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Sample records for project involved revising

  1. Expedited technology demonstration project (Revised mixed waste management facility project) Project baseline revision 4.0 and FY98 plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, M. G.

    1997-01-01

    The re-baseline of the Expedited Technology Demonstration Project (Revised Mixed Waste Facility Project) is designated as Project Baseline Revision 4.0. The last approved baseline was identified as Project Baseline Revision 3.0 and was issued in October 1996. Project Baseline Revision 4.0 does not depart from the formal DOE guidance followed by, and contained in, Revision 3.0. This revised baseline document describes the MSO and Final Forms testing activities that will occur during FY98, the final year of the ETD Project. The cost estimate for work during FY98 continues to be $2.OM as published in Revision 3.0. However, the funds will be all CENRTC rather than the OPEX/CENTRC split previously anticipated. LLNL has waived overhead charges on ETD Project CENRTC funds since the beginning of project activities. By requesting the $2.OM as all CENTRC a more aggressive approach to staffing and testing can be taken. Due to a cost under- run condition during FY97 procurements were made and work was accomplished, with the knowledge of DOE, in the Feed Preparation and Final Forms areas that were not in the scope of Revision 3.0. Feed preparation activities for FY98 have been expanded to include the drum opening station/enclosure previously deleted

  2. Fast Flux Test Facility project plan. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulvey, R.K.

    1995-11-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project Plan, Revision 2, provides changes to the major elements and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition

  3. Fast Flux Test Facility project plan. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulvey, R.K.

    1995-11-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project Plan, Revision 2, provides changes to the major elements and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

  4. Operational waste volume projection. Revision 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koreski, G.M.; Strode, J.N.

    1994-01-01

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of July 1994

  5. Description of Project Sapphire. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    The mission of Project Sapphire was to repackage approximately 600 kg of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in the Republic of Kazakhstan into internationally acceptable shipping packages and transport the material to a storage location in the United States. There were four material types to be repackaged: metal; oxide; uranium/beryllium (U/Be) alloy; and residues from U/Be alloy production. Seven major steps described in this report were necessary for successful execution of the project: planning and training; readiness assessment; deployment; set up; process; take down; and transport. Nuclear criticality safety especially affected several of these steps

  6. The National Ignition Facility Project. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paisner, J.A.; Campbell, E.M.; Hogan, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    The mission of the National Ignition Facility is to achieve ignition and gain in inertial confinement fusion targets in the laboratory. The facility will be used for defense applications such as weapons physics and weapons effects testing, and for civilian applications such as fusion energy development and fundamental studies of matter at high temperatures and densities. This paper reviews the design, schedule, and costs associated with the construction project

  7. Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project manual. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.; MacLellan, J.A.; Long, M.P.

    1994-07-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project, as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy and its Hanford contractors. Project services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessment of potential intakes and internal dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. Specific chapters deal with the following subjects: practices of the project, including interpretation of applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for assessment, documentation, and reporting of doses; assessment of internal dose, including summary explanations of when and how assessments are performed; recording and reporting practices for internal dose; selection of workers for bioassay monitoring and establishment of type and frequency of bioassay measurements; capability and scheduling of bioassay monitoring services; recommended dosimetry response to potential internal exposure incidents; quality control and quality assurance provisions of the program

  8. Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project manual. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.; MacLellan, J.A.; Long, M.P.

    1994-07-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project, as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy and its Hanford contractors. Project services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessment of potential intakes and internal dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. Specific chapters deal with the following subjects: practices of the project, including interpretation of applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for assessment, documentation, and reporting of doses; assessment of internal dose, including summary explanations of when and how assessments are performed; recording and reporting practices for internal dose; selection of workers for bioassay monitoring and establishment of type and frequency of bioassay measurements; capability and scheduling of bioassay monitoring services; recommended dosimetry response to potential internal exposure incidents; quality control and quality assurance provisions of the program.

  9. Hanford analytical sample projections FY 1996 - FY 2001. Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joyce, S.M.

    1997-07-02

    This document summarizes the biannual Hanford sample projections for fiscal year 1997-2001. Sample projections are based on inputs submitted to Analytical Services covering Environmental Restoration, Tank Wastes Remediation Systems, Solid Wastes, Liquid Effluents, Spent Nuclear Fuels, Transition Projects, Site Monitoring, Industrial Hygiene, Analytical Services and miscellaneous Hanford support activities. In addition to this revision, details on Laboratory scale technology (development), Sample management, and Data management activities were requested. This information will be used by the Hanford Analytical Services program and the Sample Management Working Group to assure that laboratories and resources are available and effectively utilized to meet these documented needs.

  10. ERD UMTRA Project quality assurance program plan, Revision 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document is the revised Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) dated September, 1995 for the Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). Quality Assurance requirements for the ERD UMTRA Project are based on the criteria outlined in DOE Order 5700.6C or applicable sections of 10 CFR 830.120. QA requirements contained in this QAPP shall apply to all personnel, processes, and activities, including planning, scheduling, and cost control, performed by the ERD UMTRA Project and its contractors

  11. Decommissioning plan - decommissioning project for KRR 1 and 2 (revised)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, K. J.; Paik, S. T.; Chung, U. S.; Jung, K. H.; Park, S. K.; Lee, D. G.; Kim, H. R.; Kim, J. K.; Yang, S. H.; Lee, B. J.

    2000-10-01

    This report is the revised Decommissioning Plan for the license of TRIGA research reactor decommissioning project according to Atomic Energy Act No. 31 and No. 36. The decommissioning plan includes the TRIGA reactor facilities, project management, decommissioning method, decontamination and dismantling activity, treatment, packaging, transportation and disposal of radioactive wastes. the report also explained the radiation protection plan and radiation safety management during the decommissioning period, and expressed the quality assurance system during the period and the site restoration after decommissioning. The first decommissioning plan was made by Hyundai Engineering Co, who is the design service company, was submitted to the Ministry of Science and Technology, and then was reviewed by the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety. The first decommissioning plan was revised including answers for the questions arising from review process

  12. Decommissioning plan - decommissioning project for KRR 1 and 2 (revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, K. J.; Paik, S. T.; Chung, U. S.; Jung, K. H.; Park, S. K.; Lee, D. G.; Kim, H. R.; Kim, J. K.; Yang, S. H.; Lee, B. J

    2000-10-01

    This report is the revised Decommissioning Plan for the license of TRIGA research reactor decommissioning project according to Atomic Energy Act No. 31 and No. 36. The decommissioning plan includes the TRIGA reactor facilities, project management, decommissioning method, decontamination and dismantling activity, treatment, packaging, transportation and disposal of radioactive wastes. the report also explained the radiation protection plan and radiation safety management during the decommissioning period, and expressed the quality assurance system during the period and the site restoration after decommissioning. The first decommissioning plan was made by Hyundai Engineering Co, who is the design service company, was submitted to the Ministry of Science and Technology, and then was reviewed by the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety. The first decommissioning plan was revised including answers for the questions arising from review process.

  13. Public involvement plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    For the past few years, the Department of Energy (DOE) has increased its efforts to involve the public in environmental management decisions. On the national level, Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary has declared public involvement one of DOE's most important objectives. On the local level, citizens are taking the microphone at DOE public hearings to voice their opinions and ask tough, detailed questions about proposed cleanup plans. To ensure that it hears, understands and responds to public input from all of its neighbors, DOE-Oak Ridge Operations has developed an Environmental Management Public Involvement Program to keep stakeholders--those affected or potentially affected by cleanup programs--informed about environmental management work on the Oak Ridge Reservation and opportunities for public comment. This Public Involvement Plan contains information about the Oak Ridge Public Involvement Program its history, goals and proposed interactions with stakeholders. It also contains information to help area citizens become involved or increase their involvement in helping DOE make responsible environmental management decisions

  14. Yakima Fisheries Project : Revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-05-01

    BPA proposes to fund several fishery-related activities in the Yakima River Basin. The Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP), included in the Northwest Power Planning Council`s fish and wildlife program, would be jointly managed by the State of Washington and the Yakima Indian Nation. Fisheries resources in the Yakima River are severely reduced from historical levels and there is a significant potential for enhancement of these resources. BPA`s proposed action is to fund (1) information gathering on the implementation of supplementation techniques and on feasibility of reintroducing coho salmon in an environment where native populations have become extinct; (2) research activities based on continuous assessment, feedback and improvement of research design and activities ({open_quotes}adaptive management{close_quotes}); and (3) the construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities for supplementing populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. The project has been considerably revised from the original proposal described in the first draft EIS. Examined in addition to No Action (which would leave present anadromous fisheries resources unchanged in the, Basin) are two alternatives for action: (1) supplementation of depressed natural populations of upper Yakima spring chinook and (2) that same supplementation plus a study to determine the feasibility of re-establishing (via stock imported from another basin) naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho in the Yakima Basin. Alternative 2 has been identified as the preferred action. Major issues examined in the Revised Draft EIS include potential impacts of the project on genetic and ecological resources of existing fish populations, on water quality and quantity, on threatened and endangered species listed under the Endangered Species Act, and on the recreational fishery.

  15. 77 FR 38796 - Georgia Power Company; Bartletts Ferry Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Revised Restricted...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... Alabama] Georgia Power Company; Bartletts Ferry Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Revised Restricted... by issuance of a new license for the Bartletts Ferry Hydroelectric Project No. 485. The programmatic... Hydroelectric Project. On June 14, 2012, the Kialegee Tribal Town requested a revision to the restricted service...

  16. Yakima fisheries project. Revised draft environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    BPA proposes to fund several fishery-related activities in the Yakima River Basin. These activities, known as the Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP), would be jointly managed by the State of Washington and the Yakima Indian Nation. The YFP is included in the Northwest Power Planning Council's (Council's) fish and wildlife program. The Council selected the Yakima River system for attention because fisheries resources are severely reduced from historical levels and because there is a significant potential for enhancement of these resources. BPA's proposed action is to fund (1) information gathering on the implementation of supplementation techniques and on feasibility of reintroducing coho salmon in an environment where native populations have become extinct; (2) research activities based on continuous assessment, feedback and improvement of research design and activities (adaptive management); and (3) the construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities for supplementing populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Major issues examined in the Revised Draft EIS include potential impacts of the project on genetic and ecological resources of existing fish populations, on water quality and quantity, on threatened and endangered species listed under the Endangered Species Act, and on the recreational fishery. Only minor differences in environmental consequences were found between Alternatives 1 and 2. Potentially high impacts on wild, native, and non-target fish populations under both alternatives would be mitigated through careful adherence to the adaptive management process outlined in the EIS

  17. UMTRA Project Office quality assurance program plan. Revision 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project was established to accomplish remedial actions at inactive uranium mill tailings sites. The UMTRA Project's mission is to stabilize and control the residual radioactive materials at designated sites in a safe and environmentally sound manner so as to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public. Because these efforts may involve possible risks to public health and safety, a quality assurance (QA) program that conforms to the applicable criteria has been established to control the quality of the work. This document, the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP), brings into one document the essential criteria to be applied on a selective basis, depending upon the nature of the activity being conducted, and describes how those criteria shall be applied to the UMTRA Project. QA requirements contained in this QAPP shall apply to all personnel, processes, and activities, including planning, scheduling, and cost control, performed by the UMTRA Project Office and its contractors

  18. 77 FR 38796 - Alabama Power Company; Holt Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Revised Restricted Service List for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... Power Company; Holt Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Revised Restricted Service List for a Programmatic... Hydroelectric Project No. 2203. The programmatic agreement, when executed by the Commission, the Alabama SHPO...

  19. Revision of migrated pelvic acetabular components in THA with or without vascular involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ștefan Cristea

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The literature describes a high rate of mortality in cases of intrapelvic acetabular component migration, which is a rare but serious complication. Our aim is to establish and propose a treatment protocol according to our results and experience. Material and Methods. We performed eight (8 total hip revisions with acetabular cup migration between 2006 and 2012. A vascular graft was needed in four (4 of these cases. Two (2 cases were revisions after a spacer for infected arthroplasties. The protocol included the following: X-Ray examination (frontal and lateral views, CT angiography, a biological evaluation, a suitable pre-operative plan, at least six (6 units of blood stock, an experienced anesthesiologist, an experienced surgical team that included a vascular surgeon and a versatile arsenal of revision prostheses, bone grafts and vascular grafts. The anterolateral approach was generally used for hip revisions and the retroperitoneal approach in the dorsal decubitus position was used when vascular risk was involved. Results: The acetabular defect was reconstructed using bone grafts and tantalum revision cups in 4 cases, Burch-Schneider cages in 2 cases, a Kerboull ring in 1 case and a cementless oblong cup (Cotyle Espace in 1 case. In 4 cases, an iliac vessel graft procedure was conducted by the vascular surgeon. All patients survived the revision procedures and returned regularly for subsequent check-ups, during which they did not show any septic complications. Conclusions: Intrapelvic acetabular cup migration is a rare but serious complication that can occur after total hip arthroplasty in either septic or aseptic cases. An experienced, multidisciplinary team of surgeons should be involved in planning and conducting such complicated revisions.

  20. 75 FR 62738 - Revisions to EPA's Rule on Protections for Subjects in Human Research Involving Pesticides...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... addressed in EPA science and ethics reviews of proposed and completed human research for pesticides, based... Revisions to EPA's Rule on Protections for Subjects in Human Research Involving Pesticides; Notification to... protection of human subjects of research that apply to third parties who conduct or support research for...

  1. 76 FR 5735 - Revisions to EPA's Rule on Protections for Subjects in Human Research Involving Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... addressed in EPA science and ethics reviews of proposed and completed human research with pesticides, drawn..., which suggest ethical considerations relevant to evaluation of human studies. Third, Petitioners argued... Revisions to EPA's Rule on Protections for Subjects in Human Research Involving Pesticides AGENCY...

  2. Revised

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Vivian Kvist; Nord-Larsen, Thomas; Riis-Nielsen, Torben

    This report is a revised analysis of the Danish data on CO2 emissions from forest, afforestation and deforestation for the period 1990 - 2008 and a prognosis for the period until 2020. Revision have included measurements from 2009 in the estimations. The report is funded by the Ministry of Climate...

  3. Korean Medication Algorithm Project for Bipolar Disorder: third revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Young Sup; Lee, Jung Goo; Jeong, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Moon-Doo; Sohn, Inki; Shim, Se-Hoon; Jon, Duk-In; Seo, Jeong Seok; Shin, Young-Chul; Min, Kyung Joon; Yoon, Bo-Hyun; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2015-01-01

    To constitute the third revision of the guidelines for the treatment of bipolar disorder issued by the Korean Medication Algorithm Project for Bipolar Disorder (KMAP-BP 2014). A 56-item questionnaire was used to obtain the consensus of experts regarding pharmacological treatment strategies for the various phases of bipolar disorder and for special populations. The review committee included 110 Korean psychiatrists and 38 experts for child and adolescent psychiatry. Of the committee members, 64 general psychiatrists and 23 child and adolescent psychiatrists responded to the survey. The treatment of choice (TOC) for euphoric, mixed, and psychotic mania was the combination of a mood stabilizer (MS) and an atypical antipsychotic (AAP); the TOC for acute mild depression was monotherapy with MS or AAP; and the TOC for moderate or severe depression was MS plus AAP/antidepressant. The first-line maintenance treatment following mania or depression was MS monotherapy or MS plus AAP; the first-line treatment after mania was AAP monotherapy; and the first-line treatment after depression was lamotrigine (LTG) monotherapy, LTG plus MS/AAP, or MS plus AAP plus LTG. The first-line treatment strategy for mania in children and adolescents was MS plus AAP or AAP monotherapy. For geriatric bipolar patients, the TOC for mania was AAP/MS monotherapy, and the TOC for depression was AAP plus MS or AAP monotherapy. The expert consensus in the KMAP-BP 2014 differed from that in previous publications; most notably, the preference for AAP was increased in the treatment of acute mania, depression, and maintenance treatment. There was increased expert preference for the use of AAP and LTG. The major limitation of the present study is that it was based on the consensus of Korean experts rather than on experimental evidence.

  4. Interdisciplinary Collaboration: Librarian Involvement in Grant Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Marci D.; Cordell, Sigrid Anderson; Joque, Justin; MacEachern, Mark P.; Song, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Librarians are excellent research collaborators, although librarian participation is not usually considered, thereby making access to research funds difficult. The University of Michigan Library became involved in the university's novel funding program, MCubed, which supported innovative interdisciplinary research on campus, primarily by funding…

  5. Yakima Fisheries Project revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement: Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP) to undertake fishery research and enhancement activities in the Yakima River Basin. The State of Washington and the Yakima Indian Nation would jointly direct the project. The Yakima River system is a promising location for mitigation and enhancement to compensate for stock losses from development and operation of hydroelectric projects elsewhere in the Columbia Basin. The YFP would help determine the role that supplementation might play in increasing natural production of anadromous salmonids throughout the Columbia Basin. In cooperation with BPA, the project managers propose to construct, operate and maintain anadromous (e.g. salmon) fish production facilities. The goal is to conduct research activities designed to increase knowledge of supplementation techniques. These techniques would be applied to rebuild naturally spawning anadromous fish stocks historically present in the Yakima River Basin and, ultimately, those throughout the Columbia River Basin. Eventually, the YFP might involve the supplementation of all stocks of anadromous fish known to have occurred in the Yakima Basin. However, at this time only two alternatives have been proposed: Alternative 1 would supplement depressed naturally spawning populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon; Alternative 2 (preferred) would include all actions under Alternative 1; it would also add a study to determine the feasibility of re-establishing a naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho salmon in the Yakima Basin. (Coho smolts are currently being imported from another basin under the Columbia River Basin Fish Management Plan; the stock is now virtually eliminated from the Basin.)

  6. 77 FR 14516 - Alabama Power Company, Martin Dam Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Proposed Revised Restricted...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    ... Power Company, Martin Dam Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Proposed Revised Restricted Service List for... for inclusion in, the National Register of Historic Places at the Martin Dam Hydroelectric Project...)). The Commission's responsibilities pursuant to section 106 for the Martin Dam Hydroelectric Project...

  7. Tank waste remediation system characterization project quality policies. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trimble, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    These Quality Policies (QPs) describe the Quality Management System of the Tank Waste Characterization Project (hereafter referred to as the Characterization Project), Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS), Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The Quality Policies and quality requirements described herein are binding on all Characterization Project organizations. To achieve quality, the Characterization Project management team shall implement this Characterization Project Quality Management System

  8. Korean Medication Algorithm Project for Bipolar Disorder: third revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo YS

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Young Sup Woo,1 Jung Goo Lee,2,3 Jong-Hyun Jeong,1 Moon-Doo Kim,4 Inki Sohn,5 Se-Hoon Shim,6 Duk-In Jon,7 Jeong Seok Seo,8 Young-Chul Shin,9 Kyung Joon Min,10 Bo-Hyun Yoon,11 Won-Myong Bahk1 1Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea; 2Department of Psychiatry, Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan, South Korea;3Paik Institute for Clinical Research, Inje Univeristy, Busan, South Korea; 4Department of Psychiatry, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju, South Korea; 5Department of Psychiatry, Keyo Hospital, Keyo Medical Foundation, Uiwang, South Korea; 6Department of Psychiatry, Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan, South Korea; 7Department of Psychiatry, Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University, Anyang, South Korea; 8Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Konkuk University, Chungju, South Korea; 9Department of Psychiatry, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, South Korea; 10Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, South Korea; 11Department of Psychiatry, Naju National Hospital, Naju, South Korea Objective: To constitute the third revision of the guidelines for the treatment of bipolar disorder issued by the Korean Medication Algorithm Project for Bipolar Disorder (KMAP-BP 2014. Methods: A 56-item questionnaire was used to obtain the consensus of experts regarding pharmacological treatment strategies for the various phases of bipolar disorder and for special populations. The review committee included 110 Korean psychiatrists and 38 experts for child and adolescent psychiatry. Of the committee members, 64 general psychiatrists and 23 child and adolescent psychiatrists responded to the survey. Results: The treatment of choice (TOC for euphoric, mixed, and psychotic mania was the combination of a mood stabilizer (MS and an atypical antipsychotic (AAP; the TOC for

  9. Expedited technology demonstration project. Project baseline revision 2.2 and FY96 plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    The Expedited Technology Demonstration Project Plan, Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) current baseline. The revised plan will focus efforts specifically on the demonstration of an integrated Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) system. In addition to the MSO primary unit, offgas, and salt recycle subsystems, the demonstrations will include feed preparation and feed delivery systems, and the generation of robust final forms from process mineral residues. A simplified process flow chart for the expedited demonstration is provided. To minimize costs and to accelerate the schedule for deployment, the integrated system will be staged in an existing facility at LLNL equipped to handle hazardous and radioactive materials. The MSO systems will be activated in fiscal year 97, followed by the activation of feed preparation and final forms in fiscal year 98

  10. Remote material handling in the Plutonium Immobilization Project. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brault, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    With the downsizing of the US and Russian nuclear stockpiles, large quantities of weapons-usable plutonium in the US are being declared excess and will be disposed of by the Department of Energy Fissile Materials Disposition Program. To implement this program, DOE has selected the Savannah River Site (SRS) for the construction and operation of three new facilities: pit disassembly and conversion; mixed oxide fuel fabrication; and plutonium immobilization. The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) will immobilize a portion of the excess plutonium in a hybrid ceramic and glass form containing high level waste for eventual disposal in a geologic repository. The PIP is divided into three distinct operating areas: Plutonium Conversion, First Stage Immobilization, and Second Stage Immobilization. Processing technology for the PIP is being developed jointly by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Westinghouse Savannah River Company. This paper will discuss development of the automated unpacking and sorting operations in the conversion area, and the automated puck and tray handling operations in the first stage immobilization area. Due to the high radiation levels and toxicity of the materials to be disposed of, the PIP will utilize automated equipment in a contained (glovebox) facility. Most operations involving plutonium-bearing materials will be performed remotely, separating personnel from the radiation source. Source term materials will be removed from the operations during maintenance. Maintenance will then be performed hands on within the containment using glove ports

  11. Functional design criteria for project W-252, phase II liquid effluent treatment and disposal. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatch, C.E.

    1995-05-01

    This document is the Functional Design Criteria for Project W-252. Project W-252 provides the scope to provide BAT/AKART (best available technology...) to 200 Liquid Effluent Phase II streams (B-Plant). This revision (Rev. 2) incorporates a major descoping of the project. The descoping was done to reflect a combination of budget cutting measures allowed by a less stringent regulatory posture toward the Phase II streams

  12. National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clobes, A.R.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility M Project. It was prepared for the NIP Prood Office by the NIF Procurement Manager

  13. Underground Test Area Quality Assurance Project Plan Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irene Farnham

    2011-05-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) provides the overall quality assurance (QA) program requirements and general quality practices to be applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) Sub-Project (hereafter the Sub-Project) activities. The requirements in this QAPP are consistent with DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance (DOE, 2005); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance for Quality Assurance Project Plans for Modeling (EPA, 2002); and EPA Guidance on the Development, Evaluation, and Application of Environmental Models (EPA, 2009). The QAPP Revision 0 supersedes DOE--341, Underground Test Area Quality Assurance Project Plan, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 4.

  14. Gordon Craig's Scene Project: a history open to revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article proposes a review of Gordon Craig’s Scene project, an invention patented in 1910 and developed until 1922. Craig himself kept an ambiguous position whether it was an unfulfilled project or not. His son and biographer Edward Craig sustained that Craig’s original aims were never achieved because of technical limitation, and most of the scholars who examined the matter followed this position. Departing from the actual screen models saved in the Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Craig’s original notebooks, and a short film from 1963, I defend that the patented project and the essay published in 1923 mean, indeed, the materialisation of the dreamed device of the thousand scenes in one scene

  15. Radioactive Waste Management System: Draft Project Decision Schedule. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982 (Pub. L. 97-425) requires that the Secretary of Energy prepare, in cooperation with affected Federal agencies, a Project Decision Schedule that portrays the optimum way to attain the operation of geologic repositories. The Draft Project Decision Schedule portrays the major milestones of the Radioactive Waste Management System. It also depicts the set of activities for which Federal agencies have responsibility and the deadlines for taking the required action that are associated with the activities. The NWPA also requires that Federal agencies having determined that they: (1) cannot comply with a deadline for taking a required action; or (2) fail to comply with a deadline contained in the Project Decision Schedule; submit a comprehensive report to the Secretary of Energy and Congress to explain their failure or expected failure. The Secretary, in turn, is required to submit to Congress a response to the agency's report. 7 figs., 13 tabs

  16. UMTRA Surface Project management action process document: Final. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designed sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project. Since its inception through March 1996, the Surface Project (hereinafter called the Project) has cleaned up 16 of the 24 designated processing sites and approximately 5,000 VPs, reducing the risk to human health and the environment posed by the uranium mill tailings. Two of the 24 sites, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, will not be remediated at the request of the state, reducing the total number of sites to 22. By the start of FY1998, the remaining 6 processing sites and associated VPs will be cleaned up. The remedial action activities to be funded in FY1998 by the FY1998 budget request are remediation of the remaining Grand Junction, Colorado, VPs; closure of the Cheney disposal cell in Grand Junction, Colorado; and preparation of the completion reports for 4 completed sites

  17. UMTRA Surface Project management action process document: Final. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designed sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project. Since its inception through March 1996, the Surface Project (hereinafter called the Project) has cleaned up 16 of the 24 designated processing sites and approximately 5,000 VPs, reducing the risk to human health and the environment posed by the uranium mill tailings. Two of the 24 sites, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, will not be remediated at the request of the state, reducing the total number of sites to 22. By the start of FY1998, the remaining 6 processing sites and associated VPs will be cleaned up. The remedial action activities to be funded in FY1998 by the FY1998 budget request are remediation of the remaining Grand Junction, Colorado, VPs; closure of the Cheney disposal cell in Grand Junction, Colorado; and preparation of the completion reports for 4 completed sites.

  18. Automated Procurement System (APS) revised project management plan (DS-03)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Diane R.

    1995-01-01

    The Project Plan is the governing document for the implementation of the Automated Procurement System (APS). It includes a description of the proposed system, describes the work to be done, establishes a schedule of deliverables, and discusses the major standards and procedures to be followed.

  19. Kinder Lernen Deutsch. Materials Project Part I. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Teachers of German.

    The Kinder Lernen Deutsch (LKD) materials evaluation project identifies materials appropriate for the elementary school German classrooms in grades K-8. This guide consists of an annotated bibliography, with ratings, of these materials. The guiding principles by which the materials were assessed were: use of the communicative approach; integration…

  20. UMTRA project disposal cell cover biointrusion sensitivity assessment, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    This study provides an analysis of potential changes that may take place in a Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cell cover system as a result of plant biointrusion. Potential changes are evaluated by performing a sensitivity analysis of the relative impact of root penetrations on radon flux out of the cell cover and/or water infiltration into the cell cover. Data used in this analysis consist of existing information on vegetation growth on selected cell cover systems and information available from published studies and/or other available project research. Consistent with the scope of this paper, no new site-specific data were collected from UMTRA Project sites. Further, this paper does not focus on the issue of plant transport of radon gas or other contaminants out of the disposal cell cover though it is acknowledged that such transport has the potential to be a significant pathway for contaminants to reach the environment during portions of the design life of a disposal cell where plant growth occurs. Rather, this study was performed to evaluate the effects of physical penetration and soil drying caused by plant roots that have and are expected to continue to grow in UMTRA Project disposal cell covers. An understanding of the biological and related physical processes that take place within the cover systems of the UMTRA Project disposal cells helps the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determine if the presence of a plant community on these cells is detrimental, beneficial, or of mixed value in terms of the cover system's designed function. Results of this investigation provide information relevant to the formulation of a vegetation control policy

  1. Hanford analytical sample projections FY 1995--FY 2000. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, F.M.

    1994-12-02

    Sample projections have been categorized into 7 major areas: Environmental Restoration, Tank Waste Remediation, Solid Waste, Liquid Effluents, Site Monitoring, Industrial Hygiene, and General Process Support Programs. The estimates are through the Fiscal Year 2000 and are categorized by radiation level. The yearly sample projection for each program will be categorized as follows: Category 1: Non-Radioactive; Category 2: <1 mR/hr {beta}/{gamma}; <10 nCi/g {alpha}; Category 3: 1 mR/hr {beta}/{gamma} to <10 mR/hr {beta}/{gamma}; and <10 nCi/g {alpha}; Category 4: <10 mR/hr {beta}/{gamma}; and <200 nCi/g {alpha}; Category 5: 10 mR/hr {beta}/{gamma} to <100 mR/hr {beta}/{gamma}; and <200 nCi/g {alpha}; Category 6: >100 mR/hr {beta}/{gamma}; and Category 7: >200 nCi/g {alpha}.

  2. Project B-610 instrument data base. Revision 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvan, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    The following technical information document contains the published data base listing for the instrumentation to be connected into the new MICON distributed control computer. Project B-610 PFP Instrument Upgrade (PFP HVAC Control Room Upgrade) will install the MICON system in PFP and provide for a new control room at the present site of the new SWP change room EDT-150750 1/11/93

  3. Ten Projects to Involve Your Students Directly in French.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lent, Peter C.

    1981-01-01

    Proposes 10 activities to provide French classes of all levels with a broad spectrum of language projects involving direct and active use of French including students polling each other, skits based on television commercials, geographical "show and tell," cooking French dishes, writing a monthly newspaper, and field trips. (BK)

  4. 242-A evaporator quality assurance project plan: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, B.J.

    1994-01-01

    The scope of this quality assurance project plan (Plan) is sampling and analytical services including, but not limited to, sample receipt, handling and storage, analytical measurements, submittal of data deliverables, archiving selected portions of samples, returning unneeded sample material to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), and/or sample disposal associated with candidate feed samples and process condensate compliance samples. Sampling and shipping activities are also included within the scope. The purpose of this project is to provide planning, implementation, and assessment guidance for achieving established data quality objectives measurement parameters. This Plan requires onsite and offsite laboratories to conform to that guidance. Laboratory conformance will help ensure that quality data are being generated and therefore, that the 242-A evaporator is operating in a safe and compliant manner. The 242-A evaporator feed stream originates from double-shell tanks (DSTs) identified as candidate feed tanks. The 242-A evaporator reduces the volume of aqueous waste contained in DSTs by boiling off water and sending it to the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) storage basin before further treatment. The slurry product is returned to DSTs. Evaporation results in considerable savings by reducing the volume of mixed waste for disposal

  5. Salt Repository Project shaft design guide: Revision 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The Salt Repository Project (SRP) Shaft Design Guide (SDG) and the accompanying SRP Input to Seismic Design define the basic approach for developing appropriate shaft designs for a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt at a proposed site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. The SDG is based on current mining industry standards and practices enhanced to meet the special needs of an underground nuclear waste repository. It provides a common approach for design of both the exploratory and repository shafts. The SDG defines shaft lining and material concepts and presents methods for calculating the loads and displacements that will be imposed on lining structures. It also presents the methodology and formulae for sizing lining components. The SDG directs the shaft designer to sources of geoscience and seismic design data for the Deaf Smith County, Texas repository site. In addition, the SDG describes methods for confirming shaft lining design by means of computer analysis, and it discusses performance monitoring needs that must be considered in the design. 113 refs., 18 figs., 14 tabs

  6. Informed Consent and Clinical Research Involving Children and Adolescents: Implications of the Revised APA Ethics Code and HIPAA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Celia B.

    2004-01-01

    In 2003, 2 new sets of rules and regulations affecting the conduct of clinical research involving children and adolescents went into effect: the revised American Psychological Association's (APA) Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (APA, 2002; effective June 1, 2003) and the Privacy Rule (45 CFR Part 160 and A and E of Part…

  7. Involving youth with disabilities in the development and evaluation of a new advocacy training: Project TEAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Jessica; Barth, Yishai; Curtis, Katie; Livingston, Kit; O'Neil, Madeline; Smith, Zach; Vallier, Samantha; Wolfe, Ashley

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes a participatory research process in which six youth with disabilities (Youth Panel) participated in the development and evaluation of a manualized advocacy training, Project TEAM (Teens making Environment and Activity Modifications). Project TEAM teaches youth with disabilities how to identify environmental barriers, generate solutions, and request accommodations. The Youth Panel conducted their evaluation after the university researcher implemented Project TEAM with three groups of trainees. The Youth Panel designed and administered a survey and focus group to evaluate enjoyment and usefulness of Project TEAM with support from an advocate/researcher. Members of the Youth Panel analyzed survey response frequencies. The advocate/researcher conducted a content analysis of the open-ended responses. Sixteen of 21 Project TEAM trainees participated in the evaluation. The evaluation results suggest that the trainees found the interactive and individualized aspects of the Project TEAM most enjoyable and useful. Some instructional materials were difficult for trainees with cognitive disabilities to understand. The Youth Panel's involvement in the development of Project TEAM may explain the relatively positive experiences reported by trainees. Project TEAM should continue to provide trainees with the opportunity to apply concepts in real-life situations. Project TEAM requires revisions to ensure it is enjoyable and useful for youth with a variety of disabilities. • Group process strategies, picture-based data collection materials, peer teamwork, and mentorship from adults with disabilities can enable youth with disabilities to engage in research. • Collaborating with youth with disabilities in the development of new rehabilitation approaches may enhance the relevance of interventions for other youth with disabilities. • Youth with cognitive disabilities participating in advocacy and environment-focused interventions may prefer interactive and

  8. Response to state comments on the revised draft North Central Regional characterization reports for the Crystalline Repository Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to respond to the comments received from the states of the North Central Region on the revised draft North Central Regional Characterization Reports (RCRs). The responses in this document indicate the manner in which the suggestions or comments received have been considered in modifying the revised draft North Central RCRs. Both general comments related to the overall Crystalline Repository Project (CRP) and comments on specific sections of the RCRs are addressed. This document responds to North Central State comments on both the revised draft North Central Regional Geologic Characterization Report (RGCR) and the revised draft North Central Regional Environmental Characterization Report (RECR)

  9. Response to state comments on the revised draft Southeastern Regional Characterization Reports for the Crystalline Repository Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to respond to the comments received from the states of the Southeastern Region on the revised draft Southeastern Regional Characterization Reports (RCRs). The responses in this document indicate the manner in which the suggestions or comments received have been considered in modifying the revised draft Southeastern RCRs. Both general comments related to the overall Crystalline Repository Project (CRP) and comments on specific sections of the RCRs are addressed. This document responds to Southeastern State comments on both the revised draft Southeastern Regional Geologic Characterization Report (RGCR) and the revised draft Southeastern Regional Environmental Characterization Report (RECR)

  10. Response to state comments on the revised draft northeastern regional characterization reports for the Crystalline Repository Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to respond to the comments received from the States of the Northeastern Region on the revised draft Northeastern Regional Characterization Reports (RCRs). The responses in this document indicate the manner in which the suggestions or comments received have been considered in modifying the revised draft Northeastern RCRs. Both general comments related to the overall Crystalline Repository Project (CRP) and comments on specific sections of the RCRs are addressed. This document responds to Northeastern State comments on both the revised draft Northeastern Regional Geologic Characterization Report (RGCR) and the revised draft Northeastern Regional Environmental Characterization Report (RECR)

  11. Communication and Stakeholder Involvement in Environmental Remediation Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-05-15

    The way in which members of the public perceive a contamination situation and an approach to the remediation of contaminated land will influence the decision making process in a variety of ways. Through communication between experts, decision makers and members of stakeholder communities, participatory processes and negotiation between different interest groups can sometimes be used effectively as mechanisms for improving the overall decision making process. The intention is to ensure a technically sound and socially acceptable decision that meets norms of adequacy or satisfactory performance in relation to a whole range of different concerns. Good communication strategies will encourage cooperation and understanding between different interested parties in remediation projects. Involvement of affected or interested persons can prevent fear driven reactions, which potentially damage public response and create undue expectations or unnecessary anxiety. For all environmental remediation (ER) cases, there is a risk that the process will fail if it does not respect social, environmental, political and economic dimensions. This requires open, clear and mutually agreed lines of communication among stakeholders within a well defined legal framework. A general recommendation is to involve them from a very early point in the process. This publication presents ER in plain language in such a way that implementers and regulators can communicate the motives and objectives of remediation projects to a variety of stakeholder communities in order to improve mutual understanding and facilitate dialogue between interested parties. ER is considered from two perspectives: technical and non-technical. A section that gives general ideas on the strategies to deal with stakeholder involvement and which discusses different aspects of the communication approaches in ER is then included. It is recognized that social, cultural and political situations are very diverse in different countries in

  12. Communication and Stakeholder Involvement in Environmental Remediation Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The way in which members of the public perceive a contamination situation and an approach to the remediation of contaminated land will influence the decision making process in a variety of ways. Through communication between experts, decision makers and members of stakeholder communities, participatory processes and negotiation between different interest groups can sometimes be used effectively as mechanisms for improving the overall decision making process. The intention is to ensure a technically sound and socially acceptable decision that meets norms of adequacy or satisfactory performance in relation to a whole range of different concerns. Good communication strategies will encourage cooperation and understanding between different interested parties in remediation projects. Involvement of affected or interested persons can prevent fear driven reactions, which potentially damage public response and create undue expectations or unnecessary anxiety. For all environmental remediation (ER) cases, there is a risk that the process will fail if it does not respect social, environmental, political and economic dimensions. This requires open, clear and mutually agreed lines of communication among stakeholders within a well defined legal framework. A general recommendation is to involve them from a very early point in the process. This publication presents ER in plain language in such a way that implementers and regulators can communicate the motives and objectives of remediation projects to a variety of stakeholder communities in order to improve mutual understanding and facilitate dialogue between interested parties. ER is considered from two perspectives: technical and non-technical. A section that gives general ideas on the strategies to deal with stakeholder involvement and which discusses different aspects of the communication approaches in ER is then included. It is recognized that social, cultural and political situations are very diverse in different countries in

  13. Origin and diversification of hoverflies: a revision of the genera Asarkina and Allobaccha – A BIG4 Consortium PhD project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Burt

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This BIG4 PhD project involves the overall taxonomic revision of the genera Allobaccha Curran and Asarkina Macquart (Diptera: Syrphidae. The revisions will be divided by biogeographic region (Afrotropical and Indomalayan and published accordingly. The publications will be collated as a thesis for submission to the University of Bonn (Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Germany doctoral program of biology. The goal of this project is to resolve alpha taxonomy and to infer the phylogenetic placement of these genera within the Syrphidae using Next-Generation Sequencing and Anchored Hybrid Enrichment techniques. The techniques undertaken in this project will be applied to future systematic problems in Diptera and testing future phylogenetic hypotheses.

  14. The evolution of a doctor of nursing practice capstone process: programmatic revisions to improve the quality of student projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Joan M; Cook, Paul F; Raterink, Ginger

    2013-01-01

    The past several years have seen explosive growth in the number of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree programs offered by colleges of nursing in the United States. Through a process of trial and error since 2005, the faculty at the University of Colorado, College of Nursing, have revised the course structure and procedures related to the DNP capstone project to improve the quality and usefulness of these student projects. Efforts have focused on educating and involving all nursing faculty in the DNP capstone process, distinguishing between competencies for our PhD and DNP projects, clearly aligning the DNP capstone project with quality improvement methods rather than with research, working with our campus institutional review board to clarify regulatory review requirements for quality improvement studies, developing a review committee to oversee DNP students' projects, and structuring our sequential course requirements to encourage students' professional presentations and publications. Our current capstone process reflects 7 years of iterative work, which we summarize in this article in hopes that it will help institutions currently in the process of developing a DNP program. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Technology status in support of refined technical baseline for the Spent Nuclear Fuel project. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puigh, R.J.; Toffer, H.; Heard, F.J.; Irvin, J.J.; Cooper, T.D.

    1995-10-20

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) has undertaken technology acquisition activities focused on supporting the technical basis for the removal of the N Reactor fuel from the K Basins to an interim storage facility. The purpose of these technology acquisition activities has been to identify technology issues impacting design or safety approval, to establish the strategy for obtaining the necessary information through either existing project activities, or the assignment of new work. A set of specific path options has been identified for each major action proposed for placing the N Reactor fuel into a ``stabilized`` form for interim storage as part of this refined technical basis. This report summarizes the status of technology information acquisition as it relates to key decisions impacting the selection of specific path options. The following specific categories were chosen to characterize and partition the technology information status: hydride issues and ignition, corrosion, hydrogen generation, drying and conditioning, thermal performance, criticality and materials accountability, canister/fuel particulate behavior, and MCO integrity. This report represents a preliminary assessment of the technology information supporting the SNFP. As our understanding of the N Reactor fuel performance develops the technology information supporting the SNFP will be updated and documented in later revisions to this report. Revision 1 represents the incorporation of peer review comments into the original document. The substantive evolution in our understanding of the technical status for the SNFP (except section 3) since July 1995 have not been incorporated into this revision.

  16. Technology status in support of refined technical baseline for the Spent Nuclear Fuel project. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puigh, R.J.; Toffer, H.; Heard, F.J.; Irvin, J.J.; Cooper, T.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) has undertaken technology acquisition activities focused on supporting the technical basis for the removal of the N Reactor fuel from the K Basins to an interim storage facility. The purpose of these technology acquisition activities has been to identify technology issues impacting design or safety approval, to establish the strategy for obtaining the necessary information through either existing project activities, or the assignment of new work. A set of specific path options has been identified for each major action proposed for placing the N Reactor fuel into a ''stabilized'' form for interim storage as part of this refined technical basis. This report summarizes the status of technology information acquisition as it relates to key decisions impacting the selection of specific path options. The following specific categories were chosen to characterize and partition the technology information status: hydride issues and ignition, corrosion, hydrogen generation, drying and conditioning, thermal performance, criticality and materials accountability, canister/fuel particulate behavior, and MCO integrity. This report represents a preliminary assessment of the technology information supporting the SNFP. As our understanding of the N Reactor fuel performance develops the technology information supporting the SNFP will be updated and documented in later revisions to this report. Revision 1 represents the incorporation of peer review comments into the original document. The substantive evolution in our understanding of the technical status for the SNFP (except section 3) since July 1995 have not been incorporated into this revision

  17. Project management plan for the 105-C Reactor interim safe storage project. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    In 1942, the Hanford Site was commissioned by the US Government to produce plutonium. Between 1942 and 1955, eight water-cooled, graphite-moderated reactors were constructed along the Columbia River at the Hanford Site to support the production of plutonium. The reactors were deactivated from 1964 to 1971 and declared surplus. The Surplus Production Reactor Decommissioning Project (BHI 1994b) will decommission these reactors and has selected the 105-C Reactor to be used as a demonstration project for interim safe storage at the present location and final disposition of the entire reactor core in the 200 West Area. This project will result in lower costs, accelerated schedules, reduced worker exposure, and provide direct benefit to the US Department of Energy for decommissioning projects complex wide. This project sets forth plans, organizational responsibilities, control systems, and procedures to manage the execution of the Project Management Plan for the 105-C Reactor Interim Safe Storage Project (Project Management Plan) activities to meet programmatic requirements within authorized funding and approved schedules. The Project Management Plan is organized following the guidelines provided by US Department of Energy Order 4700.1, Project Management System and the Richland Environmental Restoration Project Plan (DOE-RL 1992b)

  18. Fabrication drawings of fuel pins for FUJI project among PSI, JNC and NRG. Revised version 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Takayuki; Nakazawa, Hiroaki; Abe, Tomoyuki; Nagayama, Masahiro

    2002-10-01

    Irradiation tests and post-irradiation examinations in the framework of JNC-PSI-NRG collaboration project will be performed in 2003-2005. Irradiation fuel pins will be fabricated by the middle of 2003. The fabrication procedure for irradiation fuel pins has been started in 2001. Several fabrication tests and qualification tests in JNC and PSI (Paul Scherrer Institut, Switzerland) have been performed before the fuel pin fabrication. According to the design assignment between PSI and JNC in the frame of this project, PSI should make specification documents for the fuel pellet, the sphere-pac fuel particles, the vipac fuel fragments, and the fuel segment fabrication. JNC should make the fabrication drawings for irradiation pins. JNC has been performed the fuel design in cooperation with PSI and NRG (Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Holland). In this project, the pelletized fuel, the sphere-pac fuel, and the vipac fuel will be simultaneously irradiated on HFR (High Flux Reactor, Holland). The fabrication drawings have been made under the design assignment with PSI, and consist of the drawings of MOX pellet, thermal insulator pellet, pin components, fuel segments, and the constructed pin. The fabrication drawings were approved in October 2001, but after that, the optimization of specifications was discussed and agreed among all partners. According to this agreement, the fabrication drawings were revised in January 2002. After the earlier revision, the shape of particle retainer to be made by PSI was modified from its drawing beforehand delivered. In this report, the fabrication drawings revised again will be shown, and the fabrication procedure (welding Qualification Tests) will be modified in accordance with the result of discussion on the 3rd technical meeting held in September 2002. These design works have been performed in Fuel Design and Evaluation Group, Plutonium Fuel Fabrication Division, Plutonium Fuel Center under the commission of Plutonium Fuel

  19. Final environmental impact statement, Beaufort Sea oil and gas development/Northstar Project. Appendix A: BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc. Final project description - Revision 1, March 27, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-02-01

    BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc. (BPXA) submitted a permit application to the US Army Engineer District, Alaska to initiate the review process for BPXA's plans to develop and produce oil and gas from the Northstar Unit. This report contains Appendix A of an Environmental Impact Statement which was undertaken to identify and evaluate the potential effects the proposed project may have on the environment. This document is the Northstar Development Project, Final Project Description, Revision 1 for BPXA Northstar Project

  20. Project management plan for Project W-320, Tank 241-C-106 sluicing. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, D.R.

    1994-07-01

    A major mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the permanent disposal of Hanford Site defense wastes by utilizing safe, environmentally acceptable, and cost-effective disposal methods that meet applicable regulations. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program was established at the Hanford Site to manage and control activities specific to the remediation of safety watch list tanks, including high-heat-producing tanks, and for the ultimate characterization, retrieval, pretreatment, and disposal of the low- and high-level fractions of the tank waste. Project W-320, Tank 241-C-106 Sluicing, provides the methodology, equipment, utilities, and facilities necessary for retrieving the high-heat waste from single-shell tank (SST) 24-C-106. Project W-320 is a fiscal year (FY) 1993 expense-funded major project, and has a design life of 2 years. Retrieval of the waste in tank 241-C-106 will be accomplished through mobilization of the sludge into a pumpable slurry using past-practice sluicing. The waste is then transferred directly to a double-shell tank for interim storage, subsequent pretreatment, and eventual disposal. A detailed description of the management organization and responsibilities of all participants is presented in this document.

  1. Project management plan for Project W-320, Tank 241-C-106 sluicing. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, D.R.

    1994-07-01

    A major mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the permanent disposal of Hanford Site defense wastes by utilizing safe, environmentally acceptable, and cost-effective disposal methods that meet applicable regulations. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program was established at the Hanford Site to manage and control activities specific to the remediation of safety watch list tanks, including high-heat-producing tanks, and for the ultimate characterization, retrieval, pretreatment, and disposal of the low- and high-level fractions of the tank waste. Project W-320, Tank 241-C-106 Sluicing, provides the methodology, equipment, utilities, and facilities necessary for retrieving the high-heat waste from single-shell tank (SST) 24-C-106. Project W-320 is a fiscal year (FY) 1993 expense-funded major project, and has a design life of 2 years. Retrieval of the waste in tank 241-C-106 will be accomplished through mobilization of the sludge into a pumpable slurry using past-practice sluicing. The waste is then transferred directly to a double-shell tank for interim storage, subsequent pretreatment, and eventual disposal. A detailed description of the management organization and responsibilities of all participants is presented in this document

  2. Low-level radioactive waste in the northeast: revised waste volume projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-06-01

    The volume of low-level radioactive waste generated in the eleven Northeast states has undergone significant change since the inital 1982 analysis and projection. These revised projections incorporate improved data reporting and evidence of sharp declines in certain categories of waste. Volumes in the 1982-1983 period reflect waste shipped for disposal as reported by disposal site operators. Projected waste volumes represent waste intended for disposal. The recent dramatic changes in source reduction and waste management practices underscore the need for annual review of waste volume projections. The volume of waste shipped for off-site disposal has declined approximately 12% in two years, from an average 1,092,500 ft 3 annually in 1979 to 1981 to an average annual 956,500 ft 3 in 1982 to 1983; reactor waste disposal volumes declined by about 39,000 ft 3 or 7% during this period. Non-reactor waste volumes shipped for disposal declined by over 70,000 ft 3 or 15% during this period. The data suggest that generators increased their use of such management practices as source reduction, compaction, or, for carbon-14 and tritium, temporary storage followed by disposal as non-radioactive waste under the NRC de minimus standard effective March 1981. Using the Technical Subcommittee projection methodology, the volume of low-level waste produced annually in the eleven states, individually and collectively, is expected to increase through the year 2000, but at a significantly lower rate of increase than initially projected. By the year 2000, the Northeast is projected to generate 1,137,600 ft 3 of waste annually, an increase of about 20% over 1982 to 1983 average volume

  3. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Surface Project Management Plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) authorizes the US Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties (VP) containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials. The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project is to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public and the environment at the 24 sites and related VPs. This document describes the management organization, system, and methods used to manage the design, construction, and other activities required to clean up the designated sites and associated VPs, in accordance with the UMTRCA

  4. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Surface Project Management Plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) authorizes the US Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties (VP) containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials. The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project is to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public and the environment at the 24 sites and related VPs. This document describes the management organization, system, and methods used to manage the design, construction, and other activities required to clean up the designated sites and associated VPs, in accordance with the UMTRCA.

  5. Projecting Fatalities in Crashes Involving Older Drivers, 2000-2025

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, P.S.

    2001-03-23

    As part of this research effort, we developed a new methodology for projecting elderly traffic crash fatalities. This methodology separates exposure to crashes from crash risk per se, and further divides exposure into two components, the number of miles driven and the likelihood of being a driver. This component structure permits conceptually different determinants of traffic fatalities to be projected separately and has thorough motivation in behavioral theory. It also permits finer targeting of particular aspects of projections that need improvement and closer linking of projections to possible policy instruments for influencing them.

  6. Functions and requirements for Project W-236B, Initial Pretreatment Module: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, L.M.

    1994-01-01

    Hanford Site tank waste supernatants will be pretreated to separate the low-level and high-level fractions. The low-level waste fraction, containing the bulk of the chemical constituents, must be processed into a vitrified waste product which will be disposed of onsite, in a safe, environmentally sound, and cost effective manner. The high-level waste fraction separated during supernatant pretreatment (primarily cesium) will be recombined with an additional high-level waste fraction generated from pretreatment of the tank waste sludges and solids. This combined high-level waste fraction will be immobilized as glass and disposed in a geological repository. The purpose of this document is to establish the functional requirements baseline for Project W-236B, Initial Pretreatment Module, by defining the level 5 and 6 functions and requirements for the project. A functional analysis approach has been used to break down the program functions and associated physical requirements that each function must meet. As the systems engineering process evolves, the design requirements document will replace this preliminary functions and requirements document. The design requirements document (DRD) will identify key decisions and associated uncertainties that impact the project. A revision of this document to a DRD is not expected to change the performance requirements or open issues. However, additional requirements and issues may be identified

  7. Particulate Air Contamination in Puerto Rico: A Student Involvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Richard R.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a research project undertaken by physics undergraduate students to monitor particulate air contamination in Ponce, Puerto Rico, and to determine the meteorological factors which contribute to it. (GA)

  8. Public involvement in multi-objective water level regulation development projects-evaluating the applicability of public involvement methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaentaenen, Ari; Marttunen, Mika

    2005-01-01

    Public involvement is a process that involves the public in the decision making of an organization, for example a municipality or a corporation. It has developed into a widely accepted and recommended policy in environment altering projects. The EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) took force in 2000 and stresses the importance of public involvement in composing river basin management plans. Therefore, the need to develop public involvement methods for different situations and circumstances is evident. This paper describes how various public involvement methods have been applied in a development project involving the most heavily regulated lake in Finland. The objective of the project was to assess the positive and negative impacts of regulation and to find possibilities for alleviating the adverse impacts on recreational use and the aquatic ecosystem. An exceptional effort was made towards public involvement, which was closely connected to planning and decision making. The applied methods were (1) steering group work, (2) survey, (3) dialogue, (4) theme interviews, (5) public meeting and (6) workshops. The information gathered using these methods was utilized in different stages of the project, e.g., in identifying the regulation impacts, comparing alternatives and compiling the recommendations for regulation development. After describing our case and the results from the applied public involvement methods, we will discuss our experiences and the feedback from the public. We will also critically evaluate our own success in coping with public involvement challenges. In addition to that, we present general recommendations for dealing with these problematic issues based on our experiences, which provide new insights for applying various public involvement methods in multi-objective decision making projects

  9. Local involvement in CDM biogas projects: Argentine experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serna Martín, A.; Dietz, T.

    2008-01-01

    Mitigating climate change and contributing to the sustainable development of host countries are the goals of the CDM. In order to achieve these goals, projects follow an implementation chain, which starts with the design and ends with the issuance of Certified Emission Reductions (CERs). During the

  10. Involving the public into HEP through IT challenges and projects

    CERN Document Server

    Adam Bourdarios, Claire; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has recently setup three outreach projects and global challenges which have a strong IT component and could not have been envisaged without the growth of general public computing resources and network connectivity. HEP has exciting and difficult problems like the extraction of the Higgs boson signal, and at the same time data scientists have advanced algorithms. The goal of the Higgs Machine Learning (HiggsML) project was to bring the two together by a “challenge”: machine learning experts could compete online to obtain the best Higgs→ττ signal significance on a set of ATLAS fully simulated Monte Carlo signal and background events. The first challenge of this kind ran from May to September 2014, drawing considerable attention, and new projects followed in the context of the CERN open data initiative. Higgs Hunters is the only physics-related project hosted on a web-based citizen science platform called Zooniverse. Volunteers usually contributing to space, natural world and huma...

  11. Fabrication drawings of fuel pins for FUJI project among PSI, JNC and NRG. Revised version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Takayuki; Nakazawa, Hiroaki; Abe, Tomoyuki; Nagayama, Masahiro

    2002-02-01

    Irradiation tests and post-irradiation examinations in the framework of JNC-PSI-NRG collaboration project will be performed in 2003-2005. Irradiation fuel pins will be fabricated by the middle of 2003. The fabrication procedure for irradiation fuel pins has been started in 2001. Several fabrication tests and qualification tests in JNC and PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland) have been performed before the fuel pin fabrication. According to the design assignment between PSI and JNC in the frame of this project, PSI should make a specification document for the fuel pellet, the sphere-pac fuel particles, the vipac fuel particles, and the fuel pin. JNC should make a fabrication drawing for irradiation pins. JNC has been performed the fuel design in cooperation with PSI and NRG (Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Netherlands). In this project, the pelletized fuel, the sphere-pac fuel, and the vipac fuel will be simultaneously irradiated on HFR (High Flux Reactor, Netherlands). This fabrication drawing has been made under the design assignment with PSI, and consists of the drawing of MOX pellet, thermal insulator pellet, pin components, fuel segments, and the constructed pin. The fabrication drawings were approved in October 2001, but after that, the optimization of specifications has been discussed and agreed among all partners. In this report, the revised fabrication drawings will be shown. Based on the commission of Plutonium Fuel Technology Group, Advanced Fuel Recycle Technology Division, this design work has been performed in Fuel Design and Evaluation Group, Plutonium Fuel Fabrication Division, Plutonium Fuel Center. (author)

  12. Integrating Community into the Classroom: Community Gardening, Community Involvement, and Project-Based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhout, Regina Day; Rappaport, Julian; Simmons, Doretha

    2002-01-01

    Culturally relevant, ongoing project-based learning was facilitated in a predominantly African American urban elementary school via a community garden project. The project involved teachers, students, university members, and community members. This article evaluates the project through two classroom-community collaboration models, noting common…

  13. SPIRE Project: Parental Involvement in Young Children's ESL Reading Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harji, Madhubala Bava; Balakrishnan, Kavitha; Letchumanan, Krishnanveni

    2016-01-01

    Realising the clear dichotomy between schools and homes, the Malaysia government has now turned its attention to stakeholders and called for an increase involvement of parents, who are critical in transforming the education system. However, a clear line of demarcation continues to exist between the two prime educators of young children. Schools…

  14. Parent Involvement in Education Project (PIEP): Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwest Educational Development Lab., Austin, TX.

    This survey is the fifth in a series conducted to gather information about attitudinal barriers to parent involvement and to examine their implications for teacher training. In six states (Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas), school superintendents, school board presidents, and state agency officials were asked about…

  15. Mecanismos envolvidos na cicatrização: uma revisão Mechanisms involved in wound healing: a revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Aberto Balbino

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Os mecanismos envolvidos no processo de reparo de tecidos estão revisados nesse trabalho. O processo de cicatrização ocorre fundamentalmente em três fases: inflamação, formação de tecido de granulação e deposição de matriz extracelular e remodelação. Os eventos celulares e tissulares de cada uma dessas fases estão descritos e discutidos. Os mediadores químicos estão correlacionados com os eventos do processo de cicatrização e as células envolvidas. Especial ênfase é dada à participação dos fatores de crescimento.The mechanisms involved in tissue repair are revised. The wound healing process occurs basically in three phases: inflammation, formation of granulating tissue and extracellular tissue deposition, and tissue remodeling. The cellular and tissue events of each phase are described and discussed. The chemical mediators and their interplay with the wound healing events and cells involved are also discussed. However, especial attention was given to the role played by the growth factors in the tissue repair process.

  16. Inquiry, A Project of the Wisconsin Bar Foundation. Vols. 1 and 2, Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheurich, G. Michael, Ed.

    This new, revised edition of the Inquiry instructional materials is designed for use in teaching high school students about the U. S. laws and legal systems. The revised outlines, designed for instructors who have had legal training, are less technical and more informal, include new concepts and many current relevant topics, and de-emphasize…

  17. Managing delayed projects. Cernavoda NPP - Romania. Importance of NGO involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, I.

    2003-01-01

    In Romania there is a diversity of civil societies with respect to the attitude towards nuclear power. Among the dedicated societies supporting nuclear power development there are: the Romanian Atomic Forum (Ratomet), affiliated to the European Atomic Forum; the Romanian Nuclear Power Association (Arden), affiliated to the European Nuclear Society; the Romanian Radioprotection Society (SR Rp), affiliated to the Radiation Protection Association. The main dedicated activities of above mentioned Non-governmental Organizations (Ng) are: establishing contacts and organizing meeting with Romanian political decision making factors, mass media representatives, institutional entities, civil society ect.; orienting and co-coordinating activities of Romanian companies involved in production and services for nuclear energy; serving as contact point for relevant international communication and business relation; creating internal working groups for certain theme or sub-domain and suggested solution for a particular issue, including experts even from outside of the association; performing lobby activities ect

  18. Regulatory and Stakeholder Involvement is Key to Successful Project Completion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballinger, K. S.; Coleman, S. J.; Shoemake, J. M.; Olds, T. E.

    2006-01-01

    Public involvement participation is an integral and effective component of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) activities that ensures crucial decisions are made with the benefit and consideration of public perspectives. This component brings a broad range of diverse viewpoints and values into DOE's decision-making processes before end decision points are reached. Early involvement enables DOE to make more informed decisions, improve quality through collaborative efforts, and helps to build mutual understanding and trust between DOE and the public it serves. During the cold war, the production of thousands of nuclear warheads was an outstanding engineering achievement that created materials and technologies that were vital to national interest and security; however, it also created a legacy of perplexing toxic nuclear waste. The significant challenges presented by the liquid and solid nuclear wastes stored at the Hanford Site, were formally acknowledged by the U.S. Congress when it directed DOE to establish the Office of River Protection (ORP). The office was assigned the single, dedicated mission of retrieving, treating, and disposing of all waste contained in 177 huge underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site in Southeastern Washington State. As part of this on-going mission of cleanup, the Office of River Protection must make sound decisions that uphold not only the Department of Energy's interests, but more importantly, the interests of the state of Washington. Public participation is an open, ongoing, two-way communication, both formal and informal, between DOE and its stakeholders, regulatory agencies and Tribal governments. Similarly, public information is a means to keep the public informed of progress or to status ongoing activities and/or issues. Another facet of this process is that various laws and regulations govern public participation and information when it comes to Hanford cleanup, including the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent

  19. Students in a School Environment: A Project Focused on Family Involvement of At-Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denney, Pat

    2011-01-01

    This project examined family involvement of at risk students in mid-west communities. The purpose of this project was to study the affect of family involvement on at-risk student achievement. The redefining of the perception of America has resulted in a crisis of academic performance in the traditionally slow-changing education systems. This topic…

  20. Nevada Test Site Area 25, Radiological Survey and Cleanup Project, 1974-1983 (a revised final report). Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.G.

    1984-12-01

    This report describes the radiological survey, decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 25 facilities and land areas incorporated in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS). Buildings, facilities and support systems used after 1959 for nuclear reactor and engine testing were surveyed for the presence of radioactive contamination. The radiological survey portion of the project encompassed portable instrument surveys and removable contamination surveys (swipe) for beta plus gamma and alpha radioactive contamination of facilities, equipment and land areas. Soil sampling was also accomplished. The majority of Area 25 facilities and land areas have been returned to unrestricted use. Remaining radiologically contaminated areas are posted with warning signs and barricades. 9 references, 23 figures

  1. Overview of US heavy-ion fusion commercial electric power systems assessment project. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudziak, D.J.; Pendergrass, J.H.; Saylor, W.W.

    1986-01-01

    The US heavy-ion fusion (HIF) research program is oriented toward development of multiple-beam induction linacs. Over the last two years an assessment has been performed of the potential of HIF as a competitive commercial electric power source. This assessment involved several technology performance and cost issues (e.g., final beam transport system, target manufacturing, beam stability in reactor cavity environments, and reactor cavity clearing), as well as overall power plant systems integration and tradeoff studies. Results from parametric analyses using a systems code developed in the project show cost of electricity (COE) values comparable with COEs from other magnetic fusion and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plant studies; viz, 50-60 mills/kWh (1985 dollars) for 1-GWe plants. Also, significant COE insensitivity to major accelerator, target, and reactor parameters was demonstrated

  2. 32 CFR 37.220 - How involved should the Government program official be in the project?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... official be in the project? 37.220 Section 37.220 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE... Technology Investment Agreements § 37.220 How involved should the Government program official be in the project? (a) TIAs are used to carry out cooperative relationships between the Federal Government and the...

  3. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for Canister Storage Building (revised sealing configuration for spent nuclear fuel) - Project W-379

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamberg, L.D.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this Notice of Construction (NOC) is to provide a rewritten NOC for obtaining regulatory approval for changes to the previous Canister Storage Building (CSB) NOCs (WDOH, 1996 and EPA, 1996) as were approved by the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH, 1996a) and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA, 1996a). These changes are because of a revised sealing configuration of the multi-canister overpacks (MCOS) that are used to store the SNF. A flow schematic of the SNF Project is provided in Figure 1-1. A separate notification of startup will be provided apart from this NOC

  4. Partners in projects: preparing for public involvement in health and social care research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Jacqueline H; Pyer, Michelle; Wray, Paula; Taylor, Jane

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, several UK and, international funders of health and social care related research have adopted the policy of requiring explicit evidence of the 'public' voice in all aspects of project design. For many academic researchers engaged within research, evaluations or audit projects, this formal requirement to actively engage members of the public will present them with both benefits and challenges to securing knowledgeable, skilled, and confident lay representation onto project teams. This could potentially lead to the exploitation of those individuals who are available, appropriately informed, and adequately prepared for such activities. Currently, much of the preparation of patients or members of the public for research involvement tends to be aligned to specific projects; however, with the call for greater active and meaningful involvement of lay representatives in future national and international funding applications, there is clearly a growing need to 'train' sufficient numbers of confident and competent representatives to meet this growing demand. This paper describes the development of a specifically designed research awareness training programme and underpinning theoretical model, which has been specifically designed to support active and meaningful lay involvement in research, evaluations and audit projects. Developed over a four year period, the course is a culmination of learning extracted from a series of four completed research projects, which have incorporated an element of public and patient involvement (PPI) training in their overall design. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Project in Thermal Physics Involving a Car Parked in Direct Sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei; Gilley, Heidi L.; Caris, Joshua B.

    1997-05-01

    A research project for introductory physics students, involving an estimate of the surface temperature of the Sun using a parked car, was carried out in the Summer 1995 Research Apprenticeships in Science Program, sponsored by Edison Industrial Systems Center, for local-area high school students. This activity entails both outdoor quantitative observations and theoretical analysis, and yields a result within 12 percent of the accepted value. It was demonstrated that the use of everyday materials and outdoor observations, such as those in this project, is not only educational but also intriguing. The success of this experiment as a summer research project will be discussed.

  6. UMTRA project technical assistance contractor quality assurance implementation plan for surface and ground water, Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    This document contains the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) Quality Assurance Implementation Plan (QAIP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The QAIP outlines the primary requirements for integrating quality functions for TAC technical activities applied to the surface and ground water phases of the UMTRA Project. The QA program is designed to use monitoring, audit, and surveillance activities as management tools to ensure that UMTRA Project activities are carried out in amanner to protect public health and safety, promote the success of the UMTRA Project, and meet or exceed contract requirements

  7. Effluent monitoring Quality Assurance Project Plan for radioactive airborne emissions data. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, T.P.

    1995-12-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for compiling Hanford Site radioactive airborne emissions data. These data will be reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy, and the Washington State Department of Health. Effluent Monitoring performs compliance assessments on radioactive airborne sampling and monitoring systems. This Quality Assurance Project Plan is prepared in compliance with interim guidelines and specifications. Topics include: project description; project organization and management; quality assurance objectives; sampling procedures; sample custody; calibration procedures; analytical procedures; monitoring and reporting criteria; data reduction, verification, and reporting; internal quality control; performance and system audits; corrective actions; and quality assurance reports

  8. Final Design Report for the RH LLW Disposal Facility (RDF) Project, Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austad, Stephanie Lee

    2015-01-01

    The RH LLW Disposal Facility (RDF) Project was designed by AREVA Federal Services (AFS) and the design process was managed by Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The final design report for the RH LLW Disposal Facility Project is a compilation of the documents and deliverables included in the facility final design.

  9. Quality assurance project plan for ground water monitoring activities managed by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stauffer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This quality assurance project plan (QAPP) applies specifically to the field activities and laboratory analysis performed for all RCRA groundwater projects conducted by Hanford Technical Services. This QAPP is generic in approach and shall be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of individual groundwater monitoring plans

  10. Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility Quality Assurance Program Plan, Project W-236A. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, L.R.

    1995-05-30

    This document describes the Quality Assurance (QA) program for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Project. The purpose of this QA program is to control project activities in such a manner as to achieve the mission of the MWTF Project in a safe and reliable manner. The QA program for the MWTF Project is founded on DOE Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance, and implemented through the use of ASME NQA-1, Quality Assurance Program Requirements for Nuclear Facilities (ASME 1989 with addenda la-1989, lb-1991 and lc-1992). This document describes the program and planned actions which the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) will implement to demonstrate and ensure that the project meets the requirements of DOE Order 5700.6C through the interpretive guidance of ASME NQA-1.

  11. Functions and requirements for tank farm restoration and safe operations, Project W-314. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrison, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    This Functions and Requirements document (FRD) establishes the basic performance criteria for Project W-314, in accordance with the guidance outlined in the letter from R.W. Brown, RL, to President, WHC, ''Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project Documentation Methodology,'' 94-PRJ-018, dated 3/18/94. The FRD replaces the Functional Design Criteria (FDC) as the project technical baseline documentation. Project W-314 will improve the reliability of safety related systems, minimize onsite health and safety hazards, and support waste retrieval and disposal activities by restoring and/or upgrading existing Tank Farm facilities and systems. The scope of Project W-314 encompasses the necessary restoration upgrades of the Tank Farms' instrumentation, ventilation, electrical distribution, and waste transfer systems

  12. Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility Quality Assurance Program Plan, Project W-236A. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, L.R.

    1995-01-01

    This document describes the Quality Assurance (QA) program for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Project. The purpose of this QA program is to control project activities in such a manner as to achieve the mission of the MWTF Project in a safe and reliable manner. The QA program for the MWTF Project is founded on DOE Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance, and implemented through the use of ASME NQA-1, Quality Assurance Program Requirements for Nuclear Facilities (ASME 1989 with addenda la-1989, lb-1991 and lc-1992). This document describes the program and planned actions which the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) will implement to demonstrate and ensure that the project meets the requirements of DOE Order 5700.6C through the interpretive guidance of ASME NQA-1

  13. FY 1992 revised task plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipler, D.B.

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses from Hanford Site operations since 1944 to populations and individuals. The primary objectives of work to be performed in FY 1992 is to determine the appropriate scope (space, time, and radionuclides, pathways and individuals/population groups) and accuracy (level of uncertainty in dose estimates) for the project. Another objective is to use a refined computer model to estimate Native American tribal doses and individual doses for the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS). Project scope and accuracy requirements defined in FY 1992 can translated into model and data requirements that must be satisfied during FY 1993

  14. Mitigation and Monitoring Plan for impacted wetlands at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site, Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    The Gunnison, Colorado, abandoned uranium mill site is one site being cleaned up by the DOE under UMTRCA authority. This site`s contaminated material is being transported to a disposal site on US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land east of Gunnison. Remedial action activities have temporarily disturbed 0.8 acre (ac) (0.3 hectares [ha]) of wetlands and permanently eliminated 4.3 ac (1.7 ha). As required by the Clean Water Act, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) prepared a Section 404 Permit that addresses the loss of wetlands as a result of remedial action at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site. The 404 permit includes this report as an attachment and it describes the wetland mitigation and monitoring plan. The DOE formulated this plan in consultation with the BLM and the USACE. This report represents a revised version of the mitigation and monitoring plan (DOE, 1992b).

  15. Mitigation and Monitoring Plan for impacted wetlands at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site, Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    The Gunnison, Colorado, abandoned uranium mill site is one site being cleaned up by the DOE under UMTRCA authority. This site's contaminated material is being transported to a disposal site on US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land east of Gunnison. Remedial action activities have temporarily disturbed 0.8 acre (ac) (0.3 hectares [ha]) of wetlands and permanently eliminated 4.3 ac (1.7 ha). As required by the Clean Water Act, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) prepared a Section 404 Permit that addresses the loss of wetlands as a result of remedial action at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site. The 404 permit includes this report as an attachment and it describes the wetland mitigation and monitoring plan. The DOE formulated this plan in consultation with the BLM and the USACE. This report represents a revised version of the mitigation and monitoring plan (DOE, 1992b)

  16. Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project, Version 1 (GRUMPv1): Urban Extent Polygons, Revision 01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary output of the Global Rural Urban Mapping Project, Version 1 (GRUMPv1) are a series of grids representing estimated population counts and density for the...

  17. DECOVALEX II PROJECT. Technical report - Task 2A and 2B. (Revised edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanru Jing; Stephansson, Ove

    1998-08-01

    DECOVALEX II project started in November 1995 as a continuation of the DECOVALEX I project, which was completed at the end of 1994. The project was initiated by recognizing the fact that a proper evaluation of the current capacities of numerical modelling of the coupled T-H-M processes in fractured media is needed not only for small scale, well controlled laboratory test cases such as those studied in DECOVALEX 1, but also for less characterised, more complex and realistic in-situ experiments. This will contribute to validation and confidence building in the current mathematical models, numerical methods and computer codes. Four tasks were defined in the DECOVALEX II project: TASK 1 - numerical study of the RCF3 pumping test and shaft excavation at Sellafield by Nirex, UK; TASK 2 - numerical study of the in-situ T-H-M experiments at Kamaishi Mine by PNC, Japan; TASK 3 - review of current state-of-the-art of rock joint research and TASK 4 - report on the coupled T-H-M issues related to repository design and performance assessment. This report is one of the technical reports of the DECOVALEX II project, describing the work performed for TASK 2A and 2B - the predictions and model calibration for the hydro-mechanical effect of the excavation of the test pit for the in-situ T-H-M experiments at Kamaishi Mine by PNC, Japan. Presented in this report are the descriptions of the project, definition of Task 2, and approaches, methods and results of numerical modelling work carried out by the research teams. The report is a summary of the research reports written by the research teams and the discussions held during project workshops and task force group meetings. The opinions and conclusions in this report, however, reflect only ideas of the authors, not necessarily a collective representation of the funding organisations of the project

  18. Project GICC-Rhone revised final report - short version february 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The GICC-Rhone project concerns the impacts on the french part of the Rhone basin, in the case of a climatic change which double the atmospheric CO 2 . This situation is possible for the year 2050. The document precises the place of the project in the general scientifical context, the planning and the engaged teams, the experimental methodology, the used and developed simulation, a discussion on the data uncertainties and the obtained results. (A.L.B.)

  19. Factors Influencing the Private Involvement in Urban Rail Public-Private Partnership Projects in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjian Ke

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Private investors have been encouraged to participate in the development and operation of urban rail projects in China through Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs, given the fact that subnational governments are suffering from urgent development demands and severe fiscal pressure. However, there is no formal assessment to determine the private involvement in a PPP project. This problem is particularly critical in the sector of urban rail, in which the huge investment cannot rely on the private sector alone. This study hence aimed to uncover and identify the influencing factors. Multiple research methods, including content analysis, case study and focus group discussion were adopted to achieve the research purpose. Seven types of influencing factors were identified, including project financial model, government fiscal commitment, risk allocation, public accountability, efficiency considerations, policy and regulations, and organisational marketing strategies. The findings add to the current knowledge base by uncovering the drivers behind private involvement in a PPP project. They are also beneficial for industry practitioners as a basis/checklist to determine the private involvement.

  20. UMTRA Surface Project management action process document. Final report: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    A critical mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the planning, implementation, and completion of environmental restoration (ER) programs at facilities that were operated by or in support of the former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) from the late 1940s into the 1970s. Among these facilities are the 24 former uranium mill sites designed in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 (42 USC section 7901 et seq.) Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designated sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project only; a separate MAP document has been prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project

  1. Undergraduate Research Involving Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in Interdisciplinary Science Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Pagano

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Scientific undergraduate research in higher education often yields positive outcomes for student and faculty member participants alike, with underrepresented students often showing even more substantial gains (academic, professional, and personal as a result of the experience. Significant success can be realized when involving deaf and hard-of-hearing (d/hh undergraduate students, who are also vastly underrepresented in the sciences, in interdisciplinary research projects. Even d/hh Associate degree level students and those in the first two years of their postsecondary careers can contribute to, and benefit from, the research process when faculty mentors properly plan/design projects. We discuss strategies, including the dissemination/communication of research results, for involving these students in research groups with different communication dynamics and share both findings of our research program and examples of successful chemical and biological research projects that have involved d/hh undergraduate students. We hope to stimulate a renewed interest in encouraging diversity and involving students with disabilities into higher education research experiences globally and across multiple scientific disciplines, thus strengthening the education and career pipeline of these students.

  2. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Durango, Colorado. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Durango, Colorado, are described in this water sampling and analysis plan. The plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the routine monitoring stations at the site. The ground water data are used to characterize the site ground water compliance strategies and to monitor contaminants of potential concern identified in the baseline risk assessment (DOE, 1995a). Regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the US EPA regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and EPA standards of 1995 (60 FR 2854). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site

  3. Functional design criteria radioactive liquid waste line replacement, Project W-087. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVey, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides the functional design criteria for the 222-S Laboratory radioactive waste drain piping and transfer pipeline replacement. The project will replace the radioactive waste drain piping from the hot cells in 222-S to the 219-S Waste Handling Facility and provide a new waste transfer route from 219-S to the 244-S Catch Station in Tank Farms

  4. Conversion projects program plan WBS 7.4.9. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The mission of Conversion Projects (CP) is to transfer physical, intellectual, human and fiscal resources that advance the Hanford cleanup mission, support new missions, and that may inherently also benefit the economic transition of the region. This implements Function 6.0 of the Hanford Cleanup Technical Baseline

  5. Project W-151 flexible receiver radiation detector system acceptance test plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troyer, G.L.

    1994-01-01

    The attached document is the Acceptance Test Plan for the portion of Project W-151 dealing with acceptance of gamma-ray detectors and associated electronics manufactured at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The document provides a written basis for testing the detector system, which will take place in the 305 building (300 Area)

  6. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Surface remedial action was completed at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Canonsburg and Burrell Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in southwestern Pennsylvania in 1985 and 1987, respectively. The Burrell disposal site, included in the UMTRA Project as a vicinity property, was remediated in conjunction with the remedial action at Canonsburg. On 27 May 1994, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the DOE final Long-Term Surveillance Plan (LTSP) (DOE, 1993) for Burrell thus establishing the site under the general license in 10 CFR section 40.27 (1994). In accordance with the DOE guidance document for long-term surveillance (DOE, 1995), all NRC/DOE interaction on the Burrell site's long-term care now is conducted with the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office in Grand Junction, Colorado, and is no longer the responsibility of the DOE UMTRA Project Team in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Therefore, the planned sampling activities described in this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) are limited to the Canonsburg site. This WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for routine monitoring at the Canonsburg site for calendar years 1995 and 1996. Currently, the analytical data further the site characterization and demonstrate that the disposal cell's initial performance is in accordance with design requirements

  7. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Salt Lake City, Utah. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan describes planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site in Salt Lake City, Utah. This plan identifies and justifies sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for routine monitoring of ground water, sediments, and surface waters at monitoring stations on the site

  8. Global Dynamical Systems Involving Generalized -Projection Operators and Set-Valued Perturbation in Banach Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-zhi Zou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new class of generalized dynamical systems involving generalized f-projection operators is introduced and studied in Banach spaces. By using the fixed-point theorem due to Nadler, the equilibrium points set of this class of generalized global dynamical systems is proved to be nonempty and closed under some suitable conditions. Moreover, the solutions set of the systems with set-valued perturbation is showed to be continuous with respect to the initial value.

  9. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1, Version 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan describes the planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the Grand Junction US DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site (GRJ-01) in Grand Junction, Colorado, and at the Cheney Disposal Site (GRJ-03) near Grand Junction. The plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for the routine monitoring stations at the sites. Regulatory basis is in the US EPA regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and EPA ground water quality standards of 1995 (60 FR 2854). This plan summarizes results of past water sampling activities, details water sampling activities planned for the next 2 years, and projects sampling activities for the next 5 years

  10. Tumulus Disposal Demonstration Project assessment plan for potential worker exposure: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styers, D.R.

    1989-03-01

    The purpose of the ''Assessment Plan for Potential Worker Exposure'' is to determine the potential radiological exposures to the workers as they dispose of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) on the Tumulus Disposal Demonstration Project (TDDP). An evaluation of the work procedures and precautions will be made so as to maintain the exposure levels As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). 10 refs., 10 figs

  11. Site Observational Work Plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Shiprock, New Mexico. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Site is one of the first documents for developing an approach for achieving ground water compliance at the site. This SOWP applies Shiprock site information to a regulatory compliance framework, which identifies strategies for meeting ground water compliance at the site. The compliance framework was developed in the UMTRA ground water programmatic environmental impact statement

  12. 2003 Fernald Environmental Management Project Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-04

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the Fernald Environmental Management Project. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  13. Integrated data base for 1986: spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled current data on inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuel and both commercial and US Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive wastes through December 31, 1985, based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. Current projections of future waste and spent fuel to be generated through the year 2020 and characteristics of these materials are also presented. The information forecasted is consistent with the expected defense-related and private industrial and institutional activities and the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) projections of US commercial nuclear power growth. The materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are: spent fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, remedial action waste, and decommissioning waste. For each category, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2020, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or calculated isotopic compositions

  14. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Falls City, Texas. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Falls City, Texas, are described in this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP). The following plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, and sampling frequency for the routine monitoring stations at the site. The ground water data are used for site characterization and risk assessment. The regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations in 40 CFR Part 192. Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. The Falls City site is in Karnes County, Texas, approximately 8 miles [13 kilometers southwest of the town of Falls City and 46 mi (74 km) southeast of San Antonio, Texas. Before surface remedial action, the tailings site consisted of two parcels. Parcel A consisted of the mill site, one mill building, five tailings piles, and one tailings pond south of Farm-to-Market (FM) Road 1344 and west of FM 791. A sixth tailings pile designated Parcel B was north of FM 791 and east of FM 1344

  15. Proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2: Public Involvement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-01-01

    In regard to the proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project, the goal of the Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) public involvement process is to determine the issues to be examined and pertinent analyses to be conducted and to solicit comments on the content and quality of information presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). Comments and questions are solicited from the public and government agencies during the scoping process and during the comment period and public hearing on the DEIS, to find out what is of most concern to them. The end product of the public involvement process is the Comment Report which follows in part of this volume on Public Involvement.

  16. Salt Repository Project site study plan for background environmental radioactivity: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The Site Study Plan for Background Environmental Radioactivity describes a field program consisting of an initial radiological survey and a radiological sampling program. The field program includes measurement of direct radiation and collection and analysis of background radioactivity samples of air, precipitation, soil, water, milk, pasture grass, food crops, meat, poultry, game, and eggs. The plan describes for each study the need for the study, the study design, data management, and use, schedule of proposed activities, and quality assurance requirements. These studies will provide data needed to satisfy requirements contained in, or derived from, the Salt Repository Project Requirements Document. 43 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs

  17. Preliminary safety analysis report for project 89-GEB-610 Plutonium Finishing Plant instrumentation upgrade. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, T.E.

    1995-01-01

    This document consists of an analysis of the MICON system upgrade. This project shall install a Micon Co. distributed process monitor and control system with Sparc Sun workstation operator interfaces. The Sparc workstations are housed in consoles custom designed to human factors specifications. The distributed control system (DCS) shall have the installed capacity to monitor and control all related instruments and equipment presently connected to the panels in the PFP Power Control Room 321A as listed in the input/output list. This also includes all devices monitored and controlled by the 2736-ZB Allen Bradley programmable logic controller. The system has since assumed the control and monitoring responsibilities for Projects B- 680H ''Low Level Waste Treatment Facility'' and C-031H ''PFP Liquid Effluent Facilities''. Part of the new en's change area in Building 234-5ZA, Room 712, has been remodeled to house two consoles and one supervisor console. Local control units containing the microprocontrollers and the input/output interface circuit boards shall be wired to the instrumentation and controlled equipment. These units communicate with the Sparc workstations via a redundant data communications highway and shall be strategic, throughout the PFP facility. The DCS has already been purchased from Micon Co., located in Houston Texas, presently on site

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory transuranic waste quality assurance project plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This Transuranic (TRU) Waste Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) serves as the quality management plan for the characterization of transuranic waste in preparation for certification and transportation. The Transuranic Waste Characterization/Certification Program (TWCP) consists of personnel who sample and analyze waste, validate and report data; and provide project management, quality assurance, audit and assessment, and records management support, all in accordance with established requirements for disposal of TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility. This QAPjP addresses how the TWCP meets the quality requirements of the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) and the technical requirements of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). The TWCP characterizes and certifies retrievably stored and newly generated TRU waste using the waste selection, testing, sampling, and analytical techniques and data quality objectives (DQOs) described in the QAPP, the Los Alamos National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Certification Plan (Certification Plan), and the CST Waste Management Facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria and Certification [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC)]. At the present, the TWCP does not address remote-handled (RH) waste

  19. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Riverton, Wyoming. Revision 3/95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    Ground water compliance for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, including the Riverton, Wyoming, site, is governed by the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act and the US Environmental Protection Agency's Health and Environmental Protection Standards for Uranium and Thorium Mill Tailings. The compliance strategy proposed for this site is natural flushing in conjunction with institutional controls. The essential premise of natural flushing is that ground water movement and natural attenuation processes will reduce the detected contamination to background levels or alternate concentration limits that do not pose a risk to human health or the environment within 100 years. This document contains the following sections. Section 2.0 of this SOWP describes the requirements for meeting standards at UMTRA Project sites. Section 3.0 provides site-specific data and the related conceptual model. Section 4.0 provides the justification for the recommended ground water compliance strategy for the Riverton site. Section 5.0 provides the justification and process for collection and assessment of additional required data. Section 6.0 provides a list of the references cited. The appendixes include data on monitor wells and lithography, ground water, surface water, and sediment quality

  20. Worldwide transportation/energy demand, 1975-2000. Revised Variflex model projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayres, R.U.; Ayres, L.W.

    1980-03-01

    The salient features of the transportation-energy relationships that characterize the world of 1975 are reviewed, and worldwide (34 countries) long-range transportation demand by mode to the year 2000 is reviewed. A worldwide model is used to estimate future energy demand for transportation. Projections made by the forecasting model indicate that in the year 2000, every region will be more dependent on petroleum for the transportation sector than it was in 1975. This report is intended to highlight certain trends and to suggest areas for further investigation. Forecast methodology and model output are described in detail in the appendices. The report is one of a series addressing transportation energy consumption; it supplants and replaces an earlier version published in October 1978 (ORNL/Sub-78/13536/1).

  1. Guidance document for preparing water sampling and analysis plans for UMTRA Project sites. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    A water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) is prepared for each Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site to provide the rationale for routine ground water sampling at disposal sites and former processing sites. The WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the routine ground water monitoring stations at each site. This guidance document has been prepared by the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Its purpose is to provide a consistent technical approach for sampling and monitoring activities performed under the WSAP and to provide a consistent format for the WSAP documents. It is designed for use by the TAC in preparing WSAPs and by the DOE, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, state and tribal agencies, other regulatory agencies, and the public in evaluating the content of WSAPS

  2. Salt repository project site study plan for water resources: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The Site Study Plan for Water Resources describes a field program consisting of surface-water and ground-water characterization. The surface-water studies will determine the drainage basin characteristics (i.e., topography, soils, land use), hydrometeorology, runoff to streams and playas, and surface-water quality (i.e., offsite pollution sources in playa lakes and in streams). The environmental ground-water studies will focus on ground-water quality characterization. The site study plan describes for each study the need for the study, study design, data management and use, schedule of proposed activities, and quality assurance. These studies will provide data needed to satisfy requirements contained in, or derived from, the Salt Repository Projects Requirements Document. 78 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  3. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Site, Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The final audit report for remedial action at the Gunnison, Colorado Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and QA remedial action close-out inspections performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC); and on-site construction reviews (OSCR) performed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Two radiological surveillances and four radiological audits were performed at the Gunnison site. The surveillances were performed on 16 to 19 September 1992 and 28 June to 1 July 1993. The radiological audits were performed on 4 to 7 October 1993; 13 to 16 June 1994; 19 to 22 September 1994 and 10 to 12 July 1995. The surveillances and audits resulted in 79 observations. Thirty-four of the observations raised DOE concerns that were resolved on the site or through subsequent corrective action. All outstanding issues were closed on 12 July 1995. The radiological surveillances and audits are discussed in Section 2.0 of this report. Ten QA in-process surveillances were performed at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site. The surveillances were performed on 24 to 25 September 1992, 7 to 9 July 1993, 29 October 1993, 27 to 28 June 1994, 31 October to 1 November 1994, 19 to 20 June 1 995, 20 to 21 July 1995, 17 to 18 August 1995, 20 September 1995, and 11 to 13 October 1995. The surveillances resulted in 100 observations. Six observations contained recommendations that required responses from the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC). Ninety-five observations contained a recommendation that required no response. All outstanding issues were closed on 8 January 1996. The QA in-process surveillances are discussed in Section 3.0 of this report

  4. Salt Repository Project site study plan for stratigraphic boreholes: Revision 1, December 18, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This site study describes the Stratigraphic Boreholes field work to be conducted during the early stages of Site Characterization at the Deaf Smith County, Texas site. The field program has been designed to provide data useful in addressing information/data needs resulting from Federal/State/local regulations, and repository program requirements. Four Stratigraphic Holes will be drilled near the perimeter of the site to document the subsurface geologic conditions in that area and to provide data necessary for design and construction of the Exploratory Shaft Facilities. Continuous samples will be recovered from the ground surface to the total depth of each sell. Geophysical well logs will provide additional coverage of the stratigraphic section. In-situ down hole testing will include short term hydrologic tests and hydraulic fracture tests to provide information on deep groundwater characteristics and regional stress patterns, respectively. Field methods/tests are chosen that provide the best or only means of obtaining the required data. The Salt Repository Project (SRP) Networks specify the schedule which the program will operate. The Technical Services Contractor is responsible for conducting the field program of drilling and testing. Samples and data will be handled and reported in accordance with established SRP procedures. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that the appropriate documentation is maintained. 30 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs

  5. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Surface remedial action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site began in 1992; completion is expected in 1995. Ground water and surface water will be sampled semiannually at the Gunnison processing site (GUN-01) and disposal site (GUN-08). Results of previous water sampling at the Gunnison processing site indicate that ground water in the alluvium is contaminated by the former uranium processing activities. Background ground water conditions have been established in the uppermost aquifer (Tertiary gravels) at the Gunnison disposal site. Semiannual water sampling is scheduled for the spring and fall. Water quality sampling is conducted at the processing site (1) to ensure protection of human health and the environment, (2) for ground water compliance monitoring during remedial action construction, and (3) to define the extent of contamination. At the processing site, the frequency and duration of sampling will be dependent upon the nature and extent of residual contamination and the compliance strategy chosen. The monitor well locations provide a representative distribution of sampling points to characterize ground water quality and ground water flow conditions in the vicinity of the sites. The list of analytes has been modified with time to reflect constituents that are related to uranium processing activities and the parameters needed for geochemical evaluation

  6. Salt Repository Project site study plan for seismographic monitoring: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This site study plan describes the seismographic monitoring activities to be conducted during the early stages of Site Characterization at the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. The field programs has been designed to provide data useful in addressing information/data needs resulting from Federal/State/local regulatory requirements and repository program requirements. Sixteen new and three relocated seismographic stations will be added to the now existing network of 13 stations for a total of 32 stations in the network. The areal extent is being expanded and selected regions covered more densely to provide more accurate monitoring and location of microearthquakes. More sophisticated instruments are being used at selected locations to allow for more detailed analysis. A few seismographs are being installed at depth to provide a limited 3-D monitoring network in the area of the repository. The Salt Repository Project (SRP) Networks specify the schedule under which the program will operate. The Technique Field Services Contractor (TFSC) is responsible for conducting the field program. Data will be handled and reported in accordance with established SRP procedures. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that appropriate documentation is maintained. 32 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs

  7. Completion report for the UMTRA Project Vitro Processing Site. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This completion report provides evidence that the final Salt Lake City, Utah, processing site property conditions are in accordance with the approved design and that all US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards have been satisfied. Included as appendixes to support the stated conclusions are the record drawings; a summary of grid test results; contract specifications and construction drawings, the EPA standards (40 CFR Part 192); the audit, inspection, and surveillance summary; the permit information; and project photographs. The principal objective of the remedial action at Salt Lake City is to remove the tailings from the Vitro processing site, render the site free of contamination to EPA standards, and restore the site to the final design grade elevations. The final remedial action plan (RAP), which is approved by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and concurred upon by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the state of Utah, contains the conceptual design used to develop the final approved design. During remedial action construction operations, conditions were encountered that required design features that differed from the conceptual design. These conditions and the associated design changes are noted in the record drawings. All remedial action activities were completed in conformance with the specifications and drawings; the record drawings, in the state of Utah's opinion, reflect an accurate depiction of the existing property conditions at the processing site. 25 refs., 3 figs., 22 tabs

  8. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Gunnison, Colorado: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan summarizes the results of previous water sampling activities and the plan for future water sampling activities, in accordance with the Guidance Document for Preparing Sampling and Analysis Plans for UMTRA Sites. A buffer zone monitoring plan for the Dos Rios Subdivision is included as an appendix. The buffer zone monitoring plan was developed to ensure continued protection to the public from residual contamination. The buffer zone is beyond the area depicted as contaminated ground water due to former milling operations. Surface remedial action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site began in 1992; completion is expected in 1995. Ground water and surface water will be sampled semiannually at the Gunnison processing site and disposal site. Results of previous water sampling at the Gunnison processing site indicate that ground water in the alluvium is contaminated by the former uranium processing activities. Background ground water conditions have been established in the uppermost aquifer at the Gunnison disposal site. The monitor well locations provide a representative distribution of sampling points to characterize ground water quality and ground water flow conditions in the vicinity of the sites. The list of analytes has been modified with time to reflect constituents that are related to uranium processing activities and the parameters needed for geochemical evaluation

  9. Environmental assessment for the Groundwater Characterization Project, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada; Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to conduct a program to characterize groundwater at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, in accordance with a 1987 DOE memorandum stating that all past, present, and future nuclear test sites would be treated as Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites (Memorandum from Bruce Green, Weapons Design and Testing Division, June 6, 1987). DOE has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-0532) to evaluate the environmental consequences associated with the proposed action, referred to as the Groundwater Characterization Project (GCP). This proposed action includes constructing access roads and drill pads, drilling and testing wells, and monitoring these wells for the purpose of characterizing groundwater at the NTS. Long-term monitoring and possible use of these wells in support of CERCLA, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act, is also proposed. The GCP includes measures to mitigate potential impacts on sensitive biological, cultural and historical resources, and to protect workers and the environment from exposure to any radioactive or mixed waste materials that may be encountered. DOE considers those mitigation measures related to sensitive biological, cultural and historic resources as essential to render the impacts of the proposed action not significant, and DOE has prepared a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) that explains how such mitigations will be planned and implemented. Based on the analyses presented in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and the Department is issuing this FONSI.

  10. ELF-VLF communications through the Earth Project report for calendar year 1984, revision 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, H. M.; Burker, G. J.; Didwall, E. M.; Holladay, G.; Lytle, R. J.

    1985-08-01

    We use computer models and experiments to explore the feasibility of communication between points underground and on the Earth's surface. Emphasis is placed on ELF-VLF electromagnetic propagation through the Earth; nominally, we investigated propagation in the 200 Hz-30 kHz frequency range. The computer modeling included calculations of the fields of a point electric or magnetic source in a homogeneous half space or a stratified earth. Initial results for an insulated antenna of finite length are also considered. The experiments involved through-the-Earth transmissions at two locations in Pennsylvania, both of which had large formations of limestone. Initial results indicate that information rates as high as kbits/s may be possible for subsurface depths of 300 m or less. Accuracy of these estimates depends on the electromagnetic propagation constant of the rock, the noise characteristics, and the modulation scheme. Although a nuisance for evaluating through-the-Earth propagation, the existence of subsurface metal conductors can improve the transmission character of the site.

  11. ELF-VLF Communications through the Earth Project report for calendar year 1984. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buettner, H.M.; Burke, G.J.; Didwall, E.M.; Holladay, G.; Lytle, R.J.

    1985-08-01

    We use computer models and experiments to explore the feasibility of communication between points underground and on the Earth's surface. Emphasis is placed on ELF-VLF electromagnetic propagation through the Earth; nominally, we investigated propagation in the 200 Hz-30 kHz frequency range. The computer modeling included calculations of the fields of a point electric or magnetic source in a homogeneous half space or a stratified earth. Initial results for an insulated antenna of finite length are also considered. The experiments involved through-the-earth transmissions at two locations in Pennsylvania, both of which had large formations of limestone. Initial results indicate that information rates as high as kbits/s may be possible for subsurface depths of 300 m or less. Accuracy of these estimates depends on the electromagnetic propagation constant of the rock, the noise characteristics, and the modulation scheme. Although a nuisance for evaluating through-the-Earth propagation, the existence of subsurface metal conductors can improve the transmission character of the site.

  12. User and stakeholder involvement for relevant, reliable and robust local-scale climate projections in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neby, Simon; Sobolowski, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    How can users and stakeholders be actively involved with providing input to and using output from local-scale climate projections? How can the scientific community better understand the needs of local actors? And how should communication and cooperation efforts be organized? These are critical questions we aim to answer in a climate services project funded by the Norwegian Research Council (R3: Relevant, Reliable and Robust local-scale climate projections for Norway). The project takes into consideration not only the scientific issues in establishing useful local-scale climate projections, but also addresses the "usability gap" between climate information and decision-making. The lack of effective communication between scientists and user communities often result in outputs and products that are not matched with decision-relevant climate information. In the R3 project, the scientific participants actively engage with a range of users that have quite different information needs: municipalities, infrastructure developers, agriculture, energy producers, insurance companies, and more. In this particular presentation, we present our experiences concerning three specific issues that relate to the stakeholder-science interface: 1) Preferences are not clear-cut and pre-defined. In practice, this means that stakeholders often do not have precise information about their needs, nor precise information about how, where and whether their needs can be voiced. Similarly, science communities tend to presuppose that stakeholders are interested and have well-articulated needs, which is hardly the case. Collectively, that means that there is a need for an approach that guides the articulation and prioritization of preferences in a manner that integrates both scientific and stakeholder perspectives and takes the integrity of both perspectives seriously. 2) Technologies are unclear. Although information may be produced and used, past experiences, trial and error processes and pragmatic

  13. Being useful: achieving indigenous youth involvement in a community-based participatory research project in Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Ford

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To report on a participatory research process in southwest Alaska focusing on youth involvement as a means to facilitate health promotion. We propose youth-guided community-based participatory research (CBPR as way to involve young people in health promotion and prevention strategizing as part of translational science practice at the community-level. Study design. We utilized a CBPR approach that allowed youth to contribute at all stages. Methods. Implementation of the CBPR approach involved the advancement of three key strategies including: (a the local steering committee made up of youth, tribal leaders, and elders, (b youth-researcher partnerships, and (c youth action-groups to translate findings. Results. The addition of a local youth-action and translation group to the CBPR process in the southwest Alaska site represents an innovative strategy for disseminating findings to youth from a research project that focuses on youth resilience and wellbeing. This strategy drew from two community-based action activities: (a being useful by helping elders and (b being proud of our village. Conclusions. In our study, youth informed the research process at every stage, but most significantly youth guided the translation and application of the research findings at the community level. Findings from the research project were translated by youth into serviceable action in the community where they live. The research created an experience for youth to spend time engaged in activities that, from their perspectives, are important and contribute to their wellbeing and healthy living. Youth-guided CBPR meant involving youth in the process of not only understanding the research process but living through it as well.

  14. Stake holder involvement in the Canadian review process for uranium production projects in Northern Saskatchewan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underhill, D.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the Canadian environmental review process for uranium production projects as a case study for the purpose of understanding the nature and value of stakeholder involvement in the management of radiological hazards. While the Canadian review process potentially applies to any development, this case study focuses on the assessment of the uranium projects of northern Saskatchewan conducted during the 1990's. It describes the environmental assessment (EA) conducted in the 1990's for six new uranium facilities (including mines and mills and related tailings disposal sites) planned in northern Saskatchewan. Both the Canadian federal and the Saskatchewan provincial government have extensive environmental review processes that must under law be complete before any major industrial development judged to have potential environmental impacts is undertaken within their respective territories. However, even in those instances where no clear potential environmental impacts are evident, Canadian law mandates 'if public concern about the proposal is such that a public review is desirable, the initiating department shall refer the proposal to the Minister for review by a Panel'. (Wh95) As a stakeholder under law, in both Canada and Saskatchewan, the public plays an important role in the environmental review process. To encourage participation and assist the public in its review the two governments may provide funding (as done in this review) to assist qualified individuals or groups to participant in the review process. The first section of this case study sets the scene. It describes the Saskatchewan uranium mining story, focusing on how the importance of the public stakeholder evolved to become a major component, under law, in the EA process for new uranium mines. This increase in stakeholder involvement opportunities coincided with heightened public concern for the socio-economic impacts of the projects. In the late 1980's both governments were advised by

  15. Proceedings of the topical session on stakeholder involvement in decommissioning projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, Juan Luis; Chandler, Steve; Metcalfe, Doug; Le Bars, Yves

    2006-01-01

    Set up by the Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC), the WPDD brings together senior representatives of national organisations who have a broad overview of Decommissioning and Dismantling (D and D) issues through their work as regulators, implementers, R and D experts or policy makers. These include representatives from regulatory authorities, industrial decommissioners from the NEA Co-operative Programme on Exchange of Scientific and Technical Information on Nuclear Installation Decommissioning Projects (CPD), and cross-representation from the other NEA Committees. The EC is a member of the WPDD and the IAEA is participating as an observer. This broad participation provides good possibilities for the co-ordination efforts amongst activities in the international programmes. At its sixth meeting, in Paris, 14-16 November 2005, the WPDD held a topical session on the 'Stakeholder Involvement in Decommissioning Projects'. The topical session was jointly planned and run with members of the NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC). This report documents the topical session. The main text summarises the lessons learnt and includes the rapporteurs reports. Appendix 1 and 2 provide the agenda of the topical session and all contributed papers respectively. The Topical session also provided a stimuli to review all the contributions in the area of stakeholder involvement that the WPDD has received since its inception. A list of references is provided in Appendix 3. The topical session was meant to provide an exchange of information and experience on the following issues: - Views from Stakeholders Regarding Stakeholder Involvement and Their Own Role. - Case Studies on Stakeholders Confidence. At the end of each session time was allotted for a plenary discussion. The Rapporteur reviewed the main points and the lessons learnt at the end of the whole Topical Session. (authors)

  16. Revising REACH guidance on information requirements and chemical safety assessment for engineered nanomaterials for aquatic ecotoxicity endpoints: recommendations from the EnvNano project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss; Sørensen, Sara Nørgaard; Skjolding, Lars Michael

    2017-01-01

    be made applicable to nanomaterials. European Research Council project EnvNano—Environmental Effects and Risk Evaluation of Engineered, which ran from 2011 to 2016, took another outset by assuming that: “The behaviour of nanoparticles in suspension is fundamentally different from that of chemicals......The European Chemical Agency (ECHA) is in the process of revising its guidance documents on how to address the challenges of ecotoxicological testing of nanomaterials. In these revisions, outset is taken in the hypothesis that ecotoxicological test methods, developed for soluble chemicals, can...... in solution”. The aim of this paper is to present the findings of the EnvNano project and through these provide the scientific background for specific recommendations on how ECHA guidance could be further improved. Key EnvNano findings such as the need to characterize dispersion and dissolution rates in stock...

  17. The use of public participation and economic appraisal for public involvement in large-scale hydropower projects: Case study of the Nam Theun 2 Hydropower Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirumachi, Naho; Torriti, Jacopo

    2012-01-01

    Gaining public acceptance is one of the main issues with large-scale low-carbon projects such as hydropower development. It has been recommended by the World Commission on Dams that to gain public acceptance, public involvement is necessary in the decision-making process (). As financially-significant actors in the planning and implementation of large-scale hydropower projects in developing country contexts, the paper examines the ways in which public involvement may be influenced by international financial institutions. Using the case study of the Nam Theun 2 Hydropower Project in Laos, the paper analyses how public involvement facilitated by the Asian Development Bank had a bearing on procedural and distributional justice. The paper analyses the extent of public participation and the assessment of full social and environmental costs of the project in the Cost-Benefit Analysis conducted during the project appraisal stage. It is argued that while efforts were made to involve the public, there were several factors that influenced procedural and distributional justice: the late contribution of the Asian Development Bank in the project appraisal stage; and the issue of non-market values and discount rate to calculate the full social and environmental costs. - Highlights: ► Public acceptance in large-scale hydropower projects is examined. ► Both procedural and distributional justice are important for public acceptance. ► International Financial Institutions can influence the level of public involvement. ► Public involvement benefits consideration of non-market values and discount rates.

  18. Assessment of a Revised Management Strategy for Patients With Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms Involving the Main Pancreatic Duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Motokazu; Elliott, Irmina A; Nguyen, Andrew H; Kim, Stephen; Muthusamy, V Raman; Watson, Rabindra; Hines, O Joe; Dawson, David W; Reber, Howard A; Donahue, Timothy R

    2017-01-18

    According to the 2012 International Consensus Guidelines, the diagnostic criterion of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) involving the main duct (MD IPMNs) or the main and branch ducts (mixed IPMNs) of the pancreatic system is a main pancreatic duct (MPD) diameter of 5.0 mm or greater on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, surgical resection is recommended for patients with an MPD diameter of 10.0 mm or greater, which is characterized as a high-risk stigma. An MPD diameter of 5.0 to 9.0 mm is not an indication for immediate resection. To determine an appropriate cutoff (ie, one with high sensitivity and negative predictive value) of the MPD diameter on CT or MRI as a prognostic factor for malignant disease and to propose a new management algorithm for patients with MD or mixed IPMNs. This retrospective cohort study included 103 patients who underwent surgical resection for a preoperative diagnosis of MD or mixed IPMN and in whom IPMN was confirmed by surgical pathologic findings at a single institution from July 1, 1996, to December 31, 2015. Malignant disease was defined as high-grade dysplasia or invasive adenocarcinoma on results of surgical pathologic evaluation. An appropriate MPD diameter on preoperative CT or MRI to predict malignant disease was determined using a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The prognostic value of the new management algorithm that incorporated the new MPD diameter cutoff was evaluated. Among the 103 patients undergoing resection for an MD or mixed IPMN (59 men [57.3%]; 44 women [42.7%]; median [range] age, 71 [48-86] years), 64 (62.1%) had malignant disease. Diagnostic accuracy for malignant neoplasms was highest at an MPD diameter cutoff of 7.2 mm (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.59-0.81). An MPD diameter of 7.2 mm or greater was also an independent prognostic factor for malignant neoplasms (odds ratio, 12.76; 95% CI, 2

  19. Project GICC-Rhone revised final report - short version february 2005; Projet GICC-Rhone rapport final revise - version courte fevrier 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The GICC-Rhone project concerns the impacts on the french part of the Rhone basin, in the case of a climatic change which double the atmospheric CO{sub 2}. This situation is possible for the year 2050. The document precises the place of the project in the general scientifical context, the planning and the engaged teams, the experimental methodology, the used and developed simulation, a discussion on the data uncertainties and the obtained results. (A.L.B.)

  20. Patterns in professional growth of science teachers involved in a team-based PD project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    and learning and subsequent discussion of this material. Repeated interviews were analyzed using an adapted version of the interconnected model of teachers’ professional growth. The results show various ways of experimenting with new approaches to be important for three of the teachers while a novice teacher...... the participants refer to. Conclusion is that there are professional growth patterns, especially a pattern involving experimenting, which have a forward-pointing potential to be used to inform school based PD. The results implicate that the same PD project can frame experimenting into practice in various tempi...... and with differentiated facilitation aligned to the individual teacher’s current needs and that external support of science resource teachers can be an integrated part of school based PD....

  1. The Memory-Impairing Effects of Septal GABA Receptor Activation Involve GABAergic Septo-Hippocampal Projection Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs-Kraft, Desiree L.; Wheeler, Marina G.; Parent, Marise B.

    2007-01-01

    Septal infusions of the [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA)[subscript A] agonist muscimol impair memory, and the effect likely involves the hippocampus. GABA[subscript A] receptors are present on the perikarya of cholinergic and GABAergic septo-hippocampal (SH) projections. The current experiments determined whether GABAergic SH projections are…

  2. Developing Federated Services within Seismology: IRIS' involvement in the CoopEUS Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, T. K.; Trabant, C. M.; Stults, M.

    2014-12-01

    As a founding member of the CoopEUS initiative, IRIS Data Services has partnered with five data centers in Europe and the UC Berkeley (NCEDC) in the US to implement internationally standardized web services to access seismological data using identical methodologies. The International Federation of Digital Seismograph Networks (FDSN) holds commission status within IASPEI/IUGG and as such is the international body that governs data exchange formats and access protocols within seismology. The CoopEUS project involves IRIS and UNAVCO as part of the EarthScope project and the European collaborators are all members of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS). CoopEUS includes one work package that attempts to coordinate data access between EarthScope and EPOS facilities. IRIS has worked with its partners in the FDSN to develop and adopt three key international service standards within seismology. These include 1) fdsn-dataselect, a service that returns time series data in a variety of standard formats, 2) fdsn-station, a service that returns related metadata about a seismic station in stationXML format, and 3) fdsn-event, a service that returns information about earthquakes and other seismic events in QuakeML format. Currently the 5 European data centers supporting these services include the ORFEUS Data Centre in the Netherlands, the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences in Potsdam, Germany, ETH Zurich in Switzerland, INGV in Rome, Italy, and the RESIF Data Centre in Grenoble France. Presently these seven centres can all be accessed using standardized web services with identical service calls and returns results in standardized ways. IRIS is developing an IRIS federator that will allow a client to seamlessly access information across the federated centers. Details and current status of the IRIS Federator will be presented.

  3. CITON involvement in CETRAD project on 'Education and training in radiation protection and radioactive waste'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsa, Olivia; Meglea, Claudia; Banutoiu, Marina; Paraschiva, M. V.; Meglea, S.

    2003-01-01

    Within the European Community and world-wide there is extensive experience in the principles and practice of radiation protection and radioactive waste management. Nuclear skills and capabilities have grown and evolved since the inception of nuclear technology in the 1940s. However, with the current stagnation of the nuclear industry it is increasingly acknowledged that the skills and expertise held by the generation who grew up with nuclear technology are being passed on to new generations of experts. This poses a significant risk to the community who will need to manage nuclear liabilities for long times into the future in order to protect future society from radiological hazards. Notwithstanding that the state of the art in nuclear waste management is undoubtedly high in many organizations, it is very clear that there is continuous need for the provision of education and training in this area. The various training and education programmes throughout Europe are at different stages of development. There is undoubtedly a need for harmonization of the numerous programmes and there would be great benefit to countries at early stages of development due to the learning experiences from the more developed organizations. The objective of CETRAD is to develop proposals for structuring and delivering both education and training in the management of the geological disposal of long-lived radioactive waste and radiation protection across Europe. This proposal is seen as a forerunner of a more comprehensive pan-European Network in this area, which it is planned, will emerge from this work. The project activities will be carried out in two phases. Phase 1 will involve national evaluations of both the needs for education and training and the existing infrastructure and resources in the field of radiation protection and radioactive waste management. Phase 2 will involve development of specific proposals for education and training based on the needs identified in Phase 1. (authors)

  4. Religious factors associated with alcohol involvement: results from the Mauritian Joint Child Health Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczak, Susan E; Prescott, Carol A; Dalais, Cyril; Raine, Adrian; Venables, Peter H; Mednick, Sarnoff A

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine religious factors associated with alcohol involvement in Mauritius. The three main religions on the island, Hinduism, Catholicism, and Islam, promote different views of the appropriate use of alcohol. Based on reference group theory, we hypothesized that both the content of a religion's alcohol norms and an individual's religious commitment would relate to alcohol use behavior. Participants were from the Joint Child Health Project, a longitudinal study that has followed a birth cohort of 1.795 individuals since 1972 when they were 3 years old. All available participants (67%; 55% male) were assessed in mid-adulthood on religious variables, lifetime drinking, and lifetime alcohol use disorders. Across religions, individuals who viewed their religion as promoting abstinence were less likely to be drinkers. Religious commitment was associated with reduced probability of drinking only in those who viewed their religion as promoting abstinence. Among drinkers, abstention norms and religious commitment were not associated with lower likelihood of alcohol use disorders. In Catholics who viewed their religion as promoting abstinence and still were drinkers, high religious commitment was associated with increased risk for alcohol use disorders. Predictions based on reference group theory were largely supported, with religious norms and commitment differentially related to alcohol use and problems both across religions and among individuals within religions. Findings highlight the importance of examining multiple aspects of religion to better understand the relationship of religion with alcohol behaviors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Baseline comparison report for Project W-058, Replacement of the cross-site transfer system. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, D.P.

    1995-01-01

    This BCR compares the Project W-058 Functional Design Criteria with the Project W-058 Preliminary Design Requirements Document, and identifies the differences between the two documents in the mission definition, project requirements, system functions, and interfaces. Impacts these differences have on current project design are also discussed

  6. Early Involvement and Integration in Construction Projects: The Benefits of DfX in Elimination of Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Halttula

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Typical construction processes provide waste: material waste but especially process-related waste. The majority of this waste can be avoided with efficient planning in the front end of projects. The main aim is to describe how the concept of Design for Excellence (DfX can reduce the most severe waste in construction projects. Based on a literature review of waste and requirements that aid early involvement and integration, we created a survey for analyzing and prioritizing types of waste in the construction industry. We describe how DFX reduces this waste, especially through the use of early involvement and integration. When applied, DfX creates incentives for project stakeholders to eliminate waste automatically through early involvement and integration.

  7. Learning to work together - lessons from a reflective analysis of a research project on public involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, A; Mathie, E; Munday, D; Cowe, M; Goodman, C; Keenan, J; Kendall, S; Poland, F; Staniszewska, S; Wilson, P

    2017-01-01

    Patient and public involvement (PPI) in research is very important, and funders and the NHS all expect this to happen. What this means in practice, and how to make it really successful, is therefore an important research question. This article analyses the experience of a research team using PPI, and makes recommendations on strengthening PPI in research. There were different PPI roles in our study - some people were part of the research team: some were on the advisory group; and there were patient groups who gave specific feedback on how to make research work better for their needs. We used minutes, other written documents, and structured individual and group reflections to learn from our own experiences over time. The main findings were:- for researchers and those in a PPI role to work in partnership, project structures must allow flexibility and responsiveness to different people's ideas and needs; a named link person can ensure support; PPI representatives need to feel fully included in the research; make clear what is expected for all roles; and ensure enough time and funding to allow meaningful involvement. Some roles brought more demands but also more rewards than others - highlighting that it is important that people giving up their time to help with research experience gains from doing so. Those contributing to PPI on a regular basis may want to learn new skills, rather than always doing the same things. Researchers and the public need to find ways to develop roles in PPI over time. We also found that, even for a team with expertise in PPI, there was a need both for understanding of different ways to contribute, and an evolving 'normalisation' of new ways of working together over time, which both enriched the process and the outputs. Background Patient and public involvement (PPI) is now an expectation of research funders, in the UK, but there is relatively little published literature on what this means in practice - nor is there much evaluative research

  8. Transition projects, Fiscal Year 1996: Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for WBS 1.31, 7.1, and 6.13. Revision 1, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartmell, D.B.

    1995-09-01

    Based on US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) review, specific areas of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), Transition Projects ``Draft`` Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) were revised in preparation for the RL approval ceremony on September 26, 1995. These changes were reviewed with the appropriate RL Project Manager. The changes have been incorporated to the MYPP electronic file, and hard copies replacing the ``Draft`` MYPP will be distributed after the formal signing. In addition to the comments received, a summary level schedule and outyear estimates for the K Basin deactivation beginning in FY 2001 have been included. The K Basin outyear waste data is nearing completion this week and will be incorporated. This exclusion was discussed with Mr. N.D. Moorer, RL, Facility Transition Program Support/Integration. The attached MYPP scope/schedule reflects the Integrated Target Case submitted in the April 1995 Activity Data Sheets (ADS) with the exception of B Plant and the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The 8 Plant assumption in FY 1997 reflects the planning case in the FY 1997 ADS with a shortfall of $5 million. PFP assumptions have been revised from the FY 1997 ADS based on the direction provided this past summer by DOE-Headquarters. This includes the acceleration of the polycube stabilization back to its originally planned completion date. Although the overall program repricing in FY 1996 allowed the scheduled acceleration to fall with the funding allocation, the FY 1997 total reflects a shortfall of $6 million.

  9. Transition projects, Fiscal Year 1996: Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for WBS 1.31, 7.1, and 6.13. Revision 1, Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartmell, D.B.

    1995-09-01

    Based on US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) review, specific areas of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), Transition Projects ''Draft'' Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) were revised in preparation for the RL approval ceremony on September 26, 1995. These changes were reviewed with the appropriate RL Project Manager. The changes have been incorporated to the MYPP electronic file, and hard copies replacing the ''Draft'' MYPP will be distributed after the formal signing. In addition to the comments received, a summary level schedule and outyear estimates for the K Basin deactivation beginning in FY 2001 have been included. The K Basin outyear waste data is nearing completion this week and will be incorporated. This exclusion was discussed with Mr. N.D. Moorer, RL, Facility Transition Program Support/Integration. The attached MYPP scope/schedule reflects the Integrated Target Case submitted in the April 1995 Activity Data Sheets (ADS) with the exception of B Plant and the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The 8 Plant assumption in FY 1997 reflects the planning case in the FY 1997 ADS with a shortfall of $5 million. PFP assumptions have been revised from the FY 1997 ADS based on the direction provided this past summer by DOE-Headquarters. This includes the acceleration of the polycube stabilization back to its originally planned completion date. Although the overall program repricing in FY 1996 allowed the scheduled acceleration to fall with the funding allocation, the FY 1997 total reflects a shortfall of $6 million

  10. Influence of 4-H Horse Project Involvement on Development of Life Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K. P.; Karr-Lilienthal, L.

    2011-01-01

    Four-H horse project members who competed in non-riding horse contests were surveyed to evaluate the influence of their horse project participation on life-skill development. Contests in which youth competed included Horse Bowl, Demonstrations, Public Speaking, and Art. Youth indicated a positive influence on both life-skill development and horse…

  11. Reaping the harvest: nursing student service involvement with a campus gardening project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahonen, Kathleen; Lee, Carolyn; Daker, Emily

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe the development and incorporation of a multidisciplinary community garden as a service project in a baccalaureate nursing cohort in an urban university. The concepts of professional ethics and service, application of nutritional theory to a community cohort, and competencies in community health nursing are briefly discussed and applied to this service project.

  12. Experience and meaning of user involvement: some explorations from a community mental health project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truman, Carole; Raine, Pamela

    2002-05-01

    With an increased interest in and policy commitment to involving service users in the planning and delivery of health service provision, there is a clear need to explore both the rhetoric and realities of what user involvement entails. In the present paper, by drawing upon an evaluation of a community-based exercise facility for people with mental health problems, the authors explore ways in which the reality of user involvement is subject to a range of configurations within health services. The paper describes a piece of qualitative research that was undertaken within a participatory framework to explore the nature of user involvement within the facility. The data have been analysed using a grounded theory approach to provide insights into: the organisational context in which user involvement takes place; factors which encourage meaningful participation on the part of service users; perceived barriers to user involvement; and issues of sustainability and continuity. This research approach has enabled the authors to explore the views and experiences of users, service providers and referral agencies in relation to the nature and potential for user involvement. The findings illustrate ways in which user involvement may take place under both flexible and formal arrangements across a variety of activities. The present paper provides an account of some of the meanings and experiences of what 'successful' user participation may involve and the conditions which underpin 'success'. The authors conclude that successful and meaningful user involvement should enable and support users to recognise their existing skills, and to develop new ones, at a pace that suits their particular circumstances and personal resources. This process may require adaptation not only by organisations, but also by service providers and non-involved users.

  13. Standard-Setters Versus Big4 Opinion, Concerning Iasb Revision Project of the Conceptual Framework for Financial Reporting. the Case of Presentation and Disclosures Chapter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burca Valentin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available On the last decades the accounting system haven‘t been able to follow the dynamics of the economic systems generated by the globalization process. In order to reduce the lag between the demand of financial information and the offer of financial information, IASB has started numerous initiatives aiming the increase on the quality of the financial information. Among the current list of current IASB major projects there is also the project of revising the actual conceptual framework for financial reporting. This study is designed to give some directions that will be considered on the exposure draft of this project, analyzing the comment letters submitted by the members of ASAF and the Big4 as well. The study reveals the increasing importance the preparers and users give to the disclosures included on the notes to the primary financial statements. Moreover, on this study we emphasize several challenges that IASB has to face on issuing the exposure draft for this important project. Some of the main challenges refer to the narrow scope of the financial statements, the criteria used on classification, aggregation and offsetting, or the use of the materiality concept

  14. Contracting communities: Conceptualizing Community Benefits Agreements to improve citizen involvement in urban development projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen-Jansen, Leonie; Veen, van der Menno

    2017-01-01

    Contractual agreements are becoming increasingly important for city governments seeking to manage urban development. Contractual governance involves direct relations between the local state and different public and private actors and citizens. Although abundant literature exists on public–private

  15. 31 CFR 537.412 - Investments in entities involved in economic development projects in Burma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... economic development projects in Burma. 537.412 Section 537.412 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... economic development of resources located in Burma is prohibited by § 537.204 where the company's profits are predominantly derived from the company's economic development of resources located in Burma. (b...

  16. Science teachers' meaning-making when involved in a school-based professional development project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2012-01-01

    A group of teachers’ meaning-making when they are collaboratively analyzing artifacts from practice in local science classrooms in a school-based professional development (PD) project is examined through repeated interviews and represented as meaning-making maps. The interpretation of the teachers......’ meaningmaking includes both their reference to outcomes from the project and their expressed ideas about teaching and learning of science. All four teachers refer to experiences from experimenting in their classrooms and interpret the collected artifacts in relation to students’ learning. Furthermore, they all...... felt encouraged to continue collaboration around science. During the interviews, the teachers emphasize various elements apparently connected to concrete challenges they each experience in their professional work. Implications in relation to the design of PD are discussed....

  17. Science teachers' meaning-making when involved in a school-based professional development project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2012-01-01

    A group of teachers' meaning-making when they are collaboratively analyzing artifacts from practice in local science classrooms in a school-based professional development (PD) project is examined through repeated interviews and represented as meaning-makig maps. The interpretation of the teachers......' meaning-making includes both their reference to outcomes from the project and their expressed ideas about teaching and learning of science. All four teachers refer to experiences from experimenting in their classrooms and interpret the collected artifacts in relation to students' learning. Furthermore......, they all felt encouraged to continue collaboration around science. During the interviews, the teachers emphasize various elements apparently connected to concrete challenges they each experience in their professional work. Implications in relation to the design of PD are discussed....

  18. Project C-018H, 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Process Condensate Treatment Facility, functional design criteria. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, N.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides the Functional Design Criteria (FDC) for Project C-018H, the 242-A Evaporator and Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant Condensate Treatment Facility (Also referred to as the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility [ETF]). The project will provide the facilities to treat and dispose of the 242-A Evaporator process condensate (PC), the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant process condensate (PDD), and the PUREX Plant ammonia scrubber distillate (ASD)

  19. Safety analysis and hazard classification for the 100-B/C Site Remediation Project, Phase 1. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, W.J.; Lehrschall, R.R.; Oestreich, D.K.

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the preliminary hazard classification (PHC) for the initial group of sites to be remediated by the 100-B/C Site Remediation Project. The project is targeted at excavation of contaminated solid from seven waste sites, and the transportation and disposal of these wastes at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. The PHC for these remediation activities is rated as radiological

  20. Design, Utility, and History of the Colorado Adoption Project: Examples Involving Adjustment Interactions1

    OpenAIRE

    Rhea, Sally Ann; Bricker, Josh B.; Corley, Robin P.; DeFries, John C.; Wadsworth, Sally J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the Colorado Adoption Project (CAP), a longitudinal study in behavioral development, and discusses how adoption studies may be used to assess genetic and environmental etiologies of individual differences for important developmental outcomes. Previous CAP research on adjustment outcomes in childhood and adolescence which found significant interactions, including gene-environment interactions, is reviewed. New research suggests mediating effects of menarche and religiosity...

  1. Involving patients in care decisions improves satisfaction: an outcomes-based quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Ellen W

    2004-05-01

    A home care agency used quality improvement processes to improve patient satisfaction survey ratings. The focus was on involving patients in decisions about their care. A multidisciplinary team developed creative strategies to increase staff awareness and enhance customer service skills, which had dramatic results.

  2. Balancing Autonomy Rights and Protection: Children's Involvement in a Child Safety Online Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ost, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Researchers who involve children in their research are faced with the challenge of choosing between differing theoretical approaches which can prioritise children's autonomy rights or their "vulnerability" and their need to be protected. Somewhat confusingly, ethical guidelines seem to reflect a combination of these approaches. Even when…

  3. Summary of case studies presented at the WPDD topical session on stakeholder involvement in decommissioning projects - november 14, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, Doug

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Two case studies were presented on experiences with stakeholder involvement in decommissioning projects. The first paper described the development of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority's (UKAEA) stakeholder involvement activities for the Dounreay Nuclear Reactor Test Establishment. The second paper presented the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory process for decommissioning that includes opportunities for public involvement. The presentation contrasted the stakeholder involvement for two commercial US nuclear power plants (NPPs) that completed decommissioning in 2005, the Trojan NPP and the Maine Yankee NPP. The two case studies highlighted the importance of involving stakeholders in decommissioning projects, and provide important lessons learned. The Dounreay case study demonstrated the UKAEA's determination and commitment to continuously improve its stakeholder engagement program. In 2002, the UKAEA set out to broaden its stakeholder program by improving both public understanding and participation. With regard to public understanding, the UKAEA committed to keep the public informed on decommissioning developments, and ensure that communication was in an understandable form. To improve participation, the UKAEA actively worked to identify and engage stakeholders. The UKAEA then made efforts to involve stakeholders in decision-making activities, including the use of stakeholder panels to discuss and consider options for specific aspects of the Dounreay decommissioning and site restoration plan. In 2004, the UKAEA commissioned an independent review of its stakeholder involvement program to assess the program's effectiveness and benchmark it against best practices. The program was found to be useful, and positive feedback was provided on the use of stakeholder panels and the UKAEA's determination to deliver a broad based and effective stakeholder strategy. Recommendations to UKAEA included involving stakeholders

  4. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain site characterization project: Quality Assurance Project Plan, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stetzenbach, K.J.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to identify and characterize candidate conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for experiments to be conducted at the Yucca Mountain C-well complex. During this quarter the main effort was directed towards rewriting the quality assurance program in preparation for a review and audit by the USGS. However, due to budget constraints the review and audit were not carried out. The tracer QA plan and standard operating procedures (SOPs) were revised and copies are included in the report. Instrumental problems were encountered and corrected with the addition of new integration and sample control software. In the sampling, there was an unexplained peak in the chromatograms of the tracers being tested in the light tuff. This was not correctable and these experiments will be repeated in the next quarter

  5. Revising Translations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kirsten Wølch; Schjoldager, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The paper explains the theoretical background and findings of an empirical study of revision policies, using Denmark as a case in point. After an overview of important definitions, types and parameters, the paper explains the methods and data gathered from a questionnaire survey and an interview...... survey. Results clearly show that most translation companies regard both unilingual and comparative revisions as essential components of professional quality assurance. Data indicate that revision is rarely fully comparative, as the preferred procedure seems to be a unilingual revision followed by a more...... or less comparative rereading. Though questionnaire data seem to indicate that translation companies use linguistic correctness and presentation as the only revision parameters, interview data reveal that textual and communicative aspects are also considered. Generally speaking, revision is not carried...

  6. Summary report of the University of Manchester involvement in the Chemval project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandratillake, M.R.; Newton, G.W.A.; Robinson, V.J.

    1991-01-01

    Chemval is an international geochemical exercise, which aims at applying and validating predictive computer programmes describing the chemistry of radionuclides in the geosphere. As a component of the CEC Mirage project - second phase (on migration of radionuclides in the geosphere), Chemval is carried out in the framework of the third Community R and D programme on radioactive waste management and storage (1985-89). It is jointly funded by the Commission of the European Communities and Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution (UK Department of the Environment)

  7. Summary of flat-plate solar array project documentation: Abstracts of published documents, 1975-1986, revision 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Abstracts of final reports, or the latest quarterly or annual, of the Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project Contractor of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in-house activities are presented. Also presented is a list of proceedings and publications, by author, of work connected with the project. The aim of the program has been to stimulate the development of technology that will enable the private sector to manufacture and widely use photovoltaic systems for the generation of electricity in residential, commercial, industrial, and Government applications at a cost per watt that is competitive with utility generated power. FSA Project activities have included the sponsoring of research and development efforts in silicon refinement processes, advanced silicon sheet growth techniques, higher efficiency solar cells, solar cell/module fabrication processes, encapsulation, module/array engineering and reliability, and economic analyses.

  8. Can the BestGrid Process Improve Stakeholder Involvement in Electricity Transmission Projects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadejda Komendantova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The European Union has set ambitious targets for deployment of renewable energy sources to reach goals of climate change mitigation and energy security policies. However, the current state of electricity transmission infrastructure is a major bottleneck for further scaling up of renewable energy in the EU. Several thousands of kilometers of new lines have to be constructed and upgraded to accommodate growing volumes of intermittent renewable electricity. In many countries, construction of electricity transmission projects has been delayed for several years due to concerns of local stakeholders. The innovative BESTGRID approach, reported here, brings together transmission system operators (TSOs and non-governmental organizations (NGOs to discuss and understand the nature of stakeholder concerns. This paper has three objectives: (1 to understand stakeholder concerns about the deployment of electricity transmission grids in four pilot projects according to five guiding principles: need, transparency, engagement, environment, and impacts on human health as well as benefits; (2 to understand how these principles can be addressed to provide a basis for better decision-making outcomes; and (3 to evaluate the BESTGRID process based on feedback received from stakeholders and the level of participation achieved according to the ladder of Arnstein. This paper goes beyond a discussion of “measures to mitigate opposition” to understand how dialogue between TSOs and the public—represented mainly by NGOs and policy-makers—might lead to a better decision-making process and more sustainable electricity transmission infrastructure deployment.

  9. Parent-adolescent joint projects involving leisure time and activities during the transition to high school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Sheila K; Young, Richard A; Wozniak, Agnieszka; Lollis, Susan; Tilton-Weaver, Lauree; Nelson, Margo; Goessling, Kristen

    2014-10-01

    Leisure research to date has generally overlooked planning and organizing of leisure time and activities between parents and adolescents. This investigation examined how a sample of Canadian adolescents and their parents jointly constructed and acted on goals related to adolescents' leisure time during the move from elementary to high school. Using the Qualitative Action-Project Method, data were collected over an 8-10 month period from 26 parent-adolescent dyads located in two urban sites, through video-taped conversations about leisure time, video recall interviews, and telephone monitoring interviews. Analysis of the data revealed that the joint projects of the 26 dyads could be grouped into three clusters: a) governance transfer or attempts to shift, from parent to adolescent, responsibility over academic demands, organizing leisure time, and safety with peers, b) balancing extra-curricular activities with family life, academics, and social activities, and c) relationship adjustment or maintenance. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project FY 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan WBS No. 1.4.1, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document describes the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project portion of the Hanford Strategic Plan for the Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington. The SNF Project was established to evaluate and integrate the urgent risks associated with N-reactor fuel currently stored at the Hanford site in the K Basins, and to manage the transfer and disposition of other spent nuclear fuels currently stored on the Hanford site. An evaluation of alternatives for the expedited removal of spent fuels from the K Basin area was performed. Based on this study, a Recommended Path Forward for the K Basins was developed and proposed to the U.S. DOE

  11. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project FY 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan WBS No. 1.4.1, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document describes the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project portion of the Hanford Strategic Plan for the Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington. The SNF Project was established to evaluate and integrate the urgent risks associated with N-reactor fuel currently stored at the Hanford site in the K Basins, and to manage the transfer and disposition of other spent nuclear fuels currently stored on the Hanford site. An evaluation of alternatives for the expedited removal of spent fuels from the K Basin area was performed. Based on this study, a Recommended Path Forward for the K Basins was developed and proposed to the U.S. DOE.

  12. Industrial Technology Modernization Program. Project 44. Modernize Facility Equipment and Processes. Volume 2. Revision 2. Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    not be implemented. A change in foreign exchange rates (which increase the equipment cost) and a reduction in marketing forecast resulted in an...project will not be implemented due to unfavorable changes in foreign exchange rates (which increase the equipment costs) and a reduction in market

  13. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    As required by the Romer-Twining Agreement of 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this annual economic impact study for the state of Colorado. This report assesses the economic impacts related to the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in Colorado during the state fiscal year (FY) between 1 July 1994 and 30 June 1995. To estimate net economic benefit, employment, salaries and wages, and other related economic benefits are discussed, quantified, and then compared to the state's 10 percent share of the remedial action costs. Actual data obtained from sites currently undergoing remedial action were used as the basis for analyses. If data were not available, estimates were used to derive economic indicators. This study describes the types of employment associated with the UMTRA Project and estimates of the numbers of people employed by UMTRA Project subcontractors in Colorado during state FY 1995. Employment totals are reported in estimated average annual jobs; however, the actual number of workers at the site fluctuates depending on weather and on the status of remedial action activities. In addition, the actual number of people employed on the Project during the year may be higher than the average annual employment reported due to the temporary nature of some of the jobs

  14. Ethics Review for a Multi-Site Project Involving Tribal Nations in the Northern Plains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angal, Jyoti; Petersen, Julie M; Tobacco, Deborah; Elliott, Amy J

    2016-04-01

    Increasingly, Tribal Nations are forming ethics review panels, which function separately from institutional review boards (IRBs). The emergence of strong community representation coincides with a widespread effort supported by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services and other federal agencies to establish a single IRB for all multi-site research. This article underscores the value of a tribal ethics review board and describes the tribal oversight for the Safe Passage Study-a multi-site, community-based project in the Northern Plains. Our experience demonstrates the benefits of tribal ethics review and makes a strong argument for including tribal oversight in future regulatory guidance for multi-site, community-based research. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off

  16. Revised Rules for Concrete Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Jensen, F. M.; Middleton, C.

    This paper is based on research performed for the Highway Agency, London, UK under the project DPU/9/44 "Revision of Bridge Assessment Rules Based on Whole Life Performance: Concrete Bridges" It contains details of a methodology which can be used to generate Whole Life (WL) reliability profiles....... These WL reliability profiles may be used to establish revised rules for Concrete Bridges....

  17. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado State fiscal year 1994. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994 (1 July 1993 through 30 June 1994). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. Information on wages, taxes, and subcontract expenditures in combination with estimates and economic multipliers is used to estimate the dollar economic benefits to Colorado during the state fiscal year. Finally, the fiscal year 1994 estimates are compared to fiscal year 1993 employment and economic information

  18. Outfall 51 air stripping feasibility study for the Reduction of Mercury in Plant Effluent (RMPE) Project. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Within the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant there are a number of industrial wastewater discharge points or outfalls that empty into East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). EFPC originates within and runs continuously throughout the plant site and subsequently flows out the east end of the Y-12 Plant into the City of Oak Ridge. Mercury is present in outfall discharges due to contact of water with the soils surrounding past mercury-use buildings. As a result, the Reduction of Mercury in Plant Effluent (RMPE) Project was developed to achieve and maintain environmental compliance with regards to mercury, and, in particular with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit for the Y-12 Plant. To achieve a reduction in mercury loading to EFPC, a number of options have already been studied and implemented as part of the RMPE project. With the successful implementation of these options, Outfall 51 remains as a significant contributor to mercury load to EFPC. The primary purpose of this project is to determine the feasibility of removing mercury from contaminated spring water using air stripping. In order to accomplish this goal, a number of different areas were addressed. A pilot-scale unit was tested in the field using actual mercury-contaminated source water. Properties which impact the mercury removal via air stripping were reviewed to determine their effect. Also, enhanced testing was performed to improve removal efficiencies. Finally, the variable outfall flow was studied to size appropriate processing equipment for full-scale treatment

  19. Involving stakeholders in the commissioning and implementation of fishery science projects: experiences from the U.K. Fisheries Science Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, M J; Payne, A I L; Deas, B; Catchpole, T L

    2013-10-01

    Following from similar initiatives worldwide, the U.K.'s Fisheries Science Partnership (FSP) was established in 2003 to provide the fishing industry with opportunities to propose and participate in scientific studies in collaboration with fishery scientists. Key concepts were that most of the available funding would support industry participation, that industry, not scientists, would come up with the ideas for projects, and that commercial fishing vessels and fishing methods would be used to address specific concerns of the fishing industry in a scientifically controlled manner. Nearly 100 projects had been commissioned by March 2012, covering annual time-series surveys of stocks subject to traditional assessment, and ad hoc projects on, e.g. gear selectivity, discard survival, tagging and migration and fishery development. The extent to which the results of the projects have been used by stakeholders, fishery scientists and fishery managers at a national and E.U. level is evaluated, along with the degree of industry interest and involvement, and reasons are identified for successes or failures in the uptake of the results into management and policy. Finally, the question is posed whether the programme has been successful in improving the engagement of the fishing community in the science-management process and in fostering communication and greater trust between fishers, scientists and managers. © 2013 Crown Copyright. © 2013 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  20. Midwifery students experience of teamwork projects involving mark-related peer feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Carolyn R; Fahy, Kathleen M; Parratt, Jenny A; Grace, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    Lack of teamwork skills among health care professionals endangers patients and enables workplace bullying. Individual teamwork skills are increasingly being assessed in the undergraduate health courses but rarely defined, made explicit or taught. To remedy these deficiencies we introduced a longitudinal educational strategy across all three years of the Bachelor of Midwifery program. To report on students' experiences of engaging in team based assignments which involved mark-related peer feedback. Stories of midwifery students' experiences were collected from 17 participants across the three years of the degree. These were transcribed and analysed thematically and interpreted using feminist collaborative conversations. Most participants reported being in well-functioning teams and enjoyed the experience; they spoke of 'we' and said 'Everyone was on Board'. Students in poorly functioning teams spoke of 'I' and 'they'. These students complained about the poor performance of others but they didn't speak up because they 'didn't want to make waves' and they didn't have the skills to be able to confidently manage conflict. All participants agreed 'Peer-related marks cause mayhem'. Teamwork skills should be specifically taught and assessed. These skills take time to develop. Students, therefore, should be engaged in a teamwork assignment in each semester of the entire program. Peer feedback should be moderated by the teacher and not directly related to marks. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sum rules and other properties involving resonance projection operators. [for optical potential description of electron scattering from atoms and ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, A.; Temkin, A.

    1985-01-01

    A sum rule is derived for the auxiliary eigenvalues of an equation whose eigenspectrum pertains to projection operators which describe electron scattering from multielectron atoms and ions. The sum rule's right-hand side depends on an integral involving the target system eigenfunctions. The sum rule is checked for several approximations of the two-electron target. It is shown that target functions which have a unit eigenvalue in their auxiliary eigenspectrum do not give rise to well-defined projection operators except through a limiting process. For Hylleraas target approximations, the auxiliary equations are shown to contain an infinite spectrum. However, using a Rayleigh-Ritz variational principle, it is shown that a comparatively simple aproximation can exhaust the sum rule to better than five significant figures. The auxiliary Hylleraas equation is greatly simplified by conversion to a square root equation containing the same eigenfunction spectrum and from which the required eigenvalues are trivially recovered by squaring.

  2. UAS Integration in the NAS Project: Integrated Test and Evaluation (IT&E) Flight Test 3. Revision E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The desire and ability to fly Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS) is of increasing urgency. The application of unmanned aircraft to perform national security, defense, scientific, and emergency management are driving the critical need for less restrictive access by UAS to the NAS. UAS represent a new capability that will provide a variety of services in the government (public) and commercial (civil) aviation sectors. The growth of this potential industry has not yet been realized due to the lack of a common understanding of what is required to safely operate UAS in the NAS. NASA's UAS Integration into the NAS Project is conducting research in the areas of Separation Assurance/Sense and Avoid Interoperability, Human Systems Integration (HSI), and Communication to support reducing the barriers of UAS access to the NAS. This research is broken into two research themes namely, UAS Integration and Test Infrastructure. UAS Integration focuses on airspace integration procedures and performance standards to enable UAS integration in the air transportation system, covering Sense and Avoid (SAA) performance standards, command and control performance standards, and human systems integration. The focus of Test Infrastructure is to enable development and validation of airspace integration procedures and performance standards, including the integrated test and evaluation. In support of the integrated test and evaluation efforts, the Project will develop an adaptable, scalable, and schedulable relevant test environment capable of evaluating concepts and technologies for unmanned aircraft systems to safely operate in the NAS. To accomplish this task, the Project will conduct a series of Human-in-the-Loop and Flight Test activities that integrate key concepts, technologies and/or procedures in a relevant air traffic environment. Each of the integrated events will build on the technical achievements, fidelity and complexity of the previous tests and

  3. Integrated data base for 1993: US spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. Revision 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J.A.; Storch, S.N.; Ashline, R.C. [and others

    1994-03-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and DOE spent fuel; also, commercial and U.S. government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1992. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest U.S. Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration (DOE/EIA) projections of U.S. commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional (I/I) activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste (HLW), transuranic (TRU), waste, low-level waste (LLW), commercial uranium mill tailings, environmental restoration wastes, commercial reactor and fuel-cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) LLW. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the calendar-year (CY) 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal.

  4. Integrated Data Base report--1993: U.S. spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. Revision 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and DOE spent nuclear fuel; also, commercial and US government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1993. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest US Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration projections of US commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program wastes, commercial reactor and fuel-cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given the calendar-year 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal. 256 refs., 38 figs., 141 tabs.

  5. Comment and response document for the UMTRA Project vitro processing site completion report Salt Lake City, Utah. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This Comment and Response Document is a series of UMTRA document review forms regarding the UMTRA Project Vitro Processing Site Completion Report for Salt Lake City, Utah in March, 1995. The completion report provides evidence that the final Salt Lake City, Utah, processing site property conditions are in accordance with the approved design and that all U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards have been satisfied. Included as appendices to support the stated conclusions are the record drawings; a summary of grid test results; contract specifications and construction drawings, the EPA standards (40 CFR Part 192); the audit, inspection, and surveillance summary; the permit information; and project photographs. The principal objective of the remedial action at Salt Lake City is to remove the tailings from the processing site, render the site free of contamination to EPA standards, and restore the site to the final design grade elevations. Each section is evaluated in detail to check all aspects of above report, especially the inclusion of adequate verification data. Each review form contains a section entitled State of Utah Response and Action, which is an explanation or correction of DOE criticisms of the report

  6. Transferability of Data Related to the Underground Test Area Project, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2004-06-24

    This document is the collaborative effort of the members of an ad hoc subcommittee of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Technical Working Group (TWG). The UGTA Project relies on data from a variety of sources; therefore, a process is needed to identify relevant factors for determining whether material-property data collected from other areas can be used to support groundwater flow, radionuclide transport, and other models within a Corrective Action Unit (CAU), and for documenting the data transfer decision and process. This document describes the overall data transfer process. Separate Parameter Descriptions will be prepared that provide information for selected specific parameters as determined by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) UGTA Project Manager. This document and its accompanying appendices do not provide the specific criteria to be used for transfer of data for specific uses. Rather, the criteria will be established by separate parameter-specific and model-specific Data Transfer Protocols. The CAU Data Documentation Packages and data analysis reports will apply the protocols and provide or reference a document with the data transfer evaluations and decisions.

  7. Integrated Data Base report--1993: U.S. spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. Revision 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and DOE spent nuclear fuel; also, commercial and US government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1993. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest US Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration projections of US commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program wastes, commercial reactor and fuel-cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given the calendar-year 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal. 256 refs., 38 figs., 141 tabs

  8. Integrated Data Base for 1992: US spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. Revision 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payton, M. L.; Williams, J. T.; Tolbert-Smith, M.; Klein, J. A.

    1992-10-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled current data on inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuel and both commercial and US government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1991. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest US Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration (DOE/EIA) projections of US commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional (I/I) activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, environmental restoration wastes, commercial reactor and fuel cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal.

  9. Computer system design description for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1). Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truitt, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides descriptions of components and tasks that are involved in the computer system for the data acquisition and control of the mitigation tests conducted on waste tank SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The system was designed and implemented by Los alamos National Laboratory and supplied to Westinghouse Hanford Company. The computers (both personal computers and specialized data-taking computers) and the software programs of the system will hereafter collectively be referred to as the DACS (Data Acquisition and Control System)

  10. 7 CFR 3015.115 - Budget revisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Budget revisions. 3015.115 Section 3015.115..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE UNIFORM FEDERAL ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS Programmatic Changes and Budget Revisions § 3015.115 Budget revisions. (a) Nonconstruction projects. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of...

  11. The Asian Development Bank's past and future involvement in financing gas projects in developing member countries of the Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chua, S.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the Bank's involvement in financing gas projects in its developing member countries (DMC's). The paper highlights the scope of the Bank's past activities in the sector, the DMC's which had received assistance from the Bank, the types of projects financed by the Bank, the benefits expected to be derived from the projects, and the past problems encountered by the Bank. The operational framework under which past Bank lending to the gas sector was conducted is also described. The prospects of natural gas playing a prominent role as an environmentally preferred energy source to oil and coal are outlined. Indications of the direction of the Bank's future efforts to help its gas-resource-rich as well as its gas-resource-poor DMC's to quicken the use of natural gas are given. While emphasizing the Bank's contributions in helping its DMC's to increase gas supply to alleviate energy shortages, the paper stresses the important role the Bank has played and will play in institution-building and sector-development work. The paper explores the possibility for the Bank to expand its operations in the gas sector which will lead to the efficient and accelerated development of a clean energy source that will help its DMC's avoid a third oil crisis and reduce the damaging build-up of a greenhouse gas which now threatens to harm the global environment

  12. Degradation mode survey candidate titanium-base alloys for Yucca Mountain project waste package materials. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gdowski, G.E.

    1997-12-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) is evaluating materials from which to fabricate high-level nuclear waste containers (hereafter called waste packages) for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Because of their very good corrosion resistance in aqueous environments titanium alloys are considered for container materials. Consideration of titanium alloys is understandable since about one-third (in 1978) of all titanium produced is used in applications where corrosion resistance is of primary importance. Consequently, there is a considerable amount of data which demonstrates that titanium alloys, in general, but particularly the commercial purity and dilute {alpha} grades, are highly corrosion resistant. This report will discuss the corrosion characteristics of Ti Gr 2, 7, 12, and 16. The more highly alloyed titanium alloys which were developed by adding a small Pd content to higher strength Ti alloys in order to give them better corrosion resistance will not be considered in this report. These alloys are all two phase ({alpha} and {beta}) alloys. The palladium addition while making these alloys more corrosion resistant does not give them the corrosion resistance of the single phase {alpha} and near-{alpha} (Ti Gr 12) alloys.

  13. Groundwater screening evaluation/monitoring plan: 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (Project W-049H). Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, D.B.; Davis, J.D.; Collard, L.B.; Freeman, P.B.; Chou, C.J.

    1995-05-01

    This report consists of the groundwater screening evaluation required by Section S.8 of the State Waste Discharge Permit for the 200 Area TEDF. Chapter 1.0 describes the purpose of the groundwater monitoring plan. The information in Chapter 2.0 establishes a water quality baseline for the facility and is the groundwater screening evaluation. The following information is included in Chapter 2.0: Facility description;Well locations, construction, and development data; Geologic and hydrologic description of the site and affected area; Ambient groundwater quality and current use; Water balance information; Hydrologic parameters; Potentiometric map, hydraulic gradients, and flow velocities; Results of infiltration and hydraulic tests; Groundwater and soils chemistry sampling and analysis data; Statistical evaluation of groundwater background data; and Projected effects of facility operation on groundwater flow and water quality. Chapter 3.0 defines, based on the information in Chapter 2.0, how effects of the TEDF on the environment will be evaluated and how compliance with groundwater quality standards will be documented in accordance with the terms and conditions of the permit. Chapter 3.0 contains the following information: Media to be monitored; Wells proposed as the point of compliance in the uppermost aquifer; Basis for monitoring well network and evidence of monitoring adequacy; Contingency planning approach for vadose zone monitoring wells; Which field parameters will be measured and how measurements will be made; Specification of constituents to be sampled and analyzed; and Specification of the sampling and analysis procedures that will be used. Chapter 4.0 provides information on how the monitoring results will be reported and the proposed frequency of monitoring and reporting. Chapter 5.0 lists all the references cited in this monitoring plan. These references should be consulted for additional or more detailed information

  14. A taxonomic revision of the genus Podocarpus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laubenfels, de D.J.

    1985-01-01

    In connection with the forthcoming revision of the Coniferae for the Flora Malesiana, the author thought it necessary to revise the genus Podocarpus. Although this genus has a substantial representation in Malesia (30 species), the revision is too involved to be appropriate with the Flora Malesiana

  15. A Blended Learning Approach to Teaching Project Management: A Model for Active Participation and Involvement: Insights from Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassam A. Hussein

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper demonstrates and evaluates the effectiveness of a blended learning approach to create a meaningful learning environment. We use the term blended learning approach in this paper to refer to the use of multiple or hybrid instructional methods that emphasize the role of learners as contributors to the learning process rather than recipients of learning. Contribution to learning is attained by using in class gaming as pathways that ensure active involvement of learners. Using a blended learning approach is important in order to be able to address different learning styles of the target group. The approach was also important in order to be able to demonstrate different types of challenges, issues and competences needed in project management. Student evaluations of the course confirmed that the use of multiple learning methods and, in particular, in class gaming was beneficial and contributed to a meaningful learning experience.

  16. Department of Physics' Involvement of the Impact Testing Project of the High Speed Civil Transport Program (HSCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    VonMeerwall, Ernst D.

    1994-01-01

    The project involved the impact testing of a kevlar-like woven polymer material, PBO. The purpose was to determine whether this material showed any promise as a lightweight replacement material for jet engine fan containment. The currently used metal fan containment designs carry a high drag penalty due to their weight. Projectiles were fired at samples of PBO by means of a 0.5 inch diameter Helium powered gun. The Initial plan was to encase the samples inside a purpose-built steel "hot box" for heating and ricochet containment. The research associate's responsibility was to develop the data acquisition programs and techniques necessary to determine accurately the impacting projectile's velocity. Beyond this, the Research Associate's duties include any physical computations, experimental design, and data analysis necessary.

  17. Potential Involvement of Draxin in the Axonal Projection of Cranial Nerves, Especially Cranial Nerve X, in the Chick Hindbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sanbing; Cui, Huixian; Wang, Lei; Kang, Lin; Huang, Guannan; Du, Juan; Li, Sha; Tanaka, Hideaki; Su, Yuhong

    2016-07-01

    The appropriate projection of axons within the nervous system is a crucial component of the establishment of neural circuitry. Draxin is a repulsive axon guidance protein. Draxin has important functions in the guidance of three commissures in the central nervous system and in the migration of neural crest cells and dI3 interneurons in the chick spinal cord. Here, we report that the distribution of the draxin protein and the location of 23C10-positive areas have a strong temporal and spatial correlation. The overexpression of draxin, especially transmembrane draxin, caused 23C10-positive axon bundles to misproject in the dorsal hindbrain. In addition, the overexpression of transmembrane draxin caused abnormal formation of the ganglion crest of the IX and X cranial nerves, misprojection of some anti-human natural killer-1 (HNK-1)-stained structures in the dorsal roof of the hindbrain, and a simultaneous reduction in the efferent nerves of some motoneuron axons inside the hindbrain. Our data reveal that draxin might be involved in the fascicular projection of cranial nerves in the hindbrain. © 2016 The Histochemical Society.

  18. Public Values and Stakeholder Involvement - A new framework for Performance Assessment? The European Project RISCOM-II. Work Package 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Kjell [Karinta-Konsult, Taeby (Sweden); Chataignier, Stephane [Electricite de France (France); Drottz-Sjoeberg, Britt-Marie [BMD Research (Sweden)] [and others

    2002-11-01

    RISCOM-II is a project within the fifth framework programme of the European Commission. It is based on a widely recognised need for more transparent decision processes in nuclear waste management. The objective of the RISCOM-II project is to share the knowledge of the context of radioactive waste management in various European countries and to see to what extent it is possible to apply more widely the RISCOM Model in order to improve the acceptability of radioactive waste management. Thus, the project aims to promote the development of processes involving transparency, as well as means involving greater participation of the public. Key topics studied in the RISCOM-II Project are issues in risk assessment to better understand how factual elements relate to value-laden issues and how stakeholder concerns can be addressed, as well as organizational issues affecting transparency in Europe. A range of public participation processes are analysed, some will be selected for testing and hearings are evaluated with respect to transparency. There are five participating countries: Sweden, the United Kingdom, Finland, the Czech Republic, and France, which are represented by various organizations: safety or radiation protection authorities, operators involved in nuclear wastes and the production of nuclear power, research institutes or organizations, and consultants. Work Package No 1(WP-1), Public values and performance assessment, emphasises the importance of value-laden issues involved in nuclear waste management. The expert dominance in the field has so far tended to avoid values or deal with them in seemingly factual frameworks. The objectives of (WP-1) are thus: 1. to identify value-laden issues raised by performance assessment, trying to understand how factual and technical elements relate to value-laden issues 2. to find value judgements of stakeholders, and explore if and how they could be addressed in performance assessment 3. to initiate open debate about risk and

  19. Public Values and Stakeholder Involvement - A new framework for Performance Assessment? The European Project RISCOM-II. Work Package 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Kjell; Chataignier, Stephane; Drottz-Sjoeberg, Britt-Marie

    2002-11-01

    RISCOM-II is a project within the fifth framework programme of the European Commission. It is based on a widely recognised need for more transparent decision processes in nuclear waste management. The objective of the RISCOM-II project is to share the knowledge of the context of radioactive waste management in various European countries and to see to what extent it is possible to apply more widely the RISCOM Model in order to improve the acceptability of radioactive waste management. Thus, the project aims to promote the development of processes involving transparency, as well as means involving greater participation of the public. Key topics studied in the RISCOM-II Project are issues in risk assessment to better understand how factual elements relate to value-laden issues and how stakeholder concerns can be addressed, as well as organizational issues affecting transparency in Europe. A range of public participation processes are analysed, some will be selected for testing and hearings are evaluated with respect to transparency. There are five participating countries: Sweden, the United Kingdom, Finland, the Czech Republic, and France, which are represented by various organizations: safety or radiation protection authorities, operators involved in nuclear wastes and the production of nuclear power, research institutes or organizations, and consultants. Work Package No 1(WP-1), Public values and performance assessment, emphasises the importance of value-laden issues involved in nuclear waste management. The expert dominance in the field has so far tended to avoid values or deal with them in seemingly factual frameworks. The objectives of (WP-1) are thus: 1. to identify value-laden issues raised by performance assessment, trying to understand how factual and technical elements relate to value-laden issues 2. to find value judgements of stakeholders, and explore if and how they could be addressed in performance assessment 3. to initiate open debate about risk and

  20. The Cedar Project: resilience in the face of HIV vulnerability within a cohort study involving young Indigenous people who use drugs in three Canadian cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Margo E; Jongbloed, Kate A; Richardson, Chris G; Henderson, Earl W; Pooyak, Sherri D; Oviedo-Joekes, Eugenia; Christian, Wunuxtsin M; Schechter, Martin T; Spittal, Patricia M

    2015-10-29

    Indigenous scholars have long argued that it is critical for researchers to identify factors related to cultural connectedness that may protect against HIV and hepatitis C infection and buffer the effects of historical and lifetime trauma among young Indigenous peoples. To our knowledge, no previous epidemiological studies have explored the effect of historical and lifetime traumas, cultural connectedness, and risk factors on resilience among young, urban Indigenous people who use drugs. This study explored risk and protective factors associated with resilience among participants of the Cedar Project, a cohort study involving young Indigenous peoples who use illicit drugs in three cities in British Columbia, Canada. We utilized the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale to measure resilience, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire to measure childhood maltreatment, and the Symptom-Checklist 90-Revised to measure psychological distress among study participants. Multivariate linear mixed effects models (LME) estimated the effect of study variables on mean change in resilience scores between 2011-2012. Among 191 participants, 92 % had experienced any form of childhood maltreatment, 48 % had a parent who attended residential school, and 71 % had been in foster care. The overall mean resilience score was 62.04, with no differences between the young men and women (p = 0.871). Adjusted factors associated with higher mean resilience scores included having grown up in a family that often/always lived by traditional culture (B = 7.70, p = 0.004) and had often/always spoken their traditional language at home (B = 10.52, p resilience scores. Adjusted factors associated with diminished mean resilience scores included severe childhood emotional neglect (B = -13.34, p = 0.001), smoking crack daily (B = -5.42, p = 0.044), having been sexual assaulted (B =  14.42, p = 0.041), and blackout drinking (B = -6.19, p = 0.027). Young people in this study have faced multiple complex challenges to

  1. Definitive design report: Design report project W-025, Radioactive Mixed Waste (RMW) Land Disposal Facility NON-DRAG-OFF. Revision 1, Volume 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roscha, V.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the definitive design of the Radioactive Mixed Waste (RMW) Non-Drag-Off disposal facility, Project W-025. This report presents a n of the major landfill design features and a discussion of how each of the criteria is addressed in the design. The appendices include laboratory test results, design drawings, and individual analyses that were conducted in support of the design. Revision 1 of this document incorporates design changes resulting from an increase in the required operating life of the W-025 landfill from 2 to 20 years. The rationale for these design changes is described in Golder Associates Inc. 1991a. These changes include (1) adding a 1.5-foot-thick layer of compacted admix directory-under the primary FML on the floor of the landfill to mitigate the effects of possible stress cracking in the primary flexible membrane liner (FML), and (2) increasing the operations layer thickness from two to three feet over the entire landfill area, to provide additional protection for the secondary admix layer against mechanical damage and the effects of freezing and desiccation. The design of the W-025 Landfill has also been modified in response to the results of the EPA Method 9090 chemical compatibility testing program (Golder Associates Inc. 1991b and 1991c), which was completed after the original design was prepared. This program consisted of testing geosynthetic materials and soil/bentonite admix with synthetic leachate having the composition expected during the life of the W-025 Landfill., The results of this program indicated that the polyester geotextile originally specified for the landfill might be susceptible to deterioration. On this basis, polypropylene geotextiles were substituted as a more chemically-resistant alternative. In addition, the percentage of bentonite in the admix was increased to provide sufficiently low permeability to the expected leachate

  2. Managing the Challenges of Leadership in ERP Implementations: An Exploratory Study of the Leadership Challenges Encountered by Project Managers Involved in ERP Implementation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanjagi, James K.

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, organizations are conducting more Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) projects in order to promote organizational efficiencies. Meanwhile, minimal research has been conducted on the leadership challenges faced by project managers during the ERP project implementations and how these challenges are managed. The existing project…

  3. Efficacy of a group-based multimedia HIV prevention intervention for drug-involved women under community supervision: project WORTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bassel, Nabila; Gilbert, Louisa; Goddard-Eckrich, Dawn; Chang, Mingway; Wu, Elwin; Hunt, Tim; Epperson, Matt; Shaw, Stacey A; Rowe, Jessica; Almonte, Maria; Witte, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This study is designed to address the need for evidence-based HIV/STI prevention approaches for drug-involved women under criminal justice community supervision. We tested the efficacy of a group-based traditional and multimedia HIV/STI prevention intervention (Project WORTH: Women on the Road to Health) among drug-involved women under community supervision. We randomized 306 women recruited from community supervision settings to receive either: (1) a four-session traditional group-based HIV/STI prevention intervention (traditional WORTH); (2) a four-session multimedia group-based HIV/STI prevention intervention that covered the same content as traditional WORTH but was delivered in a computerized format; or (3) a four-session group-based Wellness Promotion intervention that served as an attention control condition. The study examined whether the traditional or multimedia WORTH intervention was more efficacious in reducing risks when compared to Wellness Promotion; and whether multimedia WORTH was more efficacious in reducing risks when compared to traditional WORTH. Primary outcomes were assessed over the 12-month post-intervention period and included the number of unprotected sex acts, the proportion of protected sex acts, and consistent condom use. At baseline, 77% of participants reported unprotected vaginal or anal sex (n = 237) and 63% (n = 194) had multiple sex partners. Women assigned to traditional or multimedia WORTH were significantly more likely than women assigned to the control condition to report an increase in the proportion of protected sex acts (β = 0.10; 95% CI = 0.02-0.18) and a decrease in the number of unprotected sex acts (IRR = 0.72; 95% CI = 0.57-0.90). The promising effects of traditional and multimedia WORTH on increasing condom use and high participation rates suggest that WORTH may be scaled up to redress the concentrated epidemics of HIV/STIs among drug-involved women in the criminal justice system. Clinical

  4. Revising Lecture Notes: How Revision, Pauses, and Partners Affect Note Taking and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Linlin; Kiewra, Kenneth A.; Samuelson, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    Note taking has been categorized as a two-stage process: the recording of notes and the review of notes. We contend that note taking might best involve a three-stage process where the missing stage is revision. This study investigated the benefits of revising lecture notes and addressed two questions: First, is revision more effective than…

  5. The Effect of Technical Assistance on Involvement and Use: The Case of a Research, Evaluation, and Technical Assistance Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseland, Denise; Volkov, Boris B.; Callow-Heusser, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to typical National Science Foundation program evaluations, the Utah State Math Science Partnership-Research, Evaluation and Technical Assistance Project (MSP-RETA) provided technical assistance (TA) in two forms: direct TA for up to 10 projects a year, and professional development sessions for a larger number of project staff. Not…

  6. Summary of stakeholder engagement session of WPDD topical session on stakeholder involvement in decommissioning projects - November 14, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, Steve

    2006-01-01

    as important as technical rigour in these documents. The Italian presentation mentioned setting up a bilateral agreement on monitoring with local authorities. This seems like a step in the right direction, but the FSC would recommend far more than that to build public confidence. Today the public expects to be directly involved in decision making on major issues that affect them, not just via elected representatives. As I mentioned in my presentation on the situation in the UK, it is also important not to raise unrealistic expectations of how much the public can influence our decisions. In much UK legislation, decisions can only be made on a strictly technical basis and the opportunity for public influence is very limited. The presentation by EDF highlighted another vital requirement for successful stakeholder engagement. That is a disciplined, project based approach within the leading organizations. If stakeholder engagement is not meticulously planned it will flat on its face, as people will be given different messages at different times. So it is very important that this disciplined approach includes both local and national players to ensure consistency. Finally, the presentation from Germany mentioned the stepwise approach to decision making. This is very much in line with FSC recommendations. It is important that stakeholders are involved right from the start of the process, and not just in the final site selection stage. The steps involved in reaching a decision must be transparent and the opportunity for stakeholder involvement in each one needs to be clear. If the legal and procedural framework incorporate this stepwise approach explicitly it is a great help for stakeholder participation

  7. The involvement of student teachers in the development of language learning tasks. Lessons from the ETALAGE project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koet, T.; Žogla, I.; Rutka, L.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper I report a small experiment about the involvement of student teachers as well as experienced professionals in the development of language learning tasks. I argue that involving student teachers as well as experienced professionals may yield better results than involving experienced

  8. A Collaborative Approach to Defining the Usefulness of Impact: Lessons from a Knowledge Exchange Project Involving Academics and Social Work Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Heather; Gallagher, Michael; Smith, Mark

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a knowledge exchange project involving academics and practitioners in six local authority social work departments. It contributes to recent debates about the coproduction of knowledge, presenting findings in three key areas: the importance of relationships for knowledge exchange; "what works" for practitioners…

  9. The realization of three special photovoltaic (PV) pilot projects. The roles and learning experiences of parties involved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geuzendam, C.; Van Mierlo, B.

    1995-11-01

    Experiences with the following three demonstration projects, carried out in the Netherlands, are inventorized and evaluated: (1) 16 private grid-connected PV-systems in existing houses within the framework of the project of the Organization for Renewable Energy (ODE, abbreviated in Dutch); (2) five private grid-connected roof-integrated PV-systems in renovated buildings in Leiden; and (3) the integration of PV in an acoustic baffle along the high-way A-27 near De Bilt. Attention is paid to the decision making processes, the most important actors, the management of the projects and what is learned from the experiences

  10. A taxonomic revision of the genus Podocarpus

    OpenAIRE

    Laubenfels, de, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    In connection with the forthcoming revision of the Coniferae for the Flora Malesiana, the author thought it necessary to revise the genus Podocarpus. Although this genus has a substantial representation in Malesia (30 species), the revision is too involved to be appropriate with the Flora Malesiana per se. One new subgenus and 17 new sections are described, and 94 species are enumerated, of which 11 species and 1 variety are described as new, and 3 varieties have been raised to specific rank....

  11. Determining a Consistent Set of Accounting and Financial Reporting Standards : A Research Note Based on the IASB-FASB Conceptual Framework Revision Project

    OpenAIRE

    Le Manh-Béna, Anne; Ramond, Olivier,

    2011-01-01

    Following the debate on the Conceptual Framework revision undertaken by the IASB and the FASB, this paper discusses three major concerns about the way financial reporting standards should be determined: (1) What is the role a Conceptual Framework?; (2) For whom and for which needs are accounting and financial reporting standards made?; and (3) What information set should financial reporting provide? We show that the perceived need of a Framework has resulted in practice in weak usefulness We ...

  12. Methodology for the selection of routes for international cross-border line projects involving multiple objectives and decision-makers in the analyses of restrictions and environmental possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angel S, Enrique; Cadena, Luis Fernando

    2005-01-01

    A scheme was developed and applied to select the optimum environmental route for international cross-border line projects, in a decision making context involving multiple objectives and multiple decision-makers, the project studied was the electricity interconnection for central America (SIEPAC) for which a prospective assessment was carried out regarding the restrictions and possibilities in the light of the Colombian environmental dimensions management model. The methodology proposed followed these stages: Definition and approval of the structure of environmental restriction and criticality variables, sectorization and selection of complex sections, definition of decision-makers for multi-objective analysis; design and application of consultation tool; definition and modeling of options applying SIG; sensitivity analysis of alternative routes and project's environment management. Different options were identified for insertion and permanence of the project according to the criteria of various interest groups and actors consulted: environmental authorities, electricity companies, scientific community and civil society

  13. Patient Involvement in Geriatric Care – Results and Experiences from a Mixed Models Design Study within Project INTEGRATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joern Kiselev

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient involvement is a core component of an integrated care approach. While the benefits and prerequisites of patient involvement have been described in general and additionally for some target populations, little is known about the views and experiences of older people regarding this matter. Methods: A study with a mixed-methods design was conducted to gain a better understanding about patient involvement in geriatric care. A questionnaire on shared decision-making was administered within a group of older adults in Germany. Additionally, 7 focus groups with health professionals and geriatric patients in Germany and Estonia were held to deepen the insight of the questionnaire and discussing experiences and barriers of patient involvement. Results: Older people without an actual medical problem expressed a significantly higher desire to participate in shared decisions than those requiring actual medical care. No significant differences could be found for the desire to be informed as part of the care process. No correlation between patients’ desire and experiences on shared decision-making could be observed. In the focus groups, patients demanded a comprehensive and understandable information and education process while the health professionals’ view was very task-specific. This conflict led to a loss of trust by the patients. Conclusions: There is a gap between patients’ and health professionals’ views on patient involvement in older people. The involvement process should therefore be comprehensive and should take into account different levels of health literacy.

  14. Involvement of Individuals in the Development of Technical Solutions and Rules of Management for Building Renovation Projects: A Case Study of Latvia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukite, I.; Grekis, A.; Geipele, I.; Zeltins, N.

    2017-08-01

    In March 2016, the Latvian government approved a new support program for increasing energy efficiency in residential apartment buildings. For the support of renovation of apartment buildings in the period from 2016 to 2023, 166 470 588 EUR will be available. Different persons, such as energy auditors, designers, architects, project managers and builders, will be involved in the process of planning, development and implementation of building renovation. At the development stage of the building renovation project, special attention should be devoted to the first stage - energy audit and technical project development. The problem arises due to the fact that each of these individuals, during the development of technical building documentation, does not work as a completely unified system. The implementation of construction project planning and organisational management system is one of the most important factors to guarantee that the quality of building renovation project is ensured in accordance with the laws and regulatory standards. The paper studies mutual cooperation, professionalism and the role of information feedback of personnel involved in the planning stage of building renovation, which is an essential prerequisite for the renovation process in order to achieve high quality of work and reduce the energy performance indicator. The present research includes the analysis of different technical solutions and their impact on energy efficiency. Mutual harmonisation of technical specifications is also investigated.

  15. Health Advocacy Project: Evaluating the Benefits of Service Learning to Nursing Students and Low Income Individuals Involved in a Community-Based Mental Health Promotion Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels-Dennis, Joan; Xia, Liudi; Secord, Sandra; Raiger, Amelia

    2016-10-08

    Poverty, along with other factors such as unemployment, work and life stressors, interpersonal violence, and lack of access to high quality health and/or social services all play a role in determining who develops a mental illness and for whom those symptoms persist or worsen. Senior nursing student preparing to enter the field and working in a service learning capacity may be able to influence early recovery and symptom abatement among those most vulnerable to mental illness. A consortium of community stakeholders and researchers collaboratively designed a 10-week mental health promotion project called the Health Advocacy Project (HAP). The project combines case management and system navigation support delivered by trained and highly supervised nursing students to individuals experiencing major depressive disorder (MDD) and/or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this article, we present the findings of a qualitative fidelity evaluation that examines the effectiveness of nursing students in delivering the health advocacy intervention at the level and with the intensity originally intended. The findings demonstrate how the services of senior nursing students may be optimized to benefit our healthcare system and populations most at risk for developing MDD and PTSD.

  16. Focus groups as a tool to collect data in a community informatics project involving elderly rural women

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smith, R

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the extended project is to identify and investigate the aspects that will encourage elderly women in rural areas to use the ICT platform, and to determine what the physical design, content and applications should look like...

  17. Study of Bilingual-Bicultural Projects Involving Native American, Indo-European, Asian and Pacific Language Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiste, Marie A.; And Others

    This is the final report of one of three studies in an overall project entitled "Evaluation of Bilingual Education Programs." This study was sponsored in response to a need for more information regarding bilingual-bicultural education for other than Spanish language groups. The study's objectives were to: (1) identify the major issues…

  18. Campus Community Involvement in an Experimental Food Research Project Increases Students' Motivation and Improves Perceived Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, K.; Bianco-Simeral, S.

    2009-01-01

    Although the effects of pedagogical strategies using collaborative learning on students' perceived learning outcomes have been studied, little has been examined about possible benefits and challenges in collaborating with the campus community in a food science research project conducted by nutrition majors. We examined the effects of involving…

  19. HEDR modeling approach: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipler, D.B.; Napier, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    This report is a revision of the previous Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project modeling approach report. This revised report describes the methods used in performing scoping studies and estimating final radiation doses to real and representative individuals who lived in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. The scoping studies and dose estimates pertain to various environmental pathways during various periods of time. The original report discussed the concepts under consideration in 1991. The methods for estimating dose have been refined as understanding of existing data, the scope of pathways, and the magnitudes of dose estimates were evaluated through scoping studies

  20. Identification of retinal ganglion cells and their projections involved in central transmission of information about upward and downward image motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Yonehara

    Full Text Available The direction of image motion is coded by direction-selective (DS ganglion cells in the retina. Particularly, the ON DS ganglion cells project their axons specifically to terminal nuclei of the accessory optic system (AOS responsible for optokinetic reflex (OKR. We recently generated a knock-in mouse in which SPIG1 (SPARC-related protein containing immunoglobulin domains 1-expressing cells are visualized with GFP, and found that retinal ganglion cells projecting to the medial terminal nucleus (MTN, the principal nucleus of the AOS, are comprised of SPIG1+ and SPIG1(- ganglion cells distributed in distinct mosaic patterns in the retina. Here we examined light responses of these two subtypes of MTN-projecting cells by targeted electrophysiological recordings. SPIG1+ and SPIG1(- ganglion cells respond preferentially to upward motion and downward motion, respectively, in the visual field. The direction selectivity of SPIG1+ ganglion cells develops normally in dark-reared mice. The MTN neurons are activated by optokinetic stimuli only of the vertical motion as shown by Fos expression analysis. Combination of genetic labeling and conventional retrograde labeling revealed that axons of SPIG1+ and SPIG1(- ganglion cells project to the MTN via different pathways. The axon terminals of the two subtypes are organized into discrete clusters in the MTN. These results suggest that information about upward and downward image motion transmitted by distinct ON DS cells is separately processed in the MTN, if not independently. Our findings provide insights into the neural mechanisms of OKR, how information about the direction of image motion is deciphered by the AOS.

  1. EU-level competence development projects in agri-food-environment: the involvement of sectoral social partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose - The European Commission and social partner organisations at EU level encourage the lifelong development of qualifications and competence. This is reflected in many policy reports and reviews. This paper seeks to show the involvement of social partner organisations at the level of EU-funded

  2. Soil organic carbon stocks under native vegetation - revised estimates for use with the simple assessment option of the Carbon Benefits Project system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batjes, N.H.

    2011-01-01

    The Carbon Benefits Project (CBP) is developing a standardized system for sustainable land management projects to measure, model and report changes in carbon stocks and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for use at varying scales. A global framework of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks under native

  3. [Drug use and involvement in risky driving styles in a sample of university students. The uniHcos project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Mejías, Eladio; Medina-García, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Ruiz, Virginia; Pulido-Manzanero, José; Fernández-Villa, Tania

    2015-09-01

    Drug and alcohol use are known to increase the risk of traffic accidents, especially among youth. However, the association between habitual drug use and the adoption of risky driving behavior is not well known. The aim of this study was to identify and quantify the association between habitual drug use and involvement in risky driving practices overall and by gender among university students. A cross sectional study was conducted. The study population was composed of 559 car drivers younger than 31 years who completed an online questionnaire during the 2011-2012 academic year. Among other factors, the questionnaire assessed the following items: habitual drug consumption (20 or more days) during the last year and involvement in other risky driving practices during the last month. A total of 27.7% of students reported they had used drugs regularly during the last year. Drug use was associated with a higher frequency of involvement in risky driving practices. In men, the factors most strongly associated with drug consumption were speeding, driving under influence of alcohol, and feeling drowsy while driving. In women, drug consumption was mainly associated with smoking while driving, drunk driving, and driving without rest. The results of our study support the hypothesis that habitual drug use is associated with an increased frequency of risky driving behavior. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. topics revised

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chantel

    ment of episodes involving drug overdose ... adults present special difficulties and any ... cal dependence, underlying pathology or ... taking a benzodiazepine regularly. .... Note: Over-treatment with atropine may induce atropine poisoning ..... appropriate dose should be used in order to prevent violent withdrawal symptoms.

  5. Projectables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Troels A.; Merritt, Timothy R.

    2017-01-01

    CNC cutting machines have become essential tools for designers and architects enabling rapid prototyping, model-building and production of high quality components. Designers often cut from new materials, discarding the irregularly shaped remains. We introduce ProjecTables, a visual augmented...... reality system for interactive packing of model parts onto sheet materials. ProjecTables enables designers to (re)use scrap materials for CNC cutting that would have been previously thrown away, at the same time supporting aesthetic choices related to wood grain, avoiding surface blemishes, and other...... relevant material properties. We conducted evaluations of ProjecTables with design students from Aarhus School of Architecture, demonstrating that participants could quickly and easily place and orient model parts reducing material waste. Contextual interviews and ideation sessions led to a deeper...

  6. Ghrelin fibers from lateral hypothalamus project to nucleus tractus solitaries and are involved in gastric motility regulation in cisplatin-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yanling; Liu, Yang; Liu, Fei; Wang, Shasha; Jin, Hong; Guo, Feifei; Xu, Luo

    2017-03-15

    Ghrelin can alleviate cancer chemotherapy-induced dyspepsia in rodents, though the neural mechanisms involved are not known. Therefore, ghrelin projections from the lateral hypothalamus (LH) and its involvement in the regulation of gastric motility in cisplatin-treated rats were investigated with a multi-disciplined approach. Retrograde tracing combined with fluoro-immunohistochemical staining were used to investigate ghrelin fiber projections arising from LH and projecting to nucleus tractus solitaries (NTS). Results revealed that ghrelin fibers originating in LH project to NTS. Expression of ghrelin and its receptor growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R1a) in LH and NTS were detected by Western Blot. 2days after cisplatin dosing, expression of ghrelin in LH decreased while GHS-R1a in both LH and NTS increased. In electrophysiological experiments, the effects of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) microinjection in LH on neuronal discharge of gastric distension-responsive neurons in NTS and gastric motility were assessed. NMDA in LH excited most of ghrelin-responsive gastric distension (GD)-sensitive neurons in NTS and promoted gastric motility. This effect was partially blocked by ghrelin antibody in NTS. Furthermore, the excitatory effects of NMDA in cisplatin-treated rats were weaker than those in saline-treated rats. Behaviorally, cisplatin induced a significant increase of kaolin consumption and decrease of food intake. These studies reveal a decreased expression of ghrelin in LH and up-regulation of GHS-R1a in LH and NTS, which are involved in the regulation of GD neuronal discharge in NTS and gastric motility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Improving brain computer interface research through user involvement - The transformative potential of integrating civil society organisations in research projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakunuma, Kutoma; Rainey, Stephen; Hansen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Research on Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) often aims to provide solutions for vulnerable populations, such as individuals with diseases, conditions or disabilities that keep them from using traditional interfaces. Such research thereby contributes to the public good. This contribution to the public good corresponds to a broader drive of research and funding policy that focuses on promoting beneficial societal impact. One way of achieving this is to engage with the public. In practical terms this can be done by integrating civil society organisations (CSOs) in research. The open question at the heart of this paper is whether and how such CSO integration can transform the research and contribute to the public good. To answer this question the paper describes five detailed qualitative case studies of research projects including CSOs. The paper finds that transformative impact of CSO integration is possible but by no means assured. It provides recommendations on how transformative impact can be promoted. PMID:28207882

  8. Improving brain computer interface research through user involvement - The transformative potential of integrating civil society organisations in research projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Bernd Carsten; Wakunuma, Kutoma; Rainey, Stephen; Hansen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Research on Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) often aims to provide solutions for vulnerable populations, such as individuals with diseases, conditions or disabilities that keep them from using traditional interfaces. Such research thereby contributes to the public good. This contribution to the public good corresponds to a broader drive of research and funding policy that focuses on promoting beneficial societal impact. One way of achieving this is to engage with the public. In practical terms this can be done by integrating civil society organisations (CSOs) in research. The open question at the heart of this paper is whether and how such CSO integration can transform the research and contribute to the public good. To answer this question the paper describes five detailed qualitative case studies of research projects including CSOs. The paper finds that transformative impact of CSO integration is possible but by no means assured. It provides recommendations on how transformative impact can be promoted.

  9. Frequency comparison involving the Romanian primary length standard RO.1 within the framework of the EUROMET Project #498

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Gheorghe

    2001-06-01

    An international frequency comparison was carried out at the Bundesamt fuer Eich- und Vermessungswessen (BEV), Vienna, within the framework of the EUROMET Project #498 from August 29 to September 5, 1999. The frequency differences obtained when the RO.1 laser from the National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics (NILPRP), Romania, was compared with five lasers from Austria (BEV1), Czech Republic (PLD1), France (BIPM3), Poland (GUM1) and Hungary (OMH1) are reported. Frequency differences were computed by using the matrix determinations for the group d, e, f, g. Considering the frequency differences measured for a group of three lasers compared to each other, we call the closing frequency the difference between measured and expected frequency difference (resulting from the previous two measurements). For the RO1 laser, when the BIPM3 laser was the reference laser, the closing frequencies range from +8.1 kHz to - 3.8 kHz. The relative Allan standard deviation was used to express the frequency stability and resulted 3.8 parts in 1012 for 100 s sampling time and 14000 s duration of the measurements. The averaged offset frequency relative to the BIPM4 stationary laser was 5.6 kHz and the standard deviation was 9.9 kHz.

  10. Involvement of Amylin and Leptin in the Development of Projections from the Area Postrema to the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Abegg

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The area postrema (AP and the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS are important hindbrain centers involved in the control of energy homeostasis. The AP mediates the anorectic action and the inhibitory effect on gastric emptying induced by the pancreatic hormone amylin. Amylin’s target cells in the AP project to the NTS, an integrative relay center for enteroceptive signals. Perinatal hormonal and metabolic factors influence brain development. A postnatal surge of the adipocyte-derived hormone leptin represents a developmental signal for the maturation of projections between hypothalamic nuclei controlling energy balance. Amylin appears to promote neurogenesis in the AP in adult rats. Here, we examined whether amylin and leptin are required for the development of projections from the AP to the NTS in postnatal and adult mice by conducting neuronal tracing studies with DiI in amylin- (IAPP−/− and leptin-deficient (ob/ob mice. Compared to wild-type littermates, postnatal (P10 and adult (P60 IAPP−/− mice showed a significantly reduced density of AP-NTS projections. While AP projections were also reduced in postnatal (P14 ob/ob mice, AP-NTS fiber density did not differ between adult ob/ob and wild-type animals. Our findings suggest a crucial function of amylin for the maturation of neuronal brainstem pathways controlling energy balance and gastrointestinal function. The impaired postnatal development of neuronal AP-NTS projections in ob/ob mice appears to be compensated in this experimental model during later brain maturation. It remains to be elucidated whether an amylin- and leptin-dependent modulation in neuronal development translates into altered AP/NTS-mediated functions.

  11. Projecting Fatalities in Crashes Involving Older Drivers, 2000–2025, CRADA No. ORNL98-0500 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Patricia S. [ORNL; Jones, Donald W. [ORNL; Reuscher, Timothy [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education; Schmoyer, Richard S. [ORNL; Truett, Lorena F. [ORNL

    2000-04-01

    At the turn of the century – the 20th century that is – the median age in the United States was under 30 years; America was 60% rural in nature; and there were only 36 highway fatalities all year. As we leave the 20th century behind, the route into the 21st century is very different. “Intelligent” cars speed down multi-lane “smart” highways in a nation that is 75% urban. According to the Federal Highway Administration’s Highway Statistics, there are 28,000 times more vehicles on the road in 2000 than there were in 1900, and these vehicles travel about 2.6 trillion miles each year. Annual fatalities resulting from highway crashes have also increased – by over 1100%. We see other changes as well. The face of America is changing. It is growing older. In 2025, persons 65 and over will make up 18.5% of the total population. The number of persons aged 85 and over is increasing more rapidly than any other age group. More importantly, the elderly are taking more trips, driving further, and continuing to drive much later in life. These conditions lead to concerns about traffic safety. Although the elderly are healthier and drive safer cars than they did just two decades ago, their frailty makes them more susceptible to injury than younger persons involved in traffic crashes of the same severity. In addition, visual, physical, and cognitive skills, all of which contribute to driving abilities, decrease with advancing age. The familiar “U”-shaped curve depicting the rate of fatalities per vehicle miles traveled, shows that the elderly experience a higher highway fatality rate than any other age group except teenagers. While the overall number of highway fatalities has decreased regularly since 1972, the number of fatalities of elderly travelers has continued to increase steadily. This increase is cause for concern for both the elderly driver and for other persons on the roads who migh tbe placed in danger through crashes involving elderly drivers.

  12. The importance of Probabilistic Safety Assessment in the careful study of risks involved to new nuclear power plant projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mata, Jônatas F.C. da; Mesquita, Amir Z.

    2017-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in Japan in 2011 has raised public fears about the actual safety of nuclear power plants in several countries. The response to this concern by government agencies and private companies has been objective and pragmatic in order to guarantee best practices in the design, construction, operation and decommissioning phases of nuclear reactors. In countries where the nucleo-electric matrix is consolidated, such as the United States, France and the United Kingdom, the safety assessment is carried out considering deterministic and probabilistic criteria. In the licensing stages of new projects, it is necessary to analyze and simulate the behavior of the nuclear power plant, when subjected to conditions that can lead to sequences of accidents. Each initiator event is studied and simulated through computational models, which allow the description and estimation of possible physical phenomena occurring in nuclear reactors. Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is fundamental in this process, as it studies in depth the sequences of events that can lead to the fusion of the nucleus of the nuclear reactor. Such sequences should be quantified in terms of probability of occurrence and your possible consequences, and organized through techniques such as Fault Tree Analysis and Event Tree Analysis. For these simulations, specialized computer codes for each type of phenomenon should be used, as well as databases based on experience gained in the operation of similar nuclear reactors. The present work will describe, in an objective way, the procedures for the realization of PSA and its applicability to the assurance of the operational reliability of the nuclear reactors, as well as a brief comparative between the approaches used in some countries traditionally users of thermonuclear energy and Brazil. By means of this analysis, it can be concluded that nuclear power is increasingly reliable and safe, being able to provide the necessary

  13. The importance of Probabilistic Safety Assessment in the careful study of risks involved to new nuclear power plant projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mata, Jônatas F.C. da, E-mail: jonatasfmata@yahoo.com.br [Universidade do Estado de Minas Gerais (UEMG), João Monlevade, MG (Brazil); Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: amir@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in Japan in 2011 has raised public fears about the actual safety of nuclear power plants in several countries. The response to this concern by government agencies and private companies has been objective and pragmatic in order to guarantee best practices in the design, construction, operation and decommissioning phases of nuclear reactors. In countries where the nucleo-electric matrix is consolidated, such as the United States, France and the United Kingdom, the safety assessment is carried out considering deterministic and probabilistic criteria. In the licensing stages of new projects, it is necessary to analyze and simulate the behavior of the nuclear power plant, when subjected to conditions that can lead to sequences of accidents. Each initiator event is studied and simulated through computational models, which allow the description and estimation of possible physical phenomena occurring in nuclear reactors. Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is fundamental in this process, as it studies in depth the sequences of events that can lead to the fusion of the nucleus of the nuclear reactor. Such sequences should be quantified in terms of probability of occurrence and your possible consequences, and organized through techniques such as Fault Tree Analysis and Event Tree Analysis. For these simulations, specialized computer codes for each type of phenomenon should be used, as well as databases based on experience gained in the operation of similar nuclear reactors. The present work will describe, in an objective way, the procedures for the realization of PSA and its applicability to the assurance of the operational reliability of the nuclear reactors, as well as a brief comparative between the approaches used in some countries traditionally users of thermonuclear energy and Brazil. By means of this analysis, it can be concluded that nuclear power is increasingly reliable and safe, being able to provide the necessary

  14. Project Earth Science

    CERN Document Server

    Holt, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    Project Earth Science: Astronomy, Revised 2nd Edition, involves students in activities that focus on Earth's position in our solar system. How do we measure astronomical distances? How can we look back in time as we gaze across vast distances in space? How would our planet be different without its particular atmosphere and distance to our star? What are the geometries among Earth, the Moon, and the Sun that yield lunar phases and seasons? Students explore these concepts and others in 11 teacher-tested activities.

  15. Problems and risks involved in the projected storage of radioactive waste in a salt dome in the northwest of the FRG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauthe, F.

    1979-01-01

    Current planning envisages long-term intermediate storage of radioactive waste and the exploration of the Gorleben salt dome by deep drilling in order to start appropriate mining work in case of favourable drilling results. The statements presented here on the problem of the 'Feasibility of ultimate storage of radioactive waste in salt deposits' (subject selected by the Government of the land Lower-Saxony) are aimed at informing the general public about the difficulties and problems involved in this waste disposal project and critically assess the arguments put forward by industry and licensing authorities in order to gain acceptance for this politically delicate project; the argumentation discussed here mainly refers to the field of geological science. (orig.) [de

  16. Biofuels and Women's Empowerment (REVISED VERSION: DECEMBER 2014) : A comparative theoretical analysis of 8 biofuel projects in rural India and Sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoog, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Based upon a theoretical analysis of eight case studies in rural India and Sub-Saharan Africa, this research aims to test the hypothesis that the empowerment of women can be improved through women’s participation in small-scale biofuel projects. The hypothesis has been tested through the following

  17. Loosening After Acetabular Revision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckmann, Nicholas A.; Weiss, Stefan; Klotz, Matthias C.M.

    2014-01-01

    The best method of revision acetabular arthroplasty remains unclear. Consequently, we reviewed the literature on the treatment of revision acetabular arthroplasty using revision rings (1541 cases; mean follow-up (FU) 5.7 years) and Trabecular Metal, or TM, implants (1959 cases; mean FU 3.7 years...

  18. Site specific statutory compliance planning for the salt repository project at the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Requirements, strategy, and status: Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    This document and the requirements and actions it presents are addressed to the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas. The proposed actions upon which the plan is based are those described in Chapters 4 and 5 of the final EA for the site. Similarly, the environmental and health and safety requirements covered in the plan are those identified in the EA as being potentially applicable to the salt repository project at the Deaf Smith site. 12 figs., 8 tabs

  19. HAPO Plant and capital equipment budget for FY 1966 and revision of budget for FY 1965 equipment not related to construction projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, J.E.

    1964-05-12

    This document is divided into: byproduct horizontal control rod system (5 reactors); high-speed scanning-effluent temperature monitoring system (KE reactor); improved reactor gas system (100-KE & KW); safety circuit system modifications (5 reactors); alternate process hot die sizing, 313 Building 300 Area; button line equipment (234-5 Building); in-tank waste solidification (3rd unit); and misc. minor equipment projects.

  20. Evidence-based development of school-based and family-involved prevention of overweight across Europe: The ENERGY-project's design and conceptual framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klepp Knut

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an urgent need for more carefully developed public health measures in order to curb the obesity epidemic among youth. The overall aim of the "EuropeaN Energy balance Research to prevent excessive weight Gain among Youth" (ENERGY-project is the development and formative evaluation of a theory-informed and evidence-based multi-component school-based and family-involved intervention program ready to be implemented and evaluated for effectiveness across Europe. This program aims at promoting the adoption or continuation of health behaviors that contribute to a healthy energy balance among school-aged children. Earlier studies have indicated that school and family environments are key determinants of energy-balance behaviors in schoolchildren. Schools are an important setting for health promotion in this age group, but school-based interventions mostly fail to target and involve the family environment. Methods Led by a multidisciplinary team of researchers from eleven European countries and supported by a team of Australian experts, the ENERGY-project is informed by the Environmental Research Framework for Weight gain Prevention, and comprises a comprehensive epidemiological analysis including 1 systematic reviews of the literature, 2 secondary analyses of existing data, 3 focus group research, and 4 a cross European school-based survey. Results and discussion The theoretical framework and the epidemiological analysis will subsequently inform stepwise intervention development targeting the most relevant energy balance-related behaviors and their personal, family-environmental and school-environmental determinants applying the Intervention Mapping protocol. The intervention scheme will undergo formative and pilot evaluation in five countries. The results of ENERGY will be disseminated among key stakeholders including researchers, policy makers and the general population. Conclusions The ENERGY-project is an international

  1. Test plan for in situ bioremediation demonstration of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration Project DOE/OTD TTP No.: SR 0566-01. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, T.C.

    1991-09-18

    This project is designed to demonstrate in situ bioremediation of groundwater and sediment contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Indigenous microorganisms will be simulated to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and their daughter products in situ by addition of nutrients to the contaminated zone. in situ biodegradation is a highly attractive technology for remediation because contaminants are destroyed, not simply moved to another location or immobilized, thus decreasing costs, risks, and time, while increasing efficiency and public and regulatory acceptability. Bioremediation has been found to be among the least costly technologies in applications where it will work.

  2. Engineering testing and technology projects FY 1996 Site Support Program Plan, WBS 6.3.3 and 6.3.8. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.C.

    1995-10-01

    The engineering laboratory services for development, assembly, testing, and evaluation to support the resolution of WHC, Hanford, and DOE complex wide engineering issues for 1996 are presented. Primary customers are: TWRS, spent nuclear fuels, transition projects, liquid effluent program, and other Hanford contractors and programs. Products and services provided include: fabrication and assembly facilities for prototype and test equipment, development testing, proof of principle testing, instrumentation testing, nondestructive examination application development and testing, prototype equipment design and assembly, chemical engineering unit operations testing, engineering test system disposal, and safety issue resolution

  3. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 415: Project 57 No. 1 Plutonium Dispersion (NTTR), Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick; Burmeister, Mark

    2014-04-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 415, Project 57 No. 1 Plutonium Dispersion (NTTR). CAU 415 is located on Range 4808A of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) and consists of one corrective action site: NAFR-23-02, Pu Contaminated Soil. The CAU 415 site consists of the atmospheric release of radiological contaminants to surface soil from the Project 57 safety experiment conducted in 1957. The safety experiment released plutonium (Pu), uranium (U), and americium (Am) to the surface soil over an area of approximately 1.9 square miles. This area is currently fenced and posted as a radiological contamination area. Vehicles and debris contaminated by the experiment were subsequently buried in a disposal trench within the surface-contaminated, fenced area and are assumed to have released radiological contamination to subsurface soils. Potential source materials in the form of pole-mounted electrical transformers were also identified at the site and will be removed as part of closure activities.

  4. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 415: Project 57 No. 1 Plutonium Dispersion (NTTR) Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada, Revision 0 with ROTC-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloop, Christina

    2017-12-01

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 415: Project 57 No. 1 Plutonium Dispersion, which is located on Range 4808A of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. CAU 415 comprises one corrective action site (CAS): NAFR-23-02, Pu Contaminated Soil. The purpose of this CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 415 based on the implementation of the corrective action of Closure in Place.

  5. The Nordic nuclear safety program 1994-1997. Project handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    This is a new revision of the handbook for administrators of the Nordic reactor safety program NKS. The most important administrative functions in project management are described, which should secure a uniform management approach in all the projects. The description of the organizational scheme of the NKS and distribution of responsibilities is followed by examples of various administrative routines and document forms. In the annex the names and addresses of the staff involved in administration of the NKS program are listed. (EG)

  6. Learning effects of active involvement of secondary school students in scientific research within the Sparkling Science project "FlussAu:WOW!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Michaela; Zitek, Andreas; Scheikl, Sigrid; Heidenreich, Andrea; Kurz, Roman; Schrittwieser, Martin; Muhar, Susanne

    2014-05-01

    Due to immense technological and economic developments, human activities producing greenhouse gases, destructing ecosystems, changing landscapes and societies are influencing the world to such a degree, that the environment and human well-being are significantly affected. This results in a need to educate citizens towards a scientific understanding of complex socio-environmental systems. The OECD programme for international student assessment (PISA - http://www.pisa.oecd.org) investigated in detail the science competencies of 15-year-old students in 2006. The report documented that teenagers in OECD countries are mostly well aware of environmental issues but often know little about their causes or options to tackle these challenges in the future. For the integration of science with school learning and involving young people actively into scientific research Sparkling Science projects are funded by the Federal Ministry of Science and Research in Austria. Within the Sparkling Science Project "FlussAu:WOW!" (http://www.sparklingscience.at/de/projekte/574-flussau-wow-/) scientists work together with 15 to 18-year-old students of two Austrian High Schools over two years to assess the functions and processes in near natural and anthropogenically changed river floodplains. Within the first year of collaboration students, teachers and scientists elaborated on abiotic, biotic and spatial indicators for assessing and evaluating the ecological functionality of riverine systems. After a theoretical introduction students formulated research questions, hypotheses and planned and conducted field work in two different floodplain areas in Lower Austria. From the second year on, students are going to develop qualitative models on processes in river floodplain systems by means of the learning software "DynaLearn". The "DynaLearn" software is an engaging, interactive, hierarchically structured learning environment that was developed within the EU-FP7 project "DynaLearn" (http

  7. Promoting the inclusion of Afghan women and men in research: reflections from research and community partners involved in implementing a 'proof of concept' project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Elisha; Yelland, Jane; Szwarc, Josef; Casey, Sue; Chesters, Donna; Duell-Piening, Philippa; Wahidi, Sayed; Fouladi, Fatema; Brown, Stephanie

    2015-01-31

    With mounting evidence that poor maternal and child health outcomes are related to the social determinants of health, researchers need to engage with vulnerable and isolated communities to gather the evidence that is essential to determine appropriate solutions. Conventional research methods may not ensure the degree and quality of participation that is necessary for meaningful study findings. Participatory methods provide reciprocal opportunities for often excluded communities to both take part in, and guide the conduct of research. The Having a baby in a new country research project was undertaken to provide evidence about how women and men of refugee background experience health services at the time of having a baby. This two year, multifaceted proof of concept study comprised: 1) an organisational partnership to oversee the project; 2) a community engagement framework including: female and male Afghan community researchers, community and sector stakeholder advisory groups and community consultation and engagement. Inclusive research strategies that address power imbalances in research, and diversity of and within communities, are necessary to obtain the evidence required to address health inequalities in vulnerable populations. Such an approach involves mindfully adapting research processes to ensure that studies have regard for the advice of community members about the issues that affect them. Researchers have much to gain by committing time and resources to engaging communities in reciprocal ways in research processes.

  8. Project W-026, Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility Module 1: Maximum possible fire loss (MPFL) decontamination and cleanup estimates. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkle, A.W.; Jacobsen, P.H.; Lucas, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    Project W-026, Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility Module 1, a 1991 Line Item, is planned for completion and start of operations in the spring of 1997. WRAP Module 1 will have the capability to characterize and repackage newly generated, retrieved and stored transuranic (TRU), TRU mixed, and suspect TRU waste for shipment to the Waste isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). In addition, the WRAP Facility Module 1 will have the capability to characterize low-level mixed waste for treatment in WRAP Module 2A. This report documents the assumptions and cost estimates for decontamination and clean-up of a maximum possible fire loss (MPFL) as defined by DOE Order 5480.7A, FIRE PROTECTION. The Order defines MPFL as the value of property, excluding land, within a fire area, unless a fire hazards analysis demonstrates a lesser (or greater) loss potential. This assumes failure of both automatic fire suppression systems and manual fire fighting efforts. Estimates were developed for demolition, disposal, decontamination, and rebuilding. Total costs were estimated to be approximately $98M

  9. Project network-oriented materials management policy for complex projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dixit, Vijaya; Srivastava, Rajiv K; Chaudhuri, Atanu

    2015-01-01

    This work devises a materials management policy integrated with project network characteristics of complex projects. It proposes a relative quantitative measure, overall criticality (OC), for prioritisation of items based on penalty incurred due to their non-availability. In complex projects...... managerial tacit knowledge which provides them enough flexibility to provide information in real form. Computed OC values can be used for items prioritisation and as shortage cost coefficient in inventory models. The revised materials management policy was applied to a shipbuilding project. OC values were......, practicing managers find it difficult to measure OC of items because of the subjective factors and intractable nature of penalties involved. However, using their experience, they can linguistically identify the antecedents and relate them to consequent OC. This work adopts Fuzzy Set Theory to capture...

  10. Involving women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbo, J

    1994-01-01

    I am a primary health care (PHC) coordinator working with the May Day Rural project, a local NGO involved in integrated approaches and programs with rural communities in the Ga District of the Greater-Accra region in Ghana. When we talk about the community development approach we must first and foremost recognize that we are talking about women, because in the developing world frequent childbirths mean that her burden of mortality is higher than a man's; her workload is extremely heavy--whether in gardening, farming, other household duties, caring for the sick, or the rearing of children; she has a key role in PHC and community development, because men are always looking for greener pastures elsewhere, leaving the women behind. Women's concerns are critical in most health care projects and women and children are their main beneficiaries. Why not include women in the management team, project design, implementation and evaluation processes? That is what the May Day Rural project is practicing, encouraging women's participation and creating a relationship of trust. full text

  11. Descriptor revision belief change through direct choice

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, Sven Ove

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a critical examination of how the choice of what to believe is represented in the standard model of belief change. In particular the use of possible worlds and infinite remainders as objects of choice is critically examined. Descriptors are introduced as a versatile tool for expressing the success conditions of belief change, addressing both local and global descriptor revision. The book presents dynamic descriptors such as Ramsey descriptors that convey how an agent’s beliefs tend to be changed in response to different inputs. It also explores sentential revision and demonstrates how local and global operations of revision by a sentence can be derived as a special case of descriptor revision. Lastly, the book examines revocation, a generalization of contraction in which a specified sentence is removed in a process that may possibly also involve the addition of some new information to the belief set.

  12. Bibliocable. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable Television Information Center, Washington, DC.

    This selective, annotated bibliography is a revision of the original published in 1972 (ED 071 402). Some 104 books, articles, and reports included here deal with access, applications, franchising, regulation, technology, and other aspects of cable television. The listings are of two types in each category. First are revisions of the original…

  13. Involvement of the anterior cingulate cortex in time-based prospective memory task monitoring: An EEG analysis of brain sources using Independent Component and Measure Projection Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Cruz

    Full Text Available Time-based prospective memory (PM, remembering to do something at a particular moment in the future, is considered to depend upon self-initiated strategic monitoring, involving a retrieval mode (sustained maintenance of the intention plus target checking (intermittent time checks. The present experiment was designed to explore what brain regions and brain activity are associated with these components of strategic monitoring in time-based PM tasks.24 participants were asked to reset a clock every four minutes, while performing a foreground ongoing word categorisation task. EEG activity was recorded and data were decomposed into source-resolved activity using Independent Component Analysis. Common brain regions across participants, associated with retrieval mode and target checking, were found using Measure Projection Analysis.Participants decreased their performance on the ongoing task when concurrently performed with the time-based PM task, reflecting an active retrieval mode that relied on withdrawal of limited resources from the ongoing task. Brain activity, with its source in or near the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, showed changes associated with an active retrieval mode including greater negative ERP deflections, decreased theta synchronization, and increased alpha suppression for events locked to the ongoing task while maintaining a time-based intention. Activity in the ACC was also associated with time-checks and found consistently across participants; however, we did not find an association with time perception processing per se.The involvement of the ACC in both aspects of time-based PM monitoring may be related to different functions that have been attributed to it: strategic control of attention during the retrieval mode (distributing attentional resources between the ongoing task and the time-based task and anticipatory/decision making processing associated with clock-checks.

  14. Migrant Education Administrative Handbook. Revised April 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Compensatory Education.

    The revised handbook provides specific references to the legislation and the National Migrant Program Guidelines, while setting forth the administrative procedures required for migrant projects in North Carolina. Specific topics of discussion in migrant program administration cover Public Law 89-750, state and local educational agency…

  15. Publishing and Revising Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Editors and Webmasters can publish content without going through a workflow. Publishing times and dates can be set, and multiple pages can be published in bulk. Making an edit to published content created a revision.

  16. Letter of Map Revision

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  17. Involvement of the US Department of Defense in Civilian Assistance, Part I: a quantitative description of the projects funded by the Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdeaux, Margaret Ellis; Lawry, Lynn; Bonventre, Eugene V; Burkle, Frederick M

    2010-03-01

    To review the history and goals of the US Department of Defense's largest civilian assistance program, the Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster and Civic Aid Program and to describe the number, geographic regions, years, key words, countries, and types of projects carried out under this program since 2001. Using the program's central database, we reviewed all approved projects since 2001 and tabulated them by year, combatant command, country, and key word. We also reviewed the project descriptions of projects funded between January 1, 2006, and February 9, 2008, and examined how their activities varied by combatant command and year. Of the 5395 projects in the database, 2097 were funded. Projects took place in more than 90 countries, with Southern, Pacific, and Africa Command hosting the greatest number. The most common types of projects were school, health, disaster response, and water infrastructure construction, and disaster-response training. The "global war on terror" was the key word most frequently tagged to project descriptions. Project descriptions lacked stated goals as well as implementation and coordination strategies with potential partners, and did not report outcome or impact indicators. The geographic reach of the program is vast and projects take place in a wide variety of public sectors. Yet their security and civilian assistance value remains unclear given the lack of stated project goals, implementation strategies, or measures of effectiveness. To facilitate transparency and policy discussion, we recommend project proposals include hypotheses as to how they will enhance US security, their relevance to the public sector they address, and outcome and impact indicators that can assess their value and effectiveness.

  18. Acetabular Cup Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Ho

    2017-09-01

    The use of acetabular cup revision arthroplasty is on the rise as demands for total hip arthroplasty, improved life expectancies, and the need for individual activity increase. For an acetabular cup revision to be successful, the cup should gain stable fixation within the remaining supportive bone of the acetabulum. Since the patient's remaining supportive acetabular bone stock plays an important role in the success of revision, accurate classification of the degree of acetabular bone defect is necessary. The Paprosky classification system is most commonly used when determining the location and degree of acetabular bone loss. Common treatment options include: acetabular liner exchange, high hip center, oblong cup, trabecular metal cup with augment, bipolar cup, bulk structural graft, cemented cup, uncemented cup including jumbo cup, acetabular reinforcement device (cage), trabecular metal cup cage. The optimal treatment option is dependent upon the degree of the discontinuity, the amount of available bone stock and the likelihood of achieving stable fixation upon supportive host bone. To achieve successful acetabular cup revision, accurate evaluation of bone defect preoperatively and intraoperatively, proper choice of method of acetabular revision according to the evaluation of acetabular bone deficiency, proper technique to get primary stability of implant such as precise grafting technique, and stable fixation of implant are mandatory.

  19. Characterization of the Unusual Product from the Reaction between Cobalt(II) Chloride, Ethane-1,2-diamine, and Hydrochloric Acid: An Undergraduate Project Involving an Unknown Metal Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Neil F.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the need for student research-type chemistry projects based upon "unknown" metal complexes. Describes an experiment involving the product from the reaction between cobalt(II) chloride, ethane-1,2-diamine (en) and concentrated hydrochloric acid. Outlines the preparation of the cobalt complex, along with procedure, results and…

  20. Revision of Pachycentria (Melastomataceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clausing, Gudrun

    2000-01-01

    A revision of Pachycentria Blume, which includes the monotypic Pogonanthera Blume, is presented. Pachycentria comprises eight species and one subspecies. Two species, P. vogelkopensis and P. hanseniana, are newly described. The genus is distinguished from other genera in the Medinillinae by a small

  1. Revision of Oxandra (Annonaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junikka, L.; Maas, P.J.M.; Maas-van de Kamer, H.; Westra, L.Y.Th.

    2016-01-01

    A taxonomic revision is given of the Neotropical genus Oxandra (Annonaceae). Within the genus 27 species are recognized, 4 of which are new to science. Most of the species are occurring in tropical South America, whereas a few (6) are found in Mexico and Central America and two in the West Indies

  2. Revision without ordinals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivello, Edoardo

    2013-01-01

    We show that Herzberger’s and Gupta’s revision theories of truth can be recast in purely inductive terms, without any appeal neither to the transfinite ordinal numbers nor to the axiom of Choice. The result is presented in an abstract and general setting, emphasising both its validity for a wide

  3. Revising and editing for translators

    CERN Document Server

    Mossop, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Revising and Editing for Translators provides guidance and learning materials for translation students learning to edit texts written by others, and professional translators wishing to improve their self-revision ability or learning to revise the work of others. Editing is understood as making corrections and improvements to texts, with particular attention to tailoring them to the given readership. Revising is this same task applied to draft translations. The linguistic work of editors and revisers is related to the professional situations in which they work. Mossop offers in-depth coverage of a wide range of topics, including copyediting, style editing, structural editing, checking for consistency, revising procedures and principles, and translation quality assessment. This third edition provides extended coverage of computer aids for revisers, and of the different degrees of revision suited to different texts. The inclusion of suggested activities and exercises, numerous real-world examples, a proposed gra...

  4. LEX Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkilde, Lars; Larsen, Torben J.; Walbjørn, Jacob

    This document is aimed at helping all parties involved in the LEX project to get a common understanding of words, process, levels and the overall concept.......This document is aimed at helping all parties involved in the LEX project to get a common understanding of words, process, levels and the overall concept....

  5. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easterbrooks, John A.; Pearsons, Todd N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2003-03-01

    The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program 1994, Measure 7.4K). The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington

  6. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Easterbrooks, John A. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2003-09-01

    The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council and funded by the Bonneville Power Administration. The YKFP has adopted the definition of supplementation described by Regional Assessment of Supplementation Program (1992), which is ''the use of artificial propagation in an attempt to maintain or increase natural production while maintaining the long-term fitness of the target population, and keeping the ecological and genetic impacts on nontarget populations within specified biological limits''. Recent scientific reviews of hatchery supplementation continue to highlight the experimental nature and risk of supplementation (Independent Scientific Group 1996; National Research Council 1996; Lichatowich 1999; Independent Multidisciplinary Science Team 2000; Independent Scientific Advisory Board 2003; Hatchery Scientific Review Group 2003). In addition, many of these reviews included recommendations about the best ways to operate a supplementation program. Most of these recommendations were already being done or have been incorporated into the YKFP. The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and

  7. Survey and analysis of satellite-based telemedicine projects involving Japan and developing nations: investigation of transmission rates, channel numbers, and node numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, I; Natori, M; Takizawa, M; Kaihara, S

    2001-01-01

    We surveyed interactive telemedicine projects via telecommunications satellite (AMINE-PARTNERS, Post-PARTNERS, and Shinshu University Project using Inmarsat satellites) offered by Japan as assistance to developing countries. The survey helped clarify channel occupation time and data transfer rates. Using our survey results, we proposed an optimized satellite model with VSATs simulating the number of required channels and bandwidth magnitude. For future implementation of VSATs for medical use in developing nations, design of telecommunication channels should take into consideration TCP/IP-based operations. We calculated that one hub station with 30-76 VSATs in developing nation can be operated on bandwidth 6 Mbps using with 128 Kbps videoconferencing system for teleconsultation and teleconference, and linking with Internet.

  8. Implementation and assessment of a yeast orphan gene research project: involving undergraduates in authentic research experiences and progressing our understanding of uncharacterized open reading frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, Bethany V; Schultheis, Patrick J; Strome, Erin D

    2016-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the first eukaryotic organism to be sequenced; however, little progress has been made in recent years in furthering our understanding of all open reading frames (ORFs). From October 2012 to May 2015 the number of verified ORFs had only risen from 75.31% to 78%, while the number of uncharacterized ORFs had decreased from 12.8% to 11% (representing > 700 genes still left in this category; http://www.yeastgenome.org/genomesnapshot). Course-based research has been shown to increase student learning while providing experience with real scientific investigation; however, implementation in large, multi-section courses presents many challenges. This study sought to test the feasibility and effectiveness of incorporating authentic research into a core genetics course, with multiple instructors, to increase student learning and progress our understanding of uncharacterized ORFs. We generated a module-based annotation toolkit and utilized easily accessible bioinformatics tools to predict gene function for uncharacterized ORFs within the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD). Students were each assigned an uncharacterized ORF, which they annotated using contemporary comparative genomics methodologies, including multiple sequence alignment, conserved domain identification, signal peptide prediction and cellular localization algorithms. Student learning outcomes were measured by quizzes, project reports and presentations, as well as a post-project questionnaire. Our results indicate that the authentic research experience had positive impacts on students' perception of their learning and their confidence to conduct future research. Furthermore, we believe that creation of an online repository and adoption and/or adaptation of this project across multiple researchers and institutions could speed the process of gene function prediction. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Application of unconventional geoelectrical methods to the hydrogeological examination of the Mt. S. Croce rock formations (Umbria, Italy involved in a railway tunnel project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Patella

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available he project of doubling and developing of the railway line Orte-Falconara, committed by the Italian State Railway Company to the COMAVI Consortium (Rome, Italy, envisaged building the Mt. S. Croce tunnel, about 3200 m long between the stations of Narni and Nera Montoro (Umbria, ltaly. During the last phase of the feasibility project, a geophysical research based on geoelectrical prospecting methods was carried out to complement other geognostic investigations with the following goals: a to outline the complex geotectonic model of the rock system, which will be affected by the new railway layout; b to gain information on the hydrogeologic features of the survey area, in relation to the existing geologic situation and the consequent effects on the digging conditions of the tunnel and on the operation conditions of the railway layout. The geophysical work was thus organized according to the following scheme: a execution of dipole electrical sounding pro-files, to depict a series of significant tomographic pseudosections, both across and along the new railway layout; b execution of self-potential measurements, to draw an anomaly map over the whole hydrogeological network system in the survey area. The research provided information which has helped to improve the geological-structural model of the area and disclosed the hydrogelogic network, conforming to the classified field surface manifestations. At present, further detailed field investigations are being carried out, which confirm all the results obtained by the geoelectrical survey.

  10. High participation rate among 25 721 patients with broad age range in a hospital-based research project involving whole-genome sequencing - the Lausanne Institutional Biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochud, Murielle; Currat, Christine; Chapatte, Laurence; Roth, Cindy; Mooser, Vincent

    2017-10-24

    We aimed to evaluate the interest of adult inpatients and selected outpatients in engaging in a large, real-life, hospital-based, genomic medicine research project and in receiving clinically actionable incidental findings. Within the framework of the cross-sectional Institutional Biobank of Lausanne, Switzerland, a total of 25721 patients of the CHUV University Hospital were systematically invited to grant researchers access to their biomedical data and to donate blood for future analyses, including whole-genome sequencing. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify personal factors, including age, gender, religion, ethnicity, citizenship, education level and mode of admission, associated with willingness to participate in this genomic research project and with interest in receiving clinically actionable incidental findings. The overall participation rate was 79% (20343/25721). Participation rate declined progressively with age, averaging 83%, 75%, 67% and 62% in patients aged rate, but not with higher willingness to receive incidental findings within the population who had agreed to participate. A large proportion of adult patients, even among the elderly, are willing to actively participate and receive incidental findings in this systematic hospital-based precision and genomic medicine research program with broad consent.

  11. Groundwater Pathway Model for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Miller, Terry A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Strobridge, Daniel M. [Neptune Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cole, Gregory L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Birdsell, Kay H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Robinson, Bruce Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gable, Carl Walter [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Broxton, David E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Springer, Everett P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schofield, Tracy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-10

    This report consists of four major sections, including this introductory section. Section 2 provides an overview of previous investigations related to the development of the current sitescale model. The methods and data used to develop the 3-D groundwater model and the techniques used to distill that model into a form suitable for use in the GoldSim models are discussed in Section 3. Section 4 presents the results of the model development effort and discusses some of the uncertainties involved. Eight attachments that provide details about the components and data used in this groundwater pathway model are also included with this report. The groundwater modeling effort reported here is a revision of the work that was conducted in 2005 (Stauffer et al., 2005a) in support of the 2008 Area G performance assessment and composite analysis (LANL, 2008). The revision effort was undertaken primarily to incorporate new geologic information that has been collected since 2003 at, and in the vicinity of, Area G. The new data were used to create a more accurate geologic framework model (GFM) that forms the basis of the numerical modeling of the site’s long-term performance. The groundwater modeling uses mean hydrologic properties of the geologic strata underlying Area G; this revision includes an evaluation of the impacts that natural variability in these properties may have on the model projections.

  12. Fast flux test facility, transition project plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttenberg, S.

    1994-01-01

    The FFTF Transition Project Plan, Revision 1, provides changes and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition

  13. Fast flux test facility, transition project plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guttenberg, S.

    1994-11-15

    The FFTF Transition Project Plan, Revision 1, provides changes and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

  14. A rural community's involvement in the design and usability testing of a computer-based informed consent process for the Personalized Medicine Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahnke, Andrea N; Plasek, Joseph M; Hoffman, David G; Partridge, Nathan S; Foth, Wendy S; Waudby, Carol J; Rasmussen, Luke V; McManus, Valerie D; McCarty, Catherine A

    2014-01-01

    Many informed consent studies demonstrate that research subjects poorly retain and understand information in written consent documents. Previous research in multimedia consent is mixed in terms of success for improving participants' understanding, satisfaction, and retention. This failure may be due to a lack of a community-centered design approach to building the interventions. The goal of this study was to gather information from the community to determine the best way to undertake the consent process. Community perceptions regarding different computer-based consenting approaches were evaluated, and a computer-based consent was developed and tested. A second goal was to evaluate whether participants make truly informed decisions to participate in research. Simulations of an informed consent process were videotaped to document the process. Focus groups were conducted to determine community attitudes towards a computer-based informed consent process. Hybrid focus groups were conducted to determine the most acceptable hardware device. Usability testing was conducted on a computer-based consent prototype using a touch-screen kiosk. Based on feedback, a computer-based consent was developed. Representative study participants were able to easily complete the consent, and all were able to correctly answer the comprehension check questions. Community involvement in developing a computer-based consent proved valuable for a population-based genetic study. These findings may translate to other types of informed consents, including those for trials involving treatment of genetic disorders. A computer-based consent may serve to better communicate consistent, clear, accurate, and complete information regarding the risks and benefits of study participation. Additional analysis is necessary to measure the level of comprehension of the check-question answers by larger numbers of participants. The next step will involve contacting participants to measure whether understanding of

  15. Involving migrants in the development of guidelines for communication in cross-cultural general practice consultations: a participatory learning and action research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly-de Brún, Mary; MacFarlane, Anne; de Brún, Tomas; Okonkwo, Ekaterina; Bonsenge Bokanga, Jean Samuel; Manuela De Almeida Silva, Maria; Ogbebor, Florence; Mierzejewska, Aga; Nnadi, Lovina; van den Muijsenbergh, Maria; van Weel-Baumgarten, Evelyn; van Weel, Chris

    2015-09-21

    The aim of this research was to involve migrants and other key stakeholders in a participatory dialogue to develop a guideline for enhancing communication in cross-cultural general practice consultations. In this paper, we focus on findings about the use of formal versus informal interpreters because dialogues about these issues emerged as central to the identification of recommendations for best practice. This qualitative case study involved a Participatory Learning and Action (PLA) research methodology. The sample comprised 80 stakeholders: 51 from migrant communities; 15 general practitioners (GPs) and general practice staff; 7 established migrants as peer researchers; 5 formal, trained interpreters; and 2 service planners from the national health authority. Galway, Ireland. There was 100% consensus across stakeholder groups that while informal interpreters have uses for migrants and general practice staff, they are not considered acceptable as best practice. There was also 100% consensus that formal interpreters who are trained and working as per a professional code of practice are acceptable as best practice. Policymakers and service planners need to work in partnership with service providers and migrants to progress the implementation of professional, trained interpreters as a routine way of working in general practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. AAEC nuclear power projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoe, G.; Fredsall, J.; Scurr, I.; Plotnikoff, W.

    1981-01-01

    The nuclear power capacity projections developed in the May-June period of 1981 by the AAEC are presented. There have been downward revisions for nearly all countries with centrally planned economies. Projections for the year 2000 for the Western World have decreased in aggregate by 4.7% (27Gw) compared to those of 1980. However, this reduction is less than the previous estimate reduction and there appears to have been a stabilisation in the projection

  17. Vermont's involvement with the DOE's high-level radioactive waste disposal crystalline repository project. Final technical report, January 1-September 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is charged with siting a second repository for the disposal of highly radioactive nuclear wastes. Because of this siting process, the DOE has looked to localities in 17 states in the eastern US for possible sites in crystalline rock. During the beginning of the progress report period, crystalline rocks in Vermont were under consideration as sites for further study. Vermont, through the Vermont State Geologist's Office, was closely involved with the DOE program during this period. Our main function has been to review DOE reports; attend DOE workshops and meetings; and inform the Vermont public, with the help of the DOE, about the high-level nuclear waste repository siting process. Nine sites in Vermont were under consideration during the Regional Characterization Phase until January 16, 1986. Because of this fact, there was considerable public interest in this program. Upon release of the Draft Area Recommendation Report, Vermont crystalline rock bodies were dropped from consideration. A site in New Hampshire and two sites in Maine remained on the list. Because of the draft status of the report and the possibility that a site 20 miles from the Vermont border in New Hampshire could remain as a selected site, Vermont has stayed active and interested. Two briefings and hearings were held in the State during the comment period January 16 through April 16, 1986. A thorough review of the Draft Area Recommendation Report was completed using reviewers from our Office, State agencies, outside experts, and citizen groups. With the announcement on May 28, 1986 of the suspension of the second repository siting process in crystalline rocks, our Office has worked toward closing out our active involvement

  18. [An overview on the collation and revision of medical books by the Bureau for Revising Medical Books in the Northern Song Dynasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yongliang; Liang, Yongxuan

    2014-07-01

    The Bureau for Revising Medical Books was a temporary agency established by the government of the Northern Song Dynasty in 1057, the 2nd year of Jiayou of Emperor Renzong, exclusively for the edition, revision and publishing of ancient medical books. 11 medical books were revised and edited by 13 Bureau members in a period of 12 years until 1069, the 2nd year of Xining of Emperor ShenZong, which eventually became the final versions until today. 8 medical books were initially planned for the revision, but 11 were actually completed in the end. The time for completing a revision varied from over 10 years at most to less than 1 year at least. Instead of working in the office, the officers of the Bureau for Revising Medical Books did their works at home. The members of the said Bureau came from the Tiju officer of the Bureau for Revising Medical Books and the officials of revising medical books, consisting of both Confucian ministers and medical officers. Confucian ministers played an important role in revising medical books. The Bureau had a strict workflow in electing revising officials, making the project, and the determination of the principles and arrangements of the tasks of editing and proofreading.

  19. A revised Self- and Family Management Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Margaret; Schulman-Green, Dena; Knafl, Kathleen; Reynolds, Nancy R

    2015-01-01

    Research on self- and family management of chronic conditions has advanced over the past 6 years, but the use of simple frameworks has hampered the understanding of the complexities involved. We sought to update our previously published model with new empirical, synthetic, and theoretical work. We used synthesis of previous studies to update the framework. We propose a revised framework that clarifies facilitators and barriers, processes, proximal outcomes, and distal outcomes of self- and family management and their relationships. We offer the revised framework as a model that can be used in studies aimed at advancing self- and family management science. The use of the framework to guide studies would allow for the design of studies that can address more clearly how self-management interventions work and under what conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Revision 2 of the NPP Krsko Decommissioning Program Is Stalled

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levanat, I.; Lokner, V.; Rapic, A.; Zeleznik, N.; Kralj, M.

    2012-01-01

    Revision 2 of the joint Slovenian-Croatian Program of NPP Krsko Decommissioning and SF andLILW Disposal was scheduled to be finished and formally approved by the end of 2009, in accordance with the bilateral Agreement on the NPP. Slightly behind the schedule, the Project team completed the entire document during spring of 2010, and in June 2010 drafted a proposal for a peer review of the Program by a dedicated IAEA expert mission. This procedure was agreed upon at the last session (May 2010) of the Intergovernmental Commission for implementation of the Agreement, when the Commission was acquainted with the five scenarios of the Revision 2 and with the estimates of their costs/financing. It was expected that the peer review would be performed soon, and that formal adoption of the Revision 2 would follow. Although in this process of approval some decisions remained to be made by the stakeholders, the Project team did select and recommend one scenario to be used for costing purposes, in order to ensure that most necessary corrections in Program financing would be timely adopted. However, the planned IAEA review was cancelled by the Advisory board, the body nominated by the Commission ''to supervise the activities and resolve the issues raised by the Project team''. By this cancellation, the process of Program revision was effectively stalled, because the Advisory board could not clearly define further course of action: differing views between the Slovenian and the Croatian part of the Advisory board appeared, in particular regarding the set of Program scenarios and regarding the appropriateness of the Revision 2 document for the IAEA review; nonetheless, the Advisory board sent to the Project team a compilation of requests to modify Revision 2 document. The Project team determined that some minor requests were easy to fulfill, but other modifications could only be carried out after changes in the boundary conditions (approved by the Commission), or changes in national

  1. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project technical baseline document. Fiscal year 1995: Volume 1, Baseline description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Womack, J.C.; Cramond, R.; Paedon, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a revision to WHC-SD-SNF-SD-002, and is issued to support the individual projects that make up the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project in the lower-tier functions, requirements, interfaces, and technical baseline items. It presents results of engineering analyses since Sept. 1994. The mission of the SNFP on the Hanford site is to provide safety, economic, environmentally sound management of Hanford SNF in a manner that stages it to final disposition. This particularly involves K Basin fuel, although other SNF is involved also

  2. Beginning analog electronics through projects

    CERN Document Server

    Singmin, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    Analog electronics is the simplest way to start a fun, informative, learning program. Beginning Analog Electronics Through Projects, Second Edition was written with the needs of beginning hobbyists and students in mind. This revision of Andrew Singmin's popular Beginning Electronics Through Projects provides practical exercises, building techniques, and ideas for useful electronics projects. Additionally, it features new material on analog and digital electronics, and new projects for troubleshooting test equipment.Published in the tradition of Beginning Electronics Through Projects an

  3. Parental involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezra S Simon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Parent-Teacher Associations and other community groups can play a significant role in helping to establish and run refugee schools; their involvement can also help refugee adults adjust to their changed circumstances.

  4. Sumario de Reglamentos Revisados de Titulo I - Educacion Migrante (Summary of Revised Title I - Migrant Regulations).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Ramon

    Extracted from the April 3, 1980 Federal Register, revisions of the Migrant Education regulations are synthesized in this Spanish-English booklet. Revised regulations address program planning and evaluation; needs assessment; identification and recruitment of migrant children; and special discretionary projects for the coordination of migrant…

  5. Adolescent Sociopaths. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapple, Eliot D.

    Presented is the final report of a research project on the programed training and placement of nonpsychotic disturbed adolescents. Eleven chapters cover topics which include the following: psychiatry and the sociopaths and psychopaths; boys dealt with in the project; development of the programed interaction diagnostic interview; disturbances to…

  6. Emotion Processes in Knowledge Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevors, Gregory J.; Kendeou, Panayiota; Butterfuss, Reese

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, a number of insights have been gained into the cognitive processes that explain how individuals overcome misconceptions and revise their previously acquired incorrect knowledge. The current study complements this line of research by investigating the moment-by-moment emotion processes that occur during knowledge revision using a…

  7. Project quality assurance plan for research and development services provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of the Hanford Grout Disposal Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, R.D.; Gilliam, T.M.

    1991-11-01

    This Project Quality Assurance Plan (PQAP) is being published to provide the sponsor with referenceable documentation for work conducted in support of the Hanford WHC Grout Disposal Program. This plan, which meets NQA-1 requirements, is being applied to work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during FY 1991 in support of this program. It should also be noted that with minor revisions, this plan should be applicable to other projects involving research and development that must comply with NQA-1 requirements

  8. Project quality assurance plan for research and development services provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of the Hanford Grout Disposal Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, R.D.; Gilliam, T.M.

    1991-11-01

    This Project Quality Assurance Plan (PQAP) is being published to provide the sponsor with referenceable documentation for work conducted in support of the Hanford WHC Grout Disposal Program. This plan, which meets NQA-1 requirements, is being applied to work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during FY 1991 in support of this program. It should also be noted that with minor revisions, this plan should be applicable to other projects involving research and development that must comply with NQA-1 requirements.

  9. Philippines revises power plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, D.

    1988-02-01

    Following an unexpected surge in electricity demand the Philippines has revised its medium term power development programme. The sharp increase in electricity consumption follows three years of slack demand due to civil disturbances before the end of the Macros administration and the election of Corazon Aquino as President in 1986. Originally, the Aquino government's medium term power development plans called for about 500MW of generating capacity to be installed between 1986 and 1992. The three proposed plants were scheduled for commissioning in 1991 and 1992. However, a spurt in power demand growth during the past nine months has caused concern among industrialists that power shortages could occur by the end of the decade. So additional capacity will be installed to prevent an anticipated shortfall in electricity supplies by the early 1990s.

  10. Revised SRAC code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchihashi, Keichiro; Ishiguro, Yukio; Kaneko, Kunio; Ido, Masaru.

    1986-09-01

    Since the publication of JAERI-1285 in 1983 for the preliminary version of the SRAC code system, a number of additions and modifications to the functions have been made to establish an overall neutronics code system. Major points are (1) addition of JENDL-2 version of data library, (2) a direct treatment of doubly heterogeneous effect on resonance absorption, (3) a generalized Dancoff factor, (4) a cell calculation based on the fixed boundary source problem, (5) the corresponding edit required for experimental analysis and reactor design, (6) a perturbation theory calculation for reactivity change, (7) an auxiliary code for core burnup and fuel management, etc. This report is a revision of the users manual which consists of the general description, input data requirements and their explanation, detailed information on usage, mathematics, contents of libraries and sample I/O. (author)

  11. Microcomputers and the Improvement of Revision Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses use of word processing software as an effective tool in writing and revision instruction, and describes the role of the teacher. Examples of exercises that encourage revision and of software designed to teach effective revision skills are reviewed. (MBR)

  12. A revised econometric model of the domestic pallet market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert T. Schuler; Walter B. Wallin

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this revised model is to project estimates of consumption and price of wooden pallets in the short term. This model differs from previous ones developed by Schuler and Wallin (1979 and 1980) in the following respects: The structure of the supply side of the market is more realistically identified (from an economic theory point of view) by including...

  13. Current Epidemiology of Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delanois, Ronald E; Mistry, Jaydev B; Gwam, Chukwuweike U; Mohamed, Nequesha S; Choksi, Ujval S; Mont, Michael A

    2017-09-01

    Revision surgery for failed total knee arthroplasty (TKA) continues to pose a substantial burden for the United States healthcare system. The predominant etiology of TKA failure has changed over time and may vary between studies. This report aims to update the current literature on this topic by using a large national database. Specifically, we analyzed: (1) etiologies for revision TKA; (2) frequencies of revision TKA procedures; (3) various demographics including payer type and region; and (4) the length of stay (LOS) and total charges based on type of revision TKA procedure. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database was used to identify all revision TKA procedures performed between 2009 and 2013. Clinical, economic, and demographic data were collected and analyzed for 337,597 procedures. Patients were stratified according to etiology of failure, age, sex, race, US census region, and primary payor class. The mean LOS and total charges were also calculated. Infection was the most common etiology for revision TKA (20.4%), closely followed by mechanical loosening (20.3%). The most common revision TKA procedure performed was all component revision (31.3%). Medicare was the primary payor for the greatest proportion of revisions (57.7%). The South census region performed the most revision TKAs (33.2%). The overall mean LOS was 4.5 days, with arthrotomy for removal of prosthesis without replacement procedures accounting for the longest stays (7.8 days). The mean total charge for revision TKAs was $75,028.07. Without appropriate measures in place, the burden of revision TKAs may become overwhelming and pose a strain on providers and institutions. Continued insight into the etiology and epidemiology of revision TKAs may be the principle step towards improving outcomes and mitigating the need for future revisions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Revised inspection program for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates nuclear power plants to assure adequate protection of the public and the environment from the dangers associated with nuclear materials. NRC fulfills this responsibility through comprehensive safety reviews of nuclear facilities, licensing of organizations that use nuclear materials, and continuing inspection. The NRC inspection program is currently conducted from the five regional offices in or near Philadelphia, Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas and San Francisco. Inspectors travel from the regional offices to nuclear power plants in various phases of construction, test and operation in order to conduct inspections. However, in June 1977 the Commission approved a revision to the inspection program that will include stationing inspectors at selected plants under construction and at all plants in operation. In addition, the revised program provides for appraising the performance of licensees on a national basis and involves more direct measurement and observation by NRC inspectors of work and tests in progress. The program also includes enhanced career management consisting of improved training and career development for inspectors and other professionals. The report was requested in the Conference Report on the NRC Authorization for Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1978. The report provides a discussion of the basis for both the current and revised inspection programs, describes these programs, and shows how the NRC inspection force will be trained and utilized. In addition, the report includes a discussion of the actions that will be taken to assure the objectivity of inspectors

  15. Agencies revise standards for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article deals with a guideline, compiled by the IAEA, for radiation protection. The guidelines aim at the control of individual risk through specified limits, optimisation of protection and the justification of all practices involving exposure to radiation. The guideline is a revision of the 1967 publication of the IAEA, Basic safety standards for radiation protection. According to the document the main resposibility for radiation protection lies with the employer. The workers should be responsible for observing protection procedures and regulations for their own as well as others' safety

  16. A study on scar revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Talwar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Scars are psychologically distressing for the patients and have an impact on the quality of life and self esteem of the patients. Scar revision is an aesthetic skill which is mastered by plastic surgeons and encroached now by dermatosurgeons. Scars on the face are aesthetically unacceptable and various techniques have been improvised for making a scar aesthetically acceptable. Various types of techniques are used for scar revision like W plasty, Z plasty and VY plasty. Aims: To see the efficacy of various scar revision techniques including Z plasty, VY plasty and W plasty in 30 patients with disfiguring scars. Methods: We selected twenty patients of disfiguring scars for the study. The scars from various causes including trauma and burns were included in our study. Various techniques of scar revision include Z plasty, W plasty and VY plasty were performed according to the type and site of scar. Results: Male: female was 1.5: 1. The scar revision surgery yielded excellent results with minimal complications including haematoma formation, secondary infection and delayed healing seen in 5% patients each. Regarding the efficacy of scar revision, excellent improvement was seen in 60% patients, moderate improvement was seen in 30% patients and mild improvement was seen in 10% patients. Conclusions: Dermatologists can employ a number of surgical scar revision techniques. While some are better suited to treat specific types of scars, they can be used in combination with each other or with adjunctive therapies to achieve optimal results.

  17. Inclusive Briefing and User Involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2011-01-01

    Briefing is not just about specifying needs as requirements but also about evaluating how well design proposals fulfil needs and aspirations. Furthermore, briefing is not only about building design. Briefing starts at the preproject stage to create a basis for the project decision and can include...... by top management. The article describes the briefing processes and the methods for user involvement, identifies problem areas and points out possible improvements. The author was actively involved in the project as deputy project director, with responsibility for the briefing process, and is now...... includes a literature study on briefing and user involvement in building projects, and presents a case study of a major building project of a new headquarters and media centre for the Danish Broadcasting Corporation in Copenhagen. The building project was actively used as part of a corporate change process...

  18. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project: Short Project Overview of Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation in the Upper Yakima Basin; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, David E.; Bosch, William J.

    2005-09-01

    The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is on schedule to ascertain whether new artificial production techniques can be used to increase harvest and natural production of spring Chinook salmon while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the fish population being supplemented and keeping adverse genetic and ecological interactions with non-target species or stocks within acceptable limits. The Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility (CESRF) collected its first spring chinook brood stock in 1997, released its first fish in 1999, and age-4 adults have been returning since 2001. In these initial years of CESRF operation, recruitment of hatchery origin fish has exceeded that of fish spawning in the natural environment, but early indications are that hatchery origin fish are not as successful at spawning in the natural environment as natural origin fish when competition is relatively high. When competition is reduced, hatchery fish produced similar numbers of progeny as their wild counterparts. Most demographic variables are similar between natural and hatchery origin fish, however hatchery origin fish were smaller-at-age than natural origin fish. Long-term fitness of the target population is being evaluated by a large-scale test of domestication. Slight changes in predation vulnerability and competitive dominance, caused by domestication, were documented. Distribution of spawners has increased as a result of acclimation site location and salmon homing fidelity. Semi-natural rearing and predator avoidance training have not resulted in significant increases in survival of hatchery fish. However, growth manipulations in the hatchery appear to be reducing the number of precocious males produced by the YKFP and consequently increasing the number of migrants. Genetic impacts to non-target populations appear to be low because of the low stray rates of YKFP fish. Ecological impacts to valued non-target taxa were within containment objectives or impacts that

  19. Revision of ASCE 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, T.A.; Murray, R.C.; Short, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    The original version of ASCE Standard 4, ''Seismic Analysis of Safety-Related Nuclear Structures'' was published in September 1986. It is ASCE policy to update its standards on a five year interval and the Working Group on Seismic Analysis of Safety Related Nuclear Structures was reconvened to formulate the revisions. The goal in updating the standard is to make sure that it is still relevant and that it incorporates the state of the practice in seismic engineering or, in some cases, where it has been demonstrated that state-of-the-art improvements need to be made to standard practice; new improvements are included. The contents of the new standard cover the same areas as the original version, with some additions. The contents are as follows: Input - response spectra and time histories; modeling of structures; analysis of structures; soil-structure interaction; input for subsystem analysis; special structures - buried pipes and conduits, earth-retaining walls, above-ground vertical tanks, raceways, and base-isolated structures; and an appendix providing seismic probabilistic risk assessment and margin assessment

  20. Contact activation: a revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaier, A H

    1997-07-01

    In conclusion, a revised view of the contact system has been presented. This system has little to do with the initiation of hemostasis. Like lupus anticoagulants, deficiencies of contact proteins give prolonged APTTs but may be risk factors for thrombosis. BK from kininogens is a potent modulator of vascular biology inducing vasodilation, tissue plasminogen activator release, and prostacyclin liberation. Kininogens, themselves, are selective inhibitors of alpha-thrombin-induced platelet activation preventing alpha-thrombin from cleaving the cloned thrombin receptor after arginine41. Kininogens' alpha-thrombin inhibitory activity exists in intact kininogens, BK, and all of BK's breakdown products. HK also is the pivotal protein for contact protein assembly on endothelium. It is the receptor for prekallikrein which when bound to HK becomes activated to kallikrein by an endothelial cell enzyme system independent of activated forms of plasma factor XII. Prekallikrein activation on endothelial cells results in kinetically favorable single chain urokinase and plasminogen activation. Thus the "physiologic, negatively charged surface" for contact system activation is really the assembly of these proteins on cell membranes and activation by membrane-associated enzymes.

  1. Involvement Without Participation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsén, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The article presents a case study of a knowledge-intensive company that launched a 2-year project to improve their psychosocial working environment. All parties agreed on the project, and the methods used aimed to promote the involvement of the employees. Surprisingly, the psychosocial working...... environment did not improve; on the contrary, it deteriorated. The article highlights cultural and structural obstacles to the process, including an inadequate understanding of organisational learning and a narrow focus on market and competition. The endeavours did not consistently increase delegation...

  2. Development of the Wechsler Memory Scale--Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, David O.; Young, Laura

    A study involving a sample of people selected to represent the nonimpaired American population, aged 16 to 74 years, was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of the Wechsler Memory Scale--Revised. The scale's subtests were designed to assess memory of personal and general knowledge, logical memory, verbal paired association, figural memory,…

  3. Circumcision revision in male children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Al-Ghazo

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine indications for circumcision revision and to identify the specialty of the person who performed unsatisfactory primary circumcision. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The authors reviewed medical records of 52 cases that underwent circumcision revision over a 6-year period (1998 to 2004. Sleeve surgical technique was used for revision in patients with redundant foreskin or concealed penis, penoplasty for partial or complete degloving of the penis and meatotomy for external meatal stenosis. The mean age of children was 32 months (range 6 months to 9 years. RESULTS: Most of unsatisfactory primary circumcisions (86.7% were performed by laymen. All patients who underwent circumcision revision had good to excellent cosmetic results. CONCLUSION: Primary circumcision performed by laymen carry a high complication rate and serious complications may occur. A period of training and direct supervision by physicians is required before allowing laymen to perform circumcision independently.

  4. EPR first responders revision test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    In this revision test evaluates the acquired knowledge in case of radiological emergency confront. Actions to be taken in relation to people, equipment and the environment. Doses, radioactive sources, pollution

  5. Corporate Author Entries. Revision 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, P.L.

    1986-05-01

    This reference authority has been created and is maintained to provide standard forms for recording the names of organizations consistently in bibliographic citations. This revision includes approximately 42,000 entries established since 1973

  6. Coordinate systems and map projections

    CERN Document Server

    Maling, DH

    1992-01-01

    A revised and expanded new edition of the definitive English work on map projections. The revisions take into account the huge advances in geometrical geodesy which have occurred since the early years of satellite geodesy. The detailed configuration of the geoid resulting from the GEOS and SEASAT altimetry measurements are now taken into consideration. Additionally, the chapter on computation of map projections is updated bearing in mind the availability of pocket calculators and microcomputers. Analytical derivation of some map projections including examples of pseudocylindrical and polyconic

  7. MIDAS Website. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Allen; Shively, R. Joy (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    MIDAS, Man-machine Integration Design and Analysis System, is a unique combination of software tools aimed at reducing design cycle time, supporting quantitative predictions of human-system effectiveness and improving the design of crew stations and their associated operating procedures. This project is supported jointly by the US Army and NASA.

  8. The Disgust Propensity and Sensitivity Scale - Revised : Its predictive value for avoidance behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Overveld, Mark; de Jong, Peter J.; Peters, Madelon L.

    Disgust propensity appears involved in psychopathology. However, current disgust propensity indices display inflated correlations with psychopathology indices due to conceptual overlap. The recently developed Disgust Propensity and Sensitivity Scale - Revised (DPSS-R) is unique in that it measures

  9. Draft revision of human factors guideline HF-010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Chul; Lee, Yong Hee; Oh, In Seok; Lee, Jung Woon; Cha, Woo Chang; Lee, Dhong Ha

    2003-05-01

    The Application of Human Factors to the design of Man-Machine Interfaces System(MMIS) in the nuclear power plant is essential to the safety and productivity of the nuclear power plants, human factors standards and guidelines as well as human factors analysis methods and experiments are weightily used to the design application. A Korean engineering company has developed a human factors engineering guideline, so-call HF-010, and has used it for human factors design, however the revision of HF-010 is necessary owing to lack of the contents related to the advanced MMI(Man-Machine Interfaces). As the results of the reviews of HF-010, it is found out that the revision of Section 9. Computer Displays of HF-010 is urgent, thus the revision was drafted on the basis of integrated human factors design guidelines for VDT, human factors design guidelines for PMAS SPADES display, human factors design guidelines for PMAS alarm display, and human factors design guidelines for electronic displays developed by the surveillance and operation support project of KOICS. The draft revision of HF-010 Section 9 proposed in this report can be utilized for the human factors design of the advanced MMI, and the high practical usability of the draft can be kept up through the continuous revision according to the advancement of digital technology

  10. Parental Involvement and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Sarah Christine

    2015-01-01

    This research study examined the correlation between student achievement and parent's perceptions of their involvement in their child's schooling. Parent participants completed the Parent Involvement Project Parent Questionnaire. Results slightly indicated parents of students with higher level of achievement perceived less demand or invitations…

  11. Revised licensee event report system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, G.T.; Poore, W.P.

    1985-01-01

    Licensee Event Reports (LERs) provide the basis for evaluating and assessing operating experience information from nuclear power plants. The reporting requirements for submitting LERs to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have been revised. Effective Jan. 1, 1984, all events were to be submitted in accordance with 10 CFR 50.73 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Report NUREG-1022, Licensee Event Report System-Description of System and Guidelines for Reporting, describes the guidelines on reportability of events. This article summarizes the reporting requirements as presented in NUREG-1022, high-lights differences in data reported between the revised and previous LER systems, and presents results from a preliminary assessment of LERs submitted under the revised LER reporting system

  12. China Energy Databook. Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinton, J. E.; Fridley, D. G.; Levine, M. D.; Yang, F.; Zhenping, J.; Xing, Z.; Kejun, J.; Xiaofeng, L.

    1996-09-01

    The Energy Analysis Program at LBL first became involved in Chinese energy issues through a joint China-US symposium on markets and energy demand held in Nanjing Nov. 1988. EAP began to collaborate on projects with the Energy Research Institute of China`s State Planning Commission. It was decided to compile, assess, and organize Chinese energy data. Primary interest was to use the data to help understand the historical evolution and likely future of the Chinese energy system; thus the primary criterion was to relate the data to the structure of energy supply and demand in the past and to indicate probable developments (eg, as indicated by patterns of investment). Caveats are included in forewords to both the 1992 and 1996 editions. A chapter on energy prices is included in the 1996 edition. 1993 energy consumption data are not included since there was a major disruption in energy statistical collection in China that year.

  13. Quantum interaction. Revised selected papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dawei; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Lei [Aberdeen Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Computing; Melucci, Massimo [Padua Univ., Padova (Italy). Dept. of Information Engineering; Frommholz, Ingo [Bedfordshire Univ. (United Kingdom); Arafat, Sachi (eds.) [Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Computing Science

    2011-07-01

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Quantum Interaction, QI 2011, held in Aberdeen, UK, in June 2011. The 26 revised full papers and 6 revised poster papers, presented together with 1 tutorial and 1 invited talk were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissions during two rounds of reviewing and improvement. The papers show the cross-disciplinary nature of quantum interaction covering topics such as computation, cognition, mechanics, social interaction, semantic space and information representation and retrieval. (orig.)

  14. Quantum interaction. Revised selected papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Dawei; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Lei; Arafat, Sachi

    2011-01-01

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Quantum Interaction, QI 2011, held in Aberdeen, UK, in June 2011. The 26 revised full papers and 6 revised poster papers, presented together with 1 tutorial and 1 invited talk were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissions during two rounds of reviewing and improvement. The papers show the cross-disciplinary nature of quantum interaction covering topics such as computation, cognition, mechanics, social interaction, semantic space and information representation and retrieval. (orig.)

  15. Medical writing, revising and editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Morten

    2006-01-01

    The globalization of science makes medical writing, editing and revision a rapidly growing field of linguistic study and practice. Medical science texts are written according to uniform, general guidelines and medical genres have become highly conventionalized in terms of structure and linguistic...... form. Medical editing often takes the form of peer review and mainly addresses issues of contents and overall validity. Medical revision incorporates the checking of the macrostructure and the microstructure of the text, its language and style and its suitability for the target reader or client...

  16. Revising Nabokov Revising”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Bouchet

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Nabokov revised his works as he translated them and, on another plane, canon revisionism has been having its backlash and provoked other refracting waves. The purpose of the conference was to advance Nabokov studies through the discussion of how our view of Nabokov’s standing and his works today should be revised, especially after the publication of The Original of Laura. However the conference was not confined to just this theme, since “revising” is a word rich with implications. To borrow s...

  17. Engineering drawing field verification program. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulk, P.F.

    1994-01-01

    Safe, efficient operation of waste tank farm facilities is dependent in part upon the availability of accurate, up-to-date plant drawings. Accurate plant drawings are also required in support of facility upgrades and future engineering remediation projects. This supporting document establishes the procedure for performing a visual field verification of engineering drawings, the degree of visual observation being performed and documenting the results. A copy of the drawing attesting to the degree of visual observation will be paginated into the released Engineering Change Notice (ECN) documenting the field verification for future retrieval and reference. All waste tank farm essential and support drawings within the scope of this program will be converted from manual to computer aided drafting (CAD) drawings. A permanent reference to the field verification status will be placed along the right border of the CAD-converted drawing, referencing the revision level, at which the visual verification was performed and documented

  18. 75 FR 19467 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Texas; Revisions to the New Source Review (NSR...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... Rules Revisions; 112(g) Revisions (Rule Project No. 98001-116-AI). Under the Settlement Agreement in... provisions that either prohibit future increases at the Qualified Facility, or ensure that any future... commenters do not want coal to stand in the way of a clean energy future in Texas. Strong rules are needed to...

  19. Revised energy levels of singly ionized lanthanum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güzelçimen, Feyza; Tonka, Mehdi; Uddin, Zaheer; Bhatti, Naveed Anjum; Windholz, Laurentius; Kröger, Sophie; Başar, Gönül

    2018-05-01

    Based on the experimental wavenumbers of 344 spectral lines from calibrated Fourier transform (FT) spectra as well as wavenumbers of 81 lines from the wavelength tables from literature, the energy of 115 fine structure levels of singly ionized lanthanum has been revised by weighted global fits. The classifications of the lines are provided by numerous previous investigations of lanthanum by different spectroscopic methods and authors. For the high accurate determination of the center of gravity wavenumbers from the experimental spectrum, the hyperfine constants of the involved levels have been taken into account, if possible. For the 94 levels with known hyperfine constants the accuracy of energy values is better than 0.01 cm-1. For 34 levels the magnetic dipole hyperfine constants A have been determined from FT spectra as part of this work. For four of these 34 levels even electric quadrupole hyperfine constants B could be estimated. For levels, which have experimentally unknown hyperfine constants and which are connected only by lines not found in the FT spectra but taken from literature, the uncertainties of energy values are about a factor of 10 higher. A list of all revised level energies together with a compilation of hyperfine structure data is given as well as a list of all lines used.

  20. 78 FR 16460 - Capital Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    ...-0030] RIN 2132-AA92 Capital Project Management AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT... withdrawing its September 13, 2011, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to revise the agency's project management... will reinitiate a rulemaking for project management oversight in the near future. Additionally, FTA may...

  1. Failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leta, Tesfaye H; Lygre, Stein Håkon L; Skredderstuen, Arne; Hallan, Geir; Furnes, Ove

    2015-02-01

    In Norway, the proportion of revision knee arthroplasties increased from 6.9% in 1994 to 8.5% in 2011. However, there is limited information on the epidemiology and causes of subsequent failure of revision knee arthroplasty. We therefore studied survival rate and determined the modes of failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties. This study was based on 1,016 aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register between 1994 and 2011. Revisions done for infections were not included. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to assess the survival rate and the relative risk of re-revision with all causes of re-revision as endpoint. 145 knees failed after revision total knee arthroplasty. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of re-revision (28%), followed by instability (26%), loose tibial component (17%), and pain (10%). The cumulative survival rate for revision total knee arthroplasties was 85% at 5 years, 78% at 10 years, and 71% at 15 years. Revision total knee arthroplasties with exchange of the femoral or tibial component exclusively had a higher risk of re-revision (RR = 1.7) than those with exchange of the whole prosthesis. The risk of re-revision was higher for men (RR = 2.0) and for patients aged less than 60 years (RR = 1.6). In terms of implant survival, revision of the whole implant was better than revision of 1 component only. Young age and male sex were risk factors for re-revision. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of failure of revision of aseptic total knee arthroplasties.

  2. The virtual GULLIVER project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trappl, R.; Nijholt, Antinus; Stuk, M.; Zwiers, Jakob

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we discuss our virtual reality project Gulliver. This project is part of a more comprehensive project conceived by two artists, Matjaž Štuk and Alena Hudcovicová, called “Gulliver’s Museum of Living Art��?. Our part of the project involves a virtual reality version of Swift’s Gulliver

  3. Graphic Display Development Program. Volume II, Revision 0. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and utility of developing a set of graphic displays to support symptom-based emergency operating procedures (EOPs). Development of generic graphic displays is based on Revision 3 of the symptomatic Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPGs) prepared by the BWR Owners' Group (BWROG), and development of plant-specific graphic displays is based on a set of emergency operating procedures developed from these EPGs

  4. The nuclear liability conventions revised

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyners, P.

    2004-01-01

    The signature on 12 February 2004 of the Protocols amending respectively the 1960 Paris Convention and the 1963 Brussels Supplementary Convention was the second step of the process of modernisation of the international nuclear liability regime after the adoption in September 1997 of a Protocol revising the 1963 Vienna Convention and of a new Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage. The common objective of the new instruments is to provide more funds to compensate a larger number of potential victims in respect of a broader range of damage. Another goal of the revision exercise was to maintain the compatibility between the Paris and Vienna based systems, a commitment enshrined in the 1988 Joint Protocol, as well as to ascertain that Paris/Brussels countries could also become a Party to the Convention on Supplementary Compensation. However, while generally consistent vis a vis the Joint Protocol, the provisions of the Paris and Vienna Conventions, as revised, differ on some significant aspects. Another remaining issue is whether the improved international nuclear liability regime will succeed in attracting in the future a larger number of countries, particularly outside Europe, and will so become truly universal. Therefore, the need for international co-operation to address these issues, to facilitate the adoption of new implementing legislation and to ensure that this special regime keeps abreast of economic and technological developments, is in no way diminished after the revision of the Conventions.(author)

  5. Concise revision of the Sarcospermataceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, H.J.; Royen, van P.

    1952-01-01

    After the senior writer, together with W. W. Varossieau, had published a revision of this monogeneric family (Blumea III, 1938—’39 and IV, 1941), some more material has been examined by us and, moreover, some new species have been described. Thanks to the courtesy of Prof. F. Gagnepain of Paris, and

  6. Guidelines for Curriculum Development. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, K.; And Others

    The curriculum development process explained in this booklet was first implemented at College of the Redwoods in May 1986 and then revised in June 1989. First, information on the college's Curriculum Committee is provided, indicating that the committee was formed to plan credit/non-credit courses; evaluate and approve additions, modifications, or…

  7. Revised Accounting for Business Combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Arlette C.; Key, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) has recently issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 141 (Revised 2007) Business Combinations. The object of this Statement is to improve the relevance, representational faithfulness, and comparability of reported information about a business combination and its effects. This Statement…

  8. How Adults Learn. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, J. R.

    The book's emphasis is on learning during the years of adulthood and examines present-day practice of adult education for practitioners. This revised edition brings up to date advances in such areas of learning as controversial theory; the effects of environment; sensory processes; intellectual capacities; motivation and attitude; transactional…

  9. A revision of the Paronychiinae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaudhri, Mohammad Nazeer

    1968-01-01

    This study was undertaken, in April 1964, at the suggestion of Prof. Dr. J. Lanjouw. The need for such a revision, was, however, stressed by the authors of the subtribe, viz. PAX et K. HOFFMANN, who, while delimiting these genera, remarked that the Systematics of both the (main) genera of this

  10. 77 FR 41980 - Uniontown Hydro, LLC, Project No. 12958-001-Kentucky and Indiana, Uniontown Hydroelectric Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-17

    ...-001-Kentucky and Indiana, Uniontown Hydroelectric Project; Newburgh Hydro, LLC, Project No. 12962-001-Kentucky and Indiana, Newburgh Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Revised Restricted Service List for a... licenses for the proposed Uniontown Hydroelectric Project and Newburgh Hydroelectric Project. The...

  11. Diet History Questionnaire: Database Revision History

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following details all additions and revisions made to the DHQ nutrient and food database. This revision history is provided as a reference for investigators who may have performed analyses with a previous release of the database.

  12. [Revised practice guideline 'Anaemia in midwifery practice'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, M.; Jans, S.M.P.J.

    2012-01-01

    The practice guideline of the Royal Dutch Organization of Midwives 'Anaemia in primary care midwifery practice' published in 2000, has recently been revised. The revised guideline takes physiological haemodilution during pregnancy into consideration and provides gestation specific reference values

  13. Revised Human Health Risk Assessment on Chlorpyrifos

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have revised our human health risk assessment and drinking water exposure assessment for chlorpyrifos that supported our October 2015 proposal to revoke all food residue tolerances for chlorpyrifos. Learn about the revised analysis.

  14. 75 FR 60485 - NRC Enforcement Policy Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2008-0497] NRC Enforcement Policy Revision AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Policy statement. SUMMARY: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or Commission) is publishing a major revision to its Enforcement Policy (Enforcement Policy or Policy) to...

  15. Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality, Revision 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, E.D.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Durst, Bonita E.; Erickson, David; Puigh, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    not appear in the 5f shell until protactinium (Atomic No. 91). It is, however, the inner 14 electrons in the 5f electron shell that distinguish this series from other elements of the periodic table. The first three elements occur naturally and the next eleven are man-made. Trace amounts of Np and Pu have been found, however, in naturally-occurring uranium ore samples as a result of the absorption of neutrons from both cosmic rays and spontaneous fission. Since the cross sections for the various neutron interactions differ widely between the isotopes, it is to be expected that anomalies will occur. The safety record pertaining to criticality control and prevention of accidental chain reactions outside reactors has been outstanding to date considering the many challenges of a new industry. The anomalies are presented to add to the awareness of those persons involved with criticality control and prevention and so contribute to a high level of safety within the nuclear industry, which is expected to play a more significant role in the future in view of the currently projected energy shortages. A large body of knowledge has been accumulated on criticality, and the factors affecting criticality, since inception of the first chain reaction in 1942. Criticality, however, is fraught with complexities, and it may be well to recount a few of the apparent anomalies - some of which have heretofore remained unpublished in the open literature. Most of the examples to be cited are not well known. Yet, without knowledge of these anomalies, an unwise application of existing data could lead to potentially serious consequences. As an introduction to the apparent anomalies that follow, the discussion begins with a listing of physical characteristics followed by a qualitative description of the concepts and complexities of nuclear criticality.

  16. Humeral windows in revision total elbow arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, Chris A; Salama, Amir; Stanley, David

    2016-04-01

    The use of cortical windows for revision elbow arthroplasty has not previously been widely reported. Their use aids safe revision of a well fixed humeral prosthesis and can be used in the setting of dislocation, periprosthetic fracture or aseptic loosening of the ulnar component. We describe our technique and results of cortical windows in the distal humerus for revision elbow arthroplasty surgery.

  17. 24 CFR 968.225 - Budget revisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Budget revisions. 968.225 Section... Fewer Than 250 Units) § 968.225 Budget revisions. (a) A PHA shall not incur any modernization cost in excess of the total HUD-approved CIAP budget. A PHA shall submit a budget revision, in a form prescribed...

  18. 48 CFR 15.307 - Proposal revisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Source Selection 15.307 Proposal revisions. (a) If an... allow proposal revisions to clarify and document understandings reached during negotiations. At the... submit a final proposal revision. The contracting officer is required to establish a common cut-off date...

  19. Revised accident source terms for light-water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soffer, L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    This paper presents revised accident source terms for light-water reactors incorporating the severe accident research insights gained in this area over the last 15 years. Current LWR reactor accident source terms used for licensing date from 1962 and are contained in Regulatory Guides 1.3 and 1.4. These specify that 100% of the core inventory of noble gases and 25% of the iodine fission products are assumed to be instantaneously available for release from the containment. The chemical form of the iodine fission products is also assumed to be predominantly elemental iodine. These assumptions have strongly affected present nuclear air cleaning requirements by emphasizing rapid actuation of spray systems and filtration systems optimized to retain elemental iodine. A proposed revision of reactor accident source terms and some im implications for nuclear air cleaning requirements was presented at the 22nd DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference. A draft report was issued by the NRC for comment in July 1992. Extensive comments were received, with the most significant comments involving (a) release fractions for both volatile and non-volatile species in the early in-vessel release phase, (b) gap release fractions of the noble gases, iodine and cesium, and (c) the timing and duration for the release phases. The final source term report is expected to be issued in late 1994. Although the revised source terms are intended primarily for future plants, current nuclear power plants may request use of revised accident source term insights as well in licensing. This paper emphasizes additional information obtained since the 22nd Conference, including studies on fission product removal mechanisms, results obtained from improved severe accident code calculations and resolution of major comments, and their impact upon the revised accident source terms. Revised accident source terms for both BWRS and PWRS are presented.

  20. Project mobilisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.; Limbrick, A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper identifies and reviews the issues to be addressed and the procedures to be followed during the mobilisation of projects using LFG as an energy source. Knowledge of the procedures involved in project mobilisation, their sequence and probable timescales, is essential for efficient project management. It is assumed that the majority of projects will be situated on existing, licensed landfill sites and, in addition to complying with the relevant conditions of the waste management licence and original planning consent, any proposed developments on the site will require a separate planning consent. Experience in the UK indicates that obtaining planning permission rarely constitutes a barrier to the development of schemes for the utilisation of LFG. Even so, an appreciation of the applicable environmental and planning legislation is essential as this will enable the developer to recognise the main concerns of the relevant planning authority at an early stage of the project, resulting in the preparation of an informed and well-structured application for planning permission. For a LFG utilisation scheme on an existing landfill site, the need to carry out an environmental assessment (EA) as part of the application for planning permission will, in vitually all cases, be discretionary. Even if not deemed necessary by the planning authority, an EA is a useful tool at the planning application stage, to identify and address potential problems and to support discussions with bodies such as the Environment Agency, from whom consents or authorisations may be required. Carrying out an EA can thus provide for more cost-effective project development and enhanced environmental protection. Typically, the principal contractual arrangements, such as the purchase of gas or the sale of electricity, will have been established before the project mobilisation phase. However, there are many other contractural arrangements that must be established, and consents and permits that may be

  1. Project Finance: Basic Components

    OpenAIRE

    Alfieri Li Ojeda, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    The natural speed of the contemporary world demands large investment projects which require specialized financial techniques such as Project Finance, defined as a fund to finance investment projects of great magnitude. Every Project Finance involves a wide range of elements such as promoters, government, contractors andsuppliers, among others, that will ensure project success. La rapidez del mundo contemporáneo exige que los grandes proyectos de inversión requieran de técnicas financieras ...

  2. ASSET guidelines. Revised 1991 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    The present publication is an updated version of the IAEA Assessment of Safety Significant Events Team (ASSET) Guidelines, IAEA-TECDOC-573, published in 1990. Sections 5 and 6 include revised definitions and investigation guidelines for identification of both direct and root causes. These revisions were recommended by a Consultants Meeting held in Vienna on 3-7 December 1990. This guidance is not intended to infringe an expert's prerogative to investigate additional items. Its main purpose is to provide a basic structure and ensure consistency in the assessments. Use of the ASSET guidelines should also facilitate comparison between the observations made in different nuclear power plants and harmonize the reporting of generic ASSET results. The guidelines should always be used with a critical attitude and a view to possible improvements

  3. Trust Revision for Conflicting Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    strategy is to first revise a priori trust assignments as a function of the degree of conflict, before the evidence is fused. This paper focuses on the...practical trust transitivity seems to be idiosyncratic for humans and animals, with no true analogue among non- living forms (and in the physical world ...visiting a foreign country Alice is looking for a restaurant where the locals go, because she would like to avoid places overrun by tourists. She meets a

  4. Clean Air Act. Revision 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Air Act, as amended, and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. This Reference Book has been completely revised and is current through February 15, 1994.

  5. Revised spatially distributed global livestock emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asrar, G.; Wolf, J.; West, T. O.

    2015-12-01

    Livestock play an important role in agricultural carbon cycling through consumption of biomass and emissions of methane. Quantification and spatial distribution of methane and carbon dioxide produced by livestock is needed to develop bottom-up estimates for carbon monitoring. These estimates serve as stand-alone international emissions estimates, as input to global emissions modeling, and as comparisons or constraints to flux estimates from atmospheric inversion models. Recent results for the US suggest that the 2006 IPCC default coefficients may underestimate livestock methane emissions. In this project, revised coefficients were calculated for cattle and swine in all global regions, based on reported changes in body mass, quality and quantity of feed, milk production, and management of living animals and manure for these regions. New estimates of livestock methane and carbon dioxide emissions were calculated using the revised coefficients and global livestock population data. Spatial distribution of population data and associated fluxes was conducted using the MODIS Land Cover Type 5, version 5.1 (i.e. MCD12Q1 data product), and a previously published downscaling algorithm for reconciling inventory and satellite-based land cover data at 0.05 degree resolution. Preliminary results for 2013 indicate greater emissions than those calculated using the IPCC 2006 coefficients. Global total enteric fermentation methane increased by 6%, while manure management methane increased by 38%, with variation among species and regions resulting in improved spatial distributions of livestock emissions. These new estimates of total livestock methane are comparable to other recently reported studies for the entire US and the State of California. These new regional/global estimates will improve the ability to reconcile top-down and bottom-up estimates of methane production as well as provide updated global estimates for use in development and evaluation of Earth system models.

  6. Revised dietary guidelines for Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Young Ai; Lee, Haeng Shin; Kim, Bok Hee; Lee, Yoonna; Lee, Hae Jeung; Moon, Jae Jin; Kim, Cho-il

    2008-01-01

    With rapidly changing dietary environment, dietary guidelines for Koreans were revised and relevant action guides were developed. First, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee was established with experts and government officials from the fields of nutrition, preventive medicine, health promotion, agriculture, education and environment. The Committee set dietary goals for Koreans aiming for a better nutrition state of all after a thorough review and analysis of recent information related to nutritional status and/or problems of Korean population, changes in food production/supply, disease pattern, health policy and agricultural policy. Then, the revised dietary guidelines were proposed to accomplish these goals in addition to 6 different sets of dietary action guides to accommodate specific nutrition and health problems of respective age groups. Subsequently, these guidelines and guides were subjected to the focus group review, consumer perception surveys, and a public hearing for general and professional comments. Lastly, the language was clarified in terms of public understanding and phraseology. The revised Dietary guidelines for Koreans are as follows: eat a variety of grains, vegetables, fruits, fish, meat, poultry and dairy products; choose salt-preserved foods less, and use less salt when you prepare foods; increase physical activity for a healthy weight, and balance what you eat with your activity; enjoy every meal, and do not skip breakfast; if you drink alcoholic beverages, do so in moderation; prepare foods properly, and order sensible amounts; enjoy our rice-based diet.

  7. Evaluation of revised trauma score in poly- traumatized patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, H.N.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prognostic value and reliability of revised trauma score (RTS) in polytraumatized patients. Subjects and Methods: Thirty adult patients of road traffic accidents sustaining multisystem injuries due to high energy blunt trauma were managed according to the protocols of advanced trauma life support (ATLS) and from their first set of data RTS was calculated. Score of each patient was compared with his final outcome at the time of discharge from the hospital. Results: The revised trauma score was found to be a reliable predictor of prognosis of polytraumatized patients but a potentially weak predictor for those patients having severe injury involving a single anatomical region. The higher the RTS the better the prognosis of polytrauma patient and vice versa. Revised trauma score <8 turned out to be an indicator of severe injury with high mortality and morbidity and overall mortality in polytraumatized patients was 26.66%. However, RTS-6 was associated with 50% mortality. Conclusion: The revised trauma score is a reliable indicator of prognosis of polytraumatized patients. Therefore, it can be used for field and emergency room triage. (author)

  8. 75 FR 69363 - HUD Multifamily Rental Projects: Regulatory Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-12

    ...) mortgage- backed securities, or other bond obligations specified by HUD, any of which contains a lock-out... proposed January 21, 2010. Comment: Paragraph (a)(1) of 24 CFR 207.258 should provide for an automatic 90-day extension of the deadline for filing notice of the mortgagee's election upon request. An automatic...

  9. Leith Creek, Scotland County, North Carolina, Detailed Project Report. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-07-01

    of Leith Creek within the study limits. Climate in the area is characteristic of the warm temperate zone. In summer, the days are generally hot and...RESOURCES B-2 TERRAIN AND LAND USE B-4 S CLIMATE B-4 ARCHEOLOGiCAL CONSIDERATIONS B-4 NATURAL RESOURCES B-5 0 HUMAN RESOURCES 8-6 POPULATION...irtoved cnd it ions jere corcp’-ted11, >.ve pti Vn (CI card) of the Hydr- aulic Enqincerinq Cm tt ’ .. ~ v.’Water- Surface Profi les’. Improved profil

  10. 76 FR 24363 - HUD Multifamily Rental Projects: Regulatory Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... tenants in common borrowers will have an adverse economic impact on the borrower and result in...) fails to pay before delinquency any Taxes secured by a lien having priority over this Security... consistent with the President's executive order. V. Findings and Certifications Environmental Impact A...

  11. Revised Final Report on Project “Micro-Misted Plasmas”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overzet, Lawrence J. [UT Dallas; Goeckner, Matthew J. [UT Dallas

    2014-06-04

    The key subject of this program was an examination of droplet evaporation kinetics in conjunction with plasma characteristics. Specifically, we undertook a careful investigation of the physical interactions between microscopic droplets of evaporating liquids and low pressure environments (including plasmas) by both experiment and simulation.

  12. Salt Repository Project input to seismic design: Revision 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The Salt Repository Program (SRP) Input to Seismic Design (ISD) documents the assumptions, rationale, approaches, judgments, and analyses that support the development of seismic-specific data and information to be used for shaft design in accordance with the SRP Shaft Design Guide (SDG). The contents of this document are divided into four subject areas: (1) seismic assessment, (2) stratigraphy and material properties for seismic design, (3) development of seismic design parameters, and (4) host media stability. These four subject areas have been developed considering expected conditions at a proposed site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. The ISD should be used only in conjunction with seismic design of the exploratory and repository shafts. Seismic design considerations relating to surface facilities are not addressed in this document. 54 refs., 55 figs., 18 tabs

  13. Ada 9X Project Revision Request Report. Supplement 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    SYNCHRONIZATION POINTS OF A TASK DATE: August 8, 1989 NAME: Patrick de Bondeli ADDRESS: CR2A, 19 Avenue Dubonnet 92411 - COURBEVOIE - CEDEX, FRANCE TELEPHONE...to the parent task. Evaluating the attributes TERMINATED or CALLABLE - Giovini and Zucca (1986) consider them as synchronization points, but we do not...Elena. An Analysis of Ada Tasking December 1986. Companion paper of the Ada Formal Definition Sponsored by the European Commission. De Bondeli , Patrick

  14. Mixed Waste Management Facility, revised FY94 Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streit, R.

    1994-01-01

    This revision of the FY94 Plan incorporates changes to work during FY94 in response to the DOE request in the DOE KD-1 decision letter of June 28,1994. This letter provided guidance of both scope and budget profile in response to the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) issued by the MWMF Project in April, 1994. This work plan only addresses work for the remainder of FY94. A revised plan for the complete project is in development and will be issued separately. Since February, 1994, the MWMF Project has been operating on DOE guidance directing that work on the CDR be completed, that only other essential work be continued to maintain the project, and that costs be maintained at approximately the January, 1994 spending levels until a KD-1 decision was made. This has formed the basis for monthly reports through June, 1994. The baseline contained in this report will become the basis for reports during the remainder of FY94

  15. Integrated Project Management System description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Integrated Program Management System (IPMS) Description is a ''working'' document that describes the work processes of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office (UMTRA) and IPMS Group. This document has undergone many revisions since the UMTRA Project began; this revision not only updates the work processes but more clearly explains the relationships between the Project Office, contractors, and other participants. The work process flow style has been revised to better describe Project work and the relationships of participants. For each work process, more background and guidance on ''why'' and ''what is expected'' is given. For example, a description of activity data sheets has been added in the work organization and the Project performance and reporting processes, as well as additional detail about the federal budget process and funding management and improved flow charts and explanations of cost and schedule management. A chapter has been added describing the Cost Reduction/Productivity Improvement Program. The Change Control Board (CCB) procedures (Appendix A) have been updated. Project critical issues meeting (PCIM) procedures have been added as Appendix B. Budget risk assessment meeting procedures have been added as Appendix C. These appendices are written to act as stand-alone documentation for each process. As the procedures are improved and updated, the documentation can be updated separately

  16. Patient involvement in hospital architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herriott, Richard

    2017-01-01

    the structure of the design process, identification and ranking of stakeholders, the methods of user-involvement and approaches to accessibility. The paper makes recommendations for a change of approach to user-participation in large-scale, long-duration projects. The paper adds new insight on an under...

  17. The Little Black Book of Project Management

    CERN Document Server

    Thomsett, Michael C

    2009-01-01

    For nearly twenty years, The Little Black Book of Project Management has provided businesspeople everywhere with a quick and effective introduction to project management tools and methodology. The revised and updated third edition reflects the newest techniques, the latest project management software, as well as the most recent changes to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK™). Readers will find invaluable strategies for: • Organizing any project • Choosing the project team • Preparing a budget and sticking to it • Scheduling, flowcharting, and controlling a project • Preparing proj

  18. Occupational exposures worldwide and revision of international standards for protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czarwinski, R.; Crick, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) has become the world authority on the levels and effects of ionising radiation. Since 1975, UNSCEAR has evaluated inter alia the level of occupational exposure worldwide. Based on revised questionnaires, more detailed information is now available. The results of the last evaluation (1995-2002) will be shown in the paper. Lessons learned from the responses by UN Member States will be given, as well as an outline of plans for data collection in future cycles. The requirements for protection against exposure to ionising radiation of workers, the public and patients are established in the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionising Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS), published in 1996. As a result of a review of the BSS in 2006, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) started a process for the revision of these standards in 2007. International organisations including the joint sponsoring organisations of the BSS-IAEA, FAO, ILO, OECD/NEA, PAHO and WHO-as well as potential new joint sponsoring organisations of the revised BSS-the European Commission and UNEP-were involved from the beginning in the revision process. The paper also provides a summary of the status of the Draft Revised BSS and describes the new format. The paper focuses, in particular, on requirements for the protection of workers as well as record keeping requirements, which provide the legal basis for the collection of specific data; these data are of the type that can be used by UNSCEAR. (authors)

  19. Revision hip replacement for recurrent Hydatid disease of the pelvis: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekar Coonoor R

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A case of a large recurrent hydatid cyst involving the right ilium and right hip treated with excision of the cyst, Total hip replacement and revision of the acetabular component with a Tripolar articulation for cyst recurrence and acetabular component loosening is presented along with a review of the relevant literature. To our knowledge there is no reported case of Total Hip replacement and revision for hydatid disease involving the bony pelvis.

  20. Britain's delegation to CERN, the European Centre for Nuclear Research near Geneva, voted in favour of a project which take seven years to build, involve a 27 kilometre long tunnel, and cost 230 million pounds. Now LEP receives the go-ahead later this month

    CERN Multimedia

    Llewellyn Smith, Christopher Hubert

    1981-01-01

    Britain's delegation to CERN, the European Centre for Nuclear Research near Geneva, voted in favour of a project which take seven years to build, involve a 27 kilometre long tunnel, and cost 230 million pounds. Now LEP receives the go-ahead later this month

  1. Revised ground-water monitoring compliance plan for the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    This document contains ground-water monitoring plans for a mixed waste storage facility located on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. This facility has been used since 1973 for storage of mixed wastes, which contain both chemicals and radionuclides. The ground-water monitoring plans presented here represent revision and expansion of an effort in June 1985. At that time, a facility-specific monitoring program was implemented at the 183-H Basins as part of the regulatory compliance effort being conducted on the Hanford Site. This monitoring program was based on the ground-water monitoring requirements for interimstatus facilities, which are those facilities that do not yet have final permits, but are authorized to continue interim operations while engaged in the permitting process. The program initially implemented for the 183-H Basins was designed to be an alternate program, which is required instead of the standard detection program when a facility is known or suspected to have contaminated the ground water in the uppermost aquifer. This effort, named the RCRA Compliance Ground-Water Monitoring Project for the 183-H Basins, was implemented. A supporting project involving ground-water flow modeling for the area surrounding the 183-H Basins was also initiated during 1985. Those efforts and the results obtained are described in subsequent chapters of this document. 26 refs., 55 figs., 14 tabs

  2. Re-visions of rationality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Ben R

    2005-01-01

    The appeal of simple algorithms that take account of both the constraints of human cognitive capacity and the structure of environments has been an enduring theme in cognitive science. A novel version of such a boundedly rational perspective views the mind as containing an 'adaptive toolbox' of specialized cognitive heuristics suited to different problems. Although intuitively appealing, when this version was proposed, empirical evidence for the use of such heuristics was scant. I argue that in the light of empirical studies carried out since then, it is time this 'vision of rationality' was revised. An alternative view based on integrative models rather than collections of heuristics is proposed.

  3. Revised hypothesis and future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norsk, P; Drummer, C; Christensen, N J

    2001-01-01

    Results from space have been unexpected and not predictable from the results of ground-based simulations. Therefore, the concept of how weightlessness and gravity modulates the regulation of body fluids must be revised and a new simulation model developed. The main questions to ask in the future...... are the following: Does weightlessness induce a diuresis and natriuresis during the initial hours of space flight leading to an extracellular and intravascular fluid volume deficit? Can sodium in excess be stored in a hitherto unknown way, particularly during space flight? Why are fluid and sodium retaining systems...

  4. 76 FR 2683 - Notice of a Project Waiver of Section 1605: (Buy American Requirement) of the American Recovery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... to delay shovel ready projects by requiring entities, like the IEUA, to revise their design and... the ``shovel ready'' status for this project. Further delay of this project would contravene the most...

  5. 76 FR 18218 - Notice of a Project Waiver of Section 1605 (Buy American Requirement) of the American Recovery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... delay projects that are ``shovel ready'' by requiring cities such as Salt Lake City to revise their... unreasonable delay and thus displace the ``shovel ready'' status for this project. To further delay project...

  6. 76 FR 2684 - Notice of a Project Waiver of Section 1605 (Buy American Requirement) of the American Recovery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... construction, not to delay shovel ready projects by requiring entities, like Lake County, to revise their... thus displace the ``shovel ready'' status for this project. Further delay of this project would...

  7. The PACARDO research project: youthful drug involvement in Central America and the Dominican Republic Proyecto de investigación PACARDO: el consumo de drogas entre la juventud en Centroamérica y la República Dominicana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M. Dormitzer

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To estimate the occurrence and school-level clustering of drug involvement among school-attending adolescent youths in each of seven countries in Latin America, drawing upon evidence from the PACARDO research project, a multinational collaborative epidemiological research study. METHODS: During 1999-2000, anonymous self-administered questionnaires on drug involvement and related behaviors were administered to a cross-sectional, nationally representative sample that included a total of 12 797 students in the following seven countries: Costa Rica (n= 1 702, the Dominican Republic (n= 2 023, El Salvador (n= 1 628, Guatemala (n= 2 530, Honduras (n= 1 752, Nicaragua (n= 1 419, and Panama (n= 1 743. (The PACARDO name concatenates PA for Panamá,CA for Centroamérica,and RDO for República Dominicana. Estimates for exposure opportunity and actual use of alcohol, tobacco, inhalants, marijuana, cocaine (crack/coca paste, amphetamines and methamphetamines, tranquilizers, ecstasy, and heroin were assessed via responses about questions on age of first chance to try each drug, and first use. Logistic regression models accounting for the complex survey design were used to estimate the associations of interest. RESULTS: Cumulative occurrence estimates for alcohol, tobacco, inhalants, marijuana, and illegal drug use for the overall sample were, respectively: 52%, 29%, 5%, 4%, and 5%. In comparison to females, males were more likely to use alcohol, tobacco, inhalants, marijuana, and illegal drugs; the odds ratio estimates were 1.3, 2.1, 1.6, 4.1, and 3.2, respectively. School-level clustering was noted in all countries for alcohol and tobacco use; it was also noted in Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Panama for illegal drug use. CONCLUSIONS: This report sheds new light on adolescent drug experiences in Panama, the five Spanish-heritage countries of Central America, and the Dominican Republic, and presents the first estimates of school

  8. IDC Reengineering Phase 2 Project Scope.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, James M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    This report provides a brief description of the scope of the IDC Reengineering Phase 2 project. It describes the goals and objectives of reengineering, the system definition, and the technical scope of the system. REVISIONS Version Date Author/Team Revision Description Authorized by 1.0 9/25/2014 SNL IDC Reengineering Team Unlimited Release for I2 M. Harris 1.1 28/01/2015 IDC Reengineering Team Align with previous IDC scope document E. Tomuta.

  9. A revised limbic system model for memory, emotion and behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catani, Marco; Dell'acqua, Flavio; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel

    2013-09-01

    Emotion, memories and behaviour emerge from the coordinated activities of regions connected by the limbic system. Here, we propose an update of the limbic model based on the seminal work of Papez, Yakovlev and MacLean. In the revised model we identify three distinct but partially overlapping networks: (i) the Hippocampal-diencephalic and parahippocampal-retrosplenial network dedicated to memory and spatial orientation; (ii) The temporo-amygdala-orbitofrontal network for the integration of visceral sensation and emotion with semantic memory and behaviour; (iii) the default-mode network involved in autobiographical memories and introspective self-directed thinking. The three networks share cortical nodes that are emerging as principal hubs in connectomic analysis. This revised network model of the limbic system reconciles recent functional imaging findings with anatomical accounts of clinical disorders commonly associated with limbic pathology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Deep Borehole Emplacement Mode Hazard Analysis Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevougian, S. David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-07

    This letter report outlines a methodology and provides resource information for the Deep Borehole Emplacement Mode Hazard Analysis (DBEMHA). The main purpose is identify the accident hazards and accident event sequences associated with the two emplacement mode options (wireline or drillstring), to outline a methodology for computing accident probabilities and frequencies, and to point to available databases on the nature and frequency of accidents typically associated with standard borehole drilling and nuclear handling operations. Risk mitigation and prevention measures, which have been incorporated into the two emplacement designs (see Cochran and Hardin 2015), are also discussed. A key intent of this report is to provide background information to brief subject matter experts involved in the Emplacement Mode Design Study. [Note: Revision 0 of this report is concentrated more on the wireline emplacement mode. It is expected that Revision 1 will contain further development of the preliminary fault and event trees for the drill string emplacement mode.

  11. Revision Total Hip Arthoplasty: Factors Associated with Re-Revision Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Khatod, M; Cafri, G; Inacio, MCS; Schepps, AL; Paxton, EW; Bini, SA

    2015-01-01

    The survivorship of implants after revision total hip arthroplasty and risk factors associated with re-revision are not well defined. We evaluated the re-revision rate with use of the institutional total joint replacement registry. The purpose of this study was to determine patient, implant, and surgeon factors associated with re-revision total hip arthroplasty.A retrospective cohort study was conducted. The total joint replacement registry was used to identify patients who had undergone revi...

  12. Revised nonstochastic health effects models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaniv, S.S.; Scott, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    In 1989, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published a revision of the 1985 report, Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis, NUREG/CR-4214, that included models for early occurring and continuing nonstochastic effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. This paper discusses specific models for lethality from early occurring and continuing effects. For brevity, hematopoietic-syndrome lethality is called hematopoietic death; pulmonary-syndrome lethality is called pulmonary death; and gastrointestinal syndrome lethality is called gastrointestinal death. Two-parameter Weibull risk functions are recommended for estimating the risk of hematopoietic, pulmonary, or gastrointestinal death. The risks are obtained indirectly by using hazard functions; as a result, this type of approach has been called hazard-function modeling and the models generated are called hazard-function models. In the 1989 NUREG/CR-4214 report, changes were made in the parameter values for a number of effects, and the models used to estimate hematopoietic and pulmonary deaths were substantially revised. Upper and lower estimates of model parameters are provided for all early health effects models. In this paper, we discuss the 1989 models for hematopoietic and pulmonary deaths, highlighting the differences between the 1989 and 1985 models. In addition, we give the reasons for which the 1985 models were modified

  13. The Dwarf Project: Vidojevica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vince, O.

    2013-05-01

    The DWARF project is an important international project for observing eclipsing binary stars and searching for third companion which orbit around both stars. Recently, a group of researchers at the Astronomical Observatory of Belgrade joined this project using the 60 cm telescope at the Astronomical Station Vidojevica for observations. All the equipment and the human potential involved with this project from Serbia will be described in this paper.

  14. Comparative Analysis of Direct Hospital Care Costs between Aseptic and Two-Stage Septic Knee Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasch, Richard; Merk, Sebastian; Assmann, Grit; Lahm, Andreas; Napp, Matthias; Merk, Harry; Flessa, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Background The most common intermediate and long-term complications of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) include aseptic and septic failure of prosthetic joints. These complications cause suffering, and their management is expensive. In the future the number of revision TKA will increase, which involves a greater financial burden. Little concrete data about direct costs for aseptic and two-stage septic knee revisions with an in depth-analysis of septic explantation and implantation is available. Questions/Purposes A retrospective consecutive analysis of the major partial costs involved in revision TKA for aseptic and septic failure was undertaken to compare 1) demographic and clinical characteristics, and 2) variable direct costs (from a hospital department’s perspective) between patients who underwent single-stage aseptic and two-stage septic revision of TKA in a hospital providing maximum care. We separately analyze the explantation and implantation procedures in septic revision cases and identify the major cost drivers of knee revision operations. Methods A total of 106 consecutive patients (71 aseptic and 35 septic) was included. All direct costs of diagnosis, surgery, and treatment from the hospital department’s perspective were calculated as real purchase prices. Personnel involvement was calculated in units of minutes. Results Aseptic versus septic revisions differed significantly in terms of length of hospital stay (15.2 vs. 39.9 days), number of reported secondary diagnoses (6.3 vs. 9.8) and incision-suture time (108.3 min vs. 193.2 min). The management of septic revision TKA was significantly more expensive than that of aseptic failure ($12,223.79 vs. $6,749.43) (p costs of explantation stage ($4,540.46) were lower than aseptic revision TKA ($6,749.43) which were again lower than those of the septic implantation stage ($7,683.33). All mean costs of stays were not comparable as they differ significantly (p cost drivers were the cost of the implant and

  15. Formative research: pretesting, revising, and more pretesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, M; Steckel, L

    1985-01-01

    Thorough and extensive pretesting is the formative research technique that the Program for the Introduction and Adaptation of Contraceptive Technology (PIACT) and its sister organization, the Program for Appropriate Technology in Health (PATH), rely on to develop well-understood and culturally appropriate print materials. Formative research is defined as evaluation activities that occur during a project to determine if the objectives are being met and, if not, to modify the project's direction to ensure that they are. Before materials are finalized or printed, an interviewer should pretest them with representatives of the target population to determine if the intended message is being conveyed and if it is clear and acceptable to them. Pretesting should be done while the materials are still in an unfinished state so audience-generated alterations can be made easily. Revised materials also should be tested until they communicate the inforamtion as intended. Due to the fact that PIACT/PATH work with countries where large percentages of the population are illiterate, its motivational and instructional materials rely on pictures to convey the message. Often, pictures are augmented by a line or 2 of simple text in the local language. This text also requires careful pretesting. Examples from the field demonstrate the importance of pretesting to assure that print materials are appropriate to the group for whom they are being developed. The examples deal with sympbols, positive messages, the use of common objects, extraneous detail, messages about time, and text. Through pretesting, PIACT/PATH has learned that there can be a large discrepancy between what materials developers intend to convey and what the audience understands. Pretesting is an essential formative technique that builds upon information gathered during the materials development process, ensuring the message designer that the materials will effectively address the needs of the target audience.

  16. One project's waste is another project's resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short, J.

    1997-01-01

    The author describes the efforts being made toward pollution prevention within the DOE complex, as a way to reduce overall project costs, in addition to decreasing the amount of waste to be handled. Pollution prevention is a concept which is trying to be ingrained into project planning. Part of the program involves the concept that ultimately the responsibility for waste comes back to the generator. Parts of the program involve efforts to reuse materials and equipment on new projects, to recycle wastes to generate offsetting revenue, and to increase awareness, accountability and incentives so as to stimulate action on this plan. Summaries of examples are presented in tables

  17. Sequenced Peer Revision: Creating Competence and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Ingrid K.; Robertson, John

    2013-01-01

    Mastering techniques of self- and peer revision is a valuable tool for all writers, especially US-educated Generation 1.5 students, whose near fluency enables them to dialogue successfully about their writing. Using action research, 2 academic writing instructors systematically trained students to more responsibly and effectively revise their…

  18. Emerging Societal Involvement in City Management : the case of Cape Town

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Dewar

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the advent of full participatory democracy in South Africa in April 1994, a fundamental revision of the norms, values and practices of urban management has occurred. A central feature of this is expressed commitment to greater transparency and public participation in decision-making and project execution. Manegerial practice has moved from being essentially technocratic and control-oriented to more pluralistic and development-oriented. The previously disenfranchised and largely impoverished sectors of the community have moved from exclusion and confrontation toward greater involvement and empowerment. This has not been without problems however. The current status of community participation in Cape Town is reviewed and explored against a theoretical model. The conclusion drawn is that, political impediments notwithstanding, a considerable energy and momentum has been generated at local level in civil society towards the goal of improvement in social and living environments in the city.

  19. Revised GCFR safety program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, A.P.; Boyack, B.E.; Torri, A.

    1980-05-01

    This paper presents a summary of the recently revised gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) safety program plan. The activities under this plan are organized to support six lines of protection (LOPs) for protection of the public from postulated GCFR accidents. Each LOP provides an independent, sequential, quantifiable risk barrier between the public and the radiological hazards associated with postulated GCFR accidents. To implement a quantitative risk-based approach in identifying the important technology requirements for each LOP, frequency and consequence-limiting goals are allocated to each. To ensure that all necessary tasks are covered to achieve these goals, the program plan is broken into a work breakdown structure (WBS). Finally, the means by which the plan is being implemented are discussed

  20. Radiological control manual. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloepping, R.

    1996-05-01

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Radiological Control Manual (LBNL RCM) has been prepared to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements and interpretation of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is one methodology to implement the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. Information given in this manual is also intended to provide demonstration of compliance to specific requirements in 10 CFR 835. The LBNL RCM (Publication 3113) and LBNL Health and Safety Manual Publication-3000 form the technical basis for the LBNL RPP and will be revised as necessary to ensure that current requirements from Rules and Orders are represented. The LBNL RCM will form the standard for excellence in the implementation of the LBNL RPP.

  1. Potentialities of Revised Quantum Electrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehnert B.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The potentialities of a revised quantum electrodynamic theory (RQED earlier established by the author are reconsidered, also in respect to other fundamental theories such as those by Dirac and Higgs. The RQED theory is characterized by intrinsic linear symmetry breaking due to a nonzero divergence of the electric field strength in the vacuum state, as supported by the Zero Point Energy and the experimentally confirmed Casimir force. It includes the results of electron spin and antimatter by Dirac, as well as the rest mass of elementary particles predicted by Higgs in terms of spontaneous nonlinear symmetry breaking. It will here be put into doubt whether the approach by Higgs is the only theory which becomes necessary for explaining the particle rest masses. In addition, RQED theory leads to new results beyond those being available from the theories by Dirac, Higgs and the Standard Model, such as in applications to leptons and the photon.

  2. Hot sample archiving. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVey, C.B.

    1995-01-01

    This Engineering Study revision evaluated the alternatives to provide tank waste characterization analytical samples for a time period as recommended by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Program. The recommendation of storing 40 ml segment samples for a period of approximately 18 months (6 months past the approval date of the Tank Characterization Report) and then composite the core segment material in 125 ml containers for a period of five years. The study considers storage at 222-S facility. It was determined that the critical storage problem was in the hot cell area. The 40 ml sample container has enough material for approximately 3 times the required amount for a complete laboratory re-analysis. The final result is that 222-S can meet the sample archive storage requirements. During the 100% capture rate the capacity is exceeded in the hot cell area, but quick, inexpensive options are available to meet the requirements

  3. Radiological control manual. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloepping, R.

    1996-05-01

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Radiological Control Manual (LBNL RCM) has been prepared to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements and interpretation of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is one methodology to implement the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. Information given in this manual is also intended to provide demonstration of compliance to specific requirements in 10 CFR 835. The LBNL RCM (Publication 3113) and LBNL Health and Safety Manual Publication-3000 form the technical basis for the LBNL RPP and will be revised as necessary to ensure that current requirements from Rules and Orders are represented. The LBNL RCM will form the standard for excellence in the implementation of the LBNL RPP

  4. Structuring and financing new nuclear power plant projects in Europe: selected remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belchev, A.

    2004-01-01

    Project financing in the field of nuclear energy is discussed taking into account the changes and new challenges in Europe. Bringing a project to maturity under 'revised' assumptions is likely to be a complex task for all parties involved, but there is a real potential for an enhanced role for stake holders from the private sector. There is a more realistic understanding about how the public and the private sectors can work together. Successfully combining public and private, national and foreign stake holders is likely to be a critical factor of success. The alignment of interest over the long term best serves a projects business case. In that context, a Governments policies are increasingly under the spotlight

  5. A revision of the genus Aphalloides (Digenea: Cryptogonimidae), parasites of European brackish water fishes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvach, Yuriy; Bryjová, A.; Sasal, P.; Winkler, H. M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 7 (2017), s. 1973-1980 ISSN 0932-0113 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP505/12/G112 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Aphalloides * Taxonomic revision * Zoogeography * Molecular study Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine OBOR OECD: Veterinary science Impact factor: 2.329, year: 2016

  6. A revision of the genus Aphalloides (Digenea: Cryptogonimidae), parasites of European brackish water fishes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvach, Yuriy; Bryjová, Anna; Sasal, P.; Winkler, H. M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 7 (2017), s. 1973-1980 ISSN 0932-0113 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP505/12/G112 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Aphalloides * Taxonomic revision * Zoogeography * Molecular study Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Parasitology Impact factor: 2.329, year: 2016

  7. 75 FR 2846 - Plan Revision for Prescott National Forest, Yavapai and Coconino Counties, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    .... Finally, this notice briefly describes the applicable planning rule and how work done on the plan revision... addressed project specific needs and the balance addressed programmatic needs. Programmatic needs for... guidelines; Suitability of lands for timber production, grazing, and recreation opportunities; Monitoring and...

  8. 10 CFR 600.315 - Revision of budget and program plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... revisions: (1) The transfer of funds among direct cost categories, functions, and activities for awards in... change in the scope or the objective of the project or program (even if there is no associated budget... accordance with the applicable costs principles for Federal funds and the requirements applicable to the...

  9. 36 CFR 1210.25 - Revision of budget and program plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... may, at its option, restrict the transfer of funds among direct cost categories or programs, functions... or the objective of the project or program (even if there is no associated budget revision requiring... funds allotted for training allowances (direct payment to trainees) to other categories of expense. (8...

  10. 32 CFR 34.15 - Revision of budget and program plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... prior approvals are not required): (i) The transfer of funds among direct cost categories, functions and... or the objective of the project or program (even if there is no associated budget revision requiring... principles for Federal funds and recipients' cost share or match, in § 34.17 and § 34.13, respectively. (iv...

  11. 20 CFR 435.25 - Revision of budget and program plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 435.25 Revision of budget and program plans. (a) The budget plan is the financial expression of the project or...

  12. 28 CFR 70.25 - Revision of budget and program plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS (INCLUDING SUBAWARDS) WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 70.25 Revision of budget and program plans. (a) The budget plan is the financial expression of the project or...

  13. 22 CFR 518.25 - Revision of budget and program plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 518.25 Revision of budget and program plans. (a) The budget plan is the financial expression of the project or program as approved during the...

  14. 45 CFR 2543.25 - Revision of budget and program plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... AND COMMUNITY SERVICE GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 2543.25 Revision of budget and program plans. (a) The budget plan is the financial expression of the project or...

  15. 34 CFR 74.25 - Revision of budget and program plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 74.25 Revision of budget and program plans. (a) The budget plan is the financial expression of the project or program as approved during the award process. It may...

  16. 15 CFR 14.25 - Revision of budget and program plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, OTHER NON-PROFIT, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 14.25 Revision of budget and program plans. (a) The budget plan is the financial expression of the project or...

  17. 78 FR 46314 - Request for Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... development and job creation projects such as business start-up costs, business expansion, community... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Business-Cooperative Service Request for Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection AGENCY: Rural Business-Cooperative Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice; proposed...

  18. 75 FR 27286 - Notice of Request for Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... development and job creation projects such as business start-up costs, business expansion, community... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Business-Cooperative Service Notice of Request for Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection AGENCY: Rural Business-Cooperative Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed...

  19. 76 FR 38146 - Revision to the Final Principles of Integrated Resource Planning for Use in Resource Acquisition...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... Western office responsible for marketing power from a specific project will identify the need for a long... appropriate level of NEPA review. Factors affecting the level of NEPA review include whether the project... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Western Area Power Administration Revision to the Final Principles of...

  20. Structured Head and Neck CT Angiography Reporting Reduces Resident Revision Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tucker F; Brinjikji, Waleed; Doolittle, Derrick A; Nagelschneider, Alex A; Welch, Brian T; Kotsenas, Amy L

    2018-04-12

    This resident-driven quality improvement project was undertaken to assess the effectiveness of structured reporting to reduce revision rates for afterhours reports dictated by residents. The first part of the study assessed baseline revision rates for head and neck CT angiography (CTA) examinations dictated by residents during afterhours call. A structured report was subsequently created based on templates on the RSNA informatics reporting website and critical findings that should be assessed for on all CTA examinations. The template was made available to residents through the speech recognition software for all head and neck CTA examinations for a duration of 2 months. Report revision rates were then compared with and without use of the structured template. The structured template was found to reduce revision rates by approximately 50% with 10/41 unstructured reports revised and 2/17 structured reports revised. We believe that structured reporting can help reduce reporting errors, particularly in term of typographical errors, train residents to evaluate complex examinations in a systematic fashion, and assist them in recalling critical findings on these examinations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prioritising Project Scope Definition Elements in Public Building Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed K Fageha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A complete definition of the scope of a project upfront during early stages ensures smooth and successful implementation during the project execution. This research identifies and prioritises project scope definition elements for public buildings in Saudi Arabia. Elements that could significantly contribute to complete project scope definition package at pre-project planning stage are identified and their interrelationship determined and prioritised. Using the Project Definition Rating Index (PDRI as a basis, the study uses analytical network process (ANP technique based on data obtained from project managers who have been involved in public sector projects in Saudi Arabia. Data collection and analysis was conducted in three steps. The first step involved identification of scope definition elements while the second involved an investigation into interrelationships among the elements. In the third step, ANP was used to determine the weight of the elements’ importance in terms of contribution to project scope definition completeness. Finally, Pareto analysis was used to prioritise and assess the distribution pattern of the elements. The outcome from this research is the prioritisation of project scope definition elements for public building projects in Saudi Arabia. The prioritised list developed indicates the importance of project scope definition elements. It should help project management teams identify elements to consider when evaluating project scope definition for completeness at the pre-project planning stage. Keywords: Project scope definition, pre-project planning, prioritising, public building projects, Saudi Arabia, Analytical Network Process (ANP

  2. Involving Employees in Strategy innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ole Uhrskov; Koch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Strategy as a practice and continuous innovation approaches are combined to conceptualise dilemmas of short versus long term and to analyse a case of employee participation as a particular example of strategy innovation. The case is a medium size textile company developing its strategy involving ...... and Balanced Score Card consultancy, an ‘open space’ workshop and organized strategy projects. Especially the latter two are important in facilitating the employee involvement. The case however also exhibit enterprise situated praxis’s like mitigation of taboos....

  3. Comparison of mode of failure between primary and revision total knee arthroplasties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, H; Bae, J K; Park, C H; Kim, K I; Bae, D K; Song, S J

    2018-04-01

    Cognizance of common reasons for failure in primary and revision TKA, together with their time course, facilitates prevention. However, there have been few reports specifically comparing modes of failure for primary vs. revision TKA using a single prosthesis. The goal of the study was to compare the survival rates, modes of failure, and time periods associated with each mode of failure, of primary vs. revision TKA. The survival rates, modes of failure, time period for each mode of failure, and risk factors would differ between primary and revision TKA. Data from a consecutive cohort comprising 1606 knees (1174 patients) of primary TKA patients, and 258 knees (224 patients) of revision TKA patients, in all of whom surgery involved a P.F.C ® prosthesis (Depuy, Johnson & Johnson, Warsaw, IN), was retrospectively reviewed. The mean follow-up periods of primary and revision TKAs were 9.2 and 9.8 years, respectively. The average 10- and 15-year survival rates for primary TKA were 96.7% (CI 95%,±0.7%) and 85.4% (CI 95%,±2.0%), and for revision TKA 91.4% (CI 95%,±2.5%) and 80.5% (CI 95%,±4.5%). Common modes of failure included polyethylene wear, loosening, and infection. The most common mode of failure was polyethylene wear in primary TKA, and infection in revision TKA. The mean periods (i.e., latencies) of polyethylene wear and loosening did not differ between primary and revision TKAs, but the mean period of infection was significantly longer for revision TKA (1.2 vs. 4.8 years, P=0.003). Survival rates decreased with time, particularly more than 10 years post-surgery, for both primary and revision TKAs. Continuous efforts are required to prevent and detect the various modes of failure during long-term follow-up. Greater attention is necessary to detect late infection-induced failure following revision TKA. Case-control study, Level III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Discovering beaten paths in collaborative ontology-engineering projects using Markov chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walk, Simon; Singer, Philipp; Strohmaier, Markus; Tudorache, Tania; Musen, Mark A; Noy, Natalya F

    2014-10-01

    Biomedical taxonomies, thesauri and ontologies in the form of the International Classification of Diseases as a taxonomy or the National Cancer Institute Thesaurus as an OWL-based ontology, play a critical role in acquiring, representing and processing information about human health. With increasing adoption and relevance, biomedical ontologies have also significantly increased in size. For example, the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases, which is currently under active development by the World Health Organization contains nearly 50,000 classes representing a vast variety of different diseases and causes of death. This evolution in terms of size was accompanied by an evolution in the way ontologies are engineered. Because no single individual has the expertise to develop such large-scale ontologies, ontology-engineering projects have evolved from small-scale efforts involving just a few domain experts to large-scale projects that require effective collaboration between dozens or even hundreds of experts, practitioners and other stakeholders. Understanding the way these different stakeholders collaborate will enable us to improve editing environments that support such collaborations. In this paper, we uncover how large ontology-engineering projects, such as the International Classification of Diseases in its 11th revision, unfold by analyzing usage logs of five different biomedical ontology-engineering projects of varying sizes and scopes using Markov chains. We discover intriguing interaction patterns (e.g., which properties users frequently change after specific given ones) that suggest that large collaborative ontology-engineering projects are governed by a few general principles that determine and drive development. From our analysis, we identify commonalities and differences between different projects that have implications for project managers, ontology editors, developers and contributors working on collaborative ontology

  5. Discovering Beaten Paths in Collaborative Ontology-Engineering Projects using Markov Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walk, Simon; Singer, Philipp; Strohmaier, Markus; Tudorache, Tania; Musen, Mark A.; Noy, Natalya F.

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical taxonomies, thesauri and ontologies in the form of the International Classification of Diseases as a taxonomy or the National Cancer Institute Thesaurus as an OWL-based ontology, play a critical role in acquiring, representing and processing information about human health. With increasing adoption and relevance, biomedical ontologies have also significantly increased in size. For example, the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases, which is currently under active development by the World Health Organization contains nearly 50, 000 classes representing a vast variety of different diseases and causes of death. This evolution in terms of size was accompanied by an evolution in the way ontologies are engineered. Because no single individual has the expertise to develop such large-scale ontologies, ontology-engineering projects have evolved from small-scale efforts involving just a few domain experts to large-scale projects that require effective collaboration between dozens or even hundreds of experts, practitioners and other stakeholders. Understanding the way these different stakeholders collaborate will enable us to improve editing environments that support such collaborations. In this paper, we uncover how large ontology-engineering projects, such as the International Classification of Diseases in its 11th revision, unfold by analyzing usage logs of five different biomedical ontology-engineering projects of varying sizes and scopes using Markov chains. We discover intriguing interaction patterns (e.g., which properties users frequently change after specific given ones) that suggest that large collaborative ontology-engineering projects are governed by a few general principles that determine and drive development. From our analysis, we identify commonalities and differences between different projects that have implications for project managers, ontology editors, developers and contributors working on collaborative ontology

  6. Development of the EU Ecolabel Criteria and Revision of the EU Green Public Procurement Criteria for Cleaning Services

    OpenAIRE

    DE ALMEIDA FERREIRA NETO BELMIRA; WOLF Oliver; FIELD Bethany; JENKIN Nicola; TAM Max; BENJAMIN Oscar

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a new EU Ecolabel and revise the existing EU Green Public Procurement (GPP) criteria for professional cleaning services (hereafter referred to as cleaning services). This preliminary report investigates the market, operational and sustainability aspects of cleaning services, with a goal to develop a robust evidence base and prioritise key environmental and social issues to support the development of EU Ecolabel criteria and the revision of the EU GP...

  7. Tools for Monitoring Social Media: A Marketing Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeck, Ann; Hoger, Beth

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of how to effectively monitor social media is an increasingly valued marketing research skill. This study tests an approach for adding social media content to an undergraduate marketing research class team project. The revised project maintains the expected objectives and parameters of a traditional research project, while integrating…

  8. The economic impact of revision otologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadimi, Sahar; Leonetti, John P; Pontikis, George

    2016-03-01

    Revision otologic surgery places a significant economic burden on patients and the healthcare system. We conducted a retrospective chart analysis to estimate the economic impact of revision canal-wall-down (CWD) mastoidectomy. We reviewed the medical records of all 189 adults who had undergone CWD mastoidectomy performed by the senior author between June 2006 and August 2011 at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Ill. Institutional charges and collections for all patients were extrapolated to estimate the overall healthcare cost of revision surgery in Illinois and at the national level. Of the 189 CWD mastoidectomies, 89 were primary and 100 were revision procedures. The total charge for the revision cases was $2,783,700, and the net reimbursement (collections) was $846,289 (30.4%). Using Illinois Hospital Association data, we estimated that reimbursement for 387 revision CWD mastoidectomies that had been performed in fiscal year 2011 was nearly $3.3 million. By extrapolating our data to the national level, we estimated that 9,214 patients underwent revision CWD mastoidectomy in the United States during 2011, which cost the national healthcare system roughly $76 million, not including lost wages and productivity. Known causes of failed CWD mastoidectomies that often result in revision surgery include an inadequate meatoplasty, a facial ridge that is too high, residual diseased air cells, and recurrent cholesteatoma. A better understanding of these factors can reduce the need for revision surgery, which could have a positive impact on the economic strain related to this procedure at the local, state, and national levels.

  9. Cochlear implant revision surgeries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Maria Stella Arantes do; Reis, Ana Cláudia Mirândola B; Massuda, Eduardo T; Hyppolito, Miguel Angelo

    2018-02-16

    The surgery during which the cochlear implant internal device is implanted is not entirely free of risks and may produce problems that will require revision surgeries. To verify the indications for cochlear implantation revision surgery for the cochlear implant internal device, its effectiveness and its correlation with certain variables related to language and hearing. A retrospective study of patients under 18 years submitted to cochlear implant Surgery from 2004 to 2015 in a public hospital in Brazil. Data collected were: age at the time of implantation, gender, etiology of the hearing loss, audiological and oral language characteristics of each patient before and after Cochlear Implant surgery and any need for surgical revision and the reason for it. Two hundred and sixty-five surgeries were performed in 236 patients. Eight patients received a bilateral cochlear implant and 10 patients required revision surgery. Thirty-two surgeries were necessary for these 10 children (1 bilateral cochlear implant), of which 21 were revision surgeries. In 2 children, cochlear implant removal was necessary, without reimplantation, one with cochlear malformation due to incomplete partition type I and another due to trauma. With respect to the cause for revision surgery, of the 8 children who were successfully reimplanted, four had cochlear calcification following meningitis, one followed trauma, one exhibited a facial nerve malformation, one experienced a failure of the cochlear implant internal device and one revision surgery was necessary because the electrode was twisted. The incidence of the cochlear implant revision surgery was 4.23%. The period following the revision surgeries revealed an improvement in the subject's hearing and language performance, indicating that these surgeries are valid in most cases. Copyright © 2018 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. [Osteosynthesis and cup revision in periprosthetic acetabulum fractures using a Kocher-Langenbeck approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, P; Märdian, S; Perka, C; Schaser, K-D

    2016-04-01

    Reconstruction/stable fixation of the acetabular columns to create an adequate periacetabular requirement for the implantation of a revision cup. Displaced/nondisplaced fractures with involvement of the posterior column. Resulting instability of the cup in an adequate bone stock situation. Periprosthetic acetabulum fractures with inadequate bone stock. Extended periacetabular defects with loss of anchorage options. Isolated periprosthetic fractures of the anterior column. Septic loosening. Dorsal approach. Dislocation of hip. Mechanical testing of inlaying acetabular cup. With unstable cup situation explantation of the cup, fracture fixation of acetabulum with dorsal double plate osteosynthesis along the posterior column. Cup revision. Hip joint reposition. Early mobilization; partial weight bearing for 12 weeks. Thrombosis prophylaxis. Clinical and radiological follow-ups. Periprosthetic acetabular fracture in 17 patients with 9 fractures after primary total hip replacement (THR), 8 after revision THR. Fractures: 12 due to trauma, 5 spontaneously; 7 anterior column fractures, 5 transverse fractures, 4 posterior column fractures, 1 two column fracture after hemiendoprosthesis. 5 type 1 fractures and 12 type 2 fractures. Operatively treated cases (10/17) received 3 reinforcement ring, 2 pedestal cup, 1 standard revision cup, cup-1 cage construct, 1 ventral plate osteosynthesis, 1 dorsal plate osteosynthesis, and 1 dorsal plate osteosynthesis plus cup revision (10-month Harris Hip Score 78 points). Radiological follow-up for 10 patients: consolidation of fractures without dislocation and a fixed acetabular cup. No revision surgeries during follow-up; 2 hip dislocations, 1 transient sciatic nerve palsy.

  11. Revision of infected knee arthroplasties in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg-Larsen, Martin; Jørgensen, Christoffer C; Bagger, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose - The surgical treatment of periprosthetic knee infection is generally either a partial revision procedure (open debridement and exchange of the tibial insert) or a 2-stage exchange arthroplasty procedure. We describe the failure rates of these procedures on a nationwide...... basis. Patients and methods - 105 partial revisions (100 patients) and 215 potential 2-stage revision procedures (205 patients) performed due to infection from July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013 were identified from the Danish Knee Arthroplasty Register (DKR). Failure was defined as surgically related death...

  12. Stakeholder Salience in ERP Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Salhotra, Eashan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine stakeholder involvement in an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) System project that involves implementation and improvement of the implemented system. The study targets stakeholders, their classification, and their degree of importance during different phases of an ERP project life cycle, i.e. planning, implementation, stabilisation and improvement. The study shows that stakeholder involvement and their salience vary along the ERP project life cycle a...

  13. Individual questions of financial control and revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. М. Глібко

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Problem setting. In modern conditions at investigation and gathering of proofs in criminal proceedings according to item 93 CPC of Ukraine collecting of proofs which is carried out by the criminal proceedings parties, victim is important, the representative of the legal person, in which relation carries out manufacture, including a way истребования and receptions from public authorities, local governments, the enterprises, establishments and organisations, official and physical persons of things, documents, data, conclusions of experts, conclusions of revisions and certificates of checks. Recent research and publications analisis. In scientific sources questions of carrying out of revisions S. B.Zhivko, V.V.Akimov, G.Demjanchuk, J.Buzdugan is considered. Paper objective. Article purpose is studying and definition of a place of revision among forms of inspection of the state control and use of results of revision in criminal proceedings. Paper main body. Off-schedule exit revision that is revision which is not provided in plans of work of body of the state financial control is considered and is spent at presence at least one of the circumstances listed in item 11 of the Law of Ukraine «About main principles of realisation of the state financial control in Ukraine». If revision is carried out on request of investigating bodies it is spent on the basis of the petition of the inspector and accepted by the results of consideration of this petition of the decision of the investigatory judge. The primary goal of revision on request of investigating bodies or on the basis of court definition is reception of proofs on business. Therefore the revision certificate admits the written proof as on the basis of its conclusion of the inspector, the public prosecutor receives the information on a perfect crime, abusing, and also on the persons who have committed a crime, on the period of commission of crime and an amount of damage. In criminal

  14. Experience-based knowledge in nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness - involvement of national stake holders. Report from the EURANOS project; Erfaringsbasert kunnskap i norsk atomberedskap - medvirkning fra beroerte parter. Rapport fra EURANOS-prosjektet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bay-Larsen, I.; Oughton, D.; Liland, A.; Eikelmann, I.M.; Hansen, H.S.

    2009-05-15

    The report identifies and summarises the most important experiences related to long term rehabilitation of contaminated areas after the Chernobyl accident, as phrased by representatives from the agricultural sector (including reindeer herding), primary health care, academia, NGOs, local and regional authorities, as well as national authorities with responsibilities for emergency preparedness within their sector. It also includes recommendations for future collaboration to ensure competence and stake holder involvement in Norwegian nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness. (Author)

  15. Safety Technology Research Program in the field of pressurized water reactors. 1. Technical report on advancement project RS 36/2. Emergency cooling program service life experiments: reflooding experiments involving the primary loop systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweickert, H.; Kremin, H.; Mandl, R.; Riedle, V.; Ruthrof, K.; Sarkar, J.; Schmidt, H.

    The reflooding of the hot reactor core is to be examined for a pressurized water reactor (PWR), using a model of the entire primary loop system. The scale of the model is to be 1:340 in cross-section, with the heights represented full-scale. In addition to the goals of the project, a description of the test facility, including data collection and control equipment is presented. The instrumentation, the planned test program and the test procedure are briefly set forth

  16. Who and What Does Involvement Involve?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jeppe Oute; Petersen, Anders; Huniche, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    This article gives an account of aspects of a multi-sited field study of involvement of relatives in Danish psychiatry. By following metaphors of involvement across three sites of the psychiatric systema family site, a clinical site and a policy sitethe first author (J.O.) investigated how...... theoretical perspective laid out by Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe, the aim of this study is to show how the dominant discourse about involvement at the political and clinical sites is constituted by understandings of mentally ill individuals and by political objectives of involvement. The analysis...... the responsibility toward the mental health of the ill individual as well as toward the psychological milieu of the family....

  17. Managing supplier involvement in new product development: a portfolio approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wynstra, Finn; ten Pierick, E.

    2000-01-01

    Supplier involvement in new product development projects has become an increasingly popular method for improving project effectiveness (product costs and quality) and project efficiency (development costs and time). One of the key issues in managing this involvement is determining which type of

  18. Are revised models better models? A skill score assessment of regional interannual variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperber, Kenneth R.; Participating AMIP Modelling Groups

    1999-05-01

    Various skill scores are used to assess the performance of revised models relative to their original configurations. The interannual variability of all-India, Sahel and Nordeste rainfall and summer monsoon windshear is examined in integrations performed under the experimental design of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project. For the indices considered, the revised models exhibit greater fidelity at simulating the observed interannual variability. Interannual variability of all-India rainfall is better simulated by models that have a more realistic rainfall climatology in the vicinity of India, indicating the beneficial effect of reducing systematic model error.

  19. The revised International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) dosimetric model for the human respiratory tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, W.J.

    1992-05-01

    A task group has revised the dosimetric model of the respiratory tract used to calculate annual limits on intake of radionuclides. The revised model can be used to project respiratory tract doses for workers and members of the public from airborne radionuclides and to assess past exposures. Doses calculated for specific extrathoracic and thoracic tissues can be adjusted to account for differences in radiosensitivity and summed to yield two values of dose for the respiratory tract that are applicable to the ICRP tissue weighted dosimetry system

  20. Project Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Presents sixteen project notes developed by pupils of Chipping Norton School and Bristol Grammar School, in the United Kingdom. These Projects include eight biology A-level projects and eight Chemistry A-level projects. (HM)

  1. Strategy Innovation with Employee Involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ole Uhrskov; Koch, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate how employees can be involved in strategy innovation processes and how new strategy practices (new tools and procedures) are used to change strategy praxis in order to sustain value creation. In the strategizing actions, we found that even...... if the managers still dominate, some processes of direct involvement of employees occur, in particular when employees are asked to supplement overall strategic goals and when they directly shape several sub-strategies. Strategy practices found include strategy planning, an open space workshop and organised...... strategy projects. Especially the latter two are important in facilitating the employee involvement. The case, however, also exhibits enterprise-situated praxises related to unplanned events, like the mitigation of taboos....

  2. Poverty alleviation project review

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Braun, AL

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available seven pure cashmere rams from project. EC (Emerging farmers) farmers have also received 43 upgraded cashmere rams from Dept. of Agric. EC From the plus minus 1800 goats involved in the project at least 450 kids / offspring of the improved goats have been...

  3. The Nordwrite Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evensen, Lars, Sigfred

    A planned 3-year joint project of the Nordic research council for the humanities that focuses on writing development in school-age children is described. Four Nordic countries are involved in the project: Finland, Sweden, Norway, and Denmark. In the study, discourse-level performance analyses of student writing in English as a Second Language are…

  4. The TULIP Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusack, Nancy, Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Contains 11 articles that describe different university access systems designed and built to provide access to journals via The University Licensing Program (TULIP), a science journal access project, involving Elsevier Science Publishing and major universities. The project produced insights to help with future electronic information delivery…

  5. The Fast Forward MBA in Project Management

    CERN Document Server

    Verzuh, Eric

    2011-01-01

    An updated and revised edition of the bestselling guide to managing projects For any professional responsible for coordinating projects among different departments, across executive levels, or with technical complexity, The Fast Forward MBA in Project Management offers comprehensive instruction on how to deliver on time and on budget. Get the step-by-step advice you need to find the right sponsor, clarify objectives, and set realistic schedules and budget projections. This Fourth Edition of the 200,000-copy bestseller now covers critical new topics including: software and IT projects, agile te

  6. Learning with Multiple Representations: An Example of a Revision Lesson in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Darren; Poo, Sng Peng; Hock, Ng Eng; Kang, Wee Loo

    2011-01-01

    We describe an example of learning with multiple representations in an A-level revision lesson on mechanics. The context of the problem involved the motion of a ball thrown vertically upwards in air and studying how the associated physical quantities changed during its flight. Different groups of students were assigned to look at the ball's motion…

  7. Computer Assets Recovery Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    CortesPena, Aida Yoguely

    2010-01-01

    This document reports on the project that was performed during the internship of the author. The project involved locating and recovering machines in various locations that Boeing has no need for, and therefore requires that they be transferred to another user or transferred to a non-profit organization. Other projects that the author performed was an inventory of toner and printers, loading new computers and connecting them to the network.

  8. Taxation and Welfare: A Revision Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Offers a revision exercise intended to remind students of some economic terminology associated with taxation and welfare. Provides a set of definitions for which students are to supply matching terms. Includes an answer list and suggests related exercises. (SG)

  9. Student-initiated revision in child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaham, M; Gray, O P; Davies, D P

    1994-03-01

    Most teaching of child health in Cardiff takes place in block attachments of 8 weeks. There is an introductory seminar of 2 days followed by a 6-week clinical attachment in a district general hospital in Wales, and then a revision period of one week designed to help students formalize and structure their basic knowledge and to clarify aspects of child health which they may have had difficulty in understanding. The revision programme has to take into account: the short time available, the small number of teaching staff, the most relevant basic knowledge and active participation by the student. This paper describes how this week has been improved through the use of student-initiated revision (SIR). The students' appraisal of this revision and in particular SIR is presented.

  10. New and revised standards for coke production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.A. Kotsyuba; M.I. Alpatov; Y.G. Shapoval [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-07-15

    The need for new and revised standards for coke production in Ukraine and Russia is outlined. Such standards should address improvements in plant operation, working conditions, environmental protection, energy conservation, fire and explosion safety, and economic indices.

  11. FFTF operations procedures preparation guide. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-12-01

    The Guide is intended to provide guidelines for the initial preparation of FFTF Operating Procedures. The Procedures Preparation Guide was developed from the plan presented and approved in the FFTF Reactor Plant Procedures Plan, PC-1, Revision 3

  12. Revising incompletely specified convex probabilistic belief bases

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rens, G

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available revision employing the notion of optimum entropy, and point out some of the benefits and difficulties in those methods. Both the boundary distribution method and the optimum entropy method are reasonable, yet yield different results....

  13. NRC revision to 10 CFR Part 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, R.E.; Cool, W.S.; Mills, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's pollution standards have been revised since publication in the late 1950s, but the basic approach has not changed. The revisions resulted in inaccuracies, conflicts, and ambiguities in requirements. The need for comprehensive updating including radiation-protection principles, risk, occupational exposure dose limits, standards for the public (including de minimis level), surveys and monitoring, disposal into sewerage systems, and records is discussed. 2 tables

  14. Revised data taking schedule with ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Gazdzicki, Marek; Aduszkiewicz, A; Andrieu, B; Anticic, T; Antoniou, N; Argyriades, J; Asryan, A G; Baatar, B; Blondel, A; Blumer, J; Boldizsar, L; Bravar, A; Brzychczyk, J; Bubak, A; Bunyatov, S A; Choi, K U; Christakoglou, P; Chung, P; Cleymans, J; Derkach, D A; Diakonos, F; Dominik, W; Dumarchez, J; Engel, R; Ereditato, A; Feofilov, G A; Fodor, Z; Ferrero, A; Gazdzicki, M; Golubeva, M; Grebieszkow, K; Grzeszczuk, A; Guber, F; Hasegawa, T; Haungs, A; Igolkin, S; Ivanov, A S; Ivashkin, A; Kadija, K; Katrynska, N; Kielczewska, D; Kikola, D; Kisiel, J; Kobayashi, T; Kolesnikov, V I; Kolev, D; Kolevatov, R S; Kondratiev, V P; Kowalski, S; Kurepin, A; Lacey, R; Laszlo, A; Lyubushkin, V V; Majka, Z; I Malakhov, A; Marchionni, A; Marcinek, A; Maris, I; Matveev, V; Melkumov, G L; Meregaglia, A; Messina, M; Mijakowski, P; Mitrovski, M; Montaruli, T; Mrówczynski, St; Murphy, S; Nakadaira, T; Naumenko, P A; Nikolic, V; Nishikawa, K; Palczewski, T; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Peryt, W; Planeta, R; Pluta, J; Popov, B A; Posiadala, M; Przewlocki, P; Rauch, W; Ravonel, M; Renfordt, R; Röhrich, D; Rondio, E; Rossi, B; Roth, M; Rubbia, A; Rybczynski, M; Sadovskii, A; Sakashita, K; Schuster, T; Sekiguchi, T; Seyboth, P; Shibata, M; Sissakian, A N; Skrzypczak, E; Slodkowski, M; Sorin, A S; Staszel, P; Stefanek, G; Stepaniak, J; Strabel, C; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Szuba, M; Tada, M; Taranenko, A; Tsenov, R; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Vassiliou, M; Vechernin, V V; Vesztergombi, G; Wlodarczyk, Z; Wojtaszek, A; Zipper, W; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2009-01-01

    This document presents the revised data taking schedule of NA61 with ion beams. The revision takes into account limitations due to the new LHC schedule as well as final results concerning the physics performance with secondary ion beams. It is proposed to take data with primary Ar and Xe beams in 2012 and 2014, respectively, and to test and use for physics a secondary B beam from primary Pb beam fragmentation in 2010, 2011 and 2013.

  15. Optometry: Careers with Vision. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Optometric Association, St. Louis, MO.

    This brochure gives basic facts about optometry which may be helpful in considering such a career. Included are a discussion as to what an optometrist is, the development of the profession, the need for practitioners projected by State to 1980, types of services rendered, and the variety of employment opportunities available. Over one-third of the…

  16. Training Plan (M29 Revision)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online Submission, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of training activities as stated in the DoW are: 1. to organize training within the project for the participants to learn to use the necessary tools; 2. to support training activities of the partners when they deliver and take in use the tools and practices during extended pilots. The approach with regards to the first point is that…

  17. Introductory Business Textbook Revision Cycles: Are They Getting Shorter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinser, Brian; Brunswick, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The rate of textbook revision cycles is examined in light of the recent trend towards more rapid revisions (and adoptions of textbooks). The authors conduct background research to better understand the context for textbook revision cycles and the environmental forces that have been influencing what appears to be more rapid textbook revisions. A…

  18. Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2010-02-09

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, “Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 0 issued in October 2009. Brief Description of Revision: A minor revision to correct oversights made during revision to incorporate the 10 CFR 835 Update; and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

  19. Coloss project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The COLOSS project was a shared-cost action, co-ordinated by IRSN within the Euratom Research Framework Programme 1998-2002. Started in February 2000, the project lasted three years. The work-programme performed by 19 partners was shaped around complementary activities aimed at improving severe accident codes. Unresolved risk-relevant issues regarding H2 production, melt generation and the source term were studied, through a large number of experiments such as a) dissolution of fresh and high burn-up UO 2 and MOX by molten Zircaloy, b) simultaneous dissolution of UO 2 and ZrO 2 by molten Zircaloy, c) oxidation of U-O-Zr mixtures by steam, d) degradation-oxidation of B 4 C control rods. Significant results have been produced from separate-effects, semi-global and large-scale tests on COLOSS topics. Break-through were achieved on some issues. Nevertheless, more data are needed for consolidation of the modelling on burn-up effects on UO 2 and MOX dissolution and on oxidation of U-O-Zr and B 4 C-metal mixtures. There was experimental evidence that the oxidation of these mixtures can contribute significantly to the large H2 production observed during the reflooding of degraded cores under severe accident conditions. Based on the experimental results obtained on the COLOSS topics, corresponding models were developed and were successfully implemented in several severe accident codes. Upgraded codes were then used for plant calculations to evaluate the consequences of new models on key severe accident sequences occurring in different plants designs involving B 4 C control rods (EPR, BWR, VVER- 1000) as well as in the TMI-2 accident. The large series of plant calculations involved sensitivity studies and code benchmarks. Main severe accident codes in use in the EU for safety studies were used such as ICARE/CATHARE, SCDAP/RELAP5, ASTEC, MELCOR and MAAP4. This activity enabled: a) the assessment of codes to calculate core degradation, b) the identification of main

  20. Revision of the DELFIC Particle Activity Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, David A [ORNL; Jodoin, Vincent J [ORNL

    2010-09-01

    The Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC) was originally released in 1968 as a tool for modeling fallout patterns and for predicting exposure rates. Despite the continual advancement of knowledge of fission yields, decay behavior of fission products, and biological dosimetry, the decay data and logic of DELFIC have remained mostly unchanged since inception. Additionally, previous code revisions caused a loss of conservation of radioactive nuclides. In this report, a new revision of the decay database and the Particle Activity Module is introduced and explained. The database upgrades discussed are replacement of the fission yields with ENDF/B-VII data as formatted in the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code, revised decay constants, revised exposure rate multipliers, revised decay modes and branching ratios, and revised boiling point data. Included decay logic upgrades represent a correction of a flaw in the treatment of the fission yields, extension of the logic to include more complex decay modes, conservation of nuclides (including stable nuclides) at all times, and conversion of key variables to double precision for nuclide conservation. Finally, recommended future work is discussed with an emphasis on completion of the overall radiation physics upgrade, particularly for dosimetry, induced activity, decay of the actinides, and fractionation.

  1. Revision surgery for failed thermal capsulorrhaphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung Bin; Yokota, Atsushi; Gill, Harpreet S; El Rassi, George; McFarland, Edward G

    2005-09-01

    With the failure of thermal capsulorrhaphy for shoulder instability, there have been concerns with capsular thinning and capsular necrosis affecting revision surgery. To report the findings at revision surgery for failed thermal capsulorrhaphy and to evaluate the technical effects on subsequent revision capsular plication. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Fourteen patients underwent arthroscopic evaluation and open reconstruction for a failed thermal capsulorrhaphy. The cause of the failure, the quality of the capsule, and the ability to suture the capsule were recorded. The patients were evaluated at follow-up for failure, which was defined as recurrent subluxations or dislocations. The origin of the instability was traumatic (n = 6) or atraumatic (n = 8). At revision surgery in the traumatic group, 4 patients sustained failure of the Bankart repair with capsular laxity, and the others experienced capsular laxity alone. In the atraumatic group, all patients experienced capsular laxity as the cause of failure. Of the 14 patients, the capsule quality was judged to be thin in 5 patients and ablated in 1 patient. A glenoid-based capsular shift could be accomplished in all 14 patients. At follow-up (mean, 35.4 months; range, 22 to 48 months), 1 patient underwent revision surgery and 1 patient had a subluxation, resulting in a failure rate of 14%. Recurrent capsular laxity after failed thermal capsular shrinkage is common and frequently associated with capsular thinning. In most instances, the capsule quality does not appear to technically affect the revision procedure.

  2. Involving Customer Relations in Contextual Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a case study in the form of a contextual design project, the aim of which was to design a system for a particular organization. The starting point in the case was a need in the organization for a specific system. The case involved an analysis of the organizations customer...... point of the design project, how the project was conducted, and which results it ended up with. This is followed by a discussion of the effects of, and lessons learned by, involving customer relations in contextual design....

  3. One project`s waste is another project`s resource

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short, J.

    1997-02-01

    The author describes the efforts being made toward pollution prevention within the DOE complex, as a way to reduce overall project costs, in addition to decreasing the amount of waste to be handled. Pollution prevention is a concept which is trying to be ingrained into project planning. Part of the program involves the concept that ultimately the responsibility for waste comes back to the generator. Parts of the program involve efforts to reuse materials and equipment on new projects, to recycle wastes to generate offsetting revenue, and to increase awareness, accountability and incentives so as to stimulate action on this plan. Summaries of examples are presented in tables.

  4. Revision of the International Pharmaceutical Federation's Basel Statements on the future of hospital pharmacy: From Basel to Bangkok.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Lee C; Moles, Rebekah J; Collins, Jack C; Gray, Andy; Sheikh, Abdul Latif; Surugue, Jacqueline; Moss, Robert J; Ivey, Marianne F; Stevenson, James G; Takeda, Yasuo; Ranjit, Eurek; Chaar, Betty; Penm, Jonathan

    2016-07-15

    The processes used to revise the 2008 Basel Statements on the future of hospital pharmacy are summarized, and the revised statements are presented. The process for revising the Basel Statements followed an approach similar to that used during their initial development. The Hospital Pharmacy Section (HPS) of the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) revised the 2008 FIP Basel Statements in four phases, including a survey of hospital pharmacists worldwide, an internal review, online forums, and a face-to-face "World Café" workshop in Bangkok, Thailand. The global survey on the initial Basel Statements included input from 334 respondents from 62 countries. The majority of respondents agreed that most of the initial Basel Statements were acceptable as written and did not require revision. In total, 11 statements were judged by more than 10% of respondents as needing revision or deletion. The FIP HPS executive committee used the survey results to develop 69 initial revised draft statements. After an online discussion with the international hospital pharmacy community, including individuals from 28 countries representing all six World Health Organization regions, a final set of draft statements was prepared for the live discussion involving participants from 20 countries. The final 65 revised Basel Statements were voted on and accepted. Systematic revision of the FIP Basel Statements resulted in an updated reflection of aspirational goals for the future of hospital pharmacy practice. While this revision reflects the development of new goals for hospital pharmacy practice, the core principles of the Basel Statements remain an essential foundation for the discipline. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Deep prosthetic joint infection: a qualitative study of the impact on patients and their experiences of revision surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Ashley W; Whitehouse, Michael R; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Around 1% of patients who have a hip replacement have deep prosthetic joint infection (PJI) afterwards. PJI is often treated with antibiotics plus a single revision operation (1-stage revision), or antibiotics plus a 2-stage revision process involving more than 1 operation. This study aimed to characterise the impact and experience of PJI and treatment on patients, including comparison of 1-stage with 2-stage revision treatment. Design Qualitative semistructured interviews with patients who had undergone surgical revision treatment for PJI. Patients were interviewed between 2 weeks and 12 months postdischarge. Data were audio-recorded, transcribed, anonymised and analysed using a thematic approach, with 20% of transcripts double-coded. Setting Patients from 5 National Health Service (NHS) orthopaedic departments treating PJI in England and Wales were interviewed in their homes (n=18) or at hospital (n=1). Participants 19 patients participated (12 men, 7 women, age range 56–88 years, mean age 73.2 years). Results Participants reported receiving between 1 and 15 revision operations after their primary joint replacement. Analysis indicated that participants made sense of their experience through reference to 3 key phases: the period of symptom onset, the treatment period and protracted recovery after treatment. By conceptualising their experience in this way, and through themes that emerged in these periods, they conveyed the ordeal that PJI represented. Finally, in light of the challenges of PJI, they described the need for support in all of these phases. 2-stage revision had greater impact on participants’ mobility, and further burdens associated with additional complications. Conclusions Deep PJI impacted on all aspects of patients’ lives. 2-stage revision had greater impact than 1-stage revision on participants’ well-being because the time in between revision procedures meant long periods of immobility and related psychological distress

  6. Collateral Projections Innervate the Mammillary Bodies and Retrosplenial Cortex: A New Category of Hippocampal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Mara, Shane M.

    2018-01-01

    To understand the hippocampus, it is necessary to understand the subiculum. Unlike other hippocampal subfields, the subiculum projects to almost all distal hippocampal targets, highlighting its critical importance for external networks. The present studies, in male rats and mice, reveal a new category of dorsal subiculum neurons that innervate both the mammillary bodies (MBs) and the retrosplenial cortex (RSP). These bifurcating neurons comprise almost half of the hippocampal cells that project to RSP. The termination of these numerous collateral projections was visualized within the medial mammillary nucleus and the granular RSP (area 29). These collateral projections included subiculum efferents that cross to the contralateral MBs. Within the granular RSP, the collateral projections form a particularly dense plexus in deep Layer II and Layer III. This retrosplenial termination site colocalized with markers for VGluT2 and neurotensin. While efferents from the hippocampal CA fields standardly collateralize, subiculum projections often have only one target site. Consequently, the many collateral projections involving the RSP and the MBs present a relatively unusual pattern for the subiculum, which presumably relates to how both targets have complementary roles in spatial processing. Furthermore, along with the anterior thalamic nuclei, the MBs and RSP are key members of a memory circuit, which is usually described as both starting and finishing in the hippocampus. The present findings reveal how the hippocampus simultaneously engages different parts of this circuit, so forcing an important revision of this network. PMID:29527569

  7. Integrated project support environments the ASPECT project

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Alan W

    1991-01-01

    A major part of software engineering developments involve the use of computing tools which facilitate the management, maintenance, security, and building of long-scale software engineer projects. Consequently, there have been a proliferation of CASE tools and IPSES. This book looks at IPSES in general and the ASPECT project in particular, providing design and implementation details, as well as locating ASPECT in IPSE developments.Survey of integrated project support environments for more efficient software engineering**Description of a large scale IPSE--ASPECT**Evaluation of formal methods in

  8. The revised Generalized Expectancy for Success Scale: a validity and reliability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, W D; Fiedler, L R; Cochran, C D

    1992-07-01

    The Generalized Expectancy for Success Scale (GESS; Fibel & Hale, 1978) was revised and assessed for reliability and validity. The revised version was administered to 199 college students along with other conceptually related measures, including the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the Life Orientation Test, and Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale. One subsample of students also completed the Eysenck Personality Inventory, while another subsample performed a criterion-related task that involved risk taking. Item analysis yielded 25 items with correlations of .45 or higher with the total score. Results indicated high internal consistency and test-retest reliability.

  9. A revision of the Academic Locus of Control Scale for College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Nicholas A; Trice, Ashton D

    2013-06-01

    This study presents a revision of Trice's (1985) Academic Locus of Control Scale for College Students. A principal component analysis involving 322 college students produced four factors including 21 of the original 28 items. Inspection of the seven items not included in the four-factor solution suggested that they could be eliminated on both content and technical grounds. The resulting revised scale was similar to the original scale with respect to its relations with GPA, attendance, and measures of Academic Entitlement, procrastination, depression, and anxiety.

  10. Revision 2 of the Program of NPP Krsko Decommissioning and SF and LILW Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levanat, I.; Lokner, V.; Rapic, A.

    2010-01-01

    First joint Slovenian-Croatian Program of NPP Krsko Decommissioning and SF and LILW Disposal (DP) was completed in 2004 and formally adopted in 2005. As bilateral agreement on the NPP requires periodic revisions at least each 5 years, revision 2 of DP was started in September 2008, with the purpose to incorporate relevant developments since the 1st revision, to improve the level of details and reliability of DP, and to propose updated and more accurate cost estimates and appropriate financing models. In the first phase of the revision, new supporting studies for DP modules were prepared. Among these studies, the most demanding was the NPP Krsko specific Preliminary Decommissioning Plan (PDP), complying with the IAEA-recommended format, which included development of the NPP decommissioning inventory database. For upgrade of SF management, new and more detailed descriptions with improved cost estimates were prepared. Update of LILW disposal concept was based on new developments and projects prepared for the Slovenian repository. In the second phase of the revision, integrated DP scenarios were formulated and analyzed. They integrate NPP decommissioning together with RW and SF management/disposal into rationally inter-related sequences. Boundary conditions for this revision required: (a) that the reference scenario from the previous revision should be re-examined, with appropriate variations or new alternatives; (b) that the option of the NPP Krsko life extension should also be included; and (c) that the possibility of diverging interests of the contracting parties should also be analyzed (i.e. waste division and separate management). Finally, scenario evaluation is intended to compare the analyzed scenarios taking into account both their feasibility and estimated costs. It should provide the basis for determining future financing of DP, namely the annuities to be paid by the NPP Krsko owners into the national decommissioning funds.(author).

  11. Eye Involvement in TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eye involvement. Nonretinal and Retinal Eye Findings Facial angiofibromas may involve the eyelids of individuals with TSC, ... the hamartomas have many blood vessels (as are angiofibromas of the skin). Less than half of the ...

  12. PORTNUS Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loyal, Rebecca E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-14

    The objective of the Portunus Project is to create large, automated offshore ports that will the pace and scale of international trade. Additionally, these ports would increase the number of U.S. domestic trade vessels needed, as the imported goods would need to be transported from these offshore platforms to land-based ports such as Boston, Los Angeles, and Newark. Currently, domestic trade in the United States can only be conducted by vessels that abide by the Merchant Marine Act of 1920 – also referred to as the Jones Act. The Jones Act stipulates that vessels involved in domestic trade must be U.S. owned, U.S. built, and manned by a crew made up of U.S. citizens. The Portunus Project would increase the number of Jones Act vessels needed, which raises an interesting economic concern. Are Jones Act ships more expensive to operate than foreign vessels? Would it be more economically efficient to modify the Jones Act and allow vessels manned by foreign crews to engage in U.S. domestic trade? While opposition to altering the Jones Act is strong, it is important to consider the possibility that ship-owners who employ foreign crews will lobby for the chance to enter a growing domestic trade market. Their success would mean potential job loss for thousands of Americans currently employed in maritime trade.

  13. Accident consequence calculations for project W-058 safetyanalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Keuren, J.C.

    1997-06-10

    Accident consequence analyses have been performed for Project W-058, the Replacement Cross Site Transfer System. using the assumption and analysis techniques developed for the Tank Remediation Waste system Basis for Interim Operation. most potential accident involving the FISTS are bounded by the TWRS BIO analysis. However, the spray leak and pool leak scenarios require revised analyses since the RCSTS design utilizes larger diameter pipe and higher pressures than those analyzed in the TWRS BIO. Also the volume of diversion box and vent station are larger than that assumed for the valve pits in the TWRS BIO, which effects results of sprays or spills into the pits. the revised analysis for the spray leak is presented in Section 2, for the above ground spill in Section 3, for the presented in Section 2, for the above ground spill in Section 3, for the subsurface spill forming a pool in Section 4, and for the subsurface pool remaining subsurface in Section 5. The conclusion from these sections are summarized below.

  14. Accident consequence calculations for project W-058 safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Keuren, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Accident consequence analyses have been performed for Project W-058, the Replacement Cross Site Transfer System. using the assumption and analysis techniques developed for the Tank Remediation Waste system Basis for Interim Operation. most potential accident involving the FISTS are bounded by the TWRS BIO analysis. However, the spray leak and pool leak scenarios require revised analyses since the RCSTS design utilizes larger diameter pipe and higher pressures than those analyzed in the TWRS BIO. Also the volume of diversion box and vent station are larger than that assumed for the valve pits in the TWRS BIO, which effects results of sprays or spills into the pits. the revised analysis for the spray leak is presented in Section 2, for the above ground spill in Section 3, for the presented in Section 2, for the above ground spill in Section 3, for the subsurface spill forming a pool in Section 4, and for the subsurface pool remaining subsurface in Section 5. The conclusion from these sections are summarized below

  15. The Revised Animal Preference Test: An Implicit Probe of Tendencies Toward Psychopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penzel, Ian B; Bair, Jessica; Liu, Tianwei; Robinson, Michael D

    2018-05-01

    At least some forms of interpersonal violence could follow from a vision of the self as a fierce, dominant creature. This should be particularly true when psychopathic (more proactive, less reactive) tendencies are involved. Possible relations of this type were examined in two studies (total N = 278) in which college student samples were presented with a new, structured version of an old projective test typically used in psychotherapy contexts. Participants were presented with predator-prey animal pairs (e.g., lion-zebra) that were not explicitly labeled as such. For each pair, the person was asked to choose the animal that they would more prefer to be. Participants who desired to be predator animals more often, on this Revised Animal Preference Test (RAPT), tended toward psychopathy to a greater extent. In Study 1, such relations were manifest in terms of correlations with psychopathic traits and with an interpersonal style marked by hostile dominance. Further analyses, though, revealed that predator self-identifications were more strongly related to primary psychopathy than secondary psychopathy. Study 2 replicated the interpersonal style correlates of the RAPT. In addition, photographs were taken of the participants in the second study and these photographs were rated for apparent hostility and dominance. As hypothesized, participants who wanted to be predator animals to a greater extent also appeared more hostile and dominant in their nonverbal behaviors. These studies suggest that projective preferences can be assessed in a reliable manner through the use of standardizing procedures. Furthermore, the studies point to some of the motivational factors that may contribute to psychopathy and interpersonal violence.

  16. Project DOT/11/2007/INM Revision of TRH 11 - Project Report.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, MP

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available for speed limits The current speed limits are determined in compliance with the provisions of SANS 1550: Motor vehicle tyres and rims - Dimensions and loads; and SABS Recommended Practice ARP 007: The care, maintenance and use of motor vehicle tyres... each task was addressed and the outcome for each task. Keywords: Abnormal vehicles, abnormal loads, permits, fees, road damage costs, road usage fees, abnormal loads escorts; bridge formula, pavement damage Proposals for implementation...

  17. 50 CFR 81.6 - Project Agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM CONSERVATION OF ENDANGERED AND THREATENED..., the period of time necessary to accomplish the objectives, and both the Federal and State costs. All... Office of Management and Budget Circular No. A-95 (as revised). (d) The Project Agreement will follow...

  18. Organizing Patient Involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brehm Johansen, Mette

    hospitals. During the last 25 years, patient involvement and quality improvement have become connected in Danish healthcare policy. However, the ideal of involving patients in quality improvement is described in very general terms and with only few specific expectations of how it is to be carried out...... in practice, as I show in the thesis. In the patient involvement literature, the difficulties of getting patient involvement in quality improvement to have in an impact on the planning and development of healthcare services is, for example, ascribed to conceptual vagueness of patient involvement, differences...... in perspectives, values and understandings between patients and healthcare professionals, or the lack of managerial attention and prioritization....

  19. Fiscal 2000 business report. Technology transfer project involving environmentally-friendly coal utilization (CCT downstream sector); 2000 nendo hokokusho. Kankyochowagata sekitan riyo gijutsu iten jigyo (CCT karyu bun'ya) - 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    For the clean coal technology (CCT) to be introduced into and popularized in countries in Asia and the Pacific region, Japan invited engineers from these countries and provided them with CCT-oriented education and training. The participants were backbone leaders engaged in the research and development of coal combustion technologies and facilities, in the delivery of technical guidance and education, or in the implementation of environment-related measures back in their enterprises, plants, research institutes, and the like, and they acquired leading-edge technologies, knowledge, and techniques in the field of CCT. The environment course was held in the period of October 14-29, 2000, and the combustion course in the period of November 18-December 17, 2000, and the participants totalling 38 were from China, Indonesia, Thailand, the Philippines, or Vietnam. In this fiscal year, a follow-up survey was conducted in addition to the CCT education and training, which aimed to learn the CCT popularization status in the respective countries involved. It was then found that many of the trainees assumed important positions related to CCT popularization in their countries and were dealing with CCT popularization and implementation. (NEDO)

  20. Postoperative pain outcomes after transvaginal mesh revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, Jill M; Osborn, David J; Reynolds, W Stuart; Biller, Daniel H; Dmochowski, Roger R

    2015-01-01

    Although the current literature discusses mesh complications including pain, as well as suggesting different techniques for removing mesh, there is little literature regarding pain outcomes after surgical removal or revision. The purpose of this study is to determine if surgical removal or revision of vaginal mesh improves patient's subjective complaints of pelvic pain associated with original placement of mesh. After obtaining approval from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center Institutional Review Board, a retrospective review of female patients with pain secondary to previous mesh placement who underwent excision or revision of vaginal mesh from January 2000 to August 2012 was performed. Patient age, relevant medical history including menopause status, previous hysterectomy, smoking status, and presence of diabetes, fibromyalgia, interstitial cystitis, and chronic pelvic pain, was obtained. Patients' postoperative pain complaints were assessed. Of the 481 patients who underwent surgery for mesh revision, removal or urethrolysis, 233 patients met our inclusion criteria. One hundred and sixty-nine patients (73 %) reported that their pain improved, 19 (8 %) reported that their pain worsened, and 45 (19 %) reported that their pain remained unchanged after surgery. Prior history of chronic pelvic pain was associated with increased risk of failure of the procedure to relieve pain (OR 0.28, 95 % CI 0.12-0.64, p = 0.003). Excision or revision of vaginal mesh appears to be effective in improving patients' pain symptoms most of the time. Patients with a history of chronic pelvic pain are at an increased risk of no improvement or of worsening pain.

  1. Forum on Stakeholder Confidence: A Platform to build and share Knowledge about Stakeholder Confidence in Radioactive Waste Management. Reflections on Stakeholder Involvement. How do we ensure engagement for a project running over decades - Case study Sweden. Case Study Switzerland: stakeholder involvement in the Swiss site selection procedure; View of the Implementer on the Swiss Site Selection Procedure. Stakeholder Engagement on Radioactive Waste: Australia's Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuenzi, Pascale Jana; Shaver, Kathryn; Gerhardsson, Ansi; Toernqvist, Johanna Yngve; Bjoerklund, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Session 4 focused on the topic of radioactive waste management and how governments, implementers and regulators have utilised stakeholder involvement to make fair and sustainable decisions. Presentations included case studies from Australia, Canada, Sweden and Switzerland. The session also provided insight on how the Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC), created by the NEA Radioactive Waste Management Committee in 2000, has brought together policy-makers, regulatory officials, experts, implementers and industry representatives to promote open discussion on radioactive waste management among various stakeholders. The session highlighted an ongoing transition of radioactive waste management from theoretical foundations to practical implementation, and how stakeholder involvement plays a significant role in this process. In Mr Minon's opening remarks, he highlighted that a both politically and scientifically stable solution for deep geological repositories must be found, built on trust among all stakeholders. The joint presentation by Ms Kuenzi and Mr Birkhaeuser provided an example of how the younger generation was involved in discussions on radioactive waste management by inviting ten youth from Switzerland to participate in FSC's National Workshop in 2016. Based on the outcomes of the workshop, it will be critical to continue engagement of youth in the near future by expanding outreach to increase participation levels. The Swedish case study illustrated that the roles of a potential repository host community, the implementer and the regulator are complementary. These actors maintained engagement at a high level over decades by ensuring an open process and by building competence in the municipal government. Ms Shaver's presentation conveyed the benefits of sustained engagement. Several presentations also marked the importance of utilising social media in informing stakeholders on issues related to radioactive waste management. Examples of implementation in using

  2. TWRS privatization bibliography. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this bibliography is to present a select set of documents that may be of interest to the Offeror, covering a variety of subject areas related to the TWRS Privatization Project. This bibliography is not, nor is it intended to be, exhaustive or complete. It was prepared with the intent of providing a sampling of representative documents potentially helpful to Offerors. This bibliography is organized by subject area. The subjects covered are: waste characterization; pre-treatment; high-level waste immobilization; low-level waste immobilization; low-level waste melter test program; performance assessment; general; and safety.

  3. River Corridor Project Workplace Air Monitoring Technical Basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MANTOOTH, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    This document provides the technical basis by which the workplace air monitoring and sampling program is operated in the River Corridor Project (RCP). Revision 2 addresses and incorporates changes in the air monitoring program drivers and implementing documents which occurred after the previous revision was issued. This revision also includes an additional RCP project to make Revision 2 applicable to the entire RCP. These changes occurred in the following areas: (1) Changes resulting from the conversion of the Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1) into the Project Hanford Radiological Control Manual (F-5173). HNF-5173 is now the implementing document for 10CFR835. (2) Changes resulting from the issue of new and revised Hanford Site implementing procedures. (3) Changes resulting from the issue of new and revised, as well as the cancellation of RCP implementing procedures. (4) Addition of the 200 Area Accelerated Deactivation Project (ADP). (5) Modification of some air sampling/monitoring locations to better meet the needs of facility operations. (6) Changes resulting from the RCP reorganization

  4. Inferring category characteristics from sample characteristics: inductive reasoning and social projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, J; Clement, R W

    1996-03-01

    Inductive reasoning involves generalization from sample observations to categories. This research examined the conditions under which generalizations go beyond the boundaries of the sampled categories. In Experiment 1, participants sampled colored chips from urns. When categorization was not salient, participants revised their estimates of the probability of a particular color even in urns they had not sampled. As categorization became more salient, generalization became limited to the sampled urn. In Experiment 2 the salience of categorization in social induction was varied. When social categorization was not salient, participants projected their own responses to test items to members of a laboratory group even when they themselves did not belong to this group. When salience increased, projection decreased among nonmembers but not among members. In Experiment 3 these results were replicated in a field setting.

  5. A mechanism for revising accreditation standards: a study of the process, resources required and evaluation outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, David; Civil, Mike; Donnison, Andrew; Hogden, Anne; Hinchcliff, Reece; Westbrook, Johanna; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2014-11-21

    The study objective was to identify and describe the process, resources and expertise required for the revision of accreditation standards, and report outcomes arising from such activities. Secondary document analysis of materials from an accreditation standards development agency. The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners' (RACGP) documents, minutes and reports related to the revision of the accreditation standards were examined. The RACGP revision of the accreditation standards was conducted over a 12 month period and comprised six phases with multiple tasks, including: review methodology planning; review of the evidence base and each standard; new material development; constructing field trial methodology; drafting, trialling and refining new standards; and production of new standards. Over 100 individuals participated, with an additional 30 providing periodic input and feedback. Participants were drawn from healthcare professional associations, primary healthcare services, accreditation agencies, government agencies and public health organisations. Their expertise spanned: project management; standards development and writing; primary healthcare practice; quality and safety improvement methodologies; accreditation implementation and surveying; and research. The review and development process was shaped by five issues: project expectations; resource and time requirements; a collaborative approach; stakeholder engagement; and the product produced. The RACGP evaluation was that participants were positive about their experience, the standards produced and considered them relevant for the sector. The revision of accreditation standards requires considerable resources and expertise, drawn from a broad range of stakeholders. Collaborative, inclusive processes that engage key stakeholders helps promote greater industry acceptance of the standards.

  6. Tank farm restoration and safe operation, Project W-314, upgrade scope summary report (USSR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    The revision to the Project W-314 Upgrade Scope Summary Report (USSR), incorporates changes to the project scope from customer guidance. Included are incorporation of the recommendations from HNF-2500, agreements regarding interfaces with Project W-211, and assumption of scope previously assigned to Project W-454

  7. Benchmarking and validation activities within JEFF project

    OpenAIRE

    Cabellos O.; Alvarez-Velarde F.; Angelone M.; Diez C.J.; Dyrda J.; Fiorito L.; Fischer U.; Fleming M.; Haeck W.; Hill I.; Ichou R.; Kim D. H.; Klix A.; Kodeli I.; Leconte P.

    2017-01-01

    The challenge for any nuclear data evaluation project is to periodically release a revised, fully consistent and complete library, with all needed data and covariances, and ensure that it is robust and reliable for a variety of applications. Within an evaluation effort, benchmarking activities play an important role in validating proposed libraries. The Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion (JEFF) Project aims to provide such a nuclear data library, and thus, requires a coherent and efficient be...

  8. RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certa, P.J.; Kirkbride, R.A.; Hohl, T.M.; Empey, P.A.; Wells, M.N.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of approximately 57 million gallons 1 of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure2 of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in May 2008. ORP has made a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. ORP has contracts in place to implement the strategy for completion of the mission and establish the capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategl involves a number of interrelated activities. ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by the following: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) and delivering the waste to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) fraction contained in the tank farms. About one-third of the low-activity waste (LAW) fraction separated from the HLW fraction in the WTP will be immobilized in the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility. (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability assumed to be a second LAW vitrification facility that can safely treat about two-thirds of the LAW contained in the tank farms. (4) Developing and deploying supplemental pretreatment capability currently assumed to be an Aluminum Removal Facility (ARF) using a lithium hydrotalcite process to mitigate sodium management issues. (5) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) tank waste for possible shipment to and disposal

  9. RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CERTA PJ; KIRKBRIDE RA; HOHL TM; EMPEY PA; WELLS MN

    2009-09-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of approximately 57 million gallons 1 of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure2 of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in May 2008. ORP has made a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. ORP has contracts in place to implement the strategy for completion of the mission and establish the capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategl involves a number of interrelated activities. ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by the following: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) and delivering the waste to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) fraction contained in the tank farms. About one-third of the low-activity waste (LAW) fraction separated from the HLW fraction in the WTP will be immobilized in the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility. (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability assumed to be a second LAW vitrification facility that can safely treat about two-thirds of the LAW contained in the tank farms. (4) Developing and deploying supplemental pretreatment capability currently assumed to be an Aluminum Removal Facility (ARF) using a lithium hydrotalcite process to mitigate sodium management issues. (5) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) tank waste for possible shipment to and

  10. Multiobjective Optimization Involving Quadratic Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Brito Augusto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiobjective optimization is nowadays a word of order in engineering projects. Although the idea involved is simple, the implementation of any procedure to solve a general problem is not an easy task. Evolutionary algorithms are widespread as a satisfactory technique to find a candidate set for the solution. Usually they supply a discrete picture of the Pareto front even if this front is continuous. In this paper we propose three methods for solving unconstrained multiobjective optimization problems involving quadratic functions. In the first, for biobjective optimization defined in the bidimensional space, a continuous Pareto set is found analytically. In the second, applicable to multiobjective optimization, a condition test is proposed to check if a point in the decision space is Pareto optimum or not and, in the third, with functions defined in n-dimensional space, a direct noniterative algorithm is proposed to find the Pareto set. Simple problems highlight the suitability of the proposed methods.

  11. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neitzel, D.A.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Fosmire, C.J.; Fowler, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    This eighth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Chapters 4 and 6 in Hanford Site-related NEPA documents. Chapter 4 (Affected Environment) includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, historical, archaeological and cultural resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site. The following sections were updated in this revision: climate and meteorology; ecology (threatened and endangered species section only); historical; archaeological and cultural resources; and all of chapter 6. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be used directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts

  12. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cushing, C.E.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A.

    1994-08-01

    This sixth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors; Chapter 5.0 has been significantly updated from the fifth revision. It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions; The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be utilized directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts

  13. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushing, C.E. [ed.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A. [and others

    1995-09-01

    This seventh revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, environmental monitoring, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors. Chapter 5.0 was not updated from the sixth revision (1994). It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE Orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be used directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

  14. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushing, C.E. [ed.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A. [and others

    1994-08-01

    This sixth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors; Chapter 5.0 has been significantly updated from the fifth revision. It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions; The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be utilized directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

  15. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neitzel, D.A. [ed.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Fosmire, C.J.; Fowler, R.A. [and others

    1996-08-01

    This eighth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Chapters 4 and 6 in Hanford Site-related NEPA documents. Chapter 4 (Affected Environment) includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, historical, archaeological and cultural resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site. The following sections were updated in this revision: climate and meteorology; ecology (threatened and endangered species section only); historical; archaeological and cultural resources; and all of chapter 6. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be used directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

  16. Operations program plan: Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    This document, the Operations Program Plan (OPP), has been developed as the seven-year master plan for operation of WIPP. The OPP was authorized by the Albuquerque Field Office of the Department of Energy (DOE-AL) and that organization's WIPP Project Office (DOE-WPO) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The OPP is the directive from the DOE-WPO Project Manager as to how the WIPP is to be managed, operated, and administered. As the top tier management document for WIPP, the OPP establishes organizational responsibilities and an organizational structure for the Waste Isolation Division (WID) of Westinghouse Electric Corporation. The OPP sets policy and tone for conducting WIPP operations; it requires and specifically authorizes implementing documents (e.g., manuals). It has also proven instrumental in the budgeting and planning process, most particularly in expediting the preparation of specific budgets and detailed schedules for each of the numerous work packages. The OPP is also used to communicate information about WIPP operations

  17. Recurrent instability after revision anterior shoulder stabilization surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Lisa Genevra Mandeville; Griesser, Michael J; Miniaci, Anthony A; Jones, Morgan H

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review of the literature to compare outcomes of revision anterior stabilization surgeries based on technique. This study also sought to compare the impact of bone defects on outcomes. A systematic review of the electronic databases PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Scopus was performed in July 2012 and March 2013. Of 345 articles identified in the search, 17 studies with Level I to IV Evidence satisfied the inclusion criteria and were analyzed according to PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. Recurrent instability was defined as redislocation, resubluxation, or a positive apprehensive test after revision surgery. Procedures were categorized as arthroscopic Bankart repair, open Bankart repair, Bristow-Latarjet procedure, and other open procedures. In total, 388 shoulders were studied. Male patients comprised 74.1% of patients, 66.7% of cases involved the dominant shoulder, the mean age was 28.2 years, and the mean follow-up period was 44.2 months. The surgical procedures classified as "other open procedures" had the highest rate of recurrent instability (42.7%), followed by arthroscopic Bankart repair (14.7%), the Bristow-Latarjet procedure (14.3%), and open Bankart repair (5.5%). Inconsistent reporting of bone defects precluded drawing significant conclusions. A number of different procedures are used to address recurrent instability after a primary operation for anterior shoulder instability has failed. There is significant variability in the rate of recurrent instability after revision anterior shoulder stabilization surgery. Level IV, systematic review of Level I to IV studies. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Single-stage Acetabular Revision During Two-stage THA Revision for Infection is Effective in Selected Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Bernd; Schlumberger, Michael; Oremek, Damian

    2017-08-01

    The treatment of periprosthetic infections of hip arthroplasties typically involves use of either a single- or two-stage (with implantation of a temporary spacer) revision surgery. In patients with severe acetabular bone deficiencies, either already present or after component removal, spacers cannot be safely implanted. In such hips where it is impossible to use spacers and yet a two-stage revision of the prosthetic stem is recommended, we have combined a two-stage revision of the stem with a single revision of the cup. To our knowledge, this approach has not been reported before. (1) What proportion of patients treated with single-stage acetabular reconstruction as part of a two-stage revision for an infected THA remain free from infection at 2 or more years? (2) What are the Harris hip scores after the first stage and at 2 years or more after the definitive reimplantation? Between June 2009 and June 2014, we treated all patients undergoing surgical treatment for an infected THA using a single-stage acetabular revision as part of a two-stage THA exchange if the acetabular defect classification was Paprosky Types 2B, 2C, 3A, 3B, or pelvic discontinuity and a two-stage procedure was preferred for the femur. The procedure included removal of all components, joint débridement, definitive acetabular reconstruction (with a cage to bridge the defect, and a cemented socket), and a temporary cemented femoral component at the first stage; the second stage consisted of repeat joint and femoral débridement and exchange of the femoral component to a cementless device. During the period noted, 35 patients met those definitions and were treated with this approach. No patients were lost to followup before 2 years; mean followup was 42 months (range, 24-84 months). The clinical evaluation was performed with the Harris hip scores and resolution of infection was assessed by the absence of clinical signs of infection and a C-reactive protein level less than 10 mg/L. All

  19. Hanford Site technical baseline database. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, P.E.

    1995-01-01

    This report lists the Hanford specific files (Table 1) that make up the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database. Table 2 includes the delta files that delineate the differences between this revision and revision 0 of the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database. This information is being managed and maintained on the Hanford RDD-100 System, which uses the capabilities of RDD-100, a systems engineering software system of Ascent Logic Corporation (ALC). This revision of the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database uses RDD-100 version 3.0.2.2 (see Table 3). Directories reflect those controlled by the Hanford RDD-100 System Administrator. Table 4 provides information regarding the platform. A cassette tape containing the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database is available

  20. Cryochemistry (2nd revised edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergeev, G.B.; Batiuk, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical reactions at low temperatures are characterized, summarizing the results of Soviet research since the late 1950s. Chapters are devoted to homogeneous and heterogeneous low-temperature reactions of gases and liquids, apparatus and techniques for cryochemistry, reactions of ions and radicals in frozen solids, low-temperature polymerization, chain reactions, spontaneous reactions, kinetic models of solid-phase reactions, reactions in multicomponent frozen systems, biochemical reactions at reduced and low temperatures, reactions involving metals, and science and engineering applications of low temperatures. 813 references.

  1. Resource description and access 2013 revision

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This e-book contains the 2013 Revision of RDA: Resource Description and Access, and includes the July 2013 Update. This e-book offers links within the RDA text and the capability of running rudimentary searches of RDA, but please note that this e-book does not have the full range of content or functionality provided by the subscription product RDA Toolkit. Included: A full accumulation of RDA- the revision contains a full set of all current RDA instructions. It replaces the previous version of RDA Print as opposed to being an update packet to that version. RDA has gone through many changes sin

  2. Revised Huang-Yang multipolar pseudopotential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derevianko, Andrei

    2005-01-01

    A number of authors have recently pointed out inconsistencies of results obtained with the Huang-Yang multipolar pseudopotential for low-energy scattering [K. Huang and K. C. Yang, Phys. Rev. 105, 767 (1957); later revised by Huang, Statistical Mechanics (Wiley, New York, 1963)]. The conceptual validity of their original derivation has been questioned. Here I show that these inconsistencies are rather due to an algebraic mistake made by Huang and Yang. With the corrected error, I present the revised version of the multipolar pseudopotential

  3. Plan-Belief Revision in Jason

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Schmidt; Villadsen, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    When information is shared between agents of unknown reliability, it is possible that their belief bases become inconsistent. In such cases, the belief base must be revised to restore consistency, so that the agent is able to reason. In some cases the inconsistent information may be due to use of...... of incorrect plans. We extend work by Alechina et al. to revise belief bases in which plans can be dynamically added and removed. We present an implementation of the algorithm in the AgentSpeak implementation Jason....

  4. Fast-track revision knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Otte, Niels Kristian Stahl; Kristensen, Billy B

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background and purpose Fast-track surgery has reduced the length of hospital stay (LOS), morbidity, and convalescence in primary hip and knee arthroplasty (TKA). We assessed whether patients undergoing revision TKA for non-septic indications might also benefit from fast-track surgery....... Methods 29 patients were operated with 30 revision arthroplasties. Median age was 67 (34-84) years. All patients followed a standardized fast-track set-up designed for primary TKA. We determined the outcome regarding LOS, morbidity, mortality, and satisfaction. Results Median LOS was 2 (1-4) days...

  5. PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines: Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lurie, S.; Bucci, G.; Johnson, L.; King, M.; Lamanna, L.; Morgan, E.; Bates, J.; Burns, R.; Eaker, R.; Ward, G.; Linnenbom, V.; Millet, P.; Paine, J.P.; Wood, C.J.; Gatten, T.; Meatheany, D.; Seager, J.; Thompson, R.; Brobst, G.; Connor, W.; Lewis, G.; Shirmer, R.; Gillen, J.; Kerns, M.; Jones, V.; Lappegaard, S.; Sawochka, S.; Smith, F.; Spires, D.; Pagan, S.; Gardner, J.; Polidoroff, T.; Lambert, S.; Dahl, B.; Hundley, F.; Miller, B.; Andersson, P.; Briden, D.; Fellers, B.; Harvey, S.; Polchow, J.; Rootham, M.; Fredrichs, T.; Flint, W.

    1993-05-01

    An effective, state-of-the art secondary water chemistry control program is essential to maximize the availability and operating life of major PWR components. Furthermore, the costs related to maintaining secondary water chemistry will likely be less than the repair or replacement of steam generators or large turbine rotors, with resulting outages taken into account. The revised PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines in this report represent the latest field and laboratory data on steam generator corrosion phenomena. This document supersedes Interim PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Recommendations for IGA/SCC Control (EPRI report TR-101230) as well as PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines--Revision 2 (NP-6239)

  6. JOINT INVOLVEMENT IN SYPHILIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Zlobina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint involvement in syphilis has been considered as casuistry in recent years. At the same time, the high incidence of primary syphilis and the notified cases of late neurosyphilis may suggest that joint involvement in this disease is by no means always verified. Traditionally there are two forms of syphilitic arthritis: primary synovial (involving the articular membranes and sac and primary bone (involving the articular bones and cartilages ones. The paper describes the authors' clinical case of the primary bone form of articular syphilis in a 34-year-old man. 

  7. Photon beam properties at the European XFEL (December 2010 revision)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V.

    2011-09-15

    A new set of baseline parameters of the electron beam and undulator for the European XFEL project has been defined recently. Changes refer to the electron beam emittance, charge, operation at different electron energies, and change of undulator period. According to the present concept, it is planned to vary charge from 20 pC to 1 nC allowing control of the FWHM radiation pulse duration. Operation at different electron energies of 17.5 GeV, 14 GeV, and 10.5 GeV will allow extension of the wavelength range to longer wavelengths. Electron bunches with different charges possess different properties. These features have an impact on photon beam properties which should be taken into account at the design stage optical beamlines and instruments and planning user experiments. In this note we present an overview of the radiation properties generated by SASE FEL radiators driven by electron beam with revised baseline parameters. (orig.)

  8. Define Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Madsen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    "Project" is a key concept in IS management. The word is frequently used in textbooks and standards. Yet we seldom find a precise definition of the concept. This paper discusses how to define the concept of a project. The proposed definition covers both heavily formalized projects and informally...... organized, agile projects. Based on the proposed definition popular existing definitions are discussed....

  9. Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Project Management Theory Meets Practice contains the proceedings from the 1st Danish Project Management Research Conference (DAPMARC 2015), held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on May 21st, 2015.......Project Management Theory Meets Practice contains the proceedings from the 1st Danish Project Management Research Conference (DAPMARC 2015), held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on May 21st, 2015....

  10. Lessons learned from decommissioning projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes lessons learned over the last 20 years from 12 decommissioning projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory. These lessons relate both to overall program management and to management of specific projects during the planning and operations phases. The issues include waste management; the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA); the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); contracting; public involvement; client/customer interface; and funding. Key elements of our approach are to be proactive; follow the observation method; perform field activities concurrently; develop strategies to keep reportable incidents from delaying work; seek and use programs, methods, etc., in existence to shorten learning curves; network to help develop solutions; and avoid overstudying and overcharacterizing. This approach results in preliminary plans that require very little revision before implementation, reasonable costs and schedules, early acquisition of permits and NEPA documents, preliminary characterization reports, and contracting documents. Our track record is good -- the last four projects (uranium and plutonium-processing facility and three research reactors) have been on budget and on schedule

  11. Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilkington, Alan; Chai, Kah-Hin; Le, Yang

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies the true coverage of PM theory through a bibliometric analysis of the International Journal of Project Management from 1996-2012. We identify six persistent research themes: project time management, project risk management, programme management, large-scale project management......, project success/failure and practitioner development. These differ from those presented in review and editorial articles in the literature. In addition, topics missing from the PM BOK: knowledge management project-based organization and project portfolio management have become more popular topics...

  12. Parent Involvement Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Arna

    This handbook on parent involvement, designed to be used with preschool programs, was developed by the Jefferson County Public Schools in Lakewood, Colorado. Included are: (1) a general statement about parent involvement in an early childhood program, (2) a description of the Jefferson County Early Childhood Program, (3) a description of the…

  13. Revision total hip arthoplasty: factors associated with re-revision surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatod, Monti; Cafri, Guy; Inacio, Maria C S; Schepps, Alan L; Paxton, Elizabeth W; Bini, Stefano A

    2015-03-04

    The survivorship of implants after revision total hip arthroplasty and risk factors associated with re-revision are not well defined. We evaluated the re-revision rate with use of the institutional total joint replacement registry. The purpose of this study was to determine patient, implant, and surgeon factors associated with re-revision total hip arthroplasty. A retrospective cohort study was conducted. The total joint replacement registry was used to identify patients who had undergone revision total hip arthroplasty for aseptic reasons from April 1, 2001, to December 31, 2010. The end point of interest was re-revision total hip arthroplasty. Risk factors evaluated for re-revision total hip arthroplasty included: patient risk factors (age, sex, body mass index, race, and general health status), implant risk factors (fixation type, bearing surface, femoral head size, and component replacement), and surgeon risk factors (volume and experience). A multivariable Cox proportional hazards model was used. Six hundred and twenty-nine revision total hip arthroplasties with sixty-three (10%) re-revisions were evaluated. The mean cohort age (and standard deviation) was 57.0 ± 12.4 years, the mean body mass index (and standard deviation) was 29.5 ± 6.1 kg/m(2), and most of the patients were women (64.5%) and white (81.9%) and had an American Society of Anesthesiologists score of associated with the risk of re-revision. For every ten-year increase in patient age, the hazard ratio for re-revision decreases by a factor of 0.72 (95% confidence interval, 0.58 to 0.90). For every five revision surgical procedures performed by a surgeon, the risk of revision decreases by a factor of 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.86 to 0.99). At the time of revision, a new or retained cemented femoral implant or all-cemented hip implant increases the risk of revision by a factor of 3.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.22 to 8.38) relative to a retained or new uncemented hip implant. A ceramic on a

  14. Project financing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, A.

    1998-01-01

    Project financing was defined ('where a lender to a specific project has recourse only to the cash flow and assets of that project for repayment and security respectively') and its attributes were described. Project financing was said to be particularly well suited to power, pipeline, mining, telecommunications, petro-chemicals, road construction, and oil and gas projects, i.e. large infrastructure projects that are difficult to fund on-balance sheet, where the risk profile of a project does not fit the corporation's risk appetite, or where higher leverage is required. Sources of project financing were identified. The need to analyze and mitigate risks, and being aware that lenders always take a conservative view and gravitate towards the lowest common denominator, were considered the key to success in obtaining project financing funds. TransAlta Corporation's project financing experiences were used to illustrate the potential of this source of financing

  15. Revision surgery due to magnet dislocation in cochlear implant patients: an emerging complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassepass, Frederike; Stabenau, Vanessa; Maier, Wolfgang; Arndt, Susan; Laszig, Roland; Beck, Rainer; Aschendorff, Antje

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the cause and effect of magnet dislocation in cochlear implant (CI) recipients requiring magnet revision surgery for treatment. Retrospective study. Tertiary referral center. Case reports from 1,706 CI recipients consecutively implanted from January 2000 to December 2011 were reviewed. The number of cases requiring magnet revision surgery was assessed. Revision surgery involving magnet removal or replacement was indicated in 1.23% (21/1,706), of all CI recipients. Magnet dislocation occurring during magnetic resonance tomography (MRI), at 1.5 Tesla (T), with the magnet in place and with the application of compression bandaging around the head, was the main cause for revision surgery in 47.62% (10/21) of the affected cases. All 10 cases were implanted with Cochlear Nucleus cochlear implants. These events occurred, despite adherence to current recommendations of the manufacturer. The present study underlines that MRI examination is the main cause of magnet dislocation. The use of compressive bandaging when using 1.5-T MRI does not eliminate the risk of magnet dislocation. Additional cautionary measures are for required for conditional MRI. We recommend X-ray examination after MRI to determine magnet dislocation and avoid major complications in all cases reporting pain during or after MRI. Additional research regarding silicon magnet pocket design for added retention is needed. Effective communication of guidelines for precautionary measures during MRI examination in CI patients is mandatory for all clinicians involved. MRI in CI recipients should be indicated with caution.

  16. DWPF Development Plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzscheiter, E.W.

    1994-05-09

    The DWPF Development Plan is based on an evaluation process flowsheet and related waste management systems. The scope is shown in Figure 1 entitled ``DWPF Process Development Systems.`` To identify the critical development efforts, each system has been analyzed to determine: The identification of unresolved technology issues. A technology issue (TI) is one that requires basic development to resolve a previously unknown process or equipment problem and is managed via the Technology Assurance Program co-chaired by DWPF and SRTC. Areas that require further work to sufficiently define the process basis or technical operating envelop for DWPF. This activity involves the application of sound engineering and development principles to define the scope of work required to complete the technical data. The identification of the level of effort and expertise required to provide process technical consultation during the start-up and demonstration of this first of a kind plant.

  17. DWPF Development Plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtzscheiter, E.W.

    1994-01-01

    The DWPF Development Plan is based on an evaluation process flowsheet and related waste management systems. The scope is shown in Figure 1 entitled ''DWPF Process Development Systems.'' To identify the critical development efforts, each system has been analyzed to determine: The identification of unresolved technology issues. A technology issue (TI) is one that requires basic development to resolve a previously unknown process or equipment problem and is managed via the Technology Assurance Program co-chaired by DWPF and SRTC. Areas that require further work to sufficiently define the process basis or technical operating envelop for DWPF. This activity involves the application of sound engineering and development principles to define the scope of work required to complete the technical data. The identification of the level of effort and expertise required to provide process technical consultation during the start-up and demonstration of this first of a kind plant

  18. The Involved Ostrich

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Andrea; Dobscha, Susan; Geiger, Susi

    2008-01-01

    that the transition into parenthood can be difficult for men due to their lack of a physical connection to the pregnancy, a perception that the baby industry is not designed for them, the continuance of male stereotypes in the media, and also the time available to men to become involved in consumption activities......-natal data. Data revealed that men, according to their partner’s perceptions, used consumption as a virtual umbilical cord, although levels of consumption involvement varied from co-involvement for most purchases, to limited involvement, and/or involvement for ‘large’ items, particularly travel systems...... and technical items. This research also revealed that men partook in highly masculinized forms of “nesting,” and in general shunned pregnancy book reading; although some did engage in “research” activities such as searching the internet for product safety information. We conclude from this study...

  19. Individualized In-Service Teacher Education. (Project IN-STEP). Evaluation Report, Phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, John C.

    Phase 2 of Project IN-STEP was conducted to revise, refine, and conduct further field testing of a new inservice teacher education model. The method developed (in Phase 1--see ED 003 905 for report) is an individualized, multi-media approach. Revision activities, based on feedback provided for Phase 1, include the remaking of six videotape…

  20. Special Analysis: Revision of Saltstone Vault 4 Disposal Limits (U)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J

    2005-05-26

    New disposal limits have been computed for Vault 4 of the Saltstone Disposal Facility based on several revisions to the models in the existing Performance Assessment and the Special Analysis issued in 2002. The most important changes are the use of a more rigorous groundwater flow and transport model, and consideration of radon emanation. Other revisions include refinement of the aquifer mesh to more accurately model the footprint of the vault, a new plutonium chemistry model accounting for the different transport properties of oxidation states III/IV and V/VI, use of variable infiltration rates to simulate degradation of the closure system, explicit calculation of gaseous releases and consideration of the effects of settlement and seismic activity on the vault structure. The disposal limits have been compared with the projected total inventory expected to be disposed in Vault 4. The resulting sum-of-fractions of the 1000-year disposal limits is 0.2, which indicates that the performance objectives and requirements of DOE 435.1 will not be exceeded. This SA has not altered the conceptual model (i.e., migration of radionuclides from the Saltstone waste form and Vault 4 to the environment via the processes of diffusion and advection) of the Saltstone PA (MMES 1992) nor has it altered the conclusions of the PA (i.e., disposal of the proposed waste in the SDF will meet DOE performance measures). Thus a PA revision is not required and this SA serves to update the disposal limits for Vault 4. In addition, projected doses have been calculated for comparison with the performance objectives laid out in 10 CFR 61. These doses are 0.05 mrem/year to a member of the public and 21.5 mrem/year to an inadvertent intruder in the resident scenario over a 10,000-year time-frame, which demonstrates that the 10 CFR 61 performance objectives will not be exceeded. This SA supplements the Saltstone PA and supersedes the two previous SAs (Cook et al. 2002; Cook and Kaplan 2003).