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Sample records for project flathead county

  1. Flathead River Instream Flow Investigation Project : Final Report 1996-2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, William J. (Miller Ecological Consultants., Fort Collins, CO); Ptacek, Jonathan A. (Miller Ecological Consultants, Inc., Fort Collins, CO)

    2003-09-01

    A modified Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) approach was used on the mainstem Flathead River from the South Fork Flathead River downstream to Flathead Lake. The objective of this study was to quantify changes in habitat for the target fish species, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and west slope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi), as a function of discharge in the river. This approach used a combination of georeferenced field data for each study site combined with a two-dimensional hydraulic simulation of river hydraulic characteristics. The hydraulic simulations were combined with habitat suitability criteria in a GIS analysis format to determine habitat area as a function of discharge. Results of the analysis showed that habitat area is more available at lower discharges than higher discharges and that in comparison of the pre-dam hydrology with post-dam hydrology, the stable pre-dam baseflows provided more stable habitat than the highly variable flow regime during both summer and winter baseflow post-dam periods. The variability week to week and day to day under post-dam conditions waters and dewaters stream margins. This forces sub-adult fish, in particular bull trout, to use less productive habitat during the night. There is a distinct difference between daytime and nighttime habitat use for bull trout sub-adults. The marginal areas that are constantly wet and then dried provide little in productivity for lower trophic levels and consequently become unproductive for higher trophic levels, especially bull trout sub-adults that use those areas as flows increase. A stable flow regime would be more productive than flow regimes with high variability week to week. The highly variable flows likely put stress on a bull trout subadult and west slope cutthroat trout, due to the additional movement required to find suitable habitat. The GIS approach presented here provides both a visual characterization of habitat as well as Arcview project data

  2. Environmental problem analysis of the proposed Sage Creek Coal Project in the Flathead Valley of British Columbia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The proposed Sage Creek Coal Project is analysed with respect to environmental impacts, international concerns and public concerns. Although information available to date is insufficient to pursue an analysis enabling a determination of the full social and environmental cost of the project, basic concerns and issues have been elucidated. Emphasis is given to the potential adverse effects on existing fish species and on wildlife species, particularly grizzly bear, moose and mountain goat. Because the area affected by the project includes both Canadian and U.S. territory, environmental objectives of the U.S. government for the Upper Flathead Valley ecosystem must also be considered in any future B.C. government decisions. Public opposition to the project from an environmental standpoint is documented. The report concludes the preferred option for a Ministry of Environment position is to recommend the project not proceed.

  3. Model county ordinance for wind projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bain, D.A. [Oregon Office of Energy, Portland, OR (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Permitting is a crucial step in the development cycle of a wind project and permits affect the timing, cost, location, feasibility, layout, and impacts of wind projects. Counties often have the lead responsibility for permitting yet few have appropriate siting regulations for wind projects. A model ordinance allows a county to quickly adopt appropriate permitting procedures. The model county wind ordinance developed for use by northwest states is generally applicable across the country and counties seeking to adopt siting or zoning regulations for wind will find it a good starting place. The model includes permitting procedures for wind measurement devices and two types of wind systems. Both discretionary and nondiscretionary standards apply to wind systems and a conditional use permit would be issued. The standards, criteria, conditions for approval, and process procedures are defined for each. Adaptation examples for the four northwest states are provided along with a model Wind Resource Overlay Zone.

  4. A Brief History of the Flathead Tribes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, Clarence; And Others

    A source document, illustrated with many black and white photographs of tribe members and activities, provides a brief history of the American Indian tribes, now called the Flatheads, living on the Flathead Indian Reservation in Montana and describes some of their cultural traditions, particularly their ceremonial dances. The booklet traces the…

  5. Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

    2009-08-06

    The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research

  6. Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

    2008-12-22

    The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research

  7. Orange County Photovoltaic Project & Educational COmponent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Renee [Orange County Government, FL (United States)

    2016-02-12

    The purpose of this report is to discuss the projects implemented, utilizing Department of Energy grant funds, to support the use and understanding of renewable energy in Orange County, Florida and the Greater Orlando Area. Orange County is located in the State of Florida and is most popularly referred to as Orlando. The greater Orlando area’s current population is 1,225,267 and in 2015 was the first destination to surpass 60 million visitors. Orange County utilized grant funds to add to the growing demand for access to charging stations by installing one level 2 dual NovaCharge CT4021 electric vehicle charging station at the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center. The charging station is considered a “smart” charger connected to a central network operated by a third party. Data collected includes the number of charging sessions, session start and end times, the electricity usage, greenhouse gases saved and other pertinent data used for reporting purposes. Orange County continues to support the use of electric vehicles in Metro Orlando and this project continues to bring awareness to our public regarding using alternative vehicles. Additionally, we offer all visitors to the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center free charges for their electric vehicles 24 hours a day. Since the operation of the charging station there have been 52 unique driver users, a total of 532.2258 kg of greenhouse gas savings and 159.03 gallons of gasoline savings. The installation of the additional electric vehicle charging station is part of a county-wide goal of promoting implementation of renewable energy technologies as well as supporting the use of electric vehicles including the Drive Electric Orlando & Florida programs. http://driveelectricorlando.com/ & ; http://www.driveelectricflorida.org/ . Grant funds were also used for Outreach and Educational efforts. Educational efforts about renewable energy were accomplished through

  8. South Carolina: Charleston County Area Project Impact Environmental Education Program (A Former EPA CARE Project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Charleston County Area Project Impact is the recipient of a Level II CARE cooperative agreement. The project is under the direction of the Charleston County Building Services Department, in Charleston, S.C.

  9. Project monitor. Final report. [Allegheny County, PA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, P.Y.; Beck, P.; Doctors, S.I.

    1979-04-27

    Results are reported of a study of consumers' energy attitudes and behavior. Household consumers and small business consumers (both retail and manufacturing) responded to the survey, but only the household results are reported. The study sought to understand energy-related behavior at the level where the various components of energy policy intersect. Attempts are made to attain this goal by determining the extent to which various properties of the individuals and firms are associated with various amounts of conservation. A representative sample of the adult population in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania was interviewed. Part I introduces the measures of household conservation to be used in the survey. Part II analyzes each of the types of energy conservation - general, winterization, heating, cooling, appliance, transportation, and electricity reductions - and relates them to demographic, situation, attitudinal, and perceptual variables in the household sample. Part III deals with the impacts of Project Pacesetter and the United Mine Workers' strike against the coal operators - particularly, the impact of the coal strike on household residents of Allegheny County. Part IV summarizes the findings and uses them for recommendations regarding energy conservation policy. Additional data are presented in 4 appendices. (MCW)

  10. 75 FR 26709 - Clarke County Water Supply Project, Clarke County, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... Project, Clarke County, IA AGENCY: Natural Resources Conservation Service. ACTION: Notice of intent to... Conservationist for Planning, 210 Walnut Street, Room 693, Des Moines, IA 50309-2180, telephone: 515-284- 4769... available at the Iowa NRCS Web site at http://www.ia.nrcs.usda.gov . A map of the Clarke County Water Supply...

  11. Carroll County Competency Based Teacher Certification Project. Librarian's Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Homer; Coker, Joan G.

    Reference materials, slides, cassettes, books, pamphlets, materials from other states, and articles used in the Carroll County, Georgia, Competency Based Teacher Certification Project, 1973-74, are listed. Brief annotations are included for both the reference materials and articles. (MJM)

  12. Honey Lake Geothermal Project, Lassen County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    The drilling, completion, and testing of deep well WEN-2 for a hybrid electric power project which will use the area's moderate temperature geothermal fluids and locally procured wood fuel is reported. The project is located within the Wendel-Amedee Known Geothermal Resource Area.

  13. Ponnequin Wind Energy Project Weld County, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on potential environmental impacts associated with the development of the Ponnequin Wind Energy Project in Colorado. This EA and public comments received on it will be used in DOE`s deliberations on whether to release funding for the project. This document provides a detailed description of the proposed project and an assessment of potential impacts associated with its construction and operations. Resources and conditions considered in the analysis include streams; wetlands; floodplains; water quality; soils; vegetation; air quality; socioeconomic conditions; energy resources; noise; transportation; cultural resources; visual and land use resources; public health and safety; wildlife; threatened, endangered, and candidate species; and cumulative impacts. The analysis found that the project would have minimal impacts on these resources and conditions, and would not create impacts that exceed the significance criteria defined in this document. 90 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Flathead River creel report, 1992--1993. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanzel, D.

    1995-09-01

    A roving creel survey was conducted on the Flathead River system, May 1992 through May 1993, as part of Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation, funded by Bonneville Power Administration. The Flathead River system is a tributary to the Clarks Fork of the Columbia River originating in northwest Montana and southern British Columbia. The river creel survey was conducted in conjunction with a Flathead Lake creel survey. This document summarizes the creel survey on the river system. The purpose of these creel surveys was to quantify fishery status prior to mitigation efforts and provide replicative survey methodology to measure success of future mitigation activities. 4 figs., 21 tabs

  15. Kemper County IGCC (tm) Project Preliminary Public Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Matt; Rush, Randall; Madden, Diane; Pinkston, Tim; Lunsford, Landon

    2012-07-01

    The Kemper County IGCC Project is an advanced coal technology project that is being developed by Mississippi Power Company (MPC). The project is a lignite-fueled 2-on-1 Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) facility incorporating the air-blown Transport Integrated Gasification (TRIG™) technology jointly developed by Southern Company; Kellogg, Brown, and Root (KBR); and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, Alabama. The estimated nameplate capacity of the plant will be 830 MW with a peak net output capability of 582 MW. As a result of advanced emissions control equipment, the facility will produce marketable byproducts of ammonia, sulfuric acid, and carbon dioxide. 65 percent of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) will be captured and used for enhanced oil recovery (EOR), making the Kemper County facility’s carbon emissions comparable to those of a natural-gas-fired combined cycle power plant. The commercial operation date (COD) of the Kemper County IGCC plant will be May 2014. This report describes the basic design and function of the plant as determined at the end of the Front End Engineering Design (FEED) phase of the project.

  16. A river to ruin : why are Americans fighting so hard to protect British Columbia's Flathead River from a strip mine?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, J.

    2008-06-15

    The Cline Mining Corporation has proposed an open-pit mine to extract 2 million tonnes of coal annually in the Flathead Valley of British Columbia (BC). The Flathead Valley is known internationally for the richness of its flora and fauna. After the Flathead River crosses the border into Montana, it is managed under the most restrictive environmental protection laws available in the United States. The project is expected to be the first in a series of energy projects that will ravage the valley in the near future. Major energy companies are planning to open mines at sites within the Flathead River flood plain. The low quality coal obtained from the valley will be used to supply the unregulated economies of China, India, and Brazil. The valley is situated at the convergence of several biogeoclimatic zones and is home to a rich mix of plants and animals, including the highest concentration of grizzly bears in North America. The BC government's regulatory mechanism is not able to prevent exploitation of the region. Scientists from around the world have unanimously agreed that the mine should not be opened. Tailings from other mines currently draining into the Flathead River are now beginning to alter the river's chemistry. The federal government has been unsuccessful in its bid to create a national park in the region. It was concluded that unless land use regulations for the area are changed, the valley will inevitably be developed. 13 figs.

  17. Environmental assessment, expanded Ponnequin wind energy project, Weld County, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has considered a proposal from the State of Colorado, Office of Energy Conservation (OEC), for funding construction of the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project in Weld County, Colorado. OEC plans to enter into a contracting arrangement with Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCo) for the completion of these activities. PSCo, along with its subcontractors and business partners, are jointly developing the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project. The purpose of this Final Environmental Assessment (EA) is to provide DOE and the public with information on potential environmental impacts associated with the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Energy Project. This EA, and public comments received on it, were used in DOE's deliberations on whether to release funding for the expanded project under the Commercialization Ventures Program

  18. Environmental assessment, expanded Ponnequin wind energy project, Weld County, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has considered a proposal from the State of Colorado, Office of Energy Conservation (OEC), for funding construction of the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project in Weld County, Colorado. OEC plans to enter into a contracting arrangement with Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCo) for the completion of these activities. PSCo, along with its subcontractors and business partners, are jointly developing the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project. The purpose of this Final Environmental Assessment (EA) is to provide DOE and the public with information on potential environmental impacts associated with the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Energy Project. This EA, and public comments received on it, were used in DOE`s deliberations on whether to release funding for the expanded project under the Commercialization Ventures Program.

  19. Effects of the Operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the Kokanee Fishery in the Flathead River System, 1984 Annual Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraley, John J.

    1984-12-01

    This study assessed the effects of the operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the kokanee fishery in the Flathead River system. This report covers the 1983-84 field season concerning the effects of Hungry Horse operations on kokanee abundance and reproductive success in the upper Flathead River system. This report also addresses the projected recovery of the main stem kokanee run under the flow regime recommended by the Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks and implemented by the Bureau of Reclamation and Bonneville Power Administration in 1982. An estimated 58,775 kokanee reached spawning grounds in the Flathead River System in 1983. The 1983 spawning run was composed of 92% age III + fish, as compared to an average of 80% from 1972-1983. A total of 6883 kokanee redds were enumerated in the main stem Flathead River in 1983. A total of 2366 man-days of angling pressure was estimated during the 1983 kokanee lure fishery in the Flathead River system. Estimated numbers of fry emigrating from McDonald Creek, the Whitefish River and Brenneman's Slough were 13,100,000, 66,254 and 37,198, yielding egg to fry survival rates of 76%, 10.4% and 19.2%.

  20. Environmental Assessment Expanded Ponnequin Wind Energy Project Weld County, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    1999-03-02

    The U.S.Department of Energy (DOE) has considered a proposal from the State of Colorado, Office of Energy Conservation (OEC), for funding construction of the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project in Weld County, Colorado. OEC plans to enter into a contracting arrangement with Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCO) for the completion of these activities. PSCo, along with its subcontractors and business partners, are jointly developing the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project. DOE completed an environmental assessment of the original proposed project in August 1997. Since then, the geographic scope and the design of the project changed, necessitating additional review of the project under the National Environmental Policy Act. The project now calls for the possible construction of up to 48 wind turbines on State and private lands. PSCo and its partners have initiated construction of the project on private land in Weld County, Colorado. A substation, access road and some wind turbines have been installed. However, to date, DOE has not provided any funding for these activities. DOE, through its Commercialization Ventures Program, has solicited applications for financial assistance from state energy offices, in a teaming arrangement with private-sector organizations, for projects that will accelerate the commercialization of emerging renewable energy technologies. The Commercialization Ventures Program was established by the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Technology Competitiveness Act of 1989 (P.L. 101-218) as amended by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486). The Program seeks to assist entry into the marketplace of newly emerging renewable energy technologies, or of innovative applications of existing technologies. In short, an emerging renewable energy technology is one which has already proven viable but which has had little or no operational experience. The Program is managed by the Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The

  1. Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority climate change adaptation pilot project report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    This Climate Change Adaptation Pilot Project Report details the project background of the recently-completed Los Angeles County : Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) Transit Climate Change Adaptation Pilot Project as well as the various wor...

  2. King County Metro Battery Electric Bus Demonstration: Preliminary Project Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-05-22

    The U.S. Federal Transit Administration (FTA) funds a variety of research projects that support the commercialization of zero-emission bus technology. To evaluate projects funded through these programs, FTA has enlisted the help of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to conduct third-party evaluations of the technologies deployed under the FTA programs. NREL works with the selected agencies to evaluate the performance of the zero-emission buses compared to baseline conventional buses in similar service. The evaluation effort will advance the knowledge base of zero-emission technologies in transit bus applications and provide 'lessons learned' to aid other fleets in incrementally introducing next generation zero-emission buses into their operations. This report provides preliminary performance evaluation results from a demonstration of three zero-emission battery electric buses at King County Metro in King County, Washington. NREL developed this preliminary results report to quickly disseminate evaluation results to stakeholders. Detailed evaluation results will be published in future reports.

  3. Case study: I-95 Landfill gas recovery project Fairfax County, Virginia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuigan, M.J.; Peterson, E.R.; Smithberger, J.M.; Owen, W.L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of the landfill gas (LFG) recovery project at the I-95 Landfill in Fairfax County, Virginia. The project originally was conceived more than 10 years ago and has overcome numerous obstacles enroute to its present success. The efforts of the landfill owner (Fairfax County) and the project developer (Michigan Cogeneration Systems, Inc.) to surmount these obstacles are presented

  4. El Paso County Geothermal Project at Fort Bliss. Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lear, Jon [Ruby Mountain Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United State); Bennett, Carlon [Ruby Mountain Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United State); Lear, Dan [Ruby Mountain Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United State); Jones, Phil L. [Ruby Mountain Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United State); Burdge, Mark [Evergreen Clean Energy Management, Provo, UT (United States); Barker, Ben [Evergreen Clean Energy Management, Provo, UT (United States); Segall, Marylin [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy and Geoscience Inst.; Moore, Joseph [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy and Geoscience Inst.; Nash, Gregory [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy and Geoscience Inst.; Jones, Clay [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy and Geoscience Inst.; Simmons, Stuart [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy and Geoscience Inst.; Taylor, Nancy [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy and Geoscience Inst.

    2016-02-01

    The El Paso County Geothermal Project at Fort Bliss was an effort to determine the scale and scope of geothermal resources previously identified on Fort Bliss’ McGregor Range in southern Otero County, New Mexico. The project was funded with a $5,000,000 grant to El Paso County from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and a $4,812,500 match provided by private sector partners. The project was administered through the DOE Golden Field Office to awardee El Paso County. The primary subcontractor to El Paso County and project Principal Investigator - Ruby Mountain Inc. (RMI) of Salt Lake City, Utah - assembled the project team consisting of Evergreen Clean Energy Management (ECEM) of Provo, Utah, and the Energy & Geoscience Institute at the University of Utah (EGI) in Salt Lake City, UT to complete the final phases of the project. The project formally began in May of 2010 and consisted of two preliminary phases of data collection and evaluation which culminated in the identification of a drilling site for a Resource Confirmation Well on McGregor Range. Well RMI 56-5 was drilled May and June 2013 to a depth of 3,030 ft. below ground level. A string of slotted 7 inch casing was set in 8.75 inch hole on bottom fill at 3,017 ft. to complete the well. The well was drilled using a technique called flooded reverse circulation, which is most common in mineral exploration. This technique produced an exceptionally large and complete cuttings record. An exciting development at the conclusion of drilling was the suspected discovery of a formation that has proven to be of exceptionally high permeability in three desalinization wells six miles to the south. Following drilling and preliminary testing and analysis, the project team has determined that the McGregor Range thermal anomaly is large and can probably support development in the tens of megawatts.

  5. Evaluation of two styles of slotted, flat-head screws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, C.A. Jr.; Johnson, W.B.

    1979-01-01

    A series of torque tests were performed to evaluate the relative merits of two different flat-head screws fabricated from a uranium--6% niobium alloy. The screws tested were machined with both normal, straight-through slots in the head and with slots having radiused bottoms. Test results indicate that both designs easily surpass the required 20-inch-pound-proof torque

  6. Lower Flathead System Fisheries Study, Executive Summary, Volume I, 1983-1987 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, David; DosSantos, Joseph M.

    1988-06-01

    This Executive Summary, Volume I, of the lower Flathead System Fisheries Study Final Report, was prepared to provide a study overview for persons who are not fisheries scientists. The contents provide an introduction to the study and its objectives, a short description of the study area, a discussion of the major findings and conclusions of the study, and the description of fisheries management alternatives available to managers of the lower Flathead system. Technical reports were prepared for those portions of the study dealing with the lower Flathead River and its tributaries, Volume II, and the South Bay of Flathead Lake, Volume III. The annual hydrographic regime of the Flathead system, consisting of upper rivers, lake and lower river, has been modified by the construction and operation of two major hydroelectric facilities, Hungry Horse Dam on the south fork Flathead River and Kerr Dam at the outlet of Flathead Lake. The modified hydrographic regime has resulted in significant impacts to kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) and several species of trout. Kerr Dam, closed in 1938, controls Flathead Lake levels between 878.7 m (2883 ft) and 881.8 m (2893 ft) and discharges into the lower Flathead River. Kerr Dam is a 63.4 m (208 ft) high concrete arch structure located 7.2 km (4.5 miles) downstream from the outlet of Flathead Lake. The facility is used by Montana Power Company primarily for system frequency load control with some use for low level base load. 77 refs., 5 figs.

  7. The Swanson Uranium Project (Marline/Umetco, Pittsylvania County, Virginia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.E.; Notary, A.; Yellich, J.A.; Rekemeyer, P.; Vinych, V.S.; Sealy, C.O.; Lynott, P.

    1985-01-01

    The proposed Swanson Uranium Project is located in Pittsylvania County, south-central Virginia, near the North Carolina border, and will consist of an open pit mine, a conventional alkaline leach mill, and an above-grade tailings management area. Tailings will be filtered to 25 percent moisture content prior to placement on a clay liner in the containment area, which will cover approximately 200 acres. The final tailings configuration will result in a symmetrical prism with rectangular base dimensions of 4,600 by 1,800 feet, a maximum depth of 52 feet at the centerline crest, and an average depth of 32 feet. As portions of the tailings management area reach final depth, grade and stability, a clay cap and rock drainage blanket will be constructed to provide for incremental reclamation. Mine waste rock then will be graded over the cap and blanket, followed by a soil cover to promote growth of vegetation. The encapsulation of the tailings, to a final depth of 100 feet, will enhance geomorphic and seismic stability, while minimizing project land disturbance. The conceptual plan will provide adequate protection of ground water to meet state or federal standards

  8. Draft environmental impact statement. Bison basin project, Fremont County, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Construction and operation of leach uranium mine and recovery plant designed to produce one million lb of U 3 O 8 per year at a rate not to exceed 400,000 lb/y in Fremont County, Wyoming are proposed. The project site would consist of 761 acres lying 50 miles south of Riverton and 30 miles southwest of Jeffery City. The in situ leach process, implemented to mine ore contained in the Laney member of the Green River formation, would involve use of sodium carbonate-bicarbonate solution and an oxidizing agent injected and recovered through a complex of well patterns. Each well pattern would consist of six injection wells surrounding a central production well. Only about 40 acres would be mined, while another 13.5 acres would be excavated for equipment foundations and evaporation ponds. Recycling of mined formation water through a reverse osmosis cleanup system and placing it back into the formation after mining was complete would restore the groundwater system to its former potential. Solid wastes produced by the mining process would be removed to a licensed disposal site. Positive Impacts: Uranium ore produced by the mine and refined by the plant would aid in meeting demand for this resource which is estimated to double to a level of 15,000 tons per year within the next 5 years and to reach 45,000-50,000 tons per year by 1990. Some monetary benefits would accrue to local communities due to local expenditures resulting from construction and operation. Negative Impacts: Project activities would result in displacement of livestock grazing practices from 57 acres of land. Some local deterioration of groundwater quality would be expected, and approximately 240 acre-feet of groundwater would be removed from the aquifer permanently. Radon-222 and other small radioactive emissions would result from the solution mining process

  9. Lower Flathead System Fisheries Study, 1984 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darling, James E.; Pajak, Paul; Wunderlich, Mary P.

    1984-12-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the effects of Kerr Dam operations on the fisheries of the Lower Flathead System. Supported by Bonneville Power Administration funding, and conducted by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, the study began in December of 1982 and is scheduled for completion in December of 1987. This report covers the 1983-84 field season and includes the status of target fish species populations in the Flathead River and tributaries, and initial work in South Bay of Flathead Lake. Additionally it addresses how Kerr operations may effect the reproduction of salmonids and northern pike. Combined trout population estimates for rainbow, brown, brook, and bull trout, averaged 13 fish/km of the lower Flathead River. The number of bull trout and cutthroat trout captured was so low that estimation of their individual populations was not possible. An interim closure to trout harvest on the lower Flathead River was recommended and approved by the Tribal Council until study results can be further analyzed and management options reviewed. Population estimates for northern pike ranged from six/kilometer in poorer habitat, to one hundred three/km in the best habitat in the main Flathead River. Seven pike were radio tagged and their movements monitored. Movements of over 89 km were recorded. One fish left the Flathead River and moved down the Clark Fork to the Plains area. Fish weirs were constructed on the Jocko River and Mission Creek to assess spawning runs of trout from the main river. Thirty-two adult rainbow passed the Jocko weir and twenty-eight passed the Mission weir during the spring spawning season. Twenty adult brown trout were captured at the Jocko weir and five at Mission weir in the fall. The Jocko weir suffered minor damage due to bed load movement during high flows of spring runoff. The structure of trout populations in the lower Flathead River points to spawning and recruitment problems caused by hydroelectric operations and

  10. Lower Flathead System Fisheries Study, 1985 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajak, Paul; Bradshaw, William H.; DeSantos, Joseph M.; Darling, James E.

    1986-01-01

    Existing aquatic habitat in the lower Flathead River and its tributaries was assessed for its relationship to the present size, distribution, and maintenance of all salmonid species, northern pike, and largemouth bass populations. The objectives were to assess how and to what extent hydroelectric development and operation affects the quality and quantity of aquatic habitat in the lower Flathead River and its tributaries and life stages of existing trout, pike, and largemouth bass populations, evaluate the potential for increasing quality habitat, and thus game fish production, through mitigation, and develop an array of fisheries management options to mitigate the impacts of present hydroelectric operations, demonstrating under each management option how fish populations would benefit and hydroelectric generation capabilities would be modified.

  11. City and County Solar PV Training Program, Module 2: Screening and Identifying PV Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elgqvist, Emma M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-04-09

    When screening and identifying PV projects, cities and counties should understand the different factors that impact the technical and economic potential of a PV project, the steps of the PV screening process, and how to use REopt Lite to screen a site for PV and storage project potential.

  12. Nye County Nevada local perspective of the yucca mountain project (YMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, D.

    2008-01-01

    possible, and that Nye County benefits economically from the project. (author)

  13. 75 FR 2133 - Construction and Operation of the Quartzsite Solar Energy Project, La Paz County, AZ (DOE/EIS-0440)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... Quartzsite Solar Energy Project, La Paz County, AZ (DOE/EIS-0440) AGENCY: Western Area Power Administration... proposed Quartzsite Solar Energy Project (Project) in La Paz County, near Quartzsite, Arizona. Quartzsite Solar Energy, LLC (QSE) has applied to Western to interconnect the proposed Project to Western's power...

  14. Science Projects | Akron-Summit County Public Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hours & Locations Main Library Science & Technology Division Science Projects Science Projects Have fun with science experiments. Whether you need to do a project for a school science fair or you want to be a mad scientist, our Science Project Index and other resources can get you started. Find how

  15. 77 FR 34033 - Public Utility District No. 1 of Douglas County; Notice of Authorization for Continued Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... District No. 1 of Douglas County; Notice of Authorization for Continued Project Operation On May 27, 2010, the Public Utility District No. 1 of Douglas County, licensee for the Wells Hydroelectric Project... regulations thereunder. The Wells Hydroelectric Project is located on the Columbia River in Douglas, Okanogan...

  16. Lessons Learned From the Environmental Public Health Tracking Sub-County Data Pilot Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Angela K; Strosnider, Heather; Kassinger, Craig; Shin, Mikyong

    2017-12-07

    Small area data are key to better understanding the complex relationships between environmental health, health outcomes, and risk factors at a local level. In 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program (Tracking Program) conducted the Sub-County Data Pilot Project with grantees to consider integration of sub-county data into the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (Tracking Network). The Tracking Program and grantees developed sub-county-level data for several data sets during this pilot project, working to standardize processes for submitting data and creating required geographies. Grantees documented challenges they encountered during the pilot project and documented decisions. This article covers the challenges revealed during the project. It includes insights into geocoding, aggregation, population estimates, and data stability and provides recommendations for moving forward. National standards for generating, analyzing, and sharing sub-county data should be established to build a system of sub-county data that allow for comparison of outcomes, geographies, and time. Increasing the availability and accessibility of small area data will not only enhance the Tracking Network's capabilities but also contribute to an improved understanding of environmental health and informed decision making at a local level.

  17. 77 FR 47058 - Middle Fork American River Hydroelectric Project Placer County Water Agency; Notice of Draft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [P-2079-069--CA] Middle Fork American River Hydroelectric Project Placer County Water Agency; Notice of Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Public Meetings a. Date and Time of Meetings: Tuesday, August 28, 2012, from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. and...

  18. 75 FR 23666 - Huron-Manistee National Forests, White Pines Wind Farm Project, Mason County, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Huron-Manistee National Forests, White Pines Wind Farm Project, Mason County, MI AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Cancellation Notice of notice of intent to prepare an environmental impact statement. SUMMARY: The Forest Service proposed to prepare an...

  19. 77 FR 23740 - Sears Point Wetland and Watershed Restoration Project, Sonoma County, CA; Final Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ...-FF08RSFC00] Sears Point Wetland and Watershed Restoration Project, Sonoma County, CA; Final Environmental... environmental impact report and environmental impact statement (EIR/EIS) for the Sears Point Wetland and..., while providing public access and recreational and educational opportunities compatible with ecological...

  20. Uranium Geologic Drilling Project, Sand Wash Basin, Moffat and Routt Counties, Colorado:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This environmental assessment of drill holes in Moffat and Routt Counties, Colorado considered the current environment; potential impacts from site preparation, drilling operations, and site restoration; coordination among local, state and federal plans; and consideration of alternative actions for this uranium drilling project

  1. South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program, Annual Report 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grisak, Grant; Marotz, Brian

    2003-06-01

    In 1999, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) began a program aimed at conserving the genetically pure populations of westslope cutthroat trout in the South Fork Flathead River drainage. The objective of this program is to eliminate all of the exotic and hybrid trout that threaten the genetically pure westslope cutthroat populations in the South Fork Flathead. The exotic and hybrid trout populations occur in several headwater lakes and their outflow streams. In 2001 MFWP released a draft environmental assessment, pursuant to the Montana Environmental Policy Act (MEPA), that addressed the use of motorized equipment to deliver personnel and materials to some of these lakes in the Bob Marshall and Great Bear Wildernesses (Grisak 2001). After a 30-day public comment period, MFWP determined that the complexity of issues was too great and warranted a more detailed analysis. These issues included transportation options for personnel, equipment and materials, the use of motorized equipment in wilderness, fish removal methods, fish stocking, and the status and distribution of amphibian populations in the project area. Because the program also involves the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the environmental analysis needs to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). In October 2001, pursuant to NEPA, MFWP, along with the USFS and BPA initiated an environmental assessment to address these issues. In June 2002, the three agencies determined that the scope of these issues warranted an Environmental Impact Statement. This specialist report describes the logistical, technical and biological issues associated with this project and provides an analysis of options for fish removal, transportation and fish stocking. It further analyzes issues and concerns associated with amphibian populations and creating new domesticated stocks of westslope cutthroat trout. Finally, this document provides a description of each lake, the best

  2. Tijuana River Flood Control Project, San Diego County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-20

    presence of historical and archeological resoureces in the proposed project area. His letter of August 1, 1973 (see appendix) indicated that no state... human misery among those directly affected. Those impacts will be pert of the permanent and disastrous legacy of the "Recommended Plan" (Alternative Ill...of citizens; and general human misery among those directly affected. Those impacts will be part of the permanent and disastrous legacy of the

  3. 76 FR 2903 - Interconnection of the Proposed Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project (DOE/EIS-0461), and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... Wind Energy Center Project (DOE/EIS-0461), and Proposed Crowned Ridge Wind Energy Center Project (DOE... to prepare environmental impact statements (EISs) for the Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project and the Crowned Ridge Wind Energy Center Project in the Federal Register on November 30, 2010. Both...

  4. 75 FR 31321 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Rock Sole, Flathead Sole, and “Other...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    .... 0910131363-0087-02] RIN 0648-XW74 Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Rock Sole, Flathead... participating in the Amendment 80 limited access fishery in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands management area... the trawl rock sole, flathead sole, and ``other flatfish'' fishery category by vessels participating...

  5. Final Report. Forest County Potawatomi Community, Community-Scale Solar Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drescher, Sara M. [Forest County Potawatomi Community, Crandon, WI (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community (“FCPC” or “Tribe”) is a federally recognized Indian tribe with a membership of over 1400. The Tribe has a reservation in Forest County, Wisconsin, and also holds tribal trust and fee lands in Milwaukee, Oconto, and Fond du Lac Counties, Wisconsin. The Tribe has developed the long-term goal of becoming energy independent using renewable resources. In order to meet this goal, the Tribe has taken a number of important steps including energy audits leading to efficiency measures, installation of solar PV, the construction of a biodigester and the purchase of Renewable Energy Certificates to offset its current energy use. To further its energy independence goals, FCPC submitted an application to the Department of Energy (“DOE”) and was awarded a Community-Scale Clean Energy Projects in Indian Country grant, under funding opportunity DE-FOA-0000852. The Tribe, in collaboration with Pewaukee, Wisconsin based SunVest Solar Inc. (SunVest), installed approximately 922.95 kW of solar PV systems at fifteen tribal facilities in Milwaukee and Forest Counties. The individual installations ranged from 9.0 kW to 447.64 kW and will displace between 16.9% to in some cases in excess of 90% of each building’s energy needs.

  6. 76 FR 41308 - Strata Energy, Inc., Ross In Situ Recovery Uranium Project, Crook County, WY; Notice of Materials...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ..., Inc., Ross In Situ Recovery Uranium Project, Crook County, WY; Notice of Materials License Application...-4737, or by e-mail to [email protected] . The Ross In Situ Recovery Uranium Project License... source and byproduct materials license at its Ross In Situ Recovery Uranium Project site located in Crook...

  7. Spatial variability and macro‐scale drivers of growth for native and introduced Flathead Catfish populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massie, Danielle L.; Smith, Geoffrey; Bonvechio, Timothy F.; Bunch, Aaron J.; Lucchesi, David O.; Wagner, Tyler

    2018-01-01

    Quantifying spatial variability in fish growth and identifying large‐scale drivers of growth are fundamental to many conservation and management decisions. Although fish growth studies often focus on a single population, it is becoming increasingly clear that large‐scale studies are likely needed for addressing transboundary management needs. This is particularly true for species with high recreational value and for those with negative ecological consequences when introduced outside of their native range, such as the Flathead Catfish Pylodictis olivaris. This study quantified growth variability of the Flathead Catfish across a large portion of its contemporary range to determine whether growth differences existed between habitat types (i.e., reservoirs and rivers) and between native and introduced populations. Additionally, we investigated whether growth parameters varied as a function of latitude and time since introduction (for introduced populations). Length‐at‐age data from 26 populations across 11 states in the USA were modeled using a Bayesian hierarchical von Bertalanffy growth model. Population‐specific growth trajectories revealed large variation in Flathead Catfish growth and relatively high uncertainty in growth parameters for some populations. Relatively high uncertainty was also evident when comparing populations and when quantifying large‐scale patterns. Growth parameters (Brody growth coefficient [K] and theoretical maximum average length [L∞]) were not different (based on overlapping 90% credible intervals) between habitat types or between native and introduced populations. For populations within the introduced range of Flathead Catfish, latitude was negatively correlated with K. For native populations, we estimated an 85% probability that L∞ estimates were negatively correlated with latitude. Contrary to predictions, time since introduction was not correlated with growth parameters in introduced populations of Flathead Catfish

  8. Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office independent scientific investigations program annual report, May 1997 - April 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    This annual summary report, prepared by the Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office (NWRPO), summarizes the activities that were performed during the period from May 1, 1997 to April 30, 1998. These activities were conducted in support of the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP) of Nye County at the Yucca Mountain Site (YMS). The Nye County NWRPO is responsible for protecting the health and safety of the Nye County residents. NWRPO's on-site representative is responsible for designing and implementing the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP). Major objectives of the ISIP include: Investigating key issues related to conceptual design and performance of the repository that can have major impact on human health, safety, and the environment; identifying areas not being addressed adequately by the Department of Energy (DOE). Nye County has identified several key scientific issues of concern that may affect repository design and performance which were not being adequately addressed by DOE. Nye County has been conducting its own independent study to evaluate the significance of these issues. This report summarizes the results of monitoring from two boreholes and the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) tunnel that have been instrumented by Nye County since March and April of 1995. The preliminary data and interpretations presented in this report do not constitute and should not be considered as the official position of Nye County. The ISIP presently includes borehole and tunnel instrumentation, monitoring, data analysis, and numerical modeling activities to address the concerns of Nye County

  9. Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office independent scientific investigations program annual report, May 1997--April 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This annual summary report, prepared by the Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office (NWRPO), summarizes the activities that were performed during the period from May 1, 1997 to April 30, 1998. These activities were conducted in support of the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP) of Nye County at the Yucca Mountain Site (YMS). The Nye County NWRPO is responsible for protecting the health and safety of the Nye County residents. NWRPO`s on-site representative is responsible for designing and implementing the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP). Major objectives of the ISIP include: Investigating key issues related to conceptual design and performance of the repository that can have major impact on human health, safety, and the environment; identifying areas not being addressed adequately by the Department of Energy (DOE). Nye County has identified several key scientific issues of concern that may affect repository design and performance which were not being adequately addressed by DOE. Nye County has been conducting its own independent study to evaluate the significance of these issues. This report summarizes the results of monitoring from two boreholes and the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) tunnel that have been instrumented by Nye County since March and April of 1995. The preliminary data and interpretations presented in this report do not constitute and should not be considered as the official position of Nye County. The ISIP presently includes borehole and tunnel instrumentation, monitoring, data analysis, and numerical modeling activities to address the concerns of Nye County.

  10. Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project, Morrow County, Oregon: Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-01-01

    BPA is considering whether to transfer (wheel) electrical power from a proposed privately-owned, combustion-turbine electrical generation plant in Oregon. The plant would be fired by natural gas and would use combined-cycle technology to generate up to 440 average megawatts (aMW) of energy. The plant would be developed, owned, and operated by Portland General Electric Company (PGE). The project would be built in eastern Oregon, just east of the City of Boardman in Morrow County. The proposed plant would be built on a site within the Port of Morrow Industrial Park. The proposed use for the site is consistent with the County land use plan. Building the transmission line needed to interconnect the power plant to BPA`s transmission system would require a variance from Morrow County. BPA would transfer power from the plant to its McNary-Slatt 500-kV transmission line. PGE would pay BPA for wheeling services. Key environmental concerns identified in the scoping process and evaluated in the draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) include these potential impacts: (1) air quality impacts, such as emissions and their contributions to the {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} effect; (2) health and safety impacts, such as effects of electric and magnetic fields, (3) noise impacts, (4) farmland impacts, (5) water vapor impacts to transportation, (6) economic development and employment impacts, (7) visual impacts, (8) consistency with local comprehensive plans, and (9) water quality and supply impacts, such as the amount of wastewater discharged, and the source and amount of water required to operate the plant. These and other issues are discussed in the DEIS. The proposed project includes features designed to reduce environmental impacts. Based on studies completed for the DEIS, adverse environmental impacts associated with the proposed project were identified, and no evidence emerged to suggest that the proposed action is controversial.

  11. Impacts of Water Levels on Breeding Canada Geese and the Methodology for Mitigation and Enhancement in the Flathead Drainage, 1984 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackey, Dennis L.

    1985-01-01

    The lower Flathead System Canada Goose Study was initiated to determine population trends and the effects of water level fluctuations on nest and brood habitat on the southern half of Flathead Lake and the lower Flathead River as a result of the operations of Kerr Dam. This report presents data collected during the 1984 field season as part of an ongoing project. Geese used Pablo, Kicking Horse, Ninepipe Reservoirs heavily during late summer and fall. Use of the river by geese was high during the winter, when the reservoirs were frozen, and during the breeding period. Most breeding geese left the river after broods fledged. Thirteen percent of the artificial tree nest structures on the river were used by nesting geese. Goose nest initiation on the river peaked the last week in March through the first week in April, and hatching peaked the first week in May. Predation was the most significant cause of nest loss on the river, and nest loss by flooding was not observed. Avian predation was the single largest factor contributing to nest loss on the lake. Habitat use was studied in 4 brood areas on the river and 8 brood areas on the lake, and available habitat was assessed for 2 portions of both the lake and the river. Brood habitat use was significantly different from the available habitat in all areas studied. On the lower river, broods used wheat fields, gravel bars, and shrub habitats. On the upper river, coniferous forest and shrub habitats were preferred. On the West Bay of the lake, brood areas consisted primarily of lawns and tall herbaceous habitat, while on the South Bay, marshes dominated the brood areas studied. Water levels on the river and lake affect both accessibility of these areas to brooding geese, and the ecology of the habitats preferred by geese. 43 refs., 24 figs., 31 tabs.

  12. Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Technology Project and Renewable Energy Center of Excellence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Bruce [Cloud County Community College, Concordia, KS (United States)

    2016-02-26

    Cloud County Community College's (CCCC) Wind Energy Technology (WET) program is a leader in the renewable energy movement across Kansas and the USA. The field of renewable energy is a growing industry which continues to experience high demand for career opportunities. This CCCC/DOE project entailed two phases: 1) the installation of two Northwind 100 wind turbines, and 2) the continued development of the WET program curriculum, including enhancement of the CCCC Blade Repair Certificate program. This report provides a technical account of the total work performed, and is a comprehensive description of the results achieved.

  13. Geologic report on the Sand Wash Drilling Project, Moffat and Routt Counties, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, T.E.; Wayland, T.E.

    1981-09-01

    The Sand Wash Basin Drilling Project comprises twenty-seven (27) drill holes located in Moffat and Routt Counties, northwest Colorado, having an aggregate depth of 26,107.5 feet (7957.6 m). The holes penetrate the Browns Park Formation of Miocene age, which is a tuffaceous continental sandstone deposited in fluvial, eolian, and lacustrine environments. Partly based on project drilling results, uranium potential resource estimates for this formation in the $50/lb U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ forward-cost category have been increased by 34,476 tons U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ (35,036 metric tons). Three areas between Maybell and Craig, Colorado, considered favorable for uranium occurrences were verified as favorable by project drilling, and a fourth favorable area northwest of Maybell has been expanded. In addition, project drilling results indicate two new favorable areas, one north and northwest and one south of Steamboat Springs, Colorado. Anomalous radioactivity was detected in drill holes in all six study areas of the project. The most important factor in concentrating significant amounts of uranium in the target formation appears to be the availability of gaseous or liquid hydrocarbons and/or hydrogen sulfide gas as reductants. Where subjacent formations supply these reductants to the Browns Park Formation, project drilling encountered 0.05 percent to 0.01 percent uranium concentrations. Potential, though unproven, sources of these reductants are believed to underlie parts of all six project study areas.

  14. Geologic report on the Sand Wash Drilling Project, Moffat and Routt Counties, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, T.E.; Wayland, T.E.

    1981-09-01

    The Sand Wash Basin Drilling Project comprises twenty-seven (27) drill holes located in Moffat and Routt Counties, northwest Colorado, having an aggregate depth of 26,107.5 feet (7957.6 m). The holes penetrate the Browns Park Formation of Miocene age, which is a tuffaceous continental sandstone deposited in fluvial, eolian, and lacustrine environments. Partly based on project drilling results, uranium potential resource estimates for this formation in the $50/lb U 3 O 8 forward-cost category have been increased by 34,476 tons U 3 O 8 (35,036 metric tons). Three areas between Maybell and Craig, Colorado, considered favorable for uranium occurrences were verified as favorable by project drilling, and a fourth favorable area northwest of Maybell has been expanded. In addition, project drilling results indicate two new favorable areas, one north and northwest and one south of Steamboat Springs, Colorado. Anomalous radioactivity was detected in drill holes in all six study areas of the project. The most important factor in concentrating significant amounts of uranium in the target formation appears to be the availability of gaseous or liquid hydrocarbons and/or hydrogen sulfide gas as reductants. Where subjacent formations supply these reductants to the Browns Park Formation, project drilling encountered 0.05 percent to 0.01 percent uranium concentrations. Potential, though unproven, sources of these reductants are believed to underlie parts of all six project study areas

  15. Geologic summary of the Owens Valley drilling project, Owens and Rose Valleys, Inyo County, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaer, D.W.

    1981-07-01

    The Owens Valley Drilling Project consists of eight drill holes located in southwest Inyo County, California, having an aggregate depth of 19,205 feet (5853 m). Project holes penetrated the Coso Formation of upper Pliocene or early Pleistocene age and the Owens Lake sand and lakebed units of the same age. The project objective was to improve the reliability of uranium-potential-resource estimates assigned to the Coso Formation in the Owens Valley region. Uranium-potential-resource estimates for this area in $100 per pound U 3 O 8 forward-cost-category material have been estimatd to be 16,954 tons (15,384 metric tons). This estimate is based partly on project drilling results. Within the Owens Valley project area, the Coso Formation was encountered only in the Rose Valley region, and for this reason Rose Valley is considered to be the only portion of the project area favorable for economically sized uranium deposits. The sequence of sediments contained in the Owens Valley basin is considered to be largely equivalent but lithologically dissimilar to the Coso Formation of Haiwee Ridge and Rose Valley. The most important factor in the concentration of significant amounts of uranium in the rock units investigated appears to be the availability of reducing agents. Significant amounts of reductants (pyrite) were found in the Coso Formation. No organic debris was noted. Many small, disconnected uranium occurrences, 100 to 500 ppM U 3 O 8 , were encountered in several of the holes

  16. 78 FR 65962 - Revision of the Land Management Plan for the Flathead National Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... conditions, available data, and feedback needed to support a strategic, efficient planning process. As public... Montana, is initiating the forest planning process pursuant to the 2012 Forest Planning Rule. This process... information on the planning process can also be found on the Flathead National Forest Web site at www.fs.usda...

  17. Draft environmental statement related to the Union Carbide Corporation, Gas Hills Uranium Project (Natrona County, Wyoming)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The proposed action is the renewal of Source Material License SUA-648 issued for the operation of the Gas Hills Uranium Project in Wyoming, near Moneta. The project is an acid leach, ion-exchange, and solvent-extraction uranium ore processing mill at an increased capacity of 500,000 tons per year and the construction of two heap leach facilities in Natrona and Fremont Counties for initial processing of low-grade ore. After analysis of environmental impacts and adverse effects, it is the proposed position of NRC that the license be renewed subject to conditions relating to stabilization of the tailings, reclamation, environmental monitoring, evaluation of any future activity not evaluated by NRC, archeological survey, analysis of unexpected harmful effects, and decommissioning

  18. Draft environmental statement. Homestake Mining Company: Homestake Mining Company Pitch Project (Saguache County, Colorado)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The draft concerns the proposed issuance of approvals, permits, and licenses to the Homestake Mining Company for the implementation of the Pitch Project. The Pitch Project consists of mining and milling operations involving uranium ore deposits located in Gunnison National Forest, Saguache County, Colorado. Mining of uranium ore will take place over an estimated period of 20 years; a mill with a nominal capacity of 544 metric tons per day (600 tons per day) will be constructed and operated as long as ore is available. The waste material (tailings) from the mill, also produced at a rate of about 544 metric tons per day (600 tons per day), will be buried onsite at the head end of a natural valley. The environmental impacts are summarized in sections on the existing environment, applicant's proposed mining and milling operation, environmental effects of accidents, monitoring programs, productivity, commitment of resources, alternatives, and cost-benefit evaluation

  19. Draft environmental impact statement: KENETECH/PacifiCorp Windpower Project, Carbon County, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This Draft Environmental Impact Statement assesses the environmental consequences of a proposed windpower development project in Carbon County, between Arlington and Hanna, Wyoming. Public scoping commenced in January 1994. All issues raised during scoping and interdisciplinary team preparation of the analysis are addressed. The proposed project entails the erection of approximately 1,390 wind turbine generators and associated facilities (e.g., roads, substations, distribution and communications lines) by KENETECH Windpower, Inc. A 230-kV transmission line would be built by PacifiCorp, Inc. to connect a proposed substation on Foote Creek Rim near Arlington to the Miner's substation near Hanna. The proposed project would use standard procedures as currently employed by other right-of-way projects, plus additional project-specific and site-specific mitigation measures to ensure that project impacts are minimized on all important resources. Impacts to most resources would be negligible to moderate during the life-of-project. Potentially significant impacts resulting from the project include avian mortality; declining avian populations; threatened, endangered, candidate, and/or state sensitive species mortality and/or habitat loss; disturbance to nearby residents due to noise; changes in visual resources; disturbance of important Native American traditional sites; changes in plant community species composition due to snow redistribution; displacement of big game due to windfarm operation; and loss of sage grouse nesting habitat. The proposed project could also have numerous beneficial impacts including increased revenues generated by taxes, increased employment, and benefits derived from using a nonpolluting resource for electric power generation

  20. Final environmental impact statement Kenetech/PacifiCorp Windpower Project Carbon County, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    The Draft and Final Environmental Impact Statements (DEIS and FEIS) assess the environmental consequences of a proposed windpower energy development in Carbon County, Wyoming. This abbreviated FEIS revises and supplements the DEIS for the project and addresses comments expressed for the DEIS. The proposed project entails the erection of approximately 1,390 wind turbine generators and associated facilities (e.g., roads, substations, distribution and communications lines) by KENETECH Windpower, Inc. A 230-kV transmission line would be built by PacifiCorp, Inc. to connect a proposed substation on Foote Creek Rim near Arlington to the Miner's substation near Hanna. The proposed project would use standard procedures as currently employed by other right-of-way projects, plus additional project-specific and site-specific mitigation measures to ensure that project impacts are minimized on all important resources. Impacts to most resources would be negligible to moderate during the life-of-project. Potentially significant impacts from the project include avian mortality; declining avian populations; threatened, endangered, candidate, and/or state sensitive species mortality and/or habitat loss; disturbance to nearby residents due to noise; changes in visual resources; disturbance of important Native American traditional sites; changes in plant community species composition due to snow redistribution; displacement of big game due to windfarm operation; and loss of sage grouse nesting habitat. The proposed project could also have numerous beneficial impacts including increased revenues generated by taxes, increased employment, and benefits derived from using a nonpolluting resource for electric power generation

  1. Flathead River Basin Hydrologic Observatory, Northern Rocky Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woessner, W. W.; Running, S. W.; Potts, D. F.; Kimball, J. S.; Deluca, T. H.; Fagre, D. B.; Makepeace, S.; Hendrix, M. S.; Lorang, M. S.; Ellis, B. K.; Lafave, J.; Harper, J.

    2004-12-01

    We are proposing the 22, 515 km2 glacially-sculpted Flathead River Basin located in Montana and British Columbia as a Hydrologic Observatory. This hydrologic landscape is diverse and includes large pristine watersheds, rapidly developing intermountain valleys, and a 95 km2 regulated reservoir and 510 km2 lake. The basin has a topographic gradient of over 2,339 m, and spans high alpine to arid climatic zones and a range of biomes. Stream flows are snow-melt dominated and underpinned by groundwater baseflow. The site headwaters contain 37 glaciers and thousands of square kilometers of watersheds in which fire and disease are the only disturbances. In contrast, the HO also contains watersheds at multiple scales that were dominated by glaciers within the last 100 years but are now glacier free, impacted by timber harvests and fires of varying ages to varying degrees, modified by water management practices including irrigation diversion and dams, and altered by development for homes, cities and agriculture. This Observatory provides a sensitive monitor of historic and future climatic shifts, air shed influences and impacts, and the consequences of land and water management practices on the hydrologic system. The HO watersheds are some of the only pristine watersheds left in the contiguous U.S.. They provide critical habitat for key species including the native threaten bull trout and lynx, and the listed western cutthroat trout, bald eagle, gray wolf and the grizzly bear. For the last several thousand years this system has been dominated by snow-melt runoff and moderated by large quantities of water stored in glacial ice. However, the timing and magnitude of droughts and summer flows have changed dramatically. With the information that can be gleaned from sediment cores and landscape records at different scales, this HO provides scientists with opportunities to establish baseline watershed conditions and data on natural hydrologic variability within the system. Such a

  2. Draft environmental statement. Wyoming Mineral Corporation, Irigaray solution mining project (Johnson County, Wyoming)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    The Irigaray project consists of solution mining (in situ leaching) operations involving uranium ore deposits in Johnson County, Wyoming. Solution mining activities will include a processing facility with an annual production of 500,000 lb of U 3 O 8 from up to 50 acres of well fields through the initial license authorization. The Irigaray project has an estimated lifetime of 10 to 20 years with known ore deposits and the current level of solution mining technology. Environmental impacts and adverse effects are summarized. The site is mostly used as grazing land for cattle and sheep. Initiation of the Irigaray project would result in the temporary removal from grazing and the disturbance of approximately 60 acres during operation. All disturbed surface areas will be reclaimed and returned to their original use. Approximately 1.2 x 10 6 m 3 (1000 acre-ft) of water will be withdrawn from the ore zone aquifer. This water will be conveyed to the onsite waste ponds for evaporation. An estimated 4.2 x 10 5 m 3 (340 acre-ft) of groundwater is expected to temporarily contain increased concentrations of radioactive and toxic elements during the operation of each 4-ha (10-acre) well field. Restoration should return this water to a condition that is consistent with its premining use (or potential use). There will be no discharge of liquid effluents from the Irigaray project. Atmospheric effluents will be within acceptable limits. The dose rates of radionuclides in the air at the nearest ranches from the plant site are tabulated. The Irigaray project proposes the production and utilization of 500,000 lb per year of uranium resources. The Irigaray project will not produce any significant socioeconomic impact on the local area because of the small number of employees that will be employed at the project

  3. [Experience in the treatment of patients with STEMI in the frame of urgent PCI Project in Medimurje County].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hranilović, Rudolf

    2009-02-01

    In 2004, the mortality rate of cardiovascular disease in Medimurje County was 53%, with coronary heart disease accounting for 18.2% of cases. The need of organizing a County team for health was recognized. Five health priorities were acknowledged with coronary heart disease on the top of the list. In 2005, Medimurje County was among the first regions outside Zagreb that had launched the Project of urgent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients. Internal medicine physicians from the County Hospital received thorough education and printed materials on the issue were distributed to primary care physicians. A media campaign for the general population of the Medimurje County was also prepared. During the first 2 years of the project, the average pain-to-needle time in our patients was less than 4 hours. From the beginning of the project till July 2007, more than 100 patients with STEMI were treated with emergency PCI. There still are issues that have remained unsolved (how to reduce the pain-to-door and door-to-needle time, managing patients in cardiogenic shock, NSTEMI-patients, and presentation of patients with multivessel disease to cardiac surgeons). It is important to carry on with the intensive media campaign as well as with further education of patients, physicians and other health personnel.

  4. Seminoe-Kortes transmission line/substation consolidation project, Carbon County, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    The existing switchyards at Western Area Power Administration's (WESTERN) Seminoe and Kortes facilities, located approximately 40 miles northeast of Rawlines, Carbon County, Wyoming, were constructed in 1939 and 1951, respectively. The circuit breakers at these facilities are beyond or approaching their service life and need to be replaced. In addition, the switchyards have poor access for maintenance and replacement of equipment, and their locations create potential for oil spills into the North Platte River. WESTERN is proposing to consolidate the switchyard facilities into one new substation to provide easier access, restore proper levels of system reliability, and decrease the potential for oil contamination of the river. This environmental assessment (EA) was prepared to evaluate the impacts of the proposed Seminoe-Kortes Consolidation Project. 57 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. Site study plan for Playa investigations, Deaf Smith County, Texas: Salt Repository Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This plan defines the purpose and objectives of the Playa Investigation Study, presents a plan of work to provide the information necessary to resolve issues, and discusses the rationale for test method selection. The required information will be obtained from existing well drilling records, describing and testing of soil and rock samples recovered from project test holes, geophysical well logs, seismic surveys, and shallow test pits excavated at ground surface. There have been numerous, often conflicting, theories presented to explain the origin(s) of the playas of the Texas High Plains. The primary purpose of this study is to establish if existing playas and playa alignments are related to deeper subsurface structure, such as faulting or salt dissolution, the potential for future playa development, and the significance of existing and/or future playas on siting a repository in Deaf Smith County, Texas. 11 refs

  6. Sediment cores and chemistry for the Kootenai River White Sturgeon Habitat Restoration Project, Boundary County, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Gary J.; Weakland, Rhonda J.; Fosness, Ryan L.; Cox, Stephen E.; Williams, Marshall L.

    2012-01-01

    The Kootenai Tribe of Idaho, in cooperation with local, State, Federal, and Canadian agency co-managers and scientists, is assessing the feasibility of a Kootenai River habitat restoration project in Boundary County, Idaho. This project is oriented toward recovery of the endangered Kootenai River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population, and simultaneously targets habitat-based recovery of other native river biota. Projects currently (2010) under consideration include modifying the channel and flood plain, installing in-stream structures, and creating wetlands to improve the physical and biological functions of the ecosystem. River restoration is a complex undertaking that requires a thorough understanding of the river. To assist in evaluating the feasibility of this endeavor, the U.S. Geological Survey collected and analyzed the physical and chemical nature of sediment cores collected at 24 locations in the river. Core depths ranged from 4.6 to 15.2 meters; 21 cores reached a depth of 15.2 meters. The sediment was screened for the presence of chemical constituents that could have harmful effects if released during restoration activities. The analysis shows that concentrations of harmful chemical constituents do not exceed guideline limits that were published by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 2006.

  7. Nye County nuclear waste repository project office independent scientific investigations program. Summary annual report, May 1996--April 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    This annual summary report, prepared by Multimedia Environmental Technology, Inc. (MET) on behalf of Nye County Nuclear Waste Project Office, summarizes the activities that were performed during the period from May 1, 1996 to April 30, 1997. These activities were conducted in support of the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP) of Nye County at the Yucca Mountain Site (YMS). The Nye County NWRPO is responsible for protecting the health and safety of the Nye County residents. NWRPO's on-site representative is responsible for designing and implementing the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP). Major objectives of the ISIP include: (1) Investigating key issues related to conceptual design and performance of the repository that can have major impact on human health, safety, and the environment. (2) Identifying areas not being addressed adequately by DOE Nye County has identified several key scientific issues of concern that may affect repository design and performance which were not being adequately addressed by DOE. Nye County has been conducting its own independent study to evaluate the significance of these issues

  8. Projecting county-level populations under three future scenarios: a technical document supporting the Forest Service 2010 RPA Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley J. Zarnoch; H. Ken Cordell; Carter J. Betz

    2010-01-01

    County-level population projections from 2010 to 2060 are developed under three national population growth scenarios for reporting in the 2010 Renewable Resources Planning Act (RPA) Assessment. These population growth scenarios are tied to global futures scenarios defined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a program within the United Nations...

  9. 78 FR 33101 - Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision for the Alta East Wind Project, Kern County...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [CACA-052537, LLCAD05000, L51010000.LVRWB11B4520.FX0000] Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision for the Alta East Wind Project, Kern County, California AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Availability. SUMMARY...

  10. Interim housing conditions profile, Benton and Franklin Counties, Washington: BWIP Repository Project: Working draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolton, P.A.

    1987-11-01

    This report describes the housing stock and its availability in Benton and Franklin counties. Depending on the specific measures, data are presented for the entire MSA, for Benton and Franklin counties separately, for incorporated and unincorporated areas within the counties, and for specific incorporated areas. The most detailed data are available for the two counties and for the major cities of Kennewick and Richland in Benton County and Pasco in Franklin County. In 1986, 64 percent of the population of Benton County and 66 percent of the housing units were in Kennewick and Richland. Seventy-three percent of the population and 75 percent of the housing were in the incorporated area of Benton County. In Franklin County, Pasco accounted for 52 percent of the county's 1986 population and 57 percent of its housing. Fifty-nine percent of the population and 63 percent of the housing were in the incorporated areas of Franklin County. More detailed data are needed to fully describe the housing conditions in the jurisdictions described here. 13 refs., 9 tabs

  11. Hungry Horse Dam fisheries mitigation program: Fish passage and habitat improvement in the Upper Flathead River basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knotek, W.L.; Deleray, M.; Marotz, B.

    1997-08-01

    In the past 50 years, dramatic changes have occurred in the Flathead Lake and River system. Degradation of fishery resources has been evident, in part due to deterioration of aquatic habitat and introduction of non-endemic fish and invertebrate species. Habitat loss has been attributed to many factors including the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam, unsound land use practices, urban development, and other anthropogenic and natural disturbances. Fish migration has also been limited by barriers such as dams and impassible culverts. Cumulatively, these factors have contributed to declines in the distribution and abundance of native fish populations. Recovery of fish populations requires that a watershed approach be developed that incorporates long-term aquatic habitat needs and promotes sound land use practices and cooperation among natural resource management agencies. In this document, the authors (1) describe completed and ongoing habitat improvement and fish passage activities under the Hungry Horse Fisheries Mitigation Program, (2) describe recently identified projects that are in the planning stage, and (3) develop a framework for identifying prioritizing, implementing, and evaluating future fish habitat improvement and passage projects

  12. Evaluation of stomach tubes and gastric lavage for sampling diets from blue catfish and flathead catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, D.S.; Kwak, T.J.; Arnott, J.B.; Pine, William E.

    2004-01-01

    We compared the ability to extract all stomach contents by using stomach tubes or gastric lavage to sample diets from blue catfish Ictalurus furcatus and flathead catfish Pylodictus olivarus. Pulsed gastric lavage (PGL) removed a significantly greater proportion of stomach content mass (95.6%) from blue catfish than did stomach tubes (14.6%). Percent mass of flathead catfish contents removed with PGL (96.0%) was not significantly different from that removed with stomach tubes (86.9%). Based on the greater effectiveness of PGL for blue catfish, combined with a shorter mean time required per sample (69 versus 118 s) and the better preservation of extracted diet material, we recommend using PGL as a nonlethal technique to collect diet samples from large catfishes.

  13. Flatiron-Erie 115kV transmission line project, Larimer, Weld and Boulder Counties, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to uprate its existing 115-kV Flatiron-Erie transmission line. The line is located in Larimer, Weld and Boulder Counties, Colorado, and passes through the City of Longmont. The line connects Flatiron Substation and several of the substations supplying Longmont. It is a single circuit 115-kV line, 31.5 miles long, and was built in 1950-51 on a 75-foot wide right-of-way (ROW) using wood H-frame structures. Western proposes to build 27 new structures along the line, to replace or modify 45 of the existing structures and to remote 11 of them. Many of these additions and changes would involve structures that are approximately 5 to 15 feet taller than the existing ones. The existing conductors and ground wires would remain in place. The purpose of these actions would be to allow the power carrying capability of the line to be increased and to replace deteriorating/structural members. Western would be the sole participant in the proposed project. This report gives an analysis of the study area environment and the development of alternative routes. An assessment is presented of the impacts of the primary alternative routes. The environmental consequences of this project are addressed

  14. Hematologic, cytochemical, ultrastructural, and molecular findings of Hepatozoon-infected flat-headed cats (Prionailurus planiceps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salakij, Chaleow; Salakij, Jarernsak; Narkkong, Nual-Anong; Sirinarumitr, Theerapol; Pattanarangsan, Rattapan

    2008-03-01

    The flat-headed cat (Prionailurus planiceps) is a small wild cat of Southeast Asia and is considered extremely endangered. Little is known about the hematologic values, blood cell morphology, or hemoparasites of this species in relation to other Felidae. The objective of this study was to report basic hematologic values and describe the light microscopic, cytochemical, and ultrastructural characteristics of blood cells in 2 wild-caught flat-headed cats. In addition, molecular analysis was done of a Hepatozoon organism found in the neutrophils of both cats. Blood samples were collected into EDTA from the cephalic vein. A CBC, manual differential count, manual reticulocyte count, cytochemical stains (Sudan black B [SBB], alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase [ANAE], and beta-glucuronidase), and scanning and transmission electron microscopy were done using standard methods. HCT was slightly lower and reticulocyte counts and red cell distribution width were higher than the expected values for other species of cats. Hepatozoon organisms were found in the cytoplasm of neutrophils in both cats, but the number of infected neutrophils was very low (1%-2%). Neutrophils stained strongly positive for SBB, but were negative for ANAE and beta-glucuronidase. Hepatozoon-infected neutrophils were negative for SBB, but focally positive for ANAE and beta-glucuronidase. By transmission electron microscopy, gamonts of Hepatozoon sp were observed in neutrophils, and rarely free in plasma. Infected neutrophils had fewer specific granules and more mitochondria compared with noninfected neutrophils. PCR products of partial 18S rRNA revealed that the isolate of Hepatozoon in the flat-headed cats was closely related to that of the frog Hepatozoon sp. These results add to our understanding of hematologic values and blood cell morphology in Hepatozoon-infected flat-headed cats as well as the molecular analysis of the Hepatozoon organism, and may be useful for the health management and evaluation of

  15. North Plant co-generation project for South Davis County Sewer Improvement District

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, L.S. [Aqua Environmental Services, Inc., Bountiful, UT (United States)

    1993-12-31

    In the summer of 1988, the South Davis County Sewer Improvement District (SDCSID) learned of a grant/loan program being administered by the Utah State Department of Energy(DOE) for projects that demonstrate new and innovative ways of conserving energy or utilizing renewable energy sources. The SDCSID applied for and received from the DOE both a grant and a no-interest loan to finance half of the cost of a co-generation project at the North Wastewater Treatment Plant. This co-generation project utilizes methane gas, a by-product of the anaerobic digestion process, to generate both electricity and heat that is used at the plant. The SDCSID calculated that at the current anaerobic gas production rate, a 140 KW engine generator could be run almost 24 hours a day. Approximately 75% of the current electrical needs at the North Plant are supplied by the 140 KW engine generator. Also, all of the heat necessary to raise the temperature of the incoming sludge to 95{degrees}F, and to heat four large buildings is supplied from the heat recovery system of the engine. The system utilizes an induction type generator to supply electricity, which is somewhat simpler to design and less expensive to install than a synchronous type system. An induction system utilizes the Electrical Utility`s incoming power to excite the generator to correct the phase so that is can be used by the loads in the plant. In addition, the SDCSID installed a second identical engine generator as a back-up and to peak shave. Plant effluent is used to cool the engines instead of air-cooling through radiators.

  16. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP, FLATHEAD COUNTY, MONTANA (AND INCORPORATED AREAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  17. Evaluation of the flathead catfish population and fishery on Lake Carl Blackwell, Oklahoma, with emphasis on the effects of noodling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelman, Dana L.; Michaletz, Paul H.; Travnichek, Vincent H.

    2011-01-01

    I conducted a 3-year study at Lake Carl Blackwell, Oklahoma to estimate effects of various fishing gears on the flathead catfish Pylodictis olivaris population. Managers were particularly interested in the effect of handfishing or noodling on this population. I used a phone survey to assess angler effort and electrofishing and gill nets to calculate standard population metrics to assess composition of the current population. Survey data indicated that fishing effort and harvest were highest for trotlines and juglines and lowest for noodling. Size distribution of fish harvested by noodlers was not different from sizes that were available in the fishery and was similar to those fish harvested with other gears. Flathead catfish Sampled in Lake Carl Blackwell ranged in size from 38 to 1,220 mm total length, and 77% of the population was less than 508 mm (minimum legal size). Estimated total annual mortality was about 11%. Proportional size distribution (PSD) of flathead catfish for Lake Carl Blackwell indicates that about 70% of legal-sized flathead catfish were over the preferred size of 710 mm. Overall, the Lake Carl Blackwell flathead catfish population appeared healthy. There were a wide range of sizes and ages in the population, and PSD indicated a well-balanced population with many preferred and memorable-sized fish. Due to its rarity, noodling is probably not adversely influencing the population. Additionally, noodling at Lake Carl Blackwell does not appear to be as size-selective as previously thought. 

  18. Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program. Project Shoal site, Sand Springs Range, Churchill County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    The Shoal site is located in Churchill County in the northern part of the Sand Springs Range, approximately 30 miles (48.3 kilometers) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. Project Shoal, with a yield of 12 kilotons, was detonated October 26, 1963. It was conducted as part of the Vela program to obtain event measurements relating to the detection of underground nuclear detonations. The purpose of the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program at the Shoal site is to obtain data that will assure public safety; inform the public, the news media, and the scientific community relative to radiological contamination; and to document compliance with federal, state, and local antipollution requirements. The Shoal site geographical setting, climate, geology, and hydrology are described. Site history, including Shoal event information and Shoal monitoring is described. The final radiological surveys following the Shoal site cleanup described in this report indicate that there are no radiation levels above natural background on or near the land surface and that no hazard exists or is likely to occur during public use of the surface of the Shoal site. The Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program for the Shoal site is described. 17 references, 4 figures

  19. Projecting county pulpwood production with historical production and macro-economic variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consuelo Brandeis; Dayton M. Lambert

    2014-01-01

    We explored forecasting of county roundwood pulpwood produc-tion with county-vector autoregressive (CVAR) and spatial panelvector autoregressive (SPVAR) methods. The analysis used timberproducts output data for the state of Florida, together with a set ofmacro-economic variables. Overall, we found the SPVAR specifica-tion produced forecasts with lower error rates...

  20. Bear Creek Project (Converse County, Wyoming). Draft environmental statement. Docket No. 40-8452

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The Bear Creek Project consists of certain mining and milling operations involving uranium ore deposits located in Converse County, Wyoming. Mining of uranium from six known ore bodies will take place over a period of ten years (estimated); a mill with a nominal capacity of 1000 tons per day of ore will be constructed and operated as long as ore is available. The waste material (tailings) from the mill, also produced at a rate of about 1000 tons per day, will be stored onsite in an impoundment. The project would convert about 2700 acres from grazing use to mining and milling activities for a period of about ten years. Mining activities would disturb (and remove vegetation from) a total of about 1600 acres but, because of ongoing reclamation efforts, max acreage disturbed at any one time would be about 1000 acres, with the average about 650 acres. An estimated 185 acres of highwalls and water remaining after reclamation would be lost to agricultural production. The milling activities would disturb about 430 acres; 330 of these would be reclaimed after operations cease, but the 100-acre tailings area must be considered unavailable for further productive use. Water will be removed from aquifers at about 1000 gpm (range 600 to 2000 gpm) by mine dewatering and mill operations. Long-term effects on groundwater are expected to be minor. Surface water will not be affected by normal operations. There will be no discharge of liquid or solid effluents from the mill. Discharges to air will be small and the effects negligible. The total dose rate to the bone is 1.1 mrem/y, and the whole-body-dose rate is computed to be 0.04 mrem/y

  1. Yolo County's Accelerated Anaerobic and Aerobic Composting (Full-Scale Controlled Landfill Bioreactor) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, R.; Kieffer, J.; Akau, H.; Augenstein, D.

    2002-12-01

    Sanitary landfilling is the dominant method of solid waste disposal in the United States, accounting for about 217 million tons of waste annually (U.S. EPA, 1997) and has more than doubled since 1960. In spite of increasing rates of reuse and recycling, population and economic growth will continue to render landfilling as an important and necessary component of solid waste management. Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works, Division of Integrated Waste Management is demonstrating a new landfill technology called Bioreactor Landfill to better manage solid waste. In a Bioreactor Landfill, controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray-water, etc.) are added and recirculated to increase the moisture content of the waste and improve waste decomposition. As demonstrated in a small-scale demonstration project at the Yolo County Central Landfill in 1995, this process significantly increases the biodegradation rate of waste and thus decreases the waste stabilization and composting time (5 to 10 years) relative to what would occur within a conventional landfill (30 to 50 years or more). When waste decomposes anaerobically (in absence of oxygen), it produces landfill gas (biogas). Biogas is primarily a mixture of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, and small amounts of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC's) which can be recovered for electricity or other uses. Other benefits of a bioreactor landfill composting operation include increased landfill waste settlement which increases in landfill capacity and life, improved leachate chemistry, possible reduction of landfill post-closure management time, opportunity to explore decomposed waste for landfill mining, and abatement of greenhouse gases through highly efficient methane capture over a much shorter period of time than is typical of waste management through conventional landfilling. This project also investigates the aerobic decomposition of waste of 13,000 tons of waste (2.5 acre) for

  2. Study of the Cherokee Nuclear Station: projected impacts, monitoring plan, and mitigation options for Cherokee County, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peelle, E.; Schweitzer, M.; Scharre, P.; Pressman, B.

    1979-07-01

    This report inventories Cherokee County's capabilities and CNS project characteristics, projects expected impacts from the interaction of the two defines four options for Cherokee County decision makers, and presents a range of possible mitigation and monitoring plans for dealing with the problems identified. The four options and general implementation guidelines for each are presented after reviewing pertinent features of other mitigation and monitoring plans. The four options include (1) no action, (2) preventing impacts by preventing growth, (3) selective growth in designated areas as services can be supplied, and (4) maximum growth designed to attract as many in-movers as possible through a major program of capital investiments in public and private services. With the exception of the no action option, all plans deal with impacts according to some strategy determined by how the County wishes to manage growth. Solutions for impact problems depend on which growth strategy is selected and what additional resources are secured during the impact period. A monitoring program deals with the problems of data and projections uncertainty, while direct action is proposed to deal with the institutional problems of delay of the needed access road, timeing and location problems from the tax base mismatch, and lack of local planning capability

  3. Study of the Cherokee Nuclear Station: projected impacts, monitoring plan, and mitigation options for Cherokee County, South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peelle, E.; Schweitzer, M.; Scharre, P.; Pressman, B.

    1979-07-01

    This report inventories Cherokee County's capabilities and CNS project characteristics, projects expected impacts from the interaction of the two defines four options for Cherokee County decision makers, and presents a range of possible mitigation and monitoring plans for dealing with the problems identified. The four options and general implementation guidelines for each are presented after reviewing pertinent features of other mitigation and monitoring plans. The four options include (1) no action, (2) preventing impacts by preventing growth, (3) selective growth in designated areas as services can be supplied, and (4) maximum growth designed to attract as many in-movers as possible through a major program of capital investiments in public and private services. With the exception of the no action option, all plans deal with impacts according to some strategy determined by how the County wishes to manage growth. Solutions for impact problems depend on which growth strategy is selected and what additional resources are secured during the impact period. A monitoring program deals with the problems of data and projections uncertainty, while direct action is proposed to deal with the institutional problems of delay of the needed access road, timeing and location problems from the tax base mismatch, and lack of local planning capability.

  4. Preliminary draft industrial siting administration permit application: Socioeconomic factors technical report. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project in Converse County, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    Under the with-project scenario, WyCoalGas is projected to make a difference in the long-range future of Converse County. Because of the size of the proposed construction and operations work forces, the projected changes in employment, income, labor force, and population will alter Converse County's economic role in the region. Specifically, as growth occurs, Converse County will begin to satisfy a larger portion of its own higher-ordered demands, those that are currently being satisfied by the economy of Casper. Business-serving and household-serving activities, currently absent, will find the larger income and population base forecast to occur with the WyCoalGas project desirable. Converse County's economy will begin to mature, moving away from strict dependence on extractive industries to a more sophisticated structure that could eventually appeal to national, and certainly, regional markets. The technical demand of the WyCoalGas plant will mean a significant influx of varying occupations and skills. The creation of basic manufacturing, advanced trade and service sectors, and concomitant finance and transportation firms will make Converse County more economically autonomous. The county will also begin to serve market center functions for the smaller counties of eastern Wyoming that currently rely on Casper, Cheyenne or other distant market centers. The projected conditions expected to exist in the absence of the WyCoalGas project, the socioeconomic conditions that would accompany the project, and the differences between the two scenarios are considered. The analysis is keyed to the linkages between Converse County and Natrona County.

  5. Environmental assessment for the Groundwater Characterization Project, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to conduct a program to characterize groundwater at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, in accordance with a 1987 DOE memorandum stating that all past, present, and future nuclear test sites would be treated as Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites (Memorandum from Bruce Green, Weapons Design and Testing Division, June 6, 1987). DOE has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-0532) to evaluate the environmental consequences associated with the proposed action, referred to as the Groundwater Characterization Project (GCP). This proposed action includes constructing access roads and drill pads, drilling and testing wells, and monitoring these wells for the purpose of characterizing groundwater at the NTS. Long-term monitoring and possible use of these wells in support of CERCLA, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act, is also proposed. The GCP includes measures to mitigate potential impacts on sensitive biological, cultural and historical resources, and to protect workers and the environment from exposure to any radioactive or mixed waste materials that may be encountered. DOE considers those mitigation measures related to sensitive biological, cultural and historic resources as essential to render the impacts of the proposed action not significant, and DOE has prepared a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) that explains how such mitigations will be planned and implemented. Based on the analyses presented in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and the Department is issuing this FONSI

  6. Environmental assessment for the Groundwater Characterization Project, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada; Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to conduct a program to characterize groundwater at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, in accordance with a 1987 DOE memorandum stating that all past, present, and future nuclear test sites would be treated as Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites (Memorandum from Bruce Green, Weapons Design and Testing Division, June 6, 1987). DOE has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-0532) to evaluate the environmental consequences associated with the proposed action, referred to as the Groundwater Characterization Project (GCP). This proposed action includes constructing access roads and drill pads, drilling and testing wells, and monitoring these wells for the purpose of characterizing groundwater at the NTS. Long-term monitoring and possible use of these wells in support of CERCLA, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act, is also proposed. The GCP includes measures to mitigate potential impacts on sensitive biological, cultural and historical resources, and to protect workers and the environment from exposure to any radioactive or mixed waste materials that may be encountered. DOE considers those mitigation measures related to sensitive biological, cultural and historic resources as essential to render the impacts of the proposed action not significant, and DOE has prepared a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) that explains how such mitigations will be planned and implemented. Based on the analyses presented in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and the Department is issuing this FONSI.

  7. Table - Impacts of the Proposed Transport Rule on Counties with Monitors Projected to have Ozone and/or Fine Particle Air Quality Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    This table shows the impacts of the proposed Transport Rule on Counties with Monitors Projected to have Ozone and/or Fine Particle Air Quality Problems, both with and without the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule.

  8. 2004 Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) Lidar Project: Pasco County (Classified)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Earthdata International was contracted to provide mapping services in Pasco County, Florida. Conventional aerial photography along with LIDAR observations were made....

  9. Geology of Glacier National Park and the Flathead Region, Northwestern Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Clyde P.

    1959-01-01

    This report summarizes available data on two adjacent and partly overlapping regions in northwestern Montana. The first of these is Glacier National Park plus small areas east and west of the park. The second is here called, for convenience, the Flathead region; it embraces the mountains from the southern tip of Glacier Park to latitude 48 deg north and between the Great Plains on the east and Flathead Valley on the west. The fieldwork under the direction of the writer was done in 1948, 1949, 1950, and 1951, with some work in 1952 and 1953. The two regions together include parts of the Swan, Flathead, Livingstone, and Lewis Ranges. They are drained largely by branches of the Flathead River. On the east and north, however, they are penetrated by tributaries of the Missouri River and in addition by streams that flow into Canada. Roads and highways reach the borders of the regions; but there are few roads in the regions and only two highways cross them. The principal economic value of the assemblage of mountains described in the present report is as a collecting ground for snow to furnish the water used in the surrounding lowlands and as a scenic and wildlife recreation area. A few metallic deposits and lignitic coal beds are known, but these have not proved to be important and cannot, as far as can now be judged, be expected to become so. No oil except minor seeps has yet been found, and most parts of the two regions covered do not appear geologically favorable to the presence of oil in commercial quantities. The high, Hungry Horse Dam on which construction was in progress during the fieldwork now floods part of the Flathead region and will greatly influence the future of that region. The rocks range in age from Precambrian to Recent. The thickest units belong to the Belt series of Precambrian age, and special attention was paid to them. As a result, it is clear that at least the upper part of the series shows marked lateral changes within short distances. This fact

  10. Ground-water investigations of the Project Gnome area, Eddy and Lea Counties, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J.B.

    1962-01-01

    The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, through the Office of Test Operations, Albuquerque Operations Office, plans to detonate a nuclear device in a massive salt bed 1,200 feet beneath the land surface. The project, known as Project Gnome, is an element of the Plowshare program--a study of peacetime applications of nuclear fission. The location of the proposed underground shot is in a sparsely-populated area in southeastern Eddy County, N. Mex., east of the Pecos River and about 25 miles southeast of the city of Carlsbad. The area is arid to Semiarid and ground water is a vital factor in the economic utilization of the land, which is primarily used for stock raising. An investigation of the Project Gnome site and surrounding area for the purposes of evaluating the ground-water resources and the possible effect upon them from the detonation of the nuclear shot was desired by the Commission. This report describes work done by the U.S. Geological Survey on behalf of the Commission and presents results of the investigation of the ground-water resources and geology of the area. The most intensive investigations were made within a 15-mile radius of the site of Project Gnome and mainly on the east side of the Pecos River. The total area of study of over 1,200 square miles includes parts of Eddy and Lea Counties, N. Mex. The Project Gnome site is in the sedimentary Delaware Basin. It is underlain by about 18,000 feet of sedimentary rocks ranging in age from Ordovician to Recent. Upper Permian evaporitic rocks, which contain the principal source of potash available in the United States, are worked in nearby mines. The potash minerals are found in a massive salt bed about 1,400 feet thick in the Salado Formation of Permian age. The land surface of the area is covered mostly by a wind-blown sand and caliche; however, rocks of the Rustler Formation of Permian age and younger rocks of Permian, Triassic, Pleistocene(?) and Recent age crop out at several localities. Solution by

  11. Columbia River wildlife mitigation habitat evaluation procedures report: Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County pygmy rabbit projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashley, P.R.; Ratassepp, J.; Berger, M.; Judd, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites

  12. Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    1997-01-01

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

  13. 76 FR 21401 - Notice of Availability of the Draft EIS for the HB In-Situ Solution Mine Project, Eddy County, NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ...] Notice of Availability of the Draft EIS for the HB In-Situ Solution Mine Project, Eddy County, NM AGENCY... prepared a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the HB In- Situ Solution Mine Project, and by... considered, the BLM must receive written comments on the HB In-Situ Solution Mine Project Draft EIS within 60...

  14. The tunnel project. Drill hole logging and structural geologic studies in the Grualia, the Lunner county

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elvebakk, Harald; Braathen, Alvar; Roenning, Jan S.; Nordgulen, Oeystein

    2001-01-01

    In connection with the project ''Environmental and community useful tunnels'' the Norwegian Geologic Survey (NGU) has made geologic and geophysical investigations along parts of the tunnel at the Grualia in the Lunner county. The purpose of the geologic studies was to map and investigate weakness zones in the rock foundations. The geophysical studies aimed at testing techniques that was in little use in preliminary studies for tunnel operations. The methods used have been optical inspection of drill holes, measurements of temperature and conductivity in the water and the measuring of the natural gamma radiation in the drill holes. The resistivity in the drill holes is also determined and test pumping with flow measurements is carried out in order to calculate the well water influx capacity. These methods may contribute to information about the rock condition (cracking, water influx). Previously the NGU has made 2D resistivity measurements at the ground in the tunnel in order to map the weakness zones. The results from the measurements in 6 wells show large variations in the rock qualities. The wells are drilled towards indicated weakness zones. Open water conducting cracks and sections with largely cracked rocks are detected in or in the proximity of the tunnel route. The weakness zone between the hornfels and the syenite west of the Langvatnet is largely cracked, has a large water conducting capacity and there are some unstable masses. Further east several open, water- conducting cracks are detected in the syenite. Furthest to the east in the route cracked and unstable rocks are found. Several of the holes are blocked by ravines which confirm the poor rock quality. In the particular areas problems are to be expected during the operation with respect to water influx and stability. Methodically the drill hole studies have shown great value for the follow up of the 2D resistivity measurements on the ground. The indicated weakness zones through the 2D have been

  15. State of the Crown of the continent ecosystem : Flathead/Castle Transboundary Bioregion (draft)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konrad, E.; Peck, B.; Stewart, A.; Stewart, C.

    1999-01-01

    This state of the ecosystem report describes the ecological composition of the Flathead/Castle Transboundary bioregion, including human activity. The ecosystem (which does not follow political boundaries) extends from western Alberta, eastern British Columbia and Montana. The region encompasses 5088 square km. and occupies two watersheds of the greater Crown of the Continent Ecosystem. Ecological components of the North Fork of the Flathead and of the Castle Drainage including such ecological processes as fire and disease, vegetation, species, wildlife, the aquatic environment, and a century of human activity in the two regions are described. Forestry practices, petroleum extraction, mining, recreational activities, land development, ranching practices, and road development in the two regions are reviewed, along with ecosystem-wide trends. The advantages of ecosystem based management integrated with human based management practices was demonstrated by describing the Rocky Mountain Grizzly Bear Planning Committee`s work . The Committee consists of representatives of wildlife agencies of Montana, BC, Alberta and Canadian and US federal government agencies who share responsibility for jointly mapping grizzly habitat, grizzly mortality sinks, pooling data on mortalities to ensure that the regional grizzly bear population is managed as one population regardless of political boundaries. 221 refs., tabs., figs.

  16. Final environmental statement related to the Wyoming Mineral Corporation Irigaray uranium solution mining project (Johnson County, Wyoming)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The Irigaray project consists of solution mining (in situ leaching) operations involving uranium ore deposits in Johnson County, Wyoming. Solution mining activities will include a processing facility with an annual production of 500,000 lb of U 3 O 8 from up to 50 acres of well fields through the initial license authorization. The Irigaray project has an estimated lifetime of up to 10 to 20 years with known ore deposits and the current level of solution mining technology. The site is mostly used as grazing land for cattle and sheep. Initiation of the Irigaray project would result in the temporary removal from grazing and the disturbance of approximately 60 acres during operation as proposed by the staff. All disturbed surface areas will be reclaimed and returned to their original use. Approximately 1.2 x 10 6 m 3 of water will be withdrawn from the ore zone aquifer. 43 figs, 52 tables

  17. 76 FR 3157 - Joint Operations Center Relocation Project, Sacramento County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ..., Sacramento County, CA AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an... Reclamation, 2800 Cottage Way, Sacramento, CA 95825 or e-mail [email protected] . The public scoping meetings... construct a new JOC in the Sacramento area to be occupied by June 2015. The new JOC would provide typical...

  18. Prevalence of Fibromyalgia: A Population-Based Study in Olmsted County, Minnesota, Utilizing the Rochester Epidemiology Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Ann; Lahr, Brian D; Wolfe, Frederick; Clauw, Daniel J; Whipple, Mary O; Oh, Terry H; Barton, Debra L; St Sauver, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to estimate and compare the prevalence of fibromyalgia by two different methods, in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Methods The first method was a retrospective review of medical records of potential cases of fibromyalgia in Olmsted County using Rochester Epidemiology Project (from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2009) to estimate the prevalence of diagnosed fibromyalgia in clinical practice. The second method was a random survey of adults in Olmsted County using the fibromyalgia research survey criteria to estimate the percentage of responders who met fibromyalgia research survey criteria. Results Of the 3,410 potential patients identified by the first method, 1,115 had a fibromyalgia diagnosis documented in the medical record by a health care provider. The age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of diagnosed fibromyalgia by this method was 1.1%. By the second method, of the 2,994 people who received the survey by mail, 830 (27.6%) responded and 44 (5.3%) met fibromyalgia research survey criteria. The age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of fibromyalgia in the general population of Olmsted County by this method was estimated at 6.4%. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the rate at which fibromyalgia is being diagnosed in a community. This is also the first report of prevalence as assessed by the fibromyalgia research survey criteria. Our results suggest that patients, particularly men, who meet the fibromyalgia research survey criteria are unlikely to have been given a diagnosis of fibromyalgia. PMID:23203795

  19. Longitudinal patterns in flathead catfish relative abundance and length at age within a large river: Effects of an urban gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paukert, C.P.; Makinster, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the spatial variation of flathead catfish (Pylodictis olivaris) relative abundance and growth in the 274 km long Kansas River to determine if population dynamics of catfish are related to urbanization. Electrofishing was conducted at 462 random sites throughout the river in summer, 2005-2006 to collect fish. Relative abundance of age 1 fish (???200mm), subadult (>200-400mm) and adult fish (>400 mm) ranged from 0.34 to 14.67 fish h-1, mean length at age 1 was 165 (range: 128-195) mm total length (TL) and mean length at age 3 was 376 mm TL (range: 293-419mm TL). The proportion of land use within 200 m of the river edge was between 0 and 0.54 urban. River reaches with high relative abundance of age 1 flathead catfish had high relative abundance of subadult and adult catfish. River reaches with fast flathead catfish growth to age 1 had fast growth to age 3. High urban land use and riprap in the riparian area were evident in river reaches near the heavily populated Kansas City and Topeka, Kansas, USA. Reaches with increased number of log jams and islands had decreased riparian agriculture. Areas of low urbanization had faster flathead catfish growth (r = 0.67, p = 0.005). Relative abundance of flathead catfish was higher in more agricultural areas (r = -0.57, p = 0.02). Changes in land use in riverine environments may alter population dynamics of a fish species within a river. Spatial differences in population dynamics need to be considered when evaluating riverine fish populations. Published in 2008 by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT QUEEN ANNES COUNTY, MARYLAND SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the community of Prospect Bay at Grasonville in Queen Anne’s County, MD. The objectives of the project were to ev...

  1. 77 FR 5566 - Notice of Availability of the Final EIS for the HB In-Situ Solution Mine Project, Eddy County...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ...] Notice of Availability of the Final EIS for the HB In-Situ Solution Mine Project, Eddy County, New Mexico... Statement (Final EIS) for the HB In-Situ Solution Mine Project, and by this notice is announcing its... the Federal Register. ADDRESSES: Copies of the HB In-Situ Solution Mining EIS are available for public...

  2. Impacts of Water Level Fluctuations on Kokanee Reproduction in Flathead Lake, 1984 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker-Hess, Janet; Clancey, Patrick (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Kalispell, MT)

    1984-03-01

    This study was initiated in the fall of 1981 to delineate the extent of successful shoreline spawning of kokanee salmon in Flathead Lake and determine the impacts of the historic and present operations of Kerr and Hungry Horse dams. An investigation of the quantity and quality of groundwater and other factors affecting kokanee reproductive success in Flathead Lake began in the spring of 1982. A total of 719 redds were counted in 17 shoreline areas of Flathead Lake in1983 compared to 592 in 1981 and 1,029 in 1982. Shoreline spawning contributed three percent to the total kokanee spawning in the Flathead drainage in 1983. Fifty-nine percent of the redds were located above 2883 ft, the operational minimum pool. The majority of those redds were constructed between 2885 and 2889 ft. In areas above minimum pool, intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations were adequate for embryo survival and exhibited a decrease with depth. Limited data indicated apparent velocity may be the key in determining redd distribution. Seventy-five percent of the redds located below minimum pool were constructed in a zone between 2869 and 2883 ft. In individual areas, apparent velocity measurements and intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations were related to redd density. The variation in intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Yellow Bay spawning area was partially explained by lake stage fluctuation. As lake stage declined, groundwater apparent velocity increased which increased intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations. Mean survival to the eyed stage in the three areas below minimum pool was 43 percent. Prior to exposure by lake drawdown, mean survival to the eyed stage in spawning areas above minimum pool was 87 percent. This indicated habitat most conducive to successful embryo survival was in gravels above 2883 ft. prior to significant exposure. Survival in redds exposed to either extended periods of drawdown or to temperatures less than -10% was significantly reduced to

  3. Public views of reclaiming an abandoned coal mine: the Macoupin County project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, J. R.

    1980-07-01

    An abandoned underground coal mine waste area in Macoupin County, Illinois, has been reclaimed for demonstration and research purposes near the city of Staunton. According to federal law, end uses of reclaimed coal mines must be determined in part by local concerns. This study examined local residents' preferences for land uses and their social and economic evaluations of reclamation at the Macoupin County site. Personal interviews with 119 residents revealed preferences for recreational use of the demonstration area; however, responses were probably influenced by prior awareness of land-use intentions. Generally, very positive evaluations of the reclamation were received. Willingness to pay for reclamation appears to be linked to fulfillment of desired recreational uses on the site and socioeconomic status of the respondent. In general, the research results provide further evidence that the value of abatement of environmental damage from mining is recognized and supported in economic terms at the public level.

  4. Archaeological Reconnaissance of the Oliver Lock and Dam Project Area, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama. Phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-16

    settlements in the river channel constitute a well developed riverine- horticultural settlement pattern. Unlike the river channel levees, few systematic...Competition between Newtown and old Tuscaloosa was acute, and for a time the Newtown voters succeeded in having the county court house and jail moved to...a kind of therapy (Henry Rice, personal communica- t ion) . The now demolished remains of the hospital overseer’s house are identified in the state

  5. Environmental assessmental, geothermal energy, Heber geothermal binary-cycle demonstration project: Imperial County, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    The proposed design, construction, and operation of a commercial-scale (45 MWe net) binary-cycle geothermal demonstration power plant are described using the liquid-dominated geothermal resource at Heber, Imperial County, California. The following are included in the environmental assessment: a description of the affected environment, potential environmental consequences of the proposed action, mitigation measures and monitoring plans, possible future developmental activities at the Heber anomaly, and regulations and permit requirements. (MHR)

  6. The Waldo County project: A partnership for energy efficient economic development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    In April 1988, the state of Maine designated four economically disadvantaged areas as Job Opportunity Zones. An interministerial initiative was put into place to improve the economic situation of these regions and to attract high quality jobs. One of these, Waldo County, formed part of the service territory of Central Maine Power. In May 1988, that utility asked the Alliance to Save Energy to recommend means for aligning its energy efficiency program with the state's economic improvement program in order to bring about effective economic growth in Waldo County. The utility is in the process of adopting all of the energy efficiency measures recommended by the Alliance. The utility's program in this respect is focused on support for existing small businesses in the county. In most of these businesses, the largest component of their electric bill is for lighting. A pilot program to retrofit modern energy-efficient lighting will install state-of-the-art equipment such as electronic ballasts and compact fluorescents without cost to the customer. This program will provide substantial savings to existing businesses and provide efficiency savings to the utility. Marketing of commercial and residential energy management programs is also being intensified. Energy management assistance is also given to new businesses; this assistance includes financial incentives to install energy efficient equipment

  7. Environmental Assessment of the Gering-Stegall 115-kV Transmission Line Consolidation Project, Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to consolidate segments of two transmission lines near the Gering Substation in Gering, Nebraska. The transmission lines are both located in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska. The transmission lines are both located in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska, within the city of Gering. Presently, there are three parallel 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines on separate rights-of-way (ROW) that terminate at the Gering Substation. The project would include dismantling the Archer-Gering wood-pole transmission line and rebuilding the remaining two lines on single-pole steel double circuit structures. The project would consolidate the Gering-Stegall North and Gering-Stegall South 115-kV transmission lines on to one ROW for a 1.33-mile segment between the Gering Substation and a point west of the Gering Landfill. All existing wood-pole H-frame structures would be removed, and the Gering-Stegall North and South ROWs abandoned. Western is responsible for the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the line. Western prepared an environmental assessment (EA) that analyzed the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction, operation, and maintenance of the 115-kV transmission line consolidation. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE finds that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA).

  8. Environmental Assessment of the Gering-Stegall 115-kV Transmission Line Consolidation Project, Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to consolidate segments of two transmission lines near the Gering Substation in Gering, Nebraska. The transmission lines are both located in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska. The transmission lines are both located in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska, within the city of Gering. Presently, there are three parallel 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines on separate rights-of-way (ROW) that terminate at the Gering Substation. The project would include dismantling the Archer-Gering wood-pole transmission line and rebuilding the remaining two lines on single-pole steel double circuit structures. The project would consolidate the Gering-Stegall North and Gering-Stegall South 115-kV transmission lines on to one ROW for a 1.33-mile segment between the Gering Substation and a point west of the Gering Landfill. All existing wood-pole H-frame structures would be removed, and the Gering-Stegall North and South ROWs abandoned. Western is responsible for the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the line. Western prepared an environmental assessment (EA) that analyzed the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction, operation, and maintenance of the 115-kV transmission line consolidation. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE finds that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA)

  9. Effects of the Operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the Kokanee Fishery in the Flathead River System, 1983 Annual Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraley, John J.

    1983-11-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the effects of the operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the kokanee fishery in the Flathead River system. This annual report covers the 1982-1983 field season concerning the effects of Hungry Horse operations on kokanee abundance, migration, spawning, egg incubation and fry emergence in the Flathead River system. This report also addresses the expected recovery of the mainstem kokanee population under the flow regime recommended by the Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks in 1982.

  10. [Theories and methodologies of engineering designs on sustainable agricultural land consolidation project--a case study of Xuemeiyang land consolidation project in Changtai County, Fujian Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yanmei; Wu, Cifang; Cheng, Chengbiao; Qiu, Lingzhang; Huang, Shengyu; Zheng, Ruihui

    2002-09-01

    The concept and characteristics of engineering designs on sustainable agricultural land consolidation project were discussed in this paper. Principles, basic methods and procedures of engineering designs on agricultural land consolidation project were put forward, which were successfully adopted for designing agricultural land consolidation in Xuemeiyang region of Changtai County, including diversity designs of sustainable land use, engineering designs of soil improvement, roads, ditches, and drains for protecting existent animal environments, and design of ecological shelter-forests in farmland. Moreover, from sustainable economic, ecological and social points, the results of these engineering designs were evaluated based on fouteen important indexes. After carrying out these engineeringdesigns, the eco-environments and agricultural production conditions were significantly improved, and the farm income was increased in planned regions.

  11. Microplastic Contamination of Wild and Captive Flathead Grey Mullet (Mugil cephalus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Ching Yee

    2018-01-01

    A total of 60 flathead grey mullets were examined for microplastic ingestion. Thirty wild mullets were captured from the eastern coast of Hong Kong and 30 captive mullets were obtained from fish farms. Microplastic ingestion was detected in 60% of the wild mullets, with an average of 4.3 plastic items per mullet, while only 16.7% of captive mullets were found to have ingested microplastics, with an average of 0.2 items per mullet. The results suggested that wild mullets have a higher risk of microplastic ingestion than their captive counterparts. The most common plastic items were fibres that were green in colour and small in size (microplastics was positively correlated with larger body size among the mullets. PMID:29587444

  12. Microplastic Contamination of Wild and Captive Flathead Grey Mullet (Mugil cephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis T. O. Cheung

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A total of 60 flathead grey mullets were examined for microplastic ingestion. Thirty wild mullets were captured from the eastern coast of Hong Kong and 30 captive mullets were obtained from fish farms. Microplastic ingestion was detected in 60% of the wild mullets, with an average of 4.3 plastic items per mullet, while only 16.7% of captive mullets were found to have ingested microplastics, with an average of 0.2 items per mullet. The results suggested that wild mullets have a higher risk of microplastic ingestion than their captive counterparts. The most common plastic items were fibres that were green in colour and small in size (<2 mm. Polypropylene was the most common polymer (42%, followed by polyethylene (25%. In addition, the abundance of microplastics was positively correlated with larger body size among the mullets.

  13. Modelling the species distribution of flat-headed cats (Prionailurus planiceps), an endangered South-East Asian small felid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilting, Andreas; Cord, Anna; Hearn, Andrew J; Hesse, Deike; Mohamed, Azlan; Traeholdt, Carl; Cheyne, Susan M; Sunarto, Sunarto; Jayasilan, Mohd-Azlan; Ross, Joanna; Shapiro, Aurélie C; Sebastian, Anthony; Dech, Stefan; Breitenmoser, Christine; Sanderson, Jim; Duckworth, J W; Hofer, Heribert

    2010-03-17

    The flat-headed cat (Prionailurus planiceps) is one of the world's least known, highly threatened felids with a distribution restricted to tropical lowland rainforests in Peninsular Thailand/Malaysia, Borneo and Sumatra. Throughout its geographic range large-scale anthropogenic transformation processes, including the pollution of fresh-water river systems and landscape fragmentation, raise concerns regarding its conservation status. Despite an increasing number of camera-trapping field surveys for carnivores in South-East Asia during the past two decades, few of these studies recorded the flat-headed cat. In this study, we designed a predictive species distribution model using the Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) algorithm to reassess the potential current distribution and conservation status of the flat-headed cat. Eighty-eight independent species occurrence records were gathered from field surveys, literature records, and museum collections. These current and historical records were analysed in relation to bioclimatic variables (WorldClim), altitude (SRTM) and minimum distance to larger water resources (Digital Chart of the World). Distance to water was identified as the key predictor for the occurrence of flat-headed cats (>50% explanation). In addition, we used different land cover maps (GLC2000, GlobCover and SarVision LLC for Borneo), information on protected areas and regional human population density data to extract suitable habitats from the potential distribution predicted by the MaxEnt model. Between 54% and 68% of suitable habitat has already been converted to unsuitable land cover types (e.g. croplands, plantations), and only between 10% and 20% of suitable land cover is categorised as fully protected according to the IUCN criteria. The remaining habitats are highly fragmented and only a few larger forest patches remain. Based on our findings, we recommend that future conservation efforts for the flat-headed cat should focus on the identified remaining key

  14. Modelling the species distribution of flat-headed cats (Prionailurus planiceps, an endangered South-East Asian small felid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Wilting

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The flat-headed cat (Prionailurus planiceps is one of the world's least known, highly threatened felids with a distribution restricted to tropical lowland rainforests in Peninsular Thailand/Malaysia, Borneo and Sumatra. Throughout its geographic range large-scale anthropogenic transformation processes, including the pollution of fresh-water river systems and landscape fragmentation, raise concerns regarding its conservation status. Despite an increasing number of camera-trapping field surveys for carnivores in South-East Asia during the past two decades, few of these studies recorded the flat-headed cat. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we designed a predictive species distribution model using the Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt algorithm to reassess the potential current distribution and conservation status of the flat-headed cat. Eighty-eight independent species occurrence records were gathered from field surveys, literature records, and museum collections. These current and historical records were analysed in relation to bioclimatic variables (WorldClim, altitude (SRTM and minimum distance to larger water resources (Digital Chart of the World. Distance to water was identified as the key predictor for the occurrence of flat-headed cats (>50% explanation. In addition, we used different land cover maps (GLC2000, GlobCover and SarVision LLC for Borneo, information on protected areas and regional human population density data to extract suitable habitats from the potential distribution predicted by the MaxEnt model. Between 54% and 68% of suitable habitat has already been converted to unsuitable land cover types (e.g. croplands, plantations, and only between 10% and 20% of suitable land cover is categorised as fully protected according to the IUCN criteria. The remaining habitats are highly fragmented and only a few larger forest patches remain. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on our findings, we recommend that future conservation

  15. 76 FR 41192 - Mines Management Inc. Montanore Project, Kootenai National Forest, Lincoln County, MT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Mines Management Inc. Montanore Project, Kootenai... can be reviewed at: http://www.fs.fed.usda.gov/goto/kootenai/projects . Mines Management Inc. owns two... of Environmental Quality, issued a Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Montanore Project. In...

  16. A Cultural Resources Survey of Proposed Project Areas in the Buffalo Harbor, Erie County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    continued warming was indicated - by the transition into the B-I Stage, with the decline of the spruce forests and an increase in birch and pine . Deciduous...County area in 1620 as part of the Plymouth Colony settlement. The claim was made again when the area was granted to the Duke of York in 1664. The first...Buffalo cleared the area in 1902 and removed the Sea Wall Strip of squatters, leaving the area " barren " (Symons and Quintus 1902: 256-257) . Between

  17. Dispersal, mating events and fine-scale genetic structure in the lesser flat-headed bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panyu Hua

    Full Text Available Population genetic structure has important consequences in evolutionary processes and conservation genetics in animals. Fine-scale population genetic structure depends on the pattern of landscape, the permanent movement of individuals, and the dispersal of their genes during temporary mating events. The lesser flat-headed bat (Tylonycteris pachypus is a nonmigratory Asian bat species that roosts in small groups within the internodes of bamboo stems and the habitats are fragmented. Our previous parentage analyses revealed considerable extra-group mating in this species. To assess the spatial limits and sex-biased nature of gene flow in the same population, we used 20 microsatellite loci and mtDNA sequencing of the ND2 gene to quantify genetic structure among 54 groups of adult flat-headed bats, at nine localities in South China. AMOVA and F(ST estimates revealed significant genetic differentiation among localities. Alternatively, the pairwise F(ST values among roosting groups appeared to be related to the incidence of associated extra-group breeding, suggesting the impact of mating events on fine-scale genetic structure. Global spatial autocorrelation analyses showed positive genetic correlation for up to 3 km, indicating the role of fragmented habitat and the specialized social organization as a barrier in the movement of individuals among bamboo forests. The male-biased dispersal pattern resulted in weaker spatial genetic structure between localities among males than among females, and fine-scale analyses supported that relatedness levels within internodes were higher among females than among males. Finally, only females were more related to their same sex roost mates than to individuals from neighbouring roosts, suggestive of natal philopatry in females.

  18. Dispersal, mating events and fine-scale genetic structure in the lesser flat-headed bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Panyu; Zhang, Libiao; Guo, Tingting; Flanders, Jon; Zhang, Shuyi

    2013-01-01

    Population genetic structure has important consequences in evolutionary processes and conservation genetics in animals. Fine-scale population genetic structure depends on the pattern of landscape, the permanent movement of individuals, and the dispersal of their genes during temporary mating events. The lesser flat-headed bat (Tylonycteris pachypus) is a nonmigratory Asian bat species that roosts in small groups within the internodes of bamboo stems and the habitats are fragmented. Our previous parentage analyses revealed considerable extra-group mating in this species. To assess the spatial limits and sex-biased nature of gene flow in the same population, we used 20 microsatellite loci and mtDNA sequencing of the ND2 gene to quantify genetic structure among 54 groups of adult flat-headed bats, at nine localities in South China. AMOVA and F(ST) estimates revealed significant genetic differentiation among localities. Alternatively, the pairwise F(ST) values among roosting groups appeared to be related to the incidence of associated extra-group breeding, suggesting the impact of mating events on fine-scale genetic structure. Global spatial autocorrelation analyses showed positive genetic correlation for up to 3 km, indicating the role of fragmented habitat and the specialized social organization as a barrier in the movement of individuals among bamboo forests. The male-biased dispersal pattern resulted in weaker spatial genetic structure between localities among males than among females, and fine-scale analyses supported that relatedness levels within internodes were higher among females than among males. Finally, only females were more related to their same sex roost mates than to individuals from neighbouring roosts, suggestive of natal philopatry in females.

  19. Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation : Fish Passage and Habitat Improvement in the Upper Flathead River Basin, 1991-1996 Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knotek, W.Ladd; Deleray, Mark; Marotz, Brian L.

    1997-08-01

    In the past 50 years, dramatic changes have occurred in the Flathead Lake and River system. Degradation of fishery resources has been evident, in part due to deterioration of aquatic habitat and introduction of non-endemic fish and invertebrate species. Habitat loss has been attributed to many factors including the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam, unsound land use practices, urban development, and other anthropogenic and natural disturbances. Fish migration has also been limited by barriers such as dams and impassible culverts. Cumulatively, these factors have contributed to declines in the distribution and abundance of native fish populations. Recovery of fish populations requires that a watershed approach be developed that incorporates long-term aquatic habitat needs and promotes sound land use practices and cooperation among natural resource management agencies. In this document, the authors (1) describe completed and ongoing habitat improvement and fish passage activities under the Hungry Horse Fisheries Mitigation Program, (2) describe recently identified projects that are in the planning stage, and (3) develop a framework for identifying prioritizing, implementing, and evaluating future fish habitat improvement and passage projects.

  20. Compliance status summaries for federal and state statutory directives that apply to the Salt Repository Project at the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-07-01

    This document contains statutory summaries, checklists of compliance requirements, status summaries, and lists of information needs for the environmental and health and safety statutory directives at Federal and State levels that apply to the Salt Repository Project at the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas. Statutes that apply in general to any repository project but not specifically to the Deaf Smith are not included. The information herein supplements the Salt Repository Project Statutory Compliance Plan and the Salt Repository Project Permitting Management Plan by providing lengthy details on statutory directives, compliance requirements, information needs, and the overall status of the environmental and health and safety compliance program for the Salt Repository Project at the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas

  1. Next generation sequencing yields the complete mitochondrial genome of the flathead mullet, Mugil cephalus cryptic species NWP2 (Teleostei: Mugilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kang-Ning; Yen, Ta-Chi; Chen, Ching-Hung; Li, Huei-Ying; Chen, Pei-Lung; Hsiao, Chung-Der

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the complete mitogenome sequence of Northwestern Pacific 2 (NWP2) cryptic species of flathead mullet, Mugil cephalus (Teleostei: Mugilidae) has been amplified by long-range PCR and sequenced by next-generation sequencing method. The assembled mitogenome, consisting of 16,686 bp, had the typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement, including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs, 2 ribosomal RNAs genes and a non-coding control region of D-loop. D-loop was 909 bp length and was located between tRNA-Pro and tRNA-Phe. The overall base composition of NWP2 M. cephalus was 28.4% for A, 29.8% for C, 26.5% for T and 15.3% for G. The complete mitogenome may provide essential and important DNA molecular data for further phylogenetic and evolutionary analysis for flathead mullet species complex.

  2. Weld-Windsor 115-kV Transmission Line Project, Weld County, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The Western Area Power Administration is proposing to rebuild a 3.0 mile segment of the existing Flatiron-Weld 115-kV transmission line in Weld County. The line would be reconductored with new conductor on new wood pole double circuit structures. The new structures would support a double circuit transmission line configuration. The first circuit would be owned by Western and the second by Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCO). Alternatives considered included no action, constructing PSCO's circuit on new right-of-way, and reconductoring Western's existing line on the same structures. The proposed action was selected because it provided an opportunity to share structures with PSCO and, overall, would minimize costs and environmental impacts. The environmental assessment identifies minor effects on existing natural or human resources and minor benefits for agricultural operations

  3. Kokanee Stocking and Monitoring, Flathead Lake, 1993-1994 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deleray, Mark (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Kalispell, MT); Fredenberg, Wade (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Bozeman, MT); Hansen, Barry (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

    1995-07-01

    One mitigation goal of the Hungry Horse Dam fisheries mitigation program, funded by the Bonneville Power Administration, is to replace lost production of 100,000 adult kokanee in Flathead Lake. The mitigation program calls for a five-year test to determine if kokanee can be reestablished in Flathead Lake. The test consists. of annual stocking of one million hatchery-raised yearling kokanee. There are three benchmarks for judging the success of the kokanee reintroduction effort: (1) Post-stocking survival of 30 percent of planted kokanee one year after stocking; (2) Yearling to adult survival of 10 percent (100,000 adult salmon); (3) Annual kokanee harvest of 50,000 or more fish per year by 1998, with an average length of 11 inches or longer for harvested fish, and fishing pressure of 100,000 angler hours or more. Kokanee were the primary sport fish species in the Flathead Lake fishery in the early 1900s, and up until the late 1980s when the population rapidly declined in numbers and then disappeared. Factors identified which influenced the decline of kokanee are the introduction of opossum shrimp (Mysis relicta), hydroelectric operations, overharvest through angling, and competition and/or predation by lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) and lake whitefish (Coregonur clupeaformis). The purpose of this report was to summarize the stocking program and present monitoring results from the 1993 and 1994 field seasons. In June 1993, roughly 210,000 yearling kokanee were stocked into two bays on the east shore of Flathead Lake. Following stocking, we observed a high incidence of stocked kokanee in stomach samples from lake trout captured in areas adjacent to the stocking sites and a high percentage of captured lake trout containing kokanee. Subsequent monitoring concluded that excessive lake trout predation precluded significant survival of kokanee stocked in 1993. In June 1994, over 802,000 kokanee were stocked into Big Arm Bay. The combination of near optimum water

  4. 2008 Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) Lidar Project: Pasco County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is one component of a digital terrain model (DTM) for the Florida Division of Emergency Management's (FDEM) Project Management and Technical Services...

  5. Framework for monitoring the social and economic impacts associated with the construction of the Skagit Nuclear Project in Skagit County, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merwin, D.J.; Greene, M.

    1977-01-01

    The paper discusses an information system which has been developed to monitor the social and economic impacts associated with the construction of twin nuclear reactors in Skagit County, Washington, by Puget Sound Power and Light Company. The monitoring system has been specifically designed to track the social and economic impacts of the Skagit Nuclear Project as they occur

  6. Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program: Project Gasbuggy Rio Arriba County, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    The Gasbuggy site is located in Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, approximately 55 air miles (88.6 kilometers) east of Farmington, New Mexico. The Gasbuggy device with a yield of 29 kilotons, was detonated December 10, 1967. It was the first US underground nuclear experiment for the stimulation of low-productive natural gas reservoirs. The purpose of the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program at the Gasbuggy site is to obtain data that will assure the public safety; inform the public, the news media, and the scientific community relative to radiological contamination; and to document compliance with federal, state, and local antipollution requirements. The Gasbuggy site geographical setting, climate, geology, and hydrology are described. Site history, including Gasbuggy event information and Gasbuggy monitoring by the US Public Health is described. Site cleanup activities conducted in 1978 are described. Postoperational surveys indicate that the Gasbuggy site is well below the established decontamination criteria and that no hazard exists or will likely occur during public use of the land surface of the Gasbuggy site

  7. Marquez Uranium Project, McKinley County, New Mexico: draft environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Development and operation of an underground mine to remove uranium deposits from the Canon de Marquez in McKinley County, New Mexico is proposed by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Uranium mined from the area would be used by TVA to supply fuel for its nuclear plants, ensuring a continued supply of inexpensive electricity and a source of employment for the population of the TVA's region. In addition, the mine would employ 55 to 120 persons and generate $21.1 million in state and local taxes during its lifetime. Construction and operation of mine facilities would alter land uses on 120 acres of wildlife habitat, alter the topography of the area in the vicinity of the proposed pond and rock pile sites, depress groundwater levels in the Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation in the vicinity of the mine, degrade groundwater and air quality in the vicinity of the mine, decrease plant and animal species at the site, degrade water quality in creeks downstream of the mine, and increase ambient noise levels. All negative impacts would be confined to the life of the mine, since reclamation activities would return the mine area to premining conditions

  8. Well Completion Report for Corrective Action Unit 447, Project Shoal Area, Churchill County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rick Findlay

    2006-01-01

    This Well Completion Report is being provided as part of the implementation of the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447 (NNSA/NSO, 2006a). The CADD/CAP is part of an ongoing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) funded project for the investigation of CAU 447 at the Project Shoal Area (PSA). All work performed on this project was conducted in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996), and all applicable Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) policies and regulations. Investigation activities included the drilling, construction, and development of three monitoring/validation (MV) wells at the PSA. This report summarizes the field activities and data collected during the investigation

  9. 2014 Well Completion Report for Corrective Action Unit 447 Project Shoal Area Churchill County, Nevada October 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Findlay, Rick [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States).Office of Legacy Management

    2015-11-01

    This report summarizes the drilling program conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management at the Project Shoal Area (Shoal) Subsurface Corrective Action Unit 447 in Churchill County, Nevada. Shoal was the location of an underground nuclear test conducted on October 26, 1963, as part of the Vela Uniform program sponsored jointly by the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (a predecessor to DOE). The test consisted of detonating a 12-kiloton nuclear device in granitic rock at a depth of approximately 1,211 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs) (AEC 1964). The corrective action strategy for the site is focused on revising the site conceptual model and evaluating the adequacy of the monitoring well network at the site. Field activities associated with the project were conducted in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO 1996, as amended) and applicable Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) policies and regulations.

  10. Child Maltreatment Surveillance Improvement Opportunities: A Wake County, North Carolina Pilot Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Meghan E; Fliss, Mike D; Proescholdbell, Scott K

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND As child maltreatment often occurs in private, child welfare numbers underestimate its true prevalence. Child maltreatment surveillance systems have been used to ascertain more accurate counts of children who experience maltreatment. This manuscript describes the results from a pilot child maltreatment surveillance system in Wake County, North Carolina. METHODS We linked 2010 and 2011 data from 3 sources (Child Protective Services, Raleigh Police Department, and Office of the Chief Medical Examiner) to obtain rates of definite and possible child maltreatment. We separately analyzed emergency department visits from 2010 and 2011 to obtain counts of definite and possible child maltreatment. We then compared the results from the surveillance systems to those obtained from Child Protective Services (CPS) data alone. RESULTS In 2010 and 2011, rates of definite child maltreatment were 11.7 and 11.3 per 1,000 children, respectively, when using the linked data, compared to 10.0 and 9.5 per 1,000 children using CPS data alone. The rates of possible maltreatment were 25.3 and 23.8 per 1,000, respectively. In the 2010 and 2011 emergency department data, there were 68 visits and 84 visits, respectively, that met the case definition for maltreatment. LIMITATIONS While 4 data sources were analyzed, only 3 were linked in the current surveillance system. It is likely that we would have identified more cases of maltreatment had more sources been included. CONCLUSION While the surveillance system identified more children who met the case definition of maltreatment than CPS data alone, the rates of definite child maltreatment were not considerably higher than official reports. Rates of possible child maltreatment were much higher than both the definite case definition and child welfare records. Tracking both definite and possible case definitions and using a variety of data sources provides a more complete picture of child maltreatment in North Carolina. ©2018 by the

  11. 75 FR 17397 - Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Kern County, CA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... regarding Class II wells under section 1425 of the Safe Drinking Water Act, DOGGR has responsibility for... is also invited to learn more about the proposed project at an informal session at this location... space left by the extracted oil is occupied by the injected CO 2 , sequestering it in the geologic...

  12. County Spending

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — This dataset includes County spending data for Montgomery County government. It does not include agency spending. Data considered sensitive or confidential and will...

  13. Environmental Assessment: Conestoga Reservoir Maintenance and Aquatic Habitat Rehabilitation Project Lancaster County, Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    use and camping facilities, a boat launch and mooring area, sanitary facilities, and wells for drinking water at Conestoga Reservoir. Additional...gently sloping to very steep, well drained, loamy clay soils that formed in glacial till. The Sharpsburg series is a deep, moderately drained soil...Unfortunately, due to the number of potential sources ( sanitary wastewater, storm water, Conestoga Reservoir Rehabilitation Project U.S. Army Corps of

  14. Final environmental statement related to the Plateau Resources Limited Shootering Canyon Uranium Project (Garfield County, Utah)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    The proposed action is the issuance of a Source Material License to Plateau Resources, Ltd., for the construction and operation of the proposed Shootering Canyon Uranium Project with a product (U 3 O 8 ) production limited to 2.2 x 10 5 kg (4.9 x 10 5 lb) per year. Impacts to the area from the operation of the Shootering Canyon Uranium Project will include the following: alterations of up to 140 ha (350 acres) that will be occupied by the mill, mill facilities, borrow areas, tailings areas, and roads; an increase in the existing background radiation levels of the mill area as a result of continuous but small releases of uranium, radium, radon, and other, radioactive materials during construction and operation; socioeconomic effects on the local area, particularly the proposed community of Ticaboo, where the majority of workers will be housed during project construction and operation; and production of solid waste material (tailings) from the mill at a rate of about 680 MT (750 tons) per day and deposition as a slurry in an onsite impoundment area; construction and operation of the Shootering Canyon mill will provide employment and induced economic benefits for the region but may also result in some socioeconomic stress. On the basis of the analysis and evaluation set forth in this Environmental Statement, it is proposed that any license issued for the Shootering Canyon mill should be subject to certain conditions for the protection of the environment. A list is included. Nine appendices are also included

  15. Projected effects of climate change on the carbon stocks of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. forests in Zala County, Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somogyi Zoltán

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that climate change will lead to the local extinction of many tree species from large areas during this century, affecting the functioning and ecosystem services of many forests. This study reports on projected carbon losses due to the assumed local climate change-driven extinction of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. from Zala County, South-Western Hungary, where the species grows at the xeric limit of its distribution. The losses were calculated as a difference between carbon stocks in climate change scenarios assuming an exponentially increasing forest decline over time, and those in a baseline scenario assuming no climate change. In the climate change scenarios, three different sets of forest management adaptation measures were studied: (1 only harvesting damaged stands, (2 additionally salvaging dead trees that died due to climate change, and (3 replacing, at an increasing rate over time, beech with sessile oak (Quercus petraea Matt. Lieb. after final harvest. Projections were made using the open access carbon accounting model CASMOFOR based on modeling or assuming effects of climate change on mortality, tree growth, root-to-shoot ratio and decomposition rates. Results demonstrate that, if beech disappears from the region as projected by the end of the century, over 80% of above-ground biomass carbon, and over 60% of the carbon stocks of all pools (excluding soils of the forests will be lost by 2100. Such emission rates on large areas may have a discernible positive feedback on climate change, and can only partially be offset by the forest management adaptation measures.

  16. Macroinvertebrate communities evaluated prior to and following a channel restoration project in Silver Creek, Blaine County, Idaho, 2001-16

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCoy, Dorene E.; Short, Terry M.

    2017-11-22

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Blaine County and The Nature Conservancy, evaluated the status of macroinvertebrate communities prior to and following a channel restoration project in Silver Creek, Blaine County, Idaho. The objective of the evaluation was to determine whether 2014 remediation efforts to restore natural channel conditions in an impounded area of Silver Creek caused declines in local macroinvertebrate communities. Starting in 2001 and ending in 2016, macroinvertebrates were sampled every 3 years at two long-term trend sites and sampled seasonally (spring, summer, and autumn) in 2013, 2015, and 2016 at seven synoptic sites. Trend-site communities were collected from natural stream-bottom substrates to represent locally established macroinvertebrate assemblages. Synoptic site communities were sampled using artificial (multi-plate) substrates to represent recently colonized (4–6 weeks) assemblages. Statistical summaries of spatial and temporal patterns in macroinvertebrate taxonomic composition at both trend and synoptic sites were completed.The potential effect of the restoration project on resident macroinvertebrate populations was determined by comparing the following community assemblage metrics:Total taxonomic richness (taxa richness);Total macroinvertebrate abundance (total abundance);Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera (EPT) richness;EPT abundance;Simpson’s diversity; andSimpson’s evenness for periods prior to and following restoration.A significant decrease in one or more metric values in the period following stream channel restoration was the basis for determining impairment to the macroinvertebrate communities in Silver Creek.Comparison of pre-restoration (2001–13) and post‑restoration (2016) macroinvertebrate community composition at trend sites determined that no significant decreases occurred in any metric parameter for communities sampled in 2016. Taxa and EPT richness of colonized assemblages at synoptic sites

  17. Controlled Landfill Project in Yolo County, California for Environmental Benefits of Waste Stabilization and Minimization of Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, R.; Augenstein, D.; Kieffer, J.; Cohen, K.

    2003-12-01

    The Department of Public Works of Yolo County, California, USA has been testing an advanced approach to landfill bioreactors, controlled (or "enhanced") landfilling, at its Yolo County Central Landfill site near Davis, CA, since 1994. Overall objectives have been the management of waste landfilling for: (1) rapid completion of total gas generation; (2) maximum, high-efficiency gas capture; (3) waste volume reduction; and (4) maximum greenhouse gas and carbon sequestration benefits. Methane generation is controlled and enhanced through carefully managed moisture additions, and by taking advantage of landfill temperature elevation. The generated landfill methane, an important greenhouse gas, is recovered with high efficiency through extraction from a porous recovery layer beneath a surface geomembrane cover. Instrumentation included a total of 56 moisture and 15 temperature sensors in the two cells, gas flow monitoring by positive displacement gas meters, and accurate quantification of liquid inputs and outputs. Gas composition, waste volume reduction, base hydrostatic head, and a range of environmental compliance parameters has been monitored since 1995. Partitioning gas tracer tests using the injection of two gases at dilute concentrations in the landfill have also been initiated to compute the fraction of pore space occupied by water between the points of tracer injection and tracer measurement. There has been rapid waste volume reduction in the enhanced cell that corresponds to the solids' reduction to gas. Monitoring is planned for the next several years, until stabilization parameters are determined complete. Encouraging performance is indicated by: (1) sensor data; (2) gas generation results; (3) data from landfill cores; and (4) decomposition-related indicators including rapid volume reduction. When data are synthesized, project results have attractive implications for new approaches to landfill management. Over seven-years, methane recoveries have averaged

  18. Plant water status relationships among major floodplain sites of the Flathead River, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L.C.; Hinckley, T.M.; Scott, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    Water status measurements of dominant species from major floodplain plant community types of the North Fork Flathead River, Montana were used to test the accuracy of site moisture gradient relationships postulated from floristic ordinations and site water balance estimates. Analysis of variance tests showed significant differences among the average predawn xylem pressure potential (ψp) of species in several community types. However, additional analyses failed to indicate a significant degree of association between averaged predawn Yp measurements and either floristic ordination or site water balance results. Sixty eight percent of 22 trials comparing the diurnal average ψp of the same species in different community types on the same day were less negative for a species in the wetter community types as predicted by floristic ordinations. Similarly, 64% of the trials indicated that the diurnal average stomatal conductance was higher for a species in the wetter type. These results suggest that although a floodplain moisture gradient exists, it alone does not limit the distribution of floodplain plant communities in the North Fork.

  19. Station, local, and public participation plan, Salt Repository Project Office, Deaf Smith County, Texas: Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The purpose of the SRPO State, Local, and Public Participation Plan is to provide an ''umbrella'' document for the ongoing and planned institutional involvement. One of the major goals is to develop project-specific outreach and participation programs based on input received from interested parties. DOE's commitment to interaction and information programs is to be demonstrated by conducting activities in an open environment, listening to and understanding the concerns of interested parties, actively involving affected parties in the program, executing faithfully the intent of Congress expressed through the NWPA, and providing equitable treatment for all affected parties. 1 fig., 2 tabs

  20. A Cultural Resources Literature Search and Record Review of The St. Francis River Seepage Project within Clay, Craighead, Mississippi and Poinsett Counties, Arkansas and Dunklin County, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-30

    T. E. Scheitlin, and T. 0. Maher 1982 Archaeological Predictive Models: A New Hanover County Test C’ ,e. North Carolina Archaeological3 Council...Highway Archeological Report, No. 1, Columbia. Marcus, Joyce 1973 Territorial Organization of the Lowland Classic Maya . Science 180:911-916. Martin, Dave...Arkansas Archeological Survey Fayetteville, Submitted to Memphis District, U. S. Corps of Engineers. Morse, Den F. and Phyllis A. Morse 1983 Archaeology of

  1. Big George to Carter Mountain 115-kV transmission line project, Park and Hot Springs Counties, Wyoming. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to rebuild, operate, and maintain a 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line between the Big George and Carter Mountain Substations in northwest Wyoming (Park and Hot Springs Counties). This environmental assessment (EA) was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and the Department of Energy (DOE). The existing Big George to Carter Mountain 69-kV transmission line was constructed in 1941 by the US Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, with 1/0 copper conductor on wood-pole H-frame structures without an overhead ground wire. The line should be replaced because of the deteriorated condition of the wood-pole H-frame structures. Because the line lacks an overhead ground wire, it is subject to numerous outages caused by lightning. The line will be 54 years old in 1995, which is the target date for line replacement. The normal service life of a wood-pole line is 45 years. Under the No Action Alternative, no new transmission lines would be built in the project area. The existing 69-kV transmission line would continue to operate with routine maintenance, with no provisions made for replacement.

  2. Institutional factors in resource recovery co-disposal demonstration project, Middlesex County, New Jersey, Spring 1980 - Summer 1981

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, R. M.

    1982-02-01

    A proposal to provide 1200 tons per day of solid waste disposal combined with 200 tons per day of sludge disposal was presented. The prospects for codisposal in Middlesex County were analyzed. Technically, codisposal was possible, however, it lacked a proven track record. Proposal for a resource recovery plant to be designed, built, and operated was acknowledged as consistent with County planning.

  3. Environmental assessment: Raft River geothermal project pilot plant, Cassia County, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    The action assessed here is the construction and operation of a 5- to 6-MW(e) (gross) geothermal pilot plant in the Raft River Valley of southern Idaho. This project was originally planned as a thermal test loop using a turbine simulator valve. The test loop facility (without the simulator valve) is now under construction. The current environmental assessment addresses the complete system including the addition of a turbine-generator and its associated switching gear in place of the simulator valve. The addition of the turbine-generator will result in a net production of 2.5 to 3.5 MW(e) with a commensurate reduction in waste heat to the cooling tower and will require the upgrading of existing transmission lines for offsite delivery of generated power. Construction of the facility will require disturbance of approximately 20 ha (50 acres) for the facility itself and approximately 22.5 ha (57 acres) for construction of drilling pads and ponds, pipelines, and roads. Existing transmission lines will be upgraded for the utility system interface. Interference with alternate land uses will be minimal. Loss of wildlife habitat will be acceptable, and US Fish and Wildlife Service recommendations for protection of raptor nesting sites, riparian vegetation, and other important habitats will be observed. During construction, noise levels may reach 100 dBA at 15 m (50 ft) from well sites, but wildlife and local residents should not be significantly affected if extended construction is not carried out within 0.5 km (0.3 miles) of residences or sensitive wildlife habitat. Water use during construction will not be large and impacts on competing uses are unlikely.

  4. Site specific statutory compliance planning for the salt repository project at the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Requirements, strategy, and status: Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    This document and the requirements and actions it presents are addressed to the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas. The proposed actions upon which the plan is based are those described in Chapters 4 and 5 of the final EA for the site. Similarly, the environmental and health and safety requirements covered in the plan are those identified in the EA as being potentially applicable to the salt repository project at the Deaf Smith site. 12 figs., 8 tabs

  5. Floodplain Vegetation Productivity and Carbon Cycle Dynamics of the Middle Fork Flathead River of Northwest Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakins, A. J.; Kimball, J. S.; Relyea, S.; Stanford, J. A.

    2005-05-01

    River floodplains are vital natural features that store floodwaters, improve water quality, provide habitat, and create recreational opportunities. Recent studies have shown that strong interactions among flooding, channel and sediment movement, vegetation, and groundwater create a dynamic shifting habitat mosaic that promotes biodiversity and complex food webs. Multiple physical and environmental processes interact within these systems to influence forest productivity, including water availability, nutrient supply, soil texture, and disturbance history. This study is designed to quantify the role of groundwater depth and meteorology in determining spatial and temporal patterns of net primary productivity (NPP) within the Nyack floodplain of the Middle Fork Flathead River, Northwestern Montana. We examine three intensive field sites composed of mature, mixed deciduous and evergreen conifer forest with varying hydrologic and vegetative characteristics. We use a modified Biome-BGC ecosystem process model with field-collected data (LAI, increment growth cores, groundwater depth, vegetation sap-flow, and local meteorology) to describe the effects of floodplain groundwater dynamics on vegetation community structure, and carbon/nitrogen cycling. Initial results indicate that conifers are more sensitive than deeper-rooted deciduous species to variability in groundwater depth and meteorological conditions. Forest productivity also shows a non-linear response to groundwater depth. Sites with intermediate groundwater depths (0.2-0.5m) allow vegetation to maintain connectivity to groundwater over longer periods during the growing season, are effectively uncoupled from atmospheric constraints on photosynthesis, and generally have greater productivity. Shallow groundwater sites (<0.2m) are less productive due to the indirect effects of reduced soil aerobic decomposition and reduced plant available nitrogen.

  6. Joint environmental assessment for Chevron USA, Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc.: Midway Valley 3D seismic project, Kern County, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The proposed Midway Valley 3D Geophysical Exploration Project covers approximately 31,444 aces of private lands, 6,880 acres of Department of Energy (DOE) Lands within Naval Petroleum Reserve 2 (NPR2) and 3,840 acres of lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), in western Kern County, California. This environmental assessment (EA) presents an overview of the affected environment within the project area using results of a literature review of biological field surveys previously conducted within or adjacent to a proposed 3D seismic project. The purpose is to provide background information to identify potential and known locations of sensitive wildlife and special status plant species within the proposed seismic project area. Biological field surveys, following agency approved survey protocols, will be conducted during October through November 1996 to acquire current resources data to provide avoidance as the project is being implemented in the field.

  7. Joint environmental assessment for Chevron USA, Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc.: Midway Valley 3D seismic project, Kern County, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    The proposed Midway Valley 3D Geophysical Exploration Project covers approximately 31,444 aces of private lands, 6,880 acres of Department of Energy (DOE) Lands within Naval Petroleum Reserve 2 (NPR2) and 3,840 acres of lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), in western Kern County, California. This environmental assessment (EA) presents an overview of the affected environment within the project area using results of a literature review of biological field surveys previously conducted within or adjacent to a proposed 3D seismic project. The purpose is to provide background information to identify potential and known locations of sensitive wildlife and special status plant species within the proposed seismic project area. Biological field surveys, following agency approved survey protocols, will be conducted during October through November 1996 to acquire current resources data to provide avoidance as the project is being implemented in the field

  8. The Incidence and Prevalence of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in San Francisco County, California: The California Lupus Surveillance Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Era, Maria; Cisternas, Miriam G; Snipes, Kurt; Herrinton, Lisa J; Gordon, Caroline; Helmick, Charles G

    2017-10-01

    Estimates of the incidence and prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in the US have varied widely. The purpose of this study was to conduct the California Lupus Surveillance Project (CLSP) to determine credible estimates of SLE incidence and prevalence, with a special focus on Hispanics and Asians. The CLSP, which is funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is a population-based registry of individuals with SLE residing in San Francisco County, CA, from January 1, 2007 through December 31, 2009. Data sources included hospitals, rheumatologists, nephrologists, commercial laboratories, and a state hospital discharge database. We abstracted medical records to ascertain SLE cases, which we defined as patients who met ≥4 of the 11 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria for SLE. We estimated crude and age-standardized incidence and prevalence, which were stratified by sex and race/ethnicity. The overall age-standardized annual incidence rate was 4.6 per 100,000 person-years. The average annual period prevalence was 84.8 per 100,000 persons. The age-standardized incidence rate in women and men was 8.6 and 0.7 per 100,000 person-years, respectively. This rate was highest among black women (30.5), followed by Hispanic women (8.9), Asian women (7.2), and white women (5.3). The age-standardized prevalence in women per 100,000 persons was 458.1 in blacks, 177.9 in Hispanics, 149.7 in Asians, and 109.8 in whites. Capture-recapture modeling estimated 33 additional incident cases and 147 additional prevalent cases. Comprehensive methods that include intensive case-finding provide more credible estimates of SLE in Hispanics and Asians, and confirm racial and ethnic disparities in SLE. The disease burden of SLE is highest in black women, followed by Hispanic women, Asian women, and white women. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  9. Lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) suppression for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) recovery in Flathead Lake, Montana, North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Michael J.; Hansen, Barry S; Beauchamp, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Non-native lake trout Salvelinus namaycush displaced native bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in Flathead Lake, Montana, USA, after 1984, when Mysis diluviana became abundant following its introduction in upstream lakes in 1968–1976. We developed a simulation model to determine the fishing mortality rate on lake trout that would enable bull trout recovery. Model simulations indicated that suppression of adult lake trout by 75% from current abundance would reduce predation on bull trout by 90%. Current removals of lake trout through incentivized fishing contests has not been sufficient to suppress lake trout abundance estimated by mark-recapture or indexed by stratified-random gill netting. In contrast, size structure, body condition, mortality, and maturity are changing consistent with a density-dependent reduction in lake trout abundance. Population modeling indicated total fishing effort would need to increase 3-fold to reduce adult lake trout population density by 75%. We conclude that increased fishing effort would suppress lake trout population density and predation on juvenile bull trout, and thereby enable higher abundance of adult bull trout in Flathead Lake and its tributaries.

  10. Depth and substrate as determinants of distribution of juvenile flathead sole (Hippoglossoides elassodon) and rock sole (Pleuronectes bilineatus), in Kachemak Bay, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abookire, Alisa A.; Norcross, Brenda L.

    1998-01-01

    Three transects in Kachemak Bay, Alaska, were sampled in September 1994, May and August 1995, and February, May, and August 1996. Juvenile flathead sole, Hippoglossoides elassodon, and rock sole, Pleuronectes bilineatus, were the most abundant flatfishes, comprising 65-85% of all fiatfishes captured at any period. Collections of fish and sediments were made at regular depth contour intervals of l0 m. Habitat distribution was described by depth at 10 m increments and sediment percent weights of gravel, sand, and mud. Year-round habitat of flathead sole age-0 was primarily from 40 to 60 m, and age-1 habitat was primarily from 40 to 80 m. Summer habitat of rock sole age-0 and -1 was from 10 to 30 m, and in winter they moved offshore to depths of up to 150 m. Both age classes of flathead sole were most abundant on mixed mud sediments, while age-1 were also in high abundance on muddy sand sediments. Rock sole age-0 and -1 were most abundant on sand, though age-1 were also found on a variety of sediments both finer and coarser grained than sand. Flathead sole and rock sole had distinctive depth and sediment habitats. When habitat overlap occurred between the species, it was most often due to rock sole moving offshore in the winter. Abundances were not significantly different among seasons for age-1 flatfishes.

  11. Evaluation of a single application of Neonicotnoid and multi-application contact insecticides for flatheaded borer management in field grown Acer rubrum L. cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two trials evaluated insecticides for flatheaded borer (Chrysobothris femorata [Olivier]) control and red maple (Acer rubrum L.) cultivar growth over a 4-year period. Soil-applied systemic insecticides (acephate, imidacloprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, and thiamethoxam) and trunk-applied contact i...

  12. Effects of the Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dams on the Kokanee Fishery in the Flathead River System, 1979-1985 Final Research Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clancy, Patrick

    1986-05-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the effects of the operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the kokanee fishery in the Flathead River system. Studies concerning operation of the dam on the Flathead River aquatic biota began in 1979 and continued to 1982 under Bureau of Reclamation funding. These studies resulted in flow recommendations for the aquatic biota in the main stem Flathead River, below the influence of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork. Studies concerned specifically with kokanee salmon have continued under Bonneville Power Administration funding since 1982. This completion report covers the entire study period (September 1979 to June 1985). Major results of this study were: (1) development and refinement of methods to assess hydropower impacts on spawning and incubation success of kokanee; (2) development of a model to predict kokanee year class strength from Flathead River flows; and (3) implementation of flows favorable for successful kokanee reproduction. A monitoring program has been developed which will assess the recovery of the kokanee population as it proceeds, and to recommend management strategies to maintain management goals for the kokanee fishery in the river system.

  13. Effect of the Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dams on the Reproduction Success of Kokanee in the Flathead River System, 1986 Annual Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beattie, Will; Clancey, Patrick

    1987-03-01

    The 1985 kokanee spawning run in the Flathead system was the strongest in five years. Escapement to the Flathead River system was 147,000 fish, including 123,000 in McDonald Creek and an estimated 20,000 in the main stem. Enumeration of spawners and redds in the Flathead River was hindered by high fall flows and early freezing in November. The upstream spawning migration from Flathead Lake began in late August. Schools of kokanee were seen six miles above the lake on September 4. We counted 1,156 redds in Flathead Lake, distributed primarily along the southeastern shore. An unusually high proportion (90 percent) of lakeshore spawning occurred in the zone above minimum pool, where egg mortality is very high because of exposure from drawdown. Escapement to the Swan River was 1,350 fish. Four year old (III+) fish comprised 95 percent of the spawning run in the Flathead system. This continues a five-year trend toward dominance of the III+ year class. The age composition of spawners has varied considerably for the past 15 years. The average size of spawning fish was 365 mm, which is identical to the average size of the parent year class in 1981. One of the goals of managing Flathead kokanee is to produce mature fish 300-330 mm in length. In the main stem Flathead River, pre-emergent survival was 80 percent. Survival in McDonald Creek, unaffected by hydroelectric operations, was 83 percent. Sampling showed few hatched alevins, probably due to unusually cold winter temperatures. Egg survival at Blue Bay, a spawning area on Flathead Lake where redds are concentrated below minimum pool, varied in relation to depth and dissolved oxygen concentration in the substrate. Eggs survived 78 days at 2,880 feet where dissolved oxygen was 5.7 mg/l. Eggs survived 35 days at 2,870 feet where dissolved oxygen concentration averaged 2.9 mg/l. Low dissolved oxygen contributed to poor survival to emergence at all elevations in Blue Ray. Experiments in Skidoo Bay confirmed that survival of

  14. Analysis of borehole-radar reflection logs from selected HC boreholes at the Project Shoal area, Churchill County, Nevada; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, J.W. Jr.; Joesten, P.K.; Pohll, Greg; Mihevic, Todd

    2001-01-01

    Single-hole borehole-radar reflection logs were collected and interpreted in support of a study to characterize ground-water flow and transport at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) in Churchill County, Nevada. Radar logging was conducted in six boreholes using 60-MHz omni-directional electric-dipole antennas and a 60-MHz magnetic-dipole directional receiving antenna. Radar data from five boreholes were interpreted to identify the location, orientation, estimated length, and spatial continuity of planar reflectors present in the logs. The overall quality of the radar data is marginal and ranges from very poor to good. Twenty-seven reflectors were interpreted from the directional radar reflection logs. Although the range of orientation interpreted for the reflectors is large, a significant number of reflectors strike northeast-southwest and east-west to slightly northwest-southeast. Reflectors are moderate to steeply dipping and reflector length ranged from less than 7 m to more than 133 m. Qualitative scores were assigned to each reflector to provide a sense of the spatial continuity of the reflector and the characteristics of the field data relative to an ideal planar reflector (orientation score). The overall orientation scores are low, which reflects the general data quality, but also indicates that the properties of most reflectors depart from the ideal planar case. The low scores are consistent with reflections from fracture zones that contain numerous, closely spaced, sub-parallel fractures. Interpretation of borehole-radar direct-wave velocity and amplitude logs identified several characteristics of the logged boreholes: (1) low-velocity zones correlate with decreased direct-wave amplitude, indicating the presence of fracture zones; (2) direct-wave amplitude increases with depth in three of the boreholes, suggesting an increase in electrical resistivity with depth resulting from changes in mineral assemblage or from a decrease in the specific conductance of ground

  15. Analysis of borehole-radar reflection logs from selected HC boreholes at the Project Shoal area, Churchill County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, J.W.; Joesten, P.K.; Pohll, G.M.; Mihevic, Todd

    2001-01-01

    Single-hole borehole-radar reflection logs were collected and interpreted in support of a study to characterize ground-water flow and transport at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) in Churchill County, Nevada. Radar logging was conducted in six boreholes using 60-MHz omni-directional electric-dipole antennas and a 60-MHz magnetic-dipole directional receiving antenna.Radar data from five boreholes were interpreted to identify the location, orientation, estimated length, and spatial continuity of planar reflectors present in the logs. The overall quality of the radar data is marginal and ranges from very poor to good. Twenty-seven reflectors were interpreted from the directional radar reflection logs. Although the range of orientation interpreted for the reflectors is large, a significant number of reflectors strike northeast-southwest and east-west to slightly northwest-southeast. Reflectors are moderate to steeply dipping and reflector length ranged from less than 7 m to more than 133 m.Qualitative scores were assigned to each reflector to provide a sense of the spatial continuity of the reflector and the characteristics of the field data relative to an ideal planar reflector (orientation score). The overall orientation scores are low, which reflects the general data quality, but also indicates that the properties of most reflectors depart from the ideal planar case. The low scores are consistent with reflections from fracture zones that contain numerous, closely spaced, sub-parallel fractures.Interpretation of borehole-radar direct-wave velocity and amplitude logs identified several characteristics of the logged boreholes: (1) low-velocity zones correlate with decreased direct-wave amplitude, indicating the presence of fracture zones; (2) direct-wave amplitude increases with depth in three of the boreholes, suggesting an increase in electrical resistivity with depth resulting from changes in mineral assemblage or from a decrease in the specific conductance of ground

  16. Projections of timber harvest in western Oregon and Washington by county, owner, forest type, and age class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoping Zhou; Richard W. Haynes; R. James. Barbour

    2005-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest forest resource is highly dynamic. Expected changes over the next 50 years will greatly challenge some current perceptions of resource managers and various stakeholders. This report describes the current and expected future timberland conditions of western Oregon and Washington and presents the results at the county level. About 50 percent of the...

  17. Effect of the Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dams on the Reproductive Success of Kokanee in the Flathead System, 1987 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beattie, Will; Zubik, Raymond; Clancey, Patrick

    1988-05-01

    Studies of kokanee reproductive success in the Flathead system from 1981 to 1987 have assessed the losses in fish production attributable to hydroelectric operations. We estimated that the Flathead Lake shoreline spawning stock has lost at least 50,000 fish annually, since Kerr Dam was completed in 1938. The Flathead River spawning stock has lost 95,000 spawners annually because of the operations of Hungry Horse Dam. Lakeshore spawning has been adversely affected because Flathead Lake has been drafted to minimum pool during the winter when kokanee eggs are incubating in shallow shoreline redds. Egg mortality from exposure and desiccation of kokanee redds has increased since the mid 1970's. When the lake was drafted more quickly and held longer at minimum pool. Escapement surveys in the early 1950's, and a creel survey in the early 1960's have provided a baseline to which the present escapement levels can be compared, and loss estimated. Main stem Flathead River spawning has also declined since the mid 1970's when fluctuating discharge from Hungry Horse Dam during the spawning and incubation season exposed redds at the river margin and increased mortality. This decline followed an increase in main stem spawning in the late 1950's through the mid 1960's attributable to higher winter water temperature and relatively stable discharge from Hungry Horse Dam. Spawning escapement in the main stem exceeded 300,000 kokanee in the early 1970's as a result. Spawning in spring-influenced sites has comprised 35 percent of the main stem escapement from 1979 to 1986. We took that proportion of the early 1970's escapement (105,000) as the baseline against which to measure historic loss. Agricultural and suburban development has contributed less significantly to degradation of kokanee spawning habitat in the river system and on the Flathead Lake shoreline. Their influence on groundwater quality and substrate composition has limited

  18. Somerset County Renewable Energy Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katula, Denise [County of Somerset, Somervile, NJ (United States)

    2014-05-07

    The County of Somerset, New Jersey, through the Somerset County Improvement Authority (SCIA), applied Federal funding through the U.S. Department of Energy to will apply project funds to buy-down the capital costs of equipment associated with the installation of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems at two sites owned by the County. This Renewable Energy Initiative allows the County to take advantage of clean renewable energy, without any adverse debt impacts, and at a price that results in operating budget savings beyond what is presently available in the marketplace. This project addressed the objectives of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by making the acquisition of renewable energy more affordable for the County, thereby, encouraging other counties and local units to develop similar programs and increase the deployment of solar energy technologies. The two sites that were funded by the DOE grant are part of a much larger, ambitious, and unique renewable energy project, described in the next section.

  19. The Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project — A Community-Level, Public Health Initiative to Build Community Disaster Resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Eisenman

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Public health officials need evidence-based methods for improving community disaster resilience and strategies for measuring results. This methods paper describes how one public health department is addressing this problem. This paper provides a detailed description of the theoretical rationale, intervention design and novel evaluation of the Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project (LACCDR, a public health program for increasing community disaster resilience. The LACCDR Project utilizes a pretest–posttest method with control group design. Sixteen communities in Los Angeles County were selected and randomly assigned to the experimental community resilience group or the comparison group. Community coalitions in the experimental group receive training from a public health nurse trained in community resilience in a toolkit developed for the project. The toolkit is grounded in theory and uses multiple components to address education, community engagement, community and individual self-sufficiency, and partnerships among community organizations and governmental agencies. The comparison communities receive training in traditional disaster preparedness topics of disaster supplies and emergency communication plans. Outcome indicators include longitudinal changes in inter-organizational linkages among community organizations, community member responses in table-top exercises, and changes in household level community resilience behaviors and attitudes. The LACCDR Project is a significant opportunity and effort to operationalize and meaningfully measure factors and strategies to increase community resilience. This paper is intended to provide public health and academic researchers with new tools to conduct their community resilience programs and evaluation research. Results are not yet available and will be presented in future reports.

  20. Impacts of Water Levels on Breeding Canada Geese and Methods for Mitigation and Management in the Southern Flathead Valley, Montana, 1983-1987 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackey, Dennis L.; Gregory, Shari K.; Matthews, William C. Jr.; Claar, James J.; Ball, I. Joseph

    1987-11-01

    Kerr Hydroelectric Dam is located at the south end of Flathead Lake, controls water levels on the lake and the Flathead River below the dam, and is currently operated as a load control facility. Current operation of Kerr Dam creates the greatest yearly water level fluctuations on both the lake and river during the Canada goose (Branta canadensis moffitti) brood and nesting period. Data collected from 1980-1982 indicated that goose nest numbers on the river were lower than during the 1950's, and that brood habitat on the lake may be limiting the goose population there. Our study was conducted from 1983-1987 to determine the effects of Kerr Dam operation on Canada goose populations and habitat on the south half of Flathead Lake and the Flathead River, and to formulate management and mitigation recommendations. Nesting geese on the river appeared to be negatively affected by a lack of nest sites free from predators, and responded to available artificial nest structures with an increase in nest numbers and nesting success. Under current dam operation, river channel depths and widths do not discourage access to nesting islands by mammalian predators during some years and high predation on ground nests occurs. Intensively used brood areas on the lake and river were identified and described. Brood habitat on the lake was lower in quality and quantity than on the river due to dam operations. Gosling mortality on the lake was high, almost 2 times higher than on the river. Lake broods expended more energy obtaining food than river broods. Losses of brood habitat in the form of wet meadow marshes were documented and mitigation options developed. Management/mitigation alternatives and monitoring methods for nesting and brooding geese were identified.

  1. BWIP [Battelle Waste Isolation Program] Repository Project: Interim fiscal profile, Benton and Franklin counties, Washington: Working draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, F.B.; Dugan, M.K.; Clark, D.C.

    1988-02-01

    This report presents a fiscal profile of Benton and Franklin counties, and of the cities of Richland, Kennewick, and Pasco. Overall, changes in operating revenues and expenditures in these jurisdictions have corresponded with changes in the local economy. The combined operating expenditures of Benton County, Franklin County, Kennewick, Pasco, and Richland, expressed in current dollars, tripled between 1975 and 1985, increasing from $18.1 million to $55.0 million, an annual average increase of 11.8 percent. During this time, the population of the Benton-Franklin MSA increased from 100,000 to 140,900 people, and the national all-items price index for urban consumers doubled, increasing from 161.2 to 322.2. Adjusted for inflation, per capita expenditures by these governments increased only slightly during this period, from $361.8 in 1975 to $390.3 in 1985. Employment in the Benton-Franklin MSA rose from 40,080 workers in 1970 to a peak of 75,900 in 1981 before declining to 61,100 in 1985, primarily due to the loss of 9,928 jobs in the Washington Public Power Supply System after 1981. The MSA's population followed a similar trend, with a slight lag. In 1970, total population in the Benton-Franklin MSA was 93,356 people. The MSA's population grew rapidly during the late 1970s, reached a peak of 147,900 persons in 1982, and then declined to 139,300 in 1986. 23 refs., 16 figs., 14 tabs

  2. Effect of the Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dams on the Reproductive Success of Kokanee in the Flathead System; Technical Addendum to the Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beattie, Will; Tohtz, Joel

    1990-03-01

    This addendum to the Final Report presents results of research on the zooplankton and fish communities of Flathead Lade. The intent of the Study has been to identify the impacts of hydroelectric operations at Kerr and Hungry Horse Dam on the reproductive success of kokanee an to propose mitigation for these impacts. Recent changes in the trophic ecology of the lake, have reduced the survival of kokanee. In the last three year the Study has been redirected to identify, if possible, the biological mechanisms which now limit kokanee survival, and to test methods of enhancing the kokanee fishery by artificial supplementation. These studies were necessary to the formulation of mitigation plans. The possibility of successfully rehabilitating the kokanee population, is the doubt because of change in the trophic ecology of the system. This report first presents the results of studies of the population dynamics of crustacean zooplankton, upon which planktivorous fish depend. A modest effort was directed to measuring the spawning escapement of kokanee in 1988. Because of its relevance to the study, we also report assessments of 1989 kokanee spawning escapement. Hydroacoustic assessment of the abundance of all fish species in Flathead Lake was conducted in November, 1988. Summary of the continued efforts to document the growth rates and food habits of kokanee and lake whitefish are included in this report. Revised kokanee spawning and harvest estimates, and management implications of the altered ecology of Flathead Lake comprise the final sections of this addendum. 83 refs., 20 figs., 25 tabs.

  3. Elevation - LIDAR Survey - Roseau County, Minnesota

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — LIDAR Data for Roseau County Minnesota. This project consists of approximately 87 square miles of LIDAR mapping in Roseau County, Minnesota at two sites: area 1,...

  4. Final environmental statement related to the Minerals Exploration Company, Sweetwater Uranium Project (Sweetwater County, Wyoming). Docket No. 40-8584

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    The proposed action is the issuance of a Source Material License to Minerals Exploration Company (MEC) for the construction and operation of the proposed Sweetwater Uranium Mill in Sweetwater County, Wyoming, with a nominal capacity of 3000 tons (2.7 x 10 6 kg) per day of uranium ore. As part of this proposal, the applicant proposes also to construct a heap leaching and resin ion-exchange facility to extract uranium from low-grade ores and mine water. Conditions for the protection of the environment are set forth

  5. Pinellas County, Florida Site Environmental Restoration Project Semiannual Progress Report for the 4.5 Acre Site June through November 2016 January 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Survochak, Scott [USDOE Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Daniel, Joe [Navarrao Research and Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This Pinellas County, Florida, Site Environmental Restoration Project Semiannual Progress Report for the 4.5 Acre Site describes environmental restoration activities for the 4.5 Acre Site located in Pinellas County, Largo, Florida (Figure 1). The former U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pinellas Plant facility consisted of the 4.5 Acre Site and what is now the STAR Center (Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center). Both the 4.5 Acre Site and the STAR Center are part of the overall Pinellas County, Florida, Site (Figure 2). The 4.5 Acre Site is located immediately northwest of the STAR Center, in the northeast quarter of Section 13, Township 30 South, Range 15 East. DOE owned this parcel from 1957 to 1972, at which time it was sold to a private landowner. During the period of DOE ownership, the property was used for the disposal of drums of waste resins and solvents. As a result of this practice, the surficial aquifer was impacted by volatile organic compounds (VOCs)—trichloroethene (TCE), cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), trans-1,2-dichloroethene (tDCE), vinyl chloride (VC), and benzene. Detailed background information for the site is contained in the Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Pinellas Site (DOE 2016). That document and other site-related documents can be accessed at this website: http://www.lm.doe.gov/Pinellas/Sites.aspx. Recent remediation activities consist of the injection of emulsified soybean oil and the microorganism Dehalococcoides mccartyi (formerly known as Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) into the subsurface in February 2010 and again in July 2013 to enhance contaminant biodegradation (hereafter described as bioinjection). Monitoring the performance of these actions, in the form of monitoring well sampling, is ongoing.

  6. Pinellas County, Florida Site Environmental Restoration Project Semiannual Progress Report for the 4.5 Acre Site June through November 2016 January 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Survochak, Scott; Daniel, Joe

    2017-01-01

    This Pinellas County, Florida, Site Environmental Restoration Project Semiannual Progress Report for the 4.5 Acre Site describes environmental restoration activities for the 4.5 Acre Site located in Pinellas County, Largo, Florida (Figure 1). The former U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pinellas Plant facility consisted of the 4.5 Acre Site and what is now the STAR Center (Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center). Both the 4.5 Acre Site and the STAR Center are part of the overall Pinellas County, Florida, Site (Figure 2). The 4.5 Acre Site is located immediately northwest of the STAR Center, in the northeast quarter of Section 13, Township 30 South, Range 15 East. DOE owned this parcel from 1957 to 1972, at which time it was sold to a private landowner. During the period of DOE ownership, the property was used for the disposal of drums of waste resins and solvents. As a result of this practice, the surficial aquifer was impacted by volatile organic compounds (VOCs)-trichloroethene (TCE), cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), trans-1,2-dichloroethene (tDCE), vinyl chloride (VC), and benzene. Detailed background information for the site is contained in the Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Pinellas Site (DOE 2016). That document and other site-related documents can be accessed at this website: http://www.lm.doe.gov/Pinellas/Sites.aspx. Recent remediation activities consist of the injection of emulsified soybean oil and the microorganism Dehalococcoides mccartyi (formerly known as Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) into the subsurface in February 2010 and again in July 2013 to enhance contaminant biodegradation (hereafter described as bioinjection). Monitoring the performance of these actions, in the form of monitoring well sampling, is ongoing.

  7. How Do Communities Use a Participatory Public Health Approach to Build Resilience? The Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, Elizabeth; Eisenman, David P; Magana, Aizita; Williams, Malcolm; Kim, Biblia; McCreary, Michael; Chandra, Anita; Wells, Kenneth B

    2017-10-21

    Community resilience is a key concept in the National Health Security Strategy that emphasizes development of multi-sector partnerships and equity through community engagement. Here, we describe the advancement of CR principles through community participatory methods in the Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience (LACCDR) initiative. LACCDR, an initiative led by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health with academic partners, randomized 16 community coalitions to implement either an Enhanced Standard Preparedness or Community Resilience approach over 24 months. Facilitated by a public health nurse or community educator, coalitions comprised government agencies, community-focused organizations and community members. We used thematic analysis of data from focus groups ( n = 5) and interviews ( n = 6 coalition members; n = 16 facilitators) to compare coalitions' strategies for operationalizing community resilience levers of change (engagement, partnership, self-sufficiency, education). We find that strategies that included bidirectional learning helped coalitions understand and adopt resilience principles. Strategies that operationalized community resilience levers in mutually reinforcing ways (e.g., disseminating information while strengthening partnerships) also secured commitment to resilience principles. We review additional challenges and successes in achieving cross-sector collaboration and engaging at-risk groups in the resilience versus preparedness coalitions. The LACCDR example can inform strategies for uptake and implementation of community resilience and uptake of the resilience concept and methods.

  8. How Do Communities Use a Participatory Public Health Approach to Build Resilience? The Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Bromley

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Community resilience is a key concept in the National Health Security Strategy that emphasizes development of multi-sector partnerships and equity through community engagement. Here, we describe the advancement of CR principles through community participatory methods in the Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience (LACCDR initiative. LACCDR, an initiative led by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health with academic partners, randomized 16 community coalitions to implement either an Enhanced Standard Preparedness or Community Resilience approach over 24 months. Facilitated by a public health nurse or community educator, coalitions comprised government agencies, community-focused organizations and community members. We used thematic analysis of data from focus groups (n = 5 and interviews (n = 6 coalition members; n = 16 facilitators to compare coalitions’ strategies for operationalizing community resilience levers of change (engagement, partnership, self-sufficiency, education. We find that strategies that included bidirectional learning helped coalitions understand and adopt resilience principles. Strategies that operationalized community resilience levers in mutually reinforcing ways (e.g., disseminating information while strengthening partnerships also secured commitment to resilience principles. We review additional challenges and successes in achieving cross-sector collaboration and engaging at-risk groups in the resilience versus preparedness coalitions. The LACCDR example can inform strategies for uptake and implementation of community resilience and uptake of the resilience concept and methods.

  9. Environmental assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Big Hill facility storage of commercial crude oil project, Jefferson County, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    The Big Hill SPR facility located in Jefferson County, Texas has been a permitted operating crude oil storage site since 1986 with benign environmental impacts. However, Congress has not authorized crude oil purchases for the SPR since 1990, and six storage caverns at Big Hill are underutilized with 70 million barrels of available storage capacity. On February 17, 1999, the Secretary of Energy offered the 70 million barrels of available storage at Big Hill for commercial use. Interested commercial users would enter into storage contracts with DOE, and DOE would receive crude oil in lieu of dollars as rental fees. The site could potentially began to receive commercial oil in May 1999. This Environmental Assessment identified environmental changes that potentially would affect water usage, power usage, and air emissions. However, as the assessment indicates, changes would not occur to a major degree affecting the environment and no long-term short-term, cumulative or irreversible impacts have been identified

  10. 2006 Fulton County Georgia Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) LAS dataset is a survey of Fulton County. The Fulton County LiDAR Survey project area consists of approximately 690.5 square...

  11. A New Species of Ligophorus (Monogenea: Dactylogyridae) from the gills of the Flathead Mullet Mugil cephalus (Teleostei: Mugilidae) from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-González, Abril; Míguez-Lozano, Raúl; Llopis-Belenguer, Cristina; Balbuena, Juan Antonio

    2015-12-01

    A new monogenean species, Ligophorus yucatanensis n. sp. from the gills of the flathead mullet Mugil cephalus from the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, is described. The new species can be differentiated from all other species of Ligophorus by the morphology of the accessory piece of the copulatory organ. Its main lobe is cylindrical, tunnelled expanded distally, slightly bowed with a characteristic membranous opening at level of medial bifurcation of the accessory piece, forming a thick-walled bulbshaped expansion that ends in a round labium. The secondary lobe is spatulate, straight, and shorter than the main lobe. In addition, the new species can be distinguished from other species by the morphology of the haptoral ventral bar, and the distal end of the vaginal duct. Furthermore the ventral anchors are shorter than those of all other species of Ligophorus reported in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea. In addition, the zoogeographical records of Ligophorus spp. on the M. cephalus species complex are briefly reviewed and updated.

  12. Effects of Salinity on the Habitat Selection and Growth Performance of Mediterranean Flathead Grey Mullet Mugil cephalus (Osteichthyes, Mugilidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, L.

    2000-05-01

    Flathead grey mullet (Mugil cephalus L. 1758) are commonly found in tropical and temperate estuaries. In spite of their ecological and economical importance, little is known about the effects of salinity on growth performance and habitat selection. Laboratory experiments revealed that the metabolic rate of young specimens was negatively affected by high salinity levels and that an improved growth performance was achieved in fresh water and oligohaline water. A stratified study on microhabitat use, carried out on the island of Minorca (Balearic archipelago), demonstrated that juvenile specimens, shorter than 200 mm (total length), concentrated all year round in fresh water or oligohaline sites. Mesohaline areas were usually avoided, except in summer. Immature fish, with a total length between 201 and 300 mm, show a similar pattern although in some seasons avoided freshwater sites. The habitat selection pattern of adults, i.e., fish longer than 301 mm, changed seasonally due to their offshore migration during the spawning season (from late summer to early winter). However, they usually showed a greater preference for polyhaline areas and strongly avoided freshwater sites. Euhaline areas were also avoided in autumn and summer. These results suggest that the young of this species are highly dependent on areas of low salinity and any factor which reduces the availability of such areas will, in turn, affect their fishery. Adults depend on polyhaline areas, although the avoidance of freshwater areas might be due to their shallowness. The situation might be different in some areas of the Indo-Pacific. These differences are discussed.

  13. Well Completion Report for Corrective Action Unit 447, Project Shoal Area, Churchill County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rick Findlay

    2006-09-01

    This Well Completion Report is being provided as part of the implementation of the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447 (NNSA/NSO, 2006a). The CADD/CAP is part of an ongoing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) funded project for the investigation of CAU 447 at the Project Shoal Area (PSA). All work performed on this project was conducted in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996), and all applicable Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) policies and regulations. Investigation activities included the drilling, construction, and development of three monitoring/validation (MV) wells at the PSA. This report summarizes the field activities and data collected during the investigation.

  14. 76 FR 13172 - Placer County Water Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... Water Agency Notice of Application Tendered for Filing with the Commission and Establishing Procedural... County Water Agency e. Name of Project: Middle Fork American River Project f. Location: The Middle Fork...) h. Applicant Contact: Andy Fecko, Project Manager, Placer County Water Agency, 144 Ferguson Road...

  15. 76 FR 8808 - Supplemental Final Environmental Impact Statement: Clark County, Indiana, and Jefferson County, KY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ..., financing, construction, operation and oversight of the Project, and an update to the major project finance... Indiana Ohio River Bridges (Project) in Clark County, Indiana and Jefferson County, Kentucky. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Duane Thomas, Project Manager, Federal Highway Administration, John C. Watts Federal...

  16. Data summary report on short-term turbidity monitoring of pipeline river crossings in the Moyie River, Boundary County, Idaho: PGT-PG&E Pipeline Expansion Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gowdy, M.J.; Smits, M.P.; Wilkey, P.L.; Miller, S.F.

    1994-03-01

    A water-quality monitoring program was implemented for Bechtel Corporation to measure the short-term increases in turbidity in the Moyie River caused by construction activities of the Pacific Gas Transmission-Pacific Gas & Electric Pipeline Expansion Project. Construction of the buried, 42-in.-diameter, steel pipeline, during the summer of 1992, involved eight wet crossings of the Moyie River along the 13-mi section of pipeline immediately south of the Canadian-United States border in Boundary County, Idaho. This report summarizes the sampling and analysis protocol used and gives the results and observations for each of the eight crossings. The data obtained from this monitoring program, in addition to satisfying regulatory requirements for the Pipeline Expansion Project, will contribute to an ongoing long-term study of the Moyie River crossings being performed for the Gas Research Institute by Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose of this document is strictly limited to reporting the results of the monitoring program. Interpretation of the data is not within the scope of this report.

  17. Intensive archaeological survey of the F/H Surface Enhancement Project Area, Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassaman, K.E.; Gillam, J.C.

    1993-08-01

    Twelve archaeological sites and four artifact occurrences were located by intensive survey of two tracts of land for the F and H Surface Enhancement Project on the Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. Fieldwork in the 480-acre project area included surface reconnaissance of 3.6 linear kilometers of transects, 140 shovel tests along 4.2 linear kilometers of transects, an additional 162 shovel tests at sites and occurrences, and the excavation of six l {times} 2 m test units. All but one of the sites contained artifacts of the prehistoric era; the twelfth site consists of the remains of a twentieth-century home place. The historic site and six of the prehistoric sites consist of limited and/or disturbed contexts of archaeological deposits that have little research potential and are therefore considered ineligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). The remaining five sites have sufficient content and integrity to yield information important to ongoing investigations into upland site use. These sites (38AK146, 38AK535, 38AK539, 38AK541, and 38AK543) are thus deemed eligible for nomination to the NRHP and the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) recommends that they be preserved through avoidance or data recovery.

  18. Financing Information Communication Technology Projects in Secondary Schools E-Learning: A Case of Mombasa County, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangila, Violet Muyoka

    2015-01-01

    Information communication and technology (ICTs) has become common place entities in all aspects of life. Within the education sector, ICT has begun to have a special attention although not extensively as in other fields both globally and locally. Limited funds still presents a challenge in rolling out the e-school projects in Kenyan secondary…

  19. VT River Restoration Data in Lamoille County

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) Documented river and riparian buffer restoration projects in Lamoille County, Vermont. Restoration includes buffer plantings (trees and shrubs),...

  20. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected, Washburn County had ortho/oblique photography flight done in April of 2009. Pictometry was contracted for the project., Published in 2009, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Washburn County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected dataset current as of 2009. Washburn County had ortho/oblique photography flight done in April of 2009. Pictometry...

  1. 2007 Lake County Board of County Commissioners Topographic LiDAR: Lake County, Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata document describes the LiDAR point data in LAS format produced by Kucera covering the project area of Lake County, FL. The data produced is...

  2. Draft environmental statement related to the Energy Fuels Nuclear, Inc., White Mesa Uranium Project (San Juan County, Utah)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    The proposed action is the issuance of a Source Material License to Energy Fuels Nuclear, Inc., for the construction and operation of the proposed White Mesa Uranium Project (Utah) with a product (U 3 O 8 ) production limited to 7.3 x 10 5 kg (1.6 x 10 6 lb) per year. Possible environmental impacts and adverse effects were identified. Conditions for the protection of the environment are set forth before the license can be issued

  3. Influence of Intelletual Stimulation and Conflict Resolution on Project Implementation: A case of Constituency Development Fund Construction Projects in Public Secondary Schools in Kisumu County, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Wagude

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Intellectual stimulation is one of the manifestations of transformational leadership. Intellectual stimulation is the aspect of leadership where the leader encourages teams’ ingenuity, creativity and innovative thinking, urging them to keenly question the status quo in order to make discoveries. The purpose of this study was to explore the Influence of intellectual stimulation and conflict resolution on projects implementation. The objective was to determine the Influence of intellectual stimulation and conflict resolution on projects implementation. The study used Expost facto design. Multifactor leadership Questionnaire, Thomas Kilman Instruments, Interview, and documentary analysis were used as tools for data collection. The probability sampling used was stratified and simple random sampling technique. Data was analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. Multiple linear regression analysis was used as tool of analysis to test for significance in the hypothesis. One hypothesis was formulated and subsequently tested in the study in order to establish the influence of conflict resolution thereof, in hypothesis H1,( H0: The strength of the relationship between intellectual stimulation and implementation of CDF construction projects does not depend on conflict resolution., it was concluded that the strength of the relationship between intellectual stimulation and implementation of CDF construction projects depends on conflict resolution(P=0.001˂P=0.05,using multiple linear regression analysis the following results were obtained- F value of 7.788,d.f (2,59 and (P-value 0.00˂P= 0.05 significance level which was statistically significant. It was therefore concluded that there is a regression relationship between intellectual stimulation with conflict resolution and implementation of CDF projects. It is therefore recommended that accredited MLQ coaching is desirable, coaching from the systems’ psychodynamic stance could equip the leader in

  4. Niland development project geothermal loan guaranty: 49-MW (net) power plant and geothermal well field development, Imperial County, California: Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-01

    The proposed federal action addressed by this environmental assessment is the authorization of disbursements under a loan guaranteed by the US Department of Energy for the Niland Geothermal Energy Program. The disbursements will partially finance the development of a geothermal well field in the Imperial Valley of California to supply a 25-MW(e) (net) power plant. Phase I of the project is the production of 25 MW(e) (net) of power; the full rate of 49 MW (net) would be achieved during Phase II. The project is located on approximately 1600 acres (648 ha) near the city of Niland in Imperial County, California. Well field development includes the initial drilling of 8 production wells for Phase I, 8 production wells for Phase II, and the possible need for as many as 16 replacement wells over the anticipated 30-year life of the facility. Activities associated with the power plant in addition to operation are excavation and construction of the facility and associated systems (such as cooling towers). Significant environmental impacts, as defined in Council on Environmental Quality regulation 40 CFR Part 1508.27, are not expected to occur as a result of this project. Minor impacts could include the following: local degradation of ambient air quality due to particulate and/or hydrogen sulfide emissions, temporarily increased ambient noise levels due to drilling and construction activities, and increased traffic. Impacts could be significant in the event of a major spill of geothermal fluid, which could contaminate groundwater and surface waters and alter or eliminate nearby habitat. Careful land use planning and engineering design, implementation of mitigation measures for pollution control, and design and implementation of an environmental monitoring program that can provide an early indication of potential problems should ensure that impacts, except for certain accidents, will be minimized.

  5. Transferability of Data Related to the Underground Test Area Project, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2004-06-24

    This document is the collaborative effort of the members of an ad hoc subcommittee of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Technical Working Group (TWG). The UGTA Project relies on data from a variety of sources; therefore, a process is needed to identify relevant factors for determining whether material-property data collected from other areas can be used to support groundwater flow, radionuclide transport, and other models within a Corrective Action Unit (CAU), and for documenting the data transfer decision and process. This document describes the overall data transfer process. Separate Parameter Descriptions will be prepared that provide information for selected specific parameters as determined by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) UGTA Project Manager. This document and its accompanying appendices do not provide the specific criteria to be used for transfer of data for specific uses. Rather, the criteria will be established by separate parameter-specific and model-specific Data Transfer Protocols. The CAU Data Documentation Packages and data analysis reports will apply the protocols and provide or reference a document with the data transfer evaluations and decisions.

  6. Otolith elemental ratios of flathead mullet Mugil cephalus in Taiwanese waters reveal variable patterns of habitat use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The migratory history of the flathead mullet (Mugil cephalus) in the coastal waters of Taiwan was evaluated by examining the elemental composition in the otoliths of 74 fish collected from 3 habitats of varying salinity by using laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The mean (±SD) Sr:Ca ratio for the otolith edge differed significantly among the 3 habitats of varying ambient salinity. The otolith mean Sr:Ca ratio for offshore fish was 6.7 ± 2.0 × 10-3 and 4.2 ± 1.5 × 10-3 in the estuary, which was significantly higher than that for freshwater fish (2.8 ± 1.1 × 10-3). By contrast, the mean Ba:Ca ratio for the otolith edge of offshore fish was 87.1 ± 113.0 × 10-6 and 52.1 ± 22.3 × 10-6 in the estuary, which was significantly lower than that for the fish in the freshwater habitat (144.5 ± 54.8 × 10-6). Thus, the Ba:Ca ratio can be used as an alternative to the Sr:Ca ratio for evaluating the migration of M. cephalus between freshwater and saline water. However, the Mn:Ca and Mg:Ca ratios were not significantly different among the 3 habitats. Accordingly, the Sr:Ca and Ba:Ca ratios for the otoliths can be used to reconstruct the salinity history of M. cephalus. The variation in Sr:Ca and Ba:Ca ratios among life history profiles also suggested seasonal migratory behavior in relation to salinity in M. cephalus. These results have implications for developing additional extensive studies to resolve the relative importance of marine estuarine and freshwater habitats for sustaining production of M. cephalus fisheries.

  7. Joint environmental assessment for western NPR-1 3-dimensional seismic project at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1124) to identify and evaluate the potential environmental impacts of the proposed geophysical seismic survey on and adjacent to the Naval Petroleum Reserve No.1 (NPR-1), located approximately 35 miles west of Bakersfield, California. NPR-1 is jointly owned and operated by the federal government and Chevron U.S.A. Production Company. The federal government owns about 78 percent of NPR-1, while Chevron owns the remaining 22 percent. The government`s interest is under the jurisdiction of DOE, which has contracted with Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc. (BPOI) for the operation and management of the reserve. The 3-dimensional seismic survey would take place on NPR-1 lands and on public and private lands adjacent to NPR-1. This project would involve lands owned by BLM, California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG), California Energy Commission (CEC), The Nature Conservancy, the Center for Natural Lands Management, oil companies (Chevron, Texaco, and Mobil), and several private individuals. The proposed action is designed to provide seismic data for the analysis of the subsurface geology extant in western NPR-1 with the goal of better defining the commercial limits of a currently producing reservoir (Northwest Stevens) and three prospective hydrocarbon bearing zones: the {open_quotes}A Fan{close_quotes} in Section 7R, the 19R Structure in Section 19R, and the 13Z Structure in Section 13Z. Interpreting the data is expected to provide NPR-1 owners with more accurate locations of structural highs, faults, and pinchouts to maximize the recovery of the available hydrocarbon resources in western NPR-1. Completion of this project is expected to increase NPR-1 recoverable reserves, and reduce the risks and costs associated with further exploration and development in the area.

  8. Wildlife Loss Estimates and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume Three, Hungry Horse Project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Daniel

    1984-10-01

    This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Hungry Horse Dam project on the South Fork of the Flathead River and previous mitigation of theses losses. In order to develop and focus mitigation efforts, it was first necessary to estimate wildlife and wildlife hatitat losses attributable to the construction and operation of the project. The purpose of this report was to document the best available information concerning the degree of impacts to target wildlife species. Indirect benefits to wildlife species not listed will be identified during the development of alternative mitigation measures. Wildlife species incurring positive impacts attributable to the project were identified.

  9. mHealth Series: mHealth project in Zhao County, rural China – Description of objectives, field site and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velthoven, Michelle Helena; Li, Ye; Wang, Wei; Du, Xiaozhen; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Li; Majeed, Azeem; Rudan, Igor; Zhang, Yanfeng; Car, Josip

    2013-01-01

    Background We set up a collaboration between researchers in China and the UK that aimed to explore the use of mHealth in China. This is the first paper in a series of papers on a large mHealth project part of this collaboration. This paper included the aims and objectives of the mHealth project, our field site, and the detailed methods of two studies. Field site The field site for this mHealth project was Zhao County, which lies 280 km south of Beijing in Hebei Province, China. Methods We described the methodology of two studies: (i) a mixed methods study exploring factors influencing sample size calculations for mHealth–based health surveys and (ii) a cross–over study determining validity of an mHealth text messaging data collection tool. The first study used mixed methods, both quantitative and qualitative, including: (i) two surveys with caregivers of young children, (ii) interviews with caregivers, village doctors and participants of the cross–over study, and (iii) researchers’ views. We combined data from caregivers, village doctors and researchers to provide an in–depth understanding of factors influencing sample size calculations for mHealth–based health surveys. The second study, a cross–over study, used a randomised cross–over study design to compare the traditional face–to–face survey method to the new text messaging survey method. We assessed data equivalence (intrarater agreement), the amount of information in responses, reasons for giving different responses, the response rate, characteristics of non–responders, and the error rate. Conclusions This paper described the objectives, field site and methods of a large mHealth project part of a collaboration between researchers in China and the UK. The mixed methods study evaluating factors that influence sample size calculations could help future studies with estimating reliable sample sizes. The cross–over study comparing face–to–face and text message survey data collection

  10. Pinellas County, Florida, Site Environmental Restoration Project Sitewide Environmental Monitoring Semiannual Progress Report for the Young - Rainey STAR Center June Through November 2016, January 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surovchak, Scott [USDOE Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Daniel, Joe [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The Young - Rainey STAR Center (Science, Technology, and Research Center) at the Pinellas County, Florida, Site is a former U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility constructed in the mid-1950s. The 96-acre STAR Center is located in Largo, Florida, and lies in the northeast quarter of Section 13, Township 30 South, Range 15 East (Figure 1). While it was owned by DOE, the purpose of the site was to develop and manufacture components for the nation’s nuclear weapons program. In 1987, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) performed a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Assessment (EPA 1988) at the site to gather information on potential releases of hazardous materials. In February of 1990, EPA issued a Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments permit to DOE, requiring DOE to investigate and perform remediation activities in those areas designated as solid-waste management units (SWMUs) contaminated by hazardous materials resulting from DOE operations. A total of 17 SWMUs were identified and investigated at the STAR Center. By 1997, 13 of the 17 SWMUs had been remediated or approved for no further action. More recently, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) executed Conditional Site Rehabilitation Completion Orders for the Northeast Site and the Wastewater Neutralization Area on July 27, 2016, stating that no further action is required for those SWMUs. The Building 100 Area (a combination of the Old Drum Storage Site and the Building 100-Industrial Drain Leaks SWMUs) comprises the only two active SWMUs at the STAR Center (Figure 2). This document serves as the semiannual progress report for the SWMUs by providing the results of recent monitoring activities and a summary of ongoing and projected work. The STAR Center is owned by the Pinellas County Industrial Development Authority, but DOE is responsible for remediation activities at the site. Additional background information for the site is contained in the Long-Term Surveillance

  11. Cone Penetration Test and Soil Boring at the Bayside Groundwater Project Site in San Lorenzo, Alameda County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Michael J.; Sneed, Michelle; Noce, Thomas E.; Tinsley, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Aquifer-system deformation associated with ground-water-level changes is being investigated cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) at the Bayside Groundwater Project (BGP) near the modern San Francisco Bay shore in San Lorenzo, California. As a part of this project, EBMUD has proposed an aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) program to store and recover as much as 3.78x104 m3/d of water. Water will be stored in a 30-m sequence of coarse-grained sediment (the 'Deep Aquifer') underlying the east bay alluvium and the adjacent ground-water basin. Storing and recovering water could cause subsidence and uplift at the ASR site and adjacent areas because the land surface will deform as aquifers and confining units elastically expand and contract with ASR cycles. The Deep Aquifer is overlain by more than 150 m of clayey fine-grained sediments and underlain by comparable units. These sediments are similar to the clayey sediments found in the nearby Santa Clara Valley, where inelastic compaction resulted in about 4.3 m of subsidence near San Jose from 1910 to 1995 due to overdraft of the aquifer. The Deep Aquifer is an important regional resource, and EBMUD is required to demonstrate that ASR activities will not affect nearby ground-water management, salinity levels, or cause permanent land subsidence. Subsidence in the east bay area could induce coastal flooding and create difficulty conveying winter storm runoff from urbanized areas. The objective of the cooperative investigation is to monitor and analyze aquifer-system compaction and expansion, as well as consequent land subsidence and uplift resulting from natural causes and any anthropogenic causes related to ground-water development and ASR activities at the BGP. Therefore, soil properties related to compressibility (and the potential for deformation associated with ground-water-level changes) are of the most concern. To achieve this objective, 3 boreholes

  12. Variations in Hip Shape Are Associated with Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis: Cross-sectional and Longitudinal Analyses of the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Amanda E; Golightly, Yvonne M; Renner, Jordan B; Schwartz, Todd A; Liu, Felix; Lynch, John A; Gregory, Jenny S; Aspden, Richard M; Lane, Nancy E; Jordan, Joanne M

    2016-02-01

    Hip shape by statistical shape modeling (SSM) is associated with hip radiographic osteoarthritis (rOA). We examined associations between hip shape and knee rOA given the biomechanical interrelationships between these joints. Bilateral baseline hip shape assessments [for those with at least 1 hip with a Kellgren-Lawrence arthritis grading scale (KL) 0 or 1] from the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project were available. Proximal femur shape was defined on baseline pelvis radiographs and evaluated by SSM, producing mean shape and continuous variables representing independent modes of variation (14 modes = 95% of shape variance). Outcomes included prevalent [baseline KL ≥ 2 or total knee replacement (TKR)], incident (baseline KL 0/1 with followup ≥ 2), and progressive knee rOA (KL increase of ≥ 1 or TKR). Limb-based logistic regression models for ipsilateral and contralateral comparisons were adjusted for age, sex, race, body mass index (BMI), and hip rOA, accounting for intraperson correlations. We evaluated 681 hips and 682 knees from 342 individuals (61% women, 83% white, mean age 62 yrs, BMI 29 kg/m(2)). Ninety-nine knees (15%) had prevalent rOA (4 knees with TKR). Lower modes 2 and 3 scores were associated with ipsilateral prevalent knee rOA, and only lower mode 3 scores were associated with contralateral prevalent knee rOA. No statistically significant associations were seen for incident or progressive knee rOA. Variations in hip shape were associated with prevalent, but not incident or progressive, knee rOA in this cohort, and may reflect biomechanical differences between limbs, genetic influences, or common factors related to both hip shape and knee rOA.

  13. 76 FR 64941 - Notice of Cancellation of Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Hyde County Wind Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project, Hyde County, SD AGENCY... design, construct, operate, and maintain a 150-megawatt Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project (Project... terminated the NEPA process for NextEra's proposed Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project with the...

  14. 2014 Mobile County, AL DMC 4-Band 8 Bit Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset was developed to support Mobile County. The project area is 1402 square miles of Mobile County land. The scope of work involved data acquisition and...

  15. Elevation - LiDAR Survey - Roseau County, Minnesota

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — LIDAR Data for Roseau County Minnesota. This project consists of approximately 87 square miles of LIDAR mapping in Roseau County, Minnesota at two sites: area 1,...

  16. Next-generation sequencing yields the complete mitochondrial genome of the flathead mullet, Mugil cephalus cryptic species in East Australia (Teleostei: Mugilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kang-Ning; Chen, Ching-Hung; Hsiao, Chung-Der; Durand, Jean-Dominique

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the complete mitogenome sequence of a cryptic species from East Australia (Mugil sp. H) belonging to the worldwide Mugil cephalus species complex (Teleostei: Mugilidae) has been sequenced by next-generation sequencing method. The assembled mitogenome, consisting of 16,845 bp, had the typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement, including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs, 2 ribosomal RNAs genes and a non-coding control region of D-loop. D-loop consists of 1067 bp length, and is located between tRNA-Pro and tRNA-Phe. The overall base composition of East Australia M. cephalus is 28.4% for A, 29.3% for C, 15.4% for G and 26.9% for T. The complete mitogenome may provide essential and important DNA molecular data for further phylogenetic and evolutionary analysis for flathead mullet species complex.

  17. Effectiveness of different species of entomopathogenic nematodes for biocontrol of the Mediterranean flatheaded rootborer, Capnodis tenebrionis (Linné) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in potted peach tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Ana; Del Pino, Fernando García

    2008-02-01

    The susceptibility of larvae of the Mediterranean flatheaded rootborer (Capnodis tenebrionis) to 13 isolates of entomopathogenic nematodes was examined using GF-677 potted trees (peachxalmond hybrid) as the host plant. The nematode strains tested included nine Steinernema feltiae, one S. affine, one S. carpocapsae and two Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Nematodes showed the ability to locate and kill larvae of C. tenebrionis just after they enter into the roots of the tree. S. feltiae strains provided an efficacy ranging from 79.68% to 88.24%. H. bacteriophora strains resulted in control of 71.66-76.47%. S. carpocapsae (B14) and S. affine (Gspe3) caused lower control of C. tenebrionis larvae (62.03% and 34.76%, respectively). The influence of foraging strategy and the use of autochthonous nematodes to control C. tenebrionis larvae inside the roots is discussed.

  18. Cheyenne-Laramie County Economic Development Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    Chamber of Commerce John Etchepare Warren Livestock Co. Shirley Francis Laramie County Commissioner Nancy Gire Economic Development Planner, Cheyenne...County Unamounoed 13 Industrial Development Association of Cheyenne- justifloatio Laramie County (IDAC-LC) Greater Cheyenne Chamber of Commerce (GCCC...February 10-21, 1986, in the Greater Cheyenne Chamber of Commerce offices. With a few excep- tions, BBC project team leaders met with each person

  19. 78 FR 27215 - Baker County Oregon; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ...: Baker County, Oregon (Baker County). e. Name of Project: Mason Dam Hydroelectric Project. f. Location...'s (Reclamation) Mason Dam, near Baker City, in Baker County, Oregon. The project would occupy 6.4... facilities. The proposed project's generation would not change the current day- to-day operation of Mason dam...

  20. Allegheny County Air Quality

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Air quality data from Allegheny County Health Department monitors throughout the county. Air quality monitored data must be verified by qualified individuals before...

  1. Allegheny County Municipal Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset demarcates the municipal boundaries in Allegheny County. Data was created to portray the boundaries of the 130 Municipalities in Allegheny County the...

  2. Allegheny County Addressing Landmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains address points which represent physical address locations assigned by the Allegheny County addressing authority. Data is updated by County...

  3. Allegheny County Council Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset portrays the boundaries of the County Council Districts in Allegheny County. The dataset is based on municipal boundaries and City of Pittsburgh ward...

  4. Allegheny County Address Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains address points which represent physical address locations assigned by the Allegheny County addressing authority. Data is updated by County...

  5. 2014 Horry County, South Carolina Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is comprised of lidar point cloud data. This project required lidar data to be acquired over Horry County, South Carolina. The total area of the Horry...

  6. Strengthening Public Financial Management at the County ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Counties suffer from weak financial management and accountability, human capacity ... The project team will prepare a report of its findings and recommendations, ... them consolidate their role as credible development actors in their countries, ...

  7. 2008 South Carolina Lidar: Lancaster County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The project area is composed of 16 counties in the State of South Carolina - Cherokee, Union, Laurens, Greenwood, Newberry, Chester, Fairfield, Lancaster,...

  8. Imperial County geothermal development annual meeting: summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    All phases of current geothermal development in Imperial County are discussed and future plans for development are reviewed. Topics covered include: Heber status update, Heber binary project, direct geothermal use for high-fructose corn sweetener production, update on county planning activities, Brawley and Salton Sea facility status, status of Imperial County projects, status of South Brawley Prospect 1983, Niland geothermal energy program, recent and pending changes in federal procedures/organizations, plant indicators of geothermal fluid on East Mesa, state lands activities in Imperial County, environmental interests in Imperial County, offshore exploration, strategic metals in geothermal fluids rebuilding of East Mesa Power Plant, direct use geothermal potential for Calipatria industrial Park, the Audubon Society case, status report of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, East Brawley Prospect, and precision gravity survey at Heber and Cerro Prieto geothermal fields. (MHR)

  9. Rural migration in Nevada: Lincoln County

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soden, D.L.; Carns, D.E.; Mosser, D.; Conary, J.S.; Ansell, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    The principal objective of this project was to develop insight into the scope of migration of working age Nevadans out of their county of birth; including the collection of data on their skill levels, desire to out or in-migrate, interactions between families of migratory persons, and the impact that the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca mountain might have on their individual, and collective, decisions to migrate and return. The initial phase of this project reported here was conducted in 1992 and 1993 in Lincoln County, Nevada, one of the counties designated as ''affected'' by the proposed repository program. The findings suggest that a serious out-migration problem in Lincoln County, and that the Yucca mountain project will likely affect decisions relating to migration patterns in the future

  10. Projectables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Troels A.; Merritt, Timothy R.

    2017-01-01

    CNC cutting machines have become essential tools for designers and architects enabling rapid prototyping, model-building and production of high quality components. Designers often cut from new materials, discarding the irregularly shaped remains. We introduce ProjecTables, a visual augmented...... reality system for interactive packing of model parts onto sheet materials. ProjecTables enables designers to (re)use scrap materials for CNC cutting that would have been previously thrown away, at the same time supporting aesthetic choices related to wood grain, avoiding surface blemishes, and other...... relevant material properties. We conducted evaluations of ProjecTables with design students from Aarhus School of Architecture, demonstrating that participants could quickly and easily place and orient model parts reducing material waste. Contextual interviews and ideation sessions led to a deeper...

  11. Metal levels in flathead sole (Hippoglossoides elassodon) and great sculpin (Myoxocephalus polyacanthocephalus) from Adak Island, Alaska: Potential risk to predators and fishermen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Burke, Sean; Stamm, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly there is a need to assess the contaminant levels in fish as indicators of the health and well-being of both the fish and their consumers, including humans. This paper examines the levels of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury, and selenium in the kidney, liver, and muscle of great sculpin and flathead sole from Adak Island in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska. Both species are consumed by the local Aleuts and others. There were significant differences in the levels of heavy metals as a function of tissue for both fish species; the liver of sculpin and sole generally had the highest levels of most metals, except for arsenic, lead, and selenium. Sole had significantly higher mean levels of arsenic in kidney (32,384 vs. 531 ppb, wet weight), liver (18,954 vs. 2532 ppb), and muscle (19,452 vs. 1343 ppb) than did sculpin. Sole also had higher mean levels of cadmium (230 vs. 63 ppb), lead (1236 vs. 48 ppb), mercury (150 vs. 107 ppb), and selenium (5215 vs. 1861 ppb) in kidney than did sculpin. There were significant correlations among weight and length measurements for both species. However, except for mercury, there were few significant correlations among tissue types for most metals. Only mercury and manganese levels were significantly correlated with size for sculpin (but not for sole). Levels of arsenic, lead, and mercury may pose a risk to predators that consume them, and arsenic and mercury may pose a risk to human consumers

  12. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Curecanti-Lost Canyon 230-kV Transmission Line Reroute Project, Montrose County, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2000-03-20

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to reroute a section of the Curecanti-Lost Canyon 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line, in Montrose County, Colorado. A portion of the transmission line, situated 11 miles southeast of Montrose, Colorado, crosses Waterdog Peak, an area of significant geologic surface activity, which is causing the transmission line's lattice steel towers to shift. This increases stress to structure hardware and conductors, and poses a threat to the integrity of the transmission system. Western proposes to relocate the lattice steel towers and line to a more geologically stable area. The existing section of transmission line and the proposed relocation route cross Bureau of Land Management and private land holdings.

  13. 75 FR 38798 - Douglas County, OR; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 13722-000] Douglas County... Intervene, and Competing Applications June 24, 2010. On May 5, 2010, Douglas County, Oregon, filed an... the feasibility of the Douglas County Wave and Tidal Energy Power Project, in the Pacific Ocean, off...

  14. Hole-in-the-Rock Backwater Excavation Missouri River Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Project, Thurston County, Nebraska, Missouri River Mile 706

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    8  7.0  ENVIROMENTAL CONSEQUENCES...13  9.0  ENVIROMENTAL COMPLIANCE...area. 7.0 ENVIROMENTAL CONSEQUENCES The environmental consequences of the proposed project on many of the resources within the affected environment

  15. mHealth Series: mHealth project in Zhao County, rural China – Description of objectives, field site and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Helena van Velthoven

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We set up a collaboration between researchers in China and the UK that aimed to explore the use of mHealth in China. This is the first paper in a series of papers on a large mHealth project part of this collaboration. This paper included the aims and objectives of the mHealth project, our field site, and the detailed methods of two studies.

  16. The Ambrosia Lake project archaeological investigations of three small sites associated with the southern Chacoan outlier of Kin Nizhoni, McKinley County, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullington, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    During the fall of 1987, Complete Archaeological Service Associates conducted mitigative excavations at three sites (LA50363, LA50364, and LA50371) in McKinley County, New Mexico. These sites are adjacent to the Phillips/United Nuclear Inactive Uranium Mill and Tailings site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. The primary deposition at each of these sites appears to be related to a Pueblo II or Bonito Phase occupation. Temporal placement is based primarily on the cross dating of ceramics and archaeomagnetic determinations when possible. No tree-ring or radiocarbon samples are available from these sites. These Ambrosia Lake sites indicate that this area was occupied primarily by Pueblo II people who may have had close social, economic, and ceremonial ties with the people living at the nuclear community of Lower Nizhoni about 3 km south-southeast. The later component at LA50364 indicates a Pueblo III occupation by people who may have had similar ties to the people of the Kin Nizhoni nuclear community. The Ambrosia Lake sites, then, provide important information on the structure of subnuclear communities within the southern Chaco periphery

  17. Allegheny County Obesity Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Obesity rates for each Census Tract in Allegheny County were produced for the study “Developing small-area predictions for smoking and obesity prevalence in the...

  18. Allegheny County Dam Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset shows the point locations of dams in Allegheny County. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data portal...

  19. Allegheny County Asbestos Permits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Current asbestos permit data issued by the County for commercial building demolitions and renovations as required by the EPA. This file is updated daily and can be...

  20. Allegheny County Crash Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Contains locations and information about every crash incident reported to the police in Allegheny County from 2004 to 2016. Fields include injury severity,...

  1. Allegheny County Anxiety Medication

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — These Census Tract-level datasets described here provide de-identified diagnosis data for customers of three managed care organizations in Allegheny County (Gateway...

  2. Allegheny County Smoking Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Smoking rates for each Census Tract in Allegheny County were produced for the study “Developing small-area predictions for smoking and obesity prevalence in the...

  3. Allegheny County Employee Salaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Employee salaries are a regular Right to Know request the County receives. Here is the disclaimer language that is included with the dataset from the Open Records...

  4. ROE County Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This polygon dataset shows the outlines of states, counties, and county equivalents (Louisiana parishes, Alaska boroughs, Puerto Rico municipalities, and U.S. Virgin...

  5. Allegheny County Parcel Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains parcel boundaries attributed with county block and lot number. Use the Property Information Extractor for more control downloading a filtered...

  6. Allegheny County Tobacco Vendors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The tobacco vendor information provides the location of all tobacco vendors in Allegheny County in 2015. Data was compiled from administrative records managed by...

  7. Allegheny County Plumbers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — All master plumbers must be registered with the Allegheny County Health Department. Only Registered Master Plumbers who possess a current plumbing license or...

  8. Allegheny County Traffic Counts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Traffic sensors at over 1,200 locations in Allegheny County collect vehicle counts for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. Data included in the Health...

  9. Allegheny County Greenways

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Greenways data was compiled by the Allegheny Land Trust as a planning effort in the development of Allegheny Places, the Allegheny County Comprehensive Plan. The...

  10. Allegheny County Street Centerlines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains the locations of the street centerlines for vehicular and foot traffic in Allegheny County. Street Centerlines are classified as Primary Road,...

  11. Allegheny County Major Rivers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains locations of major rivers that flow through Allegheny County. These shapes have been taken from the Hydrology dataset. The Ohio River,...

  12. Allegheny County Depression Medication

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — These Census Tract-level datasets described here provide de-identified diagnosis data for customers of three managed care organizations in Allegheny County (Gateway...

  13. Taos County Roads

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Vector line shapefile under the stewardship of the Taos County Planning Department depicting roads in Taos County, New Mexico. Originally under the Emergency...

  14. Allegheny County Property Assessments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Real Property parcel characteristics for Allegheny County, PA. Includes information pertaining to land, values, sales, abatements, and building characteristics (if...

  15. Allegheny County Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The data on health care facilities includes the name and location of all the hospitals and primary care facilities in Allegheny County. The current listing of...

  16. Allegheny County Parks Outlines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Shows the size and shape of the nine Allegheny County parks. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data portal...

  17. Allegheny County Crash Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Contains locations and information about every crash incident reported to the police in Allegheny County from 2004 to 2017. Fields include injury severity,...

  18. Allegheny County Property Viewer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Webmap of Allegheny municipalities and parcel data. Zoom for a clickable parcel map with owner name, property photograph, and link to the County Real Estate website...

  19. County Population Vulnerability

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — This layer summarizes the social vulnerability index for populations within each county in the United States at scales 1:3m and below. It answers the question...

  20. California Counties and San Francisco Bay Area Watershed Boundaries, California, 2012, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data layers represent CA counties and the Bay Area Watersheds. These data layers aid in identifying counties and watersheds where the grant projects occur.

  1. 2009 St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) Lidar: Portions of Orange and Seminole Counties, Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The project area covers 318 square miles in the eastern half of Seminole County plus portions of north central and northeast Orange County in the state of Florida....

  2. Assessing the impacts of river regulation on native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi) habitats in the upper Flathead River, Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Jones, Leslie A.; Kotter, D.; Miller, William J.; Geise, Doran; Tohtz, Joel; Marotz, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork Flathead River, Montana, USA, has modified the natural flow regimen for power generation, flood risk management and flow augmentation for anadromous fish recovery in the Columbia River. Concern over the detrimental effects of dam operations on native resident fishes prompted research to quantify the impacts of alternative flow management strategies on threatened bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi) habitats. Seasonal and life‐stage specific habitat suitability criteria were combined with a two‐dimensional hydrodynamic habitat model to assess discharge effects on usable habitats. Telemetry data used to construct seasonal habitat suitability curves revealed that subadult (fish that emigrated from natal streams to the river system) bull trout move to shallow, low‐velocity shoreline areas at night, which are most sensitive to flow fluctuations. Habitat time series analyses comparing the natural flow regimen (predam, 1929–1952) with five postdam flow management strategies (1953–2008) show that the natural flow conditions optimize the critical bull trout habitats and that the current strategy best resembles the natural flow conditions of all postdam periods. Late summer flow augmentation for anadromous fish recovery, however, produces higher discharges than predam conditions, which reduces the availability of usable habitat during this critical growing season. Our results suggest that past flow management policies that created sporadic streamflow fluctuations were likely detrimental to resident salmonids and that natural flow management strategies will likely improve the chances of protecting key ecosystem processes and help to maintain and restore threatened bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout populations in the upper Columbia River Basin.

  3. An archaeological reconnaissance of a 14 mile section of the East Fork Poplar Creek for the Environmental Restoration Project, Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuVall, G.D.

    1993-01-01

    At the request of the US Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District, Nashville, Tennessee, an archaeological reconnaissance of the potential impact areas of the Environmental Restoration Project (ERP) along the East Fork Poplar Creek was conducted during the period December 16, 1991, and March 3, 1992. The reconnaissance was conducted in response to environmental evaluations as a result of the accidental spillage of approximately 293,000 pounds of mercury, radionuclides, heavy metals and other compounds. The reconnaissance to assess adverse impacts to cultural resources located within the boundaries of Federally-licensed, permitted, funded or assisted projects was conducted in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and Executive Order 11593

  4. Final Scientific/Technical Report for DOE/EERE Comprehensive Community Renewable Energy Implementation Plan in Forest County and Milwaukee County

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karman, Nathan [Forest County Potawatomi Community, Crandon, WI (United States)

    2014-06-27

    Forest County Potawatomi Community (the “Community”) sought and obtained Community Renewable Energy Deployment funding from the Department of Energy to evaluate and implement a diverse number of renewable energy technologies throughout its lands held in trust or owned in fee simple in Forest County and Milwaukee County (the “Project”). The technologies and sites evolved during the Project, ultimately leading to the investigation of biomass and solar projects on the Community’s reservation in Forest County, as well as the investigation and eventual deployment of a solar project and an anaerobic digestion and biogas project on Community lands in Milwaukee.

  5. Wyoming coal-conversion project. Final technical report, November 1980-February 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project, Converse County, Wyoming; contains list of appendices with title and identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    This final technical report describes what WyCoalGas, Inc. and its subcontractors accomplished in resolving issues related to the resource, technology, economic, environmental, socioeconomic, and governmental requirements affecting a project located near Douglas, Wyoming for producing 150 Billion Btu per day by gasifying sub-bituminous coal. The report summarizes the results of the work on each task and includes the deliverables that WyCoalGas, Inc. and the subcontractors prepared. The co-venturers withdrew from the project for two reasons: federal financial assistance to the project was seen to be highly uncertain; and funds were being expended at an unacceptably high rate.

  6. An aerial radiological survey of Project Gasbuggy and surrounding area, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. Date of survey: October 27, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the Project Gasbuggy site, 55 miles (89 kilometers) east of Farmington, New Mexico, on October 27, 1994. Parallel lines were flown at intervals of 300 feet (91 meters) over a 16-square-mile (41-square-kilometer) area at a 150-foot (46-meter) altitude centered on the Gasbuggy site. The gamma energy spectra obtained were reduced to an exposure rate contour map overlaid on a high altitude aerial photograph of the area. The terrestrial exposure rate varied from 14 to 20 microR/h at 1 meter above ground level. No anomalous or man-made isotopes were found

  7. A Cultural Resources Survey and Testing Report of the Elk Chute West Ditch Channel Cleanout Project, Dunklin and Pemiscot Counties, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-01

    the levee is leased by the U.S. Government to private individuals for livestock grazing and cotton cultivation. Cultivation within the project area has...atiuj ng adapi-al tun to thIie wetter condi Lions tot lowing the dry hypor In .iaI. lna I us trrte.sponds to the sub-Boreal climatic episode (Sabo el...the Buckett phase of the Cairo Lowland alea . However. as rhillips (1970) noted, the phase is otherwise not well delktn|d. Specilic pottery types such as

  8. Improved survival after an educational project on colon cancer management in the county of Stockholm--a population based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhoff, R; Martling, A; Sjövall, A; Granath, F; Hohenberger, W; Holm, T

    2015-11-01

    Outcomes in rectal cancer have improved dramatically after the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME). Recently, the TME concept has been transformed into that of complete mesocolic excision (CME) in an attempt to improve prognosis for patients with colon cancer. Multidisciplinary team (MDT) workshops including the CME concept were held annually between 2004 and 2008 at the Karolinska University Hospital. The workshops focused on preoperative staging, surgery and histopathology and included lectures and live surgery sessions. To compare survival before and after the "Stockholm Colon Cancer Project" all patients diagnosed with a right sided colon cancer between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2003 (Group 1) and from January 1, 2006 until December 31, 2008 (Group 2) in Stockholm were identified from the Swedish ColoRectal Cancer Registry (SCRCR). The proportion of patients having a tumour resection and the proportion having emergency surgery was higher in Group 1. There were more early tumours and more R0 resections in Group 2. Overall survival in all diagnosed patients and disease free survival after tumour resection was improved in the second time period. Surgical teaching programmes may have an impact on the management and outcome in colon cancer. The exact impact from the "Stockholm Colon Cancer Project" cannot be established, however it is likely that it contributed to the improved survival. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Operation of south Texas Project, Units 1 and 2, Docket Nos. 50-498 and 50-499, Houston Lighting and Power Company et. al., Matagorda County, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    The draft version of the environmental impact statement, EPA No. 860106D, deals with licensing a startup of Units 1 and 2 of the South Texas Project, both pressurized water reactors. The plant will permanently eliminate over 3000 acres of farmland and affect another 6000 acres of neighboring farmland. It will discharge cooling water into the Colorado River. Mitigation plans call for 1700 acres of bottom land to become a wildlife preserve and for no use of herbicides in grazing areas. Positive impacts will be increased employment for the area with a corresponding increase in revenues. Negative impacts may be changes in marsh productivity and species composition. There may be a loss of habitat for the American alligator. Risks associated with the accidental release of radiation are rated as very low. The Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1972 and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Licensing provide legal mandates

  10. Health Status of Sand Flathead (Platycephalus bassensis, Inhabiting an Industrialised and Urbanised Embayment, Port Phillip Bay, Victoria as Measured by Biomarkers of Exposure and Effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarrad K Baker

    Full Text Available Port Phillip Bay, Australia, is a large semi-closed bay with over four million people living in its catchment basin. The Bay receives waters from the Yarra River which drains the city of Melbourne, as well as receiving the discharges of sewage treatment plants and petrochemical and agricultural chemicals. A 1999 study demonstrated that fish inhabiting Port Phillip Bay showed signs of effects related to pollutant exposure despite pollution management practices having been implemented for over a decade. To assess the current health status of the fish inhabiting the Bay, a follow up survey was conducted in 2015. A suite of biomarkers of exposure and effects were measured to determine the health status of Port Phillip Bay sand flathead (Platycephalus bassensis, namely ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD activity, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH biliary metabolites, carboxylesterase activity (CbE and DNA damage (8-oxo-dG. The reduction in EROD activity in the present study suggests a decline in the presence of EROD activity-inducing chemicals within the Bay since the 1990s. Fish collected in the most industrialised/urbanised sites did not display higher PAH metabolite levels than those in less developed areas of the Bay. Ratios of PAH biliary metabolite types were used to indicate PAH contaminant origin. Ratios indicated fish collected at Corio Bay and Hobsons Bay were subjected to increased low molecular weight hydrocarbons of petrogenic origin, likely attributed to the close proximity of these sites to oil refineries, compared to PAH biliary metabolites in fish from Geelong Arm and Mordialloc. Quantification of DNA damage indicated a localised effect of exposure to pollutants, with a 10-fold higher DNA damage level in fish sampled from the industrial site of Corio Bay relative to the less developed site of Sorrento. Overall, integration of biomarkers by multivariate analysis indicated that the health of fish collected in industrialised areas

  11. Evaluation of U.S. Geological Survey Monitoring-well network and potential effects of changes in water use, Newlands Project, Churchill County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Douglas K.; Seiler, Ralph L.; Watkins, Sharon A.

    2004-01-01

    Domestic wells tapping shallow ground water are an important source of potable water for rural residents of Lahontan Valley. For this reason, the public has expressed concern over the acquisition of water rights directed by Public Law 101-618. The acquisition has resulted in removal of land from irrigation, which could cause shallow domestic wells to go dry and adversely affect shallow ground-water quality. Periodic water-level measurements and water-quality sampling at a monitoring-well network developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provided data to evaluate the potential effects of changes in water use. The USGS, in cooperation with Churchill County, analyzed these data and the monitoring-well network to determine if the network provides an adequate means to measure the response of the shallow aquifer to changes in water use, and to determine if measurable changes have taken place. To evaluate the USGS monitoring-well network, wells were characterized by their distance from active canals or ditches, and from currently (2003) or formerly irrigated land. An analysis of historical data showed that about 9,800 acres of land have been removed from irrigation, generally from the late 1990's to 2003. Twenty-five wells in the network are within about 1 mile of fields removed from irrigation. Of the 25 wells, 13 are within 300 feet of canals or ditches where seepage maintains stable water levels. The 13 wells likely are not useful for detecting changes caused by reductions in irrigation. The remaining 12 wells range from about 400 to 3,800 feet from the nearest canal and are useful for detecting continued changes from current reductions in irrigation. The evaluation showed that of the 75 wells in the network, only 8 wells are likely to be useful for detecting the effects of future (after 2003) reductions in irrigation. Water levels at most of the monitoring wells near irrigated land have declined from 1998 to 2003 because of drought conditions and below normal

  12. VT Boundaries - county polygons

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The BNDHASH dataset depicts Vermont villages, towns, counties, Regional Planning Commissions (RPC), and LEPC (Local Emergency Planning Committee)...

  13. 77 FR 12830 - Pershing County Water Conservation District; Notice of Intent To File License Application, Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ... Water Conservation District; Notice of Intent To File License Application, Filing of Pre-Application.... Submitted by: Pershing County Water Conservation District (Pershing County). e. Name of Project: Humboldt... the Commission's regulations. h. Potential Applicant Contact: Bennie Hodges, Pershing County Water...

  14. 76 FR 30754 - Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement: Riverside and Orange Counties...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    ... Environmental Impact Statement: Riverside and Orange Counties, CA AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA... Riverside and Orange Counties, California. DATES: The comment period for the State Route 91 Corridor... in Riverside and Orange Counties. The State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project proposes to widen...

  15. 75 FR 59285 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permit, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ...] Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permit, San Luis Obispo County, CA AGENCY: U.S. Fish and... project in the community of Los Osos, San Luis Obispo County, California. We invite comments from the... community of Los Osos, San Luis Obispo County, California. The parcel is legally described as Assessor...

  16. Allegheny County Blazed Trails Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Shows the location of blazed trails in all Allegheny County parks. This is the same data used in the Allegheny County Parks Trails Mobile App, available for Apple...

  17. Allegheny County Supermarkets & Convenience Stores

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Location information for all Supermarkets and Convenience Stores in Allegheny County was produced using the Allegheny County Fee and Permit Data for 2016.

  18. Protecting Water Quality With Smart Growth Strategies and Natural Stormwater Management in Sussex County, Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report describes a technical assistance project that explored how smart growth and sustainable stormwater management approaches (known as green infrastructure) could be applied to Sussex County, DE.

  19. Smart Growth Self-Assessment for Rural Communities: Madison County

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report from a technical assistance project to help Madison County, NY, develop a tool to help rural local governments assess how well their policies are helping them achieve the type of development they want.

  20. Allegheny County Watershed Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset demarcates the 52 isolated sub-Watersheds of Allegheny County that drain to single point on the main stem rivers. Created by 3 Rivers 2nd Nature based...

  1. Allegheny County Block Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset overlays a grid on the County to assist in locating a parcel. The grid squares are 3,500 by 4,500 square feet. The data was derived from original...

  2. LANDSLIDES IN SUCEAVA COUNTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zarojanu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the county of Suceava, the landslides are a real and permanent problem. This paper presents the observations of landslides over the last 30 years in Suceava County, especially their morphology, theirs causes and the landslide stopping measures. It presents also several details regarding the lanslides from the town of Suceava, of Frasin and the village of Brodina.

  3. Population analysis relative to geothermal energy development, Imperial County, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pick, J.B.; Jung, T.H.; Butler, E.

    1977-01-01

    The historical and current population characteristics of Imperial County, California, are examined. These include vital rates, urbanization, town sizes, labor force composition, income, utility usage, and ethnic composition. Inferences are drawn on some of the important social and economic processes. Multivariate statistical analysis is used to study present relationships between variables. Population projections for the County were performed under historical, standard, and geothermal projection assumptions. The transferability of methods and results to other geothermal regions anticipating energy development is shown. (MHR)

  4. Dutchess County Resource Recovery Task Force report: Dutchess County Pyrolysis Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    Dutchess County initiated development of a long-range master plan for Solid Waste Management in 1971. The plan included development of a resource recovery facility to service the municipalities in the County population center. Based on early recommendations, a pyrolysis facility employing Purox technology was to be implemented. A feasibility study, paid for by County funds was completed in 1975. The study provided siting recommendations, estimation of available waste, and preliminary facility design. Because of various considerations, the project was not developed. Under the Department of Energy grant, the County reassessed the feasibility of a resource recovery facility, with emphasis on confirming previous conclusions supporting the Purox technology, waste availability, energy recovery and sale and siting of the plant. The conclusions reached in the new study were: a resource recovery facility is feasible for the County; sufficient waste for such a facility is available and subject to control; While Purox technology was feasible it is not the most appropriate available technoloy for the County; that mass burning with steam recovery is the most appropriate technology; and that resource recovery while presently more expensive than landfilling, represents the only cost effective, energy efficient, and environmentally sound way to handle the solid waste problem in the County.

  5. Radon mapping - Santa Barbara and Ventura counties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchill, R.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1990, the Department of Conservation''s Division of Mines and Geology (DMG) has provided geologic information and conducted several research projects on geology and radon for the California Department of Health Services (DHS) Radon Program. This article provides a brief overview of radon''s occurrence and impact on human health, and summarizes a recent DMG project for DHS that used geologic, geochemical, and indoor radon measurement data to produce detailed radon potential zone maps for Santa Barbara and Ventura counties

  6. Columbia County Habitat for Humanity Passive Townhomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-03-01

    Columbia County Habitat for Humanity (CCHH) (New York, Climate Zone 5A) built a pair of townhomes to Passive House Institute U.S. (PHIUS+ 2015) criteria to explore approaches for achieving Passive House performance (specifically with respect to exterior wall, space-conditioning, and ventilation strategies) within the labor and budget context inherent in a Habitat for Humanity project. CCHH’s goal is to eventually develop a cost-justified Passive House prototype design for future projects.

  7. SOLAR PANELS ON HUDSON COUNTY FACILITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BARRY, KEVIN

    2014-06-06

    This project involved the installation of an 83 kW grid-connected photovoltaic system tied into the energy management system of Hudson County's new 60,000 square foot Emergency Operations and Command Center and staff offices. Other renewable energy features of the building include a 15 kW wind turbine, geothermal heating and cooling, natural daylighting, natural ventilation, gray water plumbing system and a green roof. The County intends to seek Silver LEED certification for the facility.

  8. Socioeconomic profile of Clark County, Nevada: Community services inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project is preparing socioeconomic profiles of Clark County, Nevada, and communities in Clark County that could be affected by siting, construction, operation, and decommissioning of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, located in Nye County. These profiles serve as a data base for evaluating local community service impacts; store existing socioeconomic data in a uniform, readily accessible format; identify the need for additional data; and assist in developing a plan for monitoring and mitigating any significant adverse impacts that may be associated with site characterization and potential repository development. This element of the socioeconomic profiles contains an inventory of community services provided by local, county, and state agencies and volunteer organizations to residents of Las Vegas, North Las Vegas, Henderson, Boulder City, Indian Springs, and unincorporated areas of the county. Services inventoried include housing, growth management, general government, education, police protection, transportation networks, public clinics, private health personnel, parks and recreation, social services, libraries, ambulances, electric power, natural gas, water, sewers and wastewater treatment, solid waste, and fire protection. The report includes a summary overview of service providers in Clark County, discussions of the services provided to residents of communities in Clark County that may be affected by Project activities, and a description of service providers whose service areas are not limited to the incorporated areas of Clark County. Data presented in this profile were collected through March of 1985. Data collection efforts are ongoing and this profile will be updated periodically

  9. Chittenden County, Vermont land cover project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    The testing of LANDSAT applicability to urban and agricultural land use analysis at the substate level is described. It is concluded that the LANDSAT system has a place in Vermont and places like it, but that the present operation is inadequate and the need for technology transfer and excellent communication between the producers and users is fundamental to the future of the system and for the realization of benefit from the investment.

  10. Allegheny County Hydrology Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Hydrology Feature Dataset contains photogrammetrically compiled water drainage features and structures including rivers, streams, drainage canals, locks, dams,...

  11. Allegheny County Walk Scores

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Walk Score measures the walkability of any address using a patented system developed by the Walk Score company. For each 2010 Census Tract centroid, Walk Score...

  12. Allegheny County Sheriff Sales

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — List of properties up for auction at a Sheriff Sale. Datasets labeled "Current" contain this month's postings, while those labeled "Archive" contain a running list...

  13. Allegheny County Older Housing

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Older housing can impact the quality of the occupant's health in a number of ways, including lead exposure, housing quality, and factors that may exacerbate...

  14. Allegheny County Dog Licenses

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — A list of dog license dates, dog breeds, and dog name by zip code. Currently this dataset does not include City of Pittsburgh dogs.

  15. Allegheny County Housing Tenure

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Home ownership provides a number of financial, social, and health benefits to American families. Especially in areas with housing price appreciation, home ownership...

  16. Allegheny County Hydrology Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Hydrology Feature Dataset contains photogrammetrically compiled water drainage features and structures including rivers, streams, drainage canals, locks, dams,...

  17. Durham County Demographic Profile

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — (a) Includes persons reporting only one race.(b) Hispanics may be of any race, so also are included in applicable race categories. D: Suppressed to avoid disclosure...

  18. Allegheny County Vacant Properties

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Mail carriers routinely collect data on address no longer receiving mail due to vacancy. This vacancy data is reported quarterly at census tract geographies in the...

  19. 40 CFR 258.41 - Project XL Bioreactor Landfill Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Project XL Bioreactor Landfill... WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Design Criteria § 258.41 Project XL Bioreactor Landfill Projects. (a) Buncombe County, North Carolina Project XL Bioreactor Landfill Requirements...

  20. 2005 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Lewis County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Terrapoint collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Lewis County project of 2005. The project site covered approximately 223 square miles, divided...

  1. 75 FR 51257 - Public Utility District No. 1 of Douglas County (Douglas PUD); Notice of Application Ready for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ... District No. 1 of Douglas County (Douglas PUD); Notice of Application Ready for Environmental Analysis and...: May 27, 2010. d. Applicant: Public Utility District No. 1 of Douglas County (Douglas PUD). e. Name of... in Douglas, Okanogan, and Chelan Counties, Washington. The project currently occupies 15.15 acres of...

  2. 75 FR 40821 - Public Utility District No. 1 of Douglas County; Notice of Settlement Agreement and Soliciting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-14

    ... District No. 1 of Douglas County; Notice of Settlement Agreement and Soliciting Comments July 7, 2010. Take...: Public Utility District No. 1 of Douglas County, Washington. e. Location: The existing project is located at river mile 515.6 on the Columbia River in Chelan, Douglas, and Okanogan Counties in central...

  3. 75 FR 22892 - Environmental Impact Statement: Salt Lake County, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... Lake County, UT AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), USDOT. ACTION: Notice of Intent. SUMMARY... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The FHWA, in cooperation with UDOT, will prepare an EIS for a proposal to address... (WFRC). Improvements are necessary to meet the projected travel demand in 2030 in the project area and...

  4. County digital geologic mapping. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, R.H.; Johnson, G.L.; dePolo, C.M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this project is to create quality-county wide digital 1:250,000-scale geologic maps from existing published 1:250,000-scale Geologic and Mineral Resource Bulletins published by the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology (NBMG). An additional data set, based on current NBMG research, Major and Significant Quaternary and Suspected Quaternary Faults of Nevada, at 1:250,000 scale has also been included.

  5. County digital geologic mapping. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, R.H.; Johnson, G.L.; dePolo, C.M.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to create quality-county wide digital 1:250,000-scale geologic maps from existing published 1:250,000-scale Geologic and Mineral Resource Bulletins published by the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology (NBMG). An additional data set, based on current NBMG research, Major and Significant Quaternary and Suspected Quaternary Faults of Nevada, at 1:250,000 scale has also been included

  6. Allegheny County Fatal Accidental Overdoses

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Fatal accidental overdose incidents in Allegheny County, denoting age, gender, race, drugs present, zip code of incident and zip code of residence. Zip code of...

  7. Allegheny County Zip Code Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset demarcates the zip code boundaries that lie within Allegheny County.If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open...

  8. Allegheny County School District Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset demarcates the school district boundaries within Allegheny County If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open...

  9. 2015 Lowndes County (GA) Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: NOAA OCM Lidar for Lowndes County, GA with the option to Collect Lidar in Cook and Tift Counties, GA Lidar Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task...

  10. Allegheny County Fast Food Establishments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Allegheny County Health Department has generated this list of fast food restaurants by exporting all chain restaurants without an alcohol permit from the...

  11. Allegheny County Park Rangers Outreach

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Launched in June 2015, the Allegheny County Park Rangers program reached over 48,000 people in its first year. Park Rangers interact with residents of all ages and...

  12. Allegheny County Jail Daily Census

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — A daily census of the inmates at the Allegheny County Jail (ACJ). Includes gender, race, age at booking, and current age. The records for each month contain a...

  13. Allegheny County Mortgage Foreclosure Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This data includes filings related to mortgage foreclosure in Allegheny County. The foreclosure process enables a lender to take possession of a property due to an...

  14. Allegheny County Poor Housing Conditions

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This estimate of the percent of distressed housing units in each Census Tract was prepared using data from the American Community Survey and the Allegheny County...

  15. Providing engineering services to counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    An engineer is required by law to safeguard the health, safety and welfare of the public. The current Kansas : statute state, The Board of County Commissioners of each county shall appoint a licensed professional : engineer, whose title shall be c...

  16. Allegheny County Cell Tower Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset portrays cell tower locations as points in Allegheny County. The dataset is based on outbuilding codes in the Property Assessment Parcel Database used...

  17. Curry County E-911 Roads

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Line attributes denoting all street centerlines in Curry County. Dataset includes all centerlines for all county maintained roads, all state and federal highways,and...

  18. Allegheny County Summer Food Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This data set shows the Summer Food Sites located within Allegheny County for children (18 years and younger) for breakfast and lunch during summer recess. OPEN...

  19. Allegheny County Property Sale Transactions

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains data on all Real Property parcels that have sold since 2013 in Allegheny County, PA. Before doing any market analysis on property sales, check...

  20. Allegheny County Land Use Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Allegheny County land use as ascribed to areas of land. The Land Use Feature Dataset contains photogrammetrically compiled information concerning vegetation and...

  1. DOT Official County Highway Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The County Highway Map theme is a scanned and rectified version of the original MnDOT County Highway Map Series. The cultural features on some of these maps may be...

  2. Allegheny County Primary Care Access

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The data on health care facilities includes the name and location of all the hospitals and primary care facilities in Allegheny County. The current listing of...

  3. 75 FR 73059 - Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement of Findings for the Cushman Hydroelectric Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... Floodplain Statement of Findings for the Cushman Hydroelectric Project, Mason County, Washington... Project in Mason County, Washington. These components include a new 3.6 megawatt (MW) powerhouse on the... components of the Cushman Hydroelectric Project in Mason County, Washington. These components include a new 3...

  4. Fayette County Better Buildings Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capella, Arthur [County of Fayette, Uniontown, PA (United States)

    2015-03-04

    The Fayette County Better Buildings Initiative represented a comprehensive and collaborative approach to promoting and implementing energy efficiency improvements. The initiative was designed to focus on implementing energy efficiency improvements in residential units, while simultaneously supporting general marketing of the benefits of implementing energy efficiency measures. The ultimate goal of Fayette County’s Better Buildings Initiative was to implement a total of 1,067 residential energy efficiency retrofits with a minimum 15% estimated energy efficiency savings per unit. Program partners included: United States Department of Energy, Allegheny Power, and Private Industry Council of Westmoreland-Fayette, Fayette County Redevelopment Authority, and various local partners. The program was open to any Fayette County residents who own their home and meet the prequalifying conditions. The level of assistance offered depended upon household income and commitment to undergo a BPI – Certified Audit and implement energy efficiency measures, which aimed to result in at least a 15% reduction in energy usage. The initiative was designed to focus on implementing energy efficiency improvements in residential units, while simultaneously supporting general marketing of the benefits of implementing energy efficiency measures. Additionally, the program had components that involved recruitment and training for employment of persons in the energy sector (green jobs), as well as marketing and implementation of a commercial or community facilities component. The residential component of Fayette County’s Better Buildings Initiative involved a comprehensive approach, providing assistance to low- moderate- and market-rate homeowners. The initiative will also coordinate activities with local utility providers to further incentivize energy efficiency improvements among qualifying homeowners. The commercial component of Fayette County’s Better Building Initiative involved grants

  5. Minnesota County Boundaries - lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Minnesota county boundaries derived from a combination of 1:24,000 scale PLS lines, 1:100,000 scale TIGER, 1:100,000 scale DLG, and 1:24,000 scale hydrography lines....

  6. Minnesota County Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Minnesota county boundaries derived from a combination of 1:24,000 scale PLS lines, 1:100,000 scale TIGER, 1:100,000 scale DLG, and 1:24,000 scale hydrography lines....

  7. Geothermal direct-heat study: Imperial County, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-05-01

    Potential applications of geothermal energy which would be compatible with the agricultural activities in the county were identified and a plan to attract potential users to the area was developed. The intent of the first effort was to identify general classifications of industries which could utilize geothermal heat in production processes. Two levels of analyses were utilized for this effort. Initially, activities relying on previously developed engineering and industrial concepts were investigated to determine capital costs, employment, and potential energy savings. Second, innovative concepts not yet fully developed were investigated to determine their potential applicability to the agricultural base of the county. These investigations indicated that the major potential applications of geothermal heat would involve industries related to food processing or other direct agriculture-related uses of raw materials produced or imported to the county. An implementation plan which can be utilized by the county to market direct heat applications was developed. A socioeconomics analysis examined the potential effects on the county from development of direct heat projects. The county's planning and permitting requirements for dirct heat projects were also examined.

  8. Unconsolidated Aquifers in Tompkins County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Todd S.

    2000-01-01

    Unconsolidated aquifers consisting of saturated sand and gravel are capable of supplying large quantities of good-quality water to wells in Tompkins County, but little published geohydrologic inform ation on such aquifers is available. In 1986, the U.S.Geological Survey (USGS) began collecting geohydrologic information and well data to construct an aquifer map showing the extent of unconsolidated aquifers in Tompkins county. Data sources included (1) water-well drillers. logs; (2) highway and other construction test-boring logs; (3) well data gathered by the Tompkins County Department of Health, (4) test-well logs from geohydrologic consultants that conducted projects for site-specific studies, and (5) well data that had been collected during past investigations by the USGS and entered into the National Water Information System (NWIS) database. In 1999, the USGS, in cooperation with the Tompkins County Department of Planning, compiled these data to construct this map. More than 600 well records were entered into the NWIS database in 1999 to supplement the 350 well records already in the database; this provided a total of 950 well records. The data were digitized and imported into a geographic information system (GIS) coverage so that well locations could be plotted on a map, and well data could be tabulated in a digital data base through ARC/INFO software. Data on the surficial geology were used with geohydrologic data from well records and previous studies to delineate the extent of aquifers on this map. This map depicts (1) the extent of unconsolidated aquifers in Tompkins County, and (2) locations of wells whose records were entered into the USGS NWIS database and made into a GIS digital coverage. The hydrologic information presented here is generalized and is not intended for detailed site evaluations. Precise locations of geohydrologic-unit boundaries, and a description of the hydrologic conditions within the units, would require additional detailed, site

  9. Geothermal development plan: Maricopa County

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

    1982-08-01

    The Maricopa County Geothermal Development Plan evaluated the market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. The study identified six potential geothermal resource areas with temperatures less than 100{sup 0}C (212{sup 0}F) and in addition, four suspected intermediate temperature areas (90{sup 0} to 150{sup 0}C, 194{sup 0} to 300{sup 0}F). Geothermal resources are found to occur in and near the Phoenix metropolitan area where average population growth rates of two to three percent per year are expected over the next 40 years. Rapid growth in the manufacturing, trade and service sectors of the regional economy provides opportunities for the direct utilization of geothermal energy. A regional energy use analysis is included containing energy use and price projections. Water supplies are found to be adequate to support this growth, though agricultural water use is expected to diminish. The study also contains a detailed section matching geothermal resources to potential users. Two comparative analyses providing economic details for space heating projects are incorporated.

  10. Limerick, City and County

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Postcard. Colour drawings of maps of Limerick city and county and Foynes - transatlantic air base flying boat, Dromore Castle, Glenstal Abbey, Ardagh Chalice, Askeaton; the Abbey, Gate Loge Adare Manor, Newcastlewest, King John's Castle, St. Mary's Cathedral (Church of Ireland), The Old Custom House, The Hunt Museum, The Old Mill and Bridge croom, The Coll (de Valera) Cottage Buree, Town Gate Kilmallock, Lough Gur Interpretive Centre, Hospital Ancient hostelry and The Treaty Stone. Copyright ...

  11. UNEMPLOYMENT IN HUNEDOARA COUNTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CLAUDIA ISAC

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Unemployment highlights a state of imbalance on the labour market which is characterized by a surplus of workforce in relation to job vacancies. This imbalance has been more apparent in Hunedoara County than in other counties, due to the fact that there are 3 mono-industrial areas that have been restructured over the past two decades. The effects are presented in this paper in the form of a complex statistical analysis. Thus, based on the evolution of the number of unemployed individuals in 1995, one can observe the periods of significant adverse effects upon the degree of employment. Moreover, one can make correlations with periods of international financial crisis and with the number of employees in the County in order to determine significant variables of the unemployment phenomenon. The content of this paper is significant and represents the analysis of the number of unemployed in the Jiu Valley, scattered across towns. As a form of financial protection, the unemployment benefit represents a financial instrument in the cases determined by this negative phenomenon, which is why in conclusion we make a comparison of the ways this aid is granted throughout several years and in various forms.

  12. 76 FR 59394 - Big Eddy-Knight Transmission Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Bonneville Power Administration Big Eddy-Knight Transmission Project AGENCY... Eddy-Knight Transmission Project in Wasco County, Oregon and Klickitat County, Washington. Construction of the Big Eddy-Knight Transmission Project will accommodate long-term firm transmission requests...

  13. 78 FR 60009 - Environmental Impact Statement: Erie and Genesee Counties, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... and Genesee Counties, New York AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT; New York State... counties of Erie and Genesee, New York (NYSDOT Project Identification Number: 5528.28). A Notice of Intent... CONTACT: Jonathan McDade, Division Administrator, Federal Highway Administration, New York Division, Leo W...

  14. 77 FR 3326 - Cancellation of Environmental Impact Statement in Orange County, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Cancellation of Environmental Impact Statement in Orange County, NC AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), North Carolina Department of... US 70 Business and US 70 Bypass in Orange County, North Carolina. The project is now cancelled...

  15. Community participation in fire management planning: The Trinity county fire safe council's fire plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvonne Everett

    2008-01-01

    In 1999, Trinity County CA, initiated a participatory fire management planning effort. Since that time, the Trinity County Fire Safe Council has completed critical portions of a fire safe plan and has begun to implement projects defined in the plan. Completion of a GIS based, landscape scale fuels reduction element in the plan defined by volunteer fire fighters, agency...

  16. Environmental Assessment for Central Power and Light Company`s proposed Military Highway-CFE tie 138/69-kV transmission line project Brownsville, Cameron County, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    Central Power and Light Company (CPL) intends to upgrade its existing transmission line ties with the Commision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) system in Mexico. CPL currently has a single 69-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in the Brownsville area which connects CPL`s system with the system of CFE. This existing line runs between the Brownsville Switching Station, located on Laredo Road in Brownsville, Cameron County, Texas, and an existing CFE 69-kV line at the Rusteberg Bend of the Rio Grande in Cameron County. Under current conditions of need, the existing 69-kV line does not possess sufficient capability to engage in appropriate power exchanges. Therefore, CPL is proposing to build a new line to link up with CFE. This proposed line would be a double-circuit line, which would (1) continue (on a slightly relocated route) the existing 69-kV tie from CPL`s Brownsville Switching Station to CFE`s facilities, and (2) add a 138-kV tie from the Military Highway Substation, located on Military Highway (US Highway 281), to CFE`s facilities. The proposed 138/69-kV line, which will be constructed and operated by CPL, will be built primarily on steel single-pole structures within an average 60-foot (ft) wide right-of-way (ROW). It will be approximately 6900--9200 ft (1.3--1.7 miles) in length, depending on the alternative route constructed.

  17. Definition and Classification of the Stakeholders in Land Consolidation Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiang-dong; GUO Bi-jun; GUO Mao-xuan

    2012-01-01

    Using the methods of questionnaire survey, statistical analysis and multidimensional rating, we define and classify the stakeholders in land consolidation project. 25 kinds of stakeholders are determined, divided into three categories: core stakeholders, including county-level government, county-level land departments, county-level land consolidation center, the rural collective economic organizations, farmers, township government, and the villagers’ committee; middle stakeholders, including central government, the Ministry of Land and Resources, the Ministry of Land and Resources Land Consolidation Center, the provincial land departments, the provincial land consolidation center, the county-level finance departments, the county-level water resources departments, the government supervisory departments, government audit departments, and the public; peripheral stakeholders, including the county-level environmental protection departments, the county-level agricultural departments, supervisory agencies, design agencies, project contractors, equipment suppliers, material suppliers, and the bidding agencies. The project managers should pay attention to the interest appeal of the stakeholders, and adopt different coping strategies.

  18. Case study: Khoramdareh County

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Riahi Riahi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Environmental sustainability of rural settlements based on a systematic viewpoint may be defined as a realization of sustainable development in different social, economic and environmental aspects of rural areas. Achieving this goal requires that we pay more attention to effective elements and factors through a set of sustainability indices. This research was meant to analyze sustainable factors of rural settlement in three dimensions: environmental, social and economic context using multi-criteria decision analysis and explanation of the relationships between its active and effective factors in the rural area of the Khorramdarreh County in the province of Zanjan. The research method used is the descriptive analytic approach. Data from 287 households were sampled randomly from a total of 1143 households in the four villages including: Rahmat Abad, Alvand, Baghdareh and, Sukhariz (out of 15 villages in the Khorramdarreh County. In the process of doing this research and after calculating the weights, the difference in the sustainability of environmental, social, economic and physical aspects in rural areas of this county have been determined. Data was collected using library and field research through questionnaires. Data analysis was performed by the One-Sample t Test and the Vikur and path analysis techniques, using statistical software SPSS. The findings show that environmental sustainability in the study area is half desirable. Among the different aspects of environmental sustainability, the most effective factors are physical, economic, social and environmental aspects, respectively. Little attention of policy-making –system to socio-cultural and environmental aspects, especially in practice, and rapid and unplanned utilization of production resources are the most important factors affecting this situation in two given dimensions. Although, in programmed documents the planning system agents emphasize on the socio-cultural sustainability

  19. Elder Abuse Awareness Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Kathleen; Morrow, Marilyn J.

    1985-01-01

    The Elder Abuse Awareness Project was undertaken: (1) to determine the incidence of abuse and neglect in seven Illinois counties; and (2) to develop, produce, and distribute educational materials on elder abuse for the service provider and for senior citizens. Results are presented and discussed. (MT)

  20. 2015 Resident Survey (City and County)

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — The purpose of the annual City/County survey: To objectively assess citizen satisfaction with the delivery of City/County servicesTo set a baseline for future...

  1. Allegheny County Beltway System Street Centerlines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Authoritative dataset of the beltway system in Allegheny County. The system was developed to help motorists navigate through Allegheny County on low-traffic roads....

  2. 2016 Resident Survey (City and County)

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — The purpose of the annual City/County survey: To objectively assess citizen satisfaction with the delivery of City/County servicesTo set a baseline for future...

  3. Behavioral Risk Factors: Selected Metropolitan Area Risk Trends (SMART) County Prevalence Data (2011 to 2012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2011 to 2012. BRFSS SMART County Prevalence combined land line and cell phone data. The Selected Metropolitan Area Risk Trends (SMART) project uses the Behavioral...

  4. Behavioral Risk Factors: Selected Metropolitan Area Risk Trends (SMART) County Prevalence Data (2010 and prior)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2002-2010. BRFSS SMART County Prevalence land line only data. The Selected Metropolitan Area Risk Trends (SMART) project uses the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance...

  5. 75 FR 80841 - Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Land in Kern County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... County wishes to secure the land for a buffer zone for their existing landfill. In accordance with 43 CFR... an integral part of a project of public importance and speculative bidding would jeopardize a timely...

  6. Regional Photonics Initiative at the College of Lake County

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulmes, Steven; Kellerhals, William

    2017-01-01

    The College of Lake County Regional Photonics Initiative project was motivated in part by the hiring of out-of-state technicians for local Photonics industry positions. Fifteen high paying employment opportunities during the recent recession could not be filled from the locally available workforce. Research on the current demand and future growth…

  7. 76 FR 53531 - Environmental Impact Statement: Hancock County, MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-26

    ...)] Environmental Impact Statement: Hancock County, MS AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Department Of... that an environmental impact statement will be prepared for a proposed highway project in Hancock... an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the proposed widening and/or realignment of State Route...

  8. 76 FR 6116 - Madera County Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ... meeting in North Fork, California on February 16th, February 23, 2011 and March 9th, 2011, and if.... DATES: The meetings will be held on February 16th, February 23, 2011 and March 9th, 2011, and if... Payments to States Madera County Title II project matters to the attention of the Committee may file...

  9. A Study of Job Demands and Curriculum Development in Agricultural Training Related to the Muskegon County Wastewater Management System. Final Report. Volume I. An Overview of the Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Harold S.; And Others

    This volume is one of a four-volume final report of a research project developed to identify the jobs and training needs for the area of wastewater land treatment systems and related agricultural occupations. The overall purpose of the project is presented in terms of its six subobjectives: (1) To identify the agricultural occupations related to…

  10. Break Lines, This data was produced for the USGS according to specific project requirements. The Lidar derived breaklines cover Somerset County and the Western portion of Wicomico County, Maryland. Inland streams, rivers, lakes, ponds and tidal features are present., Published in 2012, Not Applicable scale, Eastern Shore Regional GIS Cooperative.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Regional | GIS Inventory — Break Lines dataset current as of 2012. This data was produced for the USGS according to specific project requirements. The Lidar derived breaklines cover Somerset...

  11. Ditches and Drainage Structures, Culverts - cross drains were collected using a GPS for drainage basin project. Ditches are planned for the future., Published in 2005, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Effingham County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Ditches and Drainage Structures dataset current as of 2005. Culverts - cross drains were collected using a GPS for drainage basin project. Ditches are planned for...

  12. 78 FR 41390 - Pershing County Water Conservation District; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing with the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-10

    ... Water Conservation District; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing with the Commission and... License. b. Project No.: 14327-000. c. Date filed: June 26, 2013. d. Applicant: Pershing County Water Conservation District. e. Name of Project: Humboldt River Hydro Power Project. f. Location: At the existing U.S...

  13. 77 FR 59166 - South Mississippi Electric Cooperative: Plant Ratcliffe, Kemper County Integrated Gasification...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... SMEPA lacks sufficient control and responsibility over the Project, RUS determined that financing SMEPA... Ratcliffe, Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) Project AGENCY: Rural Utilities..., Mississippi (the Project). The Acting Administrator of RUS has signed the ROD, which is effective on the...

  14. U.S. Geological Survey cooperative water-resources programs in Chester County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Charles R.

    1998-01-01

    Since 1969, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has had a cooperative water-resources investigation program with Chester County to measure and describe the water resources of the County. Generally, the USGS provides one-half of the program funding, and local cooperators are required to provide matching funds. Cooperation has been primarily with the Chester County Water Resources Authority (CCWRA), with participation from the Chester County Health Department and funding from the Chester County Board of Commissioners. Municipalities and the Red Clay Valley Association also have provided part of the funding for several projects. This report describes how the long-term partnership between the USGS and Chester County, Pa., provides the County with the information that it needs for sound water-resources management.The CCWRA was created in 1961, primarily for land acquisition and planning for flood-control and water-supply projects. With the backing of the Brandywine Valley Association, the CCWRA started its first cooperative project with the USGS in 1969. It was a study of the water-quality condition of Chester County streams with an emphasis on benthic macroinvertebrates and stream chemistry.The kinds of projects and data collection conducted by the USGS have changed with the needs of Chester County and the mission of the CCWRA. Chester County is experiencing rapid population growth (it had the tenth-highest rate of growth in the nation from 1980 to 1990). This growth places considerable stress on water resources and has caused the CCWRA to broaden its focus from flood control to water-supply planning, water quality, and ground-water and surface-water management. The results of USGS studies are used by the CCWRA and other County agencies, including the Planning Commission, Health Department, and Parks and Recreation Department, for conducting day-to-day activities and planning for future growth. The results also are used by the CCWRA to provide guidance and technical

  15. Oil heritage district : Lambton County Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, W. [Wendy Shearer Landscape Architect, Kitchener, ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This paper discussed a project conducted to assess the cultural heritage values of oil field equipment in Lambton County, Ontario. Oil was discovered in the region in 1858, after which a boom and bust cycle of exploration created a large rural-industrial landscape. The region now contains a unique collection of historic oil equipment. The region's industrial footprint is interwoven with village settlements, agricultural settlements, and a railway and road network linking the region to remote refineries. Oil wells in the region still operate using a jerker line system developed in the early twentieth century. The operational oil wells are subject to fluctuating oil prices and environmental protection requirements. The project presents a rare opportunity to place industrial heritage conservation directly in the hands of business operators and regulators, while also functioning as part of a living community. 2 figs.

  16. Rural migration in Nevada: Lincoln County. Phase 1, 1992--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soden, D.L.; Carns, D.E.; Mosser, D.; Conary, J.S.; Ansell, J.P.

    1993-12-31

    The principal objective of this project was to develop insight into the scope of migration of working age Nevadans out of their county of birth; including the collection of data on their skill levels, desire to out or in-migrate, interactions between families of migratory persons, and the impact that the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca mountain might have on their individual, and collective, decisions to migrate and return. The initial phase of this project reported here was conducted in 1992 and 1993 in Lincoln County, Nevada, one of the counties designated as ``affected`` by the proposed repository program. The findings suggest that a serious out-migration problem exists in Lincoln County, and that the Yucca mountain project will likely affect decisions relating to migration patterns in the future.

  17. Wind power and defense interests on Gotland. Presentation of a joint project between the County Administrative Board, Region Gotland and the Swedish Armed Forces in 2011; Vindkraft och foersvarsintressen paa Gotland. Redovisning av ett samverkansprojekt mellan Laensstyrelsen, Region Gotland och Foersvarsmakten 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The island of Gotland has a large potential for wind power production. An existing weather radar system, however, causes extensive restrictions for further development of wind power on Gotland. In a joint project during 2011 the County Administration Board of Gotland, the Municipality of Gotland and the Swedish Armed Forces have explored ways to overcome the existing conflicts. The project has been sponsored by the Swedish Energy Agency. Through the collaboration, the participants have gained a better understanding of various aspects of the conflicting interests. Studies have been carried out with the prospect to modelling alternative solutions to reduce the conflicts. The study regarding the radar system has been carried out by the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Inst.. This report present some practical solutions to avoid conflict in most of areas which are planned for wind power by the municipality. It is suggested that a complimentary radar can be built. A number of alternative localizations for the complimentary radar have been suggested and the potential effects for wind power production estimated. Costs for the suggested solutions have been calculated.

  18. HYDRAULICS, Stearns County, MN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  19. HYDRAULICS, OSCEOLA COUNTY, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  20. HYDRAULICS, GREENE COUNTY, ARKANSAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  1. Hydraulics, HOUSTON COUNTY, AL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  2. Hydraulics, OCONEE COUNTY, SC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  3. HYDRAULICS, PENNINGTON COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  4. HYDRAULICS, MARSHALL COUNTY, MS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  5. Hydraulics, AROOSTOOK COUNTY, MAINE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  6. HYDRAULICS, WILKINSON COUNTY, MS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  7. HYDRAULICS, Allegheny County, PA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  8. HYDRAULICS, DESOTO COUNTY, MS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  9. HYDRAULICS, BUTTE COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  10. HYDRAULICS, BUTLER COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  11. HYDRAULICS, ANDERSON COUNTY, SC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  12. HYDRAULICS, MEADE COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  13. HYDRAULICS, LAWRENCE COUNTY, ARKANSAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  14. HYDRAULICS, Madison COUNTY, IN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  15. Broward County, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  16. Hydraulics, DARLINGTON COUNTY, SC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  17. HYDRAULICS, SIMPSON COUNTY, MS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  18. HYDRAULICS, GILCHRIST COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  19. HYDRAULICS, LAKE COUNTY, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  20. HYDROLOGY, LAKE COUNTY, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  1. Hydraulics, GREENVILLE COUNTY, SC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  2. HYDROLOGY, Chester COUNTY, SC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  3. HYDRAULICS, MERCED COUNTY, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  4. HYDRAULICS, Sanborn COUNTY, SD

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  5. HYDRAULICS, POWESHIEK COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  6. HYDRAULICS, CHARLES COUNTY, MD

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  7. CHESTERFIELD COUNTY, VIRGINIA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  8. Reduction of community alcohol problems: computer simulation experiments in three counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, H D; Blose, J O

    1987-03-01

    A series of alcohol abuse prevention strategies was evaluated using computer simulation for three counties in the United States: Wake County, North Carolina, Washington County, Vermont and Alameda County, California. A system dynamics model composed of a network of interacting variables was developed for the pattern of alcoholic beverage consumption in a community. The relationship of community drinking patterns to various stimulus factors was specified in the model based on available empirical research. Stimulus factors included disposable income, alcoholic beverage prices, advertising exposure, minimum drinking age and changes in cultural norms. After a generic model was developed and validated on the national level, a computer-based system dynamics model was developed for each county, and a series of experiments was conducted to project the potential impact of specific prevention strategies. The project concluded that prevention efforts can both lower current levels of alcohol abuse and reduce projected increases in alcohol-related problems. Without such efforts, already high levels of alcohol-related family disruptions in the three counties could be expected to rise an additional 6% and drinking-related work problems 1-5%, over the next 10 years after controlling for population growth. Of the strategies tested, indexing the price of alcoholic beverages to the consumer price index in conjunction with the implementation of a community educational program with well-defined target audiences has the best potential for significant problem reduction in all three counties.

  9. 2009 SCDRN Lidar: Florence County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) contracted with Sanborn to provide LiDAR mapping services for Florence County, SC. Utilizing multi-return...

  10. Allegheny County Soil Type Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains soil type and soil classification, by area. Additional info at: http://mcdc.cas.psu.edu/datawiz.htm;...

  11. Allegheny County Property Assessment Appeals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Lists property assessment appeals filed and heard with the Board of Property Assessment Appeals and Review (BPAAR) and the hearing results, for tax years 2015 to...

  12. Allegheny County Basin Outlines Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This basins dataset was created to initiate regional watershed approaches with respect to sewer rehabilitation. If viewing this description on the Western...

  13. 2009 SCDNR Charleston County Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Photoscience completed the original collection and classification of the multiple return LiDAR of Charleston County, South Carolina in the winter of 2006-2007. In...

  14. Allegheny County Certified MWDBE Businesses

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — According to the Federal Department of Transportation, Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBE) are for-profit small business concerns where socially and...

  15. County Boundaries with Shorelines (National)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — County boundaries with shorelines cut in (NTAD). The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and...

  16. Allegheny County Land Cover Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Land Cover dataset demarcates 14 land cover types by area; such as Residential, Commercial, Industrial, Forest, Agriculture, etc. If viewing this description on...

  17. 2009 Chatham County Georgia Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR generated point cloud acquired in spring 2009 for Chatham County, Georgia for the Metropolitan Planning Commission. The data are classified as follows: Class 1...

  18. 2014 Mobile County, AL Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Atlantic was contracted to acquire high resolution topographic LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data located in Mobile County, Alabama. The intent was to collect...

  19. Uninsured Young Adults by County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This data file indicates the estimated number of uninsured individuals ages 19-25 in each U.S. county. These individuals may be eligible to join their parents health...

  20. Allegheny County Toxics Release Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) data provides information about toxic substances released into the environment or managed through recycling, energy recovery, and...

  1. Allegheny County Map Index Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Map Index Sheets from Block and Lot Grid of Property Assessment and based on aerial photography, showing 1983 datum with solid line and NAD 27 with 5 second grid...

  2. Allegheny County Building Footprint Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains photogrammetrically compiled roof outlines of buildings. All near orthogonal corners are square. Buildings that are less than 400 square feet...

  3. County business patterns, 1996 : Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  4. County business patterns, 1997 : Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  5. County business patterns, 1997 : Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  6. County business patterns, 1997 : Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  7. County business patterns, 1997 : Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  8. County business patterns, 1996 : Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  9. County business patterns, 1996 : Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  10. County business patterns, 1996 : Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  11. County business patterns, 1996 : Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  12. County business patterns, 1996 : Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  13. County business patterns, 1997 : Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  14. County business patterns, 1997 : Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  15. County business patterns, 1997 : Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  16. County business patterns, 1996 : Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  17. County business patterns, 1996 : Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  18. County business patterns, 1996 : Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  19. County business patterns, 1997 : Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  20. County business patterns, 1997 : Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  1. County business patterns, 1997 : Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  2. County business patterns, 1997 : Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  3. County business patterns, 1997 : Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  4. County business patterns, 1997 : Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  5. County business patterns, 1996 : Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  6. County business patterns, 1997 : Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  7. County business patterns, 1997 : Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  8. County business patterns, 1996 : Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  9. County business patterns, 1997 : Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  10. County business patterns, 1997 : Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  11. County business patterns, 1996 : Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  12. County business patterns, 1996 : Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  13. County business patterns, 1996 : Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  14. County business patterns, 1997 : Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  15. County business patterns, 1996 : Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  16. County business patterns, 1996 : Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  17. County business patterns, 1997 : Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  18. County business patterns, 1996 : Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  19. County business patterns, 1996 : Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  20. County business patterns, 1997 : Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  1. County business patterns, 1996 : Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  2. County business patterns, 1996 : Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  3. County business patterns, 1996 : Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  4. County business patterns, 1996 : Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  5. County business patterns, 1997 : Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  6. County business patterns, 1997 : Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  7. County business patterns, 1997 : Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  8. County business patterns, 1996 : Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  9. County business patterns, 1997 : Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  10. County business patterns, 1997 : Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  11. County business patterns, 1996 : Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  12. County business patterns, 1997 : Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  13. County business patterns, 1997 : Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  14. County business patterns, 1997 : Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  15. County business patterns, 1997 : Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  16. County business patterns, 1997 : Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  17. County business patterns, 1996 : Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  18. County business patterns, 1996 : Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  19. County business patterns, 1997 : Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  20. County business patterns, 1996 : Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  1. County business patterns, 1997 : Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  2. County business patterns, 1996 : Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  3. County business patterns, 1996 : Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  4. County business patterns, 1996 : Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  5. County business patterns, 1996 : Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  6. County business patterns, 1997 : Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  7. County business patterns, 1997 : Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  8. County business patterns, 1996 : Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  9. County business patterns, 1997 : Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  10. County business patterns, 1997 : Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  11. County business patterns, 1996 : Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  12. County business patterns, 1996 : Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  13. County business patterns, 1996 : California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  14. County business patterns, 1996 : Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that : provides subnational economic data by industry. The series : is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  15. County business patterns, 1997 : Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  16. County business patterns, 1997 : Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  17. Allegheny County WIC Vendor Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains the locations of Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program vendors. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data...

  18. 2009 SCDNR Horry County Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sanborn Map Company completed the original classification of the multiple return LiDAR of Horry County, South Carolina in 2009. In 2013, Dewberry was tasked with...

  19. Soils - Volusia County Soils (Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Soils: 1:24000 SSURGO Map. Polygon boundaries of Soils in Volusia County, downloaded from SJRWMD and created by NRCS and SJRWMD. This data set is a digital version...

  20. Allegheny County Environmental Justice Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Environmental Justice areas in this guide have been defined by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. The Department defines an environmental...

  1. Allegheny County Illegal Dump Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Illegal Dump Site dataset includes information on illegal dump sites, their type of trash, and the estimate tons of trash at each site. The information was...

  2. Allegheny County Wooded Area Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset demarcates stands of trees (coniferous and deciduous) too numerous to plot as individual trees. The area is delineated following a generalized line...

  3. Returns on Investment in California County Departments of Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Timothy T

    2016-08-01

    To estimate the average return on investment for the overall activities of county departments of public health in California. I gathered the elements necessary to estimate the average return on investment for county departments of public health in California during the period 2001 to 2008-2009. These came from peer-reviewed journal articles published as part of a larger project to develop a method for determining return on investment for public health by using a health economics framework. I combined these elements by using the standard formula for computing return on investment, and performed a sensitivity analysis. Then I compared the return on investment for county departments of public health with the returns on investment generated for various aspects of medical care. The estimated return on investment from $1 invested in county departments of public health in California ranges from $67.07 to $88.21. The very large estimated return on investment for California county departments of public health relative to the return on investment for selected aspects of medical care suggests that public health is a wise investment.

  4. Returns on Investment in California County Departments of Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To estimate the average return on investment for the overall activities of county departments of public health in California. Methods. I gathered the elements necessary to estimate the average return on investment for county departments of public health in California during the period 2001 to 2008–2009. These came from peer-reviewed journal articles published as part of a larger project to develop a method for determining return on investment for public health by using a health economics framework. I combined these elements by using the standard formula for computing return on investment, and performed a sensitivity analysis. Then I compared the return on investment for county departments of public health with the returns on investment generated for various aspects of medical care. Results. The estimated return on investment from $1 invested in county departments of public health in California ranges from $67.07 to $88.21. Conclusions. The very large estimated return on investment for California county departments of public health relative to the return on investment for selected aspects of medical care suggests that public health is a wise investment. PMID:27310339

  5. Socioeconomic profile of Nye County, Nevada: Community services inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project is preparing socioeconomic profiles of Nye County, Nevada, and communities in Nye County that could be affected by siting, construction, operation, and decommissioning of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, located in Nye County. These profiles serve as a data base for evaluating local community service impacts; store existing socioeconomic data in a uniform, readily accessible format; identify the need for additional data; and assist in developing a plan for monitoring and mitigating any significant adverse impacts that may be associated with site characterization and potential repository development. This element of the socioeconomic profiles contains an inventory of community services provided by local, county, and state agencies and volunteer organizations to residents of Amargosa Valley, Beatty, and Pahrump. Services inventoried for each community include housing, growth management, general government, education, police protection, transportation networks, public clinics, private health personnel, parks and recreation, social services, libraries, ambulances, electric power, heating fuel, water, sewers and wastewater treatment, solid waste, and fire protection. The report includes a summary overview of service providers in Nye County, discussions of services provided to residents of the three communities, and summary tables. Data presented in this profile were collected through early 1985. Data collection efforts are ongoing and this profile will be updated periodically

  6. Agricultural irrigated land-use inventory for Jackson, Calhoun, and Gadsden Counties in Florida, and Houston County in Alabama, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marella, Richard L.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2015-09-18

    A detailed inventory of irrigated crop acreage is not available at the level of resolution needed to accurately estimate water use or to project future water demands in many Florida counties. This report provides a detailed digital map and summary of irrigated areas for 2014 within Jackson, Calhoun, and Gadsden Counties in Florida, and Houston County in Alabama. The irrigated areas were delineated using land-use data and orthoimagery that were then field verified between June and November 2014. Selected attribute data were collected for the irrigated areas, including crop type, primary water source, and type of irrigation system. Results of the 2014 study indicate that an estimated 31,608 acres were irrigated in Jackson County during 2014. This estimate includes 25,733 acres of field crops, 1,534 acres of ornamentals and grasses (including pasture), and 420 acres of orchards. Specific irrigated crops include cotton (11,759 acres), peanuts (9,909 acres), field corn (2,444 acres), and 3,235 acres of various vegetable (row) crops. The vegetable acreage includes 1,714 acres of which 857 acres were planted with both a spring and fall crop on the same field (double cropped). Overall, groundwater was used to irrigate 98.6 percent of the total irrigated acreage in Jackson County during 2014, whereas surface water and wastewater were used to irrigate the remaining 1.4 percent.

  7. Best Manufacturing Practices. Report of Survey Conducted at Stafford County Public Schools, Stafford County, VA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1994-01-01

    During the week of August 8, 1994, a Best Manufacturing Practices (BMP) survey was conducted at the Stafford County Public Schools located in Stafford County, Virginia, considered one of the fastest growing counties in the state...

  8. EXPLORATORY ANALYSIS OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE IN GALATI COUNTY BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela GHEORGHE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on data collected as part of the COMOR Project, developed by The Scientific Society of Management from Romania, for the analysis of organizational culture in the Romanian business environment, we have initiated an exploration using Business Intelligence tools. The purpose of this analysis is to find relevant information about the organizational culture for Galati County, starting from the results obtained in this project, and, using data mining techniques, to investigate relationships and links between responses to different survey questions, in this "mine" data, gathered by the project team effort.

  9. 75 FR 81264 - Public Utility District No. 1 of Douglas County; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 2149-152] Public Utility District No. 1 of Douglas County; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement December 16, 2010. On May 27, 2010, Public Utility District No. 1 of Douglas County filed an application for the...

  10. 77 FR 75144 - Foreign-Trade Zone 277-Western Maricopa County, AZ; Application for Expansion; (New Magnet Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ... Maricopa County, AZ; Application for Expansion; (New Magnet Site) Under Alternative Site Framework An... additional new magnet sites in western Maricopa County, Arizona and request usage-driven designation for an..., Arizona. The current zone project includes the following magnet sites: Site 1 (230.25 acres)--within the...

  11. Our Stories Transforming Our Libraries: The York County Library System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Edmondson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available These narratives chronicle the authors’ journeys to collaborate and discover the transformative impact that stories have on library culture and library staff. This study describes a research collaboration between York County Libraries and Penn State York. In Phase I, we collected stories from library staff as the library system was being challenged to reimage public libraries for the future. The major themes and types of organizational stories identified in the initial narrative project were presented during a county-wide all-staff in-service training. The library District Consultant (first author and the Penn State professor (second author then facilitated a workshop designed to lead staff in their exploration of these topics and generate a written record of their storytelling/discussions. This data became the basis for Phase II of the project and allowed the system to strategically assess its evolving culture and identity.

  12. Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Vermejo Project area and the Maxwell National Wildlife Refuge, Colfax County, northeastern New Mexico, 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolino, J.R.; Garrabrant, L.A.; Wilson, Mark; Lusk, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    Based on findings of limited studies during 1989-92, a reconnaissance investigation was conducted in 1993 to assess the effects of the Vermejo Irrigation Project on water quality in the area of the project, including the Maxwell National Wildlife Refuge. This project was part of a U.S. Department of the Interior National Irrigation Water-Quality Program to determine whether irrigation drainage has caused or has the potential to cause significant harmful effects on human health, fish, and wildlife and whether irrigation drainage may adversely affect the suitability of water for other beneficial uses. For this study, samples of water, sediment, and biota were collected from 16 sites in and around the Vermejo Irrigation Project prior to, during the latter part of, and after the 1993 irrigation season (April, August-September, and November, respectively). No inorganic constituents exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water standards. The State of New Mexico standard of 750 micrograms per liter for boron in irrigation water was exceeded at three sites (five samples), though none exceeded the livestock water standard of 5,000 micrograms per liter. Selenium concentrations exceeded the State of New Mexico chronic standard of 2 micrograms per liter for wildlife and fisheries water in at least eight samples from five sites. Bottom-sediment samples were collected and analyzed for trace elements and compared to concentrations of trace elements in soils of the Western United States. Concentrations of three trace elements at eight sites exceeded the upper values of the expected 95-percent ranges for Western U.S. soils. These included molybdenum at one site, selenium at seven sites, and uranium at four sites. Cadmium and copper concentrations exceeded the National Contaminant Biomonitoring Program 85th percentile in fish from six sites. Average concentrations of selenium in adult brine flies (33.7 mg/g dry weight) were elevated above concentrations in other

  13. Operation of South Texas Project, Units 1 and 2 Docket Nos. 50-498 and 50-499, Houston Lighting and Power Company et.al., Matagorda County, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-08-01

    The final environmental impact statement (EPA No. 860376F) on a proposal to issue operating licenses for units 1 and 2 of the South Texas Project describes the two pressurized waters reactors that will produce 1250 MWe per unit. A closed-cycle will use water from the Colorado River for cooling. The site will include prime farmland. The study finds no significant effect on aquatic productivity of the river and no disruptions of the terrestrial biota. Economic benefits will include about 1800 new jobs, which will raise tax revenues and spur the local economy. Area marsh lands and wildlife habitat will suffer. The risk of exposure to accidental radiation is considered very low. The Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1972 and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Licensing require the impact study

  14. Stakeholder Choices in Adaptation and Public Finance Planning for Coastal Hazard Mitigation in a Changing World: Highlights from Case Studies in Santos, Brazil, Broward County, FL, US and Selsey, UK (The METROPOLE Project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller-Karger, F. E.; Merrill, S.; Pelling, M.; Marengo, J. A.; Reynolds, C. J.; Langbehn, K.; Paterson, S.; Nunes, L. H.; Kartez, J.; Lockman, J. T.

    2016-12-01

    Better integration of the human dimensions (values, beliefs, cultural identity, place, risk perceptions, communications, decision making) with scientific, technical, and economic data is required to advance effective municipal planning for adaptation to changes that can be expected to occur based on a changing climate. The international METROPOLE project offers practical insights and a path forward for coastal communities around the world with results from applied research carried out by social scientists, natural scientists, and practitioners working in coastal municipalities in Brazil, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Decision makers were interviewed to assess the Adaptive Capacity of their communities, and stakeholders were engaged in workshops to discuss the risks due to projected sea level rise (SLR) in terms of impacts and costs to property. The team investigated the social, cultural, and governance factors that shape decision making. Municipal leaders and local experts selected the SLR scenarios and adaptation options to be modelled using COAST, a state-of-the-art tool. The visualizations and risk maps integrated scientific and local economic data, and illustrated the potential impacts on 10,000 properties in each study area. Stakeholders voted on parameters to determine the cost-benefit ratio of potential adaptation options. Stakeholder priorities for local adaption planning, agreement with the need for increased fees/taxes, and acceptability of possible public finance mechanisms were evaluated with pre- and post-workshop surveys. The research identified similar patterns of adaptation "priorities" and new insight into how stakeholders consider public finance mechanisms for local action, in the context of "fiscal benefits and burdens." The research suggests implications for small towns, land-use policy changes, implementing adaptation options which deliver short and long-term benefits, and, for state and local governments to develop finance policy

  15. To Strengthen Policy Guiding Regionalization of Occupational Programs in New Jersey County Community Colleges. A Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorana, S. V.; And Others

    In 1985 a project was developed to strengthen policy guiding regionalization of occupational programs in New Jersey county community colleges. The project had three major goals: to establish a policy for the regionalization of selected occupational programs offered by the colleges; to describe ways that programs could be identified for regional…

  16. Geothermal development plan: Maricopa county

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    Maricopa county is the area of Arizona receiving top priority since it contains over half of the state's population. The county is located entirely within the Basin and Range physiographic region in which geothermal resources are known to occur. Several approaches were taken to match potential users to geothermal resources. One approach involved matching some of the largest facilities in the county to nearby geothermal resources. Other approaches involved identifying industrial processes whose heat requirements are less than the average assessed geothermal reservoir temperature of 110/sup 0/C (230/sup 0/F). Since many of the industries are located on or near geothermal resources, geothermal energy potentially could be adapted to many industrial processes.

  17. Allegheny County-Owned Roads Centerlines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset shows the roads owned by Allegheny County. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data portal...

  18. Allegheny County Farmers Markets Locations (2017)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset shows the locations of farmers markets in Allegheny County. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data...

  19. Allegheny County Polling Place Locations (November 2017)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains locations of the polling places in Allegheny County.If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data...

  20. Allegheny County Voting District (2016) Web Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This webmap demarcates municipal voting districts in Allegheny County. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data...

  1. Port Authority of Allegheny County Transit Stops

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — All transit stops within the Port Authority of Allegheny County's service area for the November 20, 2016 - March (TBD) 2017 schedule period.

  2. Allegheny County Particulate Matter 2.5

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency provides information on the particulate matter concentration for Allegheny County that have a diameter greater or equal to...

  3. State of Aging in Allegheny County Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — For more than three decades UCSUR has documented the status of older adults in the County along multiple life domains. Every decade we issue a comprehensive report...

  4. Allegheny County Polling Place Locations (May 2017)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains locations of the polling places in Allegheny County.If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data...

  5. 2010 South Carolina DNR Lidar: Sumter County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Provide high density LiDAR elevation data map of Sumter County, SC. Provide Bare Earth DEM (vegetation removal) of Sumter County, SC.

  6. 2010 South Carolina DNR Lidar: Richland County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Provide high density LiDAR elevation data map of Richland County, SC. Provide Bare Earth DEM (vegetation removal) of Richland County, SC.

  7. Allegheny County Weights and Measures Inspections

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Inspections conducted by the Allegheny County Bureau of Weights and Measures. The Bureau inspects weighing and timing devices such as gas pumps, laundromat timers,...

  8. Allegheny County Voting District (2015) Web Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This webmap demarcates municipal voting districts in Allegheny County. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data...

  9. Allegheny County Polling Place Locations (November 2015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains locations of the polling places in Allegheny County.If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data...

  10. Allegheny County-Owned Bridges Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset shows the location of bridges owned by Allegheny County as centroids. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s...

  11. Allegheny County Magisterial Districts Outlines (2015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset shows the magisterial districts in Allegheny County. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data portal...

  12. 2010 South Carolina DNR Lidar: Kershaw County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Provide high density LiDAR elevation data map of Kershaw County, SC. Provide Bare Earth DEM (vegetation removal) of Kershaw County, SC.

  13. Allegheny County Median Age at Death

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The median age at death is calculated for each municipality in Allegheny County. Data is based on the decedent's residence at the time of death, not the location...

  14. Douglas County Historical Rectified Aerial Photos 1937

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This raster dataset consists of approximately 200 aerial photographs taken in 1937 in Douglas county, Kansas, United States. The Douglas County Public Works...

  15. Douglas County Historical Rectified Aerial Photos 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This raster dataset consists of approximately 200 aerial photographs taken in 1954 in Douglas county, Kansas, United States. The Douglas County Public Works...

  16. Statement of Kenneth E. Yager, County Executive, Roane County, TN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    I am Ken Yager, I am the county executive for Roane County, TN which is the preferred site for the proposed Monitored Retrieval Storage facility, or the MRS. and I am submitting into the record additional written testimony which was written largely by the Honorable Robert Peele, who is sitting here, who is a member of the Roane County Board of Commissioners, our local legislative body. The premise of my remarks is that the Department of Energy proposal for the MRS in our county in unacceptable unless the Congress and the Department of Energy are to be willing partners with the local communities. Our considerations have been limited to: one, can an MRS be operated safely, and if so under what conditions; and what would be the impacts of the facility and how might they be mitigated. Our recommendations on those two points lead me to my earlier comment about being partners with the Congress, because our recommendations can be summed up simply, Mr. Chairman, as local control. We are exceedingly concerned about the prospect of being trapped in a national squeeze play, caught between a recognized need for a way to deal with nuclear waste and intense political efforts to put that problem in somebody else's back yard. And if we are to be that back yard, we would ask that the Congress and the Department of Energy recognize our stake in this national effort. We must have an equal role in the process

  17. CarbonSAFE Illinois - Macon County

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittaker, Steve [University of Illinois; Illinois State Geological Survey

    2017-08-03

    CarbonSAFE Illinois is a a Feasibility study to develop an established geologic storage complex in Macon County, Illinois, for commercial-scale storage of industrially sourced CO2. Feasibility activities are focused on the Mt. Simon Storage Complex; a step-out well will be drilled near existing storage sites (i.e., the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium’s Illinois Basin – Decatur Project and the Illinois Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Project) to further establish commercial viability of this complex and to evaluate EOR potential in a co-located oil-field trend. The Archer Daniels Midland facility (ethanol plant), City Water, Light, and Power in Springfield, Illinois (coal-fired power station), and other regional industries are potential sources of anthropogenic CO2 for storage at this complex. Site feasibility will be evaluated through drilling results, static and dynamic modeling, and quantitative risk assessment. Both studies will entail stakeholder engagement, consideration of infrastructure requirements, existing policy, and business models. Project data will help calibrate the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) Toolkit to better understand the risks of commercial-scale carbon storage.

  18. Project VUE: Volunteers Upholding Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, John C.

    This document reports on a project aimed at developing, implementing, and evaluating a plan for using volunteer classroom aides in the Palm Beach County (Florida) schools as a means for meeting various financial, human, and community needs. The desirability of a comprehensive volunteer plan was presented in a 10-point summary by an ad hoc…

  19. Inventory of power plants in the United States. [By state within standard Federal Regions, using county codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    The purpose of this inventory of power plants is to provide a ready reference for planners whose focus is on the state, standard Federal region, and/or national level. Thus the inventory is compiled alphabetically by state within standard Federal regions. The units are listed alphabetically within electric utility systems which in turn are listed alphabetically within states. The locations are identified to county level according to the Federal Information Processing Standards Publication Counties and County Equivalents of the States of the United States. Data compiled include existing and projected electrical generation units, jointly owned units, and projected construction units.

  20. Low-Wage Counties Face Locational Disadvantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Robert; Cromartie, John B.

    2000-01-01

    Small populations and remoteness are the most salient features of low-wage counties. These locational attributes coincide with fewer high-wage jobs, yet low wages within industries define low-wage counties more than industry composition. Although adults in low-wage counties have less education and labor force participation overall, the role played…