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Sample records for project plan remedial

  1. Strategic planning for remediation projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapp, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    Remediation projects may range from a single leaking storage tank to an entire plant complex or producing oil and gas field. Strategic planning comes into play when the contamination of soil and groundwater is extensive. If adjacent landowners have been impacted or the community at large is concerned about the quality of drinking water, then strategic planning is even more important. (1) To manage highly complex interrelated issues--for example, the efforts expended on community relations can alter public opinion, which can impact regulatory agency decisions that affect cleanup standards, which can...and so on. (2) To ensure that all potential liabilities are managed--for example, preparation for the defense of future lawsuits is essential during site investigation and remediation. (3) To communicate with senior management--when the remediation team provides a strategic plan that includes both technical and business issues, senior management has the opportunity to become more involved and make sound policy decisions. The following discusses the elements of a strategic plan, who should participate in it, and the issues that should be considered

  2. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project surface project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This Project Management Plan describes the planning, systems, and organization that shall be used to manage the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). US DOE is authorized to stabilize and control surface tailings and ground water contamination at 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials

  3. Tank Waste Remediation System Projects Document Control Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, G.D.; Halverson, T.G.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this Tank Waste Remediation System Projects Document Control Plan is to provide requirements and responsibilities for document control for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project and the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM) Project

  4. Remedial action and waste disposal project: 100-B/C remedial action readiness evaluation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    April, J.G.; Bryant, D.L.; Cislo, G.B.

    1996-06-01

    The Readiness Evaluation Plan presents the methodology used to assess the readiness of the 100-B/C Remedial Action Project. The 100 Areas Remedial Action Project will remediate the 100 Areas liquid waste site identified in the Interim Action Record of Decision for the 100- BC-1, 100-DR-1, and 100-HR-1 Operable Units. These sites are located in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington

  5. Remedial action and waste disposal project: 100-DR-1 remedial action readiness evaluation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    April, J.G.; Bryant, D.L.; Calverley, C.

    1996-08-01

    This plan presents the method used to assess the readiness of the 100- DR-1 Remedial Action Project. Remediation of the 100-D sites (located on the Hanford Site) involves the excavation (treatment if applicable) and final disposal of contaminated soil and debris associated with the high-priority waste sites in the 100 Areas

  6. Remedial action and waste disposal project -- 300-FF-1 remedial action readiness assessment plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    April, J.G.; Carlson, R.A.; Greif, A.A.; Johnson, C.R.; Orewiler, R.I.; Perry, D.M.; Plastino, J.C.; Roeck, F.V.; Tuttle, B.G.

    1997-04-01

    This Readiness Assessment Plan presents the methodology used to assess the readiness of the 300-FF-1 Remedial Action Project. Remediation involves the excavation, treatment if applicable, and final disposal of contaminated soil and debris associated with the waste sites in the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. The scope of the 300-FF-1 remediation is to excavate, transport, and dispose of contaminated solid from sites identified in the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit

  7. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project environmental protection implementation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP is updated annually. This version covers the time period of 9 November 1994, through 8 November 1995. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies

  8. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project environmental protection implementation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP is updated annually. This version covers the time period of 9 November 1994, through 8 November 1995. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies.

  9. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollmer, A.T.

    1993-10-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP covers the time period of November 9, 1993, through November 8, 1994. It will be updated annually. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies. Contents of this report are: (1) general description of the UMTRA project environmental protection program; (2) notifications; (3) planning and reporting; (4) special programs; (5) environmental monitoring programs; (6) quality assurance and data verification; and (7) references

  10. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, A.T.

    1993-10-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP covers the time period of November 9, 1993, through November 8, 1994. It will be updated annually. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies. Contents of this report are: (1) general description of the UMTRA project environmental protection program; (2) notifications; (3) planning and reporting; (4) special programs; (5) environmental monitoring programs; (6) quality assurance and data verification; and (7) references.

  11. Tank Waste Remediation System Characterization Project Programmatic Risk Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baide, D.G.; Webster, T.L.

    1995-12-01

    The TWRS Characterization Project has developed a process and plan in order to identify, manage and control the risks associated with tank waste characterization activities. The result of implementing this process is a defined list of programmatic risks (i.e. a risk management list) that are used by the Project as management tool. This concept of risk management process is a commonly used systems engineering approach which is being applied to all TWRS program and project elements. The Characterization Project risk management plan and list are subset of the overall TWRS risk management plan and list

  12. Uranium mill tailings remedial action project real estate management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This plan summarizes the real estate requirements of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Action (UMTRA) Project, identifies the roles and responsibilities of project participants involved in real estate activities, and describes the approaches used for completing these requirements. This document is intended to serve as a practical guide for all project participants. It is intended to be consistent with all formal agreements, but if a conflict is identified, the formal agreements will take precedence

  13. Uranium mill tailings remedial action project real estate management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This plan summarizes the real estate requirements of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Action (UMTRA) Project, identifies the roles and responsibilities of project participants involved in real estate activities, and describes the approaches used for completing these requirements. This document is intended to serve as a practical guide for all project participants. It is intended to be consistent with all formal agreements, but if a conflict is identified, the formal agreements will take precedence.

  14. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project: Cost Reduction and Productivity Improvement Program Project Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    The purpose of the Cost Reduction/Productivity Improvement Program Plan is to formalize and improve upon existing efforts to control costs which have been underway since project inception. This program plan has been coordinated with the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the DOE Field Office, Albuquerque (AL). It incorporates prior Uranium Mill Tallings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office guidance issued on the subject. The opportunities for reducing cosh and improving productivity are endless. The CR/PIP has these primary objectives: Improve productivity and quality; heighten the general cost consciousness of project participants, at all levels of their organizations; identify and implement specific innovative employee ideas that extend beyond what is required through existing processes and procedures; emphasize efforts that create additional value for the money spent by maintaining the project Total Estimated Cost (TEC) at the lowest possible level

  15. Remedial action and waste disposal project - ERDF readiness evaluation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casbon, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    This Readiness Evaluation Report presents the results of the project readiness evaluation to assess the readiness of the Environmental Restoration and Disposal Facility. The evaluation was conducted at the conclusion of a series of readiness activities that began in January 1996. These activities included completion of the physical plant; preparation, review, and approval of operating procedures; definition and assembly of the necessary project and operational organizations; and activities leading to regulatory approval of the plant and operating plans

  16. Uranium Mill Tailings remedial action project waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this plan is to establish a waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness (WM/PPA) program for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The program satisfies DOE requirements mandated by DOE Order 5400.1. This plan establishes planning objectives and strategies for conserving resources and reducing the quantity and toxicity of wastes and other environmental releases

  17. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has issued requirements for complying with DOLE and other Federal agency environmental regulations. DOE Order 5400.1 requires environmental monitoring plans for each DOE operation that uses, generates, releases, or manages pollutants of radioactive and hazardous materials

  18. Overview criteria for the environmental, safety and health evaluation of remedial action project planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenner, R.D.; Denham, D.H.

    1984-10-01

    Overview criteria (i.e., subject areas requiring review) for evaluating remedial action project plans with respect to environmental, safety and health issues were developed as part of a Department of Energy, Office of Operational Safety, technical support project. Nineteen elements were identified as criteria that should be addressed during the planning process of a remedial action (decontamination and decommissioning) project. The scope was interpreted broadly enough to include such environmental, safety and health issues as public image, legal obligation and quality assurance, as well as more obvious concerns such as those involving the direct protection of public and worker health. The nineteen elements are discussed along with suggested ways to use a data management software system to organize and report results

  19. DECHEM: A remedial planning tool for metallic contaminants in soil at UMTRA Project sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    The DECHEM (DEcontamination of CHEMicals) method was developed for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project to guide characterization and remedial planning for metals contamination in soils. This is necessary because non-radiological hazardous constituents may be more mobile than radium-226 (Ra-226), and hence may migrate more deeply into subpile soils (beneath tailings that are to be relocated) or into adjacent contaminated soils at UMTRA Project sites. The result is that remedial action to the Ra-226 excavation limit, as specified in the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards, may not adequately remove hazardous non-radiological contamination. Unmitigated, these contaminants in soil may cause health risks because of their presence in resuspended particles, their uptake by crops or fodder their seepage into aquifers used for drinking water or other possible exposure pathways. The DECHEM method was developed in response to the need for advanced planning for the remediation of chemical contaminants at UMTRA Project sites, and includes the following elements: Establishment of acceptable exposure rates for humans to chemicals, based on EPA guidelines or other toxicological literature. Modeling of chemical migration through environmental pathways from a remediated UMTRA Project site to humans. Determination of allowable residual concentrations (i.e., cleanup guidelines) for chemicals in soils that results in doses to humans that are below established acceptable exposure rates. The initial development and application of the DECHEM method has focused upon hazardous metallic contaminants such as arsenic, lead, molybdenum, and selenium, which are known to occur in elevated concentrations at some UMTRA Project sites

  20. Tank waste remediation system privatization Phase 1 infrastructure, project W-519, project execution plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parazin, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    This Project Execution Plan (PEP) defines the overall strategy, objectives, and contractor management requirements for the execution phase of Project W-519 (98-D403), Privatization Phase 1 Infrastructure Support, whose mission is to effect the required Hanford site infrastructure physical changes to accommodate the Privatization Contractor facilities. This plan provides the project scope, project objectives and method of performing the work scope and achieving objectives. The plan establishes the work definitions, the cost goals, schedule constraints and roles and responsibilities for project execution. The plan also defines how the project will be controlled and documented

  1. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Surface Project Management Plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) authorizes the US Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties (VP) containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials. The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project is to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public and the environment at the 24 sites and related VPs. This document describes the management organization, system, and methods used to manage the design, construction, and other activities required to clean up the designated sites and associated VPs, in accordance with the UMTRCA

  2. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Surface Project Management Plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) authorizes the US Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties (VP) containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials. The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project is to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public and the environment at the 24 sites and related VPs. This document describes the management organization, system, and methods used to manage the design, construction, and other activities required to clean up the designated sites and associated VPs, in accordance with the UMTRCA.

  3. Waste Management Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Remedial Action Project Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) Remedial Action project will remove mercury-contaminated soils from the floodplain of LEFPC, dispose of these soils at the Y-12 Landfill V, and restore the affected floodplain upon completion of remediation activities. This effort will be conducted in accordance with the Record of Decision (ROD) for LEFPC as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) action. The Waste Management Plan addresses management and disposition of all wastes generated during the remedial action for the LEFPC Project Most of the solid wastes will be considered to be sanitary or construction/demolition wastes and will be disposed of at existing Y-12 facilities for those types of waste. Some small amounts of hazardous waste are anticipated, and the possibility of low- level or mixed waste exists (greater than 35 pCi/g), although these are not expected. Liquid wastes will be generated which will be sanitary in nature and which will be capable of being disposed 0214 of at the Oak Ridge Sewage Treatment Plant.

  4. Waste Management Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Remedial Action Project Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    The Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) Remedial Action project will remove mercury-contaminated soils from the floodplain of LEFPC, dispose of these soils at the Y-12 Landfill V, and restore the affected floodplain upon completion of remediation activities. This effort will be conducted in accordance with the Record of Decision (ROD) for LEFPC as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) action. The Waste Management Plan addresses management and disposition of all wastes generated during the remedial action for the LEFPC Project Most of the solid wastes will be considered to be sanitary or construction/demolition wastes and will be disposed of at existing Y-12 facilities for those types of waste. Some small amounts of hazardous waste are anticipated, and the possibility of low- level or mixed waste exists (greater than 35 pCi/g), although these are not expected. Liquid wastes will be generated which will be sanitary in nature and which will be capable of being disposed 0214 of at the Oak Ridge Sewage Treatment Plant

  5. Project licensing plan for UMTRA [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action] sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Licensing Plan is to establish how a disposal site will be licensed, and to provide responsibilities of participatory agencies as legislated by the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 (Public Law 95-604). This Plan has been developed to ensure that the objectives of licensing are met by identifying the necessary institutional controls, participatory agency responsibilities, and key milestones in the licensing process. The Plan contains the legislative basis for and a description of the licensing process (''Process'') for UMTRA sites. This is followed by a discussion of agency responsibilities, and milestones in the Process. The Plan concludes with a generic timeline of this Process. As discussed in Section 2.1, a custodial maintenance and surveillance plan will constitute the basis for a site license. The details of maintenance and surveillance are discussed in the Project Maintenance and Surveillance Plan (AL-350124.0000). 5 refs., 4 figs

  6. DOE responses to Ecology review comments for ''Sampling and analysis plans for the 100-D Ponds voluntary remediation project''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Sampling and Analysis Plan describes the sampling and analytical activities which will be performed to support closure of the 100-D Ponds at the Hanford Reservation. This report contains responses by the US Department of Energy to Ecology review for ''Sampling and Analysis Plan for the 100-D Ponds Voluntary Remediation Project.''

  7. Program management plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    The primary mission of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Project is to effectively implement the risk-reduction strategies and technical plans to stabilize and prevent further migration of uranium within the MSRE facility, remove the uranium and fuel salts from the system, and dispose of the fuel and flush salts by storage in appropriate depositories to bring the facility to a surveillance and maintenance condition before decontamination and decommissioning. This Project Management Plan (PMP) for the MSRE Remediation Project details project purpose; technical objectives, milestones, and cost objectives; work plan; work breakdown structure (WBS); schedule; management organization and responsibilities; project management performance measurement planning, and control; conduct of operations; configuration management; environmental, safety, and health compliance; quality assurance; operational readiness reviews; and training

  8. Program management plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The primary mission of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Project is to effectively implement the risk-reduction strategies and technical plans to stabilize and prevent further migration of uranium within the MSRE facility, remove the uranium and fuel salts from the system, and dispose of the fuel and flush salts by storage in appropriate depositories to bring the facility to a surveillance and maintenance condition before decontamination and decommissioning. This Project Management Plan (PMP) for the MSRE Remediation Project details project purpose; technical objectives, milestones, and cost objectives; work plan; work breakdown structure (WBS); schedule; management organization and responsibilities; project management performance measurement planning, and control; conduct of operations; configuration management; environmental, safety, and health compliance; quality assurance; operational readiness reviews; and training.

  9. U.S. Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project: Project plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The scope of the Project is to develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for all 24 UMTRA Project processing sites. The compliance strategy for the processing sites must satisfy the proposed EPA ground water cleanup standards in 40 CFR Part 192, Subparts B and C (1987). This scope of work will entail the following activities on a site-specific basis: Develop a compliance strategy based on modification of the UMTRA Surface Project RAPs or develop Ground Water Project RAPs with NRC concurrence on the RAP and full participation of the affected states and tribes. Implement the RAP to include institutional controls, where appropriate, as an interim measure until compliance with the standards is achieved. Institute long-term verification monitoring for transfer to a separate long-term surveillance program on or before the Project end date. Prepare certification or confirmation reports and modify the long-term surveillance plan (LTSP), where needed, on those sites completed prior to the Project end date

  10. Quality assurance program plan for the Radiological Survey Activities Program - Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, S.J.; Berven, B.A.; Little, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for surveying designated sites in the vicinity of 24 inactive mill sites involved in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP). The purpose of these surveys is to provide a recommendation to DOE whether to include or exclude the site from UMTRAP based on whether the onsite residual radioactive material (if any) originated from the former mill sites, and radiation levels onsite are in excess of appropriate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria. This report describes the quality assurance program plan for the RASA program in conducting all activities related to the UMTRA project. All quality assurance provisions given by the DOE, DOE/UMTRA, and ORNL organizations are integrated into this plan. Specifically, this report identifies the policies and procedures followed in accomplishing the RASA/UMTRAP QA program, identifies those organizational units involved in the implementation of these procedures, and outlines the respective responsibilities of those groups

  11. Quality assurance program plan for the radiological survey activities program: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, S.J.; Berven, B.A.; Little, C.A.

    1986-08-01

    The Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for surveying designated sites in the vicinity of 24 inactive mill sites involved in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP). The purpose of these surveys is to provide a recommendation to DOE whether to include or exclude the site from UMTRAP based on whether the onsite residual radioactive material (if any) originated from the former mill sites, and radiation levels onsite are in excess of appropriate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria. This report describes the quality assurance program plan for the RASA program in conducting all activities related to the UMTRA project. All quality assurance provisions given by the DOE, DOE/UMTRA, and ORNL organizations are integrated into this plan. Specifically, this report identifies the policies and procedures followed in accomplishing the RASA/UMTRAP QA program, identifies those organizational units involved in the implementation of these procedures, and outlines the respective responsibilities of those groups

  12. Quality Assurance Program Plan for the radiological survey activities program --- Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, R.R.; Little, C.A.

    1991-08-01

    The Pollutant Assessments Group (PAG) at the Grand Junction Office (GJO), Colorado, of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for surveying designated sites in the vicinity of 24 inactive mill sites involved in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP). The purpose of these surveys is to provide a recommendation to DOE whether to include or exclude these sites from UMTRAP based on whether the on-site residual radioactive material (if any) originated from the former mill sites, and radiation levels on-site are in excess of appropriate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria. This report describes the Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) for the PAG in conducting all activities related to UMTRAP. All quality assurance provisions given by the DOE, DOE/UMTRA and ORNL organizations are integrated into this plan. Specifically, this report identifies the policies and procedures followed in accomplishing the PAG/UMTRA QA program, identifies those organizational units involved in the implementation of these procedures, and outlines the respective responsibilities of those groups. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Master plan for remediation of the Sillamaee tailings pond and technical design project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaasik, T.

    2000-01-01

    Remediation of the Sillamaee radioactive tailings pond is a priority in the Estonian National Environmental Plan. The Sillamaee plant has processed metal ores by hydrometallurgical methods since 1946. Processing continued until 1990, but in the 1970s, production of rare earths and rare metals was introduced and continues today at a smaller scale. The tailings pond contains residues from these operations. The environmental problems associated with the tailings pond are the stability of the dam and the release of contaminants. In order to deal with these two issues effectively, a master plan was drawn up. The master plan covers the period from 1997 to 2008 and was compiled with the cooperation of the Silmet Group and the Sillamaee International Expert Reference Group (SIERG). The master plan sets up a systematic approach for the overall tailings pond remediation, including drying its interior, reshaping and covering the surface, minimizing water flow through the tailings, and ensuring long-term dam stability

  14. Quality assurance plan for the molten salt reactor experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) identifies and describes the systems utilized by Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Project personnel to implement the requirements and associated applicable guidance contained in the Quality Program Description, Y/QD-15 Rev. 2 (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., 1995) and Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities Work Smart Standards. This QAP defines the quality assurance (QA) requirements applicable to all activities and operations in and directly pertinent to the MSRE Remediation Project. This QAP will be periodically reviewed, revised, and approved as necessary. This QAP identifies and describes the QA activities and procedures implemented by the various Oak Ridge National Laboratory support organizations and personnel to provide confidence that these activities meet the requirements of this project. Specific support organization (Division) quality requirements, including the degree of implementation of each, are contained in the appendixes of this plan

  15. Tank waste remediation system privatization phase I infrastructure, project W-519, Quality Assurance implementation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HUSTON, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    This document has been prepared to identify the quality requirements for all products/activities developed by or for Project W-519. This plan is responsive to the Numatec Hanford Corporation, Quality Assurance Program Plan, NHC-MP-001

  16. Tank waste remediation system year 2000 dedicated file server project HNF-3418 project plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SPENCER, S.G.

    1999-04-26

    The Server Project is to ensure that all TWRS supporting hardware (fileservers and workstations) will not cause a system failure because of the BIOS or Operating Systems cannot process Year 2000 dates.

  17. Tank waste remediation system year 2000 dedicated file server project HNF-3418 project plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SPENCER, S.G.

    1999-01-01

    The Server Project is to ensure that all TWRS supporting hardware (fileservers and workstations) will not cause a system failure because of the BIOS or Operating Systems cannot process Year 2000 dates

  18. Tank waste remediation system immobilized high-level waste storage project configuration management implementation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgard, K.G.; Schaus, P.S.; Rossi, H.

    1998-01-01

    This Configuration Management Implementation Plan was developed to assist in the management of systems, structures, and components, to facilitate the effective control and statusing of changes to systems, structures, and components; and to ensure technical consistency between design, performance, and operational requirements. Its purpose is to describe the approach Project W-464 will take in implementing a configuration management control, to determine the rigor of control, and to identify the mechanisms for imposing that control.This Configuration Management Implementation Plan was developed to assist in the management of systems, structures, and components, to facilitate the effective control and statusing of changes to systems, structures, and components; and to ensure technical consistency between design, performance, and operational requirements. Its purpose is to describe the approach Project W-464 will take in implementing a configuration management control, to determine the rigor of control, and to identify the mechanisms for imposing that control

  19. Sampling and analysis plan for the 100-D Ponds voluntary remediation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) describes the sampling and analytical activities which will be performed to support closure of the 100-D Ponds Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit. This SAP includes the Field Sampling Plan (FSP) presented in Section 2.0, and the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) described in Section 3.0. The FSP defines the sampling and analytical methodologies to be performed, and the QAPjP provides or includes information on the requirements for precision, accuracy, representativeness, comparability, and completeness of the analytical data. This sampling and analysis plan was developed using the Environmental Protection Agency's Seven-Step Data Quality Objectives (DQO) Guidance (EPA, 1994). The purpose of the DQO meetings was (1) to identify the contaminants of concern and their cleanup levels under the Washington State Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA, WAC-173-340) Method B, and (2) to determine the number and locations of samples necessary to verify that the 100-D Ponds meet the cleanup criteria. The data collected will be used to support RCRA closure of this TSD unit

  20. Tank waste remediation system program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    This program plan establishes the framework for conduct of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project. The plan focuses on the TWRS Retrieval and Disposal Mission and is specifically intended to support the DOE mid-1998 Readiness to Proceed with Privatized Waste Treatment evaluation for establishing firm contracts for waste immobilization

  1. Tank waste remediation system program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, R.W.

    1998-01-05

    This program plan establishes the framework for conduct of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project. The plan focuses on the TWRS Retrieval and Disposal Mission and is specifically intended to support the DOE mid-1998 Readiness to Proceed with Privatized Waste Treatment evaluation for establishing firm contracts for waste immobilization.

  2. Remedial investigation sampling and analysis plan for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland: Volume 2, Quality Assurance Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, S.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.

    1995-03-01

    J-Field encompasses about 460 acres at the southern end of the Gunpowder Neck Peninsula in the Edgewood Area of APG (Figure 2.1). Since World War II, the Edgewood Area of APG has been used to develop, manufacture, test, and destroy chemical agents and munitions. These materials were destroyed at J-Field by open burning and open detonation (OB/OD). For the purposes of this project, J-Field has been divided into eight geographic areas or facilities that are designated as areas of concern (AOCs): the Toxic Burning Pits (TBP), the White Phosphorus Burning Pits (WPP), the Riot Control Burning Pit (RCP), the Robins Point Demolition Ground (RPDG), the Robins Point Tower Site (RPTS), the South Beach Demolition Ground (SBDG), the South Beach Trench (SBT), and the Prototype Building (PB). The scope of this project is to conduct a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and ecological risk assessment to evaluate the impacts of past disposal activities at the J-Field site. Sampling for the RI will be carried out in three stages (I, II, and III) as detailed in the FSP. A phased approach will be used for the J-Field ecological risk assessment (ERA).

  3. Remedial action planning for Trench 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primrose, A.; Sproles, W.; Burmeister, M.; Wagner, R.; Law, J.; Greengard, T.; Castaneda, N.

    1998-01-01

    The accelerated action to remove the depleted uranium chips and associated soils and wastes from Trench 1 at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) will begin in June 1998. To ensure that the remedial action is conducted safely, a rigorous and disciplined planning process was followed that incorporates the principles of Integrated Safety Management and Enhanced Work Planning. Critical to the success of the planning was early involvement of project staff (salaried and hourly) and associated technical support groups and disciplines. Feedback was and will continue to be solicited, and lessons learned incorporated to ensure the safe remediation of this site

  4. Tank waste remediation system configuration management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vann, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The configuration management program for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project Mission supports management of the project baseline by providing the mechanisms to identify, document, and control the functional and physical characteristics of the products. This document is one of the tools used to develop and control the mission and work. It is an integrated approach for control of technical, cost, schedule, and administrative information necessary to manage the configurations for the TWRS Project Mission. Configuration management focuses on five principal activities: configuration management system management, configuration identification, configuration status accounting, change control, and configuration management assessments. TWRS Project personnel must execute work in a controlled fashion. Work must be performed by verbatim use of authorized and released technical information and documentation. Application of configuration management will be consistently applied across all TWRS Project activities and assessed accordingly. The Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) configuration management requirements are prescribed in HNF-MP-013, Configuration Management Plan (FDH 1997a). This TWRS Configuration Management Plan (CMP) implements those requirements and supersedes the Tank Waste Remediation System Configuration Management Program Plan described in Vann, 1996. HNF-SD-WM-CM-014, Tank Waste Remediation System Configuration Management Implementation Plan (Vann, 1997) will be revised to implement the requirements of this plan. This plan provides the responsibilities, actions and tools necessary to implement the requirements as defined in the above referenced documents

  5. Tank waste remediation system risk management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, B.D.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Risk Management Plan is to describe a consistent approach to risk management such that TWRS Project risks are identified and managed to achieve TWRS Project success. The Risk Management Plan implements the requirements of the Tank Waste Remediation System Systems Engineering Management Plan in the area of risk management. Figure ES-1 shows the relationship of the TWRS Risk Management Plan to other major TWRS Project documents. As the figure indicates, the Risk Management Plan is a tool used to develop and control TWRS Project work. It provides guidance on how TWRS Project risks will be assessed, analyzed, and handled, and it specifies format and content for the risk management lists, which are a primary product of the risk management process. In many instances, the Risk Management Plan references the TWRS Risk Management Procedure, which provides more detailed discussion of many risk management activities. The TWRS Risk Management Plan describes an ongoing program within the TWRS Project. The Risk Management Plan also provides guidance in support of the TWRS Readiness To-Proceed (RTP) assessment package

  6. Environmental restoration contractor facility safety plan -- MO-561 100-D site remediation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donahoe, R.L.

    1996-11-01

    This safety plan is applicable to Environmental Restoration Contractor personnel who are permanently assigned to MO-561 or regularly work in the facility. The MO-561 Facility is located in the 100-D Area at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This plan will: (a) identify hazards potentially to be encountered by occupants of MO-561; (b) provide requirements and safeguards to ensure personnel safety and regulatory compliance; (c) provide information and actions necessary for proper emergency response

  7. Tank waste remediation system retrieval and disposal mission infrastructure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Root, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    This system plan presents the objectives, organization, and management and technical approaches for the Infrastructure Program. This Infrastructure Plan focuses on the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project's Retrieval and Disposal Mission

  8. Environmental Control Plan for the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit Remedial Action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    This environmental control plan is for the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit Remedial Action Project. The purpose of this plan is to identify environmental requirements for the 300-FF-1 operable unit Remedial Action/Waste Disposal Project

  9. 300-FF-1 remedial design report/remedial action work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafson, F.W.

    1997-02-01

    The 300 Area has been divided into three operable units 300-FF-1, 300-FF-2, and 300-FF-5 all of which are in various stages of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) process. The 300-FF-1 Operable Unit, the subject of this report, includes liquid waste disposal sites, landfills, and a burial ground. This Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan (RDR/RAWP) provides a summary description of each waste site included in the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit, the basis for remedial actions to be taken, and the remedial action approach and management process for implementing these actions. The remedial action approach and management sections provide a description of the remedial action process description, the project schedule, the project team, required planning documentation, the remedial action change process, the process for verifying attainment of the remedial action goals, and the required CERCLA and RCRA closeout documentation. Appendix A provides additional details on each waste site. In addition to remediation of the waste sites, waste generated during the remedial investigation/feasibility study portions of the project will also be disposed at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). Appendix B provides a summary of the modeling performed in the 300-FF-1 Phase 3 FS and a description of the modeling effort to be used to show attainment of the remedial action goals. Appendix C provides the sampling and analysis plan (SAP) for all sampling and field-screening activities performed during remediation and for verification of attainment with the remedial action goals. Appendix D provides the public involvement plan, prepared to ensure information is provided to the public during remedial design and remedial action processes

  10. 300-FF-1 remedial design report/remedial action work plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafson, F.W.

    1997-02-01

    The 300 Area has been divided into three operable units 300-FF-1, 300-FF-2, and 300-FF-5 all of which are in various stages of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) process. The 300-FF-1 Operable Unit, the subject of this report, includes liquid waste disposal sites, landfills, and a burial ground. This Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan (RDR/RAWP) provides a summary description of each waste site included in the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit, the basis for remedial actions to be taken, and the remedial action approach and management process for implementing these actions. The remedial action approach and management sections provide a description of the remedial action process description, the project schedule, the project team, required planning documentation, the remedial action change process, the process for verifying attainment of the remedial action goals, and the required CERCLA and RCRA closeout documentation. Appendix A provides additional details on each waste site. In addition to remediation of the waste sites, waste generated during the remedial investigation/feasibility study portions of the project will also be disposed at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). Appendix B provides a summary of the modeling performed in the 300-FF-1 Phase 3 FS and a description of the modeling effort to be used to show attainment of the remedial action goals. Appendix C provides the sampling and analysis plan (SAP) for all sampling and field-screening activities performed during remediation and for verification of attainment with the remedial action goals. Appendix D provides the public involvement plan, prepared to ensure information is provided to the public during remedial design and remedial action processes.

  11. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1993 Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1993, surface remedial action was complete at 10 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites. In 1993 the UMTRA Project office revised the UMTRA Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, as required by the US DOE. Because the UMTRA Project sites are in different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  12. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1993 Environmental Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1993, surface remedial action was complete at 10 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites. In 1993 the UMTRA Project office revised the UMTRA Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, as required by the US DOE. Because the UMTRA Project sites are in different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments

  13. Communication activities during remediation project of Zavratec

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukovica, T.; Mele, I.

    1996-01-01

    The remediation project of temporary storage of radioactive waste near village Zavratec is under way. The Agency for Radwaste Management was assigned to perform this project by the Slovenian government. Radioactive waste was stored on site of Zavratec in 1961. That year an accident has occurred at Oncological institute in Ljubljana in which several rooms and some equipment have been contaminated by the content of radium applicator. Radioactive waste from decontamination was transported and stored in an old Italian military barrack near village Zavratec. The storage became known to public in eighties by the TV report. Since that time it is frequently the subject of public polemics and discussions. This year the first part of remediation project, i.e. the activity measurements and sorting of radioactive waste is taking place. It is planned to conclude the project next year. For successful realization of the project the PR activities, specially the communication with the local community, are of great importance. Special plan of these activities has been prepared by the Agency for Radwaste Management in early stage of the project. Initial activities have already been successfully realized. In this paper the communication plan is presented and most important elements of this plan are briefly described. (author)

  14. Phase 2 sampling and analysis plan, Quality Assurance Project Plan, and environmental health and safety plan for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation: An addendum to the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, R.B.; Adams, S.M.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Blaylock, B.G.; Brandt, C.C.; Etnier, E.L.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Gentry, M.J.; Greeley, M.S.; Halbrook, R.S.; Harris, R.A.; Holladay, S.K.; Hook, L.A.; Howell, P.L.; Kszos, L.A.; Levine, D.A.; Skiles, J.L.; Suter, G.W.

    1992-12-01

    This document contains a three-part addendum to the Clinch River Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation Plan. The Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation began in 1989, as part of the comprehensive remediation of facilities on the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The ORR was added to the National Priorities List in December 1989. The regulatory agencies have encouraged the adoption of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) terminology; therefore, the Clinch River activity is now referred to as the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI), not the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation. Part 1 of this document is the plan for sampling and analysis (S A) during Phase 2 of the CRRI. Part 2 is a revision of the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the CRRI, and Part 3 is a revision of the Environmental Health and Safety Plan for the CRRI. The Clinch River RI (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants (radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds) released from the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. Primary areas of investigation are Melton Hill Reservoir, the Clinch River from Melton Hill Dam to its confluence with the Tennessee River, Poplar Creek, and Watts Bar Reservoir. The contaminants identified in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) downstream of the ORR are those associated with the water, suspended particles, deposited sediments, aquatic organisms, and wildlife feeding on aquatic organisms. The purpose of the Phase 2 S A Plan is to describe the proposed tasks and subtasks developed to meet the primary objectives of the CRRI.

  15. Phase 2 sampling and analysis plan, Quality Assurance Project Plan, and environmental health and safety plan for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation: An addendum to the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, R.B.; Adams, S.M.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Blaylock, B.G.; Brandt, C.C.; Etnier, E.L.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Gentry, M.J.; Greeley, M.S.; Halbrook, R.S.; Harris, R.A.; Holladay, S.K.; Hook, L.A.; Howell, P.L.; Kszos, L.A.; Levine, D.A.; Skiles, J.L.; Suter, G.W.

    1992-12-01

    This document contains a three-part addendum to the Clinch River Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation Plan. The Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation began in 1989, as part of the comprehensive remediation of facilities on the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The ORR was added to the National Priorities List in December 1989. The regulatory agencies have encouraged the adoption of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) terminology; therefore, the Clinch River activity is now referred to as the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI), not the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation. Part 1 of this document is the plan for sampling and analysis (S ampersand A) during Phase 2 of the CRRI. Part 2 is a revision of the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the CRRI, and Part 3 is a revision of the Environmental Health and Safety Plan for the CRRI. The Clinch River RI (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants (radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds) released from the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. Primary areas of investigation are Melton Hill Reservoir, the Clinch River from Melton Hill Dam to its confluence with the Tennessee River, Poplar Creek, and Watts Bar Reservoir. The contaminants identified in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) downstream of the ORR are those associated with the water, suspended particles, deposited sediments, aquatic organisms, and wildlife feeding on aquatic organisms. The purpose of the Phase 2 S ampersand A Plan is to describe the proposed tasks and subtasks developed to meet the primary objectives of the CRRI

  16. UMTRA Project remedial action planning and disposal cell design to comply with the proposed EPA [Environmental Protection Agency] standards (40 CFR Part 192)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project involves stabilizing 24 inactive uranium mill tailings piles in 10 states. Remedial work must meet standards established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Remedial action must be designed and constructed to prevent dispersion of the tailings and other contaminated materials, and must prevent the inadvertent use of the tailings by man. This report is prepared primarily for distribution to parties involved in the UMTRA Project, including the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and states and tribes. It is intended to record the work done by the DOE since publication of the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards, and to show how the DOE has attempted to respond and react in a positive way to the new requirements that result from the proposed standards. This report discusses the groundwater compliance strategies now being defined and implemented by the DOE, and details the changes in disposal cell designs that result from studies to evaluate ways to facilitate compliance with the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards. This report also serves to record the technical advances, planning, and progress made on the UMTRA Project since the appearance of the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards. The report serves to establish, document, and disseminate technical approaches and engineering and groundwater information to people who may be interested or involved in similar or related projects. 24 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs

  17. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Environmental Line Management Audit Action Plan. Final report. Audit, October 26, 1992--November 6, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This Action Plan contains responses, planned actions, and estimated costs for addressing the findings discovered in the Environmental Management Audit conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA), October 26 through November 6, 1992. This document should be read in conjunction with the Audit Report to ensure the findings addressed in this document are fully understood. The scope of the UMTRA Environmental Management Audit was comprehensive and encompassed all areas of environmental management except environmental programs pertaining to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance. The Audit Report listed 18 findings: 11 were identified as compliance findings, and the remaining 7 were best management practice findings. Root cause analysis was performed on all the findings. The results of the analysis as well as planned corrective actions are summarized in Section 5.0. All planned actions were prioritized using the Tiger Team Assessment Corrective Action Plan system. Based on assigned priorities, all planned actions were costed by fiscal year. This Action Plan contains a description of the organizational and management structures to be used to implement the Action Plan, a brief discussion of root cause analysis and funding, followed by the responses and planned actions for each finding. A member of the UMTRA Project Office (PO) has been assigned responsibility for tracking the progress on each of the findings. The UMTRA PO staff wrote and/or approved all of the corrective actions recorded in this Action Plan

  18. Remediation plans in family medicine residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audétat, Marie-Claude; Voirol, Christian; Béland, Normand; Fernandez, Nicolas; Sanche, Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess use of the remediation instrument that has been implemented in training sites at the University of Montreal in Quebec to support faculty in diagnosing and remediating resident academic difficulties, to examine whether and how this particular remediation instrument improves the remediation process, and to determine its effects on the residents’ subsequent rotation assessments. Design A multimethods approach in which data were collected from different sources: remediation plans developed by faculty, program statistics for the corresponding academic years, and students’ academic records and rotation assessment results. Setting Family medicine residency program at the University of Montreal. Participants Family medicine residents in academic difficulty. Main outcome measures Assessment of the content, process, and quality of remediation plans, and students’ academic and rotation assessment results (successful, below expectations, or failure) both before and after the remediation period. Results The framework that was developed for assessing remediation plans was used to analyze 23 plans produced by 10 teaching sites for 21 residents. All plans documented cognitive problems and implemented numerous remediation measures. Although only 48% of the plans were of good quality, implementation of a remediation plan was positively associated with the resident’s success in rotations following the remediation period. Conclusion The use of remediation plans is well embedded in training sites at the University of Montreal. The residents’ difficulties were mainly cognitive in nature, but this generally related to deficits in clinical reasoning rather than knowledge gaps. The reflection and analysis required to produce a remediation plan helps to correct many academic difficulties and normalize the academic career of most residents in difficulty. Further effort is still needed to improve the quality of plans and to support teachers.

  19. 40 CFR 85.1803 - Remedial Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Recall Regulations § 85.1803 Remedial Plan. (a) When any manufacturer is... the total parts requirement of each person who is to perform the repair under the remedial plan to be...: (i) The recall campaign number; and (ii) A code designating the campaign facility at which the repair...

  20. Project Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The mission of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is explicitly stated and directed in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, Public Law 95-604, 42 USC 7901 (hereinafter referred to as the ''Act''). Title I of the Act authorizes the Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial actions at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials derived from the processing sites. The Act, amended in January 1983, by Public Law 97-415, also authorizes DOE to perform remedial actions at vicinity properties in Edgemont, South Dakota. Cleanup of the Edgemont processing site is the responsibility of the Tennessee Valley Authority. This document describes the plan, organization, system, and methodologies used to manage the design, construction, and other activities required to clean up the designated sites and associated vicinity properties in accordance with the Act. The plan describes the objectives of the UMTRA Project, defines participants' roles and responsibilities, outlines the technical approach for accomplishing the objectives, and describes the planning and managerial controls to be used in integrating and performing the Project mission. 21 figs., 21 tabs

  1. Economics of biofiltration for remediation projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yudelson, J.M.; Tinari, P.D.

    1995-01-01

    Biofilters with granular activated carbon (GAC) filter backup units offer substantial savings compared to conventional GAC filters and catalytic/thermal oxidation (Catox) units in controlling emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from petroleum remediation projects. Provided that the biofilter supplier is willing to satisfy the client's and consultant's risk-management concerns, biofilters offer anew method for reducing the cost of remediation projects, with savings of up to $10,000 (24%) per facility in 24-month projects and up to $16,000 (32%) per facility in 36-month projects for simple gas station remediation projects. Savings will be greater for longer projects and projects with higher average contaminant loadings

  2. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1994 environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1994, surface remedial action was complete at 14 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; Durango, Colorado; Grand Junction, Colorado; Green River Utah, Lakeview, Oregon; Lowman, Idaho; Mexican Hat, Utah; Riverton, Wyoming; Salt Lake City, Utah; Falls City, Texas; Shiprock, New Mexico; Spook, Wyoming, Tuba City, Arizona; and Monument Valley, Arizona. Surface remedial action was ongoing at 5 sites: Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico; Naturita, Colorado; Gunnison, Colorado; and Rifle, Colorado (2 sites). Remedial action has not begun at the 5 remaining UMTRA Project sites that are in the planning stage. Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota; Maybell, Colorado; and Slick Rock, Colorado (2 sites). The ground water compliance phase of the UMTRA Project started in 1991. Because the UMTRA Project sites are.` different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  3. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1994 environmental report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1994, surface remedial action was complete at 14 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; Durango, Colorado; Grand Junction, Colorado; Green River Utah, Lakeview, Oregon; Lowman, Idaho; Mexican Hat, Utah; Riverton, Wyoming; Salt Lake City, Utah; Falls City, Texas; Shiprock, New Mexico; Spook, Wyoming, Tuba City, Arizona; and Monument Valley, Arizona. Surface remedial action was ongoing at 5 sites: Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico; Naturita, Colorado; Gunnison, Colorado; and Rifle, Colorado (2 sites). Remedial action has not begun at the 5 remaining UMTRA Project sites that are in the planning stage. Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota; Maybell, Colorado; and Slick Rock, Colorado (2 sites). The ground water compliance phase of the UMTRA Project started in 1991. Because the UMTRA Project sites are.' different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments

  4. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA project site Rifle, Colorado. Rev. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This final audit report summarizes the assessments performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) and its Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) of remedial action compliance with approved plans, specifications, standards, and 40 CFR Part 192 at the Rifle, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. Remedial action construction was directed by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC)

  5. Developing a disposal and remediation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messier, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    The environmental release of wastes generated by the upstream oil and gas industry in Alberta can result in polluted soil and groundwater at several facilities across the province. Responsibility for decommissioning upstream oil and gas facilities falls under the jurisdiction of the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) and Alberta Environmental Protection (AEP). This paper outlines a protocol that can serve as a framework for the development of a plan to dispose of oilfield waste and to remediate related contaminated soils. The components involved in developing a disposal and remediation plan for oilfield wastes are: (1) identifying the potential source of pollution and oilfield waste generation, (2) characterizing oilfield wastes, (3) determining the nature and extent of soil and groundwater pollution, (4) preparing a remedial action plan, (5) assessing the viability of various remediation options, and (6) preparing health and safety plan. 12 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  6. Environmental compliance plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Remedial Action Project at Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    Remedial action for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek, as defined by the Record of Decision, requires that soil contaminated with >400 ppM mercury be excavated and disposed. Based on the remediation goal, soil will be excavated from areas located at the NOAA site and the Bruner site and disposed at the Industrial Landfill V at the Y-12 Plant. Objective is to minimize the risk to human health and the environment from contaminated soil in the lower EFPC floodplain pursuant to CERCLA and the Federal Facility Agreement (DOE 1992)

  7. Integrated approach to planning the remediation of sites undergoing decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Responding to the needs of Member States, the IAEA has launched an environmental remediation guidance initiative dealing with the issues of radioactive contamination world wide. Its aim is to collate and disseminate information concerning the key issues affecting environmental remediation of contaminated sites. This IAEA initiative includes the development of documents that report on remediation technologies available, best practices, and information and guidance concerning (a) Strategy development for environmental remediation; (b) Characterization and remediation of contaminated sites and contaminated groundwater; (c) Management of waste and residues from mining and milling of uranium and thorium; (d) Decommissioning of buildings; (e) A database for contaminated sites. The subject of this present report concerns the integration of decommissioning and remediation activities at sites undergoing decommissioning and this fits within the first category of guidance documentation (strategy development). This document addresses key strategic planning issues. It is intended to provide practical advice and complement other reports that focus on decommissioning and remediation at nuclear facilities. The document is designed to encourage site remediation activities that take advantage of synergies with decommissioning in order to reduce the duplication of effort by various parties and minimize adverse impacts on human health, the environment, and costs through the transfer of experience and knowledge. To achieve this objective, the document is designed to help Member States gain perspective by summarizing available information about synergies between decommissioning and remediation, strategic planning and project management and planning tools and techniques to support decision making and remediation. Case studies are also presented as to give concrete examples of the theoretical elements elaborated in the documents. This publication investigates the potential synergies

  8. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Work Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. M. Heileson

    2006-12-01

    This Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for operation of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility Complex (ICDF). This facility includes (a) an engineered landfill that meets the substantial requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl landfill requirements; (b) centralized receiving, inspections, administration, storage/staging, and treatment facilities necessary for CERCLA investigation-derived, remedial, and removal waste at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prior to final disposition in the disposal facility or shipment off-Site; and (c) an evaporation pond that has been designated as a corrective action management unit. The ICDF Complex, including a buffer zone, will cover approximately 40 acres, with a landfill disposal capacity of approximately 510,000 yd3. The ICDF Complex is designed and authorized to accept INL CERCLA-generated wastes, and includes the necessary subsystems and support facilities to provide a complete waste management system. This Remedial Action Work Plan presents the operational approach and requirements for the various components that are part of the ICDF Complex. Summaries of the remedial action work elements are presented herein, with supporting information and documents provided as appendixes to this work plan that contain specific detail about the operation of the ICDF Complex. This document presents the planned operational process based upon an evaluation of the remedial action requirements set forth in the Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision.

  9. Health and safety plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment remediation project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burman, S.N.; Uziel, M.S.

    1995-12-01

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of the policy requires that operations at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S and H) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all MSRE operations. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated at the MSRE that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and the best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air.

  10. Health and safety plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment remediation project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burman, S.N.; Uziel, M.S.

    1995-12-01

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of the policy requires that operations at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S and H) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all MSRE operations. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated at the MSRE that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and the best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air

  11. Present status of the Zavratec remediation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznik, N.; Stepisnik, M.; Mele, I.

    1997-01-01

    In 1992 the responsibility for the remediation of the temporary storage of radioactive waste near Zavratec was assigned to the Agency for Radwaste Management. The project was divided into two phases. First, in a study, different options for remediation were considered. In the second phase, performed in 1996, the measurements, inventorying and repacking of radioactive waste were carried out. Simultaneously with these activities a programme for covering public relations was prepared. One of the results of the public relation campaign is also a 15-minute video film, which was prepared from documentary material recorded during remedial activities, and will be presented here. (author)

  12. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Lowman, Idaho: Remedial action selection report for the Lowman UMTRA project site, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, M.L.; Nagel, J.

    1991-09-01

    The inactive uranium mill tailings site near Lowman, Idaho, was designated as one of 24 abandoned uranium tailings sites to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE's remedial action plan and certify that the remedial action complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The remedial action plan (RAP), which includes this remedial action selection report (RAS), has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of residual radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Lowman, Idaho. Second, this document and the remainder of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Idaho, and the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement (No. DE-FC04-85AL20535) between the DOE and the State of Idaho

  13. 40 CFR 92.705 - Remedial plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Recall Regulations § 92.705 Remedial plan. (a) When any... adequate supply of parts will be available to initiate the repair campaign, the percentage of the total... intact. (3) The label shall contain: (i) The recall campaign number; and (ii) A code designating the...

  14. Tank waste remediation system retrieval and disposal mission waste feed delivery plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    This document is a plan presenting the objectives, organization, and management and technical approaches for the Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) Program. This WFD Plan focuses on the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project's Waste Retrieval and Disposal Mission

  15. Best management practices plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek remedial action project, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has three major operating facilities on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee: the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the K-25 Site, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) managed by Lockheed Martin Environmental Research Corporation. All facilities are managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Incorporated (Energy Systems) for the DOE. The Y-12 Plant is adjacent to the city of Oak Ridge and is also upstream from Oak Ridge along East Fork Poplar Creek. The portion of the creek downstream from the Y-12 Plant is Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC). This project will remove mercury-contaminated soils from the LEFPC floodplain, transport the soils to Industrial Landfill V (ILF-V), and restore any affected areas. This project contains areas that were designated in 1989 as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) site. The site includes DOE property and portions of commercial, residential, agricultural, and miscellaneous areas within the city of Oak Ridge

  16. Formerly Utilized MED/AEC Sites Remedial Action Program. Project management plan for the decontamination of Jones Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Eckhart Hall, the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, K.F.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has in place a plan for the decontamination and decommissioning of contaminated sites that had been formerly utilized by the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) and/or the Atomic Energy Commission. This plan is referred to as the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Among these sites are Jones Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory and Eckhart Hall of The University of Chicago at Chicago, Illinois. This document represents the Project Management Plan for the decontamination of these facilities. 13 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  17. Formerly Utilized MED/AEC Sites Remedial Action Program. Project management plan for the decontamination of Jones Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Eckhart Hall, the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has in place a plan for the decontamination and decommissioning of contaminated sites that had been formerly utilized by the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) and/or the Atomic Energy Commission. This plan is referred to as the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Among these sites are Jones Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory and Eckhart Hall of The University of Chicago at Chicago, Illinois. This document represents the Project Management Plan for the decontamination of these facilities. 13 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  18. Licensing plan for UMTRA project disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office developed a plan to define UMTRA Project licensing program objectives and establish a process enabling the DOE to document completion of remedial actions in compliance with 40 CFR 1 92 and the requirements of the NRC general license. This document supersedes the January 1987 Project Licensing Plan (DOE, 1987). The plan summarizes the legislative and regulatory basis for licensing, identifies participating agencies and their roles and responsibilities, defines key activities and milestones in the licensing process, and details the coordination of these activities. This plan provides an overview of the UMTRA Project from the end of remedial actions through the NRC's acceptance of a disposal site under the general license. The licensing process integrates large phases of the UMTRA Project. Other programmatic UMTRA Project documents listed in Section 6.0 provide supporting information

  19. Kerr Hollow Quarry Remediation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    The Kerr Hollow Quarry is a 3-acre flooded limestone quarry located near the Y-12 Facility on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The quarry was used in the 1940s as a source of construction material for the Department of Energy in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Its use was discontinued in the early 1950s, and it was allowed to flood with water. The quarry presently has a maximum water depth of approximately 55 ft. During the period between the early 1950s until about 1988, the quarry was used for the treatment and disposal of a variety of materials including water-reactive, alkali metals, shock-sensitive chemicals, and compressed gas cylinders. For some of these materials, the treatment consisted of dropping the vessels containing the materials into the quarry from a high bluff located on one side of the quarry. The vessels were then punctured by gun shot, and the materials were allowed to react with the water and sink to the bottom of the quarry. Very few disposal records exist for the period from 1952 to 1962. The records after that time, from 1962 until 1988, indicate some 50 t of hazardous and nonhazardous materials were disposed of in the quarry. This report documents remediation efforts that have taken place at the quarry beginning in September 1990

  20. UMTRA [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action] Project site management manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    The purpose of this manual is to summarize the organizational interfaces and the technical approach used to manage the planning, design development, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance, engineering, and remedial action required to stabilize and control the designated Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites. This manual describes the Project's objective, participants' roles and responsibilities, technical approach for accomplishing the objective, and planning and managerial controls to be used in performing the site work. The narrative follows the flow of activities depicted in Figure 1.1, which provides the typical sequence of key Project activities. A list of acronyms used is presented at the end of the manual. The comparable manual for UMTRA Project vicinity properties is the ''Vicinity Properties Management and Implementation Manual'' (VPMIM) (UMTRA-DOE/AL-050601). Together, the two manuals cover the remedial action activities associated with UMTRA Project sites. The UMTRA Project's objective is to stabilize and control the uranium mill tailings, vicinity property materials, and other residual radioactive materials at the designated sites (Figure 1.2) in a safe and environmentally sound manner in order to minimize radiation health hazards to the public. 26 figs., 6 tabs

  1. Tank waste remediation system engineering plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rifaey, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    This Engineering Plan describes the engineering process and controls that will be in place to support the Technical Baseline definition and manage its evolution and implementation to the field operations. This plan provides the vision for the engineering required to support the retrieval and disposal mission through Phase 1 and 2, which includes integrated data management of the Technical Baseline. Further, this plan describes the approach for moving from the ''as is'' condition of engineering practice, systems, and facilities to the desired ''to be'' configuration. To make this transition, Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Engineering will become a center of excellence for TWRS which,will perform engineering in the most effective manner to meet the mission. TWRS engineering will process deviations from sitewide systems if necessary to meet the mission most effectively

  2. Tank waste remediation system configuration management implementation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vann, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Configuration Management Implementation Plan describes the actions that will be taken by Project Hanford Management Contract Team to implement the TWRS Configuration Management program defined in HNF 1900, TWRS Configuration Management Plan. Over the next 25 years, the TWRS Project will transition from a safe storage mission to an aggressive retrieval, storage, and disposal mission in which substantial Engineering, Construction, and Operations activities must be performed. This mission, as defined, will require a consolidated configuration management approach to engineering, design, construction, as-building, and operating in accordance with the technical baselines that emerge from the life cycles. This Configuration Management Implementation Plan addresses the actions that will be taken to strengthen the TWRS Configuration Management program

  3. Tank waste remediation system programmatic risk management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seaver, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    This risk management plan defines the approach to be taken to managing risks in the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program. It defines the actions to be taken at the overall program level, and the risk management requirements for lower-level projects and other activities. The primary focus of this plan is on ''programmatic'' risks, i.e., risks with respect to the cost, schedule, and technical performance of the program. The plan defines an approach providing managers with the flexibility to manage risks according to their specific needs, yet creates. The consistency needed for effectiveness across the program. The basic risk management approach uses a risk management list for the program, each project, and additional lower-level activities. The risk management list will be regularly reviewed and updated by appropriate level of management. Each list defines key risks, their likelihood and consequences, risk management actions to be taken, responsible individuals, and other management information

  4. Quality assurance plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Phase 1 -- Interim corrective measures and Phase 2 -- Purge and trap reactive gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) identifies and describes the systems utilized by the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project (MSRERP) personnel to implement the requirements and associated applicable guidance contained in the Quality Program Description Y/QD-15 Rev. 2 (Energy Systems 1995f). This QAP defines the quality assurance (QA) requirements applicable to all activities and operations in and directly pertinent to the MSRERP Phase 1--Interim Corrective Measures and Phase 2--Purge and Trap objectives. This QAP will be reviewed, revised, and approved as necessary for Phase 3 and Phase 4 activities. This QAP identifies and describes the QA activities and procedures implemented by the various Oak Ridge National Laboratory support organizations and personnel to provide confidence that these activities meet the requirements of this project. Specific support organization (Division) quality requirements, including the degree of implementation of each, are contained in the appendixes of this plan

  5. Project Surveillance and Maintenance Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    The Project Surveillance and Maintenance Plan (PSMP) describes the procedures that will be used by the US Department of Energy (DOE), or other agency as designated by the President to verify that inactive uranium tailings disposal facilities remain in compliance with licensing requirements and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for remedial actions. The PSMP will be used as a guide for the development of individual Site Surveillance and Maintenance Plans (part of a license application) for each of the UMTRA Project sites. The PSMP is not intended to provide minimum requirements but rather to provide guidance in the selection of surveillance measures. For example, the plan acknowledges that ground-water monitoring may or may not be required and provides the [guidance] to make this decision. The Site Surveillance and Maintenance Plans (SSMPs) will form the basis for the licensing of the long-term surveillance and maintenance of each UMTRA Project site by the NRC. Therefore, the PSMP is a key milestone in the licensing process of all UMTRA Project sites. The Project Licensing Plan (DOE, 1984a) describes the licensing process. 11 refs., 22 figs., 8 tabs

  6. UMTRA -- The US Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lightner, R.; Cormier, C.; Bierley, D.

    1995-01-01

    In the late 1970s, the United States (US) established the first comprehensive regulatory structure for the management, disposal, and long-term care of wastes produced from its domestic uranium processing industry. This regulatory framework was established through the passage of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, often referred to as UMTRCA. This legislation created the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project and assigned the US Department of Energy (DOE) the lead in conducting the required remedial action at 24 designated inactive uranium ore processing sites. With the majority of these 22 sites complete, the DOE's UMTRA Project has established a distinguished reputation for safely and effectively remediating these low-level waste sites in a complex regulatory and socioeconomic environment. This paper describes the past accomplishments and current status of the UMTRA Project and discusses the DOE's plans for addressing ground water contamination associated with these sites and its commitment to continuing the long-term care and management of these disposal cells

  7. Tank waste remediation system program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    This TWRS Program plan presents the planning requirements and schedules and management strategies and policies for accomplishing the TWRS Project mission. It defines the systems and practices used to establish consistency for business practices, engineering, physical configuration and facility documentation, and to maintain this consistency throughout the program life cycle, particularly as changes are made. Specifically, this plan defines the following: Mission needs and requirements (what must be done and when must it be done); Technical objectives/approach (how well must it be done); Organizational structure and philosophy (roles, responsibilities, and interfaces); and Operational methods (objectives and how work is to be conducted in both management and technical areas). The plan focuses on the TWRS Retrieval and Disposal Mission and supports the DOE mid-1998 Readiness to Proceed with Privatized Waste Treatment evaluation for establishing contracts with private contractors for the treatment (immobilization) of Hanford tank high-level radioactive waste

  8. Tank waste remediation system program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, R.W.

    1998-01-09

    This TWRS Program plan presents the planning requirements and schedules and management strategies and policies for accomplishing the TWRS Project mission. It defines the systems and practices used to establish consistency for business practices, engineering, physical configuration and facility documentation, and to maintain this consistency throughout the program life cycle, particularly as changes are made. Specifically, this plan defines the following: Mission needs and requirements (what must be done and when must it be done); Technical objectives/approach (how well must it be done); Organizational structure and philosophy (roles, responsibilities, and interfaces); and Operational methods (objectives and how work is to be conducted in both management and technical areas). The plan focuses on the TWRS Retrieval and Disposal Mission and supports the DOE mid-1998 Readiness to Proceed with Privatized Waste Treatment evaluation for establishing contracts with private contractors for the treatment (immobilization) of Hanford tank high-level radioactive waste.

  9. Operable Unit 3: Proposed Plan/Environmental Assessment for interim remedial action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    This document presents a Proposed Plan and an Environmental Assessment for an interim remedial action to be undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) within Operable Unit 3 (OU3) at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). This proposed plan provides site background information, describes the remedial alternatives being considered, presents a comparative evaluation of the alternatives and a rationnale for the identification of DOE's preferred alternative, evaluates the potential environmental and public health effects associated with the alternatives, and outlines the public's role in helping DOE and the EPA to make the final decision on a remedy

  10. Planning risk communication for UMTRA project groundwater restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hundertmark, Charles [Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. and University of Phoenix (United States); Hoopes, Jack [Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. (United States); Flowers, Len [Roy F. Weston Company (United States); Jackson, David G [U.S. Department of Energy (United States)

    1992-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is entering a new phase in which groundwater contamination will become a growing focus as surface remedial action draws toward completion. Planning for risk communication associated with the groundwater project will be a major factor in the successful initiation of the program. (author)

  11. Planning risk communication for UMTRA project groundwater restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundertmark, Charles; Hoopes, Jack; Flowers, Len; Jackson, David G.

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is entering a new phase in which groundwater contamination will become a growing focus as surface remedial action draws toward completion. Planning for risk communication associated with the groundwater project will be a major factor in the successful initiation of the program. (author)

  12. K basins interim remedial action health and safety plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAY, P.T.

    1999-09-14

    The K Basins Interim Remedial Action Health and Safety Plan addresses the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as they apply to the CERCLA work that will take place at the K East and K West Basins. The provisions of this plan become effective on the date the US Environmental Protection Agency issues the Record of Decision for the K Basins Interim Remedial Action, currently planned in late August 1999.

  13. The CHPRC Columbia River Protection Project Quality Assurance Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-11-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers are working on the CHPRC Columbia River Protection Project (hereafter referred to as the Columbia River Project). This is a follow-on project, funded by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, LLC (CHPRC), to the Fluor Hanford, Inc. Columbia River Protection Project. The work scope consists of a number of CHPRC funded, related projects that are managed under a master project (project number 55109). All contract releases associated with the Fluor Hanford Columbia River Project (Fluor Hanford, Inc. Contract 27647) and the CHPRC Columbia River Project (Contract 36402) will be collected under this master project. Each project within the master project is authorized by a CHPRC contract release that contains the project-specific statement of work. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Columbia River Project staff.

  14. The CHPRC Columbia River Protection Project Quality Assurance Project Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fix, N.J.

    2008-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers are working on the CHPRC Columbia River Protection Project (hereafter referred to as the Columbia River Project). This is a follow-on project, funded by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, LLC (CHPRC), to the Fluor Hanford, Inc. Columbia River Protection Project. The work scope consists of a number of CHPRC funded, related projects that are managed under a master project (project number 55109). All contract releases associated with the Fluor Hanford Columbia River Project (Fluor Hanford, Inc. Contract 27647) and the CHPRC Columbia River Project (Contract 36402) will be collected under this master project. Each project within the master project is authorized by a CHPRC contract release that contains the project-specific statement of work. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Columbia River Project staff

  15. Ad interim legal remedy in case of large projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limberger, J.

    1985-01-01

    Action for ad interim judicial relief in response to large projects approved of by the authorities very frequently take several years until a decision is taken by the court. Experience has shown that this applies in particular to large projects such as the construction of nuclear power plants, large-size industrial plants, or airports. It has become regular practice by the authorities concerned to issue an order for immediate execution upon the plan approving decision and granting of licence for said projects, in accordance with section 80, sub-section (2), no.4 of the VwGO. The problems thus created with regard to interim legal remedy sought by the parties concerned are of great significance. The book in hand discusses the question as to whether the practice of the administrative authorities and the courts satisfies the requirements embodied in the law, to provide for efficient legal protection. (orig./HSCH) [de

  16. Environmental Restoration Remedial Action Program records management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, L.E.

    1991-07-01

    The US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) Environmental Restoration Field Office Management Plan [(FOMP) DOE-RL 1989] describes the plans, organization, and control systems to be used for management of the Hanford Site environmental restoration remedial action program. The FOMP, in conjunction with the Environmental Restoration Remedial Action Quality Assurance Requirements document [(QARD) DOE-RL 1991], provides all the environmental restoration remedial action program requirements governing environmental restoration work on the Hanford Site. The FOMP requires a records management plan be written. The Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) Environmental Restoration Remedial Action (ERRA) Program Office has developed this ERRA Records Management Plan to fulfill the requirements of the FOMP. This records management plan will enable the program office to identify, control, and maintain the quality assurance, decisional, or regulatory prescribed records generated and used in support of the ERRA Program. 8 refs., 1 fig

  17. Remedial Action Work Plan Amchitka Island Mud Pit Closures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE/NV

    2001-04-05

    This remedial action work plan presents the project organization and construction procedures developed for the performance of the remedial actions at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE's) sites on Amchitka Island, Alaska. During the late1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (the predecessor agency to DOE) used Amchitka Island as a site for underground nuclear tests. A total of nine sites on the Island were considered for nuclear testing; however, tests were only conducted at three sites (i.e., Long Shot in 1965, Milrow in 1969, and Cannikin in 1971). In addition to these three sites, large diameter emplacement holes were drilled in two other locations (Sites D and F) and an exploratory hole was in a third location (Site E). It was estimated that approximately 195 acres were disturbed by drilling or preparation for drilling in conjunction with these activities. The disturbed areas include access roads, spoil-disposal areas, mud pits which have impacted the environment, and an underground storage tank at the hot mix plant which was used to support asphalt-paving operations on the island. The remedial action objective for Amchitka Island is to eliminate human and ecological exposure to contaminants by capping drilling mud pits, removing the tank contents, and closing the tank in place. The remedial actions will meet State of Alaska regulations, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge management goals, address stakeholder concerns, and address the cultural beliefs and practices of the native people. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office will conduct work on Amchitka Island under the authority of the Comprehensive Emergency Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Field activities are scheduled to take place May through September 2001. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent Closure Report.

  18. Waste Management Plan for the Oak Ridge National Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    In accordance with the requirements of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Project Quality Assurance Plan, this Waste Management Plan establishes clear lines of responsibility and authority, documentation requirements, and operational guidance for the collection, identification, segregation, classification, packaging, certification, and storage/disposal of wastes. These subjects are discussed in the subsequent sections of this document

  19. Waste Management Plan for the Oak Ridge National Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-04-01

    In accordance with the requirements of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Project Quality Assurance Plan, this Waste Management Plan establishes clear lines of responsibility and authority, documentation requirements, and operational guidance for the collection, identification, segregation, classification, packaging, certification, and storage/disposal of wastes. These subjects are discussed in the subsequent sections of this document.

  20. The 100-C-7 Remediation Project. An Overview of One of DOE's Largest Remediation Projects - 13260

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, Thomas C.; Strom, Dean; Beulow, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (RL), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington Closure Hanford LLC (WCH) completed remediation of one of the largest waste sites in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The waste site, 100-C-7, covers approximately 15 football fields and was excavated to a depth of 85 feet (groundwater). The project team removed a total of 2.3 million tons of clean and contaminated soil, concrete debris, and scrap metal. 100-C-7 lies in Hanford's 100 B/C Area, home to historic B and C Reactors. The waste site was excavated in two parts as 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1. The pair of excavations appear like pit mines. Mining engineers were hired to design their tiered sides, with safety benches every 17 feet and service ramps which allowed equipment access to the bottom of the excavations. The overall cleanup project was conducted over a span of almost 10 years. A variety of site characterization, excavation, load-out and sampling methodologies were employed at various stages of remediation. Alternative technologies were screened and evaluated during the project. A new method for cost effectively treating soils was implemented - resulting in significant cost savings. Additional opportunities for minimizing waste streams and recycling were identified and effectively implemented by the project team. During the final phase of cleanup the project team applied lessons learned throughout the entire project to address the final, remaining source of chromium contamination. The C-7 cleanup now serves as a model for remediating extensive deep zone contamination sites at Hanford. (authors)

  1. N Area Final Project Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, R.S.; Duncan, G.M; Trent, S.J.

    1998-07-01

    The N Area Final Project Program Plan is issued for information and use by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Restoration Contractor (ERC) for the Hanford Site, and other parties that require workscope knowledge for the deactivation of N Reactor facilities and remediation of the 100-N Area. This revision to the program plan contains the updated critical path schedule to deactivate N Reactor and its supporting facilities, cleanout of the N Reactor Fuel Storage Basin (105-N Basin), and remediate the 100-N Area. This document reflects notable changes in the deactivation plan for N Reactor, including changes in deactivation status, the N Basin cleanout task, and 100-N Area remediation

  2. Remedial Action Plan for Expanded Bioventing System Facility 6454

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    This draft remedial action plan (RAP) presents the scope for an expanded bioventing system for in situ treatment of fuel-contaminated soils at Site 6454 at Vandenberg Air Force Base (AFB), California...

  3. Tank waste remediation system characterization project quality policies. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trimble, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    These Quality Policies (QPs) describe the Quality Management System of the Tank Waste Characterization Project (hereafter referred to as the Characterization Project), Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS), Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The Quality Policies and quality requirements described herein are binding on all Characterization Project organizations. To achieve quality, the Characterization Project management team shall implement this Characterization Project Quality Management System

  4. Mitigation action plan for 300-FF-1 remedial action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, S.G.

    1996-10-01

    A record of decision was issued (dated July 1996), for remediation of waste sites in the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The selected remedies for the 300-FF-1 and 300-FF-5 waste sites include selective excavation and disposal of contaminated soil and debris from the process waste units, excavation and removal of the 618-4 Burial Ground, and institutional controls for groundwater. This mitigation action plan explains how cultural resources will be managed and how revegetation for these remedial activities will be planned

  5. Planning Complex Projects Automatically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Andrea L.; Stottler, Richard H.; Maher, Timothy P.

    1995-01-01

    Automated Manifest Planner (AMP) computer program applies combination of artificial-intelligence techniques to assist both expert and novice planners, reducing planning time by orders of magnitude. Gives planners flexibility to modify plans and constraints easily, without need for programming expertise. Developed specifically for planning space shuttle missions 5 to 10 years ahead, with modifications, applicable in general to planning other complex projects requiring scheduling of activities depending on other activities and/or timely allocation of resources. Adaptable to variety of complex scheduling problems in manufacturing, transportation, business, architecture, and construction.

  6. Tank waste remediation system systems engineering management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peck, L.G.

    1998-01-01

    This Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) describes the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) implementation of the US Department of Energy (DOE) systems engineering policy provided in 97-IMSD-193. The SEMP defines the products, process, organization, and procedures used by the TWRS Project to implement the policy. The SEMP will be used as the basis for tailoring the systems engineering applications to the development of the physical systems and processes necessary to achieve the desired end states of the program. It is a living document that will be revised as necessary to reflect changes in systems engineering guidance as the program evolves. The US Department of Energy-Headquarters has issued program management guidance, DOE Order 430. 1, Life Cycle Asset Management, and associated Good Practice Guides that include substantial systems engineering guidance

  7. Spent Nuclear Fuel project, project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuquay, B.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has been established to safely store spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. This Project Management Plan sets forth the management basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The plan applies to all fabrication and construction projects, operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities, and necessary engineering and management functions within the scope of the project

  8. UMTRA Project environmental, health, and safety plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    The basic health and safety requirements established in this plan are designed to provide guidelines to be applied at all Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites. Specific restrictions are given where necessary. However, an attempt has been made to provide guidelines which are generic in nature, and will allow for evaluation of site-specific conditions. Health and safety personnel are expected to exercise professional judgment when interpreting these guidelines to ensure the health and safety of project personnel and the general population. This UMTRA Project Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH ampersand S) Plan specifies the basic Federal health and safety standards and special DOE requirements applicable to this program. In addition, responsibilities in carrying out this plan are delineated. Some guidance on program requirements and radiation control and monitoring is also included. An Environmental, Health, and Safety Plan shall be developed as part of the remedial action plan for each mill site and associated disposal site. Special conditions at the site which may present potential health hazards will be described, and special areas that should should be addressed by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) will be indicated. Site-specific EH ampersand S concerns will be addressed by special contract conditions in RAC subcontracts. 2 tabs

  9. NASA Remediation Technology Collaboration Development Task, Overview and Project Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, James G.

    2014-01-01

    An overview presentation of NASA's Remediation Technology Collaboration Development Task including the following project summaries: in situ groundwater monitor, in situ chemical oxidation, in situ bioremediation, horizontal multi-port well, and high resolution site characterization.

  10. Tank Farm Contractor Waste Remediation System and Utilization Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KIRKBRIDE, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System Operation and Utilization Plan updates the operating scenario and plans for the delivery of feed to BNFL Inc., retrieval of waste from single-shell tanks, and the overall process flowsheets for Phases I and II of the privatization of the Tank Waste Remediation System. The plans and flowsheets are updated with the most recent tank-by-tank inventory and sludge washing data. Sensitivity cases were run to evaluate the impact or benefits of proposed changes to the BNFL Inc. contract and to evaluate a risk-based SST retrieval strategy

  11. Remediation planning and risk assessment support through data fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Coleman Research's Data Fusion Modeling (DFM) services gives one the ability to use large geophysical and hydrological data sets, which include direct and indirect measurements, to obtain a unified mathematical model of the geology and hydrology at one's site. Coleman Research (CRC) has adapted highly stable and efficient statistical inversion techniques, developed over the past 20 years, to provide a 3D site model with quantified uncertainty based on state-of-the-art modeling codes. This site model supports risk assessment and remediation planning with enhanced numerical accuracy for tradeoff studies of alternate remediation strategies. Further, DFM supports real time model updates during remediation and site investigation

  12. Overcoming Barriers in the Implementation of Environmental Remediation Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-15

    characterization techniques and strategies; assessment of remediation technologies; techniques and strategies for post-remediation compliance monitoring; special issues such as the remediation of sites with dispersed radioactive contamination or mixed contamination by hazardous and radioactive substances, as well as monitored natural attenuation; and long term management issues at sites with residual contamination. It was noted that, although the understanding of the need to address radiological liabilities had gained considerable momentum since the end of the Cold War, in many Member States actual remediation programmes have made little progress beyond the assessment and perhaps the planning phase. This publication analyses the various drivers for remediation projects, possible obstacles and potential solutions to overcome those obstacles. It is noted that care must be taken when establishing measures that are intended to foster increased protection, for example a very prescriptive regulatory framework, as such measures may turn out to be counterproductive. The main obstacle in most cases is a lack of funding. A number of creative ways to structure projects and to identify sources of funds are discussed in this book.

  13. Overcoming Barriers in the Implementation of Environmental Remediation Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    characterization techniques and strategies; assessment of remediation technologies; techniques and strategies for post-remediation compliance monitoring; special issues such as the remediation of sites with dispersed radioactive contamination or mixed contamination by hazardous and radioactive substances, as well as monitored natural attenuation; and long term management issues at sites with residual contamination. It was noted that, although the understanding of the need to address radiological liabilities had gained considerable momentum since the end of the Cold War, in many Member States actual remediation programmes have made little progress beyond the assessment and perhaps the planning phase. This publication analyses the various drivers for remediation projects, possible obstacles and potential solutions to overcome those obstacles. It is noted that care must be taken when establishing measures that are intended to foster increased protection, for example a very prescriptive regulatory framework, as such measures may turn out to be counterproductive. The main obstacle in most cases is a lack of funding. A number of creative ways to structure projects and to identify sources of funds are discussed in this book.

  14. Research Plan: Foam Delivery of Remedial Amendments to Deep Vadose Zone for Metals and Radionuclides Remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Lirong; Hart, Andrea T.; Szecsody, James E.; Zhang, Z.F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Ankeny, Mark; Hull, Laurence; Oostrom, Martinus; Freshley, Mark D.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2009-01-01

    Research proposals were submitted to the Scientific and Technical Basis for In Situ Treatment of Metals and Radionuclides Technical Working Group under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office (specifically, EM-22). After a peer review and selection process, the proposal, 'Foam Delivery of Remedial Amendments to Deep Vadose Zone for Metals and Radionuclides Remediation,' submitted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was selected for support by the program. A research plan was requested for this EM funded project. The overall objective of this project is to develop foam delivery technology for the distribution of remedial amendments to deep vadose zone sediments for in situ immobilization of metal and radionuclide contaminants. The focus of this research in FY 2009 is on the physical aspects of the foam delivery approach. Specific objectives are to (1) study the foam quality (i.e. the gas volume fraction in foam) influence on injection pressure, (2) study the sediment air permeability influence on injection pressure, (3) investigate liquid uptake in sediment and determine whether a water front will be formed during foam delivery, (4) test amendment distance (and mass) delivery by foam from the injection point, (5) study the enhanced sweeping over heterogeneous systems (i.e., low K zones) by foam delivery relative to water-based delivery under vadose zone conditions, and (6) numerically simulate foam delivery processes in the vadose zone. Laboratory scale experiments will be conducted at PNNL to study a range of basic physical aspects of the foam propagation in sediments, including foam quality and sediment permeability influence on injection pressure, liquid uptake, and foam sweeping across heterogeneous systems. This study will be augmented with separate studies to be conducted at MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) to evaluate foam transport and amendment delivery at the intermediate-scale. The results of intermediate

  15. Risks management in project planning

    OpenAIRE

    Stankevičiūtė, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    Project management consists of two very important aspects – managing the right project and managing the project right. To know that you are managing the right project you need to ensure that your project is based on an actual requirement and that your project goal is relevant and beneficial. And professional project planning assists in managing project the right way. The project planning process is very time consuming and is one of the most important parts of the project management process. T...

  16. Tank waste remediation system nuclear criticality safety inspection and assessment plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VAIL, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    This plan provides a management approved procedure for inspections and assessments of sufficient depth to validate that the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) facility complies with the requirements of the Project Hanford criticality safety program, NHF-PRO-334, ''Criticality Safety General, Requirements''

  17. Remediation plan for contaminated areas by naturally occurring radioactivity materials in Syrian Petroleum Company oil fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shweikani, R.; Al-Masri, M. S.; Awad, I.

    2006-01-01

    The present report contains a detailed plan for remediation of areas contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive materials in the syrian Petroleum Company Oil fields. This plan includes a description of the contaminated areas and the procedures that will be followed before and during the execution of the project in addition to the final radiation surveys according to the Syrian regulations. In addition, responsibilities of the main personnel who will carry out the work have been defined and the future monitoring program of the remediated areas was determined. (author)

  18. Remediation plan for contaminated areas by naturally occurring radioactivity materials in Syrian petroleum company oil fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shwekani, R.; Al-Masri, M.S.; Awad, I.

    2005-08-01

    The present report contains a detailed plan for remediation of areas contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive materials in the Syrian petroleum company oil fields. This plan includes a description of the contaminated areas and the procedures that will be followed before and during the execution of the project in addition to the final radiation surveys according to the Syrian regulations. In addition, responsibilities of the main personnel who will carry out the work have been defined and the future monitoring program of the remediated areas was determined. (author)

  19. UMTRA Project value engineering plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    The objective of value engineering (VE) on the Uranium MILL Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is to ensure that remedial action at the UMTRA Project sites is performed to meet the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for inactive uranium mill tailings sites at the lowest cost, while maintaining a high quality of work. Through review of designs and consideration of reasonable, less expensive alternatives, VE can be an effective cost reduction tool and a means to improve the design. The UMTRA Project products are the design and construction of stabilized tailings embankments

  20. Draft Hanford Remedial Action Environmental Impact Statement and Comprehensive Land Use Plan: Volume 2 of 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This appendix discusses the scope of actions addressed in the Draft Hanford Remedial Action Environmental Impact Statement and Comprehensive Land Use Plan. To address the purpose and need for agency action identified in Chapter 2.0 of the HRA-EIS, the scope includes an evaluation of the potential environmental impacts associated with the remedial actions to be conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the provisions of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1989). These remedial actions would bring the Hanford Site into compliance with the applicable requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). The DOE program responsible for conducting remedial actions at the Hanford Site is referred to as the Richland Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. The Richland ER Project encompasses the following projects: radiation area remedial actions and underground storage tanks (UST); RCRA closures; single-shell tank (SST) closures; past-practice waste site operable unit (source and groundwater) remedial actions; surplus facility decommissioning; and waste storage and disposal facilities

  1. Planned Positron Factory project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Sohei

    1990-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, JAERI, has started, drafting a construction plan for the 'Positron Factory', in which intense energy-controllable monoenergetic positron beams are produced from pair-production reactions caused by high-energy electrons from a linac. The JAERI organized a planning committee to provide a basic picture for the Positron Factory. This article presents an overview of the interactions of positrons, intense positron sources and the research program and facilities planned for the project. The interactions of positrons and intense positron sources are discussed focusing on major characteristics of positrons in different energy ranges. The research program for the Positron Factory is then outlined, focusing on advanced positron annihilation techniques, positron spectroscopy (diffraction, scattering, channeling, microscopy), basic positron physics (exotic particle science), and positron beam technology. Discussion is also made of facilities required for the Positron Factory. (N.K.)

  2. Recertification Project Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's (WIPP) Recertification Project was established to meet the requirement placed in the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) to demonstrate WIPP's continued compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) disposal regulations at five-year intervals. This plan delineates the end goal of the effort, sets out interim goals, and offers up guiding assumptions. In general, it sets the overall direction for a highly complex and interdependent set of tasks leading to recertification of the repository in the spring of 2004. In addition, this plan establishes the institutional roles and responsibilities of WIPP project participants in the recertification effort and lays out a high-level schedule for producing the Compliance Recertification Application (CRA). Detailed plans from each organization supporting this project have been included with this document as attachments. Each participant plan provides significantly more detail with descriptions of activities that are designed to ensure a successful outcome. Woven throughout this plan are the elements of guidance and direction gained from technical exchanges with EPA managers and staff. An important principle on which this plan is built is that the process of recertification will not involve modification to the certification baseline, nor will it involve rule making of any kind. Only changes previously approved by the EPA will be detailed in the CRA. EPA-approved changes to the WIPP certification will be accepted through modification or will be approved through the annual change reporting process. For any compliance areas that have not changed since the submission of the Compliance Certification Application(CCA), these will merely be incorporated in the CRA by reference. The CRA will cover all information since the October 1996 submittal of the CCA. A second major principle on which this plan is built stems from the EPA WIPP Recertification Guidance. That guidance makes it clear that, if

  3. Environmental health and safety plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burman, S.N.; Tiner, P.F.; Gosslee, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environmental protection and safety and health (S and H) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all MSRE operations. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated at the MSRE that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and the best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air

  4. Environmental health and safety plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burman, S.N.; Tiner, P.F.; Gosslee, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environmental protection and safety and health (S and H) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all MSRE operations. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated at the MSRE that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and the best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air.

  5. Tank waste remediation system environmental program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borneman, L.E.

    1998-01-09

    This Environmental Program Plan has been developed in support of the Integrated Environmental, Safety and Health Management System and consistent with the goals of DOE/RL-96-50, Hanford Strategic Plan (RL 1996a), and the specifications and guidance for ANSI/ISO 14001-1996, Environmental Management Systems Specification with guidance for use (ANSI/ISO 1996).

  6. Tank waste remediation system environmental program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borneman, L.E.

    1998-01-01

    This Environmental Program Plan has been developed in support of the Integrated Environmental, Safety and Health Management System and consistent with the goals of DOE/RL-96-50, Hanford Strategic Plan (RL 1996a), and the specifications and guidance for ANSI/ISO 14001-1996, Environmental Management Systems Specification with guidance for use (ANSI/ISO 1996)

  7. Remedial Action and Waste Disposal Project Manager's Implementing Instructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dronen, V.R.

    1998-01-01

    These Project Manager's Implementing Instructions provide the performance standards required of all Environmental Restoration Contractor personnel in their work during operation and administration of the Remedial Action and Waste Disposal Project. The instructions emphasize technical competency, workplace discipline, and personal accountability to ensure a high level of safety and performance during operations activities

  8. Remedial action and waste disposal project -- 100-DR-1 remedial action readiness assessment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    April, J.G.; Ard, J.A.; Corpuz, F.M.; DeMers, S.K.; Donahoe, R.L.; Frank, J.M.; Hobbs, B.J.; Roeck, F.V.

    1997-02-01

    This readiness assessment report presents the results of the project readiness assessment for the 100-DR-1 source sites remediation. The assessment was conducted at the conclusion of a series of project activities that began in August 1996. These activities included confirming the completion of project-specific procedures, training of staff, obtaining support equipment, receipt of subcontractor submittals, and mobilization and construction of site support systems

  9. Hanford well remediation and decommissioning plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledgerwood, R.K.

    1993-01-01

    Protection of Hanford Site groundwater resources and assessment of the effects of their use or contamination upon public safety are required by federal and state regulations and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) policy, (DOE, 1989). Compliance with constraints applicable to the use of existing wells requires assessment as to the suitability for use and needs for rehabilitation, remediation or decommissioning of existing groundwater wells and other boreholes potentially affecting aquifers beneath the Hanford Site. Approximately 3,500 groundwater wells and vadose zone boreholes had been drilled on the Hanford Site prior to 1989, over 2,900 still exist. Most of these boreholes were drilled prior to 1987 and do not conform to presently accepted construction standards intended to protect groundwater resources. Approximately 260 wells have been installed since 1987. These wells were constructed to current standards for well construction which mandate seals between the permanent casing and the formation to prevent potential migration of contaminated liquid. Several programs presently construct and/or utilize existing and newly drilled wells to provide characterization and groundwater monitoring data. The programs are summarized

  10. Environmental Restoration Remedial Actions Program Field Office Work Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    The Environmental Restoration Remedial Actions (ERRA) Program was established by DP to comply with regulations for characterization and cleanup of inactive waste sites. The program specifically includes inactive site identification and characterization, technology development and demonstration, remedial design and cleanup action, and postclosure activities of inactive radioactive, chemically hazardous, and mixed waste sites. It does not include facility decontamination and decommissioning activities; these are included in a parallel program, Environmental Restoration Decontamination and Decommissioning (ERD and D), also managed by DP. The ERRA program was formally established in fiscal year (FY) 1988 at the Hanford Site to characterize and remediate inactive waste sites at Hanford. The objectives, planned implementation activities, and management planning for the ERRA Program are contained in several planning documents. These documents include planning for the national program and for the Hanford Program. This summary describes the major documents and the role and purpose of this Field Office Work Plan (FOWP) within the overall hierarchy of planning documents. 4 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs

  11. IX Disposition Project - project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, I.G.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents plans for resolving saving and disposal concerns for ion exchange modules, cartridge filters and columns. This plan also documents the project baselines for schedules, cost, and technical information

  12. Remedial action work plan for the Colonie site. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    The Colonie site is a DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) site located in the Town of Colonie, New York, and consisting of an interim storage site and several vicinity properties. The Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS) is the former National Lead (NL) Industries plant located at 1130 Central Avenue. There are 11 vicinity properties that received remedial action in 1984: 7 located south of the site on Yardboro and Palmer Avenues just across the Colonie-Albany town limits in Albany, and 4 located northwest of the site along Central Avenue in Colonie. Of these properties, nine are residences and two are commercial properties. This document describes the engineering design, construction, and associated plans for remedial action on the vicinity properties and the interim storage site. These plans include both radiological and chemical work. Radiological work includes: excavating the above-guideline radioactive wastes on the vicinity properties; designing required facilities for the interim storage site; preparing the interim storage site to receive these contaminated materials; transporting the contaminated materials to the interim waste storage stockpile; and preparing necessary schedules for accomplishing the remedial actions. Chemical work involves: developing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure plans; neutralizing chemical hazards associated with plating solutions; inventorying on-site chemicals; and disposal of chemicals and/or residues. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  13. Confirmatory radiological survey of the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project exterior portions, 1989-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forbes, G.H.; Egidi, P.V.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this independent assessment was to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with an independent verification (IV) that the soil at the Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) complies with applicable DOE guidelines. Oak Ridge National Laboratory/ Environmental Technology Section (ORNL/ETS) which is also located at the GJPO, was assigned by DOE as the Independent Verification Contractor (IVC). The assessment included reviews of the decontamination and decommissioning plan, annual environmental monitoring reports, data in the pre- and post-remedial action reports, reassessment reports and IV surveys. Procedures and field methods used during the remediation were reviewed, commented on, and amended as needed. The IV surveys included beta-gamma and gamma radiation scans, soil sampling and analyses. Based on the data presented in the post-remedial action report and the results of the IV surveys, the remediation of the outdoor portions of the GJPO has achieved the objectives. Residual deposits of uranium contamination may exist under asphalt because the original characterization was not designed to identify uranium and subsequent investigations were limited. The IVC recommends that this be addressed with the additional remediation. The IVC is working with the remedial action contractor (RAC) to assure that final documentation WM be sufficient for certification. The IVC will address additional remediation of buildings, associated utilities, and groundwater in separate reports. Therefore, this is considered a partial verification

  14. Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. P. Wells

    2006-09-19

    The remedial design/remedial action for Operable Unit 6-05 (Waste Area Group 6) and Operable Unit 10-04 (Waste Area Group 10) - collectively called Operable Unit 10-04 has been divided into four phases. Phase I consists of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operable Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase III will remediate lead contamination at a gun range, and Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance. This Phase III remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility (STF)-02 Gun Range located at the Idaho National Laboratory. Remediation of the STF-02 Gun Range will include excavating contaminated soils; physically separating copper and lead for recycling; returning separated soils below the remediation goal to the site; stabilizing contaminated soils, as required, and disposing of the separated soils that exceed the remediation goal; encapsulating and disposing of creosote-contaminated railroad ties and power poles; removing and disposing of the wooden building and asphalt pads found at the STF-02 Gun Range; sampling and analyzing soil to determine the excavation requirements; and when the remediation goals have been met, backfilling and contouring excavated areas and revegetating the affected area.

  15. Project Execution Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    sectors. The strategy to be employed for environmental restoration is based on commonality of work and the DOE EM Program's vision to remediate the contaminated sites on a project-specific, site-by-site basis over an approximate ten-year period to be completed by the year 2006

  16. Environmental restoration and remediation technical data management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, K.T.; Fox, R.D.

    1994-02-01

    The tasks performed in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) work plan for each Hanford Site operable unit must meet the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) and the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement, Ecology et. al 1992). An extensive amount of data will be generated in the evaluation and remediation of hazardous waste sites at the Site. The data must be of sufficient quality, as they will be used to evaluate the need, select the method(s), and support the full remediation of the waste sites as stipulated in the Tri-Party Agreement. In particular, a data management plan (DMP) is to be included in an RI/FS work plan for managing the technical data obtained during the characterization of an operable unit, as well as other data related to the study of the operable unit. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) sites are involved in the operable unit. Thus, the data management activities for the operable unit should be applied consistently to RCRA sites in the operable unit as well. This DMP provides common direction for managing-the environmental technical data of all defined operable units at the Hanford Site during the RI/FS activities. Details specific to an operable unit will be included in the actual work plan of that operable unit

  17. Putting ecology in environmental remediation: The strategic planning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapustka, L.A.; Williams, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    Traditional ecological studies have been conducted on many sites impacted by hazardous wastes. Yet in many cases, the information obtained has had limited value in the selection of remediation options. This paper discusses the importance of developing an ecological risk-based strategic plan to fulfill the scientific and social needs demanded in the remediation and restoration of hazardous waste sites. Ecological issues need to be considered seriously at the earliest phases of the scoping process. The decisions regarding selection of assessment endpoints and data quality objectives must be incorporated from the start to insure that cost-efficient and useful measurements are used. It is too late to develop effective ecological studies after the engineering decisions have been made. Strategic planning that integrates ecological concerns will minimize the frustration and the cost associated with clean up of hazardous waste sites and maximize the likelihood of successful site restoration

  18. Project Management Plan Solution Stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SATO, P.K.

    1999-08-31

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Solutions Stabilization subproject. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP) for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization and Deactivation Project, HNF-3617. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for the PFP Solution Stabilization subproject. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baselines to manage the execution of the Solution Stabilization subproject. Any deviations to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process.

  19. Project Management Plan Solution Stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SATO, P.K.

    1999-01-01

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Solutions Stabilization subproject. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP) for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization and Deactivation Project, HNF-3617. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for the PFP Solution Stabilization subproject. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baselines to manage the execution of the Solution Stabilization subproject. Any deviations to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process

  20. Integrating removal actions and remedial actions: Soil and debris management at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goidell, L.C.; Hagen, T.D.; Strimbu, M.J.; Dupuis-Nouille, E.M.; Taylor, A.C.; Weese, T.E.; Yerace, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    Since 1991, excess soil and debris generated at the Fernald Environmental management Project (FEMP) have been managed in accordance with the principles contained in a programmatic Removal Action (RvA) Work Plan (WP). This plan provides a sitewide management concept and implementation strategy for improved storage and management of excess soil and debris over the period required to design and construct improved storage facilities. These management principles, however, are no longer consistent with the directions in approved and draft Records of Decision (RODs) and anticipated in draft RODs other decision documents. A new approach has been taken to foster improved management techniques for soil and debris that can be readily incorporated into remedial design/remedial action plans. Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) process. This paper describes the methods that were applied to address the issues associated with keeping the components of the new work plan field implementable and flexible; this is especially important as remedial design is either in its initial stages or has not been started and final remediation options could not be precluded

  1. The Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Quality Assurance Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-03-12

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers are working on the Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Project. This project is a U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management-funded initiative designed to develop new methods, strategies, and technologies for characterizing, modeling, remediating, and monitoring soils and groundwater contaminated with metals, radionuclides, and chlorinated organics. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Technologies Project staff.

  2. Neste plans three projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Neste Chemicals (Helsinki) is discussing three joint ventures with local authorities in China, says Mikko Haapavaara, v.p./Asia. The projects should help the Finnish producer to increase sales in Asia by a considerable amount by 2000, he says. The plan involves production of polyethylene (PE), unsaturated polyester resins and PE compounding-all core operations. Sites have not been selected, but Shanghai is the favored location for the PE operations. The company is also looking at a site in the south, near Hong Kong, and at locations near Beijing. The PE plant would need to be near an ethylene unit, says Haapavaara. The PE resin plant would be designed to produce about 150,000 m.t./year and would cost about No. 150 million. A part of the output would need to be exported to take care of the financing, the company says. A feasibility study now under way with the potential Chinese partners should be completed by the end of March. The plant would use Neste's linear low-density PE process, proved in a world-scale plant at Beringen, Belgium. The compounding units would produce specialty PE material for the wire and cable and pipe industry. The company is a joint venture partner in a propane dehydrogenation/polypropylene (PP) plant and a minority partner in a Qualipoly, the 20,000 m.t./year unsaturated polyester resin producer

  3. Project Cost Estimation for Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    For Nevada Department of Transportation (NDOT), there are far too many projects that ultimately cost much more than initially planned. Because project nominations are linked to estimates of future funding and the analysis of system needs, the inaccur...

  4. Alcan Kitimat smelter modernization project remedial action scheme functional requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-09-09

    This paper identified remedial actions for reducing islanding and voltage collapse at the Alcan Kitimat smelter modernization project. The study was conducted after an earlier study indicated that the proposed project significantly increased electricity loads and stresses on Alcan's power system. Remedial actions included shedding the appropriate number of Kemano (KMO) generators; reducing Kitimat potline loads by de-saturating saturable reactors and lowering tap changers; and shedding potlines to preserve the Kitimat auxiliary load and facilitate power restoration. Power flow and transient stability studies were conducted to evaluate the impact of the remedial actions on the KMO generators and the transmission system. Results showed that fast load reduction improved power system response. Load reduction by changing the converter transformer tap reduced significant amounts of loads, but was too slow to be effective during fast voltage collapse. The study showed that although the remedial action scheme (RAS) reduced the impact of various contingencies on the Alcan system, performance was degraded due to the significant load increase. Fast load shedding capability was also reduced. It was concluded that further research is needed to develop and implement the RAS. 3 tabs., 7 figs.

  5. The Project of Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Bent

    1986-01-01

    This article contains an interview with John Friedmann. The interview covers two core areas in John Friedmann's work: (a) The history of planning, from the beginning of the industrial era till today and (b) radical planning and social mobilization. In relation to radical planning and social mobil...

  6. Remedial action and waste disposal project: 100-B/C remedial action readiness report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    April, J.G.; Bryant, D.L.; Cislo, G.B.

    1996-07-01

    This Readiness Evaluation Report presents the results of the project readiness evaluation to assess the readiness of the 100-B/C source sites remediation. The 100-B/C Area is located at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The evaluation was conducted at the conclusion of a series of readiness activities that began in May 1996. These activities included confirming the completion of project specific procedures, training of staff, obtaining support equipment, receipt of subcontractor submittals, approval of subcontractor submittals, and mobilization and construction of site support systems

  7. Project Specific Quality Assurance Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, K.S.

    1995-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) identifies the Westinghouse Hanford Co. (WHC) Quality Assurance (QA) program requirements for all contractors involved in the planning and execution of the design, construction, testing and inspection of the 200 Area Effluent BAT/AKART Implementation, Project W-291

  8. Remedial action and waste disposal project -- 300-FF-1 remedial action readiness assessment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, J.W.; Carlson, R.A.; Greif, A.A.; Johnson, C.R.; Orewiler, R.I.; Perry, D.M.; Remsen, W.E.; Tuttle, B.G.; Wilson, R.C.

    1997-09-01

    This report documents the readiness assessment for initial startup of the 300-FF-1 Remedial Action Task. A readiness assessment verifies and documents that field activities are ready to start (or restart) safely. The 300-FF-1 assessment was initiated in April 1997. Readiness assessment activities included confirming the completion of project-specific procedures and permits, training staff, obtaining support equipment, receipt and approval of subcontractor submittals, and mobilization and construction of site support systems. The scope of the 300-FF-1 Remedial Action Task includes excavation and disposal of contaminated soils at liquid waste disposal facilities and of waste in the 618-4 Burial Ground and the 300-FF-1 landfills. The scope also includes excavation of test pits and test trenches

  9. Why does project planning fail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, M.; Luciano, G.

    1991-01-01

    The technology of project controls have become increasingly sophisticated. Some say that the technological advancements of the Nineteen-Eighties represented a maturation of project control tools. Others say that the advancements were merely bells and whistles that added little or nothing to the project management process. Above it all, as we enter the Nineties, there is a popular outcry to get back to the basics of planning. The genesis of this outcry is the sobering impact of significant cost overruns and schedule extensions, even on projects that have employed the most advanced project control tools and systems. This paper examines the merits of taking a strategic approach to the project planning process. Within that context, there are basic goals of planning which are enduring through the life cycle of the project. Key reasons for failure and inability to achieve the goals of project planning are explained. By examining the goals of project planning and the reasons for failure, insight is provided into the role of project controls specialists and sophisticated project control tools in meeting the challenges of complex project management in the 1990's

  10. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. 1995 Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 23 1. 1, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, the DOE prepares an annual report to document the activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring program. This monitoring must comply with appropriate laws, regulations, and standards, and it must identify apparent and meaningful trends in monitoring results. The results of all monitoring activities must be communicated to the public. The UMTRA Project has prepared annual environmental reports to the public since 1989.

  11. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. 1995 Environmental Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 23 1. 1, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, the DOE prepares an annual report to document the activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring program. This monitoring must comply with appropriate laws, regulations, and standards, and it must identify apparent and meaningful trends in monitoring results. The results of all monitoring activities must be communicated to the public. The UMTRA Project has prepared annual environmental reports to the public since 1989

  12. Proposed plan for remedial action at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    This proposed plan addresses the management of contaminated material at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring site and nearby properties in St. Charles County, Missouri. The site consists of a chemical plant area and a noncontiguous limestone quarry, both of which are radioactively and chemically contaminated as a result of past processing and disposal activities. Explosives were produced at the chemical plant in the 1940s, and uranium and thorium materials were processed in the 1950s and 1960s. Various liquid, sludge, and solid wastes were disposed of at the Chemical plant area and in the quarry during that time. The Weldon Spring site is listed on the National Priorities List (NPL) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the site under its Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. The proposed plan is organized as follows: Chapter 2 presents the history and setting of the Weldon Spring site and briefly describes the contaminated material at the chemical plant area. Chapter 3 defines the scope of the remedial action and its role in the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project. Chapter 4 summarizes the risks associated with possible exposures to site contaminants in the absence of remedial action and identifies proposed cleanup levels for soil. Chapter 5 briefly describes the final alternatives considered for the remedial action. Chapter 6 summarizes the evaluation of final alternatives for managing the contaminated material, identifies the currently preferred alternative, and discusses a possible contingency remedy to provide treatment flexibility. Chapter 7 presents the community's role in this action. Chapter 8 is a list of the references cited in this proposed plan

  13. Work plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental assessment for the Colonie site, Colonie, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    This work plan has been prepared to document the scoping and planning process performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to support remedial action activities at the Colonie site. The site is located in eastern New York State in the town of Colonie near the city of Albany. Remedial action of the Colonie site is being planned as part of DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. The DOE is responsible for controlling the release of all radioactive and chemical contaminants from the site. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) must be prepared to support the decision-making process for evaluating remedial action alternatives. This work plan contains a summary of information known about the site as of January 1988, presents a conceptual site model that identifies potential routes of human exposure to site containments, identifies data gaps, and summarizes the process and proposed studies that will be used to fill the data gaps. In addition, DOE activities must be conducted in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which requires consideration of the environmental consequences of a proposed action as part of its decision-making process. This work also describes the approach that will be used to evaluate potential remedial action alternatives and includes a description of the organization, project controls, and task schedules that will be employed to fulfill the requirements of both CERCLA and NEPA. 48 refs., 18 figs., 25 tabs

  14. Tank waste remediation system retrieval authorization basis amendment task plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetz, T.G.

    1998-01-01

    This task plan is a documented agreement between Nuclear Safety and Licensing and the Process Development group within the Waste Feed Delivery organization. The purpose of this task plan is to identify the scope of work, tasks and deliverables, responsibilities, manpower, and schedules associated with an authorization basis amendment as a result of the Waste Feed Waste Delivery Program, Project W-211, and Project W-TBD

  15. The 100-C-7 Remediation Project. An Overview of One of DOE's Largest Remediation Projects - 13260

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, Thomas C. [U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Strom, Dean [Washington Closure Hanford LLC, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Beulow, Laura [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 309 Bradley Boulevard, Suite 115, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (RL), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington Closure Hanford LLC (WCH) completed remediation of one of the largest waste sites in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The waste site, 100-C-7, covers approximately 15 football fields and was excavated to a depth of 85 feet (groundwater). The project team removed a total of 2.3 million tons of clean and contaminated soil, concrete debris, and scrap metal. 100-C-7 lies in Hanford's 100 B/C Area, home to historic B and C Reactors. The waste site was excavated in two parts as 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1. The pair of excavations appear like pit mines. Mining engineers were hired to design their tiered sides, with safety benches every 17 feet and service ramps which allowed equipment access to the bottom of the excavations. The overall cleanup project was conducted over a span of almost 10 years. A variety of site characterization, excavation, load-out and sampling methodologies were employed at various stages of remediation. Alternative technologies were screened and evaluated during the project. A new method for cost effectively treating soils was implemented - resulting in significant cost savings. Additional opportunities for minimizing waste streams and recycling were identified and effectively implemented by the project team. During the final phase of cleanup the project team applied lessons learned throughout the entire project to address the final, remaining source of chromium contamination. The C-7 cleanup now serves as a model for remediating extensive deep zone contamination sites at Hanford. (authors)

  16. Communication and Stakeholder Involvement in Environmental Remediation Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-05-15

    The way in which members of the public perceive a contamination situation and an approach to the remediation of contaminated land will influence the decision making process in a variety of ways. Through communication between experts, decision makers and members of stakeholder communities, participatory processes and negotiation between different interest groups can sometimes be used effectively as mechanisms for improving the overall decision making process. The intention is to ensure a technically sound and socially acceptable decision that meets norms of adequacy or satisfactory performance in relation to a whole range of different concerns. Good communication strategies will encourage cooperation and understanding between different interested parties in remediation projects. Involvement of affected or interested persons can prevent fear driven reactions, which potentially damage public response and create undue expectations or unnecessary anxiety. For all environmental remediation (ER) cases, there is a risk that the process will fail if it does not respect social, environmental, political and economic dimensions. This requires open, clear and mutually agreed lines of communication among stakeholders within a well defined legal framework. A general recommendation is to involve them from a very early point in the process. This publication presents ER in plain language in such a way that implementers and regulators can communicate the motives and objectives of remediation projects to a variety of stakeholder communities in order to improve mutual understanding and facilitate dialogue between interested parties. ER is considered from two perspectives: technical and non-technical. A section that gives general ideas on the strategies to deal with stakeholder involvement and which discusses different aspects of the communication approaches in ER is then included. It is recognized that social, cultural and political situations are very diverse in different countries in

  17. Communication and Stakeholder Involvement in Environmental Remediation Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The way in which members of the public perceive a contamination situation and an approach to the remediation of contaminated land will influence the decision making process in a variety of ways. Through communication between experts, decision makers and members of stakeholder communities, participatory processes and negotiation between different interest groups can sometimes be used effectively as mechanisms for improving the overall decision making process. The intention is to ensure a technically sound and socially acceptable decision that meets norms of adequacy or satisfactory performance in relation to a whole range of different concerns. Good communication strategies will encourage cooperation and understanding between different interested parties in remediation projects. Involvement of affected or interested persons can prevent fear driven reactions, which potentially damage public response and create undue expectations or unnecessary anxiety. For all environmental remediation (ER) cases, there is a risk that the process will fail if it does not respect social, environmental, political and economic dimensions. This requires open, clear and mutually agreed lines of communication among stakeholders within a well defined legal framework. A general recommendation is to involve them from a very early point in the process. This publication presents ER in plain language in such a way that implementers and regulators can communicate the motives and objectives of remediation projects to a variety of stakeholder communities in order to improve mutual understanding and facilitate dialogue between interested parties. ER is considered from two perspectives: technical and non-technical. A section that gives general ideas on the strategies to deal with stakeholder involvement and which discusses different aspects of the communication approaches in ER is then included. It is recognized that social, cultural and political situations are very diverse in different countries in

  18. Project Quality Plan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandborg-Petersen, Ulrik; Øhrstrøm, Peter

    This document defines the procedures, standards, and strategies which will be used to ensure high standards of quality of the work produced within the HANDS project. It contains the following sections...

  19. Successful community relations efforts at the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, James E. Jr.; Meyer, Linda L.

    1992-01-01

    The Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) Community Relations Program involves many participants from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Prime Management Contractor (PMC) composed of M.K. Ferguson and Jacobs Engineering. The proactive community relations plan exceeds the compliance requirements of NEPA and CERCLA and is coordinated by a three-person staff of professional communicators. The program permeates many of the operating decisions and the result has been public acceptance of the Project and its actions to date, which has been to conduct remedial actions that will place the site in a radiologically and chemically safe condition, eliminating potential hazards to the public and environment. (author)

  20. Planning and Managing Drupal Projects

    CERN Document Server

    Nordin, Dani

    2011-01-01

    If you're a solo website designer or part of a small team itching to build interesting projects with Drupal, this concise guide will get you started. Drupal's learning curve has thrown off many experienced designers, particularly the way it handles design challenges. This book shows you the lifecycle of a typical Drupal project, with emphasis on the early stages of site planning. Learn how to efficiently estimate and set up your own project, so you can focus on ways to make your vision a reality, rather than let project management details constantly distract you. Plan and estimate your projec

  1. Research Planning and Evaluation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Seunghyun; Kim, Doyang; Ryu, Byunghoon; Lim, Chaeyoung; Song, Leeyoung; Lee, Youngchul; Han, Changsun; Kim, Hackchoon

    2011-12-01

    - To activate R and D through a systematic and impartial evaluation by using information on efficient distribution of research resource, setting project priorities, and measuring achievement against goals produced after research on planning and evaluation system for the government-funded project for KAERI was conducted. - Nuclear R and D project is the representative national R and D project which has been implemented in Korea. For the sustainable development of nuclear energy which supplies about 40% of total electricity generation and the enhancement of it innovative ability in the future, a systematic and efficient strategy in the planning stage is required

  2. Status and outlook for the WISMUT Remediation Project in the States of Thuringia and Saxony, Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, M.; Gatzweiler, R.; Jakubick, A.T.

    2002-01-01

    The ongoing WISMUT Remediation Program deals with the legacy of more than 40 years of largescale uranium mining and processing in the densely populated areas of Eastern Thuringia and Saxony (Germany). The mining and processing operations (total uranium production more than 220,000 tonnes) comprise an area of approx. 37 km 2 . WISMUT started with a complex site investigation program to determine the degree of contamination of affected areas and an extended environmental monitoring system of the pathways was established. The overall approach follows the general rule of guiding, planning and implementation of the site specific rehabilitation projects to ensure an optimal balance between rehabilitation costs and environmental benefits while complying with the applicable laws and requirements of the permitting agencies. The WISMUT approach to remediation can be viewed as an adaptable process tailored to specific circumstances and site specific situations taking public interests into account. Remediation solutions will be demonstrated by various site specific examples. The WISMUT decommissioning and rehabilitation project is now in its eleventh year and by middle of the year 2000 approximately half of the cleanup has been finished. A well thought out approach to water treatment and timely adjustment to changing conditions will help save water treatment costs. Consideration of the post rehabilitation use and surveillance requirements are an integral part of the optimisation of the remedial measures. (author)

  3. Project implementation plan: ASTD remote deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CRASS, D.W.

    1999-01-01

    This document is the project implementation plan for the ASTD Remote Deployment Project. The Plan identifies the roles and responsibilities for the project and defines the integration between the ASTD Project and the B-Cell Cleanout Project

  4. HANDI 2000 project execution plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BENNION, S.I.

    1999-01-01

    The HANDI 2000 project will meet some of the major objectives and goals of the PHMC Management and Integration Plan, HNF-MP-00/Rev. 11, by integrating the major Hanford business processes and their supporting information systems

  5. Project W-320 ALARA Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harty, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    This supporting document establishes the As Low As Reasonable Achievable (ALARA) Plan to be followed during Sluicing Project W-320 design and construction activities to minimize personnel exposure to radiation and hazardous materials

  6. Project W-320 ALARA Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harty, W.M.

    1995-06-06

    This supporting document establishes the As Low As Reasonable Achievable (ALARA) Plan to be followed during Sluicing Project W-320 design and construction activities to minimize personnel exposure to radiation and hazardous materials.

  7. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project: technical approach document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, PL95-604, grants the Secretary of Energy authority and responsibility to perform such actions as are necessary to minimize radiation health hazards and other environmental hazards from inactive uranium mill sites. These cleanup actions are to be performed in compliance with the EPA standards (40 CFR Part 192) which became final on March 7, 1983. This document describes the general technical approaches and design criteria that are adopted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in order to implement Remedial Action Plans (RAPs) and final designs that comply with EPA standards

  8. Programmatic Environmental Report for remedial actions at UMTRA [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action] Project vicinity properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-03-01

    This Environmental Report (ER) examines the environmental consequences of implementing a remedial action that would remove radioactive uranium mill tailings and associated contaminated materials from 394 vicinity properties near 14 inactive uranium processing sites included in the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project pursuant to Public Law 95--604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. Vicinity properties are those properties in the vicinity of the UMTRA Project inactive mill sites, either public or private, that are believed to be contaminated by residual radioactive material originating from one of the 14 inactive uranium processing sites, and which have been designated under Section 102(a)(1) of UMTRCA. The principal hazard associated with the contaminated properties results from the production of radon, a radioactive decay product of the radium contained in the tailings. Radon, a radioactive gas, can diffuse through the contaminated material and be released into the atmosphere where it and its radioactive decay products may be inhaled by humans. A second radiation exposure pathway results from the emission of gamma radiation from uranium decay products contained in the tailings. Gamma radiation emitted from contaminated material delivers an external exposure to the whole body. If the concentration of radon and its decay products is high enough and the exposure time long enough, or if the exposure to direct gamma radiation is long enough, cancers (i.e., excess health effects) may develop in persons living and working at the vicinity properties. 3 refs., 7 tabs

  9. Green PCB Remediation from Sediment Systems (GPRSS) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falker, John; Thompson, Karen; Zeitlin, Nancy; Quinn, Jacqueline; Parrish, Lewis M.

    2014-01-01

    An ongoing problem facing the global environment community including NASA centers is the removal and remediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). PCBs were commonly used in a variety of materials including paints, caulking, and adhesives due to the advantageous physical and chemical properties that PCBs imparted to these various materials. Unfortunately, these properties have made the treatment of sites contaminated with these chemicals extremely difficult to deal with, due to their inherent chemical stability. The remediation of sediments contaminated with PCBs is especially difficult, primarily due to the risk of releasing the contaminant into the environment during the treatment process. Traditional treatment options involve the use of dredging and incineration of the contaminated soils/sediments, in which the chance of releasing the contaminants is greatly increased. The purpose of this project is to develop cleanup technology capable of remediating contaminated sediments in-situ, with minimum intrusion. This allows for the minimization of any potential contaminant release during the treatment process, providing a safer method for cleanup operations (as opposed to dredging/incineration) and still treating the basic problem of PCB contamination (as opposed to capping).

  10. UMTRA Project Office quality assurance program plan. Revision 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project was established to accomplish remedial actions at inactive uranium mill tailings sites. The UMTRA Project's mission is to stabilize and control the residual radioactive materials at designated sites in a safe and environmentally sound manner so as to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public. Because these efforts may involve possible risks to public health and safety, a quality assurance (QA) program that conforms to the applicable criteria has been established to control the quality of the work. This document, the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP), brings into one document the essential criteria to be applied on a selective basis, depending upon the nature of the activity being conducted, and describes how those criteria shall be applied to the UMTRA Project. QA requirements contained in this QAPP shall apply to all personnel, processes, and activities, including planning, scheduling, and cost control, performed by the UMTRA Project Office and its contractors

  11. US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action ground water Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The scope of the Project is to develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for all 24 UMTRA processing sites. The compliance strategy for the processing sites must satisfy requirements of the proposed EPA ground water cleanup standards in 40 CFR Part 192, Subparts B and C (1988). This scope of work will entail the following activities, on a site-specific basis: Development of a compliance strategy based upon modification of the UMTRA Surface Project remedial action plans (RAP) or development of Ground Water Project RAPs with NRC and state or tribal concurrence on the RAP; implementation of the RAP to include establishment of institutional controls, where appropriate; institution of long-term verification monitoring for transfer to a separate DOE program on or before the Project end date; and preparation of completion reports and final licensing on those sites that will be completed prior to the Project end date

  12. Route planning algorithms: Planific@ Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Martín Ortega

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Planific@ is a route planning project for the city of Madrid (Spain. Its main aim is to develop an intelligence system capable of routing people from one place in the city to any other using the public transport. In order to do this, it is necessary to take into account such things as: time, traffic, user preferences, etc. Before beginning to design the project is necessary to make a comprehensive study of the variety of main known route planning algorithms suitable to be used in this project.

  13. Tank waste remediation system characterization project quality policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Board, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    This quality plan describes the system used by Characterization Project management to achieve quality. This plan is comprised of eleven quality policies which, when taken together, form a management system deployed to achieve quality. This quality management system is based on the customer's quality requirements known as the 'RULE', 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance

  14. Tank waste remediation system multi-year work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Multi-Year Work Plan (MYWP) documents the detailed total Program baseline and was constructed to guide Program execution. The TWRS MYWP is one of two elements that comprise the TWRS Program Management Plan. The TWRS MYWP fulfills the Hanford Site Management System requirement for a Multi-Year Program Plan and a Fiscal-Year Work Plan. The MYWP addresses program vision, mission, objectives, strategy, functions and requirements, risks, decisions, assumptions, constraints, structure, logic, schedule, resource requirements, and waste generation and disposition. Sections 1 through 6, Section 8, and the appendixes provide program-wide information. Section 7 includes a subsection for each of the nine program elements that comprise the TWRS Program. The foundation of any program baseline is base planning data (e.g., defendable product definition, logic, schedules, cost estimates, and bases of estimates). The TWRS Program continues to improve base data. As data improve, so will program element planning, integration between program elements, integration outside of the TWRS Program, and the overall quality of the TWRS MYWP. The MYWP establishes the TWRS baseline objectives to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The TWRS Program will complete the baseline mission in 2040 and will incur costs totalling approximately 40 billion dollars. The summary strategy is to meet the above objectives by using a robust systems engineering effort, placing the highest possible priority on safety and environmental protection; encouraging open-quotes out sourcingclose quotes of the work to the extent practical; and managing significant but limited resources to move toward final disposition of tank wastes, while openly communicating with all interested stakeholders

  15. Tank waste remediation system multi-year work plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Multi-Year Work Plan (MYWP) documents the detailed total Program baseline and was constructed to guide Program execution. The TWRS MYWP is one of two elements that comprise the TWRS Program Management Plan. The TWRS MYWP fulfills the Hanford Site Management System requirement for a Multi-Year Program Plan and a Fiscal-Year Work Plan. The MYWP addresses program vision, mission, objectives, strategy, functions and requirements, risks, decisions, assumptions, constraints, structure, logic, schedule, resource requirements, and waste generation and disposition. Sections 1 through 6, Section 8, and the appendixes provide program-wide information. Section 7 includes a subsection for each of the nine program elements that comprise the TWRS Program. The foundation of any program baseline is base planning data (e.g., defendable product definition, logic, schedules, cost estimates, and bases of estimates). The TWRS Program continues to improve base data. As data improve, so will program element planning, integration between program elements, integration outside of the TWRS Program, and the overall quality of the TWRS MYWP. The MYWP establishes the TWRS baseline objectives to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The TWRS Program will complete the baseline mission in 2040 and will incur costs totalling approximately 40 billion dollars. The summary strategy is to meet the above objectives by using a robust systems engineering effort, placing the highest possible priority on safety and environmental protection; encouraging {open_quotes}out sourcing{close_quotes} of the work to the extent practical; and managing significant but limited resources to move toward final disposition of tank wastes, while openly communicating with all interested stakeholders.

  16. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 300-FF-1 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    Over 1,400 waste facilities have been identified on the Hanford Site. Most of the waste facilities are located within geographic areas on the Hanford Site that are referred to as the 100, 200, 300, 400, and 1100 areas. The purpose of this work plan is to document the project scoping process and to outline all remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) activities, to determine the nature and extent of the threat presented by releases of hazardous substances from the operable unit, and to evaluate proposed remedies for such releases. The goal of the 300-FF-1 remedial investigation (RI) is to provide sufficient information needed to conduct the feasibility study (FS), by determining the nature and extent of the threat to public health and the environment posed by releases of hazardous substances from 300-FF-1, and the performance of specific remedial technologies. 62 refs., 28 figs., 48 tabs

  17. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Citizen Science Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Quality Assurance Project Plan is necessary for every project that collects or uses environmental data. It documents the project planning process and serves as a blueprint for how your project will run.

  18. Project management approach for the Waste Area Grouping 6 Closure/Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    This document has been developed as a preliminary definition of the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 Closure Project Management Approach. The purpose of this document is to identify the roles and responsibilities of the various project team members and to identify the project scope, schedule and budget. This document is intended to be a living document. As information develops, this document will be revised to create a WAG 6 Project Management Plan (PMP). The PMP will provide additional focus to the information contained in this document. The information required will be available as the selected alternative for remediation of WAG 6 is approved and Remedial Action Plans are conceptualized. This document has been reviewed against, and is intended to be consistent with, the Environmental Restoration Program Management Plan

  19. ERD UMTRA Project quality assurance program plan, Revision 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document is the revised Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) dated September, 1995 for the Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). Quality Assurance requirements for the ERD UMTRA Project are based on the criteria outlined in DOE Order 5700.6C or applicable sections of 10 CFR 830.120. QA requirements contained in this QAPP shall apply to all personnel, processes, and activities, including planning, scheduling, and cost control, performed by the ERD UMTRA Project and its contractors

  20. 40 CFR 85.1802 - Notice to manufacturer of nonconformity; submission of Remedial Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... nonconformity; submission of Remedial Plan. 85.1802 Section 85.1802 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Regulations § 85.1802 Notice to manufacturer of nonconformity; submission of Remedial Plan. (a) A manufacturer... category of vehicles or engines encompassed by the determination of nonconformity, will give the factual...

  1. 40 CFR 92.704 - Notice to manufacturer or remanufacturer of nonconformity; submission of remedial plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... remanufacturer of nonconformity; submission of remedial plan. 92.704 Section 92.704 Protection of Environment... nonconformity; submission of remedial plan. (a) The manufacturer or remanufacturer will be notified whenever the... category of locomotives or locomotive engines encompassed by the determination of nonconformity, will give...

  2. Project Execution Plan, Rev. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IT Corporation, Las Vegas

    2002-01-01

    This plan addresses project activities encompassed by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, Environmental Restoration Division and conforms to the requirements contained in the Life-Cycle Asset Management, DOE Order 430.1A; The Joint Program Office Policy on Project Management in Support of DOE Order 430.1; Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE Order 413.3; the Project Execution and Engineering Management Planning Guide, GPG-FM-010; and other applicable Good Practice Guides; and the FY 2001 Integrated Planning, Accountability, and Budgeting System Policy Guidance. The plan also reflects the milestone philosophies of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, as agreed to by the State of Nevada, the DOE, and the U.S. Department of Defense; and traditional project management philosophies such as the development of life-cycle costs, schedules, and work scope; identification o f roles and responsibilities; and baseline management and controls

  3. FY 1995 Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, D.R.; Herbes, S.E.

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide key information needed by decision makers to expedite the process of environmental restoration and to provide the data base required by the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). WAG 2 is the major drainage system downgradient of other WAGs that contain significant sources of contamination at ORNL. Field activities to support the remedial investigation for the RI portion include characterization of the nature and extent of contamination in WAG 2 [consisting of White Oak Creek (WOC) and associated tributaries and floodplain, White Oak Lake (WOL), and White Oak Creek Embayment (WOCE)], specifically to support risk-based remediation decisions. The project consists of three phases: Phase 1, initial scoping characterization to determine the need for early action; Phase 2, interim activities during remediation of upslope WAGs to evaluate potential changes in the contamination status of WAG 2 that would necessitate revaluation of the need for early action; and Phase 3, completion of the RI process following remediation of upslope WAGs. Overall RI objectives, consistent with ORNL Environmental Restoration (ER) Program strategic objectives to reduce risks and comply with environmental regulations, are discussed in the WAG 2 Remedial Investigation Plan

  4. PACTEL OECD project planning (PACO). PACTEL OECD project planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouhia, V.; Purhonen, H. [Lappeenranta University of Technology (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    OECD launched the SETH project to investigate issues relevant for accident prevention and management and to ensure the existence of integral thermal hydraulic test facilities. The facilities included in the SETH project are PKL from Germany and PANDA from Switzerland. At the early stages of the SETH project an idea was raised to exploit the PACTEL facility in a similar OECD project. Without any external funding the analytical work in the required extent would not be possible within Lappeenranta University of Technology, the party responsible of operating PACTEL. This fact directed the PACO project proposal to be conducted for the SAFIR programme. The aim of the PACO project is to prepare a project proposal to OECD of a PACTEL related project. To attain this objective some preliminary analyses have to be performed to ensure the relevancy of the proposed topic. The low power situation, i.e. midloop state was chosen to be the topic in the PACO studies and project planning basis. The plan is to use PACTEL to examine vertical steam generator behaviour during the midloop operation and the following loss of residual heat removal system transient. Such a possibility is acknowledged with special alterations to PACTEL. The APROS code version 5.04.07 was selected as a tool for the preanalyses. The virtual simulation of the chosen experimental situation would give a preconception on the phenomena to be expected and the progression of the transient. Originally the PACO project was planned to continue only for a few months, ending up with the project proposal to OECD during the summer time 2004. During the pre-calculation process it became obvious that the time expected was not enough to establish good pre-calculation results. The reasons for this relates to time used to learn and adapt the use of the chosen code, improvements and corrections in modelling as well as the code ability to manage the special conditions defined for the project topic. Another aspect on completing a

  5. Chernobyl 30 years on. Key remediation and safety projects are 'on track'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, David [NucNet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    Thirty years after the accident at Chernobyl, key remediation and safety projects are on track and construction of the vital Euro 1.5 bn (US Dollars 1.6 bn) New Safe Confinement (NSC) is almost finished with commissioning scheduled for November 2017, the company in charge of construction and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) told NucNet. The NSC is the most high profile and expensive element of the US Dollars 2.15 bn Shelter Implementation Plan (SIP), a framework developed to overcome the consequences of the accident.

  6. Quality planning in Construction Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, I.; Shafiq, Nasir; Nuruddin, M. F.

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate deeper on the factors that contribute to the effectiveness of quality planning, identifying the common problems encountered in quality planning, practices and ways for improvements in quality planning for construction projects. This paper involves data collected from construction company representatives across Malaysia that are obtained through semi-structured interviews as well as questionnaire distributions. Results shows that design of experiments (average index: 4.61), inspection (average index: 4.45) and quality audit as well as other methods (average index: 4.26) rank first, second and third most important factors respectively.

  7. Tank waste remediation system integrated technology plan. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, B.; Ignatov, A.; Johnson, S.; Mann, M.; Morasch, L.; Ortiz, S.; Novak, P. [eds.] [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-02-28

    The Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, is operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors. Starting in 1943, Hanford supported fabrication of reactor fuel elements, operation of production reactors, processing of irradiated fuel to separate and extract plutonium and uranium, and preparation of plutonium metal. Processes used to recover plutonium and uranium from irradiated fuel and to recover radionuclides from tank waste, plus miscellaneous sources resulted in the legacy of approximately 227,000 m{sup 3} (60 million gallons) of high-level radioactive waste, currently in storage. This waste is currently stored in 177 large underground storage tanks, 28 of which have two steel walls and are called double-shell tanks (DSTs) an 149 of which are called single-shell tanks (SSTs). Much of the high-heat-emitting nuclides (strontium-90 and cesium-137) has been extracted from the tank waste, converted to solid, and placed in capsules, most of which are stored onsite in water-filled basins. DOE established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program in 1991. The TWRS program mission is to store, treat, immobilize and dispose, or prepare for disposal, the Hanford tank waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. Technology will need to be developed or improved to meet the TWRS program mission. The Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) is the high-level consensus plan that documents all TWRS technology activities for the life of the program.

  8. Tank waste remediation system integrated technology plan. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, B.; Ignatov, A.; Johnson, S.; Mann, M.; Morasch, L.; Ortiz, S.; Novak, P.

    1995-01-01

    The Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, is operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors. Starting in 1943, Hanford supported fabrication of reactor fuel elements, operation of production reactors, processing of irradiated fuel to separate and extract plutonium and uranium, and preparation of plutonium metal. Processes used to recover plutonium and uranium from irradiated fuel and to recover radionuclides from tank waste, plus miscellaneous sources resulted in the legacy of approximately 227,000 m 3 (60 million gallons) of high-level radioactive waste, currently in storage. This waste is currently stored in 177 large underground storage tanks, 28 of which have two steel walls and are called double-shell tanks (DSTs) an 149 of which are called single-shell tanks (SSTs). Much of the high-heat-emitting nuclides (strontium-90 and cesium-137) has been extracted from the tank waste, converted to solid, and placed in capsules, most of which are stored onsite in water-filled basins. DOE established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program in 1991. The TWRS program mission is to store, treat, immobilize and dispose, or prepare for disposal, the Hanford tank waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. Technology will need to be developed or improved to meet the TWRS program mission. The Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) is the high-level consensus plan that documents all TWRS technology activities for the life of the program

  9. Final 2014 Remedial Action Report Project Chariot, Cape Thompson, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-03-01

    This report was prepared to document remedial action (RA) work performed at the former Project Chariot site located near Cape Thompson, Alaska during 2014. The work was managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Alaska District for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM). Due to the short field season and the tight barge schedule, all field work was conducted at the site July 6 through September 12, 2014. Excavation activities occurred between July 16 and August 26, 2014. A temporary field camp was constructed at the site prior to excavation activities to accommodate the workers at the remote, uninhabited location. A total of 785.6 tons of petroleum, oil, and lubricants (POL)-contaminated soil was excavated from four former drill sites associated with test holes installed circa 1960. Diesel was used in the drilling process during test hole installations and resulted in impacts to surface and subsurface soils at four of the five sites (no contamination was identified at Test Hole Able). Historic information is not definitive as to the usage for Test Hole X-1; it may have actually been a dump site and not a drill site. In addition to the contaminated soil, the steel test hole casings were decommissioned and associated debris was removed as part of the remedial effort.

  10. Environmental management audit, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) has established, as part of the internal oversight responsibilities within Department of Energy (DOE), a program within the Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), to conduct environmental audits at DOE's operating facilities. This document contains the results of the Environmental Management Audit of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. This Environmental Management Audit was conducted by the DOE's Office of Environmental Audit from October 26 through November 6, 1992. The audit's objective is to advise the Secretary as to the adequacy of UMTRA's environmental programs, and management organization in ensuring environmental protection and compliance with Federal, state, and DOE environmental requirements. This Environmental Management Audit's scope was comprehensive and covered all areas of environmental management with the exception of environmental programs pertaining to the implementation of the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which is the responsibility of the DOE Headquarters Office of NEPA Oversight

  11. Environmental Audit, Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Baseline Audit of DOE's Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP), located in St. Charles, Missouri. The purpose of the Environmental Baseline Audit is to provide the Secretary of Energy with concise information pertaining to the following issues: (1) compliance status with applicable environmental regulations (with the exception of National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA] requirements); (2) adherence to best management and accepted industry practices; (3) DOE vulnerabilities and liabilities associated with compliance status, environmental conditions, and management practices; (4) root causes of compliance findings (CF) and best management practice (BMP) findings; (5) adequacy of environmental management programs and organizations; and (6) noteworthy practices. This information will assist DOE in determining patterns and trends in environmental compliance, BMPs, and root causes, and will provide the information necessary for line management to take appropriate corrective actions. 6 figs., 11 tabs

  12. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Vicinity Property Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, L.E.; Potter, R.F.; Arpke, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    The Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Grand Junction Project Vicinity Property Program is a $165 million program for the removal and disposal of uranium mill tailings that were used in the construction of approximately 4,000 residences, commercial buildings, and institutional facilities in the City of Grand Junction and surrounding Mesa County, Colorado. This paper discusses the UMTRA Vicinity Property Program and the economic benefits of this program for the City of Grand Junction and Mesa County, Colorado. The Bureau of Reclamation Economic Assessment Model (BREAM) was used to estimate the increases in employment and increases in personal income in Mesa County that result from the Vicinity Property Program. The effects of program-related changes in income and taxable expenditures on local and state tax revenue are also presented

  13. 200-UP-1 groundwater remedial design/remedial action work plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    This 200-UP-1 remedial design report presents the objective and rationale developed for the design and implementation of the selected interim remedial measure for the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit, located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site

  14. Draft programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for performing remedial action to bring surface and ground water contaminant levels at 24 inactive uranium processing sites into compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards. DOE is accomplishing this through the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface and Ground Water Projects. Remedial action will be conducted with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the full participation of affected states and Indian tribes. Uranium processing activities at most of 24 the inactive mill sites resulted in the contamination of ground water beneath and, in some cases, downgradient of the sites. This contaminated ground water often has elevated levels of constituents such as uranium and nitrate. The purpose of the UMTRA Ground Water Project is to eliminate, or reduce to acceptable levels, the potential health and the environmental consequences of milling activities by meeting the EPA standards in areas where ground water has been contaminated. The first step in the UMTRA Ground Water Project is the preparation of this programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS). This document analyzes potential impacts of four programmatic alternatives, including the proposed action. The alternatives do not address site-specific ground water compliance strategies. Rather, the PEIS is a planning document that provides a framework for conducting the Ground Water Project; assesses the potential programmatic impacts of conducting the Ground Water Project; provides a method for determining the site-specific ground water compliance strategies; and provides data and information that can be used to prepare site-specific environmental impacts analyses more efficiently

  15. Planning for high performance project teams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, W.; Keeney, J.; Westney, R.

    1997-01-01

    Both industry-wide research and corporate benchmarking studies confirm the significant savings in cost and time that result from early planning of a project. Amoco's Team Planning Workshop combines long-term strategic project planning and short-term tactical planning with team building to provide the basis for high performing project teams, better project planning, and effective implementation of the Amoco Common Process for managing projects

  16. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Safety Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvin, L.J.

    1996-02-01

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Safety Management Plan describes the new nuclear facility regulatory requirements basis for the Spemt Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project and establishes the plan to achieve compliance with this basis at the new SNF Project facilities

  17. Ferrier Groundwater Remediation Project: A proactive response to public concerns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulton, B.D.

    1993-01-01

    The Ferrier gas plant in Alberta is owned by Pembina Resources and produces ca 10 m 3 /d of oil, 8,000 l/d of natural gas liquids, and sales gas. In late 1992, contamination from benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene was detected in a residential water well south of the plant. A site investigation found that a drain line from the plant's dehydrator still column to the flare was leaking, and that a well in the process building had free condensate on the water. Within the first three weeks of the initial report of contamination, the source of contamination had been identified, soil gas surveys had been conducted, integrity of pipelines was tested, piezometers were installed, and the first of many public meetings was held to inform residents of progress in tackling the problem. An action plan was developed and alternative water supplies were installed for affected residents. Newsletters were mailed to local residents concerning progress on remediation and plans to control the source and to capture the contamination plume were shared with the community at all times. Recovery wells to capture the plume were drilled and the captured water was treated and returned to the aquifer. Control of the source (the free condensate floating on the water table) was tackled by installing a recovery trench with drain lines. Meetings with the local residents' committee will continue to maintain trust with the community

  18. Project of the Year Submittal SY-101 Surface Level Rise Remediation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BAUER, R.E.

    2001-01-01

    CH2M HILL Hanford Group is pleased to nominate the SY-101 Surface Level Rise Remediation Project (SLRRP) for the Project Management Institute's consideration as International Project of the Year for 2001. We selected this project as being our best recent example of effective project management, having achieved and exceeded our client's expectations in resolving urgent safety issues related to the storage of high level nuclear waste. In reflection, we consider the SY-101 SLRRP to be a prime example of safe and effective project delivery. The pages that follow present the tools and techniques employed to manage this complex and technically challenging project. Our objective in submitting this nomination is twofold--to share the lessons we have learned with other organizations, and to honor the men and women who contributed to this endeavor. It was by their diligent effort that the successes we relate here were accomplished 10 months ahead of schedule and one million dollars below the authorized budget

  19. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Salt Lake City, Utah. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan describes planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site in Salt Lake City, Utah. This plan identifies and justifies sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for routine monitoring of ground water, sediments, and surface waters at monitoring stations on the site

  20. Sustainable geoengineering projects for the remediation of mine site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Perez-Sirvent, Carmen; Garcia-Lorenzo, Maria Luz; Martinez-Lopez, Salvadora; Gonzalez, Eva; Perez-Espinosa, Victor; Molina-Ruiz, Jose; Belen Martinez, Lucia; Hernandez, Carmen; Bech, Jaime; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    A large number of soils are contaminated by heavy metals due to mining activities, generating adverse effects on human health and the environment. In response to these negative effects, a variety of technologies have been developed. In situ immobilization by means of soil amendment is a non-intrusive and cost effective alternative that transforms the highly mobile toxic heavy metals to physico-chemically stable forms. Limestone filler is a good selection for such a purpose, because of its characteristics. In addition, the use of this amendment could revalorize the residues, reducing the costs of the process. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of an immobilization technique in sediments contaminated by heavy metals. Two experimental areas, approximately 1 Ha each one, were selected, and technosols were developed as follows: original sediments, sediments mixed with limestone filler in a 1:1 proportion, gravel to avoid capillary and natural soil to allow plant growth. After the remediation technique was applied, monitoring was done in 18 points collecting samples (sediment and water) during a 4 years period at two month intervals. The pH and electrical conductivity as well as the heavy metal (Zn, Pb, Cd, Cu and As) contents were measured. Microtox bioassay was also applied. Sediments before the remediation technique showed acidic pH, high EC values and high trace elements content. The results obtained after the immobilization showed that sediment samples had neutral pH (average value of 8.3) low electrical conductivity (1.32 dS m-1) and low trace elements concentration. It can be concluded that the use of limestone filler is an excellent option in sediments polluted because of the risk for human health or ecosystem disappears or is decreased in a large extent. In addition, the designed experience allows stabilizer proportion to be optimized and may suppose a big cost-saving in the project in areas affected by mining activities.

  1. Pad A treatability study long-range project plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousseau, J.D.

    1991-06-01

    This plan addresses the work to be accomplished by the Pad A Treatability Study Project. The purpose of this project is to investigate potential treatment and separation technologies, identify the best technologies, and to demonstrate by both lab- and pilot-scale demonstration, the most applicable remedial technologies for treating plutonium-contaminated salts at the Pad A site located at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) a the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The conduct of this project will be supported by other DOE laboratories, universities, and private industries, who will provide support for near-term demonstrations of treatment and separation technologies. The purpose of this long-range planning document is to present the detailed plan for the implementation of the Pad A Treatability Study Project

  2. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    In 1992, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project experienced several health and safety related incidents at active remediation project sites. As a result, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) directed the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to establish a program increasing the DOE`s overall presence at operational remediation sites to identify and minimize risks in operations to the fullest extent possible (Attachments A and B). In response, the TAC, in cooperation with the DOE and the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), developed the Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program.

  3. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    In 1992, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project experienced several health and safety related incidents at active remediation project sites. As a result, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) directed the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to establish a program increasing the DOE's overall presence at operational remediation sites to identify and minimize risks in operations to the fullest extent possible (Attachments A and B). In response, the TAC, in cooperation with the DOE and the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), developed the Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program

  4. Remedial design work plan for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    The Remedial Design Work Plan (RDWP) for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) Operable Unit (OU) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This remedial action fits into the overall Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) cleanup strategy by addressing contaminated floodplain soil. The objective of this remedial action is to minimize the risk to human health and the environment from contaminated soil in the Lower EFPC floodplain pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (1992). In accordance with the FFA, a remedial investigation (RI) (DOE 1994a) and a feasibility study (DOE 1994b) were conducted to assess contamination of the Lower EFPC and propose remediation alternatives. The remedial investigation determined that the principal contaminant is mercury, which originated from releases during Y-12 Plant operations, primarily between 1953 and 1963. The recommended alternative by the feasibility study was to excavate and dispose of floodplain soils contaminated with mercury above the remedial goal option. Following the remedial investigation/feasibility study, and also in accordance with the FFA, a proposed plan was prepared to more fully describe the proposed remedy.

  5. Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. P. Wells

    2006-11-14

    This Phase IV Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of areas with the potential for UXO at the Idaho National Laboratory. These areas include portions of the Naval Proving Ground, the Arco High-Altitude Bombing Range, and the Twin Buttes Bombing Range. Five areas within the Naval Proving Ground that are known to contain UXO include the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area, the Mass Detonation Area, the Experimental Field Station, The Rail Car Explosion Area, and the Land Mine Fuze Burn Area. The Phase IV remedial action will be concentrated in these five areas. For other areas, such as the Arco High-Altitude Bombing Range and the Twin Buttes Bombing Range, ordnance has largely consisted of sand-filled practice bombs that do not pose an explosion risk. Ordnance encountered in these areas will be addressed under the Phase I Operations and Maintenance Plan that allows for the recovery and disposal of ordnance that poses an imminent risk to human health or the environment.

  6. Documenting cost and performance for environmental remediation projects: Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-08

    The purpose of this DOE guide is to facilitate the use of consistent procedures to document cost and performance information for projects involving the remediation of media contaminated with hazardous and radioactive wastes. It provides remedial action project managers with a standardized set of data to document completed remediation projects. Standardized reporting of data will broaden the utility of the information, increase confidence in the effectiveness of future remedial technologies, and enhance the organization, storage and retrieval of relevant information for future cleanup projects. The foundation for this guide was laid down by the Federal Remediation Technologies Roundtable (FRTR) in their publication, Guide to Documenting Cost and Performance for Remediation Projects, EPA-542-B- 95-002. Member agencies of the FRTR include the US EPA, the US DOD, the US DOE, and the US DOI. All the member agencies are involved in site remediation projects and anticipate following the guidance provided in the above reference. Therefore, there is much to be gained for DOE to be consistent with the other member agencies as it will be easier to compare projects across different agencies and also to learn from the experiences of a wider spectrum of prior completed projects.

  7. Initial Remedial Action Plan for Expanded Bioventing System BX Service Station, Patrick Air Force Base, Florida

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1995-01-01

    This initial remedial action plan presents the scope for an expanded bioventing system for in situ treatment of fuel-contaminated soils at the BX Service Station at Patrick Air Force Base (AFB), Florida...

  8. Remedial Action Plan for Expanded Bioventing System Buildings 2034/2035, Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    This remedial action plan (RAP) presents the scope for an expanded bioventing system for in situ treatment of fuel-contaminated soils in the vicinity of Buildings 2034 and 2035 at Fairchild Air Force Base (AFB), Washington...

  9. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Gunnison, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan summarizes the results of previous water sampling activities and the plan for water sampling activities for calendar year 1994. A buffer zone monitoring plan is included as an appendix. The buffer zone monitoring plan is designed to protect the public from residual contamination that entered the ground water as a result of former milling operations. Surface remedial action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site began in 1992; completion is expected in 1995. Ground water and surface water will be sampled semiannually in 1994 at the Gunnison processing site (GUN-01) and disposal site (GUN-08). Results of previous water sampling at the Gunnison processing site indicate that ground water in the alluvium is contaminated by the former uranium processing activities. Background ground water conditions have been established in the uppermost aquifer (Tertiary gravels) at the Gunnison disposal site. The monitor well locations provide a representative distribution of sampling points to characterize ground water quality and ground water flow conditions in the vicinity of the sites. The list of analytes has been modified with time to reflect constituents that are related to uranium processing activities and the parameters needed for geochemical evaluation. Water sampling will be conducted at least semiannually during and one year following the period of construction activities, to comply with the ground water protection strategy discussed in the remedial action plan (DOE, 1992a)

  10. Completion report for the Inactive Liquid Low-Level Waste Tank Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    This report documents the results of the Inactive Liquid Low-Level Waste Tank Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The work performed is compared with that proposed in the statement of work and the service contract specification for the maintenance action to remediate tanks 3013, 3004-B, T-30, and 3001-B. The Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) among the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires that all tanks, which have been removed from service and are designated in the FFA as Category D, must be remediated in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements. The Environmental Restoration Program's inactive tank removal program strategy and plans for remediating the inactive LLLW tanks were documented in a report issued in January 1995 (Inactive Tanks Remediation Program Strategy and Plans for Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, ORNL/ER-297). The inactive (Category D) tanks were initially screened for remediation according to risk, remediation technology required, level of instrumentation available, interferences with other piping and equipment, location, and available sludge removal techniques and storage requirements. On the basis of this preliminary screening, the tanks were assigned to one of five batches (I through V) for consideration of remedial action alternatives, and these batches were tentatively scheduled for remedial actions. The eight links tentatively assigned to Batch I were divided into two groups (Series I and Series II)

  11. Draft Hanford Remedial Action Environmental Impact Statement and Comprehensive Land Use Plan. Volume 4 of 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) is preparing this ''Hanford Site Comprehensive Land Use Plan'' (Comprehensive Plan), Appendix M to address future land uses for the Hanford Site. The DOE has integrated this land-use planning initiative with the development of the HRA-EIS to facilitate and expedite land-use and remediation decision making, reduce time and cost of remediation, and optimize the usefulness of the planning process. The HRA-EIS is being developed to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with remediation, create a remedial baseline for the Environmental Restoration Program, and provide a framework for future uses at the Hanford Site. This Comprehensive Plan identifies current assets and resources related to land-use planning, and provides the analysis and recommendations for future land sues and accompanying restrictions at the Hanford Site over a 50-year period. This Comprehensive Plan relies on the analysis of environmental impacts in the HRA-EIS. The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) Record of Decision (ROD) issued for the HRA-EIS will be the decision process for finalization and adoption of this Comprehensive Plan. The HRA-EIS and this Comprehensive Plan will provide a basis for remediation decisions to be identified and contained in site- and area-specific Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 ROD

  12. Advanced Life Support Project Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Life support systems are an enabling technology and have become integral to the success of living and working in space. As NASA embarks on human exploration and development of space to open the space frontier by exploring, using and enabling the development of space and to expand the human experience into the far reaches of space, it becomes imperative, for considerations of safety, cost, and crew health, to minimize consumables and increase the autonomy of the life support system. Utilizing advanced life support technologies increases this autonomy by reducing mass, power, and volume necessary for human support, thus permitting larger payload allocations for science and exploration. Two basic classes of life support systems must be developed, those directed toward applications on transportation/habitation vehicles (e.g., Space Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), next generation launch vehicles, crew-tended stations/observatories, planetary transit spacecraft, etc.) and those directed toward applications on the planetary surfaces (e.g., lunar or Martian landing spacecraft, planetary habitats and facilities, etc.). In general, it can be viewed as those systems compatible with microgravity and those compatible with hypogravity environments. Part B of the Appendix defines the technology development 'Roadmap' to be followed in providing the necessary systems for these missions. The purpose of this Project Plan is to define the Project objectives, Project-level requirements, the management organizations responsible for the Project throughout its life cycle, and Project-level resources, schedules and controls.

  13. Remediation activities at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, T.J.; Danner, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) is a United States Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in southwestern Ohio. The facility began manufacturing uranium products in the early 1950's and continued processing uranium ore concentrates until 1989. The facility used a variety of chemical and metallurgical processes to produce uranium metals for use at other DOE sites across the country. Since the facility manufactured uranium metals for over thirty years, various amounts of radiological contamination exists at the site. Because of the chemical and metallurgical processes employed at the site, some hazardous wastes as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) were also generated at the site. In 1989. the FEMP was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) requiring cleanup of the facility's radioactive and chemical contamination under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This paper discusses the proposed remediation activities at the five Operable Units (OUs) designated at the FEMP. In addition, the paper also examines the ongoing CERCLA response actions and RCRA closure activities at the facility

  14. SNF Project Engineering Process Improvement Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DESAI, S.P.

    2000-01-01

    This plan documents the SNF Project activities and plans to support its engineering process. It describes five SNF Project Engineering initiatives: new engineering procedures, qualification cards process; configuration management, engineering self assessments, and integrated schedule for engineering activities

  15. Incorporating ecological risk assessment into remedial investigation/feasibility study work plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This guidance document (1) provides instructions on preparing the components of an ecological work plan to complement the overall site remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan and (2) directs the user on how to implement ecological tasks identified in the plan. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), and RI/FS work plan will have to be developed as part of the site-remediation scoping process. Specific guidance on the RI/FS process and the preparation of work plans has been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988a). This document provides guidance to US Department of Energy (DOE) staff and contractor personnel for incorporation of ecological information into environmental remediation planning and decision making at CERCLA sites

  16. Incorporating ecological risk assessment into remedial investigation/feasibility study work plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This guidance document (1) provides instructions on preparing the components of an ecological work plan to complement the overall site remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan and (2) directs the user on how to implement ecological tasks identified in the plan. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), and RI/FS work plan will have to be developed as part of the site-remediation scoping process. Specific guidance on the RI/FS process and the preparation of work plans has been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988a). This document provides guidance to US Department of Energy (DOE) staff and contractor personnel for incorporation of ecological information into environmental remediation planning and decision making at CERCLA sites.

  17. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Tuba City, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Tuba City, Arizona, are described in the following sections of this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP). This plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the stations routinely monitored at the site. The ground water data are used for site characterization and risk assessment. The regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and the final EPA standards of 1995 (60 FR 2854). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), and the most effective technical approach for the site

  18. In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Northeast Site Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhlin, R.; Butherus, M.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting thermal remediation to remove non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from the subsurface at the Northeast Site that is part of the Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project. The Northeast Site is located on the Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research (STAR) Center in Largo, Florida. The STAR Center was formerly a DOE facility. The NAPL remediation was performed at Area A and is currently being performed at Area B at the Northeast Site. The remediation at Area A was completed in 2003 and covered an area of 900 m 2 (10,000 ft 2 ) and a depth of remediation that extended to 10.7 m (35 ft) below ground surface. Cleanup levels achieved were at or below maximum contaminant levels in almost all locations. The remediation project at Area B is ongoing and covers an area of 3,240 m 2 (36,000 ft 2 ), a volume of 41,300 m (54,000 yd 3), and a depth of remediation to 12 m (40 ft) below ground surface. In addition, a portion of the subsurface under an occupied building in Area B is included in the remediation. The cleanup levels achieved from this remediation will be available in the Area B Final Report that will be posted on the DOE Office of Legacy Management web site (www.lm.doe.gov/land/sites/fl/ pinellas/pinellas.htm) in January 2007. Electrical resistive heating and steam were the chosen remediation methods at both areas. Lessons learned from the Area A remediation were incorporated into the Area B remediation and could benefit managers of similar remediation projects. (authors)

  19. Project Plan Remote Target Fabrication Refurbishment Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, Gary L.; Taylor, Robin D.

    2009-01-01

    In early FY2009, the DOE Office of Science - Nuclear Physics Program reinstated a program for continued production of 252 Cf and other transcurium isotopes at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The FY2009 major elements of the workscope are as follows: (1) Recovery and processing of seven transuranium element targets undergoing irradiation at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL; (2) Development of a plan to manufacture new targets for irradiation beginning in early- to mid-FY10 to supply irradiated targets for processing Campaign 75 (TRU75); and (3) Refurbishment of the target manufacturing equipment to allow new target manufacture in early FY10 The 252 Cf product from processing Campaign 74 (recently processed and currently shipping to customers) is expected to supply the domestic demands for a period of approximately two years. Therefore it is essential that new targets be introduced for irradiation by the second quarter of FY10 (HFIR cycle 427) to maintain supply of 252 Cf; the average irradiation period is ∼10 HFIR cycles, requiring about 1.5 calendar years. The strategy for continued production of 252 Cf depends upon repairing and refurbishing the existing pellet and target fabrication equipment for one additional target production campaign. This equipment dates from the mid-1960s to the late 1980s, and during the last target fabrication campaign in 2005- 2006, a number of component failures and operations difficulties were encountered. It is expected that following the target fabrication and acceptance testing of the targets that will supply material for processing Campaign 75 a comprehensive upgrade and replacement of the remote hot-cell equipment will be required prior to subsequent campaigns. Such a major refit could start in early FY 2011 and would take about 2 years to complete. Scope and cost estimates for the repairs described herein were developed, and authorization for the work

  20. Standard review plan for the review of environmental restoration remedial action quality assurance program plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This plan establishes both the scope of the review and the acceptance criteria to be utilized for the review of Quality Assurance Program Plans (QAPPs) developed in accordance with the requirements of DOE/RL-90-28. DOE/RL-90-28, the Environmental Restoration Remedial Action Quality Assurance Requirements Document (QARD) defines all quality assurance (QA) requirements governing activities that affect the quality of the Environmental Restoration Remedial Action (ERRA) program at the Hanford Site. These requirements are defined in three parts, Part 1 of Quality Management and Administration tasks, Part 2 for Environmental Data Operations, and Part 3 of the Design and Construction of items, systems, and facilities. The purpose of this document is to identify the scope of the review by the DOE Field Office, Richland staff, and establish the acceptance criteria (Parts 1, 2, and 3) that the DOE Field Office, Richland staff will utilize to evaluate the participant QAPPs. Use of the standard review plan will (1) help ensure that participant QAPPs contain the information required by DOE/RL-90-28, (2) aid program participant and DOE Field Office, Richland staff is ensuring that the information describing the participant's QAPP is complete, (3) help persons regarding DOE/RL- 90-28 to locate information, and (4) contribute to decreasing the time needed for the review process. In addition, the Standard Review Plan (SRP) ensures the quality and uniformity of the staff reviews and presents a well-defined base from which to evaluate compliance of participant quality programs against DOE/RL-90-28

  1. Test plan guidance for transuranic-contaminated arid landfill remedial technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.; Shaw, P.

    1995-05-01

    This document provides guidance for preparing plans to test or demonstrate buried waste assessment or remediation technologies supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Landfill Stabilization Focus Area, Transuranic-Contaminated Arid Landfill Product Line. This document also provides guidance for development of data quality objectives, along with the necessary data to meet the project objectives. The purpose is to ensure that useful data of known quality are collected to support conclusions associated with the designated demonstration or test. A properly prepared test plan will integrate specific and appropriate objectives with needed measurements to ensure data will reflect the Department of Energy Office of Technology Development's mission, be consistent with Landfill Stabilization Focus Area test goals, and be useful for the Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management programs and other potential partners (e.g., commercial concerns). The test plan becomes the planning and working document for the demonstration or test to be conducted ensuring procedures are followed that will allow data of sufficient quality to be collected for comparison and evaluation

  2. Project Planning and Implementation: Lessons Learned From the AQBMP Project

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    ...). This NSRP report is funded as an addendum to the Air Quality Best Management Practices (AQBMP) project (N1 -944). The AQBMP project was completed using an intensive project planning process using a variety of quality management tools...

  3. Environmental, Safety, and Health Plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    This Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES ampersand H) Plan presents the concepts and methodologies to be followed during the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to protect the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. This ES ampersand H Plan acts as a management extension for ORNL and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) to direct and control implementation of the project ES ampersand H program. The subsections that follow describe the program philosophy, requirements, quality assurance measures, and methods for applying the ES ampersand H program to individual waste area grouping (WAG) remedial investigations. Hazardous work permits (HWPs) will be used to provide task-specific health and safety requirements

  4. Project planning and project management of Baseball II-T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozman, T.A.; Chargin, A.K.

    1975-01-01

    The details of the project planning and project management work done on the Baseball II-T experiment are reviewed. The LLL Baseball program is a plasma confinement experiment accomplished with a superconducting magnet in the shape of a baseball seam. Both project planning and project management made use of the Critical Path Management (CPM) computer code. The computer code, input, and results from the project planning and project management runs, and the cost and effectiveness of this method of systems planning are discussed

  5. 32 CFR 516.64 - Comprehensive remedies plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Remedies in Procurement Fraud and Corruption § 516.64 Comprehensive... investigation involving fraud or corruption that relates to Army procurement activities. When possible, these... participation of the appropriate criminal investigators and other relevant personnel such as the contracting...

  6. Use of geostatistics for remediation planning to transcend urban political boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milillo, Tammy M.; Sinha, Gaurav; Gardella, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Soil remediation plans are often dictated by areas of jurisdiction or property lines instead of scientific information. This study exemplifies how geostatistically interpolated surfaces can substantially improve remediation planning. Ordinary kriging, ordinary co-kriging, and inverse distance weighting spatial interpolation methods were compared for analyzing surface and sub-surface soil sample data originally collected by the US EPA and researchers at the University at Buffalo in Hickory Woods, an industrial–residential neighborhood in Buffalo, NY, where both lead and arsenic contamination is present. Past clean-up efforts estimated contamination levels from point samples, but parcel and agency jurisdiction boundaries were used to define remediation sites, rather than geostatistical models estimating the spatial behavior of the contaminants in the soil. Residents were understandably dissatisfied with the arbitrariness of the remediation plan. In this study we show how geostatistical mapping and participatory assessment can make soil remediation scientifically defensible, socially acceptable, and economically feasible. - Highlights: ► Point samples and property boundaries do not appropriately determine the extent of soil contamination. ► Kriging and co-kriging provide best concentration estimates for mapping soil contamination and refining clean-up sites. ► Maps provide a visual representation of geostatistical results to communities to aid in geostatistical decision making. ► Incorporating community input into the assessment of neighborhoods is good public policy practice. - Using geostatistical interpolation and mapping results to involve the affected community can substantially improve remediation planning and promote its long-term effectiveness.

  7. Proposed plan for interim remedial measures at the 100-KR-1 Operable Unit. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This proposed plan identifies the preferred alternative for interim remedial measures for remedial action of radioactive liquid waste disposal sites that include contaminated soils and structures at the 100-KR-1 Operable Unit, located at the Hanford Site. It also summarizes other remedial alternatives evaluated for interim remedial measures in this Operable Unit. The intent of interim remedial measures is to speed up actions to address contaminated areas that pose potential threats to human health and the environment. This proposed plan is being issued by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the lead regulatory agency; the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), the support regulatory agency; and the US Department of Energy (DOE), the responsible agency. The EPA, Ecology, and the DOE are issuing this proposed plan as part of their public participation responsibilities under Section 117(a) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), commonly known as the ''Superfund Law.'' This proposed plan is intended to be a fact sheet for public review which briefly describes the remedial alternatives analyzed, identifies a preferred alternative, and summarizes the information relied upon to recommend the preferred alternative

  8. Remedial action plan for the inactive Uranium Processing Site at Naturita, Colorado. Remedial action plan: Attachment 2, Geology report, Attachment 3, Ground water hydrology report: Working draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado, is one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be cleaned up by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), 42 USC section 7901 et seq. Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE's remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This RAP serves two purposes. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Second, this RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the state of Colorado, and the NRC, become Appendix B of the cooperative agreement between the DOE and the state of Colorado

  9. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994. To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized. This study assesses benefits associated with the Grand Junction, Gunnison, Naturita, and Rifle UMTRA Projects sites for the 1-year period under study. Work at the Naturita site was initiated in April 1994 and involved demolition of buildings at the processing site. Actual start-up of remediation of Naturita is planned to begin in the spring of 1995. Work at the Slick Rock and Maybell sites is expected to begin in 1995. The only current economic benefits associated with these sites are related to UMTRA Project support work

  10. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, T.P.

    1994-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, which are part of the overall Hanford Site Environmental Protection Plan. This plan specifically applies to the sampling and analysis activities and continuous monitoring performed for all Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is generic in approach and will be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of the individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans

  11. Interim remedial measures proposed plan for the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, D.L.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this interim remedial measures (IRM) proposed plan is to present and solicit public comments on the IRM planned for the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site in Washington state. The 200-ZP-1 is one of two operable units that envelop the groundwater beneath the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site

  12. Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    Public concern regarding the potential human health and environmental effects from uranium mill tailings led Congress to pass the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (Public Law 95-604) in 1978. In the UMTRCA, Congress acknowledged the potentially harmful health effects associated with uranium mill tailings at 24 abandoned uranium mill processing sites needing remedial action. Uranium processing activities at most of the 24 mill processing sites resulted in the formation of contaminated ground water beneath and, in some cases, downgradient of the sites. This contaminated ground water often has elevated levels of hazardous constituents such as uranium and nitrate. The purpose of the Ground Water Project is to protect human health and the environment by meeting EPA-proposed standards in areas where ground water has been contaminated with constituents from UMTRA Project sites. A major first step in the UMTRA Ground Water Project is the preparation of this Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). This document analyzes potential impacts of the alternatives, including the proposed action. These alternatives are programmatic in that they are plans for conducting the UMTRA Ground Water Project. The alternatives do not address site-specific ground water compliance. This PEIS is a planning document that will provide a framework for conducting the Ground Water Project; assess the potential programmatic and environmental impacts of conducting the UMTRA Ground Water Project; provide a method for determining the site-specific ground water compliance strategies; and provide data and information that can be used to prepare site-specific environmental impacts analyses documents more efficiently

  13. The Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Quality Assurance Project Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fix, Anne

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has conducted interim groundwater remedial activities on the Hanford Site since the mid-1990s for several groundwater contamination plumes. DOE established the Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Project (Technologies Project) in 2006 to evaluate alternative treatment technologies. The objectives for the technology project are as follows: develop a 300 Area polyphosphate treatability test to immobilize uranium, design and test infiltration of a phosphate/apatite technology for Sr-90 at 100-N, perform carbon tetrachloride and chloroform attenuation parameter studies, perform vadose zone chromium characterization and geochemistry studies, perform in situ biostimulation of chromium studies for a reducing barrier at 100-D, and perform a treatability test for phytoremediation for Sr-90 at 100-N. This document provides the quality assurance guidelines that will be followed by the Technologies Project. This Quality Assurance Project Plan is based on the quality assurance requirements of DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance, and 10 CFR 830, Subpart A--Quality Assurance Requirements as delineated in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory?s Standards-Based Management System. In addition, the technology project is subject to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Requirements for Quality Assurance Project Plans (EPA/240/B-01/003, QA/R-5). The Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD, DOE/RL-96-68) apply to portions of this project and to the subcontractors. HASQARD requirements are discussed within applicable sections of this plan.

  14. Remediation Approach for the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, P.G.; Stephens, Jr.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) is a multi-billion-dollar remediation effort being conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The scope of the IFDP encompasses remedial actions related to activities conducted over the past 65 years at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). Environmental media and facilities became contaminated as a result of operations, leaks, spills, and past waste disposal practices. ORNL's mission includes energy, environmental, nuclear security, computational, and materials research and development. Remediation activities will be implemented at ORNL as part of IFDP scope to meet remedial action objectives established in existing and future decision documents. Remedial actions are necessary (1) to comply with environmental regulations to reduce human health and environmental risk and (2) to release strategic real estate needed for modernization initiatives at ORNL. The scope of remedial actions includes characterization, waste management, transportation and disposal, stream restoration, and final remediation of contaminated soils, sediments, and groundwater. Activities include removal of at or below-grade substructures such as slabs, underground utilities, underground piping, tanks, basins, pits, ducts, equipment housings, manholes, and concrete-poured structures associated with equipment housings and basement walls/floors/columns. Many interim remedial actions involving groundwater and surface water that have not been completed are included in the IFDP remedial action scope. The challenges presented by the remediation of Bethel Valley at ORNL are formidable. The proposed approach to remediation endeavors to use the best available technologies and technical approaches from EPA and other federal agencies and lessons learned from previous cleanup efforts. The objective is to minimize cost, maximize remedial

  15. Readiness Review Plan for the Interim Remedial Action on Surface Debris in Waste Area Grouping 11 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This Readiness Review Plan was prepared by the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 11 Site Project Readiness Review Team as an overview of the Interim Remedial Action on Surface Debris in WAG 11 project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, including major readiness milestones, criteria development methodology, and a list of events to occur as part of the review process for determining readiness for each project phase

  16. Environmental Restoration Strategic Plan. Remediating the nuclear weapons complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    With the end of the cold war, the US has a reduced need for nuclear weapons production. In response, the Department of Energy has redirected resources from weapons production to weapons dismantlement and environmental remediation. To this end, in November 1989, the US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (renamed the Office of Environmental Management in 1994). It was created to bring under a central authority the management of radioactive and hazardous wastes at DOE sites and inactive or shut down facilities. The Environmental Restoration Program, a major component of DOE's Environmental Management Program, is responsible for the remediation and management of contaminated environmental media (e.g., soil, groundwater, sediments) and the decommissioning of facilities and structures at 130 sites in over 30 states and territories

  17. Scheduling the Remediation of Port Hope: Logistical and Regulatory Challenges of a Multiple Site Urban Remediation Project - 13119

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson Jones, Andrea; Lee, Angela; Palmeter, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The Port Hope Project is part of the larger CAN$1.28 billion Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI), a community-based program for the development and implementation of a safe, local, long-term management solution for historic Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) in the Municipalities of Port Hope and Clarington, Ontario, Canada. Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) is the Project Proponent, Public Works and Government Services (PWGSC) is managing the procurement of services and the MMM Group Limited - Conestoga Rovers and Associates Joint Venture (MMM-CRA Joint Venture) is providing detailed design and construction oversight and administration services for the Project. The Port Hope Project includes the construction of a long-term waste management facility (LTWMF) in the Municipality of Port Hope and the remediation of 18 (eighteen) large-scale LLRW, numerous small-scale sites still being identified and industrial sites within the Municipality. The total volume to be remediated is over one million cubic metres and will come from sites that include temporary storage sites, ravines, beaches, parks, private commercial and residential properties and vacant industrial sites all within the urban area of Port Hope. Challenges that will need to be overcome during this 10 year project include: - Requirements stipulated by the Environmental Assessment (EA) that affect Project logistics and schedule. - Coordination of site remediation with the construction schedule at the LTWMF. - Physical constraints on transport routes and at sites affecting production rates. - Despite being an urban undertaking, seasonal constrains for birds and fish (i.e., nesting and spawning seasons). - Municipal considerations. - Site-specific constraints. - Site interdependencies exist requiring consideration in the schedule. Several sites require the use of an adjacent site for staging. (authors)

  18. Scheduling the Remediation of Port Hope: Logistical and Regulatory Challenges of a Multiple Site Urban Remediation Project - 13119

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson Jones, Andrea; Lee, Angela [MMM Group Limited, 100 Commerce Valley Drive West, Thornhill, Ontario, L3T 0A1 (Canada); Palmeter, Tim [Public Works and Government Services Canada, 4900 Yonge Street, Toronto, Ontario, M2N 6A6 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The Port Hope Project is part of the larger CAN$1.28 billion Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI), a community-based program for the development and implementation of a safe, local, long-term management solution for historic Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) in the Municipalities of Port Hope and Clarington, Ontario, Canada. Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) is the Project Proponent, Public Works and Government Services (PWGSC) is managing the procurement of services and the MMM Group Limited - Conestoga Rovers and Associates Joint Venture (MMM-CRA Joint Venture) is providing detailed design and construction oversight and administration services for the Project. The Port Hope Project includes the construction of a long-term waste management facility (LTWMF) in the Municipality of Port Hope and the remediation of 18 (eighteen) large-scale LLRW, numerous small-scale sites still being identified and industrial sites within the Municipality. The total volume to be remediated is over one million cubic metres and will come from sites that include temporary storage sites, ravines, beaches, parks, private commercial and residential properties and vacant industrial sites all within the urban area of Port Hope. Challenges that will need to be overcome during this 10 year project include: - Requirements stipulated by the Environmental Assessment (EA) that affect Project logistics and schedule. - Coordination of site remediation with the construction schedule at the LTWMF. - Physical constraints on transport routes and at sites affecting production rates. - Despite being an urban undertaking, seasonal constrains for birds and fish (i.e., nesting and spawning seasons). - Municipal considerations. - Site-specific constraints. - Site interdependencies exist requiring consideration in the schedule. Several sites require the use of an adjacent site for staging. (authors)

  19. Spent Nuclear Fuel project interface control plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    This implementation process philosophy is in keeping with the ongoing reengineering of the WHC Controlled Manuals to achieve interface control within the SNF Project. This plan applies to all SNF Project sub-project to sub-project, and sub-project to exteranl (both on and off the Hanford Site) interfaces

  20. Management and Beneficial Reuse of Overburden Material - Linde Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Remediation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, J.D.; Schwippert, M.; Lorenz, W.D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper outlines three separate and distinct situations where the proper management of overburden material allows for the beneficial reuse of overburden material. Beneficial reuse of overburden material at the Linde Project was made possible by a simultaneous combination of physical conditions at the site in conjunction with collaborative planning and cooperation between U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District, New York State Department of Energy and Conservation, the Owner and Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure. Efforts by the project team focused on maintaining compliance with project plan requirements, communicating the plan to all parties, executing the plan safely and efficiently, and emphasizing fiscal responsibility to ensure maximum cost savings. (authors)

  1. Project structure plan requirements for the deconstruction projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrasch, Peter; Schmitt, Christian; Stapf, Meike

    2011-01-01

    The deconstruction of nuclear facilities requires due to the particular conditions and the size of the project a special project planning. The authors analyze the possible requirements to be fulfilled by a project structure plan for nuclear facilities, including personnel resources, organization structure, budget questions, operation and project oriented measures, possibility of modifications and supplements. Further topics include controlling and project realization procedures, documentation, third party activities (authorities, consultants, surveyors), logistics and transport, and radiation protection issues. Several questions remain for plants-specific planning, including the integration of the plant personnel, administrative work, project management, economic and financial issues, radioactive waste management issues.

  2. ReSCA: decision support tool for remediation planning after the Chernobyl accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulanovsky, A; Jacob, P; Fesenko, S; Bogdevitch, I; Kashparov, V; Sanzharova, N

    2011-03-01

    Radioactive contamination of the environment following the Chernobyl accident still provide a substantial impact on the population of affected territories in Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine. Reduction of population exposure can be achieved by performing remediation activities in these areas. Resulting from the IAEA Technical Co-operation Projects with these countries, the program ReSCA (Remediation Strategies after the Chernobyl Accident) has been developed to provide assistance to decision makers and to facilitate a selection of an optimized remediation strategy in rural settlements. The paper provides in-depth description of the program, its algorithm, and structure. © Springer-Verlag 2010

  3. Remedial design work plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    The Remedial Design Work Plan (RDWP) for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) Operable Unit (OU) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been prepared. The remedial investigation determined that the principal contaminant is mercury, which originated from releases during Y-12 Plant operations, primarily between 1953 and 1963. The recommended alternative, as stated in the Record of Decision (ROD) was to excavate and dispose of floodplain soils contaminated with mercury above the remedial goal option. Thereafter, a public hearing was held to review the proposed plan. Comments were incorporated. The revised selected remedy, per the ROD is to excavate and dispose of floodplain soils contaminated above the remediation goal of 400 parts per million mercury. The approved ROD with this goal will be the basis for remedial design (RD). The RD work plan (RDWP) is composed of six chapters. An introductory chapter describes the purpose and scope of the RDWP, the selected remedy as identified by the ROD; the roles and responsibilities of the RD team members, and the site background information, including site history, contaminants of concern, and site characteristics. Chapter 2 contains the design objectives, RD approach, regulatory considerations during RD, and the design criteria with assumptions. Chapter 3 presents the RD planning process to prepare this RDWP, as well as secondary RD support plans. Chapter 4 describes the scope of the RD activities in more detail and identifies what will be included in the design package. Chapter 5 presents the schedule for performance of the RD activities, identifying key RD milestones. Specific documents used in the preparation of this document are referenced in Chapter 6

  4. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Tuba City, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a threefold purpose. It presents the series of activities which are proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Tuba City, Arizona. It provides a characterization of the present conditions of the site. It also serves to document the concurrence of the Navajo Nation, the Hopi Tribe, US Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE, the Navajo Nation, and the Hopi Tribe, and concurrence by NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. Following the introduction, contents are as follows: Section 2.0 presents the EPA standards, including a discussion of their objectives. Section 3.0 summarizes the present site characteristics and provides a definition of site-specific problems. Section 4.0 is the site design for the proposed action. Section 5.0 summarizes the plan for ensuring environmental, health, and safety protection for the surrounding community and the on-site workers. Section 6.0 presents a detailed listing of the responsibilities of the project participants. Section 7.0 describes the features of the long-term surveillance and maintenance plan. Section 8.0 presents the quality assurance aspects of the project. Section 9.0 documents the ongoing activities to keep the public informed and participating in the project

  5. Tank waste remediation system dangerous waste training plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    POHTO, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    This document outlines the dangerous waste training program developed and implemented for all Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) Units operated by Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) in the Hanford 200 East, 200 West and 600 Areas and the <90 Day Accumulation Area at 209E. Operating TSD Units operated by TWRS are: the Double-Shell Tank (DST) System (including 204-AR Waste Transfer Building), the 600 Area Purgewater Storage and the Effluent Treatment Facility. TSD Units undergoing closure are: the Single-Shell Tank (SST) System, 207-A South Retention Basin, and the 216-B-63 Trench

  6. Environmental, Safety, and Health Plan for the remedial investigation of the liquid low-level waste tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    The Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES ampersand H) Plan presents the concepts and methodologies to be used during the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) RI/FS project to protect the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. The ES ampersand H Plan acts as a management extension for ORNL and Energy Systems to direct and control implementation of the project ES ampersand H program. This report describes the program philosophy, requirements, quality assurance measures, and methods for applying the ES ampersand H program to individual task remedial investigations, project facilities, and other major tasks assigned to the project

  7. Geotechnical engineering considerations in the NRC's review of uranium mill tailings remedial action plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    To reduce potential health hazards associated with inactive uranium mill tailings sites, the Department of Energy (DOE) is presently investigating and implementing remedial actions at 24 sites in the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program (UMTRAP). All remedial actions must be selected and performed with the concurrence of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This paper provides a discussion of geotechnical engineering considerations during the NRC's preconcurrence review of proposed remedial action plans. In order for the NRC staff to perform an adequate geotechnical engineering review, DOE documents must contain a presentation of the properties and stability of all in-situ and engineered soil and rock which may affect the ability of the remedial action plans to meet EPA standards for long-term stability and control. Site investigations, laboratory testing, and remedial action designs must be adequate in scope and technique to provide sufficient data for the NRC staff to independently evaluate static and dynamic stability, settlement, radon attenuation through the soil cover, durability of rock for erosion protection, and other geotechnical engineering factors

  8. Quality Assurance Project Plan Development Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    This tool contains information designed to assist in developing a Quality Assurance (QA) Project Plan that meets EPA requirements for projects that involve surface or groundwater monitoring and/or the collection and analysis of water samples.

  9. Fast flux test facility, transition project plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttenberg, S.

    1994-01-01

    The FFTF Transition Project Plan, Revision 1, provides changes and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition

  10. Fast flux test facility, transition project plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guttenberg, S.

    1994-11-15

    The FFTF Transition Project Plan, Revision 1, provides changes and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

  11. Understanding Applications of Project Planning and Scheduling in Construction Projects

    OpenAIRE

    AlNasseri, Hammad Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Construction project life-cycle processes must be managed in a more effective and predictable way to meet project stakeholders’ needs. However, there is increasing concern about whether know-how effectively improves understanding of underlying theories of project management processes for construction organizations and their project managers. Project planning and scheduling are considered as key and challenging tools in controlling and monitoring project performance, but many worldwide constru...

  12. Project Strategy For The Remediation And Disposition Of Legacy Transuranic Waste At The Savannah River Site, South Carolina, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the Savannah River Site Accelerated Transuranic (TRU) Waste Project that was initiated in April of 2009 to accelerate the disposition of remaining legacy transuranic waste at the site. An overview of the project execution strategy that was implemented is discussed along with the lessons learned, challenges and improvements to date associated with waste characterization, facility modifications, startup planning, and remediation activities. The legacy waste was generated from approximately 1970 through 1990 and originated both on site as well as at multiple US Department of Energy sites. Approximately two thirds of the waste was previously dispositioned from 2006 to 2008, with the remaining one third being the more hazardous waste due to its activity (curie content) and the plutonium isotope Pu-238 quantities in the waste. The project strategy is a phased approach beginning with the lower activity waste in existing facilities while upgrades are made to support remediation of the higher activity waste. Five waste remediation process lines will be used to support the full remediation efforts which involve receipt of the legacy waste container, removal of prohibited items, venting of containers, and resizing of contents to fit into current approved waste shipping containers. Modifications have been minimized to the extent possible to meet the accelerated goals and involve limited upgrades to address life safety requirements, radiological containment needs, and handling equipment for the larger waste containers. Upgrades are also in progress for implementation of the TRUPACT III for the shipment of Standard Large Boxes to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, the US TRU waste repository. The use of this larger shipping container is necessary for approximately 20% of the waste by volume due to limited size reduction capability. To date, approximately 25% of the waste has been dispositioned, and several improvements have been made to the overall processing

  13. Tools for Supporting Distributed Agile Project Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Maurer, Frank; Morgan, Robert; Oliveira, Josyleuda

    Agile project planning plays an important part in agile software development. In distributed settings, project planning is severely impacted by the lack of face-to-face communication and the inability to share paper index cards amongst all meeting participants. To address these issues, several distributed agile planning tools were developed. The tools vary in features, functions and running platforms. In this chapter, we first summarize the requirements for distributed agile planning. Then we give an overview on existing agile planning tools. We also evaluate existing tools based on tool requirements. Finally, we present some practical advices for both designers and users of distributed agile planning tools.

  14. ISS Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Coolant Remediation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Russell H.; Holt, Mike

    2005-01-01

    The IATCS coolant has experienced a number of anomalies in the time since the US Lab was first activated on Flight 5A in February 2001. These have included: 1) a decrease in coolant pH, 2) increases in inorganic carbon, 3) a reduction in phosphate buffer concentration, 4) an increase in dissolved nickel and precipitation of nickel salts, and 5) increases in microbial concentration. These anomalies represent some risk to the system, have been implicated in some hardware failures and are suspect in others. The ISS program has conducted extensive investigations of the causes and effects of these anomalies and has developed a comprehensive program to remediate the coolant chemistry of the on-orbit system as well as provide a robust and compatible coolant solution for the hardware yet to be delivered. The remediation steps include changes in the coolant chemistry specification, development of a suite of new antimicrobial additives, and development of devices for the removal of nickel and phosphate ions from the coolant. This paper presents an overview of the anomalies, their known and suspected system effects, their causes, and the actions being taken to remediate the coolant.

  15. Modern Sorters for Soil Segregation on Large Scale Remediation Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shonka, J.J.; Kelley, J.E.; O'Brien, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    volume is 50 kilograms or less. Smaller sorting volumes can be obtained with lower throughput or by re-sorting the diverted material. This equipment can also handle large objects. The use of spectroscopy systems allows several regions of- interest to be set. Super-Sorters can bring waste processing charges down to less than $30/ metric ton on smaller jobs and can save hundreds of dollars per metric ton in disposal charges. The largest effect on the overall project cost occurs during planning and implementation. The overall goal is reduction of the length of the project, which dictates the most efficient soil processing. With all sorting systems the parameters that need to be accounted for are matrix type, soil feed rate, soil pre-processing, site conditions, and regulatory issues. The soil matrix and its ability to flow are extremely crucial to operations. It is also important to consider that as conditions change (i.e., moisture), the flowability of the soil matrix will change. Many soil parameters have to be considered: cohesive strength, internal and wall friction, permeability, and bulk density as a function of consolidating pressure. Clay bearing soils have very low permeability and high cohesive strength which makes them difficult to process, especially when wet. Soil feed speed is dependent on the equipment present and the ability to move the soil in the Super-Sorter processing area. When a Super-Sorter is running at 400 metric tons per hour it is difficult to feed the system. As an example, front-end loaders with large buckets would move approximately 5-10 metric tons of material, and 400 metric tons per hour would require 50-100 bucket-loads per hour to attain. Because the flowability of the soil matrix is important, poor material is often pre-processed before it is added to the feed hopper of the 'survey' conveyor. This pre-processing can consist of a 'grizzly' to remove large objects from the soil matrix, followed screening plant to prepare the soil so that it

  16. RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certa, P.J.; Kirkbride, R.A.; Hohl, T.M.; Empey, P.A.; Wells, M.N.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of approximately 57 million gallons 1 of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure2 of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in May 2008. ORP has made a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. ORP has contracts in place to implement the strategy for completion of the mission and establish the capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategl involves a number of interrelated activities. ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by the following: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) and delivering the waste to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) fraction contained in the tank farms. About one-third of the low-activity waste (LAW) fraction separated from the HLW fraction in the WTP will be immobilized in the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility. (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability assumed to be a second LAW vitrification facility that can safely treat about two-thirds of the LAW contained in the tank farms. (4) Developing and deploying supplemental pretreatment capability currently assumed to be an Aluminum Removal Facility (ARF) using a lithium hydrotalcite process to mitigate sodium management issues. (5) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) tank waste for possible shipment to and disposal

  17. RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CERTA PJ; KIRKBRIDE RA; HOHL TM; EMPEY PA; WELLS MN

    2009-09-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of approximately 57 million gallons 1 of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure2 of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in May 2008. ORP has made a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. ORP has contracts in place to implement the strategy for completion of the mission and establish the capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategl involves a number of interrelated activities. ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by the following: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) and delivering the waste to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) fraction contained in the tank farms. About one-third of the low-activity waste (LAW) fraction separated from the HLW fraction in the WTP will be immobilized in the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility. (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability assumed to be a second LAW vitrification facility that can safely treat about two-thirds of the LAW contained in the tank farms. (4) Developing and deploying supplemental pretreatment capability currently assumed to be an Aluminum Removal Facility (ARF) using a lithium hydrotalcite process to mitigate sodium management issues. (5) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) tank waste for possible shipment to and

  18. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Maybell, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) describes planned water sampling activities and provides the regulatory and technical basis for ground water sampling in 1994 at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Maybell, Colorado. The WSAP identifies and justifies sampling locations, analytical parameters, and sampling frequencies at the site. The ground water data will be used for site characterization and risk assessment. The regulatory basis for the ground water and surface water monitoring activities is derived from the EPA regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1993) and the proposed EPA standards of 1987 (52 FR 36000). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. This WSAP also includes a summary and the results of water sampling activities from 1989 through 1992 (no sampling was performed in 1993)

  19. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-06-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the Facility Monitoring Plans of the overall site-wide environmental monitoring plan. This plan specifically applies to the sampling and analysis activities and continuous monitoring performed for all Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is generic in approach and will be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. This document is intended to be a basic road map to the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan documents (i.e., the guidance document for preparing Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations, management plan, and Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans). The implementing procedures, plans, and instructions are appropriate for the control of effluent monitoring plans requiring compliance with US Department of Energy, US Environmental Protection Agency, state, and local requirements. This Quality Assurance Project Plan contains a matrix of organizational responsibilities, procedural resources from facility or site manuals used in the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, and a list of the analytes of interest and analytical methods for each facility preparing a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan. 44 refs., 1 figs., 2 tabs

  20. 200 Areas Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Implementation Plan - Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knepp, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    The 200 Areas Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Implementation Plan - Environmental Restoration Program (Implementation Plan) addresses approximately 700 soil waste sites (and associated structures such as pipelines) resulting from the discharge of liquids and solids from processing facilities to the ground (e.g., ponds, ditches, cribs,burial grounds) in the 200 Areas and assigned to the Environmental Restoration Program. The Implementation Plan outlines the framework for implementing assessment activities in the 200 Areas to ensure consistency in documentation, level of characterization, and decision making. The Implementation Plan also consolidates background information and other typical work plan materials, to serve as a single referenceable source for this type of information

  1. Tank Waste Remediation System Tank Waste Analysis Plan. FY 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, C.S.; Dove, T.H.

    1994-01-01

    This documents lays the groundwork for preparing the implementing the TWRS tank waste analysis planning and reporting for Fiscal Year 1995. This Tank Waste Characterization Plan meets the requirements specified in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, better known as the Tri-Party Agreement

  2. RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CERTA PJ

    2008-07-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, the ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of the approximately 57 million gallons of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in September 2003. ORP has approved a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. The ORP has established contracts to implement this strategy to establish a basic capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategy for completion of the mission uses a number of interrelated activities. The ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) for treatment and disposal; (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) and about half of the low-activity waste (LAW) contained in the tank farms, and maximizing its capability and capacity; (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability or a second WTP LAW Facility that can safely treat about half of the LAW contained in the tank farms; (4) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for transuranic (TRU) tank waste for shipment to and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP); (5) Deploying interim storage capacity for the immobilized HLW and shipping that waste to Yucca Mountain for disposal; (6) Operating the Integrated Disposal Facility for the disposal of immobilized LAW, along with the associated secondary waste, (7) Closing the SST and DST tank farms, ancillary facilities, and al1 waste

  3. RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CERTA PJ

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, the ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of the approximately 57 million gallons of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in September 2003. ORP has approved a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. The ORP has established contracts to implement this strategy to establish a basic capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategy for completion of the mission uses a number of interrelated activities. The ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) for treatment and disposal; (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) and about half of the low-activity waste (LAW) contained in the tank farms, and maximizing its capability and capacity; (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability or a second WTP LAW Facility that can safely treat about half of the LAW contained in the tank farms; (4) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for transuranic (TRU) tank waste for shipment to and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP); (5) Deploying interim storage capacity for the immobilized HLW and shipping that waste to Yucca Mountain for disposal; (6) Operating the Integrated Disposal Facility for the disposal of immobilized LAW, along with the associated secondary waste, (7) Closing the SST and DST tank farms, ancillary facilities, and al1 waste

  4. Oppenheimer's Box of Chocolates: Remediation of the Manhattan Project Landfill at Los Alamos National Laboratory - 12283

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Donald L.; Ramsey, Susan S.; Finn, Kevin P.; Chaloupka, Allan B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Material Disposal Area B (MDA B) is the oldest radioactive waste disposal facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Operated from 1944-48, MDA B was the disposal facility for the Manhattan Project. Recognized as one of the most challenging environmental remediation projects at Los Alamos, the excavation of MDA B received $110 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to accelerate this complex remediation work. Several factors combined to create significant challenges to remediating the landfill known in the 1940's as the 'contaminated dump'. The secrecy surrounding the Manhattan Project meant that no records were kept of radiological materials and chemicals disposed or of the landfill design. An extensive review of historical documents and interviews with early laboratory personnel resulted in a list of hundreds of hazardous chemicals that could have been buried in MDA B. Also, historical reports of MDA B spontaneously combusting on three occasions -with 50-foot flames and pink smoke spewing across the mesa during the last incident in 1948-indicated that hazardous materials were likely present in MDA B. To complicate matters further, though MDA B was located on an isolated mesa in the 1940's, the landfill has since been surrounded by a Los Alamos commercial district. The local newspaper, hardware store and a number of other businesses are located directly across the street from MDA B. This close proximity to the public and the potential for hazardous materials in MDA B necessitated conducting remediation work within protective enclosures. Potential chemical hazards and radiological inventory were better defined using a minimally intrusive sampling method called direct push technology (DPT) prior to excavation. Even with extensive sampling and planning the project team encountered many surprises and challenges during the project. The one area where planning did not fail to meet reality was safety. There were no serious

  5. Independent technical reviews for groundwater and soil remediation projects at US Department Of Energy sites - 59188

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaback, Dawn S.; Chamberlain, Grover; Morse, John G.; Petersen, Scott W.

    2012-01-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management has supported independent technical reviews of soil and groundwater projects at multiple DOE sites over the last 10 years. These reviews have resulted in significant design improvements to remedial plans that have accelerated cleanup and site closure. Many have also resulted in improved understanding of complex subsurface conditions, promoting better approaches to design and implementation of new technologies. Independent technical reviews add value, because they provide another perspective to problem solving and act as a check for especially challenging problems. By bringing in a team of independent experts with a broad experience base, alternative solutions are recommended for consideration and evaluation. In addition, the independence of the panel is significant, because it is able to address politically sensitive issues. The expert panel members typically bring lessons learned from other sites to help solve the DOE problems. In addition, their recommendations at a particular site can often be applied at other sites, making the review even more valuable. The review process can vary, but some common lessons ensure a successful review: - Use a multi-disciplinary broadly experienced team; - Engage the panel early and throughout the project; - Involve regulators and stakeholders in the workshop, if appropriate. - Provide sufficient background information; - Close the workshop with a debriefing followed by a written report. Many groundwater remediation challenges remain at DOE sites. Independent technical reviews have and will ensure that the best capabilities and experience are applied to reduce risks and uncertainties. Even though the groundwater remediation industry has developed significantly over the last twenty years, advancements are needed to address the complexities of the subsurface at the DOE sites. These advancements have tremendous potential to save millions of dollars and to accelerate the

  6. Remediation of Gremikha Coastal maintenance base - status of the project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillette-Cousin, L.; Stepennov, B.S.; Gorbatchev, A.

    2008-01-01

    The former coastal maintenance base in Gremikha is located in the Kola Peninsula, along the Barents Sea, about 300 km east from Murmansk. There is no road or railway to get there, therefore the only possible connection is either by sea or by helicopter. Remediation of the Gremikha coastal maintenance base (CMB) is now one of the main priorities for Rosatom (the Agency for Atomic Energy of the Russian Federation) because nuclear and radioactive waste are currently stored in conditions which do not meet the up-to-date safety and regulatory requirements and it might represent an environmental hazard and a risk of misappropriation of the nuclear material stored there. (authors)

  7. 10 CFR 765.30 - Reimbursement of costs incurred in accordance with a plan for subsequent remedial action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reimbursement of costs incurred in accordance with a plan... Procedures § 765.30 Reimbursement of costs incurred in accordance with a plan for subsequent remedial action. (a) This section establishes procedures governing reimbursements of costs of remedial action incurred...

  8. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Mexican Hat, Utah -- Monument Valley, Arizona, sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    The final audit report for remedial action at the Mexican Hat, Utah, Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and QA remedial action close-out inspections performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC); on-site construction reviews (OSCR) performed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); and a surveillance performed by the Navajo Nation. This report refers to remedial action activities performed at the Mexican Hat, Utah--Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites

  9. Tank 241-SY-101 surface level rise remediation test and evaluation plan for transfer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BAUER, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this testing and evaluation plan (TEP) is to provide the high level guidance on testing requirements for ensuring that the equipment and systems to be implemented for remediation of the SY-101 waste level rise USQ are effective

  10. Field Investigation Plan for 1301-N and 1325-N Facilities Sampling to Support Remedial Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, S. G.

    1998-01-01

    This field investigation plan (FIP) provides for the sampling and analysis activities supporting the remedial design planning for the planned removal action for the 1301-N and 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facilities (LWDFs), which are treatment, storage,and disposal (TSD) units (cribs/trenches). The planned removal action involves excavation, transportation, and disposal of contaminated material at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF).An engineering study (BHI 1997) was performed to develop and evaluate various options that are predominantly influenced by the volume of high- and low-activity contaminated soil requiring removal. The study recommended that additional sampling be performed to supplement historical data for use in the remedial design

  11. Tank SY-102 remediation project: Flowsheet and conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarbro, S.L.; Punjak, W.A.; Schreiber, S.B.; Dunn, S.L.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Pope, N.G.; Agnew, S.; Birnbaum, E.R.; Thomas, K.W.; Ortic, E.A.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to safely manage and dispose of radioactive waste stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Site. A major program in TWRS is pretreatment which was established to process the waste prior to disposal. Pretreatment is needed to resolve tank safety issues and to separate wastes into high-level and low-level fractions for subsequent immobilization and disposal. There is a fixed inventory of actinides and fission products in the tank which must be prepared for disposal. By segregating the actinides and fission products from the bulk of the waste, the tank`s contents can be effectively managed. Due to the high public visibility and environmental sensitivity of this problem, real progress and demonstrated efforts toward addressing it must begin as soon as possible. As a part of this program, personnel at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have developed and demonstrated a flowsheet to remediate tank SY-102 which is located in the 200 West Area and contains high-level radioactive waste. This report documents the results of the flowsheet demonstrations performed with simulated, but radioactive, wastes using an existing glovebox line at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. The tank waste was characterized using both a tank history approach and an exhaustive evaluation of the available core sample analyses. This report also presents a conceptual design complete with a working material flow model, a major equipment list, and cost estimates.

  12. Tank SY-102 remediation project: Flowsheet and conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarbro, S.L.; Punjak, W.A.; Schreiber, S.B.; Dunn, S.L.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Pope, N.G.; Agnew, S.; Birnbaum, E.R.; Thomas, K.W.; Ortic, E.A.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to safely manage and dispose of radioactive waste stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Site. A major program in TWRS is pretreatment which was established to process the waste prior to disposal. Pretreatment is needed to resolve tank safety issues and to separate wastes into high-level and low-level fractions for subsequent immobilization and disposal. There is a fixed inventory of actinides and fission products in the tank which must be prepared for disposal. By segregating the actinides and fission products from the bulk of the waste, the tank's contents can be effectively managed. Due to the high public visibility and environmental sensitivity of this problem, real progress and demonstrated efforts toward addressing it must begin as soon as possible. As a part of this program, personnel at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have developed and demonstrated a flowsheet to remediate tank SY-102 which is located in the 200 West Area and contains high-level radioactive waste. This report documents the results of the flowsheet demonstrations performed with simulated, but radioactive, wastes using an existing glovebox line at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. The tank waste was characterized using both a tank history approach and an exhaustive evaluation of the available core sample analyses. This report also presents a conceptual design complete with a working material flow model, a major equipment list, and cost estimates

  13. Inactive tanks remediation program strategy and plans for Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This report presents plans and strategies for remediation of the liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that have been removed from service (also known as inactive tanks) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These plans and strategies will be carried out by the Environmental Restoration Program's Inactive LLLW Tank Program at ORNL. These tanks are defined as Category D tanks because they are existing tank systems without secondary containment that are removed from service. The approach to remediation of each tank or tank farm must be adapted in response to the specific circumstances of individual tank sites. The approach will be tailored to accommodate feedback on lessons learned from previous tank remediation activities and will not be a rigid step-by-step approach that must be conducted identically for every tank system. However, the approach will follow a multistep decision process. The overall objective of the Inactive Tank Program is to remediate all LLLW tanks that have been removed from service to the extent practicable in accordance with the FFA requirements. The Inactive Tank Program will focus on the remediation of the tank residues (i.e., contents after tank has been emptied) and tank shell. This strategy is discussed in detail in this report

  14. Inactive tanks remediation program strategy and plans for Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    This report presents plans and strategies for remediation of the liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that have been removed from service (also known as inactive tanks) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These plans and strategies will be carried out by the Environmental Restoration Program's Inactive LLLW Tank Program at ORNL. The approach to remediation of each tank or tank farm must be adapted in response to the specific circumstances of individual tank sites. The approach will be tailored to accommodate feedback on lessons learned from previous tank remediation activities and will not be a rigid step-by-step approach that must be conducted identically for every tank system. However, the approach will follow a multistep decision process. The overall objective of the Inactive Tank Program is to remediate all LLLW tanks that have been removed from service to the extent practicable in accordance with the FFA requirements. The Inactive Tank Program will focus on the remediation of the tank residues and tank shell. This strategy is discussed in detail in this report

  15. UMTRA Project: Environment, Safety, and Health Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    The US Department of Energy has prepared this UMTRA Project Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Plan to establish the policy, implementing requirements, and guidance for the UMTRA Project. The requirements and guidance identified in this plan are designed to provide technical direction to UMTRA Project contractors to assist in the development and implementation of their ES and H plans and programs for UMTRA Project work activities. Specific requirements set forth in this UMTRA Project ES and H Plan are intended to provide uniformity to the UMTRA Project's ES and H programs for processing sites, disposal sites, and vicinity properties. In all cases, this UMTRA Project ES and H Plan is intended to be consistent with applicable standards and regulations and to provide guidance that is generic in nature and will allow for contractors' evaluation of site or contract-specific ES and H conditions. This plan specifies the basic ES and H requirements applicable to UMTRA Project ES and H programs and delineates responsibilities for carrying out this plan. DOE and contractor ES and H personnel are expected to exercise professional judgment and apply a graded approach when interpreting these guidelines, based on the risk of operations

  16. The Soils and Groundwater – EM-20 S&T Roadmap Quality Assurance Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-02-11

    The Soils and Groundwater – EM-20 Science and Technology Roadmap Project is a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management-funded initiative designed to develop new methods, strategies and technology for characterizing, modeling, remediating, and monitoring soils and groundwater contaminated with metals, radionuclides, and chlorinated organics. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by EM-20 Roadmap Project staff.

  17. Graduate Student Project: Operations Management Product Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    An operations management product project is an effective instructional technique that fills a void in current operations management literature in product planning. More than 94.1% of 286 graduates favored the project as a learning tool, and results demonstrate the significant impact the project had in predicting student performance. The author…

  18. 233S Decommissioning Project Environmental Control Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoric, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    This Environmental Control Plan is for the 233S Decommissioning activities conducted under the removal action report for the 233S Decontamination and Demolition Project. The purpose of this ECP is to identify environmental requirements for the 233S project. The ECP is a compilation of existing environmental permit conditions, regulatory requirements, and environmental requirements applicable to the specific project or functional activity

  19. Ecological risk assessment guidance for preparation of remedial investigation/feasibility study work plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pentecost, E.D.; Vinikour, W.S.

    1993-08-01

    This guidance document (1) provides instructions on preparing the components of an ecological work plan to complement the overall site remedial assessment investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan and (2) directs the user on how to implement ecological tasks identified in the plan. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfired Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), an RI/FS work plan win have to be developed as part of the site-remediation scoping the process. Specific guidance on the RI/FS process and the preparation of work plans has been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988a). This document provides guidance to US Department of Energy (DOE) staff and contractor personnel for incorporation of ecological information into environmental remediation planning and decision making at CERCLA sites. An overview analysis of early ecological risk assessment methods (i.e., in the 1980s) at Superfund sites was conducted by the EPA (1989a). That review provided a perspective of attention given to ecological issues in some of the first RI/FS studies. By itself, that reference is of somewhat limited value; it does, however, establish a basis for comparison of past practices in ecological risk with current, more refined methods

  20. Public information experience in the uranium mill tailings remedial action (UMTRA) project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.R.; Skinner, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    To enhance public perception of the UMTRA Project remedial actions at some 23 sites in the US, an information program has been designed to demonstrate the small risk associated with the work in each community. An unusual aspect of this information program has involved a specific effort to educate listeners concerning the Health Physics terminology being used. The information program has been successful in reducing the level of public anxiety associated with UMTRA remedial action at the first Project site, and is currently being applied at several new sites

  1. UMTRA project technical assistance contractor quality assurance implementation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Technical Assistance contractor (TAC) Quality Assurance Implementation Plan (QAIP) outlines the primary requirements for integrating quality functions for TAC technical activities applied to the surface and ground water phases of the UMTRA Project. The QAIP is subordinate to the latest issue of the UMTRA Project TAC Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) (DOE, 1993a), which was developed using US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5700.6C quality assurance (QA) criteria. The QAIP addresses technical aspects of the TAC UMTRA Project surface and ground water programs. All QA issues in the QAIP shall comply with requirements contained in the TAC QAPP (DOE, 1933a). Because industry standards for data acquisition and data control are not addressed in DOE Order 5700.6C, the QAIP has been formatted to the 14 US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) QA requirements. DOE Order 5700.6C criteria that are not contained in the CERCLA requirements are added to the QAIP as additional requirements in Sections 15.0 through 18.0. Project documents that contain CERCLA requirements and 5700.6 criteria shall be referenced in this document to avoid duplication. Referenced documents are not included in this QAIP but are available through the UMTRA Project Document Control Center

  2. Project Management Plan for Material Stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SPEER, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Materials Stabilization project. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP), HNF-3617/Rev. 0. This is the top-level definitive project management document that specifies the technical (work scope), schedule, and cost baselines to manager the execution of this project. It describes the organizational approach and roles/responsibilities to be implemented to execute the project. This plan is under configuration management and any deviations must be authorized by appropriate change control action. Materials stabilization is designated the responsibility to open and stabilize containers of plutonium metal, oxides, alloys, compounds, and sources. Each of these items is at least 30 weight percent plutonium/uranium. The output of this project will be containers of materials in a safe and stable form suitable for storage pending final packaging and/or transportation offsite. The corrosion products along with oxides and compounds will be stabilized via muffle furnaces to reduce the materials to high fired oxides

  3. Engineering evaluation/conceptual plan for the 200-UP-1 groundwater operable unit interim remedial measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.A.; Swanson, L.C.; Weeks, R.S.; Giacinto, J.; Gustafson, F.W.; Ford, B.H.; Wittreich, C.; Parnell, S.; Green, J.

    1995-04-01

    This report presents an engineering evaluation and conceptual plan for an interim remedial measure (ERM) to address a uranium and technetium-99 groundwater plume and an associated nitrate contamination plume in the 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. This report provides information regarding the need and potentially achievable objectives and goals for an IRM and evaluates alternatives to contain elevated concentrations of uranium, technetium-99, nitrate, and carbon tetrachloride and to obtain information necessary to develop final remedial actions for the operable unit

  4. Policy and planning for large infrastructure projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Bent

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on problems and their causes and cures in policy and planning for large infrastructure projects. First, it identifies as the main problem in major infrastructure development pervasive misinformation about the costs, benefits, and risks involved. A consequence of misinformation ...... for large infrastructure projects, with a focus on better planning methods and changed governance structures, the latter being more important.......This paper focuses on problems and their causes and cures in policy and planning for large infrastructure projects. First, it identifies as the main problem in major infrastructure development pervasive misinformation about the costs, benefits, and risks involved. A consequence of misinformation...... the likelihood that it is their projects, and not the competition's, that gain approval and funding. This results in the "survival of the unfittest," where often it is not the best projects that are built, but the most misrepresented ones. Finally, the paper presents measures for reforming policy and planning...

  5. Tank waste remediation system tank waste retrieval risk management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimper, S.C.

    1997-01-01

    This Risk Management Plan defines the approach to be taken to manage programmatic risks in the TWRS Tank Waste Retrieval program. It provides specific instructions applicable to TWR, and is used to supplement the guidance given by the TWRS Risk Management procedure

  6. Integrated program management for major nuclear decommissioning and environmental remediation projects - 59068

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehew, John

    2012-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) is the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) contractor responsible for the safe, environmental cleanup of the Hanford Sites Central Plateau, sections of the Columbia River Corridor and the Hanford Reach National Monument. The 586-square-mile Hanford Site is located along the Columbia River in southeastern Washington, U.S.A. A plutonium production complex, housing the largest volume of radioactive and contaminated waste in the nation, with nine nuclear reactors and associated processing facilities, Hanford played a pivotal role in the nation's defense for more than 40 years, beginning in the 1940's with the Manhattan Project. Today, under the direction of the DOE, Hanford is engaged in one of the world's largest environmental cleanup project. The Plateau Remediation Contract is a 10-year project paving the way for closure of the Hanford Site. The site through its location, climate, geology and proximity to the Columbia River in combination with the results of past nuclear operations presents a highly complex environmental remediation challenge. The complexity is not only due to the technical issues associated with decommissioning nuclear facilities, remediating soil contamination sites, dispositioning legacy waste and fuel materials and integrating these with the deep vadose zone and groundwater remediation

  7. SNF project engineering process improvement plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KELMENSON, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    This Engineering Process Improvement Plan documents the activities and plans to be taken by the SNF Project (the Project) to support its engineering process and to produce a consolidated set of engineering procedures that are fully compliant with the requirements of HNF-PRO-1819 (1819). These requirements are imposed on all engineering activities performed for the Project and apply to all life-cycle stages of the Project's systems, structures and components (SSCs). This Plan describes the steps that will be taken by the Project during the transition period to ensure that new procedures are effectively integrated into the Project's work process as these procedures are issued. The consolidated procedures will be issued and implemented by September 30, 1999

  8. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Monument Valley, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    The Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Cane Valley is a former uranium mill that has undergone surface remediation in the form of tailings and contaminated materials removal. Contaminated materials from the Monument Valley (Arizona) UMTRA Project site have been transported to the Mexican Hat (Utah) UMTRA Project site for consolidation with the Mexican Hat tailings. Tailings removal was completed in February 1994. Three geologic units at the site contain water: the unconsolidated eolian and alluvial deposits (alluvial aquifer), the Shinarump Conglomerate (Shinarump Member), and the De Chelly Sandstone. Water quality analyses indicate the contaminant plume has migrated north of the site and is mainly in the alluvial aquifer. An upward hydraulic gradient in the De Chelly Sandstone provides some protection to that aquifer. This water sampling and analysis plan recommends sampling domestic wells, monitor wells, and surface water in April and September 1994. The purpose of sampling is to continue periodic monitoring for the surface program, evaluate changes to water quality for site characterization, and provide data for the baseline risk assessment. Samples taken in April will be representative of high ground water levels and samples taken in September will be representative of low ground water levels. Filtered and nonfiltered samples will be analyzed for plume indicator parameters and baseline risk assessment parameters

  9. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benioff, P.; Biang, R.; Dolak, D.; Dunn, C.; Haffenden, R.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.; Wang, Y.; Yuen, C.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of an RI/FS is to characterize the nature and extent of the risks posed by contaminants present at a site and to develop and evaluate options for remedial actions. The overall objective of the RI is to provide a comprehensive evaluation of site conditions, types and quantities of contaminants present, release mechanisms and migration pathways, target populations, and risks to human health and the environment. The information developed during the RI provides the basis for the design and implementation of remedial actions during the FS. The purpose of this RI Work Plan is to define the tasks that will direct the remedial investigation of the J-Field site at APG.

  10. Multi-site risk-based project planning, optimization, sequencing, & budgeting process and tool for the integrated facility disposition project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.G.; Castillo, C.; Huntsman, J.; Killoy, S.; Lucek, H.; Marks, T.C.

    2011-01-01

    Faced with the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex Transformation, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) was tasked with developing an integrated plan for the decommissioning of over 400 facilities and 300 environmental remediation units, as well as the many reconfiguration and modernization projects at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Y-12 Complex. Manual scheduling of remediation activities is time-consuming and inherently introduces bias of the scheduler or organization into the process. Clearly a well-defined process, quantitative risk-based tool was needed to develop an objective, unbiased baseline sequence and schedule with a sound technical foundation for the Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP). Faced with limited available data, innovation was needed to extrapolate intelligent relative data for key risk parameters based on known data elements. The IFDP Supermodel was customized and expanded to provide this capability for conceptual planning of diverse project portfolios and multiple sites. (author)

  11. Safety analysis and hazard classification for the 100-B/C Site Remediation Project, Phase 1. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, W.J.; Lehrschall, R.R.; Oestreich, D.K.

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the preliminary hazard classification (PHC) for the initial group of sites to be remediated by the 100-B/C Site Remediation Project. The project is targeted at excavation of contaminated solid from seven waste sites, and the transportation and disposal of these wastes at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. The PHC for these remediation activities is rated as radiological

  12. Conceptual Design Plan SM-43 Replacement Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    University of California, Los Alamos National Laboratory, SCC Project Office

    2000-11-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Conceptual Design Plan for the SM-43 Replacement Project outlines plans for replacing the SM-43 Administration Building. Topics include the reasons that replacement is considered a necessity; the roles of the various project sponsors; and descriptions of the proposed site and facilities. Also covered in this proposal is preliminary information on the project schedule, cost estimates, acquisition strategy, risk assessment, NEPA strategy, safety strategy, and safeguards and security. Spreadsheets provide further detail on space requirements, project schedules, and cost estimates.

  13. Decontamination Technologies, Task 3, Urban Remediation and Response Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiser, J.; Sullivan, T.

    2009-01-01

    In the aftermath of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD, also known as a dirty bomb) it will be necessary to remediate the site including building exteriors and interiors, equipment, pavement, vehicles, personal items etc. Remediation will remove or reduce radioactive contamination from the area using a combination of removing and disposing of many assets (including possible demolition of buildings), decontaminating and returning to service other assets, and fixing in place or leaving in place contamination that is deemed 'acceptable'. The later will require setting acceptable dose standards, which will require negotiation with all involved parties and a balance of risk and cost to benefit. To accomplish the first two, disposal or decontamination, a combination of technologies will be deployed that can be loosely classified as: Decontamination; Equipment removal and size reduction; and Demolition. This report will deal only with the decontamination technologies that will be used to return assets to service or to reduce waste disposal. It will not discuss demolition, size reduction or removal technologies or equipment (e.g., backhoe mounted rams, rock splitter, paving breakers and chipping hammers, etc.). As defined by the DOE (1994), decontamination is removal of radiological contamination from the surfaces of facilities and equipment. Expertise in this field comes primarily from the operation and decommissioning of DOE and commercial nuclear facilities as well as a small amount of ongoing research and development closely related to RDD decontamination. Information related to decontamination of fields, buildings, and public spaces resulting from the Goiania and Chernobyl incidents were also reviewed and provide some meaningful insight into decontamination at major urban areas. In order to proceed with decontamination, the item being processed needs to have an intrinsic value that exceeds the cost of the cleaning and justifies the exposure of any workers during the

  14. Decontamination Technologies, Task 3, Urban Remediation and Response Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser,J.; Sullivan, T.

    2009-06-30

    In the aftermath of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD, also known as a dirty bomb) it will be necessary to remediate the site including building exteriors and interiors, equipment, pavement, vehicles, personal items etc. Remediation will remove or reduce radioactive contamination from the area using a combination of removing and disposing of many assets (including possible demolition of buildings), decontaminating and returning to service other assets, and fixing in place or leaving in place contamination that is deemed 'acceptable'. The later will require setting acceptable dose standards, which will require negotiation with all involved parties and a balance of risk and cost to benefit. To accomplish the first two, disposal or decontamination, a combination of technologies will be deployed that can be loosely classified as: Decontamination; Equipment removal and size reduction; and Demolition. This report will deal only with the decontamination technologies that will be used to return assets to service or to reduce waste disposal. It will not discuss demolition, size reduction or removal technologies or equipment (e.g., backhoe mounted rams, rock splitter, paving breakers and chipping hammers, etc.). As defined by the DOE (1994), decontamination is removal of radiological contamination from the surfaces of facilities and equipment. Expertise in this field comes primarily from the operation and decommissioning of DOE and commercial nuclear facilities as well as a small amount of ongoing research and development closely related to RDD decontamination. Information related to decontamination of fields, buildings, and public spaces resulting from the Goiania and Chernobyl incidents were also reviewed and provide some meaningful insight into decontamination at major urban areas. In order to proceed with decontamination, the item being processed needs to have an intrinsic value that exceeds the cost of the cleaning and justifies the exposure of any workers

  15. Hanford Remedial Action Environmental Impact Statement, Richland, Washington. Implementation Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This implementation plan was prepared in compliance in compliance with 10 CFR 1021. It includes the following sections: introduction; purpose and need for departmental action; scope, content, and alternatives for the HRA EIS; public participation process; schedule for preparation of the HRA EIS; anticipated environmental reviews and consultations; and contractor disclosure statement. The following appendices are also included: notice of intent, federal register notice for extension of public scoping period, proposed annotated outline for the draft HRA EIS, summary of final report for the Hanford Future Site Uses Working Group, and summary of comments and responses from the public scoping process

  16. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan -- Shiprock, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    Water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) is required for each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site to provide a basis for ground water and surface water sampling at disposal and former processing sites. This WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the monitoring stations at the Navaho Reservation in Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project site. The purposes of the water sampling at Shiprock for fiscal year (FY) 1994 are to (1) collect water quality data at new monitoring locations in order to build a defensible statistical data base, (2) monitor plume movement on the terrace and floodplain, and (3) monitor the impact of alluvial ground water discharge into the San Juan River. The third activity is important because the community of Shiprock withdraws water from the San Juan River directly across from the contaminated alluvial floodplain below the abandoned uranium mill tailings processing site

  17. Uniroyal Chemical`s remediation project meets or exceeds expectations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon,

    1997-11-01

    Recent remedial actions taken by Uniroyal Chemical Ltd at their Elmira, Ontario, plant have been considered. The company has been manufacturing a wide range of organic chemicals at this plant for use in agriculture and in the plastics and rubber industries since 1942. Historically, wastes were disposed of on-site, which while common practice at the time, caused soil and water contamination by N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), volatile organic compounds such as benzene, toluene, and chlorobenzene, aniline, mercaptobenzothiazole and basic compounds such as ammonia. The local hydrogeology is fairly complex and consists of several aquifers and aquitards of which the Upper Aquifer (UA) and the Municipal Aquifer (MA) have been the primary concern. They have supplied all or part of the drinking water for the Kitchener-Waterloo area and the town of Elmira. After an extensive feasibility study, the decision was made to install shallow extension wells, and a system to treat the groundwater to acceptable criteria to discharge the treated water to the river system. Development of the system, which besides ten extraction wells includes a tertiary treatment process for UV oxidation, was described. The system has been in operation since January 1997. It affords 95 to 98 per cent of containment efficiency, 99 per cent ammonia removal, and 99.97 per cent of NDMA removal. Effluent requirements have been consistently met for all 18 primary contaminants, and no groundwater is being discharged into the river system.

  18. Tank waste remediation system vadose zone program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredenburg, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the vadose zone characterization under this program is to develop a better conceptual geohydrologic model of identified tank farms which will be characterized so that threats to human health and the environment from past leaks and spills, intentional liquid discharges, potential future leaks during retrieval, and from residual contaminants that may remain in tank farms at closure can be explicitly addressed in decision processes. This model will include geologic, hydrologic, and hydrochemical parameters as defined by the requirements of each of the TWRS programs identified here. The intent of this TWRS Vadose Zone Program Plan is to provide justification and an implementation plan for the following activities: Develop a sufficient understanding of subsurface conditions and transport processes to support decisions on management, cleanup, and containment of past leaks, spills, and intentional liquid discharges; Develop a sufficient understanding of transport processes to support decisions on controlling potential retrieval leaks; Develop a sufficient understanding of transport processes to support decisions on tank farm closure, including allowable residual waste that may remain at closure; and Provide new information on geotechnical properties in the 200 Area to supplement data used for design and performance assessment for immobilized low-activity waste disposal facilities

  19. Tank waste remediation system vadose zone program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredenburg, E.A.

    1998-07-27

    The objective of the vadose zone characterization under this program is to develop a better conceptual geohydrologic model of identified tank farms which will be characterized so that threats to human health and the environment from past leaks and spills, intentional liquid discharges, potential future leaks during retrieval, and from residual contaminants that may remain in tank farms at closure can be explicitly addressed in decision processes. This model will include geologic, hydrologic, and hydrochemical parameters as defined by the requirements of each of the TWRS programs identified here. The intent of this TWRS Vadose Zone Program Plan is to provide justification and an implementation plan for the following activities: Develop a sufficient understanding of subsurface conditions and transport processes to support decisions on management, cleanup, and containment of past leaks, spills, and intentional liquid discharges; Develop a sufficient understanding of transport processes to support decisions on controlling potential retrieval leaks; Develop a sufficient understanding of transport processes to support decisions on tank farm closure, including allowable residual waste that may remain at closure; and Provide new information on geotechnical properties in the 200 Area to supplement data used for design and performance assessment for immobilized low-activity waste disposal facilities.

  20. Soil Remediation Demonstration Project: Biodegradation of Heavy Fuel Oils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reynolds, Charles

    1997-01-01

    .... Low-cost treatments applicable to small-scale spills are needed. The object of this CPAR project was to examine using cost-effective, on-site bioremediation techniques for heavy-oil-contaminated soil in cold regions...

  1. Tank Waste Remediation System Inactive Miscellaneous Underground Storage Tanks Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavson, R.D.

    1995-12-01

    The Program Management Plan (PMP) describes the approach that will be used to manage the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Inactive Miscellaneous Underground Storage Tank (IMUST) Program. The plan describes management, technical, and administrative control systems that will be used to plan and control the IMUSTs Program performance. The technical data to determine the IMUSTs status for inclusion in the Single Shell Tank Farm Controlled Clean and Stable (CCS) Program. The second is to identify and implement surveillance, characterization, stabilization, and modifications to support CCS prior to final closure

  2. Life sciences space biology project planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primeaux, G.; Newkirk, K.; Miller, L.; Lewis, G.; Michaud, R.

    1988-01-01

    The Life Sciences Space Biology (LSSB) research will explore the effect of microgravity on humans, including the physiological, clinical, and sociological implications of space flight and the readaptations upon return to earth. Physiological anomalies from past U.S. space flights will be used in planning the LSSB project.The planning effort integrates science and engineering. Other goals of the LSSB project include the provision of macroscopic view of the earth's biosphere, and the development of spinoff technology for application on earth.

  3. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the designated disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

  4. Addendum to the Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    This document is an addendum to the Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (DOE 1993). The Department of Energy--Oak Ridge Operations (DOE-ORO) is proposing this addendum to the US Envianmental Protection Agency, Region IV (EPA-IV), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) as a reduced sampling program on the Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir and on Poplar Creek. DOE-ORO is proposing to maximize the use of existing data and minimize the collection of new data for water, sediment, and biota during Phase 2 of the Clinch River Remedial Investigation. The existing data along with the additional data collected in Phase 2 would be used to perform a baseline risk assessment and make remedial decisions. DOE-ORO considers that the existing data, the additional data collected in Phase 2, and on-site remedial investigation data would be sufficient to understand the nature and extent of the contamination problem in the Clinch River, perform a baseline risk assessment,and make remedial decisions. This addendum is organized in three sections. The first section provides background information and describes a rationale for modifying the Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis Plan. Section 2 presents a summary of the existing data for the Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir and an evaluation of the sufficiency of this data for a baseline human health and ecological risk assessment. Section 3 describes the revised Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis Plan for surface water, sediment, and biota in the Clinch River OU and in the Poplar Creek OU

  5. SNF project engineering process improvement plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DESAI, S.P.

    1999-01-01

    This Engineering Process Improvement Plan documents the activities and plans to be taken by the SNF Project to support its engineering process and to produce a consolidated set of engineering procedures that are fully compliant with the requirements of HNF-PRO-1819. All new procedures will be issued and implemented by September 30, 1999

  6. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-KR-4 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the CERCLA remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-KR-4 operable unit. The 100-K Area consists of the 100-KR-4 groundwater operable unit and three source operable units. The 100-KR-4 operable unit includes all contamination found in the aquifer soils and water beneath the 100-K Area. Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of contamination

  7. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-KR-4 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the CERCLA remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-KR-4 operable unit. The 100-K Area consists of the 100-KR-4 groundwater operable unit and three source operable units. The 100-KR-4 operable unit includes all contamination found in the aquifer soils and water beneath the 100-K Area. Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of contamination.

  8. Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Retrieval Authorization Basis Amendment Task Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HARRIS, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    This task plan is a documented agreement between Nuclear Safety and Licensing and Retrieval Engineering. The purpose of this task plan is to identify the scope of work, tasks and deliverables, responsibilities, manpower, and schedules associated with an authorization basis amendment as a result of the Waste Feed Delivery Program, Project W-211, Project W-521, and Project W-522

  9. Remedial investigation/feasibility study Work Plan and addenda for Operable Unit 4-12: Central Facilities Area Landfills II and III at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keck, K.N.; Stormberg, G.J.; Porro, I.; Sondrup, A.J.; McCormick, S.H.

    1993-07-01

    This document is divided into two main sections -- the Work Plan and the addenda. The Work Plan describes the regulatory history and physical setting of Operable Unit 4-12, previous sampling activities, and data. It also identifies a preliminary conceptual model, preliminary remedial action alternatives, and preliminary applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. In addition, the Work Plan discusses data gaps and data quality objectives for proposed remedial investigation activities. Also included are tasks identified for the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and a schedule of RI/FS activities. The addenda include details of the proposed field activities (Field Sampling Plan), anticipated quality assurance activities (Quality Assurance Project Plan), policies and procedures to protect RI/FS workers and the environment during field investigations (Health and Safety Plan), and policies, procedures, and activities that the Department of Energy will use to involve the public in the decision-making process concerning CFA Landfills II and III RI/FS activities (Community Relations Plan)

  10. Remedial investigation/feasibility study Work Plan and addenda for Operable Unit 4-12: Central Facilities Area Landfills II and III at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, K.N.; Stormberg, G.J.; Porro, I.; Sondrup, A.J.; McCormick, S.H.

    1993-07-01

    This document is divided into two main sections -- the Work Plan and the addenda. The Work Plan describes the regulatory history and physical setting of Operable Unit 4-12, previous sampling activities, and data. It also identifies a preliminary conceptual model, preliminary remedial action alternatives, and preliminary applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. In addition, the Work Plan discusses data gaps and data quality objectives for proposed remedial investigation activities. Also included are tasks identified for the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and a schedule of RI/FS activities. The addenda include details of the proposed field activities (Field Sampling Plan), anticipated quality assurance activities (Quality Assurance Project Plan), policies and procedures to protect RI/FS workers and the environment during field investigations (Health and Safety Plan), and policies, procedures, and activities that the Department of Energy will use to involve the public in the decision-making process concerning CFA Landfills II and III RI/FS activities (Community Relations Plan).

  11. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Surface remedial action was completed at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Canonsburg and Burrell Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in southwestern Pennsylvania in 1985 and 1987, respectively. The Burrell disposal site, included in the UMTRA Project as a vicinity property, was remediated in conjunction with the remedial action at Canonsburg. On 27 May 1994, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the DOE final Long-Term Surveillance Plan (LTSP) (DOE, 1993) for Burrell thus establishing the site under the general license in 10 CFR section 40.27 (1994). In accordance with the DOE guidance document for long-term surveillance (DOE, 1995), all NRC/DOE interaction on the Burrell site's long-term care now is conducted with the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office in Grand Junction, Colorado, and is no longer the responsibility of the DOE UMTRA Project Team in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Therefore, the planned sampling activities described in this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) are limited to the Canonsburg site. This WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for routine monitoring at the Canonsburg site for calendar years 1995 and 1996. Currently, the analytical data further the site characterization and demonstrate that the disposal cell's initial performance is in accordance with design requirements

  12. Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project Building 2 public dose evaluation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, R.

    1996-05-01

    Building 2 on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) site, which is operated by Rust Geotech, is part of the GJPO Remedial Action Program. This report describes measurements and modeling efforts to evaluate the radiation dose to members of the public who might someday occupy or tear down Building 2. The assessment of future doses to those occupying or demolishing Building 2 is based on assumptions about future uses of the building, measured data when available, and predictive modeling when necessary. Future use of the building is likely to be as an office facility. The DOE sponsored program, RESRAD-BUILD, Version. 1.5 was chosen for the modeling tool. Releasing the building for unrestricted use instead of demolishing it now could save a substantial amount of money compared with the baseline cost estimate because the site telecommunications system, housed in Building 2, would not be disabled and replaced. The information developed in this analysis may be used as part of an as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) cost/benefit determination regarding disposition of Building 2

  13. Scoping session of the programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This document is about the scoping session which was held at the Community Center in Falls City, Texas. The purpose was to obtain public comment on the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA), specifically on the ground water project. Presentations made by the manager for the entire UMTRA program, manager of the site and ground water program, comments made by two residents of Fall City are included in this document

  14. TANK FARM REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT AN EXERCISE IN TECHNICAL & REGULATORY COLLABORATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JARAYSI, M.N.

    2007-01-08

    The Tank Farm Remediation Technology Development Project at the Hanford Site focuses on waste storage tanks, pipelines and associated ancillary equipment that are part of the C-200 single-shell tank (SST) farm system located in the C Tank Farm. The purpose of the project is to obtain information on the implementation of a variety of closure activities and to answer questions on technical, operational and regulatory issues associated with closure.

  15. Scoping session of the programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-12-31

    This document is about the scoping session which was held at the Community Center in Falls City, Texas. The purpose was to obtain public comment on the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA), specifically on the ground water project. Presentations made by the manager for the entire UMTRA program, manager of the site and ground water program, comments made by two residents of Fall City are included in this document.

  16. TANK FARM REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT AN EXERCISE IN TECHNICAL and REGULATORY COLLABORATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JARAYSI, M.N.

    2007-01-01

    The Tank Farm Remediation Technology Development Project at the Hanford Site focuses on waste storage tanks, pipelines and associated ancillary equipment that are part of the C-200 single-shell tank (SST) farm system located in the C Tank Farm. The purpose of the project is to obtain information on the implementation of a variety of closure activities and to answer questions on technical, operational and regulatory issues associated with closure

  17. Data Management Plan and Functional System Design for the Information Management System of the Clinch River Remedial Investigation and Waste Area Grouping 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, T.; Brandt, C.; Calfee, J.; Garland, M.; Holladay, S.; Nickle, B.; Schmoyer, D.; Serbin, C.; Ward, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The Data Management Plan and Functional System Design supports the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) and Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 Environmental Monitoring Program. The objective of the Data Management Plan and Functional System Design is to provide organization, integrity, security, traceability, and consistency of the data generated during the CRRI and WAG 6 projects. Proper organization will ensure that the data are consistent with the procedures and requirements of the projects. The Information Management Groups (IMGs) for these two programs face similar challenges and share many common objectives. By teaming together, the IMGs have expedited the development and implementation of a common information management strategy that benefits each program.

  18. Waste minimization opportunities at the U.S. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, Rifle, Colorado, site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, G.L.; Arp, S.; Hempill, H.

    1993-01-01

    At two uranium mill sites in Rifle, Colorado, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is removing uranium mill tailings and contaminated subgrade soils. This remediation activity will result in the production of groundwater contaminated with uranium, heavy metals, ammonia, sulfates, and total dissolved solids (TDS). The initial remediation plan called for a wastewater treatment plant for removal of the uranium, heavy metals, and ammonia, with disposal of the treated water, which still includes the sulfates and TDSS, to the Colorado River. The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination (NPDES) permit issued by the Colorado Department of Health for the two Rifle sites contained more restrictive discharge limits than originally anticipated. During the detailed review of alternate treatment systems to meet these more restrictive limits, the proposed construction procedures were reviewed emphasizing the methods to minimize groundwater production to reduce the size of the water treatment facility, or to eliminate it entirely. It was determined that with changes to the excavation procedures and use of the contaminated groundwater for use in dust suppression at the disposal site, discharge to the river could be eliminated completely

  19. Fiscal planning of private electricity production projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, R.

    2002-01-01

    Various fiscal considerations frequently encountered in the context of the planning of private electricity production projects were described. Two major themes were discussed: 1) the different jurisdictional vehicles that can be used during the planning of private electricity production projects and the associated fiscal considerations, and 2) the two main fiscal incentives of the Income Tax Act (Canada) which could impact on the financing and operation costs of such a project, namely the accelerated amortization and the possibility of deducting the costs associated to renewable energies and energy savings in Canada. This was a general presentation that did not go into specific details and did not represent a legal opinion. refs

  20. Dynamic and stochastic multi-project planning

    CERN Document Server

    Melchiors, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with dynamic and stochastic methods for multi-project planning. Based on the idea of using queueing networks for the analysis of dynamic-stochastic multi-project environments this book addresses two problems: detailed scheduling of project activities, and integrated order acceptance and capacity planning. In an extensive simulation study, the book thoroughly investigates existing scheduling policies. To obtain optimal and near optimal scheduling policies new models and algorithms are proposed based on the theory of Markov decision processes and Approximate Dynamic programming.

  1. Project MOHAVE data analysis plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, J.G.; Green, M.; Hoffer, T.E.; Lawson, D.R.; Pitchford, M.; Eatough, D.J.; Farber, R.J.; Malm, W.C.; McDade, C.E.

    1993-01-01

    Project MOHAVE is intended to develop ambient and source emissions data for use with source models, receptor models, and data analysis methods in order to explain the nature and causes of visibility degradation in the Grand Canyon. Approximately 50% of the modeling and data analysis effort will be directed toward understanding the contributions from the Mohave Power Project to haze in the Grand Canyon and other nearby Class areas; the remaining resources will be used to understand the contribution from other sources. The major goals of Project MOHAVE and data analysis are: to evaluate the measurement for applicability to modeling and data analysis activities; to describe the visibility, air quality and meteorology during the field study period and to determine the degree to which these measurements represent typical visibility events at the Grand Canyon; to further develop conceptual models of physical and chemical processes which affect visibility impairment at the Grand Canyon; to estimate the contributions from different emission sources to visibility impairment at the Grand Canyon, and to quantitatively evaluate the uncertainties of those estimates; to reconcile different scientific interpretations of the same data and to present this reconciliation to decision-makers. Several different approaches will be applied. Each approach will involve explicit examination of measurement uncertainties, compliance with implicit and explicit assumptions, and representativeness of the measurements. Scientific disagreements will be sought, expressed, explained, quantified, and presented. Data which can be used to verify methods will be withheld for independent evaluation of the validity of those methods. All assumptions will be stated and evaluated against reality. Data analysis results not supporting hypotheses will be presented with those results supporting the hypotheses. Uncertainty statements will be quantitative and consistent with decision-making needs

  2. Spent nuclear fuel project high-level information management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Main, G.C.

    1996-09-13

    This document presents the results of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) Information Management Planning Project (IMPP), a short-term project that identified information management (IM) issues and opportunities within the SNFP and outlined a high-level plan to address them. This high-level plan for the SNMFP IM focuses on specific examples from within the SNFP. The plan`s recommendations can be characterized in several ways. Some recommendations address specific challenges that the SNFP faces. Others form the basis for making smooth transitions in several important IM areas. Still others identify areas where further study and planning are indicated. The team`s knowledge of developments in the IM industry and at the Hanford Site were crucial in deciding where to recommend that the SNFP act and where they should wait for Site plans to be made. Because of the fast pace of the SNFP and demands on SNFP staff, input and interaction were primarily between the IMPP team and members of the SNFP Information Management Steering Committee (IMSC). Key input to the IMPP came from a workshop where IMSC members and their delegates developed a set of draft IM principles. These principles, described in Section 2, became the foundation for the recommendations found in the transition plan outlined in Section 5. Availability of SNFP staff was limited, so project documents were used as a basis for much of the work. The team, realizing that the status of the project and the environment are continually changing, tried to keep abreast of major developments since those documents were generated. To the extent possible, the information contained in this document is current as of the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. Programs and organizations on the Hanford Site as a whole are trying to maximize their return on IM investments. They are coordinating IM activities and trying to leverage existing capabilities. However, the SNFP cannot just rely on Sitewide activities to meet its IM requirements

  3. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Preliminary Project Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis J. Harrell

    2006-01-01

    This draft preliminary project management plan presents the conceptual framework for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, consistent with the authorization in the Energy Policy Act of 2005. In developing this plan, the Idaho National Laboratory has considered three fundamental project planning options that are summarized in the following section. Each of these planning options is literally compliant with the Energy Policy Act of 2005, but each emphasizes different approaches to technology development risks, design, licensing and construction risks, and to the extent of commercialization support provided to the industry. The primary focus of this draft preliminary project management plan is to identify those activities important to Critical Decision-1, at which point a decision on proceeding with the NGNP Project can be made. The conceptual project framework described herein is necessary to establish the scope and priorities for the technology development activities. The framework includes: A reference NGNP prototype concept based on what is judged to be the lowest risk technology development that would achieve the needed commercial functional requirements to provide an economically competitive nuclear heat source and hydrogen production capability. A high-level schedule logic for design, construction, licensing, and acceptance testing. This schedule logic also includes an operational shakedown period that provides proof-of-principle to establish the basis for commercialization decisions by end-users. An assessment of current technology development plans to support Critical Decision-1 and overall project progress. The most important technical and programmatic uncertainties (risks) are evaluated, and potential mitigation strategies are identified so that the technology development plans may be modified as required to support ongoing project development. A rough-order-of-magnitude cost evaluation that provides an initial basis for budget planning. This

  4. Project Hanford management contract quality improvement project management plan; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ADAMS, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    On July 13, 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) Manager transmitted a letter to Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) describing several DOE-RL identified failed opportunities for FDH to improve the Quality Assurance (QA) Program and its implementation. In addition, DOE-RL identified specific Quality Program performance deficiencies. FDH was requested to establish a periodic reporting mechanism for the corrective action program. In a July 17, 1998 response to DOE-RL, FDH agreed with the DOE concerns and committed to perform a comprehensive review of the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) QA Program during July and August, 1998. As a result, the Project Hanford Management Contract Quality Improvement Plan (QIP) (FDH-3508) was issued on October 21, 1998. The plan identified corrective actions based upon the results of an in-depth Quality Program Assessment. Immediately following the scheduled October 22, 1998, DOE Office of Enforcement and Investigation (EH-10) Enforcement Conference, FDH initiated efforts to effectively implement the QIP corrective actions. A Quality Improvement Project (QI Project) leadership team was assembled to prepare a Project Management Plan for this project. The management plan was specifically designed to engage a core team and the support of representatives from FDH and the major subcontractors (MSCs) to implement the QIP initiatives; identify, correct, and provide feedback as to the root cause for deficiency; and close out the corrective actions. The QI Project will manage and communicate progress of the process

  5. National Security Technology Incubation Project Continuation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-09-30

    This document contains a project continuation plan for the National Security Technology Incubator (NSTI). The plan was developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP) funded by a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. This continuation plan describes the current status of NSTI (staffing and clients), long-term goals, strategies, and long-term financial solvency goals.The Arrowhead Center of New Mexico State University (NMSU) is the operator and manager of the NSTI. To realize the NSTI, Arrowhead Center must meet several performance objectives related to planning, development, execution, evaluation, and sustainability. This continuation plan is critical to the success of NSTI in its mission of incubating businesses with security technology products and services.

  6. Approved CAMU equals faster, better, cheaper remediation at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis-Nouille, E.M.; Goidell, L.C.; Strimbu, M.J.; Nickel, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    A 1,050 acre Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) was approved for the Fernald Protection Agency Environmental Management Project (FEMP) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to manage environmental media remediation waste in the Operable Unit 5 Record of Decision, 1995. Debris is also proposed for management as remediation waste under the CAMU Rule in the Operable Unit 3 Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Report, as of December 1995. Application of the CAMU Rule at the FEMP will allow consolidation of low-level mixed waste and hazardous waste that presents minimal threat from these two operable units in an on-property engineered disposal facility without triggering land disposal restrictions (LDRs). The waste acceptance criteria for the on property disposal facility are based on a combination of site-specific risk-based concentration standards, as opposed to non-site-specific requirements imposed by regulatory classifications

  7. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Mexican Hat, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    The Mexican Hat, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is a former uranium mill that is undergoing surface remediation in the form of on-site tailings stabilization. Contaminated surface materials from the Monument Valley, Arizona, UMTRA Project site have been transported to the Mexican Hat site and are being consolidated with the Mexican Hat tailings. The scheduled completion of the tailings disposal cell is August 1995. Water is found in two geologic units at the site: the Halgaito Shale Formation and the Honaker Trail Formation. The tailings rest on the Halgaito Shale, and water contained in that unit is a result of milling activities and, to a lesser extent, water released from the tailings from compaction during remedial action construction of the disposal cell. Water in the Halgaito Shale flows through fractures and discharges at seeps along nearby arroyos. Flow from the seeps will diminish as water drains from the unit. Ground water in the lower unit, the Honaker Trail Formation, is protected from contamination by an upward hydraulic gradient. There are no nearby water supply wells because of widespread poor background ground water quality and quantity, and the San Juan River shows no impacts from the site. This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) recommends sampling six seeps and one upgradient monitor well compared in the Honaker Trail Formation. Samples will be taken in April 1994 (representative of high group water levels) and September 1994 (representative of low ground water levels). Analyses will be performed on filtered samples for plume indicator parameters

  8. Energy Strategic Planning & Sufficiency Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retziaff, Greg

    2005-03-30

    This report provides information regarding options available, their advantages and disadvantages, and the costs for pursuing activities to advance Smith River Rancheria toward an energy program that reduces their energy costs, allows greater self-sufficiency and stimulates economic development and employment opportunities within and around the reservation. The primary subjects addressed in this report are as follows: (1) Baseline Assessment of Current Energy Costs--An evaluation of the historical energy costs for Smith River was conducted to identify the costs for each component of their energy supply to better assess changes that can be considered for energy cost reductions. (2) Research Viable Energy Options--This includes a general description of many power generation technologies and identification of their relative costs, advantages and disadvantages. Through this research the generation technology options that are most suited for this application were identified. (3) Project Development Considerations--The basic steps and associated challenges of developing a generation project utilizing the selected technologies are identified and discussed. This included items like selling to third parties, wheeling, electrical interconnections, fuel supply, permitting, standby power, and transmission studies. (4) Energy Conservation--The myriad of federal, state and utility programs offered for low-income weatherization and utility bill payment assistance are identified, their qualification requirements discussed, and the subsequent benefits outlined. (5) Establishing an Energy Organization--The report includes a high level discussion of formation of a utility to serve the Tribal membership. The value or advantages of such action is discussed along with some of the challenges. (6) Training--Training opportunities available to the Tribal membership are identified.

  9. Systems engineering management and implementation plan for Project W-464, immobilized high-level waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wecks, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    The Systems Engineering Management and Implementation Plan (SEMIP) for TWRS Project W-46 describes the project implementation of the Tank Waste Remediation System Systems Engineering Management Plan. (TWRS SEMP), Rev. 1. The SEMIP outlines systems engineering (SE) products and processes to be used by the project for technical baseline development. A formal graded approach is used to determine the products necessary for requirements, design, and operational baseline completion. SE management processes are defined, and roles and responsibilities for management processes and major technical baseline elements are documented

  10. Systems engineering management and implementation plan for Project W-465, immobilized low-activity waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaspar, J.R.; Latray, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Systems Engineering Management and Implementation Plan (SEMIP) for TWRS Project W-465 describes the project implementation of the Tank Waste Remediation System Systems Engineering Management Plan (TWRS SEMP), Rev. 1. The SEMIP outlines systems engineering (SE) products and processes to be used by the project for technical baseline development. A formal graded approach is used to determine the products necessary for requirements, design, and operational baseline completion. SE management processes are defined, and roles and responsibilities for management processes and major technical baseline elements are documented

  11. Analysis of expert opinion on uranium mill tailings remedial action project (UMTRAP) alternatives: a decision-support-system pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thode, E.F.

    1983-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project requires a specific remedial action individually chosen for each site. A panel of professionals was asked to rate objectives for remedial action and to rank alternatives for meeting the objectives. Responses were statistically analyzed. The panel's preference was earth cover in place at the Salt Lake City, Utah, and Shiprock, New Mexico, sites. Asphalt cover was next at Salt Lake City. This decision support system is appropriate for use with other inactive and active tailings sites

  12. SNF sludge treatment system preliminary project execution plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flament, T.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) Project Director for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project has requested Numatec Hanford Company (NHC) to define how Hanford would manage a new subproject to provide a process system to receive and chemically treat radioactive sludge currently stored in the 100 K Area fuel retention basins. The subproject, named the Sludge Treatment System (STS) Subproject, provides and operates facilities and equipment to chemically process K Basin sludge to meet Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) requirements. This document sets forth the NHC management approach for the STS Subproject and will comply with the requirements of the SNF Project Management Plan (HNF-SD-SNFPMP-011). This version of this document is intended to apply to the initial phase of the subproject and to evolve through subsequent revision to include all design, fabrication, and construction conducted on the project and the necessary management and engineering functions within the scope of the subproject. As Project Manager, NHC will perform those activities necessary to complete the STS Subproject within approved cost and schedule baselines and turn over to FDH facilities, systems, and documentation necessary for operation of the STS

  13. Causes and remedies for the dominant risk factors in Enterprise System implementation projects: the consultants' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the causes of the dominant risk factors, affecting Enterprise System implementation projects and propose remedies for those risk factors from the perspective of implementation consultants. The study used a qualitative research strategy, based on e-mail interviews, semi-structured personal interviews with consultants and participant observation during implementation projects. The main contribution of this paper is that it offers viable indications of how to mitigate the dominant risk factors. These indications were grouped into the following categories: stable project scope, smooth communication supported by the project management, dedicated, competent and decision-making client team, competent and engaged consultant project manager, schedule and budget consistent with the project scope, use of methodology and procedures, enforced and enabled by the project managers, competent and dedicated consultants. A detailed description is provided for each category.

  14. Project Plan IRRS Ireland 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, T.

    2015-02-01

    . This time is in line with the requirements of both the Nuclear Safety Directive and the Radioactive Waste Directive. The project will be taking place in the context of the merger with EPA and when the mission happens in 2015 RPII will no longer exist. However, for now as RPII is the legal entity the term RPII will be used in this and associated documents but will be amended to EPA post merger

  15. The role of project planning in project management

    OpenAIRE

    Klitsenko, A. I.; Клиценко, А. И.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the importance of the process of project planning. The author gives irrefutable arguments concerning crucial role of project planning. This article presents the definition, objects and the main goal of project planning. The purpose of this article is to review such objects of project planning as project scope, risk and human resources. Данная статья описывает важность процесса проектного планирования. Автор дает неопровержимые доводы, касающиеся решающей роли проектн...

  16. TREATABILITY TEST PLAN FOR DEEP VADOSE ZONE REMEDIATION AT THE HANFORD'S SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PETERSEN SW; MORSE JG; TRUEX MJ; LAST GV

    2007-01-01

    A treatability test plan has been prepared to address options for remediating portions of the deep vadose zone beneath a portion of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site. The vadose zone is the region of the subsurface that extends from the ground surface to the water table. The overriding objective of the treatability test plan is to recommend specific remediation technologies and laboratory and field tests to support the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 remedial decision-making process in the Central Plateau of the Hanford Site. Most of the technologies considered involve removing water from the vadose zone or immobilizing the contaminants to reduce the risk of contaminating groundwater. A multi-element approach to initial treatability testing is recommended, with the goal of providing the information needed to evaluate candidate technologies. The proposed tests focus on mitigating two contaminants--uranium and technetium. Specific technologies are recommended for testing at areas that may affect groundwater in the future, but a strategy to test other technologies is also presented

  17. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project operational staffing plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debban, B.L.

    1996-03-01

    Using the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project's current process flow concepts and knowledge from cognizant engineering and operational personnel, an initial assessment of the SNF Project radiological exposure and resource requirements was completed. A small project team completed a step by step analysis of fuel movement in the K Basins to the new interim storage location, the Canister Storage Building (CSB). This analysis looked at fuel retrieval, conditioning of the fuel, and transportation of the fuel. This plan describes the staffing structure for fuel processing, fuel movement, and the maintenance and operation (M ampersand O) staffing requirements of the facilities. This initial draft does not identify the support function resources required for M ampersand O, i.e., administrative and engineering (technical support). These will be included in future revisions to the plan. This plan looks at the resource requirements for the SNF subprojects, specifically, the operations of the facilities, balances resources where applicable, rotates crews where applicable, and attempts to use individuals in multi-task assignments. This plan does not apply to the construction phase of planned projects that affect staffing levels of K Basins

  18. Independent Verification Survey of the Clean Coral Storage Pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium Contaminated Soil Remediation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson-Nichols, M.J.; Egidi, P.V.; Roemer, E.K.; Schlosser, R.M.

    2000-01-01

    f I The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section conducted an independent verification (IV) survey of the clean storage pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium Contaminated Soil Remediation Project (JAPCSRP) from January 18-25, 1999. The goal of the JAPCSRP is to restore a 24-acre area that was contaminated with plutonium oxide particles during nuclear testing in the 1960s. The selected remedy was a soil sorting operation that combined radiological measurements and mining processes to identify and sequester plutonium-contaminated soil. The soil sorter operated from about 1990 to 1998. The remaining clean soil is stored on-site for planned beneficial use on Johnston Island. The clean storage pile currently consists of approximately 120,000 m3 of coral. ORNL conducted the survey according to a Sampling and Analysis Plan, which proposed to provide an IV of the clean pile by collecting a minimum number (99) of samples. The goal was to ascertain wi th 95% confidence whether 97% of the processed soil is less than or equal to the accepted guideline (500-Bq/kg or 13.5-pCi/g) total transuranic (TRU) activity

  19. New Production Reactor project-management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCrosson, F.J.; Hibbard, L.; Buckner, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    This document provides a project management plan for the first phase of a project to design and build a new production reactor (NPR) at SRP. The design of the NPR is based upon proven SRP heavy water reactor design, with several enhancements such as full containment, moderator detritiation, improved cooling, and modernized control rooms and instrumentation. The first phase of the NPR project includes environmental and safety analyses, preparation of the technical data summary and basic data, site studies, engineering studies, and conceptual design. The project management plan was developed by a 14-member task force comprised of representatives from the Technical Division, the Manufacturing Division, the Departmental Engineer's Office, and the Engineering Department

  20. Project Execution Plan,Rev. 3; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IT Corporation, Las Vegas

    2002-01-01

    This plan addresses project activities encompassed by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, Environmental Restoration Division and conforms to the requirements contained in the Life-Cycle Asset Management, DOE Order 430.1A; The Joint Program Office Policy on Project Management in Support of DOE Order 430.1; Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE Order 413.3; the Project Execution and Engineering Management Planning Guide, GPG-FM-010; and other applicable Good Practice Guides; and the FY 2001 Integrated Planning, Accountability, and Budgeting System Policy Guidance. The plan also reflects the milestone philosophies of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, as agreed to by the State of Nevada, the DOE, and the U.S. Department of Defense; and traditional project management philosophies such as the development of life-cycle costs, schedules, and work scope; identification o f roles and responsibilities; and baseline management and controls

  1. AVLIS Production Plant Project Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The AVLIS Production Plant is designated as a Major System Acquisition (in accordance with DOE Order 4240.IC) to deploy Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) technology at the Oak Ridge, Tennessee site, in support of the US Uranium Enrichment Program. The AVLIS Production Plant Project will deploy AVLIS technology by performing the design, construction, and startup of a production plant that will meet capacity production requirements of the Uranium Enrichment Program. The AVLIS Production Plant Project Management Plan has been developed to outline plans, baselines, and control systems to be employed in managing the AVLIS Production Plant Project and to define the roles and responsibilities of project participants. Participants will develop and maintain detailed procedures for implementing the management and control systems in agreement with this plan. This baseline document defines the system that measures work performed and costs incurred. This plan was developed by the AVLIS Production Plant Project staff of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in accordance with applicable DOE directives, orders and notices. 38 figures, 19 tables

  2. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Annual status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    The FY 1983 project accomplishments are: completed the Remedial Action Plan and Phase I engineering design for the Canonsburg processing site; completed remedial action on an additional 52 vicinity properties and the inclusion of an additional 303 properties in the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; executed cooperative agreements with four states and the Navajo Nation; published the draft environmental impact statement for Salt Lake City site; and issued the approved Project Plan

  3. Environmental Restoration Project - Systems Engineering Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.D.

    1998-06-01

    This Environmental Restoration (ER) Project Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) describes relevant Environmental Restoration Contractor (ERC) management processes and shows how they implement systems engineering. The objective of this SEMP is to explain and demonstrate how systems engineering is being approached and implemented in the ER Project. The application of systems engineering appropriate to the general nature and scope of the project is summarized in Section 2.0. The basic ER Project management approach is described in Section 3.0. The interrelation and integration of project practices and systems engineering are outlined in Section 4.0. Integration with sitewide systems engineering under the Project Hanford Management Contract is described in Section 5.0

  4. Cesium legacy safety project management work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, J.S.

    1998-01-01

    This Management Work Plan (MWP) describes the process flow, quality assurance controls, and the Environment, Safety, and Health requirements of the Cesium Legacy Safety Project. This MWP provides an overview of the project goals and methods for repackaging the non-conforming Type W overpacks and packaging the CsCl powder and pellets. This MWP is not intended to apply to other activities associated with the CsCl Legacy Safety Program (i.e., clean out of South Cell)

  5. Proposed plan for remedial action at the quarry residuals operable unit of the Weldon Spring Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    This proposed plan addresses the management of contamination present in various components of the quarry residuals operable unit (QROU) of the Weldon Spring site, which is located in St. Charles County, Missouri. The QROU consists of (1) residual waste at the quarry proper; (2) the Femme Osage Slough, Little Femme Osage Creek, and Femme Osage Creek; and (3) quarry groundwater located primarily north of the slough. Potential impacts to the St. Charles County well field downgradient of the quarry area are also being addressed as part of the evaluations for this operable unit. Remedial activities for the QROU will be conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. As part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process required for the QROU under CERCLA, three major evaluation documents have been prepared to support cleanup decisions for this operable unit. decisions for this operable unit

  6. Interface control document for tank waste remediation system privatization phase 1 infrastructure support Project W-519

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parazin, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes the functional and physical interfaces between the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Privatization Phase 1 Infrastructure Project W-519 and the various other projects (i.e., Projects W-314, W-464, W-465, and W-520) supporting Phase 1 that will require the allocation of land in and about the Privatization Phase 1 Site and/or interface with the utilities extended by Project W-519. Project W-519 will identify land use allocations and upgrade/extend several utilities in the 200-East Area into the Privatization Phase 1 Site (formerly the Grout Disposal Compound) in preparation for the Privatization Contractors (PC) to construct treatment facilities. The project will upgrade/extend: Roads, Electrical Power, Raw Water (for process and fire suppression), Potable Water, and Liquid Effluent collection. The replacement of an existing Sanitary Sewage treatment system that may be displaced by Phase 1 site preparation activities may also be included

  7. Remedial design report and remedial action work plan for the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 groundwater operable units' interim action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    This document is a combination remedial design report and remedial action work plan for the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 Operable Units (located on the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington) interim action. The interim actions described in this document represent the first of an ongoing program to address groundwater contamination in each operable unit. This document describes the design basis, provides a description of the interim action, and identifies how they will meet the requirements set forth in the interim action Record of Decision

  8. Department of Energy Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the hazardous waste remedial actions program (HAZWRAP) which manages approximately 200 hazardous waste projects. These projects include preliminary assessments, site inspections, and remedial investigation/feasibility studies. The author describes the procedures HAZWRAP follows to ensure quality. The discussion covers the quality assurance aspects of project management, project planning, site characterization, document control and technical teamwork

  9. Project Execution Plan for Project W-211 Initial Tank Retrieval Systems (ITRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VAN BEEK, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    This Project Execution Plan documents the methodology for managing Project W-211. Project W-211, Initial Tank Retrieval Systems (ITRS), is a fiscal year 1994 Major Systems Acquisition that will provide systems for retrieval of radioactive wastes from selected double-shell tanks (DST). The contents of these tanks are a combination of supernatant liquids and settled solids. To retrieve waste from the tanks, it is first necessary to mix the liquid and solids prior to transferring the slurry to alternative storage or treatment facilities. The ITRS will provide systems to mobilize the settled solids and transfer the wastes out of the tanks. In so doing, ITRS provides feed for the future waste treatment plant, allows for consolidation of tank solids to manage space within existing DST storage capacity, and supports continued safe storage of tank waste. The ITRS scope has been revised to include waste retrieval systems for tanks AP-102, AP-104, AN-102, AN-103, AN-104, AN-105, AY-102, AZ-102, and SY-102. This current tank selection and sequence provides retrieval systems supporting the River Protection Project (RF'P) Waste Treatment Facility and sustains the ability to provide final remediation of several watch list DSTs via treatment. The ITRS is configured to support changing program needs, as constrained by available budget, by maintaining the flexibility for exchanging tanks requiring mixer pump-based retrieval systems and shifting the retrieval sequence. Preliminary design was configured such that an adequate basis exists for initiating Title II design of a mixer pump-based retrieval system for any DST. This Project Execution Plan (PEP), derived from the predecessor Project Management Plan, documents the methodology for managing the ITRS, formalizes organizational responsibilities and interfaces, and identifies project requirements such as change control, design verification, systems engineering, and human factors engineering

  10. Pu-238 Supply Program Project Execution Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wham, Robert M.; Martin, Sherman

    2012-01-01

    This Pu-238 Supply Program Project Execution Plan (PEP) summarizes critical information and processes necessary to manage the program. The PEP is the primary agreement regarding planning and objectives between The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE NE-75), Oak Ridge National Laboratory Site Office (OSO) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The acquisition executive (AE) will approve the PEP. The PEP is a living document that will be reviewed and revised periodically until the project is complete. The purpose of the project is to reestablish the capability to produce plutonium-238 (Pu-238) domestically. This capability consists primarily of procedures, processes, and design information, not capital assets. As such, the project is not subject to the requirements of DOE O 413.3B, but it will be managed using the project management principles and best practices defined there. It is likely that some capital asset will need to be acquired to complete tasks within the project. As these are identified, project controls and related processes will be updated as necessary. Because the project at its initiation was envisioned to require significant capital assets, Critical Decision 0 (CD-0) was conducted in accordance with DOE O 413.3B, and the mission need was approved on December 9, 2003, by William Magwood IV, director of the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Science and Technology, DOE. No date was provided for project start-up at that time. This PEP is consistent with the strategy described in the June 2010 report to Congress, Start-up Plan for Plutonium-238 Production for Radioisotope Power Systems.

  11. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Waste Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. L. Schwendiman

    2006-01-01

    This Waste Management Plan describes waste management and waste minimization activities for Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory. The waste management activities described in this plan support the selected response action presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. This plan identifies the waste streams that will be generated during implementation of the remedial action and presents plans for waste minimization, waste management strategies, and waste disposition

  12. UMTRA project technical assistance contractor quality assurance implementation plan for surface and ground water, Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    This document contains the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) Quality Assurance Implementation Plan (QAIP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The QAIP outlines the primary requirements for integrating quality functions for TAC technical activities applied to the surface and ground water phases of the UMTRA Project. The QA program is designed to use monitoring, audit, and surveillance activities as management tools to ensure that UMTRA Project activities are carried out in amanner to protect public health and safety, promote the success of the UMTRA Project, and meet or exceed contract requirements

  13. Proposed plan for interim remedial measures at the 100-HR-1 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This proposed plan identifies the preferred alternative for interim remedial measures for remedial action of radioactive liquid waste disposal sites at the 100-HR-1 Operable Unit, located at the Hanford Site. It also summarizes other remedial alternatives evaluated for interim remedial measures in this operable unit. The intent of interim remedial measures is to speed up actions to address contaminated areas that historically received radioactive liquid waste discharges that pose a potential threat to human health and the environment. This proposed plan is being issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), the lead regulatory agency; the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the support regulatory agency; and the US Department of Energy (DOE), the responsible agency. Ecology, EPA, and DOE are issuing this proposed plan as part of their public participation responsibilities under Section 117(a) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), commonly known as the ''Superfund Program.'' The proposed plan is intended to be a fact sheet for public review that (1) briefly describes the remedial alternatives analyzed; (2) proposes a preferred alternative; (3) summarizes the information relied upon to recommend the preferred alternative; and (4) provides a basis for an interim action record of decision (ROD). The preferred alternative presented in this proposed plan is removal, treatment (as appropriate), and disposal of contaminated soil and associated structures. Treatment will be conducted if there is cost benefit

  14. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project dose management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergsman, K.H.

    1996-03-01

    This dose management plan facilitates meeting the dose management and ALARA requirements applicable to the design activities of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project, and establishes consistency of information used by multiple subprojects in ALARA evaluations. The method for meeting the ALARA requirements applicable to facility designs involves two components. The first is each Spent Nuclear Fuel Project subproject incorporating ALARA principles, ALARA design optimizations, and ALARA design reviews throughout the design of facilities and equipment. The second component is the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project management providing overall dose management guidance to the subprojects and oversight of the subproject dose management efforts

  15. UMTRA project technical assistance contractor quality assurance implementation plan for surface and ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) Quality Assurance Implementation Plan (QAIP) outlines the primary requirements for integrating quality functions for TAC technical activities applied to the surface and ground water phases of the UMTRA Project. The QAIP is subordinate to the latest issue of the UMTRA Project TAC Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). The QAIP addresses technical aspects of the TAC UMTRA Project surface and ground water programs. The QAIP is authorized and approved by the TAC Project Manager and QA manager. The QA program is designed to use monitoring, audit, and surveillance functions as management tools to ensure that all Project organization activities are carried out in a manner that will protect public health and safety, promote the success of the UMTRA Project and meet or exceed contract requirements

  16. Salt Repository Project. FY-84 technical project plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    The FY 84 technical plans for the Salt Repository Project (SRP) are briefly presented. The objectives of the project in relation to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) program are discused and the technical activities directed toward accomplishing these objectives are detailed. A budget is presented for each of the Level 2 Work Breakdown Structure Tasks (Systems, Waste Package, Site, Repository, Regulatory and Institutional, Test Facilities, Exploratory Shaft, Land Acquisition, and Program Management) in an appendix. An overall description, current status, and planned activities are presented for each of the subtasks which make up the above-mentioned Level 2 tasks. Milestones and their definitions for the plan year, as well as milestones for the outyears are also presented at this same subtask level for each subtask

  17. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Document Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, M.D.; Harizison, G.L.; Rice, W.C.

    1995-12-01

    The SNF Project Document Management Plan identifies and describes the currently available systems and processes for implementing and maintaining an effective document control and records management program. This program governs the methods by which documents are generated, released, distributed, maintained current, retired, and ultimately disposed

  18. National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callaghan, R.W.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The scope of the plan describes the procurement activities and acquisition strategy for the following phases of the NIF Project, each of which receives either plant and capital equipment (PACE) or other project cost (OPC) funds: Title 1 and 2 design and Title 3 engineering (PACE); Optics manufacturing facilitization and pilot production (OPC); Convention facility construction (PACE); Procurement, installation, and acceptance testing of equipment (PACE); and Start-up (OPC). Activities that are part of the base Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program are not included in this plan. The University of California (UC), operating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lockheed-Martin, which operates Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR-LLE), will conduct the acquisition of needed products and services in support of their assigned responsibilities within the NIF Project structure in accordance with their prime contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). LLNL, designated as the lead Laboratory, will have responsibility for all procurements required for construction, installation, activation, and startup of the NIF

  19. Data base management plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    This Data Base Management (DBM) Plan has been prepared for use by Bechtel National, Inc. (Bechtel) and its subcontractors in the performance of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) program activities. The RI/FS program is being performed under subcontract to Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), the contractor operating ORNL for the Department of Energy. This DBM Plan defines the procedures and protocol to be followed in developing and maintaining the data base used by Bechtel and its subcontractors for RI/FS activities at ORNL; describes the management controls, policies, and guidelines to be followed; and identifies responsible positions and their Energy Systems functions. The Bechtel RI/FS data base will be compatible with the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System and will include data obtained from field measurements and laboratory and engineering analyses. Personnel health and safety information, document control, and project management data will also be maintained as part of the data base. The computerized data management system is being used to organize the data according to application and is capable of treating data from any given site as a variable entity. The procedures required to implement the DBM Plan are cross-referenced to specific sections of the plan

  20. Salt Repository Project: FY 85 technical project plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    The FY 85 technical plan for the Salt Repository Project is briefly presented. The objectives of the project in relation to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program are discussed, and the technical activities directed toward accomplishing these objectives are detailed. A budget is presented for each of the Level 2 work breakdown structure tasks (Systems, Waste Package, Site, Repository, Regulatory and Institutional, Exploratory Shaft, Test Facilities, Land Acquisition, and Project Management) in the various sections. An overall description, current status, and planned activities are presented for each of the subtasks which make up the above-mentioned Level 2 tasks. A strategy diagram and a master schedule are included and each of the milestones is also listed chronologically in the sections

  1. Subjective risk assessment for planning conservation projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Game, Edward T; Fitzsimons, James A; Lipsett-Moore, Geoff; McDonald-Madden, Eve

    2013-01-01

    Conservation projects occur under many types of uncertainty. Where this uncertainty can affect achievement of a project’s objectives, there is risk. Understanding risks to project success should influence a range of strategic and tactical decisions in conservation, and yet, formal risk assessment rarely features in the guidance or practice of conservation planning. We describe how subjective risk analysis tools can be framed to facilitate the rapid identification and assessment of risks to conservation projects, and how this information should influence conservation planning. Our approach is illustrated with an assessment of risks to conservation success as part of a conservation plan for the work of The Nature Conservancy in northern Australia. Risks can be both internal and external to a project, and occur across environmental, social, economic and political systems. Based on the relative importance of a risk and the level of certainty in its assessment we propose a series of appropriate, project level responses including research, monitoring, and active amelioration. Explicit identification, prioritization, and where possible, management of risks are important elements of using conservation resources in an informed and accountable manner. (letter)

  2. FY95 software project management plan: TMACS, CASS computer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurling, D.G.

    1994-01-01

    The FY95 Work Plan for TMACS and CASS Software Projects describes the activities planned for the current fiscal year. This plan replaces WHC-SD-WM-SDP-008. The TMACS project schedule is included in the TWRS Integrated Schedule

  3. Environmental, Safety, and Health Plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Revision 1, Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, C. M.; El-Messidi, O. E.; Cowser, D. K.; Kannard, J. R.; Carvin, R. T.; Will, III, A. S.; Clark, Jr., C.; Garland, S. B.

    1993-05-01

    This Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Plan presents the concepts and methodologies to be followed during the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to protect the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. This ES&H Plan acts as a management extension for ORNL and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) to direct and control implementation of the project ES&H program. The subsections that follow describe the program philosophy, requirements, quality assurance measures, and methods for applying the ES&H program to individual waste area grouping (WAG) remedial investigations. Hazardous work permits (HWPs) will be used to provide task-specific health and safety requirements.

  4. 33 CFR 385.24 - Project Management Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Project Management Plans. 385.24... Processes § 385.24 Project Management Plans. (a) General requirements. (1) The Corps of Engineers and the... agencies, develop a Project Management Plan prior to initiating activities on a project. (2) The Project...

  5. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Durango, Colorado: Remedial action selection report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    The uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado, was one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE's Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Included in the RAP is this Remedial Action Selection Report (RAS), which has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities that have been conducted by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium mill processing site near Durango, Colorado. Secondly, this document and the rest of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Colorado, and the NRC, become Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement between the DOE and the State of Colorado

  6. US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project, final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 36 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widdop, M.R.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also is the remedial action contractor. Building 36 was found to be radiologically contaminated and was demolished in 1996. The soil beneath the building was remediated in accordance with identified standards and can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building

  7. WSSRAP chemical plant geotechnical investigations for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    This document has been prepared for the United states Department of Energy (DOE) Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) by the Project Management Contractor (PMC), which consists of MK-Ferguson Company (MKF) and Morrison Knudsen Corporation Environmental Services Group (MKES) with Jacobs Engineering Group (JEG) as MKF's predesignated subcontractor. This report presents the results of site geotechnical investigations conducted by the PMC in the vicinity of the Weldon Spring chemical plant and raffinate pits (WSCP/RP) and in potential on-site and off-site clayey material borrow sources. The WSCP/RP is the proposed disposal cell (DC) site. 39 refs., 24 figs., 12 tabs

  8. Consensus implementation of a groundwater remediation project at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, K.R.; Carlson, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    Because of significant characterization uncertainties existing when the Record of Decision was signed and the unfavorable national reputation of groundwater pump and treat remediation projects, the Test Area North (TAN) groundwater ROD includes the evaluation of five emerging technologies that show potential for treating the organic contamination in situ or reducing the toxicity of contaminants above ground. Treatability studies will be conducted to ascertain whether any may be suitable for implementation at TAN to yield more timely or cost effective restoration of the aquifer. The implementation approach established for the TAN groundwater project is a consensus approach, maximizing a partnership relation with stakeholders in constant, iterative implementation decision making

  9. Integrated planning and spatial evaluation of megasite remediation and reuse options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schädler, Sebastian; Morio, Maximilian; Bartke, Stephan; Finkel, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Redevelopment of large contaminated brownfields (megasites) is often hampered by a lack of communication and harmonization among diverse stakeholders with potentially conflicting interests. Decision support is required to provide integrative yet transparent evaluation of often complex spatial information to stakeholders with different areas of expertise. It is considered crucial for successful redevelopment to identify a shared vision of how the respective contaminated site could be remediated and redeveloped. We describe a framework of assessment methods and models that analyzes and visualizes site- and land use-specific spatial information at the screening level, with the aim to support the derivation of recommendable land use layouts and to initiate further and more detailed planning. The framework integrates a GIS-based identification of areas to be remediated, an estimation of associated clean-up costs, a spatially explicit market value appraisal, and an assessment of the planned future land use's contribution to sustainable urban and regional development. Case study results show that derived options are potentially favorable in both a sustainability and an economic sense and that iterative re-planning is facilitated by the evaluation and visualization of economic, ecological and socio-economic aspects. The framework supports an efficient early judgment about whether and how abandoned land may be assigned a sustainable and marketable land use.

  10. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Rifle, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-02-01

    This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Rifle sites. That remedial action consists of removing approximately 4,185,000 cubic yards (cy) of tailings and contaminated materials from their current locations, transporting, and stabilizing the tailings material at the Estes Gulch disposal site, approximately six miles north of Rifle. The tailings and contaminated materials are comprised of approximately 597,000 cy from Old Rifle, 3,232,000 cy from New Rifle, and 322,000 cy from vicinity properties and about 34,000 cy from demolition. The remedial action plan includes specific design requirements for the detailed design and construction of the remedial action. An extensive amount of data and supporting information have been generated for this remedial action and cannot all be incorporated into this document. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents

  11. Remedial training for the radiology resident: a template for optimization of the learning plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Colin; Chang, Silvia; Forster, Bruce

    2015-02-01

    All radiology residency programs should strive for the early identification of individuals in need of remedial training and have an approach ready to address this situation. This article provides a template for a step-by-step approach which is team based. It includes definition of the learning or performance issues, creation of suitable learning objectives and learning plan, facilitation of feedback and assessment, and definition of outcomes. Using such a template will assist the resident in returning to the path toward a safe and competent radiologist. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Phase 1 Characterization sampling and analysis plan West Valley demonstration project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R. L. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-06-30

    The Phase 1 Characterization Sampling and Analysis Plan (CSAP) provides details about environmental data collection that will be taking place to support Phase 1 decommissioning activities described in the Phase 1 Decommissioning Plan for the West Valley Demonstration Project, Revision 2 (Phase I DP; DOE 2009). The four primary purposes of CSAP data collection are: (1) pre-design data collection, (2) remedial support, (3) post-remediation status documentation, and (4) Phase 2 decision-making support. Data collection to support these four main objectives is organized into two distinct data collection efforts. The first is data collection that will take place prior to the initiation of significant Phase 1 decommissioning activities (e.g., the Waste Management Area [WMA] 1 and WMA 2 excavations). The second is data collection that will occur during and immediately after environmental remediation in support of remediation activities. Both data collection efforts have a set of well-defined objectives that encompass the data needs of the four main CSAP data collection purposes detailed in the CSAP. The main body of the CSAP describes the overall data collection strategies that will be used to satisfy data collection objectives. The details of pre-remediation data collection are organized by WMA. The CSAP contains an appendix for each WMA that describes the details of WMA-specific pre-remediation data collection activities. The CSAP is intended to expand upon the data collection requirements identified in the Phase 1 Decommissioning Plan. The CSAP is intended to tightly integrate with the Phase 1 Final Status Survey Plan (FSSP). Data collection described by the CSAP is consistent with the FSSP where appropriate and to the extent possible.

  13. Case study of shallow soil mixing and soil vacuum extraction remediation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, M.J.; Day, S.R.; Pinewski, R.; Schroder, D.

    1995-01-01

    Shallow Soil Mixing (SSM) and Soil Vacuum Extraction (SVE) are techniques which have been increasingly relied on for the insitu remediation of contaminated soils. The primary applications of SSM have been to mix cement, bentonite, or other reagents to modify properties and thereby remediate contaminated soils or sludges. Soil vacuum extraction has been used at numerous applications for insitu removal of contaminants from soils. At a recent project in southern Ohio, the two technologies were integrated and enhanced to extract volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from soils at a Department of Energy facility. Advantages of the integrated SSM/SVE technology over alternative technologies include a relatively rapid remediation compared to other in-situ techniques at a lower cost, less exposure of waste to the surface environment and elimination of off-site disposal. These advantages led to the selection of the use of both technologies on the project in Southern Ohio. The information presented in this paper is intended to provide Engineers and owners with the level of understanding necessary to apply soil mixing and vacuum extraction technology to a specific site. The most important steps in implementing the technology are site investigation, feasibility estimate, selection of performance criteria, selection of appropriate materials, bench scale testing and construction

  14. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement: Quarterly environmental data summary for third quarter 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-06

    In support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement, a copy of the Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the third quarter of 1998 is enclosed. The data presented in this letter and attachment constitute the QEDS. The data, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses), were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group, and merged into the database during the third quarter of 1998. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data. Significant data, defined as data values that have exceeded defined above normal Level 2 values, are discussed in this letter for Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) generated data only. Above normal Level 2 values are based, in ES and H procedures, on historical high values, DOE Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs), NPDES limits, and other guidelines. The procedures also establish actions to be taken in the event that above normal data occur.

  15. Missouri Department of Natural Resources Hazardous Waste Program Weldon Spring site remedial action project. Status to date January 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This document describes the progress made by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) during the fifth year (1997) of the Agreement in Support (AIS) in its oversight role of the Weldon Springs Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). Staffing issues this year have been a challenge with the resignation of an Environmental Specialist (ES) in June 1997, and the death of Robert Stovall, an Environmental Engineer (EE) II in August 1997. Progress made during this period includes securing a contract laboratory, participation in several workgroup meetings for activities at the site, oversight of the Feasibility Study/Proposed Plan (FS/PP), coordination between the US Department of Energy and the various State regulatory programs and interactions with the local public drinking water supply agency and health departments

  16. Business System Planning Project, Preliminary System Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EVOSEVICH, S.

    2000-01-01

    CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) is currently performing many core business functions including, but not limited to, work control, planning, scheduling, cost estimating, procurement, training, and human resources. Other core business functions are managed by or dependent on Project Hanford Management Contractors including, but not limited to, payroll, benefits and pension administration, inventory control, accounts payable, and records management. In addition, CHG has business relationships with its parent company CH2M HILL, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection and other River Protection Project contractors, government agencies, and vendors. The Business Systems Planning (BSP) Project, under the sponsorship of the CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. Chief Information Officer (CIO), have recommended information system solutions that will support CHG business areas. The Preliminary System Design was developed using the recommendations from the Alternatives Analysis, RPP-6499, Rev 0 and will become the design base for any follow-on implementation projects. The Preliminary System Design will present a high-level system design, providing a high-level overview of the Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) modules and identify internal and external relationships. This document will not define data structures, user interface components (screens, reports, menus, etc.), business rules or processes. These in-depth activities will be accomplished at implementation planning time

  17. Data Base Management Plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    The remedial investigation (RI) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 will involve gathering, verifying, analyzing, reporting, and archiving numerous types of field and analytical data. Field investigations will produce data documenting surficial and geophysical surveys, geologic and hydrogeologic logs, aquifer tests, water level measurements, geophysical logs, and stream and seepage flow measurements. Laboratory analyses will be performed on soil, surface water, groundwater, and sediment samples collected during field investigations. All data resulting from these activities will be contained in the Bechtel RI/feasibility study (FS) project data base and will be managed in accordance with the RI/FS Data Base Management Plan and this WAG-specific plan. This Data Base Management Plan describes the gathering, verifying, analyzing, reporting, and archiving of data generated during Bechtel's remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 5. This investigation will produce data documenting surficial surveys, geophysical surveys, geologic and hydrologic logs, aquifer tests, water level measurements, geophysical logs, and stream and seep flow measurements. Also, laboratory analyses will be performed on soil, surface water, groundwater, and sediment samples. The 1500 series of Bechtel project procedures, ''Data Base Management,'' and the project Data Base Management Plan will be used to ensure that data are handled properly

  18. SRP [Salt Repository Project] configuration management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This configuration management plan describes the organization, policies, and procedures that will be used on the Salt Repository Project (SRP) to implement the configuration management disciplines and controls. Configuration management is a part of baseline management. Baseline management is defined in the SRP Baseline Procedures Notebook and also includes cost and schedule baselines. Configuration management is a discipline applying technical and administrative direction and surveillance to identify and document the functional and physical characteristics of an item, to control changes to those characteristics, to record and report change processing and implementation status, and to audit the results. Configuration management is designed as a project management tool to determine and control baselines, and ensure and document all components of a project interface both physically and functionally. The purpose is to ensure that the product acquired satisfies the project's technical and operational requirements, and that the technical requirements are clearly defined and controlled throughout the development and acquisition process. 5 figs

  19. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project approach to building dismantlement and demolition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spittler, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    When remediation began at the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP), there were 41 buildings on site. Twenty-nine of these buildings were ancillary structures and were not used for processing radioactive material. Most of these have been torn down. The remaining 12 buildings were used for uranium and thorium processing or were major support structures, such as the laboratory. Two of the buildings were major processing operations occurred were successfully demolished in February of this year. Demolition of all structures will be complete in September of this year. To give an understanding of the magnitude of the work, the following is a description of the physical characteristics of the green salt building. This building was used to convert brown oxide (UO3) to green salt (UF4), which is the last intermediate step in purifying the mostly yellow cake feed material into uranium metal.

  20. Simulant composition for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater remediation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siler, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    A project has been initiated at the request of ER to study and remediate the groundwater contamination at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF). This water contains a wide variety of both inorganics (e.g., sodium) and organics (e.g., benzene, trichloroethylene). Most compounds are present in the ppB range, and certain components (e.g., trichloroethylene, silver) are present at concentrations that exceed the primary drinking water standards (PDWS). These compounds must be reduced to acceptable levels as per RCRA and CERCLA orders. This report gives a listing of the important constituents which are to be included in a simulant to model the MWMF aquifer. This simulant will be used to evaluate the feasibility of various state of the art separation/destruction processes for remediating the aquifer

  1. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project approach to building dismantlement and demolition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spittler, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    When remediation began at the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP), there were 41 buildings on site. Twenty-nine of these buildings were ancillary structures and were not used for processing radioactive material. Most of these have been torn down. The remaining 12 buildings were used for uranium and thorium processing or were major support structures, such as the laboratory. Two of the buildings were major processing operations occurred were successfully demolished in February of this year. Demolition of all structures will be complete in September of this year. To give an understanding of the magnitude of the work, the following is a description of the physical characteristics of the green salt building. This building was used to convert brown oxide (UO3) to green salt (UF4), which is the last intermediate step in purifying the mostly yellow cake feed material into uranium metal

  2. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Site, Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The final audit report for remedial action at the Gunnison, Colorado Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and QA remedial action close-out inspections performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC); and on-site construction reviews (OSCR) performed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Two radiological surveillances and four radiological audits were performed at the Gunnison site. The surveillances were performed on 16 to 19 September 1992 and 28 June to 1 July 1993. The radiological audits were performed on 4 to 7 October 1993; 13 to 16 June 1994; 19 to 22 September 1994 and 10 to 12 July 1995. The surveillances and audits resulted in 79 observations. Thirty-four of the observations raised DOE concerns that were resolved on the site or through subsequent corrective action. All outstanding issues were closed on 12 July 1995. The radiological surveillances and audits are discussed in Section 2.0 of this report. Ten QA in-process surveillances were performed at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site. The surveillances were performed on 24 to 25 September 1992, 7 to 9 July 1993, 29 October 1993, 27 to 28 June 1994, 31 October to 1 November 1994, 19 to 20 June 1 995, 20 to 21 July 1995, 17 to 18 August 1995, 20 September 1995, and 11 to 13 October 1995. The surveillances resulted in 100 observations. Six observations contained recommendations that required responses from the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC). Ninety-five observations contained a recommendation that required no response. All outstanding issues were closed on 8 January 1996. The QA in-process surveillances are discussed in Section 3.0 of this report

  3. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project fiscal year 1997 annual report to stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The fiscal year (FY) 1997 annual report is the 19th report on the status of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. In 1978, Congress directed the DOE to assess and clean up contamination at 24 designated former uranium processing sites. The DOE is also responsible for cleaning up properties in the vicinity of the sites where wind and water erosion deposited tailings or people removed them from the site for use in construction or landscaping. Cleanup has been undertaken in cooperation with state governments and Indian tribes within whose boundaries the sites are located. It is being conducted in two phases: the surface project and the groundwater project. This report addresses specifics about the UMTRA surface project

  4. Fiscal year 1996 annual report to stakeholders, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This is the Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 annual report on the status of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. In 1978, Congress directed the DOE to assess and clean up contamination at 24 designated former uranium processing sites. The DOE is also responsible for cleaning up properties in the vicinity of the sites where wind and water erosion deposited tailings or people removed them from the site for use in construction of landscaping. Cleanup is being undertaken in cooperation with state governments and Indian tribes within whose boundaries the sites are located. It is being conducted in two phases: the surface project and the ground water project. This report addresses specifics about the surface phase of the UMTRA Project

  5. Site Observational Work Plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Shiprock, New Mexico. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Site is one of the first documents for developing an approach for achieving ground water compliance at the site. This SOWP applies Shiprock site information to a regulatory compliance framework, which identifies strategies for meeting ground water compliance at the site. The compliance framework was developed in the UMTRA ground water programmatic environmental impact statement

  6. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-FR-3 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Figure 1-1 shows the location of these areas. Under the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement, Ecology et al. 1990a), signed by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), EPA, and the US Department of Energy (DOE), more than 1,000 inactive waste disposal and unplanned release sites on the Hanford Site have been grouped into a number of source and groundwater operable units. These operable units contain contamination in the form of hazardous waste, radioactive/hazardous mixed waste, and other CERCLA hazardous substances. This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the CERCLA remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-FR-3 operable unit. The 100-K Area consists of the 100-FR-3 groundwater operable unit and two source operable units. The 100-FR-3 operable unit includes all contamination found in the aquifer soils and water beneath the 100-F Area. Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of contamination. A separate work plan has been initiated for the 100-FR-1 source operable unit (DOE-RL 1992a)

  7. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-FR-1 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200,300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement, Ecology et al. 1990a), signed by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), EPA, and the US Department of Energy (DOE), more than 1,000 inactive waste disposal and unplanned release sites on the Hanford Site have been grouped into a number of source and groundwater operable units. These operable units contain contamination in the form of hazardous waste, radioactive/hazardous mixed waste, and other CERCLA hazardous substances. This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the CERCLA remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-FR-1 operable unit. The 100-FR-1 source operable unit is one of two source operable units in the 100-F Area. Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of hazardous substance contamination. The groundwater affected or potentially affected by the entire 100-F Area is considered as a separate operable unit, the 100-FR-3 groundwater operable unit. A separate work plan has been initiated for the 100-FR-3 operable unit (DOE/RL 1992a)

  8. 14 CFR 152.109 - Project eligibility: Airport planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Project eligibility: Airport planning. 152....109 Project eligibility: Airport planning. (a) Airport master planning. A proposed project for airport master planning is not approved unless— (1) The location of the existing or proposed airport is included...

  9. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project is to eliminate, reduce, or address to acceptable levels the potential health and environmental consequences of milling activities by meeting Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards. One of the first steps in the UMTRA Ground Water Project is the preparation of this Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The EPA standards allow the use of different strategies for achieving compliance with the standards. This document analyzes the potential impacts of four alternatives for conducting the Ground Water Project. Each of the four alternatives evaluated in the PEIS is based on a different mix of strategies to meet EPA ground water standards. The PEIS is intended to serve as a programmatic planning document that provides an objective basis for determining site-specific ground water compliance strategies and data and information that can be used to prepare site-specific environmental impact analyses more efficiently. DOE will prepare appropriate further National Environmental Policy Act documentation before making site-specific decisions to implement the Ground Water Project. Affected States, Tribes, local government agencies, and members of the public have been involved in the process of preparing this PEIS; DOE encourages their continued participation in the site-specific decision making process

  10. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Apatite Investigation at the 100-NR-2 Quality Assurance Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-03-28

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by staff working on the 100-NR-2 Apatite Project. The U.S. Department of Energy, Fluor Hanford, Inc., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the Washington Department of Ecology agreed that the long-term strategy for groundwater remediation at 100-N would include apatite sequestration as the primary treatment, followed by a secondary treatment. The scope of this project covers the technical support needed before, during, and after treatment of the targeted subsurface environment using a new high-concentration formulation.

  11. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1, Version 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan describes the planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the Grand Junction US DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site (GRJ-01) in Grand Junction, Colorado, and at the Cheney Disposal Site (GRJ-03) near Grand Junction. The plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for the routine monitoring stations at the sites. Regulatory basis is in the US EPA regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and EPA ground water quality standards of 1995 (60 FR 2854). This plan summarizes results of past water sampling activities, details water sampling activities planned for the next 2 years, and projects sampling activities for the next 5 years

  12. Remedial Action Plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendices C--E. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    This document provides appendices C, D, and E this Remedial Action Plan (RAP) which is a revision of the original Mexican Hat Remedial Action Plan and RAP Modification submitted in July 1988 and January 1989, respectively, along with updated design documents. Appendix C provide the Radiological Support Plan, Appendix D provides the Site Characterization, and Appendix E provides the Water Resources Protection Strategy

  13. Remedial Action Plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendices C--E. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-02-01

    This document provides appendices C, D, and E this Remedial Action Plan (RAP) which is a revision of the original Mexican Hat Remedial Action Plan and RAP Modification submitted in July 1988 and January 1989, respectively, along with updated design documents. Appendix C provide the Radiological Support Plan, Appendix D provides the Site Characterization, and Appendix E provides the Water Resources Protection Strategy.

  14. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-02-01

    This radiologic characterization of tho two inactive uranium millsites at Rifle, Colorado, was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (Bendix) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Grand Junction Projects Office, in accord with a Statement of Work prepared by the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Technical Assistance Contractor, Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. (Jacobs). The purpose of this project is to define the extent of radioactive contamination at the Rifle sites that exceeds US Environmental Protection Agency, (EPA) standards for UMTRA sites. The data presented in this report are required for characterization of the areas adjacent to the tailings piles and for the subsequent design of cleanup activities. An orientation visit to the study area was conducted on 31 July--1 August 1984, in conjunction with Jacobs, to determine the approximate extent of contaminated area surrounding tho piles. During that visit, survey control points were located and baselines were defined from which survey grids would later be established; drilling requirements were assessed; and radiologic and geochemical data were collected for use in planning the radiologic fieldwork. The information gained from this visit was used by Jacobs, with cooperation by Bendix, to determine the scope of work required for the radiologic characterization of the Rifle sites. Fieldwork at Rifle was conducted from 1 October through 16 November 1984

  15. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1993 (July 1, 1992, through June 30, 1993). To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized

  16. Missouri Department of Natural Resources Hazardous Waste Program Weldon Spring site remedial action project. Status of project to date January 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This document describes the progress made by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) during the fourth year (1996) of the Agreement in Support (AIS) in its oversight role of the Weldon Springs Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). The fourth year at the Weldon Springs Site shows sustained progress as the project moves through the final design and into the remedial action phases of the Chemical Plant Operable Unit. The remedial action phase includes the Foundations Removal work package, Chemical Solidification and Stabilization, and disposal cell

  17. Report on game species of concern associated with the Gunnison Remedial Action Project, Gunnison, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This report provides background information and data used in the analysis of potential impacts to game species reported in the Environmental Assessment of the Proposed Remedial Action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Gunnison, Colorado. That environmental assessment provides details regarding proposed remedial action at the Gunnison site along with a description of existing conditions and projected environmental impacts. A summary of the proposed action is provided. The uranium mill tailings and other contaminated materials at the Gunnison processing site would be transported to the Landfill disposal site via the Tenderfoot Mountain (TM) haul route. The remedial action would take place over a three-year period with two six-month winter shutdowns. The first year would consist of site preparation and haul road construction. The second year would consist of moving the tailings. Movement of the radon/infiltration barrier cover material and erosion protection material would take place during the third construction year. The material used to cover the pile is fine-grained material for the radon/infiltration barrier (Sixmile Lane borrow site) and rock for erosion protection from the Chance Gulch borrow site. The location of the borrow sites used to obtain these materials and the associated haul roads is shown

  18. Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Dresel, P. Evan; Lindberg, Jon W.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Thornton, Edward C.

    2000-01-01

    Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976; the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The U.S. Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/ frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories: plume and trend tracking, treatment/ storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently

  19. Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newcomer, D.R.; Thornton, E.C.; Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.

    1999-01-01

    Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The US Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories plume and trend tracking, treatment/storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently

  20. Cost-benefit analysis of copper recovery in remediation projects: A case study from Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchko, Yevheniya; Norrman, Jenny; Rosén, Lars; Karlfeldt Fedje, Karin

    2017-12-15

    Contamination resulting from past industrial activity is a problem throughout the world and many sites are severely contaminated by metals. Advances in research in recent years have resulted in the development of technologies for recovering metal from metal-rich materials within the framework of remediation projects. Using cost-benefit analysis (CBA), and explicitly taking uncertainties into account, this paper evaluates the potential social profitability of copper recovery as part of four remediation alternatives at a Swedish site. One alternative involves delivery of copper-rich ash to a metal production company for refining. The other three alternatives involve metal leaching from materials and sale of the resulting metal sludge for its further processing at a metal production company using metallurgical methods. All the alternatives are evaluated relative to the conventional excavation and disposal method. Metal recovery from the ash, metal sludge sale, and disposal of the contaminated soil and the ash residue at the local landfill site, was found to be the best remediation alternative. However, given the present conditions, its economic potential is low relative to the conventional excavation and disposal method but higher than direct disposal of the copper-rich ash for refining. Volatile copper prices, the high cost of processing equipment, the highly uncertain cost of the metal leaching and washing process, coupled with the substantial project risks, contribute most to the uncertainties in the CBA results for the alternatives involving metal leaching prior to refining. However, investment in processing equipment within the framework of a long-term investment project, production of safe, reusable soil residue, and higher copper prices on the metal market, can make metal recovery technology socially profitable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Closure plan for the proposed Millennium Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuttle, S.; Sisson, R.

    1999-01-01

    A $2.2 billion expansion of the current oil sands operation has been proposed by Suncor Energy Inc. The expansion would more than double the productive capacity of the present facility. As part of the application for this expansion, called Project Millennium, a comprehensive closure plan has been developed and filed by the Corporation. The Plan includes a systematic evaluation of the area to be developed, a description of the development activities planned, and the goals and objectives of the Corporation in re-establishing the landforms and ecosystems concurrently with running the operation. The Plan envisages surface contouring as early as practicable during the mine development, soil reconstruction, and re-establishment of vegetation, surface drainage and wetlands. The Corporation undertakes to monitor the performance of the reclaimed areas based on landform performance, the impact of chemical constituents on the landscape and ecosystem sustainability. An annual monitoring report assessing herbaceous vegetation growth, major species composition, tree and shrub survival and growth rate, groundwater conditions, amount of precipitation, the utility of constructed wetlands for treatment of reclamation area seepage and runoff waters, and wildlife population changes, will be prepared annually. A future research program associated with the Reclamation and Closure Plan will also examine the effectiveness of the reclamation drainage system as fish habitat, and the potential of the proposed end-pit lake to provide a viable aquatic ecosystem. 8 refs., 2 figs

  2. Radiological survey activities: uranium mill tailings remedial action project procedures manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, C.A.; Berven, B.A.; Carter, T.E.

    1986-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) was assigned the responsibility for conducting remedial action at 24 sites, which are located in one eastern and nine western states. The DOE's responsibilities are being met through its Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office (UMTRA-PO) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The purpose of this Procedures Manual is to provide a standardized set of procedures that document in an auditable manner the activities performed by the Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) group in the Dosimetry and Biophysical Transport Section (DABTS) of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), in its role as the Inclusion Survey Contractor (ISC). Members of the RASA group assigned to the UMTRA Project are headquartered in the ORNL/RASA office in Grand Junction, Colorado, and report to the ORNL/RASA Project Manager. The Procedures Manual ensures that the organizational, administrative, and technical activities of the RASA/UMTRA group conform properly to those of the ISC as described in the Vicinity Properties Management and Implementation Manual and the Summary Protocol. This manual also ensures that the techniques and procedures used by the RASA/UMTRA group and contractor personnel meet the requirements of applicable governmental, scientific, and industrial standards

  3. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project quarterly environmental data summary (QEDS) for fourth quarter 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    This report contains the Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the fourth quarter of 1998 in support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement. The data, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses) were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group, and merged into the database during the fourth quarter of 1998. KPA results for on-site total uranium analyses performed during fourth quarter 1998 are included. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data.

  4. The Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project Tank Waste Retrieval Performance and Lessons Learned, vol. 1 [of 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, BE

    2003-10-07

    The Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Remediation Project was the first of its kind performed in the United States. Robotics and remotely operated equipment were used to successfully transfer almost 94,000 gal of remote-handled transuranic sludge containing over 81,000 Ci of radioactive contamination from nine large underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The sludge was transferred with over 439,000 gal of radioactive waste supernatant and {approx}420,500 gal of fresh water that was used in sluicing operations. The GAATs are located in a high-traffic area of ORNL near a main thoroughfare. A phased and integrated approach to waste retrieval operations was used for the GAAT Remediation Project. The project promoted safety by obtaining experience from low-risk operations in the North Tank Farm before moving to higher-risk operations in the South Tank Farm. This approach allowed project personnel to become familiar with the tanks and waste, as well as the equipment, processes, procedures, and operations required to perform successful waste retrieval. By using an integrated approach to tank waste retrieval and tank waste management, the project was completed years ahead of the original baseline schedule, which resulted in avoiding millions of dollars in associated costs. This report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1 provides information on the various phases of the GAAT Remediation Project. It also describes the different types of equipment and how they were used. The emphasis of Volume 1 is on the description of the tank waste retrieval performance and the lessons learned during the GAAT Remediation Project. Volume 2 provides the appendixes for the report, which include the following information: (A) Background Information for the Gunite and Associated Tanks Operable Unit; (B) Annotated Bibliography; (C) Comprehensive Listing of the Sample Analysis Data from the GAAT Remediation Project; (D) GAAT Equipment Matrix; and (E) Vendor List

  5. FY 1995 remedial investigation work plan for Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, D.R.; Herbes, S.E.

    1994-09-01

    Field activities to support the remedial investigation (RI) of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) include characterization of the nature and extent of contamination in WAG 2, specifically to support risk-based remediation decisions. WAG 2 is the major drainage system downgradient of other WAGs containing significant sources of contamination at ORNL. The RI of WAG 2 is developed in three phases: Phase 1, initial scoping characterization to determine the need for early action; Phase 2, interim activities during remediation of upgradient WAGs to evaluate potential changes in the contamination status of WAG 2 that would necessitate reevaluation of the need for early action; and Phase 3, completion of the RI process following remediation of upslope WAGs. Specifically, Phase 2 activities are required to track key areas to determine if changes have occurred in WAG 2 that would require (1) interim remedial action to protect human health and the environment or (2) changes in remedial action plans and schedules for WAG2 because of changing contaminant release patterns in upslope WAGs or because of the effects of interim remedial or removal actions in other WAGs. This report defines activities to be conducted in FY 1995 for completion of the Phase 1 RI and initiation of limited Phase 2 field work

  6. Project X Accelerator R and D Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Project X is a high intensity proton facility conceived to support a world-leading program in neutrino and flavor physics over the next two decades at Fermilab. Project X is an integral part of the Fermilab Roadmap as described in the Fermilab Steering Group Report. Project X is based on an 8 GeV superconducting H-linac, paired with the existing (but modified) Main Injector and Recycler Ring, to provide in excess of 2 MW of beam power throughout the energy range 60-120 GeV, simultaneous with at least 100 kW of beam power at 8 GeV. The linac utilizes technology in common with the ILC over the energy range 0.6-8.0 GeV. Beam current parameters can be made identical to ILC resulting in identical rf generation and distribution systems. This alignment of ILC and Project X technologies allows for a shared development effort. The initial 0.6 GeV of the linac draws heavily on technology developed by Argonne National Laboratory for a facility for rare isotope beams. It is anticipated that the exact configuration and operating parameters of the linac will be defined through the R and D program and will retain alignment with the ILC plan as it evolves over this period. Utilization of the Recycler Ring as an H - stripper and accumulator ring is the key element that provides the flexibility to operate the linac with the same beam parameters as the ILC. The linac operates at 5 Hz with a total of 5.6 x 10 13 H - ions delivered per pulse. H - are stripped at injection into the Recycler in a manner that 'paints' the beam both transversely and longitudinally to reduce space charge forces. Following the 1 ms injection, the orbit moves off the stripping foil and circulates for 200 msec, awaiting the next injection. Following three such injections a total of 1.7 x 10 14 protons are transferred in a single turn to the Main Injector. These protons are then accelerated to 120 GeV and fast extracted to a neutrino target. The Main Injector cycle takes 1.4 seconds, producing approximately 2

  7. Mitigation and monitoring plan for impacted wetlands at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site, Gunnison, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The UMTRA Project is the result of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act(UMTRA) which was passed in response to the public's concern over the potential public health hazards related to uranium mill tailings and associated contaminated material at abandoned or otherwise uncontrolled inactive processing sites throughout the United States. The Gunnison, Colorado abandoned uranium mill site is one of the sites slated for cleanup by the DOE under authority of UMTRA. The contaminated material at this site will be transported to a disposal site on US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land east of Gunnison. Remedial action activities will temporarily disturb 0.8 acre and permanently eliminate 5.1 acres of wetlands. This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for the 5.9 acres of impacted wetlands. In conjunction with the mitigation of the permanently impacted wetlands through the enhancement of wetland and adjacent riparian areas, impacts to wildlife as a result of this project will also be mitigated. However, wildlife mitigation is not the focus of this document and is covered in relevant BLM permits for this project. This plan proposes the enhancement of a 3:1 ratio of impacted wetlands in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency guidelines, plus the enhancement of riparian areas for wildlife mitigation. Included in this mitigation plan is a monitoring plan to ensure that the proposed measures are working and being maintained

  8. Completion of the uranium mill tailings remedial project and cleanup of the former mill site at Grand Junction, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rael, G.J.; Cox, S.W.; Artiglia, E.W.

    2000-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project has successfully completed the cleanup of 22 former uranium mill sites, more than 5400 vicinity properties, and has constructed 18 entombment cells. The Project has recently received the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's approval and certification for the last two disposal sites, with these sites being placed under the general license for long term custodial care of residual radioactive material. The UMTRA site located at Grand Junction, Colorado is a good example of the technical, political, economic, and public relations challenges that were overcome in achieving success. The UMTRA Team discussed, negotiated, planned, and eventually acted on this uranium mill tailings problem and brought the project to a successful conclusion for the community. From the early 1940s through the 1970s, uranium ore was mined in significant quantities under United States federal contracts for the government's national defence programmes, i.e. the Manhattan Engineering District and Atomic Energy Commission programmes. The problem started as the need for uranium decreased in the late 1960s, resulting in mills shutting down, leaving behind large quantities of process waste tailings and contaminated mill buildings. The former Climax Uranium Company mill site in Grand Junction was one of the largest of these sites. (author)

  9. Work Plan for the Feasibility Study for Remedial Action at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benioff, P.; Biang, C.; Haffenden, R.; Goyette, M.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.; Yuen, C.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of the feasibility study is to gather sufficient information to develop and evaluate alternative remedial actions to address contamination at J-Field in compliance with the NCP, CERCLA, and SARA. This FS Work Plan summarizes existing environmental data for each AOC and outlines the tasks to be performed to evaluate and select remedial technologies. The tasks to be performed will include (1) developing remedial action objectives and identifying response actions to meet these objectives; (2) identifying and screening remedial action technologies on the basis of effectiveness, implementability, and cost; (3) assembling technologies into comprehensive alternatives for J-Field; (4) evaluating, in detail, each alternative against the nine EPA evaluation criteria and comparing the alternatives to identify their respective strengths and weaknesses; and (5) selecting the preferred alternative for each operable unit.

  10. UMTRA project office federal employee occupational safety and health program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This document establishes the Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health (FEOSH) Program for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office. This program will ensure compliance with applicable requirements of DOE Order 3790.1B and DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) Order 3790.lA. FEOSH Program responsibilities delegated by the DOE-AL to the UMTRA Project Office by AL Order 3790.1A also are assigned. The UMTRA Project Office has developed the UMTRA Project Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES ampersand H) Plan (DOE, 1992), which establishes the basic programmatic ES ampersand H requirements for all participants on the UMTRA Project. The ES ampersand H plan is designed primarily to cover remedial action activities at UMTRA sites and defines the ES ampersand H responsibilities of both the UMTRA Project Office and its contractors. The UMTRA FEOSH Program described herein is a subset of the overall UMTRA ES ampersand H program and covers only federal employees working on the UMTRA Project

  11. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Grand Junction, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    Surface remedial action will be completed at the Grand Junction processing site during the summer of 1994. Results of 1993 water sampling indicate that ground water flow conditions and ground water quality at the processing site have remained relatively constant with time. Uranium concentrations in ground water continue to exceed the maximum concentration limits, providing the best indication of the extent of contaminated ground water. Evaluation of surface water quality of the Colorado River indicate no impact from uranium processing activities. No compliance monitoring at the Cheney disposal site has been proposed because ground water in the Dakota Sandstone (uppermost aquifer) is classified as limited-use (Class 111) and because the disposal cell is hydrogeologically isolated from the uppermost aquifer. The following water sampling and water level monitoring activities are planned for calendar year 1994: (i) Semiannual (early summer and late fall) sampling of six existing monitor wells at the former Grand Junction processing site. Analytical results from this sampling will be used to continue characterizing hydrogeochemical trends in background ground water quality and in the contaminated ground water area resulting from source term (tailings) removal. (ii) Water level monitoring of approximately three proposed monitor wells projected to be installed in the alluvium at the processing site in September 1994. Data loggers will be installed in these wells, and water levels will be electronically monitored six times a day. These long-term, continuous ground water level data will be collected to better understand the relationship between surface and ground water at the site. Water level and water quality data eventually will be used in future ground water modeling to establish boundary conditions in the vicinity of the Grand Junction processing site. Modeling results will be used to help demonstrate and document the potential remedial alternative of natural flushing

  12. 7 CFR 1219.50 - Budgets, programs, plans, and projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of appropriate programs, plans, or projects for advertising, sales promotion, other promotion, and... HASS AVOCADO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information... promotion, industry information, consumer information, and related research programs, plans, and projects...

  13. Salt Repository Project transportation program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, R.L.; Greenberg, A.H.; Anderson, T.L.; Yates, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Salt Repository Project (SRP) has the responsibility to develop a comprehensive transportation program plan (TrPP) that treats the transportation of workers, supplies, and high-level radioactive waste to the site and the transportation of salt, low-level, and transuranic wastes from the site. The TrPP has developed a systematic approach to transportation which is directed towards satisfying statutes, regulations, and directives and is guided by a hierarchy of specific functional requirements, strategies, plans, and reports. The TrPP identifies and develops the planning process for transportation-related studies and provides guidance to staff in performing and documenting these activities. The TrPP also includes an explanation of the responsibilities of the organizational elements involved in these transportation studies. Several of the report chapters relate to identifying routes for transporting nuclear waste to the site. These include a chapter on identifying an access corridor for a new rail route leading to the site, identifying and evaluating emergency-response preparedness capabilities along candidate routes in the state, and identifying alternative routes from the state border, ports, or in-state reactors to the site. The TrPP also includes plans for identifying salt disposal routes and a discussion of repository/transportation interface requirements. 89 refs., 6 figs

  14. The Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project Tank Waste Retrieval Performance and Lessons Learned, vol. 2 [of 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, BE

    2003-10-07

    The Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Remediation Project was the first of its kind performed in the United States. Robotics and remotely operated equipment were used to successfully transfer almost 94,000 gal of remote-handled transuranic sludge containing over 81,000 Ci of radioactive contamination from nine large underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The sludge was transferred with over 439,000 gal of radioactive waste supernatant and {approx}420,500 gal of fresh water that was used in sluicing operations. The GAATs are located in a high-traffic area of ORNL near a main thoroughfare. Volume 1 provides information on the various phases of the project and describes the types of equipment used. Volume 1 also discusses the tank waste retrieval performance and the lessons learned during the remediation effort. Volume 2 consists of the following appendixes, which are referenced in Vol. 1: A--Background Information for the Gunite and Associated Tanks Operable Unit; B--Annotated Bibliography; C--GAAT Equipment Matrix; D--Comprehensive Listing of the Sample Analysis Data from the GAAT Remediation Project; and E--Vendor List for the GAAT Remediation Project. The remediation of the GAATs was completed {approx}5.5 years ahead of schedule and {approx}$120,435K below the cost estimated in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for the project. These schedule and cost savings were a direct result of the selection and use of state-of-the-art technologies and the dedication and drive of the engineers, technicians, managers, craft workers, and support personnel that made up the GAAT Remediation Project Team.

  15. The Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project Tank Waste Retrieval Performance and Lessons Learned, vol. 2 [of 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, BE

    2003-01-01

    The Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Remediation Project was the first of its kind performed in the United States. Robotics and remotely operated equipment were used to successfully transfer almost 94,000 gal of remote-handled transuranic sludge containing over 81,000 Ci of radioactive contamination from nine large underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The sludge was transferred with over 439,000 gal of radioactive waste supernatant and ∼420,500 gal of fresh water that was used in sluicing operations. The GAATs are located in a high-traffic area of ORNL near a main thoroughfare. Volume 1 provides information on the various phases of the project and describes the types of equipment used. Volume 1 also discusses the tank waste retrieval performance and the lessons learned during the remediation effort. Volume 2 consists of the following appendixes, which are referenced in Vol. 1: A--Background Information for the Gunite and Associated Tanks Operable Unit; B--Annotated Bibliography; C--GAAT Equipment Matrix; D--Comprehensive Listing of the Sample Analysis Data from the GAAT Remediation Project; and E--Vendor List for the GAAT Remediation Project. The remediation of the GAATs was completed ∼5.5 years ahead of schedule and ∼$120,435K below the cost estimated in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for the project. These schedule and cost savings were a direct result of the selection and use of state-of-the-art technologies and the dedication and drive of the engineers, technicians, managers, craft workers, and support personnel that made up the GAAT Remediation Project Team

  16. Experimental logistics plan in support of Extensive Separations for Hanford tank waste remediation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enderlin, W.I.; Swanson, J.L.; Carlson, C.D.; Hirschi, E.J.

    1993-12-01

    All proposed methods for remediating the radioactive and chemical waste stored in single- and double-shell tanks (SSTs and DSTs) at the Hanford Site require the separation of the waste mixtures in the tank into high-level and low-level fractions, the safe transport of this separated waste to appropriate immobilization facilities, and the long-term disposal of the immobilized waste forms. Extensive experimentation, especially in waste separations, will be required to develop the technologies and to produce the data that support the most effective and safe cleanup processes. As part of this effort, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing this detailed experimental logistics plan to determine the logistical/resource requirements, and ultimately the critical paths, necessary to effectively and safely conduct the multitude of experiments within the Extensive Separations Development Program, which addresses the experimental needs of a concept that provides a high degree of separation for the high-level and low-level waste fractions. The logistics issues developed for this program are expected to be similar to those for other programs aimed at remediating and disposing of the wastes

  17. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-BC-5 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The Tri-Party Agreement requires that the cleanup programs at the Hanford Site integrate the requirements of CERCLA, RCRA, and Washington State's dangerous waste (the state's RCRA-equivalent) program. This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the CERCLA remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-BC-5 operable unit. The 100-B/C Area consists of the 100-BC-5 groundwater operable unit and four source operable units. The 100-BC-5 operable unit includes all contamination found in the aquifer soils and water beneath the 100-B/C Area. Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of contamination

  18. The South Wilmington Area remedial cost estimating methodology (RCEM) -- A planning tool and reality check for brownfield development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yancheski, T.B.; Swanson, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    The South Wilmington Area (SWA), which is comprised of 200 acres of multi-use urban lowlands adjacent to the Christina River, is a brownfields area that has been targeted for redevelopment/restoration as part of a major waterfront revitalization project for the City of Wilmington, Delaware. The vision for this riverfront development, which is being promoted by a state-funded development corporation, includes plans for a new harbor, convention and entertainment facilities, upscale residences, an urban wildlife refuge, and the restoration of the Christina River. However, the environmental quality of the SWA has been seriously impacted by an assortment of historic and current heavy industrial land-uses since the late 1800's, and extensive environmental cleanup of this area will be required as part of any redevelopment plan. Given that the environmental cleanup cost will be a major factor in determining the overall economic feasibility of brownfield development in the SWA, a reliable means of estimating potential preliminary remedial costs, without the expense of costly investigative and engineering studies, was needed to assist with this redevelopment initiative. The primary chemicals-of-concern (COCs) area-wide are lead and petroleum compounds, however, there are hot-spot occurrences of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PCBs, and other heavy metals such as arsenic and mercury

  19. Project No. 8 - Final decommissioning plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Ignalina NPP should prepare the final Ignalina NPP unit 1 decommissioning plan by march 31, 2002. This plan should include the following : description of Ignalina NPP and the Ignalina NPP boundary that could be influenced by decommissioning process; decommissioning strategy selected and a logical substantiation for this selection; description of the decommissioning actions suggested and a time schedule for the actions to be performed; conceptual safety and environmental impact assessment covering ionizing radiation and other man and environment impact; description of the environmental monitoring program proposed during decommissioning process; description of the waste management proposed; assessment of decommissioning expenses including waste management, accumulated funds and other sources. Estimated project cost - 0.75 M EURO

  20. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Durango, Colorado. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Durango, Colorado, are described in this water sampling and analysis plan. The plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the routine monitoring stations at the site. The ground water data are used to characterize the site ground water compliance strategies and to monitor contaminants of potential concern identified in the baseline risk assessment (DOE, 1995a). Regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the US EPA regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and EPA standards of 1995 (60 FR 2854). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site

  1. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    This Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1995 (1 July 1994 through 30 June 1995). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock, Colorado. Economic data were requested from the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE). The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized

  2. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Remedial Action Selection Report. Preliminary final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This proposed remedial action plan incorporates the results of detailed investigation of geologic, geomorphic, and seismic conditions at the proposed disposal site. The proposed remedial action will consist of relocating the uranium mill tailings, contaminated vicinity property materials, demolition debris, and windblown/waterborne materials to a permanent repository at the proposed Burro Canyon disposal cell. The proposed disposal site will be geomorphically stable. Seismic design parameters were developed for the geotechnical analyses of the proposed cell. Cell stability was analyzed to ensure long-term performance of the disposal cell in meeting design standards, including slope stability, settlement, and liquefaction potential. The proposed cell cover and erosion protection features were also analyzed and designed to protect the RRM (residual radioactive materials) against surface water and wind erosion. The location of the proposed cell precludes the need for permanent drainage or interceptor ditches. Rock to be used on the cell top-, side-, and toeslopes was sized to withstand probable maximum precipitation events.

  3. 300 Area Revitalization Project Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downey, H. D.

    1999-01-01

    The 300 Area Revitalization Team has been tasked with the responsibility to develop an integrated path forward for the 300 Area, as part of a commitment stemming from the 300 Area Disposition Workshop that was held on March 17, 1998. The integrated path forward that is needed must ensure that budget, schedule, and work scopes are complementary between the Programs that are involved in the 300Area. This Project Management Plan (PMP) defines the roles and responsibilities, and the overall approach, to development of a prioritized schedule for 300 Area activities that will achieve the end-state condition

  4. Unique Regulatory Approach for Licensing the Port Hope Remediation Project in Canada - 13315

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostova, M.; Howard, D.; Elder, P.

    2013-01-01

    The Port Hope remediation project is a part of a larger initiative of the Canadian Federal Government the Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI) which is based upon a community proposal. The Government of Canada, through Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) is investing $1.28 billion over 10 years to clean up historic low-level radioactive waste in the Port Hope Area and to provide long-term safe management of the low-level radioactive wastes in the Port Hope Area. These wastes arose from the activities of a former Federal Crown Corporation (Eldorado Nuclear) and its private sector predecessors. In Canada, historic waste are defined as low-level radioactive waste that was managed in a manner no longer considered acceptable, but for which the original producer cannot reasonably be held responsible or no longer exists and for which the Federal Government has accepted responsibility. In Canada, under the current regulatory framework, the environmental remediation is not considered as a distinct phase of the nuclear cycle. The regulatory approach for dealing with existing sites contaminated with radioactive residues is defined on the basis of risk and application of existing regulations. A unique regulatory approach was taken by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) to address the various licensing issues and to set out the requirements for licensing of the Port Hope Project within the current regulatory framework. (authors)

  5. Unique Regulatory Approach for Licensing the Port Hope Remediation Project in Canada - 13315

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostova, M.; Howard, D.; Elder, P. [Directorate of Nuclear Cycle and Facilities Regulation, Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, 280, Slater Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5S9 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The Port Hope remediation project is a part of a larger initiative of the Canadian Federal Government the Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI) which is based upon a community proposal. The Government of Canada, through Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) is investing $1.28 billion over 10 years to clean up historic low-level radioactive waste in the Port Hope Area and to provide long-term safe management of the low-level radioactive wastes in the Port Hope Area. These wastes arose from the activities of a former Federal Crown Corporation (Eldorado Nuclear) and its private sector predecessors. In Canada, historic waste are defined as low-level radioactive waste that was managed in a manner no longer considered acceptable, but for which the original producer cannot reasonably be held responsible or no longer exists and for which the Federal Government has accepted responsibility. In Canada, under the current regulatory framework, the environmental remediation is not considered as a distinct phase of the nuclear cycle. The regulatory approach for dealing with existing sites contaminated with radioactive residues is defined on the basis of risk and application of existing regulations. A unique regulatory approach was taken by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) to address the various licensing issues and to set out the requirements for licensing of the Port Hope Project within the current regulatory framework. (authors)

  6. Final Work Plan for a Remedial Action Plan in Support of the Risk-Based Approach to Remediation at KC-135 Crash Site

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1994-01-01

    ... receptor exposure to fuel-hydrocarbon- contaminated environmental media at the KC-135 Crash Site. The second goal is to implement any necessary and appropriate remedial technologies at the KC-135 Crash Site...

  7. 78 FR 54949 - Major Project Financial Plan Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ...'' (GA-090-751). That report recommended that Financial Plans include the cost of financing the project... Project Financial Plan Guidance AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice; Request for comments. SUMMARY: This notice requests comments on draft Major Project Financial Plan...

  8. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project is to eliminate, reduce, or address to acceptable levels the potential health and environmental consequences of milling activities. One of the first steps in the UMTRA Ground Water Project is the preparation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). This report contains the comments and responses received on the draft PEIS

  9. Business System Planning Project, Alternatives Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EVOSEVICH, S.

    2000-01-01

    The CHG Chief Information Officer (CIO) requested a study of alternatives to the current business system computing environment. This Business Systems Planning (BSP) Project Alternatives Analysis document presents an analysis of the current Project Controls, Work Management, and Business Management systems environment and alternative solutions that support the business functions. The project team has collected requirements and priorities from stakeholders in each business area and documented them in the BSP System Requirements Specification (SRS), RPP-6297. The alternatives analysis process identifies and measures possible solutions in each of the business process areas against the requirements as documented in the SRS. The team gathered input from both internal and external sources to identify and grade the possible solutions. This document captures the results of that activity and recommends a suite of software products. This study was to select the best product based on how well the product met the requirements, not to determine the platform or hardware environment that would be used. Additional analysis documentation can be found in BSP project files

  10. Remedial Action Plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    This document is a revision of the original Mexiacan Hat Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and RAP Modification submitted in July 1988 and January 1989, respectively, along with updated design documents. This RAP has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents. Section 2.0 presents the EPA standards, including a discussion of their objectives. Section 3. 0 summarizes the present site characteristics and provides a definition of site-specific problems. Section 4.0 is the site design for the proposed action. Section 5.0 presents the water resources protection strategy. Section 6.0 summarizes the plan for ensuring health and safety protection for the surrounding community and the on- site workers. Section 7.0 lists the responsibilities of the project participants. Section 8.0 describes the features of the long-term surveillance and maintenance plan

  11. Treatment Study Plan for Nitrate Salt Waste Remediation Revision 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juarez, Catherine L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Funk, David John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Naranjo, Felicia Danielle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-07

    The two stabilization treatment methods that are to be examined for their effectiveness in the treatment of both the unremediated and remediated nitrate salt wastes include (1) the addition of zeolite and (2) cementation. Zeolite addition is proposed based on the results of several studies and analyses that specifically examined the effectiveness of this process for deactivating nitrate salts. Cementation is also being assessed because of its prevalence as an immobilization method used for similar wastes at numerous facilities around the DOE complex, including at Los Alamos. The results of this Treatment Study Plan will be used to provide the basis for a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit modification request of the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit for approval by the New Mexico Environment Department-Hazardous Waste Bureau (NMED-HWB) of the proposed treatment process and the associated facilities.

  12. Quarry geotechnical report for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    This report has been prepared for the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) by the Project Management Contractor (PMC), which is MK-Ferguson Company (MK-Ferguson) with Jacobs Engineering Group (JEG) as its designated subcontractor. The Weldon Spring site (WSS) comprises the Weldon Spring quarry area and the Weldon Spring chemical plant and raffinate pit areas. This report presents the results of geotechnical investigations conducted during 1989--1990 at the proposed Weldon Spring quarry staging and water treatment facilities in the quarry area. The facilities are intended for treatment of water removed from the quarry area. An access road and a decontamination pad will be necessary for handling and transportation of bulk waste. Results of previous geotechnical investigations performed by other geoscience and environmental engineering firms in the quarry area, were reviewed, summarized and incorporated into this report. Well logging, stratigraphy data, piezometer data, elevations, and soil characteristics are also included

  13. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Monument Valley, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Monument Valley, Arizona, US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action(UMTRA) Project site is one of the first site-specific documents developed to achieve ground water compliance at the site. This SOWP applies information about the Monument Valley site to a regulatory compliance framework that identifies strategies that could be used to meet ground water compliance. The compliance framework was developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement (DOE, 1996). The DOE`s goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. The compliance strategy that emerges in the final version of the SOWP will be evaluated in the site-specific environmental assessment to determine potential environmental impacts and provide stakeholders a forum for review and comment. When the compliance strategy is acceptable, it will be detailed in a remedial action plan that will be subject to review by the state and/or tribe and concurrence by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Information for the preparation of this SOWP indicates active remediation is the most likely compliance strategy for the Monument Valley site. Additional data are needed to determine the most effective remediation technology.

  14. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Monument Valley, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Monument Valley, Arizona, US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is one of the first site-specific documents developed to achieve ground water compliance at the site. This SOWP applies information about the Monument Valley site to a regulatory compliance framework that identifies strategies that could be used to meet ground water compliance. The compliance framework was developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement (DOE, 1995). The DOE`s goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. The compliance strategy that emerges in the final version of the SOWP will assess potential environmental impacts and provide stakeholder a forum for review and comment. When the compliance strategy is acceptable, it will be detailed in a remedial action plan that will be subject to review by the state and/or tribe and concurrence by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Information available for the preparation of this SOWP indicates active remediation is the most likely compliance strategy for the Monument Valley site. Additional data are needed to determine the most effective remediation technology.

  15. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Monument Valley, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Monument Valley, Arizona, US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action(UMTRA) Project site is one of the first site-specific documents developed to achieve ground water compliance at the site. This SOWP applies information about the Monument Valley site to a regulatory compliance framework that identifies strategies that could be used to meet ground water compliance. The compliance framework was developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement (DOE, 1996). The DOE's goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. The compliance strategy that emerges in the final version of the SOWP will be evaluated in the site-specific environmental assessment to determine potential environmental impacts and provide stakeholders a forum for review and comment. When the compliance strategy is acceptable, it will be detailed in a remedial action plan that will be subject to review by the state and/or tribe and concurrence by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Information for the preparation of this SOWP indicates active remediation is the most likely compliance strategy for the Monument Valley site. Additional data are needed to determine the most effective remediation technology

  16. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Monument Valley, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Monument Valley, Arizona, US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is one of the first site-specific documents developed to achieve ground water compliance at the site. This SOWP applies information about the Monument Valley site to a regulatory compliance framework that identifies strategies that could be used to meet ground water compliance. The compliance framework was developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement (DOE, 1995). The DOE's goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. The compliance strategy that emerges in the final version of the SOWP will assess potential environmental impacts and provide stakeholder a forum for review and comment. When the compliance strategy is acceptable, it will be detailed in a remedial action plan that will be subject to review by the state and/or tribe and concurrence by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Information available for the preparation of this SOWP indicates active remediation is the most likely compliance strategy for the Monument Valley site. Additional data are needed to determine the most effective remediation technology

  17. Determination of aerosol size distributions at uranium mill tailings remedial action project sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, G.J.; Reif, R.H.; Hoover, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an ongoing program, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, to stabilize piles of uranium mill tailings in order to reduce the potential radiological hazards to the public. Protection of workers and the general public against airborne radioactivity during remedial action is a top priority at the UMTRA Project. The primary occupational radionuclides of concern are 230 Th, 226 Ra, 210 Pb, 210 Po, and the short-lived decay products of 222 Rn with 230 Th causing the majority of the committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) from inhaling uranium mill tailings. Prior to this study, a default particle size of 1.0 μm activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) was assumed for airborne radioactive tailings dust. Because of recent changes in DOE requirements, all DOE operations are now required to use the CEDE methodology, instead of the annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE) methodology, to evaluate internal radiation exposures. Under the transition from AEDE to CEDE, with a 1.0 μm AMAD particle size, lower bioassay action levels would be required for the UMTRA Project. This translates into an expanded internal dosimetry program where significantly more bioassay monitoring would be required at the UMTRA Project sites. However, for situations where the particle size distribution is known to differ significantly from 1.0 μm AMAD, the DOE allows for corrections to be made to both the estimated dose to workers and the derived air concentration (DAC) values. For particle sizes larger than 1.0 μm AMAD, the calculated CEDE from inhaling tailings would be relatively lower

  18. Sample management implementation plan: Salt Repository Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the Sample Management Implementation Plan is to define management controls and building requirements for handling materials collected during the site characterization of the Deaf Smith County, Texas, site. This work will be conducted for the US Department of Energy Salt Repository Project Office (SRPO). The plan provides for controls mandated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the US Environmental Protection Agency. Salt Repository Project (SRP) Sample Management will interface with program participants who request, collect, and test samples. SRP Sample Management will be responsible for the following: (1) preparing samples; (2) ensuring documentation control; (3) providing for uniform forms, labels, data formats, and transportation and storage requirements; and (4) identifying sample specifications to ensure sample quality. The SRP Sample Management Facility will be operated under a set of procedures that will impact numerous program participants. Requesters of samples will be responsible for definition of requirements in advance of collection. Sample requests for field activities will be approved by the SRPO, aided by an advisory group, the SRP Sample Allocation Committee. This document details the staffing, building, storage, and transportation requirements for establishing an SRP Sample Management Facility. Materials to be managed in the facility include rock core and rock discontinuities, soils, fluids, biota, air particulates, cultural artifacts, and crop and food stuffs. 39 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs

  19. Quality assurance project plan for the UMTRA technical assistance contractor hydrochemistry facility. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) hydrochemistry facility is used to perform a limited but important set of services for the UMTRA Project. Routine services include support of field-based hydrological and geochemical operations and water sampling activities. Less commonly, the hydrology and geochemistry staff undertake special studies and site characterization studies at this facility. It is also used to train hydrologists, geochemists, and groundwater sampling crews. A review of this Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) shall be accomplished once each calendar year. This review will be targeted to be accomplished not sooner than 6 months and not later than 18 months after the last review

  20. Comment and response document for the final remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    This document for the final remedial action plan and site design has been prepared for US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Division as part of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action plan. Comments and responses are included for the site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado

  1. Critical management issues for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Themelis, J.G.; Krishnan, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (PL95-604) authorized the Secretary of Energy to enter into cooperative agreements with certain states and Indian Tribes to clean up 24 inactive uranium mill tailing sites and associated vicinity properties. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project includes the three Federal agencies (EPA, DOE, and NRC), eleven state, Indian Tribes, and at least four major contractors. The UMTRA Project extends over a period of ten years. The standards for the Project require a design life of 1000 years with a minimum performance period of 200 years. This paper discusses the critical management issues in dealing with the UMTRA Project and identifies the development of solutions for many of those issues. The highlights to date are promulgation of EPA standards, continued support from Congress and participating states and Indian Tribes, significant leadership shown at all levels, establishment of credibility with the public, and continued motivation of the team. The challenge for tomorrow is making certain NRC will license the sites and maintaining the high level of coordination exhibited to date to assure Project completion on schedule

  2. March 2016 Memo: Planning for Removal and Remedial Activities at Hardrock Mining and Mineral Processing Sites with Fluid Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memo from EPA Assistant Administrator Mathy Stanislaus, regarding planning for removal and remedial activities at hardrock mining and mineral processing sites with fluid hazards, and to share the Agency’s expectations for the work that is done at these sit

  3. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Falls City, Texas, site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    This final audit report for the Falls City, Texas, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site summarizes the radiological audits and the quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, audits, and final close-out inspection performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). It also summarizes U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) surveillances. One radiological audit and three radiological surveillances were performed at the Falls City site. These surveillances and audit, which resulted in 31 observations, focused primarily on processing site activities and were performed on the following dates: 3-6 August 1992, 29-30 October 1992, 22-26 March 1993, and 1-3 November 1993. All outstanding radiological issues were closed out at the completion of the construction activities. Six QA in-process surveillances, which resulted in 71 observations, were performed at the Falls City site on the following dates: 22-24 July 1992, 23-25 November 1992, 17-19 May 1993, 16-18 August 1993, 13-15 October 1993, and 2-4 February 1994. All outstanding issues were closed out with the February surveillance on 3 March 1994. The DOE/TAC remedial action close-out inspections of the Falls City site, which resulted in 56 observations, were conducted 9-10 June 1994 and 26 July 1994. The inspections were closed out on 26 January 1995. The NRC performed three on-site construction reviews (OSCR), resulting in seven observations of remedial action construction activities that occurred during site visits. The OSCRs were performed 9 December 1992, 12 May 1993, and 25 October 1993. Since all audit and surveillance observations and recommendations have been closed out, this final audit report segment of the site certification process is complete

  4. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The final audit report for remedial action at the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and a QA final closeout inspection performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). One radiological surveillance and three radiological audits were performed at the Ambrosia Lake site. The surveillance was performed on 12--16 April 1993 (DOE, 1993d). The audits were performed on 26--29 July 1993 (DOE, 1993b); 21--23 March 1994 (DOE, 1994d); and 1--2 August 1994 (DOE, 1994d). The surveillance and audits resulted in 47 observations. Twelve of the observations raised DOE concerns that were resolved on site or through subsequent corrective action. All outstanding issues were satisfactorily closed out on 28 December 1994. The radiological surveillance and audits are discussed in this report. A total of seven QA in-process surveillances were performed at the Ambrosia Lake UMTRA site are discussed. The DOE/TAC Ambrosia Lake final remedial action close-out inspection was conducted on 26 July 1995 (DOE, 1995a). To summarize, a total of 155 observations were noted during DOE/TAC audit and surveillance activities. Follow-up to responses required from the RAC for the DOE/TAC surveillance and audit observations indicated that all issues related to the Ambrosia Lake site were resolved and closed to the satisfaction of the DOE

  5. NORM remediation project of Der Ezzor Petroleum Company (DEZPC) oil fields in Der Ezzor area, Syrian Arab Republic: Determination of NORM contaminated soil volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M. S.; Aba, A.; Hamwi, A.; Hassan, M.

    2002-04-01

    DEZP Company has used to collect product water, scale and sludge in artificial pits. Run-off channel had been created to allow water to run-off into the desert. A radioactive contamination by NORM in DEZP oil fields (JAFRA) has occurred and quite significant area of land has been affected. As a part of the remediation project the volume of contaminated soil with NORM according to the Syrian criteria for clean up and disposal has been determined. Surface and core soil samples were collected from the contaminated areas and analyzed for 226 Ra. The results have shown that contamination has reached a depth of more than one meter in the surface water pit. The estimated contaminated soil that needs disposal according to the Syrian criteria was calculated and found to be about 3161 m 3 . Most of the contaminated soil was found to be in the surface water pit. In addition, the contamination in the mud pit and the run-off channel was rather small and could be treated on site. However, the obtained results can be used for preparation of the remediation plan where size of the disposal pit and on site treatment is defined. The plan should be submitted to the Syrian Regulatory Office for review and approval to initiation of the remediation work (author)

  6. 1,4-Dioxane Remediation by Extreme Soil Vapor Extraction (XSVE). Screening-Level Feasibility Assessment and Design Tool in Support of 1,4-Dioxane Remediation by Extreme Soil Vapor Extraction (XSVE) ESTCP Project ER 201326

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    USER GUIDE 1,4-Dioxane Remediation by Extreme Soil Vapor Extraction (XSVE) Screening-Level Feasibility Assessment and Design Tool in...Support of 1,4-Dioxane Remediation by Extreme Soil Vapor Extraction (XSVE) ESTCP Project ER-201326 OCTOBER 2017 Rob Hinchee Integrated Science...Technology, Inc. 1509 Coastal Highway Panacea, FL 32346 8/8/2013 - 8/8/2018 10-2017 1,4-Dioxane Remediation by Extreme Soil Vapor Extraction (XSVE) Screening

  7. Evaluation of surface water treatment and discharge options for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyette, M.L.; MacDonell, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), under its Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program, is responsible for conducting response actions at the Weldon Spring site in St. Charles County, Missouri. The site consists of two noncontiguous areas: (1) the chemical plant area, which includes four raffinate pits and two small ponds, and (2) a 3.6-ha (9-acre) quarry located about 6.4 km (4 mi) southwest of the chemical plant area. Both of these areas became chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through 1960s. The Weldon Spring site, located about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis, is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Nitroaromatic explosives were processed by the Army at the chemical plant area during the 1940s, and radioactive materials were processed by DOE's predecessor agency (the Atomic Energy Commission) during the 1950s and 1960s. Overall remediation of the Weldon Spring site is being addressed through the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, and it consists of several components. One component is the management of radioactively and chemically contaminated surface water impoundments at the chemical plant area -- i.e., the four raffinate pits, Frog Pond, and Ash Pond which was addressed under a separate action and documented in an engineering evaluation/cost analysis report. This report discusses the evaluation of surface water treatment at the Weldon Spring site

  8. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project, Grand Junction, Colorado, processing site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    This final audit report (FAR) for remedial action at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project processing site consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/ audits, the quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and the QA final close-out inspection performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). The FAR also summarizes other surveillances performed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). To summarize, a total of one finding and 127 observations were noted during DOE/TAC audit and surveillance activities. The NRC noted general site-related observations during the OSCRs. Follow-up to responses required from MK-Ferguson for the DOE/TAC finding and observations indicated that all issues related to the Grand Junction processing site were resolved and closed out to the DOE's satisfaction. The NRC OSCRs resulted in no issues related to the Grand Junction processing site requiring a response from MK-Ferguson

  9. Process Control Plan for Tank 241-SY-101 Surface Level Rise Remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ESTEY, S.D.

    1999-01-01

    The tank 241-SY-101 transfer system was conceived and designed to address the immediate needs presented by rapidly changing waste conditions in tank 241-SY-101. Within the last year or so, the waste in this tank has exhibited unexpected behavior (Rassat et al. 1999) in the form of rapidly increasing crust growth. This growth has been brought about by a rapidly increasing rate of gas entrapment within the crust. It has been conceived that the lack of crust agitation beginning upon the advent of mixer pump operations may have set-up a more consolidated, gas impermeable barrier when compared to a crust regularly broken up by the prior buoyant displacement events within the tank. As a result, a series of level-growth remediation activities have been developed for tank 241-SY-101. The initial activities are also known as near-term crust mitigation. The first activity of near-term mitigation is to perform the small transfer of convective waste from tank 241-SY-101 into tank 241-SY-102. A 100 kgal transfer represents about a 10% volume reduction allowing a 10% water in-tank dilution. Current thinking holds that this should be enough to dissolve nitrite solids in the crust and perhaps largely eliminate gas retention problem in the crust (Raymond 1999). Additional mitigation activities are also planned on less constrained schedules. The net affect of the small transfer and follow-on mitigation activities for tank 241-SY-101 is strongly believed to be the remediation of tank 241-SY-101 as a flammable gas safety concern. The process for remediating the tank will require two or more transfer/dilution cycles. In-tank dilution will begin shortly after the initial transfer and the total dilution required to reach the final state is estimated to be between 250 to 400K gallons. The final state of the waste will not require any active measures to safely store the waste and operation of the mixer pump will no longer be necessary. The remediation activities are centered on a purpose

  10. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Durango, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Surface remedial action has been completed at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Durango, Colorado. Contaminated soil and debris have been removed from the former processing site and placed in the Bodo Canyon disposal cell. Ground water at the former uranium mill/tailings site and raffinate pond area has been contaminated by the former milling operations. The ground water at the disposal site was not impacted by the former milling operations at the time of the cell's construction. Activities for fiscal 1994 involve ground water sampling and site characterization of the disposal site

  11. How public issues shape environmental restoration plans - experiences with Colorado UMTRA projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, B.; Monaghan, J.

    1991-01-01

    Federal environmental restoration plans are being significantly impacted by open-quotes grassrootsclose quotes public pressure and by community demands, some of which have little relation to the technical standards of remediation and which go well beyond authorizing legislation. These demands often represent significant additional project costs. A review of Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Program experiences in Colorado suggests that the more serious open-quotes grassrootsclose quotes issues associated with remediation rarely diminish and, in fact, will intensify over time. This presents program administrators with the dilemma of attempting to adhere to program mandates and keep projects within budget, while at the same time trying to be responsive to community concerns. Such high-profiled community debates have the ability to delay remediation and even jeopardize important projects. After prolonged public debate, when it becomes clear an issue will not dissipate, project officials may be forced to meet certain community demands. Often, this results in not only increased costs, but a loss of public confidence in clean-up efforts. Evidence also suggests, however, that when critical public issues can be identified and addressed before they become overly contentious, significant problems and controversy can be avoided; but, the situation is made difficult because project officials often lack the policy guidance to determine which, if any, community demands should be addressed and to what extent they should be met. The adoption of several key public policy principles by program administrators will provide a greater ability to address community demands in a timely and successful manner

  12. Independent Technical Review of the C-400 Interim Remedial Project Phase I Results, Paducah, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looney, B.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart, L.; Richards, W.

    2010-01-01

    The groundwater and soil in the vicinity of the C-400 Building at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), is contaminated with substantial quantities of industrial solvents, primarily trichoroethene (TCE). This solvent 'source' is recognized as a significant challenge and an important remediation target in the overall environmental cleanup strategy for PGDP. Thus, the cleanup of the C-400 TCE Source is a principal focus for the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors, and for PGDP regulators and stakeholders. Using a formal investigation, feasibility study and decision process, Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH) was selected for the treatment of the soil and groundwater in the vicinity of C-400. ERH was selected as an interim action to remove 'a significant portion of the contaminant mass of TCE at the C-400 Cleaning Building area through treatment' with the longer term goal of reducing 'the period the TCE concentration in groundwater remains above its Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL).' ERH is a thermal treatment that enhances the removal of TCE and related solvents from soil and groundwater. The heterogeneous conditions at PGDP, particularly the high permeability regional gravel aquifer (RGA), are challenging to ERH. Thus, a phased approach is being followed to implement this relatively expensive and complex remediation technology. Conceptually, the phased approach encourages safety and efficiency by providing a 'lessons learned' process and allowing appropriate adjustments to be identified and implemented prior to follow-on phase(s) of treatment. More specifically, early deployment targeted portions of the challenging RGA treatment zone with relatively little contamination reducing the risk of adverse collateral impacts from underperformance in terms of heating and capture. Because of the importance and scope of the C-400 TCE source remediation activities, DOE chartered an Independent Technical Review (ITR) in 2007 to assess the C-400 ERH plans prior

  13. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE C-400 INTERIM REMEDIAL PROJECT PHASE I RESULTS, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, B.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart,L.; Richards, W.

    2010-10-29

    The groundwater and soil in the vicinity of the C-400 Building at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), is contaminated with substantial quantities of industrial solvents, primarily trichoroethene (TCE). This solvent 'source' is recognized as a significant challenge and an important remediation target in the overall environmental cleanup strategy for PGDP. Thus, the cleanup of the C-400 TCE Source is a principal focus for the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors, and for PGDP regulators and stakeholders. Using a formal investigation, feasibility study and decision process, Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH) was selected for the treatment of the soil and groundwater in the vicinity of C-400. ERH was selected as an interim action to remove 'a significant portion of the contaminant mass of TCE at the C-400 Cleaning Building area through treatment' with the longer term goal of reducing 'the period the TCE concentration in groundwater remains above its Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL).' ERH is a thermal treatment that enhances the removal of TCE and related solvents from soil and groundwater. The heterogeneous conditions at PGDP, particularly the high permeability regional gravel aquifer (RGA), are challenging to ERH. Thus, a phased approach is being followed to implement this relatively expensive and complex remediation technology. Conceptually, the phased approach encourages safety and efficiency by providing a 'lessons learned' process and allowing appropriate adjustments to be identified and implemented prior to follow-on phase(s) of treatment. More specifically, early deployment targeted portions of the challenging RGA treatment zone with relatively little contamination reducing the risk of adverse collateral impacts from underperformance in terms of heating and capture. Because of the importance and scope of the C-400 TCE source remediation activities, DOE chartered an Independent Technical Review (ITR) in

  14. US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 52 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krabacher, J.E.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also was the remedial action contractor. Building 52 was found to be radiologically contaminated and was demolished in 1994. The soil area within the footprint of the building has been remediated in accordance with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building

  15. Remedial Action Plan and final design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings at Green River, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, M.L.; Alkema, K.

    1991-03-01

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a threefold purpose. It presents the series of activities that are proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site located near Green River, Utah. It provides a characterization of the present conditions of the site. It also serves to document the concurrence of the state of Utah and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by the DOE and the state of Utah, and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix 8 of the Cooperative Agreement

  16. Engineering evaluation/conceptual plan for the 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit interim remedial measure. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    This report presents an engineering evaluation and conceptual plan for an interim remedial measure (IRM) to address a uranium and technetium-99 groundwater plume in the 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. This report provides information regarding the need for an IRM and its potentially achievable objectives and goals. The report also evaluates alternatives to contain elevated concentrations of uranium and technetium-99 and to obtain information necessary to develop final remedial actions for the operable unit

  17. Review of selected 100-N waste sites related to N-Springs remediation projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeFord, D.H.; Carpenter, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    This document has been prepared in support of the environmental restoration program at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, by the Bechtel Hanford, Inc. Facility and Waste Site Research Office. It provides historical information that documents and characterizes selected waste sites that are related to the N-Springs remediation projects. The N-Springs are a series of small, inconspicuous groundwater seepage springs located along the Columbia River shoreline near the 100-N Reactor. The spring site is hydrologically down-gradient from several 100-N Area liquid waste sites that are believed to have been the source(s) of the effluents being discharged by the springs. This report documents and characterizes these waste sites, including the 116-N-1 Crib and Trench, 116-N-3 Crib and Trench, unplanned releases, septic tariks, and a backwash pond

  18. Multi-site risk-based project planning, optimization, sequencing and budgeting process and tool for the integrated facility disposition project - 59394

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Jerel; Castillo, Carlos; Huntsman, Julie; Lucek, Heather; Marks, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Faced with the DOE Complex Transformation, NNSA was tasked with developing an integrated plan for the decommissioning of over 400 facilities and 300 environmental remediation units, as well as the many reconfiguration and modernization projects at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Y-12 Complex. Manual scheduling of remediation activities is time-consuming, labor intensive, and inherently introduces bias and unaccounted for aspects of the scheduler or organization in the process. Clearly a tool was needed to develop an objective, unbiased baseline optimized project sequence and schedule with a sound technical foundation for the Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP). In generating an integrated disposition schedule, each project (including facilities, environmental sites, and remedial action units) was identified, characterized, then ranked relative to other projects. Risk matrices allowed for core project data to be extrapolated into probable contamination levels, relative risks to the public, and other technical and risk parameters to be used in the development of an overall ranking. These matrices ultimately generated a complete data set that were used in the Ranking and Sequencing Model (RSM), commonly referred to as the SUPER model, for its numerous abilities to support D and D planning, prioritization, and sequencing

  19. PNNL Apatite Investigation at 100-NR-2 Quality Assurance Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, N. J.

    2009-04-02

    In 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy, Fluor Hanford, Inc., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the Washington Department of Ecology agreed that the long-term strategy for groundwater remediation at the 100-N Area would include apatite sequestration as the primary treatment, followed by a secondary treatment if necessary. Since then, the agencies have worked together to agree on which apatite sequestration technology has the greatest chance of reducing strontium-90 flux to the Columbia River. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by staff working on the PNNL Apatite Investigation at 100-NR-2 Project. The plan is designed to be used exclusively by project staff.

  20. Mitigation action plan for remedial action at the Uranium Mill Tailing Sites and Disposal Site, Rifle, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    The Estes Gulch disposal site is approximately 10 kilometers (6 miles) north of the town of Rifle, off State Highway 13 on Federal land administered by the Bureau of Land Management. The Department of Energy (DOE) will transport the residual radioactive materials (RRM) by truck to the Estes Gulch disposal site via State Highway 13 and place it in a partially below-grade disposal cell. The RRM will be covered by an earthen radon barrier, frost protection layers, and a rock erosion protection layer. A toe ditch and other features will also be constructed to control erosion at the disposal site. After removal of the RRM and disposal at the Estes Gulch site, the disturbed areas at all three sites will be backfilled with clean soils, contoured to facilitate surface drainage, and revegetated. Wetlands areas destroyed at the former Rifle processing sites will be compensated for by the incorporation of now wetlands into the revegetation plan at the New Rifle site. The UMTRA Project Office, supported by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC), oversees the implementation of the MAP. The RAC executes mitigation measures in the field. The TAC provides monitoring of the mitigation actions in cases where mitigation measures are associated with design features. Site closeout and inspection compliance will be documented in the site completion report

  1. Remedial investigation work plan for the Groundwater Operable Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Work Plan has been developed as part of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) investigation of the Groundwater Operable Unit (GWOU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The first iteration of the GWOU RI Work Plan is intended to serve as a strategy document to guide the ORNL GWOU RI. The Work Plan provides a rationale and organization for groundwater data acquisition, monitoring, and remedial actions to be performed during implementation of environmental restoration activities associated with the ORNL GWOU. It Is important to note that the RI Work Plan for the ORNL GWOU is not a prototypical work plan. The RI will be conducted using annual work plans to manage the work activities, and task reports will be used to document the results of the investigations. Sampling and analysis results will be compiled and reported annually with a review of data relative to risk (screening level risk assessment review) for groundwater. This Work Plan outlines the overall strategy for the RI and defines tasks which are to be conducted during the initial phase of investigation. This plan is presented with the understanding that more specific addenda to the plan will follow.

  2. Remedial investigation work plan for the Groundwater Operable Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Work Plan has been developed as part of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) investigation of the Groundwater Operable Unit (GWOU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The first iteration of the GWOU RI Work Plan is intended to serve as a strategy document to guide the ORNL GWOU RI. The Work Plan provides a rationale and organization for groundwater data acquisition, monitoring, and remedial actions to be performed during implementation of environmental restoration activities associated with the ORNL GWOU. It Is important to note that the RI Work Plan for the ORNL GWOU is not a prototypical work plan. The RI will be conducted using annual work plans to manage the work activities, and task reports will be used to document the results of the investigations. Sampling and analysis results will be compiled and reported annually with a review of data relative to risk (screening level risk assessment review) for groundwater. This Work Plan outlines the overall strategy for the RI and defines tasks which are to be conducted during the initial phase of investigation. This plan is presented with the understanding that more specific addenda to the plan will follow

  3. Linear-programming-based heuristics for project capacity planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gademann, A.J.R.M.; Schutten, J.M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Many multi-project organizations are capacity driven, which means that their operations are constrained by various scarce resources. An important planning aspect in a capacity driven multi-project organization is capacity planning. By capacity planning, we mean the problem of matching demand for

  4. Single-Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Project Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VLADIMIROFF, D.T.; BOYLES, V.C.

    2000-01-01

    This project plan establishes the management framework for the conduct of the CHG Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization completion program. Specifically, this plan defines the mission needs and requirements; technical objectives and approach; organization structure, roles, responsibilities, and interfaces; and operational methods. This plan serves as the project executional baseline

  5. Single-shell tank interim stabilization project plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, W.E.

    1998-05-11

    This project plan establishes the management framework for conduct of the TWRS Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization completion program. Specifically, this plan defines the mission needs and requirements; technical objectives and approach; organizational structure, roles, responsibilities, and interfaces; and operational methods. This plan serves as the project executional baseline.

  6. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Falls City, Texas. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Falls City, Texas, are described in this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP). The following plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, and sampling frequency for the routine monitoring stations at the site. The ground water data are used for site characterization and risk assessment. The regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations in 40 CFR Part 192. Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. The Falls City site is in Karnes County, Texas, approximately 8 miles [13 kilometers southwest of the town of Falls City and 46 mi (74 km) southeast of San Antonio, Texas. Before surface remedial action, the tailings site consisted of two parcels. Parcel A consisted of the mill site, one mill building, five tailings piles, and one tailings pond south of Farm-to-Market (FM) Road 1344 and west of FM 791. A sixth tailings pile designated Parcel B was north of FM 791 and east of FM 1344

  7. Sampling and analysis plan for remediation of Operable Unit 100-IU-3 waste site 600-104

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) presents the rationale and strategy for the sampling and analysis activities to support remediation of 100-IU-3 Operable Unit waste site 600-104. The purpose of the proposed sampling and analysis activities is to demonstrate that time-critical remediation of the waste site for soil containing 2,4-Dichlorophonoxyacetic acid salts and esters (2,4-D) and dioxin/furan isomers at concentrations that exceed cleanup levels has been effective. This shall be accomplished by sampling various locations of the waste site before and after remediation, analyzing the samples, and comparing the results to action levels set by the Washington State Department of Ecology

  8. Sampling and analysis plan for remediation of Operable Unit 100-IU-3 waste site 600-104. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    This sampling and analysis plan presents the rationale and strategy for the sampling and analysis activities to support remediation of 100-IU-3 Operable Unit waste site 600-104. The purpose of the proposed sampling and analysis activities is to demonstrate that time-critical remediation of the waste site for soil containing 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid salts and esters (2,4-D) and dioxin/furan isomers at concentrations that exceed cleanup levels has been effective. This shall be accomplished by sampling various locations of the waste site before and after remediation, analyzing the samples, and comparing the results to action levels set by the Washington State Department of Ecology

  9. Field Sampling Plan for the Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04 Remedial Action, Phase IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Wells

    2006-11-14

    This Field Sampling Plan outlines the collection and analysis of samples in support of Phase IV of the Waste Area Group 10, Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04 remedial action. Phase IV addresses the remedial actions to areas with the potential for unexploded ordnance at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. These areas include portions of the Naval Proving Ground, the Arco High-Altitude Bombing Range, and the Twin Buttes Bombing Range. The remedial action consists of removal and disposal of ordnance by high-order detonation, followed by sampling to determine the extent, if any, of soil that might have been contaminated by the detonation activities associated with the disposal of ordnance during the Phase IV activities and explosives during the Phase II activities.

  10. Sampling and analysis plan for the Bear Creek Valley Boneyard/Burnyard Accelerated Action Project, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    In the Bear Creek Valley Watershed Remedial Investigation, the Boneyard/Burnyard was identified as the source of the largest releases of uranium into groundwater and surface water in Bear Creek Valley. The proposed action for remediation of this site is selective excavation and removal of source material and capping of the remainder of the site. The schedule for this action has been accelerated so that this is the first remedial action planned to be implemented in the Bear Creek Valley Record of Decision. Additional data needs to support design of the remedial action were identified at a data quality objectives meeting held for this project. Sampling at the Boneyard/Burnyard will be conducted through the use of a phased approach. Initial or primary samples will be used to make in-the-field decisions about where to locate follow-up or secondary samples. On the basis of the results of surface water, soil, and groundwater analysis, up to six test pits will be dug. The test pits will be used to provide detailed descriptions of source materials and bulk samples. This document sets forth the requirements and procedures to protect the personnel involved in this project. This document also contains the health and safety plan, quality assurance project plan, waste management plan, data management plan, implementation plan, and best management practices plan for this project as appendices

  11. Sampling and analysis plan for the Bear Creek Valley Boneyard/Burnyard Accelerated Action Project, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    In the Bear Creek Valley Watershed Remedial Investigation, the Boneyard/Burnyard was identified as the source of the largest releases of uranium into groundwater and surface water in Bear Creek Valley. The proposed action for remediation of this site is selective excavation and removal of source material and capping of the remainder of the site. The schedule for this action has been accelerated so that this is the first remedial action planned to be implemented in the Bear Creek Valley Record of Decision. Additional data needs to support design of the remedial action were identified at a data quality objectives meeting held for this project. Sampling at the Boneyard/Burnyard will be conducted through the use of a phased approach. Initial or primary samples will be used to make in-the-field decisions about where to locate follow-up or secondary samples. On the basis of the results of surface water, soil, and groundwater analysis, up to six test pits will be dug. The test pits will be used to provide detailed descriptions of source materials and bulk samples. This document sets forth the requirements and procedures to protect the personnel involved in this project. This document also contains the health and safety plan, quality assurance project plan, waste management plan, data management plan, implementation plan, and best management practices plan for this project as appendices.

  12. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Gunnison, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    To achieve compliance with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater protection standards the US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to meet background concentrations or the EPA maximum concentration limits (MCLS) for hazardous constituents in groundwater in the uppermost aquifer at the point of compliance (POC) at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site near Gunnison, Colorado. The proposed remedial action will ensure protection of human health and the environment. A summary of the principal features of the water resources protection strategy for the Gunnison disposal site is included in this report

  13. SAFETY IMPROVES DRAMATICALLY IN FLUOR HANFORD SOIL AND GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION PROJECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GERBER MS

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes dramatic improvements in the safety record of the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington state over the past four years. During a period of enormous growth in project work and scope, contractor Fluor Hanford reduced injuries, accidents, and other safety-related incidents and enhanced a safety culture that earned the SGRP Star Status in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) in 2007. This paper outlines the complex and multi-faceted work of Fluor Hanford's SGRP and details the steps taken by the project's Field Operations and Safety organizations to improve safety. Holding field safety meetings and walkdowns, broadening safety inspections, organizing employee safety councils, intensively flowing down safety requirements to subcontractors, and adopting other methods to achieve remarkable improvement in safety are discussed. The roles of management, labor and subcontractors are detailed. Finally, SGRP's safety improvements are discussed within the context of overall safety enhancements made by Fluor Hanford in the company's 11 years of managing nuclear waste cleanup at the Hanford Site

  14. SAFETY IMPROVES DRAMATICALLY IN FLUOR HANFORD SOIL AND GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GERBER MS

    2007-12-05

    This paper describes dramatic improvements in the safety record of the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington state over the past four years. During a period of enormous growth in project work and scope, contractor Fluor Hanford reduced injuries, accidents, and other safety-related incidents and enhanced a safety culture that earned the SGRP Star Status in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) in 2007. This paper outlines the complex and multi-faceted work of Fluor Hanford's SGRP and details the steps taken by the project's Field Operations and Safety organizations to improve safety. Holding field safety meetings and walkdowns, broadening safety inspections, organizing employee safety councils, intensively flowing down safety requirements to subcontractors, and adopting other methods to achieve remarkable improvement in safety are discussed. The roles of management, labor and subcontractors are detailed. Finally, SGRP's safety improvements are discussed within the context of overall safety enhancements made by Fluor Hanford in the company's 11 years of managing nuclear waste cleanup at the Hanford Site.

  15. DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF GEO-PROCESSING MODELS FOR THE AUTOMATIC GENERATION OF REMEDIATION PLAN AND NAVIGATION DATA TO USE IN INDUSTRIAL DISASTER REMEDIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lucas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces research done on the automatic preparation of remediation plans and navigation data for the precise guidance of heavy machinery in clean-up work after an industrial disaster. The input test data consists of a pollution extent shapefile derived from the processing of hyperspectral aerial survey data from the Kolontár red mud disaster. Three algorithms were developed and the respective scripts were written in Python. The first model aims at drawing a parcel clean-up plan. The model tests four different parcel orientations (0, 90, 45 and 135 degree and keeps the plan where clean-up parcels are less numerous considering it is an optimal spatial configuration. The second model drifts the clean-up parcel of a work plan both vertically and horizontally following a grid pattern with sampling distance of a fifth of a parcel width and keep the most optimal drifted version; here also with the belief to reduce the final number of parcel features. The last model aims at drawing a navigation line in the middle of each clean-up parcel. The models work efficiently and achieve automatic optimized plan generation (parcels and navigation lines. Applying the first model we demonstrated that depending on the size and geometry of the features of the contaminated area layer, the number of clean-up parcels generated by the model varies in a range of 4% to 38% from plan to plan. Such a significant variation with the resulting feature numbers shows that the optimal orientation identification can result in saving work, time and money in remediation. The various tests demonstrated that the model gains efficiency when 1/ the individual features of contaminated area present a significant orientation with their geometry (features are long, 2/ the size of pollution extent features becomes closer to the size of the parcels (scale effect. The second model shows only 1% difference with the variation of feature number; so this last is less interesting for

  16. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado, is one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be cleaned up by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), 42 USC section 7901 et seq. Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE's remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Included in the RAP is this Remedial Action Selection Report (RAS), which describes the proposed remedial action for the Naturita site. An extensive amount of data and supporting information has been generated and evaluated for this remedial action. These data and supporting information are not incorporated into this single document but are included or referenced in the supporting documents. The RAP consists of this RAS and four supporting documents or attachments. This Attachment 2, Geology Report describes the details of geologic, geomorphic, and seismic conditions at the Dry Flats disposal site

  17. Vicinity Property Assessments at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Project Sites in the New York District - 13420

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewy, Ann; Hays, David [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) has addressed sites across the nation for almost 4 decades. Multiple stake holder pressures, multiple regulations, and process changes occur over such long time periods. These result in many challenges to the FUSRAP project teams. Initial FUSRAP work was not performed under Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Records of Decision (ROD). The ROD identifies the remedy decision and ultimately the criteria to be used to release a site. Early FUSRAP projects used DOE Orders or the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) standards. Under current RODs, regulations may differ, resulting in different cleanup criteria than that used in prior Vicinity Property (VP) remediation. The USACE, in preparation for closeout of Sites, conducts reviews to evaluate whether prior actions were sufficient to meet the cleanup criteria specified in the current ROD. On the basis of these reviews, USACE has conducted additional sampling, determined that prior actions were sufficient, or conducted additional remediation consistent with the selected remedy in the ROD. As the public pressures, regulations, and processes that the FUSRAP encounters continue to change, the program itself continues to evolve. Assessment of VPs at FUSRAP sites is a necessary step in the life cycle of our site management. (authors)

  18. Vicinity Property Assessments at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Project Sites in the New York District - 13420

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewy, Ann; Hays, David

    2013-01-01

    The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) has addressed sites across the nation for almost 4 decades. Multiple stake holder pressures, multiple regulations, and process changes occur over such long time periods. These result in many challenges to the FUSRAP project teams. Initial FUSRAP work was not performed under Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Records of Decision (ROD). The ROD identifies the remedy decision and ultimately the criteria to be used to release a site. Early FUSRAP projects used DOE Orders or the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) standards. Under current RODs, regulations may differ, resulting in different cleanup criteria than that used in prior Vicinity Property (VP) remediation. The USACE, in preparation for closeout of Sites, conducts reviews to evaluate whether prior actions were sufficient to meet the cleanup criteria specified in the current ROD. On the basis of these reviews, USACE has conducted additional sampling, determined that prior actions were sufficient, or conducted additional remediation consistent with the selected remedy in the ROD. As the public pressures, regulations, and processes that the FUSRAP encounters continue to change, the program itself continues to evolve. Assessment of VPs at FUSRAP sites is a necessary step in the life cycle of our site management. (authors)

  19. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    As required by the Romer-Twining Agreement of 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this annual economic impact study for the state of Colorado. This report assesses the economic impacts related to the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in Colorado during the state fiscal year (FY) between 1 July 1994 and 30 June 1995. To estimate net economic benefit, employment, salaries and wages, and other related economic benefits are discussed, quantified, and then compared to the state's 10 percent share of the remedial action costs. Actual data obtained from sites currently undergoing remedial action were used as the basis for analyses. If data were not available, estimates were used to derive economic indicators. This study describes the types of employment associated with the UMTRA Project and estimates of the numbers of people employed by UMTRA Project subcontractors in Colorado during state FY 1995. Employment totals are reported in estimated average annual jobs; however, the actual number of workers at the site fluctuates depending on weather and on the status of remedial action activities. In addition, the actual number of people employed on the Project during the year may be higher than the average annual employment reported due to the temporary nature of some of the jobs

  20. Investigation of the Use of "Cucumis Sativus" for Remediation of Chromium from Contaminated Environmental Matrices: An Interdisciplinary Instrumental Analysis Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Lynsey R.; Edwards, Michael R.; Farmer, Russell; Greenly, Kathryn J.; Hensler, Sherri; Jenkins, Scott E.; Joyce, J. Michael; Mann, Jason A.; Prentice, Boone M.; Puckette, Andrew E.; Shuford, Christopher M.; Porter, Sarah E. G.; Rhoten, Melissa C.

    2009-01-01

    An interdisciplinary, semester-long project is presented in which students grow Cucumis sativus (cucumber) plants from seeds and study the ability of the plants to remediate a heavy metal from contaminated soil or water or both. Phytoremediation strategies for environmental cleanup are presented as possible alternatives to chemical based clean-up…

  1. Project chariot remediation - the use of DOE's observational approach for environmental restoration with elements of the new DOE safer approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, A.; Stewart, C.; Cabble, K.

    1994-01-01

    The primary purpose of Project Chariot was to investigate the technical problems and assess the effect of the proposed harbor excavation using nuclear explosives in Alaska. However, no nuclear devices were brought to the Project Chariot site. Between 1959 and 1961 various environmental tests were conducted. During the course of these environmental studies, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) granted the use of up to 5 curies of radioactive material at the Chariot site in Cape Thompson, Alaska; however only 26 millicuries were ever actually used. The tests were conducted in 12 test plots which were later gathered together and were mixed with in situ-soils generating approximately 1,600 cubic feet of soil. This area was then covered with four feet of clean soil, creating a mound. In 1962, the site was abandoned. A researcher at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks obtained in formation regarding the tests conducted and the materials left at the Project Chariot site. In response to concerns raised through the publication of this information, it was decided by the Department of Energy (DOE) that total remediation of the mound be completed within the year. During the summer of 1993, IT Corporation carried out the assessment and remediation of the Project Chariot site using a streamlined approach to waste site decision making called the Observational Approach (OA), and added elements of the new DOE Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER). This remediation and remediation approach is described

  2. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-KR-1 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Figure 1-1 shows the location of these areas. Under the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement, Ecology et al. 1990a), signed by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), EPA, and the US Department of Energy (DOE), more than 1,000 inactive waste disposal and unplanned release sites on the Hanford Site have been grouped into a number of source and groundwater operable units. These operable units contain contamination in the form of hazardous waste, radioactive/hazardous mixed waste, and other CERCLA hazardous substances. Also included in the Tri-Party Agreement are 55 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facilities that will be closed or permitted to operate in accordance with RCRA regulations, under the authority of Chapter 173-303 Washington Administrative Code (WAC). Some of the TSD facilities are included in the operable units. This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the CERCLA remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-KR-1 operable unit. The 100-KR-1 source operable unit is one of three source operable units in the 100-K Area. Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of hazardous substance contamination

  3. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-BC-2 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    This work plan and attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-BC-2 operable unit in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The 100 Area is one of four areas at the Hanford Site that are on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Priorities List under CERCLA. The 100-BC-2 operable unit is one of two source operable units in the 100-B/C Area (Figure ES-1). Source operable units are those that contain facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of hazardous substance contamination. The 100-BC-2 source operable unit contains waste sites that were formerly in the 100-BC-2, 100-BC-3, and 100-BC-4 operable units. Because of their size and geographic location, the waste sites from these two operable units were added to 100-BC-2. This allows for a more efficient and effective investigation of the remaining 100-B/C Reactor area waste sites. The investigative approach to waste sites associated with the 100-BC-2 operable unit are listed in Table ES-1. The waste sites fall into three general categories: high priority liquid waste disposal sites, low priority liquid waste disposal sites, and solid waste burial grounds. Several sites have been identified as candidates for conducting an IRM. Two sites have been identified as warranting additional limited field sampling. The two sites are the 116-C-2A pluto crib, and the 116-C-2C sand filter

  4. National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clobes, A.R.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility M Project. It was prepared for the NIP Prood Office by the NIF Procurement Manager

  5. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado. Volume 2, Appendices D and E: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the designated disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

  6. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Gunnison, Colorado: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan summarizes the results of previous water sampling activities and the plan for future water sampling activities, in accordance with the Guidance Document for Preparing Sampling and Analysis Plans for UMTRA Sites. A buffer zone monitoring plan for the Dos Rios Subdivision is included as an appendix. The buffer zone monitoring plan was developed to ensure continued protection to the public from residual contamination. The buffer zone is beyond the area depicted as contaminated ground water due to former milling operations. Surface remedial action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site began in 1992; completion is expected in 1995. Ground water and surface water will be sampled semiannually at the Gunnison processing site and disposal site. Results of previous water sampling at the Gunnison processing site indicate that ground water in the alluvium is contaminated by the former uranium processing activities. Background ground water conditions have been established in the uppermost aquifer at the Gunnison disposal site. The monitor well locations provide a representative distribution of sampling points to characterize ground water quality and ground water flow conditions in the vicinity of the sites. The list of analytes has been modified with time to reflect constituents that are related to uranium processing activities and the parameters needed for geochemical evaluation

  7. Risk communication and trust in decision-maker action: a case study of the Giant Mine Remediation Plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia G. Jardine

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. The development and implementation of a remediation plan for the residual arsenic trioxide stored at the former Giant Mine site in the Canadian Northwest Territories has raised important issues related to trust. Social and individual trust of those responsible for making decisions on risks is critically important in community judgements on risk and the acceptability of risk management decisions. Trust is known to be affected by value similarity and confidence in past performance, which serve as interacting sources of cooperation in acting toward a common goal. Objective. To explore the elements of trust associated with the development and implementation of the Giant Mine Remediation Plan. Design. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight purposively selected key informants representing both various interested and affected parties and the two government proponents. Results. Five primary issues related to trust were identified by the participants: (1 a historical legacy of mistrust between the community (particularly Aboriginal peoples and government; (2 barriers to building trust with the federal government; (3 limited community input and control over the decision-making process; (4 the conflicted and confounded role of the government agencies being both proponent and regulator, and the resulting need for independent oversight; and (5 distrust of the government to commit to the perpetual care required for the remediation option selected. Conclusions. The dual-mode model of trust and confidence was shown to be a useful framework for understanding the pivotal role of trust in the development of the Giant Mine Remediation Plan. Failure to recognize issues of trust based on value dissimilarity and lack of confidence based on past performance have resulted in a lack of cooperation characterized by delayed remediation and a prolonged and expensive consultation process. Government recognition of the importance of trust to these

  8. Double Star project - master science operations plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, C.; Liu, Z.

    2005-11-01

    For Double Star Project (DSP) exploration, the scientific operations are very important and essential for achieving its scientific objectives. Two years before the launch of the DSP satellites (TC-1 and TC-2) and during the mission operating phase, the long-term and short-term master science operations plans (MSOP) were produced. MSOP is composed of the operation schedules of all the scientific instruments, the modes and timelines of the Payload Service System on TC-1 and TC-2, and the data receiving schedules of the three ground stations. The MSOP of TC-1 and TC-2 have been generated according to the scientific objectives of DSP, the orbits of DSP, the near-Earth space environments and the coordination with Cluster, etc., so as to make full use of the exploration resources provided by DSP and to acquire as much quality scientific data as possible for the scientific communities. This paper has summarized the observation resources of DSP, the states of DSP and its evolution since the launch, the strategies and rules followed for operating the payload and utilizing the ground stations, and the production of MSOP. Until now, the generation and execution of MSOP is smooth and successful, the operating of DSP is satisfactory, and most of the scientific objectives of DSP have been fulfilled.

  9. Double Star project - master science operations plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Shen

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available For Double Star Project (DSP exploration, the scientific operations are very important and essential for achieving its scientific objectives. Two years before the launch of the DSP satellites (TC-1 and TC-2 and during the mission operating phase, the long-term and short-term master science operations plans (MSOP were produced. MSOP is composed of the operation schedules of all the scientific instruments, the modes and timelines of the Payload Service System on TC-1 and TC-2, and the data receiving schedules of the three ground stations. The MSOP of TC-1 and TC-2 have been generated according to the scientific objectives of DSP, the orbits of DSP, the near-Earth space environments and the coordination with Cluster, etc., so as to make full use of the exploration resources provided by DSP and to acquire as much quality scientific data as possible for the scientific communities. This paper has summarized the observation resources of DSP, the states of DSP and its evolution since the launch, the strategies and rules followed for operating the payload and utilizing the ground stations, and the production of MSOP. Until now, the generation and execution of MSOP is smooth and successful, the operating of DSP is satisfactory, and most of the scientific objectives of DSP have been fulfilled.

  10. Fast Flux Test Facility project plan. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulvey, R.K.

    1995-11-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project Plan, Revision 2, provides changes to the major elements and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition

  11. Fast Flux Test Facility project plan. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulvey, R.K.

    1995-11-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project Plan, Revision 2, provides changes to the major elements and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

  12. Project Management Plan (PMP) for Work Management Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHIPLER, C.E.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a project plan for Work Management Implementation by the River Protection Project (RPP). Work Management is an information initiative to implement industry best practices by replacing some Tank Farm legacy system

  13. Integrated multi-resource planning and scheduling in engineering project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Ben Issa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Planning and scheduling processes in project management are carried out sequentially in prac-tice, i.e. planning project activities first without visibility of resource limitation, and then schedul-ing the project according to these pre-planned activities. This is a need to integrate these two pro-cesses. In this paper, we use Branch and Bound approach for generating all the feasible and non-feasible project schedules with/without activity splitting, and with a new criterion called “the Minimum Moments of Resources Required around X-Y axes (MMORR”, we select the best feasible project schedule to integrate plan processing and schedule processing for engineering projects. The results illustrate that this integrated approach can effectively select the best feasible project schedule among alternatives, improves the resource utilization, and shortens the project lead time.

  14. I-15 integrated corridor management system : project management plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    The Project Management Plan (PMP) assists the San Diego ICM Team by defining a procedural framework for : management and control of the I-15 Integrated Corridor Management Demonstration Project, and development and : deployment of the ICM System. The...

  15. AMADEUS Project Deliverable 1.2: Data Management Plan

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Belén Cristobal

    2018-01-01

    This document describes the initial Data Management Plan (DMP) for AMADEUS project. It addresses Project administration data collected as part of the execution and management of a disruptive research that could be in the market in the incoming years.

  16. Project Management Plan for Initial Tank Retrieval Systems, Project W-211

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VAN BEEK, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Project W-211, Initial Tank Retrieval Systems (ITRS), is a fiscal year 1994 Major Systems Acquisition that will provide systems for retrieval of radioactive wastes from selected double-shell tanks (DST). The contents of these tanks are a combination of supernatant liquids and settled solids. To retrieve waste from the tanks, it is first necessary to mix the liquid and solids prior to transferring the slurry to alternative storage or treatment facilities. The ITRS will provide systems to mobilize the settled solids and transfer the wastes out of the tanks. In so doing, ITRS provides feed for future processing plants, allows for consolidation of tank solids to manage space within existing DST storage capacity, and supports continued safe storage of tank waste. The ITRS scope has been revised to include waste retrieval systems for tanks AP-102, AP-104, AP-108, AN-103, AN-104, AN-105, AY-102, AZ-102, and SY-102. This current tank selection and sequence provides retrieval systems supporting the Privatized waste processing plant and sustains the ability to provide final remediation of several watch list DSTs via treatment. The ITRS is configured to support changing program needs, as constrained by available budget, by maintaining the flexibility for exchanging tanks requiring mixer pump-based retrieval systems and shifting the retrieval sequence. Preliminary design was configured such that an adequate basis exists for initiating Title II design of a mixer pump based retrieval system for any DST. This Project Management Plan (PMP) documents the methodology for managing the ITRS, formalizes organizational responsibilities and interfaces, and identifies project requirements such as change control, design verification, systems engineering, and human factors engineering

  17. Sensemaking in Enterprise Resource Planning Project Deescalation: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battleson, Douglas Aloys

    2013-01-01

    Enterprise resource planning (ERP) projects, a type of complex information technology project, are very challenging and expensive to implement. Past research recognizes that escalation, defined as the commitment to a failing course of action, is common in such projects. While the factors that contribute to escalation (e.g., project conditions,…

  18. Integrated Project Teams - An Essential Element of Project Management during Project Planning and Execution - 12155

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burritt, James G.; Berkey, Edgar [Longenecker and Associates, Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Managing complex projects requires a capable, effective project manager to be in place, who is assisted by a team of competent assistants in various relevant disciplines. This team of assistants is known as the Integrated Project Team (IPT). he IPT is composed of a multidisciplinary group of people who are collectively responsible for delivering a defined project outcome and who plan, execute, and implement over the entire life-cycle of a project, which can be a facility being constructed or a system being acquired. An ideal IPT includes empowered representatives from all functional areas involved with a project-such as engineering design, technology, manufacturing, test and evaluation, contracts, legal, logistics, and especially, the customer. Effective IPTs are an essential element of scope, cost, and schedule control for any complex, large construction project, whether funded by DOE or another organization. By recently assessing a number of major, on-going DOE waste management projects, the characteristics of high performing IPTs have been defined as well as the reasons for potential IPT failure. Project managers should use IPTs to plan and execute projects, but the IPTs must be properly constituted and the members capable and empowered. For them to be effective, the project manager must select the right team, and provide them with the training and guidance for them to be effective. IPT members must treat their IPT assignment as a primary duty, not some ancillary function. All team members must have an understanding of the factors associated with successful IPTs, and the reasons that some IPTs fail. Integrated Project Teams should be used by both government and industry. (authors)

  19. Project Plan For Remove Special Nuclear Material (SNM) from Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BARTLETT, W.D.

    1999-01-01

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Remove SNM Materials. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP), HNF-3617. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for the PFP Remove SNM Materials project. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baseline to manage the execution of the Remove SNM Materials project. Any deviation to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process. The Remove SNM Materials project provides the necessary support and controls required for DOE-HQ, DOE-RL, BWHC, and other DOE Complex Contractors the path forward to negotiate shipped/receiver agreements, schedule shipments, and transfer material out of PFP to enable final deactivation

  20. Proper project planning helps minimize overruns and delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, G.; Cooney, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes planning methods to help minimize cost overruns during the construction of oil and gas pipelines. These steps include background data collection methods, field surveys, determining preliminary pipeline routes, regulatory agency pre-application meetings, and preliminary engineering. Methods for planning also include preliminary aerial mapping, biological assessments, cultural resources investigations, wetlands delineation, geotechnical investigations, and environmental audits. Identification of potential problems can allow for rerouting of the pipeline or remediation processes before they are raised during the permitting process. By coordinating these events from the very beginning, significant cost savings will result that prevent having to rebudget for them after the permitting process starts