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Sample records for project management team

  1. MANAGING MULTICULTURAL PROJECT TEAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezar SCARLAT

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is based on literature review and authors’ own recent experience in managing multicultural project teams, in international environment. This comparative study considers two groups of projects: technical assistance (TA projects versus information technology (IT projects. The aim is to explore the size and structure of the project teams – according to the team formation and its lifecycle, and to identify some distinctive attributes of the project teams – both similarities and differences between the above mentioned types of projects. Distinct focus of the research is on the multiculturalism of the project teams: how the cultural background of the team members influences the team performance and team management. Besides the results of the study are the managerial implications: how the team managers could soften the cultural clash, and avoid inter-cultural misunderstandings and even conflicts – in order to get a better performance. Some practical examples are provided as well.

  2. Managing projects a team-based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Karen A

    2010-01-01

    Students today are likely to be assigned to project teams or to be project managers almost immediately in their first job. Managing Projects: A Team-Based Approach was written for a wide range of stakeholders, including project managers, project team members, support personnel, functional mangers who provide resources for projects, project customers (and customer representatives), project sponsors, project subcontractors, and anyone who plays a role in the project delivery process. The need for project management is on the rise as product life cycles compress, demand for IT systems increases, and business takes on an increasingly global character. This book adds to the project management knowledge base in a way that fills an unmet need—it shows how teams can apply many of the standard project management tools, as well as several tools that are relatively new to the field. Managing Projects: A Team-Based Approach offers the academic rigor found in most textbooks along with the practical attributes often foun...

  3. DIPLOMA PROJECT TEAM WORK MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Kruglyk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available During the work performance students should get the maximal approach to the process of real project execution, so the project should include the need to use the latest technology, integration of data or services with different developments, architecture design, interaction of the team members and others. Implementation of graduation projects is the useful activity for the acquisition and consolidation of key IT competencies. Since the task of educational projects is maximal close to real one, students participate almost in all typical stages of commercial product’s development, and do so successfully. This is also confirmed practically: students, who were actively engaged in some projects at the university, have key positions in IT companies of the city and country after that. The main objective of the paper is to describe the organization of a common group students’ work on a degree project, implementation peculiarity of such projects, recommendations for improving the quality of projects. Thus, the paper is devoted to the peculiarities of the joint students’ work on a project during diploma execution in IT specialties, as the final part of the acquisition and consolidation process of key IT competencies of future programmers. The problem of choosing work topic, project concept, work organization in a group, implementation process organization has been considered. Also the specific stages of software development have been considered: development of interface, choice of technology, product quality, project disposal to the next developers, project completion.

  4. Relationships among Team Trust, Team Cohesion, Team Satisfaction and Project Team Effectiveness as Perceived by Project Managers in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Han-Ping Fung

    2014-01-01

    Today, more and more project teams are formed to achieve organizational objectives as organizations generally recognized the importance and benefits of project teams. There is a compelling reason to study what are the team outcome factors that can predict project team effectiveness as it is unclear whether these team outcome factors can yield the same result in project setting whereby there is resource and time constraint compare to normal work teams which are ongoing and operational in natur...

  5. Managing teams performing complex innovation projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeij, P.R.A.; Vroome, E.M.M. de; Dhondt, S.; Gaspersz, J.B.R.

    2012-01-01

    Complexity of projects is hotly debated and a factor which affects innovativeness of team performance. Much attention in the past is paid to technical complexity and many issues are related to natural and physical sciences. A growing awareness of the importance of socio-organisational issues is

  6. Management Guidelines for Database Developers' Teams in Software Development Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Lazar; Lin, Yifeng; Hodosi, Georg

    Worldwide job market for database developers (DBDs) is continually increasing in last several years. In some companies, DBDs are organized as a special team (DBDs team) to support other projects and roles. As a new role, the DBDs team is facing a major problem that there are not any management guidelines for them. The team manager does not know which kinds of tasks should be assigned to this team and what practices should be used during DBDs work. Therefore in this paper we have developed a set of management guidelines, which includes 8 fundamental tasks and 17 practices from software development process, by using two methodologies Capability Maturity Model (CMM) and agile software development in particular Scrum in order to improve the DBDs team work. Moreover the management guidelines developed here has been complemented with practices from authors' experience in this area and has been evaluated in the case of a software company. The management guidelines for DBD teams presented in this paper could be very usefully for other companies too that are using a DBDs team and could contribute towards an increase of the efficiency of these teams in their work on software development projects.

  7. Adaptation of Agile Project Management Methodology for Project Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasnacis Arturs

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A project management methodology that defines basic processes, tools, techniques, methods, resources and procedures used to manage a project is necessary for effective and successful IT project management. Each company needs to define its own methodology or adapt some of the existing ones. The purpose of the research is to evaluate the possibilities of adapting IT project development methodology according to the company, company employee characteristics and their mutual relations. The adaptation process will be illustrated with a case study at an IT company in Latvia where the developed methodology is based on Agile Scrum, one of the most widespread Agile methods.

  8. Integrated Project Teams - An Essential Element of Project Management during Project Planning and Execution - 12155

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burritt, James G.; Berkey, Edgar [Longenecker and Associates, Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Managing complex projects requires a capable, effective project manager to be in place, who is assisted by a team of competent assistants in various relevant disciplines. This team of assistants is known as the Integrated Project Team (IPT). he IPT is composed of a multidisciplinary group of people who are collectively responsible for delivering a defined project outcome and who plan, execute, and implement over the entire life-cycle of a project, which can be a facility being constructed or a system being acquired. An ideal IPT includes empowered representatives from all functional areas involved with a project-such as engineering design, technology, manufacturing, test and evaluation, contracts, legal, logistics, and especially, the customer. Effective IPTs are an essential element of scope, cost, and schedule control for any complex, large construction project, whether funded by DOE or another organization. By recently assessing a number of major, on-going DOE waste management projects, the characteristics of high performing IPTs have been defined as well as the reasons for potential IPT failure. Project managers should use IPTs to plan and execute projects, but the IPTs must be properly constituted and the members capable and empowered. For them to be effective, the project manager must select the right team, and provide them with the training and guidance for them to be effective. IPT members must treat their IPT assignment as a primary duty, not some ancillary function. All team members must have an understanding of the factors associated with successful IPTs, and the reasons that some IPTs fail. Integrated Project Teams should be used by both government and industry. (authors)

  9. Exploring leadership in self-managed project teams in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaleha Yazid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on a longitudinal approach in exploring leadership in Self-Managed Project Teams (SMPT. SMPT has been known to contribute to organizations by improving productivity and increasing organizational performance. Therefore, understanding the dynamics of leadership in this type of team can be seen as one of the important factors to ensure the success of organizations. Leading a team which manages itself is a challenge as increased autonomy and control is given to the team which eliminates the existence of a leader. It is important to understand the extent of how the external leader is involved within SMPT and whether the external leader approaches highlighted in the literature are applicable in such a situation and how these approaches change during work processes. This study comprises of evidence collected through semi-structured interviews in two small and medium sized organizations in Malaysia. Weekly telephone interviews as well as face-to-face interviews were conducted which provides contextual data for the research. In this research, the evidence suggested that SMPT transform from self-managed toward leader-managed resulting from several factors, such as conflict handling strategies. Specifically, it was found that avoiding conflicts, rather than confronting, transform the team into being leader dependent.

  10. Knowledge management in design teams using a project website

    OpenAIRE

    Otter, den, A.F.H.J.; Lima, C.P

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the sharing of knowledge in architectural design teams using a Project Website is discussed. The results of multiple case studies, being part of a recently finished PhD research project to communication and performance of design teams using a Project Website, show that systems for sharing of knowledge in such teams are hard to change and better systems are difficult to implement for various reasons. Sharing of knowledge in such teams is important for collective understanding of ...

  11. Evaluation on Collaborative Satisfaction for Project Management Team in Integrated Project Delivery Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Li, Y.; Wu, Q.

    2013-05-01

    Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) is a newly-developed project delivery approach for construction projects, and the level of collaboration of project management team is crucial to the success of its implementation. Existing research has shown that collaborative satisfaction is one of the key indicators of team collaboration. By reviewing the literature on team collaborative satisfaction and taking into consideration the characteristics of IPD projects, this paper summarizes the factors that influence collaborative satisfaction of IPD project management team. Based on these factors, this research develops a fuzzy linguistic method to effectively evaluate the level of team collaborative satisfaction, in which the authors adopted the 2-tuple linguistic variables and 2-tuple linguistic hybrid average operators to enhance the objectivity and accuracy of the evaluation. The paper demonstrates the practicality and effectiveness of the method through carrying out a case study with the method.

  12. Knowledge management in design teams using a project website

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otter, den A.F.H.J.; Lima, C.P

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the sharing of knowledge in architectural design teams using a Project Website is discussed. The results of multiple case studies, being part of a recently finished PhD research project to communication and performance of design teams using a Project Website, show that systems for

  13. Teaching supply chain management through global projects with global project teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopczak, L.R.; Fransoo, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    In this article, we describe the Global Project Coordination Course, a course in which project teams composed of three students from each of two overseas universities execute company-sponsored projects dealing with global supply chain management issues. The $75,000 to $100,00 contributed in total by

  14. The Use of Virtual Project Teams for Project Management in Jordanian Corporations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belal Hashem Alnsour

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Jordanian companies need virtual project teams that can use advanced technology to solve problems and make specialist multi perspective decisions when working across different and distance location. The main mission of the team is to make decisions through interdependent specialists and perspectives. In terms of its use and application, the virtual project team is a difficult challenge for Jordan corporations. This study aims to explore such applications and to detect which factors face virtual project teams in the Jordanian situation. The author focused on how to explore and gain a deeper understanding from a virtual team’s perspective, and team members’ opinions of the factors in the organization that support or hinder the mission. More specifically, this research sought to discover precisely which factors in an organization support virtual project teams, and how they can develop a support system which enables their work in an Arab environment. The main objective was to identify the effects of all factors on the efficiency of virtual teams. The research used empirical case studies from three Jordanian corporations in the communication sector which operate in a high-tech environment, and used surveys to collect data. Structured interviews with both management and team members during the study discovered that the use of virtual teams within Jordanian companies is still limited, and detected that the main factors which hinder their development in many corporations is the level of trust in the ability of virtual teams, together with the high level of centralized decision making in Jordanian corporations. Additionally, communication and coordination affect the execution of work processes and methods for virtual teams, together with a general weakness which exists in terms of infrastructure, resources and technology within the corporation, which then impacts on the efficiency of virtual team work.

  15. Management Teams

    CERN Document Server

    Belbin, R Meredith Meredith

    2012-01-01

    Meredith Belbin's work on teams has become part of everyday language in organizations all over the world. All kinds of teams and team behaviours are covered. At the end of the book is a self-perception inventory so that readers can match their own personalities to particular team roles. Management Teams is required reading for managers concerned with achieving results by getting the best from their key personnel.

  16. A multilevel study of the impact of project manager's leadership on extra-role performance of project team members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokory, Suzyanty Mohd; Suradi, Nur Riza Mohd

    2018-04-01

    The current study examines the impact of transformational and transactional leadership of project manager on the extra-role performance of project team members. In addition, this study also identifies factor dominant to extra-role performance of project team members when the transformational and transactional leadership of project managers are analyzed simultaneously. The study involved 175 of project team members from 35 project teams (each project team consists of different contracting companies registered in the Selangor (N = 175 from 35 contractors company). A multilevel analysis with hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) approach was used in this study. The analysis showed that transformational and transactional leadership of the project manager is a positive significant with extra-role performance project team members when analyzed separately. However when the two constructs (transformational leadership and transactional leadership of project manager) were analyzed simultaneously, transformational leadership was found to have more impact on extra-role performance project team members compared to transactional leadership. These findings explained that although transformational and transactional leadership of project managers can improve extra-role performance project team members, but this study has proved that transformational leadership of project managers affect extra-role performance project team members more as compared to transactional leadership.

  17. Defining Projects to Integrate Evolving Team Fundamentals and Project Management Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Harold, III; Smarkusky, Debra; Corrigall, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Industry has indicated the desire for academic programs to produce graduates that are well-versed in collaborative problem solving and general project management concepts in addition to technical skills. The primary focus of a curriculum is typically centered on the technical training with minimal attention given to coalescing team and project…

  18. Managing Project Team in Local Government B.A. Amujiri Abstract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Religion Dept

    government and discovered that managing project team is indispensable in local governments .... subordinate; improve employee motivation; improve communication between .... or events required in completing the project. This will help to.

  19. Cultural Issue and its Influence in the Management of Global Project Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Lima

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between the project manager and team members may be affected by several variables, such as culture, leadership style of the project manager, and the complexity of the developed tasks. Focused in this context, the objective of this paper is to investigate and describe how the culture issue can affect the anagement of global project teams. It is a qualitative, descriptive study conducted in a large multinational company in the automotive sector. The results of this research show that cultural issues can influence both positively and negatively the management of project global teams and the managers of these projects have to deal with several management challenges that require the adoption of certain ways of dealing with culture impacts in managing their teams to minimize potential problems in this context.

  20. Translational Science Project Team Managers: Qualitative Insights and Implications from Current and Previous Postdoctoral Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Kevin C; Dann, Sara M; Finnerty, Celeste C; Kotarba, Joseph A

    2014-07-01

    The development of leadership and project management skills is increasingly important to the evolution of translational science and team-based endeavors. Team science is dependent upon individuals at various stages in their careers, inclusive of postdocs. Data from case histories, as well as from interviews with current and former postdocs, and those supervising postdocs, indicate six essential tasks required of project managers in multidisciplinary translational teams, along with eight skill-related themes critical to their success. To optimize the opportunities available and to ensure sequential development of team project management skills, a life cycle model for the development of translational team skills is proposed, ranging from graduate trainees, postdocs, assistant professors, and finally to mature scientists. Specific goals, challenges and project management roles and tasks are recommended for each stage for the life cycle.

  1. An Empirical Study of Hospitality Management Student Attitudes toward Group Projects: Instructional Factors and Team Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youngsoo; Ro, Heejung

    2012-01-01

    The development of positive attitudes in team-based work is important in management education. This study investigates hospitality students' attitudes toward group projects by examining instructional factors and team problems. Specifically, we examine how the students' perceptions of project appropriateness, instructors' support, and evaluation…

  2. Updates from the AmeriFlux Management Project Tech Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biraud, S.; Chan, S.; Dengel, S.; Polonik, P.; Hanson, C. V.; Billesbach, D. P.; Torn, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    The goal of AmeriFlux is to develop a network of long-term flux sites for quantifying and understanding the role of the terrestrial biosphere in global climate and environmental change. The AmeriFlux Management Program (AMP) Tech Team at LBNL strengthens the AmeriFlux Network by (1) standardizing operational practices, (2) developing calibration and maintenance routines, and (3) setting clear data quality goals. In this poster we will present results and recent progress in three areas: IRGA intercomparison experiment in cooperation with UC Davis, and main manufacturers of sensors used in the AmeriFlux network (LI-COR, Picarro, and Campbell Scientific). Gill sonic anemometers characterization in collaboration with John Frank and Bill Massman (US Forest Service) following the discovery of a significant firmware problem in commonly used Gill Sonic anemometer, Unmanned aerial systems (UAS), and sensors systematically used at AmeriFlux sites to improve site characterization.

  3. Team research at the biology-mathematics interface: project management perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, John G; Radunskaya, Ami E; Lee, Arthur H; de Pillis, Lisette G; Bartlett, Diana F

    2010-01-01

    The success of interdisciplinary research teams depends largely upon skills related to team performance. We evaluated student and team performance for undergraduate biology and mathematics students who participated in summer research projects conducted in off-campus laboratories. The student teams were composed of a student with a mathematics background and an experimentally oriented biology student. The team mentors typically ranked the students' performance very good to excellent over a range of attributes that included creativity and ability to conduct independent research. However, the research teams experienced problems meeting prespecified deadlines due to poor time and project management skills. Because time and project management skills can be readily taught and moreover typically reflect good research practices, simple modifications should be made to undergraduate curricula so that the promise of initiatives, such as MATH-BIO 2010, can be implemented.

  4. The Cultural Challenges of Managing Global Project Teams: A Study of Brazilian Multinationals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivete Rodrigues

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The internationalization of Brazilian companies brings a new reality: the need for implementation of global projects that bring, in turn, the challenge of managing multicultural teams. Since this is a recent phenomenon with little theoretical development, this study sought to understand the relationships between cultural characteristics and management teams of global projects in Brazilian multinationals. To carry this discussion forward, we studied six cases of Brazilian multinational companies, with the aim of deepening the understanding of the management of global teams, involving the planning, deployment, development and management of human resources. Among the projects studied, it was found that there is very little concern with the specific issue of multiculturalism and little inter-cultural incentive to the development of team members, which ends up hindering the construction of a global mindset, important for the Brazilian multinational companies to perform successfully abroad. Faced with this situation, each of the managerial processes mentioned were presented with a number of actions to be undertaken by the project manager in three different dimensions: the project itself, the organization and the global environment. The work contributes, thus, to enable Brazilian multinational companies to manage their global teams in order to maximize the advantages of global teams, such as increased creativity and innovative capacity, but avoid the problems that multiculturalism can bring, ranging from conflicts between people to project failure.

  5. Crew Resource Management (CRM) video storytelling project: a team-based learning activity

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Maggie Jiao; Denando, John

    2011-01-01

    This Crew Resource Management (CRM) video storytelling project asks students to work in a team (4-5 people per team) to create (write and produce) a video story. The story should demonstrate lacking and ill practices of CRM knowledge and skills, or positive skills used to create a successful scenario in aviation (e. g. , flight training, commercial aviation, airport management). The activity is composed of two parts: (1) creating a video story of CRM in aviation, and (2) delivering a group pr...

  6. Using Agile Project Management to Enhance the Performance of Instructional Design Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, David S.; Cifuentes, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    Instructional design models describe in detail methodologies for designing effective instruction. Several widely adopted models include suggestions for managing instructional design projects. However, these suggestions focus on how to manage the instructional design steps rather than the instructional design and development team process. The…

  7. A team leadership approach to managing the transition from construction to operations for an environmental project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.W.

    1994-06-01

    This presentation describes a team approach, at the totalproject level that focused team members with common objectives, for the transition to start-up and operation of the project. The Integrated Management Team (IMT) approach has been successful for this US Department of Energy (DOE) environmental restoration project at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The $53.8-million project will collect, treat, and dispose of low-level mixed waste water discharges from the Hanford Site. Construction is scheduled for completion in September 1994 and facility start-up in June 1995. The project challenge is for leadership that is committed to the transition from construction to operation of the environmental restoration project

  8. Team work on international projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayfield, F.

    1983-01-01

    A successful team will result in Project efficiency and so lead to a better achievement of the Project objectives. Such a team will be self-motivating and have a high level of morale. An effective team will also create a better context for transfer of know-how and so better prepare its members for greater roles on future Project teams. The nature of Project work forces the process of team building to recognize several facts of life. A Project team can have a life as short as one year and as long as ten years. A team usually consists of people on temporary transfer from different departments yet retaining a link of some sort to their departments of origin. It may consist of members of one company only or of several as in a joint-venture and may include Client personnel. On International Projects, the members of a team may have different nationalities and be working in a language foreign to many of them. Many of the Project people may be expatriates to the Project area on a bachelor or on a married status well away from their head or usual office. Team building is a complex organizational and human process, with no mathematical formula for the ideal solution. It starts with the selection of the right Project Manager who should be a leader, a technocrat manager and an integrator all at the same time. The Project Manager must have the authority to create the organizational and human climate that will motivate to a maximum each member of the team. Each member must understand clearly his role and realize that this contribution to the Project will influence his career development. Loyalty to the Project Manager must be possible and the Departmental Manager has to recognize this necessity. This presentation will indicate the basic steps of a team building process on a typical major international Project

  9. Crew Resource Management (CRM video storytelling project: a team-based learning activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma, Maggie Jiao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This Crew Resource Management (CRM video storytelling project asks students to work in a team (4-5 people per team to create (write and produce a video story. The story should demonstrate lacking and ill practices of CRM knowledge and skills, or positive skills used to create a successful scenario in aviation (e. g. , flight training, commercial aviation, airport management. The activity is composed of two parts: (1 creating a video story of CRM in aviation, and (2 delivering a group presentation. Each tem creates a 5-8 minute long video clip of its story. The story must be originally created by the team to educate pilot and/or aviation management students on good practices of CRM in aviation. Accidents and incidents can be used as a reference to inspire ideas. However, this project is not to re-create any previous CRM accidents/incidents. The video story needs to be self-contained and address two or more aspects of CRM specified in the Federal Aviation Administration’s Advisory Circular 120-51. The presentation must include the use of PowerPoint or similar software and additional multimedia visual aids. The presentation itself will last no more than 17 minutes in length; including the actual video story (each group has additional 3 minutes to set up prior to the presentation. During the presentation following the video each team will discuss the CRM problems (or invite audience to identify CRM problems and explain what CRM practices were performed, and should have been performed. This presentation also should describe how each team worked together in order to complete this project (i. e. , good and bad CRM practiced

  10. Total Quality Management: Analysis, Evaluation and Implementation Within ACRV Project Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiman, Laura B.

    1991-01-01

    Total quality management (TQM) is a cooperative form of doing business that relies on the talents of everyone in an organization to continually improve quality and productivity, using teams and an assortment of statistical and measurement tools. The Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) Project Office was identified as an excellent project in which to demonstrate the applications and benefits of TQM processes. As the ACRV Program moves through its various stages of development, it is vital that effectiveness and efficiency be maintained in order to provide the Space Station Freedom (SSF) crew an affordable, on-time assured return to Earth. A critical factor for the success of the ACRV is attaining the maximum benefit from the resources applied to the program. Through a series of four tutorials on various quality improvement techniques, and numerous one-on-one sessions during the SSF's 10-week term in the project office, results were obtained which are aiding the ACRV Office in implementing a disciplined, ongoing process for generating fundamental decisions and actions that shape and guide the organization. Significant advances were made in improving the processes for two particular groups - the correspondence distribution team and the WATER Test team. Numerous people from across JSC were a part of the various team activities including engineering, man systems, and safety. The work also included significant interaction with the support contractor to the ACRV Project. The results of the improvement activities can be used as models for other organizations desiring to operate under a system of continuous improvement. In particular, they have advanced the ACRV Project Teams further down the path of continuous improvement, in support of a working philosophy of TQM.

  11. Team Research at the Biology-Mathematics Interface: Project Management Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, John G.; Radunskaya, Ami E.; Lee, Arthur H.; de Pillis, Lisette G.; Bartlett, Diana F.

    2010-01-01

    The success of interdisciplinary research teams depends largely upon skills related to team performance. We evaluated student and team performance for undergraduate biology and mathematics students who participated in summer research projects conducted in off-campus laboratories. The student teams were composed of a student with a mathematics…

  12. Change Management for using a Project Website in Design Team Communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otter, den A.F.H.J.; Emitt, S.; Prins, M.

    2005-01-01

    A Project Website (PWS) has been advocated as an important tool for design teams of construction projects, because the tool is supposed to greatly enhance team communication. This, finally, should result in improved team performance in terms of increase of efficiency and effectiveness. PWS vendors

  13. Team collaborative innovation management based on primary pipes automatic welding project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jing; Wang Dong; Zhang Ke

    2012-01-01

    The welding quality of primary pipe directly affects the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Primary pipe automatic welding, first of its kind in China, is a complex systematic project involving many facets, such as design, manufacturing, material, and on-site construction. A R and D team was formed by China Guangdong Nuclear Power Engineering Co., Ltd. (CNPEC) together with other domestic nuclear power design institutes, and manufacturing and construction enterprises. According to the characteristics of nuclear power plant construction, and adopting team collaborative innovation management mode, through project co-ordination, resources allocation and building production, education and research collaborative innovation platform, CNPEC successfully developed the primary pipe automatic welding technique which has been widely applied to the construction of nuclear power plant, creating considerable economic benefits. (authors)

  14. Virtual Project Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille

    technology in six real-life virtual teams, two in industry and four in education, applying interpretative research and action research methods. Two main lines of investigation are pursued: the first involves an examination of the organisational issues related to groupware adaptation in virtual project teams......, professional disciplines, time differences and technology. This thesis comprises a general introduction, referred to as the summary report, and seven research papers, which deal in detail with the results and findings of the empirical cases. The summary report provides a general introduction to the research......, while the second looks at the social context and practices of virtual project teams. Two of the key findings are 1) that the process of groupware adaptation by virtual project teams can be viewed as a process of expanding and aligning the technological frames of the participants, which includes mutual...

  15. Volunteer Team Management

    OpenAIRE

    Monych, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This thesis looked into volunteer team management in a project in AIESEC in Finland through the action research method. AIESEC in Finland is a non-profit non-government organization with a purpose of “peace and fulfilment of humankinds potential” through development of the youth’s future leadership. AIESEC was not a commissioning party; the project was the basis for the thesis without the supervision of the company. The thesis is based on a project that the author was in charge of, in ...

  16. First, build the project team

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, J.C. [Duke/Fluor Daniel, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    1997-03-01

    The EPC consortium of American, Japanese and Indonesian companies has been formed to construct the first phase of the coal-fired Paiton Power Project in Indonesia under a lump sum turnkey contract. A Consortium Agreement defines the respective roles, scope and responsibilities, as well as allocation of risks and rewards for each member. The roles of members have been assigned to match their experience and expertise and a Division of Responsibility document has been drawn up for each stage of the project. The management of the project depends on an effective team aligning the consortium members to a common set of project goals and objectives. Communication and understanding are all important. The project team have overcome some of the challenges of differences in culture, language, contractual practice and experience between the members. Some of the systems which are in place to minimise the effect of these differences and to focus on the execution of the project are outlined. (UK)

  17. Planning for high performance project teams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, W.; Keeney, J.; Westney, R.

    1997-01-01

    Both industry-wide research and corporate benchmarking studies confirm the significant savings in cost and time that result from early planning of a project. Amoco's Team Planning Workshop combines long-term strategic project planning and short-term tactical planning with team building to provide the basis for high performing project teams, better project planning, and effective implementation of the Amoco Common Process for managing projects

  18. A Team Formation Framework for Managing Diversity in Multidisciplinary Engineering Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawqi Mohammed Hossain

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Team formation is one of the essential elements in constructing effective teamwork of any team size that requires different skill sets. Diversity in team encourages students to challenge and compete with one another while searching for new ideas, which in turn can lead to a better team performance. In a well-functioning diverse teams, the students who performed poorly may gain benefit by observing how excellent students approach the assignments. They may also benefit by getting advice and assistance from the excellent students. Studies have shown that Malaysian university graduates lack of team skills. The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework for forming a diverse multidisciplinary team among engineering undergraduates based on selected criteria such as individual personality type, gender, and other relevant demographic information. The proposed framework can also be used to design an automated team-formation system based on the identified metrics. The purpose of the framework is to consolidate the existing team formation literature, and to develop and test interventions for maximizing individual member and team performance as a whole that makes an effective team. For this study, a multidisciplinary approach was used where first year engineering students from three different faculties, namely Faculty of Electrical Engineering (FKE, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering (FKM, and Faculty of Biosciences and Medical Engineering (FBME at Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM worked on an innovation project using the Conceive, Design, Implement, and Operate (CDIO framework. Keirsey Temperament Sorter was used as an instrument to identify an individual's personality type.

  19. READINGS FROM THE FORMAL DISCOURSE OF PROJECT MANAGERS REGARDING DIVERSITY IN TEAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Regina da Rocha-Pinto

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on the viewpoint of project managers with regards to diversity, this paper used a phenomenographic method. Fifteen project managers were interviewed. The latter focused primarily on the variety of techniques, rather than on varieties of any other kind. This view of diversity extends beyond those angles generally taken in the literature on the theme which in most instances refer to diversity as based on gender, race and disadvantaged ethnic and minority groups. Additionally, the study brings to light the fact that diversities of knowledge and behavior are as beneficial for the development of projects. Furthermore, communication and the role of the project manager were raised as mitigating factors when it came to diversity. And, lastly, the conclusion arrived at was that project managers have similar discourses which correspond to the recommendation of the main project management manuals. These discourses and forms of expression are in most cases ready-made.

  20. Managing multicultural teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Jeanne; Behfar, Kristin; Kern, Mary C

    2006-11-01

    Multicultural teams offer a number of advantages to international firms, including deep knowledge of different product markets, culturally sensitive customer service, and 24-hour work rotations. But those advantages may be outweighed by problems stemming from cultural differences, which can seriously impair the effectiveness of a team or even bring itto a stalemate. How can managers best cope with culture-based challenges? The authors conducted in-depth interviews with managers and members of multicultural teams from all over the world. Drawing on their extensive research on dispute resolution and teamwork and those interviews, they identify four problem categories that can create barriers to a team's success: direct versus indirect communication, trouble with accents and fluency, differing attitudes toward hierarchy and authority, and conflicting norms for decision making. If a manager--or a team member--can pinpoint the root cause of the problem, he or she is likelier to select an appropriate strategy for solving it. The most successful teams and managers, the authors found, dealt with multicultural challenges in one of four ways: adaptation (acknowledging cultural gaps openly and working around them), structural intervention (changing the shape or makeup of the team), managerial intervention (setting norms early or bringing in a higher-level manager), and exit (removing a team member when other options have failed). Which strategy is best depends on the particular circumstances--and each has potential complications. In general, though, managers who intervene early and set norms; teams and managers who try to engage everyone on the team; and teams that can see challenges as stemming from culture, not personality, succeed in solving culture-based problems with good humor and creativity. They are the likeliest to harvest the benefits inherent in multicultural teams.

  1. Better team management--better team care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, P; Powney, B

    1994-01-01

    Team building should not be a 'bolt-on' extra, it should be a well planned, integrated part of developing teams and assisting their leaders. When asked to facilitate team building by a group of NHS managers we developed a framework which enabled individual members of staff to become more effective in the way they communicated with each other, their teams and in turn within the organization. Facing the challenge posed by complex organizational changes, staff were able to use 3 training days to increase and develop their awareness of the principles of teamwork, better team management, and how a process of leadership and team building could help yield better patient care.

  2. Understanding and managing three-dimensional/four-dimensional model implementations at the project team level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann, Timo; Levitt, R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces an extant, theoretical, social-psychological model that explains the sense-making processes of project managers confronted with a new technology to improve our understanding of project-based innovation processes. The model represents the interlinked processes through which

  3. Project team motyvation

    OpenAIRE

    Jasionis, Dominykas

    2016-01-01

    The term paper is to analyze the formation of the team and its - motyvation, and interviews from four different companies and find out the leaders in terms of your team, and what principle he tries to motivate her. The Tasks of this paper is to review the organization formed by a team; investigate the promotion of employees in enterprises; The four firms interviewed; Assess how you can work in different organizations. Methods used To analyze the topic, I decided to interview four different co...

  4. How Configuration Management (CM) Can Help Project Teams To Innovate and Communicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioletti, Louis

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, CM is relegated to a support role in project management activities. CM s traditional functions of identification, change control, status accounting, and audits/verification are still necessary and play a vital role. However, this presentation proposes CM s role in a new and innovative manner that will significantly improve communication throughout the organization and, in turn, augment the project s success. CM s new role is elevated to the project management level, above the engineering or sub-project level in the Work Breakdown Structure (WBS), where it can more effectively accommodate changes, reduce corrective actions, and ensure that requirements are clear, concise, and valid, and that results conform to the requirements. By elevating CM s role in project management and orchestrating new measures, a new communication will emerge that will improve information integrity, structured baselines, interchangeability/traceability, metrics, conformance to standards, and standardize the best practices in the organization. Overall project performance (schedule, quality, and cost) can be no better than the ability to communicate requirements which, in turn, is no better than the CM process to communicate project decisions and the correct requirements.

  5. The rational project manager: a thinking team's guide to getting work done

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mullins, James; Longman, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    ... into a rational methodology. This process approach continues to be a distinction and strength today, as Jim Schlick still consults for Kepner-Tregoe as a partner and project management expert. He has served as a mentor to the authors in their professional endeavors, and his ideas form the core of the book. The book also relied on sound editing, proofing, formatt...

  6. Managing Large Scale Project Analysis Teams through a Web Accessible Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Daniel A.

    2008-01-01

    Large scale space programs analyze thousands of requirements while mitigating safety, performance, schedule, and cost risks. These efforts involve a variety of roles with interdependent use cases and goals. For example, study managers and facilitators identify ground-rules and assumptions for a collection of studies required for a program or project milestone. Task leaders derive product requirements from the ground rules and assumptions and describe activities to produce needed analytical products. Disciplined specialists produce the specified products and load results into a file management system. Organizational and project managers provide the personnel and funds to conduct the tasks. Each role has responsibilities to establish information linkages and provide status reports to management. Projects conduct design and analysis cycles to refine designs to meet the requirements and implement risk mitigation plans. At the program level, integrated design and analysis cycles studies are conducted to eliminate every 'to-be-determined' and develop plans to mitigate every risk. At the agency level, strategic studies analyze different approaches to exploration architectures and campaigns. This paper describes a web-accessible database developed by NASA to coordinate and manage tasks at three organizational levels. Other topics in this paper cover integration technologies and techniques for process modeling and enterprise architectures.

  7. Building Productivity in Virtual Project Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Hamersly

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The steady increase in project failure rates is leaving businesses searching for better integration techniques to virtualize their project environments. Through virtualization, organizations may have positive impacts on communities across geographical boundaries and resource constraints. The focus of this phenomenological study was to explore, via the experiences of successful project management practitioners, best practice strategies for integrating virtual project teams through data analysis. The conceptual framework included von Bertalanffy’s general systems theory, decomposition model of business process and project management frameworks, and the recomposition approach. Twenty-two senior project managers with more than 5 years of experience managing virtual project environments participated in semistructured telephone interviews. The van Kaam process employing normalization and bracketing approaches in data analysis resulted in the emergence of 34 thematic categories. The 10 most common themes culminated in the identification of strategies relevant for virtual project teams. The major themes pertained to 3 broad areas: (a structure that accommodates skills and technology for virtual team success, (b governance leading to efficient virtual project team management, and (c collaboration practices across diverse environments. This study involved the exploration of the experiences of the participants. Using the van Kaam method for normalization of the data and clustering like experiences into thematic statements, the study provided a plethora of new information concentrated on 10 themes that emerged.

  8. The Motivated Project Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Financial incentives that match level of achievement • Regular, constructive feedback. Hierarchy of Needs ( Abraham H. Maslow ) Team members can be...Much has been written regarding motivational Defense AT&L: November-December 2009 58 theory . To further complicate mat- ters, some motivational... theories clearly contradict others, and a manager’s ability to motivate is, to no small degree, related to his or her leadership approach and inter

  9. Aircrew team management program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margerison, Charles; Mccann, Dick; Davies, Rod

    1987-01-01

    The key features of the Aircrew Team Management Workshop which was designed for and in consultation with Trans Australia Airlines are outlined. Five major sections are presented dealing with: (1) A profile of the airline and the designers; (2) Aircrew consultation and involvement; (3) Educational design and development; (4) Implementation and instruction; and (5) Evaluation and assessment. These areas are detailed.

  10. Project management process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    This course provides INDOT staff with foundational knowledge and skills in project management principles and methodologies. INDOTs project management processes provide the tools for interdisciplinary teams to efficiently and effectively deliver pr...

  11. Team dynamics in complex projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeij, P.; Vroome, E.E.M. de; Dhondt, S.; Gaspersz, J.B.R.

    2012-01-01

    Complexity of projects is hotly debated and a factor which affects innovativeness of team performance. Much attention in the past is paid to technical complexity and many issues are related to natural and physical sciences. A growing awareness of the importance of socioorganisational issues is

  12. Strategic momentum in virtual R&D project teams : a complement to management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdenakker, R.J.G.

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades there is a growing interest in working in multidisciplinary teams. A main reason for this is that often solving problems in organisations needs the use of various different expertises. As these expertises often are not to be found concentrated in one place, this interest is

  13. Managing International Consulting Projects and International Business Courses Using Virtual Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prachyl, Cheryl; Quintanilla, Hector; Gutiérrez, Luis Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey and Texas Wesleyan University used technology based courses to enhance internationalization of their curricula. These courses required students to use computer technology as the distance communication medium and to complete an applied international consulting project as part of each…

  14. The Origins of Team Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, James S.

    1971-01-01

    An analysis of the factors that have led to team management, including classical principles of management, the human relations or behavioral school of management, and the systems theory both closed and open. (JF)

  15. Perspectives on projects, project success and team work

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This paper brings together perspectives on projects, project success and team work as a background to two graphical tools for considering project success and individual capabilities for working in a project team.

  16. Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Project Management Theory Meets Practice contains the proceedings from the 1st Danish Project Management Research Conference (DAPMARC 2015), held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on May 21st, 2015.......Project Management Theory Meets Practice contains the proceedings from the 1st Danish Project Management Research Conference (DAPMARC 2015), held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on May 21st, 2015....

  17. Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilkington, Alan; Chai, Kah-Hin; Le, Yang

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies the true coverage of PM theory through a bibliometric analysis of the International Journal of Project Management from 1996-2012. We identify six persistent research themes: project time management, project risk management, programme management, large-scale project management......, project success/failure and practitioner development. These differ from those presented in review and editorial articles in the literature. In addition, topics missing from the PM BOK: knowledge management project-based organization and project portfolio management have become more popular topics...

  18. A Project Team: a Team or Just a Group?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with issues related to work in either teams or groups. The theoretical part discusses a team and a group with regards to its definition, classification and basic distinction, brings in more on the typology of team roles, personality assessment and sociometric methods. The analytical part tests the project (work team of a medical center represented in terms of personality and motivational types, team roles and interpersonal team relations concerning the willingness of cooperation and communication. The main objective of this work is to verify the validity of the assumptions that the analyzed team represents a very disparate group as for its composition from the perspective of personality types, types of motivation, team roles and interpersonal relations in terms of the willingness of cooperation and communication. A separate output shall focus on sociometric investigation of those team members where willingness to work together and communicate is based on the authors’ assumption of tight interdependence.

  19. SAT project introduction: management issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazennov, A.Yu.

    1998-01-01

    Management issues of introducing SAT Project include main objectives and expectations; SAT goal and management; major phases of SAT implementation; project quality assurance; SAT based training system and procedures; role of the project team qualifications

  20. Sourcing Team Behavior in Project-Based MNE's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Peder Lysholm

    2014-01-01

    across the three cases was characterized by conflict between departments represented in the category teams. This resulted in unfortunate sourcing team behaviour and unaligned performance management, which in turn had a number of adverse effects. Further research on how to create a holistic and balanced......This paper presents and discusses a multiple case study of three cross-functional category teams responsible for sourcing critical components within multi-national, project-based enterprises. The study focused on behaviour and management of the sourcing teams and found that the sourcing process...... team perspective in the sourcing teams is suggested....

  1. The Project Team: Features, Effectiveness and Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona-Elena GABREA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The project team that is responsible for providing flexibility and innovation to this structure in order to enable organizations to remain successful (1. The very nature of the project team's work underpins a collective task much more complex than that assumed by other types of work teams. The aim of this paper is to explore the main factors that determine the project team effectiveness. The research methodology was the literature review. The main finding reveals that the organizational structure of projects and the project team should not be considered as a panacea for all problems of organizational effectiveness.

  2. Team and Project Work in Engineering Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Buch

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we investigate teamwork amongst professionals in engineering consultancy companies in order to discern how teamwork affects the collaboration and work practices of the professionals. The article investigates how professional engineering practices are enacted in two engineering consultancy companies in Denmark where teamwork has been or is an ideal for organizing work. Through a practice-based lens, the article sets out to investigate, firstly, how discourses about team and project work affect engineering work practices; secondly, how technologymediated management is reconciled in teamwork practices; and thirdly, how team and project work affect engineering professionalism and collaborative work practices. A practice theoretical framework informs the analysis. Teamwork is investigated as a phenomenon enacted through the sayings, doings and relatings of practitioners in landscapes of practices and the interconnectedness of the practices is traced through the setup of specific ecologies in the sites.

  3. A Project Team: A Team or Just a Group?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Hrazdilova Bockova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with issues related to work in either teams or groups. The theoretical part which discusses a team and a group with regards to its definition, classification and basic distinction brings in more on the typology of team roles, personality assessment and sociometric methods. The analytical part tests the project (work team of a medical center represented in terms of personality and motivational types, team roles and interpersonal team relations concerning the willingness of cooperation and communication. The main objective of this work was to determine whether the existing team is not by its nature rather a working group that contributes to the generally perceived stagnation of that field.

  4. Managing a Product Development Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, Kenneth E.; Barrett, Larry

    2003-01-01

    Orbiting 380 miles above the earth, NASA s Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has returned a wealth of scientific data about our universe and galaxies beyond highlighted by spectacular images of the birth and death of stars, colliding galaxies, and other extra-worldly events. Despite its tremendous success for almost two decades, the HST ground support system experienced down-to-earth problems prior to the turn of the century, namely budgetary ones. To keep HST operating efficiently to 201 2 and beyond, the Vision 2000 project was conceived with the primary goal of substantially reducing the costs of operating and maintaining the spacecraft ground systems. Taking advantage of this atypical management opportunity, a set of Product Development Teams (PDTs) were established, whose charter was to re-engineer the ground system, and in doing so, reduce the remaining life-of-mission operating and maintenance costs, while providing improved reliability and increased capabilities.

  5. Students’ Team Project Experiences and Their Attitudes Towards Teamwork

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandra Rudawska

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to evaluate the influence of team project experiences of students (presence and role of a leader; fairness in team projects; conditions supporting teamwork created by a university) on their attitudes towards teamwork, especially the perception of teamwork effectiveness and the preference of working in teams. Methodology: In the study the quantitative research was done among master degree Polish students of Management (105 questionnaires). The measures used f...

  6. Fundamentals of Project Management

    CERN Document Server

    Heagney, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    With sales of more than 160,000 copies, Fundamentals of Project Management has helped generations of project managers navigate the ins and outs of every aspect of this complex discipline. Using a simple step-by-step approach, the book is the perfect introduction to project management tools, techniques, and concepts. Readers will learn how to: ò Develop a mission statement, vision, goals, and objectives ò Plan the project ò Create the work breakdown structure ò Produce a workable schedule ò Understand earned value analysis ò Manage a project team ò Control and evaluate progress at every stage.

  7. Managing projects using a project management approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko D. Andrejić

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Modern management theory treats all complex tasks and duties like projects and make these projects possible to be managed by a particular organizational-management concept in order to achieve a goal effectively. A large number of jobs and tasks performed in the system of defense or for defense purposes have the characteristics of projects. Project management is both a skill and a science of monitoring human, material, financial, energy and other resources to achieve required objectives within the given limits: deadlines, time, budget, possibility of realization and the satisfaction of the interests of all project participants. Project management is a traditional area of applied (or functional management focused on managing complex and uncertain situations with defined goals. Introduction In conditions of rapid change and high uncertainty, only adaptive organizations survive, i. e. those that are able not only to react quickly to changes but also to proactively take advantage of changes. Development of project management The biggest influence on the development of the area had complex jobs within the engineering profession. In parallel with the traditional approach new approaches began to develop, while the traditional one still remained in use. Contrary to the traditional engineering approach, a dynamic model first developed in order to respond to demands for greater control of costs. Project management Project management is a skill and knowledge of human and material resources to achieve set objectives within prescribed limits: deadlines, time, budget, possibility of realization, and the satisfaction of all participants in the project. In order to realize a project effectively, it is necessary to manage it rationally. Planning and project management A project plan is a document that allows all team members insight on where to go, when to start and when to arrive, what is necessary to be done in order to achieve the project objectives and what

  8. Student-Led Project Teams: Significance of Regulation Strategies in High- and Low-Performing Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Judith

    2016-01-01

    We studied group and individual co-regulatory and self-regulatory strategies of self-managed student project teams using data from intragroup peer evaluations and a postproject survey. We found that high team performers shared their research and knowledge with others, collaborated to advise and give constructive criticism, and demonstrated moral…

  9. ORGANIZATIONAL PROJECT MANAGEMENT MATURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana Derenskaya

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present article is aimed at developing a set of recommendations for achieving a higher level of organizational project maturity at a given enterprise. Methodology. For the purposes of the current research, the available information sources on the components of project management system are analysed; the essence of “organizational maturity” and the existing models of organizational maturity are studied. The method of systemic and structural analysis, as well as the method of logical generalization, are employed in order to study the existing models of organizational maturity, to describe levels of organizational maturity, and finally to develop a set of methodological recommendations for achieving a higher level of organizational project maturity at a given enterprise. The results of the research showed that the core elements of project management system are methodological, organizational, programtechnical, and motivational components. Project management encompasses a wide range of issues connected with organizational structure, project team, communication management, project participants, etc. However, the fundamental basis for developing project management concept within a given enterprise starts with defining its level of organizational maturity. The present paper describes various models of organizational maturity (staged, continuous, petal-shaped and their common types (H. Кеrzner Organizational Maturity Model, Berkeley PM Maturity Model, Organizational Project Management Maturity Model, Portfolio, Program & Project Management Maturity Model. The analysis of available theoretic works showed that the notion “organizational project maturity” refers to the capability of an enterprise to select projects and manage them with the intention of achieving its strategic goals in the most effective way. Importantly, the level of maturity can be improved by means of formalizing the acquired knowledge, regulating project-related activities

  10. Successful project management

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Trevor L

    2016-01-01

    Successful Project Management, 5th edition, is an essential guide for anyone who wants to improve the success rate of their projects. It will help managers to maintain a balance between the demands of the customer, the project, the team and the organization. Covering the more technical aspects of a project from start to completion it contains practised and tested techniques, covering project conception and start-up, how to manage stake holders, effective risk management, project planning and launch and execution. Also including a brand new glossary of key terms, it provides help with evaluating your project as well as practical checklists and templates to ensure success for any ambitious project manager. With over one million copies sold, the hugely popular Creating Success series covers a wide variety of topic, with the latest editions including new chapters such as Tough Conversations and Treating People Right. This indispensable business skills collection is suited to a variety of roles, from someone look...

  11. Earned value project management

    CERN Document Server

    Fleming, Quentin W

    2010-01-01

    Organizations that follow the principles of good Earned Value Management (EVM) create an environment that allows teams to successfully operate and thrive ? even in the face of challenges that could negatively impact their projects. Earned Value Project Management (EVPM) is a methodology used to measure and communicate the real physical progress of a project taking into account the work completed, the time taken and the costs incurred to complete that work. As a result, EVPM allows more educated and effective management decision-making, which helps evaluate and control project risk by measuring project progress in monetary terms. In the first two editions of Earned Value Project Management, Quentin W. Fleming and Joel M. Koppelman provided guidance for project management practitioners already familiar with EVPM, was well as those who were new to the use of this technique. The third edition expanded the information available on of EVPM for medium and smaller projects while still being relevant for larger projec...

  12. [The mobile geriatrics team, global patient management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Fréderiue; Bloch, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    The mobile geriatric team of Cochin hospital in Paris is responsible for the management and orientation of fragile elderly patients over the age of 75 admitted to emergency departments. It carries out a multi-disciplinary assessment, contributes to the creation of the care project and life project of geriatric patients and is involved in organising the patient's return home. This article focuses on the role of the social assistant through two clinical cases.

  13. Team- and project work in engineering practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Anders; Andersen, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    in teamwork practices, and, thirdly, how team- and project work affect engineering professionalism and collaborative work practices. A practice theoretical framework informs the analysis. Teamwork is investigated as a phenomenon enacted through the sayings, doings and relatings of practitioners in landscapes......In this paper we investigate teamwork amongst professionals in engineering consultancy companies in order to discern how teamwork affects the collaboration and work practices of the professionals. The paper investigates how professional engineering practices are enacted in two engineering...... consultancy companies in Denmark where teamwork has been or is an ideal for organizing work. Through a practice-based lens the article sets out to investigate, firstly, how discourses about teamand project work affect engineering work practices, secondly, how technology-mediated management is reconciled...

  14. Managing Projects with KPRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braden, Barry M.

    2004-01-01

    How does a Project Management Office provide: Consistent, familiar, easily used scheduling tools to Project Managers and project team members? Provide a complete list of organization resources available for use on the project? Facilitate resource tracking and visibility? Provide the myriad reports that the organization requires? Facilitate consistent budget planning and cost performance information? Provide all of this to the entire organization? Provide for the unique requirement of the organization? and get people to use it? Answer: Implementation of the Kennedy space Center Projects and Resources Online (KPRO), a modified COTS solution.

  15. Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance

    2009-01-01

    In this video Associate Professor Constance Kampf talks about the importance project management. Not only as a tool in implementation, but also as a way of thinking, and as something that needs to be considered from idea conception......In this video Associate Professor Constance Kampf talks about the importance project management. Not only as a tool in implementation, but also as a way of thinking, and as something that needs to be considered from idea conception...

  16. Improving collaborative work and project management in a nuclear power plant design team: A human-centered design approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boy, Guy André; Jani, Gopal; Manera, Annalisa; Memmott, Matthew; Petrovic, Bojan; Rayad, Yassine; Stephane, Lucas; Suri, Neha

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a collaborative system, called SCORE, useful for a multi-disciplinary team designing a new nuclear power plant (NPP). It was developed during the first phase of the I 2 S-LWR project (Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor). SCORE enables the generation of design cards (DCs). A DC includes four main spaces (Boy, 2005): (1) a rationalization space where the various components of the system being designed (SBD) are described in terms of design rationale, integration and requirements; this space includes declarative and procedural descriptions and statements; (2) an activity space where the current version of the SBD is displayed; it includes static and dynamic features; this space enables SBD manipulation; (3) a structure space where the various components and their inter-relations are formally and declaratively described as systems of systems; (4) a function space where the various functions of the SBD are described in terms of procedural knowledge and dynamic processes involved; this space includes qualitative and quantitative physical and cognitive models. The rationalization space is informed using an adapted version of the QOC method (Questions, Options, Criteria), which was tested within the I 2 S-LWR design team. The activity space contains 3D models developed using AutoDesk Inventor, and transferred into the Unity game engine web player in order to facilitate integration within the DC spaces and enable intuitive manipulation of objects in the activity space. Two additional spaces were added: an instant messaging capability that allows design team members (DTMs) to exchange with one another on a DC; and a structured evaluation space. DCs are cooperatively created and refined by DTMs, and synthesized during periodic design meetings, the frequency of which may vary. Incrementally combining abstract explanations of designed elements and integration with their explicit visual representation improves mutual understanding among DTMs, and

  17. The Relationship between Management Team Size and Team Performance: The Mediating Effect of Team Psychological Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Midthaug, Mari Bratterud

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to explore the relationship between team size (number of team members) and team performance in management teams. There is a lack of empirical research exploring the potential links between these two elements within management teams. Further, little attention has been paid to potential mechanisms affecting this relationship. In this study, team psychological safety has been examined as a potential mediator in the size-performance relationship, hypothesizing that t...

  18. Web Based Project Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Aadamsoo, Anne-Mai

    2010-01-01

    To increase an efficiency of a product, nowadays many web development companies are using different project management systems. A company may run a number of projects at a time, and requires input from a number of individuals, or teams for a multi level development plan, whereby a good project management system is needed. Project management systems represent a rapidly growing technology in IT industry. As the number of users, who utilize project management applications continues to grow, w...

  19. Software Engineering Team Project - lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogumiła Hnatkowska

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the 2010/11 academic year the Institute of Informatics at Wroclaw University of Technology issued ’Software Engineering Team Project’ as a course being a part of the final exam to earn bachelor’s degree. The main assumption about the course was that it should simulate the real environment (a virtual IT company for its participants. The course was aimed to introduce issues regarding programming in the medium scale, project planning and management. It was a real challenge as the course was offered for more than 140 students. The number of staff members involved in its preparation and performance was more than 15. The paper presents the lessons learned from the first course edition as well as more detailed qualitative and quantitative course assessment.

  20. PROJECT SCOPE MANAGEMENT PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana Derenskaya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to define the essence of project scope management process, its components, as well as to develop an algorithm of project scope management in terms of pharmaceutical production. Methodology. To carry out the study, available information sources on standards of project management in whole and elements of project scope management in particular are analysed. Methods of system and structural analysis, logical generalization are used to study the totality of subprocesses of project scope management, input and output documents, and to provide each of them. Methods of network planning are used to construct a precedence diagram of project scope management process. Results of the research showed that components of the project scope management are managing the scope of the project product and managing the content of project work. It is the second component is investigated in the presented work as a subject of research. Accordingly, it is defined that project scope management process is to substantiate and bring to the realization the necessary amount of work that ensures the successful implementation of the project (achievement of its goal and objectives of individual project participants. It is also determined that the process of managing the project scope takes into account the planning, definition of the project scope, creation of the structure of project work, confirmation of the scope and management of the project scope. Participants of these subprocesses are: customer, investor, and other project participants – external organizations (contractors of the project; project review committee; project manager and project team. It is revealed that the key element of planning the project scope is the formation of the structure of design work, the justification of the number of works, and the sequence of their implementation. It is recommended to use the following sequence of stages for creating the structure of project work

  1. Ensuring effective project management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.N.

    1980-01-01

    A brief description is given of the organisation methods employed by the Bechtel Power Corporation, in their contract with Mississippi Power and Light Company for the design, construction and procurement activities for the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station. The aim is to ensure effective management, and good communications at all stages of construction, between the project team and the client. (U.K.)

  2. Managing Your Team's Weakest Link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Do you have a poor-performing employee on your medical practice team? If so, you're not alone. Unfortunately, this is a problem that many medical practice managers face. This article describes the best strategies for managing your team's weakest link. It explores common yet very difficult circumstances that cause low employee performance and that test the patience, heart, and skills of a practice manager. It guides readers through a process of self-discovery to determine whether their negative biases or grudges may be causing employees to perform poorly. It suggests several possible other reasons for weak employee performance, including problems with the job, practice, leadership, communication, and fit between the employee and the job. This article also suggests the best strategy for communicating concerns about performance to the weakest-link employee. It offers guidance to practice managers about protecting their time and energy when handling a poor performer. It provides a simple formula for calculating the cost of a low-performing employee, 10 possible personal reasons for the employee's poor work performance, specific questions to ask to uncover the reasons for poor performance, and an eight-rule strategy for confronting poor performance effectively. Finally, this article offers practice managers a practical strategy for handling resistance from their weakest link, illustrated with a sample dialogue.

  3. Adapting Configuration Management for Agile Teams Balancing Sustainability and Speed

    CERN Document Server

    Moreira, Mario E

    2009-01-01

    Adapting Configuration Management for Agile Teams provides very tangible approaches on how Configuration Management with its practices and infrastructure can be adapted and managed in order to directly benefit agile teams. Written by Mario E. Moreira, author of Software Configuration Management Implementation Roadmap , columnist for CM Crossroads online community and writer for the Agile Journal, this unique book provides concrete guidance on tailoring CM for Agile projects without sacrificing the principles of Configuration Management.

  4. Cheap Talk: “Team Factors and Management Practices Influence on Team Trust”

    OpenAIRE

    Doris Padmini Selvaratnam; Aini Aman; Muhamad Maziz Mahyuddin Bin Kamaludin; Gary Lynn; Richard Reilly

    2016-01-01

    Team trust has been cited as a contributing factor towards team performance. This paper looks at the antecedents of team trust and to what extent they influence team trust. The antecedents of team trust are team factors like team autonomy, team stability and team member experience; and the management practices are top management involvement and management support. The results demonstrated that team factors and management practices influence team trust individually. The key find...

  5. Methodologies used in Project Management

    OpenAIRE

    UNGUREANU, Adrian; UNGUREANU, Anca

    2014-01-01

    Undoubtedly, a methodology properly defined and strictly followed for project management provides a firm guarantee that the work will be done on time, in budget and according to specifications. A project management methodology in simple terms is a “must-have” to avoid failure and reduce risks, because is one of the critical success factors, such basic skills of the management team. This is the simple way to guide the team through the design and execution phases, processes and tasks throughout...

  6. Students’ Team Project Experiences and Their Attitudes Towards Teamwork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Rudawska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the study is to evaluate the influence of team project experiences of students (presence and role of a leader; fairness in team projects; conditions supporting teamwork created by a university on their attitudes towards teamwork, especially the perception of teamwork effectiveness and the preference of working in teams. Methodology: In the study the quantitative research was done among master degree Polish students of Management (105 questionnaires. The measures used for the study were developed specifcally for the study referring to the previous research in the feld. Findings: Results indicate that leaders in team projects and conditions supporting teamwork are connected with the students’ perception of teamwork effectiveness, while the fairness in team projects is connected with students’ preference of working collectively. Research implications: We conclude that in order to develop a positive attitude towards teamwork, the teamwork projects should be better supported by the instructors (especially supporting the emergence of leader(s and minimising the problem of free riders and the university should create a climate that facilitates teamworking, otherwise team projects might negatively influence students’ attitude towards collective work. Value: On the labour market the teamwork skills are one of the most important skills of employees, as the team-based organizational designs are becoming the norm in work organization. The study is contributing to the understanding of the relations between student experiences and their attitudes as well as the role played by high education in the development of these attitudes. Some previous research in Anglo-Saxon culture countries indicate that team project assignments realised by students during studies might even hinder their attitudes to teamwork and their willingness to work in teams in the future.

  7. COMMUNICATING SUCCESSFULLY WHEN MANAGING MULTICULTURAL TEAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra IOANID

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Day by day globalization covers new areas of life and calls for continuous learning and adjusting to new cultural dimensions. Managers are expected to display adaptation to new ways of working, cultural sensitivity, cultural intelligence and to posses multicultural competencies communication skills. Understanding the impact of cultural diversity on the communication within the organization is essential for the success of a company. Especially in multinational companies, when departments working on the same projects are located in different countries, the managers rely more and more on cultural- specific country characteristics in order to chose the best negotiation and communication techniques. The aim of this paper is to show how the country specific cultural characteristics impact on the success or failure of a business and the organizations’ challenge with preparing managers for success in international business environment. The paper is based on literature review and on authors’ experience in managing multicultural project teams, in international environment.

  8. Putting the "Team" in the Fine Arts Team: An Application of Business Management Team Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses current challenges to the idea of teamwork in fine arts teams, redefines the terms team and collaboration using a business management perspective, discusses the success of effective teams in the business world and the characteristics of those teams, and proposes the implementation of the business model of…

  9. Project management tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluf, David A. (Inventor); Bell, David G. (Inventor); Gurram, Mohana M. (Inventor); Gawdiak, Yuri O. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A system for managing a project that includes multiple tasks and a plurality of workers. Input information includes characterizations based upon a human model, a team model and a product model. Periodic reports, such as a monthly report, a task plan report, a budget report and a risk management report, are generated and made available for display or further analysis. An extensible database allows searching for information based upon context and upon content.

  10. MANAGING LARGE INVESTMENT PROJECTS IN GORJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CÎRNU DORU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the concept of project management is considered to be the best concept for efficient management of a project, so it is used all over the world, and most recently in our country. This concept is designed with all the general characteristics of project management, but adapted to the large investment projects. This paper presents the project management concept and project management organization for capital projects. This concept is conceived with all general characteristics of project management, but adopted to the condition of large investment projects. The concept also includes the project team and the project manager, the person authorized and responsible for achieving the objectives planned in the project. For efficient managing by project, it is necessary to insure a good compozition of project team, as a team of people who, in collaboration with project manager, work directly on managing the project. To effectively manage the project, it is necessary to ensure a proper composition of the project team, a team of people who, in collaboration with the project manager to work directly for project management. It is a particularly good method of achieving the objectives planned projects, which means a project with a certain level of performance required in a planned time, with planned costs.

  11. Scrum Project Management

    CERN Document Server

    Pries, Kim H

    2010-01-01

    Scrum, which was originally invented solely for software development, can now be applied to all types of projects. This book shows project managers how to implement Scrum by explaining the artifacts, rituals, and roles used. The text provides Scrum planning methods to control project scope and schedule as well as Scrum tracking methods to focus teams on improving throughput and streamlining communications. The authors show how to combine traditional project methods with Scrum and how to adapt the familiar work breakdown structure to create Scrum backlogs and sprints. They also demonstrate how

  12. The Research of Self-Management Team and Superior-Direction Team in Team Learning Influential Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Wei

    2013-01-01

    Team learning is a cure for bureaucracy; it facilitates team innovation and team performance. But team learning occurs only when necessary conditions were met. This research focused on differences of team learning influential factors between self-management team and superior-direction team. Four variables were chosen as predictors of team learning though literature review and pilot interview. The 4 variables are team motivation, team trust, team conflict and team leadership. Selected 54 self ...

  13. LEADERSHIP AS A FACTOR FOR BUILDING A PROJECT TEAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Grynchenko

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The subject matter of the article is to determine the role of leadership for building a project team as the team quality and the professionalism of the team participants play a key role in ensuring the proper work performance that is specified by the tasks of the project. The goal of the article is to reveal the significance of the capability of a leader to build a project team and to develop in it a favorable psychological climate, common values and ideals and show the place of this capability in the general system of the leader’s behavioural competences, that is to justify the importance of this skill and its application to increase the effectiveness of the impact of leadership on the project team. The objectives of the study involve  - identifying a project team as a complex social organism where highly qualified people perform a specific set of functions; - emphasizing the fact that different individual features and qualities of participants greatly complicate the process of building a project team as well as  coordinating the goals, aspirations and interests of team participants. Besides, the students who study Project Management should be familiarized with the methods of acquiring the knowledge and developing skills necessary for building a team. The methods of the study involve the analysis of the role of motivation in the process of team building since while building a team the leader has to solve many problems and the issues of motivation are among them. Second, the character of relations among the participants and the rational organization of their efficient teamwork should be analyzed. Third, the analysis of the leader’s capability to foster the professional and personal development of the participants in the teamwork is of great importance. Fourth, the effective method of cultivating in leaders the skills of building a team is increasing the level of teaching behavioural competences using innovative pedagogical techniques

  14. Agile project management managing for success

    CERN Document Server

    Crowder, James A

    2015-01-01

    Management and enables them to deal with the demands and complexities of modern, agile systems/software/hardware development teams. The book examines the project/program manager beyond the concepts of leadership and aims to connect to employees' sense of identity. The text examines human psychological concepts such as "locus of control," which will help the manager understand their team members' view and how best to manage their "world" contributions. The authors cover new management tools and philosophies for agile systems/software/hardware development teams, with a specific focus on how this

  15. I-15 integrated corridor management system : project management plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    The Project Management Plan (PMP) assists the San Diego ICM Team by defining a procedural framework for : management and control of the I-15 Integrated Corridor Management Demonstration Project, and development and : deployment of the ICM System. The...

  16. Project manager attributes influencing project success in the South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    success criteria for building projects in Ghana and concluded that the “current and ... qualifications, profession, leadership style and project team ... and expectations of project management competence between ... 1.d. Sense of teamwork ...

  17. Occupational emerging risks affecting international virtual project Team Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitraşcu-Băldău Iulia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of internet access, high-speed connection services, collaborative work platforms and tools, allowed employees to interact virtually offering companies the possibility to develop projects around the world, reducing operational costs and gain competitive advantage. Realizing the advantages and disadvantages of developing a project team in an international virtual work environment, requires adopting specific strategies to construct an effective team and ensure the project success. One of the most important disadvantages that we identified is that the new work environment brings new risks for both team members and managers. So, it becomes mandatory to identify and analyze the occupational emerging risks and their impact on the productivity of virtual team members, in order to prevent them efficiently and to ensure the safety and health of employees in a virtual working environment. This paper aims to highlight the necessity for project managers and organizations, to include in their specific project strategies, an efficient occupational risks management in the virtual workplace, to obtain a continuously improved virtual working environment, so to achieve a high performance from virtual employees.

  18. Successful project teams (in R&D environment)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Giesler, Achmed

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available management tools no longer give project teams a competitive edge - additional qualitative tools are required, following a systems approach. A paradigm shift away from the traditional triangle of budget, brief and time towards a stronger focus on people issues...

  19. Progress report on recommendations of the Flaring Project Team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macken, C.

    1999-01-01

    Part of the mandate of the Clean Air Strategic Alliance (CASA) is to share decision-making responsibility for air quality management with the government of Alberta, through the ministries of Environmental Protection, Energy, and Health, and the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB). CASA's vision for air quality in Alberta is that 'the air will be odourless, tasteless, look clear, and have no measurable short- or long-term adverse effects on people, animals, or the environment'. In 1997, CASA approved the establishment of the Flaring Project Team in response to public concern about potential and observed impacts associated with flaring of solution gas. Members of that team established a framework for the management of solution gas flaring. Their long-term goal is to eliminate routine flaring of solution gas. The Project Team assessed existing information on solution gas flaring, including technologies, efficiencies, emissions and impacts. Alternative technologies were also reviewed along with biological and health effects of solution gas flaring. A list of data gaps and research needs was compiled in order to help with the development of the Team's recommendations. The Team's final report was delivered in June 1998. It was recommended that the following policy objective hierarchy be used to guide decisions related to routine solution gas flaring: (1) eliminate routine solution gas flaring, (2) reduce volumes of gas flared, and (3) improve the efficiency of flares. By way of progress the Project Team was able to report that in March, 1999, the EUB issued a draft interim directive to address upstream petroleum industry flaring. The draft Directive incorporates the recommendations from the CASA Flaring Project Team with respect to management of solution gas flaring. In December 1998, changes to the royalty structure to encourage the productive use of flare gas have been announced by the Alberta Department of Energy and Alberta Environmental protection, thus

  20. Agile & Distributed Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries-Heje, Jan; Pries-Heje, Lene

    2011-01-01

    Scrum has gained surprising momentum as an agile IS project management approach. An obvious question is why Scrum is so useful? To answer that question we carried out a longitudinal study of a distributed project using Scrum. We analyzed the data using coding and categorisation and three carefully...... selected theoretical frameworks. Our conclusion in this paper is that Scrum is so useful because it provides effective communication in the form of boundary objects and boundary spanners, it provides effective social integration by building up social team capital, and it provides much needed control...... and coordination mechanisms by allowing both local and global articulation of work in the project. That is why Scrum is especially useful for distributed IS project management and teamwork....

  1. Diversity Management in Global Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lisbeth

    2016-01-01

    implemented in the local organization? How are organizational culture, vision and images aligned with the team processes to accomplish the task? Does professional (functional) expertise influence team collaboration and finally how do individual experiences and coping strategies matter? The US and Japan...

  2. Managing Geographically Dispersed Teams: From Temporary to Permanent Global Virtual Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane Hansen, Tine; Hope, Alexander John; Moehler, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    for organisations to move towards establishing permanent Global Virtual Teams in order to leverage knowledge sharing and cooperation across distance. To close this gap, this paper will set the scene for a research project investigating the changed preconditions for organisations. As daily face-to-face communication......The rise and spread of information communication technologies (ICT) has enabled increasing use of geographically dispersed work teams (Global Virtual Teams). Originally, Global Virtual Teams were mainly organised into temporary projects. Little research has focused on the emergent challenge...... generation of self-lead digital natives, who are already practising virtual relationships and a new approach to work, and currently joining the global workforce; and improved communication technologies. Keywords: Global Virtual teams, ICT, leadership, motivation, self-management, millenials....

  3. A Team Building Model for Software Engineering Courses Term Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Yasar Guneri

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a new model for team building, which enables teachers to build coherent teams rapidly and fairly for the term projects of software engineering courses. Moreover, the model can also be used to build teams for any type of project, if the team member candidates are students, or if they are inexperienced on a certain subject. The…

  4. Successful implementation of self-managing teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerheim, Wilke; Van Rossum, Lisa; Ten Have, Wouter Dirk

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Following health-care organisations, many mental health-care organisations nowadays consider starting to work with self-managing teams as their organisation structure. Although the concept could be effective, the way of implementing self-managing teams in an organisation is crucial to

  5. Successful implementation of self-managing teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerheim, W. (Wilke); Van Rossum, L. (Lisa); Ten Have, W.D. (Wouter Dirk)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Following health-care organisations, many mental health-care organisations nowadays consider starting to work with self-managing teams as their organisation structure. Although the concept could be effective, the way of implementing self-managing teams in an organisation is

  6. Enhanced project management tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chen-Jung (Inventor); Patel, Hemil N. (Inventor); Maluf, David A. (Inventor); Moh Hashim, Jairon C. (Inventor); Tran, Khai Peter B. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A system for managing a project that includes multiple tasks and a plurality of workers. Input information includes characterizations based upon a human model, a team model and a product model. Periodic reports, such as one or more of a monthly report, a task plan report, a schedule report, a budget report and a risk management report, are generated and made available for display or further analysis or collection into a customized report template. An extensible database allows searching for information based upon context and upon content. Seven different types of project risks are addressed, including non-availability of required skill mix of workers. The system can be configured to exchange data and results with corresponding portions of similar project analyses, and to provide user-specific access to specified information.

  7. Project Management with IT Security Focus

    OpenAIRE

    Felician Alecu; Paul Pocatilu; Sergiu Capisizu

    2011-01-01

    The paper focus on the main key points related to the IT security project management. The most important lifecycle stages are identified: IT security project proposal definition, project organization, project planning, quality planning, project team organization, IT security project activities management and project closing. The most important success factors for IT security projects are the support of top-management, customer satisfaction, prevention over remediation and continuous progress....

  8. Methodology Proposal for Increasing Swift Trust within Virtual Teams in the Inception Phase of a Project Life-Cycle: Project Manager’s Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovanović Bojan Morić

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes team building methodology for project managers in virtual teams as means to develop swift trust between new team members in the inception phase of the project life cycle. Proposed methodology encompasses activities within the first three days after the team formation and proposes the measuring tools for monitoring and managing trust development within the project team. Aim of this paper is to provide new insights to various decision makers potentially interested in increasing the performance of project teams operating in virtual environment, such as: investors, business owners and project managers working in virtual environment.

  9. Managing Virtual Product Development team: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Mohammad Colabi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Although there are many potential benefits associated with the use of virtual product development teams, exploiting these benefits requires an appropriate management. Managing virtual product development team is a critical issue as many of these teams fail to accomplish their goals. Review of previous literature shows that body of knowledge in managing virtual product development teams is fragmented and inconsistent. The main objective of this paper is to categorize the previous research on the subject of virtual product development team management in order to integrate the research into a thematic model and to enable recommendations for future research. So, this study reviews and summarizes empirical research in the field, also conceptual and qualitative papers, experiences, reports and explorative case studies. Results show that there are three fields of research in this area, including: Virtual production and Virtual team in Product Development, Managing virtual team in R&D[1] and product development, Managing global virtual product development teams. In order to organize previous studies in this area, a thematic map is proposed which shows the structure and sequence of research. Finally, a comprehensive discussion on the future directions in this field is proposed.

  10. Creating a Realistic Context for Team Projects in HCI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, Herman; van Dijk, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    Team projects are nowadays common practice in HCI education. This paper focuses on the role of clients and users in team projects in introductory HCI courses. In order to provide projects with a realistic context we invite people from industry to serve as clients for the student teams. Some of them

  11. 33 CFR 385.17 - Project Delivery Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Project Delivery Team. 385.17... Processes § 385.17 Project Delivery Team. (a) In accordance with the procedures of the Corps of Engineers...,” the Corps of Engineers and the non-Federal sponsor shall form a Project Delivery Team to develop the...

  12. RISK MANAGEMENT USING PROJECT RECON

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-28

    centralized database . • Project Recon (formerly Risk Recon) is designed to be used by all Program Management Offices, Integrated Project Teams and any...Create growth plans to proactively capture benefits • Customize reports to group opportunities by programmatic, technical, business, contracting, and

  13. Performance Management and Sourcing Team Behaviour - Working Paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Peder Lysholm

    The purpose of this development paper is to outline the main ideas of a Ph.d.-project research proposal,which deals with the influence of Performance Management on the behaviour and decisions of Sourcing Category Team members. The background for the project is described, as well as the main theory...

  14. Healthcare management strategies: interdisciplinary team factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreatta, Pamela; Marzano, David

    2012-12-01

    Interdisciplinary team factors are significant contributors to clinical performance and associated patient outcomes. Quality of care and patient safety initiatives identify human factors associated with team performance as a prime improvement area for clinical patient care. The majority of references to interdisciplinary teams in obstetrics and gynecology in the literature recommends the use of multidisciplinary approaches when managing complex medical cases. The reviewed literature suggests that interdisciplinary team development is important for achieving optimally efficient and effective performance; however, few reports provide specific recommendations for how to optimally achieve these objectives in the process of providing interdisciplinary care to patients. The absence of these recommendations presents a significant challenge for those tasked with improving team performance in the workplace. The prescribed team development programs cited in the review are principally built around communication strategies and simulation-based training mechanisms. Few reports provide descriptions of optimal team-based competencies in the various contexts of obstetric and gynecology teams. However, team-based evaluation strategies and empirical data documenting the transfer of team training to applied clinical care are increasing in number and quality. Our findings suggest that research toward determining team factors that promote optimal performance in applied clinical practice requires definition of specific competencies for the variable teams serving obstetrics and gynecology.

  15. HBR guide to project management

    CERN Document Server

    Harvard Business Review

    2013-01-01

    MEET YOUR GOALS—ON TIME AND ON BUDGET. How do you rein in the scope of your project when you’ve got a group of demanding stakeholders breathing down your neck? And map out a schedule everyone can stick to? And motivate team members who have competing demands on their time and attention? Whether you’re managing your first project or just tired of improvising, this guide will give you the tools and confidence you need to define smart goals, meet them, and capture lessons learned so future projects go even more smoothly. The HBR Guide to Project Management will help you: • Build a strong, focused team • Break major objectives into manageable tasks • Create a schedule that keeps all the moving parts under control • Monitor progress toward your goals • Manage stakeholders’ expectations • Wrap up your project and gauge its success

  16. Defensive behaviours in innovation teams: how project teams discuss defensiveness and its relationship with innovation resilience behaviour and project success

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeij, P.R.A.; Dhondt, S.; Gaspersz, J.B.R.; Vuuren, T. van

    2016-01-01

    Project team members and project leaders of innovation projects were interviewed about the possible presence of defensive behaviours within the team. While investigating defensive behaviour can be done validly by observation techniques, to talk about defensiveness within a team often leads to

  17. Project Leader's Dual Socialization and Its Impact on Team Learning and Performance: A Diagnostic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Tanvi

    2009-01-01

    One of the important challenges for leadership in project teams is the ability to manage the knowledge, communication and coordination related activities of team. In cross-team collaboration, different boundaries contribute to the situated nature of knowledge and hamper the flow of knowledge and prevent shared understanding with those on the other…

  18. Exploring Academics' Approaches to Managing Team Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augar, Naomi; Woodley, Carolyn J.; Whitefield, Despina; Winchester, Maxwell

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop an understanding of academics' approaches to managing team assessment at an Australian University with a view to informing policy development and assessment design. Design/methodology/approach: The research was conducted using a single exploratory case study approach focussing on the team assessment…

  19. Beyond Quality Circles: Self-Managing Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Henry P., Jr.; Dean, James W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    This article reviews the quality circle concept, shows why its characteristics appeal to American executives, and examines some of its limitations. It looks at self-managing teams and discusses the reasons that adoptions have been relatively few. It then shows what organizational conditions are necessary for quality circles to evolve into teams.…

  20. Functional Heterogeneity and Senior Management Team Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoliel, Pascale; Somech, Anit

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There has been an increasing trend toward the creation of senior management teams (SMTs) which are characterized by a high degree of functional heterogeneity. Although such teams may create better linkages to information, along with the benefits of functional heterogeneity comes the potential for conflicts that stem from the value…

  1. Managing Communication within Virtual Intercultural Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Christine Uber

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that business students need to be prepared to manage the communication of intercultural teams. Discusses strategies for success such as: developing a network of good relationships built on trust and understanding; showing respect for other cultures and languages; and understanding how diversity strengthens the team. (SG)

  2. Using Action Research to Teach Students to Manage Team Learning and Improve Teamwork Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Ladd, Brenda; Chan, Christopher C. A.

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on a study investigating strategies that students can use to develop skills in managing team learning. Two groups of second-year management students participated in a semester-long action research project over two semesters. The students were educated on team development, team processes and conflict management and how to…

  3. Nurse managers' challenges in project management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhonen, Marjo; Paasivaara, Leena

    2011-11-01

    To analyse the challenges that nurse managers meet in project management. Project management done by nurse managers has a significant role in the success of projects conducted in work units. The data were collected by open interviews (n = 14). The participants were nurse managers, nurses and public health nurses. Data analysis was carried out using qualitative content analysis. The three main challenges nurse managers faced in project management in health-care work units were: (1) apathetic organization and management, (2) paralysed work community and (3) cooperation between individuals being discouraged. Nurse managers' challenges in project management can be viewed from the perspective of the following paradoxes: (1) keeping up projects-ensuring patient care, (2) enthusiastic management-effective management of daily work and (3) supporting the work of a multiprofessional team-leadership of individual employees. It is important for nurse managers to learn to relate these paradoxes to one another in a positive way. Further research is needed, focusing on nurse managers' ability to promote workplace spirituality, nurse managers' emotional intelligence and their enthusiasm in small projects. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Toward a model of socializing project team members : An integrative approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batistič, S.; Kenda, R.

    2018-01-01

    Project work is becoming more and more important in everyday business, as is staffing the right newcomers for the project. Recognizing that not all new project team workers possess equally important specific knowledge, skills and abilities for the success of projects, we draw on project management,

  5. Team Development for High Performance Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermerhorn, John R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The author examines a team development approach to management that creates shared commitments to performance improvement by focusing the attention of managers on individual workers and their task accomplishments. It uses the "high-performance equation" to help managers confront shared beliefs and concerns about performance and develop realistic…

  6. Effective team management by district nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Julie

    2004-12-01

    This article considers the key role played by the district nurse in managing the district nursing team in order to provide high quality health care. It considers how the district nurse can use key managerial roles (interpersonal, informational and decision-making) in order to ensure unity within the team. The importance of shared goals and trust to achieve unity is explored and a strategy for managing conflict is discussed. Finally, the article suggests a set of ground rules which could be used to facilitate effective team working.

  7. Team effectiveness in Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Khawaja Fawad; Williams, Nigel

    2017-10-01

    The incorporation of team context into research and practice regarding team effectiveness in NGOs projects is a constant challenge. The research seeks to address the gap and identify the critical determinants of team effectiveness in projects undertaken by non-governmental organizations. Using a systematic process, the study involved both literature and focus group discussions to generate the required items. A total of 157 respondents (Team Members and Team Leaders) were part of the study that filled the questionnaires. Using exploratory factor analysis followed by confirmatory factor analysis, both convergent and discriminant validity was established. The present study found that team effectiveness in NGO social projects has a total of seven dimensions namely: Inter team coordination, community social linkage, team performance, knowledge, skills, and attitudes, leadership communication and engagement, decision making and information sharing, and team formation. There is a significant lack of research on team effectiveness in NGO projects. Where considerably large proportion of research on team effectiveness has focused on the corporate sector, the non-governmental teams have been neglected. This study clearly highlights the determinants that make up team effectiveness in NGOs. The determinants identified will help to specifically look at the effectiveness of teams in NGO projects. The study would help NGOs identify the dimensions in which they may be performing in a weaker manner and direct their energies in improving the factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. CERN's IT Consultancy Team: a new IT project support service

    CERN Multimedia

    Ignacio Reguero, IT Department

    2016-01-01

    Newly created IT Consultancy Team provides advice on IT matters to communities at CERN starting new projects or reviewing computing activities of old.   The members of CERN's IT Consultancy Team. The consultants share their knowledge and experience to improve awareness of the IT landscape at CERN and to advise on system architecture and design to ensure best usage of existing IT services and solutions that favour, and are compatible with, the infrastructure already in place. They also help to formalise requirements and assess impact on security, software licenses and cost, especially where contacts among different services are needed and questions go beyond the current computing service offerings. For instance, the IT consultants may help answering questions like the ones below: We are starting with project X – how could we make its computing aspects compatible with the CERN IT infrastructure? E.g. if you need a web content management system favour Drupal instead of Wor...

  9. Managing complex industrial change through projects

    OpenAIRE

    Perotti , Clément; Minel , Stéphanie; Benoit , Roussel; Jean , Renaud

    2010-01-01

    International audience; This paper proposes some elements showing that project is an appropriate way to manage organizational change, and that an individual change occurs during these phases. We suggest that project team should manage individual change in the framework of project for three main reasons. First, being at the crossroad of strategic and operational levels, project team is in the right position in organisation to "translate" organizational change to individuals, and vice-versa. Se...

  10. Waste Management Process Improvement Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwood, J.; Borden, G.; Rangel, G. R.

    2002-01-01

    The Bechtel Hanford-led Environmental Restoration Contractor team's Waste Management Process Improvement Project is working diligently with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office to improve the waste management process to meet DOE's need for an efficient, cost-effective program for the management of dangerous, low-level and mixed-low-level waste. Additionally the program must meet all applicable regulatory requirements. The need for improvement was highlighted when a change in the Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project's waste management practices resulted in a larger amount of waste being generated than the waste management organization had been set up to handle

  11. A Data Scheduling and Management Infrastructure for the TEAM Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andelman, S.; Baru, C.; Chandra, S.; Fegraus, E.; Lin, K.; Unwin, R.

    2009-04-01

    currently partnering with the San Diego Super Computer Center to build the data management infrastructure. Data collected from the three core protocols as well as others are currently made available through the TEAM Network portal, which provides the content management framework, the data scheduling and management framework, an administrative framework to implement and manage TEAM sites, collaborative tools and a number of tools and applications utilizing Google Map and Google Earth products. A critical element of the TEAM Network data management infrastructure is to make the data publicly available in as close to real-time as possible (the TEAM Network Data Use Policy: http://www.teamnetwork.org/en/data/policy). This requires two essential tasks to be accomplished, 1) A data collection schedule has to be planned, proposed and approved for a given TEAM site. This is a challenging process since TEAM sites are geographically distributed across the tropics and hence have different seasons where they schedule field sampling for the different TEAM protocols. Capturing this information and ensuring that TEAM sites follow the outlined legal contract is key to the data collection process and 2) A stream-lined and efficient information management system to ensure data collected from the field meet the minimum data standards (i.e. are of the highest scientific quality) and are securely transferred, archived, processed and be rapidly made publicaly available, as a finished consumable product via the TEAM Network portal. The TEAM Network is achieving these goals by implementing an end-to-end framework consisting of the Sampling Scheduler application and the Data Management Framework. Sampling Scheduler The Sampling Scheduler is a project management, calendar based portal application that will allow scientists at a TEAM site to schedule field sampling for each of the TEAM protocols implemented at that site. The sampling scheduler addresses the specific requirements established in the

  12. SharePoint 2010 for Project Management

    CERN Document Server

    Sy, Dux

    2012-01-01

    If you were to analyze your team's performance on a typical project, you'd be surprised how much time is wasted on non-productive tasks. This hands-on guide shows you how to work more efficiently by organizing and managing projects with SharePoint 2010. You'll learn how to build a Project Management Information System (PMIS), customized to your project, that can effectively coordinate communication and collaboration among team members. Written by a certified Project Management Professional (PMP) and Microsoft SharePoint MVP with 15 years of IT project management experience, each chapter incl

  13. Does team stability mediate the relationship between leadership and team learning? An empirical study among Dutch project teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelsbergh, Chantal M.J.H.; Poell, Rob F.; van der Heijden, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    An exploratory field study was conducted among 30 project teams in the sectors of building and utilities, engineering and construction, infrastructure, and area decontamination and development in the Netherlands. It examined the influence of leadership on team learning behaviors and included team

  14. Does team stability mediate the relationship between leadership and team learning? : An empirical study among Dutch project teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelsbergh, C.; Poell, R.F.; van der Heijden, B.

    2015-01-01

    An exploratory field study was conducted among 30 project teams in the sectors of building and utilities, engineering and construction, infrastructure, and area decontamination and development in the Netherlands. It examined the influence of leadership on team learning behaviors and included team

  15. TEAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This document presents materials covering the television campaign against drunk driving called "TEAM" (Techniques for Effective Alcohol Management). It is noted that TEAM's purpose is to promote effective alcohol management in public facilities and other establishments that serve alcoholic beverages. TEAM sponsors are listed, including…

  16. Interdisciplinary collaboration within project-level NEPA teams in the US Forest Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    James W. Freeman; Marc J. Stern; Michael Mortimer; Dale J. Blahna; Lee K. Cerveny

    2011-01-01

    Interdisciplinary teamwork has become a foundation of natural resources planning and management in the US. Yet, we know little about the degree of interdisciplinary collaboration of natural resource planning teams. We conducted 10 case studies of Forest Service NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) teams working on projects related to the 2005 Travel Management Rule...

  17. Effects of interdependencies in project teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Vegt, G.S.; Emans, B.J.M.; Van de Vliert, E.

    The associations between task interdependence, outcome interdependence, and the effectiveness of team members were examined. The sample consisted of 181 employees at 10 engineering companies in The Netherlands. The participants evaluated their interdependence with 1 specific team member and rated

  18. Document Management Projects: implementation guide

    OpenAIRE

    Beatriz Bagoin Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    Records Management System implementation is a complex process that needs to be executed by a multidisciplinary team and involves components of apparently non-related areas such as archival science, computer engineering, law, project management and human resource management. All of them are crucial and complementary to guarantee a full and functional implementation of a system and a perfect fusion with the connected processes and procedures. The purpose of this work is to provide organizations...

  19. Project Hanford management contract quality improvement project management plan; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ADAMS, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    On July 13, 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) Manager transmitted a letter to Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) describing several DOE-RL identified failed opportunities for FDH to improve the Quality Assurance (QA) Program and its implementation. In addition, DOE-RL identified specific Quality Program performance deficiencies. FDH was requested to establish a periodic reporting mechanism for the corrective action program. In a July 17, 1998 response to DOE-RL, FDH agreed with the DOE concerns and committed to perform a comprehensive review of the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) QA Program during July and August, 1998. As a result, the Project Hanford Management Contract Quality Improvement Plan (QIP) (FDH-3508) was issued on October 21, 1998. The plan identified corrective actions based upon the results of an in-depth Quality Program Assessment. Immediately following the scheduled October 22, 1998, DOE Office of Enforcement and Investigation (EH-10) Enforcement Conference, FDH initiated efforts to effectively implement the QIP corrective actions. A Quality Improvement Project (QI Project) leadership team was assembled to prepare a Project Management Plan for this project. The management plan was specifically designed to engage a core team and the support of representatives from FDH and the major subcontractors (MSCs) to implement the QIP initiatives; identify, correct, and provide feedback as to the root cause for deficiency; and close out the corrective actions. The QI Project will manage and communicate progress of the process

  20. Methodologies of Project Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Macek

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents comparison of three most popular project management standardsbelonging to a wider group of models (for example, PMBOK, Prince 2, CMMI, ISO 10006,BS 6079, IPMA Competence Baseline, European Commission Project Cycle ManagementGuidelines. The author discusses methods of project management according to PMBoK,Prince 2 and ISO 10006, some chosen criteria and fields of knowledge, such as generalregulations of standards, project range management, resources management, and processesconnected with risk, systems of project quality management.

  1. Team self-regulation and meeting deadlines in project teams: antecedents and effects of temporal consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gevers, J.M.P.; van Eerde, W.; Rutte, C.G.

    2009-01-01

    In a longitudinal study among 48 project teams, we investigated how temporal consensus (i.e., the extent to which team members have a shared understanding of the temporal aspects of their collective task) affects the ability of teams to establish coordinated action and meet deadlines. In addition,

  2. String Quartets as Self-Managed Teams: An Interdisciplinary Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilboa, Avi; Tal-Shmotkin, Malka

    2012-01-01

    This article examines empirically and systematically whether a string quartet (SQ) ensemble is perceived as a self-managed team (SMT). SMTs, which were initially employed in the industrial world, are groups of employees that have a total responsibility for a defined project. The hypothesis that the SQ would exhibit more typical SMT characteristics…

  3. Decommissioning project management unit started its activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeliene, D.

    2002-01-01

    The Decommissioning Project Management Unit team comprises western experts as well as experts from INPP Decommissioning Service who all work as a single team. The DPMU will develop the Final Decommissioning Plan and a more detailed Decommissioning Project, which will describe how the plant will be removed from service and safely decommissioned

  4. Training teams for emergency management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafstal, A.M.; Johnston, J.H.; Oser, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Emergency management (EM), the decision making involved in directing the relief operation after a disaster or otherwise catastrophic accident is an issue of great public and private concern because of the high stakes involved. Due to the nature of emergencies, and especially mass emergencies, EM

  5. PROJECT MANAGER SKILLS, RISK MANAGEMENT TOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladut Iacob

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Although the projects are different from each other there are many common things that contribute to their success. Looked overall, the success of a project is the result of a multitude of factors. This person is considered the "engine" of the project. The man who makes the action set for the achievement of project objectives to be brought to an end. The project manager must have the technical knowledge and economic diverse. He should be able to choose a team and lead. You must be tenacious, combative, to know how to communicate both within the team and beyond. In a word, the project manager must have an impressive stock of knowledge, skills and abilities and appreciate as Peter Drucker, to "exist for the organization. To be its servant. Any management who forget this will only cause damage to the organization. "This study will focus on highlighting the skills of the project manager and their role in managing difficult situations or risk.

  6. How Does a Project Manager's Level of Development Influence Conceptualizations of Project Management and the Project Development Environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Margaret M.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the meaning project managers (PMs) make of their project environment, how they lead their teams and have incorporate complexity into their project management approach. The exploration of the PM's developmental level and meaning making offers a different angle on the project management and leadership literature. The study…

  7. The Relationship Between Team Psychological Safety and Team Effectiveness in Management Teams: The Mediating Effect of Dialogue.

    OpenAIRE

    Bilstad, Julie Brat

    2016-01-01

    This study is a response to the research and request presented by Bang and Midelfart (2010), to further investigate the effect dialogue can have on management team s effectiveness. The purpose of the study was to investigate and explain the effect of team psychological safety on task performance and team member satisfaction, with dialogue as a mediator in this relationship. 215 Norwegian and Danish management teams in the private and public sector were studied. As expected, team psychological...

  8. Distributed team cohesion – not an oxymoron. The impact of information and communications technologies on teamness in globally distributed IT projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Stawnicza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Globally distributed IT projects are common practice in today’s globalized world. Typically, project team members’ work on interdependent tasks, with a common goal to be achieved as one team. However, being split between multiple locations impedes communication among team members and hampers the development of trust. Information and communications media enable communication between geographically distributed project team members and help to create and maintain trust within project units. Communication and trust are particularly significant for fostering a feeling of oneness among project team members. Oneness, also referred to as “teamness”, is repeatedly mentioned as one of the challenges facing global project teams. However, prior literature on teamness is very scarce and its importance is underrepresented. This research contributes to the field in two ways. First, the theoretical study based on a systematic literature review examines available evidence of teamness in globally distributed projects. Secondly, an empirical study based on interviews conducted with global project managers fills the current gap in literature on the link between use of ICT and establishing a sense of team unity. This paper draws practitioners’ attention to the importance of striving for teamness in spite of the geographical distance that exists between project team members.

  9. Planning and Managing Drupal Projects

    CERN Document Server

    Nordin, Dani

    2011-01-01

    If you're a solo website designer or part of a small team itching to build interesting projects with Drupal, this concise guide will get you started. Drupal's learning curve has thrown off many experienced designers, particularly the way it handles design challenges. This book shows you the lifecycle of a typical Drupal project, with emphasis on the early stages of site planning. Learn how to efficiently estimate and set up your own project, so you can focus on ways to make your vision a reality, rather than let project management details constantly distract you. Plan and estimate your projec

  10. Managing Projects for Change: Contextualised Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, Belinda; Adlington, Rachael; Stewart, Cherry; Vale, Deborah; Sims, Rod; Shanahan, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This paper will detail three projects which focussed on enhancing online learning at a large Australian distance education University within a School of Business, School of Health and School of Education. Each project had special funding and took quite distinctive project management approaches, which reflect the desire to embed innovation and…

  11. Project Communications Management

    OpenAIRE

    José C. Santiago-Guevara; Mauricio Rojas-Contreras; Luis A. Esteban-Villamizar

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a review in relation to the object of study: Communications Management as an important factor in the management of projects. The review includes the most relevant and most renowned authors in the field of project management, focusing on telecommunications projects, which lets you define a communications management model.

  12. Using Existing Teams to Teach about Teams: How an MBA Course in Managing Teams Helps Students and the Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isabella, Lynn A.

    2005-01-01

    This article chronicles the unique manner in which a second-year MBA elective course in managing teams has been crafted using existing first-year learning teams as its core. The design and orchestration of this course are detailed, as are the challenges posed, in delivering a course that not only teaches about teams and team dynamics but does so…

  13. Interdependence and fit in team performance management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijfeijken, van H.T.G.A.; Kleingeld, P.A.M.; Tuijl, van H.F.J.M.; Algera, J.A.; Thierry, H.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: Purpose – To evaluate a proposed prescriptive model for the design of effective combinations of performance goals and pay-for-performance plans for the performance management of teams. Design/methodology/approach – The idea underlying the model – in which task, goal, and reward

  14. CSR Position in the Top Management Team

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Robert

    Recently, a number of positions with corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the position title have been introduced to the top management teams (TMTs) of some of the world’s largest corporations. I explore this phenomenon. I revisit 10 such positions identified in a previous study to add...

  15. Managing clinical improvement projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Joanna; Simmonds, Lorraine

    This paper, the second of a three-part series looking at change management tools, provides a practical guide on how to use common project management principles in practice. Much of the literature on project management focuses on the business arena, with little reference to clinical settings. Identifying this literature and understanding its relevance to managing projects in healthcare can be difficult. This article provides a practical guide to identifying the key principles of good project management and applying these in health settings.

  16. Modern project-management

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    This lecture will focus on the following issues: - The current state of the art in Project Management, especially the integration of Project Management with general management activities, and the integrated view of resources allocation. - Overview of the project life cycle, the phases and the deliverables - Necessity and limits of planning in a research environment - Organizational aspects of the projects the roles of the stakeholders - How to get the resources when they are needed - Risk Management in Projects - Earned value - How to keep a project on track (schedule and budget) - Management of the suppliers - Closing of the project

  17. A Project Team Analysis Using Tuckman's Model of Small-Group Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natvig, Deborah; Stark, Nancy L

    2016-12-01

    Concerns about equitable workloads for nursing faculty have been well documented, yet a standardized system for workload management does not exist. A project team was challenged to establish an academic workload management system when two dissimilar universities were consolidated. Tuckman's model of small-group development was used as the framework for the analysis of processes and effectiveness of a workload project team. Agendas, notes, and meeting minutes were used as the primary sources of information. Analysis revealed the challenges the team encountered. Utilization of a team charter was an effective tool in guiding the team to become a highly productive group. Lessons learned from the analysis are discussed. Guiding a diverse group into a highly productive team is complex. The use of Tuckman's model of small-group development provided a systematic mechanism to review and understand group processes and tasks. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(12):675-681.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. A Quantitative Study of Global Software Development Teams, Requirements, and Software Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Linda L.

    2016-01-01

    The study explored the relationship between global software development teams, effective software requirements, and stakeholders' perception of successful software development projects within the field of information technology management. It examined the critical relationship between Global Software Development (GSD) teams creating effective…

  19. The Little Black Book of Project Management

    CERN Document Server

    Thomsett, Michael C

    2009-01-01

    For nearly twenty years, The Little Black Book of Project Management has provided businesspeople everywhere with a quick and effective introduction to project management tools and methodology. The revised and updated third edition reflects the newest techniques, the latest project management software, as well as the most recent changes to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK™). Readers will find invaluable strategies for: • Organizing any project • Choosing the project team • Preparing a budget and sticking to it • Scheduling, flowcharting, and controlling a project • Preparing proj

  20. Exploring the concept of a team approach to wound care: Managing wounds as a team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Zena; Butcher, Gillian; Corbett, Lisa Q; McGuiness, William; Snyder, Robert J; van Acker, Kristien

    2014-05-01

    Background - The growing prevalence and incidence of nonhealing acute and chronic wounds is a worrying concern. A major challenge is the lack of united services aimed at addressing the complex needs of individuals with wounds. However, the WHO argues that interprofessional collaboration in education and practice is key to providing the best patient care, enhancing clinical and health-related outcomes and strengthening the health system. It is based on this background that the team approach to wound care project was conceptualised. The project was jointly initiated and realised by the Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC-USA), the Australian Wound Management Association (AWMA) and the European Wound Management Association (EWMA). Aim - The aim of this project was to develop a universal model for the adoption of a team approach to wound care. Objective The overarching objective of this project was to provide recommendations for implementing a team approach to wound care within all clinical settings and through this to develop a model for advocating the team approach toward decision makers in national government levels. Method An integrative literature review was conducted. Using this knowledge, the authors arrived at a consensus on the most appropriate model to adopt and realise a team approach to wound care. Results - Eighty four articles met the inclusion criteria. Following data extraction, it was evident that none of the articles provided a definition for the terms multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary or transdisciplinary in the context of wound care. Given this lack of clarity within the wound care literature, the authors have here developed a Universal Model for the Team Approach to Wound Care to fill this gap in our current understanding. Conclusion - We advocate that the patient should be at the heart of all decision-making, as working with the Universal Model for the Team Approach to Wound Care begins with the needs of the patient. To

  1. Managing Complex Distance Education Projects in a Telework Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ally, Mohamed; Cleveland-Innes, Marti; Wiseman, Colin

    2010-01-01

    The advances of communication technologies have allowed professionals to work on distance education projects in a telework environment. Managers of these projects must have the skills to manage the projects from a distance. They must be able to select the appropriate team members to work on the project, orient team members, and monitor team…

  2. Project management case studies

    CERN Document Server

    Kerzner, Harold R

    2013-01-01

    A new edition of the most popular book of project management case studies, expanded to include more than 100 cases plus a ""super case"" on the Iridium Project Case studies are an important part of project management education and training. This Fourth Edition of Harold Kerzner''s Project Management Case Studies features a number of new cases covering value measurement in project management. Also included is the well-received ""super case,"" which covers all aspects of project management and may be used as a capstone for a course. This new edition:Contains 100-plus case studies drawn from re

  3. Self-Managed Work Teams in Nursing Homes: Implementing and Empowering Nurse Aide Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeatts, Dale E.; Cready, Cynthia; Ray, Beth; DeWitt, Amy; Queen, Courtney

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes the progress of our study to examine the advantages and costs of using self-managed nurse aide teams in nursing homes, steps that are being taken to implement such teams, and management strategies being used to manage the teams. Design and Methods: A quasi-experimental design is underway where certified nurse aide…

  4. Designing Project Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heintz, John Linke; Lousberg, L.; Wamelink, J.W.F.; Saari, A.; Huovinen, P.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of Designing Project Management. On the basis of our earlier work, we suggest that there is still a gap between what is known from recent project management literature and what project managers can structurally help in the effectiveness of their work. Assuming

  5. MRS project management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doman, J.W.; Vlahakis, J.

    1992-01-01

    Management of projects under the control of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management within the Department of Energy is subject to overview by a variety of internal and external entities. This paper reports that effective project management often requires balancing of conflicting directions and conflicting agendas of the different entities in order to proceed with implementation of the Monitored Retrievable Storage project

  6. Results Without Authority Controlling a Project When the Team Doesn't Report to You

    CERN Document Server

    KENDRICK, Tom

    2012-01-01

    It's tricky enough to spearhead a big project when you're the boss. But when you're the leader of a team of people who don't report to you, the obstacles are even greater. Results Without Authority is the definitive book for project managers looking to establish credibility and control. A groundbreaker in the field, it supplies a start-to-finish system for getting successful project results from cross-functional, outsourced, and other types of teams. The completely updated second edition includes new information on: * Agile methods and evolving project management tools * Strategies for working

  7. Web Project Management

    OpenAIRE

    Suralkar, Sunita; Joshi, Nilambari; Meshram, B B

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes about the need for Web project management, fundamentals of project management for web projects: what it is, why projects go wrong, and what's different about web projects. We also discuss Cost Estimation Techniques based on Size Metrics. Though Web project development is similar to traditional software development applications, the special characteristics of Web Application development requires adaption of many software engineering approaches or even development of comple...

  8. Project Risk Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jr., R. F. Miles

    1995-01-01

    Project risk management is primarily concerned with performance, reliability, cost, and schedule. Environmental risk management is primarily concerned with human health and ecological hazards and likelihoods. This paper discusses project risk management and compares it to environmental risk management, both with respect to goals and implementation. The approach of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to risk management is presented as an example of a project risk management approach that is an extension to NASA NHB 7120.5: Management of Major System Programs and Projects.

  9. Document Management Projects: implementation guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Bagoin Guimarães

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Records Management System implementation is a complex process that needs to be executed by a multidisciplinary team and involves components of apparently non-related areas such as archival science, computer engineering, law, project management and human resource management. All of them are crucial and complementary to guarantee a full and functional implementation of a system and a perfect fusion with the connected processes and procedures. The purpose of this work is to provide organizations with a basic guide to Records Management Project implementation beginning with the steps prior to acquiring the system, following with the main project activities and concluding with the post implementation procedures of continuous improvement and system maintenance.

  10. Managing a Team of Former Peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Becoming a manager of former peers is a common occurrence in medical practice management, but it can be awkward and challenging. This article describes the specific staff management challenges that recently promoted practice managers encounter. It urges promoted managers to seek support outside the practice through new friendships, mentoring, and leadership networks. This article also describes how best to announce the promotion and suggests that new managers hold one-on-one meetings with each employee. It offers the agenda for those meetings and for the manager's first whole-team leadership kickoff meeting. This article also describes smart first tasks for a promoted practice manager and considers the possibility that some employees may not come on board with the changing social and leadership structures in the practice, and what to do about them. Finally, this article suggests that preparation to become a medical practice manager should start early. It offers a strategy for handling former peers who continue to overshare personal information with the manager. It describes how to handle four common authority challenges newly promoted practice managers may face, with sample dialogue. And it suggests a social media strategy medical practice managers can use when they are connected electronically to their former peers.

  11. 97 Things Every Project Manager Should Know

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Barbee

    2009-01-01

    If the projects you manage don't go as smoothly as you'd like, 97 Things Every Project Manager Should Know offers knowledge that's priceless, gained through years of trial and error. This illuminating book contains 97 short and extremely practical tips -- whether you're dealing with software or non-IT projects -- from some of the world's most experienced project managers and software developers. You'll learn how these professionals have dealt with everything from managing teams to handling project stakeholders to runaway meetings and more. While this book highlights software projects, its w

  12. Dream Team - A pregraduate surgical talent development project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rune Dall; Seyer-Hansen, Mikkel; Christensen, Mette Krogh

    Dream Team is an extracurricular pregraduate surgical talent development project founded in 2009 at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. It aims to identify and develop laparoscopic surgical talents during medical school. Dream Team contains two parts: 1) a weeklong boot camp where app. 10 % of 8th...... the mentorship the students will be in operation room at least once a week and participate as much as their skills allow. Dream Team differs from similar pregraduate programs as it selects the most talented students, but does the boot camp select the best and does the mentorship program provide optimal learning......? A PhD project aims to critically analyze and develop Dream Team. The PhD project is based on theories about deliberate practice[1] and social learning[2]. In addition, we compare surgical talent development[3][4] with talent development in elite sport in order to inspire, refine and develop Dream Team...

  13. Project stakeholder management

    CERN Document Server

    Eskerod, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    Carrying out a project as planned is not a guarantee for success. Projects may fail because project management does not take the requirements, wishes and concerns of stakeholders sufficiently into account. Projects can only be successful though contributions from stakeholders. And in the end, it is the stakeholders that evaluate whether they find that the project is a success. To manage stakeholders effectively, you need to know your stakeholders, their behaviours and attitudes towards the project. In Project Stakeholder Management, the authors give guidance on how to adopt an analytical and s

  14. Managing MDO Software Development Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, J. C.; Salas, A. O.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past decade, the NASA Langley Research Center developed a series of 'grand challenge' applications demonstrating the use of parallel and distributed computation and multidisciplinary design optimization. All but the last of these applications were focused on the high-speed civil transport vehicle; the final application focused on reusable launch vehicles. Teams of discipline experts developed these multidisciplinary applications by integrating legacy engineering analysis codes. As teams became larger and the application development became more complex with increasing levels of fidelity and numbers of disciplines, the need for applying software engineering practices became evident. This paper briefly introduces the application projects and then describes the approaches taken in project management and software engineering for each project; lessons learned are highlighted.

  15. Project management in practice : Evaluating a case project through project management theories

    OpenAIRE

    Uusitalo, Jenni

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to evaluate a case project and to study whether it was carried out in a correct manner; meaning that did the case project follow the project management models. In addition, part of the study was to determine what could have been improved in the management of the case project. The case project was about creating and launching a communication channel based on a social media service, on a blog platform called Tumblr, for Team Finland in Spain network. The network p...

  16. IT Project Management Metrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Many software and IT projects fail in completing theirs objectives because different causes of which the management of the projects has a high weight. In order to have successfully projects, lessons learned have to be used, historical data to be collected and metrics and indicators have to be computed and used to compare them with past projects and avoid failure to happen. This paper presents some metrics that can be used for the IT project management.

  17. How to manage your negotiating team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Jeanne M; Friedman, Ray; Behfar, Kristin

    2009-09-01

    You are leading a negotiating team for your company. When you sit down with the other party, someone on your side of the table blurts out: "Just tell us--what do we need to do to get more of your business?" And in that moment, you know you've lost the upper hand. Gaffes like this are more common than most businesspeople would care to admit, management professors Brett, Friedman, and Behfar have found in their research. Even though team members are all technically on the same side, they often have different priorities and imagine different ideal outcomes: Business development just wants to close the deal. Finance is most concerned about costs. Legal is focused on patents and intellectual property. The authors recommend taking four steps, either singly or in tandem, to align those goals: Map out each person's priorities, work out conflicts directly with departments, employ a mediator if that doesn't work, and use data to resolve differences. Once you are all on the same page, you can take steps to make sure everyone is coordinated during the negotiations themselves. Try simulating the negotiation beforehand, assigning roles to team members that take advantage of their strengths, and establishing the signals you will use to communicate with one another during the session. The payoff from working as a cohesive group is clear. With access to greater expertise and the ability to assign members to specialized roles, teams can implement more-complex strategies than a sole negotiator could ever pull off.

  18. Crisis management teams in health organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canyon, Deon V

    2012-01-01

    Crisis management teams (CMT) are necessary to ensure adequate and appropriate crisis management planning and response to unforeseen, adverse events. This study investigated the existence of CMTs, the membership of CMTs, and the degree of training received by CMTs in Australian health and allied health organisations. This cross-sectional study draws on data provided by executive decision makers in a broad selection of health and allied health organisations. Crisis management teams were found in 44.2 per cent of the health-related organisations surveyed, which is ten per cent lower than the figure for business organisations. Membership of these CMTs was not ideal and did not conform to standard CMT membership profiles. Similarly, the extent of crisis management training in health-related organisations is 20 per cent lower than the figure for business organisations. If organisations do not become pro-active in their crisis management practices, the onus is on government to improve the situation through regulation and the provision of more physical, monetary and skill resources to ensure that the health services of Australia are sufficiently prepared to respond to adverse events.

  19. Spent Nuclear Fuel project, project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuquay, B.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has been established to safely store spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. This Project Management Plan sets forth the management basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The plan applies to all fabrication and construction projects, operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities, and necessary engineering and management functions within the scope of the project

  20. Curriculum Management: "Driving the School Management Team Frantic"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumadi, M. W.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores factors which have a negative impact, on the role of the School Management Team (SMT) that serves as the fulcrum of the curriculum management process. The SMT is compelled to execute its responsibilities in an efficient and effective manner thus keeping a delicate balance between the often-conflicting pressures from parents,…

  1. Managing Distributed Software Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, John Stouby

    Increasingly, software projects are becoming geographically distributed, with limited face-toface interaction between participants. These projects face particular challenges that need careful managerial attention. This PhD study reports on how we can understand and support the management...... of distributed software projects, based on a literature study and a case study. The main emphasis of the literature study was on how to support the management of distributed software projects, but also contributed to an understanding of these projects. The main emphasis of the case study was on how to understand...... the management of distributed software projects, but also contributed to supporting the management of these projects. The literature study integrates what we know about risks and risk-resolution techniques, into a framework for managing risks in distributed contexts. This framework was developed iteratively...

  2. Construction project management handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of the FTA Construction Project Management Handbook is to provide guidelines for use by public transit agencies (Agen-cies) undertaking substantial construction projects, either for the first time or with little prior experience with cons...

  3. Can I Trust You? Profile Elements that Inform First Impressions of Trustworthiness in Virtual Project Teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusman, Ellen; Van Bruggen, Jan; Sloep, Peter; Valcke, Martin; Koper, Rob

    2010-01-01

    Rusman, E., Van Bruggen, J., Sloep, P. B., Valcke, M., & Koper, R. (2012). Can I Trust You? Profile Elements that Inform First Impressions of Trustworthiness in Virtual Project Teams. International Journal of Information Technology Project Management (IJITPM), 3(1), 15-35.

  4. Project management for engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Project Management for Engineers, as the title suggests, is a direct attempt at addressing the ever-increasing and specific needs for better project management of engineering students, practicing engineers and managers in the industry. It aims not only to present the principles and techniques of Project Management, but also to discuss project management standards, processes and requirements, such as PMBOK, IEEE and PRINCE. Each chapter begins with the basics of the theme being developed at a level understandable to an undergraduate, before more complex topics are introduced at the end of each section that are suitable for graduate students. For the practicing professionals or managers in the industry, the book also provides many real illustrations of practical application of the principles of Project Management. Through a realistic blend of theory and practical examples, as well as an integration of the engineering technical issues with business issues, this book seeks to remove the veil of mystery that has...

  5. Project Management Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Mihalache Anita; Salagean Liana

    2010-01-01

    Project management is a technique that can aid in the planning, scheduling, and monitoring of complex projects characterized by numerous, non repetitive jobs called activities. Examples of projects that would use project management include: - developing a mass rapid – transit system for a metropolitan area; - organizing the relocation of a corporate headquarters; - planning the production of a concert, film, or play; - developing and marketing a new automobile; - constructing a high – rise of...

  6. Risks management in project planning

    OpenAIRE

    Stankevičiūtė, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    Project management consists of two very important aspects – managing the right project and managing the project right. To know that you are managing the right project you need to ensure that your project is based on an actual requirement and that your project goal is relevant and beneficial. And professional project planning assists in managing project the right way. The project planning process is very time consuming and is one of the most important parts of the project management process. T...

  7. Principles of project management

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    The basic principles of project management as practiced by NASA management personnel are presented. These principles are given as ground rules and guidelines to be used in the performance of research, development, construction or operational assignments.

  8. Training van crisismanagement-teams [Training of emergency management teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berlo, M.P.W. van; Stroomer, S.; Bosch, K. van den

    2003-01-01

    Een rampenplan of bedrijfsnoodplan bestaat veelal slechts uit een lijst met telefoonnummers, of het is een plan dat niet is geactualiseerd. Bovendien is het trainen van crisismanagement-teams lastig omdat crises vaak een onvoorspelbaar karakter hebben. in deze bijdrage worden twee methoden

  9. Intercultural team maturity model: Unity, diversity, capability. Achieving optimal performance when leading \\ud a multicultural project team

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhakar, G. P.; Walker, S.

    2005-01-01

    Our research helps to judge ‘maturity’ as an asset to projects and heightens awareness of situational leadership, using intercultural team maturity levels as a tool for optimal project leadership success.\\ud \\ud This study focuses on exactly how to analyse the team members’ ability to adapt to complex intercultural project environments, using an intercultural team maturity model.

  10. Team role stress : relationships with team learning and performance in project teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelsbergh, C.; Gevers, J.M.P.; Heijden, van der B.I.J.M.; Poell, R.F.

    2012-01-01

    Although role stress literature has almost exclusively focused on individual role incumbents, it is conceivable that shared conditions of ambiguity, conflict, and quantitative or qualitative overload may give rise to a collective experience of role stress in teams. Testing a multilevel mediation

  11. Team and teamwork in modern european HR management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usheva Mariana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the major issues occurring in every contemporary organization is the issue of the efficiency of work and obtaining maximum results from work done. Most often when the issue of increasing the efficiency of work is laid the question of teams and teamwork in various projectя of the company comes to the foreground and frequently no proper differentiation is made between a “group of people” and a “team” and this brings to a large number of misunderstandings of managers and employees with regard to the designation and benefits of team organization of work. There are clear traceable differences between the perception of the concept of “team” and the implementation of teamwork by European and Bulgarian companies and it is good to make the differentiation between them with a view to the HR management.

  12. Scaffolding Project-Based Learning with the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK[R])

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooij, Shahron Williams

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a study of the extent to which processes and procedures from the discipline of project management can scaffold online project-based learning in a graduate-level instructional technology course, by facilitating intra-team interaction, enhancing project outcomes and promoting a positive project team experience. With…

  13. Managing Stress. Project Seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Donna; Wilk, Jan

    One of eight papers from Project Seed, this paper describes a stress management project undertaken with high school sophomores. Managing Stress is described as an interactive workshop that offers young people an opportunity to examine specific areas of stress in their lives and to learn effective ways to deal with them. The program described…

  14. Managing creative team performance in virtual environments : An empirical study in 44 R&D teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kratzer, J.; Leenders, R.Th.A.J.; van Engelen, J.M.L.

    Creative performance in R&D is of vital importance to organizations. Because R&D usually is organized in teams, the management of creative performance inherently refers to the team level creative performance. Over the last decades, R&D teams have become increasingly virtual. In this article we

  15. Managing the Chronically Overworked Team: Twenty Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Overwork, at first glance, seems like a problem that affects only the employee. But for medical practices and those who manage them, the problem is far greater than that. Chronically overworked employees may not be meeting their goals. They may be making more mistakes and letting things slip through the cracks. Ultimately, patients may have less-than-ideal experiences in a practice where the employees are stretched thin. And turnover may skyrocket in practices where employees are chronically overworked. This article offers practice managers 20 practical and affordable strategies they can use to manage a chronically overworked medical practice team. It suggests an effective technique they can use to tell their bosses that their employees are overworked. This article also suggests the costs to the practice of a chronically overworked staff, including a hidden cost many people overlook. It provides four coping strategies practice managers can teach to their overworked employees. It summarizes research exploring how overwork affects employees' sleep and eating habits, and additional research linking long hours of overwork to diminished productivity. Finally, this article provides five strategies practice managers can use to make their overworked employees feel valued.

  16. Collective Global Leadership in Self-Managed Multicultural Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paunova, Minna; Lee, Yih-Teen

    2016-01-01

    Arguing that it is necessary to look into specific global leadership processes in specific contexts, this article focuses on collective global leadership in self-managed multicultural teams using an input-process-output model. Building on a study of nationally and culturally diverse self-managed...... teams, our work demonstrates that collective global leadership in these teams is critical for team performance (output). Our study also examines some of the affective or attitudinal antecedents of collective global leadership in self-managed multicultural teams (process) and their members’ goal...... orientations (input). Our findings suggest that a team learning orientation may greatly help multicultural teams overcome the liability of cultural diversity, create a positive intra-team environment, and enable collective global leadership. Our research also suggests that team performance orientation...

  17. Managing team learning in a Spanish commercial bank

    OpenAIRE

    Døving, Erik; Martin-Rubio, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyze how team management affects team-learning activities. Design/methodology/approach – The authors empirically study 68 teams as they operate in the natural business context of a major Spanish bank. Quantitative research utilizing multiple regression analyses is used to test hypotheses. Findings – The leadership behaviour (consideration, initiation of structure) displayed by the team leader plays a key role in facilitating team learning. Te...

  18. The Role of the Facilitator on Total Quality Management Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakin, William L.

    1993-01-01

    As Total Quality Management teams work to improve organizational processes, several types of facilitators emerge: the director, the workhorse, and the cheerleader. Experience at the University of Kansas illustrates how different facilitator styles can affect team learning. (MSE)

  19. Chosen aspects of innovative projects management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gawlik

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Any company willing to maintain its market position has to search and implement innovative products and services. Integrated development ofenterprise’s innovative activity requests a constant search for new technologies and new organizational forms. Ability of effectivemanagement of innovative projects becomes a crucial issue. The paper presents a characteristic of innovative projects accordingly toOECD standards. Project management concepts based on Project Management Institute (PMI and International Project ManagementAssociation (IPMA procedures have been discussed. Key success factors have been defined, i.e.: obtaining assumed project outcome (range, project implementation conform to planned schedule (deadline, maintaining project costs under a certain limit (budget, quality (are the customers satisfied?, resources (team losses and interpersonal relations. Tables comparing product innovativeness with fields of requested know – how for particular product innovativeness levels have been elaborated. Finally, SCRUM method of adaptive project management aiming at providing possibly optimal outcome has been described.

  20. Open Source and Proprietary Project Management Tools for SMEs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Abramova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The dimensional growth and increasing difficulty in project management promoted the development of different tools that serve to facilitate project management and track project schedule, resources and overall progress. These tools offer a variety of features, from task and time management, up to integrated CRM (Customer Relationship Management and ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning modules. Currently, a large number of project management software is available, to assist project team during the entire project lifecycle. We present the main differences between open source and proprietary project management tools and how those could be important for SMEs, describing the key features and how those can assist the project manager and the development team. In this paper, we analyse four open-source project management tools: OpenProject, ProjectLibre, Redmine, LibrePlan and four proprietary tools: Bitrix24, JIRA, Microsoft Project and Asana.

  1. The programme benefits of improving project team communication through a contact centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bond-Barnard, T. J.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A South African national programme to repair government infrastructure uses a contact centre (or call centre to facilitate and manage communication. An important question is: How does the contact centre benefit the programme and its projects? This study discusses the findings of a survey that quantified the benefits of the programme when the communication between team members in the programme was improved by using a contact centre. The results show that, by using a contact centre to improve the communication between project team members, their perception of communication effectiveness, quality of project deliverables, service delivery, and customer satisfaction of the programme dramatically increases.

  2. Contingency Management with Human Autonomy Teaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, Robert J.; Lachter, Joel B.

    2018-01-01

    Automation is playing an increasingly important role in many operations. It is often cheaper faster and more precise than human operators. However, automation is not perfect. There are many situations in which a human operator must step in. We refer to these instances as contingencies and the act of stepping in contingency management. Here we propose coupling Human Autonomy Teaming (HAT) with contingency management. We describe two aspects to HAT, bi-directional communication, and working agreements (or plays). Bi-directional communication like Crew Resource Management in traditional aviation, allows all parties to contribute to a decision. Working agreements specify roles and responsibilities. Importantly working agreements allow for the possibility of roles and responsibilities changing depending on environmental factors (e.g., situations the automation was not designed for, workload, risk, or trust). This allows for the automation to "automatically" become more autonomous as it becomes more trusted and/or it is updated to deal with a more complete set of possible situations. We present a concrete example using a prototype contingency management station one might find in a future airline operations center. Automation proposes reroutes for aircraft that encounter bad weather or are forced to divert for environmental or systems reasons. If specific conditions are met, these recommendations may be autonomously datalinked to the affected aircraft.

  3. Management systems for environmental restoration projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbert, R.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that the success fo large environmental restoration projects depends on sound management systems to guide the team of organizations and individuals responsible for the project. Public concern about and scrutiny of these environmental projects increase the stakes for those involved in the management of projects. The Department of Energy (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) uses a system approach to performing and improving the work necessary to meet FUSRAP objectives. This approach to preforming and improving the work necessary to meet FUSRAP objectives. This approach is based upon management criteria embodied in DOE cost and schedule control system and the quality assurance requirements. The project team used complementary criteria to develop a system of related parts and processes working together to accomplish the goals of the project

  4. Project Management Performance Drivers

    OpenAIRE

    Ra’ad, Mohammed A.; Najdawi, Mohammad K.

    2010-01-01

    The practice of project management has gained enormous importance over the past several years in various business industries. “In industries as diverse as pharmaceuticals, software, and aerospace, projects drive business” (Wheatley). This gain of importance can be attributed to the magnitude of the impact project performance results in terms of time, cost, and scope have over the project performing entity. “On the basis of data released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis, part of the US De...

  5. Experiences with Designing a Team Project Module for Teaching Teamwork to Students

    OpenAIRE

    Bieliková, Mária

    2005-01-01

    Team projects play an important role in the education of engineers. This paper describes a team project module (called Team project) that is part of a postgraduate course in Informatics. Its main objective is to give students a hands-on experience with different aspects of working in team on a problem. We discuss several aspects that should be considered in designing such module as a part of a curriculum: team formation, team communication, team assessment, problem statement and assignment, d...

  6. A new approach to cost effective projects: High performance project teams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, N.C.

    1994-01-01

    In low oil price environment in which environmental conditions are more challenging, reservoir characteristics less favourable and political risk increasing, successful projects are required in such cases. The present paper deals with the visionary process of establishing high performance project teams. According to the author, such project teams embody dynamic recognition of holism. Holism is achieved as an output from the process of establishing the drivers and enablers for success on a project. They are given birth during the unfolding of the operators development plans and contracting strategy. The paper discusses the main drivers of project teams comprising purpose and performance goals, selection, common approach, commitment and accountability, and financial alignment

  7. A new approach to cost effective projects: High performance project teams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, N.C. [Brown and Root Energy Services (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    In low oil price environment in which environmental conditions are more challenging, reservoir characteristics less favourable and political risk increasing, successful projects are required in such cases. The present paper deals with the visionary process of establishing high performance project teams. According to the author, such project teams embody dynamic recognition of holism. Holism is achieved as an output from the process of establishing the drivers and enablers for success on a project. They are given birth during the unfolding of the operators development plans and contracting strategy. The paper discusses the main drivers of project teams comprising purpose and performance goals, selection, common approach, commitment and accountability, and financial alignment

  8. Open Source and Proprietary Project Management Tools for SMEs.

    OpenAIRE

    Veronika Abramova; Francisco Pires; Jorge Bernardino

    2017-01-01

    The dimensional growth and increasing difficulty in project management promoted the development of different tools that serve to facilitate project management and track project schedule, resources and overall progress. These tools offer a variety of features, from task and time management, up to integrated CRM (Customer Relationship Management) and ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) modules. Currently, a large number of project management software is available, to assist project team during t...

  9. Managing Global Virtual Teams across Classrooms, Students and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Timothy P.; Sherer, Pamela D.; Quilling, Rosemary D.; Blewett, Craig N.

    2011-01-01

    Virtual teams are becoming commonplace in business today so our business school students should have experience in effectively working in virtual teams. Based on a month-long virtual team project conducted by the authors between classes in South Africa and the United States, this paper discusses the opportunities and challenges of using global…

  10. Me, Myself and My Team : How communications teams can harness the power of online impression management

    OpenAIRE

    Fieseler, Christian; Meckel, Miriam; Ranzini, Giulia

    2012-01-01

    The article is a short piece based on our EACD survey on the identity management practices of marketing and communication professeionals on how communications teams can harness the power of online impression management

  11. Project Management and the Project Manager: A Strategy for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Development and Management Review ... collapse, project failure, project abandonment, project cost and time overruns, etc. ... component parts that constitute project management in the building construction industry.

  12. BODIES OF KNOWLEDGE IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND PROJECT QUALITY MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Tamara Gvozdenovic; Mirjana Miljanovic; Aleksandar Jegdic; Zeljko Crnogorcic

    2008-01-01

    One of the main trends is standardization of project management. Some of the most important bodies of knowledge in project management, which were created by professional associations for project management are given in this paper. The main of the project management, apart from minimization of time, resources and costs, is to finish the project in the required quality, i.e. it is very important during the whole process of project management to provide realizing the project without any deviatio...

  13. Organization of project management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.

    1975-01-01

    When speaking about interfaces within a project and their management, one has to understand and define what an interface is. In general, each component facing another one and each person working on a project with another person represents an interface. Therefore a project will consist practically in its entirety of interfaces with components and people sandwiched between them. This paper is limited to the most important interfaces with a focus on the problems occuring at them and their resolution. (orig.) [de

  14. Cultural differences in Research project management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Scientific Projects today have increased in complexity, requiring multidisciplinarity, and requiring a mix of diverse individuals from different countries who must be integrated into an effective project. Effective team building is one of the prime responsibilities of the project manager. When the project is supported by a funding, the integration and the implication of the different partners are quite easy. Particularly when partners are developing high-performing teams. However, management of research project requires further skills when the budget is not very high and/or when partners are from non-European countries and are not using the same vocabulary. The various cultures, values, beliefs and social usages, particularly with Mediterranean countries cause a special style of communication for an individual or group of individuals. This communication style participates in the success of the project and encompasses a lot of diplomatic skills which will be highlighted.

  15. Managing Team Learning in a Spanish Commercial Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doving, Erik; Martin-Rubio, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze how team management affects team-learning activities. Design/methodology/approach: The authors empirically study 68 teams as they operate in the natural business context of a major Spanish bank. Quantitative research utilizing multiple regression analyses is used to test hypotheses. Findings: The…

  16. Managing Intercultural Teams: The eOrganization Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humes, Michelle; Reilly, Anne H.

    2008-01-01

    In today's global environment, intercultural teams may become the most effective teams in an organization when their diversity is managed as an asset. However, because of miscommunication and conflict, intercultural teams often become dysfunctional. This experiential group exercise demonstrates how cultural dimensions such as individualism and…

  17. One step ahead of technology Cern and HP - an ideal team project

    CERN Multimedia

    Garvey, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    "In 2004, the It team at Cern recognized the comprehensiveness and future of the LHC Computing Grid Project and realized that the IT infrastructures were not sufficient enough to manage the data. Cern therefore partnered with HP ProCurve the following year to minimize the day-to-day workload and improve infrastructure for data output" (1 page)

  18. Formation of the Project Team on Introduction of Financial Controlling into Banking Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chmutova Iryna M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article identifies order and content of stages of formation of the project team of introduction of financial controlling into banking activity. It offers a procedure of identification of the qualitative team composition, which envisages selection of candidates with the use of rules of fuzzy logical conclusion for assessing three groups of competences: personal (initiative, communication ability, creative ability, purposefulness and responsibility; common managerial (ability to work in a team, ability to manage conflicts, ability to manage, strategic thinking ability, ability to plan team work and distribute rights and obligations and co-ordinate work; special managerial (ability to justify and make decisions under conditions of uncertainty and dynamism, analytical abilities, ability to master new directions and methods of work and use them, skills and ability to form justified recommendations, special knowledge – theoretical grounds and recommendations of modern science with respect to introduction of controlling.

  19. The manager of the future and the team performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drd. ec. Mirela Udrea

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The achievement of strategic objectives of any economic organization cannot be real withoutturning to account the professional potential of all its employees, of their abilities and knowledge.“Team work”, as a method of activities organization, is a requirement in order to obtain success. The teamwork based on solidarity and cohesion is more performant than team work based on individualism andcompetition.The confidence is the basic principle in order to build a performant team, within the team (confidencebetween the members of team and, also, the confidence of the whole team in their leader (manager. Theworking style of a manager has an influence on the team working style leaded by him.Manager of future will be a decisive progress factor through his open-minded personality for noveltyand his involvement, and the prevalent feature of his activities will be “orientation to excellency ”.

  20. Are We Ready to Go Live with Our Team Projects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice Whatley

    2016-05-01

    Over the three years that the Live Projects have been running, feedback indicates that the students gain employability skills from the projects, and the organisations involved develop links with the university and benefit from output from the projects. A number of suggestions for improving the administration of the Live Projects were suggested, such as providing clients with information on timescales and providing students with more guidance on managing the projects.

  1. Ace Project as a Project Management Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Melinda; Guynes, Carl S.; Simard, Karine

    2010-01-01

    The primary challenge of project management is to achieve the project goals and objectives while adhering to project constraints--usually scope, quality, time and budget. The secondary challenge is to optimize the allocation and integration of resources necessary to meet pre-defined objectives. Project management software provides an active…

  2. Power, politics, and top management team characteristics: do they matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerowitz, M B

    1998-01-01

    This study assesses the contributions of the leader power and top management team characteristics to perceived strategic capability. Low age heterogeneity and low tenure heterogeneity were found to have a positive association with perceived adaptability. High diversity in educational specialization was also found to be positively associated with adaptability. Top management perceptions of CEO power were, however, lower among high adaptors. Implications for leadership research, senior management recruitment, and the design of management development for top management teams are discussed.

  3. HERMES project management I

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    A two-hours course on the HERMES Project Management Methodology to the attention of Project Leaders and Project Participants. The methodology is quickly presented; the focus is put on the roles and responsibilities and on the project initiation phase. The course is given in French with slides in English. On April 22nd 2013, a new version of the HERMES methodology was made public. For practical reasons, this course is still given based on the 2009 version of HERMES (a.k.a. HERMES 4).

  4. The Future of Project Management in Technical Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance

    2006-01-01

    Project Management increasing shapes workplace communication, especially when technical commuicators participate in cross-disciplinary development teams. This paper looks at the future of project management in technical communication and argues for a communicative approach to project management...... for technical communication students. The Project Management course in the International Bachelor Program of Marketing and Management Communication at the Aarhus School of Business is described, and the implications fortechnical communication curricula are discussed....

  5. Project management in health informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an educational overview of: * the concept of project management and its role in modern management * the generic project lifecycle process * processes used in developing a plan for the management of resources - time, cost, physical resources and people * the concept of managing risk in projects * communication processes and practices that are important to the management of projects.

  6. Cooperative Learning through Team-Based Projects in the Biotechnology Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luginbuhl, Sarah C; Hamilton, Paul T

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a cooperative-learning, case studies project model that has teams of students working with biotechnology professionals on company-specific problems. These semester-long, team-based projects can be used effectively to provide students with valuable skills in an industry environment and experience addressing real issues faced by biotechnology companies. Using peer-evaluations, we have seen improvement in students' professional skills such as time-management, quality of work, and level of contribution over multiple semesters. This model of team-based, industry-sponsored projects could be implemented in other college and university courses/programs to promote professional skills and expose students to an industry setting.

  7. Leadership Styles: Perceptions in Information Technology Project Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fune, Roy P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to uncover Information Technology (IT) Project Managers' and IT Professionals' perceptions of effective leadership styles as they apply to project success. There have been prior studies dealing with the differences in perceptions between IT Functional Manager's leadership self-perception versus staff perceptions of…

  8. Managing stress in a palliative care team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vineeta; Woodman, Clare

    2010-12-01

    This article describes a strategy to reduce the high levels of stress experienced by community nurses in a children's palliative care team. The development, use and effectiveness of a problem-solving team intervention are illustrated by direct quotations from the nurses themselves.

  9. Effects of team tenure and leadership in self-managing teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoker, J.I.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose - This study seeks to identify the relationship between leader behaviour and the effectiveness of the members of a self-managing team (SMT) in terms of perceived individual performance and emotional exhaustion. In particular, it aims to examine the moderating role of individual team tenure.

  10. The Perspective of Women Managing Research Teams in Social Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas, Marina; Castro, Diego

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a research study that focuses on how women manage research teams. More specifically, the study aims to ascertain the perception of female researchers who are leaders of research groups in social sciences with regard to the formation, operation and management of their research teams. Fifteen interviews were carried out, eight…

  11. Top management team heterogeneity, strategic change and operational performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naranjo Gil, D.; Hartmann, F.; Maas, V.S.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the role of top management team (TMT) heterogeneity in facilitating strategic change. Based on the upper echelons literature, we argue that heterogeneous management teams are better able to handle the simultaneous and conflicting demands of refocusing the organization

  12. BODIES OF KNOWLEDGE IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND PROJECT QUALITY MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Gvozdenovic

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the main trends is standardization of project management. Some of the most important bodies of knowledge in project management, which were created by professional associations for project management are given in this paper. The main of the project management, apart from minimization of time, resources and costs, is to finish the project in the required quality, i.e. it is very important during the whole process of project management to provide realizing the project without any deviations from the previously set quality standards. Basic processes of project quality management are: quality planning, quality assurance and quality control.

  13. Experience as Knowledge in a New Product Development Team: Implications for Knowledge Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to better understand how New Product Development (NPD) team members apply their experiences to meet the task needs of their project. Although "experience" is highly valued in team members, little research has looked specifically at experiences as a type of knowledge, and how this knowledge is used in work settings. This research evaluated nearly 200 instances where team members referenced past experiences during team meetings. During these experience exchanges, team members structured the sharing of their experiences to include three common elements: the source of the experience, the nature of the experience, and the degree of relevance to the current work of the team. The experiences fell into four categories: people (relationships), process, product, and politics. This paper describes how team members structured, applied, and integrated their individual experiences and presents the resulting implications for knowledge management systems that wish to exploit experience knowledge.

  14. Agile Project Portfolio Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jesper Rank; Riis, Jens Ove; Mikkelsen, Hans

    2005-01-01

    This paper will provide a preliminary introduction to the application of Agile Thinking in management of project portfolio and company development. At any point in time, companies have a crowd of development initiatives spread around the organisation and managed at different levels...... in the managerial hierarchy. They compete for resources and managerial attention, and they often take too long time - and some do not survive in the rapid changing context. Top man¬agers ask for speed, flexibility and effectiveness in the portfolio of development activities (projects). But which competencies...

  15. Project as a System and its Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Skalický

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The contribution aims to describe project as a system, to define project control goal and strategy, control variables and their relationships. Three common control variables represented by the project triangle, are extended by two other important variables – project risk and quality. The control system consists of two components: social one – project manager and project team – and technical one – project dynamic simulation model as a decision making support of project manager in project milestones. In the project planning phase, the project baseline with planned controlled variables is created. In milestones after project launch, the actual values of these variables are measured. If the actual values deviate from planned ones, corrective actions are proposed and new baseline for the following control interval is created. Project plan takes into account the actual project progress and optimum corrective actions are determined by simulation, respecting control strategy and availability of resources. The contribution presents list of references to articles dealing with project as a system and its simulation. In most cases, they refer to the project control using the Earned Value Management method and its derivatives. Using of the dynamic simulation model for project monitoring and control, suggested in this contribution, presents a novel approach. The proposed model can serve as departure point to future research of authors and for development of appropriate and applicable tool.

  16. Targeting relationally integrated project teams for sustainable PPPs

    OpenAIRE

    Kumaraswamy, M. M.; Ling, F. Y. Y.; Anvuur, A. M.; Rahman, M. M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – This paper targets the development of comprehensive approaches to prequalifying teams for Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). Design/methodology/approach – Research outcomes from a study into “relationally integrated project teams” (RIPTs) were applied to necessarily longer-term PPP scenarios. A force field model was developed to visualise the importance of stronger relational forces between the many PPP participants for “sustainable RIPTs” (SRITs). A framework was conceptualised to...

  17. NORSTAR Project: Norfolk public schools student team for acoustical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Ronald C.

    1987-01-01

    Development of the NORSTAR (Norfolk Public Student Team for Acoustical Research) Project includes the definition, design, fabrication, testing, analysis, and publishing the results of an acoustical experiment. The student-run program is based on a space flight organization similar to the Viking Project. The experiment will measure the scattering transfer of momentum from a sound field to spheres in a liquid medium. It is hoped that the experimental results will shed light on a difficult physics problem - the difference in scattering cross section (the overall effect of the sound wave scattering) for solid spheres and hollow spheres of differing wall thicknesses.

  18. Towards a Methodology for Managing Competencies in Virtual Teams - A Systemic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Marinita; Stal-Le Cardinal, Julie; Bocquet, Jean-Claude

    Virtual instruments and tools are future trends in Engineering which are a response to the growing complexity of engineering tasks, the facility of communication and strong collaborations on the international market. Outsourcing, off-shoring, and the globalization of organisations’ activities have resulted in the formation of virtual product development teams. Individuals who are working in virtual teams must be equipped with diversified competencies that provide a basis for virtual team building. Thanks to the systemic approach of the functional analysis our paper responds to the need of a methodology of competence management to build virtual teams that are active in virtual design projects in the area of New Product Development (NPD).

  19. From project management to project leadership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braun, F.; Avital, M.

    2010-01-01

    It is virtually a truism that good leadership practices can help project managers with attaining the desired project outcome. However, a better understanding of which leadership practices enable project managers to be more effective warrants further investigation. Subsequently, in this study, we

  20. An IS Project Management Course Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    Information Systems curricula should provide project management (PM) theory, current practice, and hands-on experience. The schedule usually does not allow time in Analysis and Design courses for development oriented project management instruction other than a short introduction. Similarly, networking courses usually don't put project management…

  1. Self-managing teams: a strategy for quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feifer, Chris; Nocella, Kiki; DeArtola, Ignacio; Rowden, Suzanne; Morrison, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Organizations are impacted by their environments, and health care settings are no different. Individuals charged with improving a practice are often impeded by environmental barriers, including incomplete information for decision making. One strategy to empower an organization for change is to form a self-managing team. This paper discusses the self-managing team concept and uses a case study to illustrate its application in primary care. Factors contributing to team success are presented as a guide, and a reminder--there is more to an effective team than gathering people in a room.

  2. Structural equation modeling analysis of factors influencing architects' trust in project design teams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Zhi-kun; NG Fung-fai; WANG Jia-yuan

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis of factors influencing architects' trust in project design teams. We undertook a survey of architects, during which we distributed 193 questionnaires in 29 A-level architectural We used Amos 6.0 for SEM to identify significant personal construct based factors affecting interpersonal trust. The results show that only social interaction between architects significantly affects their interpersonal trust. The explained variance of trust is not very high in the model. Therefore, future research should add more factors into the current model. The practical implication is that team managers should promote the social interactions between team members such that the interpersonal trust level between team members can be improved.

  3. Exploring Project Management Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steven Nijhuis

    2017-01-01

    From the article: "The object of this paper is to explore the actual practice in project management education in the Netherlands and compare it to reference institutions and recent literature. A little over 40% of the Higher Education institutions in the Netherlands mentions PM education in

  4. Managing a sensitive project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etcheber, Pascal

    1998-01-01

    A 'sensitive' project needs to be managed differently from a 'normal' project. This statement might seem simple enough. However, it does not seem to be a simple task to prove it in twenty minutes. This paper is an attempt to share with the audience some of the experiences the company had dealing with sensitive projects. It describes what a sensitive project is, though of all people, the 'nuclear' should know. Then the common mistakes are described, that are made in the hoping that some personal experiences are recognised. Finally the company's strategy is shown, how we foster third party support and the main tools to be used. Ultimately, success is ensured by having a sufficient quantity of allies. A sensitive project does not die because it has too many opponents, but because it has too few allies. Finding and helping allies to act is the thrust of our activity. It enables sensitive projects which deserve to succeed to do so, where traditional management fails miserably

  5. Project Success in IT Project Management

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui, Farhan Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    The rate of failed and challenged Information Technology (IT) projects is too high according to the CHAOS Studies by the Standish Group and the literature on project management (Standish Group, 2008). The CHAOS Studies define project success as meeting the triple constraints of scope, time, and cost. The criteria for project success need to be agreed by all parties before the start of the project and constantly reviewed as the project progresses. Assessing critical success factors is another ...

  6. An integrative model of knowledge management and team work

    OpenAIRE

    Juan A. Marin-Garcia; Mª Elena Zarate-Martinez

    2008-01-01

    Human Resource Management relevance in Knowledge Management has been studied in academic literature mostly from the point of view of recruitment, selection, wages and salaries and career development processes. We have found few publications that are focused in the behaviour of the group of people who generate, share and transfer that knowledge while working in a team. The aim of this paper is to propose a framework that describes the relation between knowledge management and team work,, integ...

  7. Mobile crisis management teams as part of an effective crisis management system for rural communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trantham, Doug; Sherry, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Mobile crisis management teams provide crisis prevention and intervention services in community settings. The Appalachian Community Services crisis management program shows how such teams can be used to effectively serve rural communities.

  8. Building an exceptional imaging management team: from theory to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Laurie

    2010-01-01

    Building a strong, cohesive, and talented managerial team is a critical endeavor for imaging administrators, as the job will be enhanced if supported by a group of high-performing, well-developed managers. For the purposes of this article, leadership and management are discussed as two separate, yet equally important, components of an imaging administrator's role. The difference between the two is defined as: leadership relates to people, management relates to process. There are abundant leadership and management theories that can help imaging administrators develop managers and ultimately build a better team. Administrators who apply these theories in practical and meaningful ways will improve their teams' leadership and management aptitude. Imaging administrators will find it rewarding to coach and develop managers and witness transformations that result from improved leadership and management abilities.

  9. Online Project Management for Dynamic e-Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia RUSU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Today's collaborative projects demand efficient and productive software application tools for the workplace that will bring remote teams together to get the work done. Dynamic e-collaboration is a necessity for virtual relations and business agreements. It depends on two distinct factors: trust and need. This paper presents a way to manage remote teams using a web application developed with ColMap model of project management in an IT company. The information exposed and shared applications with partners in collaborative projects are based on RBAC. Group collaboration and management software has been proven to successfully manage and coordinate projects.

  10. Learning to evaluate multidisciplinary crisis-management team exercises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berlo, M.P.W. van; Dommele, R. van; Schneider, P.; Veerdonk, I. van de; Braakhekke, E.; Hendriks van de Weem, N.; Dijkman, E. van; Wartna, S.

    2007-01-01

    Training of multidisciplinary crisis management teams is becoming more common practice. Nevertheless, the value of these trainings and exercises is questionable. Scenarios are quite often realistic and challenging to the trainees: the team members are heavily engaged in doing their jobs in a

  11. No More Heroes: Entrepreneurial Learning in the SME Management Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckeown, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Entrepreneurship is increasingly viewed as a plural rather than singular endeavour. This paper develops a conceptual framework of team-based entrepreneurial learning, challenging the myth of the entrepreneurial "Lone Ranger" and revealing the significance of power structures in the SME management team in mediating what is and is not learnt.…

  12. Performance of District Disaster Management Teams after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Uganda is vulnerable to several natural, man-made and a hybrid of disasters including drought, famine, floods, warfare, and disease outbreaks. We assessed the district disaster team's performance, roles and experiences following the training. Findings: The disasters most commonly experienced by the district ...

  13. What are the communication challenges for politicians, experts and stakeholders in order to enhance transparency in nuclear waste management decisions? Report from a Team Syntegrity Meeting. The European Project RISCOM-II. Work Package 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Kjell; Espejo, Raul; Wene, Clas-Otto

    2003-09-01

    The Team Syntegrity Meeting is a special part of the project. It aims for increased awareness among key stakeholder groups in Europe about how nuclear waste decision processes should be developed in order to increase transparency and trust. Team Syntegrity is conducted with a special meeting format. The self-organisation of the meeting is a strong positive feature of the format. Instead of having a project leader setting the agenda, the participants formulate their own topics of relevance starting from an opening question. This report documents the meeting that was held in Lanaken, Belgium on 14-17 May 2002. The opening question for the meeting was: What are communication challenges for politicians, experts and stakeholders in order to enhance transparency in nuclear waste management decisions? There are different opinions about how communication on nuclear waste issues should be done. There are differences between stakeholder groups, and there are different approaches taken in various countries. Still it should be possible to reach a deeper understanding of social communications, that is, understanding the requirements to have effective communications between policy makers, experts and stakeholders. The aim was thus not to develop common views on the nuclear waste problem as such, but rather common grounds for developing procedures for effective communication. Hopefully, this meeting made some progress in this direction. The call for the Team Syntegrity (TS) Meeting resulted in 105 Statements of Importance given in Appendix 2. Following the TS format the meeting then formed its own agenda by first producing 30 Aggregated Statements of Importance (Appendix 3), which were grouped into 12 Consolidated Statements of Importance or topics. The group discussions were thus held under the twelve topics of: Consultation, communication and participation; Mutual learning; Roles and arenas; Heritage; Transparency; Wider context; Process; Risk; Institutional cultures

  14. Management & Communication: Project Management Case Study

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2004-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the recent launch of a new workshop on Project Management. This is designed for People with budgetary, scheduling and/or organizational responsibilities in a project or a sub-project. The objectives through a management case study specially suited to CERN are: to become familiar with modern management techniques in use for structuring, planning, scheduling, costing and progress monitoring of a project or a sub-project. to understand in-depth issues associated with Deliverable-oriented Project Management, Earned Value Management, Advanced Project Cost Engineering and Project Risk Management. The full description of this workshop can be found here. The next session will be held on 8 October 2004. If you are interested in this workshop, please contact Nathalie Dumeaux, email or 78144. Programme of Seminars October to December 2004 Situation : 21.09.2004 Séminaires bilingues Dates Jours Places disponibles Project Management Case study 8 October 1 oui Intr...

  15. Can teams benefit from using a mindful infrastructure when defensive behaviour threatens complex innovation projects?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeij, P.R.A.; Dhondt, S.; Gaspersz, J.B.R.; Vroome, E.M.M. de

    2016-01-01

    Projects are often doomed to fail. An explorative case study which carried out team-based complex innovation projects in a research and technology organisation suggests three main results. 1] Project team leaders experienced that the complexity involved in the various aspects of team functioning,

  16. Making Choices: Self-Directed Teams or Total Quality Management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holpp, Lawrence

    1992-01-01

    Describes differences between total quality management and self-directed teams in terms of job design, decision making, flexibility, supervision, labor relations, quality, customers, and training. Offers suggestions for which method to choose when. (SK)

  17. GLOBAL TEAM MANAGEMENT: AN ESSENTIAL COMPONENT OF FIRMS’ INNOVATION STRATEGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AZİM ÖZTÜRK

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the world marketplace some firms compete successfully and others fail to gain global competitive advantage. Some researchers argue that innovation strategy is the answer to successfully meeting today’s and tomorrow’s global business challenges.  An important aspect of the innovation strategy is managing global teams effectively.  Thus, firms of tomorrow will be characterized by values such as teamwork, innovation, cultural diversity, and a global mindset.  The rapid globalization of business, and increasing competition will continue to drive the need for effective teamwork and/in innovation management.  The purpose of our research is to gain insight into global team management and its role as a major component of innovation strategy.  We discuss the changing and developing functions of teamwork, examine the characteristics of global teams, and finally offer a process to achieve effective global team management.

  18. Switchgear project meticulously managed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Electrical engineering and estates personnel at Sodexo--which manages a wide range of soft and hard facilities management services for five hospitals under a PFI contract at the Manchester Royal Infirmary--have successfully planned, managed, and co-ordinated, a complex electrical engineering project which saw high voltage (HV) switchgear in the site's main intake sub-station dismantled by the supplier to repair a potential earthing mechanism fault which would have prevented individual switchgear panels being shut down, to, for example, cater for renovation of electrical cabling or components cross the site's high voltage network. With detailed planning, including provision for bringing onto site temporary bulk generators, and the formulation of a 600-step switching programme, the replacement of potential faulty driver components in the disconnect mechanism for 20 HV switchgear panels was completed in just four weeks, with minimal interruption to the vast complex's power supply.

  19. SemanticOrganizer: A Customizable Semantic Repository for Distributed NASA Project Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Richard M.; Berrios, Daniel C.; Carvalho, Robert E.; Hall, David R.; Rich, Stephen J.; Sturken, Ian B.; Swanson, Keith J.; Wolfe, Shawn R.

    2004-01-01

    SemanticOrganizer is a collaborative knowledge management system designed to support distributed NASA projects, including diverse teams of scientists, engineers, and accident investigators. The system provides a customizable, semantically structured information repository that stores work products relevant to multiple projects of differing types. SemanticOrganizer is one of the earliest and largest semantic web applications deployed at NASA to date, and has been used in diverse contexts ranging from the investigation of Space Shuttle Columbia's accident to the search for life on other planets. Although the underlying repository employs a single unified ontology, access control and ontology customization mechanisms make the repository contents appear different for each project team. This paper describes SemanticOrganizer, its customization facilities, and a sampling of its applications. The paper also summarizes some key lessons learned from building and fielding a successful semantic web application across a wide-ranging set of domains with diverse users.

  20. ELECTRICAL SAFETY IMPROVEMENT PROJECT A COMPLEX WIDE TEAMING INITIATIVE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GRAY BJ

    2007-11-26

    This paper describes the results of a year-long project, sponsored by the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG) and designed to improve overall electrical safety performance throughout Department of Energy (DOE)-owned sites and laboratories. As evidenced by focused metrics, the Project was successful primarily due to the joint commitment of contractor and DOE electrical safety experts, as well as significant support from DOE and contractor senior management. The effort was managed by an assigned project manager, using classical project-management principles that included execution of key deliverables and regular status reports to the Project sponsor. At the conclusion of the Project, the DOE not only realized measurable improvement in the safety of their workers, but also had access to valuable resources that will enable them to do the following: evaluate and improve electrical safety programs; analyze and trend electrical safety events; increase electrical safety awareness for both electrical and non-electrical workers; and participate in ongoing processes dedicated to continued improvement.

  1. Project Management Methodology in Human Resource Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josler, Cheryl; Burger, James

    2005-01-01

    When charged with overseeing a project, how can one ensure that the project will be completed on time, within budget, and to the satisfaction of everyone involved? In this article, the authors examine project management methodology as a means of ensuring that projects are conducted in a disciplined, well-managed and consistent manner that serves…

  2. [Community health in primary health care teams: a management objective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebot Adell, Carme; Pasarin Rua, Maribel; Canela Soler, Jaume; Sala Alvarez, Clara; Escosa Farga, Alex

    2016-12-01

    To describe the process of development of community health in a territory where the Primary Health Care board decided to include it in its roadmap as a strategic line. Evaluative research using qualitative techniques, including SWOT analysis on community health. Two-steps study. Primary care teams (PCT) of the Catalan Health Institute in Barcelona city. The 24 PCT belonging to the Muntanya-Dreta Primary Care Service in Barcelona city, with 904 professionals serving 557,430 inhabitants. Application of qualitative methodology using SWOT analysis in two steps (two-step study). Step 1: Setting up a core group consisting of local PCT professionals; collecting the community projects across the territory; SWOT analysis. Step 2: From the needs identified in the previous phase, a plan was developed, including a set of training activities in community health: basic, advanced, and a workshop to exchange experiences from the PCTs. A total of 80 team professionals received specific training in the 4 workshops held, one of them an advanced level. Two workshops were held to exchange experiences with 165 representatives from the local teams, and 22 PCTs presenting their practices. In 2013, 6 out of 24 PCTs have had a community diagnosis performed. Community health has achieved a good level of development in some areas, but this is not the general situation in the health care system. Its progression depends on the management support they have, the local community dynamics, and the scope of the Primary Health Care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Self-managing teams in manufacturing companies: implications for the engineering function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leede, de Jan; Stoker, Janka

    Reports on an explanatory multiple case-study of companies with self-managing teams. Reasons for introducing self-managing teams; Cooperation between self-managing teams and engineering development; Conclusion.

  4. Project management of radwaste retrofits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaught, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    Many utilities are finding it necessary to provide additional radioactive waste processing facilities at operating or nearly completed nuclear stations in order to accommodate the ever-changing regulatory, political and socio-economic environment in which we operate. This paper describes the project approach taken at Duke Power Company to provide a comprehensive radioactive waste processing facility at Oconee Nuclear Station. Following a historical perspective, the philosophy and mechanics of the project team are discussed. The goal of the project team was to provide a facility which could meet the liquid and solid radioactive waste processing needs of Oconee within the restraints of a utility budget and schedule. The unique quality of the project team approach was the integral involvement of all of the necessary departments in every part of the design, construction and start-up phases. The project team thereby utilized feedback from over thirty reactor years of operational experience. The remainder of the paper provides examples of the problems encountered and their resolution (eg. equipment layout, materials handling, vendor improvements and regulatory changes all required design-in-progress changes). It has been the integration and concentration of the diverse resources of a large utility into a cross-departmental team which has allowed the timely resolution of the necessary changes. This same philosophy is being applied to the facility start-up program and to other major projects at Duke Power Company

  5. Crisis Team Management in a Scarce Resource Setting: Angkor Hospital for Children in Siem Reap, Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Alynn Henker

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionA crisis team management (CTM simulation course was developed by volunteers from Health Volunteers Overseas for physicians and nurses at Angkor Hospital for Children (AHC in Siem Reap, Cambodia. The framework for the course was adapted from crisis resource management (1, 2, crisis team training (3, and TeamSTEPPs© models (4. The CTM course focused on teaching physicians and nurses on the development of team performance knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Challenges to providing this course at AHC included availability of simulation equipment, cultural differences in learning, and language barriers. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the impact of a CTM simulation course at AHC on attitudes and perceptions of participants on concepts related to team performance.MethodsEach of the CTM courses consisted of three lectures, including team performance concepts, communication, and debriefing followed by rotation through four simulation scenarios. The evaluation instrument used to evaluate the AHC CTM course was developed for Cambodian staff at AHC based on TeamSTEPPs© instruments evaluating attitude and perceptions of team performance (5. CTM team performance concepts included in lectures, debriefing sessions, and the evaluation instrument were: team structure, leadership, situation monitoring, mutual support, and communication. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to analyze pre- and post-test paired data from participants in the course.ResultsOf the 54 participants completing the three CTM courses at AHC, 27 were nurses, 6 were anesthetists, and 21 were physicians. Attitude and perception scores were found to significantly improve (p < 0.05 for team structure, leadership, situation monitoring, and communication. Team performance areas that improved the most were: discussion of team performance, communication, and exchange of information.ConclusionTeaching of non-technical skills can be effective in a setting with scarce

  6. Crisis Team Management in a Scarce Resource Setting: Angkor Hospital for Children in Siem Reap, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henker, Richard Alynn; Henker, Hiroko; Eng, Hor; O'Donnell, John; Jirativanont, Tachawan

    2017-01-01

    A crisis team management (CTM) simulation course was developed by volunteers from Health Volunteers Overseas for physicians and nurses at Angkor Hospital for Children (AHC) in Siem Reap, Cambodia. The framework for the course was adapted from crisis resource management (1, 2), crisis team training (3), and TeamSTEPPs© models (4). The CTM course focused on teaching physicians and nurses on the development of team performance knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Challenges to providing this course at AHC included availability of simulation equipment, cultural differences in learning, and language barriers. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the impact of a CTM simulation course at AHC on attitudes and perceptions of participants on concepts related to team performance. Each of the CTM courses consisted of three lectures, including team performance concepts, communication, and debriefing followed by rotation through four simulation scenarios. The evaluation instrument used to evaluate the AHC CTM course was developed for Cambodian staff at AHC based on TeamSTEPPs© instruments evaluating attitude and perceptions of team performance (5). CTM team performance concepts included in lectures, debriefing sessions, and the evaluation instrument were: team structure, leadership, situation monitoring, mutual support, and communication. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to analyze pre- and post-test paired data from participants in the course. Of the 54 participants completing the three CTM courses at AHC, 27 were nurses, 6 were anesthetists, and 21 were physicians. Attitude and perception scores were found to significantly improve ( p  < 0.05) for team structure, leadership, situation monitoring, and communication. Team performance areas that improved the most were: discussion of team performance, communication, and exchange of information. Teaching of non-technical skills can be effective in a setting with scarce resources in a Southeastern Asian country.

  7. Science operations management. [with Infrared Astronomy Satellite project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, G. F.

    1984-01-01

    The operation teams engaged in the IR Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) project included scientists from the IRAS International Science Team. The detailed involvement of these scientists in the design, testing, validation, and operations phases of the IRAS mission contributed to the success of this project. The Project Management Group spent a substantial amount of time discussing science-related issues, because science team coleaders were members from the outset. A single scientific point-of-contact for the Management Group enhanced the depth and continuity of agreement reached in decision-making.

  8. Project management and Enterprise systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Buhl, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Implementing and Operating integrated Enterprise Systems are a multidimensional effort. It seriously challenges the IT supplier as well as the professional service provider client. The paper discuss these issues in a project management perspective. A framework for supporting project management...

  9. The Challenges and Enhancing Opportunities of Global Project Management: Evidence from Chinese and Dutch Cross-Cultural Project Management

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ying; Marquis, Christopher G; Filippov, Sergey; Haasnoot, Henk-Jan; van der Steen, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the role of national and organisational culture in day-to-day activities of multinational project teams, specifically focusing on differences between Chinese and Dutch project managers. We rely on fieldwork observation and interviews with representatives from a diverse set of organizations in China and the Netherlands. Analyses focus on the impact of cultural differences on five project management processes – (1) project planning, (2) cost and quality management, (3) r...

  10. Agile Project Management For Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Layton, Mark C

    2012-01-01

    Be flexible and faster with Agile project management As mobile and web technologies continue to evolve rapidly, there is added pressure to develop and implement software projects in weeks instead of months. Agile Project Management For Dummies can make that happen. This is the first book to provide a simple, step-by-step guide to Agile Project Management approaches, tools, and techniques. With the fast pace of mobile and web technology development, software project development must keep pace; Agile Project Management enables developers to complete and implement projects more quickly and this b

  11. Project management for economical nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majerle, P.P.

    2005-01-01

    The price of electricity is significantly influenced by the cost of the initial generation asset. The cost of the initial nuclear generation asset is significantly influenced by the design and construction duration. Negative variations in the cost and duration of actual design and construction have historically impacted the early relative economics of nuclear power generation. Successful management of plant design information will mitigate the risks of the design and construction of future nuclear plants. Information management tools that can model the integrated delivery of large complex projects enable the project owners to accurately evaluate project progress, as well as the economic impact of regulatory, political, or market activities not anticipated in the project execution plan. Significant differences exist in the electrical energy markets, project delivery models, and fuel availability between continents and countries. However, each market and project delivery model is challenged by the need to produce economical electrical energy. The information management system presented in this paper provides a means to capture in a single integrated computerized database the design information developed during plant design, procurement, and construction and to allow this information to be updated and retrieved in real time by all project participants. Utilization of the information management system described herein will enable diverse project teams to rapidly and reliably input, share, and retrieve power plant information, thereby supporting project management's goal to make good on its commitment to the economic promise of tomorrow's nuclear electrical power generation by achieving cost-effective construction. (authors)

  12. Managing Communication among Geographically Distributed Teams: A Brazilian Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Ana Carina M.; de Farias Junior, Ivaldir H.; de S. Carneiro, Pedro Jorge

    The growing demand for qualified professionals is making software companies opt for distributed software development (DSD). At the project conception, communication and synchronization of information are critical factors for success. However problems such as time-zone difference between teams, culture, language and different development processes among sites could difficult the communication among teams. In this way, the main goal of this paper is to describe the solution adopted by a Brazilian team to improve communication in a multisite project environment. The purposed solution was based on the best practices described in the literature, and the communication plan was created based on the infrastructure needed by the project. The outcome of this work is to minimize the impact of communication issues in multisite projects, increasing productivity, good understanding and avoiding rework on code and document writing.

  13. CONTEMPORARY TRENDS IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Argirova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The modern information society in ever increasing business projects and time limits to achieve the objectives at minimum cost leads to a search for ways to manage them. Today, more and more managers use IT tools for project management, and the term itself is associated with software solutions for the optimization and management of projects in different fields of human activity. The paper examines the main characteristics of project management by means of information technology. Key tasks and processes in the project implementation and management are discussed.

  14. What are the communication challenges for politicians, experts and stakeholders in order to enhance transparency in nuclear waste management decisions? Report from a Team Syntegrity Meeting. The European Project RISCOM-II. Work Package 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Kjell [Karinta-Konsult, Taeby (Sweden); Espejo, Raul [Syncho Ltd., Birmingham (United Kingdom); Wene, Clas-Otto [Wenergy, Lund (Sweden)

    2003-09-01

    The Team Syntegrity Meeting is a special part of the project. It aims for increased awareness among key stakeholder groups in Europe about how nuclear waste decision processes should be developed in order to increase transparency and trust. Team Syntegrity is conducted with a special meeting format. The self-organisation of the meeting is a strong positive feature of the format. Instead of having a project leader setting the agenda, the participants formulate their own topics of relevance starting from an opening question. This report documents the meeting that was held in Lanaken, Belgium on 14-17 May 2002. The opening question for the meeting was: What are communication challenges for politicians, experts and stakeholders in order to enhance transparency in nuclear waste management decisions? There are different opinions about how communication on nuclear waste issues should be done. There are differences between stakeholder groups, and there are different approaches taken in various countries. Still it should be possible to reach a deeper understanding of social communications, that is, understanding the requirements to have effective communications between policy makers, experts and stakeholders. The aim was thus not to develop common views on the nuclear waste problem as such, but rather common grounds for developing procedures for effective communication. Hopefully, this meeting made some progress in this direction. The call for the Team Syntegrity (TS) Meeting resulted in 105 Statements of Importance given in Appendix 2. Following the TS format the meeting then formed its own agenda by first producing 30 Aggregated Statements of Importance (Appendix 3), which were grouped into 12 Consolidated Statements of Importance or topics. The group discussions were thus held under the twelve topics of: Consultation, communication and participation; Mutual learning; Roles and arenas; Heritage; Transparency; Wider context; Process; Risk; Institutional cultures

  15. Strategic leadership of portfolio and project management

    CERN Document Server

    Kloppenborg, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    As an executive in today's economy, your organization may have limited resources and bench strength. How can you and other leaders make the most of your company's assets? This book will instruct you and your leadership teams on implementing strategy through identifying, selecting, prioritizing, resourcing, and governing an optimal combination of projects and other work. Inside, you'll learn how to sponsor every project stage, as well as instruct your project managers and direct reports to follow your lead. Detailed advice is given for project management competency on utilizing input from customers, employees, and processes. Much of your organization's work is probably dependent on information technology and understanding and using information technology as a strategic weapon, and with this book, you'll learn how your organization can become competitive and how to effectively implement smart business strategies. This book outlines how these portfolio and project decisions have to be made based on both qualitat...

  16. Globalization And Knowledge Management In Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bubel Dagmara

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge management is a field of management dealing with the use of knowledge, methods, and tools to effectively coordinate complex and unique projects. In accordance with this definition, project knowledge can be treated as a useful resource of information that allows projects to be implemented in compliance with its objectives: time, costs, and quality of results. Knowledge in the activity of an organization, including in the implementation of projects, has for many years been an area of interest to researchers, who confirmed its key importance for building permanent competitive advantages of companies and enterprises. In project management, this issue takes on a new character, as it is transferred to the field of dynamic, time restricted, temporary, and team-implemented projects. The aim of this paper is to present the results of a survey regarding the use of practices of knowledge management in projects in international organizations and to show that the concept of knowledge management in projects is a tool conducive to spreading the process of globalization.

  17. Head and neck multidisciplinary team meetings: Effect on patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Markus; Gore, Sinclair M; Read, Rebecca L; Alexander, Ashlin; Mehta, Ankur; Elliot, Michael; Milross, Chris; Boyer, Michael; Clark, Jonathan R

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was for us to present our findings on the prospectively audited impact of head and neck multidisciplinary team meetings on patient management. We collected clinical data, the pre-multidisciplinary team meeting treatment plan, the post-multidisciplinary team meeting treatment plans, and follow-up data from all patients discussed at a weekly multidisciplinary team meeting and we recorded the changes in management. One hundred seventy-two patients were discussed in 39 meetings. In 52 patients (30%), changes in management were documented of which 20 (67%) were major. Changes were statistically more likely when the referring physician was a medical or radiation oncologist, when the initial treatment plan did not include surgery, and when the histology was neither mucosal squamous cell cancer nor a skin malignancy. Compliance to the multidisciplinary team meeting treatment recommendation was 84% for all patients and 70% for patients with changes in their treatment recommendation. Head and neck multidisciplinary team meetings changed management in almost a third of the cases. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Project Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The mission of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is explicitly stated and directed in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, Public Law 95-604, 42 USC 7901 (hereinafter referred to as the ''Act''). Title I of the Act authorizes the Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial actions at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials derived from the processing sites. The Act, amended in January 1983, by Public Law 97-415, also authorizes DOE to perform remedial actions at vicinity properties in Edgemont, South Dakota. Cleanup of the Edgemont processing site is the responsibility of the Tennessee Valley Authority. This document describes the plan, organization, system, and methodologies used to manage the design, construction, and other activities required to clean up the designated sites and associated vicinity properties in accordance with the Act. The plan describes the objectives of the UMTRA Project, defines participants' roles and responsibilities, outlines the technical approach for accomplishing the objectives, and describes the planning and managerial controls to be used in integrating and performing the Project mission. 21 figs., 21 tabs

  19. Risk management methodology for RBMN project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borssatto, Maria F.B.; Tello, Cledola C.O.; Uemura, George

    2013-01-01

    RBMN Project has been developed to design, construct and commission a national repository to dispose the low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes from the operation of nuclear power plants and other industries that use radioactive sources and materials. Risk is a characteristic of all projects. The risks arise from uncertainties due to assumptions associated with the project and the environment in which it is executed. Risk management is the method by which these uncertainties are systematically monitored to ensure that the objectives of the project will be achieved. Considering the peculiarities of the Project, that is, comprehensive scope, multidisciplinary team, apparently polemic due to the unknowing of the subject by the stake holders, especially the community, it is being developed a specific methodology for risk management of this Project. This methodology will be critical for future generations who will be responsible for the final stages of the repository. It will provide greater guarantee to the processes already implemented and will maintain a specific list of risks and solutions for this Project, ensuring safety and security of the repository throughout its life cycle that is the planned to last at least three hundred years. This paper presents the tools and processes already defined, management actions aimed at developing a culture of proactive risk in order to minimize threats to this Project and promote actions that bring opportunities to its success. The methodology is based on solid research on the subject, considering methodologies already established and globally recognized as best practices for project management. (author)

  20. Leadership and organizational tenure diversity as determinants of project team effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Poel, Frouke M.; Stoker, Janka I.; Van der Zee, Karen I.

    2014-01-01

    The present study reveals how leadership effectiveness in project teams is dependent on the level of organizational tenure diversity. Data from 34 project teams showed that transformational leadership is related to organizational commitment, creative behavior, and job satisfaction, but only in teams

  1. Leadership and Organizational Tenure Diversity as Determinants of Project Team Effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Poel, Frouke M.; Stoker, Janka I.; Van der Zee, Karen I.

    2014-01-01

    The present study reveals how leadership effectiveness in project teams is dependent on the level of organizational tenure diversity. Data from 34 project teams showed that transformational leadership is related to organizational commitment, creative behavior, and job satisfaction, but only in teams

  2. Multidisciplinary Cooperation in Crisis Management Teams: a Tool to Improve Team Situation Awareness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, L. de; Kuijt-Evers, L.; Theunissen, N.; Rijk, R. van; Huis in 't Veld, M.

    2011-01-01

    When a crisis occurs, people from different organizations, on different hierarchical levels have to deal with unexpected situations that require coordinated effort. The goal of this research is to improve multidisciplinary cooperation for crisis management teams. We developed a tool, the Multi-mono

  3. Why turnover matters in self-managing work teams : Learning, social integration, and task flexibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vegt, G.S.; Bunderson, S.; Kuipers, B.

    This study considers how turnover in self-managing work teams influences the team interaction processes that promote effective task accomplishment. Drawing from research on self-managing work teams and group process, the authors propose that team turnover affects performance in self-managing teams

  4. An integrative model of knowledge management and team work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. Marin-Garcia

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Human Resource Management relevance in Knowledge Management has been studied in academic literature mostly from the point of view of recruitment, selection, wages and salaries and career development processes. We have found few publications that are focused in the behaviour of the group of people who generate, share and transfer that knowledge while working in a team. The aim of this paper is to propose a framework that describes the relation between knowledge management and team work,, integrating Nonaka and Takeuchi, Leonard- Barton and Heisig framework proposals, as well as to outline some reflexions for further researches.

  5. Building Team Spirit in Organization Management Through a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Building Team Spirit in Organization Management Through a System Approach. ... able to function and attain a dynamic equilibrium for desired level of maximum productivity. It thus helps the manager to pull the various components of the organization together with the awareness, desire and commitment for a common goal.

  6. Project and Sports Events Management

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian Madalin MUNTEANU

    2011-01-01

    This paper tries to capture the importance it holds the project management in socio-cultural sector which stands out when we refer to the sport. So when we talk about project management in sport, to consider a much larger vision, a new project management perspective, they involve a responsibility for the implementation of an event with global impact on very long term. Sports projects, as history shows us, played a significant role in developing societies. Also, all major sports industry proje...

  7. Project Portfolio Management Applications Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Paul POCATILU

    2006-01-01

    Many IT companies are running project simultaneously. In order to achieve the best results, they have to group to the project in portfolios, and to use specific software that helps to manage them. Project portfolio management applications have a high degree of complexity and they are very important for the companies that are using it. This paper focuses on some characteristics of the testing process for project portfolio management applications

  8. Project Portfolio Management Applications Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul POCATILU

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Many IT companies are running project simultaneously. In order to achieve the best results, they have to group to the project in portfolios, and to use specific software that helps to manage them. Project portfolio management applications have a high degree of complexity and they are very important for the companies that are using it. This paper focuses on some characteristics of the testing process for project portfolio management applications

  9. CERN has a new Management team

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Dr Robert Aymar succeeded Professor Luciano Maiani as CERN's Director-General on 1 January 2004. At its 126th Session, chaired by Professor Maurice Bourquin, the CERN Council elected Professor Enzo Iarocci as the new President of Council. In his last presentation to the Council, Professor Maiani reported on CERN's activities during the year and on progress with the LHC Project.

  10. Adaptive self-management of teams of autonomous vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Sloman, M; Asmare, E; Gopalan, A; Lupu, E; Dulay, N

    2008-01-01

    Unmanned Autonomous Vehicles (UAVs) are increasingly deployed for missions that are deemed dangerous or impractical to perform by humans in many military and disaster scenarios. Collaborating UAVs in a team form a Self- Managed Cell (SMC) with at least one commander. UAVs in an SMC may need to operate independently or in sub- groups, out of contact with the commander and the rest of the team in order to perform specific tasks, but must still be able to eventually synchronise state information...

  11. Cross-functional Sourcing Teams – A Purchasing and Supply Management Literature Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Peder Lysholm

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic literature review of scientific papers on cross-functional sourcing teams in top journals within Purchasing and Supply Management. The review identifies four common research topics within the field; Determining factors of sourcing team success, Performance...... management/goals of sourcing teams, Behavior and decisions in sourcing teams and Involvement of purchasing in sourcing teams. Further research on Performance Management and how to create a holistic, teams based perspective in cross-functional sourcing teams is suggested....

  12. How management teams can have a good fight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhardt, K M; Kahwajy, J L; Bourgeois, L J

    1997-01-01

    Top-level managers know that conflict over issues is natural and even necessary. Management teams that challenge one another's thinking develop a more complete understanding of their choices, create a richer range of options, and make better decisions. But the challenge--familiar to anyone who has ever been part of a management team--is to keep constructive conflict over issues from degenerating into interpersonal conflict. From their research on the interplay of conflict, politics, and speed in the decision--making process of management teams, the authors have distilled a set of six tactics characteristic of high-performing teams: They work with more, rather than less, information. They develop multiple alternatives to enrich debate. The establish common goals. They make an effort to inject humor into the workplace. They maintain a balanced corporate power structure. They resolve issues without forcing a consensus. These tactics work because they keep conflict focused on issues; foster collaborative, rather than competitive, relations among team members; and create a sense of fairness in the decision-making process. Without conflict, groups lose their effectiveness. Managers often become withdrawn and only superficially harmonious. The alternative to conflict is not usually agreement but rather apathy and disengagement, which open the doors to a primary cause of major corporate debacles: groupthink.

  13. A case for safety leadership team training of hospital managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Sara J; Hayes, Jennifer; Cooper, Jeffrey B; Vogt, Jay W; Sales, Michael; Aristidou, Angela; Gray, Garry C; Kiang, Mathew V; Meyer, Gregg S

    2011-01-01

    Delivering safe patient care remains an elusive goal. Resolving problems in complex organizations like hospitals requires managers to work together. Safety leadership training that encourages managers to exercise learning-oriented, team-based leadership behaviors could promote systemic problem solving and enhance patient safety. Despite the need for such training, few programs teach multidisciplinary groups of managers about specific behaviors that can enhance their role as leadership teams in the realm of patient safety. The aims of this study were to describe a learning-oriented, team-based, safety leadership training program composed of reinforcing exercises and to provide evidence confirming the need for such training and demonstrating behavior change among management groups after training. Twelve groups of managers from an academic medical center based in the Northeast United States were randomly selected to participate in the program and exposed to its customized, experience-based, integrated, multimodal curriculum. We extracted data from transcripts of four training sessions over 15 months with groups of managers about the need for the training in these groups and change in participants' awareness, professional behaviors, and group activity. Training transcripts confirmed the need for safety leadership team training and provided evidence of the potential for training to increase targeted behaviors. The training increased awareness and use of leadership behaviors among many managers and led to new routines and coordinated effort among most management groups. Enhanced learning-oriented leadership often helped promote a learning orientation in managers' work areas. Team-based training that promotes specific learning-oriented leader behaviors can promote behavioral change among multidisciplinary groups of hospital managers.

  14. A Method for Knowledge Management and Communication Within and Across Multidisciplinary Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don Flynn

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of knowledge management (KM and communication tools in an applied scientific arena where research is performed and knowledge must be managed within and across multidisciplinary teams and organizations is a challenge. Teams of scientists and engineers from up to 17 different technical specialties required knowledge management tools for developing multiple environmental impact statements under challenging circumstances. Factors that contributed to the success of the KM tools included 1 pairing of project staff with Knowledge Systems staff to determine system requirements, 2 the use of the tools by the team as they were being developed thus allowing many opportunities for feedback and interaction, 3 developing the tools to approximate the overall project structure and work flow already in place, 4 providing immediate assistance to the project team as they learned to use the new KM tools, and 5 replacing earlier practices with the new KM approach by "burning the bridges" to past practices after the team had learned to use the new KM tools.

  15. Rethinking Project Management in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejvig, Per

    2012-01-01

    . The chapter argues for a rethinking process due to pervasiveness and complexity in the contemporary project environment where rethinking is needed in order to stay competitive. The suggested approach for the rethinking project management is a framing process where body of ideas is established......Projects are everywhere across different sectors, industries and countries. Project management is no longer a sub-discipline of engineering and other rather technical disciplines but is also used for many other purposes. Even though practice has changed dramatically over the years, the models...... and methodologies for project management has been fairly static and has therefore received substantial criticism for a lack of relevance to practice. Several scholars have therefore started to think more widely about projects and project management conceptualized as rethinking project management. However this theme...

  16. User experience management essential skills for leading effective UX teams

    CERN Document Server

    Lund, Arnie

    2011-01-01

    The role of UX manager is of vital importance -- it means leading a productive team, influencing businesses to adopt user-centered design, and delivering valuable products customers. Few UX professionals who find themselves in management positions have formal training in management. More often than not they are promoted to a management position after having proven themselves as an effective and successful practitioner.Yet as important as the position of manager is to the advancement of the field there are no books that specifically address the needs of user experience managers. Though informat

  17. Management of research and development project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Go, Seok Hwa; Hong Jeong Yu; Hyun, Byeong Hwan

    2010-12-01

    This book introduces summary on management of research and development project, prepare of research and development with investigation and analysis of paper, patent and trend of technology, structure of project, management model, management of project, management of project range, management of project time, management of project cost, management of project goods, management of project manpower, management of communication, management of project risk, management of project supply, management of outcome of R and D, management of apply and enroll of patent and management of technology transfer.

  18. Project Management in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Shannon Atkinson

    2011-01-01

    This study identified factors that influenced the use of project management in higher education research projects. Using a qualitative grounded theory approach that included in-depth interviews with assistant professors, the researcher examined how these individuals were using project management processes and tools and factors that enabled,…

  19. Comprehensive management of project changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aljaž Stare

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research was to examine how project changes can be prevented, and how to reduce their negative impact. Theoretical research examined risk management, project control and change management. Based on the study a “Comprehensive Change Management Model” was developed and verified after conducting empirical research in Slovenian enterprises. The research confirmed that risk management identifies possible changes and reduces their impact; project control ensures the timely detection of changes and an efficient response, while formal change management ensures the effective implementation of changes. The combined functioning of all three areas ensures effective project execution.

  20. Managing Conflict in School Teams: The Impact of Task and Goal Interdependence on Conflict Management and Team Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somech, Anit

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Although conflict has traditionally been considered destructive, recent studies have indicated that conflict management can contribute to effective teamwork. The present study explores conflict management as a team phenomenon in schools. The author examined how the contextual variables (task interdependence, goal interdependence) are…

  1. Project Management: Essential Skill of Nurse Informaticists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipes, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    With the evolution of nursing informatics (NI), the list of skills has advanced from the original definition that included 21 competencies to 168 basic competencies identified in the TIGER-based Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies (TANIC) and 178 advanced skills in the Nursing Informatics Competency Assessment (NICA) L3/L4 developed by Chamberlain College of Nursing, Nursing Informatics Research Team (NIRT). Of these competencies, project management is one of the most important essentials identified since it impacts all areas of NI skills and provides an organizing framework for processes and projects including skills such as design, planning, implementation, follow-up and evaluation. Examples of job roles that specifically require project management skills as an essential part of the NI functions include management, administration, leadership, faculty, graduate level master's and doctorate practicum courses. But first, better understanding of the NI essential skills is vital before adequate education and training programs can be developed.

  2. Evaluation of an Initiative for Fostering Provider-Pharmacist Team Management of Hypertension in Communities

    OpenAIRE

    William R. Doucette; Cailin Lickteig; Stevie Veach; Barry Carter; Barcey Levy

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: 1) Conduct team building activities for provider-community pharmacist teams in small communities and 2) Determine the impact of the team approach on practitioner-reported consequences and 3) Identify obstacles to the team approach and ways to overcome them. Methods: Eleven provider-pharmacist teams were recruited in rural/micropolitan communities in Iowa. The teams participated in team building sessions facilitated by the project leaders, to discuss the team approach. Decisio...

  3. Risk management in nuclear projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salles, Claudio J.R.

    2002-01-01

    The risk management will be defined by different aspects: danger or loss possibility, or responsibility for damage. The risk management is one stage of project management. The risk management is a continuous process of planning, identification, quantification, answer and risk control to maximize the success potential of activity. The reduction of risk is part of priority establishment. This work will indicate how introduce this important instrument in the management of nuclear projects. (author)

  4. Project management in building industry management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Nový

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with contents of the project management on general level first. It mentions the most widespread project management standards, which have historically developed in global scale, their parts and objectives. Further, it describes position of the building industry in national economy, its specific features distinguishing it from the other industrial production, contents of the building industry management and project management of structures. The importance of the role of project manager is documented by characteristics of construction projects, their course, contents of sub-phases, and individual types of managing activities. Attention is devoted to project planning – determination of realization costs, necessary resources, sequence and time course of individual works. The most frequently used graphic methods of schedule presentation – Gantt chart, network chart and frequency bar chart are applied on examples of constructions. These charts can be focused in time sequence on individual types of resources – workforce, finance, materials, energies, and machinery. In conclusion, necessity to manage the project management procedures is emphasized as a part of skills of a construction engineer in the role of preparation manager or construction project realization manager.

  5. Designing and Developing an Effective Safety Program for a Student Project Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Catton

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In the workplace, safety must be the first priority of all employers and employees alike. In order to maintain the safety and well-being of their employees, employers must demonstrate due diligence and provide the appropriate safety training to familiarize employees with the hazards within the workplace. Although, a student “project team” is not a business, the work done by students for their respective teams is synonymous with the work done in a place of business and thus requires that similar safety precautions and training be administered to students by their team leads and faculty advisors. They take on the role of supervisors within the team dynamic. Student teams often utilize the guidelines and policies that their universities or colleges have developed in order to build a set of standard operating procedures and safety training modules. These guidelines aid in providing a base for training for the team, however, they are no substitute for training specific to the safety risks associated with the work the team is doing. In order to comply with these requirements, a full analysis of the workplace is required to be completed. A variety of safety analysis techniques need to be applied to define the hazards within the workplace and institute appropriate measures to mitigate them. In this work, a process is developed for establishing a safety training program for a student project team, utilizing systems safety management techniques and the aspect of gamification to produce incentives for students to continue developing their skills. Although, systems safety management is typically applied to the design of active safety components or systems, the techniques for identifying and mitigating hazards can be applied in the same fashion to the workplace. They allow one to analyze their workplace and determine the hazards their employees might encounter, assign appropriate hazard ratings and segregate each respective hazard by their risks. In so

  6. The Influence of Top Management Team Characteristics on BPD Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy Elly Tulung

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on ”upper echelons theory”, this paper investigates the relation between top management team composition and BPD performance. For top management team characteristics, we employ age, level of education, background of education, gender, and functional background, while for measured the BPD performance we employ return on asset (ROA, return on equity (ROE, capital adequacy ratio (CAR, net interest margin (NIM, loan to deposit ratio (LDR, non-performing loan (NPL and operation expenses to operation income (BOPO. The results show that all characteristics have positive significant influences on BPD performance.

  7. Uncovering Transdisciplinary Team Project Outcomes through Ripple Effect Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Catherine H.; Chalker-Scott, Linda; Martini, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The Garden Team at Washington State University is a transdisciplinary, geographically dispersed group of faculty and staff. As with many such teams, member retention requires effort, as busy individuals may not see the overall benefits of active team membership. Ripple effect mapping is a strategy that can illustrate the tangible and often…

  8. Global Project Management: Graduate Course

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beranek, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    ..., A. James Clark School of Engineering - Project Management Program. The course slides and suggested readings provide a general exploration of the nuances of doing projects globally as compared to domestically...

  9. Efficient and Effective Project Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Pene

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to investigate different authorities and responsibilities of a project manager and of a project leader. Considering the fact that nowadays the project management is becoming the important factor in performing and leading the investments which are modified by modern leadership theories, we can say that the key element is the sovereign leadership of a manager and a project leader. The current multi-project environments and modern techniques at the project management area need the interdisciplinary leadership approach and at the same time they enable the strengthening of company’s competitive features so they are consistently satisfying high project expectations of the project investor or a client.

  10. Investigating the Linkage between Intrinsic Motivation and Project Team Satisfaction in Undergraduate Agricultural Leadership Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Kevan W.; Carter, Hannah S.; Melendez, Marcus W.

    2014-01-01

    Organizations have increased the amount of work that is completed by project teams over the past several decades. This trend is projected to continue into the foreseeable future. In response to this trend, the academic community has increased the number of project team based learning experiences for students in classes. The challenge has been that…

  11. Problem-Based Service Learning: The Evolution of a Team Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor-Greene, Patricia A.

    2002-01-01

    In this article, I describe the evolution of a problem-based service learning project in an undergraduate Abnormal Psychology course. Students worked in teams on a semester-long project to locate and evaluate information and treatment for specific psychiatric disorders. As part of the project, each team selected relevant bibliographic materials,…

  12. An Interdisciplinary Team Project: Psychology and Computer Science Students Create Online Cognitive Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Kathleen A.; Malita, Mihaela

    2014-01-01

    We present our case study of an interdisciplinary team project for students taking either a psychology or computer science (CS) course. The project required psychology and CS students to combine their knowledge and skills to create an online cognitive task. Each interdisciplinary project team included two psychology students who conducted library…

  13. [How management teams use information and control systems to manage hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo-Gil, David

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the relationship between the characteristics of top management teams and the different use of management information and control systems (MICS) to implement policies that encourage cooperation and activity coordination in public hospitals. Data were collected through a questionnaire sent to each member of the top management teams of 231 Spanish public hospitals (chief executive director, medical director, nursing director and director for financial and social issues). A total of 457 valid questionnaires were returned, composing 86 full top management teams (37.23%). Top management team diversity was positively related to the interactive use of MICS. Management teams composed of younger members and members with longer service used MICS interactively. Top management teams with a predominantly clinical education and experience used MICS interactively, while top teams with a predominantly administrative education and experience used MICS diagnostically. The results also showed that cooperation and coordination in hospitals were positively related to the interactive use of MICS and were negatively related to the diagnostic use of MICS. The interactive use of MICS is an important mediator in the relationship between top team diversity and policies focused on hospital decentralization. Top management teams with diverse characteristics (e.g. age, length of service, education and experience) use management information interactively to enhance activity coordination and resource allocation in hospitals. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. The Virtual Design Team: Designing Project Organizations as Engineers Design Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond E. Levitt

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a 20-year program of research intended to advance the theory and practice of organization design for projects from its current status as an art practiced by a handful of consultants worldwide, based on their intuition and tacit knowledge, to: (1 an “organizational engineering” craft, practiced by a new generation of organizational designers; and (2 an attractive and complementary platform for new modes of “virtual synthetic organization theory research.” The paper begins with a real-life scenario that provided the motivation for developing the Virtual Design Team (VDT, an agent-based project organizational simulation tool to help managers design the work processes and organization of project teams engaged in large, semi-routine but complex and fast-paced projects. The paper sets out the underlying philosophy, representation, reasoning, and validation of VDT, and it concludes with suggestions for future research on computational modeling for organization design to extend the frontiers of organizational micro-contingency theory and expand the range of applicability and usefulness of design tools for project organizations and supply-chain networks based on this theory.

  15. Report of the Space Shuttle Management Independent Review Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-02-01

    At the request of the NASA Administrator a team was formed to review the Space Shuttle Program and propose a new management system that could significantly reduce operating costs. Composed of a group of people with broad and extensive experience in spaceflight and related areas, the team received briefings from the NASA organizations and most of the supporting contractors involved in the Shuttle Program. In addition, a number of chief executives from the supporting contractors provided advice and suggestions. The team found that the present management system has functioned reasonably well despite its diffuse structure. The team also determined that the shuttle has become a mature and reliable system, and--in terms of a manned rocket-propelled space launch system--is about as safe as today's technology will provide. In addition, NASA has reduced shuttle operating costs by about 25 percent over the past 3 years. The program, however, remains in a quasi-development mode and yearly costs remain higher than required. Given the current NASA-contractor structure and incentives, it is difficult to establish cost reduction as a primary goal and implement changes to achieve efficiencies. As a result, the team sought to create a management structure and associated environment that enables and motivates the Program to further reduce operational costs. Accordingly, the review team concluded that the NASA Space Shuttle Program should (1) establish a clear set of program goals, placing a greater emphasis on cost-efficient operations and user-friendly payload integration; (2) redefine the management structure, separating development and operations and disengaging NASA from the daily operation of the space shuttle; and (3) provide the necessary environment and conditions within the program to pursue these goals.

  16. From Project Management to Process Management - Effectively Organising Transdisciplinary Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Moschitz, Heidrun

    2013-01-01

    In transdisciplinary projects, the roles of researchers change. In addition to being a source of knowledge, they are required to engage in knowledge exchange processes. This results in an alteration at project level: researchers need to creatively manage projects as group processes.

  17. The Environmental Management Project Manager's Handbook for improved project definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to providing high quality products that satisfy customer needs and are the associated with this goal, DOE personnel must possess the knowledge, skills, and abilities to ensure successful job performance. In addition, there must be recognition that the greatest obstacle to proper project performance is inadequate project definition. Without strong project definition, DOE environmental management efforts are vulnerable to fragmented solutions, duplication of effort, and wastes resources. The primary means of ensuring environmental management projects meet cost and schedule milestones is through a structured and graded approach to project definition, which is the focus of this handbook

  18. The Role of Council Health Management Team in the Improvement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Role of Council Health Management Team in the Improvement of Health Services Quality: The Case of Kinondoni and Ilala Municipalities in Dar es ... poor working equipment, lack of commitment on the part of members of the CHMT, lack of effective CHMTs' supervision, as well as the lack of good networking and ...

  19. Multidisciplinary team (MDT) approach to management of malignant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Multidisciplinary Team meetings (MDTs) in cancer management emphasize collaborative decision making and treatment planning among core members of the specialties relevant to an index case, who come together to share their knowledge and make recommendations for an 'all-inclusive' patient ...

  20. Managing the negatives of experience in physician teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Experience is a key shaper of thought and action in the health care workplace and a fundamental component of management and professional policies dealing with improving quality of care. Physicians rely on experience to structure social interaction, to determine authority relations, and to resist organizational encroachments on their work and autonomy. However, an overreliance on experience within physician teams may paradoxically undermine learning, participation, and entrepreneurship, affecting organizational performance. Approximately 100 hours of direct observation of normal workdays for physician teams (n = 17 physicians) in two different work settings in a single academic medical center located in the Northeastern part of the United States. Qualitative data were collected from physician teams in the medical intensive care unit and trauma/general surgery settings. Data were transcribed and computer analyzed through an interactive process of open coding, theoretical sampling, and pattern recognition that proceeded longitudinally. Three particular experience-based schemas were identified that physician teams used to structure social relations and perform work. These schemas involved using experience as a commodity, trump card, and liberator. Each of these schemas consisted of strongly held norms, beliefs, and values that produced team dynamics with the potential for undermining learning, participation, and entrepreneurship in the group. Organizations may move to mitigate the negative impact of an overreliance on experience among physicians by promoting bureaucratic forms of control that enable physicians to engage learning, participation, and entrepreneurship in their work while not usurping existing and difficult-to-change cultural drivers of team behavior.

  1. Managing chronic myeloid leukemia: a coordinated team care perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Stacie; Lord, Katharine; Bethelmie-Bryan, Beverly; Shepard, Marian W; Neely, Jessica; McLemore, Morgan; Reddy, Satyanarayan K; Montero, Aldemar; Jonas, William S; Gladney, Sara Pierson; Khanwani, Shyam L; Reddy, Silpa C; Lahiry, Anup K; Heffner, Leonard T; Winton, Elliott; Arellano, Martha; Khoury, Hanna Jean

    2012-04-01

    Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has seen dramatic progress in recent years with the development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). To take maximum advantage of therapy with TKIs, compliance and good understanding of monitoring response to therapy are essential. We established a team that included a hematologist, a physician assistant (PA), and a nurse who work closely with a social worker, a pharmacist, and a research coordinator to assist patients throughout their journey with CML. The patient and the referring community oncologist were incorporated into this team. This coordinated team care approach takes advantage of each member's specific skills to provide patients with education about CML, encourage patients' strong involvement in tracking/monitoring results/response to therapy, and support patients with issues that arise throughout the long course of the disease. A low rate of noncompliance with clinic visits (3%) was an indirect measure of the impact of this approach. The inclusion of the referring oncologist in the team extended the tracking of monitoring results to the community practice. We conclude that a coordinated team care approach is feasible in the management of patients with CML. This approach provided patients with education and a good understanding of response to therapy and improved relations with the health care team. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Integrated Project Management System description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is a Department of Energy (DOE) designated Major System Acquisition (MSA). To execute and manage the Project mission successfully and to comply with the MSA requirements, the UMTRA Project Office (''Project Office'') has implemented and operates an Integrated Project Management System (IPMS). The Project Office is assisted by the Technical Assistance Contractor's (TAC) Project Integration and Control (PIC) Group in system operation. Each participant, in turn, provides critical input to system operation and reporting requirements. The IPMS provides a uniform structured approach for integrating the work of Project participants. It serves as a tool for planning and control, workload management, performance measurement, and specialized reporting within a standardized format. This system description presents the guidance for its operation. Appendices 1 and 2 contain definitions of commonly used terms and abbreviations and acronyms, respectively. 17 figs., 5 tabs

  3. The agile edge managing projects effectively using agile scrum

    CERN Document Server

    Vanderjack, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This concise book is an effective source for understanding Agile Scrum development; why we use it and how it works. It will explain how work gets done in manageable iterations (sprints) and the team meetings that keep work on track (ceremonies). Also, since risk is a constant threat to any team-based project, managing risk in an Agile Scrum environment is specii cally discussed. This book is for: New Agile Scrum team members. Team leaders - this book describes the foundation of Agile Scrum, which can save time getting team members on the same page. Trainer/Educator of Agile Scrum - this book clearly defines Agile Scrum in a structured way so that students can learn how to effectively serve on an Agile team to improve their marketability. If you need to know Agile Scrum, this book will show you how to own it.

  4. Formal and informal computer mediated communication within within design teams for complex building projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otter, den A.F.H.J.; Gray, C.; Prins, M.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper the information environment of design teams is discussed because of the use of Internet based Project websites (PWS) to improve the information exchange within design teams. Because design teams heavenly depend on informal information exchange and PWS is a tool for formalising

  5. Mobile Project Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin BOJA

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the development of new communication and data transfer technologies, the mobile solutions for the management process have been able to provide new ways to conduct management actions. This environment describes methods and tools available only here, which will bring information, speed and efficiency to any stage and component of the management process. The paper takes into discussion the impact of the technological development on the management process paradigm. The paper presents the main aspects regarding the business and management models used in mobile management. The role of mobile multimedia informatics applications in mobile management is highlighted.

  6. 7 CFR 4290.360 - Initial review of Applicant's management team's qualifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Initial review of Applicant's management team's...'s management team's qualifications. The Secretary will review the information submitted by the Applicant concerning the qualifications of the Applicant's management team to determine in his or her sole...

  7. Making sense of project management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Annemette; Kautz, Karl; Nielsen, Peter Axel

    2007-01-01

    How can a software company make sense of project management when it becomes involved in software process improvement? In software development most research has an instrumental view of knowledge management thus neglecting what is probably the most important part of knowledge management namely making...... sense of practice by developers and project managers. Through an action case, we study the knowledge management processes in a Danish software company. We analyse the case through the lens of a theoretical framework. The theoretical framework focuses in particular on sensemaking, collective construed...... substantial insight which could not have been achieved through an instrumental perspective on knowledge management....

  8. Project Management Personnel Competencies Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul POCATILU

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An important factor for the success management of IT projects is the human resource. People involved in the project management process have to be evaluated. In order to do that, same criteria has to be specified. This paper describes some aspects regarding the personnel evaluation.

  9. Application of Project Portfolio Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankowska, Malgorzata

    The main goal of the chapter is the presentation of the application project portfolio management approach to support development of e-Municipality and public administration information systems. The models of how people publish and utilize information on the web have been transformed continually. Instead of simply viewing on static web pages, users publish their own content through blogs and photo- and video-sharing slides. Analysed in this chapter, ICT (Information Communication Technology) projects for municipalities cover the mixture of the static web pages, e-Government information systems, and Wikis. So, for the management of the ICT projects' mixtures the portfolio project management approach is proposed.

  10. 6 Project-Management Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demski, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    When it comes to project management, the IT department is typically its own worst enemy. When project requests are pushed through the budgeting process by different departments, it's up to IT to make them all work. The staff is required to be "heroic" to get the project load done. People get to work over weekends and postpone their vacations. The…

  11. Analysis of Return on Investment in Different Types of Agile Software Development Project Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran MILANOV

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory study of IT project teams in Serbia investigates how the choice of agile methods in different development project teams affects the return-on-investment (ROI. In this paper different types of software project teams are analyzed in order to examine and identify the business-value of using agile methods. In various software development project teams, the ROI of agile methods is yet to be fully explored, while the ROI of traditional methods is well-understood. Since ROI is important indicator of the projects success, in this paper we examine the factors that influence the ROI both from software solution customer point of view, and different agile project teams.

  12. Managing Senior Management Team Boundaries and School Improvement: An Investigation of the School Leader Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoliel, Pascale

    2017-01-01

    The present study purpose was to investigate the unique role and activities of school principals in managing their senior management team (SMT) boundaries. The study examined how school principals' internal and external activities mediate the relationship of principals' personal factors from the Big Five typology, the team and contextual…

  13. Resilient behaviour in innovation teams for better project results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeij, P.R.A.

    2017-01-01

    Extenden abstract. Organising in a mindful way is a central aspect to making innovation teams become more resilient and enahnce their chances of innovation success. Such organising, called mindful infrastructure, implies creating the right conditions for teams to excel. Four elements are crucial to

  14. The One-Page Project Manager Comunicate and Manage Any Project With a Single Sheet of Paper

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Clark A

    2007-01-01

    The One-Page Project Manager shows you how to boil down any project into a simple, one-page document that can be used to communicate all essential details to upper management, other departments, suppliers, and audiences. This practical guide will save time and effort, helping you identify the vital parts of a project and communicate those parts and duties to other team members.

  15. Governance of innovation project management : necessary and neglected

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stettina, Christoph Johann

    2015-01-01

    The study is motivated by the aspiration to understand project governance in organizations pursuing the development of new products and services across multiple knowledge worker teams. In particular, the following problem statement guides the study: Is governance of innovation project management

  16. Integrating a Project Management Approach to E-Business Application Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan C.; Chuang, Keh-Wen

    2008-01-01

    Teaching students project managements requires a hands-on approach. Incorporating project management concepts and processes into a student team Web development project adds a dimension that exposes students to the realities of effective Web development. This paper will describe the project management approach used in a Web development course in…

  17. Are characteristics of team members important for quality management of chronic patients at primary care level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Poplas-Susič, Antonija

    2017-12-01

    To determine the possible associations between higher levels of selected quality indicators and the characteristics of providers. In 2011, an ongoing project on a new model of family medicine practice was launched in Slovenia; the family physicians' working team (a family physician and a practice nurse) was extended by a nurse practitioner working 0.5 full-time equivalents. This was an example of a personalised team approach to managing chronic patients. We included all family medicine practices in the six units of the Community Health Centre Ljubljana which were participating in the project in December 2015 (N = 66). Data were gathered from automatic electronic reports on quality indicators provided monthly by each practice. We also collected demographic data. There were 66 family medicine teams in the sample, with 165 members of their teams (66 family physicians, 33 nurse practitioners and 66 practice nurses). Fifty-six (84.4%) of the family physicians were women, as were 32 (97.0%) of the nurse practitioners, and 86 (95.5%) of the practice nurses. Multivariate analysis showed that a higher level of the quality indicator "Examination of diabetic foot once per year" was independently associated with nurse practitioners having attended additional education on diabetes, duration of participation in the project, age and years worked since graduation of nurse practitioners, working in the Center unit and not working in the Bezigrad unit. Characteristics of team members are important in fostering quality management of chronic patients. Nurse practitioners working in new model family practices need obligatory, continuous professional education in the management of chronic patients. The quality of care of chronic patients depends on the specific characteristics of the members of the team, which should be taken into account when planning quality improvements. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Action-embedded transformational leadership in self-managing global information systems development teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eseryel, U. Yeliz; Eseryel, Deniz

    While software development teams are becoming more and more distributed around the globe, most software development methodologies used by global teams prescribe self-managing teams. Transformational leadership is the key to successful information systems development and use for competitive

  19. Managing regional innovation strategy projects

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Patricia; Hanisch, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative interview study with 28 RIS project managers that aimed at understanding whether or not this is true in the context of regional innovation and what the specifics of managing regional innovation projects are. In taking up a recent claim for policy intervention studies which allow to “derive precise suggestions for their design and management”.  The study investigated the interrelation between the agility of the management approach and the achievements of RIS p...

  20. EDUCATIONAL PROJECTS STAKEHOLDER MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юлія Юріївна ГУСЄВА

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available An approach based on an integration of requirements breakdown structure and work breakdown structure of the project is proposed. It can complement existing methods of project stakeholders classification with the indicator of resource input, which can be defined in monetary terms. A method of requirements monitoring is proposed, which allows you to track the requirements of project stakeholders over time according to the actual amount of resources spent by analogy with the earned value method. Proposed indexes are the basis not only for monitoring but for the forecast of the project. The need of creating of a mechanism for getting baseline data taking into account the existence of different types of requirements of project stakeholders is grounded.

  1. The Assistant Manager - a Key Factor of the Managerial Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lecturer Ph. D. Niculina Vargolici

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The new economic context, marked by the crisis and by radical transformations of the labor market, generates the need for more and more sophisticated skills for the assistant manager. That is because the efficiency of the secretarial activity implies both strategic skills and complex abilities, starting from knowledge about the specific activity of the company/institution where the person works as assistant manager, to connected areas such as: management, marketing, human resources, brand communication, company’s culture etc. Whether the manager changes his job together with the “boss”, or the boss is changed and he is bond to adapt to new conditions, a strong team spirit between the manager and his assistant is one of the most important elements that contribute to the productivity and efficiency of the both. The loyalty to the boss and to the company where he works, his adaptation capacity, his competence and his professionalism make the today’s assistant manager a key factor of the managerial team. The essence of the assistant manager job consists in making more efficient the managerial activities, namely, to make it respond to the expectations expressed or not of the manager, or even to anticipate them.

  2. Using an Undergraduate Materials Research Project to Foster Multidisciplinary Teaming Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, James A.; Cleary, Doug D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the use of undergraduate materials multidisciplinary research projects as a means of addressing the growing industrial demand for graduates experienced in working in multidisciplinary teams. It includes a detailed description of a project in which a multidisciplinary team of chemical engineering and civil engineering students…

  3. The Trust Project - Symbiotic Human Machine Teams: Social Cueing for Trust and Reliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-30

    AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2016-0096 THE TRUST PROJECT - SYMBIOTIC HUMAN-MACHINE TEAMS: SOCIAL CUEING FOR TRUST & RELIANCE Susan Rivers, Monika Lohani, Marissa...30 JUN 2012 – 30 JUN 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE THE TRUST PROJECT - SYMBIOTIC HUMAN-MACHINE TEAMS: SOCIAL CUEING FOR TRUST & RELIANCE 5a. CONTRACT

  4. Sustainable energy development material management team report. Fossil business unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, P.; Keller, P.; Manning, P.; Nolan, M.; Ricci, A.; Turnbull, F.; Varadinek, H.

    1995-01-01

    Report of the Material Management Sustainable Energy Development (SED) Team was presented, outlining strategic directions and initiative for embedding SED principles in the materials management function. Six principles underlying SED were prescribed, accompanied by a framework for analysis. Excerpts from position papers used in the formulation of SED recommendations and initiatives were provided. The general theme of the recommendations was: (1) materials management activities should be review to ensure consistency with SED, (2) strategic alliances should be developed where appropriate and (3) staff in the Fossil Business Unit should promote SED among industry suppliers

  5. Information management for decommissioning projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeClair, A.N.; Lemire, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the importance of records and information management for decommissioning projects. Key decommissioning information and elements of a sound information management strategy are identified. Various knowledge management strategies and tools are discussed as opportunities for leveraging decommissioning information. The paper also examines the implementation of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) strategy for the long term preservation of decommissioning information, and its initiatives in leveraging of information with the application of several knowledge management strategies and tools. The implementation of AECL's strategy illustrates common as well as unique information and knowledge management challenges and opportunities for decommissioning projects. (author)

  6. Project Management Plan Solution Stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SATO, P.K.

    1999-08-31

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Solutions Stabilization subproject. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP) for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization and Deactivation Project, HNF-3617. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for the PFP Solution Stabilization subproject. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baselines to manage the execution of the Solution Stabilization subproject. Any deviations to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process.

  7. Project Management Plan Solution Stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SATO, P.K.

    1999-01-01

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Solutions Stabilization subproject. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP) for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization and Deactivation Project, HNF-3617. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for the PFP Solution Stabilization subproject. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baselines to manage the execution of the Solution Stabilization subproject. Any deviations to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process

  8. Managing a project's legacy: implications for organizations and project management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.; Hecht, Michael H.; Majchrzak, Ann

    2003-01-01

    Organizations that rely on projects to implement their products must find effective mechanisms for propagating lessons learned on one project throughout the organization. A broad view of what constitutes a project's 'legacy' is presented that includes not just the design products and leftover parts, but new processes, relationships, technology, skills, planning data, and performance metrics. Based on research evaluating knowledge reuse in innovative contexts, this paper presents an approach to project legacy management that focuses on collecting and using legacy knowledge to promote organizational learning and effective reuse, while addressing factors of post-project responsibility, information obsolescence, and the importance of ancillary contextual information. .

  9. Disruption of Information Technology Projects: The Reactive Decoupling of Project Management Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Kurt W.

    2013-01-01

    Information Technology projects have migrated toward two dominant Project Management (PM) methodologies. Plan-driven practices provide organizational control through highly structured plans, schedules, and specifications that facilitate oversight by hierarchical bureaucracies. In contrast, agile practices emphasize empowered teams using flexible…

  10. PROJECT APPROACH TO ENERGY MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Інга Борисівна СЕМКО

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Project management is widely used around the world as a tool to improve business performance. Correct implementation of the program of implementation of energy efficiency is accompanied by the adoption of an appropriate legislative framework, support programs, the approval of market-based instruments. Currently, it is paying enough attention to the effective application of market-based instruments, although most of the activities in the field of energy efficiency from the economic side are quite profitable. The authors suggested the use of the methodology of project management to the management of energy-saving measures, new approaches to the place and role of project management in the hierarchy of guidance. As a result, this innovation can improve the competitiveness of enterprises. The conclusions that the energy-saving project management allows you to get the best results for their implementation by reducing the time, resources, risk reduction.

  11. Agile Project Management with Scrum

    CERN Document Server

    Schwaber, Ken

    2009-01-01

    The rules and practices for Scrum-a simple process for managing complex projects-are few, straightforward, and easy to learn. But Scrum's simplicity itself-its lack of prescription-can be disarming, and new practitioners often find themselves reverting to old project management habits and tools and yielding lesser results. In this illuminating series of case studies, Scrum co-creator and evangelist Ken Schwaber identifies the real-world lessons-the successes and failures-culled from his years of experience coaching companies in agile project management. Through them, you'll understand how to

  12. WIPP Project Records Management Handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Records Management Handbook provides the WIPP Project Records Management personnel with a tool to use to fulfill the requirements of the WIPP Records Program and direct their actions in the important area of records management. The handbook describes the various project areas involved in records management, and how they function. The handbook provides the requirements for Record Coordinators and Master Record Center (MRC) personnel to follow in the normal course of file management, records scheduling, records turnover, records disposition, and records retrieval. More importantly, the handbook provides a single reference which encompasses the procedures set fourth in DOE Order 1324.2A, ''Records Disposition'' ASME NQA-1, ''Quality Assurance Program Requirements for Nuclear Facilities'' and DOE-AL 5700.6B, ''General Operations Quality Assurance.'' These documents dictate how an efficient system of records management will be achieved on the WIPP Project

  13. IS-ENES project management - lessons learnt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parinet, Marie; Guglielmo, Francesca; Joussaume, Sylvie

    2017-04-01

    IS-ENES is the distributed e-infrastructure of models, model data and metadata of the European Network for Earth System Modelling (ENES). It has benefitted from two EC FP7 grants and aims towards further European and national funding to achieve sustainability. We highlight here several challenges related to project management that have risen in the course of these two project-phases spanning 8 years. Some challenges are related to the heterogeneity of the activities within IS-ENES, with different groups working on very diverse activities, not necessarily strictly interdependent. An immediate consequence is the need of implementing and setting up in early phases of the project efficient collection and circulation of information to preserve and reinforce the systemic view of the infrastructure as a whole and the pursuit of common goals, including coordinated provision of services. Toward and beyond such common goals, managing IS-ENES, covering both scientific and more strictly management-related aspects, implies a double-paced approach: besides setting up efficient project workflow, there is the need of setting up longer term objectives. This implies, within the project lifetime, to elaborate and implement a coherent organizational (consistent with scientific goals, funding schemes, research and technology landscape) strategy to pursue these goals beyond the project itself. Furthermore, a series of more generic project management challenges will also be listed and can be gathered around 3 main objectives: ease the internal processes in order to optimize the work, anticipate delays and budget issues, and motivate the project teams by ensuring an efficient internal and external communication.

  14. 76 FR 61371 - All-Hazard Position Task Books for Type 3 Incident Management Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    ...-Hazard Position Task Books for Type 3 Incident Management Teams AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management... Books for Type 3 Incident Management Teams were developed to assist personnel achieve qualifications in... Management Teams were developed to assist personnel achieve qualifications in the All-Hazard ICS positions...

  15. MANAGEMENT TEAM CHARACTERISTICS: EVIDENCE FROM UNIVERSITY GOVERNANCE AND SCHOOL PERFORMANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiang-Tsai Chiang; Mei-Chih Lin

    2013-01-01

    The paper examines cognition from the viewpoint of internal management teams of private universities against satisfaction with school performance, applying the SEM model. Empirical results show that the board’s operational effectiveness and attendance rate for internal important meetings held on campus have a significantly positive relationship with implementing effectiveness and satisfaction with school administrative performance. The satisfaction with school administrative performance and...

  16. Top Management Team Nationality Diversity and Firm Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bo Bernhard; Nielsen, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    This research reexamines the equivocal relationship between top management team (TMT) diversity and firm performance. Combining upper echelons theory with insights from institutional theory, we establish a new, timely dimension of TMT diversity—nationality diversity—and develop an integrated...... generally, our research demonstrates that the consequences of TMT diversity depend on the (1) specific attributes of diversity being considered and (2) firm and industry conditions under which strategic decisions take place....

  17. 300 Area Revitalization Project Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downey, H. D.

    1999-01-01

    The 300 Area Revitalization Team has been tasked with the responsibility to develop an integrated path forward for the 300 Area, as part of a commitment stemming from the 300 Area Disposition Workshop that was held on March 17, 1998. The integrated path forward that is needed must ensure that budget, schedule, and work scopes are complementary between the Programs that are involved in the 300Area. This Project Management Plan (PMP) defines the roles and responsibilities, and the overall approach, to development of a prioritized schedule for 300 Area activities that will achieve the end-state condition

  18. Interprofessional team management in pediatric critical care: some challenges and possible solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Martin; Pilgrim, Sina B; Burmester, Margarita; Allen, Meredith L; Gijselaers, Wim H

    2016-01-01

    Aiming for and ensuring effective patient safety is a major priority in the management and culture of every health care organization. The pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) has become a workplace with a high diversity of multidisciplinary physicians and professionals. Therefore, delivery of high-quality care with optimal patient safety in a PICU is dependent on effective interprofessional team management. Nevertheless, ineffective interprofessional teamwork remains ubiquitous. We based our review on the framework for interprofessional teamwork recently published in association with the UK Centre for Advancement of Interprofessional Education. Articles were selected to achieve better understanding and to include and translate new ideas and concepts. The barrier between autonomous nurses and doctors in the PICU within their silos of specialization, the failure of shared mental models, a culture of disrespect, and the lack of empowering parents as team members preclude interprofessional team management and patient safety. A mindset of individual responsibility and accountability embedded in a network of equivalent partners, including the patient and their family members, is required to achieve optimal interprofessional care. Second, working competently as an interprofessional team is a learning process. Working declared as a learning process, psychological safety, and speaking up are pivotal factors to learning in daily practice. Finally, changes in small steps at the level of the microlevel unit are the bases to improve interprofessional team management and patient safety. Once small things with potential impact can be changed in one's own unit, engagement of health care professionals occurs and projects become accepted. Bottom-up patient safety initiatives encouraging participation of every single care provider by learning effective interprofessional team management within daily practice may be an effective way of fostering patient safety.

  19. Major Events Coordinated Security Solutions: The Application of the Project Management Body of Knowledge for Managing a Science and Technology Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    represents the sum of knowledge related to project management and includes best practises and techniques generally accepted by the project...project has demonstrated that the principles of project management can be applied even to those activities that naturally resist the structure and...team and to engender trust in the output. DRDC believes strongly in the application of sound project management principles and uses an abbreviated

  20. Knowledge Model: Project Knowledge Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durao, Frederico; Dolog, Peter; Grolin, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The Knowledge model for project management serves several goals:Introducing relevant concepts of project management area for software development (Section 1). Reviewing and understanding the real case requirements from the industrial perspective. (Section 2). Giving some preliminary suggestions...... for usage in KIWI system (Sections 3). This document is intended for technological partners to understand how for example the software development concepts can be applied to a semantic wiki framework....

  1. Towards rethinking Project portfolio management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kristian; Svejvig, Per

    the last five years. Utilizing the theoretical lens proposed by Svejvig and Andersen (2015), we apply two complementary analytical perspectives to classify and analyze the stocks. One perspective, denoted as classical project management (CPM), highlights key characteristics of conventional research....... A second perspective, denoted as rethinking project management (RPM), highlights characteristics of progressive research. Not surprisingly, characteristics from CPM are very dominant in the stock of most cited publications of all years — instrumentality and controllability in particular. In the newest...

  2. The IT project manager competencies that impact project success – A qualitative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia Cristina Silva de Araújo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Since there is a lack of studies about the relationship of IT project manager competencies and project success, this paper will address the following research question: Which competencies should IT project managers develop in order to achieve success in IT projects? To answer this question, we conducted a qualitative research with an exploratory approach. To collect data, twelve (12 in-depth interviews were done with Brazilian project managers from different companies from several business sectors. The analysis results pointed out that for our respondents the most needed category of competencies are team management, business domain knowledge,  communication, project management and people skills. As other authors have affirmed, technical skills were considered to be less relevant to project success than interpersonal and intrapersonal competencies.

  3. Highway project cost estimating and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    "This report provides detailed information about the project objectives, deliverables, and findings. The project team : thoroughly reviewed the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) structure, operations, and current procedures as : related to M...

  4. Managing Challenges in a Multi Contractor Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ron

    2011-01-01

    The presentation provides a project description, describes the integrated product team, and review project challenges. The challenges include programmatic, technical, basic drop tests, heavy drop tests, C-17 envelope expansion, and Ares I-X.

  5. Management Of Building Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Niko Majdandzic; Tadija Lovric; Vido Peric

    2006-01-01

    In this work we have shown the concept of logistic support in management in building production and in building of objects, which is realised in Enterprise resource Planning – ERP system ERPINSG, developed in Informatic firm Informatic engineering – ININ in Slavonski Brod, and in cooperation with scientists of catedra for informatics of Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and users from building firms.

  6. Team management in the 21 st century: A human relations theory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Team management in the 21 st century: A human relations theory angle. ... a team is about understanding human relation, that is, the manager understanding the ... The problem ranges from membership isolation to lack of communication and ...

  7. The impact of project management on nuclear construction lead times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radlaver, M.A.; Bauman, D.S.; Chapel, S.W.

    1985-01-01

    A two-year study of lead times for nuclear power plants found that construction time is affected by six fundamental influences. One of the six is project management. An analysis of construction management teams at 26 nuclear units found that many of the most successful shared five general characteristics: nuclear power experience, skill in project control, adaptability and initiative, commitment to success, and communication and coordination skill

  8. Contribution of Full-Scope Simulator Development Project to the Dissemination of Nuclear Knowledge within New-Build–Project Teams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gain, P.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: In a context where few countries recently carried out nuclear new-build projects combined with very strong need for generation renewal, there exists a major stake for the training of the hundreds of engineers who are involved in the design and commissioning teams of this highly complex industrial facility. The Simulator project, which gives the first opportunity for integration and validation of the whole of the design data, to check their coherence, the good performance with the interface and conformity with the safety and performance requirements, allows a fast and effective competence rise of all the resources involved in its development. In addition, the phased availability of the whole of data generally results in having several phased versions of the simulator. Each can then be deployed in great number for training drills which also will contribute to share in optimal way knowledge on the reference plant design. This contexts of broader use of these training modules and use of simulation in support of the engineering activities lead to their use by many teams with varied profiles; and there too, the simulation technologies are of a remarkable effectiveness to share a common and stable knowledge management. (author

  9. A Mirror for Managers: Using Simulation to Develop Management Teams. Technical Report 23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Robert E.; And Others

    Although simulation is among the least common of the many methods consultants employ to stimulate team development, realistic simulation can help in the diagnosis of management teams. Simulations fill a gap in the repertoire of data collection methods for organizational diagnosis and development by affording an opportunity for direct observation…

  10. Involving youth with disabilities in the development and evaluation of a new advocacy training: Project TEAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Jessica; Barth, Yishai; Curtis, Katie; Livingston, Kit; O'Neil, Madeline; Smith, Zach; Vallier, Samantha; Wolfe, Ashley

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes a participatory research process in which six youth with disabilities (Youth Panel) participated in the development and evaluation of a manualized advocacy training, Project TEAM (Teens making Environment and Activity Modifications). Project TEAM teaches youth with disabilities how to identify environmental barriers, generate solutions, and request accommodations. The Youth Panel conducted their evaluation after the university researcher implemented Project TEAM with three groups of trainees. The Youth Panel designed and administered a survey and focus group to evaluate enjoyment and usefulness of Project TEAM with support from an advocate/researcher. Members of the Youth Panel analyzed survey response frequencies. The advocate/researcher conducted a content analysis of the open-ended responses. Sixteen of 21 Project TEAM trainees participated in the evaluation. The evaluation results suggest that the trainees found the interactive and individualized aspects of the Project TEAM most enjoyable and useful. Some instructional materials were difficult for trainees with cognitive disabilities to understand. The Youth Panel's involvement in the development of Project TEAM may explain the relatively positive experiences reported by trainees. Project TEAM should continue to provide trainees with the opportunity to apply concepts in real-life situations. Project TEAM requires revisions to ensure it is enjoyable and useful for youth with a variety of disabilities. • Group process strategies, picture-based data collection materials, peer teamwork, and mentorship from adults with disabilities can enable youth with disabilities to engage in research. • Collaborating with youth with disabilities in the development of new rehabilitation approaches may enhance the relevance of interventions for other youth with disabilities. • Youth with cognitive disabilities participating in advocacy and environment-focused interventions may prefer interactive and

  11. Analisa Pengaruh Empowering Leadership Terhadap Team Performance Management Dengan Team Cohesion Sebagai Variabel Intervening Di Hachi-hachi Surabaya

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra, Meggie; Theola, Devina

    2016-01-01

    Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui apakah Empowering Empowering Leadership berpengaruh atau tidak terhadap Team Performance Management dengan Team Cohesion sebagai variabel intervening di restoran Hachi-Hachi Surabaya. Teknik analisa yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah analisa statistik deskriptif dan analisa Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) dengan alat penelitian berupa Partial Least Square (PLS). Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa Empowering Leadership berpengaruh t...

  12. Strategic Management of Large Projects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangYingluo; LiuYi; LiYuan

    2004-01-01

    The strategic management of large projects is both theoretically and practically important. Some scholars have advanced flexible strategy theory in China. The difference of strategic flexibility and flexible strategy is pointed out. The supporting system and characteristics of flexible strategy are analyzed. The changes of flexible strategy and integration of strategic management are discussed.

  13. Project management in crisis situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Goździewska-Nowicka

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In today’s methodologies of project management attention is increasingly paid to the crises-related issues. Modern economy and the turbulent environment cause that an emergingcrisis can pose a serious threat to the implementation of any undertaking. This article focuses on the presentation of the conditions and causes of crisis situations, the essence of projects, and their effective management. The major objective of the paper, however, is to demonstrate how companies implementing projects cope with the occurrence of a crisis situation.

  14. Agent-Based Simulations for Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J. Chris; Sholtes, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the most common approach used in project planning tools is the Critical Path Method (CPM). While this method was a great improvement over the basic Gantt chart technique being used at the time, it now suffers from three primary flaws: (1) task duration is an input, (2) productivity impacts are not considered , and (3) management corrective actions are not included. Today, computers have exceptional computational power to handle complex simulations of task e)(eculion and project management activities (e.g ., dynamically changing the number of resources assigned to a task when it is behind schedule). Through research under a Department of Defense contract, the author and the ViaSim team have developed a project simulation tool that enables more realistic cost and schedule estimates by using a resource-based model that literally turns the current duration-based CPM approach "on its head." The approach represents a fundamental paradigm shift in estimating projects, managing schedules, and reducing risk through innovative predictive techniques.

  15. Waste Management Project Contingency Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edward L. Parsons, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the office of Waste Management (WM) with recommended contingency calculation procedures for typical WM projects. Typical projects were defined as conventional construction-type activities that use innovative elements when necessary to meet the project objectives. Projects involve treatment, storage, and disposal of low level, mixed low level, hazardous, transuranic, and high level waste. Cost contingencies are an essential part of Total Cost Management. A contingency is an amount added to a cost estimate to compensate for unexpected expenses resulting from incomplete design, unforeseen and unpredictable conditions, or uncertainties in the project scope (DOE 1994, AACE 1998). Contingency allowances are expressed as percentages of estimated cost and improve cost estimates by accounting for uncertainties. The contingency allowance is large at the beginning of a project because there are more uncertainties, but as a project develops, the allowance shrinks to adjust for costs already incurred. Ideally, the total estimated cost remains the same throughout a project. Project contingency reflects the degree of uncertainty caused by lack of project definition, and process contingency reflects the degree of uncertainty caused by use of new technology. Different cost estimation methods were reviewed and compared with respect to terminology, accuracy, and Cost Guide standards. The Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering (AACE) methods for cost estimation were selected to represent best industry practice. AACE methodology for contingency analysis can be readily applied to WM Projects, accounts for uncertainties associated with different stages of a project, and considers both project and process contingencies and the stage of technical readiness. As recommended, AACE contingency allowances taper off linearly as a project nears completion

  16. Integrated project management type contracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heisler, S.I.

    1975-01-01

    The concept of integrated project management represents a single source to which the owner can turn for all project management functions excepting for those relating to outside parties such as site purchase, personnel selection etc. Other functions such as design, procurement, construction management, schedule and cost control, quality assurance/quality control are usually handled by the integrated project manager as the agent of the owner. The arrangement is flexible and the responsibilities can be varied to suit the size and experience of the owner. Past experience in the United States indicates an increase in the trend toward IPM work and it appears that overseas this trend is developing also. (orig./RW) [de

  17. 76 FR 69700 - Klamath National Forest; California; Pumice Vegetation Management Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... Management Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an environmental impact.... Grantham, Forest Supervisor, Attn: Ben Haupt, Pumice Vegetation Management Project Team Leader, Goosenest... Management Project will recommend implementation of one of the following: (1) The proposed action; (2) an...

  18. Teaching Tip: Managing Software Engineering Student Teams Using Pellerin's 4-D System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doman, Marguerite; Besmer, Andrew; Olsen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the use of Pellerin's Four Dimension Leadership System (4-D) as a way to manage teams in a classroom setting. Over a 5-year period, we used a modified version of the 4-D model to manage teams within a senior level Software Engineering capstone course. We found that this approach for team management in a classroom…

  19. Low Emissions Alternative Power (LEAP) Project Office Business Team of the Aeropropulsion Research Program Office (ARPO) Org. 0140

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttler, Jennifer A.

    2004-01-01

    The program for which I am working at this summer is Propulsion and Power/Low Emissions Alternative Power (P&P/LEAP). It invests in a fundamental TRL 1-6 research and technology portfolio that will enable the future of: Alternative fuels and/or alternative propulsion systems, non-combustion (electric) propulsion systems. P&P/LEAP will identify and capitalize on the highest potential concepts generated both internal and external to the Agency. During my 2004 summer at NASA Glenn Research Center, I worked with my mentor Barbara Mader, in the Project Office with the Business Team completing various tasks for the project and personnel. The LEAP project is a highly matrixed organization. The Project Office is responsible for the goals advocacy and dollar (budget) of the LEAP project. The objectives of the LEAP Project are to discover new energy sources and develop unconventional engines and power systems directed towards greatly reduced emissions, enable new vehicle concepts for public mobility, new science missions and national security. The Propulsion and PowerLow Emissions Alternative Power directly supports the environmental, mobility, national security objectives of the Vehicle Systems Program and the Aeronautics Technology Theme. Technology deliverables include the demonstration through integrated ground tests, a constant volume combustor in an engine system, and UAV/small transport aircraft all electric power system. My mentor serves as a key member of the management team for the Aeropropulsion Research Program Office (ARPO). She has represented the office on numerous occasions, and is a member of a number of center-wide panels/teams, such as the Space management Committee and is chair to the Business Process Consolidation Team. She is responsible for the overall coordination of resources for the Propulsion and Power Project - from advocacy to implementation. The goal for my summer at NASA was to document processes and archive program documents from the past

  20. What can sales managers learn from coaches of professional sport teams?

    OpenAIRE

    G. Troilo; P. Guenzi

    2010-01-01

    Sales organizations are increasing their use of sales teams, but team selling is an under- researched area. In this perspective, the role of sales teams’ leaders deserves special attention. Sales teams have many characteristics in common with sport teams. Hence, sales managers often look to sport for inspirational examples and useful models of teamwork. Based on interviews with 31 coaches of professional sport teams, we developed a conceptual model providing sales managers with some useful le...

  1. Integrated Risk Management Within NASA Programs/Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connley, Warren; Rad, Adrian; Botzum, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    As NASA Project Risk Management activities continue to evolve, the need to successfully integrate risk management processes across the life cycle, between functional disciplines, stakeholders, various management policies, and within cost, schedule and performance requirements/constraints become more evident and important. Today's programs and projects are complex undertakings that include a myriad of processes, tools, techniques, management arrangements and other variables all of which must function together in order to achieve mission success. The perception and impact of risk may vary significantly among stakeholders and may influence decisions that may have unintended consequences on the project during a future phase of the life cycle. In these cases, risks may be unintentionally and/or arbitrarily transferred to others without the benefit of a comprehensive systemic risk assessment. Integrating risk across people, processes, and project requirements/constraints serves to enhance decisions, strengthen communication pathways, and reinforce the ability of the project team to identify and manage risks across the broad spectrum of project management responsibilities. The ability to identify risks in all areas of project management increases the likelihood a project will identify significant issues before they become problems and allows projects to make effective and efficient use of shrinking resources. By getting a total team integrated risk effort, applying a disciplined and rigorous process, along with understanding project requirements/constraints provides the opportunity for more effective risk management. Applying an integrated approach to risk management makes it possible to do a better job at balancing safety, cost, schedule, operational performance and other elements of risk. This paper will examine how people, processes, and project requirements/constraints can be integrated across the project lifecycle for better risk management and ultimately improve the

  2. Top management team composition and organizational ecology : A nested hierarchical selection theory of team reproduction and organizational diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, Christophe; Wezel, Filippo C.; van Witteloostuijn, Arjen; Baum, JAC; Dobrev, SD; VanWitteloostuijn, A

    2006-01-01

    The "upper echelon" literature has mainly produced static empirical studies on the impact of top management team composition on organizational outcomes, ignoring the dynamics of industrial demography. Organizational ecology explicitly studied the dynamics of organizational diversity at the

  3. Conceptualizing Knowledge Communication for Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    In the field of project management, the search for better ways to manage projects is ongoing. One of the more recent trends in the literature focuses on the integration of knowledge management in project management environments. Advantages of integrating knowledge management into projects can be ...... knowledge for project management, this paper focuses on extending Knowledge Management to include concepts related to communicating knowledge from the fields of rhetoric, knowledge communication, and corporate communication....

  4. Conflict Approaches of Effective Project Manager in the Upstream Sector of Indonesian Oil & Gas Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Adhi Cahyono; Yanki Hartijasti

    2012-01-01

    Conflict can be functional or dysfunctional to the organization’s performance. This study focused on the relationship between conflict approaches implemented by the project manager based on project team member’s perception on the effectiveness of the project manager in managing project’s conflict. Questionnaires were modified from Barker et al. (1988) to measure conflict management approaches and outcomes of managing project conflict. Data were gathered from 57 respondents w...

  5. Managing project risks and uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Mentis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article considers threats to a project slipping on budget, schedule and fit-for-purpose. Threat is used here as the collective for risks (quantifiable bad things that can happen and uncertainties (poorly or not quantifiable bad possible events. Based on experience with projects in developing countries this review considers that (a project slippage is due to uncertainties rather than risks, (b while eventuation of some bad things is beyond control, managed execution and oversight are still the primary means to keeping within budget, on time and fit-for-purpose, (c improving project delivery is less about bigger and more complex and more about coordinated focus, effectiveness and developing thought-out heuristics, and (d projects take longer and cost more partly because threat identification is inaccurate, the scope of identified threats is too narrow, and the threat assessment product is not integrated into overall project decision-making and execution. Almost by definition, what is poorly known is likely to cause problems. Yet it is not just the unquantifiability and intangibility of uncertainties causing project slippage, but that they are insufficiently taken into account in project planning and execution that cause budget and time overruns. Improving project performance requires purpose-driven and managed deployment of scarce seasoned professionals. This can be aided with independent oversight by deeply experienced panelists who contribute technical insights and can potentially show that diligence is seen to be done.

  6. Multidisplinary Engineering, Project, and Production Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Ho Ko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Journal of Engineering, Project, and Production Management (EPPM-Journal reflect the journal’s multidisciplinary approach to management research and can be categorized as belonging to three general topics: Project Management, Engineering and Project Management, and Project and Production Management.

  7. 7 CFR 3565.351 - Project management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Project management. 3565.351 Section 3565.351... AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED RURAL RENTAL HOUSING PROGRAM Project Management § 3565.351 Project management. As a... Agency and complies with an approved management plan for the project. (b) Management plan. The lender...

  8. Multidisplinary Engineering, Project, and Production Management

    OpenAIRE

    Chien-Ho Ko

    2012-01-01

    Journal of Engineering, Project, and Production Management (EPPM-Journal) reflect the journal’s multidisciplinary approach to management research and can be categorized as belonging to three general topics: Project Management, Engineering and Project Management, and Project and Production Management.

  9. uCollaborator: Framework for STEM Project Collaboration among Geographically-Dispersed Student/Faculty Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Stephen M.; Rodriguez, Walter E.; Carstens, Deborah S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for facilitating communication among STEM project teams that are geographically dispersed in synchronous or asynchronous online courses. The framework has been developed to: (a) improve how engineering and technology students and faculty work with collocated and geographically-dispersed teams; and (b) to connect the…

  10. Dispositional factors, experiences of team members and effectiveness in self-managing work teams / Susanna Catherina Coetzee

    OpenAIRE

    Coetzee, Susanna Catherina

    2003-01-01

    Changes in South Africa's political and economic sphere demand the democratisation of the workplace, participation and empowerment of the work force. Flatter hierarchical structures, as a result of downsizing, enhance involvement but also demand that workers function in a more autonomous manner. The use of self-managing work teams has increased in response to these competitive challenges. Self-managing work teams are groups of employees who are fully responsible for a well-d...

  11. Team management as a condition for the implementation of competency management training of future specialists

    OpenAIRE

    Драч, Ірина Іванівна

    2015-01-01

    The article described the specific features that define the independent status of the competence-based management training of future specialists in the management of educational activities. The use of principles of team in the implementation of a new management paradigm is justified. The advantages of using a matrix organizational structure are characterized

  12. Simulation Based Training Improves Airway Management for Helicopter EMS Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhindsa, Harinder S.; Reid, Renee; Murray, David; Lovelady, James; Powell, Katie; Sayles, Jeff; Stevenson, Christopher; Baker, Kathy; Solada, Brian; Carroll, Scott; hide

    2011-01-01

    The use of paralytic medications in the performance of RSI intubation is a high risk intervention used by many HEMS crews. There is no margin for error in RSI intubation as the results can be fatal. Operating room access for airway management training has become more difficult, and is not representative of the environment in which HEMS crews typically function. LifeEvac of Virginia designed and implemented an SST airway management program to provide a realistic, consistent training platform. The dynamic program incorporates standardized scenarios, and real life challenging cases that this and other programs have encountered. SST is done in a variety of settings including the helicopter, back of ambulances, staged car crashes and simulation centers. The result has been the indoctrination of a well defined, consistent approach to every airway management intervention. The SST program facillitates enhancement of technical skills. as well as team dynamics and communication.

  13. The interdisciplinary nature of the skills needed by project managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Nesbit

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore and analyse the additional skills that are transferrable across different sectors, that project managers require and that go beyond technical project management skills to enable them to be successful in what is becoming an increasingly interdisciplinary role.The conclusions highlight that the project management role requires a range of non- technical project management skills and characteristics to enable project management to be carried out successfully. These non- technical project management skills and characteristics include the ability to build relationships with stakeholders; possessing formal project management certification; understanding the creation and functioning of project teams; understanding the political environment that the project exists in; the ability to work in a team; possessing leadership and management skills; possessing interpersonal and communication skills and possessing a strategic orientation.The skills and characteristics that are perceived by the cross section of project managers as being the most important are possessing interpersonal and communication skills; possessing leadership and management skills; the ability to work in a team and the ability to build relationships with stakeholders. Interpersonal and communication skills along with the ability to work in a team are not included significantly in job advertisements for project managers, with the requirement to have them potentially being assumed and not needed to be stated.This research provides a basis for a further study involving in-depth interviews with project managers from the information technology sector with the aim of highlighting specific projects where these additional skills have been vital to the success of these projects.Issues surrounding the political environment of the project from the perspective of different genders; the importance interpersonal and communication skills along with team work for

  14. Budgeting, funding, and managing clinical research projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Elizabeth; Dicks, Elizabeth; Parfrey, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Large, integrated multidisciplinary teams have become recognized as an efficient means by which to drive innovation and discovery in clinical research. This chapter describes how to budget and fund these large studies and effectively manage the large, often dispersed teams involved. Sources of funding are identified; budget development, justification, reporting, financial governance, and accountability are described; in addition to the creation and management of the multidisciplinary team that will implement the research plan.

  15. Project Management Software for Distributed Industrial Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrojević, M.; Medjo, B.; Rakin, M.; Sedmak, A.

    This paper gives an overview of the development of a new software solution for project management, intended mainly to use in industrial environment. The main concern of the proposed solution is application in everyday engineering practice in various, mainly distributed industrial companies. Having this in mind, special care has been devoted to development of appropriate tools for tracking, storing and analysis of the information about the project, and in-time delivering to the right team members or other responsible persons. The proposed solution is Internet-based and uses LAMP/WAMP (Linux or Windows - Apache - MySQL - PHP) platform, because of its stability, versatility, open source technology and simple maintenance. Modular structure of the software makes it easy for customization according to client specific needs, with a very short implementation period. Its main advantages are simple usage, quick implementation, easy system maintenance, short training and only basic computer skills needed for operators.

  16. The Automated Assembly Team contributions to the APRIMED Agile Manufacturing Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.E.; Ames, A.L.; Calton, T.L.

    1995-06-01

    The Automated Assembly Team of the APRIMED Project (abbreviated as A') consists of two parts: the Archimedes Project, which is an ongoing project developing automated assembly technology, and the A' Robot Team. Archimedes is a second generation assembly planning system that both provides a general high-level assembly sequencing capability and, for a smaller class of products, facilitates automatic programming of a robotic workcell to assemble them. The A' robot team designed, developed, and implemented a flexible robot workcell which served as the automated factory of the A' project. In this document we briefly describe the role of automated assembly planning in agile manufacturing, and specifically describe the contributions of the Archimedes project and the A' robot team to the A' project. We introduce the concepts of the Archimedes automated assembly planning project, and discuss the enhancements to Archimedes which were developed in response to the needs of the A' project. We also present the work of the A' robot team in designing and developing the A' robot workcell, including all tooling and programming to support assembly of the A' discriminator devices. Finally, we discuss the process changes which these technologies have enabled in the A' project

  17. A GUIDE TO RECOMMENDATIONS FOR WORKING WITH VIRTUAL TEAMS ON PROJECTS GUIDED BY PMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra Paschoalino Fernandes Bahia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Due the demand of markets to be more competitive in search of immediate results, reach high quality and low cost, the companies are seeking alternatives to have more quality, minimize the cost and speed up the time in a project. One example is work with a model of teams called virtual teams. In order to identify bottlenecks and difficulties encountered in this team model to minimize the risk of failures in a project, this study applied a survey to professionals of various nationalities with experience working with virtual teams based in projects guided by PMI good practices. At the end of this study was possible to quantify and relate the main problems listed by these professionals, which prevented them from completing the projects on time, cost and quality desired. Thus for each of the points mentioned it was suggested some recommendations for the application of tools and techniques most suitable in this context.

  18. Lightning Mapper Sensor Lens Assembly S.O. 5459: Project Management Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidler, Janet

    1999-01-01

    Kaiser Electro-Optics, Inc. (KEO) has developed this Project Management Plan for the Lightning Mapper Sensor (LMS) program. KEO has integrated a team of experts in a structured program management organization to meet the needs of the LMS program. The project plan discusses KEO's approach to critical program elements including Program Management, Quality Assurance, Configuration Management, and Schedule.

  19. One System Integrated Project Team Progress in Coordinating Hanford Tank Farms and the Waste Treatment Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skwarek, Raymond J.; Harp, Ben J.; Duncan, Garth M.

    2013-01-01

    The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed at the Hanford Site in late 2011 as a way to improve coordination and itegration between the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) on interfaces between the two projects, and to eliminate duplication and exploit opportunities for synergy. The IPT is composed of jointly staffed groups that work on technical issues of mutal interest, front-end design and project definition, nuclear safety, plant engineering system integration, commissioning, planning and scheduling, and environmental, safety, health and quality (ESH&Q) areas. In the past year important progress has been made in a number of areas as the organization has matured and additional opportunities have been identified. Areas covered in this paper include: Support for development of the Office of Envirnmental Management (EM) framework document to progress the Office of River Protection's (ORP) River Protection Project (RPP) mission; Stewardship of the RPP flowsheet; Collaboration with Savannah River Site (SRS), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Operations programs integration; and, Further development of the waste acceptance criteria

  20. Project management at a university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Joel A.

    2006-06-01

    Managing instrumentation projects, large or small, involves a number of common challenges-defining what is needed, desiging a system to provide it, producing it in an economical way, and putting it into service expeditiously. Doing these things in a university environoment provides unique challenges and opportunities not obtaining in the environment of large projects at NASA or national labs. I address this topic from the viewpoint of knowledge of two such projects, the development of OAO-2 at the University of Wisconsin and the relocation of Fairborn Observatory to the Patagonia Mountains in Arizona, as well as my own developemnt of the Tennessee State 2-m Automatic Spectroscopic Telescope. For the university environment, I argue for a more traditional management style that relies on more informal techniques than those used in large-scale projects conducted by big bureaucratic institutions. This style identifies what tasks are really necessary and eliminates as much wasteful overhead as possible. I discuss many of the formalities used in project management, such as formal reviews (PDR, CDR, etc.) and Gantt charts, and propose other ways of acheving the same results more effectively. The university environment acutely requires getting the right people to do the project, both in terms of their individual personalities, motivation, and technical skills but also in terms of their ability to get on with one another. Two critical challenges confronting those doing such projects in universities are 1) keeping the contractors on task (the major challenge to anyone doing project management) and 2) dealing with the purchasing systems in such institutions.

  1. Management of Software Development Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felician ALECU

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Any major software development starts with the Initiating process group. Once the charter document is approved, the Planning and then to the Executing stages will follow. Monitoring and Controlling is measuring the potential performance deviation of the project in terms of schedule and costs and performs the related Integrated Change Control activities. At the end, during the Closing, the program/project manager will check the entire work is completed and the objectives are met.

  2. Project management plan : Dallas Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) demonstration project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    The Dallas Integrated Corridor Management System Demonstration Project is a multi-agency, de-centralized operation which will utilize a set of regional systems to integrate the operations of the corridor. The purpose of the Dallas ICM System is to im...

  3. Project Management 2027; The Future of Project Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drs. A.J.G. Silvius

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a study into the expected development of the competences op the project manager in the year 2027. The study was performed amongst the members of IPMA-Netherlands during the summer of 2007. In the study the 46 competences of the International Competence Baseline 3 (ICB 3) were

  4. Managing and mitigating conflict in healthcare teams: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almost, Joan; Wolff, Angela C; Stewart-Pyne, Althea; McCormick, Loretta G; Strachan, Diane; D'Souza, Christine

    2016-07-01

    To review empirical studies examining antecedents (sources, causes, predictors) in the management and mitigation of interpersonal conflict. Providing quality care requires positive, collaborative working relationships among healthcare team members. In today's increasingly stress-laden work environments, such relationships can be threatened by interpersonal conflict. Identifying the underlying causes of conflict and choice of conflict management style will help practitioners, leaders and managers build an organizational culture that fosters collegiality and create the best possible environment to engage in effective conflict management. Integrative literature review. CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Proquest ABI/Inform, Cochrane Library and Joanne Briggs Institute Library were searched for empirical studies published between 2002-May 2014. The review was informed by the approach of Whittemore and Knafl. Findings were extracted, critically examined and grouped into themes. Forty-four papers met the inclusion criteria. Several antecedents influence conflict and choice of conflict management style including individual characteristics, contextual factors and interpersonal conditions. Sources most frequently identified include lack of emotional intelligence, certain personality traits, poor work environment, role ambiguity, lack of support and poor communication. Very few published interventions were found. By synthesizing the knowledge and identifying antecedents, this review offers evidence to support recommendations on managing and mitigating conflict. As inevitable as conflict is, it is the responsibility of everyone to increase their own awareness, accountability and active participation in understanding conflict and minimizing it. Future research should investigate the testing of interventions to minimize these antecedents and, subsequently, reduce conflict. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Integrated Project Management System description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Integrated Program Management System (IPMS) Description is a ''working'' document that describes the work processes of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office (UMTRA) and IPMS Group. This document has undergone many revisions since the UMTRA Project began; this revision not only updates the work processes but more clearly explains the relationships between the Project Office, contractors, and other participants. The work process flow style has been revised to better describe Project work and the relationships of participants. For each work process, more background and guidance on ''why'' and ''what is expected'' is given. For example, a description of activity data sheets has been added in the work organization and the Project performance and reporting processes, as well as additional detail about the federal budget process and funding management and improved flow charts and explanations of cost and schedule management. A chapter has been added describing the Cost Reduction/Productivity Improvement Program. The Change Control Board (CCB) procedures (Appendix A) have been updated. Project critical issues meeting (PCIM) procedures have been added as Appendix B. Budget risk assessment meeting procedures have been added as Appendix C. These appendices are written to act as stand-alone documentation for each process. As the procedures are improved and updated, the documentation can be updated separately

  6. Relationship between time management in construction industry and project management performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Najuwa; Nawi, Mohd Nasrun Mohd; Radzuan, Kamaruddin

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, construction industry particularly in Malaysia struggle in achieving status of eminent time management for construction project. Project managers have a great responsibility to keep the project success under time of project completion. However, studies shows that delays especially in Malaysian construction industry still unresolved due to weakness in managing the project. In addition, quality of time management on construction projects is generally poor. Due to the progressively extended delays issue, time performance becomes an important subject to be explored to investigate delay factors. The method of this study is review of literature towards issues in construction industry which affecting time performance of project in general by focusing towards process involved for project management. Based on study, it was found that knowledge, commitment, cooperation are the main criteria as an overall to manage the project into a smooth process during project execution until completion. It can be concluded that, the strength between project manager and team members in these main criteria while conducting the project towards good time performance is highly needed. However, there is lack of establishment towards factors of poor time performance which strongly related with project management. Hence, this study has been conducted to establish factors of poor time performance and its relations with project management.

  7. The application of project management in construction projects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Project management is critical for successful project development. A crucial responsibility of the project manager is ensuring that the client is certified and the scope of work is of high quality, within the agreed budget and time frame. In some way, project financing is completed from the time of project conception. Indeed ...

  8. Interprofessional team management in pediatric critical care: some challenges and possible solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stocker M

    2016-02-01

    factors to learning in daily practice. Finally, changes in small steps at the level of the microlevel unit are the bases to improve interprofessional team management and patient safety. Once small things with potential impact can be changed in one's own unit, engagement of health care professionals occurs and projects become accepted.Conclusion: Bottom–up patient safety initiatives encouraging participation of every single care provider by learning effective interprofessional team management within daily practice may be an effective way of fostering patient safety. Keywords: pediatric intensive care unit, patient safety, interprofessional team management, teamwork, psychological safety, organizational learning

  9. Identifying Coordination Problems in Software Development : Finding Mismatches between Software and Project Team Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amrit, Chintan Amrit; van Hillegersberg, Jos; Kumar, Kuldeep

    2012-01-01

    Today’s dynamic and iterative development environment brings significant challenges for software project management. In distributed project settings, “management by walking around” is no longer an option and project managers may miss out on key project insights. The TESNA (TEchnical Social Network

  10. Structuring Effective Student Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Ellen L.

    1997-01-01

    Experience with student teams working on policy analysis projects indicates the need for faculty supervision of teams in the process of addressing complex issues. The problem-solving approach adopted in one policy analysis course is described, including assignments and tasks, issues and sponsors, team dynamics, conflict management, and the…

  11. How Project Managers Really Manage: An Indepth Look at Some Managers of Large, Complex NASA Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M.; Impaeilla, Cliff (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports on a research study by the author that examined ten contemporary National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) complex projects. In-depth interviews with the project managers of these projects provided qualitative data about the inner workings of the project and the methodologies used in establishing and managing the projects. The inclusion of a variety of space, aeronautics, and ground based projects from several different NASA research centers helped to reduce potential bias in the findings toward any one type of project, or technical discipline. The findings address the participants and their individual approaches. The discussion includes possible implications for project managers of other large, complex, projects.

  12. LEADER VS MANAGER. INFLUENCES AND CONTRIBUTIONS TO TEAM DEVELOPMENT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madlena NEN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available When exposed to the theoretic leadership concepts, it is rather rare that managers - either already acting or pursuing this role – don’t identify themselves as leaders. A leader is a person who motivates , supports and listens. To be a leader means to mobilize human resources , to establish a direction emerged from a personal vision on the evolution of things, to have the power to transform this vision into reality. And yet, real leaders are far more rare than most managers are ready to admit. Both have their added value within an organization and in practice it’s rather challenging to see things moving ahead without having both roles pulling together. So far, a leader's skills are necessary to deal with the ambiguities and uncertainties with which they are accustomed. Another aspect is the strategic positioning in case of conflict . This paper aims to identify the influences of a leader in team building.

  13. Pain Management in Children with Collaborative Parents and Healthcare Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Vakili

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Most children in hospital have pain. Seeing your child in pain or discomfort is incredibly difficult. Pain in children is a public health concern of major significance in most parts of the world. We have learned that unrelieved pain causes the body to release certain chemicals that may actually delay healing, so it's important to work with child's nurses and doctors to help children for control the pain. On the other side, medication is not the only way to relieve pain. Pain in children should always be managed and pain expression is dependent on the child’s age, cognitive development, and socio cultural context and it is important to pay particular attention to developmental variations in any behavioural manifestations of pain. In this study to explain some ways for parents and healthcare team to manage pain in children.

  14. Evaluation of NRC maintenance team inspection reports for managing aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fresco, A.; Gunther, W.

    1991-01-01

    A nuclear power plant's maintenance program is the principal vehicle through which age-related degradation is managed. Over the past two years, the NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] has evaluated the maintenance program of every nuclear power plant in the U.S. The reports issued on these in-depth team inspections have been reviewed to ascertain the strengths and weaknesses of the programs as related to the need to understand and manage the effects of aging on nuclear power plant systems, structures, and components. Selected results of this review are presented in this paper, including examples of inspection and monitoring techniques successfully used by utilities to detect degradation due to aging. Attributes of plant maintenance programs where the NRC inspectors felt that improvement was needed to properly address the aging issue are also discussed. 6 refs., 1 tab

  15. Software Tools Streamline Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Three innovative software inventions from Ames Research Center (NETMARK, Program Management Tool, and Query-Based Document Management) are finding their way into NASA missions as well as industry applications. The first, NETMARK, is a program that enables integrated searching of data stored in a variety of databases and documents, meaning that users no longer have to look in several places for related information. NETMARK allows users to search and query information across all of these sources in one step. This cross-cutting capability in information analysis has exponentially reduced the amount of time needed to mine data from days or weeks to mere seconds. NETMARK has been used widely throughout NASA, enabling this automatic integration of information across many documents and databases. NASA projects that use NETMARK include the internal reporting system and project performance dashboard, Erasmus, NASA s enterprise management tool, which enhances organizational collaboration and information sharing through document routing and review; the Integrated Financial Management Program; International Space Station Knowledge Management; Mishap and Anomaly Information Reporting System; and management of the Mars Exploration Rovers. Approximately $1 billion worth of NASA s projects are currently managed using Program Management Tool (PMT), which is based on NETMARK. PMT is a comprehensive, Web-enabled application tool used to assist program and project managers within NASA enterprises in monitoring, disseminating, and tracking the progress of program and project milestones and other relevant resources. The PMT consists of an integrated knowledge repository built upon advanced enterprise-wide database integration techniques and the latest Web-enabled technologies. The current system is in a pilot operational mode allowing users to automatically manage, track, define, update, and view customizable milestone objectives and goals. The third software invention, Query

  16. White Paper on the Use of Team Calendars with the JIRA Issue Tracking System and Confluence Collaboration Tools for the xLPR Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasky, Hilda B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Williams, Paul T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bass, Bennett Richard [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2012-09-01

    ORNL was tasked by xLPR project management to propose a team calendar for use within the xLPR consortium. Among various options that were considered, the approach judged by ORNL to best fit the needs of the xLPR project is presented in this document. The Atlassian Team Calendars plug-in used with the Confluence collaboration tool was recommended for several reasons, including the advantage that it provides for a tight integration between Confluence (found at https://xlpr.ornl.gov/wiki ) and xLPR s JIRA issue tracking system (found at https://xlpr.ornl.gov/jira ). This document is divided into two parts. The first part (Sections 1-6) consists of the white paper, which highlights some of the ways that Team Calendars can improve com mun ication between xLPR project managers, group leads, and team members when JIRA is applied for both issue tracking and change-management activities. Specific points emphasized herein are as follows: The Team Calendar application greatly enhances the added value that the JIRA and Confluence tools bring to the xLPR Project. The Team Calendar can improve com mun ication between xLPR project managers, group leads, and team members when JIRA is applied for both issue tracking and change-management activities. The Team Calendar works across different email tools such as Outlook 2011, Outlook 2010, Outlook 2007, Google Calendars and Mac s iCalendar to name a few. xLPR users can now access the wiki Confluence (with embedded Team Calendars) directly from JIRA without having to re-validate their login. The second part consists of an Annex (Section 7), which describes how users can subscribe to Team Calendars from different calendar applications. Specific instructions are given in the Annex that describe how to Import xLPR Team Calendar to Outlook Version Office 2010 Import xLPR Team Calendar to Outlook Version Office 2007 Subscribe to Team Calendar from Google Calendar The reader is directed to Section 4 for instructions on adding events to the

  17. Public participation in UMTRA Project Program Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majors, M.J.; Ulland, L.M.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up radioactive soil and ore residue from 24 inactive uranium processing sites under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. In early 1993, the DOE adopted new guidelines strongly encouraging public participation. This guidance commits to providing the public with opportunities to participate in the decision-making process for program planning, design, and implementation. Rooted in the conviction that an effective public participation program will enable citizens to take part in policy decisions, the full adoption of the guidance by the UMTRA project can also help DOE make better decisions, provide a means to build consensus, and assist in building credibility. This transition to open communication parallels the climate of corporate America in which increases in productivity are often the result of workers and management teaming together to solve problems. While these guidelines have been embraced by public affairs staff from headquarters to the field offices, barriers still exist that inhibit substantive public involvement. The challenge for the UMTRA project is to overcome these barriers to ensure that public participation is an integral part of the way business is conducted. This paper discusses lessons learned by the UMTRA project in its efforts to address barriers to public participation and the project's plans for full compliance with the DOE guidelines

  18. Factors affecting fire suppression costs as identified by incident management teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janie Canton-Thompson; Brooke Thompson; Krista Gebert; David Calkin; Geoff Donovan; Greg Jones

    2006-01-01

    This study uses qualitative sociological methodology to discover information and insights about the role of Incident Management Teams in wildland fire suppression costs. We interviewed 48 command and general staff members of Incident Management Teams throughout the United States. Interviewees were asked about team structure, functioning, and decision making as a...

  19. Evaluation of an Initiative for Fostering Provider-Pharmacist Team Management of Hypertension in Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Doucette

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: 1 Conduct team building activities for provider-community pharmacist teams in small communities and 2 Determine the impact of the team approach on practitioner-reported consequences and 3 Identify obstacles to the team approach and ways to overcome them. Methods: Eleven provider-pharmacist teams were recruited in rural/micropolitan communities in Iowa. The teams participated in team building sessions facilitated by the project leaders, to discuss the team approach. Decisions included patient identification, practitioner roles, and communications. Most pharmacists conducted blood pressure (BP checks in the pharmacy and assessed the anti-hypertensive medications. If the BP was not at goal, the pharmacist worked with the patient and provider to make improvements. Teams followed their strategies for 3-5 months. Data were collected from pharmacy logs and on-line surveys of team members before and after the team period. Results: Using a multi-case approach, 4 cases were classified as Worked-Well, 5 as Limited-Success, and 2 as No-Team-Care. The Worked-Well teams provided an average of 26.5 BP visits per team, while the Limited-Success teams averaged 6.8 BP visits. The Worked-Well teams established and used a system to support the team approach. The Limited-Success teams either didn't fully establish their team system, or used it sparingly. The No-Team-Care cases did not provide any team care. Conclusions: Factors supporting success were: positive provider-pharmacist relations, established team system, commitment to team care, and patient willingness to participate. While this program had some success, potential improvements were identified: more follow-up after the team building session, additional patient materials, and guidance for practice changes.   Type: Case Study

  20. Project management as steppingstone of enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Andreeva, T.; Petrovska, T.; Tytar, T.

    2011-01-01

    Actual problems of project management in enterprises in order to achieve their goals. The basic members of the organization and implementation of project and the methodology for their implementation. The basic principles of project management are included.

  1. PROJECT MANAGEMENT CONSIDERED IN A 2014 PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GRAPĂ ADELINA-ROXANA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Project Management has come of age, yet multiple surveys and reports confirm the fact that the majority of projects are challenged. Given the more demanding and strict financial constraints associated with the current fiscal climate, project management is regarded as a tool that can deliver more with less. The literature on Project Management shows that, in spite of advancement in Project Management processes, tools and systems, project success has not significantly improved. This problem raises questions about the value and effectiveness of Project Management and Project Management systems. Programs and projects are considered as strategic assets for the majority of businesses, therefore, the trend of these organizations is to embrace a management by projects culture. The main objective of Project Management nowadays is to ensure programs and projects aligned to a certain strategy and also to provide for every member of an organization the ability to take proactive actions creating additional benefits.

  2. Development of an Integrated Team Training Design and Assessment Architecture to Support Adaptability in Healthcare Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    provision of training is not a major focus of this project, trainees were able to practice trauma management skills as well as leadership skills...SUBJECT TERMS Military healthcare team; Trauma teams; Team training; Teamwork; Adaptive performance; Leadership ; Simulation; Modeling; Bayesian belief...ABBREVIATIONS Healthcare team Trauma Trauma teams Team training Teamwork Adaptability Adaptive performance Leadership Simulation Modeling

  3. Quality Interaction Between Mission Assurance and Project Team Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong-Fu, Helenann H.; Wilson, Robert K.

    2006-01-01

    Mission Assurance independent assessments started during the development cycle and continued through post launch operations. In operations, Health and Safety of the Observatory is of utmost importance. Therefore, Mission Assurance must ensure requirements compliance and focus on process improvements required across the operational systems including new/modified products, tools, and procedures. The deployment of the interactive model involves three objectives: Team member Interaction, Good Root Cause Analysis Practices, and Risk Assessment to avoid reoccurrences. In applying this model, we use a metric based measurement process and was found to have the most significant effect, which points to the importance of focuses on a combination of root cause analysis and risk approaches allowing the engineers the ability to prioritize and quantify their corrective actions based on a well-defined set of root cause definitions (i.e. closure criteria for problem reports), success criteria and risk rating definitions.

  4. Ensuring on-time quality data management deliverables from global clinical data management teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zia Haque

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing emphasis on off-site and off-shore clinical data management activities mandates a paramount need for adequate solutions geared toward on-time, quality deliverables. The author has been leading large teams that have been involved in successful global clinical data management endeavors. While each study scenario is unique and has to be approached as such, there are several elements in defining strategy and team structure in global clinical data management that can be applied universally. In this article, key roles, practices, and high-level procedures are laid out as a road map to ensure success with the model.

  5. 44 CFR 206.438 - Project management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Project management. 206.438 Section 206.438 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... Project management. (a) General. The State serving as grantee has primary responsibility for project...

  6. PROJECT MANAGEMENT CONSIDERED IN A 2014 PERSPECTIVE

    OpenAIRE

    GRAPA ADELINA-ROXANA; SOARE ALICE-MAGDALENA

    2014-01-01

    Project Management has come of age, yet multiple surveys and reports confirm the fact that the majority of projects are challenged. Given the more demanding and strict financial constraints associated with the current fiscal climate, project management is regarded as a tool that can deliver more with less. The literature on Project Management shows that, in spite of advancement in Project Management processes, tools and systems, project success has not significantly improved. T...

  7. Risk Management of NASA Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarper, Hueseyin

    1997-01-01

    Various NASA Langley Research Center and other center projects were attempted for analysis to obtain historical data comparing pre-phase A study and the final outcome for each project. This attempt, however, was abandoned once it became clear that very little documentation was available. Next, extensive literature search was conducted on the role of risk and reliability concepts in project management. Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) techniques are being used with increasing regularity both in and outside of NASA. The value and the usage of PRA techniques were reviewed for large projects. It was found that both civilian and military branches of the space industry have traditionally refrained from using PRA, which was developed and expanded by nuclear industry. Although much has changed with the end of the cold war and the Challenger disaster, it was found that ingrained anti-PRA culture is hard to stop. Examples of skepticism against the use of risk management and assessment techniques were found both in the literature and in conversations with some technical staff. Program and project managers need to be convinced that the applicability and use of risk management and risk assessment techniques is much broader than just in the traditional safety-related areas of application. The time has come to begin to uniformly apply these techniques. The whole idea of risk-based system can maximize the 'return on investment' that the public demands. Also, it would be very useful if all project documents of NASA Langley Research Center, pre-phase A through final report, are carefully stored in a central repository preferably in electronic format.

  8. Measurement of software project management effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Demir, Kadir Alpaslan

    2008-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Evaluating, monitoring, and improving the effectiveness of project management can contribute to successful acquisition of software systems. In this dissertation, we introduce a quantitative metric for gauging the effectiveness of managing a software-development project. The metric may be used to evaluate and monitor project management effectiveness in software projects by project managers, technical managers, executive man...

  9. CooMan - a global collaborative project management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, J.M. de; Palma, S.

    1994-01-01

    Project Coordination and Management have long been recognized as an area with growing problems and unsatisfactory solutions. Conciliating flexibility with target achievements is historically the main problem to face. The difficulties have been growing at more than linear ratio with the size and complexity of the Projects being developed in the present days. The HEP communities suffer additional challenges because of the distributed nature of the collaborations, the novelty of each project; and the less authoritarian form of leadership and management of team and individual. This prevents the adoption of more centralized focus on decision. CooMan intends to be a Global Collaborative Project Management System. This paper discusses the basic aspects of the concepts involved, outlining how task coordination, acts of speech, and World-Wide hyper media can be used to support project management activities. A distributed tool to implement such proposition is described, and a first prototype is presented

  10. Factors influencing direct costs dynamics of building projects - team ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 6, No 5 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  11. Collaboration between competitors’ NPD teams : in search of effective modes of management control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smets, L.P.M.; Langerak, F.; Tatikonda, M.V.

    Successful collaboration between new product development (NPD) teams maintained by competitors (so-called horizontal NPD collaboration) requires the use of formal modes of management control that simultaneously coordinate the teams' interdependent development activities and encourage their

  12. Managing Inclusiveness and Diversity in Teams: How Leader Inclusiveness Affects Performance through Status and Team Identity

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Rebecca; Boyle, Brendan; Parker, Vicki; Giles, Michelle; Chiang, Vico; Joyce, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    While there is increasing pressure to work collaboratively in interprofessional teams, health professionals often continue to operate in uni-professional silos. Leader inclusiveness is directed toward encouraging and valuing the different viewpoints of diverse members within team interactions, and has significant potential to overcome barriers to interprofessional team performance. In order to better understand the influence of leader inclusiveness, we develop and investigate a model of its e...

  13. A methodology and supply chain management inspired reference ontology for modeling healthcare teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuziemsky, Craig E; Yazdi, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies and strategic plans are advocating more team based healthcare delivery that is facilitated by information and communication technologies (ICTs). However before we can design ICTs to support teams we need a solid conceptual model of team processes and a methodology for using such a model in healthcare settings. This paper draws upon success in the supply chain management domain to develop a reference ontology of healthcare teams and a methodology for modeling teams to instantiate the ontology in specific settings. This research can help us understand how teams function and how we can design ICTs to support teams.

  14. Project Management Yinyang: Coupling project success and client satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Stewart Usher

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Our research applies paradox theory to a project management construct to help project management researchers and practitioners understand the tensions that can exist between project success and client satisfaction. Our research highlights that although project success and client satisfaction are both present within a project management construct, they also belong to different functional systems. Project success and client satisfaction have different systemic-discourses and use different language games to convey information. These distinctions can create latent and sometimes salient tensions within the project management construct that project managers must understand, embrace, and work with. We have used a Grounded Theory (GT methodology to explore the lived experience of project managers, and from this have identified a phenomenon which we have termed project management yinyang. Project management yinyang is the state that exists when both project success and Client satisfaction are tightly coupled within the project management construct. Project management yinyang highlights that these two phenomena cannot be viewed as separate elements because the ‘seed’ of each exists within the other. And to truly achieve one, you must also achieve the other. Our findings indicate that in order to create project management yinyang the project manager must embrace a paradoxical yet holistic philosophy. They must understand the complementarity, interdependency, and structural coupling that exists between the positivist and interpretivist paradigms within the project management construct. They must understand how satisfaction (Yin and success (Yang are created through focus. Furthermore, they must understand how project management yinyang is separate from, but borne from, the convergence of the other two elements.

  15. Team-Teaching a Digital Senior Capstone Project in CTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Melanie D.; Tews, Nichole M.; Washer, Barton A.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary career and technical education (CTE) students are faced with the unique challenge of learning not only specific content-related knowledge and skills, but also postsecondary preparation, 21st century technology, employability and self-marketing skills. At Cass Career Center in Harrisonville, Missouri, a senior capstone project was…

  16. ASPECTS OF THE ASSOCIATION OF EFFECTIVE TEAM RELATED VARIABLES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF INTERCULTURAL WORK TEAMS IN MULTINATIONAL COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BIBU Nicolae

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Various phenomena generated by the new context of globalization have focused our research interest towards studying in what ways management of Intercultural Work teams (IWT could and should contribute to the increase of their performance at work. Despite the recognition of the fact that many MNCs fail in the management of IWTs, there is still a significant knowledge gap about their non-functionalities. Managerial literature „blames” national and organizational culture differences for the failure of this process. This is because each member brings his own style of work, with his own way of ensuring effective cooperation, making difficult to identify a clear recipe of a team organization and management in intercultural context. Teamwork, managing work teams made the subject of numerous researchers from many fields, denoting so difficult exercise in practice. However, we have identified high performance IWTs whose members are from different countries. Therefore, we assume that their management identified and used methods and instruments able to ensuring IWT performance. If we look at international research, intercultural teams management models have a reductionist and not holistic approach, namely stochastic in terms of selection of specific cultural dimensions cultural models specific to the interest of the researcher. In contrast, in Romania, intercultural management and intercultural management teams performance is less studied. The research presented below is set up to be a part of a pilot study, an exploratory research of how intercultural management assigned dimensions are directly related to the concept of EIA performance dimensions assigned. Our assumption for the empirical research is the following: work team performance (effective, efficient, with a high degree of satisfaction of its members is the result of application performance management in the context of a particular style of interaction specific team. Because the dependent

  17. Habitat Demonstration Unit Project: Leadership and Management Strategies for a Rapid Prototyping Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.; Toup, Larry; Gill, Tracy; Tri, Terry; Howe, Scott; Smitherman, David

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) led multi-center Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) project leadership and management strategies being used by the NASA HDU team for a rapid prototyping project. The HDU project team constructed and tested an analog prototype lunar surface habitat/laboratory called the Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) during 2010. The prototype unit subsystems were integrated in a short amount of time, utilizing a tiger team rapid prototyping approach that brought together over 20 habitation-related technologies and innovations from a variety of NASA centers. This paper describes the leadership and management strategies as well as lessons learned pertaining to leading and managing a multi-center diverse team in a rapid prototype environment. The PEM configuration went from a paper design to an operational surface habitat demonstration unit in less than 12 months. The HDU project is part of the strategic plan from the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) Directorate Integration Office (DIO) and the Exploration Mission Systems Office (EMSO) to test destination elements in analog environments. The 2011 HDU-Deep Space Habitat (DSH) configuration will build upon the PEM work, and emphasize validity of crew operations (remote working and living), EVA operations, mission operations, logistics operations, and science operations that might be required in a deep space context for Near Earth Object (NEO) exploration mission architectures. The 2011 HDU-DSH will be field-tested during the 2011 Desert Research and Technologies Studies (DRaTS) field tests. The HDU project is a "technology-pull" project that integrates technologies and innovations from multiple NASA centers. This project will repurpose the HDU 2010 demo unit that was field tested in the 2010 DRaTS, adding habitation functionality to the prototype unit. This paper will describe the strategy of establishing a multi-center project

  18. Nurse practitioners' perceptions of interprofessional team functioning with implications for nurse managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heale, Roberta; Dickieson, Patti; Carter, Lorraine; Wenghofer, Elizabeth F

    2014-10-01

    To determine the perceptions of nurse practitioners (NPs) about the level of functioning of their interprofessional teams. Interprofessional teams are a global trend, and nurses play leadership roles in their management. Little is known about the impact of specific barriers to team functioning and the role of the nurse manager on team functioning. Ninety-eight NPs at a conference completed the Interprofessional Team Functioning Survey (ITFS). The survey items with the lowest mean scores were related to organisational systems. These items included workplace policies that support interprofessional teamwork, in particular, orientation to the interprofessional team. Items that generated lower mean scores were adequate time to work as a member of the interprofessional team, team dynamics, collaboration among team members and the sharing of responsibility. Organisational and team relational issues can be addressed through organisational management strategies. Nurse managers have an important role in facilitating high functioning interprofessional teams. Strategies for managers to support interprofessional team functioning emerged. These strategies include ensuring that there are appropriate policies, orientation of new members, allocation of time to support interprofessional teamwork, leadership to enhance team collaboration and clear delineation of responsibilities of each member. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Project work on wellbeing in multidisciplinary student teams : A triple testimonial on eps at artesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohaert, S.; Baelus, C.; Lacko, D.

    2012-01-01

    The European Project Semester (EPS) programme offers an educational framework to support students to practice problem-and project-based cross-disciplinary product innovation and research, in small multidisciplinary and international teams. To explore the potential and the restrictions of this

  20. Virtual Teaming and Collaboration Technology: A Study of Influences on Virtual Project Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broils, Gary C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to explore the relationships between the independent variables, contextual factors for virtual teams and collaboration technology, and the dependent variable, virtual project outcomes. The problem leading to the need for the study is a lower success rate for virtual projects compared to…

  1. Oil sands tailings management project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godwalt, C. [Alberta WaterSMART, Calgary, AB (Canada); Kotecha, P. [Suncor Energy Inc, Calgary, AB (Canada); Aumann, C. [Alberta Innovates - Technology Futures, Alberta Governement, AB (Canada)

    2010-11-15

    The Oil sands leadership initiative (OSLI) works with the Government of Alberta on the development of the oil sands industry, considering environmental, economical and social aspects. Water management was identified as one of most important areas to focus on. Alberta WaterSMART was requested to support the development and the management of projects resulting from the work done or underway in this field. The development of a regional water management solution stood out as the most interesting solution to obtain significant results. In the Athabasca Region, oil sands producers work independently on their water sourcing and disposal with particular attention to fresh water conservation and economics. The Athabasca River represents a source for mines and distant saline aquifers are the target of steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) operators. As part of a four-phase project aiming to study the environmental and economic footprint (EEF) benefit of alternatives for Athabasca oil sands production water supply and disposal, the purpose of the tailings water management project was to identify tailings treatment technologies that are ready to be implemented, and to design and evaluate solutions in order to improve regional oil sands production water sourcing and disposal. Alternatives were evaluated based on their total EEF, applying a lifecycle assessment methodology with a particular attention on the quantification of important performance indicators. 25 refs., 8 tabs., 40 figs.

  2. Oil sands tailings management project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godwalt, C.; Kotecha, P.; Aumann, C.

    2010-11-01

    The Oil sands leadership initiative (OSLI) works with the Government of Alberta on the development of the oil sands industry, considering environmental, economical and social aspects. Water management was identified as one of most important areas to focus on. Alberta WaterSMART was requested to support the development and the management of projects resulting from the work done or underway in this field. The development of a regional water management solution stood out as the most interesting solution to obtain significant results. In the Athabasca Region, oil sands producers work independently on their water sourcing and disposal with particular attention to fresh water conservation and economics. The Athabasca River represents a source for mines and distant saline aquifers are the target of steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) operators. As part of a four-phase project aiming to study the environmental and economic footprint (EEF) benefit of alternatives for Athabasca oil sands production water supply and disposal, the purpose of the tailings water management project was to identify tailings treatment technologies that are ready to be implemented, and to design and evaluate solutions in order to improve regional oil sands production water sourcing and disposal. Alternatives were evaluated based on their total EEF, applying a lifecycle assessment methodology with a particular attention on the quantification of important performance indicators. 25 refs., 8 tabs., 40 figs.

  3. Project risk management: A review of an institutional project life cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanjiru Gachie

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is a desktop analysis of project risk management involving a project management institutional restructuring. The pragmatic nature of this research allows for the literature review and the document analysis to be integrated and presented as both a descriptive and analytical research. The analysis demonstrates that the project committee did not proactively manage project risk. The restructuring was a change management project, entailing the implementation of many organisational changes, such as restructuring, lay-off of some part of the administrative workforce, adoption of new technology, provision of new approaches to well-established procedures, and implementation of new performance initiative, the process which should have been managed with an effective integrated risk strategy and plan. Analysis of the restructuring project risk management exhibits little evidence of a systematic (computer based or manual record that should have provided policies, procedures, and structures for managing risk. The article concludes that the restructuring risk process was inadequate and it could not have ensured a successful project. An analysis of the restructuring project risk monitoring and control exhibits a reactive rather than proactive application of risk management procedures. The analysis further indicates that the committee failed to make use of the various project risk management processes, standards, and guidelines. Based on the conclusions, the article recommends that project risk planning, strategy, control, and monitoring should be put in place for future institutional projects. The project management team should also put in place procedures for primary stakeholders engagements, identify and address their nature of interest and power in future risk management projects

  4. Environmental Management Assessment of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Assessment performed at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) in Fernald, Ohio. During this assessment, the activities conducted by the assessment team included review of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE) and FEMP contractor personnel; and inspection and observation of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the assessment was conducted from March 15 through April 1, 1993, by DOE`s Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health (EH-1). EH-24 carries out independent assessments of DOE facilities and activities as part of the EH-1 Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight Audit Program. The EH-24 program is designed to evaluate the status of DOE facilities and activities with respect to compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, Guidance and Directives; conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance; and the status and adequacy of management systems developed to address environmental requirements. The Environmental Management Assessment of FEMP focused on the adequacy of environmental management systems. Further, in response to requests by the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and Fernald Field Office (FN), Quality Assurance and Environmental Radiation activities at FEMP were evaluated from a programmatic standpoint. The results of the evaluation of these areas are contained in the Environmental Protection Programs section in this report.

  5. Environmental Management Assessment of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Assessment performed at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) in Fernald, Ohio. During this assessment, the activities conducted by the assessment team included review of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE) and FEMP contractor personnel; and inspection and observation of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the assessment was conducted from March 15 through April 1, 1993, by DOE's Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health (EH-1). EH-24 carries out independent assessments of DOE facilities and activities as part of the EH-1 Environment, Safety, and Health (ES ampersand H) Oversight Audit Program. The EH-24 program is designed to evaluate the status of DOE facilities and activities with respect to compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, Guidance and Directives; conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance; and the status and adequacy of management systems developed to address environmental requirements. The Environmental Management Assessment of FEMP focused on the adequacy of environmental management systems. Further, in response to requests by the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and Fernald Field Office (FN), Quality Assurance and Environmental Radiation activities at FEMP were evaluated from a programmatic standpoint. The results of the evaluation of these areas are contained in the Environmental Protection Programs section in this report

  6. Breakthrough Propulsion Physics Project: Project Management Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millis, Marc G.

    2004-01-01

    To leap past the limitations of existing propulsion, the NASA Breakthrough Propulsion Physics (BPP) Project seeks further advancements in physics from which new propulsion methods can eventually be derived. Three visionary breakthroughs are sought: (1) propulsion that requires no propellant, (2) propulsion that circumvents existing speed limits, and (3) breakthrough methods of energy production to power such devices. Because these propulsion goals are presumably far from fruition, a special emphasis is to identify credible research that will make measurable progress toward these goals in the near-term. The management techniques to address this challenge are presented, with a special emphasis on the process used to review, prioritize, and select research tasks. This selection process includes these key features: (a) research tasks are constrained to only address the immediate unknowns, curious effects or critical issues, (b) reliability of assertions is more important than the implications of the assertions, which includes the practice where the reviewers judge credibility rather than feasibility, and (c) total scores are obtained by multiplying the criteria scores rather than by adding. Lessons learned and revisions planned are discussed.

  7. Bed management team with Kanban web-based application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Hermano Alexandre Lima; Santos, Ana Kelly Lima da Cruz; Alcântara, Antônia Celia de Castro; Lima, Carmen Sulinete Suliano da Costa; Rocha, Sabrina Gabriele Maia Oliveira; Cardoso, Roberto Melo; Cremonin, Jair Rodrigues

    2018-05-15

    To measure the effectiveness of the bed management process that uses a web-based application with Kanban methodology to reduce hospitalization time of hospitalized patients. Before-after study was performed. The study was conducted between July 2013 and July 2017, at the Unimed Regional Hospital of Fortaleza, which has 300 beds, of which 60 are in the intensive care unit (ICU). It is accredited by International Society for Quality in Healthcare. Patients hospitalized in the referred period. Bed management with an application that uses color logic to signal at which stage of high flow the patients meet, in which each patient is interpreted as a card of the classical Kanban theory. It has an automatic user signaling system for process movement, and a system for monitoring and analyzing discharge forecasts. Length of hospital stay, number of customer complaints related to bed availability. After the intervention, the hospital's overall hospital stay time was reduced from 5.6 days to 4.9 days (P = 0.001). The units with the greatest reduction were the ICUs, with reduction from 6.0 days to 2.0 (P = 0.001). The relative percentage of complaints regarding bed availability in the hospital fell from 27% to 0%. We conclude that the use of an electronic tool based on Kanban methodology and accessed via the web by a bed management team is effective in reducing patients' hospital stay time.

  8. Cross-Cultural Management Learning through Innovative Pedagogy: An Exploratory Study of Globally Distributed Student Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel-Radic, Anne; Moos, J. Chris; Long, Suzanna K.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an innovative pedagogy based on student participation in globally distributed project teams. The study questions the link between student learning of intercultural competence and the global teaming experience. Data was collected from 115 students participating in 22 virtual intercultural teams. Results revealed that students…

  9. Project-focused activity and knowledge tracker: a unified data analysis, collaboration, and workflow tool for medicinal chemistry project teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodney, Marian D; Brosius, Arthur D; Gregory, Tracy; Heck, Steven D; Klug-McLeod, Jacquelyn L; Poss, Christopher S

    2009-12-01

    Advances in the field of drug discovery have brought an explosion in the quantity of data available to medicinal chemists and other project team members. New strategies and systems are needed to help these scientists to efficiently gather, organize, analyze, annotate, and share data about potential new drug molecules of interest to their project teams. Herein we describe a suite of integrated services and end-user applications that facilitate these activities throughout the medicinal chemistry design cycle. The Automated Data Presentation (ADP) and Virtual Compound Profiler (VCP) processes automate the gathering, organization, and storage of real and virtual molecules, respectively, and associated data. The Project-Focused Activity and Knowledge Tracker (PFAKT) provides a unified data analysis and collaboration environment, enhancing decision-making, improving team communication, and increasing efficiency.

  10. Team-up Crop Diversification and Weed Management: PRODIVA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerowitt, B.; Melander, B.; Krawczyk, R.

    2015-01-01

    The research-network PRODIVA focuses on a better utilization of crop diversification for weed management in North European arable cropping systems. The goal is to maintain diverse arable weed vegetation that is manageable in the long-term and could fulfil other necessary systemfunctions including...... support of beneficial organisms. The partners in PRODIVA will synthesize knowledge from terminated and running research projects and set-up selected new experiments on cover crops and variety resp. crop mixtures. Moreover, we will interact with partners from farming practice and extension services...... in organic agriculture. Regional fields will be surveyed for weeds to safeguard the relevance of the experimental research. Current cropping practices and their influence on weed pressure and weed diversity will be identified. The project will involve relevant stakeholders from the participating countries...

  11. The Competence for Project Team Members in the Conditions of Remote Working

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdonek Iwona

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents results of the qualitative research on competence of project team members in the conditions of remote working. These competences were considered in relation to different roles, which the members of such a team accept. The reference point to studied roles was the concept of Hansen and Allen authorships, and with regard to competence, the author's synthesis of deliberations above their models described in the literature.

  12. [Dream Team--a pre-graduate surgical talent development project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Rune Dall; Christensen, Mette Krogh; Seyer-Hansen, Mikkel

    2014-08-04

    In 2009 surgeons from Aarhus University Hospital founded an extracurricular talent development project based on a skill-acquisition training programme for medical students at Aarhus University. The training program, named Dream Team, provides medical students with the opportunity to pursue a career in surgery. This paper presents and discusses the organizational and pedagogical framework of the concept Dream Team, as well as the results from two inquiries: a survey and an exploratory observational study. The inquiries were conducted in summer 2013.

  13. Project planning and project management of Baseball II-T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozman, T.A.; Chargin, A.K.

    1975-01-01

    The details of the project planning and project management work done on the Baseball II-T experiment are reviewed. The LLL Baseball program is a plasma confinement experiment accomplished with a superconducting magnet in the shape of a baseball seam. Both project planning and project management made use of the Critical Path Management (CPM) computer code. The computer code, input, and results from the project planning and project management runs, and the cost and effectiveness of this method of systems planning are discussed

  14. [The research project: financing and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schena, F P

    2003-01-01

    Basic and clinical research is accomplished by projects. The design of a project is not only based on the scientific content but also on its financing and management. This article wants to illustrate the correct modalities for project financing and project management in a scientific project.

  15. Trauma teams and time to early management during in situ trauma team training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härgestam, Maria; Lindkvist, Marie; Jacobsson, Maritha; Brulin, Christine; Hultin, Magnus

    2016-01-29

    To investigate the association between the time taken to make a decision to go to surgery and gender, ethnicity, years in profession, experience of trauma team training, experience of structured trauma courses and trauma in the trauma team, as well as use of closed-loop communication and leadership styles during trauma team training. In situ trauma team training. The patient simulator was preprogrammed to represent a severely injured patient (injury severity score: 25) suffering from hypovolemia due to external trauma. An emergency room in an urban Scandinavian level one trauma centre. A total of 96 participants were divided into 16 trauma teams. Each team consisted of six team members: one surgeon/emergency physician (designated team leader), one anaesthesiologist, one registered nurse anaesthetist, one registered nurse from the emergency department, one enrolled nurse from the emergency department and one enrolled nurse from the operating theatre. HRs with CIs (95% CI) for the time taken to make a decision to go to surgery was computed from a Cox proportional hazards model. Three variables remained significant in the final model. Closed-loop communication initiated by the team leader increased the chance of a decision to go to surgery (HR: 3.88; CI 1.02 to 14.69). Only 8 of the 16 teams made the decision to go to surgery within the timeframe of the trauma team training. Conversely, call-outs and closed-loop communication initiated by the team members significantly decreased the chance of a decision to go to surgery, (HR: 0.82; CI 0.71 to 0.96, and HR: 0.23; CI 0.08 to 0.71, respectively). Closed-loop communication initiated by the leader appears to be beneficial for teamwork. In contrast, a high number of call-outs and closed-loop communication initiated by team members might lead to a communication overload. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Medical team training: applying crew resource management in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Edward J; Mills, Peter D; Neily, Julia; Crittenden, Michael D; Carmack, Amy L; Bagian, James P

    2007-06-01

    Communication failure, a leading source of adverse events in health care, was involved in approximately 75% of more than 7,000 root cause analysis reports to the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) National Center for Patient Safety (NCPS). The VA NCPS Medical Team Training (MTT) program, which is based on aviation principles of crew resource management (CRM), is intended to improve outcomes of patient care by enhancing communication between health care professionals. Unique features of MTT include a full-day interactive learning session (facilitated entirely by clinical peers in a health care context), administration of pre-and postintervention safety attitudes questionnaires, and follow-up semistructured interviews with reports of program activities and lessons learned. Examples of projects in these facilities include intensive care unit (ICU) teams' patient-centered multidisciplinary rounds, surgical teams' preoperative briefings and debriefings, an entire operating room (OR) unit's adoption of "Rules of Conduct" for expected staff behavior, and an ICU team's use of the model for daily administrative briefings. An MTT program based on applied CRM principles was successfully developed and implemented in 43 VA medical centers from September 2003 to May 2007.

  17. Project management v praxi

    OpenAIRE

    Králová, Eliška

    2013-01-01

    Project management approaches are commonly used to write and implement business plans. In this thesis standard project management tools and methods are applied to a real project, which aims to improve the properties of the product it offers (an online educational game). This project is unique in that it is based on a voluntary basis, has limited resources and is very responsive to market demands. Project management is broken down into four stages according to the project life cycle: initiatio...

  18. Project report - an overview of the project and experiences with project management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg

    1996-01-01

    A collection of the project planning and the experiences with project management from the Catering 2000 project.As appendieces articles etc. from journals, newspapers etc. about the project.......A collection of the project planning and the experiences with project management from the Catering 2000 project.As appendieces articles etc. from journals, newspapers etc. about the project....

  19. Essentials of Project and Systems Engineering Management

    CERN Document Server

    Eisner, Howard S

    2008-01-01

    The Third Edition of Essentials of Project and Systems Engineering Management enables readers to manage the design, development, and engineering of systems effectively and efficiently. The book both defines and describes the essentials of project and systems engineering management and, moreover, shows the critical relationship and interconnection between project management and systems engineering. The author's comprehensive presentation has proven successful in enabling both engineers and project managers to understand their roles, collaborate, and quickly grasp and apply all the basic princip

  20. Managing relationship conflict and the effectiveness of organizational teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Dreu, C.K.W.; van Vianen, A.E.M.

    2001-01-01

    Past research has revealed that team effectiveness and satisfaction suffer when teams experience relationship conflict - conflict related to interpersonal issues, political norms and values, and personal taste. This study examined how teams should respond to these conflicts. Three types of conflict

  1. Two levels of employees in self-managing teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voxted, Søren

    Paperet diskutere selvstyrende teams på postsorterignscentre og pakkesorteringscentre i Post Danmark. De enkelte teams består både af en kernearbejdskraft, med særlige ansvarsopgaver. Typisk har de koordinatorfunktioner. Samtidig er der i hvert team en gruppe af midlertidig ansatte og deltidsansa...

  2. Globus Online: Climate Data Management for Small Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakrishnan, R.; Foster, I.

    2013-12-01

    Large and highly distributed climate data demands new approaches to data organization and lifecycle management. We need, in particular, catalogs that can allow researchers to track the location and properties of large numbers of data files, and management tools that can allow researchers to update data properties and organization during their research, move data among different locations, and invoke analysis computations on data--all as easily as if they were working with small numbers of files on their desktop computer. Both catalogs and management tools often need to be able to scale to extremely large quantities of data. When developing solutions to these problems, it is important to distinguish between the needs of (a) large communities, for whom the ability to organize published data is crucial (e.g., by implementing formal data publication processes, assigning DOIs, recording definitive metadata, providing for versioning), and (b) individual researchers and small teams, who are more frequently concerned with tracking the diverse data and computations involved in what highly dynamic and iterative research processes. Key requirements in the latter case include automated data registration and metadata extraction, ease of update, close-to-zero management overheads (e.g., no local software install); and flexible, user-managed sharing support, allowing read and write privileges within small groups. We describe here how new capabilities provided by the Globus Online system address the needs of the latter group of climate scientists, providing for the rapid creation and establishment of lightweight individual- or team-specific catalogs; the definition of logical groupings of data elements, called datasets; the evolution of catalogs, dataset definitions, and associated metadata over time, to track changes in data properties and organization as a result of research processes; and the manipulation of data referenced by catalog entries (e.g., replication of a dataset to

  3. Habitat Demonstration Unit Project Leadership and Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) led multi-center Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) project leadership and management strategies. The HDU project team constructed and tested an analog prototype lunar surface habitat/laboratory called the Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) during 2010. The prototype unit subsystems were integrated in a short amount of time, utilizing a tiger team approach that brought together over 20 habitation-related technologies and innovations from a variety of NASA centers. This paper describes the leadership and management strategies as well as lessons learned pertaining to leading and managing a multi-center diverse team in a rapid prototype environment. The PEM configuration went from a paper design to an operational surface habitat demonstration unit in less than 12 months. The HDU project is part of the strategic plan from the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) Directorate Integration Office (DIO) and the Exploration Mission Systems Office (EMSO) to test destination elements in analog environments. The 2011 HDU-Deep Space Habitat (DSH) configuration will build upon the PEM work, and emphasize validity of crew operations (remote working and living), EVA operations, mission operations, logistics operations, and science operations that might be required in a deep space context for Near Earth Object (NEO) exploration mission architectures. The 2011 HDU-DSH will be field-tested during the 2011 Desert Research and Technologies Studies (DRaTS) field tests. The HDU project is a "technology-pull" project that integrates technologies and innovations from multiple NASA centers. This project will repurpose the HDU 2010 demo unit that was field tested in the 2010 DRaTS, adding habitation functionality to the prototype unit. This paper will describe the strategy of establishing a multi-center project management team that put in place the key multi-center leadership skills and

  4. Using project management techniques in hydro-relicensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominie, D.; Richard, J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that to answer a pressing need for managing today's complex process and requirements of hydro relicensing, Central Maine Power Company has applied the principles of project management, including the use of computerized scheduling to its hydro relicensing efforts. This approach involves early inter-departmental cooperation in mapping out critical path scheduling by requiring the project team to: Outline the scope of the project in its entirety. Clarify and define components of the project. Quantify and categorize assumptions and dependencies. Identify constraints. The computer-generated schedule of this cooperative planning effort provides a graphic representation of the team's plan and become the focal point for refinements and adjustments necessary to complete an application on time. The use of project management techniques facilities team understanding of the realities and limitations in the relicensing process. These techniques encourage cooperative action, and use a solution-oriented process resulting in a product which can be a useful tool in communicating with resource agencies and regulators

  5. Exploring the dynamics of formal and informal networks in complex multi-team development projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kratzer, J.; Gemuenden, H. G.; Lettl, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    The increasing number of complex multi-team projects and the scarcity of knowledge about how to run them successfully, create a need for systematic empirical studies. We attempt to lessen this empirical gap by examining the overlap and structure of formally ascribed design interfaces and informal...... communication networks between participating teams in two complex multi-team projects in the space industry. We study the two projects longitudinally throughout the design and integration phases of product development. There are three major findings. First, formally ascribed design interfaces and informal...... communication networks overlap only marginally. Second, the structure of informal communication remains largely stable in the transition from the design to the integration phase. The third and most intriguing finding is that the weak overlap between formally ascribed design interfaces and the informal...

  6. Investigating the extent to which mobile phones reduce Knowledge Transfer barriers in Student Project Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Kyobe

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Group learning plays a key role in the transfer of knowledge. In institutions of learning, it enhances students’ understanding, critical thinking, integration of knowledge and knowledge sharing. However, the transfer of knowledge in group projects is often impeded by factors such as time and budget constraints, individual and social barriers, and a lack of motivation.Institutions of learning are increasingly adopting information and communication technologies (e.g. mobile technologies to provide solutions to the challenges facing them. Whilst the integration of the mobile context and technologies in learning environment has been encouraged over the years, and indeed many students today can use mobile phones, the effectiveness of these technologies in reducing impediments to knowledge transfer in group learning has not been investigated.This study investigated the extent to which mobile phones reduce the barriers to knowledge transfer in project groups. The impediments examined include the nature of knowledge, social barriers, lack of time and lack of motivation. Quantitative and qualitative approaches were used to collect and analyse the data. The sample consisted of 85 students engaged in group projects in the departments of Information Systems, Civil Engineering, Computer Science and Construction Engineering.The results show that mobile phones reduce all four knowledge transfer barriers investigated in the project groups. We found no significant difference in the nature of knowledge shared by teams with weak and strong ties. This suggests that teams with weak social ties who normally experience difficulty sharing complex (tacit knowledge can easily do so with the aid of mobile facilities. In addition, frequent users of mobile phones were motivated to share explicit knowledge with their peers whilst those who often work with tacit knowledge could convert it to explicit form and share it with others. Mobile features like short messaging

  7. ANALYSIS OF THE POSSIBILITY FOR ESTABLISHING PROJECT MANAGEMENT OFFICE (PMO IN COMPANIES IN SERBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Milin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Project Management Office (PMO is an organizational unit established to help project managers, project teams and the various levels of management in carrying out the principles of project management. The research was carried out in Serbia, in 2011, with the aim to establish which methodologies and techniques are used for project m anagement, and which of them are used the most frequently. Furthermore, the need for establishment of PMOs in Serbia is discussed. These offices should help in establishing a standardized methodology (at the organization level and thus overcome the obviou s poor use of any project management methodology at all.

  8. Prioritization of proposed waste management construction projects for the Waste Management program within the Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.V.

    1995-01-01

    A prioritization process is used to evaluate and rank proposed construction projects within the Department of Energy's Waste Management program. The process is used to determine which projects should proceed with conceptual design activities. The proposed construction projects are evaluated against a set of criteria which reflect Waste Management priorities. A management review team ranks and scores the projects thereby generating a prioritized list of projects. Despite decreasing budgets and changing political climates, the process has been a successful decision-aiding tool for selecting construction projects to carry out the Waste Management mission within the Department of Energy

  9. Innovation in top management teams: minority dissent, transformational leadership, and radical innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijstad, B.A.; Berger-Selman, F.; de Dreu, C.K.W.

    2014-01-01

    Research among lower level teams suggests that minority dissent stimulates team innovation. We consider the role of CEO transformational leadership in the dissent-innovation relation and study this in Top Management Teams (TMTs). We propose that transformational leaders create a psychologically safe

  10. Innovation in top management teams : Minority dissent, transformational leadership, and radical innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijstad, Bernard A.; Berger-Selman, Floor; De Dreu, Carsten K. W.

    2014-01-01

    Research among lower level teams suggests that minority dissent stimulates team innovation. We consider the role of CEO transformational leadership in the dissent-innovation relation and study this in Top Management Teams (TMTs). We propose that transformational leaders create a psychologically safe

  11. Team Conflict in ICT-Rich Environments: Roles of Technologies in Conflict Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Ana-Paula

    2008-01-01

    This study looks at how an information and communication technologies (ICT)-rich environment impacts team conflict and conflict management strategies. A case study research method was used. Three teams, part of a graduate class in instructional design, participated in the study. Data were collected through observations of team meetings, interviews…

  12. The Kozloduy project management unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnes, W.S.; Gros-Gean, P.; Demireva, E.

    2004-01-01

    The Project Management Unit (PMU) has been established in support to the Kozloduy NPP decommissioning department. It is comprised of a Consortium of the British Nuclear Group, EDF and subcontractor ENPRO Consult. It is responsible for the management of seven projects (a facility for dry storage of spent fuel; equipment to treat low activity liquid radioactive waste; provision of physical separation of the plant systems and areas to be decommissioned from the ones in operation; equipment to decontaminate and clean pools and large tanks; a facility to provide high volume reduction of solid radioactive wastes and retrieval and conditioning of ion exchange resins and other sorbents; equipment to provide measurement for the free-release of materials and components; a facility for personnel monitoring, decontamination and clothes changing for work outside of the normal radiological control areas) that will be used in support of the KNPP decommissioning process. The projects will be tendered in compliance with the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development requirements

  13. Project Management Communication 2.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berggreen, Line; Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    How can we understand project management communication practices for developing effective practices in professional and technical communication? In this article we explore an approach to project management that focuses on projects as having a technical documentation structure with content...... that is developed through social or interpersonal communication practices. Looking at the broader picture of project management which besides the implementation phase also includes conception, planning and closure, we see a project management framework that brings together both technical and social aspects...... of project communication. To understand how this works, we interviewed project managers about their understanding and strategy in communicating about the projects they lead. Findings demonstrate that more experienced project managers have a more nuanced understanding of project communication as both...

  14. Project Management – Multi-perspective Leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Project Management – Multi-perspective Leadership” af Hans Mikkelsen og Jens Ove Riis - anmeldelse......”Project Management – Multi-perspective Leadership” af Hans Mikkelsen og Jens Ove Riis - anmeldelse...

  15. Project management in the library workplace

    CERN Document Server

    Daugherty, Alice

    2018-01-01

    This volume of Advances in Library Administration and Organization attempts to put project management into the toolboxes of library administrators through overviews of concepts, analyses of experiences, and forecasts for the use of project management within the profession.

  16. Risk management in product innovation projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halman, J.I.M.; Keizer, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    In product innovation projects risk management has become increasingly important. Technological and commercial developments ask for effective and efficient product innovation. Systematic diagnosing and management of risks can help to make product innovation projects successful. In this paper a

  17. A proposed model for construction project management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Communication skills and leadership model, construction project ..... help a manager handle stress and break tension (Gido & Clements,. 2012: 331; Harrin .... production and management of projects, the higher the demand for.

  18. Project management. A discipline which contributes to project success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoch, G.

    2008-01-01

    The presentation covers the following topics: description of the Project - a contract was signed between KNPP and European Consortium Kozloduy (ECK) consisting of Framatome ANP GmbH as Leader (63%), Framatome ANP S.A.S. (17%), Atomenergoexport (20%) ; Project management in the modernization of NPP Kozloduy units 5 and 6; Project management process within AREVA NP GmbH; current status

  19. Perceptions of project managers regarding communication failures and barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn de Souza Cyganczuk

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The management of communication within a project can be considered as important as any other system within an organization because communication transmits and connects ideas, concepts, experiences and information on a project. This article describes an investigation of the problems in communication encountered by project managers in companies of different sizes and sectors in the project management area and compares these problems with what is found in the literature. Based on the study conducted, it was possible to identify the main barriers and failures in communication in these organizations and compare them with what is in the literature. The results showed that the main barriers and flaws found are: the lack of feedback to the members of the project team, the lack of trust among team members, channeling of misleading and distorted information, the lack of transmission of information or its transmission at an inopportune moment, and the limited knowledge and competencies of project managers, representing poor leadership and consequently impacting communication.

  20. Adapt! – Agile Project Management Supported by Axiomatic Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Jakob

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel approach for the use of Axiomatic Design Theory in combination with agile project management methods like Scrum for an effective, structured and combined product design and development process. Agile project management methods give a guideline how to manage a project, but there is only minor assistance regarding the actual product development process itself. Axiomatic Design can be used to support these methods in this point. In concrete terms, the results of the decomposition process of this theory can be used to formulate and structure the work packages for the agile project managing process. The Independence Axiom of Axiomatic Design Theory has a substantial contribution by ensuring the independence of the work packages which can be assigned to different project team members and can be processed independently by them. The combination of the different methods not only helps to ensure a good design solution but also helps to work more agile within a project team. The here proposed approach is one part of a holistic product design and development process for changeable production units – called Adapt! – and is described within a use case in the automotive sector.

  1. Executive Management Team Demography and Minority Student Retention: Does Executive Team Diversity Influence the Retention of Minority Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincher, Mark; Katsinas, Stephen; Bush, V. Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Many colleges and universities are expected to produce more graduates while responding to an increasing level of racial and ethnic diversity among students. While the importance of diversity within executive management leadership teams may be accepted among nonprofit higher education institutions, the connection between diversity among the…

  2. Integrating configuration workflows with project management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsen, Dimitri; Weber, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of the heterogeneous computing resources, services and recurring infrastructure changes at the GridKa WLCG Tier-1 computing center require a structured approach to configuration management and optimization of interplay between functional components of the whole system. A set of tools deployed at GridKa, including Puppet, Redmine, Foreman, SVN and Icinga, provides the administrative environment giving the possibility to define and develop configuration workflows, reduce the administrative effort and improve sustainable operation of the whole computing center. In this presentation we discuss the developed configuration scenarios implemented at GridKa, which we use for host installation, service deployment, change management procedures, service retirement etc. The integration of Puppet with a project management tool like Redmine provides us with the opportunity to track problem issues, organize tasks and automate these workflows. The interaction between Puppet and Redmine results in automatic updates of the issues related to the executed workflow performed by different system components. The extensive configuration workflows require collaboration and interaction between different departments like network, security, production etc. at GridKa. Redmine plugins developed at GridKa and integrated in its administrative environment provide an effective way of collaboration within the GridKa team. We present the structural overview of the software components, their connections, communication protocols and show a few working examples of the workflows and their automation.

  3. Ready to Retrofit: The Process of Project Team Selection, Building Benchmarking, and Financing Commercial Building Energy Retrofit Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, Mark D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Parrish, Kristen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mathew, Paul [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    This guide presents a process for three key activities for the building owner in preparing to retrofit existing commercial buildings: selecting project teams, benchmarking the existing building, and financing the retrofit work. Although there are other essential steps in the retrofit process, the three activities presented in this guide are the critical elements where the building owner has the greatest influence on the outcome of the project.

  4. On Services for Collaborative Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollus, Martin; Jansson, Kim; Karvonen, Iris; Uoti, Mikko; Riikonen, Heli

    This paper presents an approach for collaborative project management. The focus is on the support of collaboration, communication and trust. Several project management tools exist for monitoring and control the performance of project tasks. However, support of important intangible assets is more difficult to find. In the paper a leadership approach is identified as a management means and the use of new IT technology, especially social media for support of leadership in project management is discussed.

  5. Managing dualities in organizational change projects

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, David

    2016-01-01

    When managers want to change their organisation they often set up a project to do it, in the belief that doing so simplifies and focuses the change initiative and brings greater assurance of success. Case studies of three organisational change projects undertaken by Arts Council England during 2006-2007 are used to examine the notion of project management and change management as a duality. It is argued that the structured, systematic approach associated with project management needs to be ba...

  6. The three-dimensional matrix -- An evolution in project management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glidewell, D.

    1996-09-01

    In the Functional Department Dimension, functional departments such as project management, design, and construction would be maintained to maximize consistency among project teams, evenly allocate training opportunities, and facilitate the crossfeeding of lessons learned and innovative ideas. Functional departments were also determined to be the surest way of complying uniformly with all project control systems required by the Department of Energy (Sandia`s primary external customer). The Technical Discipline dimension was maintained to enhance communication within the technical disciplines, such as electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, civil engineering, etc., and to evenly allocate technical training opportunities, reduce technical obsolescence, and enhance design standards. The third dimension, the Project Dimension, represents the next step in the project management evolution at Sandia, and together with Functional Department and Technical Discipline Dimensions constitutes the three-dimensional matrix. It is this Project Dimension that will be explored thoroughly in this paper, including a discussion of the specific roles and responsibilities of both management and the project team.

  7. One more thing: Faculty response to increased emphasis on project teams in undergraduate engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jane

    Tenured and tenure-track faculty members at institutions of higher education, especially those at Research I institutions, are being asked to do more than ever before. With rapidly changing technology, significant decreases in public funding, the shift toward privately funded research, and the ever increasing expectations of students for an education that adequately prepares them for professional careers, engineering faculty are particularly challenged by the escalating demands on their time. In 1996, the primary accreditation organization for engineering programs (ABET) adopted new criteria that required, among other things, engineering programs to teach students to function on multidisciplinary teams and to communicate effectively. In response, most engineering programs utilize project teams as a strategy for teaching these skills. The purpose of this qualitative study of tenured and tenure track engineering faculty at a Research I institution in the southwestern United States was to explore the variety of ways in which the engineering faculty responded to the demands placed upon them as a result of the increased emphasis on project teams in undergraduate engineering education. Social role theory and organizational climate theory guided the study. Some faculty viewed project teams as an opportunity for students to learn important professional skills and to benefit from collaborative learning but many questioned the importance and feasibility of teaching teamwork skills and had concerns about taking time away from other essential fundamental material such as mathematics, basic sciences and engineering sciences. Although the administration of the College of Engineering articulated strong support for the use of project teams in undergraduate education, the prevailing climate did little to promote significant efforts related to effective utilization of project teams. Too often, faculty were unwilling to commit sufficient time or effort to make project teamwork a

  8. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Safety Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvin, L.J.

    1996-02-01

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Safety Management Plan describes the new nuclear facility regulatory requirements basis for the Spemt Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project and establishes the plan to achieve compliance with this basis at the new SNF Project facilities

  9. Development of funding project risk management tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Funding project risk management is a process for identifying, assessing, and prioritizing project funding risks. To plan to : minimize or eliminate the impact of negative events, one must identify what projects have higher risk to respond to potentia...

  10. Towards Integrated Team Practice: A Case of Malaysian Industrialised Building System (IBS Construction Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Nawi Mohd Nasrun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Problems associated with fragmentation in the traditional construction process, such as isolation of professionals, lack of co-ordination between design and construction, and the sequential manner of its processes, has impacted on construction performance leading to a lack of integration, wastage, low productivity and efficiency. Integrated team practice is perceived as paramount. Unfortunately, there has a limitation of study focus on the dimension of fully integrated team especially for Malaysian Industrialised Building System (IBS projects. Accordingly, this research paper explores and identifies the dimension of fully integrated team from the traditional approach and conduct a validation process for implementing it in Malaysian IBS projects. The research presented uses interviews case study to obtain qualitative data. It was found that the dimension of fully integrated team from the traditional construction process could apply to the Malaysian IBS projects. Suggestions on how an integrated team practice in IBS design and construction process in order to minimise the fragmentation gaps will be concluded.

  11. Process-based project proposal risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We all are aware of the organizational omnipresence. Projects within the organizations are ubiquitous too. Projects achieve their goals successfully if they are planned, scheduled, controlled and implemented well. The project lifecycle of initiating, planning, scheduling, controlling and implementing are very well-planned by project managers and the organizations. Successful projects have well-developed risk management plans to deal with situations impacting projects. Like any other organisation, a university does try to access funds for different purposes too. For such organisations, running a project is not the issue, rather getting a project proposal approved to fund a project is the key. Project proposal processing is done by the nodal office in every organisation. Usually, these nodal offices help in administration and submission of a project proposal for accessing funds. Seldom are these nodal project offices within the organizations facilitate a project proposal approval by proactively reaching out to the project managers. And as project managers prepare project proposals, little or no attention is made to prepare a project proposal risk plan so as to maximise project acquisition. Risk plans are submitted while preparing proposals but these risk plans cater to a requirement to address actual projects upon approval. Hence, a risk management plan for project proposal is either missing or very little effort is made to treat the risks inherent in project acquisition. This paper is an integral attempt to highlight the importance of risk treatment for project proposal stage as an extremely important step to preparing the risk management plan made for projects corresponding to their lifecycle phases. Several tools and techniques have been proposed in the paper to help and guide either the project owner (proposer or the main organisational unit responsible for project management. Development of tools and techniques to further enhance project

  12. Brokerage by a Project Manager across a New Product Development Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Lisbeth Brøde; Jepsen, Anna Lund; Dietrich, Perttu

    2012-01-01

    between three subtypes of brokerage: Brokerage connecting actors from the project team with actors from the various departments within the same organization (intra-organizational brokerage), brokerage connecting employees at the NPD organization with someone working in another organization (inter...... as a hub between possible suppliers for the project. We had also expected that the PM would be more involved in coordination of, to and from the project team than what we found in this study. Based on the study, it seems that some of the connections that we, based on existing knowledge, would expect...... that the management of the project in terms of linking the stakeholders takes off in the solution development phase rather than in the concept development phase which is the phase in focus in large parts of the research that has taken place in this field. Further, contrary to expectations based on existing knowledge...

  13. Investigating the extent to which mobile phones reduce Knowledge Transfer barriers in Student Project Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Kyobe

    2011-10-01

    Institutions of learning are increasingly adopting information and communication technologies (e.g. mobile technologies to provide solutions to the challenges facing them. Whilst the integration of the mobile context and technologies in learning environment has been encouraged over the years, and indeed many students today can use mobile phones, the effectiveness of these technologies in reducing impediments to knowledge transfer in group learning has not been investigated. This study investigated the extent to which mobile phones reduce the barriers to knowledge transfer in project groups. The impediments examined include the nature of knowledge, social barriers, lack of time and lack of motivation. Quantitative and qualitative approaches were used to collect and analyse the data. The sample consisted of 85 students engaged in group projects in the departments of Information Systems, Civil Engineering, Computer Science and Construction Engineering. The results show that mobile phones reduce all four knowledge transfer barriers investigated in the project groups. We found no significant difference in the nature of knowledge shared by teams with weak and strong ties. This suggests that teams with weak social ties who normally experience difficulty sharing complex (tacit knowledge can easily do so with the aid of mobile facilities. In addition, frequent users of mobile phones were motivated to share explicit knowledge with their peers whilst those who often work with tacit knowledge could convert it to explicit form and share it with others. Mobile features like short messaging service and multimedia messaging service (SMS & MMS or what some people refer to as ‘texting’, and email were mainly used to share knowledge and were perceived to reduce knowledge transfer time more than voice facilities. Our findings indicate that most students do not utilise the affordances of mobile phones for tacit knowledge transfer. Sharing of tacit knowledge needs to be encouraged

  14. 76 FR 67400 - Capital Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ...-0030] RIN 2132-AA92 Capital Project Management AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT... extending the comment period on its proposed rule for Capital Project Management to December 2, 2011, to...) proposing to transform the current FTA rule for project management oversight into a discrete set of...

  15. 76 FR 56363 - Capital Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ...-0030] RIN 2132-AA92 Capital Project Management AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT... current FTA rule for project management oversight into a discrete set of managerial principles for sponsors of major capital projects; enable FTA to more clearly identify the necessary management capacity...

  16. 78 FR 16460 - Capital Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    ...-0030] RIN 2132-AA92 Capital Project Management AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT... withdrawing its September 13, 2011, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to revise the agency's project management... will reinitiate a rulemaking for project management oversight in the near future. Additionally, FTA may...

  17. Finance and supply management project execution plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BENNION, S.I.

    1999-02-10

    As a subproject of the HANDI 2000 project, the Finance and Supply Management system is intended to serve FDH and Project Hanford major subcontractor with financial processes including general ledger, project costing, budgeting, and accounts payable, and supply management process including purchasing, inventory and contracts management. Currently these functions are performed with numerous legacy information systems and suboptimized processes.

  18. The evolution of the project management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin Drob

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Project management has appeared and developed based on scientific management theory during the '50s-'60s of the last century. After the 1990s of the last century, we can say that project management has truly become an independent discipline, which has a huge impact on the success or failure of companies which are engaged in major projects.

  19. IX Disposition Project - project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, I.G.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents plans for resolving saving and disposal concerns for ion exchange modules, cartridge filters and columns. This plan also documents the project baselines for schedules, cost, and technical information

  20. Beautiful Teams Inspiring and Cautionary Tales from Veteran Team Leaders

    CERN Document Server

    Stellman, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    What's it like to work on a great software development team facing an impossible problem? How do you build an effective team? Beautiful Teams takes you behind the scenes with some of the most interesting teams in software engineering history. You'll learn from veteran team leaders' successes and failures, told through a series of engaging personal stories -- and interviews -- by leading programmers, architects, project managers, and thought leaders.