan; Schnurrenberger, Doug; Olago, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Sediments on the bottom of Lake Challa, a 92-meter deep crater lake on the border of Kenya and Tanzania near Mt. Kilimanjaro, contain a uniquely long and continuous record of past climate and environmental change. The near-equatorial location and exceptional quality of this natural archive provide great opportunities to study tropical climate variability at both short (inter-annual to decadal) and long (glacial-interglacial) time scales; and the influence of this climate variability on the region's freshwater resources, the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, and the history of the East African landscape in which modern humans (our species, Homo sapiens) evolved and have lived ever since. Supported in part by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Programme (ICDP), the DeepCHALLA project has now recovered the sediment record of Lake Challa down to 214.8 meter below the lake floor, with almost certain 100% cover of the uppermost 121.3 meter (ca.150,000 year BP to present) and estimated 85% cover over the lower part of the sequence, down to the lowermost distinct reflector in the available seismic stratigraphy. This reflector represents a 2 meter thick layer of volcanic sand and silt deposited ca.250,000 years ago, and overlies still older silty lacustrine clays deposited during early lake development. Down-hole logging produced continuous profiles of in-situ sediment composition that confer an absolute depth scale to both the recovered cores and their three-dimensional representation in seismic stratigraphy. As readily observed through the transparent core liners, Lake Challa sediments are finely laminated throughout most of the recovered sequence. Combined with the great time span, the exquisite temporal resolution of these sediments promises to greatly increase our understanding of tropical climate and ecosystem dynamics, and create a long-awaited equatorial counterpart to the high-latitude climate records extracted from the ice sheets of Greenland

  20. Designing a compact MRI motion phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmiedel Max

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Even today, dealing with motion artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a challenging task. Image corruption due to spontaneous body motion complicates diagnosis. In this work, an MRI phantom for rigid motion is presented. It is used to generate motion-corrupted data, which can serve for evaluation of blind motion compensation algorithms. In contrast to commercially available MRI motion phantoms, the presented setup works on small animal MRI systems. Furthermore, retrospective gating is performed on the data, which can be used as a reference for novel motion compensation approaches. The motion of the signal source can be reconstructed using motor trigger signals and be utilized as the ground truth for motion estimation. The proposed setup results in motion corrected images. Moreover, the importance of preprocessing the MRI raw data, e.g. phase-drift correction, is demonstrated. The gained knowledge can be used to design an MRI phantom for elastic motion.

  1. MRI of focal cortical dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.C.P.; Hatfield, G.A.; Bourgeois, B.; Park, T.S.

    1998-01-01

    We studied nine cases of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) by MRI, with surface-rendered 3D reconstructions. One case was also examined using single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy (MRS). The histological features were reviewed and correlated with the MRI findings. The gyri affected by FCD were enlarged and the signal of the cortex was slightly increased on T1-weighted images. The gray-white junction was indistinct. Signal from the subcortical white matter was decreased on T1- and increased on T2-weighted images in most cases. Contrast enhancement was seen in two cases. Proton MRS showed a spectrum identical to that of normal brain. (orig.) (orig.)

  2. Head MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hearing aids Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items Removable dental work How the Test will ... an MRI can make heart pacemakers and other implants not work as well. It can also cause ...

  3. Pediatric MRI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  4. Radioactive contamination of fish, shellfish, and waterfowl exposed to Hanford effluents: Annual summaries, 1945--1972. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanf, R.W.; Dirkes, R.L.; Duncan, J.P.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project (HEDR) is to estimate the potential radiation doses received by people living within the sphere of influence of the Hanford Site. A potential critical pathway for human radiation exposure is through the consumption of waterfowl that frequent onsite waste-water ponds or through eating of fish, shellfish, and waterfowl that reside in/on the Columbia River and its tributaries downstream of the reactors. This document summarizes information on fish, shellfish, and waterfowl radiation contamination for samples collected by Hanford monitoring personnel and offsite agencies for the period 1945 to 1972. Specific information includes the types of organisms sampled, the kinds of tissues and organs analyzed, the sampling locations, and the radionuclides reported. Some tissue concentrations are also included. We anticipate that these yearly summaries will be helpful to individuals and organizations interested in evaluating aquatic pathway information for locations impacted by Hanford operations and will be useful for planning the direction of future HEDR studies.

  5. FY1995 report on the novel methods for magnetic resonance imaging; 1995 nendo senshin MRI gazoka shuho no kiso kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop new 2-dimensional ultrafast MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) methods for the Image Guided Cancer Therapy (IGT) and the non-invasive clinical diagnosis. We have developed two MRI methods. They can reconstruct a two dimensional image by only a RF excitation and slow changing of gradient fields. This paper describes theoretically how to apply the RF wave and the gradient in x, y and z direction, respectively. Echo signals are acquired under multi-frequency resonance. The frequency bandwidth of the RF wave adjusts the field of view (FOV) of the imaging plane. Biological effects of the applied RF wave was evaluated by the brain microdialysis. In animal experiments, these was not significant change of neurotransmitters subject to the RF wave. From these theoretical and experimental results, these MRI methods are applicable to IGT and the clinical diagnosis for the cancer and other diseases. (NEDO)

  6. Classification of cryo electron microscopy images, noisy tomographic images recorded with unknown projection directions, by simultaneously estimating reconstructions and application to an assembly mutant of Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus and portals of the bacteriophage P22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junghoon; Zheng, Yili; Yin, Zhye; Doerschuk, Peter C.; Johnson, John E.

    2010-08-01

    Cryo electron microscopy is frequently used on biological specimens that show a mixture of different types of object. Because the electron beam rapidly destroys the specimen, the beam current is minimized which leads to noisy images (SNR substantially less than 1) and only one projection image per object (with an unknown projection direction) is collected. For situations where the objects can reasonably be described as coming from a finite set of classes, an approach based on joint maximum likelihood estimation of the reconstruction of each class and then use of the reconstructions to label the class of each image is described and demonstrated on two challenging problems: an assembly mutant of Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus and portals of the bacteriophage P22.

  7. Comparing reconstructed past variations and future projections of the Baltic Sea ecosystem—first results from multi-model ensemble simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, H E Markus; Andersson, Helén C; Arheimer, Berit; Donnelly, Chantal; Eilola, Kari; Höglund, Anders; Kuznetsov, Ivan; Blenckner, Thorsten; Gustafsson, Bo G; Müller-Karulis, Bärbel; Niiranen, Susa; Chubarenko, Boris; Hansson, Anders; Havenhand, Jonathan; MacKenzie, Brian R; Neumann, Thomas; Piwowarczyk, Joanna; Raudsepp, Urmas; Reckermann, Marcus; Ruoho-Airola, Tuija

    2012-01-01

    Multi-model ensemble simulations for the marine biogeochemistry and food web of the Baltic Sea were performed for the period 1850–2098, and projected changes in the future climate were compared with the past climate environment. For the past period 1850–2006, atmospheric, hydrological and nutrient forcings were reconstructed, based on historical measurements. For the future period 1961–2098, scenario simulations were driven by regionalized global general circulation model (GCM) data and forced by various future greenhouse gas emission and air- and riverborne nutrient load scenarios (ranging from a pessimistic ‘business-as-usual’ to the most optimistic case). To estimate uncertainties, different models for the various parts of the Earth system were applied. Assuming the IPCC greenhouse gas emission scenarios A1B or A2, we found that water temperatures at the end of this century may be higher and salinities and oxygen concentrations may be lower than ever measured since 1850. There is also a tendency of increased eutrophication in the future, depending on the nutrient load scenario. Although cod biomass is mainly controlled by fishing mortality, climate change together with eutrophication may result in a biomass decline during the latter part of this century, even when combined with lower fishing pressure. Despite considerable shortcomings of state-of-the-art models, this study suggests that the future Baltic Sea ecosystem may unprecedentedly change compared to the past 150 yr. As stakeholders today pay only little attention to adaptation and mitigation strategies, more information is needed to raise public awareness of the possible impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems. (letter)

  8. Dose reduction in chest CT: Comparison of the adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D, adaptive iterative dose reduction, and filtered back projection reconstruction techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yoshitake, E-mail: yamada@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Jinzaki, Masahiro, E-mail: jinzaki@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Hosokawa, Takahiro, E-mail: hosokawa@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Tanami, Yutaka, E-mail: tanami@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Sugiura, Hiroaki, E-mail: hsugiura@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Abe, Takayuki, E-mail: tabe@z5.keio.jp [Center for Clinical Research, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Kuribayashi, Sachio, E-mail: skuribay@a5.keio.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: To assess the effectiveness of adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR) and AIDR 3D in improving the image quality in low-dose chest CT (LDCT). Materials and methods: Fifty patients underwent standard-dose chest CT (SDCT) and LDCT simultaneously, performed under automatic exposure control with noise index of 19 and 38 (for a 2-mm slice thickness), respectively. The SDCT images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (SDCT-FBP images), and the LDCT images with FBP, AIDR and AIDR 3D (LDCT-FBP, LDCT-AIDR and LDCT-AIDR 3D images, respectively). On all the 200 lung and 200 mediastinal image series, objective image noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured in several regions, and two blinded radiologists independently assessed the subjective image quality. Wilcoxon's signed rank sum test with Bonferroni's correction was used for the statistical analyses. Results: The mean dose reduction in LDCT was 64.2% as compared with the dose in SDCT. LDCT-AIDR 3D images showed significantly reduced objective noise and significantly increased SNR in all regions as compared to the SDCT-FBP, LDCT-FBP and LDCT-AIDR images (all, P ≤ 0.003). In all assessments of the image quality, LDCT-AIDR 3D images were superior to LDCT-AIDR and LDCT-FBP images. The overall diagnostic acceptability of both the lung and mediastinal LDCT-AIDR 3D images was comparable to that of the lung and mediastinal SDCT-FBP images. Conclusions: AIDR 3D is superior to AIDR. Intra-individual comparisons between SDCT and LDCT suggest that AIDR 3D allows a 64.2% reduction of the radiation dose as compared to SDCT, by substantially reducing the objective image noise and increasing the SNR, while maintaining the overall diagnostic acceptability.

  9. Comparison of applied dose and image quality in staging CT of neuroendocrine tumor patients using standard filtered back projection and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böning, G; Schäfer, M; Grupp, U; Kaul, D; Kahn, J; Pavel, M; Maurer, M; Denecke, T; Hamm, B; Streitparth, F

    2015-08-01

    To investigate whether dose reduction via adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) affects image quality and diagnostic accuracy in neuroendocrine tumor (NET) staging. A total of 28 NET patients were enrolled in the study. Inclusion criteria were histologically proven NET and visible tumor in abdominal computed tomography (CT). In an intraindividual study design, the patients underwent a baseline CT (filtered back projection, FBP) and follow-up CT (ASIR 40%) using matched scan parameters. Image quality was assessed subjectively using a 5-grade scoring system and objectively by determining signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Applied volume computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) of each scan was taken from the dose report. ASIR 40% significantly reduced CTDIvol (10.17±3.06mGy [FBP], 6.34±2.25mGy [ASIR] (pASIR]) (pASIR]) (pASIR]), visibility of suspicious lesion (4.8±0.5 [FBP], 4.8±0.5 [ASIR]) and artifacts (5.0±0 [FBP], 5.0±0 [ASIR]). ASIR 40% significantly decreased scores for noise (4.3±0.6 [FBP], 4.0±0.8 [ASIR]) (pASIR]) (pASIR]) (pASIR can be used to reduce radiation dose without sacrificing image quality and diagnostic confidence in staging CT of NET patients. This may be beneficial for patients with frequent follow-up and significant cumulative radiation exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fetal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  11. Interventional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Junta; Dohi, Michiko; Yoshihiro, Akiko; Mogami, Takuji; Kuwada, Tomoko; Nakata, Norio [Jikei Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kashiwa Hospital

    2000-06-01

    Open type MR system and fast sequence is now available and MRI becomes a new modality for interventional Radiology, including biopsy, drainage operation, and monitoring for minimally invasive therapy. Experimental studies of temperature monitoring were performed under hot and cold status. Signal changes of porcine disc and meat under microwave and laser ablation were observed as low signal area by signal intensity method. Using proton chemical shift method, signal change by laser ablation was displaced color imaging and correlated with thermometric temperature measurement. The very T2 relaxation time of ice affords excellent contrast between ice and surrounding gelatin tissue allowing acute depiction of the extent of the iceball under MRI. (author)

  12. Fetal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C. [University Hospital of Vienna (Austria). Division of Neuroradiology

    2004-07-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  13. Evaluation of MRI and cannabinoid type 1 receptor PET templates constructed using DARTEL for spatial normalization of rat brains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronfeld, Andrea; Müller-Forell, Wibke; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Maus, Stephan; Reuss, Stefan; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Miederer, Isabelle; Lutz, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Image registration is one prerequisite for the analysis of brain regions in magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) or positron-emission-tomography (PET) studies. Diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) is a nonlinear, diffeomorphic algorithm for image registration and construction of image templates. The goal of this small animal study was (1) the evaluation of a MRI and calculation of several cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor PET templates constructed using DARTEL and (2) the analysis of the image registration accuracy of MR and PET images to their DARTEL templates with reference to analytical and iterative PET reconstruction algorithms. Methods: Five male Sprague Dawley rats were investigated for template construction using MRI and [ 18 F]MK-9470 PET for CB1 receptor representation. PET images were reconstructed using the algorithms filtered back-projection, ordered subset expectation maximization in 2D, and maximum a posteriori in 3D. Landmarks were defined on each MR image, and templates were constructed under different settings, i.e., based on different tissue class images [gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and GM + WM] and regularization forms (“linear elastic energy,” “membrane energy,” and “bending energy”). Registration accuracy for MRI and PET templates was evaluated by means of the distance between landmark coordinates. Results: The best MRI template was constructed based on gray and white matter images and the regularization form linear elastic energy. In this case, most distances between landmark coordinates were <1 mm. Accordingly, MRI-based spatial normalization was most accurate, but results of the PET-based spatial normalization were quite comparable. Conclusions: Image registration using DARTEL provides a standardized and automatic framework for small animal brain data analysis. The authors were able to show that this method works with high reliability and validity. Using DARTEL templates

  14. Evaluation of MRI and cannabinoid type 1 receptor PET templates constructed using DARTEL for spatial normalization of rat brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronfeld, Andrea; Müller-Forell, Wibke [Institute of Neuroradiology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Langenbeckstraße 1, Mainz 55131 (Germany); Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Maus, Stephan; Reuss, Stefan; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Miederer, Isabelle, E-mail: isabelle.miederer@unimedizin-mainz.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Langenbeckstraße 1, Mainz 55131 (Germany); Lutz, Beat [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Duesbergweg 6, Mainz 55128 (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Image registration is one prerequisite for the analysis of brain regions in magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) or positron-emission-tomography (PET) studies. Diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) is a nonlinear, diffeomorphic algorithm for image registration and construction of image templates. The goal of this small animal study was (1) the evaluation of a MRI and calculation of several cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor PET templates constructed using DARTEL and (2) the analysis of the image registration accuracy of MR and PET images to their DARTEL templates with reference to analytical and iterative PET reconstruction algorithms. Methods: Five male Sprague Dawley rats were investigated for template construction using MRI and [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 PET for CB1 receptor representation. PET images were reconstructed using the algorithms filtered back-projection, ordered subset expectation maximization in 2D, and maximum a posteriori in 3D. Landmarks were defined on each MR image, and templates were constructed under different settings, i.e., based on different tissue class images [gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and GM + WM] and regularization forms (“linear elastic energy,” “membrane energy,” and “bending energy”). Registration accuracy for MRI and PET templates was evaluated by means of the distance between landmark coordinates. Results: The best MRI template was constructed based on gray and white matter images and the regularization form linear elastic energy. In this case, most distances between landmark coordinates were <1 mm. Accordingly, MRI-based spatial normalization was most accurate, but results of the PET-based spatial normalization were quite comparable. Conclusions: Image registration using DARTEL provides a standardized and automatic framework for small animal brain data analysis. The authors were able to show that this method works with high reliability and validity. Using DARTEL

  15. TU-H-BRA-05: A System Design for Integration of An Interior MRI and a Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, W [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States); Wang, G [Rensselaer Polytechnic Instit., Troy, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: MRI is a highly desirable modality to guide radiation therapy but it is difficult to combine a conventional MRI scanner directly with a linear accelerator (linac). An interior MRI (iMRI) concept has been proposed to acquire MRI images within a small field of view only covering targets and immediate surrounding tissues. The objective of this project is to design an interior MRI system to work with a linac using a magnet to provide a field around 0.2T in a cube of 20cm per side, and perform image reconstruction with a slightly inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. Methods: All the results are simulated using a commercially available software package, FARADY. In our design, a ring structure holds the iMRI system and also imbeds a linac treatment head. The ring is synchronized to the linac gantry rotation. Half of the ring is made of steel and becomes a magnetic flux return path (yoke) so that a strong magnetic field will be limited inside the iron circuit and fringe fields will be very weak. In order to increase the static magnetic field homogeneity, special steel magnet boots or tips were simulated. Three curved boots were designed based on two-dimensional curves: arc, parabola and hyperbola. Results: Different boot surfaces modify magnetic field distributions differently. With the same pair of neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets, the magnetic induction at the centers are 0.217T, 0.201T, 0.204T, and 0.212T for flat, arc, parabola and hyperbola boots, respectively. The hyperbola boots lead to the most homogeneous results, the static magnetic field deviations are within 0.5% in a cube of 20cm, and can be further improved using shimming techniques. Conclusion: This study supports the concept of an iMRI design. Successful development of iMRI will provide crucial information for tumor delineation in radiation therapy.

  16. TU-H-BRA-05: A System Design for Integration of An Interior MRI and a Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, W; Wang, G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: MRI is a highly desirable modality to guide radiation therapy but it is difficult to combine a conventional MRI scanner directly with a linear accelerator (linac). An interior MRI (iMRI) concept has been proposed to acquire MRI images within a small field of view only covering targets and immediate surrounding tissues. The objective of this project is to design an interior MRI system to work with a linac using a magnet to provide a field around 0.2T in a cube of 20cm per side, and perform image reconstruction with a slightly inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. Methods: All the results are simulated using a commercially available software package, FARADY. In our design, a ring structure holds the iMRI system and also imbeds a linac treatment head. The ring is synchronized to the linac gantry rotation. Half of the ring is made of steel and becomes a magnetic flux return path (yoke) so that a strong magnetic field will be limited inside the iron circuit and fringe fields will be very weak. In order to increase the static magnetic field homogeneity, special steel magnet boots or tips were simulated. Three curved boots were designed based on two-dimensional curves: arc, parabola and hyperbola. Results: Different boot surfaces modify magnetic field distributions differently. With the same pair of neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets, the magnetic induction at the centers are 0.217T, 0.201T, 0.204T, and 0.212T for flat, arc, parabola and hyperbola boots, respectively. The hyperbola boots lead to the most homogeneous results, the static magnetic field deviations are within 0.5% in a cube of 20cm, and can be further improved using shimming techniques. Conclusion: This study supports the concept of an iMRI design. Successful development of iMRI will provide crucial information for tumor delineation in radiation therapy.

  17. MRI of anterior cruciate ligament autografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogi, Shigeyuki; Ariizumi, Mitsuko; Yamagishi, Tsuneo; Agata, Toshihiko; Tada, Shinpei; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of MRI in the evaluation of autografts after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects were 110 patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using patellar tendon autografts who underwent clinical examination, MRI, and arthroscopy of the knee. T1- and T2-weighted MR images were obtained in sagittal plane. Clinical findings were categorized into three groups: normal, borderline, and abnormal. The MRI appearances of the autografts were categorized into three types: straight continuous band (type I), interrupted band (type II) and generalized increased intensity band (type III). The clinical findings and MRI findings were compared with arthroscopic findings. Ninety-six percent of the type I showed no autograft tear on arthroscopy. In comparison with the clinical findings, MRI was found to be well correlated with arthroscopic findings. In conclusion, if the clinical findings are normal, patients are to be followed-up without MRI and arthroscopy. However, if clinical findings are either borderline or abnormal, MRI should be performed prior to arthroscopy. (author)

  18. Anatomy-based reconstruction of FDG-PET images with implicit partial volume correction improves detection of hypometabolic regions in patients with epilepsy due to focal cortical dysplasia diagnosed on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goffin, Karolien; Baete, Kristof; Nuyts, Johan; Laere, Koen van; Van Paesschen, Wim; Dupont, Patrick; Palmini, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Detection of hypometabolic areas on interictal FDG-PET images for assessing the epileptogenic zone is hampered by partial volume effects. We evaluated the performance of an anatomy-based maximum a-posteriori (A-MAP) reconstruction algorithm which combined noise suppression with correction for the partial volume effect in the detection of hypometabolic areas in patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). FDG-PET images from 14 patients with refractory partial epilepsy were reconstructed using A-MAP and maximum likelihood (ML) reconstruction. In all patients, presurgical evaluation showed that FCD represented the epileptic lesion. Correspondence between the FCD location and regional metabolism on a predefined atlas was evaluated. An asymmetry index of FCD to normal cortex was calculated. Hypometabolism at the FCD location was detected in 9/14 patients (64%) using ML and in 10/14 patients (71%) using A-MAP reconstruction. Hypometabolic areas outside the FCD location were detected in 12/14 patients (86%) using ML and in 11/14 patients (79%) using A-MAP reconstruction. The asymmetry index was higher using A-MAP reconstruction (0.61, ML 0.49, p=0.03). The A-MAP reconstruction algorithm improved visual detection of epileptic FCD on brain FDG-PET images compared to ML reconstruction, due to higher contrast and better delineation of the lesion. This improvement failed to reach significance in our small sample. Hypometabolism outside the lesion is often present, consistent with the observation that the functional deficit zone tends to be larger than the epileptogenic zone. (orig.)

  19. Anatomy-based reconstruction of FDG-PET images with implicit partial volume correction improves detection of hypometabolic regions in patients with epilepsy due to focal cortical dysplasia diagnosed on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goffin, Karolien; Baete, Kristof; Nuyts, Johan; Laere, Koen van [University Hospital Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Center, Leuven (Belgium); Van Paesschen, Wim [University Hospital Leuven, Neurology Department, Leuven (Belgium); Dupont, Patrick [University Hospital Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Center, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospital Leuven, Laboratory of Cognitive Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); Palmini, Andre [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre Epilepsy Surgery Program, Hospital Sao Lucas, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2010-06-15

    Detection of hypometabolic areas on interictal FDG-PET images for assessing the epileptogenic zone is hampered by partial volume effects. We evaluated the performance of an anatomy-based maximum a-posteriori (A-MAP) reconstruction algorithm which combined noise suppression with correction for the partial volume effect in the detection of hypometabolic areas in patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). FDG-PET images from 14 patients with refractory partial epilepsy were reconstructed using A-MAP and maximum likelihood (ML) reconstruction. In all patients, presurgical evaluation showed that FCD represented the epileptic lesion. Correspondence between the FCD location and regional metabolism on a predefined atlas was evaluated. An asymmetry index of FCD to normal cortex was calculated. Hypometabolism at the FCD location was detected in 9/14 patients (64%) using ML and in 10/14 patients (71%) using A-MAP reconstruction. Hypometabolic areas outside the FCD location were detected in 12/14 patients (86%) using ML and in 11/14 patients (79%) using A-MAP reconstruction. The asymmetry index was higher using A-MAP reconstruction (0.61, ML 0.49, p=0.03). The A-MAP reconstruction algorithm improved visual detection of epileptic FCD on brain FDG-PET images compared to ML reconstruction, due to higher contrast and better delineation of the lesion. This improvement failed to reach significance in our small sample. Hypometabolism outside the lesion is often present, consistent with the observation that the functional deficit zone tends to be larger than the epileptogenic zone. (orig.)

  20. MRI measurement for inner ear structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shuling; Liu Huaijun; Chi Chen; Qin Ruiping; Shi Zhaoxia

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To reconstruct the image of inner ear by using 3D-FASE heavily T 2 WI, and to establish MRI measurement criterion of inner ear structures. Methods: One hundred and six inner ears of 53 healthy volunteers underwent MRI heavily T2-weighted axial scanning by using 3D fast advanced spin echo sequence. All the original images were transferred to an online workstation. Analyze AVW software was used for image post-processing. All the structures of inner ear were reconstructed, rotated from various angles and measured by using maximum intensity projection (MIP). Results: (1) All the structures of inner ear and internal auditory channel (IAC) could be visualized clearly by using 3D-FASE heavily T 2 WI. (2) Using analysis of variance, there was no age, side or race-related difference in inner ear volume, but it was bigger in male than in female [(0.242 ± 0.0236) mm 3 (male) versus (0.226 ± 0.021) mm 3 (female)]. There was no age, side-related differences in three semicircular canal height and vestibule vertical diameter, but, again, they were bigger in male than in female. The height of upper, lateral and posterior semicircular canal were (5.511 ± 0.626) mm (male) versus (5.167 ± 0.357) mm (female); (3.763 ± 0.495) mm (male) versus (3.446 ± 0.405) mm (female); (5.227 ± 0.547) mm (male) versus (4.786 ± 0.500) mm (female). There was no age, sex or side-related differences in three semicircular canal diameter and cochlea. The diameter of upper, lateral and posterior semicircular canal were (1.06 ± 0.119) mm, (1.14 ± 0.181) mm, and (1.22 ± 0.196)mm; the external diameter of cochlea basal turn was (6.520 ± 0.475) mm, the diameter of cochlea basal turn was (1.413 ± 0.144) mm, and cochlea height was (4.100 ± 0.405) mm. Conclusion: (1) For the first time, the MRI measurement criterion of inner ear structures is established. (2) Vestibule and three semicircular canal of inner ear are bigger in male than in female

  1. Climate Reconstructions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Paleoclimatology Program archives reconstructions of past climatic conditions derived from paleoclimate proxies, in addition to the Program's large holdings...

  2. Projectables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Troels A.; Merritt, Timothy R.

    2017-01-01

    CNC cutting machines have become essential tools for designers and architects enabling rapid prototyping, model-building and production of high quality components. Designers often cut from new materials, discarding the irregularly shaped remains. We introduce ProjecTables, a visual augmented...... reality system for interactive packing of model parts onto sheet materials. ProjecTables enables designers to (re)use scrap materials for CNC cutting that would have been previously thrown away, at the same time supporting aesthetic choices related to wood grain, avoiding surface blemishes, and other...... relevant material properties. We conducted evaluations of ProjecTables with design students from Aarhus School of Architecture, demonstrating that participants could quickly and easily place and orient model parts reducing material waste. Contextual interviews and ideation sessions led to a deeper...

  3. Impact of hybrid iterative reconstruction on Agatston coronary artery calcium scores in comparison to filtered back projection in native cardiac CT; Einfluss der hybriden iterativen Rekonstruktion bei der nativen CT des Herzens auf die Agatston-Kalziumscores der Koronararterien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obmann, V.C.; Heverhagen, J.T. [Inselspital - University Hospital Bern (Switzerland). University Inst. for Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology; Klink, T. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Stork, A.; Begemann, P.G.C. [Roentgeninstitut Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf (Germany); Laqmani, A.; Adam, G. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2015-05-15

    To investigate whether the effects of hybrid iterative reconstruction (HIR) on coronary artery calcium (CAC) measurements using the Agatston score lead to changes in assignment of patients to cardiovascular risk groups compared to filtered back projection (FBP). 68 patients (mean age 61.5 years; 48 male; 20 female) underwent prospectively ECG-gated, non-enhanced, cardiac 256-MSCT for coronary calcium scoring. Scanning parameters were as follows: Tube voltage, 120 kV; Mean tube current time-product 63.67 mAs (50 - 150 mAs); collimation, 2 x 128 x 0.625 mm. Images were reconstructed with FBP and with HIR at all levels (L1 to L7). Two independent readers measured Agatston scores of all reconstructions and assigned patients to cardiovascular risk groups. Scores of HIR and FBP reconstructions were correlated (Spearman). Interobserver agreement and variability was assessed with k-statistics and Bland-Altmann-Plots. Agatston scores of HIR reconstructions were closely correlated with FBP reconstructions (L1, R = 0.9996; L2, R = 0.9995; L3, R = 0.9991; L4, R = 0.986; L5, R = 0.9986; L6, R = 0.9987; and L7, R = 0.9986). In comparison to FBP, HIR led to reduced Agatston scores between 97% (L1) and 87.4% (L7) of the FBP values. Using HIR iterations L1-L3, all patients were assigned to identical risk groups as after FPB reconstruction. In 5.4% of patients the risk group after HIR with the maximum iteration level was different from the group after FBP reconstruction. There was an excellent correlation of Agatston scores after HIR and FBP with identical risk group assignment at levels 1 - 3 for all patients. Hence it appears that the application of HIR in routine calcium scoring does not entail any disadvantages. Thus, future studies are needed to demonstrate whether HIR is a reliable method for reducing radiation dose in coronary calcium scoring.

  4. MRI angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncelet, B.; Baleriiaux, D.; struyven, J.; Segebarth, C.

    1989-01-01

    In MRI angiography two basis images are measured which only differ by the signal intensity of the flowing blood in the vessels. Subtraction of these two images produces a high contrast-to-noise representation of the vessels. Contrast between stationary tissues and flowing blood is changed, for one image compared to the second one, using a selective modification of the phase of the signal from the flowing blood, and/or using a selective modification of its longitudinal magnetization: The macroscopic spin motions along the selection and the measurement gradient directions affect the phase of the nuclear signal; assuming constant velocity, the phase is proportional to the velocity and to the first moment of the gradient waveforms applied. This work concentrates on the generarion of MRI angiograms, following a phase-based approach, of the carotid bifurcation and of different intracranical regions including the carotid syphon and the circle of Willis. (author). 21 refs.; 3 figs

  5. MRI zoo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    The basic idea was to use MRI to produce a sequence of 3D gray scale image slices of various animals, subsequentlyimaged with a clinical CT system. For this purpose, these animals were used: toad, lungfish, python snake and a horseshoe crab. Each animal was sacrificed according to standard...... visually inspected, both in 2D and 3D, and compared with photographs and anatomy atlases found at library and on the internet....

  6. Compressed sensing along physically plausible sampling trajectories in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauffert, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    . First, we propose continuous sampling schemes based on random walks and on travelling salesman (TSP) problem. Then, we propose a projection algorithm onto the space of constraints that returns the closest feasible curve of an input curve (eg, a TSP solution). Finally, we provide an algorithm to project a measure onto a set of measures carried by parameterizations. In particular, if this set is the one carried by admissible curves, the algorithm returns a curve which sampling density is close to the measure to project. This designs an admissible variable density sampler. The reconstruction results obtained in simulations using this strategy outperform existing acquisition trajectories (spiral, radial) by about 3 dB. They permit to envision a future implementation on a real 7 T scanner soon, notably in the context of high resolution anatomical imaging. (author) [fr

  7. Simultaneous auto-calibration and gradient delays estimation (SAGE) in non-Cartesian parallel MRI using low-rank constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenwen; Larson, Peder E Z; Lustig, Michael

    2018-03-09

    To correct gradient timing delays in non-Cartesian MRI while simultaneously recovering corruption-free auto-calibration data for parallel imaging, without additional calibration scans. The calibration matrix constructed from multi-channel k-space data should be inherently low-rank. This property is used to construct reconstruction kernels or sensitivity maps. Delays between the gradient hardware across different axes and RF receive chain, which are relatively benign in Cartesian MRI (excluding EPI), lead to trajectory deviations and hence data inconsistencies for non-Cartesian trajectories. These in turn lead to higher rank and corrupted calibration information which hampers the reconstruction. Here, a method named Simultaneous Auto-calibration and Gradient delays Estimation (SAGE) is proposed that estimates the actual k-space trajectory while simultaneously recovering the uncorrupted auto-calibration data. This is done by estimating the gradient delays that result in the lowest rank of the calibration matrix. The Gauss-Newton method is used to solve the non-linear problem. The method is validated in simulations using center-out radial, projection reconstruction and spiral trajectories. Feasibility is demonstrated on phantom and in vivo scans with center-out radial and projection reconstruction trajectories. SAGE is able to estimate gradient timing delays with high accuracy at a signal to noise ratio level as low as 5. The method is able to effectively remove artifacts resulting from gradient timing delays and restore image quality in center-out radial, projection reconstruction, and spiral trajectories. The low-rank based method introduced simultaneously estimates gradient timing delays and provides accurate auto-calibration data for improved image quality, without any additional calibration scans. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Vaginal reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesavoy, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Vaginal reconstruction can be an uncomplicated and straightforward procedure when attention to detail is maintained. The Abbe-McIndoe procedure of lining the neovaginal canal with split-thickness skin grafts has become standard. The use of the inflatable Heyer-Schulte vaginal stent provides comfort to the patient and ease to the surgeon in maintaining approximation of the skin graft. For large vaginal and perineal defects, myocutaneous flaps such as the gracilis island have been extremely useful for correction of radiation-damaged tissue of the perineum or for the reconstruction of large ablative defects. Minimal morbidity and scarring ensue because the donor site can be closed primarily. With all vaginal reconstruction, a compliant patient is a necessity. The patient must wear a vaginal obturator for a minimum of 3 to 6 months postoperatively and is encouraged to use intercourse as an excellent obturator. In general, vaginal reconstruction can be an extremely gratifying procedure for both the functional and emotional well-being of patients

  9. ACL Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in moderate exercise and recreational activities, or play sports that put less stress on the knees. ACL reconstruction is generally recommended if: You're an athlete and want to continue in your sport, especially if the sport involves jumping, cutting or ...

  10. MR image reconstruction via guided filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Heyan; Yang, Hang; Wang, Kang

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reconstruction from the smallest possible set of Fourier samples has been a difficult problem in medical imaging field. In our paper, we present a new approach based on a guided filter for efficient MRI recovery algorithm. The guided filter is an edge-preserving smoothing operator and has better behaviors near edges than the bilateral filter. Our reconstruction method is consist of two steps. First, we propose two cost functions which could be computed efficiently and thus obtain two different images. Second, the guided filter is used with these two obtained images for efficient edge-preserving filtering, and one image is used as the guidance image, the other one is used as a filtered image in the guided filter. In our reconstruction algorithm, we can obtain more details by introducing guided filter. We compare our reconstruction algorithm with some competitive MRI reconstruction techniques in terms of PSNR and visual quality. Simulation results are given to show the performance of our new method.

  11. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... affecting the MRI images, these objects can become projectiles within the MRI scanner room and may cause ... MRI has proven valuable in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  13. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ... size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  17. Play the MRI Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teachers' Questionnaire MRI Play MRI the Magnetic Miracle Game About the game In the MRI imaging technique, strong magnets and ... last will in Paris. Play the Blood Typing Game Try to save some patients and learn about ...

  18. Comparison of Biomarkers in Transgenic Alzheimer Rats Using Multi-shell Diffusion MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Fick , Rutger ,; Daianu , Madelaine; Pizzolato , Marco; Wassermann , Demian; Jacobs , Russel E.; Thompson , Paul M.; Town , Terrence; Deriche , Rachid

    2016-01-01

    International audience; In this study, we assessed the evolution of diffusion MRI (dMRI) derived markers from different white matter models as progressive neurodegeneration occurs in transgenic Alzheimer rats (TgF344-AD) at 10, 15 and 24 months. We compared biomarkers reconstructed from Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), Neurite Orientation Dispersion and Density Imaging (NODDI) and Mean Apparent Propagator (MAP)-MRI in the hippocampus, cingulate cortex and corpus callosum using multi-shell dMRI...

  19. Role of MRI in the evaluation of ambiguous genitalia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Secaf, E [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States) Dept. de Radiologia, Faculdade de Medicina da Univ. de Sao Paulo (Brazil); Hricak, H [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States) Dept. of Urology, Univ. of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Gooding, C A [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States) Dept. of Pediatrics, Univ. of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ho, V W [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Gorczyca, D P [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States) Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ringertz, H [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Conte, F A [Dept. of Pediatr

    1994-08-01

    Diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) interpretation was assessed prospectively in patients with ambiguous genitalia or intersex problems. MRI depiction of the uterus was possible in 93 %, the vagina in 95 %, the penis in 100 %, the testis in 88 %, and the ovary in 74 % of patients. The strength of MRI lies in the multiplanar capability and tissue characterization by means of T1- and T2-weighted sequences. MRI contributes to accurate morphologic evaluation of muellerian duct structures, the gonads, and the development of the phallus, all of which are essential for appropriate gender assignment and planning of surgical reconstruction. (orig.)

  20. 2015 MICCAI Workshop on Computational Diffusion MRI

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Aurobrata; Kaden, Enrico; Rathi, Yogesh; Reisert, Marco

    2016-01-01

    These Proceedings of the 2015 MICCAI Workshop “Computational Diffusion MRI” offer a snapshot of the current state of the art on a broad range of topics within the highly active and growing field of diffusion MRI. The topics vary from fundamental theoretical work on mathematical modeling, to the development and evaluation of robust algorithms, new computational methods applied to diffusion magnetic resonance imaging data, and applications in neuroscientific studies and clinical practice. Over the last decade interest in diffusion MRI has exploded. The technique provides unique insights into the microstructure of living tissue and enables in-vivo connectivity mapping of the brain. Computational techniques are key to the continued success and development of diffusion MRI and to its widespread transfer into clinical practice. New processing methods are essential for addressing issues at each stage of the diffusion MRI pipeline: acquisition, reconstruction, modeling and model fitting, image processing, fiber t...

  1. A single-mode data acquisition architecture for PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sportelli, Giancarlo; Belcari, Nicola; Bisogni, Maria Giuseppina; Camarlinghi, Niccolo; Zaccaro, Emanuele; Del Guerra, Alberto [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy)

    2015-05-18

    The development of MRI compatible detectors based on compact solid state photomultipliers has recently led to simultaneous fully integrated PET/MRI systems for human imaging. The PET acquisition design for MRI integration is known to have several additional constraints, including smaller space, electromagnetic compatibility issues and thermal management. The current work presents the PET acquisition architecture that has been developed for the TRIMAGE project, whose aim is to provide a cost effective, commercial grade trimodality PET/MRI/EEG scanner. The TRIMAGE PET component consists of 216 modules of 2.5 cm x 2.5 cm, arranged in 18 rectangular detectors of 5 cm x 15 cm, the latter in the axial direction, to form a full ring of 31 cm diameter. Each module consists of a staggered dual layer LYSO matrix read out by two arrays of 4 x 8 SiPMs and an ASIC. The detector board hosts a low-power low-end FPGA that performs pixel identification, energy calibration and handles the communication between the ASICs and the motherboard, which is located in proximity of the scanner. Data is streamed using high-density shielded cables and high-speed LVDS transmission to 9 low-end SoC FPGAs and from there to a central mainboard where coincidences and events statistics are processed. Coincidence data is finally transmitted to a host PC for image reconstruction. The proposed architecture and technological solutions will be presented and discussed.

  2. A single-mode data acquisition architecture for PET/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sportelli, Giancarlo; Belcari, Nicola; Bisogni, Maria Giuseppina; Camarlinghi, Niccolo; Zaccaro, Emanuele; Del Guerra, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The development of MRI compatible detectors based on compact solid state photomultipliers has recently led to simultaneous fully integrated PET/MRI systems for human imaging. The PET acquisition design for MRI integration is known to have several additional constraints, including smaller space, electromagnetic compatibility issues and thermal management. The current work presents the PET acquisition architecture that has been developed for the TRIMAGE project, whose aim is to provide a cost effective, commercial grade trimodality PET/MRI/EEG scanner. The TRIMAGE PET component consists of 216 modules of 2.5 cm x 2.5 cm, arranged in 18 rectangular detectors of 5 cm x 15 cm, the latter in the axial direction, to form a full ring of 31 cm diameter. Each module consists of a staggered dual layer LYSO matrix read out by two arrays of 4 x 8 SiPMs and an ASIC. The detector board hosts a low-power low-end FPGA that performs pixel identification, energy calibration and handles the communication between the ASICs and the motherboard, which is located in proximity of the scanner. Data is streamed using high-density shielded cables and high-speed LVDS transmission to 9 low-end SoC FPGAs and from there to a central mainboard where coincidences and events statistics are processed. Coincidence data is finally transmitted to a host PC for image reconstruction. The proposed architecture and technological solutions will be presented and discussed.

  3. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  4. Iterative reconstruction technique vs filter back projection: utility for quantitative bronchial assessment on low-dose thin-section MDCT in patients with/without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Hisanobu; Seki, Shinichiro; Sugimura, Kazuro [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiharu; Nishio, Mizuho; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Yoshikawa, Takeshi [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Centre, Kobe (Japan); Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe (Japan); Sugihara, Naoki [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Ohtawara, Tochigi (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of the iterative reconstruction (IR) technique for quantitative bronchial assessment during low-dose computed tomography (CT) as a substitute for standard-dose CT in patients with/without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Fifty patients (mean age, 69.2; mean % predicted FEV1, 79.4) underwent standard-dose CT (150mAs) and low-dose CT (25mAs). Except for tube current, the imaging parameters were identical for both protocols. Standard-dose CT was reconstructed using filtered back-projection (FBP), and low-dose CT was reconstructed using IR and FBP. For quantitative bronchial assessment, the wall area percentage (WA%) of the sub-segmental bronchi and the airway luminal volume percentage (LV%) from the main bronchus to the peripheral bronchi were acquired in each dataset. The correlation and agreement of WA% and LV% between standard-dose CT and both low-dose CTs were statistically evaluated. WA% and LV% between standard-dose CT and both low-dose CTs were significant correlated (r > 0.77, p < 0.00001); however, only the LV% agreement between SD-CT and low-dose CT reconstructed with IR was moderate (concordance correlation coefficient = 0.93); the other agreement was poor (concordance correlation coefficient <0.90). Quantitative bronchial assessment via low-dose CT has potential as a substitute for standard-dose CT by using IR and airway luminal volumetry techniques. circle Quantitative bronchial assessment of COPD using low-dose CT is possible. (orig.)

  5. Compressively sampled MR image reconstruction using generalized thresholding iterative algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Sana; kaleem, Muhammad; Omer, Hammad

    2018-01-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) is an emerging area of interest in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). CS is used for the reconstruction of the images from a very limited number of samples in k-space. This significantly reduces the MRI data acquisition time. One important requirement for signal recovery in CS is the use of an appropriate non-linear reconstruction algorithm. It is a challenging task to choose a reconstruction algorithm that would accurately reconstruct the MR images from the under-sampled k-space data. Various algorithms have been used to solve the system of non-linear equations for better image quality and reconstruction speed in CS. In the recent past, iterative soft thresholding algorithm (ISTA) has been introduced in CS-MRI. This algorithm directly cancels the incoherent artifacts produced because of the undersampling in k -space. This paper introduces an improved iterative algorithm based on p -thresholding technique for CS-MRI image reconstruction. The use of p -thresholding function promotes sparsity in the image which is a key factor for CS based image reconstruction. The p -thresholding based iterative algorithm is a modification of ISTA, and minimizes non-convex functions. It has been shown that the proposed p -thresholding iterative algorithm can be used effectively to recover fully sampled image from the under-sampled data in MRI. The performance of the proposed method is verified using simulated and actual MRI data taken at St. Mary's Hospital, London. The quality of the reconstructed images is measured in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), artifact power (AP), and structural similarity index measure (SSIM). The proposed approach shows improved performance when compared to other iterative algorithms based on log thresholding, soft thresholding and hard thresholding techniques at different reduction factors.

  6. Maxillary reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown James

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to discuss the various defects that occur with maxillectomy with a full review of the literature and discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques described. Reconstruction of the maxilla can be relatively simple for the standard low maxillectomy that does not involve the orbital floor (Class 2. In this situation the structure of the face is less damaged and the there are multiple reconstructive options for the restoration of the maxilla and dental alveolus. If the maxillectomy includes the orbit (Class 4 then problems involving the eye (enopthalmos, orbital dystopia, ectropion and diplopia are avoided which simplifies the reconstruction. Most controversy is associated with the maxillectomy that involves the orbital floor and dental alveolus (Class 3. A case is made for the use of the iliac crest with internal oblique as an ideal option but there are other methods, which may provide a similar result. A multidisciplinary approach to these patients is emphasised which should include a prosthodontist with a special expertise for these defects.

  7. MO-DE-201-03: This course presents a review of radiologic anatomy and physiology as it applies to projection radiography, fluoroscopy, CT, MRI, U/S, and nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahey, F.

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental knowledge of radiologic anatomy and physiology is critical for medical physicists. Many physicists are exposed to this topic only in graduate school, and knowledge is seldom formally evaluated or assessed after Part I of the ABR exam. Successful interactions with clinicians, including surgeons, radiologists, and oncologists requires that the medical physicist possess this knowledge. This course presents a review of radiologic anatomy and physiology as it applies to projection radiography, fluoroscopy, CT, MRI, U/S, and nuclear medicine. We will review structural anatomy, manipulation of tissue contrast, the marriage between anatomy and physiology, and explore how medical imaging exploits normal and pathological processes in the body to generate contrast. Learning Objectives: Review radiologic anatomy. Examine techniques to manipulate tissue contrast in radiology. Integrate anatomy and physiology in molecular imaging

  8. MO-DE-201-03: This course presents a review of radiologic anatomy and physiology as it applies to projection radiography, fluoroscopy, CT, MRI, U/S, and nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahey, F.

    2015-06-15

    Fundamental knowledge of radiologic anatomy and physiology is critical for medical physicists. Many physicists are exposed to this topic only in graduate school, and knowledge is seldom formally evaluated or assessed after Part I of the ABR exam. Successful interactions with clinicians, including surgeons, radiologists, and oncologists requires that the medical physicist possess this knowledge. This course presents a review of radiologic anatomy and physiology as it applies to projection radiography, fluoroscopy, CT, MRI, U/S, and nuclear medicine. We will review structural anatomy, manipulation of tissue contrast, the marriage between anatomy and physiology, and explore how medical imaging exploits normal and pathological processes in the body to generate contrast. Learning Objectives: Review radiologic anatomy. Examine techniques to manipulate tissue contrast in radiology. Integrate anatomy and physiology in molecular imaging.

  9. Fast Tomographic Reconstruction From Limited Data Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.M. Pelt (Daniël); K.J. Batenburg (Joost)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractImage reconstruction from a small number of projections is a challenging problem in tomography. Advanced algorithms that incorporate prior knowledge can sometimes produce accurate reconstructions, but they typically require long computation times. Furthermore, the required prior

  10. Integrated variable projection approach (IVAPA) for parallel magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiao; Sheng, Jinhua

    2012-10-01

    Parallel magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI) is a fast method which requires algorithms for the reconstructing image from a small number of measured k-space lines. The accurate estimation of the coil sensitivity functions is still a challenging problem in parallel imaging. The joint estimation of the coil sensitivity functions and the desired image has recently been proposed to improve the situation by iteratively optimizing both the coil sensitivity functions and the image reconstruction. It regards both the coil sensitivities and the desired images as unknowns to be solved for jointly. In this paper, we propose an integrated variable projection approach (IVAPA) for pMRI, which integrates two individual processing steps (coil sensitivity estimation and image reconstruction) into a single processing step to improve the accuracy of the coil sensitivity estimation using the variable projection approach. The method is demonstrated to be able to give an optimal solution with considerably reduced artifacts for high reduction factors and a low number of auto-calibration signal (ACS) lines, and our implementation has a fast convergence rate. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated using a set of in vivo experiment data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Dosimetric comparison of different dose prescription systems with CT based intracavitary brachytherapy and manual back projection technique to reconstruct the applicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oinam, A.S.; Dubey, S.; Kehwar, T.S.; Rout, Sanjaya K.; Patel, F.D.; Sharma, S.C.; Goyal, D.R.; Narayan, P.

    2002-01-01

    Intracavitary brachytherapy is one of the well-established techniques for the treatment of carcinoma of cervix. The prediction of late effect of normal tissue like rectum and bladder needs the defining of the volume of the bladder and rectum in situ. In the normal planning of intracavitary and interstitial implants, simulated radiograph films are used to reconstruct the applicator geometry and dose points to represent the dose to critical organs. CT based brachytherapy can define such volume instead of defining dose points, which represent the dose to these critical organs

  12. Future changes in tropical cyclone activity projected by multi-physics and multi-SST ensemble experiments using the 60-km-mesh MRI-AGCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Hiroyuki [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC)/Meteorological Research Institute (MRI), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); University of Hawaii at Manoa, International Pacific Research Center, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, Honolulu, Hawaii (United States); Mizuta, Ryo; Shindo, Eiki [Meteorological Research Institute (MRI), Climate Research Department, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Uncertainties in projected future changes in tropical cyclone (TC) activity are investigated using future (2075-2099) ensemble projections of global warming under the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) A1B scenario. Twelve ensemble experiments are performed using three different cumulus convection schemes and four different assumptions for prescribed future sea surface temperatures (SSTs). All ensemble experiments consistently project significant reductions in global and hemispheric TC genesis numbers as well as reductions in TC frequency of occurrence (TCF) and TC genesis frequency (TGF) in the western North Pacific, South Indian Ocean, and South Pacific Ocean. TCF and TGF are projected to increase over the central Pacific which is consistent with the findings of Li et al. (2010). Inter-experimental variations of projected future changes in TGF and TC genesis number are caused mainly by differences in large-scale dynamical parameters and SST anomalies. Thermodynamic parameters are of secondary importance for variations in TGF and TC genesis number. These results imply that differences in SST spatial patterns can cause substantial variations and uncertainties in projected future changes of TGF and TC numbers at ocean-basin scales. (orig.)

  13. Whole-body MRI screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puls, Ralf [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology; Hosten, Norbert (ed.) [Universitaetsklinikum Greifswald (Germany). Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology

    2014-07-01

    The advent of dedicated whole-body MRI scanners has made it possible to image the human body from head to toe with excellent spatial resolution and with the sensitivity and specificity of conventional MR systems. A comprehensive screening examination by MRI relies on fast image acquisition, and this is now feasible owing to several very recent developments, including multichannel techniques, new surface coil systems, and automatic table movement. The daily analysis of whole-body MRI datasets uncovers many incidental findings, which are discussed by an interdisciplinary advisory board of physicians from all specialties. This book provides a systematic overview of these incidental findings with the aid of approximately 240 high-quality images. The radiologists involved in the project have written chapters on each organ system, presenting a structured compilation of the most common findings, their morphologic appearances on whole-body MRI, and guidance on their clinical management. Chapters on technical and ethical issues are also included. It is hoped that this book will assist other diagnosticians in deciding how to handle the most common incidental findings encountered when performing whole-body MRI.

  14. Whole-body MRI screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puls, Ralf; Hosten, N