WorldWideScience

Sample records for project coordinator john

  1. Improving Project Manufacturing Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korpivaara Ville

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to develop firms’ project manufacturing coordination. The development will be made by centralizing the manufacturing information flows in one system. To be able to centralize information, a deep user need assessment is required. After user needs have been identified, the existing system will be developed to match these needs. The theoretical background is achieved through exploring the literature of project manufacturing, development project success factors and different frameworks and tools for development project execution. The focus of this research is rather in customer need assessment than in system’s technical expertise. To ensure the deep understanding of customer needs this study is executed by action research method. As a result of this research the information system for project manufacturing coordination was developed to respond revealed needs of the stakeholders. The new system improves the quality of the manufacturing information, eliminates waste in manufacturing coordination processes and offers a better visibility to the project manufacturing. Hence it provides a solid base for the further development of project manufacturing.

  2. Capital projects coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubović Jovan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at the difficulties of managing modem capital projects and endeavors to reduce the complexities to simpler and more understandable terms. It examines the project environment, defines project management and discusses points of difference from traditional management. In the second part of the paper are presented fundamentals for project success for different types of projects.

  3. Coordinated research projects (CRP). Coordinated research project (CRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Hidekazu; Koike, Fumihiro; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, the contribution of Japanese scientists in coordinated research projects on thermonuclear fusion. Representative subjects taken in seven projects are the precise computation of theoretical data on electron-molecule collisions in the peripheral plasma, the computation of spectroscopic data of multi-charged tungsten ions, the spectroscopic measurement of multi-charged tungsten ions using an ion trap device, the development of collisional-radiative model for plasmas including hydrogen and helium, the computational and theoretical studies on the behavior of tungsten and beryllium in the plasma-wall interaction, the study on the property of dusts generated in fusion devices. These subjects are those of most important issues in ITER. (author)

  4. Project Coordinator - Karianet | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Primary Duties or Responsibilities. The specific responsibilities of the Project Coordinator are grouped into three categories: Knowledge Management, Research Management and Project Management. As Knowledge Manager, the program coordinator will play a lead role in: Introducing and using knowledge management ...

  5. Saint John lateral pipeline project: comprehensive study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-02-01

    A descripion is given of the results of an environmental impact assessment of the construction of a natural gas pipeline that will bring gas from Maritimes and Northeast Pipeline Management Ltd.'s (M and NP) main transmission pipeline to clients in Lake Utopia and Saint John, NB. It will be 110 km long, and the Saint John lateral will join the mainline approximately 2 km south of Big Kedron Lake, NB. Various institutional, industrial, commercial and residential clients will be able to access the pipeline in the future, and it is intended to be capable of future expansion for markets along its route and for markets that become economically feasible in the future. A matrix was developed that relates environmental resources to Environmental Components of Concern (ECCs), and to the rationale for exclusion/inclusion of the ECC as a Valued Environmental Component (VECs). The positive benefits of the pipeline to clients in the Saint John area include: reduced dependence on foreign oil, fuel switching and price competition, lower air emission pollution, increased energy efficiency, and a source of energy that is secure and reliable. VECs were selected based on: concerns of various stakeholders including the public, community groups, scientific parties, Aboriginal groups, government officials and agencies, relevant regulations; relevant literature; and past evaluation experiences, including future developments of the proposed study area. Further selection of the VECs required an examination of the issues picked out via scoping to determine the ways in which the overall project could affect the ECCs, and included construction, operation, decommissioning/abandonment, malfunctions and accidents of the pipeline. The phases of the project as they impacted residually and cumulatively on the VECs were evaluated, and impacts on Valued Socio-Economic Components (VSCs) were assessed also. The mitigation efforts taken will minimize the potential effects of the project on VECs and VSCs

  6. Coordinate systems and map projections

    CERN Document Server

    Maling, DH

    1992-01-01

    A revised and expanded new edition of the definitive English work on map projections. The revisions take into account the huge advances in geometrical geodesy which have occurred since the early years of satellite geodesy. The detailed configuration of the geoid resulting from the GEOS and SEASAT altimetry measurements are now taken into consideration. Additionally, the chapter on computation of map projections is updated bearing in mind the availability of pocket calculators and microcomputers. Analytical derivation of some map projections including examples of pseudocylindrical and polyconic

  7. Coordinate transformations, orthographic projections, and robot kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crochetiere, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    Humans do not consciously think of moving each of their joints while they move their hands from one place to another. Likewise, robot arms can be commanded to move about in cartesian space without the need to address the individual joints. To do this, the direct and inverse kinematic equations of any robot arm must be derived. The direct kinematic equations uniquely transform the joint positions into the position (and orientation) of the hand, whereas the inverse kinematic equations transform the position (and orientation) of the hand into joint positions. The derivation of the inverse kinematic equations for any particular robot is a difficult problem which may have more than one solution. In this paper, these equations are derived for a six degree of freedom robot arm. A combination of matrix operations to perform coordinate rotations, and trigonometry within the appropriate orthographic projects to perform coordinate translations is employed. This complementary approach yields a solution which is more easily obtained, and also more easily visualized. The resulting solution was programmed into a real-time computer as a part of a higher level software system to control the motion of the arm

  8. Key drivers for informal project coordination among sub-contractors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Annabeth; Eskerod, Pernille; Madsen, Erik Skov

    2015-01-01

    understandings. Still though, many sub-contractors choose not to coordinate informally. The purpose of this paper is to identify drivers that enhance or inhibits informal coordination in projects. A qualitative, explorative case study approach was applied. Fifteen SME sub-contractors within the offshore wind...... are massive. Six drivers which enhance informal coordination and three drivers which inhibit informal coordination among sub-contractors in projects were identified. The findings imply that management in project-oriented organizations can enhance informal coordination across project sub-contractors...... and by facilitating trust building, by emphasizing previous collaboration successes with the sub-contractors and the possibility of future common projects, by being explicit about expectations on informal coordination, and by developing sub-contractor contracts that are not as tight in economic terms, but instead...

  9. Identification of coordination factors affecting building projects performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesam Salah Alaloul

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Construction projects performance requires improvement to fulfil the complexity of the stakeholders’ needs and expectations. Coordination process is proposed as an efficient solution for weak performance of construction projects. Therefore, coordination factors are vital in ensuring a successful implementation of all project phases. This study aimed to identify and prioritise coordination factors that influence the performance of building projects in Malaysian context. A vast body of literature on coordination process was reviewed and resulted in 53 coordination factor. Three rounds of Delphi technique were conducted. The most effective coordination factors were ranked based on the Relative Importance Index (RII such as Scheduling (RII = 0.97, Quality assurance plan (RII = 0.93, and all parties’ participation in plans (RII = 0.89. These coordination factors have fulfilled the research gap and provided better management and higher performance for project parties. The results offer insightful perspectives to define the most effective coordination factors, for addressing the dependency between project tasks and the parties to enhance project performance.

  10. Coordinating Management Activities in Distributed Software Development Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Bendeck, Fawsy; Goldmann, Sigrid; Holz, Harald; Kötting, Boris

    1999-01-01

    Coordinating distributed processes, especially engineering and software design processes, has been a research topic for some time now. Several approaches have been published that aim at coordinating large projects in general, and large software development processes in specific. However, most of these approaches focus on the technical part of the design process and omit management activities like planning and scheduling the project, or monitoring it during execution. In this paper, we focus o...

  11. COORDINATES OF A RISK MANAGEMENT PROJECT

    OpenAIRE

    ALEXANDRU OLTEANU; MĂDĂLINA ANTOANETA RĂDOI

    2013-01-01

    High risk – high benefit: a well-known correlation both in the economic field and in the day-to-day life. Another correlation, on which this article is based: large project – numerous participants – increased risks and other malfunctions. The risk management concept is challenged by those projects and is forced to find the most adequate “customized” ways for each project at its turn. In this respect, the assessment of management has followed the trend of the last three decades, marked by movi...

  12. COORDINATES OF A RISK MANAGEMENT PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEXANDRU OLTEANU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available High risk – high benefit: a well-known correlation both in the economic field and in the day-to-day life. Another correlation, on which this article is based: large project – numerous participants – increased risks and other malfunctions. The risk management concept is challenged by those projects and is forced to find the most adequate “customized” ways for each project at its turn. In this respect, the assessment of management has followed the trend of the last three decades, marked by moving of management profit analysis by risk intermediation, respectively the transition from managing profit to risk-return relationship management. Such trend assumes the obligation of participants to identify objectives and expected benefits of the project on the basis of the strategies laid-down, the elements of risk management policies, in conjunction with the indication of the most negative scenarios which they may provide. This activity must take into consideration the process of obtaining and combining human, financial, physical and information resources in order to accomplish the primary goal of the proposed and wanted project by a certain segment of population. Project participants are directed to evaluate their own activities in terms of revenues and risks from the business access, opportunity, operating mode, as well as the limitations and boundaries on certain sides of activity. The paper focuses on the analysis and evaluation of incomes and risks, on simulations to streamline the activities and the determination of the optimal model of project choice. Also, the paper treats the risks that can be taken over by the sponsors, especially those related to implied guaranties, even implied guaranties.

  13. A Framework for Coordination Process into Construction Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaloul Wesam S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction industry is recognized as high fragmentation, low efficiency, cost and time overruns in contrast with other industries. These peculiarities are the main roots of poor performance facing by the industry. Effective coordination is vital in construction projects success and mitigate the fragmentation dilemma, however it is often difficult to achieve and need iterative process. Coordination is core issue to improve performance in construction project. Relevant studies have addressed the coordination process importance and implementation, but not in a framework. This paper propose a framework for coordination process in construction projects, as well as its relationship with performance. The objective of the framework is to provide a roadmap for the construction parties to realize operational excellence so that collectively stakeholders can recognize the effect of coordination process application on the project performance. The data were obtained from literature review and structured interviews with five experts. The analysis produced the framework of coordination based on the extensively used procedures for information and data flow between stakeholders.

  14. John Day River Subbasin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2001 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, Russ M.; Delano, Kenneth H.; Jerome, James P.

    2002-07-01

    Work undertaken in 2001 included: (1) 3335 structure posts were pounded on six new projects thereby protecting 10 miles of stream (2) Completion of 1000 ft. of barbed wire fence and one watergap on the Middle Fork of the John Day River/ Forrest property. (3) Fence removal of 5010 ft. of barbed wire fence on the Meredith project. (4) Maintenance of all active project fences (66 miles), watergaps (76), spring developments (32) and plantings were checked and repairs performed. (5) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Project in 1984 we have 63.74 miles of stream protected using 106.78 miles of fence. With the addition of the Restoration and Enhancement Projects we have 180.64 miles of fence protecting 120.6 miles of stream.

  15. John Day River Subbasin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2000 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, Jeff A.; Jerome, James P.; Delano, Kenneth H.

    2001-01-01

    During 2000, 3 new projects were completed thereby adding 4.6 miles of stream to the program. Protection for these reaches required the construction of 3.2 miles of riparian fence and 1 livestock watering sites. 5,750 pounds of grass and shrub seed were planted for revegetating ground disturbed during construction. Stream temperatures were monitored on the Middle Fork of the John Day. All project fences, watergaps, spring developments and plantings were checked and repairs performed where needed. We now have 70 miles of stream protected using 111 miles of fence.

  16. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2003-06-30

    The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day, who contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2002, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies

  17. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office: watershed restoration projects: annual report, 1999.; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The John Day River is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and one of the few major subbasins in the Columbia River basin containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, the fourth largest drainage area in Oregon. With its beginning in the Strawberry Mountains near the town of Prairie City, the John Day flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly one of national significance. The entire John Day basin was granted to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) initiated contracting the majority of its construction implementation actions with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of the projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 1999, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional eleven (11

  18. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office: watershed restoration projects: annual report, 1998.; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The John Day River is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous US and one of the few major subbasins in the Columbia River basin containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, the fourth largest drainage area in Oregon. With its beginning in the Strawberry Mountains near the town of Prairie City, the John Day flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly one of national significance. The entire John Day basin was granted to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) initiated contracting the majority of its construction implementation actions with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of the projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 1998, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional ten (10) watershed

  19. Darboux coordinates and instanton corrections in projective superspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichigno, P. Marcos; Jain, Dharmesh

    2012-10-01

    By demanding consistency of the Legendre transform construction of hyperkähler metrics in projective superspace, we derive the expression for the Darboux coordinates on the hyperkähler manifold. We apply these results to study the Coulomb branch moduli space of 4D, {N}=2 super-Yang-Mills theory (SYM) on {{{R}}^3}× {S^1} , recovering the results by GMN. We also apply this method to study the electric corrections to the moduli space of 5D, {N}=1 SYM on {{{R}}^3}× {T^2} and give the Darboux coordinates explicitly.

  20. Statement of John H. Anttonen, Project Manager, Basalt Waste Isolation Project, Richland Operations Office, Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    My name is John Anttonen and I am the Project Manager for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) at the Department of Energy Richland Operation Office. The responsibilities of may office are to manage the day-to-day activities of the site suitability investigations of the basalt formations at the Hanford Site, a Department complex that is involved in a variety of national missions, including defense materials production, nuclear energy research, and radioactive waste management. In may prepared comments today I would like to touch upon four specific subject areas relating to the BWIP program and then I would be happy to answer any questions you might have. The topics I will cover are: (1) historical aspects; (2) site specific technical issues and how they will be addressed during site characterization of the basalt site at Hanford; (3) current project status and; (4) institutional interaction. For clarity, I have attached several charts to my statement

  1. Integration, Configuration and Coordination: from Project to Reality, at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Barberan Marin, Maria; Bernardini, Marzia; Birtwistle, Thomas; Chemli, Samy; Corso, Jean-Pierre; Coupard, Julie; Foraz, Katy; Grillot, Serge; Muttoni, Yvon; Perrot, Anne-Laure

    2016-01-01

    The rigorous process in place at CERN to approve and follow-up the implementation of any modification of the LHC machine and its Injectors is presented in this paper. Our methodology implies the support of three teams, in charge of the configuration management, the scheduling and safety coordination, and the 3D integration studies. At each stage of the project the support of the three teams evolves, to provide the adequate support in the preparation phase and during the technical stops and long shutdowns. The formal roles and the processes used to govern the interaction of the Integration, Configuration and Coordination teams, and their relation to the project teams during the preparation and implementation phases, for activities to be performed in LHC and its injector chain are described and discussed.

  2. THE CARE PROJECT - Coordinated Accelerator Research in Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A one-day presentation of the project will take place on Monday February 10th in the CERN Council Chamber. The meeting will start a 9am and is expected to end at 4:30pm. The meeting, which is open to the whole community, will present an initiative on accelerator R&D in Europe, supported by ECFA, with the aim to bid for European Union support through the Framework 6 scheme. This initiative is coordinated by a steering group (ESGARD - European Steering Group on Accelerator Research and Development), which has been set up to coordinate European efforts on accelerator R&D and the submission of such bids. The initial bids have to be submitted by April 15th. All those interested in accelerator R&D are welcome to attend. Presentation of the CARE project (Coordinated Accelerator Research in Europe) to be submitted within FP6 February 10th, at CERN in the council room Agenda Chair : C. Wyss 9:00 General presentation of FP6 and introduction of IA proposal (R. Aleksan) 9:45 Networking activities on e ...

  3. The CARE project - Coordinated Accelerator Research in Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A one-day presentation of the project will take place on Monday February 10th in the CERN Council Chamber. The meeting will start a 9am and is expected to end at 4:30pm. The meeting, which is open to the whole community, will present an initiative on accelerator R&D in Europe, supported by ECFA, with the aim to bid for European Union support through the Framework 6 scheme. This initiative is coordinated by a steering group (ESGARD - European Steering Group on Accelerator Research and Development), which has been set up to coordinate European efforts on accelerator R&D and the submission of such bids. The initial bids have to be submitted by April 15th. All those interested in accelerator R&D are welcome to attend.

  4. Application for coordinate transformation between Gaus - Kruger projection: Bessel ellipsoid and UTM projection: WGS84 ellipsoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Gojković

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The physical surface of the earth has irregular shape which is not mathematically defined, therefore the shape of the Earth is approximated with mathematically defined surfaces such as ellipsoid and sphere. The developing of a global positioning systems, thus and modern navigation systems, as effect produce large amounts of data which contain the problem of homogeneity. This problem could be exceed if all the data are store in the same coordinate system. Hence the need for data transformation from local coordinate systems to the global coordinate systems. Global level implies WGS84 ellipsoid and UTM projection while national coordinate system of Republic Serbia is Gauss-Kruger with Bessel ellipsoid. This coordinate system of Republic Serbia on a global level has a local character. Applying appropriate mathematical models and functions it is possible to transform coordinates from one system to another and vice versa. The paper describes coordinate transformations from Gauss-Kruger coordinate system ellipsoid Bessel to UTM projection WGS84 ellipsoid and vice versa, and also an application which provides transformation of its kind that is made using open source environment. Name of the application is TRANS7_GK_UTM_GK and it can be found and used on the web page of the faculty for Mining and Geology under the link http://gk2utm.rgf.bg.ac.rs with a user guide.

  5. The CARE project (Coordinated Accelerator Research in Europe)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napoly, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    CARE, an ambitious and coordinated project of accelerator research and developments oriented towards High Energy Physics projects, has been launched in January 2004 by the main European laboratories and the European Commission with the 6th Framework Programme. This project aims at improving existing infrastructures dedicated to future projects such as linear colliders, upgrades of hadron colliders and high intensity proton drivers An important part of this programme is devoted to advancing the performance of the superconducting technology, both in the fields of RF cavities for electron and proton acceleration and of high field magnets, as well as to developing high intensity electron and proton injectors. We describe the plans of the four main Joint Research Activities and report on the results and progress obtained so far. The CARE project also includes three adjacent Networking Activities whose main goal is to organize a forum of discussions and to provide the strategic plans in the fields of the Linear Collider, intense Neutrino Beams, and future Hadron Colliders

  6. Eurotrac: a co-ordinated project for applied tropospheric research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrell, P [EUROTRAC International Scientific Secretariat, Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    It was with the realisation that the scientific problems associated with regional air pollution could only be solved within the framework of an international interdisciplinary approach that in 1985 EUROTRAC, the European co-ordinated research project, was formed. Such an approach provides the scientific consensus necessary for the acceptance of regional air-pollution abatement measures by the countries affected. EUROTRAC is a EUREKA environmental project, studying the transport and chemical transformation of trace substances and pollutants in the troposphere. Three goals were specified the outset: (1) to increase the basic knowledge in atmospheric science, (2) to promote the technological development of sensitive, specific and fast response instruments for environmental research and development, and (3) to improve the scientific basis for taking future political decisions on environmental management in the European countries. Thus EUROTRAC was founded as a scientific project but had the specific intention that its results should be utilised in the formulation of policy. This presentation reviews the progress made towards each of the three goals and also indicates the proposed direction which a follow-on project is likely to take when EUROTRAC finishes at the end of 1995. (author)

  7. Eurotrac: a co-ordinated project for applied tropospheric research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrell, P. [EUROTRAC International Scientific Secretariat, Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    It was with the realisation that the scientific problems associated with regional air pollution could only be solved within the framework of an international interdisciplinary approach that in 1985 EUROTRAC, the European co-ordinated research project, was formed. Such an approach provides the scientific consensus necessary for the acceptance of regional air-pollution abatement measures by the countries affected. EUROTRAC is a EUREKA environmental project, studying the transport and chemical transformation of trace substances and pollutants in the troposphere. Three goals were specified the outset: (1) to increase the basic knowledge in atmospheric science, (2) to promote the technological development of sensitive, specific and fast response instruments for environmental research and development, and (3) to improve the scientific basis for taking future political decisions on environmental management in the European countries. Thus EUROTRAC was founded as a scientific project but had the specific intention that its results should be utilised in the formulation of policy. This presentation reviews the progress made towards each of the three goals and also indicates the proposed direction which a follow-on project is likely to take when EUROTRAC finishes at the end of 1995. (author)

  8. Reflections in the Mirror of Reggio Emilia's Soul: John Dewey's Foundational Influence on Pedagogy in the Italian Educational Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Gai

    2015-01-01

    This paper articulates John Dewey's socio-political and historical influence upon the foundation and evolution of the world-renowned Reggio Emilia approach to early childhood education. It proposes that the pedagogical depth, influence and endurance of the Italian project are grounded in Dewey's philosophies of education, aesthetics and democracy.…

  9. Graduate Management Project: An Evaluation of the Johns Hopkins Outpatient Surgery Center Patient Satisfaction Survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Evan, Barry

    1999-01-01

    .... Customer or patient satisfaction is a widely accepted measure of quality. Numerous organizations use satisfaction surveys as the foundation for organizational improvement and the Johns Hopkins Health System is no different...

  10. Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) Project FL1421: ST JOHNS RIVER, FL.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objective of Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) is to improve the coordination among federal, state and local government, non-governmental and private...

  11. Meteor Beliefs Project: Meteoric imagery associated with the death of John Brown in 1859

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobnock, G. J.; McBeath, A.; Gheorghe, A. D.

    2009-12-01

    An examination is made of metaphorical meteor imagery used in conjunction with the death of American anti-slavery activist John Brown, who was executed in December 1859. Such imagery continues to be used in this regard into the 21st century.

  12. Radioactive waste management in Spain: co-ordination and projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The sixth workshop of the OECD/NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) was hosted by ENRESA, the Spanish agency responsible for the management of radioactive waste and the dismantling of nuclear power plants, and the Council of Nuclear Safety (CSN), with the support of the Association of Spanish Municipalities in Areas Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants (AMAC). The workshop took place at L'Hospitalet de l'Infant, Catalonia, Spain, on 21-23 November 2005. At this workshop, Spanish stakeholders and delegates from 14 countries discussed current co-ordination of radioactive waste management decision making in Spain. Findings were shared from Cowam-Spain, a co-operative research project on the involvement of local stakeholders, the relationship between national and local levels of decision making, and the long-term sustainability of decisions regarding the siting of a centralized interim storage facility for high-level waste. These proceedings include the workshop presentations and discussions, as well as the rapporteurs' reflections on what was learned about policy making and participative decision making. (author)

  13. 4D CAD Based Method for Supporting Coordination of Urban Subsurface Utility Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    olde Scholtenhuis, Léon Luc; Hartmann, T.; Doree, Andries G.

    Coordinators of inner city utility construction works face increasing difficulty in managing their projects due to tight physical restrictions, strict deadlines and growing stakeholder fragmentation. This paper therefore presents a 4D CAD based coordination method that supports project plan scoping,

  14. John Day River Subbasin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, Russ M.; Delano, Kenneth H.

    2004-04-01

    Work undertaken in 2003 included: (1) Seven new fence projects were completed thereby protecting 7.6 miles of stream (2) Completion of 0.7 miles of dredge tail leveling on Granite Creek. (3) Maintenance of all active project fences (66.14 miles), watergaps (66), spring developments (33) and plantings were checked and repairs performed. (4) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Project in 1984 we have 72.94 miles of stream protected using 131.1 miles of fence. With the addition of the Restoration and Enhancement Projects we have 205.96 miles of fence protecting 130.3 miles of stream.

  15. On the use of polar coordinate system in the projective graphic drawings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivashchenko Andrey Viktorovich

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Projective graphics is a polyhedra simulation method, which is based on the use of trace diagrams of initial polyhedron. Previously developed computer software allows using Cartesian coordinates. In some cases it is advisable to use polar coordinate system for description of projective graphics drawings. Using the example of icosahedron the authors analyzed the advantages of using projective graphics drawings in the polar coordinate system. The transition to the polar coordinate system is a tool that allows using certain patterns of projective graphics drawings in the process of calculation. When using polar coordinate system the search of Polar correspondence for the directs is simplified. In order to analyze the two lines in the polar coordinate system it is enough to compare the corresponding coefficients of the equations of these lines. The authors consider a diagram of the icosahedron in polar coordinates, and a corresponding fragment of calculation program in the Mathematica system. Some examples of forming based on icosahedrons are offered. Optimization of computer programs using polar coordinate system will simplifies the calculations of projective graphics drawings, accelerates the process of constructing three-dimensional models, which expand the possibilities of selecting original solutions. Finally, the authors conclude that it is appropriate to use the polar coordinate system only in the construction of projective graphics diagrams of the planes system having rich symmetry. All Platonic and Archimedean solids, Catalan solid possess this property.

  16. John Day River Subbasin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, Russ M.; Jerome, James P.; Delano, Kenneth H.

    2003-03-01

    Work undertaken in 2002 included: (1) Seven new fence projects were completed thereby protecting 6.0 miles of stream (2) Completion of 0.7 miles of dredge tail leveling on Granite Creek. (3) New fence construction (300ft) plus one watergap on Indian Creek/ Kuhl property. (4) Maintenance of all active project fences (58.76 miles), watergaps (56), spring developments (32) and plantings were checked and repairs performed. (5) Restoration and Enhancement projects protected 3 miles of stream within the basin. (6) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Project in 1984 we have 67.21 miles of stream protected using 124.2 miles of fence. With the addition of the Restoration and Enhancement Projects we have 199.06 miles of fence protecting 124.57 miles of stream.

  17. Coordinators' experience-self evaluation of project development status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sijali, I.V

    2009-01-01

    Outlines the progress of the project as follows, design cleared ny NLO, PMO and team refined the submitted project design to improve it's quality. Comments and any questions invited deadline 23 may 2008, endorsement of the project by Tuesday 24 June 2008 and project completed

  18. Homogenisation in project management for large German research projects in the Earth system sciences: overcoming the institutional coordination bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauser, Florian; Vamborg, Freja

    2016-04-01

    The interdisciplinary project on High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing climate prediction HD(CP)2 (hdcp2.eu) is an example for the trend in fundamental research in Europe to increasingly focus on large national and international research programs that require strong scientific coordination. The current system has traditionally been host-based: project coordination activities and funding is placed at the host institute of the central lead PI of the project. This approach is simple and has the advantage of strong collaboration between project coordinator and lead PI, while exhibiting a list of strong, inherent disadvantages that are also mentioned in this session's description: no community best practice development, lack of integration between similar projects, inefficient methodology development and usage, and finally poor career development opportunities for the coordinators. Project coordinators often leave the project before it is finalized, leaving some of the fundamentally important closing processes to the PIs. This systematically prevents the creation of professional science management expertise within academia, which leads to an automatic imbalance that hinders the outcome of large research programs to help future funding decisions. Project coordinators in academia often do not work in a professional project office environment that could distribute activities and use professional tools and methods between different projects. Instead, every new project manager has to focus on methodological work anew (communication infrastructure, meetings, reporting), even though the technological needs of large research projects are similar. This decreases the efficiency of the coordination and leads to funding that is effectively misallocated. We propose to challenge this system by creating a permanent, virtual "Centre for Earth System Science Management CESSMA" (cessma.com), and changing the approach from host- based to centre-based. This should

  19. Coordination Implications of Software Coupling in Open Source Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amrit, Chintan Amrit; van Hillegersberg, Jos; Ågerfalk, Pär

    2010-01-01

    The effect of software coupling on the quality of software has been studied quite widely since the seminal paper on software modularity by Parnas [1]. However, the effect of the increase in software coupling on the coordination of the developers has not been researched as much. In commercial

  20. Coordinate reconstruction using box reconstruction and projection of X-ray photo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achmad Suntoro

    2011-01-01

    Some mathematical formula have been derived for a process of reconstruction to define the coordinate of any point relative to a pre set coordinate system. The process of reconstruction uses a reconstruction box in which each edge's length of the box is known, each top-bottom face and left-right face of the box having a cross marker, and the top face and the right face of the box as plane projections by X-ray source in perspective projection -system. Using the data of the two X-ray projection images, any point inside the reconstruction box, as long as its projection is recorded in the two photos, will be determined its coordinate relative to the midpoint of the reconstruction box as the central point coordinates. (author)

  1. International co-ordinated research project on low and intermediate level waste package performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayal, R.

    2001-01-01

    As part of IAEA's mandate to facilitate the transfer and exchange of information amongst Member States, the Agency is currently coordinating an international R and D project, involving 12 developed and developing countries, on Performance of Low and Intermediate Level Waste Packages under Disposal Conditions. This paper will review the current status of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) and summarize the key findings of the work completed to date within the context of the CRP in the participating Member States. (author)

  2. Current projects of the National Wind Coordinating Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhoads, H. [National Wind Coordinating Committee, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This paper summarizes the activities of the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC), a multi-stakeholder collaborative formed in 1994 to support the responsible use of wind power in the USA. The NWCC`s vision is a self-sustaining commercial market for wind power - environmentally, economically, and politically sustainable. Current NWCC activities include: outreach initiatives, disseminating information about wind energy to regulators and legislators through the Wind Energy Issue Paper Series, researching distributed wind energy models, producing a wind facility permitting handbook, improving avian research, addressing transmission and resource assessment issues, and exploring sustainable development and marketing approaches.

  3. Final Report of the Final Meeting of Project Coordinators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordero Calderon, Carlos F.

    1996-06-01

    The Costa Rican Electricity Institute has always been worried of the verification of the good state of the works and thus to guarantee their operation. For that reason, it has established different sorts of auscultation of the Arenal's Dam. Some investigations have been done to find new methods to improve and to eliminate risks in different works or projects. The Arenal's Dam is one of the greatest engineering works in Costa Rica, it has the Arenal, Corobici and Sandillal Hydroelectric Plants. Furthermore, the irrigation system in the Tempisque River Valley, in the Guanacaste province. One special characteristic of the Site of the Dam, is the near location of the Arenal Volcano, in full activity and located at 6 Km. from the dam. This report has two goals, one is the traditional permanent measurements report for the project, and the other, is to present it as a final work of the Project Arcal XVIII, to the International Atomic Energy Agency. This report analyses the geo-hydraulic, structural and topographic auscultation, as well as the activities accomplished during the ARCAL XVIII /8/018, Application of Tracer Techniques for Leakage in Dams and Damming Project, based on information gathered through the geo-chemical auscultation, until June 1996. (author).30 ills., 80 charts, 35 tabs

  4. Coordination and Control of Globally Distributed Software Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.C. van Fenema (Paul)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractRecently, software development and implementation projects have globalized at a rapid pace. Companies in North America, Europe, and the Far East are beginning to integrate international Information Technology (IT) resources to support operations across the globe. Offshore IT services

  5. A Coordinated Decentralized Approach to Online Project Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mykota, David

    2013-01-01

    With the growth rate of online learning outpacing traditional face-to-face instruction, universities are beginning to recognize the importance of strategic planning in its development. Making the case for online learning requires sound project management practices and an understanding of the business models on which it is predicated. The objective…

  6. Equidistant map projections of a triaxial ellipsoid with the use of reduced coordinates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pędzich Paweł

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new method of constructing equidistant map projections of a triaxial ellipsoid as a function of reduced coordinates. Equations for x and y coordinates are expressed with the use of the normal elliptic integral of the second kind and Jacobian elliptic functions. This solution allows to use common known and widely described in literature methods of solving such integrals and functions. The main advantage of this method is the fact that the calculations of x and y coordinates are practically based on a single algorithm that is required to solve the elliptic integral of the second kind. Equations are provided for three types of map projections: cylindrical, azimuthal and pseudocylindrical. These types of projections are often used in planetary cartography for presentation of entire and polar regions of extraterrestrial objects. The paper also contains equations for the calculation of the length of a meridian and a parallel of a triaxial ellipsoid in reduced coordinates. Moreover, graticules of three coordinates systems (planetographic, planetocentric and reduced in developed map projections are presented. The basic properties of developed map projections are also described. The obtained map projections may be applied in planetary cartography in order to create maps of extraterrestrial objects.

  7. ATEE Interactive Co-ordination and Educational Monitoring of Socrates Comenius Action 3 Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libotton, Arno; Van Braak, Johan; Garofalo, Mara

    2002-01-01

    Asserts that although the Comenius Action 3 courses were well-accepted and high quality, there is a need for a structure for easily monitoring and evaluating these projects. This article presents a pilot project designed with this purpose, which may be useful in implementing a system of coordination and communication among the different projects…

  8. Measurement, calculation and evaluation of photon production data. Final report of a coordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oblozinsky, P.; Dietrich, F.S.; Mengoni, A.

    1999-12-01

    The report summarizes results of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) devoted to photon preduction in neutron-induced reactions. The report presents 25 original contributions that reflect accomplishments achieved in measurement, calculation and evaluation of photon production under the project in 1994-1997. Major results are highlighted and a list of the CRP publications is given. (author)

  9. Oregon wildlife planning coordination project: Annual report, October 1, 1998 to September 30, 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, S.P.

    1999-01-01

    The intent of the Oregon Wildlife Planning Coordination project is to fund Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) staff to facilitate wildlife mitigation coordination and planning between Oregon wildlife managers. The primary goal of ODFW wildlife mitigation planning/coordination staff is to foster, facilitate, and manage a statewide cooperative wildlife mitigation planning and implementation effort between the Oregon wildlife managers (the Oregon Wildlife Coalition or OWC) to mitigate for wildlife losses in Oregon caused by the development and operation of the hydropower system

  10. Co-ordinated ozone and UV project COZUV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braathen, Geir

    1999-01-01

    The project encompasses all the major Norwegian research groups in the field of stratospheric ozone and UV research. the duration is from the 1st January 1999 to the 31st December 2000. The tasks carried out will include investigations of the ozone layer over the North Polar and middle latitudes, 3-D chemical modelling, diagnosis of chemical ozone loss, investigations of transport mechanisms between the polar vortex and middle latitudes, study of the coupling between ozone change and climate change in the stratosphere and upper troposphere, scenario calculations in order to investigate the consequences of temperature change in the stratosphere, development of methods to measure global, direct and radiance distribution of UV, to improve UV dose calculations, investigate the influence of clouds on the surface UV radiation and to use existing surface UV radiation measurements together with existing radiation models to investigate the connection between UV radiation and ozone, clouds and surface albedo. The results will be published in various publications, progress reports, by participation in international conferences, through information to the environmental authorities and through information on the Internet

  11. John Stachel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. John Stachel. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 3 Issue 8 August 1998 pp 76-92 Reflections. Albert Einstein-The Man Behind the Myths · John Stachel · More Details Fulltext PDF ...

  12. International co-ordinated research project on low and intermediate level waste package performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayal, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA, Vienna (Austria)

    2001-07-01

    As part of IAEA's mandate to facilitate the transfer and exchange of information amongst Member States, the Agency is currently coordinating an international R and D project, involving 12 developed and developing countries, on Performance of Low and Intermediate Level Waste Packages under Disposal Conditions. This paper will review the current status of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) and summarize the key findings of the work completed to date within the context of the CRP in the participating Member States. (author)

  13. [Health projects managed by Nursing Coordinators: an analysis of contents and degree of success].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palese, Alvisa; Bresciani, Federica; Brutti, Caterina; Chiari, Ileana; Fontana, Luciana; Fronza, Ornella; Gasperi, Giuseppina; Gheno, Oscar; Guarese, Olga; Leali, Anna; Mansueti, Nadia; Masieri, Enrico; Messina, Laura; Munaretto, Gabriella; Paoli, Claudia; Perusi, Chiara; Randon, Giulia; Rossi, Gloria; Solazzo, Pasquale; Telli, Debora; Trenti, Giuliano; Veronese, Elisabetta; Saiani, Luisa

    2012-01-01

    To describe the evolution and results of health projects run in hospitals and managed by Nursing Coordinators. A convenience sample of 13 north Italian hospital, and a sample of 56 Nursing Coordinators with a permanent position from at least 1 year, was contacted. The following information was collected with a structured interview: projects run in 2009, topic, if bottom up or top down, number of staff involved and state (ended, still running, stopped). In 2009 Nursing Coordinators started 114 projects (mean 1.8±1.2 each): 94 (82.5%) were improvement projects, 17 (14.9%) accreditation, and 3 (2.6%) research. The projects involved 2.732 staff members (73.7%; average commitment 84 hours); 55 (48.2%) projects were still running, 52 (45.6%) completed, for 5 (4.4%) there was no assessment and 2 (1.8%) had been stopped. Nurses are regularly involved in several projects. A systematic monitoring of the results obtained and stabilization strategies are scarce. Due to the large number of resources invested, a correct management and the choice of areas relevant for patients' problems and needs are pivotal.

  14. A Study of Four Library Programs for Disadvantaged Persons. Part II, Appendices B: Brooklyn Public Library Community Coordinator Project, the New York Public Library North Manhattan Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsor, Charlotte B.; Burrows, Lodema

    This document contains observations of library staff and interviews with community members about the Brooklyn Public Library Community Coordinator Project and the New York Public Library North Manhattan Project. The Community Coordinator Project employs four professional librarians to take an active part in community institutions and organizations…

  15. A simplified generator coordinate treatment with analytical projected-BCS solutions for isovector pairing collective motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyotoku, M.; Chen, H.T.

    1979-01-01

    Analytical expressions for the projected-BCS energies and reaction transition rates among the isovector pairing collective states are obtained by the recognition of symmetry properties in a class of BCS wave functions. As a consequence, a simplified generator coordinate treatment is suggested [pt

  16. Graduate Management Project: The Capital Equipment Acquisition Process at The Johns Hopkins Hospital Evaluating Acquisition Strategies Through Financial Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McGowan, Colleen

    1999-01-01

    .... The purpose of this paper is to first develop an equipment evaluation process at The Johns Hopkins Hospital which considers both clinical and financial factors when allocating capital dollars to acquire equipment...

  17. Communication, coordination and cooperation in construction projects: business environment and human behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah Alaloul, Wesam; Shahir Liew, Mohd; Zawawi, Noor Amila Wan

    2017-12-01

    The accomplishment of construction projects is extremely dependent on the integration of several stakeholders; therefore none of them has the control or the ability to accomplish the project alone. Each of them may influence and be influenced by the project management approach. There is no comprehensive theoretical platform for defining Communication, Coordination and Cooperation (3Cs) in the management of construction project. This paper deliberates the function of the 3Cs different theoretical perceptions. Through an analysis of selected articles from reputable academic journals in construction management, the business environment and human behaviour were identified as two main parts. A little has been done so far about the 3Cs, and how they are correlated with construction projects performance. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to explain the definitions and the association between the 3Cs. There is a significant link between communication and coordination. Coordination alternatively, is trust-based a logic of mutual and exchange. Consequently, cooperation is much more sophisticated, which needing more time and attempts.

  18. John Day Basin Spring Chinook Salmon Escapement and Productivity Monitoring; Fish Research Project Oregon, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmichael, Richard W.; Claire, Glenda M.; Seals, Jason

    2002-01-01

    The four objectives of this report are: (1) Estimate annual spawner escapement and number of spring chinook salmon redds in the John Day River basin; (2) Determine sex ratio, age composition, length-at-age of spawners, and proportion of natural spawners that are hatchery origin strays; (3) Determine adequacy of historic index surveys for indexing spawner abundance and for detecting changes in spawner distribution through time; and (4) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival for spring chinook salmon emigrating from the John Day River basin.

  19. Coordinated Research Projects of the IAEA Atomic and Molecular Data Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braams, B. J.; Chung, H.-K.

    2011-05-01

    The IAEA Atomic and Molecular Data Unit is dedicated to the provision of databases for atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (AM/PMI) data that are relevant for nuclear fusion research. IAEA Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) are the principal mechanism by which the Unit encourages data evaluation and the production of new data. Ongoing and planned CRPs on AM/PMI data are briefly described here.

  20. Coordinated Research Projects of the IAEA Atomic and Molecular Data Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B. J.; Chung, H.-K.

    2011-01-01

    The IAEA Atomic and Molecular Data Unit is dedicated to the provision of databases for atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (AM/PMI) data that are relevant for nuclear fusion research. IAEA Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) are the principal mechanism by which the Unit encourages data evaluation and the production of new data. Ongoing and planned CRPs on AM/PMI data are briefly described here.

  1. In-house coordination project for organ and tissue procurement: social responsibility and promising results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Vanessa Silva E; Moura, Luciana Carvalho; Martins, Luciana Ribeiro; Santos, Roberta Cristina Cardoso Dos; Schirmer, Janine; Roza, Bartira de Aguiar

    2016-01-01

    to report the results of evaluation regarding changes in the number of potential donor referrals, actual donors, and conversion rates after the implementation of an in-house organ and tissue donation for transplantation coordination project. epidemiological study, both retrospective and transversal, was performed with organ donation data from the Secretariat of Health for the State and the in-house organ donation coordination project of a beneficent hospital. The data was compared using nonparametric statistical Mann-Whitney test, and the Student's t-test, considering a significance level of 5% (p <0.05). there were statistically significant differences (p < 0.05), before and after the implementation of the project on the number of potential donor notification/month (3.05 - 4.7 ), number of actual donor/month (0.78 to 1.60) and rate of conversion ( 24.7 to 34.8 %). The hospitals 1, 2, 7 and 8 had significant results in potential donor, actual donor or conversion rate. the presence of an in-house coordinator is promising and beneficial, the specialist is important to change the indicators of efficiency, which consequently reduces the waiting lists for organ transplants.

  2. Research coordination meeting of the coordinated research project on analytical and experimental benchmark analyses of accelerator driven systems. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The Technical Meeting hosted at the Belarus National Academy of Sciences in Minsk by the Joint Institute of Power Engineering and Nuclear Research 'SOSNY' from 5-9 December 2005 was the kick-off Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analyses of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS)'. The CRP had received proposals for research agreements and contracts from scientists representing the following 25 institutions: Centro Atomico Bariloche, SCK CEN Mol, Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares Sao Paulo, Joint Institute of Power Engineering and Nuclear Research SOSNY Minsk, China Institute of Atomic Energy, CEA Cadarache, CNRS Paris, FZ Rossendorf, FZ Karlsruhe, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG) Petten, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, AGH-University of Science and Technology Krakow, Institute of Atomic Energy Otwock/Swierk, ITEP Moscow, MEPHI Moscow, Kurchatov Institute, JINR Dubna, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, CIEMAT Madrid, Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm, National Science Center 'Kharkov Institute and Technology', and Argonne National Laboratory). These institutions represent 18 IAEA Member States (i.e., Argentina, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, China, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Pakistan, Poland, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Ukraine, USA), and one International Organization (JINR Dubna). The overall objective of the CRP is contributing to the generic R and D efforts in various fields common to innovative fast neutron system development, i.e., heavy liquid metal thermal hydraulics, dedicated transmutation fuels and associated core designs, theoretical nuclear reaction models, measurement and evaluation of nuclear data for transmutation, and development and validation of calculational methods and codes. Ultimately, the CRP

  3. Participation in the IAEA Coordinated Research Project Fumex III: Final Report of AREVA NP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    After the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) FUMEXII, participants asked for a new exercise within an IAEA CRP. This CRP started in December 2008 in Vienna with the first Research Coordination Meeting (RCM). The CRP is titled ''Improvement of Computer Codes Used for Fuel Behaviour Simulation FUMEX III''. The object of FUMEX III were the improvement of fuel rod performance codes for modeling high burnup phenomena in modern fuel. This includes transient behavior, as well as mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding and, in progression to the FUMEX II exercise, fission gas release during various conditions (steady state, load follow, transient). AREVA NP agreed on participating in this exercise under the IAEA research agreement no. 15369 and expressed interest in the modeling of pelletclad mechanical interactions as well as fission gas release under steady state and transient conditions. In this exercise AREVA NP used its new global fuel rod code GALILEO, which is still under development (formerly known under the project name COPERNIC 3). During a Consultants Meeting potential topics and a proposed selection of cases have been prepared, which were discussed during the 1st Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) in Vienna in December 2008. During the discussions a number of additional cases motivated by the participants have been identified. Finally, a case table has been agreed upon, which included several cases for the different topics. Most of the cases have been based on the International Fuel Performance Experiments (IFPE) database, but additional cases have been provided during the exercise (e.g., the AREVA idealized case

  4. John Lindsay

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    A few weeks ago John Lindsay passed away unexpectedly at his home in St. Genis. With his death we have lost a pioneer in detector electronics and one of the founding fathers of the CERN Electronics Group. John came to CERN in 1956 to join the Electronics Group, which was being formed in the SC Division. He thus participated from the beginning in the design, development, production, commissioning and support of electronics for the experiments at the CERN accelerators, initially at the SC and finally at the SPS. From the University of Glasgow he brought his expertise on pulse height analyzers, which were called kick sorters in those days, and did pioneering work with it in the early CERN experiments. He designed read-out systems for successive generations of detectors, such as wire spark chambers, multiwire proportional chambers, calorimeters, etc., often coming up with innovative solutions. Surely one of his finest moments must have been when he worked on complex detector systems, such as liquid argon calo...

  5. Databases and coordinated research projects at the IAEA on atomic processes in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.; Chung, Hyun-Kyung [Nuclear Data Section, NAPC Division, International Atomic Energy Agency P. O. Box 100, Vienna International Centre, AT-1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-05-25

    The Atomic and Molecular Data Unit at the IAEA works with a network of national data centres to encourage and coordinate production and dissemination of fundamental data for atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (A+M/PMI) processes that are relevant to the realization of fusion energy. The Unit maintains numerical and bibliographical databases and has started a Wiki-style knowledge base. The Unit also contributes to A+M database interface standards and provides a search engine that offers a common interface to multiple numerical A+M/PMI databases. Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) bring together fusion energy researchers and atomic, molecular and surface physicists for joint work towards the development of new data and new methods. The databases and current CRPs on A+M/PMI processes are briefly described here.

  6. Databases and coordinated research projects at the IAEA on atomic processes in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.; Chung, Hyun-Kyung

    2012-05-01

    The Atomic and Molecular Data Unit at the IAEA works with a network of national data centres to encourage and coordinate production and dissemination of fundamental data for atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (A+M/PMI) processes that are relevant to the realization of fusion energy. The Unit maintains numerical and bibliographical databases and has started a Wiki-style knowledge base. The Unit also contributes to A+M database interface standards and provides a search engine that offers a common interface to multiple numerical A+M/PMI databases. Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) bring together fusion energy researchers and atomic, molecular and surface physicists for joint work towards the development of new data and new methods. The databases and current CRPs on A+M/PMI processes are briefly described here.

  7. Databases and coordinated research projects at the IAEA on atomic processes in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.; Chung, Hyun-Kyung

    2012-01-01

    The Atomic and Molecular Data Unit at the IAEA works with a network of national data centres to encourage and coordinate production and dissemination of fundamental data for atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (A+M/PMI) processes that are relevant to the realization of fusion energy. The Unit maintains numerical and bibliographical databases and has started a Wiki-style knowledge base. The Unit also contributes to A+M database interface standards and provides a search engine that offers a common interface to multiple numerical A+M/PMI databases. Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) bring together fusion energy researchers and atomic, molecular and surface physicists for joint work towards the development of new data and new methods. The databases and current CRPs on A+M/PMI processes are briefly described here.

  8. Deviation rectification for dynamic measurement of rail wear based on coordinate sets projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chao; Ma, Ziji; Li, Yanfu; Liu, Hongli; Zeng, Jiuzhen; Jin, Tan

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic measurement of rail wear using a laser imaging system suffers from random vibrations in the laser-based imaging sensor which cause distorted rail profiles. In this paper, a simple and effective method for rectifying profile deviation is presented to address this issue. There are two main steps: profile recognition and distortion calibration. According to the constant camera and projector parameters, efficient recognition of measured profiles is achieved by analyzing the geometric difference between normal profiles and distorted ones. For a distorted profile, by constructing coordinate sets projecting from it to the standard one on triple projecting primitives, including the rail head inner line, rail waist curve and rail jaw, iterative extrinsic camera parameter self-compensation is implemented. The distortion is calibrated by projecting the distorted profile onto the x – y plane of a measuring coordinate frame, which is parallel to the rail cross section, to eliminate the influence of random vibrations in the laser-based imaging sensor. As well as evaluating the implementation with comprehensive experiments, we also compare our method with other published works. The results exhibit the effectiveness and superiority of our method for the dynamic measurement of rail wear. (paper)

  9. Deviation rectification for dynamic measurement of rail wear based on coordinate sets projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Ma, Ziji; Li, Yanfu; Zeng, Jiuzhen; Jin, Tan; Liu, Hongli

    2017-10-01

    Dynamic measurement of rail wear using a laser imaging system suffers from random vibrations in the laser-based imaging sensor which cause distorted rail profiles. In this paper, a simple and effective method for rectifying profile deviation is presented to address this issue. There are two main steps: profile recognition and distortion calibration. According to the constant camera and projector parameters, efficient recognition of measured profiles is achieved by analyzing the geometric difference between normal profiles and distorted ones. For a distorted profile, by constructing coordinate sets projecting from it to the standard one on triple projecting primitives, including the rail head inner line, rail waist curve and rail jaw, iterative extrinsic camera parameter self-compensation is implemented. The distortion is calibrated by projecting the distorted profile onto the x-y plane of a measuring coordinate frame, which is parallel to the rail cross section, to eliminate the influence of random vibrations in the laser-based imaging sensor. As well as evaluating the implementation with comprehensive experiments, we also compare our method with other published works. The results exhibit the effectiveness and superiority of our method for the dynamic measurement of rail wear.

  10. Pairing vibrational and isospin rotational states in a particle number and isospin projected generator coordinate method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.T.; Muether, H.; Faessler, A.

    1978-01-01

    Pairing vibrational and isospin rotational states are described in different approximations based on particle number and isospin projected, proton-proton, neutron-neutron and proton-neutron pairing wave functions and on the generator coordinate method (GCM). The investigations are performed in models for which an exact group theoretical solution exists. It turns out that a particle number and isospin projection is essential to yield a good approximation to the ground state or isospin yrast state energies. For strong pairing correlations (pairing force constant equal to the single-particle level distance) isospin cranking (-ωTsub(x)) yields with particle number projected pairing wave function also good agreement with the exact energies. GCM wave functions generated by particle number and isospin projected BCS functions with different amounts of pairing correlations yield for the lowest T=0 and T=2 states energies which are practically indistinguishable from the exact solutions. But even the second and third lowest energies of charge-symmetric states are still very reliable. Thus it is concluded that also in realistic cases isospin rotational and pairing vibrational states may be described in the framework of the GCM method with isospin and particle number projected generating wave functions. (Auth.)

  11. High Temperature Reactors for a proposed IAEA Coordinated Research Project on Energy Neutral Mineral Development Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haneklaus, Nils; Reitsma, Frederik; Tulsidas, Harikrishnan

    2014-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is promoting a new Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to elaborate on the applicability and potential of using High Temperature Reactors (HTRs) to provide process heat and/or electricity to power energy intensive mineral development processes. The CRP aims to provide a platform for cooperation between HTR-developers and mineral development processing experts. Energy intensive mineral development processes with (e.g. phosphate-, gold-, copper-, rare earth ores) or without (e.g. titanium-, aluminum ore) the possibility to recover accompanying uranium and/or thorium that could be developed and used to run the HTR for “energy neutral” processing of the primary ore shall be discussed according to the participants needs. This paper specifically focuses on the aspects that need to be addressed by HTR-designers and developers. First requirements that should be fulfilled by the HTR-designs are highlighted together with the desired outcomes of the research project. (author)

  12. First research coordination meeting of the coordinated research project on validation of tracers and software for interwell investigations. Meeting report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    . The introduction and promotion of tracer techniques for oil producing industry have been going on through several national and regional technical cooperation projects. Presently, R and D is going on in interwell tracer technology, including development of new tracers, improvement of analytical and interpretation techniques, and other innovative techniques for multiphase flow pattern characterization. The CRP coordinates knowledge generated in this field to guarantee the continuity of technology and to transfer the best part to developing countries. For effective transfer of the technology to developing countries, the target techniques will be consolidated, developed further and validated though the CRP activities. Technical documents will also be prepared to facilitate upgradation of the capability of tracer groups in developing countries. In line with the CRP objectives, the first RCM summarized the status of tracer technology as applied to interwell tests and discussed the ways to meet the proposed goals. The proposed investigations were focused on three main fields: 1) Software and model development and interpretation, 2) development of new tracers, methods and technologies, and 3) field applications. All participants were encouraged to participate in one or more of these topics of discussion and establish networking activities

  13. The action of the project coordinator with respect to reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclercq, Jacques

    1981-01-01

    Before describing the various actions of the project coordinator (EDF) entrusted with the building of nuclear power stations, with respect to reactor safety in France, the definition of reactor safety and the various participants are mentioned first. These participants are: the Government Departments and the Experts involved (the Department of Nuclear Safety of the 'Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire' forming the first technical support) and the applicant, namely the EDF. The reactor safety actions of the project coordinator are defined as from the following components: 1 - The targets laid down with respect to safety, the final objective being the protection of workers and the public against the potential dangers of the installations, principally against radiation. 2 - The safety methodology at the design stage of the power station: 'barrier' method, defence method in depth at three levels, lines of assurance method, and probabilistic method. 3 - Safety actions at the construction stage within the context of an assurance of quality programe. 4 - Safety at the trials, commissioning and operating stage, with the backing of the 'Groupe Operationnel de Demarrage (G.O.D.)' and the 'Commission d'Essais sur Site (C.E.S.)'. An initial balance sheet of the reactor safety actions for the PWR units built by the EDF is presented [fr

  14. Roles and Responsibilities of Coordinators/Alternates in Managing IAEA Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otwoma, D.

    2009-01-01

    Indicates that, the responsibilities of the coordinators include, to collect lessons learned from past experiences of coordinators/alternates in implementation and to collect information from all stake holders who include, coordinators' and alternates' institutions, regulatory,operations, general public

  15. One System Integrated Project Team Progress in Coordinating Hanford Tank Farms and the Waste Treatment Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skwarek, Raymond J.; Harp, Ben J.; Duncan, Garth M.

    2013-01-01

    The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed at the Hanford Site in late 2011 as a way to improve coordination and itegration between the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) on interfaces between the two projects, and to eliminate duplication and exploit opportunities for synergy. The IPT is composed of jointly staffed groups that work on technical issues of mutal interest, front-end design and project definition, nuclear safety, plant engineering system integration, commissioning, planning and scheduling, and environmental, safety, health and quality (ESH&Q) areas. In the past year important progress has been made in a number of areas as the organization has matured and additional opportunities have been identified. Areas covered in this paper include: Support for development of the Office of Envirnmental Management (EM) framework document to progress the Office of River Protection's (ORP) River Protection Project (RPP) mission; Stewardship of the RPP flowsheet; Collaboration with Savannah River Site (SRS), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Operations programs integration; and, Further development of the waste acceptance criteria

  16. Dense Magnetized Plasmas. Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2001-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-04-01

    The IAEA strives to promote the development and utilization of nuclear technologies offering research opportunities for the growth of industrial applications in various domains. The Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Dense Magnetized Plasmas (DMPs) was intended to coordinate the development of compact and low cost sources for the generation of charged particle beams, neutrons, X rays and plasma streams. Intense short bursts of neutrons are required for testing and calibrating neutron based diagnostics. Intense particle beams and plasma streams from DMP sources find applications in various research fields and technology, for instance, high heat load testing of candidate materials for the first wall of future fusion reactors. On-site detection of illicit and explosive materials using high rep-rate neutron bursts from compact DMP devices is of great interest. Soft and hard X ray beams produced from such sources have potential applications in biology and enzymology. The overall objective of this CRP was to stimulate and promote investigation of DMPs through synergistic international cooperation. Specific objectives were: (i) to coordinate complementary research efforts related to DMPs by experts in developed and developing Members States, (ii) to speed up the progress in DMP applications by sharing knowledge, expertise and costs, (iii) to promote technology transfer among Member States, and (iv) to contribute to knowledge preservation by involving additional scientists from developing Member States who are not yet experts in DMPs. The three major components of DMP devices are the driver (power supply, electrode system and its associated switch), the target and the target chamber. Engineering fields related to DMP system design include vacuum technology, radiation resistant material development, ablation hydrodynamics and neutronics. In each case, the integration of the components must account for the unique interfaces and constraints of the particular application

  17. Preventing Elder Abuse: The Texas Plan for a Coordinated Service Delivery System. Collaborative Elder Abuse Prevention Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Garry L.

    The Texas Department of Human Services, in collaboration with 13 other public and private organizations, co-sponsored a statewide Collaborative Elder Abuse Prevention project. The goal of this project is to develop a comprehensive, long-range plan for the prevention of elder abuse, a method for achieving a coordinated service delivery system for…

  18. Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs): Annual report of activities and statistics for 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-15

    Article III of the IAEA Statute authorises the Agency to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful purposes throughout the world and to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information, as well as the exchange of scientists in the field of peaceful uses of atomic energy. The research supported by the Agency is within the framework of the Agency's programmes, sub-programmes and projects that are listed in the approved Programme and Budget of the Agency. The research work is normally implemented through Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that bring together research institutes in both developing and developed Member States to collaborate on the research topic of interest. In addition, the introduction of a new type of CRP (called Thematic CRP), meant to complement traditional CRPs, is currently being tested by the Human Health programme. This new, optional type of CRP is designed to strengthen promotion of research on nuclear technologies in developing Member States through CRPs that rest on pair building between agreement holders and contract holders and includes a PhD training programme at the contract holders' institutions. Further details of the administration of research contracts and general information on CRPs is contained in the Agency?s Website at http://www.iaea.org/programmes/ri/uc.html. The CRPs reported in this document are conducted in support of the following Agency programmes: Nuclear Power; Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technology; Comparative Assessment for Sustainable Energy Development; Food and Agriculture; Human Health; Marine Environment and Water Resources; Applications of Physical and Chemical Sciences; Nuclear Safety; Radiation Safety; Radioactive Waste Safety; Co-ordination of Safety Activities; Safeguards. The Sub-programmes supported by the CRPs are listed. Results of research are available to all Member States, and are disseminated through national

  19. Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs): Annual report of activities and statistics for 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-07-01

    Article III of the IAEA Statute authorises the Agency to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful purposes throughout the world and to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information, as well as the exchange of scientists in the field of peaceful uses of atomic energy. The research supported by the Agency is within the framework of the Agency's programmes, sub-programmes and projects that are listed in the approved Programme and Budget of the Agency. The research work is normally implemented through Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that bring together research institutes in both developing and developed Member States to collaborate on the research topic of interest. In addition, the introduction of a new type of CRP (called Thematic CRP), meant to complement traditional CRPs, is currently being tested by the Human Health programme. This new, optional type of CRP is designed to strengthen promotion of research on nuclear technologies in developing Member States through CRPs that rest on pair building between agreement holders and contract holders and includes a PhD training programme at the contract holders' institutions. Further details of the administration of research contracts and general information on CRPs is contained in the Agency?s Website at http://www.iaea.org/programmes/ri/uc.html. The CRPs reported in this document are conducted in support of the following Agency programmes: Nuclear Power; Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technology; Comparative Assessment for Sustainable Energy Development; Food and Agriculture; Human Health; Marine Environment and Water Resources; Applications of Physical and Chemical Sciences; Nuclear Safety; Radiation Safety; Radioactive Waste Safety; Co-ordination of Safety Activities; Safeguards. The Sub-programmes supported by the CRPs are listed. Results of research are available to all Member States, and are disseminated through national

  20. Coordinated Fault-Tolerance for High-Performance Computing Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, Dhabaleswar Kumar [The Ohio State University; Beckman, Pete

    2011-07-28

    With the Coordinated Infrastructure for Fault Tolerance Systems (CIFTS, as the original project came to be called) project, our aim has been to understand and tackle the following broad research questions, the answers to which will help the HEC community analyze and shape the direction of research in the field of fault tolerance and resiliency on future high-end leadership systems. Will availability of global fault information, obtained by fault information exchange between the different HEC software on a system, allow individual system software to better detect, diagnose, and adaptively respond to faults? If fault-awareness is raised throughout the system through fault information exchange, is it possible to get all system software working together to provide a more comprehensive end-to-end fault management on the system? What are the missing fault-tolerance features that widely used HEC system software lacks today that would inhibit such software from taking advantage of systemwide global fault information? What are the practical limitations of a systemwide approach for end-to-end fault management based on fault awareness and coordination? What mechanisms, tools, and technologies are needed to bring about fault awareness and coordination of responses on a leadership-class system? What standards, outreach, and community interaction are needed for adoption of the concept of fault awareness and coordination for fault management on future systems? Keeping our overall objectives in mind, the CIFTS team has taken a parallel fourfold approach. Our central goal was to design and implement a light-weight, scalable infrastructure with a simple, standardized interface to allow communication of fault-related information through the system and facilitate coordinated responses. This work led to the development of the Fault Tolerance Backplane (FTB) publish-subscribe API specification, together with a reference implementation and several experimental implementations on top of

  1. IAEA coordinated research project on 'analytical and experimental benchmark analyses of accelerator driven systems'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait-Abderrahim, H.; Stanculescu, A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides the general background and the main specifications of the benchmark exercises performed within the framework of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analyses of Accelerator Driven Systems. The overall objective of the CRP, performed within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR) of IAEA's Nuclear Energy Dept., is to contribute to the generic R and D efforts in various fields common to innovative fast neutron system development, i.e. heavy liquid metal thermal hydraulics, dedicated transmutation fuels and associated core designs, theoretical nuclear reaction models, measurement and evaluation of nuclear data for transmutation, and development and validation of calculational methods and codes. (authors)

  2. Identification of High Confidence Nuclear Forensics Signatures. Results of a Coordinated Research Project and Related Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-08-01

    The results of a Coordinated Research Project and related research on the identification of high confidence nuclear forensic isotopic, chemical and physical data characteristics, or signatures, provides information on signatures that can help identify the origin and history of nuclear and other radioactive material encountered out of regulatory control. This research report compiles findings from investigations of materials obtained from throughout the nuclear fuel cycle to include radioactive sources. The report further provides recent results used to identify, analyse in the laboratory, predict and interpret these signatures relative to the requirements of a nuclear forensics examination. The report describes some of the controls on the incorporation and persistence of these signatures in these materials as well as their potential use in a national system of identification to include a national nuclear forensics library.

  3. The AgMIP Coordinated Climate-Crop Modeling Project (C3MP): Methods and Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Sonali P.; Ruane, Alexander Clark

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is expected to alter a multitude of factors important to agricultural systems, including pests, diseases, weeds, extreme climate events, water resources, soil degradation, and socio-economic pressures. Changes to carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]), temperature, and water (CTW) will be the primary drivers of change in crop growth and agricultural systems. Therefore, establishing the CTW-change sensitivity of crop yields is an urgent research need and warrants diverse methods of investigation. Crop models provide a biophysical, process-based tool to investigate crop responses across varying environmental conditions and farm management techniques, and have been applied in climate impact assessment by using a variety of methods (White et al., 2011, and references therein). However, there is a significant amount of divergence between various crop models' responses to CTW changes (Rotter et al., 2011). While the application of a site-based crop model is relatively simple, the coordination of such agricultural impact assessments on larger scales requires consistent and timely contributions from a large number of crop modelers, each time a new global climate model (GCM) scenario or downscaling technique is created. A coordinated, global effort to rapidly examine CTW sensitivity across multiple crops, crop models, and sites is needed to aid model development and enhance the assessment of climate impacts (Deser et al., 2012). To fulfill this need, the Coordinated Climate-Crop Modeling Project (C3MP) (Ruane et al., 2014) was initiated within the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP; Rosenzweig et al., 2013). The submitted results from C3MP Phase 1 (February 15, 2013-December 31, 2013) are currently being analyzed. This chapter serves to present and update the C3MP protocols, discuss the initial participation and general findings, comment on needed adjustments, and describe continued and future development. AgMIP aims to improve

  4. High Temperature Reactors for a new IAEA Coordinated Research Project on energy neutral mineral development processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haneklaus, Nils, E-mail: n.haneklaus@berkeley.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, 4118 Etcheverry Hall, MC 1730, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States); Reitsma, Frederik [IAEA, Division of Nuclear Power, Section of Nuclear Power Technology Development, VIC, PO Box 100, Vienna 1400 (Austria); Tulsidas, Harikrishnan [IAEA, Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Technology, Section of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Materials, VIC, PO Box 100, Vienna 1400 (Austria)

    2016-09-15

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is promoting a new Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to elaborate on the applicability and potential of using High Temperature Reactors (HTRs) to provide process heat and/or electricity to power energy intensive mineral development processes. The CRP aims to provide a platform for cooperation between HTR-developers and mineral development processing experts. Energy intensive mineral development processes with (e.g. phosphate-, gold-, copper-, rare earth ores) or without (e.g. titanium-, aluminum ore) the possibility to recover accompanying uranium and/or thorium that could be developed and used as raw material for nuclear reactor fuel enabling “energy neutral” processing of the primary ore if the recovered uranium and/or thorium is sufficient to operate the greenhouse gas lean energy source used shall be discussed according to the participants needs. This paper specifically focuses on the aspects to be addressed by HTR-designers and developers. First requirements that should be fulfilled by the HTR-designs are highlighted together with the desired outcomes of the research project.

  5. The participation of IPEN in the IAEA coordinated research projects on accelerators driven systems (ADS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiorino, J.R.; Santos, A.; Carluccio, T.; Rossi, P.C.R.; Antunes, A.; Oliveira, F. de; Lee, S.M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: maiorino@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes the participation of the IPEN in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Projects(CRP) on Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analysis on ADS and Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Utilization in ADS. The first CRP has as specific objective to improve the present understanding of the coupling of an external neutron source [e.g. a spallation source in the case of the accelerator driven system (ADS)] with a multiplicative sub-critical core, and the second CRP, or collaborative work, the utilization of LEU in existing or planned ADS facilities. IPEN participate in both CRP through a research contract (13388), and although there are several benchmarks defined in both CRP, presently IPEN is participating in the activities related with reactor physics benchmark of the Yalina Booster facility in Belarus, in the analytical and numerical benchmarking of methods and codes for ADS kinetics, and in the ADS target calculations. Besides, since there are plans to introduce a compact neutron generator in a sub critical core of the IPEN-MB-01 facility, a benchmark of a simulation of such project has been proposed in the LEU-ADS CRP. The paper will review the CRPs with details on the activities in which IPEN is participating. (author)

  6. The participation of IPEN in the IAEA coordinated research projects on accelerators driven systems (ADS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiorino, J.R.; Santos, A.; Carluccio, T.; Rossi, P.C.R.; Antunes, A.; Oliveira, F. de; Lee, S.M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the participation of the IPEN in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Projects(CRP) on Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analysis on ADS and Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Utilization in ADS. The first CRP has as specific objective to improve the present understanding of the coupling of an external neutron source [e.g. a spallation source in the case of the accelerator driven system (ADS)] with a multiplicative sub-critical core, and the second CRP, or collaborative work, the utilization of LEU in existing or planned ADS facilities. IPEN participate in both CRP through a research contract (13388), and although there are several benchmarks defined in both CRP, presently IPEN is participating in the activities related with reactor physics benchmark of the Yalina Booster facility in Belarus, in the analytical and numerical benchmarking of methods and codes for ADS kinetics, and in the ADS target calculations. Besides, since there are plans to introduce a compact neutron generator in a sub critical core of the IPEN-MB-01 facility, a benchmark of a simulation of such project has been proposed in the LEU-ADS CRP. The paper will review the CRPs with details on the activities in which IPEN is participating. (author)

  7. IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) on 'Analytical and experimental benchmark analyses of accelerator driven systems'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abanades, Alberto; Aliberti, Gerardo; Gohar, Yousry; Talamo, Alberto; Bornos, Victor; Kiyavitskaya, Anna; Carta, Mario; Janczyszyn, Jerzy; Maiorino, Jose; Pyeon, Cheolho; Stanculescu, Alexander; Titarenko, Yury; Westmeier, Wolfram

    2008-01-01

    In December 2005, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has started a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analyses of Accelerator Driven Systems'. The overall objective of the CRP, performed within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWGFR) of IAEA's Nuclear Energy Department, is to increase the capability of interested Member States in developing and applying advanced reactor technologies in the area of long-lived radioactive waste utilization and transmutation. The specific objective of the CRP is to improve the present understanding of the coupling of an external neutron source (e.g. spallation source) with a multiplicative sub-critical core. The participants are performing computational and experimental benchmark analyses using integrated calculation schemes and simulation methods. The CRP aims at integrating some of the planned experimental demonstration projects of the coupling between a sub-critical core and an external neutron source (e.g. YALINA Booster in Belarus, and Kyoto University's Critical Assembly (KUCA)). The objective of these experimental programs is to validate computational methods, obtain high energy nuclear data, characterize the performance of sub-critical assemblies driven by external sources, and to develop and improve techniques for sub-criticality monitoring. The paper summarizes preliminary results obtained to-date for some of the CRP benchmarks. (authors)

  8. Supervision and technical coordination of the German activities in the 2D/3D-project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayinger, F.

    1988-01-01

    The German Federal Minister for Research and Technology, the Japanese Atomic Energy Bureau, represented by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) made a contract to cooperate in the field of nuclear safety research with the aim to improve and to guarantee the safety of water-cooled nuclear reactors on an international basis by joint research activities in the 2D/3D-project. The necessity for these research activities results from gaps in the status of knowledge for a best-estimate analysis in emergency core cooling, from the legally established duty to minimize the radioactive emission to the environment as consequence of an incident, and from the effort to optimize the safeguard systems of nuclear reactors continuously and steadily. The activities which were performed in the frame of this project concentrated on the coordination of the experimental and theoretical work, as well as on the technical supervision with respect to an efficient attainment of the internationally aspired research aim and to an optimal adjustment with respect to the emergency core cooling problems of pressurized water reactors. (orig.) [de

  9. Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs): Annual report of activities and statistics for 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    Article III of the IAEA Statute authorises the Agency to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful purposes throughout the world and to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information, as well as the exchange of scientists in the field of peaceful uses of atomic energy. The research supported by the Agency is within the framework of the Agency's programmes, sub-programmes and projects that are listed in the approved Programme and Budget of the Agency. The research work is normally implemented through Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that bring together research institutes in both developing and developed Member States to collaborate on the research topic of interest. Doctoral CRPs, (previously known as Thematic CRPs), meant to complement traditional CRPs, are currently being tested by the Human Health programme. This new, optional type of CRP is designed to strengthen promotion of research on nuclear technologies in developing Member States through CRPs that rest on pair building between agreement holders and contract holders and includes a PhD training programme at the contract holders? institutions. Further details of the administration of research contracts and general information on CRPs is contained in the Agency's Website at http://www-crp.iaea.org. The CRPs reported in this document are conducted in support of the following Agency programmes: Nuclear Power; Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Material Technologies; Analysis for Sustainable Energy Development; Nuclear Science; Food and Agriculture; Human Health; Water Resources; Protection of the Marine and Terrestrial Environments; Physical and Chemical Applications; Safety of Nuclear Installations; Radiation Safety; Management of Radioactive Waste; Safeguards. The Sub-programmes supported by the CRPs are listed. Results of research are available to all Member States, and are disseminated through national, international and Agency scientific

  10. Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs): Annual report of activities and statistics for 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-08-15

    Article III of the IAEA Statute authorises the Agency to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful purposes throughout the world and to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information, as well as the exchange of scientists in the field of peaceful uses of atomic energy. The research supported by the Agency is within the framework of the Agency's programmes, sub-programmes and projects that are listed in the approved Programme and Budget of the Agency. The research work is normally implemented through Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that bring together research institutes in both developing and developed Member States to collaborate on the research topic of interest. Doctoral CRPs, (previously known as Thematic CRPs), meant to complement traditional CRPs, are currently being tested by the Human Health programme. This new, optional type of CRP is designed to strengthen promotion of research on nuclear technologies in developing Member States through CRPs that rest on pair building between agreement holders and contract holders and includes a PhD training programme at the contract holders? institutions. Further details of the administration of research contracts and general information on CRPs is contained in the Agency's Website at http://www-crp.iaea.org. The CRPs reported in this document are conducted in support of the following Agency programmes: Nuclear Power; Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Material Technologies; Analysis for Sustainable Energy Development; Nuclear Science; Food and Agriculture; Human Health; Water Resources; Protection of the Marine and Terrestrial Environments; Physical and Chemical Applications; Safety of Nuclear Installations; Radiation Safety; Management of Radioactive Waste; Safeguards. The Sub-programmes supported by the CRPs are listed. Results of research are available to all Member States, and are disseminated through national, international and Agency scientific

  11. Peter St. John | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. John Photo of Peter St. John Peter St. John Researcher III-Chemical Engineering Peter.StJohn @nrel.gov | 303-384-7969 Orcid ID http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7928-3722 Education Peter St. John received his engineering from the University of California at Santa Barbara in 2015. During his Ph.D., St. John applied

  12. Application of the BISON Fuel Performance Code of the FUMEX-III Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, R.L.; Novascone, S.R.

    2013-01-01

    Since 1981, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has sponsored a series of Coordinated Research Projects (CRP) in the area of nuclear fuel modeling. These projects have typically lasted 3-5 years and have had broad international participation. The objectives of the projects have been to assess the maturity and predictive capability of fuel performance codes, support interaction and information exchange between countries with code development and application needs, build a database of well- defined experiments suitable for code validation, transfer a mature fuel modeling code to developing countries, and provide guidelines for code quality assurance and code application to fuel licensing. The fourth and latest of these projects, known as FUMEX-III1 (FUel Modeling at EXtended Burnup- III), began in 2008 and ended in December of 2011. FUMEX-III was the first of this series of fuel modeling CRP's in which the INL participated. Participants met at the beginning of the project to discuss and select a set of experiments ('priority cases') for consideration during the project. These priority cases were of broad interest to the participants and included reasonably well-documented and reliable data. A meeting was held midway through the project for participants to present and discuss progress on modeling the priority cases. A final meeting was held at close of the project to present and discuss final results and provide input for a final report. Also in 2008, the INL initiated development of a new multidimensional (2D and 3D) multiphysics nuclear fuel performance code called BISON, with code development progressing steadily during the three-year FUMEX-III project. Interactions with international fuel modeling researchers via FUMEX-III played a significant role in the BISON evolution, particularly influencing the selection of material and behavioral models which are now included in the code. The FUMEX-III cases are generally integral fuel rod experiments occurring

  13. NOAA TIFF Image - 1m Multibeam Bathymetry, US Virgin Islands - St. John Shelf - Project NF-10-03 - (2010), UTM 20N NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131854)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a GeoTIFF with 1x1 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of St. John Shelf, a selected portion of seafloor south of St. John, USVI,...

  14. NOAA TIFF Image - 1m Multibeam Bathymetry, US Virgin Islands - St. John Shelf - Project NF-10-03 - (2010), UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a GeoTIFF with 1x1 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of St. John Shelf, a selected portion of seafloor south of St. John, USVI,...

  15. Small angle neutron scattering. Report of a coordinated research project 2000-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-03-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) is a powerful technique for studying macro structures like polymers, precipitates in metallurgical specimens, biological molecules, micelles and magnetic systems like ferrofluids. Neutron scattering has an advantage over X ray scattering (XSAXS) due to selective absorption and scattering cross section of neutrons across the periodic table. It is possible to develop and use a SANS instrument even with a medium flux reactor. The present CRP was aimed at the development of components like collimators, monochromators, position sensitive detectors (PSD) etc. for improving the throughput of the instrument and foster the effective utilization of research reactors, as well as to provide a link between developing and developed facilities. The CRP was launched with the first research coordination meeting (RCM) in 2000 to refine the project proposals and define the action plans and partnerships. There were eight research contracts and four research agreements. Good partnerships were established between various participants with collaborations among participants from various countries including those from developing and developed countries. The progress of the individual projects and team work under the CRP was evaluated and discussed during the second RCM and the action plan for the final phase was formulated. The results of the work done under the CRP were then reviewed in the final RCM held in Vienna, December 2003. This publication presents the results of the work carried out by the participants under the CRP at their respective institutions. The information will be useful for the users and operators of research reactors in developing an instrument and building collaborations for capacity building. The development of collimators, detector assemblies, utilization of the SANS for microstructural characterization of advanced materials , development and design of a ultra small angle neutron scattering (USANS) and proposals for a new SANS

  16. IAEA coordinated research project on thermal-hydraulics of Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors (SCWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, K.; Aksan, S. N.

    2012-01-01

    The Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) is an innovative water-cooled reactor concept, which uses supercritical pressure water as reactor coolant. It has been attracting interest of many researchers in various countries mainly due to its benefits of high thermal efficiency and simple primary systems, resulting in low capital cost. The IAEA started in 2008 a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Thermal-Hydraulics of SCWRs as a forum to foster the exchange of technical information and international collaboration in research and development. This paper summarizes the activities and current status of the CRP, as well as major progress achieved to date. At present, 15 institutions closely collaborate in several tasks. Some organizations have been conducting thermal-hydraulics experiments and analysing the data, and others have been participating in code-to-test and/or code-to-code benchmark exercises. The expected outputs of the CRP are also discussed. Finally, the paper introduces several IAEA activities relating to or arising from the CRP. (authors)

  17. International outage coding system for nuclear power plants. Results of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-05-01

    The experience obtained in each individual plant constitutes the most relevant source of information for improving its performance. However, experience of the level of the utility, country and worldwide is also extremely valuable, because there are limitations to what can be learned from in-house experience. But learning from the experience of others is admittedly difficult, if the information is not harmonized. Therefore, such systems should be standardized and applicable to all types of reactors satisfying the needs of the broad set of nuclear power plant operators worldwide and allowing experience to be shared internationally. To cope with the considerable amount of information gathered from nuclear power plants worldwide, it is necessary to codify the information facilitating the identification of causes of outages, systems or component failures. Therefore, the IAEA established a sponsored Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the International Outage Coding System to develop a general, internationally applicable system of coding nuclear power plant outages, providing worldwide nuclear utilities with a standardized tool for reporting outage information. This TECDOC summarizes the results of this CRP and provides information for transformation of the historical outage data into the new coding system, taking into consideration the existing systems for coding nuclear power plant events (WANO, IAEA-IRS and IAEA PRIS) but avoiding duplication of efforts to the maximum possible extent

  18. HTGR reactor physics, thermal-hydraulics and depletion uncertainty analysis: a proposed IAEA coordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyobeka, Bismark; Reitsma, Frederik; Ivanov, Kostadin

    2011-01-01

    The continued development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) requires verification of HTGR design and safety features with reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes. The predictive capability of coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics and depletion simulations for reactor design and safety analysis can be assessed with sensitivity analysis and uncertainty analysis methods. In order to benefit from recent advances in modeling and simulation and the availability of new covariance data (nuclear data uncertainties) extensive sensitivity and uncertainty studies are needed for quantification of the impact of different sources of uncertainties on the design and safety parameters of HTGRs. Uncertainty and sensitivity studies are an essential component of any significant effort in data and simulation improvement. In February 2009, the Technical Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors recommended that the proposed IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling be implemented. In the paper the current status and plan are presented. The CRP will also benefit from interactions with the currently ongoing OECD/NEA Light Water Reactor (LWR) UAM benchmark activity by taking into consideration the peculiarities of HTGR designs and simulation requirements. (author)

  19. Low dose radiation effects: an integrative european approach (Risc-Rad Project) coordinated by the Cea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabatier, L.

    2006-01-01

    RISC-RAD (Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by ionizing Radiations) is an Integrated Project funded by the European Commission under 6. Framework Programme / EURATOM. RISC-RAD started on 1. January 2004 for a duration of four years. Coordinated by Cea (Dr Laure Sabatier), it involves 11 European countries (Austria, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom) and 29 research institutions. Objectives: Exposures to low and protracted doses of ionizing radiation are very frequent in normal living environment, at work places, in industry and in medicine. Effects of these exposures on human health cannot be reliably assessed by epidemiological methods, nor is thoroughly understood by biologists. RISC-RAD project proposes to help bridging the gap of scientific knowledge about these effects. To achieve this goal, a necessary key step is to understand the basic mechanisms by which radiation induces cancer. Studying this multistage process in an integrated way, the project offers a new biological approach characterised by and clear-cut and objective-driven scientific policy: the project is focused on the effects of low doses (less than 100 mSv) and protracted doses of radiation. It aims at identifying new parameters that take into account the differences in radiation responses between individuals. A group of modelers works closely with the experimental teams in order to better quantify the risks associated with low and protracted doses. Research work is divided into five work packages interacting closely with each other. WP1 is dedicated to DNA damage. Ionizing Radiation (IR) produce a broad spectrum of base modifications and DNA strand breaks of different kinds, among which double-strand breaks and 'clustered damage' which is thought to be a major feature in biological effectiveness of IR. The aim of Work Package 1 is to improve understanding of the initial DNA damage induced by

  20. Coordinated research project on radiation sterilization and decontamination of pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutical raw materials. CRP report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Radiation processing is a very convenient tool for imparting desirable effects in materials and it has been an area of enormous interest in the last few decades. Radiation processing of synthetic and natural polymers for improving their characteristics is largely used in laboratory and industrial scale. Radiation sterilization is a well developed and established technology for many products. It is especially useful for the treatment of pharmaceuticals due to flexibility of radiation processing to be carried out at any desired temperature, sterilizability of mixed products in kits, offering simultaneous sterilization and modification of polymer based formulations. The success of radiation technology for processing of synthetic and natural polymers and treatment of pharmaceuticals has been based, to a large extent, on empirical knowledge. But now, the applications of natural polymers are being sought in knowledge-demanding areas such as pharmacy and biotechnology. Reliable analytical methods are being developed for controlling of degradation effects of radiation on polymers. Procedures and chemical formulations are being investigated enhancing or preventing degradation effects depending on the desired application of the process. The Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the use of radiation processing for sterilization or decontamination of pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutical raw materials has been completed in 2002. The overall objective of the CRP was to coordinate the research and development programmes carried out in different countries in use of radiation processing for sterilization or decontamination of pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutic raw materials. It has been concluded that in addition to well known advantages of radiation sterilization being a well developed and established technology requiring the control of only one parameter, dose, to achieve sterilization; it is especially useful for the treatment of pharmaceuticals due to flexibility of radiation

  1. Coordinated research project on radiation sterilization and decontamination of pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutical raw materials. CRP report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    Radiation processing is a very convenient tool for imparting desirable effects in materials and it has been an area of enormous interest in the last few decades. Radiation processing of synthetic and natural polymers for improving their characteristics is largely used in laboratory and industrial scale. Radiation sterilization is a well developed and established technology for many products. It is especially useful for the treatment of pharmaceuticals due to flexibility of radiation processing to be carried out at any desired temperature, sterilizability of mixed products in kits, offering simultaneous sterilization and modification of polymer based formulations. The success of radiation technology for processing of synthetic and natural polymers and treatment of pharmaceuticals has been based, to a large extent, on empirical knowledge. But now, the applications of natural polymers are being sought in knowledge-demanding areas such as pharmacy and biotechnology. Reliable analytical methods are being developed for controlling of degradation effects of radiation on polymers. Procedures and chemical formulations are being investigated enhancing or preventing degradation effects depending on the desired application of the process. The Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the use of radiation processing for sterilization or decontamination of pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutical raw materials has been completed in 2002. The overall objective of the CRP was to coordinate the research and development programmes carried out in different countries in use of radiation processing for sterilization or decontamination of pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutic raw materials. It has been concluded that in addition to well known advantages of radiation sterilization being a well developed and established technology requiring the control of only one parameter, dose, to achieve sterilization; it is especially useful for the treatment of pharmaceuticals due to flexibility of radiation

  2. Patient Dose Optimization in Fluoroscopically Guided Interventional Procedures. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, many surgical procedures have increasingly been replaced by interventional procedures that guide catheters into the arteries under X ray fluoroscopic guidance to perform a variety of operations such as ballooning, embolization, implantation of stents etc. The radiation exposure to patients and staff in such procedures is much higher than in simple radiographic examinations like X ray of chest or abdomen such that radiation induced skin injuries to patients and eye lens opacities among workers have been reported in the 1990's and after. Interventional procedures have grown both in frequency and importance during the last decade. This Coordinated Research Project (CRP) and TECDOC were developed within the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) framework of statutory responsibility to provide for the worldwide application of the standards for the protection of people against exposure to ionizing radiation. The CRP took place between 2003 and 2005 in six countries, with a view of optimizing the radiation protection of patients undergoing interventional procedures. The Fundamental Safety Principles and the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation (BSS) issued by the IAEA and co-sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Labour Organization (ILO), the World Health Organization (WHO), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), among others, require the radiation protection of patients undergoing medical exposures through justification of the procedures involved and through optimization. In keeping with its responsibility on the application of standards, the IAEA programme on Radiological Protection of Patients encourages the reduction of patient doses. To facilitate this, it has issued specific advice on the application of the BSS in the field of radiology in Safety Reports Series No. 39 and the three volumes on Radiation

  3. Irradiated sewage sludge for application to cropland. Results of a co-ordinated research project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-10-01

    Research Project on the Use of Irradiated Sewage Sludge to Increase Soil Fertility and Crop Yields and to Preserve the Environment between 1995 and 2000. The overall objective was to assist national institutes from Member States to develop management practices for the efficient use of sewage sludge as an organic fertilizer for increasing and sustaining crop production and soil fertility in an environmentally sound manner. Twelve contract holders from Argentina, Bangladesh, China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Pakistan, Portugal, Romania, Sweden, and Thailand, and five agreement holders from Austria, Germany, Japan, the United States of America, and the United Kingdom participated in the project. The first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) was held 10-14 July 1995 in Vienna, the second RCM 14-18 September 1996 in Cairo, Egypt, the third RCM 22-26 June 1998 in Oeiras, Portugal, and the fourth RCM was held 20-24 September 1999 in Serdang, Malaysia.

  4. Industrial process gamma tomography. Final report of a coordinated research project 2003-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-05-01

    Gamma computed tomography (CT) is complementary to radiotracer and gamma sealed source techniques largely used for analyzing industrial process units. Relevant target areas for gamma CT applications are generally known. Although the methodology is generic and applicable across broad industrial specimen and facilities, a number of specific items have been identified as the most appropriate target beneficiaries of these applications: distillation columns; packed beds; risers; fluidized beds and other multiphase processing units. These industrial process units present significant technical challenges to CT investigations in terms of the complexity of the multiphase flows that occur in them. In order to address these needs, the IAEA implemented a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Industrial Process Gamma Tomography with the overall objective of testing and validating CT techniques for diagnosing industrial multiphase processes. CT laboratories from Argentina, Brazil, Czech Republic, France, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Norway, Poland, United Kingdom and the United States of America have participated. The specific objectives of the CRP were assessment of the tomographic methods, evaluation of them for investigation of multiphase engineering processes, and design of prototypes of simple CT systems for industrial processing, which can be transferred to other developing countries. The CRP has generated an active network, which also included other groups engaged in the CT field. The round robin test has played an important role in validation of techniques and software. This TECDOC is prepared based on the findings and achievements of the CRP. It is a comprehensive technical report containing valuable information, not readily available in any single publication elsewhere. The participants' reports and software developed by them are compiled in a CD-ROM and attached to the back cover. The guidelines and software packages described in this report can be used as an

  5. A Coordinated Research Project on the Implementation of Nuclear Techniques to Improve Food Traceability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, Russell; Cannavan, Andrew; Zandric, Zora; Maestroni, Britt; Abrahim, Aiman

    2013-04-01

    Traceability systems play a key role in assuring a safe and reliable food supply. Analytical techniques harnessing the spatial patterns in distribution of stable isotope and trace element ratios can be used for the determination of the provenance of food. Such techniques offer the potential to enhance global trade by providing an independent means of verifying "paper" traceability systems and can also help to prove authenticity, to combat fraudulent practices, and to control adulteration, which are important issues for economic, religious or cultural reasons. To address some of the challenges that developing countries face in attempting to implement effective food traceability systems, the IAEA, through its Joint FAO/IAEA Division on Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, has initiated a 5-year coordinated research project involving institutes in 15 developing and developed countries (Austria, Botswana, Chile, China, France, India, Lebanon, Morocco, Portugal, Singapore, Sweden, Thailand, Uganda, UK, USA). The objective is to help in member state laboratories to establish robust analytical techniques and databases, validated to international standards, to determine the provenance of food. Nuclear techniques such as stable isotope and multi-element analysis, along with complementary methods, will be applied for the verification of food traceability systems and claims related to food origin, production, and authenticity. This integrated and multidisciplinary approach to strengthening capacity in food traceability will contribute to the effective implementation of holistic systems for food safety and control. The project focuses mainly on the development of techniques to confirm product authenticity, with several research partners also considering food safety issues. Research topics encompass determination of the geographical origin of a variety of commodities, including seed oils, rice, wine, olive oil, wheat, orange juice, fish, groundnuts, tea, pork, honey and

  6. John Bertram Adams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stafford, G.H.

    1986-01-01

    This is the biography of a man obviously much liked and respected. It gives some personal details but is mainly concerned with his scientific work and achievements on major projects. Thus, some background information on those projects is also given as a context to the work of John Adams. The biography is written in sections; early years, the creation of CERN, Adams at CERN 1953-61, Adams and thermonuclear research 1958-69, (which includes his Directorship of the Culham Laboratory), Adams and the Ministry of Technology 1965-66, member for research of the UK Atomic Energy Authority 1966-69, Adams at CERN 1969-84 (as Director General of the SPS, as Executive Director-General of CERN 1979-81 and work at CERN up to 1984). (UK)

  7. Co-ordinated research project on comparative international studies of osteoporosis using isotope techniques. Report on the final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1994, the International Atomic Energy Agency started the five-year Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Comparative International Studies of Osteoporosis Using Isotope Techniques. The objectives of this study were: To harmonize the techniques of measuring BMD within the participating countries and to obtain data that can be compared between the different study groups (countries); To determine whether early adult PBM varies between populations over the age range from 15 to 50 years. In other words, to determine the age of peak bone mass in selected populations from developing countries; To explore environmental and nutritional contributions to any determined differences. Further information about the purpose and scope of the CRP may be found in the report of the Advisory Group Meeting (AGM) held in 19921 and other reports of this CRP. The fourth Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) for participants of the CRP, which is the subject of the present report, was held at the University of Sheffield Medical School; WHO Collaborating Center for Metabolic Bone Diseases in Sheffield, UK from 28 Feb. to 3 March 2000

  8. Fourth and final research co-ordination meeting for the coordinated research project on 'Comparative international studies of osteoporosis using isotopic techniques'. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, G.V.; Mokhtar, N.

    2002-01-01

    In 1994, the International Atomic Energy Agency started the five-year Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Comparative International Studies of Osteoporosis Using Isotope Techniques. The objectives of this study were: To harmonize the techniques of measuring BMD within the participating countries and to obtain data that can be compared between the different study groups (countries); To determine whether early adult PBM varies between populations over the age range from 15 to 50 years. In other words, to determine the age of peak bone mass in selected populations from developing countries; To explore environmental and nutritional contributions to any determined differences. Further information about the purpose and scope of the CRP may be found in the report of the Advisory Group Meeting (AGM) held in 19921 and other reports of this CRP. Since the last RCM held in 1998, the CRP participants have gathered up more data on BMD. Indeed 3488 subjects 15-50 years) have been recruited for the purpose of this project and have been stratified equally by sex and age into six -year age bands. Most of the participants have also completed collecting data on dietary intake, medical history, physical exercise, and lifestyle, as suggested in the VrHO questionnaire. Some participants have analyzed trace elements in a number of bone samples as well. One of the most important purposes of this CRP is to obtain harmonized data on BMD that is comparable from one study group to another. To ensure this quality insurance, the densitometers in each center were cross calibrated using a European Spine Phantom (ESP). Further-more, day-to-day control of DEXA machines was managed by each individual center. The fourth Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) for participants of the CRP, which is the subject of the present report, was held at the University of Sheffield Medical School; WHO Collaborating Center for Metabolic Bone Diseases in Sheffield, UK from 28 Feb. to 3 March 2000

  9. CT image reconstruction of steel pipe section from few projections using the method of rotating polar-coordinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Shuaijun; Wu Zhifang

    2008-01-01

    Fast online inspection in steel pipe production is a big challenge. Radiographic CT imaging technology, a high performance non-destructive testing method, is quite appropriate for inspection and quality control of steel pipes. The method of rotating polar-coordinate is used to reconstruct the steel pipe section from few projections with the purpose of inspecting it online. It reduces the projection number needed and the data collection time, and accelerates the reconstruction algorithm and saves the inspection time evidently. The results of simulation experiment and actual experiment indicate that the image quality and reconstruction time of rotating polar-coordinate method meet the requirements of inspecting the steel tube section online basically. The study is of some theoretical significance and the method is expected to be widely used in practice. (authors)

  10. Cementitious materials for radioactive waste management within IAEA coordinated research project - 59021

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drace, Zoran; Ojovan, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on cementitious materials for radioactive waste management was launched in 2007 [1, 2]. The objective of CRP was to investigate the behaviour and performance of cementitious materials used in radioactive waste management system with various purposes and included waste packages, waste-forms and backfills as well as investigation of interactions and interdependencies of these individual elements during long term storage and disposal. The specific research topics considered were: (i) cementitious materials for radioactive waste packaging: including radioactive waste immobilization into a solid waste form, (ii) waste backfilling and containers; (iii) emerging and alternative cementitious systems; (iv) physical-chemical processes occurring during the hydration and ageing of cement matrices and their influence on the cement matrix quality; (v) methods of production of cementitious materials for: immobilization into wasteform, backfills and containers; (vi) conditions envisaged in the disposal environment for packages (physical and chemical conditions, temperature variations, groundwater, radiation fields); (vii) testing and non-destructive monitoring techniques for quality assurance of cementitious materials; (viii) waste acceptance criteria for waste packages, waste forms and backfills; transport, long term storage and disposal requirements;and finally (ix) modelling or simulation of long term behaviours of cementations materials used for packaging, waste immobilization and backfilling, especially in the post-closure phase. The CRP has gathered overall 26 research organizations from 22 Member States aiming to share their research and practices on the use of cementitious materials [2]. The main research outcomes of the CRP were summarized in a summary report currently under preparation to be published by IAEA. The generic topical sections covered by report are: a) conventional cementitious systems; b) novel cementitious

  11. Identifying Coordination Problems in Software Development : Finding Mismatches between Software and Project Team Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amrit, Chintan Amrit; van Hillegersberg, Jos; Kumar, Kuldeep

    2012-01-01

    Today’s dynamic and iterative development environment brings significant challenges for software project management. In distributed project settings, “management by walking around” is no longer an option and project managers may miss out on key project insights. The TESNA (TEchnical Social Network

  12. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic evaluations in infant growth monitoring - a collaboration with WHO (partly RCA). Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This Coordinated Research Project (CRP) came about as an initiative to collaborate with the WHO Multicenter Growth Reference Study (MGRS) to generate new growth reference data for breastfed babies using stable isotopes. The WHO MRGS measures growth using anthropometric measurements (e.g. height and weight) in healthy infants and young children in different countries and continents. All participants are fed according to strict criteria regarding duration and frequency of breast-feeding. The MGRS' main goal is to develop a truly international growth standard to look at growth pattern of healthy breast-fed babies. Nevertheless, the composition of the growth (fat/lean tissue) and the nutrient intake that produced the standard growth were not originally included in the study. In order to address these and other important issues related to the baby's body composition and growth, a fruitful collaboration between the WHO and the IAEA has been established. The Agency technical experts and consultants will assist developing countries to carry out isotopic work to measure infant's growth using the in vivo kinetics technique. The objective of this CRP is to measure breast milk intake, using stable isotopes in a subgroup of breast-fed infants growing normally, and to assess their nutrient intakes. Furthermore, the results from the participating projects will provide new and valuable information on the nutrient requirement of healthy breast-fed babies, who were fed according to the WHO standard protocols

  13. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic evaluations in infant growth monitoring - a collaboration with WHO (partly RCA). Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This Coordinated Research Project (CRP) came about as an initiative to collaborate with the WHO Multicenter Growth Reference Study (MGRS) to generate new growth reference data for breastfed babies using stable isotopes. The WHO MRGS measures growth using anthropometric measurements (e.g. height and weight) in healthy infants and young children in different countries and continents. All participants are fed according to strict criteria regarding duration and frequency of breast-feeding. The MGRS' main goal is to develop a truly international growth standard to look at growth pattern of healthy breast-fed babies. Nevertheless, the composition of the growth (fat/lean tissue) and the nutrient intake that produced the standard growth were not originally included in the study. In order to address these and other important issues related to the baby's body composition and growth, a fruitful collaboration between the WHO and the IAEA has been established. The Agency technical experts and consultants will assist developing countries to carry out isotopic work to measure infant's growth using the in vivo kinetics technique. The objective of this CRP is to measure breast milk intake, using stable isotopes in a subgroup of breast-fed infants growing normally, and to assess their nutrient intakes. Furthermore, the results from the participating projects will provide new and valuable information on the nutrient requirement of healthy breast-fed babies, who were fed according to the WHO standard protocols.

  14. NOAA TIFF Image - 1 m Backscatter Mosaic of the St. John Shelf, U.S. Virgin Islands, Project NF-10-03, 2010, UTM 20 WGS84

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the St. John Shelf, US Virgin Islands. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team, in collaboration...

  15. Pathways to Energy from Inertial Fusion. An Integrated Approach. Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2006-2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-04-01

    The IAEA has continuously demonstrated its commitment to supporting the development of safe and environmentally clean nuclear fusion energy. Statistics show that at the current rate of energy consumption, fusion energy would remain an inexhaustible energy source for humankind for millions of years. Furthermore, some of the existing and foreseen risks - such as nuclear waste disposal and rising greenhouse gas emissions from the use of fossil fuels - can also be reduced. In the quest for fusion energy, two main lines of research and development are currently being pursued worldwide, namely the inertial and the magnetic confinement fusion concepts. For both approaches, the IAEA has conducted coordinated research activities focusing on specific physics and technological issues relevant the establishment of the knowledge base and foundation for the design and construction of fusion power plants. This report describes the recent research and technological developments and challenges in inertial fusion energy within the framework of such a coordinated research effort. The coordinated research project on Pathways to Energy from Inertial Fusion: An Integrated Approach was initiated in 2006 and concluded in 2010. The project involved experts and institutions from 16 Member States, addressing issues relevant to advancing inertial fusion energy research and development in its practical applications. The key topics addressed include: (i) high repetition rate, low cost, high efficiency ignition drivers; (ii) beam-matter/beam-plasma interaction related to inertial fusion target physics; (iii) target fusion chamber coupling and interface; and (iv) integrated inertial fusion power plant design. Participants in this coordinated research project have contributed 17 detailed research and technology progress reports of work performed at national and international levels. This report compiles all these reports while highlighting the various achievements.

  16. Coordination of Project and Current Activities on the Basis of the Strategy Alignment Metamodel in the Oil and Gas Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Yu. Dashkov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the purpose of this article is to describe the Strategy Alignment Metamodel of the project and current activities, which allows us to connect the Goals and Strategies for Phases of the project with the Goals and Strategies of the company at all levels of the organization through targeted measurement and application of Interpretive Models. Building Networks of Goals and Strategies, and adopting organizational solutions, you coordinate the interaction of the Project office and departments of the company. This methodology is based on a Logical Rationale of the Contexts and Assumptions for establishing Goals and Strategies both for the project and for the company, and on preparation of Contexts and Assumptions, Goals and Strategies Alignment Matrices, which provides a flexible adaptation to the internal and external environment in the process of selecting the most successful Strategies to achieve the Goals. Methods: this article is based on the concept of Goals-Questions-Metrics+ Strategies, which is adapted as another concept of strategic monitoring and control system of projects: Goals-Phases-Metrics+Strategies. These concepts have formed the basis of the Strategy Alignment Metamodel, where a technology of Phases Earned Value Management is used as a measurement system for the project activity, and Balanced scorecard is applied for current operations. Results: strategy Alignment Metamodel of the project and current activities of the company is proposed hereby. It uses modern strategic monitoring and control systems for projects: Goals-Phases-Metrics+Strategies, and for the company: Goals-Questions-Metrics+ Strategies. The interaction between these systems is based on Contexts and Assumptions, Goals and Strategies Alignment Matrices. The existence of such matrices greatly simplifies management decisions and prevents the risk of delays in the execution of project Phases based on rational participation and coordination of the company

  17. 3. Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Studies of advanced reactor technology options for effective incineration of radioactive waste'. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    To meet expressed Member States' needs, the IAEA has initiated a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Studies of Advanced Reactor Technology Options for Effective Incineration of Radioactive Waste'. The final goal of the CRP is to deepen the understanding of the dynamics of transmutation systems, e.g. the accelerator driven system, especially systems with deteriorated safety parameters, qualify the available methods, specify the range of validity of methods, and formulate requirements for future theoretical developments. Should transient experiments be available, the CRP will pursue experimental benchmarking work. In any case, based on the results, the CRP will conclude on the potential need of transient experiments and make appropriate proposals for experimental programs. The Technical Meeting in Chennai was the 3rd Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the CRP The man objectives of the RCM were to: - Discuss and perform inter-comparisons of the various benchmark results; - Prepare the first draft of the final CRP Report Status of the analyses and inter-comparisons of the results. The main objective of the CRP was to study innovative technology options for incinerating/utilizing radioactive wastes. The CRP's benchmarking exercises focused on eight innovative transmutation 'Domains', which correspond to different critical and sub-critical concepts or groups of concepts: I. Critical fast reactor, solid fuel, with fertile; II. Critical fast reactor, solid fuel, fertile-free; III. ADS, solid fuel, with fertile; IV. ADS, solid fuel, fertile-free; V. Critical reactor and ADS, molten salt fuel, with fertile; VI. Critical reactor and ADS, molten salt fuel, fertile-free; VII. Critical fast reactor and ADS, gas cooled; VIII. Fusion/fission hybrid system. For each of these Domains, the discussions and inter-comparisons considered the following issues: - Reactor-models; - Scenarios/phenomena; - Static analyses; - Dynamic analyses; - Methods; - Codes; - Neutronic data base

  18. Co-ordinated research project on health impacts of mercury cycling in contaminated environments studied by nuclear techniques. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The specific research objective of this coordinated research project is to study and assess the factors influencing the dynamics of Hg cycling and its impact on human health in mercury contaminated ecosystems, especially in tropical environments, using radioisotopes and enriched stable isotope tracers and/or complementary analytical techniques. Areas of research include: Evaluation of the relevant environmental factors influencing mercury transformations, transportation (mass balances), and partitioning in ecosystems; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg methylation and de-methylation rates in various environmental compartments; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg fluxes at natural interfaces such as sediment-water, water-air, land-air, plant-air, and saline-water-fresh-water, etc.; Determination and evaluation of the human exposure to Hg using bio-indicators such as hair, blood, and urine in light of epidemiological requirements; Preparation of an appropriate test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies. Expected research outputs are: Recommended approaches for the determination of mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and flux measurements; A compilation of reliable data on mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and fluxes in contaminated tropical ecosystems for comparison with existing data from temperate regions; Generated knowledge on factors influencing mercury transformations, transport and partitioning in various ecosystems; Test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies; Database of bio-indicator measurements (hair, blood, and urine, etc.) of human Hg exposure in contaminated tropical ecosystems; and Recommended countermeasures for the prevention and/or reduction of mercury contamination in polluted areas. This compilation contains country reports on the Second Research Coordination Meeting, Minamata

  19. Co-ordinated research project on health impacts of mercury cycling in contaminated environments studied by nuclear techniques. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The specific research objective of this coordinated research project is to study and assess the factors influencing the dynamics of Hg cycling and its impact on human health in mercury contaminated ecosystems, especially in tropical environments, using radioisotopes and enriched stable isotope tracers and/or complementary analytical techniques. Areas of research include: Evaluation of the relevant environmental factors influencing mercury transformations, transportation (mass balances), and partitioning in ecosystems; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg methylation and de-methylation rates in various environmental compartments; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg fluxes at natural interfaces such as sediment-water, water-air, land-air, plant-air, and saline-water-fresh-water, etc.; Determination and evaluation of the human exposure to Hg using bio-indicators such as hair, blood, and urine in light of epidemiological requirements; Preparation of an appropriate test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies. Expected research outputs are: Recommended approaches for the determination of mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and flux measurements; A compilation of reliable data on mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and fluxes in contaminated tropical ecosystems for comparison with existing data from temperate regions; Generated knowledge on factors influencing mercury transformations, transport and partitioning in various ecosystems; Test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies; Database of bio-indicator measurements (hair, blood, and urine, etc.) of human Hg exposure in contaminated tropical ecosystems; and Recommended countermeasures for the prevention and/or reduction of mercury contamination in polluted areas. This compilation contains country reports on the Second Research Coordination Meeting, Minamata

  20. Leveraging Economy of Scale across Construction Projects by Implementing Coordinated Purchasing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian Langhoff

    2010-01-01

    coordinated purchasing is an important step in the attempt to rethink the existing business model in construction. Going from competing on overhead (in a red ocean) to start to compete on company specific core competencies. The paper concludes highlighting the next milestones at the journey leveraging economy...

  1. Joint Coordinating Committee on environmental restoration and waste management (JCCEM) support, technology transfer, and special projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgar, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) assisted in identifying and evaluating foreign technologies to meet EM needs; supported the evaluation, removal, and/or revision of barriers to international technology and information transfer/exchange; facilitated the integration and coordination of U.S. government international environmental restoration and waste management activities; and enhanced U.S. industry's competitiveness in the international environmental technology market

  2. 23 CFR 771.111 - Early coordination, public involvement, and project development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ENVIRONMENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT AND RELATED PROCEDURES § 771.111 Early coordination... applicant for incorporation into the environmental assessment (EA) or draft EIS. (f) In order to ensure... obtained from: Director, Office of Human and Natural Environment, Federal Transit Administration...

  3. St. John's Wort (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The herb St. John's Wort is believed to be helpful in relieving mild to moderate depression, but should only be taken under a physician's supervision. St. John's Wort may clash with other medications or ...

  4. Intercomparison and biokinetic model validation of radionuclide intake assessment. Report of a co-ordinated research project. 1996-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    This TECDOC presents the results of a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Intercomparison and Biokinetic Model Validation of Radionuclide Intake Assessment, including the conclusions of a Research Co-ordination Meeting held from 6 to 8 July 1998. The present CRP on Intercomparison and Biokinetic Model Validation of Radionuclide Intake Assessment is part of the activities of the IAEA's Occupational Protection programme. The objective of this programme is to promote an internationally harmonized approach for optimizing occupational radiation protection through: the development of guides, within the IAEA's activities for establishing standards for radiation protection, for restricting radiation exposures in the workplace and for applying current occupational radiation protection techniques; and the promotion of application of these guidelines

  5. Shared investment projects and forecasting errors: setting framework conditions for coordination and sequencing data quality activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Stephan; Brauneis, Alexander; Rausch, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of inaccurate forecasting on the coordination of distributed investment decisions. In particular, by setting up a computational multi-agent model of a stylized firm, we investigate the case of investment opportunities that are mutually carried out by organizational departments. The forecasts of concern pertain to the initial amount of money necessary to launch and operate an investment opportunity, to the expected intertemporal distribution of cash flows, and the departments' efficiency in operating the investment opportunity at hand. We propose a budget allocation mechanism for coordinating such distributed decisions The paper provides guidance on how to set framework conditions, in terms of the number of investment opportunities considered in one round of funding and the number of departments operating one investment opportunity, so that the coordination mechanism is highly robust to forecasting errors. Furthermore, we show that-in some setups-a certain extent of misforecasting is desirable from the firm's point of view as it supports the achievement of the corporate objective of value maximization. We then address the question of how to improve forecasting quality in the best possible way, and provide policy advice on how to sequence activities for improving forecasting quality so that the robustness of the coordination mechanism to errors increases in the best possible way. At the same time, we show that wrong decisions regarding the sequencing can lead to a decrease in robustness. Finally, we conduct a comprehensive sensitivity analysis and prove that-in particular for relatively good forecasters-most of our results are robust to changes in setting the parameters of our multi-agent simulation model.

  6. Shared Investment Projects and Forecasting Errors: Setting Framework Conditions for Coordination and Sequencing Data Quality Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Stephan; Brauneis, Alexander; Rausch, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of inaccurate forecasting on the coordination of distributed investment decisions. In particular, by setting up a computational multi-agent model of a stylized firm, we investigate the case of investment opportunities that are mutually carried out by organizational departments. The forecasts of concern pertain to the initial amount of money necessary to launch and operate an investment opportunity, to the expected intertemporal distribution of cash flows, and the departments’ efficiency in operating the investment opportunity at hand. We propose a budget allocation mechanism for coordinating such distributed decisions The paper provides guidance on how to set framework conditions, in terms of the number of investment opportunities considered in one round of funding and the number of departments operating one investment opportunity, so that the coordination mechanism is highly robust to forecasting errors. Furthermore, we show that—in some setups—a certain extent of misforecasting is desirable from the firm’s point of view as it supports the achievement of the corporate objective of value maximization. We then address the question of how to improve forecasting quality in the best possible way, and provide policy advice on how to sequence activities for improving forecasting quality so that the robustness of the coordination mechanism to errors increases in the best possible way. At the same time, we show that wrong decisions regarding the sequencing can lead to a decrease in robustness. Finally, we conduct a comprehensive sensitivity analysis and prove that—in particular for relatively good forecasters—most of our results are robust to changes in setting the parameters of our multi-agent simulation model. PMID:25803736

  7. Shared investment projects and forecasting errors: setting framework conditions for coordination and sequencing data quality activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Leitner

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the impact of inaccurate forecasting on the coordination of distributed investment decisions. In particular, by setting up a computational multi-agent model of a stylized firm, we investigate the case of investment opportunities that are mutually carried out by organizational departments. The forecasts of concern pertain to the initial amount of money necessary to launch and operate an investment opportunity, to the expected intertemporal distribution of cash flows, and the departments' efficiency in operating the investment opportunity at hand. We propose a budget allocation mechanism for coordinating such distributed decisions The paper provides guidance on how to set framework conditions, in terms of the number of investment opportunities considered in one round of funding and the number of departments operating one investment opportunity, so that the coordination mechanism is highly robust to forecasting errors. Furthermore, we show that-in some setups-a certain extent of misforecasting is desirable from the firm's point of view as it supports the achievement of the corporate objective of value maximization. We then address the question of how to improve forecasting quality in the best possible way, and provide policy advice on how to sequence activities for improving forecasting quality so that the robustness of the coordination mechanism to errors increases in the best possible way. At the same time, we show that wrong decisions regarding the sequencing can lead to a decrease in robustness. Finally, we conduct a comprehensive sensitivity analysis and prove that-in particular for relatively good forecasters-most of our results are robust to changes in setting the parameters of our multi-agent simulation model.

  8. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic evaluations of maternal and child health nutrition to help prevent stunting. Report on the 1. research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The concept for the Co-ordinated Research Programme on isotopic evaluations of maternal and child nutrition to help prevent stunting was a consequence of discussions held between IAEA staff and participants in a regional training course on 'Isotope Techniques in Human Nutrition' held in Lima, Peru in June 1996. The intention then was to develop research on factors influencing the success of lactation and the consequent effects on the breast-fed child. The project would have Latin American participants to promote regional exchange of expertise and ideas. Initial participation was from Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Peru and Venezuela. Brazil and Pakistan have now been added to these. There are three Specific Research Objectives: (1) To develop stable isotope methods for measuring breast-milk intake using regionally available equipment. (2) To apply the methodology in the assessment of milk intake in infants in relation to maternal nutrition, socio-economic status and education, and infant nutrition and intake of macro- and micro-nutrients. (3) To use information gathered at 2) to determine the need for supplementation programmes for mothers and/or infants, and educational programmes for the mothers

  9. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic evaluations of maternal and child health nutrition to help prevent stunting. Report on the 1. research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    The concept for the Co-ordinated Research Programme on isotopic evaluations of maternal and child nutrition to help prevent stunting was a consequence of discussions held between IAEA staff and participants in a regional training course on `Isotope Techniques in Human Nutrition` held in Lima, Peru in June 1996. The intention then was to develop research on factors influencing the success of lactation and the consequent effects on the breast-fed child. The project would have Latin American participants to promote regional exchange of expertise and ideas. Initial participation was from Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Peru and Venezuela. Brazil and Pakistan have now been added to these. There are three Specific Research Objectives: (1) To develop stable isotope methods for measuring breast-milk intake using regionally available equipment. (2) To apply the methodology in the assessment of milk intake in infants in relation to maternal nutrition, socio-economic status and education, and infant nutrition and intake of macro- and micro-nutrients. (3) To use information gathered at 2) to determine the need for supplementation programmes for mothers and/or infants, and educational programmes for the mothers Refs, figs, tabs, graphs

  10. Project Newgate: Morehead State University and Federal Youth Center Institutional Coordination and Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norfleet, Morris L.

    An experimental prison program on a college campus is discussed. The purpose of the project, Project Newgate, is to find innovative ways of helping society's wrongdoers. Problems discussed are: salaries, travel expenses, communications, supplies, personnel training, admission, staff recruitment, and policy formation. (CK)

  11. Processing of Irradiated Graphite to Meet Acceptance Criteria for Waste Disposal. Results of a Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-05-01

    Graphite is widely used in the nuclear industry and in research facilities and this has led to increasing amounts of irradiated graphite residing in temporary storage facilities pending disposal. This publication arises from a coordinated research project (CRP) on the processing of irradiated graphite to meet acceptance criteria for waste disposal. It presents the findings of the CRP, the general conclusions and recommendations. The topics covered include, graphite management issues, characterization of irradiated graphite, processing and treatment, immobilization and disposal. Included on the attached CD-ROM are formal reports from the participants

  12. NOAA TIFF Image - 8m Multibeam Bathymetry, US Virgin Islands - St. John Shelf - Project NF-10-03 - (2010), UTM 20N NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131854)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a GeoTIFF with 8x8 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of a sharply sloping swath of the St. John Shelf, a selected portion of seafloor...

  13. NOAA TIFF Image - 8m Multibeam Bathymetry, US Virgin Islands - St. John Shelf - Project NF-10-03 - (2010), UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a GeoTIFF with 8x8 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of a sharply sloping swath of the St. John Shelf, a selected portion of seafloor...

  14. D4SCIENCE-II - Report on inter-projects coordination and collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Castelli, Donatella; Zoppi, Franco

    2010-01-01

    This deliverable reports on the collaborations with other FP7 projects and R&D programmes established by D4Science-II from the beginning of the project until July 2010. The collaborations described are of different nature, as they range from purely technical exchanges involving mutual exploitation of technologies to the sharing of e- Infrastructure resources and to the joint organization of networking and dissemination events. The deliverable presents these collaborations clustered into: (i) ...

  15. A coordinated school health approach to obesity prevention among Appalachian youth: the Winning with Wellness Pilot Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schetzina, Karen E; Dalton, William T; Lowe, Elizabeth F; Azzazy, Nora; VonWerssowetz, Katrina M; Givens, Connie; Pfortmiller, Deborah T; Stern, H Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Childhood obesity has been an increasing problem in the United States, especially in rural areas. Effective prevention approaches are needed. This article describes the development, implementation, effectiveness, feasibility, and sustainability of a school-based obesity prevention pilot project, Winning with Wellness. The program was based on the coordinated school health model and included a community-based participatory research approach aimed at promoting healthy eating and physical activity in a rural Appalachian elementary school. Findings from this preliminary project revealed improvements in nutrition offerings and increased physical activity during the school day. In addition, the program was found to be acceptable to teachers, successfully implemented utilizing both existing and newly developed resources, and sustainable as evidenced in continued practice and expansion to other area schools.

  16. Spent fuel performance assessment and research. Final report of a co-ordinated research project on Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research (SPAR) 1997-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    The report provides an overview of technical issues related to spent fuel wet and dry storage and summarizes the objectives and major findings of research, carried out within the framework of the Coordinated Research Program. Included are the fuel integrity aspects, fuel degradation mechanisms in dry and wet storage, behaviour of storage facility components (metallic components, reinforced concrete). Also included are issues related to long-term storage and monitoring technologies and techniques. Country reports on research projects within the SPAR Coordinated Research Program is presented. A brief history is given on the history of the BEFAST and SPAR Coordinated Research Projects

  17. Spent fuel performance assessment and research. Final report of a co-ordinated research project on Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research (SPAR) 1997-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    The report provides an overview of technical issues related to spent fuel wet and dry storage and summarizes the objectives and major findings of research, carried out within the framework of the Coordinated Research Program. Included are the fuel integrity aspects, fuel degradation mechanisms in dry and wet storage, behaviour of storage facility components (metallic components, reinforced concrete). Also included are issues related to long-term storage and monitoring technologies and techniques. Country reports on research projects within the SPAR Coordinated Research Program is presented. A brief history is given on the history of the BEFAST and SPAR Coordinated Research Projects.

  18. Innovative and adaptive technologies in decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Final report of a coordinated research project 2004-2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    There are dozens of old reactors and other nuclear facilities worldwide that are either being actively dismantled or are candidates for decommissioning in the near term. A significant proportion of these facilities are situated in Member States or institutions that do not have adequate expertise and technologies for planning and implementing state of the art decommissioning projects. The technology selection process is critical in that regard. The main objective of the IAEA technical activities on decommissioning is to promote the exchange of lessons learned in order to improve the technologies, thereby contributing to successful planning and implementation of decommissioning. This should be achieved through a better understanding of the decision making process in technology comparison and selection and relevant issues affecting the entire decommissioning process. The specific objectives of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Innovative and Adaptive Technologies in Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities include the following general aspects: (a) To establish methodologies and data needs for developing concepts and approaches relevant to technology comparison and selection in decommissioning; (b) To improve and expand the database on applications and performance of various types of decommissioning technologies; (c) To address specific issues for individual decommissioning technologies and generate data relevant to their comparison and selection. It is also expected that this project, and in particular the papers collected in this TECDOC, will draw Member States' attention to the practicality and achievability of timely planning and implementation of decommissioning, especially for many smaller projects. Concluding reports that summarized the work undertaken under the aegis of the CRP were presented at the third and final research coordination meeting held in Rez, Czech Republic, 3-7 December 2007, and collected in this technical publication. Operating

  19. Optimizing nitrogen fertilizer application to irrigated wheat. Results of a co-ordinated research project. 1994-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-07-01

    This TECDOC summarizes the results of a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Use of Nuclear Techniques for Optimizing Fertilizer Application under Irrigated Wheat to Increase the Efficient Use of Nitrogen Fertilizer and Consequently Reduce Environmental Pollution. The project was carried out between 1994 and 1998 through the technical co-ordination of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. Fourteen Member States of the IAEA and FAO carried out a series of field experiments aimed at improving irrigation water and fertilizer-N uptake efficiencies through integrated management of the complex Interactions involving inputs, soils, climate, and wheat cultivars. Its goals were: to investigate various aspects of fertilizer N uptake efficiency of wheat crops under irrigation through an interregional research network involving countries growing large areas of irrigated wheat; to use 15 N and the soil-moisture neutron probe to determine the fate of applied N, to follow water and nitrate movement in the soil, and to determine water balance and water-use efficiency in irrigated wheat cropping systems; to use the data generated to further develop and refine various relationships in the Ceres-Wheat computer simulation model; to use the knowledge generated to produce a N-rate-recommendation package to refine specific management strategies with respect to fertilizer applications and expected yields

  20. Investigations of Materials under High Repetition and Intense Fusion Pulses. Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2011-2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-12-01

    This publication presents experimental simulations of plasma-surface interaction phenomena at extreme conditions as expected in a fusion reactor, using dedicated test bed devices such as dense plasma focus, particle accelerators, plasma accelerators and plasma guns. It includes the investigation of the mechanism of material damage during transient heat loads on materials and addresses, in particular, the performance and adequacy of tungsten as plasma facing material for the next step fusion devices, such as ITER and fusion demonstration power plants. The publication is a compilation of the main results and findings of an IAEA coordinated research project on investigations on materials under high repetition and intense fusion pulses, conducted in the period 2011-2016 and provides a practical knowledge base for scientists and engineers carrying out activities in the plasma-material surface interaction area. Through its coordinated research activities, the IAEA has made it possible for States that are not yet members of the ITER project to contribute to ITER relevant scientific investigations, which have led to increased capabilities of diagnostics for plasma surface interaction.

  1. Co-ordinated research project on health impacts of mercury cycling in contaminated environments studied by nuclear techniques. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The specific research objective of this coordinated research project is to study and assess the factors influencing the dynamics of Hg cycling and its impact on human health in mercury contaminated ecosystems, especially in tropical environments, using radioisotopes and enriched stable isotope tracers and/or complementary analytical techniques. Areas of research include: Evaluation of the relevant environmental factors influencing mercury transformations, transportation (mass balances), and partitioning in ecosystems; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg methylation and de-methylation rates in various environmental compartments; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg fluxes at natural interfaces such as sediment-water, water-air, land-air, plant-air, and saline-water-fresh-water, etc.; Determination and evaluation of the human exposure to Hg using bio-indicators such as hair, blood, and urine in light of epidemiological requirements; Preparation of an appropriate test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies. Expected research outputs are: Recommended approaches for the determination of mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and flux measurements; A compilation of reliable data on mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and fluxes in contaminated tropical ecosystems for comparison with existing data from temperate regions; Generated knowledge on factors influencing mercury transformations, transport and partitioning in various ecosystems; Test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies; Database of bio-indicator measurements (hair, blood, and urine, etc.) of human Hg exposure in contaminated tropical ecosystems; and Recommended countermeasures for the prevention and/or reduction of mercury contamination in polluted areas.

  2. Co-ordinated research project on health impacts of mercury cycling in contaminated environments studied by nuclear techniques. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The specific research objective of this coordinated research project is to study and assess the factors influencing the dynamics of Hg cycling and its impact on human health in mercury contaminated ecosystems, especially in tropical environments, using radioisotopes and enriched stable isotope tracers and/or complementary analytical techniques. Areas of research include: Evaluation of the relevant environmental factors influencing mercury transformations, transportation (mass balances), and partitioning in ecosystems; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg methylation and de-methylation rates in various environmental compartments; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg fluxes at natural interfaces such as sediment-water, water-air, land-air, plant-air, and saline-water-fresh-water, etc.; Determination and evaluation of the human exposure to Hg using bio-indicators such as hair, blood, and urine in light of epidemiological requirements; Preparation of an appropriate test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies. Expected research outputs are: Recommended approaches for the determination of mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and flux measurements; A compilation of reliable data on mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and fluxes in contaminated tropical ecosystems for comparison with existing data from temperate regions; Generated knowledge on factors influencing mercury transformations, transport and partitioning in various ecosystems; Test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies; Database of bio-indicator measurements (hair, blood, and urine, etc.) of human Hg exposure in contaminated tropical ecosystems; and Recommended countermeasures for the prevention and/or reduction of mercury contamination in polluted areas

  3. Diagnosis and epidemiology of animal diseases in Latin America. Proceedings of the final research co-ordination meetings of FAO/IAEA/SIDA co-ordinated research projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    In 1986 the Animal Production and Health Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture embarked on a programme of support to scientists in developing countries focused on improving animal disease diagnosis through the use of nuclear and related technologies. As part of this programme the Swedish International Development Authority (SIDA) agreed to provide support for a FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) concerned with the introduction and use of such technologies in Latin America. Through this programme, which was entitled Regional Network for Latin America on Animal Disease Diagnosis Using Immunoassays and Labeled DNA Probe Techniques, studies were supported on a number of diseases considered to be of substantial economic and social importance to the region, including brucellosis, tuberculosis, babesiosis, leukosis, bluetongue and chlamydia infection in cattle and psedorabies in pigs. One significant conclusion was that large number of diseases studied limited research findings owing to the lack of a critical mass of scientists studying any one specific disease problem. Thus when in 1991, SIDA agreed to follow-up CRP on Immunoassay Methods for the Diagnosis and Epidemiology of Animal Diseases in Latin America, the work was restricted to three diseases, i.e. foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), bovine brucellosis and bovine babesiosis. In 1994 results were presented in Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles, France. The outcome of this meeting was the validation of ELISAs for the above mentioned diseases and a recommendation that future research should focus on diagnosis and epidemiology to support existing control and eradication campaigns against the two diseases of major importance in the region (FMD and Brucellosis). A follow-up CRP (1994-1997) entitled the Use of ELISA for Epidemiology and Control of Foot-and-Mouth Disease and Bovine Brucellosis in Latin America focused on the further validation and subsequent use of a

  4. Diagnosis and epidemiology of animal diseases in Latin America. Proceedings of the final research co-ordination meetings of FAO/IAEA/SIDA co-ordinated research projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    In 1986 the Animal Production and Health Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture embarked on a programme of support to scientists in developing countries focused on improving animal disease diagnosis through the use of nuclear and related technologies. As part of this programme the Swedish International Development Authority (SIDA) agreed to provide support for a FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) concerned with the introduction and use of such technologies in Latin America. Through this programme, which was entitled Regional Network for Latin America on Animal Disease Diagnosis Using Immunoassays and Labeled DNA Probe Techniques, studies were supported on a number of diseases considered to be of substantial economic and social importance to the region, including brucellosis, tuberculosis, babesiosis, leukosis, bluetongue and chlamydia infection in cattle and psedorabies in pigs. One significant conclusion was that large number of diseases studied limited research findings owing to the lack of a critical mass of scientists studying any one specific disease problem. Thus when in 1991, SIDA agreed to follow-up CRP on Immunoassay Methods for the Diagnosis and Epidemiology of Animal Diseases in Latin America, the work was restricted to three diseases, i.e. foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), bovine brucellosis and bovine babesiosis. In 1994 results were presented in Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles, France. The outcome of this meeting was the validation of ELISAs for the above mentioned diseases and a recommendation that future research should focus on diagnosis and epidemiology to support existing control and eradication campaigns against the two diseases of major importance in the region (FMD and Brucellosis). A follow-up CRP (1994-1997) entitled the Use of ELISA for Epidemiology and Control of Foot-and-Mouth Disease and Bovine Brucellosis in Latin America focused on the further validation and subsequent use of a

  5. Collaborative project to co-ordinate care for patients with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennerley, Dorothy; Bolas, Robert; Bourne, Jennifer; Branson, Kathy; Cavenagh, Penny; Chappell, Pam; Collins, Gwen; Coveney, Nick; Day, Nicole; Hardman, Mary; Hayter, Sue; Fenner, Pam; Jones, Jennifer; Jordan, Siobhan; Noble, Brendon; Osbourne, Sarah; Smith, Carol; Wigens, Lynn

    2011-05-01

    Health leaders from across Suffolk joined together in a collaborative action-learning project to identify ways of offering more productive and personalised care for patients with dementia and their carers. The project revealed a range of factors necessary for success, notably professional collaboration and effective facilitation. The outcome was a range of evidenced-based recommendations to improve care and efficiency, as well as ensuring that the quality, innovation, productivity and prevention (QIPP) agenda was met. The lessons can be applied not just in dementia care, but to other long-term and complex care situations.

  6. Co-ordinated research project: comparative international studies of osteoporosis using isotope techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-31

    Poor bone health is a major public health problem of worldwide concern. No country is immune. One of the main concerns - osteoporosis - is a bone disease that usually affects older people (primarily post-menopausal women), leading to hip fractures, vertebral compression fractures, and other related problems.In 1994 the IAEA (henceforth the `Agency`) started a 5-year Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) which addresses one particular measure of bone health - bone mineral density (BMD). The main concept underpinning this CRP is that good bone health in later years is primarily determined by the attainment of a sufficiently high BMD during early adulthood. The `core` objective of the Agency`s CRP is to investigate how BMD varies with the age, sex, ethnicity and geographical origin of the subjects over the age range from 15 to 50 years. This is being done in the hopeful expectation that, by looking at a large number of population groups with different lifestyle, nutritional and other parameters, it might be possible to obtain some new insights into which factors are important for attaining a high value of BMD during early adulthood, and for being able to maintain it at a sufficiently high level into old age. The Second Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) for participants in the CRP - which is the subject of the present report - was held at the University of California San Diego (UCSD), USA. An overview of the data on BMD reported by the participants during the meeting. It is concluded that the CRP participants have gathered an impressive amount of data over the last 2 years. Given the fact that some age groups contain relatively small numbers of subjects, the statistical uncertainties are still relatively large. Nevertheless, there do appear to be quite marked differences in BMD across the centres, approaching approximately 10%. If confirmed, this could represent a major difference in fracture risk for the future, if all other factors (bone quality, weight, fall

  7. Co-ordinated research project: comparative international studies of osteoporosis using isotope techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Poor bone health is a major public health problem of worldwide concern. No country is immune. One of the main concerns - osteoporosis - is a bone disease that usually affects older people (primarily post-menopausal women), leading to hip fractures, vertebral compression fractures, and other related problems.In 1994 the IAEA (henceforth the 'Agency') started a 5-year Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) which addresses one particular measure of bone health - bone mineral density (BMD). The main concept underpinning this CRP is that good bone health in later years is primarily determined by the attainment of a sufficiently high BMD during early adulthood. The 'core' objective of the Agency's CRP is to investigate how BMD varies with the age, sex, ethnicity and geographical origin of the subjects over the age range from 15 to 50 years. This is being done in the hopeful expectation that, by looking at a large number of population groups with different lifestyle, nutritional and other parameters, it might be possible to obtain some new insights into which factors are important for attaining a high value of BMD during early adulthood, and for being able to maintain it at a sufficiently high level into old age. The Second Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) for participants in the CRP - which is the subject of the present report - was held at the University of California San Diego (UCSD), USA. An overview of the data on BMD reported by the participants during the meeting. It is concluded that the CRP participants have gathered an impressive amount of data over the last 2 years. Given the fact that some age groups contain relatively small numbers of subjects, the statistical uncertainties are still relatively large. Nevertheless, there do appear to be quite marked differences in BMD across the centres, approaching approximately 10%. If confirmed, this could represent a major difference in fracture risk for the future, if all other factors (bone quality, weight, fall

  8. John Dewey, an Appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clopton, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The subject of the annual Presidential address of Phi Kappa Phi, presented on May 8, 1962, was John Dewey. Dewey is identified in the public mind chiefly as an educational philosopher. In this address, the author describes the life and work of John Dewey as an indefatigable student of life whose interests ranged, like those of Aristotle, over the…

  9. John P Craig

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. John P Craig. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 17 Issue 10 October 2012 pp 924-925 Article-in-a-Box. S N De - An Appreciation · John P Craig · More Details Fulltext PDF ...

  10. A John Wilson

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. A John Wilson. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 11 Issue 7 July 2006 pp 70-76 Classroom. Inverting Matrices Constructed from Roots of Unity · A John Wilson · More Details Fulltext PDF ...

  11. John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nall, Marsha

    2004-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium is an inter-institutional research and technology development, beginning with ten projects in FY02 that are aimed at applying GRC expertise in fluid physics and sensor development with local biomedical expertise to mitigate the risks of space flight on the health, safety, and performance of astronauts. It is anticipated that several new technologies will be developed that are applicable to both medical needs in space and on earth.

  12. The use of fuzzy logic in coordinating investment projects in the public sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jože Benčina

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Politics and the professions often have different standpoints on development planning and investment decisions in the public sector. Opposing views, lack of understanding and an inability to accept compromises in the planning and execution of investments frequently cause deviations which ultimately reveal themselves in negativeeconomic consequences. Effective and successful planning and execution of investments in the public sector is one of the key development tasks in a state or local community. For this reason we have undertaken a detailed investigation of the issue with the goal of devising a tool in the form of a model of a system for supportin decision making. In order to make it easier for appraisers and decision makers to express their opinions in a natural and individual manner, we have introduced an appraisal with linguistic values through the use of fuzzy logic. The purpose of this article is to present the characteristics and structure of the fuzzy model for coordinating opinions, and the progress and results of its use in the case of two Slovenian municipalities.

  13. Safety cases for the co-ordinated research project on improvement of safety assessment methodologies for near surface radioactive waste disposal facilities (ISAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, M.W.; Torres-Vidal, C.; Kelly, E.; Guskov, A.; Blerk, J. van

    2002-01-01

    A Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) has recently been completed on the Improvement of Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near-Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities (ISAM). A major aspect of the project was the use of safety cases for the practical application of safety assessment. An overview of the ISAM safety cases is given in this paper. (author)

  14. Bone SPECT in low back pain: Results of an IAEA co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscombe, J.; Cwikla, J.B.; Kolasinska, A.D.; Xing-Dang, L.; Dave, P.K.; Dougall, P.; Fettich, J.; Fettich-Seliger, M.; Frangos, S.; Van Heerden, B.B.; Kanmaz, B.; Lele, V.; Szilvasi, I.; Soricelli, A.; Padhy, A.K.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if it would be possible to use spinal bone single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with unexplained back pain in varied clinical backgrounds and to determine if a positive or negative study had any prognostic value. The study was co-ordinated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and involved 8 centres in 7 countries. A total of 174 patients (mean age 42 years, range 15-80 years) were screened and found to have no obvious cause for their back pain at the time of the SPECT scan. All patients had a CT, and planar radiology. There was clinical follow-up data for 6 months without active treatment (such as surgery) in 147 patients. A panel of 9 specialists in nuclear medicine, radiology and orthopaedics reviewed all images and histories. Final assessment determined that 141 patients had skeletal causes for their back pain. SPECT was abnormal in 64% of these patients as compared to 58% with CT and 18% with planar radiology. CT was most likely to be diagnostic in disc degeneration (sensitivity 92%). SPECT was most diagnostic in facet joint disease (sensitivity 96%). In the 43 patients without any skeletal disease the specificity of SPECT was 79%, compared to 65% for CT. Follow-up of patients at 6 months showed that on average 71% had improvement of symptoms, suggesting a benign course for their back pain, with the exception of patients with pure facet joint disease, identified on SPECT but with no treatment. Spinal skeletal SPECT can be applied in a wide range of social and clinical settings. Results compare well with CT, providing additional information in 30% of patients, especially in facet joint disease where a positive SPECT study, suggests a worse clinical outcome at 6 months. (author)

  15. Radiation protection and quality assurance in diagnostic radiology - an IAEA coordinated research project in Asia and Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oresegun, Modupe; LeHeron, J.; Maccia, C.; Padovani, R.; Vano, E.

    1999-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency currently has two parallel Coordinated Research Projects (CRP) running in Asia and Eastern Europe. The main objective of the CRPs is to raise the level of awareness in participating countries about the need for radiation protection for patients undergoing diagnostic radiology procedures. This is to be achieved by first assessing the status quo in a sample of hospitals and X-ray rooms in each participating country. A program of optimization of radiation protection for patients is then introduced by means of a comprehensive quality assurance program and the implementation of appropriate dose reduction methods, taking into account clinical requirements for diagnostically acceptable images. Patient dose assessment and image quality assessment are to be performed both before and after the introduction of the quality assurance program. The CRP is divided into two phases - the first is concerned with conventional radiography, while the second involves fluoroscopy and computed tomography. The CRP is still running, restricting the scope of this paper to a discussion of the approach being taken with the project. The project will be completed in 1998, with analysis to follow

  16. Radiation protection and quality assurance in diagnostic radiology - an IAEA coordinated research project in Asia and Eastern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oresegun, Modupe [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); LeHeron, J. [National Radiation Laboratory, Christchurch (New Zealand); Maccia, C. [Centre d' Assurance de qualite des Applications Technologiques dans le Domaine de la Sante, Bourg-la-Reine (France); Padovani, R. [Instituto di Fisica Sanitaria, Udine (Italy); Vano, E. [Medical Physics Group, Radiology Department, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain)

    1999-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency currently has two parallel Coordinated Research Projects (CRP) running in Asia and Eastern Europe. The main objective of the CRPs is to raise the level of awareness in participating countries about the need for radiation protection for patients undergoing diagnostic radiology procedures. This is to be achieved by first assessing the status quo in a sample of hospitals and X-ray rooms in each participating country. A program of optimization of radiation protection for patients is then introduced by means of a comprehensive quality assurance program and the implementation of appropriate dose reduction methods, taking into account clinical requirements for diagnostically acceptable images. Patient dose assessment and image quality assessment are to be performed both before and after the introduction of the quality assurance program. The CRP is divided into two phases - the first is concerned with conventional radiography, while the second involves fluoroscopy and computed tomography. The CRP is still running, restricting the scope of this paper to a discussion of the approach being taken with the project. The project will be completed in 1998, with analysis to follow.

  17. Poisson Coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian-Ying; Hu, Shi-Min

    2013-02-01

    Harmonic functions are the critical points of a Dirichlet energy functional, the linear projections of conformal maps. They play an important role in computer graphics, particularly for gradient-domain image processing and shape-preserving geometric computation. We propose Poisson coordinates, a novel transfinite interpolation scheme based on the Poisson integral formula, as a rapid way to estimate a harmonic function on a certain domain with desired boundary values. Poisson coordinates are an extension of the Mean Value coordinates (MVCs) which inherit their linear precision, smoothness, and kernel positivity. We give explicit formulas for Poisson coordinates in both continuous and 2D discrete forms. Superior to MVCs, Poisson coordinates are proved to be pseudoharmonic (i.e., they reproduce harmonic functions on n-dimensional balls). Our experimental results show that Poisson coordinates have lower Dirichlet energies than MVCs on a number of typical 2D domains (particularly convex domains). As well as presenting a formula, our approach provides useful insights for further studies on coordinates-based interpolation and fast estimation of harmonic functions.

  18. Characterization of ceramics and semiconductors using nuclear techniques. Final report of a co-ordinated research project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    With the aim of promoting research and facilitating more extensive application of nuclear techniques for material development, the IAEA established in 1994 a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Characterization of Ceramics and Semiconductors using Nuclear Techniques. This publication reviews and summarizes recent developments in this field and includes an assessment of the current status and trends in nuclear techniques in characterization of inorganic materials of technological importance. The TECDOC presents new achievements on ceramic superconductor behaviour under neutron induced defects, optimization of structure of mineral gels,m low temperature preparation of fine particles of ferrites, crystal luminescence of ceramic composites with improved plastic properties, thin film defects and detoxification of asbestos. The investigation of chemical composition, phase transitions and magnetic properties of ferrites by Moessbauer spectroscopy is largely developed. The document includes 18 individual contributions, each of them has been indexed and provided with an abstract Refs, figs, tabs

  19. Characterization of ceramics and semiconductors using nuclear techniques. Final report of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    With the aim of promoting research and facilitating more extensive application of nuclear techniques for material development, the IAEA established in 1994 a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Characterization of Ceramics and Semiconductors using Nuclear Techniques. This publication reviews and summarizes recent developments in this field and includes an assessment of the current status and trends in nuclear techniques in characterization of inorganic materials of technological importance. The TECDOC presents new achievements on ceramic superconductor behaviour under neutron induced defects, optimization of structure of mineral gels,m low temperature preparation of fine particles of ferrites, crystal luminescence of ceramic composites with improved plastic properties, thin film defects and detoxification of asbestos. The investigation of chemical composition, phase transitions and magnetic properties of ferrites by Moessbauer spectroscopy is largely developed. The document includes 18 individual contributions, each of them has been indexed and provided with an abstract

  20. Front-office staff can improve clinical tobacco intervention: health coordinator pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Frederic; Naish, Brigham; Buwembo, Isaac

    2013-11-01

    To learn whether front-line personnel in primary care practices can increase delivery of clinical tobacco interventions and also help smokers address physical inactivity, at-risk alcohol use, and depression. Uncontrolled before-and-after design. Vancouver, BC, area (4 practices); northern British Columbia (2 practices). Six practices, with 1 staff person per practice serving as a "health coordinator" who tracked and, after the baseline period, delivered preventive interventions to all patients who smoked. To assess delivery of preventive interventions, each practice was to sample 300 consecutive patient records, both at baseline and at follow-up 15 months later. Front-office staff were recruited, trained, paid, and given ongoing support to provide preventive care. Clinicians supplemented this care with advice and guided the use of medication. Effectiveness of the intervention was based on comparison, at baseline and at follow-up, of the proportion of patients with any of the following 6 proven intervention components documented in their medical records: chart reminder, advice received, self-management plan, target quit date, referral, and follow-up date (as they applied to tobacco, physical inactivity, at-risk alcohol use, and depression). A Tobacco Intervention Flow Sheet cued preventive care, and its data were entered into a spreadsheet (which served as a smokers' registry). Qualitative appraisal data were noted. For tobacco, substantial increases occurred after the intervention period in the proportion of patients with each of the intervention components noted in their charts: chart reminder (20% vs 94%); provision of advice (34% vs 79%); self-management plan (14% vs 57%); target quit date (5% vs 11%); referral (6% vs 11%); and follow-up date (7% vs 42%). Interventions for physical inactivity and depression showed some gains, but there were no gains for at-risk alcohol use. Front-line staff, patients, and clinicians were enthusiastic about the services offered

  1. Intersectoral coordination in Aedes aegypti control. A pilot project in Havana City, Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, L; Perez, D; Pérez, T; Sosa, T; Cruz, G; Kouri, G; Boelaert, M; Van der Stuyft, P

    2005-01-01

    Background The 55th World Health Assembly declared dengue prevention and control a priority and urged Member States to develop sustainable intersectoral strategies to this end. To provide evidence for the reorientation of the dengue prevention policy in Cuba, we launched an intervention study to document the effectiveness of a local-level intersectoral approach. We used a quasi-experimental design. Social scientists introduced participatory methods to facilitate dialogue in the biweekly meetings of the intersectoral Health Council of the intervention area. This council subsequently developed an intersectoral plan for dengue prevention, of which the core objective was to design and implement activities for communication and social mobilization. In the control area, routine dengue control activities continued without additional input. Knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of dengue, and entomological indices were compared inside and between the areas before and after the 1-year intervention period. In the intervention area the Health Council elaborated an intersectoral plan for dengue prevention focused on source reduction. The Aedes aegypti control methods consisted in eliminating useless containers in the houses and surroundings, covering tanks, and cleaning public and inhabited areas. It was implemented through communication and social mobilization. The Health Council in the control area occasionally discussed dengue issues but did not develop a coordinated action plan. Good knowledge about breeding sites and disease symptoms increased significantly (by 49.7% and 17.1% respectively) in the intervention area as well as the proportion of respondents eliminating containers in and around their houses (by 44%). No changes were observed in the control area. The House Index in the intervention area was 3.72% at baseline and decreased to 0.61% after 1 year. In the control area it remained stable throughout the study period (1.31% and 1.65% respectively). The introduction

  2. IAEA Coordinated Research Project on HTGR Reactor Physics, Thermal-hydraulics and Depletion Uncertainty Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bostelmann, F. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The continued development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) requires verification of HTGR design and safety features with reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes. The predictive capability of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics and depletion simulations for reactor design and safety analysis can be assessed with sensitivity analysis (SA) and uncertainty analysis (UA) methods. Uncertainty originates from errors in physical data, manufacturing uncertainties, modelling and computational algorithms. (The interested reader is referred to the large body of published SA and UA literature for a more complete overview of the various types of uncertainties, methodologies and results obtained). SA is helpful for ranking the various sources of uncertainty and error in the results of core analyses. SA and UA are required to address cost, safety, and licensing needs and should be applied to all aspects of reactor multi-physics simulation. SA and UA can guide experimental, modelling, and algorithm research and development. Current SA and UA rely either on derivative-based methods such as stochastic sampling methods or on generalized perturbation theory to obtain sensitivity coefficients. Neither approach addresses all needs. In order to benefit from recent advances in modelling and simulation and the availability of new covariance data (nuclear data uncertainties) extensive sensitivity and uncertainty studies are needed for quantification of the impact of different sources of uncertainties on the design and safety parameters of HTGRs. Only a parallel effort in advanced simulation and in nuclear data improvement will be able to provide designers with more robust and well validated calculation tools to meet design target accuracies. In February 2009, the Technical Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (TWG-GCR) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommended that the proposed Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on

  3. Demythologizing John Dewey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, N. C.

    1974-01-01

    This article takes a brief but critical look at John Dewey's version of pragmatism, his contribution to philosophical scholarship generally as well as his theory and practice of liberalism. (Author/RK)

  4. Sassis tuumamajandus / John Carey

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Carey, John

    2008-01-01

    USA presidendikandidaadi John McCaini energeetikakava kohaselt tuleks USA-sse ehitada 100 uut tuumaelektrijaama, neist esimesed 45 peaksid valmima aastaks 2030. Tuumaelektrijaamad aitaksid rahuldada USA energiavajadust ning võitleksid ka kliimasoojenemise vastu. Eksperdid on arengukava suhtes kriitilised

  5. Interview with John Milnor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This interview was given by Professor John Milnor in connection to the Abel Prize 2011 ceremony. Originally the interview appeared in the September issue of the Newsletter of the European Mathematical Society......This interview was given by Professor John Milnor in connection to the Abel Prize 2011 ceremony. Originally the interview appeared in the September issue of the Newsletter of the European Mathematical Society...

  6. Digital fringe projection for hand surface coordinate variation analysis caused by osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor Haimi, Wan Mokhdzani Wan; Hau Tan, Cheek; Retnasamy, Vithyacharan; Vairavan, Rajendaran; Sauli, Zaliman; Roshidah Yusof, Nor; Hambali, Nor Azura Malini Ahmad; Aziz, Muhammad Hafiz Ab; Bakhit, Ahmad Syahir Ahmad

    2017-11-01

    Hand osteoarthritis is one of the most common forms of arthritis which impact millions of people worldwide. The disabling problem occurs when the protective cartilage on the boundaries of bones wear off over time. Currently, in order to identify hand osteoarthritis, special instruments namely X-ray scanning and MRI are used for the detection but it also has its limitations such as radiation exposure and can be quite costly. In this work, an optical metrology system based on digital fringe projection which comprises of an LCD projector, CCD camera and a personal computer has been developed to anticipate abnormal growth or deformation on the joints of the hand which are common symptoms of osteoarthritis. The main concept of this optical metrology system is to apply structured light as imaging source for surface change detection. The imaging source utilizes fringe patterns generated by C++ programming and is shifted by 3 phase shifts based on the 3 steps 2 shifts method. Phase wrapping technique and analysis were applied in order to detect the deformation of live subjects. The result has demonstrated a successful method of hand deformation detection based on the pixel tracking differences of a normal and deformed state.

  7. Sesame improvement by induced mutations: Results of the co-ordinated research project and recommendation for future studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanten, L. van

    2001-01-01

    The FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project has brought together sesame breeders from 11 countries. They, together with pathologists, agronomists and physiologists, have made considerable effort to advance the genetic improvement in sesame. The results and conclusions from this project cover the mutation techniques used for the genetic improvement of various aspects of sesame. These recommendations do not only deal with the application of mutation induction, but also with the wider plant breeding related objectives and methods to be considered for this semi-domesticated crop. It is clear that more advanced techniques can and should be incorporated in the process which would enhance the genetic improvement. Although five years is a relatively limited time in a plant breeding programme, the participants have been able to produce and make available a considerable pool of agronomically interesting mutant sesame germplasm. The participants in the CRP considered that, together with other specialists, plant breeders can gain fuller benefit from the mutations induced by radiation or chemicals. Work on these mutants must continue in co-operation/consultation with plant physiologists and pathologists, and with biotechnologists who may in the future be able to provide in the future methods for introducing beneficial traits from other crops into sesame. The sesame programme should include scientists from the Member States where sesame grows and scientists from developed countries who may have greater access to physiological and molecular research facilities. (author)

  8. IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) on 'Analytical and experimental benchmark analyses of accelerator driven systems'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abanades, Alberto [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); Aliberti, Gerardo; Gohar, Yousry; Talamo, Alberto [ANL, Argonne (United States); Bornos, Victor; Kiyavitskaya, Anna [Joint Institute of Power Eng. and Nucl. Research ' Sosny' , Minsk (Belarus); Carta, Mario [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy); Janczyszyn, Jerzy [AGH-University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland); Maiorino, Jose [IPEN, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Pyeon, Cheolho [Kyoto University (Japan); Stanculescu, Alexander [IAEA, Vienna (Austria); Titarenko, Yury [ITEP, Moscow (Russian Federation); Westmeier, Wolfram [Wolfram Westmeier GmbH, Ebsdorfergrund (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    In December 2005, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has started a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analyses of Accelerator Driven Systems'. The overall objective of the CRP, performed within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWGFR) of IAEA's Nuclear Energy Department, is to increase the capability of interested Member States in developing and applying advanced reactor technologies in the area of long-lived radioactive waste utilization and transmutation. The specific objective of the CRP is to improve the present understanding of the coupling of an external neutron source (e.g. spallation source) with a multiplicative sub-critical core. The participants are performing computational and experimental benchmark analyses using integrated calculation schemes and simulation methods. The CRP aims at integrating some of the planned experimental demonstration projects of the coupling between a sub-critical core and an external neutron source (e.g. YALINA Booster in Belarus, and Kyoto University's Critical Assembly (KUCA)). The objective of these experimental programs is to validate computational methods, obtain high energy nuclear data, characterize the performance of sub-critical assemblies driven by external sources, and to develop and improve techniques for sub-criticality monitoring. The paper summarizes preliminary results obtained to-date for some of the CRP benchmarks. (authors)

  9. Radiotracer technology as applied to industry. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Radiotracer Technology for Engineering Unit Operation Studies and Unit Process Optimization was carried out by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from December 1997 until December 2000. The project developed and validated procedures and protocols for investigation of major industrial processes, including fluidized beds, sugar crystallizers, trickle bed reactors, cement rotary kilns, flotation cells, grinding mills, incinerators, wastewater treatment units and interwell communications in oil fields. This publication is the output of the above mentioned CRP. It provides the principles and state of the art of radiotracer methodology and technology as applied to industry and environment. It is expected to provide wider interest for further development of skills and confidence prior to carrying out field work. It facilitates transfer of technology from developed to developing countries and from nuclear research institutions to industrial end users. The publication could be a suitable guide for radiotracer applications in almost all types of process investigations. The case studies described in this publication deal with typical problems in industry and environment common to all countries. It is intended for radiotracer groups as well as for end engineers and managers from chemical and petrochemical industries, mineral ore and raw material processing, wastewater treatment plants, and other industrial sectors

  10. Elements of power plant design for inertial fusion energy. Final report of a coordinated research project 2000-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    There are two major approaches in fusion energy research: magnetic fusion energy (MFE) and inertial fusion energy (IFE). The basic physics of IFE (compression and ignition of small fuel pellets containing deuterium and tritium) is being increasingly understood. Based on recent advances by individual countries, IFE has reached a stage at which benefits could be obtained from a coordinated approach in the form of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Elements of Power Plant Design for Inertial Fusion Energy. This CRP helped Member States to promote the development of plasma/fusion technology transfer and to emphasize safety and environmental advantages of fusion energy. The CRP was focused on interface issues including those related to, - the driver/target interface (e.g. focusing and beam uniformity required by the target), - the driver/chamber interface (e.g. final optics and magnets protection and shielding), - and the target/chamber interface (e.g. target survival during injection, target positioning and tracking in the chamber). The final report includes an assessment of the state of the art of the technologies required for an IFE power plant (drivers, chambers, targets) and systems integration as presented and evaluated by members of the CRP. Additional contributions by cost free invited experts to the final RCM are included. The overall objective of this CRP was to foster the inertial fusion energy development by improving international cooperation. The variety of contributions compiled in this TECDOC reflects, that the goal of stimulating the exchange of knowledge was well achieved. Further the CRP led to the creation of a network, which not only exchanged their scientific results, but also developed healthy professional relations and strong mutual interest in the work of the group members

  11. Integrated Approach to Dense Magnetized Plasmas Applications in Nuclear Fusion Technology. Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2007-2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-04-01

    Through its coordinated research activities, the IAEA promotes the development and application of nuclear technologies in Member States. The scientific and technical knowledge required for the construction and operation of large nuclear fusion research facilities, including ITER and the Laser Megajoule in France, and the Z machine and the National Ignition Facility in the United States of America, necessitates several accompanying research and development programmes in physics and technology. This is particularly true in the areas of materials science and fusion technology. Hence, the long standing IAEA effort to conduct coordinated research projects (CRPs) in these areas is aimed at: (i) the development of appropriate technical tools to investigate the issue of materials damage and degradation in a fusion plasma environment; and (ii) the emergence of a knowledge based understanding of the various processes underlying materials damage and degradation, thereby leading to the identification of suitable candidate materials fulfilling the stringent requirements of a fusion environment in any next step facility. Dense magnetized plasma (DMP) devices serve as a first test bench for testing of fusion relevant plasma facing materials, diagnostic development and calibration, technologies and scaling to conceptual principles of larger devices while sophisticated testing facilities such as the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) are being designed. The CRP on Integrated Approach to Dense Magnetized Plasmas Applications in Nuclear Fusion Technology described herein was initiated in 2007 with the participation of 12 research institutions in 8 Member States and was concluded in 2011. It was designed with specific research objectives falling into two main categories: support to mainstream fusion research and development of DMP technology. This publication is a compilation of the individual reports submitted by the 12 CRP participants. These reports discuss

  12. Commemorating John Dyson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittard, Julian M.

    2015-03-01

    John Dyson was born on the 7th January 1941 in Meltham Mills, West Yorkshire, England, and later grew up in Harrogate and Leeds. The proudest moment of John's early life was meeting Freddie Trueman, who became one of the greatest fast bowlers of English cricket. John used a state scholarship to study at Kings College London, after hearing a radio lecture by D. M. McKay. He received a first class BSc Special Honours Degree in Physics in 1962, and began a Ph.D. at the University of Manchester Department of Astronomy after being attracted to astronomy by an article of Zdenek Kopal in the semi-popular journal New Scientist. John soon started work with Franz Kahn, and studied the possibility that the broad emission lines seen from the Orion Nebula were due to flows driven by the photoevaporation of neutral globules embedded in a HII region. John's thesis was entitled ``The Age and Dynamics of the Orion Nebula`` and he passed his oral examination on 28th February 1966.

  13. John Deakin: Double Exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Rousseau

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this series of short films made by Jonathan Law, the art historian James Boaden, and the curator of The John Deakin Archive, Paul Rousseau, discuss the double-exposure images made by the photographer John Deakin (1912-1972 in the 1950s and 1960s. The films ask you, firstly, to look closely at the images being discussed. Each one begins with a sustained and intense shot of a single image before opening up to a wide-ranging discussion about Deakin, double exposures, and photography.

  14. John Donne no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Garcez Ghirardi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available O leitor fica sem saber a troco do que John Donne lhe surge de repente, num virar de página, e através de períodos que parecem responder a uma pergunta que não foi formulada.(... Ninguém, nem o Sr. Afrânio Coutinho falara, até então, de John Donne,(.... Simplesmente, esse trecho, como inúmeros outros (quase todos do livro, revela que leituras apaixonantes obrigaram o professor Afrânio Coutinho a tomar em seu caderno alguns apontamentos eruditos. (MARTINS 1983 vol.I:621

  15. The use of nuclear techniques in the management of nitrogen fixation by trees to enhance fertility of fragile tropical soils. Results of a co-ordinated research project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture initiated in 1990 a Co-ordinated Research Project on The Use of Nuclear or Related Techniques in Management of Nitrogen Fixation by Trees for Enhancing Soil Fertility and Soil Conservation in Fragile Tropical Soils. This document contains nine papers referring to the results of the project. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper Refs, figs, tabs

  16. The use of nuclear techniques in the management of nitrogen fixation by trees to enhance fertility of fragile tropical soils. Results of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture initiated in 1990 a Co-ordinated Research Project on The Use of Nuclear or Related Techniques in Management of Nitrogen Fixation by Trees for Enhancing Soil Fertility and Soil Conservation in Fragile Tropical Soils. This document contains nine papers referring to the results of the project. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper

  17. John Cale avaldas memuaarid

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    Rockbändi "The Velvet Underground" asutajaliige John Cale avaldas oma autobiograafia "What's Welsh for Zen?". Koos biograafiakirjanik Victor Bockrisiga kirjutatud teos räägib 60ndate lõpu kultuurielust New Yorgis, koostööst Andy Warholiga jm.

  18. John Hennessey, Barrier Breaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Stephen J.

    2018-01-01

    John Hennessey lived a remarkable, full life as a professor, as a leader in his field of management and business, and moral, ethical leadership, and as dean at Dartmouth College's Tuck School of Business and provost at the University of Vermont. He was extraordinary on many fronts, a great man who lived in tumultuous times marked by world war as a…

  19. John Archibald Wheeler

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 1. John Archibald Wheeler - Man with Picturesque Imagination. Jayant V Narlikar. General Article Volume 18 Issue 1 January 2013 pp 22-28. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  20. John Maynard Smith

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 11. John Maynard Smith (1920-2004). Featured Scientist Volume 10 Issue 11 November 2005 pp 110-110. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/010/11/0110-0110. Resonance ...

  1. Tuber resistance and slow rotting characteristics of potato clones associated with the Solanaceae Coordinated Agricultural Project to the US-24 clonal lineage of Phytophthora infestans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans, is a devastating disease on potato worldwide and new lineages of the pathogen continue to develop in the U.S. Breeding for resistance is important for economic and environmental purposes. The Solanaceae Coordinated Agricultural Project (SolCAP) focuses ...

  2. Development of an Integrated Approach to Routine Automation of Neutron Activation Analysis. Results of a Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-04-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a powerful technique for determining bulk composition of major and trace elements. Automation may contribute significantly to keep NAA competitive for end-users. It provides opportunities for a larger analytical capacity and a shorter overall turnaround time if large series of samples have to be analysed. This publication documents and disseminates the expertise generated on automation in NAA during a coordinated research project (CRP). The CRP participants presented different cost-effective designs of sample changers for gamma-ray spectrometry as well as irradiation devices, and were able to construct and successfully test these systems. They also implemented, expanded and improved quality control and quality assurance as cross-cutting topical area of their automated NAA procedures. The publication serves as a reference of interest to NAA practitioners, experts, and research reactor personnel, but also to various stakeholders and users interested in basic research and/or services provided by NAA. The individual country reports are available on the CD-ROM attached to this publication.

  3. Microbiological and ecological responses to global environmental changes in polar regions (MERGE): An IPY core coordinating project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganuma, Takeshi; Wilmotte, Annick

    2009-11-01

    An integrated program, “Microbiological and ecological responses to global environmental changes in polar regions” (MERGE), was proposed in the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2008 and endorsed by the IPY committee as a coordinating proposal. MERGE hosts original proposals to the IPY and facilitates their funding. MERGE selected three key questions to produce scientific achievements. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms in terrestrial, lacustrine, and supraglacial habitats were targeted according to diversity and biogeography; food webs and ecosystem evolution; and linkages between biological, chemical, and physical processes in the supraglacial biome. MERGE hosted 13 original and seven additional proposals, with two full proposals. It respected the priorities and achievements of the individual proposals and aimed to unify their significant results. Ideas and projects followed a bottom-up rather than a top-down approach. We intend to inform the MERGE community of the initial results and encourage ongoing collaboration. Scientists from non-polar regions have also participated and are encouraged to remain involved in MERGE. MERGE is formed by scientists from Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Philippines, Poland, Russia, Spain, UK, Uruguay, USA, and Vietnam, and associates from Chile, Denmark, Netherlands, and Norway.

  4. Specialized software utilities for gamma ray spectrometry. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1996-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    A Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Software Utilities for Gamma Ray Spectrometry was initiated by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 1996 for a three year period. In the CRP several basic applications of nuclear data handling were assayed which also dealt with the development of PC computer codes for various spectrometric purposes. The CRP produced several software packages: for the analysis of low level NaI spectra; user controlled analysis of gamma ray spectra from HPGe detectors; a set of routines for the definition of the detector resolution function and for the unfolding of experimental annihilation spectra; a program for the generation of gamma ray libraries for specific applications; a program to calculate true coincidence corrections; a program to calculate full-energy peak efficiency calibration curve for homogenous cylindrical sample geometries including self-attenuation correction; and a program for the library driven analysis of gamma ray spectra and for the quantification of radionuclide content in samples. In addition, the CRP addressed problems of the analysis of naturally occurring radioactive soil material gamma ray spectra, questions of quality assurance and quality control in gamma ray spectrometry, and verification of the expert system SHAMAN for the analysis of air filter spectra obtained within the framework of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. This TECDOC contains 10 presentations delivered at the meeting with the description of the software developed. Each of the papers has been indexed separately

  5. CINCH-II project. Next step in the coordination of education in nuclear- and radiochemistry in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, Jan; Cuba, Vaclav; Nemec, Mojmir

    2013-01-01

    Any of the potential options for the nuclear power – both the renaissance, if any, or the phase out – will require significant numbers of the respective specialists, amongst others the nuclear and/or radiochemists. In parallel, a significant demand exists for these specialists in non-energy fields, such as environmental protection, radiopharmacy, nuclear medicine, biology, authorities, etc. Since the numbers of staff in teaching and the number of univerzities with facilities licensed for the work with open sources of ionizing radiation has decreased on or sometimes even below the critical level, coordination and collaboration are required to maintain the necessary teaching and training capabilities. The CINCH-II project, aiming at the Coordination of education and training In Nuclear CHemistry in Europe, will be a direct continuation of the CINCH-I project which, among others, identified the EuroMaster in Nuclear Chemistry quality label recognized and guaranteed by the European Chemistry Thematic Network Association as an optimum common mutual recognition system in the field of education in Nuclear Chemistry in Europe, surveyed the status of Nuclear Chemistry in industry / the needs of the end-users, developed an efficient system of education/training compact modular courses, or developed and tested two electronic tools as a basis of a future efficient distance learning system. In the first part of this paper, the achievements of the CINCH-I project will be described. This description will cover both the status review and the development activities of this Collaboration. In the status review field, the results of a detailed survey of the universities and curricula in nuclear- and radiochemistry in Europe and Russia will be presented. Another survey mapped the nuclear- and radiochemistry in industry – specifically the training and education needs of the end users. In the development activities field, the main achievements of the CINCH-project will be presented

  6. Sesame improvement by induced mutations. Final reports of an FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research project. 1993-1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-01-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is an ancient oil crop considered to be still at an early stage in breeding. The fact that sesame is a crop of mainly developing countries with limited available research funds for long term breeding programmes, resulted in very few breeding efforts in research stations. Furthermore, sesame is not a mandate crop of any of the international agriculture research centers. Until recently most of the released sesame varieties in countries such as China, India and the Republic of Korea were the product of selection and pedigree breeding. A major constraint in this approach was the lack of sufficient genetic variation within the existing germplasm collections, especially for traits such as resistance to various diseases and seed retention. This is where mutation techniques could offer a possible solution. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) organized some expert consultations on sesame breeding between 1981 and 1987, which all recommended the use of mutation induction for the enhancement of genetic variability with a focus on the following traits: modified plant architecture, seed retention, and resistance to diseases and pests. As a result, most of these recommendations have been included in this five year co-ordinated research project (CRP) that started in 1993, organized by the Plant Breeding and Genetics Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division. This CRP focused on the induction of the above mentioned characters in different sesame improvement programmes, and on the enhancement of co-operation between sesame breeders in developed and developing countries. Each participant covered a number of traits important for their specific breeding needs. During regular meetings under this project the participants had the opportunity to jointly appraise and evaluate sesame mutants and varieties in demonstration fields, thus strengthening the mutual effort for the genetic improvement of sesame through mutation techniques. The success

  7. Sesame improvement by induced mutations. Final reports of an FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research project. 1993-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is an ancient oil crop considered to be still at an early stage in breeding. The fact that sesame is a crop of mainly developing countries with limited available research funds for long term breeding programmes, resulted in very few breeding efforts in research stations. Furthermore, sesame is not a mandate crop of any of the international agriculture research centers. Until recently most of the released sesame varieties in countries such as China, India and the Republic of Korea were the product of selection and pedigree breeding. A major constraint in this approach was the lack of sufficient genetic variation within the existing germplasm collections, especially for traits such as resistance to various diseases and seed retention. This is where mutation techniques could offer a possible solution. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) organized some expert consultations on sesame breeding between 1981 and 1987, which all recommended the use of mutation induction for the enhancement of genetic variability with a focus on the following traits: modified plant architecture, seed retention, and resistance to diseases and pests. As a result, most of these recommendations have been included in this five year co-ordinated research project (CRP) that started in 1993, organized by the Plant Breeding and Genetics Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division. This CRP focused on the induction of the above mentioned characters in different sesame improvement programmes, and on the enhancement of co-operation between sesame breeders in developed and developing countries. Each participant covered a number of traits important for their specific breeding needs. During regular meetings under this project the participants had the opportunity to jointly appraise and evaluate sesame mutants and varieties in demonstration fields, thus strengthening the mutual effort for the genetic improvement of sesame through mutation techniques. The success

  8. Two Project Methods: Preliminary Observations on the Similarities and Differences between William Heard Kilpatrick's Project Method and John Dewey's Problem-Solving Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutinen, Ari

    2013-01-01

    The project method became a famous teaching method when William Heard Kilpatrick published his article "Project Method" in 1918. The key idea in Kilpatrick's project method is to try to explain how pupils learn things when they work in projects toward different common objects. The same idea of pupils learning by work or action in an…

  9. John Donne no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Garcez Ghirardi

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2003n45p77 O leitor fica sem saber a troco do que John Donne lhe surge de repente, num virar de página, e através de períodos que parecem responder a uma pergunta que não foi formulada.(... Ninguém, nem o Sr. Afrânio Coutinho falara, até então, de John Donne,(.... Simplesmente, esse trecho, como inúmeros outros (quase todos do livro, revela que leituras apaixonantes obrigaram o professor Afrânio Coutinho a tomar em seu caderno alguns apontamentos eruditos. (MARTINS 1983 vol.I:621

  10. Oliver St John Gogarty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, R W

    1997-01-01

    Oliver St John Gogarty--Otolaryngologist to fashionable Edwardian Dublin--was a distinguished poet and a Senator in the fledgling Irish Free State after its establishment in 1922. He numbered amongst his acquaintances the poet William Butler Yeats, the novelist James Joyce and a host of political and literary persona who helped to shape modern Ireland. He was satirised as 'stately plump Buck Mulligan' in Joyce's novel Ulysses.

  11. John Kenneth Hulm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulm, J.

    1988-01-01

    John Hulm has made profound contributions to the field of superconductivity as a research scientist and as an engineer. He and his colleagues discovered the superconducting materials in commercial use today, and he played a key role in the development of commercial superconducting magnets. Dr. Hulm now serves as Chief Scientist at Westinghouse Electric Corporation. This story describes many milestones in the history of superconductivity and offers personal insight into this distinguished scientist

  12. Sir John Meurig Thomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John Meurig

    2013-10-11

    "My greatest achievement has been to combine being a teacher, a researcher, and a popularizer of science for over 50 years. My worst nightmare is to find myself dumbstruck when I am about to give a lecture …︁" This and more about Sir John Meurig Thomas can be found on page 10938. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. John Strong (1941 - 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    Wickens, F

    Our friend and colleague John Strong was cruelly taken from us by a brain tumour on Monday 31st July, a few days before his 65th birthday John started his career working with a group from Westfield College, under the leadership of Ted Bellamy. He obtained his PhD and spent the early part of his career on experiments at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), but after the early 1970s his research was focussed on experiments in CERN. Over the years he made a number of notable contributions to experiments in CERN: The Omega spectrometer adopted a system John had originally developed for experiments at RAL using vidicon cameras to record the sparks in the spark chambers; He contributed to the success of NA1 and NA7, where he became heavily involved in the electronic trigger systems; He was responsible for the second level trigger system for the ALEPH detector and spent five years leading a team that designed and built the system, which ran for twelve years with only minor interventions. Following ALEPH he tur...

  14. Safety cases for radioactive waste disposal facilities: guidance on confidence building and regulatory review IAEA-ASAM co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Belfadhel, M.; Bennett, D.G.; Metcalf, P.; Nys, V.; Goldammer, W.

    2008-01-01

    The IAEA has been conducting two co-ordinated research programmes (CRPs) projects to develop and apply improved safety assessment methodologies for near-surface radioactive waste disposal facilities. The more recent of these projects, ASAM (application of safety assessment methodologies), included a Regulatory Review Working Group (RRWG) which has been working to develop guidance on how to gain confidence in safety assessments and safety cases, and on how to conduct regulatory reviews of safety assessments. This paper provides an overview of the ASAM project, focusing on the safety case and regulatory review. (authors)

  15. Economics of nuclear desalination: New developments and site specific studies. Final results of a coordinated research project 2002-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    Following successive General Conference Resolutions since the mid-eighties, the IAEA has continued to promote nuclear desalination and has been providing its Member States with the publication of guidebooks, technical documents and computer programs on nuclear desalination as well as the provision of technical assistance through the framework of technical cooperation programs. In 1997, the IAEA launched the International Nuclear Desalination Advisory Group (INDAG), with well known experts from 16 participating Member States. INDAG has not only been successful in its advisory role in all aspects dealing with nuclear desalination, but has also been extremely efficient in promoting exchange of information and creating contacts between technology providers and its end-users. A number of technical cooperation projects have assessed the feasibility of particular nuclear desalination projects. Under the IAEA inter-regional technical cooperation (TC) framework, several international collaboration activities were completed. For example: between China and Morocco; the Republic of Korea and Indonesia; France and Tunisia; and in Pakistan. TC national projects for the United Arab Emirates, Algeria and Jordan, for the techno-economic feasibility studies of nuclear desalination plants, are currently being considered. The Coordinated Research Project (CRP1) on Optimization of the Coupling of Nuclear Reactors and Desalination Systems was completed in 2003 with the participation of 11 Member States. The results of the CRP were published as IAEA-TECDOC-1444 (2005). Following recommendations from INDAG, a second CRP (CRP2) on Economic Research on, and Assessment of, Selected Nuclear Desalination Projects and Case Studies with the participation of ten Member States. It was started in 2002 and was completed in 2006. The scope of CRP2 was to enable the Member States to dispose of precise and well validated methods for desalination cost evaluations and to contribute to the IAEA's efforts

  16. Decommissioning techniques for research reactors. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-01

    In its international role, the IAEA is faced with a wide variety of national situations and different availability of technical, human and financial resources. While it is recognised that nuclear decommissioning is a mature industry in some developed countries, and may soon become a routine activity, the situation is by no means so clear in other countries. In addition, transfer of technologies and know-how from developed to developing countries is not a spontaneous, straightforward process, and will take time and considerable effort. As mandated by its own statute and Member States' requests, the IAEA continues to respond to its Member States by monitoring technological progress, ensuring development of safer and more efficient strategies and fostering international information exchange. Previous co-ordinated research projects (CRP) conducted respectively from 1984 to 1987, and from 1989 to 1993, investigated the overall domain of decommissioning. In those CRPs no distinction was made between decommissioning activities carried out at nuclear power plants, research reactors or nuclear fuel cycle facilities. With technological progress and experience gained, it became clear that decommissioning of research reactors had certain specific characteristics which needed a dedicated approach. In addition, a large number of research reactors reached a state of permanent shutdown in the 1990s and were candidates for prompt decommissioning. With the progressive ageing of research reactors, many more of these units will soon become redundant worldwide and require decommissioning. Within this context, a CRP on Decommissioning Techniques for Research Reactors was launched and conducted by the IAEA from 1997 to 2001 in order to prepare for eventual decommissioning. Concluding reports that summarized the work undertaken under the aegis of the CRP were presented at the third and final Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Kendal, United Kingdom, 14-18 May 2001, and are collected

  17. Decommissioning techniques for research reactors. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-02-01

    In its international role, the IAEA is faced with a wide variety of national situations and different availability of technical, human and financial resources. While it is recognised that nuclear decommissioning is a mature industry in some developed countries, and may soon become a routine activity, the situation is by no means so clear in other countries. In addition, transfer of technologies and know-how from developed to developing countries is not a spontaneous, straightforward process, and will take time and considerable effort. As mandated by its own statute and Member States' requests, the IAEA continues to respond to its Member States by monitoring technological progress, ensuring development of safer and more efficient strategies and fostering international information exchange. Previous co-ordinated research projects (CRP) conducted respectively from 1984 to 1987, and from 1989 to 1993, investigated the overall domain of decommissioning. In those CRPs no distinction was made between decommissioning activities carried out at nuclear power plants, research reactors or nuclear fuel cycle facilities. With technological progress and experience gained, it became clear that decommissioning of research reactors had certain specific characteristics which needed a dedicated approach. In addition, a large number of research reactors reached a state of permanent shutdown in the 1990s and were candidates for prompt decommissioning. With the progressive ageing of research reactors, many more of these units will soon become redundant worldwide and require decommissioning. Within this context, a CRP on Decommissioning Techniques for Research Reactors was launched and conducted by the IAEA from 1997 to 2001 in order to prepare for eventual decommissioning. Concluding reports that summarized the work undertaken under the aegis of the CRP were presented at the third and final Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Kendal, United Kingdom, 14-18 May 2001, and are collected

  18. Bookshelf. John Adams biography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billinge, Roy

    1993-01-01

    Full text: When John Bertram Adams died on 3 March 1984, CERN lost one of its principal architects. The late Sir John Adams was a very private person who rarely confided in his colleagues. This made the job of his biographer particularly difficult. Michael Crowley- Milling has succeeded admirably, and has performed a very important service. Is it a potted history of CERN, or the story of the building of the PS, or of the SPS? Yes, all of these, but most of all it is a thoughtful and discerning biography and a fitting tribute to a veritable giant of European science and technology. The sub-title,' Engineer Extraordinary' refers not only to John's outstanding ability as a builder of accelerators, but perhaps even more importantly, as a builder of teams and an 'engineer of opinions'. The book describes how John's attention to detail and intuitive engineering skills developed during the early part of his career, when working in radar research, and how he emerged as a natural leader in the building of the CERN PS. Then later, how his statesmanship enabled him to ''...rescue it (the 300 GeV Programme) from seeming political disaster and nurse it through technical problems to a successful conclusion.'' One crucial part of this process described is the visit to CERN in 1970 by Margaret Thatcher, at that time UK Secretary of State for Education and Science, and her subsequent letters of thanks, not only to Bernard Gregory as Director General, but also to John. It is interesting to speculate to what extent the good impression made on that occasion helped many years later, when as Prime Minister Mrs Thatcher decided that Britain should stay in CERN! After the successful commissioning of the SPS, the book goes on to describe the period when the two CERN Laboratories were merged under two Directors General. Unfortunately I found this part a little too low key, given that John and Leon van Hove presided over what was undoubtedly

  19. Foreword: Sir John Pendry FRS Sir John Pendry FRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglesfield, John; Echenique, Pedro

    2008-07-01

    John Pendry John Inglesfield and Pedro Echenique write: John Pendry's 65th birthday is on 4 July 2008, and this issue of the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter is dedicated to him, with articles by friends, colleagues, and former students. By any standards, John Pendry is a great scientist, who has made—and continues to make—an enormous contribution to physics; the wide range of his interests is reflected in the scope of these articles. Not many scientists can establish a completely new and unexpected area of research, but this has been John's achievement in the last few years in the field of metamaterials, materials whose electromagnetic properties depend on their structure rather than the materials of which the structure is built. In this way, structures with effectively negative electrical permittivity and negative magnetic permeability can be constructed, demonstrating negative refraction; through metamaterials scientists now have access to properties not found in nature, and never previously explored experimentally. Never a week goes by without a potential new application of metamaterials, whether it is perfect lensing, or the cloak of invisibility. This has certainly led to tremendous visibility for John himself, with guest lectures all over the world, and radio and television appearances. John Pendry's first paper was published exactly 40 years ago, 'Analytic properties of pseudopotentials' [1], and since then he has published 310 articles at the latest count. But this first paper already reflected something of the way John works. His PhD project, with Volker Heine at the Cavendish Laboratory, was to interpret the scattering of low energy electrons from surfaces, the technique of LEED which was to become the method of choice for determining surface structure. Although the energy of the electrons in LEED is relatively low—say 50 eV—it is much higher than the energy of the conduction electrons, for which pseudopotentials had been devised, and John

  20. Coordinated Research Project: Relationship between recurrent lower respiratory tract infection, bronchial asthma and gastroesophageal reflux in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orellana, P.; Bernal, P.; Birkenfeld, B.; Boonyaprapa, S.; Chen, S.; Ciofetta, G.; Ellman, A.; Fatima, S.; Kavasakal, L.; Rondain, J.E.; Padhy, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux may cause or contribute to different respiratory problems such as bronchial asthma (BA), recurrent lower respiratory tract infection (rLRTI), among others. There is no clear cut explanation of mechanisms responsible for the respiratory symptoms in children with recurrent GER, and how beneficial GER treatment could be in the management of this children. The aim of this prospective coordinate research project was to evaluated the presence of GER, esophageal transit (ET) abnormalities and lung aspiration (LA) in children with recurrent respiratory symptoms. So far we had evaluated 309 children; 173 boys and 136 girls, between 15 days and 15 years old of age. Under standard and protocolized procedures all children underwent gastroesophageal scintigraphic study. Esophageal transit scintigraphy (ETS) was performed in 127 and LA scintigraphy in 205. The scintigraphic study was positive for GER in 160/309 (51.8%) of the total group. We found an abnormal ETS in 13.4% and a LA scintigraphy positive for aspiration of gastric content in 3.9% of the studied patients. According to clinical features, 75% of asthmatic children with persistent symptoms had GER and 30.7% of children with rLRTI. Follow-up studies were performed in 85 children after treatment of GER and there was a normalization of the scintigraphic study, associated with clinical improvement in 69.4% of them. These results show that GER prevalence in children with BA and rLRTI is higher than the reported normal prevalence in infancy, specially in the group of asthmatic patients. In our group, we do not find a significant presence of ET abnormalities neither LA of gastric content. The diagnosis and treatment of GER is mandatory in children with rLRTI or persistent BA. In asthmatic patients the recognition of gastric abnormalities is highly relevant for therapeutic problems when GER is in a sub-clinical stage

  1. Stability and stabilization of polymers under irradiation. Final report of a co-ordinated research project, 1994-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The contributions presented in this technical publication describe progress in understanding and controlling the degradation of polymeric materials induced by exposure to ionizing radiation. This subject area is of widespread importance to industrial use of radiation for two classes of applications: (1) the processing and production of polymeric materials by means of irradiation facilities, and (2) the use of polymeric materials in applications for which they must withstand irradiation throughout the course of their useful lifetimes. Due to extensive and still-growing use of polymeric materials for technological applications of immense variety, and the fact that radiation-processing has the potential to play an expanding role in polymer manufacturing (current uses include crosslinking, curing, sterilization, surface modification, lithography, etc.), the ability to inhibit unwanted material property changes which often occur when materials are irradiated, and to predict useful lifetimes, remains a limiting factor in a number of existing radiation technologies. Additionally, the ability to control unwanted degradation will be necessary for successful implementation of future, more advanced, radiation processing schemes. This co-ordinated research project (CRP) was established for the purpose of focusing the attention of appropriate technical experts on the complex task of establishing a better fundamental basis for understanding and attacking problems or radiation degradation of materials. The group dynamics have been designed to achieve a synergistic interaction among worldwide research facilities for the purposes of identifying degradation problems, exchanging ideas and results on the solution of these problems, and making the emerging information available in an organized and accessible format. From this meeting, it is clear that much remains to be learnt in terms of understanding degradation mechanisms and phenomena. It also appears that important new

  2. New developments and improvements in processing of 'problematic' radioactive waste. Results of a coordinated research project 2003-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-12-01

    This report addresses a category of wastes termed 'problematic wastes', wastes for which safe, efficient and cost effective methods for processing are not readily available. Processing options for many of these are identified and addressed. Results presented, illustrate the strategy for breaking 'problematic' waste streams down into a sequence of 'standard' issues which are amenable to solution. Decision makers and facility managers faced with problematic waste streams should be able to use this information to identify and pursue solutions to meet their needs. In this report, processing options for a total of 27 problematic waste streams that were identified and addressed by the individual laboratories participating in the Coordinated Research Project are discussed. These waste streams covered an extremely broad spectrum, ranging from simple, one component aqueous solutions originating from a research laboratory to very complex aqueous concentrates of waste resulting from reprocessing activities or reactor operation. These challenging wastes included: waste contaminated by tritium, wastes containing transuranic elements, and solid health care waste. The range of aqueous wastes included those contaminated by organic complexing agents and surfactants to pure organic waste such as contaminated oil. Correspondingly, the scale of approaches and technologies used to address these wastes is very broad. Use of this report is likely to be most effective as an initial screening tool to identify technologies best able to meet specific waste management objectives in terms of the waste generated, the technical complexity, the available economic resources, the environmental impact considerations, and the desired end product (output) of the technology. The report should assist the user to compare technologies and to reach an informed decision based on safety, technological maturity, economics, and other local needs

  3. Advances in Neutron Activation Analysis of Large Objects with Emphasis on Archaeological Examples. Results of a Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-03-01

    This publication is a compilation of the main results and findings of an IAEA coordinated research project (CRP). In particular, it discusses an innovative variation of neutron activation analysis (NAA) known as large sample NAA (LSNAA). There is no other way to measure the bulk mass fractions of the elements present in a large sample (up to kilograms in mass) non-destructively. Examples amenable to LSNAA include irregularly shaped archaeological artefacts, excavated rock samples, large samples of assorted ore, and finished products, such as nuclear reactor components. The CRP focused primarily on the application of LSNAA in the areas of archaeology and geology; however it was also open for further exploration in other areas such as industry and life sciences as well as in basic research. The CRP contributed to establish the validation of the methodology, and, in particular, it provided an opportunity for developing trained manpower. The specific objectives of this CRP were to: i) Validate and optimize the experimental procedures for LSNAA applications in archaeology and geology; ii) Identify the needs for development or upgrade of the neutron irradiation facility for irradiation of large samples; iii) Develop and standardize data acquisition and data analysis systems; iv) Harmonize and standardize data collection from facilities with similar kind of instrumentation for further analysis and benchmarking. Advantages of LSNAA applications, limitations and scientific and technological requirements are described in this publication, which serves as a reference of interest not only to the NAA experts, research reactor personnel, and those considering this technique, but also to various stakeholders and users such as researchers, industrialists, environmental and legal experts, and administrators.

  4. Second research co-ordination meeting for the coordinated research project on 'Application of nuclear techniques in the prevention of degenerative diseases (obesity and non-insulin dependent diseases) in ageing'. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, G.V.; Mokhtar, N.

    2002-01-01

    In the developed countries, research using nuclear methods has been substantially used to examine the physiological and biochemical mechanisms involved in obesity-related diseases. This Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) is intended to promote the use of these techniques in the developing world. The specific objectives of this CRP are: 1. To define the magnitude of the obesity/NIDDM problem in developing countries. 2. To identify vulnerable groups at high risk. 3. To describe the metabolic mechanisms involved. The purpose of this first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) was thus to develop a worldwide collaboration in the use of nuclear and isotopic techniques to investigate the aetiology of degenerative diseases in ageing. All countries participating in this CRP are going through the epidemiological transition with changes in lifestyles to approach those seen in the developed nations

  5. Co-ordinated research project on application of nuclear techniques in the prevention of degenerative diseases (obesity and non-Insulin dependent diseases) in ageing. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    In the developed countries, research using nuclear methods has been substantially used to examine the physiological and biochemical mechanisms involved in obesity-related diseases. This Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) is intended to promote the use of these techniques in the developing world. The specific objectives of this CRP are: 1. To define the magnitude of the obesity/NIDDM problem in developing countries. 2. To identify vulnerable groups at high risk. 3. To describe the metabolic mechanisms involved. The purpose of this first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) was thus to develop a worldwide collaboration in the use of nuclear and isotopic techniques to investigate the aetiology of degenerative diseases in ageing. All countries participating in this CRP are going through the epidemiological transition with changes in lifestyles to approach those seen in the developed nations.

  6. Co-ordinated research project on application of nuclear techniques in the prevention of degenerative diseases (obesity and non-Insulin dependent diseases) in ageing. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In the developed countries, research using nuclear methods has been substantially used to examine the physiological and biochemical mechanisms involved in obesity-related diseases. This Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) is intended to promote the use of these techniques in the developing world. The specific objectives of this CRP are: 1. To define the magnitude of the obesity/NIDDM problem in developing countries. 2. To identify vulnerable groups at high risk. 3. To describe the metabolic mechanisms involved. The purpose of this first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) was thus to develop a worldwide collaboration in the use of nuclear and isotopic techniques to investigate the aetiology of degenerative diseases in ageing. All countries participating in this CRP are going through the epidemiological transition with changes in lifestyles to approach those seen in the developed nations

  7. Irradiation to ensure the safety and quality of prepared meals. Results of the coordinated research project (2002-2006)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    The consumption of prepared meals has increased enormously during the last decade, not only in developed countries but also in developing countries where many types of ethnic foods are now also prepared as convenience foods. Consumer studies carried out on the consumption of these types of foods have shown that perceived time pressures contribute positively to the purchase of both prepared meals and takeaway meals. Other reasons are also mentioned in the literature, among them are the increasing proportion of working women outside of the home, not enjoying cooking for oneself and the need of family members to eat at different times. Traditionally, prepared meals are retort processed, or, more recently, stored frozen, whereas an increasing demand exists for chilled commodities, partly due to their fresh appearance. However, the chilled prepared meals are non-sterile and potential survival of some pathogenic microorganisms and/or post-processing contamination before packaging creates microbiological risks and a considerable limitation of shelf life. This is particularly important for countries where the microbiological safety of many ethnic prepared meals is questionable and their shelf life limited due to the conditions under which they are produced, stored and distributed. Food irradiation used on its own, or in combination with other technologies, could significantly enhance the microbial safety of such products as well as extend their shelf life. Although extensive research has been carried out on the microbiological, chemical, nutritional and sensorial effects of irradiating individual uncooked food items, little work has been reported on the irradiation of complex food systems such as prepared meals. In 2002, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture initiated in a Coordinated Research Project on Irradiation to Ensure the Safety and Quality of Prepared Meals. This project included the studies of participants from different

  8. Optimization of the coupling of nuclear reactors and desalination systems. Final report of a coordinated research project 1999-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    Nuclear power has been used for five decades and has been one of the fastest growing energy options. Although the rate at which nuclear power has penetrated the world energy market has declined, it has retained a substantial share, and is expected to continue as a viable option well into the future. Seawater desalination by distillation is much older than nuclear technology. However, the current desalination technology involving large-scale application, has a history comparable to nuclear power, i.e. it spans about five decades. Both nuclear and desalination technologies are mature and proven, and are commercially available from a variety of suppliers. Therefore, there are benefits in combining the two technologies together. Where nuclear energy could be an option for electricity supply, it can also be used as an energy source for seawater desalination. This has been recognized from the early days of the two technologies. However, the main interest during the 1960s and 1970s was directed towards the use of nuclear energy for electricity generation, district heating, and industrial process heat. Renewed interest in nuclear desalination has been growing worldwide since 1989, as indicated by the adoption of a number of resolutions on the subject at the IAEA General Conferences. Responding to this trend, the IAEA reviewed information on desalination technologies and the coupling of nuclear reactors with desalination plants, compared the economic viability of seawater desalination using nuclear energy in various coupling configuration with fossil fuels in a generic assessment, conducted a regional feasibility study on nuclear desalination in the North African Countries and initiated in a two-year Options Identification Programme (OIP) to identify candidate reactor and desalination technologies that could serve as practical demonstrations of nuclear desalination, supplementing the existing expertise and experience. In 1998, the IAEA initiated a Coordinated Research

  9. Nuclear based technologies for estimating microbial protein supply in ruminant livestock. Proceedings of the second research co-ordination meeting of a co-ordinated research project (phase 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture through its Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs), has been assisting national agricultural research systems in Member States to develop and apply nuclear and related techniques for improving livestock productivity. The programmes have focused on animal nutrition, animal reproduction and more recently on animal nutrition/reproduction interactions with emphasis on smallholder farming systems. The measurement of microbial protein supply to ruminant livestock has been an important area of research in ruminant nutrition. An estimate of microbial protein contribution to the intestinal protein flow is important for estimating the protein requirement of ruminant animals. Understanding the process of microbial protein synthesis has been difficult however, and due to the lack of simple and accurate methods for measuring microbial protein production in vivo, the methods used are based on complex microbial markers which require surgically prepared animals. As a result of a consultants meeting held in May 1995 to advise the Joint FAO/IAEA Division on the feasibility of using nuclear and related techniques for the development and validation of techniques for measuring microbial protein supply in ruminant animals, an FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project on Development, Standardization and Validation of Nuclear Based Technologies for Measuring Microbial Protein Supply in Ruminant Livestock for Improving Productivity was initiated in 1996, with a view to validating and adapting this technology for use in developing countries. To assist scientists participating in the CRP, a laboratory manual containing experimental protocols and methodologies for standardization and validation of the urine purine derivative technique and the development of models to suit local conditions, was published as IAEA-TECDOC-945. The present publication contains the final reports from participants in Phase 1 of the project

  10. Nuclear based technologies for estimating microbial protein supply in ruminant livestock. Proceedings of the second research co-ordination meeting of a co-ordinated research project (phase 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture through its Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs), has been assisting national agricultural research systems in Member States to develop and apply nuclear and related techniques for improving livestock productivity. The programmes have focused on animal nutrition, animal reproduction and more recently on animal nutrition/reproduction interactions with emphasis on smallholder farming systems. The measurement of microbial protein supply to ruminant livestock has been an important area of research in ruminant nutrition. An estimate of microbial protein contribution to the intestinal protein flow is important for estimating the protein requirement of ruminant animals. Understanding the process of microbial protein synthesis has been difficult however, and due to the lack of simple and accurate methods for measuring microbial protein production in vivo, the methods used are based on complex microbial markers which require surgically prepared animals. As a result of a consultants meeting held in May 1995 to advise the Joint FAO/IAEA Division on the feasibility of using nuclear and related techniques for the development and validation of techniques for measuring microbial protein supply in ruminant animals, an FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project on Development, Standardization and Validation of Nuclear Based Technologies for Measuring Microbial Protein Supply in Ruminant Livestock for Improving Productivity was initiated in 1996, with a view to validating and adapting this technology for use in developing countries. To assist scientists participating in the CRP, a laboratory manual containing experimental protocols and methodologies for standardization and validation of the urine purine derivative technique and the development of models to suit local conditions, was published as IAEA-TECDOC-945. The present publication contains the final reports from participants in Phase 1 of the project

  11. Lower Savannah aging, disability & transportation resource center : regional travel management and coordination center (TMCC) model and demonstration project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This report details the deployed technology and implementation experiences of the Lower Savannah Aging, Disability & Transportation : Resource Center in Aiken, South Carolina, which served as the regional Travel Management and Coordination Center (TM...

  12. John Greenleaf's life of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E

    2012-12-01

    This article summarizes the life and career of John E. Greenleaf, PhD. It complements an interview of Dr. Greenleaf sponsored by the American Physiological Society Living History Project found on the American Physiological Society website. Dr. Greenleaf is a "thought leader" and internationally renowned physiologist, with extensive contributions in human systems-level environmental physiology. He avoided self-aggrandizement and believed that deeds rather than words define one's legacy. Viewed another way, however, Greenleaf's words define his deeds: 48% of his 185 articles are first author works, which is an unusually high proportion for a scientist of his stature. He found that writing a thorough and thoughtful discussion section often led to novel ideas that drove future research. Beyond Greenleaf's words are the many students, postdocs, and collaborators lucky enough to have worked with him and thus learn and carry on his ways of science. His core principles included the following: avoid research "fads," embrace diversity, be the first subject in your own research, adhere to rules of fiscal responsibility, and respect administrative forces-but never back down from them when you know you are right. Greenleaf's integrity ensured he was usually right. He thrived on the axiom of many successful scientists: avoid falling in love with hypotheses, so that when unexpected findings appear, they arouse curiosity instead of fear. Dr. Greenleaf's legacy will include the John and Carol Greenleaf Award for prolific environmental and exercise-related publication in the Journal of Applied Physiology.

  13. Fuel Modelling at Extended Burnup (Fumex-II). Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2002-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-08-01

    to fuel licensing. This report describes the results of the coordinated research project on fuel modelling at extended burnup (FUMEX-II). This programme was initiated in 2000 and completed in 2006. It followed previous programmes on fuel modelling, D-COM which was conducted between 1982 and 1984, and the FUMEX programme which was conducted between 1993 and 1996. The participants used a mixture of data, derived from actual irradiation histories, in particular those with PIE measurements from high burnup commercial and experimental fuels, combined with idealized power histories intended to represent possible future extended dwell, commercial irradiations, to test code capabilities at high burnup. All participants have carried out calculations on the six priority cases selected from the 27 cases identified to them at the first research coordination meeting (RCM). At the second RCM, three further priority cases were identified and have been modelled. These priority cases have been chosen as the best available to help determine which of the many high burnup models used in the codes best reflect reality. The participants are using the remaining cases for verification and validation purposes as well as inter-code comparisons. The codes participating in the exercise have been developed for a wide variety of purposes, including predictions for fuel operation in PWR, BWR, WWER, the pressurized HWR type, CANDU and other reactor types. They are used as development tools as well as for routine licensing calculations, where code configuration is strictly controlled.

  14. Report of the first research co-ordination meeting under co-ordinated research project on 'In situ applications of XRF techniques'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence is a well-established analytical technique widely used in industrial and research applications for materials characterisation. However, a relatively recent development has been the availability of portable instrumentation, which can be used for both the direct in situ non-destructive analysis of samples, and also is readily transportable to field sites for use in a 'mobile laboratory' style of operation. In situ analyses using the XRF technique can make an essential contribution to a wide range of projects, including: - Analysis of soils, particularly in the assessment of agricultural land and contaminated land - Sorting scrap metal alloys and plastics to increase the value of recyclable materials - Geochemical mapping and exploration to locate mineralisation deposits - Environmental monitoring related to air pollution studies and contamination of the work - The on-line control of industrial processes for the production of raw materials - Archaeological studies and the classification of artefacts, the restoration of sculptures, paintings and other objects of cultural heritage. - In situ geochemical studies on Mars, including the 1997 NASA Pathfinder mission and the forthcoming European Space Agency Mars Express mission, which includes the In these applications, the major advantages of field-portable X-ray fluorescence (FPXRF) spectrometry include: on-site immediate availability of analytical results, non-destructive analysis, a multielement capability, speed of operation and access to valuable/unique samples that otherwise would be unavailable for chemical analysis. The CRP on 'In situ applications of XRF techniques' is one element of the project on Nuclear Instruments for Specific Applications the major objective of which is to assist Member States in the development of nuclear instruments and software for special applications, such as the characterisation of materials. An overall objective of this CRP is to assist laboratories in Member States

  15. Outline of the 1996-1998 IAEA co-ordinated research project on intercomparison for individual monitoring of external exposure from photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, J.; Gustafsson, M.; Ouvrard, R.

    1999-01-01

    The outline of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project 1996-1998 on intercomparison for individual monitoring is described. The intercomparison focused on IAEA Member States in Eastern Europe and was based on the operational quantity personal dose equivalent, H p (10). The three phases of the intercomparison were: the preparatory phase including a workshop, the 'type-test' intercomparison, and the 'simulated workplace field' intercomparison. Details of the phases are given. (author)

  16. Filsafat Multikulturalisme John Rawls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Rehayati

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Terjadinya konflik horizontal yang mengatasnamakan identitas kelompok (etnis, suku, keyakinan dan seterusnya dikarenakan adanya phobia terhadap perbedaan. Padahal perbedaan suatu keniscayaan, karena manusia tidak akan mampu menyeragamkan atau menuntut orang lain untuk sama dengan dirinya, baik pada aspek pemikiran, keyakinan, etnis, suku, budaya, dan sebagainya. Filsafat multikulturalisme John Rawls merupakan alternatif tawaran politik kebudayaan untuk mengatasi konflik horizontal. Menurut Rawls, suatu masyarakat yang adil bukanlah hanya menjamin “the greatest happiness for the greatest number” yang selama ini terkenal dalam prinsip demokrasi. Tetapi, masyarakat yang adil menurutnya adalah adanya pengakuan dan penerimaan terhadap perbedaan dan keberagaman. Pendapatnya ini dia rangkai dalam pokok-pokok pemikirannya tentang keadilan, seperti: Justice as Fairness, Veil of Ignorance, Principle of Equal Liberty, Maximin Rule, Lexical Order dan Reflective Equilibrium.

  17. Development of feed supplementation strategies for improving the productivity of dairy cattle on smallholder farms in Africa. Proceedings of the final research co-ordination meeting of a co-ordinated research project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture through co-ordinated research projects (CRP) supports studies aimed at improving livestock productivity in developing countries through the application of nuclear and related techniques. These studies have focused on animal nutrition, animal reproduction and more recently on animal nutrition/reproduction interactions with emphasis on smallholder farming systems. The primary aim of this CRP was to identify approaches for improving the productivity of dairy cattle maintained on smallholder farms in peri-urban areas. Central to the approach was to first obtain baseline information on productivity and reproductive efficiency and thereby identify nutritional and management constraints. Subsequently, corrective measures were developed and tested, keeping in mind the need for maximising the efficiency of current production systems and sustaining the nutrient supply through practical and economically feasible feed supplementation strategies developed using locally available feed resources. In addition the project envisaged contributing to enhancing the level of expertise within the national animal production research institutes in the region, to encourage close contact and interaction between scientists and institutions in Africa and to promote scientific information exchange on a regional basis. Through the project substantial progress was made in understanding the relationship between nutrient supply and productive and reproductive functions in dairy cattle on smallholder farming systems. Most of the participating countries were able to develop and test cost-effective feed supplementation strategies which improved both milk production and/or reproductive efficiency. The present publication contains the reports from participants of the project presented at the final Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Vienna from 7 to 11 September 1998 Refs, figs, tabs

  18. Development of feed supplementation strategies for improving the productivity of dairy cattle on smallholder farms in Africa. Proceedings of the final research co-ordination meeting of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture through co-ordinated research projects (CRP) supports studies aimed at improving livestock productivity in developing countries through the application of nuclear and related techniques. These studies have focused on animal nutrition, animal reproduction and more recently on animal nutrition/reproduction interactions with emphasis on smallholder farming systems. The primary aim of this CRP was to identify approaches for improving the productivity of dairy cattle maintained on smallholder farms in peri-urban areas. Central to the approach was to first obtain baseline information on productivity and reproductive efficiency and thereby identify nutritional and management constraints. Subsequently, corrective measures were developed and tested, keeping in mind the need for maximising the efficiency of current production systems and sustaining the nutrient supply through practical and economically feasible feed supplementation strategies developed using locally available feed resources. In addition the project envisaged contributing to enhancing the level of expertise within the national animal production research institutes in the region, to encourage close contact and interaction between scientists and institutions in Africa and to promote scientific information exchange on a regional basis. Through the project substantial progress was made in understanding the relationship between nutrient supply and productive and reproductive functions in dairy cattle on smallholder farming systems. Most of the participating countries were able to develop and test cost-effective feed supplementation strategies which improved both milk production and/or reproductive efficiency. The present publication contains the reports from participants of the project presented at the final Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Vienna from 7 to 11 September 1998

  19. Extrapolation of short term observations to time periods relevant to the isolation of long lived radioactive waste. Results of a co-ordinated research project 1995-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-09-01

    This report addresses safety analysis of the whole repository life-cycle that may require long term performance assessment of its components and evaluation of potential impacts of the facility on the environment. Generic consideration of procedures for the development of predictive tools are completed by detailed characterization of selected principles and methods that were applied and presented within the co-ordinated research project (CRP). The project focused on different approaches to extrapolation, considering radionuclide migration/sorption, physical, geochemical and geotechnical characteristics of engineered barriers, irradiated rock and backfill performance, and on corrosion of metallic and vitreous materials. This document contains a comprehensive discussion of the overall problem and the practical results of the individual projects preformed within the CRP. Each of the papers on the individual projects has been indexed separately

  20. Cooperative project for energy-oriented modernisation of industrial buildings - coordination results; Projektverbund zur energiegerechten Sanierung industriell errichteter Gebaeude - Ergebnisse der Koordination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerschberger, A. [Assmann Beraten und Planen GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The cooperative project concept of the federal ministry of science and technology is discussed. Coordination activities as well as pilot projects and comparative projects are described. Results obtained so far are reported in detail; heat energy conservation potentials as substantiated by means of measurements are shown in tabulated form. Further indicated in tabulated form are the redevelopment costs per residential unit, the payback period of the entire project, and a comparison of reduced heating costs with increased basic rent for apportioning the costs of modernization. (MSK) [Deutsch] Die Konzeption des Projektverbundes des BMBF wird naeher erlaeutert. Die Aktivitaeten der Koordination und die Versuchs-und Vergleichsbauvorhaben werden beschrieben. Die bisherigen Ergebnisse werden detailliert geschildert und die mess

  1. COMET- co-ordination and implementation of a pan-European instrument for radioecology - COMET- co-ordination and implementation of a pan-European project for radioecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenhove, Hildegarde [SCK.CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Muikku, Maarit [STUK, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, P.O. Box 14, FI-00881 Helsinki (Finland); Liland, Astrid [NRPA, Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Grini Naeringspark 13, Oesteraas, 1332 (Norway); Adam-Guillermin, Christelle [IRSN-Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, 31, Avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92260 Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France); Howard, Brenda [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Av., Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    The EC-FP7 project COMET (June 2013 - May 2017) intends to strengthen the pan-European research initiative on the impact of radiation on man and the environment by facilitating the integration of 'radioecological' research. The COMET consortium currently has thirteen partners; eight from EU member states, two from Norway, two from Ukraine and one from Japan. COMET operates in close association with the FP7-STAR Network of Excellence[1]and the Radioecology Alliance[2], COMET will develop initiatives to encourage organisations from the European (and larger) radioecological research community to join the Radioecology Alliance to help address the priorities identified in the Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) for radioecological research. Capacity, competence and skills in radioecology will thus be strengthened at a pan-European level. Mechanisms for knowledge exchange, dissemination and training will be established to enhance and maintain European capacity, competence and skills in radioecology, partially through an open access web site, topical workshops and training activities. COMET will develop innovative mechanisms for joint programming and implementation of radioecological research. Mechanisms for planning and carrying out joint research activities in radioecology will be developed based on the scientific requirements identified in the SRA and via interaction with a wide range of stakeholders. COMET will strengthen the bridge with other radiation protection and ecological communities. A roadmap and associated implementation plan is being developed in collaboration with the Radioecology Alliance and the allied platforms on low dose risk research (MELODI[3]), and emergency management research (NERIS[4]) and the radioecology community at large who is invited to become associated to the development of roadmap and implementation plan. COMET will initiate innovative research on key needs identified by the radioecology community, the (post) emergency management

  2. Major Events Coordinated Security Solutions: The Application of the Project Management Body of Knowledge for Managing a Science and Technology Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    represents the sum of knowledge related to project management and includes best practises and techniques generally accepted by the project...project has demonstrated that the principles of project management can be applied even to those activities that naturally resist the structure and...team and to engender trust in the output. DRDC believes strongly in the application of sound project management principles and uses an abbreviated

  3. John Adams Lecture

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    13 December 2010 14:30 - Council Chamber, Bldg.503-1-001 Accelerator Breakthroughs, Achievements and Lessons from the Tevatron Collider V. Shiltsev / Fermilab’s Accelerator Physics Centre This year we celebrate the 25th anniversary of the first proton-antiproton collisions in the Tevatron. For two and a half decades the Tevatron at Fermilab (Batavia, IL, USA) was a centerpiece of the US and world’s High Energy Physics as the world’s highest energy particle collider at 1.8 TeV center of mass energy. While funding agencies are deciding on a 3-year extension of the Collider Run II operation through 2014, we – in this 2010 John Adams Lecture - will take a look in exciting story of the Tevatron: the story of long preparations, great expectations, numerous difficulties, years of “blood and sweat”, continuous upgrades, exceeding original goals (by a factor of 400) and high emotions. An accelerator scientist prospective will be given on a wide spectrum o...

  4. Labelling techniques of biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1998-2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    Malignant tumour disease accounts for approximately one third of deaths worldwide. Gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas, prostate and breast cancers are among the most frequently appearing tumours. Radiotherapy is an essential mode of treatment of all cancer patients either alone or in conjunction with other modalities like surgery and chemotherapy. In most cases radiotherapy is given using external radiation sources. It is also possible to administer radiotherapy by specifically localizing radioisotopes emitting particulate radiation in the tumour tissue. This targeted therapy has proved to have several advantages over external beam therapy, notably the possibility of selectively delivering higher radiation doses to the targeted tumour cells and treating multiple metastases. Procedures for therapy of thyroid carcinoma and hyper-thyroidism using radioiodine (131I) introduced about five decades ago, have stood the test of time and are still widely used the world over. In addition to the therapeutic nuclides of the first generation 131I, 89Sr, 32P, 90Y, etc., which are still widely utilized and accepted by the medical community, many other beta emitting radionuclides with relatively short half-lives such as 153Sm, 186Re, 188Re, 166Ho, 165Dy, etc. have also been recently made available for therapy and used with promising good results. In spite of the potential of targeted radiotherapy to treat a wide range of malignant conditions, routine clinical use is mostly confined to therapy of thyroid carcinoma, hyperthyroidism, metastatic bone pain and synovectomy. In most of the cases, the limitation is obviously not the availability of suitable radionuclides but rather the lack of suitable carrier molecules that would adequately concentrate these radionuclides in target tissues of interest. Based on the above considerations, the scope of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) has focused on the synthesis of the required BFCAs for MoAbs and peptide labelling, development and

  5. Labelling techniques of biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1998-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    Malignant tumour disease accounts for approximately one third of deaths worldwide. Gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas, prostate and breast cancers are among the most frequently appearing tumours. Radiotherapy is an essential mode of treatment of all cancer patients either alone or in conjunction with other modalities like surgery and chemotherapy. In most cases radiotherapy is given using external radiation sources. It is also possible to administer radiotherapy by specifically localizing radioisotopes emitting particulate radiation in the tumour tissue. This targeted therapy has proved to have several advantages over external beam therapy, notably the possibility of selectively delivering higher radiation doses to the targeted tumour cells and treating multiple metastases. Procedures for therapy of thyroid carcinoma and hyper-thyroidism using radioiodine (131I) introduced about five decades ago, have stood the test of time and are still widely used the world over. In addition to the therapeutic nuclides of the first generation 131I, 89Sr, 32P, 90Y, etc., which are still widely utilized and accepted by the medical community, many other beta emitting radionuclides with relatively short half-lives such as 153Sm, 186Re, 188Re, 166Ho, 165Dy, etc. have also been recently made available for therapy and used with promising good results. In spite of the potential of targeted radiotherapy to treat a wide range of malignant conditions, routine clinical use is mostly confined to therapy of thyroid carcinoma, hyperthyroidism, metastatic bone pain and synovectomy. In most of the cases, the limitation is obviously not the availability of suitable radionuclides but rather the lack of suitable carrier molecules that would adequately concentrate these radionuclides in target tissues of interest. Based on the above considerations, the scope of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) has focused on the synthesis of the required BFCAs for MoAbs and peptide labelling, development and

  6. Compilation and evaluation of fission yield nuclear data. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1991-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-12-01

    Fission product yields are required at several stages of the nuclear fuel cycle and are therefore included in all large international data files for reactor calculations and related applications. Such files are maintained and disseminated by the Nuclear Data Section of the IAEA as a member of an international data centres network. Users of these data are from the fields of reactor design and operation, waste management and nuclear materials safeguards, all of which are essential parts of the IAEA programme. In the 1980s, the number of measured fission yields increased so drastically that the manpower available for evaluating them to meet specific user needs was insufficient. To cope with this task, it was concluded in several meetings on fission product nuclear data, some of them convened by the IAEA, that international co-operation was required, and an IAEA co-ordinated research project (CRP) was recommended. This recommendation was endorsed by the International Nuclear Data Committee, an advisory body for the nuclear data programme of the IAEA. As a consequence, the CRP on the Compilation and Evaluation of Fission Yield Nuclear Data was initiated in 1991, after its scope, objectives and tasks had been defined by a preparatory meeting. The different tasks, such as special evaluations and development of improved methods, were distributed among participants. The results of the research work were discussed and approved by all participants in research co-ordination meetings. For a successful development of theoretical and empirical models, experiments had to be recommended and their results to be awaited, which made necessary an extension of the CRP by two years. This TECDOC is the result of a joint effort of all participants in this CRP. The individual sections represent CRP tasks and were prepared by the participants responsible for doing the research, some of which comprise significant new scientific developments. The appendices to this book contain voluminous

  7. Worldwide marine radioactivity studies (WOMARS): Radionuclide levels in oceans and seas. Final report of a coordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This publication summarizes the results of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Worldwide Marine Radioactivity Studies (WOMARS) carried out by the IAEA's Marine Environment Laboratory in Monaco. It provides the most comprehensive information on levels of anthropogenic radionuclides in the world ocean. Three anthropogenic radionuclides - 90 Sr, 137 Cs and 239,240 Pu - were chosen as the most representative of anthropogenic radioactivity in the marine environment, comprising beta-, gamma- and alpha-emitters which have the highest potential contribution to radiation doses to humans via seafood consumption. Although the ocean contains the majority of the anthropogenic radionuclides released into the environment, the radiological impact of this contamination is low. Radiation doses from naturally-occurring radionuclides in the marine environment (e.g. 210 Po) are on the average two orders of magnitude higher. The results confirm that the dominant source of anthropogenic radionuclides in the marine environment is global fallout. The total 137 Cs input from global fallout was estimated to be 311 PBq for the Pacific Ocean, 201 PBq for the Atlantic Ocean, 84 PBq for the Indian Ocean and 7.4 PBq for the Arctic Ocean. For comparison, about 40 PBq of 137 Cs was released to the marine environment from Sellafield and Cap de la Hague reprocessing plants. The Chernobyl accident contributed about 16 PBq of 137 Cs to the sea, mainly the Baltic and Black Seas, where the present average concentrations of 137 Cs in surface water were estimated to be about 60 and 25 Bq/m 3 , respectively, while the worldwide average concentration due to global fallout is about 2 Bq/m 3 . For the purposes of this study, the world ocean was divided into latitudinal belts for which average radionuclide concentrations were estimated. Further, where available, time trends in radionuclide concentrations in surface water were studied and mean residence times of radionuclides in these areas as well as in

  8. The Behaviours of Cementitious Materials in Long Term Storage and Disposal of Radioactive Waste. Results of a Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-09-01

    Radioactive waste with widely varying characteristics is generated from the operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, research laboratories and medical facilities. This waste must be treated and conditioned, as necessary, to provide waste forms acceptable for safe storage and disposal. Many countries use cementitious materials (concrete, mortar, etc.) as a containment matrix for immobilization, as well as for engineered structures of disposal facilities. Radionuclide release is dependent on the physicochemical properties of the waste forms and packages, and on environmental conditions. In the use of cement, the diffusion process and metallic corrosion can induce radionuclide release. The advantage of cementitious materials is the added stability and mechanical support during storage and disposal of waste. Long interim storage is becoming an important issue in countries where it is difficult to implement low level waste and intermediate level waste disposal facilities, and in countries where cement is used in the packaging of waste that is not suitable for shallow land disposal. This coordinated research project (CRP), involving 24 research organizations from 21 Member States, investigated the behaviour and performance of cementitious materials used in an overall waste conditioning system based on the use of cement - including waste packaging (containers), waste immobilization (waste form) and waste backfilling - during long term storage and disposal. It also considered the interactions and interdependencies of these individual elements (containers, waste, form, backfill) to understand the processes that may result in degradation of their physical and chemical properties. The main research outcomes of the CRP are summarized in this report under four topical sections: (i) conventional cementitious systems; (ii) novel cementitious materials and technologies; (iii) testing and waste acceptance criteria; and (iv) modelling long

  9. The Behaviours of Cementitious Materials in Long Term Storage and Disposal of Radioactive Waste. Results of a Coordinated Research Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-09-15

    Radioactive waste with widely varying characteristics is generated from the operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, research laboratories and medical facilities. This waste must be treated and conditioned, as necessary, to provide waste forms acceptable for safe storage and disposal. Many countries use cementitious materials (concrete, mortar, etc.) as a containment matrix for immobilization, as well as for engineered structures of disposal facilities. Radionuclide release is dependent on the physicochemical properties of the waste forms and packages, and on environmental conditions. In the use of cement, the diffusion process and metallic corrosion can induce radionuclide release. The advantage of cementitious materials is the added stability and mechanical support during storage and disposal of waste. Long interim storage is becoming an important issue in countries where it is difficult to implement low level waste and intermediate level waste disposal facilities, and in countries where cement is used in the packaging of waste that is not suitable for shallow land disposal. This coordinated research project (CRP), involving 24 research organizations from 21 Member States, investigated the behaviour and performance of cementitious materials used in an overall waste conditioning system based on the use of cement - including waste packaging (containers), waste immobilization (waste form) and waste backfilling - during long term storage and disposal. It also considered the interactions and interdependencies of these individual elements (containers, waste, form, backfill) to understand the processes that may result in degradation of their physical and chemical properties. The main research outcomes of the CRP are summarized in this report under four topical sections: (i) conventional cementitious systems; (ii) novel cementitious materials and technologies; (iii) testing and waste acceptance criteria; and (iv) modelling long

  10. Optimization of the radiological protection of patients: Image quality and dose in mammography (co-ordinated research in Europe). Results of the coordinated research project on optimization of protection mammography in some eastern European States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-05-01

    Mammography is an extremely useful non-invasive imaging technique with unparalleled advantages for the detection of breast cancer. It has played an immense role in the screening of women above a certain age or with a family history of breast cancer. The IAEA has a statutory responsibility to establish standards for the protection of people against exposure to ionizing radiation and to provide for the worldwide application of those standards. A fundamental requirement of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation (BSS) and for the Safety of Radiation Sources, issued by the IAEA and co-sponsored by FAO, ILO, WHO, PAHO and NEA, is the optimization of radiological protection of patients undergoing medical exposure. In keeping with its responsibility on the application of standards, the IAEA programme on Radiological Protection of Patients attempts to reduce radiation doses to patients while balancing quality assurance considerations. IAEA-TECDOC-796, Radiation Doses in Diagnostic Radiology and Methods for Dose Reduction (1995), addresses this aspect. The related IAEA-TECDOC-1423 on Optimization of the Radiological Protection of Patients undergoing Radiography, Fluoroscopy and Computed Tomography, (2004) constitutes the final report of the coordinated research in Africa, Asia and eastern Europe. The preceding publications do not explicitly consider mammography. Mindful of the importance of this imaging technique, the IAEA launched a Coordinated Research Project on Optimization of Protection in Mammography in some eastern European States. The present publication is the outcome of this project: it is aimed at evaluating the situation in a number of countries, identifying variations in the technique, examining the status of the equipment and comparing performance in the light of the norms established by the European Commission. A number of important aspects are covered, including: - quality control of mammography equipment; - imaging

  11. Radiation synthesis of stimuli-responsive membranes, hydrogels and adsorbents for separation purposes. Final report of a coordinated research project 2000-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-08-01

    This coordinated research project coordinated research work for the development of novel materials prepared by radiation processing techniques. Single and multi-pore polyamide membranes, fast thermo-responsive hydrogels, porous polymer monoliths, stimuli-responsive hydrogels based on natural and synthetic polymers, temperature responsive membranes, selective adsorbents, polymeric nanogels and novel non-ionic thermo-sensitive hydrogels were produced. The application areas explored for beneficially utilizing these novel materials included specialized drug delivery systems (DDS), selective adsorbents, nanopores for single molecule detection, membranes for separation and concentration of solutes, health care and remediation of environmental pollution. The report provides basic information on radiation processing and promotes experience exchange for further developments of radiation technology. Protocols and procedures of preparation of various stimuli responsive membranes and their actual and perspective applications are described in the report. Public awareness and technology acceptance are other factors to be considered for further dissemination. This publication summarizes the present status and the prospects of this technology

  12. Ion beam techniques for the analysis of light elements in thin films, including depth profiling. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 2000-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    This publication highlights the achievements of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to promote the potential of accelerator-based nuclear techniques of analysis for light elements in thin films. The objectives of this CRP were to develop a coordinated research effort between accelerator laboratories and materials science research groups in order to assist and promote the development of quality assurance methods, to evaluate databases of parameters needed for quantitative analysis, and to develop and apply techniques to selected problems concerning the surface modification of materials and production of thin films. Through various case studies, this publication assesses and demonstrates the effectiveness of accelerator-based nuclear techniques for analysis to provide valuable data and knowledge not readily accessible using other methods

  13. Co-ordinated research project on validation and application of plants as biomonitors of trace element atmospheric pollution, analysed by nuclear and related techniques. Report on the 1. research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    Environmental pollution is a cause of ever increasing concern in the world. The UN Conference on Environment and Development (Rio, Brazil, 1992) reaffirmed the importance of protecting the environment within the context of sustainable development. Arising out of this conference, the Rio Agenda 21 declaration called for a number of nationally determined action programmes, with international assistance and co-ordination under 'Capacity 21', concerning environmental monitoring and assessment, including the use of biological markers. Environmental protection and control is a matter of high priority in all developing countries' governmental policies in view of its implications for the welfare of the present and future populations. Therefore it is expected that regional and national organisations responsible for legislation and environmental policy, municipal organisations, which could use the data collected for establishing emission levels, organisations responsible for pollutant emission control and public health-related institutions will benefit from this proposed Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP). The CRP is expected to exploit possibilities of developing and validating tools for using appropriate biomonitors to map the distribution of air pollution over wide areas in developing countries. If successful, this would be a powerful way for developing countries to monitor air pollution.

  14. Co-ordinated research project on validation and application of plants as biomonitors of trace element atmospheric pollution, analysed by nuclear and related techniques. Report on the 1. research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Environmental pollution is a cause of ever increasing concern in the world. The UN Conference on Environment and Development (Rio, Brazil, 1992) reaffirmed the importance of protecting the environment within the context of sustainable development. Arising out of this conference, the Rio Agenda 21 declaration called for a number of nationally determined action programmes, with international assistance and co-ordination under 'Capacity 21', concerning environmental monitoring and assessment, including the use of biological markers. Environmental protection and control is a matter of high priority in all developing countries' governmental policies in view of its implications for the welfare of the present and future populations. Therefore it is expected that regional and national organisations responsible for legislation and environmental policy, municipal organisations, which could use the data collected for establishing emission levels, organisations responsible for pollutant emission control and public health-related institutions will benefit from this proposed Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP). The CRP is expected to exploit possibilities of developing and validating tools for using appropriate biomonitors to map the distribution of air pollution over wide areas in developing countries. If successful, this would be a powerful way for developing countries to monitor air pollution

  15. Report on the consultants' meeting on preparation of the proposal for a coordinated research project to update X- and γ-ray decay data standards for detector calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.; Herman, M.

    1998-05-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section has been charged by the International Nuclear Data Committee to consider the establishment of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to update the IAEA database of X-ray and γ-ray Standards for Detector Calibration. This CRP should re-define the radionuclides most suited for detector calibration, extending applications to safeguards, materials analysis, environmental monitoring, and medical use. This document is a report on the Consultants' Meeting held at IAEA, Vienna, between 24-25 November 1997 to assess the current needs, re-define the most suitable radionuclides, and advise the IAEA Nuclear Data Section on the need and form of such a CRP

  16. Managing Irrigation Water to Enhance Crop Productivity under Water-limiting Conditions: A Role for Isotopic Techniques. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-05-01

    This publication presents the outcome of an IAEA coordinated research project and provides research findings and isotopic methodologies to quantify the soil evaporation component of water losses and determine the transpiration efficiency for several important crop species under a variety of environments. The TECDOC also presents a simple, fast and portable vacuum distillation apparatus for extraction water from soil and plant samples for isotopic analyses for the separation of soil evaporation, which helped to reduce the bottleneck in sample throughput for many soil water and hydrology studies

  17. Surface modification of materials by ion implantations for industrial and medical applications. Final report of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-07-01

    The objectives of the Co-ordinated Research Project on Modification of Materials by Ion Treatment for Industrial Applications were to develop economically acceptable surface modification techniques leading to thick treated layers, to predict ion beam mixing and impurity atom migration during and after implantation, and to evaluate the tribological post-implantation properties and performance of treated components. This TECDOC summarises the current status and prospects in surface modification by ion implantation methodology and technology, providing new information in basic and applied research

  18. Surface modification of materials by ion implantations for industrial and medical applications. Final report of a co-ordinated research project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The objectives of the Co-ordinated Research Project on Modification of Materials by Ion Treatment for Industrial Applications were to develop economically acceptable surface modification techniques leading to thick treated layers, to predict ion beam mixing and impurity atom migration during and after implantation, and to evaluate the tribological post-implantation properties and performance of treated components. This TECDOC summarises the current status and prospects in surface modification by ion implantation methodology and technology, providing new information in basic and applied research.

  19. Use of irradiation for chemical and microbial decontamination of water, wastewater and sludge. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1995-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    The co-ordinated research project (CRP) was established in order to focus the attention of appropriate technical experts in integrating the effects of ionizing radiation on refractory organic pollutants and pathogenic microorganisms and parasites in the treatment of water, waste water and sewage sludge. This publication describes the findings of the CRP in three subject areas: ground water remediation, decontamination of industrial and municipal waste water and sewage sludge hygienization. This publication contains 11 individual papers from participants; each of the papers was indexed separately

  20. Processing of Irradiated Graphite to Meet Acceptance Criteria for Waste Disposal. Results of a Coordinated Research Project. Companion CD-ROM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-05-01

    Graphite is widely used in the nuclear industry and in research facilities and this has led to increasing amounts of irradiated graphite residing in temporary storage facilities pending disposal. This publication arises from a coordinated research project (CRP) on the processing of irradiated graphite to meet acceptance criteria for waste disposal. It presents the findings of the CRP, the general conclusions and recommendations. The topics covered include, graphite management issues, characterization of irradiated graphite, processing and treatment, immobilization and disposal. Included on the attached CD-ROM are formal reports from the participants

  1. Co-ordinated research project: ingestion and organ content of trace elements of importance in radiological protection. Reference Asian man project, phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This First Research Co-ordination Meeting on Ingestion and Organ Content of Trace Elements was held at the Hotel Rembrandt,Quezon City, the Philippines. Information on individual participant's plans for participation in the CRP, and the progress achieved so far on this and related topics is presented in each country's report. The major themes covered include sampling of diets and tissues, analytical techniques used, analytical quality assurance and data reporting of results

  2. HISTORICAL NOTE JOHN HUNTER (SURGEON) John Hunter FRS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JOHN HUNTER (SURGEON). John Hunter FRS (13 February 1728-16 October 1793) was a Scottish surgeon, one of the most distinguished scientists and surgeons of his day. He was an early advocate of careful observation and scientific method in medicine. He was the husband of Anne Hunter, a teacher, friend and ...

  3. Combined methods for liquid radioactive waste treatment. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-02-01

    The report contains 13 papers presented at the final research co-ordination meeting of the CRP. The subjects covered include processes and technologies for treatment and conditioning of liquid radioactive wastes. It quite often includes the application of several steps, such as filtration, precipitation, sorption, ion exchange, evaporation and/or membrane separation to meet the requirements both for the release of decontaminated effluents into the environment and the conditioning of waste concentrates for disposal. Combination of the processes and their consecutive or simultaneous application is also described. It results in an improved decontamination, waste volume reduction, safety and overall cost effectiveness in the treatment, conditioning and disposal of these wastes.

  4. Combined methods for liquid radioactive waste treatment. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    The report contains 13 papers presented at the final research co-ordination meeting of the CRP. The subjects covered include processes and technologies for treatment and conditioning of liquid radioactive wastes. It quite often includes the application of several steps, such as filtration, precipitation, sorption, ion exchange, evaporation and/or membrane separation to meet the requirements both for the release of decontaminated effluents into the environment and the conditioning of waste concentrates for disposal. Combination of the processes and their consecutive or simultaneous application is also described. It results in an improved decontamination, waste volume reduction, safety and overall cost effectiveness in the treatment, conditioning and disposal of these wastes

  5. Utilization of a Network of Small Magnetic Confinement Fusion Devices for Mainstream Fusion Research. Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2011–2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-12-01

    The IAEA actively promotes the development of controlled fusion as a source of energy. Through its coordinated research activities, the IAEA helps Member States to exchange and establish scientific and technical knowledge required for the design, construction and operation of a fusion reactor. Due to their compactness, flexibility and low operation costs, small fusion devices are a great resource for supporting and accelerating the development of mainstream fusion research on large fusion devices such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. They play an important role in investigating the physics of controlled fusion, developing innovative technologies and diagnostics, testing new materials, training highly qualified personnel for larger fusion facilities, and supporting educational programmes for young scientists. This publication reports on the research work accomplished within the framework of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Utilization of the Network of Small Magnetic Confinement Fusion Devices for Mainstream Fusion Research, organized and conducted by the IAEA in 2011–2016. The CRP has contributed to the coordination of a network of research institutions, thereby enhancing international collaboration through scientific visits, joint experiments and the exchange of information and equipment. A total of 16 institutions and 14 devices from 13 Member States participated in this CRP (Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Costa Rica, the Czech Republic, the Islamic Republic of Iran, Kazakhstan, Pakistan, Portugal, the Russian Federation, Ukraine and the United Kingdom).

  6. Carbon-Temperature-Water Change Analysis for Peanut Production Under Climate Change: A Prototype for the AgMIP Coordinated Climate-Crop Modeling Project (C3MP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruane, Alex C.; McDermid, Sonali; Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Baigorria, Guillermo A.; Jones, James W.; Romero, Consuelo C.; Cecil, L. DeWayne

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is projected to push the limits of cropping systems and has the potential to disrupt the agricultural sector from local to global scales. This article introduces the Coordinated Climate-Crop Modeling Project (C3MP), an initiative of the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) to engage a global network of crop modelers to explore the impacts of climate change via an investigation of crop responses to changes in carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]), temperature, and water. As a demonstration of the C3MP protocols and enabled analyses, we apply the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) CROPGRO-Peanut crop model for Henry County, Alabama, to evaluate responses to the range of plausible [CO2], temperature changes, and precipitation changes projected by climate models out to the end of the 21st century. These sensitivity tests are used to derive crop model emulators that estimate changes in mean yield and the coefficient of variation for seasonal yields across a broad range of climate conditions, reproducing mean yields from sensitivity test simulations with deviations of ca. 2% for rain-fed conditions. We apply these statistical emulators to investigate how peanuts respond to projections from various global climate models, time periods, and emissions scenarios, finding a robust projection of modest (20%) losses and larger uncertainty at the end of the century under the more severe representative concentration pathway (RCP8.5). This projection is not substantially altered by the selection of the AgMERRA global gridded climate dataset rather than the local historical observations, differences between the Third and Fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3 and CMIP5), or the use of the delta method of climate impacts analysis rather than the C3MP impacts response surface and emulator approach.

  7. Coordinated international action to accelerate genome-to-phenome with FAANG, the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes project : open letter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archibald, A.L.; Bottema, C.D.; Brauning, R.; Burgess, S.C.; Burt, D.W.; Casas, E.; Cheng, H.H.; Clarke, L.; Couldrey, C.; Dalrymple, B.P.; Elsik, C.G.; Foissac, S.; Giuffra, E.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Hayes, B.J.; Huang, L.S.; Khatib, H.; Kijas, J.W.; Kim, H.; Lunney, J.K.; McCarthy, F.M.; McEwan, J.; Moore, S.; Nanduri, B.; Notredame, C.; Palti, Y.; Plastow, G.S.; Reecy, J.M.; Rohrer, G.; Sarropoulou, E.; Schmidt, C.J.; Silverstein, J.; Tellam, R.L.; Tixier-Boichard, M.; Tosser-klopp, G.; Tuggle, C.K.; Vilkki, J.; White, S.N.; Zhao, S.; Zhou, H.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the organization of a nascent international effort, the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) project, whose aim is to produce comprehensive maps of functional elements in the genomes of domesticated animal species.

  8. Approaches to Improvement of Crop Genotypes with High Water and Nutrient Use Efficiency for Water Scarce Environments. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-12-01

    Projected global population increase and the impacts of climate change on agriculture highlight the importance of the use of improved crop varieties coupled with better soil, water and fertilizer management practices designed to protect the natural resource base. This publication is the outcome of a coordinated research project (CRP) and focuses on the practical application of nuclear and related techniques, such as mutation induction and the use of stable isotopes of nitrogen [N-15] and carbon [C-13]. The use of such techniques can improve crop productivity with mutant varieties and best-fit soil management practices in diverse agro-ecological zones affected by drought, high temperatures, water scarcity, soil acidity and soil salinity. The findings of the CRP will be highly valuable to agricultural scientists and laboratory technicians of national agricultural research organizations in Member States as a resource for improving soil and crop productivity.

  9. Demonstrating managed aquifer recharge as a solution for climate change adaptation: results from Gabardine project and asemwaterNet coordination action in the Algarve region (Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Lobo Ferreira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Algarve southern Portugal region, Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR research activities have been developed to provide not only water surplus storage in aquifers during wet years, focusing in the Querença-Silves aquifer (FP6 ASEMWATERNet Coordination Action, but also groundwater quality rehabilitation in the Campina de Faro aquifer (FP6 Gabardine Project. Following MAR research potentialities in southern Portugal, this paper describes the objectives, conceptual demonstration, background and capabilities of one of the selected Circum-Mediterranean pilot sites (in Portugal that will be researched in the new FP7-ENV-2013-WATER-INNO-DEMO MARSOL project, which started Dec. 1st, 2013. In the Algarve pilot site, several case-study areas will be located in the Querença-Silves aquifer and in the Campina de Faro aquifer.

  10. Spent fuel and high level waste: Chemical durability and performance under simulated repository conditions. Results of a coordinated research project 1998-2004. Part 1: Contributions by participants in the co-ordinated research project on chemical durability and performance assessment under simulated repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    This publication contains the results of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP). It provides a basis for understanding the potential interactions of waste form and repository environment, which is necessary for the development of the design and safety case for deep disposal. Types of high level waste matrices investigated include spent fuel, glasses and ceramics. Of particular interest are the experimental results pertaining to ceramic forms such as SYNROC. This publication also outlines important areas for future work, namely, standardized, collaborative experimental protocols for package-release studies, structured development and calibration of predictive models linking the performance of packaged waste and the repository environment, and studies of the long term behaviour of the wastes, including active waste samples. It comprises 15 contributions of the participants on the Coordinated Research Project which are indexed individually.

  11. Co-ordinated research project: Ingestion and organ content of trace elements of importance in radiological protection (CRP: E4.30.08). Reference Asian man project, phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The Second Research Coordination Meeting for the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Ingestion and Organ Content of Trace Elements of Importance in Radiological Protection: Reference Asian Man Project, Phase 2' was held at the China Institute for Radiation Protection (CIRP) in Taiyuan, People's Republic of China. During the first technical Session, an overview of the current status of the CRP was presented by the IAEA technical officer, Dr. Parr, and the responsible officer of the Central Reference Laboratory (NIRS, Japan), Dr. Kawamura. They drew attention to the agreed programme of work, as described in the project documentation, and the timetable foreseen for the CRP as summarized in table 1. In general, they concluded that the achievements of the CRP to-date appear to be good, particularly in relation to sample collection (in most countries) and quality control (the development of appropriate reference materials). However, some aspects of the work appear to be a little behind schedule, particularly (1) the final stages of preparation of total diet samples (because of delays in providing a suitable food blender), (2) the analysis of some of the elements of first priority (because of the non-availability, until now, of suitable analytical reference materials), and (3) in some countries, the collection of autopsy specimens. One country (Malaysia) has experienced considerable difficulties in implementing the project due to the retirement of the former Chief Scientific Investigator. For this reason it was unfortunately not possible for the Malaysian representative to be present at the RCM

  12. Obituary: Michael John Seaton, 1923-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Anil; Nahar, Sultana

    2007-12-01

    Professor Michael John Seaton, hailed as the "Father of Atomic Astrophysics," passed away on May 29, 2007. He was one of the few Honorary Fellows of both the American Astronomical Society and the American Physical Society, so honored for his monumental contributions to both physics and astronomy. Mike Seaton was born on January 16, 1923 in Bristol, England. He attended Wallington County High School. But his leftist political activities, even at that stage, led to his expulsion, though he was eventually allowed to matriculate. He enlisted in the Royal Air Force as a navigator during the Second World War, and flew many dangerous missions. His legendary concentration and precision are reflected in the following anecdote. Once after a bombing mission his aircraft was lost in fog over the Alps. Seaton calculated the position and coordinates in flight to guide the aircraft. When the fog lifted, the crew found themselves flying perilously close to the mountains, but made it safely back. His associates often said, "A Seaton calculation is carried out as if his life depended on it." After the War he was admitted to University College London (UCL) as an undergraduate. Thereafter, he spent all of his professional career at UCL. Seaton received his Batchelor's degree in 1948, and his Ph.D. in 1951. His tenure at UCL coincided with the golden age of atomic astrophysics, for he was largely responsible for it. Seaton was elected Fellow of the Royal Society in 1967, and as President of the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS) in 1978. He was the recipient of an Honorary Doctorate from the Observatoire de Paris, an Honorary D.Sc. from the Queen's University of Belfast, the Gold Medal for Astronomy by the RAS, the Guthrie Medal by the Institute of Physics, the Royal Society Hughes award for lifetime work by the RAS, and several other prestigious awards. Nevertheless, as Alex Dalgarno recently remarked, Seaton was not part of the establishment because he chose not to be. Though rooted in

  13. Report of regional coordinator for the year ending 31 December 1980 [Management of water hyacinth (A CSC-UNEP Project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyagarajan, G.

    1981-01-01

    The water hyacinth project was first reviewed at the time of its commencement in Papua New Guinea in June 1979, and activities and time schedules were formulated. In April 1980 an interim review meeting was held in London where, based on the progress made in the participating countries, activities and time schedules were refined and sharpened. The project is deemed to have formally commenced on 1 January 1980. Australia, Bangladesh, Fiji, India, Malaysia and Sri Lanka are actively participating in the project at the present time. Information and results emerging from the different participating countries are very encouraging and they strengthen the hope that technically, environmentally and economically feasible solutions can be found for managing water hyacinth weed. The participating countries are enthusiastic about handling the activities assigned to them. The tempo of work was substantially increased after funds were made available in February 1980

  14. NOAA TIFF Image - 1 m Backscatter Mosaic of an offshore portion of the NPS's Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument, south of St. John, US Virgin Islands, Project NF-05-05, 2005, UTM 20 WGS84

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of an offshore portion of the NPS's Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument, south of St. John, US...

  15. NOAA TIFF Image - 1 m Backscatter Mosaic of an inshore portion of the NPS's Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument, south of St. John, US Virgin Islands, Project NF-05-05, 2005, UTM 20 WGS84 (NCEI Accession 0131860)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the inshore portion of the NPS's Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument, south of St. John, US...

  16. NOAA TIFF Image - 1 m Backscatter Mosaic of an offshore portion of the NPS's Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument, south of St. John, US Virgin Islands, Project NF-05-05, 2005, UTM 20 WGS84 (NCEI Accession 0131860)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of an offshore portion of the NPS's Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument, south of St. John, US...

  17. NOAA TIFF Image - 1 m Backscatter Mosaic of the St. John Shelf, U.S. Virgin Islands, Project NF-10-03, 2010, UTM 20 WGS84 (NCEI Accession 0131854)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the St. John Shelf, US Virgin Islands. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team, in collaboration...

  18. NOAA TIFF Image - 1 m Backscatter Mosaic of an inshore portion of the NPS's Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument, south of St. John, US Virgin Islands, Project NF-05-05, 2005, UTM 20 WGS84

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the inshore portion of the NPS's Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument, south of St. John, US...

  19. Interim report on visioning. BRAID, EC FP7 Coordinated action project 248485, deliverable D4.1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afsarmanesh, H.; Brielmann, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    The ageing population of Europe is growing very fast. The Bridging Research in Ageing and ICT Development (BRAID) project aims at approaching this phenomenon and many of its arisen challenges. BRAID develops a comprehensive RTD roadmap for "ageing well" which identifies advanced ICT-based approaches

  20. International Severe Weather and Flash Flood Hazard Early Warning Systems—Leveraging Coordination, Cooperation, and Partnerships through a Hydrometeorological Project in Southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Jubach

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Climate, weather and water hazards do not recognize national boundaries. Transboundary/regional programs and cooperation are essential to reduce the loss of lives and damage to livelihoods when facing these hazards. The development and implementation of systems to provide early warnings for severe weather events such as cyclones and flash floods requires data and information sharing in real time, and coordination among the government agencies at all levels. Within a country, this includes local, municipal, provincial-to-national levels as well as regional and international entities involved in hydrometeorological services and Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR. Of key importance are the National Meteorological and Hydrologic Services (NMHSs. The NMHS is generally the authority solely responsible for issuing warnings for these hazards. However, in many regions of the world, the linkages and interfaces between the NMHS and other agencies are weak or non-existent. Therefore, there is a critical need to assess, strengthen, and formalize collaborations when addressing the concept of reducing risk and impacts from severe weather and floods. The U.S. Agency for International Development/Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance; the United Nations World Meteorological Organization (WMO; the WMO Southern Africa Regional Specialized Meteorological Center, hosted by the South African Weather Service; the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/National Weather Service and the Hydrologic Research Center (a non-profit corporation are currently implementing a project working with Southern Africa NMHSs on addressing this gap. The project aims to strengthen coordination and collaboration mechanisms from national to local levels. The project partners are working with the NMHSs to apply and implement appropriate tools and infrastructure to enhance currently operational severe weather and flash flood early warning systems in each country in support of

  1. Application of isotopes to the assessment of pollutant behaviour in the unsaturated zone for groundwater protection. Final report of a coordinated research project 2004-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-05-01

    A coordinated research project (CRP) was conducted by the IAEA with the purpose of studying what isotopic and other ancillary data are required to help understand migration of potential contaminants through the unsaturated zone (UZ) into the underlying groundwater. To this end, research projects were conducted in ten countries to study recharge and infiltration processes, as well as contaminant migration in a wide variety of UZ environments. This publication contains the reports of these ten projects and a summary of the accomplishments of the individual projects. The IAEA-TECDOC reviews the usefulness and current status of application of the combined use of isotope and other hydrogeochemical tools for the assessment of flow and transport processes in the UZ. A number of isotope and hydrochemical tools have been used to simultaneously study groundwater recharge and transport of pollutants in the UZ. This information is relevant for assessing the vulnerability of groundwater to contamination. The ten projects covered climates ranging from humid to arid, and water table depths from the near surface to over 600 m. The studies included measuring movement of water, solutes, and gases through the UZ using an assortment of isotope and geochemical tracers and approaches. Contaminant issues have been studied at most of the ten sites and the UZ was found to be very effective in protecting groundwater from most heavy metal contaminants. The publication is expected to be of interest to hydrologists, hydrogeologists and soil scientists dealing with pollution aspects and protection of groundwater resources, as well as counterparts of TC projects in Member States

  2. Coordination of I and C design with the obligatory consideration of human factors. A project management approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz, Silvia; Ciriello, Antonio; Krause, Wolfgang; Eisinger, Asriel

    2015-01-01

    Human Factors Engineering (HFE), like other engineering disciplines involved in plant design, cannot be considered retroactively. The engineering principles and methods derived from deep knowledge of the cognitive and perceptual capabilities and limitations of the plant's 'human element' are applied instead throughout plant design. Focusing HFE efforts on the plant's I and C, the plant's HMI is designed to ensure effective and error-free performance of the monitoring, control, and administrative tasks allocated to the control room crew. Generally speaking, a project's HFE program prescribes three main steps: (1) the analyses of plant monitoring and control functions in order to identify those to be performed manually (all others are performed automatically while still manually monitored) and determine in turn the HMI inventory of information displays, controls, alarms, and operating procedures required to support their performance, (2) the guided design of the plant's HMI, ensuring its compliance with HFE principles and the completeness and correctness of the task support it provides, and (3) the subsequent evaluation of operators performance, trained to follow the operating procedures and use the HMI referred to. The I and C systems designed to monitor and control the plant processes and implement, among other functions, the plant's HMI, are likely validated, governed by I and C norms and the project's V and V guidelines. Past experience shows that the three following obligatory steps pose challenges to project execution: (1) the acquisition and analysis of the multidisciplinary functional requirements (related to plant monitoring and control); (2) the likely interdisciplinary analysis whether and how fulfillment of these requirements shall be allocated to I and C automation systems or operators (or both), and (3) the HFE-guided HMI design and validation. A timely and cost-effective application of HFE to I and C engineering can be achieved by adequate planning and

  3. Management tools for R&D engineering projects: Coordination perspective for large international consortium (NeXOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Ayoze; Memè, Simone; Quevedo, Eduardo; Waldmann, Christoph; Pearlman, Jay; Delory, Eric; Llinás, Octavio

    2017-04-01

    NeXOS is a cross-functional and multidisciplinary project funded under the EU FP7 Program, which involves 21 organizations from six different European countries. They all have different backgrounds, interests, business models and perspectives. To be successful, NeXOS applied an international recognized management methodology tailored to the specific project's environment and conditions, with an explicit structure based on defined roles and responsibilities for the people involved in the project and a means for effective communication between them (Fig.1). The project, divided in four different stages of requirements, design, integration, validation and demonstration, allows a clearer monitor of its progress, a comparison of the level of achievement in accordance with the plan and an earlier detection of problems/issues, leading to implementation of less disruptive, but still effective corrective actions. NeXOS is following an ambitious plan to develop innovative sensor systems with a high degree of modularity and interoperability, starting with requirements definition through validation and demonstration phase. To make this integrative approach possible, a management development strategy has been used incorporating systems engineering methods (Fig.2). Although this is standard practice in software development and large scale systems such as aircraft production, it is still new in the ocean hardware business and therefore NeXOS was a test case for this development concept. The question is one of scale as ocean observation systems are typically built on the scale of a few with co-located teams. With a system of diverse technologies (optical, acoustic, platform interfaces), there are cultural differences that must be bridged. The greatest challenge is in the implementation and the willingness of different teams to work with an engineering process, which may help ultimate system integration, but may place additional burdens on individual participants. This presentation

  4. Dose reconstruction for the Urals population. Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research, Project 1.1 -- Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degteva, M.O.; Drozhko, E.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Napier, B.A.; Bouville, A.C.; Miller, C.W.

    1996-02-01

    This work is being carried out as a feasibility study to determine if a long-term course of work can be implemented to assess the long-term risks of radiation exposure delivered at low to moderate dose rates to the populations living in the vicinity of the Mayak Industrial Association (MIA). This work was authorized and conducted under the auspices of the US-Russian Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) and its Executive Committee (EC). The MIA was the first Russian site for the production and separation of plutonium. This plant began operation in 1948, and during its early days there were technological failures that resulted in the release of large amounts of waste into the rather small Techa River. There were also gaseous releases of radioiodines and other radionuclides during the early days of operation. In addition, there was an accidental explosion in a waste storage tank in 1957 that resulted in a significant release. The Techa River Cohort has been studied for several years by scientists from the Urals Research Centre for Radiation Medicine and an increase in both leukemia and solid tumors has been noted

  5. Dose reconstruction for the Urals population. Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research, Project 1.1 -- Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degteva, M.O. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Drozhko, E. [Branch 1 of Moscow Biophysics Inst., Ozersk (Russian Federation); Anspaugh, L.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Napier, B.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Bouville, A.C. [National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States); Miller, C.W. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-02-01

    This work is being carried out as a feasibility study to determine if a long-term course of work can be implemented to assess the long-term risks of radiation exposure delivered at low to moderate dose rates to the populations living in the vicinity of the Mayak Industrial Association (MIA). This work was authorized and conducted under the auspices of the US-Russian Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) and its Executive Committee (EC). The MIA was the first Russian site for the production and separation of plutonium. This plant began operation in 1948, and during its early days there were technological failures that resulted in the release of large amounts of waste into the rather small Techa River. There were also gaseous releases of radioiodines and other radionuclides during the early days of operation. In addition, there was an accidental explosion in a waste storage tank in 1957 that resulted in a significant release. The Techa River Cohort has been studied for several years by scientists from the Urals Research Centre for Radiation Medicine and an increase in both leukemia and solid tumors has been noted.

  6. Reference materials for microanalytical nuclear techniques. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1994-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    A significant problem in the use of solid- and small-sample techniques is a general lack in suitable certified reference materials (CRM). Essentially, no CRM are certified for the small sample sizes typically used. Direct utilization of most existing CRM in solid sampling analysis procedures, typically 1 mg sample size, is often difficult or even impossible because trace components may not be sufficiently homogeneously distributed in the sample or their homogeneous distribution has not been tested. To explore the production, characterization and use of CRM for determinations with sample sizes much smaller than currently used, the Coordinated Research Program focused on selection of biological and environmental materials suitable for microanalytical techniques, definition of specifications for suitable CRM, evaluation of existing CRM for use with microanalytical techniques, evaluation of requirements for sample pre-treatment, evaluation of analytical techniques and research on development of techniques to be used in characterizing the homogeneity and chemical composition of small samples, and application of analytical techniques to the characterization of candidate reference materials for use with microanalytical techniques

  7. The coordinate transforming in geography information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiang; Chen Gang

    2003-01-01

    The coordinate transforming of geography information system includes two kinds of transforming, map projection and coordinate-transforming. This paper proposed a arithmetic of coordinate-transforming, it implement the transforming between the longitude-latitude coordinate and the screen coordinate and apply it in the GIS. The preferable effect was made. (authors)

  8. Magic moments with John Bell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertlmann, Reinhold A.

    2015-07-15

    John Bell, with whom I had a fruitful collaboration and warm friendship, is best known for his seminal work on the foundations of quantum physics, but he also made outstanding contributions to particle physics and accelerator physics.

  9. Magic moments with John Bell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertlmann, Reinhold A.

    2015-01-01

    John Bell, with whom I had a fruitful collaboration and warm friendship, is best known for his seminal work on the foundations of quantum physics, but he also made outstanding contributions to particle physics and accelerator physics

  10. John locke on personal identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimbalkar, Namita

    2011-01-01

    John Locke speaks of personal identity and survival of consciousness after death. A criterion of personal identity through time is given. Such a criterion specifies, insofar as that is possible, the necessary and sufficient conditions for the survival of persons. John Locke holds that personal identity is a matter of psychological continuity. He considered personal identity (or the self) to be founded on consciousness (viz. memory), and not on the substance of either the soul or the body.

  11. John Locke on Personal Identity**

    OpenAIRE

    Nimbalkar, Namita

    2011-01-01

    John Locke speaks of personal identity and survival of consciousness after death. A criterion of personal identity through time is given. Such a criterion specifies, insofar as that is possible, the necessary and sufficient conditions for the survival of persons. John Locke holds that personal identity is a matter of psychological continuity. He considered personal identity (or the self) to be founded on consciousness (viz. memory), and not on the substance of either the soul or the body.

  12. The coordinated research project on use of irradiation to ensure the safety and quality of prepared meals. Proceedings of the 3rd FAO/IAEA research coordination meeting (RCM). Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    Although extensive research has been carried out on the microbiological and sensorial effects of irradiating individual uncooked food items, little work has been reported on the irradiation of complex food systems such as prepared meals. In this Coordinated Research Project (CRP), the potential of using the irradiation technology for convenience foods has been investigated with regard to safety, shelf-life and overall quality, particularly in terms of sensory acceptance. A wide range of ethnic meals as well as meal components were investigated with the objective of meeting continual changes in consumer demands worldwide. Other aspects of the CRP included the adoption of a Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) system for prepared meals and research into consumer willingness to purchase irradiated food at a premium price. The scope of the CRP was therefore wide-ranging. The overall objective of this CRP was to evaluate the effectiveness of irradiation as a method to ensure the microbiological safety and extend the shelf-life of prepared meals, stored under ambient, chilled or frozen conditions, and to evaluate the sensory quality of the treated products. The specific objective of the CRP was to use validated procedures for irradiation treatment and process control, and to use validated methods for assessing microbiological safety and quality as well as the sensory quality of prepared meals mainly of ethnic origin.

  13. The coordinated research project on use of irradiation to ensure the safety and quality of prepared meals. Proceedings of the 3rd FAO/IAEA research coordination meeting (RCM). Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Although extensive research has been carried out on the microbiological and sensorial effects of irradiating individual uncooked food items, little work has been reported on the irradiation of complex food systems such as prepared meals. In this Coordinated Research Project (CRP), the potential of using the irradiation technology for convenience foods has been investigated with regard to safety, shelf-life and overall quality, particularly in terms of sensory acceptance. A wide range of ethnic meals as well as meal components were investigated with the objective of meeting continual changes in consumer demands worldwide. Other aspects of the CRP included the adoption of a Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) system for prepared meals and research into consumer willingness to purchase irradiated food at a premium price. The scope of the CRP was therefore wide-ranging. The overall objective of this CRP was to evaluate the effectiveness of irradiation as a method to ensure the microbiological safety and extend the shelf-life of prepared meals, stored under ambient, chilled or frozen conditions, and to evaluate the sensory quality of the treated products. The specific objective of the CRP was to use validated procedures for irradiation treatment and process control, and to use validated methods for assessing microbiological safety and quality as well as the sensory quality of prepared meals mainly of ethnic origin

  14. Co-ordinated research project on application of nuclear techniques in the prevention of degenerative diseases (obesity and non-insulin dependent diabetes) in ageing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    In the developed countries, research using nuclear methods has been substantially used to examine the physiological and biochemical mechanisms involved in obesity-related diseases. This Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) is intended to promote the use of these techniques in the developing world. The specific objectives of this CRP are: 1. To define the magnitude of the obesity/NIDDM problem in developing countries. 2. To identify vulnerable groups at high risk. 3. To describe the metabolic mechanisms involved. The purpose of this first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) was thus to develop a worldwide collaboration in the use of nuclear and isotopic techniques to investigate the aetiology of degenerative diseases in ageing. All countries participating in this CRP are going through the epidemiological transition with changes in lifestyles to approach those seen in the developed nations. This first meeting was held in the Agency's headquarters in Vienna, with participation of contract and agreement holders, experts, observer, and in-house staff.

  15. Review of methodologies for analysis of safety incidents at NPPs. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1998-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    The safe operation of nuclear power plants around the world and the prevention of incidents in these installations remain key concerns for the nuclear community. In this connection, the feedback of operating experience plays a major role: every nuclear power plant or nuclear utility needs to have a system in place for collecting information on unusual events, whether these are incidents or merely deviations from normal operation. Reporting to the regulatory body of important events and lessons learned is normally carried out through the national reporting schemes based on regulatory reporting requirements. The most important lessons learned are further shared internationally, through, for example, the Joint IAEA/NEA Incident Reporting System (IRS) or the event information exchange of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO). In order to properly assess the event, an adequate event investigation methodology has to be applied, which leads to the identification of correct root causes. Once these root causes have been ascertained, appropriate corrective actions can be established and corresponding lessons can be drawn. The overall goal of root cause analysis is the prevention of events or their recurrence and thus the overall improvement in plant safety. In 1998, the IAEA established a co-ordinated research project with the objective of exploring root cause methodologies and techniques currently in use in Member States, evaluating their strengths and limitations and developing criteria for appropriate event investigation methodologies. This report is the outcome of four years of co-ordinated research which involved 15 national and international research organizations

  16. Co-ordinated research project on application of nuclear techniques in the prevention of degenerative diseases (obesity and non-insulin dependent diabetes) in ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In the developed countries, research using nuclear methods has been substantially used to examine the physiological and biochemical mechanisms involved in obesity-related diseases. This Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) is intended to promote the use of these techniques in the developing world. The specific objectives of this CRP are: 1. To define the magnitude of the obesity/NIDDM problem in developing countries. 2. To identify vulnerable groups at high risk. 3. To describe the metabolic mechanisms involved. The purpose of this first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) was thus to develop a worldwide collaboration in the use of nuclear and isotopic techniques to investigate the aetiology of degenerative diseases in ageing. All countries participating in this CRP are going through the epidemiological transition with changes in lifestyles to approach those seen in the developed nations. This first meeting was held in the Agency's headquarters in Vienna, with participation of contract and agreement holders, experts, observer, and in-house staff

  17. The application of isotope techniques to the assessment of aquifer systems in major urban areas. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-07-01

    Aquifer systems in most urban areas have been impacted to varying degrees by sustained exploitation and the future availability of water is being threatened by depleting aquifers or water quality degradation. Improved methods for the assessment and management of groundwater resources in major urban areas, therefore, are issues of high priority for most countries. The IAEA has, over last four decades, co-ordinated the development, adaptation, and testing of isotope techniques for hydrological applications. A number of techniques and methodologies that are now established for water resources management are potentially useful for characterizing the short and long term changes resulting from the extensive use of aquifers in and near urban areas. The application of isotope techniques in urban hydrology was the focus of this co-ordinated research project (CRP). This report provides the final results of the CRP, and is expected to be of interest to scientists, managers and planners involved in water resources assessment in urban areas. This publication contains seven individual reports, each of them was indexed separately

  18. Development and characterization of semiconductor materials by ion beams. Final report of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    This CRP was recommended by the Consultants meeting on Ion Beam Techniques Applied to Semiconductor and Related Advanced Materials, held in April 1997 in Vienna. The consultants proposed to have a CRP in the field of application of MeV ion beams for the development and characterization of semiconductor materials. The CRP was approved and a first RCM was held in Vienna between 2-5 June 1998, in order to stimulate ideas and to promote collaborations among CRP participants. The goals and practical outcomes of the CRP were defined and several specific topics were identified including: optoelectronic characterization of semiconductor materials and devices by ion microbeams, characterization of thin films, defect transformations in semiconductors, light element analysis. One important recommendation was that sample exchanges among different laboratories be strongly encouraged. The participants presented individual activities on their projects, all subjects of research were identified and linked with approved individual projects. Collaboration among the participants was discussed and established. Some modifications to work plans were adopted. As proposed during the first RCM, the final RCM was held at the Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia, between 25 and 29 September 2000, with the purpose of reviewing/discussing the results achieved during the course of the CRP and to prepare a draft of the final report and associated publication. This document contains summary of the CRP and ten individual reports presented by participants. Each of the reports has been indexed separately

  19. Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Section of Uranium, Americium and Curium Isotopes. Progress report - Research Contract 14485, Coordinated Research Project on Minor Actinide Neutron Reaction Data (MANREAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, A.A.; Bergman, A.A.; Berlev, A.I.; Koptelov, E.A.; Samylin, B.F.; Trufanov, A.M.; Fursov, B.I.; Shorin, V.S.

    2009-12-01

    This report contains brief description of the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer and results of measurements of neutron-induced fission cross sections for 236 U, 242m Am, 243 Cm, 244 Cm, 245 Cm and 246 Cm done at this spectrometer. The work was partially supported through the IAEA research contract RC-14485-RD in the framework of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project 'Minor Actinide Neutron Reaction Data (MANREAD)'. The detailed description of the experimental set up, measurements procedure and data treatment can be found in the JIA-1182 (2007) and JIA-1212 (2009) reports from the Institute of Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Science published in Russian. Part 1 contains the first year report of the research contract and part 2 the second year report. (author)

  20. Improvement of technical measures to detect and respond to illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials [Results of a coordinated research project 2003-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-07-01

    This publication summarizes the research conducted during an IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) undertaken to address technical and operational difficulties in the detection of and response to illicit trafficking of nuclear material. Equipment to detect illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials at borders has specific technical and operational requirements that are very different from equipment used in other radiation monitoring cases. Automated and manual measurements need to be done in the field, often outdoors, at land or sea borders, crossing points or airports. The free flow of goods and passengers must not be impacted, thus requiring that the measurement time be short. The design needs to take into account that the users of the equipment are not experts in radiation detection; thus the results of the measurements should be easy to understand

  1. Spent fuel and high level waste: Chemical durability and performance under simulated repository conditions. Results of a coordinated research project 1998-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-10-01

    This publication contains the results of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP). It provides a basis for understanding the potential interactions of waste form and repository environment, which is necessary for the development of the design and safety case for deep disposal. Types of high level waste matrices investigated include spent fuel, glasses and ceramics. Of particular interest are the experimental results pertaining to ceramic forms such as SYNROC. This publication also outlines important areas for future work, namely, standardized, collaborative experimental protocols for package-release studies, structured development and calibration of predictive models linking the performance of packaged waste and the repository environment, and studies of the long term behaviour of the wastes, including active waste samples

  2. Data processing technologies and diagnostics for water chemistry and corrosion control in nuclear power plants (DAWAC). Report of a coordinated research project 2001-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    This publication provides information on the current status and development trends in monitoring, diagnostics and control of water chemistry and corrosion of core and primary circuit materials in water cooled power reactors. It summarizes the results of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project and focuses on the methods for development, qualification and implementation of water chemistry expert systems at nuclear power plants. These systems are needed to have full benefit from using on-line sensors in real time mode when sensor signals, and other chemistry and operational data, are collected and continuously analysed with data acquisition and evaluation software. Technical knowledge was acquired in water chemistry control techniques (grab sampling, on-line monitoring, data collecting and processing, etc), plant chemistry and corrosion diagnostics, plant monitoring (corrosion, chemistry, activity) and plant chemistry improvement (analytical models and practices). This publication covers contributions from leading experts in water chemistry/corrosion, representing organizations from 16 countries with the largest nuclear capacities

  3. Intercomparison for individual monitoring of external exposure from photon radiation. Results of a co-ordinated research project 1996-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-12-01

    This TECDOC presents the results of a Co-ordinated Research Project on Intercomparison for Individual Monitoring of External Exposure from photon radiation. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) have endorsed the use of the operational quantities for monitoring purposes. Specifically, personal dose equivalent, H p (d), is to be used for individual dosimetry to demonstrate compliance with the exposure limit recommendations, while for workplace area monitoring the ambient dose equivalent and the directional dose equivalent are recommended. In view of the technical difficulties associated with the introduction of these operational quantities the IAEA decided to assist Member States in their provision of appropriate dosimetry for occupational protection. In this respect, intercomparisons have proven to be a cost effective method of providing such support. A Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) was started in 1997 on Intercomparison for Individual Monitoring of External Exposure from photon radiation, involving more than twenty laboratories from eastern Europe and the countries of the former Soviet Union, and focusing on personnel dosimetry services for nuclear power plants. This CRP was part of the activities of the IAEA Occupational Protection Programme, the objective4s of which are to promote and internationally harmonized approach for optimizing occupational radiation protection through: the development of guides, within the IAEA activities for establishing standards for radiation protection, for restricting radiation exposures in the workplace and for applying current occupational radiation protection techniques, and the promotion of the application of these guidelines. The preparatory phase included, in May 1997, a workshop aimed at familiarizing the participants with the new operational quantities

  4. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic evaluations in infant growth monitoring - a collaboration with WHO (partly RCA). Report on the second and final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    In the last few years, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has organised the development of new reference data for infant growth, reflecting the fact that previous growth reference data were based in part on formula-fed infants. With the benefits of breast-feeding for infant health increasingly recognised, and the differences in growth rate between breast-fed and formula-fed infants replicated in many populations, growth reference data from breast-fed infants became a priority. The importance of early growth for adult health is also increasingly appreciated, with numerous studies linking early nutrition and growth patterns to the risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes and stroke in later life. To support these new reference data, it is also important to assess the breast-milk and nutrient intakes of normally-growing breast-fed infants, in order to revise recommendations for their energy requirements. This coordinated research project (CRP) was therefore initiated by the International Atomic Energy Agency to investigate milk intake and growth in several populations from developing countries. A secondary aim was to continue the technological development of methodologies that allow the required measurements to be undertaken in free-living mother-infant pairs in field conditions. The measurement of breast-milk intake was until recently undertaken using test-weighing, whereby the infant is weighed before and after each feed during one or more 24 hour periods. This method is intrusive, cumbersome, and unsuitable for many populations under field conditions. The development of the dose-to-the-mother deuterium oxide turnover method, by which maternal breast-milk transfer can be assessed by isotopic kinetics, has transformed the ability to measure milk intake in wholly or partially breast-fed infants in developing countries. The current CRP aimed to apply this technology to a variety of populations, ensuring that the data were comparable between countries

  5. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic evaluations in infant growth monitoring - a collaboration with WHO (partly RCA). Report on the second and final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    In the last few years, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has organised the development of new reference data for infant growth, reflecting the fact that previous growth reference data were based in part on formula-fed infants. With the benefits of breast-feeding for infant health increasingly recognised, and the differences in growth rate between breast-fed and formula-fed infants replicated in many populations, growth reference data from breast-fed infants became a priority. The importance of early growth for adult health is also increasingly appreciated, with numerous studies linking early nutrition and growth patterns to the risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes and stroke in later life. To support these new reference data, it is also important to assess the breast-milk and nutrient intakes of normally-growing breast-fed infants, in order to revise recommendations for their energy requirements. This coordinated research project (CRP) was therefore initiated by the International Atomic Energy Agency to investigate milk intake and growth in several populations from developing countries. A secondary aim was to continue the technological development of methodologies that allow the required measurements to be undertaken in free-living mother-infant pairs in field conditions. The measurement of breast-milk intake was until recently undertaken using test-weighing, whereby the infant is weighed before and after each feed during one or more 24 hour periods. This method is intrusive, cumbersome, and unsuitable for many populations under field conditions. The development of the dose-to-the-mother deuterium oxide turnover method, by which maternal breast-milk transfer can be assessed by isotopic kinetics, has transformed the ability to measure milk intake in wholly or partially breast-fed infants in developing countries. The current CRP aimed to apply this technology to a variety of populations, ensuring that the data were comparable between countries

  6. Treatment of liquid effluent from uranium mines and mills. Report of a co-ordinated research project 1996-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    Treatment and control of liquid effluents produced during uranium mining and milling operations is an integral part of environmental project management. Research has continued to add to the large body of science that has been built up around the treatment of radioactive and non-radioactive effluents to minimize their long-term environmental impact. The objective of the meetings on which this publication is based was to exchange information on active effluent treatment technologies that have application during operations and passive treatment techniques such as constructed wetlands and use of micro-organisms that are applicable during project reclamation and long-term care and maintenance. Papers describe effluent treatment case histories from active uranium mining and processing operations as well as effluent treatment research on both active and passive systems that have potential application under a wide range of operating and post-operational conditions including new information on high-density sludge from effluent neutralization (Australia), aerated manganese hydroxide for removal of radium (China), nanofiltration and macropore resins to treat mine water (Australia and China), in situ microbial treatment and permeable reactive walls for treatment of contaminated groundwater (Germany), construction of wetlands to treat mine water runoff (Australia and Germany), biogenic granules to remove 226 Ra from mill effluent (India), self-remediation of acidic in situ leach aquifers (Kazakhstan) and sorption characteristics of soil for self-remediation of contaminated groundwater (Hungary). These and other topics presented in this publication will be of interest to technical personnel who deal with day-to-day practical aspects of liquid effluent control and treatment at uranium production facilities worldwide

  7. Management of crop residues for sustainable crop production. Results of a co-ordinated research project 1996-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-05-01

    -wheat cropping systems co-ordinated by the Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Section, where management of crop residues and fertilizer plays a major role in increasing crop yields

  8. John Leask Lumley: Whither Turbulence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibovich, Sidney; Warhaft, Zellman

    2018-01-01

    John Lumley's contributions to the theory, modeling, and experiments on turbulent flows played a seminal role in the advancement of our understanding of this subject in the second half of the twentieth century. We discuss John's career and his personal style, including his love and deep knowledge of vintage wine and vintage cars. His intellectual contributions range from abstract theory to applied engineering. Here we discuss some of his major advances, focusing on second-order modeling, proper orthogonal decomposition, path-breaking experiments, research on geophysical turbulence, and important contributions to the understanding of drag reduction. John Lumley was also an influential teacher whose books and films have molded generations of students. These and other aspects of his professional career are described.

  9. Titular Tilting in John Ashbery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balle, Søren Hattesen

    2008-01-01

    Among the numerous poems published by the American poet John Ashbery since his debut in 1956 one finds a few that specifically deal with the issue of entitlement. These poems do not appear in one single of his volumes, but are disseminated throughout Ashbery’s career and production. Their occurre......Among the numerous poems published by the American poet John Ashbery since his debut in 1956 one finds a few that specifically deal with the issue of entitlement. These poems do not appear in one single of his volumes, but are disseminated throughout Ashbery’s career and production....... Their occurrence neither follows any particular plan, nor do they form part of a larger poetic or thematic whole in the volumes where they have been published. Rather, they are perhaps better characterized as “typically atypical of Ashbery’s poetry” – to put it in paradoxical terms used by John Shoptaw in his 1994...

  10. Co-ordinated research project on use of nuclear and related analytical techniques in studying human health impacts of toxic elements consumed through foodstuffs contaminated by industrial activities. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The overall objective of the Co-ordinated research project is to provide a scientific basis for better assessment of selected pollutants in the food chain with a view to elucidating their impacts on human health and nutrition. Results of this study will enhance the existing body of knowledge and can be used to develop preventive strategies. Specific objectve: To determine the extent to which toxic element levels in food are affected by surrounding industrial activities and to assess potential human exposure from the consumption of such foodstuffs. EXPECTED RESEARCH OUTPUTS (RESULTS): Harmonized protocols and procedures for sampling and analyses; ? Compiled results for toxic element levels and their average daily dietary intake (ADDI) / dietary intake; Evaluated toxic element exposure levels based on biological indicators (where applicable); Publications of the study results in an IAEA TECDOC, and in peer-reviewed journals by participants. ACTION PLAN (ACTIVITIES) a. Core research activities: 1 Identification of the study areas and population groups. 2 Collection of information on food consumption patterns of the population groups under study (e.g. through questionnaires). 3 Development of harmonized protocols and validation of analytical methodologies in compliance with ISO/IEC 17025. 4 Collection and analysis of food samples, and estimation of the dietary intake. 5 Collection and analysis of biological indicators where applicable. 6 Evaluation of possible relationships between human exposures and biological indicators for the pollutants studied. 4b. Supplementary activities: ? Speciation studies of pollutants. ? Comparison of present and previous data on relevant parameters. ? Possible production and distribution of laboratory intercomparison samples. 7. Recommendations for nuclear analytical techniques ? Nuclear analytical technique (NAT) such as INAA, PIXE, PIGE, XRF should be the primary technique of analysis; Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA

  11. Using high temperature gas-cooled reactors for energy neutral mineral development processes – A proposed IAEA Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haneklaus, N.; Reitsma, F.; Tulsidas, H.; Dyck, G.; Koshy, T.; Tyobeka, B.; Schnug, E.; Allelein, H-J.; Birky, B.

    2014-01-01

    Today, uranium mined from various regions is the predominant reactor fuel of the present generation of nuclear power plants. The anticipated growth in nuclear energy may require introducing uranium/thorium from unconventional resources (e.g. phosphates, coal ash or sea water) as a future nuclear reactor fuel. The demand for mineral commodities is growing exponentially and high-grade, easily-extractable resources are being depleted rapidly. This shifts the global production to low-grade, or in certain cases unconventional mineral resources, the production of which is constrained by the availability of large amounts of energy. Numerous mining processes can benefit from the use of so-called “thermal processing”. This is in particular beneficial for (1) low grade deposits that cannot be treated using the presently dominant chemical processing techniques; (2) the extraction of high purity end products; and (3) the separation of high value or unwanted impurities (e.g. uranium, thorium, rare earths, etc.) that could be used/sold, when extracted, which will result in cleaner final products. The considerably lower waste products also make it attractive compared to chemical processing. In the future, we may need to extract nuclear fuel and minerals from the same unconventional resources to make nuclear fuel- and low grade ore processing feasible and cost-effective. These processes could be sustainable only if low-cost, carbon free, reliable energy is available for comprehensive extraction of all valuable commodities, for the entire life of the project. Nuclear power plants and specifically High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) can produce this energy and heat in a sustainable way, especially if enough uranium/thorium can be extracted to fuel these reactors.

  12. Neutron imaging: A non-destructive tool for materials testing. Report of a coordinated research project 2003-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-09-01

    The enhancement of utilization of research reactors is one of the major objectives of the IAEA's project on Effective Utilization of Research Reactors. In particular, the improvement of existing installations for neutron imaging and the effective utilization of such facilities are intended. From the experience of Type A facilities, it is obvious that some investment is required to come from simple neutron imaging methods (film, track-etch foils) to the more enhanced ones. Related to the installation and operation of the whole reactor system, the volume of the investment for an imaging device is minor. Also compared to the installations for neutron scattering research, neutron imaging systems are relatively cheap, but very efficient in the use of the neutrons. Therefore, one of the aims of the CRP was to look for adapted solutions for the individual reactor installation and beam line. Specific Research Objectives: To optimize the neutron beams for imaging purpose using modern simulation techniques; To enhance the beam intensity using modern layout principles, neutron optics, like focusing and beam guides and filters; To develop a standardized, low cost, neutron image grabber and analyzer for efficient data collection that can be used with low intensity sources; To improve signal processing techniques used in neutron imaging applications. Expected Research Outputs: Neutron radiography is used at research reactor centres in many Member States, but the facilities are not optimized for attractive potential applications. This fact has been brought out at various discussion meetings. The CRP is aimed at improving the design of beam lines in terms of neutron collimation and intensity; Improvements in resolution are normally achieved at a cost in intensity. For an instrument exhibiting good resolution, one needs to employ a fast counting system. It is proposed to work along these lines to develop an optimised detection system. Many facilities, at present, have small CCD

  13. Irradiation to control Vibrio infection from consumption of raw seafood and fresh produce. Results of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    Vibrio spp. comprises an important group of pathogenic bacteria in food that often causes human illness and even death when the contaminated food is consumed raw or improperly cooked. The most dangerous member of this group, the El Tor strain of V. cholerae, was responsible for the cholera pandemic which started in Peru in 1991 and spread to nearby countries, resulting in hundreds of thousands of cases and thousands of deaths. Recognizing the role of irradiation to ensure the microbiological safety of food, the Pan American Health Organization of the World Health Organization and the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture jointly sponsored a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Use of Irradiation as a Public Health Intervention Measure to Control Foodborne Diseases in Latin America and the Caribbean, to assess the efficacy of this technology for food protection. The CRP was initiated in 1993 and concluded in 1998. The results of this CRP demonstrated that irradiation is effective for ensuring the microbiological safety of food naturally contaminated by Vibrio spp. This process offers unique benefits for decontamination of seafood, often contaminated with this group of aquatic bacteria at the source, and fresh vegetables that may be contaminated during production and handling, especially when these products are consumed raw or not thoroughly cooked. Because of the sensitivity of this group of bacteria to radiation, the dose required to ensure microbiological safety of food against them is not more than 1 kGy. The CRP also generated data on the effectiveness of irradiation to control infection by pork tapeworm (Taenia solium metacestode). However, the results of these studies were not conclusive enough for publication. This publication presents the research results reported at the final Research Co-ordination meeting on this CRP held in Havana, Cuba, 16-20 November 1998

  14. Irradiation to control Vibrio infection from consumption of raw seafood and fresh produce. Results of a co-ordinated research project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-04-01

    Vibrio spp. comprises an important group of pathogenic bacteria in food that often causes human illness and even death when the contaminated food is consumed raw or improperly cooked. The most dangerous member of this group, the El Tor strain of V. cholerae, was responsible for the cholera pandemic which started in Peru in 1991 and spread to nearby countries, resulting in hundreds of thousands of cases and thousands of deaths. Recognizing the role of irradiation to ensure the microbiological safety of food, the Pan American Health Organization of the World Health Organization and the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture jointly sponsored a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Use of Irradiation as a Public Health Intervention Measure to Control Foodborne Diseases in Latin America and the Caribbean, to assess the efficacy of this technology for food protection. The CRP was initiated in 1993 and concluded in 1998. The results of this CRP demonstrated that irradiation is effective for ensuring the microbiological safety of food naturally contaminated by Vibrio spp. This process offers unique benefits for decontamination of seafood, often contaminated with this group of aquatic bacteria at the source, and fresh vegetables that may be contaminated during production and handling, especially when these products are consumed raw or not thoroughly cooked. Because of the sensitivity of this group of bacteria to radiation, the dose required to ensure microbiological safety of food against them is not more than 1 kGy. The CRP also generated data on the effectiveness of irradiation to control infection by pork tapeworm (Taenia solium metacestode). However, the results of these studies were not conclusive enough for publication. This publication presents the research results reported at the final Research Co-ordination meeting on this CRP held in Havana, Cuba, 16-20 November 1998.

  15. Case studies in the application of probabilistic safety assessment techniques to radiation sources. Final report of a coordinated research project 2001-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-04-01

    Radiation sources are used worldwide in many industrial and medical applications. In general, the safety record associated with their use has been very good. However, accidents involving these sources have occasionally resulted in unplanned exposures to individuals. When assessed prospectively, this type of exposure is termed a 'potential exposure'. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has recommended the assessment of potential exposures that may result from radiation sources and has suggested that probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) techniques may be used in this process. Also, Paragraph 2.13 of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) requires that the authorization process for radiation sources include an assessment of all exposures, including potential exposures, which may result from the use of a radiation source. In light of the ICRP's work described above, and the possibility that PSA techniques could be used in exposure assessments that are required by the BSS, the IAEA initiated a coordinated research project (CRP) to study the benefits and limitations of the application of PSA techniques to radiation sources. The results of this CRP are presented in this publication. It should be noted that these results are based solely on the work performed, and the conclusions drawn, by the research teams involved in this CRP. It is intended that international organizations involved in radiation protection will review the information in this report and will take account of it during the development of guidance and requirements related to the assessment of potential exposures from radiation sources. Also, it is anticipated that the risk insights obtained through the studies will be considered by medical practitioners, facility staff and management, equipment designers, and regulators in their safety management and risk evaluation activities. A draft

  16. The Poetry of John Dewey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    This essay examines the poetry of John Dewey, 101 poems in total. Characteristic of the rhymed and metered poetry of the period, they show a very human side of Dewey. This analysis argues that many of his poems deal with existential themes--love, finitude, and God, for example. On a deeper level these poems are also show connections to Dewey's…

  17. An Interview with John Liontas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Karim

    2017-01-01

    John I. Liontas, Ph.D. is an associate professor of foreign languages, English for speakers of other languages (ESOL), and technology in education and second language acquisition (TESLA), and director and faculty of the TESLA doctoral program at the University of South Florida. Dr. Liontas is a distinguished thought leader, author, and…

  18. John Dewey, Gothic and Modern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, James S.

    2010-01-01

    It is argued here that understanding John Dewey's thought as that of a prodigal liberal or a fellow traveller does not capture the complexity of his work. It is also important to recognise the portion of his work that is "historie morale." In the very best sense it is epic, encapsulating the hopes and dreams of a history of the American people in…

  19. Rees, Prof. Lord Martin (John)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1991 Honorary. Rees, Prof. Lord Martin (John) FRS. Date of birth: 23 June 1942. Address: Emeritus professor of Cosmology & Astrophysics, Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA, U.K.. Contact: Office: (+44-1223) 33 7548

  20. The Art of John Biggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, Mary

    2010-01-01

    In their 2005 exhibit of John Biggers' work, the New Orleans Museum of Art described it as being inspired by "African art and culture, the injustices of a segregated United States, the stoic women in his own family, and the heroes of everyday survival." In this article, the author describes how her students reinterpreted Biggers' work.…

  1. Dr. John Marburger visits DESY

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Dr. John Marburger, Director of the United States Office of Science and Technology Policy, visited the research center DESY in Hamburg. The American physicist wanted to inform himself about the status of the TESLA X-ray laser and the TESLA linear collider as well as the international collaboration at DESY (1/2 page).

  2. Thomas, Prof. Sir John Meurig

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thomas, Prof. Sir John Meurig FRS. Date of birth: 15 December 1932. Address: Department of Materials Science and, Metallurgy, New Museums Site, 27, Babbage ... Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on the teaching of the theory of evolution more.

  3. John Dalton (1766–1844)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    of matter and the development of science in the world, especially in. Europe. During ... He belonged to a family of Quakers. (Society of ... During this period, Dalton came under the influence of John Gough, who suggested that he maintain a ...

  4. Obituary: John J. Hillman, 1938-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanover, Nancy

    2007-12-01

    , and Hawaii. John's interest in AOTF technology did not stop at planetary science: he cleverly applied this powerful tool to some of his other areas of interest, including art and history. Hyperspectral imaging, when applied to oil paintings, can reveal drawings underneath a "finished" work of art, and John was keen to learn more about his favorite artists by making spectral image cubes of their famous paintings. He also participated in an effort by the National Museum of American History to preserve the Star Spangled Banner flag that motivated Francis Scott Key to pen our national anthem. Perhaps John's most famous "observing run" was conducted at the Smithsonian, on the Mall in Washington, D.C., with an AOTF camera mounted on scaffolding in front of the flag. Spectral imaging revealed locations on the flag with signs of deterioration not visible to the unaided eye. In yet another example of John's amazing ability to bring together people from various disciplines, the team of people who worked on the flag project included planetary scientists, molecular spectroscopists, textile conservators, and agricultural scientists with expertise in the proteins of wool and cotton. John was deeply committed to the scientific community, as demonstrated by his numerous service contributions. He spent two terms at NASA Headquarters, once in 1983-1985 as a Discipline Scientist for Planetary Astronomy, and once in 1999-2001 as a Discipline Scientist for the Planetary Astronomy and Planetary Atmospheres Programs in NASA's Solar System Exploration Division. He also served as a frequent reviewer for journals in planetary science, astrophysics, and molecular spectroscopy and served on numerous review panels for NASA and Goddard Space Flight Center. Although John spent the vast majority of his career at a NASA center, he loved teaching and working with students. He was occasionally called upon to teach an astronomy course at the University of Maryland, which he thoroughly enjoyed, and for

  5. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic techniques to examine the significance of infection and other insults in early childhood to diarrhoea morbidity, mal-assimilation and failure to thrive. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) addresses an important public health issue in many developing areas, which is the existence of high rates of infection and diarrhoea disease and its deleterious effects on the health and nutritional status of infants and children around the world. Persistent diarrhoea with associated malnutrition remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing countries. There are established relations between diarrhoea disease and Helicobacter pylori infection and the latter may also additionally specifically impair nutrient absorption. Helicobacter pylori infection is likely to be the most common world wide bacterial infection, and it is estimated that approximately 50% of the general population is affected. The World Health Organisation has classified H. pylori as a Group 1 carcinogen. Young children in developing countries are the main targets of infection, with a substantial risk of developing gastric carcinoma during adulthood. High infection rates of H. pylori among new-borns and young children in developing nations appear to be a major cause for chronic under-nutrition and diarrhoea syndrome with failure to thrive. This bacterium can survive in the acidic interior of the human stomach due to its capacity to secrete an enzyme called urease, which decomposes the urea contained in the stomach's interior into ammonia and carbon dioxide increasing the pH move underneath the protective mucous membrane in the stomach where it is protected from the caustic stomach acid. This transitory drop in stomach acidity, explained by a diminished gastric secretion and an increase in ammonia production during infection, promotes the transit of lower bowel pathogens leading to repeated gastrointestinal infections, causing diarrhoea and adverse consequences on nutrition and growth. This CRP seeks to identify and assist research groups in developing countries, which plan to conduct studies on the area of H. pylori infection and its

  6. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic techniques to examine the significance of infection and other insults in early childhood to diarrhoea morbidity, mal-assimilation and failure to thrive. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) addresses an important public health issue in many developing areas, which is the existence of high rates of infection and diarrhoea disease and its deleterious effects on the health and nutritional status of infants and children around the world. Persistent diarrhoea with associated malnutrition remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing countries. There are established relations between diarrhoea disease and Helicobacter pylori infection and the latter may also additionally specifically impair nutrient absorption. Helicobacter pylori infection is likely to be the most common world wide bacterial infection, and it is estimated that approximately 50% of the general population is affected. The World Health Organisation has classified H. pylori as a Group 1 carcinogen. Young children in developing countries are the main targets of infection, with a substantial risk of developing gastric carcinoma during adulthood. High infection rates of H. pylori among new-borns and young children in developing nations appear to be a major cause for chronic under-nutrition and diarrhoea syndrome with failure to thrive. This bacterium can survive in the acidic interior of the human stomach due to its capacity to secrete an enzyme called urease, which decomposes the urea contained in the stomach's interior into ammonia and carbon dioxide increasing the pH move underneath the protective mucous membrane in the stomach where it is protected from the caustic stomach acid. This transitory drop in stomach acidity, explained by a diminished gastric secretion and an increase in ammonia production during infection, promotes the transit of lower bowel pathogens leading to repeated gastrointestinal infections, causing diarrhoea and adverse consequences on nutrition and growth. This CRP seeks to identify and assist research groups in developing countries, which plan to conduct studies on the area of H. pylori infection and its

  7. Case studies to assess and compare different energy sources in sustainable energy and electricity supply strategies. Final report of a co-ordinated project 1997-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    easy integration into other energy planning or analysis tools. DECADES was thus organized as a data management system rather than as an overall or long range energy planning tool. In 1997, the IAEA initiated a co-ordinated research project (CRP) on Case Studies to Assess and Compare Different Sources in Sustainable Energy and Electricity Supply Strategies under the aegis of the DECADES project to conduct a series of national studies using the DECADES package (DECPAC). Under this CRP, experts from more than twenty countries utilized databases and methodologies developed and reviewed under the DECADES project to carry out national comparative assessment studies. At a final Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM), held from 14 to 16 December 1999, meeting participants agreed on the format of executive summaries to be prepared for each of the national case studies. This publication summarizes the results obtained and the lessons learned from national case studies carried out under the CRP. The report is intended primarily for managers and senior experts in governmental organizations, research institutes and power utilities who are involved in energy and environmental analysis, interpretation of model results and translation into decision and policy making

  8. Use of electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry with tooth enamel for retrospective dose assessment. Report of a co-ordinated research project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry is a physical method for the assessment of absorbed dose from ionising radiation. It is based on the measurement of stable radiation induced radicals in human calcified tissues (primarily in tooth enamel). EPR dosimetry with teeth is now firmly established in retrospective dosimetry. It is a powerful method for providing information on exposure to ionising radiation many years after the event, since the 'signal' is 'stored' in the tooth or the bone. This technique is of particular relevance to relatively low dose exposures or when the results of conventional dosimetry are not available (e.g. in accidental circumstances). The use of EPR dosimetry, as an essential tool for retrospective assessment of radiation exposure is an important part of radioepidemiological studies and also provides data to select appropriate countermeasures based on retrospective evaluation of individual doses. Despite well established regulations and protocols for maintaining radiation protection dose limits, the assurance that these limits will not be exceeded cannot be guaranteed, thus providing new challenges for development of accurate methods of individual dose assessment. To meet some of these challenges, in 1998 the IAEA initiated a co-ordinated research project (CRP) with the objective to review the available methods, current research and development in EPR biodosimetry technology, which may be of practical use. The major goal of this CRP was to investigate the use of EPR biodosimetry for reconstruction of absorbed dose in tooth enamel with the aim of providing Member States with up-to-date, and generally agreed upon advice regarding the most suitable procedures and the best focus for their research. The co-ordinated research project was conducted over four years and this publication presents the results and findings by a group of investigators from different countries. The available cytogenetic methods for radiation dose assessment were

  9. Use of electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry with tooth enamel for retrospective dose assessment. Report of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry is a physical method for the assessment of absorbed dose from ionising radiation. It is based on the measurement of stable radiation induced radicals in human calcified tissues (primarily in tooth enamel). EPR dosimetry with teeth is now firmly established in retrospective dosimetry. It is a powerful method for providing information on exposure to ionising radiation many years after the event, since the 'signal' is 'stored' in the tooth or the bone. This technique is of particular relevance to relatively low dose exposures or when the results of conventional dosimetry are not available (e.g. in accidental circumstances). The use of EPR dosimetry, as an essential tool for retrospective assessment of radiation exposure is an important part of radioepidemiological studies and also provides data to select appropriate countermeasures based on retrospective evaluation of individual doses. Despite well established regulations and protocols for maintaining radiation protection dose limits, the assurance that these limits will not be exceeded cannot be guaranteed, thus providing new challenges for development of accurate methods of individual dose assessment. To meet some of these challenges, in 1998 the IAEA initiated a co-ordinated research project (CRP) with the objective to review the available methods, current research and development in EPR biodosimetry technology, which may be of practical use. The major goal of this CRP was to investigate the use of EPR biodosimetry for reconstruction of absorbed dose in tooth enamel with the aim of providing Member States with up-to-date, and generally agreed upon advice regarding the most suitable procedures and the best focus for their research. The co-ordinated research project was conducted over four years and this publication presents the results and findings by a group of investigators from different countries. The available cytogenetic methods for radiation dose assessment were

  10. Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project on Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research (SPAR-III) 2009–2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-10-01

    At the beginning of 2014, there were 437 nuclear power reactors in operation and 72 reactors under construction. To date, around 370 500 t (HM) (tonnes of heavy metal) of spent fuel have been discharged from reactors, and approximately 253 700 t (HM) are stored at various storage facilities. Although wet storage at reactor sites still dominates, the amount of spent fuel being transferred to dry storage technologies has increased significantly since 2005. For example, around 28% of the total fuel inventory in the United States of America is now in dry storage. Although the licensing for the construction of geological disposal facilities is under way in Finland, France and Sweden, the first facility is not expected to be available until 2025 and for most States with major nuclear programmes not for several decades afterwards. Spent fuel is currently accumulating at around 7000 t (HM) per year worldwide. The net result is that the duration of spent fuel storage has increased beyond what was originally foreseen. In order to demonstrate the safety of both spent fuel and the storage system, a good understanding of the processes that might cause deterioration is required. To address this, the IAEA continued the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research (SPAR-III) in 2009 to evaluate fuel and materials performance under wet and dry storage and to assess the impact of interim storage on associated spent fuel management activities (such as handling and transport). This has been achieved through: evaluating surveillance and monitoring programmes of spent fuel and storage facilities; collecting and exchanging relevant experience of spent fuel storage and the impact on associated spent fuel management activities; facilitating the transfer of knowledge by documenting the technical basis for spent fuel storage; creating synergy among research projects of the participating Member States; and developing the capability to assess the impact

  11. IAEA coordinated research project on improvement of technical measures to detect and respond to illicit trafficking of nuclear and other radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abedin-Zadeh, R.; Abou-Zahra, A.; Weiss, B.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Monitoring to detect the illicit trafficking of nuclear and other radioactive materials includes screening vehicles, cargo and individuals at borders to 1) detect smuggling of these materials; 2) locate, measure and characterize the source of radiation; and 3) fully characterize any confiscated material. Currently available instruments used for the field measurements are not optimized for this purpose and may not detect shielded plutonium and highly enriched uranium. Confiscated radioactive materials need to be characterized with macro- and microanalysis techniques to fully understand the significance of the material and to provide credible evidence in the event of prosecution of the traffickers. Although most States have national laboratories capable to determine the basic characteristics of such material, only a few member States have the sophisticated analytical capability necessary to perform proper forensics analysis. The coordinated research project on 'Improvement of Technical Measures to Detect and Respond to Illicit Trafficking of Nuclear and other Radioactive Materials' has been established to: Improve the detection capability and performance of hand-held and portable isotope measurement devices, including the technical and functional specifications for such devices; standardize procedures to examine suspicious packages and to assess the hazard of confiscated material; and develop recommendations and guidelines for establishing a system to provide nuclear forensics support to member States for the characterization of seized nuclear material. Related to the nuclear forensics support, it should be noted that with the inception of the Agency's nuclear security programme in 1995, the IAEA has offered the services of its laboratories in Seibersdorf and associated laboratories to assist States in analysing confiscated nuclear materials. Since 1993 the IAEA has received reports of over 300 cases of smuggling of nuclear and other radioactive materials

  12. Integration of nuclear spectrometry methods as a new approach to material research. Final report of a coordinated research project 2006-2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-10-01

    In 2006, the IAEA initiated a coordinated research project (CRP) on 'Unification of Nuclear Spectrometries: Integrated Techniques as a New Tool for Material Research' as one of the elements of a project on 'Improvements in Nuclear Spectrometry Applications'. The major objective was to assist laboratories in Member States in enhancing proper utilization of nuclear analytical methods and to help them develop nuclear instruments for special applications. An overall objective of the CRP was to help Member States to improve characterization of materials by the effective utilization of nuclear spectrometry instruments and techniques as well as by developing integrated/unified instruments and analytical methodologies in support of environmental pollution monitoring, industry, study of cultural heritage, human health, agriculture, etc. These techniques can be used in small laboratories as well as in state of the art synchrotron sources. The specific research objectives of the CRP included development (or upgrading) of integrated multifunctional instruments based on nuclear spectrometries and related techniques as well as development of software for the handling and operation of integrated multifunctional instruments, including data acquisition. The CRP also covered: development (or upgrading) of integrated analytical approaches/methodologies and software for processing and presentation of data collected by multifunctional instruments; extension of the applications of integrated/unified instruments; and synergistic and complementary use of nuclear spectrometries, with the aim of assisting end users of nuclear spectrometries in various fields. The CRP covered a period of four years (2006-2009). Twelve laboratories from both developed and developing Member States and the IAEA's Laboratories participated. The first research coordination meeting (RCM) was held in Vienna, from 16 to 20 April 2007. The participants presented progress reports, reviewed the status of the

  13. John Adams and his times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaldi, E.

    1986-01-01

    In this first John Adams' Memorial Lecture, an outline is given of his work, especially from the beginning of CERN in 1952 until his death in 1984. The historical survey covers John Adams' technical and managerial contributions to the development of CERN and its accelerators, as well as to fusion research in Britain and Europe. Exemplified by his role as member and president of the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA), Adams' interest in international co-operation is also stressed. In the spirit of this great European, arguments are given for CERN to continue to be the first-rate high-energy physics laboratory which it has been in the past. (orig.)

  14. John von Neumann selected letters

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    John von Neuman was perhaps the most influential mathematician of the twentieth century, especially if his broad influence outside mathematics is included. Not only did he contribute to almost all branches of mathematics and created new fields, but he also changed post-World War II history with his work on the design of computers and with being a sought-after technical advisor to many figures in the U.S. military-political establishment in the 1940s and 1950s. The present volume is the first substantial collection of (previously mainly unpublished) letters written by von Neumann to colleagues, friends, government officials, and others. The letters give us a glimpse of the thinking of John von Neumann about mathematics, physics, computer science, science management, education, consulting, politics, and war. Readers of quite diverse backgrounds will find much of interest in this fascinating first-hand look at one of the towering figures of twentieth century science.

  15. Is John Locke a democrat?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Palle

      Over recent years there has been a tendency to present John Locke as an equalitarian democrat (Ashcraft) and being close to the political views of the levellers (Waldron). This is not a completely new interpretation (Kendall, 1941), but contrasts with the prevalent view presented in textbooks (......, criteria for a democratic process, and the institutions of polyarchy. The conclusion has implications for the relationship between political liberalism and constitutionalism on the one hand and democracy on the other....

  16. Charles Darwin and John Herschel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, B.

    2009-11-01

    The influence of John Herschel on the philosophical thoughts of Charles Darwin, both through the former's book, Natural Philosophy, and through their meeting in 1836 at the Cape of Good Hope, is discussed. With Herschel having himself speculated on evolution just a few months before he met Darwin, it is probable that he stimulated at least the beginnings of the latter's lifelong work on the subject.

  17. A Conversation with John Nelder

    OpenAIRE

    Senn, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    John Ashworth Nelder was born in 1924 in Dulverton, Somerset, England. He received his secondary education in nearby Tiverton at Blundell's, a "public" [that is to say, privately funded] school that he attended as a day pupil. In 1942, he entered Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge University, to read mathematics. His studies were interrupted after one year by war service and he trained as an RAF navigator in South Africa. He returned to Cambridge in 1946 and complete his studies, graduating a "...

  18. Verification of analysis methods for predicting the behaviour of seismically isolated nuclear structures. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1996-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    This report is a summary of the work performed under a co-ordinated research project (CRP) entitled Verification of Analysis Methods for Predicting the Behaviour of Seismically isolated Nuclear Structures. The project was organized by the IAEA on the recommendation of the IAEA's Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWGFR) and carried out from 1996 to 1999. One of the primary requirements for nuclear power plants and facilities is to ensure safety and the absence of damage under strong external dynamic loading from, for example, earthquakes. The designs of liquid metal cooled fast reactors (LMFRs) include systems which operate at low pressure and include components which are thin-walled and flexible. These systems and components could be considerably affected by earthquakes in seismic zones. Therefore, the IAEA through its advanced reactor technology development programme supports the activities of Member States to apply seismic isolation technology to LMFRs. The application of this technology to LMFRs and other nuclear plants and related facilities would offer the advantage that standard designs may be safely used in areas with a seismic risk. The technology may also provide a means of seismically upgrading nuclear facilities. Design analyses applied to such critical structures need to be firmly established, and the CRP provided a valuable tool in assessing their reliability. Ten organizations from India, Italy, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, the United Kingdom, the United States of America and the European Commission co-operated in this CRP. This report documents the CRP activities, provides the main results and recommendations and includes the work carried out by the research groups at the participating institutes within the CRP on verification of their analysis methods for predicting the behaviour of seismically isolated nuclear structures

  19. Thermophysical properties database of materials for light water reactors and heavy water reactors. Final report of a coordinated research project 1999-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    The IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Establishment of a Thermo-physical Properties Database for Light Water Reactors (LWRs) and Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs) started in 1999. It was included in the IAEA's Nuclear Power Programme following endorsement in 1997 by the IAEA's Technical Working Groups on Advanced Technologies for LWRs and HWRs (the TWG-LWR and the TWG-HWR). Furthermore, the TWG on Fuel Performance and Technology (TWG-FPT) also expressed its support. This CRP was conducted as a joint task within the IAEA's project on technology development for LWRs and HWRs in its nuclear power programme. Improving the technology for nuclear reactors through better computer codes and more accurate materials property data can contribute to improved economics of future plants by helping to remove the need for large design margins, which are currently used to account for limitations of data and methods. Accurate representations of thermo-physical properties under relevant temperature and neutron fluence conditions are necessary for evaluating reactor performance under normal operation and accident conditions. The objective of this CRP was to collect and systematize a thermo-physical properties database for light and heavy water reactor materials under normal operating, transient and accident conditions and to foster the exchange of non-proprietary information on thermo-physical properties of LWR and HWR materials. An internationally available, peer reviewed database of properties at normal and severe accident conditions has been established on the Internet. This report is intended to serve as a useful source of information on thermo-physical properties data for water cooled reactor analyses. The properties data have been initially stored in the THERSYST data system at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, which was subsequently developed into an internationally available Internet database named THERPRO at Hanyang University, Republic of Korea

  20. Evaluation of Conditions for Hydrogen Induced Degradation of Zirconium Alloys during Fuel Operation and Storage. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2011-2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-12-01

    This publication reports on the work carried out in 2011–2015 in the coordinated research project (CRP) on the evaluation of conditions for hydrogen induced degradation of zirconium alloys during fuel operation and storage. The CRP was carried out to evaluate the threshold condition for delayed hydride cracking (KIH) in pressurized water reactors and zircaloy-4 and E635M fuel claddings, with application to in-pile operation and spent fuel storage. The project consisted of adding hydrogen to samples of cladding and measuring K IH by one of four methods. The CRP was the third in the series, of which the results of the first two were published in IAEA-TECDOC-1410 and IAEA-TECDOC-1649, in 2004 and 2010, respectively. This publication includes all of the research work performed in the framework of the CRP, including details of the experimental procedures that led to a set of data for tested materials. The research was conducted by representatives from 13 laboratories from all over the world. In addition to the basic goal to transfer the technology of the testing techniques from experienced laboratories to those unfamiliar with the methods, the CRP was set up to develop experimental procedures to produce consistent sets of data, both within a single laboratory and among different laboratories. The material condition and temperature history were prescribed, and laboratories chose one or two of four methods of loading that were recommended in an attempt to develop standard sets of experimental protocols so that consistent results could be obtained. Experimental discrepancies were minimized through careful attention to details of microstructure, temperature history and stress state in the samples, with the main variation being the mode of loading

  1. John Strong - 1941-2006

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Our friend and colleague John Strong was cruelly taken from us by a brain tumour on 31 July, a few days before his 65th birthday. John started his career and obtained his PhD in a group from Westfield College, initially working on experiments at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). From the early 1970s onwards, however, his research was focused on experiments in CERN, with several particularly notable contributions. The Omega spectrometer adopted a system John had originally developed for experiments at RAL using vidicon cameras (a type of television camera) to record the sparks in the spark chambers. This highly automated system allowed Omega to be used in a similar way to bubble chambers. He contributed to the success of NA1 and NA7, where he became heavily involved in the electronic trigger systems. In these experiments the Westfield group joined forces with Italian colleagues to measure the form factors of the pion and the kaon, and the lifetime of some of the newly discovered charm particles. Such h...

  2. Status of the IAEA coordinated research project on natural circulation phenomena, modelling, and reliability of passive systems that utilize natural circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, J.N. Jr.; Cleveland, J.; Aksan, N.

    2004-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) titled ''Natural Circulation Phenomena, Modelling and Reliability of Passive Safety Systems that Utilize Natural Circulation. '' This work has been organized within the framework of the IAEA Department of Nuclear Energy's Technical Working Groups for Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors and Heavy Water Reactors (the TWG-LWR and the TWG-HWR). This CRP is part of IAEA's effort to foster international collaborations that strive to improve the economic performance of future water-cooled nuclear power plants while meeting stringent safety requirements. Thus far, IAEA has established 12 research agreements with organizations from industrialized Member States and 3 research contracts with organizations from developing Member States. The objective of the CRP is to enhance our understanding of natural circulation phenomena in water-cooled reactors and passive safety systems. The CRP participants are particularly interested in establishing a natural circulation and passive safety system thermal hydraulic database that can be used to benchmark computer codes for advanced reactor systems design and safety analysis. An important aspect of this CRP relates to developing methodologies to assess the reliability of passive safety systems in advanced reactor designs. This paper describes the motivation and objectives of the CRP, the research plan, and the role of each of the participating organizations. (author)

  3. Delayed hydride cracking in zirconium alloys in pressure tube nuclear reactors. Final report of a coordinated research project 1998-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    This report describes all of the research work undertaken as part of the IAEA coordinated research project on hydrogen and hydride induced degradation of the mechanical and physical properties of zirconium based alloys, and includes a review of the state of the art in understanding crack propagation by Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC), and details of the experimental procedures that have produced the most consistent set of DHC rates reported in an international round-robin exercise to this date. It was concluded that 1) the techniques for performing measurements of the rate of delayed hydride cracking in zirconium alloys have been transferred from the host laboratory to other countries; 2) by following a strict procedure, a very consistent set of values of crack velocity were obtained by both individual laboratories and between the different laboratories; 3) the results over a wide range of test temperatures from materials with various microstructures fitted into the current theoretical framework for delayed hydride cracking; 4) an inter-laboratory comparison of hydrogen analysis revealed the importance of calibration and led to improvements in measurement in the participating laboratories and 5) the success of the CRP in achieving its goals has led to the initiation of some national programmes

  4. Dosimetry for radiation processing. Final report of the co-ordinated research project on characterization and evaluation of high dose dosimetry techniques for quality assurance in radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-06-01

    In many Member States the use of large cobalt-60 gamma ray facilities and electron beam accelerators with beam energies from about 0.1 to 10 MeV for industrial processing continues to increase. For these processes, quality assurance relies on the application of well established dosimetry systems and procedures. This is especially the case for health regulated processes, such as the radiation sterilization of health care products, and the irradiation of food to eliminate pathogenic organisms or to control insect pests. A co-ordinated research project (CRP) was initiated by the IAEA in June 1995. Research contracts and research agreements in areas of high dose dosimetry were initiated to meet these challenges. The major goals of this CRP were to investigate the parameters that influence the response of dosimeters and to develop reference and transfer dosimetry techniques, especially for electron beams of energy less than 4 MeV and for high energy X ray sources (up to 5 MV). These will help to unify the radiation measurements performed by different radiation processing facilities and other high dose dosimetry users in Member States and encourage efforts to obtain traceability to primary and secondary standards laboratories. It will also aim to strengthen and expand the present International Dose Assurance Service (IDAS) provided by the IAEA

  5. Advances in Neutron Activation Analysis of Large Objects with Emphasis on Archaeological Examples. Results of a Coordinated Research Project. Annex II. Companion CD-ROM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-03-01

    This publication is a compilation of the main results and findings of an IAEA coordinated research project (CRP). In particular, it discusses an innovative variation of neutron activation analysis (NAA) known as large sample NAA (LSNAA). There is no other way to measure the bulk mass fractions of the elements present in a large sample (up to kilograms in mass) non-destructively. Examples amenable to LSNAA include irregularly shaped archaeological artefacts, excavated rock samples, large samples of assorted ore, and finished products, such as nuclear reactor components. Advantages of LSNAA applications, limitations and scientific and technological requirements are described in this publication, which serves as a reference of interest not only to the NAA experts, research reactor personnel, and those considering this technique, but also to various stakeholders and users such as researchers, industrialists, environmental and legal experts, and administrators. The county reports given in this companion CD-ROM (Annex II) give a global overview of all the accomplishments achieved by the participants during the CRP. However, in several cases common procedures were employed by several participating laboratories, constituting one general approach.

  6. Benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER type NPPs. Final report of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-10-01

    This report is the final results of a five-year IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) launched in 1992. The main goal was the harmonization of criteria and methods used in Member States in seismic reassessment and upgrading of existing nuclear power plants. To this aim, most of the activities have been focused on a benchmarking exercise related to a mixed numerical and experimental dynamic analysis carried out on two reference units of WWER reactors (WWER-1000 and WWER-440/213): Kozloduy NPP Units 5/6 and PAKS NPP. Twenty-four institutions from 13 countries participated in the CRP, and two other institutions from Japan contributed to the CRP informally. The objective of this TECDOC is to provide a consistent and comprehensive summary of the results of the work performed in the CRP through the preparation of a ''self-standing'' report with the general conclusion of the programme: a great deal of information from the Background Documents has been included in this report with a set of recommendations for future work in this field

  7. Development of an Integrated Approach to Routine Automation of Neutron Activation Analysis. Results of a Coordinated Research Project. Companion CD-ROM. Annex II: Country Reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-04-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a powerful technique for determining bulk composition of major and trace elements. Automation may contribute significantly to keep NAA competitive for end-users. It provides opportunities for a larger analytical capacity and a shorter overall turnaround time if large series of samples have to be analysed. This publication documents and disseminates the expertise generated on automation in NAA during a coordinated research project (CRP). The CRP participants presented different cost-effective designs of sample changers for gamma-ray spectrometry as well as irradiation devices, and were able to construct and successfully test these systems. They also implemented, expanded and improved quality control and quality assurance as cross-cutting topical area of their automated NAA procedures. The publication serves as a reference of interest to NAA practitioners, experts, and research reactor personnel, but also to various stakeholders and users interested in basic research and/or services provided by NAA. This CD-ROM contains the individual country reports

  8. Benchmark Analyses of Sodium Natural Convection in the Upper Plenum of the Monju Reactor Vessel. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2008-2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-11-01

    The IAEA supports Member States in the area of advanced fast reactor technology development by providing a major fulcrum for information exchange and collaborative research programmes. The IAEA’s activities in this field are mainly carried out within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR), which assists in the implementation of corresponding IAEA support, and ensures that all technical activities are in line with expressed needs of Member States. Among this broad range, the IAEA proposes and establishes coordinated research projects (CRPs), aimed at improving Member State capability in fast reactor design and analysis. An important opportunity to perform collaborative research activities was provided by the system startup tests carried out by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the prototype loop type sodium cooled fast reactor Monju, in particular a turbine trip test performed in December 1995. As the JAEA opened the experimental dataset to international collaboration in 2008, the IAEA launched the CRP on Benchmark Analyses of Sodium Natural Convection in the Upper Plenum of the Monju Reactor Vessel. The CRP, together with eight institutes from seven States, has contributed to improving capabilities in sodium cooled fast reactors simulation through code verification and validation, with particular emphasis on thermal stratification and natural circulation phenomena

  9. Coordinated Noninvasive Studies (CNS) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauter, Judith

    1988-11-01

    Research activities during this period include: data collection related to the interface between complex-sound production and perception, specifically, studies on speech acoustics including two experiments on voice-onset-time variability in productions by speakers of several languages, and a series on acoustical characteristics of emotional expression; data collection regarding individual differences in the effect of stimulus characteristic on relative ear advantages; continuing data analysis and new collections documenting individual differences in auditory evoked potentials, with details related to auditory-systems asymmetries preliminary tests regarding the match between behavioral measures of relative ear advantages and quantitative-electroencephalographic asymmetries observed during auditory stimulation; pilot testing using a combination of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance's (NMR) anatomical-imaging and chemical-spectral-analysis capabilities to study physiological activation in the human brain.

  10. Coordinated Noninvasive Studies (CNS) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-01

    It Is used to "label’ (e.g., glucose labelled with an isotope of carbon), autoradlography can used to study metabolism (e.g., uptake of dopamIne In...defined dysfunctions, Such as autism and dementia, and to obtain detailed Information regarding brain function even In subjects who cannot actively...man. Ann NY Acad Sc 508: 1-537. Courchesne E (In press) Cerebellar changes In autism . In J Swann and A Messer (Eds) Disorders of the developing

  11. Small Reactors without On-site Refuelling: Neutronic Characteristics, Emergency Planning and Development Scenarios. Final Report of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    Small reactors without on-site refuelling have a capability to operate without reloading or shuffling of fuel in their cores for reasonably long periods of time consistent with plant economy and considerations of energy security, with no fresh or spent fuel being stored at the site during reactor operation. In 2009, more than 25 design concepts of such reactors were analyzed or developed in IAEA Member States, representing both developed and developing countries. Small reactors without on-site refuelling are being developed for several reactor lines, including water cooled reactors, sodium cooled fast reactors, lead and lead bismuth cooled reactors, and also include some non-conventional concepts. Most of the concepts of small reactors without on-site refuelling reactors are at early design stages. To make such reactors viable, further research and development (R and D) is necessary, inter alia, to validate long-life core operation, define and validate new robust types of fuel, justify an option of plant location in the proximity to its users, and examine possible niches that such reactors could fill in future energy systems. To further research and development (R and D) in the areas mentioned above and several others, and to facilitate progress in Member States in design and technology development for small reactors without on-site refueling, the IAEA has conducted a dedicated Coordinated Research Project (CRP) entitled 'Small Reactors without On-site Refuelling' (CRPi25001). The project started late in 2004 and, after a review in 2008, was extended for one more year to be ended in 2009. The project has created a network of 18 research institutions from 10 Member States, representing both developed and developing countries. Over the CRP period, collaborative results were achieved for many of the abovementioned research areas. Some studies highlighted new directions of research to be furthered after the CRP completion. Some studies remained the efforts of

  12. Development of kits for radioimmunometric assays for tumour markers. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-08-01

    Many tumour marker assays have been reported over the years and their role is well recognized and acknowledged in the follow-up of known cancer cases. However, their true potential for use in primary diagnosis or screening of high risk groups is still to be fully realized due to the need to achieve better specificity. Among the various tumour markers, the one for prostate cancer - prostate specific antigen (PSA) - appears to have better specificity, coming close to a tumour specific antigen. Prostate cancer is a commonly encountered cancer in men, and can be effectively treated if detected early. PSA levels in serum appear to provide good correlation with tumour burden. Estimation of free PSA in serum is reported to further improve the diagnosis. In several developed countries routine screening of men above 50 years of age for prostate cancer using serum PSA as marker is recommended. Radioimmunometric assay techniques offer themselves as attractive candidates for measurement of tumour markers. They are robust, economical and didactic, thus eminently suitable for technology transfer, training and teaching. Preparation of primary reagents is relatively easy. The methodology is flexible. As a result of co-operation projects of the IAEA, many developing Member States have built up indigenous capabilities to perform radioimmunometric assays, which can be extended to development of kits for tumour marker assays. Considering the need for indigenous development of capabilities to produce reliable kits for radioimmunometric assays for PSA, in 1997 the IAEA initiated a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Kits for Radioimmunometric Assays for Tumour Markers. Even though the focus of the project was PSA, it was expected that the expertise to be gained by the participants would also help them undertake development of kits for other tumour markers, essentially using the same methodology. Ten laboratories from Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas participated

  13. Isotopic composition of precipitation in the Mediterranean Basin in relation to air circulation patterns and climate. Final report of a coordinated research project 2000-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-10-01

    The IAEA has operated the Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) since 1961. There has been an increased need for GNIP data following the recognition of the role of precipitation stable isotopes in better simulating the hydrologic cycle in climate models. The isotopic composition of precipitation is closely related to rain formation conditions, i.e. with the temperature of formation, the origin of air masses, and the degree and mechanism of rainout. Over the last twenty years, use of GNIP data in climate model has indicated a need for a much more refined, process-based understanding of isotope variations in the hydrological cycle. This coordinated research project (CRP) was initiated with the aim of collecting new data on higher spatial density and temporal frequency to improve our knowledge of environmental isotope variations in atmospheric waters. The Mediterranean region was chosen for this study so that climatic and meteorological conditions, which govern the rain formation process, and their variations along east-west and north-south directions, could be investigated. In addition, the first steps of the hydrological cycle, that is evaporation from seawater and condensation of atmospheric vapour could also be studied. The IAEA invited scientists from institutes in Mediterranean countries who have already been involved in studies related to the isotopic composition of precipitation to take part in this CRP, which was initiated in 2000. This publication is a summary of the results achieved in the CRP. The overall achievements are presented as the executive summary, and the detailed findings are presented in each contribution. These results were presented in the final research coordination meeting, held in Vienna from 15 to 19 March 2004. The results of this CRP are relevant to the Member State scientists conducting hydrological research. In addition, the results would contribute to the IAEA programme on water resources, in particular to its activities

  14. IAEA Coordinated Research Project on the Establishment of a Material Properties Database for Irradiated Core Structural Components for Continued Safe Operation and Lifetime Extension of Ageing Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borio Di Tigliole, A.; Schaaf, Van Der; Barnea, Y.; Bradley, E.; Morris, C.; Rao, D. V. H. [Research Reactor Section, Vianna (Australia); Shokr, A. [Research Reactor Safety Section, Vienna (Australia); Zeman, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Australia)

    2013-07-01

    Today more than 50% of operating Research Reactors (RRs) are over 45 years old. Thus, ageing management is one of the most important issues to face in order to ensure availability (including life extension), reliability and safe operation of these facilities for the future. Management of the ageing process requires, amongst others, the predictions for the behavior of structural materials of primary components subjected to irradiation such as reactor vessel and core support structures, many of which are extremely difficult or impossible to replace. In fact, age-related material degradation mechanisms resulted in high profile, unplanned and lengthy shutdowns and unique regulatory processes of relicensing the facilities in recent years. These could likely have been prevented by utilizing available data for the implementation of appropriate maintenance and surveillance programmes. This IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) will provide an international forum to establish a material properties Database for irradiated core structural materials and components. It is expected that this Database will be used by research reactor operators and regulators to help predict ageing related degradation. This would be useful to minimize unpredicted outages due to ageing processes of primary components and to mitigate lengthy and costly shutdowns. The Database will be a compilation of data from RRs operators' inputs, comprehensive literature reviews and experimental data from RRs. Moreover, the CRP will specify further activities needed to be addressed in order to bridge the gaps in the new created Database, for potential follow-on activities. As per today, 13 Member States (MS) confirmed their agreement to contribute to the development of the Database, covering a wide number of materials and properties. The present publication incorporates two parts: the first part includes details on the pre-CRP Questionnaire, including the conclusions drawn from the answers received from

  15. IAEA Coordinated Research Project on the Establishment of a Material Properties Database for Irradiated Core Structural Components for Continued Safe Operation and Lifetime Extension of Ageing Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borio Di Tigliole, A.; Schaaf, Van Der; Barnea, Y.; Bradley, E.; Morris, C.; Rao, D. V. H.; Shokr, A.; Zeman, A.

    2013-01-01

    Today more than 50% of operating Research Reactors (RRs) are over 45 years old. Thus, ageing management is one of the most important issues to face in order to ensure availability (including life extension), reliability and safe operation of these facilities for the future. Management of the ageing process requires, amongst others, the predictions for the behavior of structural materials of primary components subjected to irradiation such as reactor vessel and core support structures, many of which are extremely difficult or impossible to replace. In fact, age-related material degradation mechanisms resulted in high profile, unplanned and lengthy shutdowns and unique regulatory processes of relicensing the facilities in recent years. These could likely have been prevented by utilizing available data for the implementation of appropriate maintenance and surveillance programmes. This IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) will provide an international forum to establish a material properties Database for irradiated core structural materials and components. It is expected that this Database will be used by research reactor operators and regulators to help predict ageing related degradation. This would be useful to minimize unpredicted outages due to ageing processes of primary components and to mitigate lengthy and costly shutdowns. The Database will be a compilation of data from RRs operators' inputs, comprehensive literature reviews and experimental data from RRs. Moreover, the CRP will specify further activities needed to be addressed in order to bridge the gaps in the new created Database, for potential follow-on activities. As per today, 13 Member States (MS) confirmed their agreement to contribute to the development of the Database, covering a wide number of materials and properties. The present publication incorporates two parts: the first part includes details on the pre-CRP Questionnaire, including the conclusions drawn from the answers received from the MS

  16. Improvement of Computer Codes Used for Fuel Behaviour Simulation (FUMEX-III). Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2008-2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-03-01

    It is fundamental to the future of nuclear power that reactors can be run safely and economically to compete with other forms of power generation. As a consequence, it is essential to develop the understanding of fuel performance and to embody that knowledge in codes to provide best estimate predictions of fuel behaviour. This in turn leads to a better understanding of fuel performance, a reduction in operating margins, flexibility in fuel management and improved operating economics. The IAEA has therefore embarked on a series of programmes addressing different aspects of fuel behaviour modelling with the following objectives: - To assess the maturity and prediction capabilities of fuel performance codes, and to support interaction and information exchange between countries with code development and application needs (FUMEX series); - To build a database of well defined experiments suitable for code validation in association with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA); - To transfer a mature fuel modelling code to developing countries, to support teams in these countries in their efforts to adapt the code to the requirements of particular reactors, and to provide guidance on applying the code to reactor operation and safety assessments; - To provide guidelines for code quality assurance, code licensing and code application to fuel licensing. This report describes the results of the coordinated research project on the ''Improvement of computer codes used for fuel behaviour simulation (FUMEX-III)''. This programme was initiated in 2008 and completed in 2012. It followed previous programmes on fuel modelling: D-COM 1982-1984, FUMEX 1993-1996 and FUMEX-II 2002-2006. The participants used a mixture of data derived from commercial and experimental irradiation histories, in particular data designed to investigate the mechanical interactions occurring in fuel during normal, transient and severe transient operation. All participants carried out calculations on priority

  17. John W. Daly - An Appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Kenneth L.

    2015-01-01

    John W. Daly was engaged in groundbreaking basic research for nearly 50 years at NIH in Bethesda, Maryland. A primary focus of his research included the discovery, structure elucidation, synthesis and pharmacology of alkaloids and other biologically active natural products. However, he earned further acclaim in other areas that included the investigation of the structure-activity relationships for agonists/antagonists at adenosine, adrenergic, histamine, serotonin, and acetylcholine receptors. In addition he was a pioneer in studies of the modulation and functional relationships for systems involving calcium, cyclic nucleotides, ion channels and phospholipids and in the mechanism of actions of caffeine and other xanthines. PMID:26160996

  18. A tribute to John Gibbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Russell M.

    2002-04-28

    This article provides an overview of the published research of John Gibbon. It describes his experimental research on scalar timing and his development of scalar timing theory. It also describes his methods of research which included mathematical analysis, conditioning methods, psychophysical methods and secondary data analysis. Finally, it describes his application of scalar timing theory to avoidance and punishment, autoshaping, temporal perception and timed behavior, foraging, circadian rhythms, human timing, and the effect of drugs on timed perception and timed performance of Parkinson's patients. The research of Gibbon has shown the essential role of timing in perception, classical conditioning, instrumental learning, behavior in natural environments and in neuropsychology.

  19. Kick-off research coordination meeting of the IAEA coordinated research project on analyses of, and lessons learned from the operational experience with fast reactor equipment and systems. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The specific objectives of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Analyses of, and Lessons Learned from the Operational Experience with Fast Reactor Equipment and Systems are to - Preserve the feedback from commissioning, operation, and decommissioning experience of experimental and power sodium cooled fast reactors; - Enable easy access to the information from this feedback; - Produce lessons-learned/synthesis reports from the commissioning, operation, and decommissioning of experimental and power sodium cooled fast reactors. To achieve these objectives, the CRP participants will retrieve, assess and archive all the documentation and information relevant to feedback from commissioning, operation, and decommissioning of sodium cooled fast reactors. The archiving step may include conversion of the documents in electronic form and the preparation of electronic databases organized along scientific/technical topics and reactors. Then, the CRP will work on the critical review, assessment, and systematization of the available data, and will publish synthesis reports, including the appropriate recommendations from the 'lessons learned'. It is important to stress that these generalization efforts are crucial in view of the generational change occurring now: preserving the knowledge and experience of the generation who participated in the initial development work of sodium cooled fast reactors and is now retiring, and ultimately ensuring the systematic use of the operational feedback in the form of a 'lessons learned' approach, is essential since it was in the early stage of the studies that the key decisions and design choices were made. To accomplish the lessons-learned and synthesising work requires for as many as possible of the highly skilled specialists and pioneers in the sodium cooled fast reactor research and development area to be actively involved in the CRP. Thus, the first stage of the CRP will address feedback from operational experience with regard to

  20. John Donne no Brasil John Donne no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Garcez Ghirardi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available O leitor fica sem saber a troco do que John Donne lhe surge de repente, num virar de página, e através de períodos que parecem responder a uma pergunta que não foi formulada.(... Ninguém, nem o Sr. Afrânio Coutinho falara, até então, de John Donne,(.... Simplesmente, esse trecho, como inúmeros outros (quase todos do livro, revela que leituras apaixonantes obrigaram o professor Afrânio Coutinho a tomar em seu caderno alguns apontamentos eruditos. (MARTINS 1983 vol.I: 621 A citação acima, extraída de um artigo de Wilson Martins (in O Estado de São Paulo, 25/02/54, ilustra bem a posição reservada a John Donne, até então, por aqueles que, no Brasil, se dedicavam aos estudos de literatura. “A troco do que” - perguntava o autor - deveria ser o leitor de Correntes Cruzadas confrontado com o nome de Donne? Quem, até aquele momento, dele se ocupara? Ninguém, respondia o erudito articulista (nem mesmo o Sr. Afrânio Coutinho, embora reconhecendo que o nome do poeta pudesse ter sido fonte de algumas “leituras apaixonantes” . Interessava-lhe apontar enfaticamente, porém, que a lembrança de Donne surgia de maneira gratuita, desligada de qualquer argumentação ou contexto que a preparas se ou justificasse. Não apenas Afrânio Coutinho silenciara sobre a obra de Donne em seu livro; ninguém, de fato, havia, até aquele momento, dedicado, ao poeta, qualquer atenção mais demorada. Curiosamente, o próprio artigo, assim como o livro nele discutido, atestava, no entanto, que o esquecimento do nome de Donne estava por findar.

  1. John Strong 1941-2006

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    John started his career and obtained his PhD in a group from Westfield College, initially working on experiments at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). From the early 1970s onwards, however, his research was focused on experiments in CERN, with several particularly notable contributions. The Omega spectrometer adopted a system John had originally developed for experiments at RAL using vidicon Cameras (a type of television camera) to record the sparks in the spark chambers. This highly automated system allowed Omega to be used in a similar way to bubble chambers.  He contributed to the success of NA1 and NA7, where he became heavily involved in the electronic trigger systems. In these experiments the Westfield group joined forces with Italian colleagues to measure the form factors of the pion and the kaon, and the lifetime of some of the newly discovered charm particles. Such has been the lasting impact of these measurements that the paper on the pion form-factor had been cited 323 times up to the time of J...

  2. Evaluating agronomic effectiveness of phosphate rocks using nuclear and related techniques: Results from an FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapata, F.

    2000-01-01

    An FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project, 'The use of nuclear and related techniques for evaluating the agronomic effectiveness of phosphatic fertilisers, in particular rock phosphates', was in operation during the period 1993-98. The research network comprised twenty-three scientists, of whom seventeen were in developing countries, with six in industrialized nations. Conventional and 32 P-isotope techniques were utilized to assess the bioavailability of P in soils amended with phosphate rock (PR) and water-soluble fertilisers, and to evaluate the agronomic effectiveness of PR products. No single chemical extraction method was found to be suitable for all soils and fertilisers. The Pi strip method showed promising results, but more testing is needed with tropical acid soils. The 32 P-phosphate-exchange kinetics method allowed a complete characterization of P dynamics, and provided basic information for estimating the kinetic pools of soil P. The agronomic effectiveness (AE) of PRs depends on their solubility (reactivity), which is related to the degree of carbonate substitution for phosphate in the apatite structure. Rock phosphates of low reactivity were unsuitable for direct application to annual crops. Research in Venezuela, China, Cuba, Brazil, and Thailand demonstrated that AE can be increased by partial acidulation, or by mixing with organic materials or a water-soluble source. The AE can be enhanced also through inoculation with mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobacteria. The AE, which depends on species, is particularly high in crops such as canola and lupin that exude organic acids from the roots. Agronomic effectiveness of PR is higher on soils with low pH, low available P, low exchangeable Ca, high cation exchange capacity and high organic-matter content. The 32 P-techniques are powerful tools for studying the factors that affect AE. Information from field trials was used to create a database for validating a model for providing recommendations for PR

  3. Evaluating agronomic effectiveness of phosphate rocks using nuclear and related techniques: Results from an FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, F [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2000-06-01

    An FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project, 'The use of nuclear and related techniques for evaluating the agronomic effectiveness of phosphatic fertilisers, in particular rock phosphates', was in operation during the period 1993-98. The research network comprised twenty-three scientists, of whom seventeen were in developing countries, with six in industrialized nations. Conventional and {sup 32}P-isotope techniques were utilized to assess the bioavailability of P in soils amended with phosphate rock (PR) and water-soluble fertilisers, and to evaluate the agronomic effectiveness of PR products. No single chemical extraction method was found to be suitable for all soils and fertilisers. The Pi strip method showed promising results, but more testing is needed with tropical acid soils. The {sup 32}P-phosphate-exchange kinetics method allowed a complete characterization of P dynamics, and provided basic information for estimating the kinetic pools of soil P. The agronomic effectiveness (AE) of PRs depends on their solubility (reactivity), which is related to the degree of carbonate substitution for phosphate in the apatite structure. Rock phosphates of low reactivity were unsuitable for direct application to annual crops. Research in Venezuela, China, Cuba, Brazil, and Thailand demonstrated that AE can be increased by partial acidulation, or by mixing with organic materials or a water-soluble source. The AE can be enhanced also through inoculation with mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobacteria. The AE, which depends on species, is particularly high in crops such as canola and lupin that exude organic acids from the roots. Agronomic effectiveness of PR is higher on soils with low pH, low available P, low exchangeable Ca, high cation exchange capacity and high organic-matter content. The {sup 32}P-techniques are powerful tools for studying the factors that affect AE. Information from field trials was used to create a database for validating a model for providing recommendations

  4. Benchmark Analyses on the Control Rod Withdrawal Tests Performed During the PHÉNIX End-of-Life Experiments. Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2008–2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-06-01

    The IAEA supports Member State activities in advanced fast reactor technology development by providing a major fulcrum for information exchange and collaborative research programmes. The IAEA’s activities in this field are mainly carried out within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR), which assists in the implementation of corresponding IAEA activities and ensures that all technical activities are in line with the expressed needs of Member States. In the broad range of activities, the IAEA proposes and establishes coordinated research projects (CRPs) aimed at improving Member States’ capabilities in fast reactor design and analysis. An important opportunity to conduct collaborative research activities was provided by the experimental campaign run by the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA, Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives) at the PHÉNIX, a prototype sodium cooled fast reactor. Before the definitive shutdown in 2009, end-of-life tests were conducted to gather additional experience on the operation of sodium cooled reactors. Thanks to the CEA opening the experiments to international cooperation, the IAEA decided in 2007 to launch the CRP entitled Control Rod Withdrawal and Sodium Natural Circulation Tests Performed during the PHÉNIX End-of-Life Experiments. The CRP, together with institutes from seven States, contributed to improving capabilities in sodium cooled fast reactor simulation through code verification and validation, with particular emphasis on temperature and power distribution calculations and the analysis of sodium natural circulation phenomena. The objective of this publication is to document the results and main achievements of the benchmark analyses on the control rod withdrawal test performed within the framework of the PHÉNIX end-of-life experimental campaign

  5. The Use of Numerical Models in Support of Site Characterization and Performance Assessment Studies of Geological Repositories. Results of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project 2005-2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-10-01

    The siting, development and operation of waste disposal facilities, and the related safety issues, have been described in many IAEA publications. The safe management and disposal of radioactive waste from the nuclear fuel cycle remains a necessary condition for future development of nuclear energy. In particular, the disposal of high level waste and spent nuclear fuel in geological repositories, despite having been studied worldwide over the past several decades, still requires full scale demonstration through safe implementation, as planned at the national level in Finland and Sweden by 2020 and 2023, respectively, and in France by 2025. Safety assessment techniques are currently applicable to potential facility location and development through a quite large range of approaches and methodologies. By implementing research activities through coordinated research projects (CRPs), the IAEA enables research institutes in both developing and developed Member States to collaborate on research topics of common interest. In response to requests by several Member States in different networks and platforms dealing with waste disposal, in 2005 a CRP on The Use of Numerical Models in Support of Site Characterization and Performance Assessment Studies of Geological Repositories was proposed and developed to transfer modelling expertise and numerical simulation technology to countries needing them for their national nuclear waste management programmes. All Member States involved in this CRP have acquired the scientific basis for, and expertise in, the site characterization process, including test design, data analysis, model calibration, model validation, predictive modelling, sensitivity analysis and uncertainty propagation analysis. This expertise is documented in this publication, in which numerical modelling is used to address the pertinent issue of site characterization and its impact on safety, using data and information from a potential repository site

  6. Benchmark Analyses on the Natural Circulation Test Performed During the PHENIX End-of-Life Experiments. Final Report of a Co-ordinated Research Project 2008-2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) supports Member State activities in the area of advanced fast reactor technology development by providing a forum for information exchange and collaborative research programmes. The Agency's activities in this field are mainly carried out within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR), which assists in the implementation of corresponding IAEA activities and ensures that all technical activities are in line with the expressed needs of Member States. Among its broad range of activities, the IAEA proposes and establishes coordinated research projects (CRPs) aimed at the improvement of Member State capabilities in the area of fast reactor design and analysis. An important opportunity to undertake collaborative research was provided by the experimental campaign of the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) in the prototype sodium fast reactor PHENIX before it was shut down in 2009. The overall purpose of the end of life tests was to gather additional experience on the operation of sodium cooled reactors. As the CEA opened the experiments to international cooperation, in 2007 the IAEA launched a CRP on ''Control Rod Withdrawal and Sodium Natural Circulation Tests Performed during the PHENIX End-of-Life Experiments''. The CRP, with the participation of institutes from eight countries, contributed to improving capabilities in sodium cooled reactor simulation through code verification and validation, with particular emphasis on temperature and power distribution calculations and the analysis of sodium natural circulation phenomena. The objective of this report is to document the results and main achievements of the benchmark analyses on the natural circulation test performed in the framework of the PHENIX end of life experimental campaign

  7. Benchmark Analyses on the Control Rod Withdrawal Tests Performed During the PHÉNIX End-of-Life Experiments. Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2008–2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-06-15

    The IAEA supports Member State activities in advanced fast reactor technology development by providing a major fulcrum for information exchange and collaborative research programmes. The IAEA’s activities in this field are mainly carried out within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR), which assists in the implementation of corresponding IAEA activities and ensures that all technical activities are in line with the expressed needs of Member States. In the broad range of activities, the IAEA proposes and establishes coordinated research projects (CRPs) aimed at improving Member States’ capabilities in fast reactor design and analysis. An important opportunity to conduct collaborative research activities was provided by the experimental campaign run by the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA, Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives) at the PHÉNIX, a prototype sodium cooled fast reactor. Before the definitive shutdown in 2009, end-of-life tests were conducted to gather additional experience on the operation of sodium cooled reactors. Thanks to the CEA opening the experiments to international cooperation, the IAEA decided in 2007 to launch the CRP entitled Control Rod Withdrawal and Sodium Natural Circulation Tests Performed during the PHÉNIX End-of-Life Experiments. The CRP, together with institutes from seven States, contributed to improving capabilities in sodium cooled fast reactor simulation through code verification and validation, with particular emphasis on temperature and power distribution calculations and the analysis of sodium natural circulation phenomena. The objective of this publication is to document the results and main achievements of the benchmark analyses on the control rod withdrawal test performed within the framework of the PHÉNIX end-of-life experimental campaign.

  8. Nuclear and isotopic techniques for the characterization of submarine groundwater discharge in coastal zones. Results of a coordinated research project 2001-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) is now recognized as an important pathway between land and sea. As such, this flow may contribute to the biogeochemical and other marine budgets of nearshore waters. These discharges typically display significant spatial and temporal variability, making direct assessments difficult. Groundwater seepage is patchy, diffuse, temporally variable, and may involve multiple aquifers. Thus, the measurement of its magnitude and associated chemical fluxes is a challenging enterprise. An initiative on SGD characterization was developed by the IAEA and UNESCO in 2000 as a 5-year plan to assess methodologies and importance of SGD for coastal zone management. The IAEA component included a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Nuclear and Isotopic Techniques for the Characterization of Submarine Groundwater Discharge (SGD) in Coastal Zones, carried out jointly by the IAEA's Isotope Hydrology Section in Vienna and the Marine Environment Laboratory in Monaco, together with 9 laboratories from 8 countries. In addition to the IAEA, the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) and the International Hydrological Programme (IHP) have provided support. This overall effort originally grew from a project sponsored by the Scientific Committee on Ocean Research (SCOR) who established a Working Group (112) on SGD. The activities included joint meetings (Vienna 2000, 2002, and 2005; Syracuse, Italy, 2001; and Monaco 2004), sampling expeditions (Australia 2000; Sicily 2001 and 2002; New York 2002; Brazil 2003; and Mauritius 2005), joint analytical work, data evaluation, and preparation of joint publications. The objectives of the CRP included the improvement of capabilities for water resources and environmental management of coastal zones; application of recently developed nuclear and isotopic techniques suitable for quantitative estimation of various components of SGD; understanding of the influence of SGD on coastal processes and on groundwater

  9. Long term behaviour of low and intermediate level waste packages under repository conditions. Results of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-06-01

    The development and application of approaches and technologies that provide long term safety is an essential issue in the disposal of radioactive waste. For low and intermediate level radioactive waste, engineered barriers play an important role in the overall safety and performance of near surface repositories. Thus, developing a strong technical basis for understanding the behaviour and performance of engineered barriers is an important consideration in the development and establishment of near surface repositories for radioactive waste. In 1993, a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Performance of Engineered Barrier Materials in Near Surface Disposal Facilities for Radioactive Waste was initiated by the IAEA with the twin goals of addressing some of the gaps in the database on radionuclide isolation and long term performance of a wide variety of materials and components that constitute the engineered barriers system (IAEA-TECDOC-1255 (2001)). However, during the course of the CRP, it was realized that that the scope of the CRP did not include studies of the behaviour of waste packages over time. Given that a waste package represents an important component of the overall near surface disposal system and the fact that many Member States have active R and D programmes related to waste package testing and evaluation, a new CRP was launched, in 1997, on Long Term Behaviour of Low and Intermediate Level Waste Packages Under Repository Conditions. The CRP was intended to promote research activities on the subject area in Member States, share information on the topic among the participating countries, and contribute to advancing technologies for near surface disposal of radioactive waste. Thus, this CRP complements the afore mentioned CRP on studies of engineered barriers. With the active participation and valuable contributions from twenty scientists and engineers from Argentina, Canada, Czech Republic, Egypt, Finland, India, Republic of Korea, Norway, Romania

  10. Optimization of the radiological protection of patients undergoing radiography, fluoroscopy and computed tomography. Final report of a coordinated research project in Africa, Asia and eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-12-01

    Although radiography has been an established imaging modality for over a century, continuous developments have led to improvements in technique resulting in improved image quality at reduced patient dose. If one compares the technique used by Roentgen with the methods used today, one finds that a radiograph can now be obtained at a dose which is smaller by a factor of 100 or more. Nonetheless, some national surveys, particularly in the United Kingdom and in the United States of America in the 1980s and 1990s, have indicated large variations in patient doses for the same diagnostic examination, in some cases by a factor of 20 or more. This arises not only owing to the various types of equipment and accessories used by the different health care providers, but also because of operational factors. The IAEA has a statutory responsibility to establish standards for the protection of people against exposure to ionising radiation and to provide for the worldwide application of those standards. A fundamental requirement of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS), issued by the IAEA in cooperation with the FAO, ILO, WHO, PAHO and NEA, is the optimization of radiological protection of patients undergoing medical exposure. Towards its responsibility of implementation of standards and under the subprogramme of radiation safety, in 1995, the IAEA launched a coordinated research project (CRP) on radiological protection in diagnostic radiology in some countries in the Eastern European, African and Asian region. Initially, the CRP addressed radiography only and it covered wide aspects of optimisation of radiological protection. Subsequently, the scope of the CRP was extended to fluoroscopy and computed tomography (CT), but it covered primarily situation analysis of patient doses and equipment quality control. It did not cover patient dose reduction aspects in fluoroscopy and CT. The project

  11. John Adams and CERN: Personal Recollections

    CERN Document Server

    Brianti, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    By any standards, John Adams had a most remarkable career. He was involved in three important, emerging technologies, radar, particle accelerators and controlled fusion, and had an outstanding impact on the last two. Without a university education, he attained hierarchical positions of the highest level in prestigious national and international organizations. This article covers the CERN part of his career, by offering some personal insights into the different facets of his contributions to major accelerator projects, from the first strong-focusing synchrotron, the PS, to the SPS and its conversion to a proton–antiproton collider. In particular, it outlines his abilities as a leader of an international collaboration, which has served as an example for international initiatives in other disciplines.

  12. Obituary: John Daniel Kraus, 1910-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, John D., Jr.; Marhefka, Ronald J.

    2005-12-01

    John Daniel Kraus, 94, of Delaware, Ohio, director of the Ohio State University "Big Ear" Radio Observatory, physicist, inventor, and environmentalist died 18 July 2004 at his home in Delaware, Ohio. He was born on 28 June 1910 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He received a Bachelor of Science in 1930, a Master of Science in 1931, and a PhD in physics in 1933 (at 23 years of age), all from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. During the 1930s at Michigan, he was involved in physics projects, antenna consulting, and in atomic-particle-accelerator research using the University of Michigan's premier cyclotron. Throughout the late 1920s and the 1930s, John was an avid radio amateur with call sign W8JK. He was back on the air in the 1970s. In 2001 the amateur radio magazine CQ named him to the inaugural class of its Amateur Radio Hall of Fame. He developed many widely used innovative antennas. The "8JK closely spaced array" and the "corner reflector" were among his early designs. Edwin H. Armstrong wrote John in July 1941 indicating in part, "I have read with interest your article in the Proceedings of the Institute on the corner reflector...Please let me congratulate you on a very fine piece of work." Perhaps John's most famous invention, and a product of his intuitive reasoning process, is the helical antenna, widely used in space communications, on global positioning satellites, and for other applications. During World War II, John was in Washington, DC as a civilian scientist with the U.S. Navy responsible for "degaussing" the electromagnetic fields of steel ships to make them safe from magnetic mines. He also worked on radar countermeasures at Harvard University's Radio Research Laboratory. He received the U.S. Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Award for his war work. In 1946 he took a faculty position at Ohio State University, becoming professor in 1949, and retiring in 1980 as McDougal Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering and Astronomy. Even so, he never retired

  13. Coordination cycles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Steiner, Jakub

    -, č. 274 (2005), s. 1-26 ISSN 1211-3298 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : coordination * crises * cycles and fluctuations Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp274.pdf

  14. Coordination cycles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Steiner, Jakub

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 1 (2008), s. 308-327 ISSN 0899-8256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : global games * coordination * crises * cycles and fluctuations Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.333, year: 2008

  15. John Wheeler, 1933 - 1959: Particles and Weapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kenneth

    2009-05-01

    During the early part of his career, John Archibald Wheeler made an astonishing number of contributions to nuclear and particle physics, as well as to classical electrodynamics, often in collaboration with another physicist. He was also a major contributor to the Manhattan Project (in Chicago and Hanford rather than Los Alamos), and, following World War II, became an influential scientific cold warrior. His early achievements in physics include the calculated scattering of light by light (with Gregory Breit), the prediction of nuclear rotational states (with Edward Teller), the theory of fission (with Niels Bohr), action-at-a-distance electrodynamics (with Richard Feynman), the theory of positronium, the universal weak interaction (with Jayme Tiomno), and the proposed use of the muon as a nuclear probe particle. He gained modest fame as the person who identified xenon 135 as a reactor poison. His Project Matterhorn contributed significantly to the design of the H bomb, and his Project 137, which he had hoped would flower into a major defense lab, served as the precursor to the Jason group.

  16. John Tyndall's religion: a fragment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Both contemporaries and historians have focused on the high-profile 1874 Belfast Address in which John Tyndall was widely perceived as promulgating atheism. Although some historians have instead interpreted him as a pantheist or an agnostic, it is clear that any such labels do not accurately capture Tyndall's religious position throughout his life. By contrast, this paper seeks to chart Tyndall's religious journey from 1840 (when he was in his late teens) to the autumn of 1848 when he commenced his scientific studies at Marburg. Although he had been imbued with his father's stern conservative Irish Protestantism and opposition to Catholicism, as a youth he seems for a time to have been attracted to Methodism. Later, however, he questioned and rejected his father's religious views and was increasingly drawn to the more spiritual outlook of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Thomas Carlyle, along with a more radical attitude to politics.

  17. Characterization of Swelling Clays as Components of the Engineered Barrier System for Geological Repositories. Results of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project 2002-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-11-01

    At the request of the Member States, the IAEA coordinates research into subjects of common interest in the context of the peaceful application of nuclear technology. The coordinated research projects (CRPs) are intended to promote knowledge and technology transfer between Member States and are largely focused on subjects of prime interest to the international nuclear community. This report presents the results of a CRP carried out between 2002 and 2007 on the subject of swelling clays proposed for use as a component in the engineered barrier system (EBS) of the multibarrier concept for disposal of radioactive waste. In 2002, under the auspices of the IAEA, a number of Member States came together to form a Network of Centres of Excellence on Training in and Demonstration of Waste Disposal Technologies in Underground Research Facilities (URF Network). This network identified the general subject of the application of high swelling clays to seal repositories for radioactive waste, with specific emphasis on the isolation of high level radioactive waste from the biosphere, as being suitable for a CRP. Existing concepts for geological repositories for high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel require the use of EBSs to ensure effective isolation of the radioactive waste. There are two major materials proposed for use in the EBS, swelling clay based materials and cementitious/concrete materials. These materials will be placed between the perimeter of the excavation and the waste container to fill the existing gap and ensure isolation of the waste within the canister (also referred to as a container in some EBS concepts) by supporting safety through retardation and confinement. Cementitious materials are industrially manufactured to consistent standards and are readily available in most locations and therefore their evaluation is of less value to Member States than that of swelling clays. There exists a considerable range of programme development regarding

  18. Projects in Medical Education: “Social Justice In Medicine” A Rationale for an Elective Program as Part of the Medical Education Curriculum at John A. Burns School of Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Background Research has shown that cultural competence training improves the attitudes, knowledge, and skills of clinicians related to caring for diverse populations. Social Justice in medicine is the idea that healthcare workers promote fair treatment in healthcare so that disparities are eliminated. Providing students with the opportunity to explore social issues in health is the first step toward decreasing discrimination. This concept is required for institutional accreditation and widely publicized as improving health care delivery in our society. Methods A literature review was performed searching for social justice training in medical curricula in North America. Results Twenty-six articles were discovered addressing the topic or related to the concept of social justice or cultural humility. The concepts are in accordance with objectives supported by the Future of Medical Education in Canada Report (2010), the Carnegie Foundation Report (2010), and the LCME guidelines. Discussion The authors have introduced into the elective curriculum of the John A. Burns School of Medicine a series of activities within a time span of four years to encourage medical students to further their knowledge and skills in social awareness and cultural competence as it relates to their future practice as physicians. At the completion of this adjunct curriculum, participants will earn the Dean's Certificate of Distinction in Social Justice, a novel program at the medical school. It is the hope of these efforts that medical students go beyond cultural competence and become fluent in the critical consciousness that will enable them to understand different health beliefs and practices, engage in meaningful discourse, perform collaborative problem-solving, conduct continuous self-reflection, and, as a result, deliver socially responsible, compassionate care to all members of society. PMID:22737646

  19. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    Overview From a technical perspective, CMS has been in “beam operation” state since 6th November. The detector is fully closed with all components operational and the magnetic field is normally at the nominal 3.8T. The UXC cavern is normally closed with the radiation veto set. Access to UXC is now only possible during downtimes of LHC. Such accesses must be carefully planned, documented and carried out in agreement with CMS Technical Coordination, Experimental Area Management, LHC programme coordination and the CCC. Material flow in and out of UXC is now strictly controlled. Access to USC remains possible at any time, although, for safety reasons, it is necessary to register with the shift crew in the control room before going down.It is obligatory for all material leaving UXC to pass through the underground buffer zone for RP scanning, database entry and appropriate labeling for traceability. Technical coordination (notably Stephane Bally and Christoph Schaefer), the shift crew and run ...

  20. Benchmark Analysis for Condition Monitoring Test Techniques of Aged Low Voltage Cables in Nuclear Power Plants. Final Results of a Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-10-01

    This publication provides information and guidelines on how to monitor the performance of insulation and jacket materials of existing cables and establish a programme of cable degradation monitoring and ageing management for operating reactors and the next generation of nuclear facilities. This research was done through a coordinated research project (CRP) with participants from 17 Member States. This group of experts compiled the current knowledge in a report together with areas of future research and development to cover aging mechanisms and means to identify and manage the consequences of aging. They established a benchmarking programme using cable samples aged under thermal and/or radiation conditions, and tested before and after ageing by various methods and organizations. In particular, 12 types of cable insulation or jacket material were tested, each using 14 different condition monitoring techniques. Condition monitoring techniques yield usable and traceable results. Techniques such as elongation at break, indenter modulus, oxidation induction time and oxidation induction temperature were found to work reasonably well for degradation trending of all materials. However, other condition monitoring techniques, such as insulation resistance, were only partially successful on some cables and other methods like ultrasonic or Tan δ were either unsuccessful or failed to provide reliable information to qualify the method for degradation trending or ageing assessment of cables. The electrical in situ tests did not show great promise for cable degradation trending or ageing assessment, although these methods are known to be very effective for finding and locating faults in cable insulation material. In particular, electrical methods such as insulation resistance and reflectometry techniques are known to be rather effective for locating insulation damage, hot spots or other faults in essentially all cable types. The advantage of electrical methods is that they can be

  1. High temperature on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion control in water cooled power reactors. Report of a co-ordinated research project 1995-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-07-01

    This report documents the results of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on High Temperature On-line Monitoring of Water Chemistry and Corrosion in Water Cooled Power Reactors (1995-1999). This report attempts to provide both an overview of the state of the art with regard to on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion in operating reactors, and technical details of the important contributions made by programme participants to the development and qualification of new monitoring techniques. The WACOL CRP is a follow-up to the WACOLIN (Investigations on Water Chemistry Control and Coolant Interaction with Fuel and Primary Circuit Materials in Water Cooled Power Reactors) CRP conducted by the IAEA from 1986 to 1991. The WACOLIN CRP, which described chemistry, corrosion and activity-transport aspects, clearly showed the influence of water chemistry on corrosion of both fuel and reactor primary-circuit components, as well as on radiation fields. It was concluded that there was a fundamental need to monitor water-chemistry parameters in real time, reliably and accurately. The objectives of the WACOL CRP were to establish recommendations for the development, qualification and plant implementation of methods and equipment for on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion. Chief investigators from 18 organizations representing 15 countries provided a variety of contributions aimed at introducing proven monitoring techniques into plants on a regular basis and filling the gaps between plant operator needs and available monitoring techniques. The CRP firmly demonstrated that in situ monitoring is able to provide additional and valuable information to plant operators, e.g. ECP, high temperature pH and conductivity. Such data can be obtained promptly, i.e. in real time and with a high degree of accuracy. Reliable techniques and sensor devices are available which enable plant operators to obtain additional information on the response of structural materials in

  2. Optimization of production and quality control of therapeutic radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1994-1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    The `renaissance` of the therapeutic applications of radiopharmaceuticals during the last few years was in part due to a greater availability of radionuclides with appropriate nuclear decay properties, as well as to the development of carrier molecules with improved characteristics. Although radionuclides such as {sup 32}P, {sup 89}Sr and {sup 131}I, were used from the early days of nuclear medicine in the late 1930s and early 1940s, the inclusion of other particle emitting radionuclides into the nuclear medicine armamentarium was rather late. Only in the early 1980s did the specialized scientific literature start to show the potential for using other beta emitting nuclear reactor produced radionuclides such as {sup 153}Sm, {sup 166} Ho, {sup 165}Dy and {sup 186-188}Re. Bone seeking agents radiolabelled with the above mentioned beta emitting radionuclides demonstrated clear clinical potential in relieving intense bone pain resulting from metastases of the breast, prostate and lung of cancer patients. Therefore, upon the recommendation of a consultants meeting held in Vienna in 1993, the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Optimization of the Production and quality control of Radiotherapeutic Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals was established in 1994. The CRP aimed at developing and improving existing laboratory protocols for the production of therapeutic radionuclides using existing nuclear research reactors including the corresponding radiolabelling, quality control procedures; and validation in experimental animals. With the participation of ten scientists from IAEA Member States, several laboratory procedures for preparation and quality control were developed, tested and assessed as potential therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals for bone pain palliation. In particular, the CRP optimised the reactor production of {sup 153}Sm and the preparation of the radiopharmaceutical {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP (ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate), as well as radiolabelling

  3. Summary of the co-ordinated research project on development of feed supplementation strategies for improving the productivity of dairy cattle on smallholder farms in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayasuriya, M.C.N.

    1999-01-01

    Livestock are an important and integral part of most farming systems in Africa. Recent nutritional research has demonstrated the possibility of substantial increases in the productivity of milk-producing animals fed poor quality roughages through small alterations to the feed base. In some cases, improvements have been demonstrated at the farm level: milk yield has increased, body condition of the animals has improved and age at puberty and the interval between calvings have been reduced. These advances have been brought about by the addition of critical nutrients to the diet, e.g. nitrogen or minerals for the rumen micro-organisms or rumen non-degradable protein or all of these. The introduction of improved feeding practices such as strategic supplementation using locally available feed resources (e.g. tree legume leaves, brewers waste, fish waste, multinutrient blocks, etc.) will not only enhance milk production but will also introduce a sustainable fanning practice that will ensure a continuous supply of milk and milk products to local populations. To introduce effective supplementation there is a need to identify the nutrient or combination of nutrients that are the limiting factors for achieving optimum rumen fermentative digestion of the basal diet or the efficiency of utilization of the major products of digestion. In many of the dairying systems operating in Africa this is far from easy, mainly because of the difficulties encountered in effectively measuring feed intake and selection and the efficiency with which the nutrients absorbed are used for productive purposes. In order to circumvent these difficulties it may be possible to measure biochemical indicators in the cows themselves that provide an assessment of nutrient status. The specific objectives of the co-ordinated research project (CRP) were to: - btain baseline information on production and reproductive parameters using a comprehensive survey, progesterone radioimmunoassay and clinical

  4. Optimization of production and quality control of therapeutic radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1994-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    The 'renaissance' of the therapeutic applications of radiopharmaceuticals during the last few years was in part due to a greater availability of radionuclides with appropriate nuclear decay properties, as well as to the development of carrier molecules with improved characteristics. Although radionuclides such as 32 P, 89 Sr and 131 I, were used from the early days of nuclear medicine in the late 1930s and early 1940s, the inclusion of other particle emitting radionuclides into the nuclear medicine armamentarium was rather late. Only in the early 1980s did the specialized scientific literature start to show the potential for using other beta emitting nuclear reactor produced radionuclides such as 153 Sm, 166 Ho, 165 Dy and 186-188 Re. Bone seeking agents radiolabelled with the above mentioned beta emitting radionuclides demonstrated clear clinical potential in relieving intense bone pain resulting from metastases of the breast, prostate and lung of cancer patients. Therefore, upon the recommendation of a consultants meeting held in Vienna in 1993, the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Optimization of the Production and quality control of Radiotherapeutic Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals was established in 1994. The CRP aimed at developing and improving existing laboratory protocols for the production of therapeutic radionuclides using existing nuclear research reactors including the corresponding radiolabelling, quality control procedures; and validation in experimental animals. With the participation of ten scientists from IAEA Member States, several laboratory procedures for preparation and quality control were developed, tested and assessed as potential therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals for bone pain palliation. In particular, the CRP optimised the reactor production of 153 Sm and the preparation of the radiopharmaceutical 153 Sm-EDTMP (ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate), as well as radiolabelling techniques and quality control methods for

  5. Strategy for assessment of WWER steam generator tube integrity. Report prepared within the framework of the coordinated research project on verification of WWER steam generator tube integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-12-01

    Steam generator heat exchanger tube degradations happen in WWER Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The situation varies from country to country and from NPP to NPP. More severe degradation is observed in WWER-1000 NPPs than in case of WWER-440s. The reasons for these differences could be, among others, differences in heat exchanger tube material (chemical composition, microstructure, residual stresses), in thermal and mechanical loadings, as well as differences in water chemistry. However, WWER steam generators had not been designed for eddy current testing which is the usual testing method in steam generators of western PWRs. Moreover, their supplier provided neither adequate methodology and criteria nor equipment for planning and implementing In-Service Inspection (ISI). Consequently, WWER steam generator ISI infrastructure was established with delay. Even today, there are still big differences in the eddy current inspection strategy and practice as well as in the approach to steam generator heat exchanger tube structural integrity assessment (plugging criteria for defective tubes vary from 40 to 90% wall thickness degradation). Recognizing this situation, the WWER operating countries expressed their need for a joint effort to develop methodology to establish reasonable commonly accepted integrity assessment criteria for the heat exchanger tubes. The IAEA's programme related to steam generator life management is embedded into the systematic activity of its Technical Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants (TWG-LMNPP). Under the advice of the TWG-LMNPP, an IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) on Verification of WWER Steam Generator Tube Integrity was launched in 2001. It was completed in 2005. Thirteen organizations involved in in-service inspection of steam generators in WWER operating countries participated: Croatia, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Hungary, Russian Federation, Slovakia, Spain, Ukraine, and the USA. The overall objective was to

  6. Monitoring Isotopes in Rivers: Creation of the Global Network of Isotopes in Rivers (GNIR). Results of a Coordinated Research Project 2002-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-03-01

    River runoff plays a key role in human development in all societies through the provision of water for agriculture, industry and domestic use. Although the monitoring of water availability and our understanding of the main hydrological processes at the catchment scale are relatively good, many important aspects, especially those related to the interaction of runoff and groundwater, remain poorly understood. Additionally, the impact of human activities - such as the construction of large reservoirs and diversions, and the redirection of rivers to supply drinking water or water for irrigation or hydropower - are highly relevant and, together with the predicted impact of climate change, are likely to heavily impact local water cycles. The effects of such changes include: limited availability of water; changes in flood or drought frequency; changes in water quality, sediment load and groundwater recharge; and biodiversity loss in riparian environments. Additionally, political disputes may result as water resources become affected in terms of availability and/or quality. In most instances, stable isotopes and other water tracers provide a deeper insight into hydrological processes, especially in aspects related to water pathways, interconnections, transport of water and pollutants, and the transit time of water. To explore the contribution of these techniques in more detail, the IAEA has launched a monitoring programme, the Global Network of Isotopes in Rivers (GNIR), aimed at regular analysis of the isotope composition of runoff in large rivers. This isotope monitoring network complements an earlier precipitation network, the Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP). To prepare for GNIR, the IAEA launched a coordinated research project (CRP) called Design Criteria for a Network to Monitor Isotope Compositions of Runoff in Large Rivers. The main aim of the CRP was to develop a scientific rationale and a protocol for the operation of such a network, as well as

  7. 15 years of Spanish participation in the international projects of R and D coal technology coordinated by OCICARBON; 15 Anos de Participacion Espanola en los foros Internacionales de I+D Tecnologico del Carbon coordinados por OCICARBON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    As fulfillment of strategy objectives, OCICARBON ( the Spanish Management Association for Coal Research and Development Projects) has maintained a strong link with European and International entities, devoted to coal research and development activities. As consequence of these collaborations, it has been reached uncountable economical and technological benefits, from the projects carried out by Spanish industries and technological entities, under the European Programmes umbrella. In this summary report, it is informed about how the co-ordination of national and international entities, was organised and structured; and the national results, obtained as consequence of the activities carried out by OCICARBON. (Author)

  8. Automation for tsetse mass rearing for use in sterile insect technique programmes. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1995-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-05-01

    The rearing of tsetse flies for the sterile insect technique has been a laborious procedure in the past. The purpose of this co-ordinated research project (CRP) 'Automation for tsetse mass rearing for use in sterile insect technique programmes' was to develop appropriate semiautomated procedures to simplify the rearing, reduce the cost and standardize the product. Two main objectives were accomplished. The first was to simplify the handling of adults at emergence. This was achieved by allowing the adults to emerge directly into the production cages. Selection of the appropriate environmental conditions and timing allowed the manipulation of the emergence pattern to achieve the desired ratio of four females to one male with minimal un-emerged females remaining mixed with the male pupae. Tests demonstrated that putting the sexes together at emergence, leaving the males in the production cages, and using a ratio of 4:1 (3:1 for a few species) did not adversely affect pupal production. This has resulted in a standardized system for the self stocking of production cages. The second was to reduce the labour involved in feeding the flies. Three distinct systems were developed and tested in sequence. The first tsetse production unit (TPU 1) was a fully automated system, but the fly survival and fecundity were unacceptably low. From this a simpler TPU 2 was developed and tested, where 63 large cages were held on a frame that could be moved as a single unit to the feeding location. TPU 2 was tested in various locations, and found to satisfy the basic requirements, and the adoption of Plexiglas pupal collection slopes resolved much of the problem due to light distribution. However the cage holding frame was heavy and difficult to position on the feeding frame and the movement disturbed the flies. TPU 2 was superseded by TPU 3, in which the cages remain stationary at all times, and the blood is brought to the flies. The blood feeding system is mounted on rails to make it

  9. Charged particle cross-section database for medical radioisotope production: diagnostic radioisotopes and monitor reactions. Final report of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    Medical applications of nuclear radiation are of considerable interest to the IAEA. Cyclotrons and accelerators, available in recent years in an increasing number of countries, are being used for the production of radioisotopes for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The physical basis of this production is described through interaction of charged particles, such as protons, deuterons and alphas, with matter. These processes have to be well understood in order to produce radioisotopes in an efficient and clean manner. In addition to medical radioisotope production, reactions with low energy charged particles are of primary importance for two major applications. Techniques of ion beam analysis use many specific reactions to identify material properties, and in nuclear astrophysics there is interest in numerous reaction rates to understand nucleosynthesis in the Universe. A large number of medically oriented cyclotrons have been running in North America, western Europe and Japan for more than two decades. In recent years, 30-40 MeV cyclotrons and smaller cyclotrons (E p < 20 MeV) have been installed in several countries. Although the production methods are well established, there are no evaluated and recommended nuclear data sets available. The need for standardization was thus imminent. This was pointed out at three IAEA meetings. Based on the recommendations made at these meetings, the IAEA decided to undertake and organize the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Reference Charged Particle Cross-Section Database for Medical Radioisotope Production. The project was initiated in 1995. It focused on radioisotopes for diagnostic purposes and on the related beam monitor reactions in order to meet current needs. It constituted the first major international effort dedicated to standardization of nuclear data for radioisotope production. It covered the following areas: Compilation of data on the most important reactions for monitoring light ion

  10. Obituary: John P. Oliver (1939-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Howard

    2011-12-01

    John P. Oliver, an emeritus professor of astronomy at the University of Florida in Gainesville, passed away Thursday, February 10, 2011, after a courageous and long battle with renal cancer. He left behind memories of a life and career to envy. During his forty years of service to his profession and department, this unique astronomer distinguished himself as a research scientist and instrumentalist, creative software designer, gifted teacher and speaker, a vocal advocate of public outreach, and friend to all who knew him. Oliver was born in New Rochelle, New York, during late fall 1939 on November 24. His father, James P. Oliver, was a naval officer and his mother was the former Dorothy Armstrong Cambell. Oliver's early days were spent in various cities due to his father's military life but he eventually received a high school diploma from Princess Ann High School in Virginia. Oliver subsequently graduated with a bachelor of science degree in physics in 1963 from the prestigious Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy. Lick Observatory awarded him a graduate assistantship so he moved west to California where he met and, on November 2, 1963, married Barbara Kay McKenna, who became his lifelong love and partner. In California Oliver had the good fortune to work with several eminent astronomers. This included Albert E. Whifford, director of Lick Observatory and known for his work on interstellar reddening, and Merle F. Walker, an expert in photometry, who also helped establish Pluto's rotation period. His close relation with Lawrence H. Aller, one of the 20th century's memorable astronomers, known for his ability to combine observation, theory and education, and for his care and kindness, helped bind Oliver and astronomy together for life. Oliver would also join the technical staff of the Aerospace Corporation, become an acting director of the Pine Mountain Observatory (University of Oregon), and a research assistant at the University of California in Los Angeles

  11. Coordinating controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-07-15

    While physics Laboratories are having to absorb cuts in resources, the machines they rely on are becoming more and more complex, requiring increasingly sophisticated systems. Rather than being a resourceful engineer or physicist able to timber together solutions in his 'backyard', the modern controls specialist has become a professional in his own right. Because of possible conflicts between increasing sophistication on one hand and scarcer resources on the other, there was felt a need for more contacts among controls specialists to exchange experiences, coordinate development and discuss 'family problems', away from meetings where the main interest is on experimental physics.

  12. Coordinated unbundling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermans, Bram; Zabala-Iturriagagoitia, Jon Mikel

    2013-01-01

    Public procurement for innovation is a matter of using public demand to trigger innovation. Empirical studies have demonstrated that demand-based policy instruments can be considered to be a powerful tool in stimulating innovative processes among existing firms; however, the existing literature has...... not focused on the role this policy instrument can play in the promotion of (knowledge-intensive) entrepreneurship. This paper investigates this link in more detail and introduces the concept of coordinated unbundling as a strategy that can facilitate this purpose. We also present a framework on how...

  13. Coordinating controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    While physics Laboratories are having to absorb cuts in resources, the machines they rely on are becoming more and more complex, requiring increasingly sophisticated systems. Rather than being a resourceful engineer or physicist able to timber together solutions in his 'backyard', the modern controls specialist has become a professional in his own right. Because of possible conflicts between increasing sophistication on one hand and scarcer resources on the other, there was felt a need for more contacts among controls specialists to exchange experiences, coordinate development and discuss 'family problems', away from meetings where the main interest is on experimental physics

  14. Homepage Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodas, Steven

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes efforts to identify issues and design implementation strategies to better promote the NASA IITA K-12 project on the world wide web and, in so doing, better serve our constituents.

  15. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    2010-01-01

    Operational Experience At the end of the first full-year running period of LHC, CMS is established as a reliable, robust and mature experiment. In particular common systems and infrastructure faults accounted for <0.6 % CMS downtime during LHC pp physics. Technical operation throughout the entire year was rather smooth, the main faults requiring UXC access being sub-detector power systems and rack-cooling turbines. All such problems were corrected during scheduled technical stops, in the shadow of tunnel access needed by the LHC, or in negotiated accesses or access extensions. Nevertheless, the number of necessary accesses to the UXC averaged more than one per week and the technical stops were inevitably packed with work packages, typically 30 being executed within a few days, placing a high load on the coordination and area management teams. It is an appropriate moment for CMS Technical Coordination to thank all those in many CERN departments and in the Collaboration, who were involved in CMS techni...

  16. How do I manage and staff for intelligent transportation systems? : thinking outside the box : a cross-cutting study : maximizing project resources and advancing coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Intelligent transportation systems (ITS) projects often need staff with skills that are not resident in traditional transportation organizations. Therefore, project administrators must sometimes look beyond the usual staffing methods to fill these po...

  17. Coordinated Collection Development via CD-ROM. A Pilot Project Granted by LSCA Title III Funds to Crosby Library, Gonzaga University. Final Narrative Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Elaine; Carr, Mary M.

    Three colleges in the state of Washington--Gonzaga College (Crosby Library), Whitworth College, and Eastern Washington University--received grants from the Fred Meyer Charitable Trust and the Library Services and Construction Act to facilitate coordinated collection development in the areas of education and business/economics, so that their…

  18. 99mTc labelled peptides for imaging of peripheral receptors. Final report of a co-ordinated research project. 1995-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    99m Tc radiopharmaceuticals have remained the workhorse of diagnostic nuclear medicine over the last three decades ever since the introduction of the gamma camera as the main imaging instrument. Due to the near ideal nuclear properties such as gamma energy, half-life, lack of beta radiation and easy availability as a convenient generator system at an affordable cost of 99m Tc, it can be reasonably anticipated that 99m Tc will continue to retain this position in the foreseeable future. To a large extent this has been possible because of the successful development, over the years, of 99m Tc radiopharmaceuticals as substitutes for other clinically well established agents. Examples of these success stories are 99m Tc substitutes for 131 I hippuran and rose bengal 201 Tl and 123 I brain perfusion agents, which have come to be known collectively as 'second generation 99m Tc radiopharmaceuticals'. It should be acknowledged that each one of these developments was a result of innovative and sustained research and development efforts by scientists from different parts of the world. Concurrently these research efforts have made significant contributions to better understanding of the radiochemistry and co-ordination chemistry of 99m Tc. The radiopharmaceutical scientists are now in a much better position to design, prepare and evaluate 99m Tc complexes for specific applications. Building on this capability, the next step is development of 99m Tc substitutes for receptor specific radiopharmaceuticals, which have established clinical potential. Efforts in this direction are already ongoing and the work during the last decade on 99m Tc labelling of monoclonal antibodies can be considered the beginning of these 'third generation 99m Tc radiopharmaceuticals'. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) had organized two co-ordinated research projects (CRPs) in the past covering 99m Tc second generation agents and 99m Tc monoclonal antibodies, and the results were published in

  19. Development of kits for 99mTc radiopharmaceuticals for infection imaging. Report of a co-ordinated research project 2000-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-09-01

    establishment of a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) by the IAEA. The CRP could investigate alternate biochemical pathways, promising recent advances in 99 mTc labelling methodologies and recent progress in evaluation methods. Based on recommendations of two consultants meetings, the IAEA initiated a CRP entitled Development of Kits for 99 mTc Radiopharmaceuticals for Infection Imaging in 2000. Twelve laboratories from Asia, Europe, North America, and South America participated in the CRP, which was concluded in 2003. Among the objectives of this CRP was the development of different 99 mTc labelling strategies in participating laboratories that would be useful in the development of 99 mTc labelled infection imaging agents. In addition, techniques were to be developed for the in vitro and in vivo testing of label stability. Finally, it was hoped that one or more of the identified agents would prove to localize in infection by a specific mechanism. The CRP may be said to be successful in all three measures. Finally, with the identification of 99 mTc ubiquicidine fragment (UBI 29-41) as a radiolabelled agent with potential clinical utility, this CRP can be considered to have made a major contribution by providing the first validated specific 99 mTc labelled infection imaging agent

  20. Evaluation of the efficacy of radiosynovectomy in rheumatoid arthritis and haemophilic arthropathy (CERAHA): First results of an IAEA co-ordinated research project (CRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vereb, M.; Kaliska, L.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The main objective of the study was to determine the therapeutic efficacy of radiosynovectomy. Rheumatoid arthritis is a Chronic or sub-acute, systemic inflammatory disorder principally involving the joints with peripheral symmetrical inflammatory non-suppurative arthritis. It usually has a prolonged course with relapse and remissions. Haemophilia is a congenital blood disease that produces abnormal bleeding at musculoskeletal level. The origin of this abnormal bleeding is the lack of a coagulation factor, Factor VIII for haemophilia A and Factor IX for haemophilia B or Christmas disease. The overall goals of therapy in rheumatoid arthritis are: alleviation of pain, control of disease activity, slowing down the rate of damage and improvement in the quality of life. On the other hand the aim of the orthopaedic treatment in haemophilic haemarthrosis is to avoid recurrence of the haemarthrosis by acting on the synovial membrane, by fibrosing it, in addition to pain alleviation and improving the quality of life. Radionuclide therapy, commonly known as 'Radiosynovectomy', is a very useful procedure, which if used appropriately may form an effective tool in the management of rheumatoid arthritis and haemophilic haemoarthropathy. With the help received from the IAEA under the auspices of a coordinated research project, for the first time in our hospital we introduced radiosynovectomy in the year 2003. Until now, a total number of 40 patients of rheumatoid arthritis and one patient of haemophilic arthritis have been treated following a protocol designed by the IAEA under the CRP. The diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis and haemophilic arthropathy was established by standard well established findings of clinical examination and laboratory investigations. All patients underwent a two phase bone soft tissue scintigraphy to assess the inflammatory activity in the joints prior to therapy. A radiosynovectomy team was formed in the hospital consisting of a nuclear

  1. Comparative assessment of energy options and strategies in Mexico until 2025. Final report of a coordinated research project 2000-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-10-01

    demand analysis and projections, least-cost electric system expansion analysis, energy resource allocation to power and non-power sectors and environmental analysis. Because many of the assumptions made for the study are the result of expert consensus but have not been validated or endorsed by the Government, the present study should not be considered as the Energy and Electricity Master Plan for Mexico, but rather as a very real attempt to evaluate the possible evolution of the energy and electricity consumption under certain scenarios of socioeconomic and technical development. Likewise, the expansion plans of the electricity supply system delineated by the study should not be taken as the Government plan in this area. The findings of the study do, however, provide more insight as to the possible strategies for developing the power generating system and the necessary work to be undertaken to supplement the results of the study or to update it, if deviations are experienced in the principal hypothesis made for the study. It should be noted that the Secretaria de Energia, Mexico, was fully responsible for all phases of the study, including the preparation of the present report. The IAEA's role was to provide overall coordination and guidance throughout the conduct of the study, and to guarantee that adequate training in the use of IAEA energy planning models was provided to the members of the national team

  2. Report of the consultancy meeting for the coordinated research project on comparative analysis of methods and tools for nuclear knowledge preservation. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    In response to long-term energy scenarios, it is necessary to preserve and maintain the accumulated knowledge in nuclear science and the nuclear industry. Within these scenarios is the reality of ageing of the human workforce in the nuclear sector and the sharp decline in the number of entrants to education and training in nuclear science and engineering. The challenge of the IAEA to this reality is to enhance the capacity of Member States to maintain and preserve the information and knowledge resources related to the peaceful use of nuclear energy. This knowledge could be tacit and/or explicit. Appendix A lists examples of tacit and explicit knowledge that need to be preserved. Finally, the need to manage, access and preserve this knowledge across human generations (30 years) and even nuclear facility lifetimes (over 60) years extends the challenges for the CRP. Implementation of the recommendations and conclusions from this CRP may be difficult due to resources, legal factors and legacy systems, but nevertheless the goal of nuclear knowledge preservation should be permanent access and knowledge resource interoperability that will allow knowledge sharing for as long as the knowledge remains useful. This Coordinated Research Project was started in the IAEA Program for the period 2004-2005 and continues for the 2006-2007, Programme C, Capacity Building and Nuclear Knowledge Maintenance for Sustainable Energy Development, Section C.3, Nuclear Knowledge Management and Section C.3.03, Maintenance and preservation of knowledge in specific areas of nuclear science and technology, specifically a 'CRP on knowledge preservation technologies leading to archiving of information'. The objectives of the consultancy were: - to review the CRP's Terms of Reference, research framework and specific research topics, and - to develop the survey form on current status of knowledge preservation to establish a baseline source of information on nuclear knowledge management in IAEA

  3. Application of non-destructive testing and in-service inspection to research reactors. Results of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    -destructive testing (NDT), are generally called in-service inspections (ISI) and, together with the above specific techniques, are the subject of the present TECDOC. The main objectives of the TECDOC are to present a number of these special techniques and to give guidance for their application. The guidance and recommendations given in this publication form the basis for the conduct of ISI of research reactors with limited hazard potential to the public. This TECDOC is based on the results of a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Application of Non-destructive Testing and In-service Inspection to Research Reactors that the IAEA organized in 1995 to supplement its activities on research reactor ageing within its Research Reactor Safety Programme (RRSP). Because of the importance of such in-service inspections within the programmes for the management of ageing in research reactors, this TECDOC will be useful to a large fraction of the currently operating research reactors that are over 30 years old

  4. WIT Diversity Talk with John Ellis

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Ellis, Jonathan R.

    2017-01-01

    Sudeshna Datta Cockerill, CERN Ombudsperson, will interview John Ellis, a renown British theoretical physicist with a long career both at CERN and externally. John Ellis has also been awarded several prizes for his work in physics. Among many other outstanding roles and positions, he was Division Leader of the Theory Division at CERN from 1988-1994. John Ellis is currently Clerk Maxwell Professor of Theoretical Physics at King's College London.

  5. Universal mechatronics coordinator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Patrick F.

    1999-11-01

    Mechatronic systems incorporate multiple actuators and sensor which must be properly coordinated to achieve the desired system functionality. Many mechatronic systems are designed as one-of-a-kind custom projects without consideration for facilitating future system or alterations and extensions to the current syste. Thus, subsequent changes to the system are slow, different, and costly. It has become apparent that manufacturing processes, and thus the mechatronics which embody them, need to be agile in order to more quickly and easily respond to changing customer demands or market pressures. To achieve agility, both the hardware and software of the system need to be designed such that the creation of new system and the alteration and extension of current system is fast and easy. This paper describes the design of a Universal Mechatronics Coordinator (UMC) which facilitates agile setup and changeover of coordination software for mechatronic systems. The UMC is capable of sequencing continuous and discrete actions that are programmed as stimulus-response pairs, as state machines, or a combination of the two. It facilitates the modular, reusable programing of continuous actions such as servo control algorithms, data collection code, and safety checking routines; and discrete actions such as reporting achieved states, and turning on/off binary devices. The UMC has been applied to the control of a z- theta assembly robot for the Minifactory project and is applicable to a spectrum of widely differing mechatronic systems.

  6. Report on the 1st research co-ordination meeting of the co-ordinated research project on standardized high current solid targets for cyclotron production of diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Radioisotopes produced with a cyclotron and their corresponding radiopharmaceuticals have already been shown to be extremely valuable in basic medical research, disease diagnosis and radiotherapy treatment. There are more than 200 cyclotron facilities worldwide and the number is growing every year. A number of the Member States have acquired cyclotrons for the purpose of producing radioisotopes for nuclear medicine and a number of others have expressed an interest in acquiring such facilities. This report is concerned with the production of four radiotracers: Iodine-123, Iodine-124, Thallium-201 and Palladium-103. Iodine-123 is already widely used in SPECT studies, I-124 has shown great promise and can be used for PET studies as well as in radiotherapy. Tl-201 is widely used throughout the world as 201 Tl + for measuring cardiac blood flow. It is a routine tool that is needed for the Nuclear Medicine communities and can be made available by those countries possessing a cyclotron facility with 30 MeV protons. Moreover, as preliminary results dealing with the labelling of chelated polypeptides with trivalent cationic Tl-201 are very promising; the nuclide can also be tried as a potential substitute for Indium tracers in SPECT diagnosis involving polypeptides. Palladium-103, an Auger electron emitter, has become an extremely important radionuclide for therapy. The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) focuses on the optimisation and standardisation of solid phase cyclotron target technology for the production of I-123, I-124, Tl-201 and Pd-103. In particular, as originally proposed and further discussed and agreed upon during the 1st Research Co-ordination Meeting, the main technical goals of the CRP are described as follows: (i) to investigate the possibility of using electrodeposited tellurium and melted tellurium oxide as target material for the production of I-123 and I-124. For the oxide target, the following parameters and techniques will be explored: 1) methods

  7. Input data for quantifying risks associated with the transport of radioactive material. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1996-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    The final outcome of the work done for the Coordinated Research Program (CRP) by ten countries, which was co-ordinated by the IAEA, is presented. Described are the modalities for the collection, analysis and processing of relevant input data and the selection of databases. These data cover such items as package characteristics, accident environments and package behaviour under accident load conditions. Advice is given as to how to present the risk assessment results and how to quantify the uncertainty inherent in the predicted consequences and risks. INTERTRAN2 computer code system as a risk assessment tool is described. Information is also given on various accident scenarios, event trees and severity frequencies, transport accident severity and frequency assessment methods as well as on dose assessment techniques

  8. John Smithi kaks palet / Johannes Saar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Saar, Johannes, 1965-

    2003-01-01

    Näitus "John Smith. Marko ja Kaido" Tallinna Kunstihoones. Kaido Ole ja Marko Mäetamm esindavad rühmitusena "John Smith" Eestit 2003. a. Veneetsia biennaalil. Ilmunud ka kogumikus "Päevast päeva", lk. 90-96

  9. John of Salisbury on Aristotelian Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, David

    The First substantial treatment of John of Salisbury's views on Aristotelian science. Important for our understanding of the reception of Aristotle's works and for the history of theories of science.......The First substantial treatment of John of Salisbury's views on Aristotelian science. Important for our understanding of the reception of Aristotle's works and for the history of theories of science....

  10. John Kotter on Leadership, Management and Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencivenga, Jim

    2002-01-01

    Excerpts from interview with John Kotter, Konosuke Matsushita Professor of Leadership at the Harvard Business School, about his thoughts on the role of the superintendent as leader and manager. Describes his recent book "John P. Kotter on What Leaders Really Do," 1999. Lists eight-step change process from his book "Leading Change," 1996. (PKP)

  11. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Christophe Delaere

    2013-01-01

    The focus of Run Coordination during LS1 is to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities, to smooth interactions between subsystems and to ensure that all are ready in time to resume operations in 2015 with a fully calibrated and understood detector. After electricity and cooling were restored to all equipment, at about the time of the last CMS week, recommissioning activities were resumed for all subsystems. On 7 October, DCS shifts began 24/7 to allow subsystems to remain on to facilitate operations. That culminated with the Global Run in November (GriN), which   took place as scheduled during the week of 4 November. The GriN has been the first centrally managed operation since the beginning of LS1, and involved all subdetectors but the Pixel Tracker presently in a lab upstairs. All nights were therefore dedicated to long stable runs with as many subdetectors as possible. Among the many achievements in that week, three items may be highlighted. First, the Strip...

  12. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Delaere

    2013-01-01

    Since the LHC ceased operations in February, a lot has been going on at Point 5, and Run Coordination continues to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities. In the last months, the Pixel detector was extracted and is now stored in the pixel lab in SX5; the beam pipe has been removed and ME1/1 removal has started. We regained access to the vactank and some work on the RBX of HB has started. Since mid-June, electricity and cooling are back in S1 and S2, allowing us to turn equipment back on, at least during the day. 24/7 shifts are not foreseen in the next weeks, and safety tours are mandatory to keep equipment on overnight, but re-commissioning activities are slowly being resumed. Given the (slight) delays accumulated in LS1, it was decided to merge the two global runs initially foreseen into a single exercise during the week of 4 November 2013. The aim of the global run is to check that we can run (parts of) CMS after several months switched off, with the new VME PCs installed, th...

  13. Obituary: John Louis Africano III, 1951-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Edwin, S.

    2007-12-01

    Technical Conference whose attendance expanded dramatically during his tenure. John moved to the NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, in 1998 to work full time on orbital debris projects including the 3.0 meter Liquid Mirror Telescope and the CCD Debris Telescope in Cloudcroft, New Mexico. In 2000 he moved back to Colorado Springs, Colorado, to be closer to his family. From there he continued to support both the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) and AMOS. John was very instrumental in establishing cooperative programs between the ODPO and AMOS, which will benefit both organizations for many years to come. John left an indelible mark on his programs and all those who knew and loved him. The impact of his untimely departure will reverberate for many years. As John's wife Linda put it, "John is now visiting the stars and galaxies he adored from afar." John is survived by his wife, Linda Ann Africano; two sons, James Keith and Brian Michael; a daughter, Monica Lynn Africano; a sister, Diana Smith; and four grandchildren. The author acknowledges valuable input from Brian Africano (University of Colorado at Colorado Springs), Eugene Stansbery (NASA), Mark Mulrooney (NASA contractor), Tom Kelecy (Boeing LTS, Inc.), Paul Sydney (Boeing LTS, Inc.), Kira Abercromby (NASA contractor), and Patrick Seitzer (University of Michigan).

  14. Co-ordinated research project on validation and application of plants as biomonitors of trace element atmospheric pollution, analyzed by nuclear and related techniques. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Environmental pollution is a cause of ever increasing concern in the world. The UN Conference on Environment and Development (Rio, Brazil, 1992) reaffirmed the importance of protecting the environment within the context of sustainable development. Arising out of this conference, the Rio Agenda 21 declaration called for a number of nationally determined action programmes, with international assistance and co-ordination under 'Capacity 21', concerning environmental monitoring and assessment, including the use of biological markers. Biomonitoring is an appropriate tool for assessing the levels of air pollution. In several developed countries biomonitoring is used on a regular basis for such surveys. Application of biomonitors has several advantages compared to the use of direct measurements of contaminants, related primarily to the permanent and common occurrence in the field, the ease of sampling and trace element accumulation. Furthermore, biomonitors provide a measure of integrated exposure over an extended period of time, are present in remote areas and no expensive technical equipment is involved in collecting them. Suitably chosen biomonitors accumulate contaminants over certain periods of time, concentrate them, thus allowing more reliable analytical measurements. Simple and cheap sampling procedures (in contrast to direct measurements) allow a very large number of sites to be included in the same survey, permitting detailed geographical patterns to be drawn. In combination with the specimen banking (long-term storage) of selected samples, biomonitoring can be an effective tool for pollutant mapping and trend monitoring by real time and retrospective analysis. By application of appropriate statistical tools, information can also be obtained on the type and location of pollution sources as well as on the short, medium and long range trans-boundary transport of environmental pollutants. In Europe, nuclear and related analytical techniques have been shown to be

  15. Co-ordinated research project on validation and application of plants as biomonitors of trace element atmospheric pollution, analyzed by nuclear and related techniques. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Environmental pollution is a cause of ever increasing concern in the world. The UN Conference on Environment and Development (Rio, Brazil, 1992) reaffirmed the importance of protecting the environment within the context of sustainable development. Arising out of this conference, the Rio Agenda 21 declaration called for a number of nationally determined action programmes, with international assistance and co-ordination under 'Capacity 21', concerning environmental monitoring and assessment, including the use of biological markers. Biomonitoring is an appropriate tool for assessing the levels of air pollution. In several developed countries biomonitoring is used on a regular basis for such surveys. Application of biomonitors has several advantages compared to the use of direct measurements of contaminants, related primarily to the permanent and common occurrence in the field, the ease of sampling and trace element accumulation. Furthermore, biomonitors provide a measure of integrated exposure over an extended period of time, are present in remote areas and no expensive technical equipment is involved in collecting them. Suitably chosen biomonitors accumulate contaminants over certain periods of time, concentrate them, thus allowing more reliable analytical measurements. Simple and cheap sampling procedures (in contrast to direct measurements) allow a very large number of sites to be included in the same survey, permitting detailed geographical patterns to be drawn. In combination with the specimen banking (long-term storage) of selected samples, biomonitoring can be an effective tool for pollutant mapping and trend monitoring by real time and retrospective analysis. By application of appropriate statistical tools, information can also be obtained on the type and location of pollution sources as well as on the short, medium and long range trans-boundary transport of environmental pollutants. In Europe, nuclear and related analytical techniques have been shown to be

  16. Development of a Reference Database for Ion Beam Analysis. Report of a Coordinated Research Project on Reference Database for Ion Beam Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-12-01

    Ion beam analysis techniques are non-destructive analytical techniques used to identify the composition and provide elemental depth profiles in surface layers of materials. The applications of such techniques are diverse and include environmental control, cultural heritage and conservation and fusion technologies. Their reliability and accuracy depends strongly on our knowledge of the nuclear reaction cross sections, and this publication describes the coordinated effort to measure, compile and evaluate cross section data relevant to these techniques and make these data available to the user community through a comprehensive online database. It includes detailed assessments of experimental cross sections as well as attempts to benchmark these data against appropriate integral measurements

  17. Projectables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Troels A.; Merritt, Timothy R.

    2017-01-01

    CNC cutting machines have become essential tools for designers and architects enabling rapid prototyping, model-building and production of high quality components. Designers often cut from new materials, discarding the irregularly shaped remains. We introduce ProjecTables, a visual augmented...... reality system for interactive packing of model parts onto sheet materials. ProjecTables enables designers to (re)use scrap materials for CNC cutting that would have been previously thrown away, at the same time supporting aesthetic choices related to wood grain, avoiding surface blemishes, and other...... relevant material properties. We conducted evaluations of ProjecTables with design students from Aarhus School of Architecture, demonstrating that participants could quickly and easily place and orient model parts reducing material waste. Contextual interviews and ideation sessions led to a deeper...

  18. Electric power supply and demand 1978--1987 for the continuous United States as projected by the Regional Electric Reliability Councils in their April 1, 1978 long-range coordinated planning reports to the Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-15

    The Regional Reliability Council projections of peak demand, generating capability, and electric energy requirements for the contiguous U.S. have declined for the fourth consecutive year. On the basis of these projections, it appears that the electric utility industry believes the U.S. will experience smaller annual increases in power use than have occurred in the past. The summer peak demand growth rates of the Councils range from 3.52 percent annually, as projected by the Northeast Power Coordinating Council, to the 6.21 percent projected by the Southwest Power Pool. Subregional growth covers a wider range, from the 2.77 percent of the New York Power Pool to the 6.51 percent of the Southern Company area. Total reserve margins at the time of summer peak demands are projected to decline from an estimated 30.16 percent in 1978 to about 23.81 percent in 1987. If projected loads are not exceeded, if projected capability levels are actually attained, if fuel requirements are satisfied, and if no contingencies worse than those normally met with are experienced, electric power supply should be adequate for the next decade. However, it is possible that the projected reserve margins will not be attained, and that adequate primary energy supply (fuel and hydro) will not be available when needed. Completion of generating units and transmission facilities on schedule is made uncertain by difficulties related to financing, environmental pressures, procedural delays and some inadequacies with respect to quality control of manufactured and field-assembled components.

  19. Astrobiology in an Urban New York City High School: John Dewey High School's Space Science Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, B.; Dash, H. B.

    2010-04-01

    John Dewey High School's participation in NASA's MESDT and DLN projects and other partnerships provide opportunities for our diverse population, focusing particular attention to under-represented and under-served groups in the field of Space Science.

  20. Data collection and evaluation of continuity detail for John James Audubon Bridge No. 61390613004101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This report summarizes findings from monitoring data that was collected over a two-year period from Bridge No. : 61390613004101 in the John James Audubon Project, which was formerly designated as Bridge #2 prior to : construction completion. The brid...

  1. Nordic nuclear safety research program 1994-1997. Project coordination incl. SAM-4 general information issues. Report 1996. Plans for 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    NKS (Nordic Nuclear Safety Research) is a cooperative body in nuclear safety, radiation protection and emergency preparedness. Its purpose is to carry out cost-effective Nordic projects, thus producing research results, exercises, information, recommendations, manuals etc., to be used by decision makers and other concerned staff members at authorities and within the nuclear industry. This is the annual report for 1996, the third year of the fifth four-year NKS program (1994-1997). The report also contains plans for the rest of the program period, including budget proposals. The following major fields of research have been identified: reactor safety; radioactive waste; radioecology; emergency preparedness; and information issues. A total of nine projects are now under way within that framework. One project (RAK-1) is dedicated to reactor safety strategies: how to avoid serious accidents. A parallel project (RAK-2) deals with minimizing releases in case of an accident. When can an overheated reactor core still be water-cooled? What might be the consequences of the cooling? All Nordic countries have long-lived low and medium level radioactive waste that requires final disposal. One project (AFA-1) addresses that issue. Environmental impact of radioactive releases is studied in two radioecology projects. The project on marine radioecology, including sediment research (EKO-1), encompasses sampling, analysis and modeling. These are also key issues in the project on long ecological half-lives in semi-natural systems (EKO-2). The transfer of radioactive cesium and strontium in the chains soil - vegetation - sheep and mushroom - roe deer is studied, along with freshwater systems. Long-term doses to main is the ultimate output from the obtained models. Another aspect of environmental impact is emergency preparedness. A recently started project, EKO-5, addresses the issue of early planning for cleanup operations following a fallout. 'Early' in this context means within the

  2. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic and complementary tools for the study of micronutrient status and interactions in developing country populations exposed to multiple nutritional deficiencies. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    using isotopic and nuclear methods, the focus being primarily on the known incidence of Fe, I, vitamin A deficiencies in humans and the potential for deficiencies of other trace minerals (e.g. Zn, Cu, Se) due to inadequate intakes, and the possible interactions between nutrients (e.g. nutrient affecting the availability of another nutrient). This CRP aims to bring in several issues concerning micronutrient malnutrition under one project to enable participants to choose an area that best suits their country's public health problems. In addition, this CRP is aimed at the creation of a high educational level degree (e.g. PhD) from each participating center, and establishing a foundation for developing leadership skills among young nutrition professionals

  3. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic and complementary tools for the study of micronutrient status and interactions in developing country populations exposed to multiple nutritional deficiencies. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    using isotopic and nuclear methods, the focus being primarily on the known incidence of Fe, I, vitamin A deficiencies in humans and the potential for deficiencies of other trace minerals (e.g. Zn, Cu, Se) due to inadequate intakes, and the possible interactions between nutrients (e.g. nutrient affecting the availability of another nutrient). This CRP aims to bring in several issues concerning micronutrient malnutrition under one project to enable participants to choose an area that best suits their country's public health problems. In addition, this CRP is aimed at the creation of a high educational level degree (e.g. PhD) from each participating center, and establishing a foundation for developing leadership skills among young nutrition professionals.

  4. International Atomic Energy Agency Coordinated Research Project on Application of 3D Neutron Imaging and Tomography in Cultural Heritage Research. Report of the first Research Co-ordination Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Experts from the participating IAEA Member States presented their individual reports on their activities on Neutron Imaging (NI) as well as on Cultural Heritage (CH) studies. The participants also presented an overview of their facilities, ranging from conventional to advanced, and their plans for implementing or improving NI. From the presentations of the delegates it is evident that the current existing NI technology provides a unique non-destructive bulk analytical capability to the CH community. This technology entails 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional results, and is available at about 16 well equipped facilities throughout the world.The presentations also reported new techniques under development in NI which will be capable to further support the needs expressed by the CH community. These techniques expand the capability of the existing NI technology in the field of structural, chemical and elemental analysis. The CH-community favours non-invasive techniques to characterize their research objects, which include irreplaceable unique findings recovered from Archaeological-, Palaeontologic-, Human evolution- and Historical sites. Answers needed include identification of ancient manufacturing technology, detection of hidden features and objects, mensuration, authentication, provenance and identification of the best ways of conservation, etc. The experts welcome the initiation of a CRP to harmonize selected Neutron-based Imaging techniques in order to provide state-of-the-art end user services in the area of CH research. The CRP promotes NI technology utilization in all Member States, especially those in developing countries in order to encourage exploitation of all types of neutron sources for NI through CH research activities. These activities will establish and strengthen collaborations between the NI specialists and researchers from the CH community beyond the 3-year lifetime of this project. Standardization procedures and methodologies were addressed to achieve

  5. Report on the third research co-ordination meeting of the coordinated research project: 'The development of strategies for the effective monitoring of veterinary drug residues in livestock and livestock products in developing countries' (D3.20.22)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The third RCM for the CRP on the development of strategies for the effective monitoring of veterinary drug residues in livestock and livestock products in developing countries was held in Natal, Brazil, from 11-15 April 2005. The meeting was attended by ten Research Contract Holders, a second representative of the research group of the host country, two Research Agreement Holders, two Technical Contract Holders and the Scientific Secretary. The work in the second phase of this CRP has built upon the progress reported from the first phase, resulting in good quality immunoassay reagents, confirmatory methods and a number of validated methods. It is recommended that all contracts (with one exception), including technical contracts, be renewed to facilitate the completion of the work plans agreed at the meeting. A protocol for the validation of immunoassays will be provided by a Research Agreement Holder. The protocol has already been successfully applied for validation of an RIA method in Brazil. It is recommended that this protocol be adopted by all participants in the project to harmonize the validation of immunoassay methods developed. Work on the development of the 125 I-radioimmunoassay for chloramphenicol has not been satisfactory. It is recommended that this work is transferred to the research group in Brazil. The meeting agreed that the FAO/IAEA Joint Division's INFOCRIS database and associated e-learning modules are a very useful resource for developing country scientists. It is recommended to proceed with the expansion of the database as planned. In addition, it was suggested that a database and bibliography of original literature on, for example, pharmacokinetic and metabolism studies on veterinary drugs and hormonal growth promoters should be included. Much of this data was published many years ago and is very difficult to access, but is of importance in the design and development of methods. Some of the results generated by CRP participants should be

  6. Results and assessment of participation of VUPEK in coordinated research project of the IAEA ''Comparison of cost-effectiveness of risk reduction among different energy systems''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadlec, J.; Horacek, P.

    1989-01-01

    The results and conclusions are summarized of the research programme ''Comparison of cost-effectiveness of risk reduction among different energy systems'' co-ordinated in 1983 to 1988 by the International Atomic Energy Agency. Institutes in 18 member states were involved which performed 33 case studies in the field of risk reduction in various power systems or their parts. A comparison with cost-effectiveness of risk reduction in other fields was made as well. The health risks (occupational, those of population) and the environmental risks were evaluated. The case studies cover various stages of the decision-making process and various decision makers. The solution resulted in 5 methodological studies and 16 models. 11 case studies and 1 methodological study were conducted by the Research Institute of the Fuel and Energy Complex. The experiences obtained, the questions so far unanswered and recommendations for those who will perform similar studies are given. (author). 1 fig., 2 tabs., 3 refs

  7. Severity, probability and risk of accidents during maritime transport of radioactive material. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1995-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    The primary purpose of this CRP was to provide a co-ordinated international effort to assemble and evaluate relevant data using sound technical judgement concerning the effects that fires, explosions or breaches of hulls of ships might have on the integrity of radioactive material packages. The probability and expected consequences of such events could thereby be assessed. If it were shown that the proportion of maritime accidents with severity in excess of the IAEA regulatory requirements was expected to be higher than that for land transport, then pertinent proposals could be submitted to the forthcoming Revision Panels to amend the IAEA Regulations for Safe Transport of Radioactive Material and their supporting documents. Four main areas of research were included in the CRP. These consisted of studying the probability of ship accidents; fire; collision; and radiological consequences

  8. Severity, probability and risk of accidents during maritime transport of radioactive material. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1995-1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The primary purpose of this CRP was to provide a co-ordinated international effort to assemble and evaluate relevant data using sound technical judgement concerning the effects that fires, explosions or breaches of hulls of ships might have on the integrity of radioactive material packages. The probability and expected consequences of such events could thereby be assessed. If it were shown that the proportion of maritime accidents with severity in excess of the IAEA regulatory requirements was expected to be higher than that for land transport, then pertinent proposals could be submitted to the forthcoming Revision Panels to amend the IAEA Regulations for Safe Transport of Radioactive Material and their supporting documents. Four main areas of research were included in the CRP. These consisted of studying the probability of ship accidents; fire; collision; and radiological consequences.

  9. Radiological aspects of non-fixed contamination of packages and conveyances. Final report of a coordinated research project 2001-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    This publication reports the findings of an international Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) organized by the IAEA in which scientists from France, Germany, Japan, UK, USA and the World Nuclear Transport Institute participated. On the basis of extensive studies, the possible radiation exposure that may result due to the presence of non-fixed contamination on packages and conveyances has been estimated. The study reveals that the limits on non-fixed contamination prescribed in the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material and also adopted by the various other international and national regulations are adequate for ensuring that the potential radiation exposure of workers and public due to the presence of non-fixed contamination is not significant. Related work carried out by the researchers, which is reported in the CD-ROM supplied with this publication, provides useful leads for further work by researchers interested in estimating exposures from non-fixed contamination by a large variety of radionuclides

  10. Radiation synthesis and modification of polymers for biomedical applications. Final results of a co-ordinated research project. 1996-2000

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Radiation techniques are being used for synthesis of hydrogels, functional polymers, interpenetrating systems, chemical modification of surfaces, immobilization of bioactive materials, synthesis of functional micro- and nanospheres and processing of naturally derived biomaterials. Potential medical applications of these biomaterials include implants, topical dressings, treatment devices and drug delivery systems. Biotechnological applications include diagnostic assays, separation and purification systems, immobilized enzyme and cell bioprocesses and cell culture surfaces. The main objective of the CRP on The use of Radiation Processing to Prepare Biomaterials for Application in Medicine was to co-ordinate the research carried out in the participating countries, to ensure that different research programmes complement each other and the information exchange is available to all. Furthermore, the objective was to expand the use of ionizing radiation in two major areas: synthesis of polymers and gels for medical a...

  11. Johns Hopkins Particulate Matter Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Johns Hopkins Particulate Matter Research Center will map health risks of PM across the US based on analyses of national databases on air pollution, mortality,...

  12. 2008 St. Johns County, FL Countywide Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne terrestrial LiDAR was collected for St. Johns County, FL. System Parameters/Flight Plan. The LiDAR system acquisition parameters were developed based on a...

  13. John Dewey--Philosopher and Educational Reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Kandan

    2015-01-01

    John Dewey was an American philosopher and educator, founder of the philosophical movement known as pragmatism, a pioneer in functional psychology, and a leader of the progressive movement in education in the United States.

  14. Vähesed head portfellihaldurid / John Mauldin

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mauldin, John

    2005-01-01

    USA investeerimisnõustaja olulisematest põhimõtetest ja -reeglitest portfellihaldurite valikul. Investeerimissüsteemi analüüsist, minevikutootluse väheolulisusest ja fondimaailmas ellujäämisvõimalustest. Vt. samas: John Maudlin

  15. John Bell and the Identical Twins

    CERN Multimedia

    1984-01-01

    A biographical profile of John S.Bell is presented based on extensive interviews the author had with Bell. Bell’s vierws on the quantum theory are presented along with a simple explanation of his idenity.

  16. Translating The Infinities by John Banville

    OpenAIRE

    Irene Abigail Piccinini

    2015-01-01

    Abstract - John Banville’s talent as a prose stylist is widely recognized. The polished elegance of his phrases constitutes a continuing and fascinating challenge for his translator, due to the intricacies of the source text, its manifold registers and lexical choices. In his novel The Infinities, in Italian Teoria degli Infiniti, John Banville takes cue from Kleist’s Amphytrion to devise a novel where classicality interweaves with science and science fiction through the invention of a world ...

  17. Would John Stuart Mill have regulated pornography?

    OpenAIRE

    McGlynn, C.; Ward, I.

    2014-01-01

    John Stuart Mill dominates contemporary pornography debates where he is routinely invoked as an authoritative defence against regulation. This article, by contrast, argues that a broader understanding of Mill's ethical liberalism, his utilitarianism, and his feminism casts doubt over such an assumption. New insights into Mill's approach to sex, sexual activity, and the regulation of prostitution reveal an altogether more nuanced and activist approach. We conclude that John Stuart Mill would a...

  18. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Zeuner and A. Ball

    2013-01-01

    LS1 overview In general the LS1 project is progressing well and the workflow is holding to the original December 2012 schedule within two–three weeks, acceptable at this stage, with about 400 work packages already completed. In particular, the critical logistic configuration planned for summer 2013, giving simultaneous access to both ends of the vacuum tank interior and the exterior, plus the YE1 nose zones, was achieved significantly before the deadline at the end of June. The safety awareness of all those working on the CMS detector is currently very satisfactory and the general atmosphere at Point 5 is good, despite many concurrent activities and inevitable last minute adjustments to the day-to-day planning. LS1 services infrastructure work The “once-in-ten years” maintenance of the water-cooling infrastructure has been completed successfully by EN department teams; underground circuits were available again from 12 June. In the shadow of this activity, consolidation and m...

  19. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2011-01-01

    In this report we will review the main achievements of the Technical Stop and the progress of several centrally-managed projects to support CMS operation and maintenance and prepare the way for upgrades. Overview of the extended Technical Stop  The principal objectives of the extended Technical Stop affecting the detector itself were the installation of the TOTEM T1 telescopes on both ends, the readjustment of the alignment link-disk in YE-2, the replacement of the light-guide sleeves for all PMs of both HFs, and some repairs on TOTEM T2 and CASTOR. The most significant tasks were, however, concentrated on the supporting infrastructure. A detailed line-by-line leak search was performed in the C6F14 cooling system of the Tracker, followed by the installation of variable-frequency drives on the pump motors of the SS1 and SS2 tracker cooling plants to reduce pressure transients during start-up. In the electrical system, larger harmonic filters were installed in ...

  20. John Archibald Wheeler: A study of mentoring in modern physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Terry M.

    This dissertation has two objectives. The first objective is to determine where best to situate the study of mentoring (i.e. the 'making of scientists') on the landscape of the history of science and science studies. This task is accomplished by establishing mentoring studies as a link between the robust body of literature dealing with Research Schools and the emerging scholarship surrounding the development, dispersion, and evolution of pedagogy in the training of twentieth century physicists. The second, and perhaps more significant and novel objective, is to develop a means to quantitatively assess the mentoring workmanship of scientific craftsmen who preside over the final stages of preparation when apprentices are transformed into professional scientists. The project builds upon a 2006 Master's Thesis that examined John Archibald Wheeler's work as a mentor of theoretical physicists at Princeton University in the years 1938--1976. It includes Wheeler's work as a mentor at the University of Texas and is qualitatively and quantitatively enhanced by virtue of the author having access to five separate collections with archival holdings of John Wheeler's papers and correspondence, as well as having access to thirty one tape recorded interviews that feature John Wheeler as either the interviewee or a prominent subject of discussion. The project also benefited from the opportunity to meet with and gather background information from a number of John Wheeler's former colleagues and students. Included in the dissertation is a content analysis of the acknowledgements in 949 Ph.D. dissertations, 122 Master's Theses, and 670 Senior Theses that were submitted during Wheeler's career as an active mentor. By establishing a census of the students of the most active mentors at Princeton and Texas, it is possible to tabulate the publication record of these apprentice groups and obtain objective measures of mentoring efficacy. The dissertation concludes by discussing the wider

  1. Obituary: John W. Firor (1927-2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Peter A.

    2009-12-01

    John W. Firor, a former Director of the High Altitude Observatory and the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and a founder of the Solar Physics Division of the American Astronomical Society, died of Alzheimer's disease in Pullman, Washington on November 5, 2007, he was 80. He was born in Athens Georgia on October 18, 1927, where his father was a professor of agricultural economics. John had an unusually diverse scientific career. His interest in physics and astrophysics began while serving in the army, during which time he was assigned to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, where he guarded highly radioactive materials (many have heard him describe how informal the protections were compared to later times). After his service he returned to college and graduated in physics from Georgia Tech in 1949. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1954, writing his thesis on cosmic rays under John Simpson. John Firor would later remark that: "If you needed cosmic rays to actually do anything, you are sunk." That thought, partly in jest, may help explain his motivation for moving to so many new scientific and management pursuits. John moved from cosmic ray physics to radio astronomy (particularly of the Sun) when he began work at the Carnegie Institution of Washington's Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, where he remained until 1961. During this time, he met Walter Orr Roberts, then the Director of the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) in Boulder, Colorado. HAO was then affiliated with the University of Colorado. In 1959, a movement began to upgrade the atmospheric sciences in the United States by establishing a National Center, where the largest, most important atmospheric research problems could be addressed. Roberts became the first Director of NCAR, as well as the first president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), the consortium of universities that was commissioned to manage and staff the new Center. HAO became a

  2. RADON-type disposal facility safety case for the co-ordinated research project on improvement of safety assessment methodologies for near surface radioactive waste disposal facilities (ISAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guskov, A.; Batanjieva, B.; Kozak, M.W.; Torres-Vidal, C.

    2002-01-01

    The ISAM safety assessment methodology was applied to RADON-type facilities. The assessments conducted through the ISAM project were among the first conducted for these kinds of facilities. These assessments are anticipated to lead to significantly improved levels of safety in countries with such facilities. Experience gained though this RADON-type Safety Case was already used in Russia while developing national regulatory documents. (author)

  3. Radiation synthesis and modification of polymers for biomedical applications. Final results of a co-ordinated research project. 1996-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-12-01

    Radiation techniques are being used for synthesis of hydrogels, functional polymers, interpenetrating systems, chemical modification of surfaces, immobilization of bioactive materials, synthesis of functional micro- and nanospheres and processing of naturally derived biomaterials. Potential medical applications of these biomaterials include implants, topical dressings, treatment devices and drug delivery systems. Biotechnological applications include diagnostic assays, separation and purification systems, immobilized enzyme and cell bioprocesses and cell culture surfaces. The main objective of the CRP on The use of Radiation Processing to Prepare Biomaterials for Application in Medicine was to co-ordinate the research carried out in the participating countries, to ensure that different research programmes complement each other and the information exchange is available to all. Furthermore, the objective was to expand the use of ionizing radiation in two major areas: synthesis of polymers and gels for medical and biotechnological applications, and modification of surfaces to achieve a specific functionality and/or to immobilize bioactive materials. This publication contains 10 reports of participants; each of the reports has been indexed separately.

  4. Radiation synthesis and modification of polymers for biomedical applications. Final results of a co-ordinated research project. 1996-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-12-01

    Radiation techniques are being used for synthesis of hydrogels, functional polymers, interpenetrating systems, chemical modification of surfaces, immobilization of bioactive materials, synthesis of functional micro- and nanospheres and processing of naturally derived biomaterials. Potential medical applications of these biomaterials include implants, topical dressings, treatment devices and drug delivery systems. Biotechnological applications include diagnostic assays, separation and purification systems, immobilized enzyme and cell bioprocesses and cell culture surfaces. The main objective of the CRP on The use of Radiation Processing to Prepare Biomaterials for Application in Medicine was to co-ordinate the research carried out in the participating countries, to ensure that different research programmes complement each other and the information exchange is available to all. Furthermore, the objective was to expand the use of ionizing radiation in two major areas: synthesis of polymers and gels for medical and biotechnological applications, and modification of surfaces to achieve a specific functionality and/or to immobilize bioactive materials. This publication contains 10 reports of participants; each of the reports has been indexed separately

  5. Coordinating Group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    In December 1992, western governors and four federal agencies established a Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-site Innovative Technologies for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (the DOIT Committee). The purpose of the Committee is to advise the federal government on ways to improve waste cleanup technology development and the cleanup of federal sites in the West. The Committee directed in January 1993 that information be collected from a wide range of potential stakeholders and that innovative technology candidate projects be identified, organized, set in motion, and evaluated to test new partnerships, regulatory approaches, and technologies which will lead to improve site cleanup. Five working groups were organized, one to develop broad project selection and evaluation criteria and four to focus on specific contaminant problems. A Coordinating Group comprised of working group spokesmen and federal and state representatives, was set up to plan and organize the routine functioning of these working groups. The working groups were charged with defining particular contaminant problems; identifying shortcomings in technology development, stakeholder involvement, regulatory review, and commercialization which impede the resolution of these problems; and identifying candidate sites or technologies which could serve as regional innovative demonstration projects to test new approaches to overcome the shortcomings. This report from the Coordinating Group to the DOIT Committee highlights the key findings and opportunities uncovered by these fact-finding working groups. It provides a basis from which recommendations from the DOIT Committee to the federal government can be made. It also includes observations from two public roundtables, one on commercialization and another on regulatory and institutional barriers impeding technology development and cleanup

  6. Back-to-back technical meetings (TMs): 'TM on the coordinated project (CRP) analyses of and lessons learned from the operational experience with fast reactor equipment and systems' and 'TM to coordinate the Agency's fast reactor knowledge preservation international project in Russia'. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    follow-up of the actions and commitments), the IAEA will also organize coordinate d research projects on specific topics of relevance to fast reactor knowledge preservation issues.

  7. Low carbon logistics through supply chain design and coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    "In this project, we propose to address carbon emissions in logistics through supply chain design, planning and : coordination. We argue that (1) supply chain design, planning, and coordination can help reduce carbon emissions : significantly, (2) su...

  8. The emergency to home project: impact of an emergency department care coordinator on hospital admission and emergency department utilization among seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Christopher Matthew; Freiheit, Elizabeth A; Podruzny, Lesley; Kingsly, Alianu Akawakun; Wang, Dongmei; Davenport, Jamie; Gutscher, Abram; Askin, Cathy; Taylor, Allison; Lee, Vivian; Choo, Queenie; Lang, Eddy Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Seniors comprise 14% to 21% of all emergency department (ED) visits, yet are disproportionately larger users of ED and inpatient resources. ED care coordinators (EDCCs) target seniors at risk for functional decline and connect them to home care and other community services in hopes of avoiding hospitalization. The goal of this study was to measure the association between the presence of EDCCs and admission rates for seniors aged ≥ 65. Secondary outcomes included length of stay, recidivism at 30 days, and revisit resulting in admission at 30 days. This was a matched pairs study using administrative data from eight EDs in six Alberta cities. Four of these hospitals were intervention sites, in which patients were seen by an EDCC, while the other four sites had no EDCC presence. All seniors aged ≥ 65 with a discharge diagnosis of fall or musculoskeletal pathology were included. Cases were matched by CTAS category, age, gender, mode of arrival, and home living environment. McNemar's test for matched pairs was used to compare admission and recidivism rates at EDCC and non-EDCC hospitals. A paired t-test was used to compare length of stay between groups. There were no statistically significant differences for baseline admission rate, revisit rate at 30 days, and readmission rate at 30 days between EDCC and non-EDCC patients. This study showed no reduction in senior patients' admission rates, recidivism at 30 days, or hospital length of stay when comparing seniors seen by an EDCC with those not seen by an EDCC.

  9. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting of the co-ordinated research project: 'The development of strategies for the effective monitoring of veterinary drug residues in livestock and livestock products in developing countries' (D3.20.22)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'the development of strategies for the effective monitoring of veterinary drug residues in livestock and livestock products in developing countries' was held in the Vienna International Centre from 2 to 6 September 2002. Twelve Research Contracts (RCs) and 3 Research Agreements (RAs) have been awarded under this CRP and all awardees, the Project Officer and a guest speaker from the Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AAHFS) participated in the RCM. The objective of the RCM was to plan the first phase of the CRP, initiation of the development and validation of methods. Specific objectives were to: Agree upon a small number of veterinary drugs upon which to focus the research; Agree upon analytical methodologies to be employed; formulate individual work plans for each research contract holder within the framework of the overall work plan. Each RC holder presented an overview of residues monitoring from the perspective of their respective countries. Emphasis was placed on problems encountered and future requirements. The participants visited the Austrian National Reference Laboratory for veterinary drug residues at Moedling and discussed the activities there with Mr. Kuhn and laboratory staff. An overall framework for phase of the CRP, focusing upon the compounds and analytical techniques of major importance to the majority of participants, was formulated. Each RC holder discussed and revised their individual work plan with the RA holders and the PO. The overall framework was then reviewed and a summary of the individual work plans presented. Conclusions and recommendations were drafted

  10. The Equatorial Coordinates and B-Magnitudes of the Stars in the Southern Hemisphere Zones Based on the Digitized Astronegatives of FON Project at the Ulugh Beg Astronomical Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuldoshev, Q. X.; Muminov, M. M.; Ehgamberdiev, Sh. A.; Usmanov, O. U.; Relke, H.; Protsyuk, Yu. I.; Kovylianska, O. E.; Protsyuk, S. V.; Andruk, V. N.

    FON (Russian abbreviation of the Photographic Sky Survey) were carried out at 6 observatories. The Kitab Observatory (KO) of Ulugh Beg Astronomical Institute (UBAI) of the Uzbek Academy of Sciences (UzAS) was involved in this project from 1981 to 1996. For the observations the Double Astrograph of Zeiss (DAZ, D/F = 40/300, 69"/mm) was used. On the FON project about 2600 photographic plates were exposed. In October, 2015 digitization of these astroplates were started using EPSON Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner with the spatial resolution of 1200 dpi and completed in June, 2016. The first stage of the work is the processing of the 2000 photographic plates in zones of the southern hemisphere with the declination between 0 and -20 degrees. The 1704 plates have already been processed. The equatorial coordinates α, δ of stars and galaxies were determined in the system of the Tycho2 catalogue and the Bmagnitudes in the system of the photoelectric standards. UBAI UzAS, Tashkent (Uzbekistan), ASU, Andijan (Uzbekistan), WHO, Essen (Germany), RI NAO, Nikolaev (Ukraine), MAO NASU, Kyiv (Ukraine) have taken part in the processing of the digitized images. For the data reduction the MIDAS package and software, developed in the MAO NASU were used. Based on the results of the processing of the astronegatives in the sectors of right ascension from 0 hours to 24 hours and declination from - 20° to 0° the internal errors of the catalogue were estimated. The errors calculated for all stars are 0.17" and 0.18m respectively. For the stars brighter than 14 magnitude the errors are 0.08" and 0.07m for the equatorial coordinates and B-magnitudes respectively.

  11. Coordination Approaches for Complex Software Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosse, T.; Hoogendoorn, M.; Treur, J.

    2006-01-01

    This document presents the results of a collaboration between the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Artificial Intelligence and Force Vision to investigate coordination approaches for complex software systems. The project was funded by Force Vision.

  12. Obituary: John Louis Perdrix, 1926-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchiston, D. Wayne

    2006-12-01

    John Perdrix, astronomical historian and co-founder of the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage, died on 27 June 2005. John Louis Perdrix was born in Adelaide, Australia, on 30 June 1926. After studying chemistry at Melbourne Technical College and working in industry, he joined the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation's Division of Minerals and Geochemistry. In 1974 the Division relocated to the Western Australian capital, Perth, and John spent the rest of his working life there involved in geochemical research. From his teenage years John had a passion for astronomy, which he fine-tuned through the Astronomical Society of Victoria and the Victorian Branch of the British Astronomical Association. He was very active in both groups, serving as President of the former and Secretary/Treasurer of the latter. He was also an FRAS, and a member of the AAS, the BAA parent body, and the IAU (Commission 41)?no mean feat for an Australian amateur astronomer. Throughout his life, he was a strong advocate of close amateur-professional relations. John's main research interest was history of astronomy, and over the years he wrote a succession of research papers, mainly about aspects of Australian astronomy. His well-researched and neatly-illustrated papers on the Melbourne Observatory and the Great Melbourne Telescope are classics, and when the Observatory's future was in the balance they played a key role in the State Government's decision to convert this unique facility into a museum precinct. To support his research activities, John built up an amazing library that developed its own distinctive personality and quickly took over his house and garage before invading commercial storage facilities! Apart from writing papers, John had an even greater passion for editing and publishing. From 1985 to 1997 he produced the Australian Journal of Astronomy, and in 1998 this was replaced by the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage (JAH2). Both

  13. Performance of engineered barrier materials in near surface disposal facilities for radioactive waste. Results of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    The primary objectives of the CRP were to: promote the sharing of experiences of the Member States in their application of engineered barrier materials for near surface disposal facilities; help enhance their use of engineered barriers by improving techniques and methods for selecting, planning and testing performance of various types of barrier materials for near surface disposal facilities. The objective of this publication is to provide and overview of technical issues related to the engineered barrier systems and a summary of the major findings of each individual research project that was carried out within the framework of the CRP. This publication deals with a general overview of engineered barriers in near surface disposal facilities, key technical information obtained within the CRP and overall conclusions and recommendations for future research and development activities. Appendices presenting individual research accomplishments are also provided. Each of the 13 appendices was indexed separately

  14. Bathymetry (2011) for Fish Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a LiDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) 0.3x0.3 meter resolution depth surface for Fish Bay, St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI). The...

  15. The Bildungsroman in Cameroon Anglophone Literature: John ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigates the bildungsroman genre in postcolonial Cameroon Anglophone fiction through a textual analysis of John Nkemngong Nkengasong's Across the Mongolo and Margaret Afuh's Born before Her Time. It seeks to show that these two writers have borrowed a foreign genre and successfully manipulated ...

  16. Capitalism in Six Westerns by John Ford

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Carlos Rodriguez

    2011-01-01

    The economic and institutional analysis of capitalism can be illustrated through John Ford's Westerns. This article focuses on six classics by Ford that show the move toward modern order, the creation of a new society, and the rule of law. Economic features are pervading, from property rights and contracts to markets, money, and trade. Ford has…

  17. John Dewey in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Morgan K.

    2017-01-01

    John Dewey was a pragmatist, progressivist, educator, philosopher, and social reformer (Gutek, 2014). Dewey's various roles greatly impacted education, and he was perhaps one of the most influential educational philosophers known to date (Theobald, 2009). Dewey's influence on education was evident in his theory about social learning; he believed…

  18. Preparing for Citizenship: Bring Back John Dewey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pring, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The paper traces the development of citizenship in the curriculum in England since the 1960s, emerging particularly from the Crick report. It argues for lessons to be learnt from John Dewey's "Democracy and education", the centenary of which is being celebrated this year.

  19. We, John Dewey's Audience of Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Marcus Vinicius

    2016-01-01

    This article suggests that John Dewey's "Democracy and Education" does not describe education in an existing society, but it conveys a utopia, in the sense coined by Mannheim: utopian thought aims at instigating actions towards the transformation of reality, intending to attain a better world in the future. Today's readers of Dewey (his…

  20. Jean Piaget's Debt to John Dewey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Jean Piaget became a veritable institution unto himself in education and psychology, largely as the result of his developmental-stage theory advanced over the second quarter of the twentieth century. Not until Piaget was 73 did he make mention of John Dewey's work at Dewey's laboratory school, founded in 1894 at the University of Chicago. But here…

  1. John Deweys kritik af liberal education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huggler, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with John Dewey's aversion against liberal education and his concern about a 'dual track' educational system separating liberal education and vocational education. It investigates the reason why Dewey maintains that the philosophical 'dualisms' culminate in the question on vocation....

  2. Astronaut John Glenn Enters Friendship 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-01-01

    Astronaut John Glenn enters the Mercury spacecraft, Friendship 7, prior to the launch of MA-6 on February 20, 1961 and became the first American who orbited the Earth. The MA-6 mission was the first manned orbital flight boosted by the Mercury-Atlas vehicle, a modified Atlas ICBM (Intercontinental Ballistic Missile), lasted for five hours, and orbited the Earth three times.

  3. The Johns Hopkins Hospital: A Summer Internship

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Adam Smith, a native of Richmond, Indiana, is an advanced pharmacy practice student in the College of Pharmacy at Purdue University. In this article, he describes how career exploration through a summer internship with The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland solidified his desire to pursue a career in pharmacy administration.

  4. John R. Commons: Pioneer in Labor Economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbash, Jack

    1989-01-01

    John R. Commons has contributed in one way or another to pratically every piece of social and labor legislation that has been enacted in the twentieth century. He has made his mark on such diverse aspects of American labor as apprenticeship, vocational education, workers' compensation, and the administration of labor law. (Author/JOW)

  5. John Maynard Smith (1920-2004)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 11. John Maynard Smith (1920-2004) - “One of the last Grand Evolutionary Theorists of the 20th Century”. Vidyanand Nanjundiah. General Article Volume 10 Issue 11 November 2005 pp 70-78 ...

  6. In Memoriam: Dr. Frank John Fenner

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast reflects on one of the greatest pioneers in virology, Dr. Frank John Fenner. Dr. Frederick Murphy, a member of EID's editorial board and the Institute of Medicine, and professor of Pathology at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, shares professional and personal stories of Dr. Frank Fenner.

  7. Obituary: John Leroy Climenhaga, 1916-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, Colin

    2009-01-01

    John Leroy Climenhaga was born on 7 November 1916 on a farm some 10 km from Delisle, a small town on the Canadian prairies, located about 50 km south-west of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, and died at his home in Victoria, British Columbia, on 27 May 2008. His parents, Reuben and Elizabeth (nee Bert) Climenhaga, were farming folk, and he carried their honest and open attitude to the world throughout his life. John was the seventh born, and last to die, of their ten children. His father also served as an ordained minister of the Brethren in Christ. In early adulthood, John worked on his father's farm, but then attended the University of Saskatchewan, obtaining a B.A. with Honors in Mathematics and Physics and an M.A. in Physics, in 1945 and 1949 respectively. Between these events he worked as a Physics Instructor at Regina College from 1946 to 1948. In 1949 Climenhaga joined the faculty of Victoria College, as one of only two physicists in a small institution that was then part of the University of British Columbia. He remained in Victoria for the rest of his career, playing a major role in the College's growth into a full-fledged university, complete with thriving graduate programs in physics and astronomy as well as in many other fields. He served as Head of the Physics Department during the 1960s, a period which saw the College become the University of Victoria, with a full undergraduate program in Physics, and campaigned successfully for the establishment of a program in Astronomy, which began in 1965. From 1969 until 1972 he held the position of Dean of Arts and Science, and championed the university's participation in the Tri-University Meson Facility, whose high-current medium-energy beam was ideal for the production and study of mesons and their physics. That period was a turbulent one in the university's history, but John's integrity and his balanced and fair-minded approach to conflicts were of immeasurable importance in steering the young institution through it

  8. El último libro de John Strachey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helcías Martán Góngora

    1965-08-01

    Full Text Available Fue muy largo el sendero ideológico que hubo de recorrer el inglés John Strachey en la busqueda íntima de una respuesta a su inquirir constante. En su viaje interior escuchó, a la siniestra, también la voz de las sirenas socialistas.

  9. John Smith - eesti kunstnik / Ants Juske

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Juske, Ants, 1956-2016

    2006-01-01

    Marko Mäetamme ja Kaido Ole kollektiivsest loomingust, mida esitatakse John Smithi autorinime all, mõnda ka salapärase J. Smithi nn. biograafiast. Illustratsiooniks J. Smith'i "Jumalate maailm I (fragment). Õli, lõuend, 2002. Erakogu

  10. John Dewey on Philosophy and Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Maughn; Granger, David

    2012-01-01

    John Dewey was not a philosopher of education in the now-traditional sense of a doctor of philosophy who examines educational ends, means, and controversies through the disciplinary lenses of epistemology, ethics, and political theory, or of agenda-driven schools such as existentialism, feminism, and critical theory. Rather, Dewey was both an…

  11. Bathymetry (2011) for Coral Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a LiDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) 0.3x0.3 meter resolution depth surface for Coral Bay, St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI). The...

  12. Optimisation of water chemistry to ensure reliable water reactor fuel performance at high burnup and in ageing plant (FUWAC): an International Atomic Energy Agency coordinated research project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killeen, J.C. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Nordmann, F. [Advanced Nuclear Technology International Europe AB, Beauchamp (France); Schunk, J. [Paks NPP (Hungary); Vonkova, K. [Nuclear Research Inst., Rez (Czech Republic)

    2010-07-01

    The IAEA project 'Optimisation of Water Chemistry to ensure Reliable Water Reactor Fuel Performance at High Burnup and in Aging Plant' (FUWAC) was initiated with the objectives of monitoring, maintaining and optimising water chemistry regimes in primary circuits of water cooled power reactors, taking into account high burnup operation, mixed cores and plant aging, including following issues and remedies. This report provides some highlights of the work undertaken by the project participants. Clad oxidation studies have been undertaken and include operational data from the South Ukraine WWER where no corrosion problems have been seen on either Westinghouse ZIRLO™ or Russian alloy E110 fuel cladding. Work on the Russian alloy E110 showed that potassium in the coolant is preferable to lithium for mitigating fuel cladding oxidation. Studies on crud behaviour in PWR have shown a dependence on crud thickness and pHT. The nature and mechanisms for boron deposition in fuel cladding cruds have been investigated which is the root cause of crud induced power shifts (CIPS). Operational experience at French PWRs shows no difference in the CIPS behaviour between units with Alloy 600 or 690 steam generators, whilst Korean experience provides information on the Ni/Fe ratio on fuel cladding crud and the occurrence of CIPS. Coolant additions have been studied, for example in BWR units using zinc addition, crud is more tenacious. Zinc is also added to PWR units, mainly for dose rate control and in some cases for PWSCC mitigation of Alloy 600. At low levels there has been no clear evidence of any effect of zinc on CIPS, but there is a benefit on fuel oxidation. It is suggested that zinc addition should be considered where there is SG replacement or fuel core management modification. One possibility for the elimination of fuel crud is decontamination. Such an operation is time consuming, expensive, includes several risks of corrosion and induces a large quantity of

  13. Improvement in image quality. Results of a pilot project coordinated by the International Atomic Energy Agency in the Republic of Moldova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplanis, P.A.; Rehani, M.M.; Chupov, A.; ); Bahnarel, I.; Roshka, A.; Catrinici, V.; Rabovila, E.; Donos, V.; Guzun, E.; Crivoi, V.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this Pilot Project was to perform reanalysis and image quality checks, pin point problems, suggest methods of improvement. Seven departments/rooms participated in the study. The work was conducted in two phases. A total of 1538 films were evaluated over the period of May, 12-23 2003. The films were first evaluated by a radiographer and the reject rate at radiographer level was estimated. After the data of the analysis was collected, the experts of the IAEA evaluated the results. They identified suggestions for each department, based on the results and the aim of improvement of the image quality. This was called the Quality Control (QC) step and required different levels of emphasis to parameters i different hospitals. After each department adopted the QC actions, the image quality analysis was performed once again to investigate whether or not the suggestions helped towards the improvement of image quality. In this phase 1411 films were evaluated during the period of 09.22.2003-10.03.2003. Review of the first phase results indicated that the following causes contributed to poor quality films: kVp error, improper collimation, radiation output problems, scratchers due to hanger, intensifying screen problems, improper processing, finger marks and darkroom light leak. Corrective actions, qualitative control steps, were suggested on these factors. (authors)

  14. Progress report on Freeform Calibrations on Coordinate Measureing Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savio, Enrico; Meneghello, R.; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    This report is made as a part of the project Easytrac, an EU project under the programme: Competitive and Sustainable Growth: Contract No: G6RD-CT-2000-00188, coordinated by UNIMETRIK S.A. (Spain). The project is concerned with low uncertainty calibrations on coordinate measuring machines...

  15. Obituary: Michael John Klein, 1940-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulkis, Samuel

    2006-12-01

    Michael John Klein died on 14 May 2005 at home in South Pasadena, California. The cause of death was tongue cancer that metastasized to the lungs. He was a non-smoker. Mike was a passionate radio astronomer, a trusted astronomical observer, an educator and a family man. Mike was born on 19 January 1940 in Ames, Iowa, the son of Florence Marie (Graf) and Fred Michael Klein. His mother was a homemaker, and his father was a banker. Mike had two older sisters, Lois Jean (Klein) Flauher and Marilyn June (Klein) Griffin. In 1962, Mike married his high school sweetheart Barbara Dahlberg, who survives him along with their three children, Kristin Marie (Klein) Shields, Michael John Klein Jr., Timothy Joel Klein, and six grandchildren. Mike developed a love for astronomy early in his life, and credited an early morning, newspaper-delivery route that he had at age twelve, which took him outside well before sunrise. He told family members that as he walked along his route, he stared into the sky and wondered what everything was. He studied sky charts, located stars, and began to understand how the planets shifted their positions relative to the stars each day. Another big influence in Mike's life was his brother in-law, Jim Griffin. Jim helped Mike understand that his passion for science did not have to remain a hobby, but could and should become a career. Jim's encouragement led Mike to attend Iowa State University in Ames, where he earned a BS in electrical engineering in 1962. Mike then started graduate school in electrical engineering at Michigan State, but after one semester transferred to the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where he earned an MS (1966) and PhD (1968) in astronomy. His doctoral dissertation, under the direction of Professor Fred Haddock, was based on extensive observations of the planets and examined the physical and thermal properties of planetary atmospheres and surfaces. Mike was awarded a Resident Research Associate position at JPL by the National

  16. Commissioning of radiotherapy treatment planning systems: Testing for typical external beam treatment techniques. Report of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Procedures for Quality Assurance of Dosimetry Calculations in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Quality Assurance (QA) in the radiation therapy treatment planning process is essential to ensure accurate dose delivery to the patient and to minimize the possibility of accidental exposure. Computerized radiotherapy treatment planning systems (RTPSs) are now widely available in both industrialised and developing countries so, it is of special importance to support hospitals in the IAEA Member States in developing procedures for acceptance testing, commissioning and ongoing QA of their RTPSs. Responding to these needs, a group of experts developed a comprehensive report, the IAEA Technical Reports Series No 430 'Commissioning and quality assurance of computerized planning systems for radiation treatment of cancer', that provides the general framework and describes a large number of tests and procedures to be considered by the RTPS users. To provide practical guidance for implementation of IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 430 in radiotherapy hospitals and particularly in those with limited resources, a coordinated research project (CRP E2.40.13) 'Development of procedures for dosimetry calculation in radiotherapy' was established. The main goal of the project was to create a set of practical acceptance and commissioning tests for dosimetry calculations in radiotherapy, defined in a dedicated protocol. Two specific guidance publications that were developed in the framework of the Coordinated Research Project E2.40.13 are based on guidelines described in the IAEA Technical Report Series No. 430 and provide a step-by-step description for users at hospitals or cancer centres how to implement acceptance and commissioning procedures for their RTPSs. The first publication, 'Specification and acceptance testing of radiotherapy treatment planning systems' IAEA-TECDOC-1540 uses the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard IEC 62083 as its basis and addresses the procedures for specification and acceptance testing of RTPSs to be used by both manufacturers and

  17. A New Reading of Shakespeare's King John.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Peter D.

    1995-12-01

    Shakespeare wrote King John c.1594, six years after the defeat of the Spanish Armada, and ~ 50 years after publication of the Copernican heliocentric hypothesis. It is said to be the most unhistorical of the History Plays, ``anomalous'', ``puzzling'', and ``odd'', and as such it has engendered far more than the customary range of interpretive opinion. I suggest that the play alerts Elizabethans not just to military and political threats, but to a changing cosmic world view, all especially threatening as they arise in Catholic countries. (a) Personification characterizes the play. John personifies the old order, while Arthur and the Dauphin's armies personify the new. I suggest that Shakespeare decenters King John just as Copernicus decentered the world. (b) Hubert menaces Arthur's eyes for a whole scene (4.1), but the need for such cruelty is not explained and is especially odd as Arthur is already under sentence of death (3.3.65-66). This hitherto unexplained anomaly suggests that the old order fears what the new might see. (c) Eleanor's confession is made only to Heaven and to her son the King (1.1.42-43), yet by echoing and word play the Messenger from France later reveals to John that he is privy to it (4.2.119-124). This circumstance has not been questioned heretofore. I suggest that the Messenger is like the wily Hermes (Mercury), chief communicator of the gods and patron of the sciences; by revealing that he moves in the highest circles, he tells John that he speaks with an authority that transcends even that of a king. The message from on high presages more than political change; it warns of a new cosmic and religious world order (d) Most agree that John is a weak king, so Shakespeare must have suspected flaws in the old ways. He would have known that Tycho Brahe's new star of 1572, the comet of 1577, and the 1576 model of his compatriot Thomas Digges, were shattering old ideas. (e) The tensions of the play are not resolved because in 1594 the new order was

  18. John Holt Stanway: Gone to Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, J.

    2008-01-01

    John Holt Stanway (1799Ð1872) was an amateur astronomer who lived in Manchester, England until 1845. He was in contact with the English Ôgrand amateurÕ astronomer, William Henry Smyth, who supported him for Fellowship of the Royal Astronomical Society and evidently advised him on how to build and equip an observatory. Apparently, Stanway had an observatory at Chorlton-cum-Hardy in 1837. In 1845, Stanway left for the United States in response to serious business problems. En route, he met Ashbel Smith, a representative of the government of the Republic of Texas, who convinced Stanway to go to Texas. There he changed his name to John H. Smythe Stanley and settled in Houston, where he re-established his observatory. He became a commercial photographer and wrote about astronomy and other scientific subjects in Houston newspapers until his death in 1872.

  19. Germany [Summary country report on coordinated research project on development of protocols for corrosion and deposit evaluation in large diameter pipes by radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In the framework of the CRP, Germany provided certified stepped film density strips for the calibration of film densitometers. They were used by each participant in his own country to validate the density measurements made in the radiographs prepared from the test specimen. According to the working plan, BAM belongs to Group 2 (8 and 12 inch pipe diameter, Co 60 available). The necessary raw pipe material was ordered and the corresponding drawings for machining were prepared in 2003. Because of weight and handiness it was decided to cut each of the two pipes into 2 halves, i.e. one half with outer steps and the other half with inner steps. In this way, a total number of 4 pipes were produced. As material, steel St-52 was chosen, the maximum wall thickness was 26 mm. The film exposure was finalized in October 2003. As radiation source, Co 60 was used and, as detector, AGFA D7 films with front/back screens of 0.5 mm Fe. Two different inspection methods have been applied: tangential projection technique (TRT) for absolute wall thickness measurements and double wall penetration technique (DWT) for estimation of wall thickness differences in the pipe centre. The combination of Fe screens with AGFA D7 films gives an excellent image quality with very low noise, but needs about double exposure time as compared with Pb screens. After film exposure, the evaluation of the films started. Wall thicknesses and optical film densities have been measured according to the recommended procedures as agreed at the expert meetings. In parallel Excel data sheets were developed for easy data evaluation and for the comparison of results provided by the different participating countries. The final Excel sheets for data evaluation and data collection have been distributed to the other CRP participants at the end of 2003. All films have been digitized at BAM Berlin. The digitized films have been evaluated also by special software, developed together with BASF for the German

  20. In Memoriam: Dr. Frank John Fenner

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-22

    This podcast reflects on one of the greatest pioneers in virology, Dr. Frank John Fenner. Dr. Frederick Murphy, a member of EID's editorial board and the Institute of Medicine, and professor of Pathology at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, shares professional and personal stories of Dr. Frank Fenner.  Created: 4/22/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/26/2011.

  1. 65 Year Birthday Celebration's Prof. John Ellis.

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Jeannet

    2011-01-01

    On 13 September, physicists from around the world joined John Ellis at a colloquium to celebrate his 65th birthday, and as he ended his long career as a distinguished CERN staff member and joins King’s College London. Here he is in the audience with fellow theorists, Nobel laureate Gerard ’t Hooft and Chris Llewellyn Smith, former director-general of CERN.

  2. John Dewey's Visits to Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Hunter

    2015-01-01

    John Dewey visited Hawai'i on three separate occasions. Of all three trips, by far the most important, as far as Dewey's influence on education in Hawai'i is concerned, was in 1899 when he came with his wife, Alice Chipman Dewey, to help launch the University Extension program in Honolulu. The Deweys' second trip was a very brief one--twenty years…

  3. Historical Footage of John Glenn Friendship 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-01-01

    The Friendship mission launch on the 20th day of February marked the first time that an American attempts to orbit the Earth. Historical footage of John Glenn's suit up, ride out to the launch pad, countdown, liftoff, booster engine cutoff, and separation of the booster engine escape tower is shown. Views of the Earth, Glenn's manual control of the electrical fly-by wire system, and the recovery of the landing vehicle from the ocean are presented.

  4. Coordination in the European Union

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Feldstein

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the sources of current conflict within the EU and the EMU. The topics discussed include the recent ECB policy of bond buying (the OMT policy), the attempts to advance the "European Project" of stronger political union (the fiscal compact, the banking union, and the proposals for budget supervision). Contrary to the claims of the European leadership, the progress that has been made has been by individual countries and not by coordinated action. The special problems of Franc...

  5. Book in three volumes of dr. John Puricha: Theology and pedagogy of St. John Chrysostom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parlić-Božović Jasna Lj.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Before the is latest work of Bishop Dr John Puric, by its importance, analytically decorated works, an impressive and voluminous number of facts happy including pedagogical Serbian public. Specifically, our pedagogical public is missing in this way displayed the Orthodox point of view of observation pedagogical crown and top categories. Episkom John was the there / volume work attempted to provide the interested reader the personality profile of any precise data from the conception of St. John Crisostom by looking at the same time as its pedagogy, and theology. Moreover these two concepts and bringing them to their assence, John episcope them actually connects into one inseparable unity. Therefore, this work has a multiple value and importance esportance especially for educators, who have not tried or had the oppotunality to see and understand the pedagogy of Orthodox theology in general, decorated with the ideas of Saint John Chrysostom special. Mindfullpeace as heir and successor creative Cappadocia 'novonikejske' trijadologije, St. John Chrystom recognizes the statut of Divine pedagogy educational philanthropy and philanthropic saving of pedagogy in each of the three Divine Persons. God the Father is this part, written by Bishop John, and from the perspective of John Chrysostom, is uncreated and unborn educationak philanthropy source of grace of the Holy Trinity. God the Son, and of the Father, uncreated etrinilly born, only begotten Son of God, newborn Logos, Jesus Christ the God/ man, BewAdam is alive and saving, hypostatic Ikonomija God, great mystery of the faith- God is reported in the body, the Divine Krishna- resurrect pedagogy, in which the comic-eschatologiocal Body, Church of Heaven and Earth, The Secret New Substances contain - the salvation of all creation, all creatures animate and inanimate. The salvation of man and the world, in the Divine dispensation and the pedagogy of salvation invation involve all there persons of the Holy

  6. BN-600 MOX Core Benchmark Analysis. Results from Phases 4 and 6 of a Coordinated Research Project on Updated Codes and Methods to Reduce the Calculational Uncertainties of the LMFR Reactivity Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-12-01

    For those Member States that have or have had significant fast reactor development programmes, it is of utmost importance that they have validated up to date codes and methods for fast reactor physics analysis in support of R and D and core design activities in the area of actinide utilization and incineration. In particular, some Member States have recently focused on fast reactor systems for minor actinide transmutation and on cores optimized for consuming rather than breeding plutonium; the physics of the breeder reactor cycle having already been widely investigated. Plutonium burning systems may have an important role in managing plutonium stocks until the time when major programmes of self-sufficient fast breeder reactors are established. For assessing the safety of these systems, it is important to determine the prediction accuracy of transient simulations and their associated reactivity coefficients. In response to Member States' expressed interest, the IAEA sponsored a coordinated research project (CRP) on Updated Codes and Methods to Reduce the Calculational Uncertainties of the LMFR Reactivity Effects. The CRP started in November 1999 and, at the first meeting, the members of the CRP endorsed a benchmark on the BN-600 hybrid core for consideration in its first studies. Benchmark analyses of the BN-600 hybrid core were performed during the first three phases of the CRP, investigating different nuclear data and levels of approximation in the calculation of safety related reactivity effects and their influence on uncertainties in transient analysis prediction. In an additional phase of the benchmark studies, experimental data were used for the verification and validation of nuclear data libraries and methods in support of the previous three phases. The results of phases 1, 2, 3 and 5 of the CRP are reported in IAEA-TECDOC-1623, BN-600 Hybrid Core Benchmark Analyses, Results from a Coordinated Research Project on Updated Codes and Methods to Reduce the

  7. Spent fuel and high level waste: Chemical durability and performance under simulated repository conditions. Results of a coordinated research project 1998-2004. Part 2: Results of a previously unpublished CRP: Performance of high level waste forms and packages under repository conditions. Results of a co-ordinated research project 1991-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    The objective of the CRP (Coordinated Research Projekt) on the 'Performance of High Level Waste Forms and Packages under Repository Conditions' was to contribute to the development and implementation of proper and sound technologies for HLW and spent fuel management. Special emphasis was given to the identification of various waste form properties and the study of their long term durability in simulated repository conditions. Another objective was to promote the co-operation and exchange of information between Member States on experimental concerning behaviour of the waste form. The CRP was composed of research contracts and agreements with Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, India, Japan, Russia, and the United States of America. The publication includes 14 individual contributions of the participants to the CRP, which are indexed separately.

  8. Valuing the Leadership Role of University Unit Coordinators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Coral; Roberts, Susan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we describe the experiences of 64 unit coordinators across 15 Australian universities, gathered during 2011/2012 as part of an Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT) project. Our intention was to gain insight into how unit coordinators (academics who coordinate a discrete unit of study) perceive their role as leaders of learning in…

  9. Development of interpersonal coordination between peers during a drumming task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endedijk, H.M.; Ramenzoni, V.C.; Cox, R.F.A.; Cillessen, A.H.N.; Bekkering, H.; Hunnius, S.

    2015-01-01

    During social interaction, the behavior of interacting partners becomes coordinated. Although interpersonal coordination is well-studied in adults, relatively little is known about its development. In this project we explored how 2-, 3-, and 4-year-old children spontaneously coordinated their

  10. Development of Interpersonal Coordination Between Peers During a Drumming Task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endedijk, Hinke M.; Ramenzoni, Veronica C. O.; Cox, Ralf F. A.; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Bekkering, Harold; Hunnius, Sabine

    During social interaction, the behavior of interacting partners becomes coordinated. Although interpersonal coordination is well-studied in adults, relatively little is known about its development. In this project we explored how 2-, 3-, and 4-year-old children spontaneously coordinated their

  11. Co-ordinated research project on application of isotopic and nuclear techniques in the study of nutrition-pollution interactions and their impact on the nutritional status of human subjects in developing country populations. Report on the 2. research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is actively contributing through coordinated research project mechanisms to the development of isotopic techniques applicable for pollution-nutrition interactions. This CRP is based on the recommendations of a consultants' meeting on: 'Nuclear Analytical and Isotope Techniques for assessing nutrition-pollution interactions', NAHRES-62. The main objective of the CRP is to provide a scientific basis for better assessment of selected pollutants and nutrients in biological samples with a view to elucidate their interactions and the impact on human health. Results of this study will enhance the existing body of knowledge on nutrition-pollution interactions mechanisms and can be used to develop preventive strategies. SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES: Use of non-invasive specimens (e.g. breast milk, blood, hair, urine, placenta, eventually adipose tissue for organic pollutants) as indicators to monitor the interaction between the environmental pollution (both organic and inorganic) and nutritional status. Development of protocols to assess the health impact of environmental conditions on populations living under the risk of malnutrition. Validated procedures for chemical analysis in selected environment and nutritional specimens for research in the pollutant-nutrition interaction

  12. IAEA Co-ordinated Research Program (CRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrenk, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Coordinated Research Project is a topical collection of research agreements and contracts. The research contracts are awarded with financial support of about 10-20% of the total contract cost. Among the activities of the project is the organization of consultant group meetings and workshops involving several international experts and representatives of users and developers of border radiation monitoring equipment. The project also supports in coordinating the development of equipment and techniques for up-to-date border monitoring and in establishing of a process for providing nuclear forensics support to member states

  13. Safety assessment methodologies for near surface disposal facilities. Results of a co-ordinated research project (ISAM). Volume 1: Review and enhancement of safety assessment approaches and tools. Volume 2: Test cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-07-01

    For several decades, countries have made use of near surface facilities for the disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive waste. In line with the internationally agreed principles of radioactive waste management, the safety of these facilities needs to be ensured during all stages of their lifetimes, including the post-closure period. By the mid 1990s, formal methodologies for evaluating the long term safety of such facilities had been developed, but intercomparison of these methodologies had revealed a number of discrepancies between them. Consequently, in 1997, the International Atomic Energy Agency launched a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Improvement of Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near Surface Disposal Facilities (ISAM). The particular objectives of the CRP were to provide a critical evaluation of the approaches and tools used in post-closure safety assessment for proposed and existing near-surface radioactive waste disposal facilities, enhance the approaches and tools used and build confidence in the approaches and tools used. The CRP ran until 2000 and resulted in the development of a harmonized assessment methodology (the ISAM project methodology), which was applied to a number of test cases. Over seventy participants from twenty-two Member States played an active role in the project and it attracted interest from around seven hundred persons involved with safety assessment in seventy-two Member States. The results of the CRP have contributed to the Action Plan on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management which was approved by the Board of Governors and endorsed by the General Conference in September 2001. Specifically, they contribute to Action 5, which requests the IAEA Secretariat to 'develop a structured and systematic programme to ensure adequate application of the Agency's waste safety standards', by elaborating on the Safety Requirements on 'Near Surface Disposal of Radioactive Waste' (Safety Standards Series No. WS-R-1) and

  14. Fallout radionuclide-based techniques for assessing the impact of soil conservation measures on erosion control and soil quality: an overview of the main lessons learnt under an FAO/IAEA Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dercon, G.; Mabit, L.; Hancock, G.; Nguyen, M.L.; Dornhofer, P.; Bacchi, O.O.S.; Benmansour, M.; Bernard, C.; Froehlich, W.; Golosov, V.N.; Haciyakupoglu, S.; Hai, P.S.; Klik, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes key findings and identifies the main lessons learnt from a 5-year (2002–2008) coordinated research project (CRP) on “Assessing the effectiveness of soil conservation measures for sustainable watershed management and crop production using fallout radionuclides” (D1.50.08), organized and funded by the International Atomic Energy Agency through the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. The project brought together nineteen participants, from Australia, Austria, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Japan, Morocco, Pakistan, Poland, Romania, Russian Federation, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States of America and Vietnam, involved in the use of nuclear techniques and, more particularly, fallout radionuclides (FRN) to assess the relative impacts of different soil conservation measures on soil erosion and land productivity. The overall objective of the CRP was to develop improved land use and management strategies for sustainable watershed management through effective soil erosion control practices, by the use of 137 Cs (half-life of 30.2 years), 210 Pb ex (half-life of 22.3 years) and 7 Be (half-life of 53.4 days) for measuring soil erosion over several spatial and temporal scales. The environmental conditions under which the different research teams applied the tools based on the use of fallout radionuclides varied considerably – a variety of climates, soils, topographies and land uses. Nevertheless, the achievements of the CRP, as reflected in this overview paper, demonstrate that fallout radionuclide-based techniques are powerful tools to assess soil erosion/deposition at several spatial and temporal scales in a wide range of environments, and offer potential to monitor soil quality. The success of the CRP has stimulated an interest in many IAEA Member States in the use of these methodologies to identify factors and practices that can enhance sustainable agriculture and minimize land degradation. - Highlights:

  15. TIARA: Toward accelerator R&D coordination

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    The preparatory phase of the TIARA (Test Infrastructure and Accelerator Research Area) project has begun. In January, members from 11 research institutes in 8 European countries began a three-year collaboration intended to enhance, improve and structure R&D efforts in the area of accelerator science and technology in Europe.   Partly funded by the European Commission under its Seventh Framework Programme (FP7), the TIARA project is being coordinated by the CEA (Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives). “The aim of the project is to arrive at an organisational structure that will provide coordination for R&D efforts and associated infrastructures in the field of particle accelerators in Europe,” explains the CEA’s Céline Tanguy, project coordinator assistant. “The new structure, which we hope will be a durable one, will be set up at the end of the project’s preparatory phase....

  16. John Paul College: The Professional Renewal Journey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Mundie

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available John Paul College, a K-12 School in Queensland, Australia, recognises the centrality of classroom teachers to the ongoing improvement of student outcomes. The college has implemented a multi-tiered professional renewal and assessment process. These changes of emphasis are the result of significant research and subsequent/associated professional discussion and were supported during the EBA decision-making in 2012. The professional renewal process at John Paul College guides teachers through a cycle of goal setting (related to any aspect of teacher practice which aims to improve student learning and achievement; ongoing discussion between the teacher and a mentor which determines actions; directed classroom observations (3 per term and associated pre and post reflection/discussion; leading to application of changed practice toward achieving the criteria of the goals. The principles of the professional renewal program are to:  enhance development along accepted school-wide, team and department goals;  encourage professional pedagogical reflections and conversations with a colleague/mentor;  motivate improved performance and highlight the next steps in a teacher’s development. Through the introduction of professional renewal, attestation and exemplary teacher processes, the leadership and teachers of John Paul College have achieved an appropriate and innovative balance between self-directed, peer supported/directed and college-wide, strategic initiatives. Each member of the teaching team, from graduate to senior leaders are actively engaged in personalised programs of professional growth which is specifically aimed at improved learning and outcomes of the college’s students.

  17. The John Zink Hamworthy combustion handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Baukal, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    Despite the length of time it has been around, its importance, and vast amounts of research, combustion is still far from being completely understood. Issues regarding the environment, cost, and fuel consumption add further complexity, particularly in the process and power generation industries. Dedicated to advancing the art and science of industrial combustion, The John Zink Hamworthy Combustion Handbook, Second Edition: Volume 3 - Applications offers comprehensive, up-to-date coverage of equipment used in the process and power generation industries. Under the leadership of Charles E. Baukal

  18. Suehiro Jurisprudence and John R. Commons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tackney, Charles T.

    This is a comparative history study at the interface of industrial / employment relations and stakeholder theory. The focus concerns decades of post-World War II Japanese and U.S. path dependent national divergence from common labor legislation enactments separated by only 15 years: 1933...... or Suehiro hōgaku) document a dramatic, fascinating historical parting of two nations due to Japanese deep appreciation of the labor law and institutional economics research legacy of John R. Commons, the father of U.S. industrial relations. Understanding this common, shared source opens industrial relations...

  19. Part Twelve. The Voyages of John Matthias

    OpenAIRE

    Printz-Påhlson, Göran

    2013-01-01

    In August 1974, when the Watergate scandal was moving into its last phase, the American poet John Matthias returned to his home, in South Bend, Indiana, after a year’s stay in England, traveling on the Polish ocean-liner Stefan Bathory. In June of 1976 he set out to sea again, this time on a Russian ship, the Mikhail Lermontov, in order to spend another year in England, as a Visiting Fellow in Poetry in Clare Hall, Cambridge. The voyages took approximately nine days each, and on both ships he...

  20. John Locke on persons and personal identity

    OpenAIRE

    Boeker, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    John Locke claims both that ‘person’ is a forensic term and that personal identity consists in sameness of consciousness. The aim of my dissertation is to explain and critically assess how Locke links his moral and legal account of personhood to his account of personal identity in terms of sameness of consciousness. My interpretation of Locke’s account of persons and personal identity is embedded in Locke’s sortal-dependent account of identity. Locke’s sortal-dependent ac...

  1. Remembering John M. Olson (1929-2017).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, Robert E; Brune, Daniel C; Olson, Jon C

    2018-02-19

    Here we provide reflections of and a tribute to John M. Olson, a pioneering researcher in photosynthesis. We trace his career, which began at Wesleyan University and the University of Pennsylvania, and continued at Utrech in The Netherlands, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Odense University in Denmark. He was the world expert on pigment organization in the green photosynthetic bacteria, and discovered and characterized the first chlorophyll-containing protein, which has come to be known as the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein. He also thought and wrote extensively on the origin and early evolution of photosynthesis. We include personal comments from Brian Matthews, Raymond Cox, Paolo Gerola, Beverly Pierson and Jon Olson.

  2. Project Copernicus: Cooperation Programme in Europe on Nature and Industry through Coordinated University Study. Round Table. Unesco-Standing Conference of Rectors, Presidents, and Vice Chancellors of the European Universities (CRE) (Catania, Sicily, April 5-8, 1989). Number 32. Papers on Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This Project COPERNICUS (Cooperation Programme in Europe for Research on Nature and Industry through Coordinated University Studies) Round Table report considers efforts to identify priorities and objectives of the new alliance between the higher education community, industry, and international organizations in addressing today's environmental…

  3. Final report of the FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research project on the use of nuclear and related techniques for evaluating the agronomic effectiveness of phosphate fertilisers, in particular rock phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapata, F.

    1999-02-01

    Soils in developing countries are often deficient in available P, and therefore require inputs of P fertiliser for optimum plant growth and production of food and fibre. Due to economic considerations, the cost of applying imported or locally produced water-soluble P fertilisers is often more expensive than utilising indigenous phosphate rock. Phosphate rocks show large differences in their suitability for direct application and several factors influence their capability to supply phosphorus to crops. Therefore, quantifying the P availability of soils amended with phosphate rocks in a variety of crop management and environmental conditions in developing countries is imperative for making recommendations on the best type and rate of P fertiliser sources for maximum agronomic and economic benefits. P-32 isotope techniques are very useful for such studies. The background situation of phosphate research and the topics to be investigated using isotope techniques were critically examined in a Consultants Meeting held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria, from 10 to 12 May 1993. For detailed information please refer to IAEA Report CT-1112. Based on the recommendations of this Consultants' Meeting, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture with the generous support of the French Government decided to implement the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'The Use of Nuclear and Related Techniques for Evaluating the Agronomic Effectiveness of Phosphate Fertilisers, in particular Rock Phosphates'. This final report describes the Fourth and Final RCM of the CRP which was held in Vienna, 16-20 November 1998. It also contains a full description of the project and the conclusions and recommendations of the CRP. The programme of the meeting, list of participants, summaries submitted by the participants and list of publications are included as annexes

  4. Final report of the FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research project on the use of nuclear and related techniques for evaluating the agronomic effectiveness of phosphate fertilisers, in particular rock phosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, F

    1999-02-01

    Soils in developing countries are often deficient in available P, and therefore require inputs of P fertiliser for optimum plant growth and production of food and fibre. Due to economic considerations, the cost of applying imported or locally produced water-soluble P fertilisers is often more expensive than utilising indigenous phosphate rock. Phosphate rocks show large differences in their suitability for direct application and several factors influence their capability to supply phosphorus to crops. Therefore, quantifying the P availability of soils amended with phosphate rocks in a variety of crop management and environmental conditions in developing countries is imperative for making recommendations on the best type and rate of P fertiliser sources for maximum agronomic and economic benefits. P-32 isotope techniques are very useful for such studies. The background situation of phosphate research and the topics to be investigated using isotope techniques were critically examined in a Consultants Meeting held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria, from 10 to 12 May 1993. For detailed information please refer to IAEA Report CT-1112. Based on the recommendations of this Consultants' Meeting, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture with the generous support of the French Government decided to implement the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'The Use of Nuclear and Related Techniques for Evaluating the Agronomic Effectiveness of Phosphate Fertilisers, in particular Rock Phosphates'. This final report describes the Fourth and Final RCM of the CRP which was held in Vienna, 16-20 November 1998. It also contains a full description of the project and the conclusions and recommendations of the CRP. The programme of the meeting, list of participants, summaries submitted by the participants and list of publications are included as annexes.

  5. Development of Radiometric and Allied Analytical Methods and Strategies to Strengthen National Residue Control Programmes for Antibiotic and Anthelmintic Veterinary Drug Residues. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-08-01

    Awareness of food safety is rising among consumers, and many importing countries implement food control regulations to guarantee the quality and safety of imported foods for their consumers. Many developing countries have also taken steps to put in place control systems that encourage responsible use of veterinary medicines to combat possible drug resistance, control drug residues and ensure compliance with international and national standards. However, these countries still require the necessary know-how and skills to protect local consumers and to access international markets. One significant constraint is the capacity of laboratory services to generate surveillance data using reliable and cost effective analytical methods validated to national and international standards. The IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) on the Development of Radiometric and Allied Analytical Methods to Strengthen National Residue Control Programmes for Antibiotic and Anthelmintic Veterinary Drug Residues was initiated in 2009 to conduct work on robust nuclear and related technologies suitable for the screening and confirmatory analysis of residues of veterinary medicines, including antimicrobials and anthelmintics commonly used in animal production, with public health and trade significance. The CRP also explored mechanisms to enhance networking among research institutions involved in research on pharmacologically active veterinary drug residues in food (primarily) and environmental samples. The project was implemented by the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture between 2009 and 2014 and involved eleven research contracts and one technical contract, five research agreements and one institution. The CRP was a continuation of the CRP on the Development of Strategies for the Effective Monitoring of Veterinary Drug Residues in Livestock and Livestock Products in Developing Countries and the key findings are also summarized in this publication.

  6. Fallout radionuclide-based techniques for assessing the impact of soil conservation measures on erosion control and soil quality: an overview of the main lessons learnt under an FAO/IAEA Coordinated Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dercon, G; Mabit, L; Hancock, G; Nguyen, M L; Dornhofer, P; Bacchi, O O S; Benmansour, M; Bernard, C; Froehlich, W; Golosov, V N; Haciyakupoglu, S; Hai, P S; Klik, A; Li, Y; Lobb, D A; Onda, Y; Popa, N; Rafiq, M; Ritchie, J C; Schuller, P; Shakhashiro, A; Wallbrink, P; Walling, D E; Zapata, F; Zhang, X

    2012-05-01

    This paper summarizes key findings and identifies the main lessons learnt from a 5-year (2002-2008) coordinated research project (CRP) on "Assessing the effectiveness of soil conservation measures for sustainable watershed management and crop production using fallout radionuclides" (D1.50.08), organized and funded by the International Atomic Energy Agency through the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. The project brought together nineteen participants, from Australia, Austria, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Japan, Morocco, Pakistan, Poland, Romania, Russian Federation, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States of America and Vietnam, involved in the use of nuclear techniques and, more particularly, fallout radionuclides (FRN) to assess the relative impacts of different soil conservation measures on soil erosion and land productivity. The overall objective of the CRP was to develop improved land use and management strategies for sustainable watershed management through effective soil erosion control practices, by the use of ¹³⁷Cs (half-life of 30.2 years), ²¹⁰Pb(ex) (half-life of 22.3 years) and ⁷Be (half-life of 53.4 days) for measuring soil erosion over several spatial and temporal scales. The environmental conditions under which the different research teams applied the tools based on the use of fallout radionuclides varied considerably--a variety of climates, soils, topographies and land uses. Nevertheless, the achievements of the CRP, as reflected in this overview paper, demonstrate that fallout radionuclide-based techniques are powerful tools to assess soil erosion/deposition at several spatial and temporal scales in a wide range of environments, and offer potential to monitor soil quality. The success of the CRP has stimulated an interest in many IAEA Member States in the use of these methodologies to identify factors and practices that can enhance sustainable agriculture and minimize land degradation. Copyright

  7. Fallout radionuclide-based techniques for assessing the impact of soil conservation measures on erosion control and soil quality: an overview of the main lessons learnt under an FAO/IAEA Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dercon, G.; Mabit, L.; Nguyen, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes key findings and identifies the main lessons learnt from a 5-year (2002-2008) coordinated research project (CRP) on Assessing the effectiveness of soil conservation measures for sustainable watershed management and crop production using fallout radionuclides (D1.50.08), organized and funded by the International Atomic Energy Agency through the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. The project brought together nineteen participants, from Australia, Austria, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Japan, Morocco, Pakistan, Poland, Romania, Russian Federation, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States of America and Vietnam, involved in the use of nuclear techniques and, more particularly, fallout radionuclides (FRN) to assess the relative impacts of the different soil conservation measure on soil erosion and land productivity. The overall objective of the CRP was to develop improved land use and management strategies for sustainable watershed management through effective soil erosion control practices, by the use of 137 Cs (half-life of 30.2 years), 210 Pb ex (half-life of 22.3 years) and 7 Be (half-life of 53.4 days) for measuring soil erosion over several spatial and temporal scales. The environmental conditions under which the different research teams applied the tools based on the use of fallout radionuclides varied considerably - a variety of climates, soils, topographies and land uses. Nevertheless, the achievements of the CRP, as reflected in this overview paper, demonstrate that fallout radionuclide-based techniques are powerful tools to assess soil erosion/deposition at several spatial and temporal scales in a wide range of environments, and offer potential to monitor soil quality. The success of the CRP has stimulated an interest in many IAEA Member States in the use of these methodologies to identify factors and practices that can enhance sustainable agriculture and minimize land degradation. (author)

  8. U.S. Virgin Islands National Park Coral Transplant Study, St. John, 1999-2009 (NODC Accession 0112724)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In a pilot project in the Caribbean (Virgin Islands National Park, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands), storm-produced fragments of Acropora palmata, Acropora...

  9. The Trieste Lecture of John Stewart Bell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassi, Angelo; Ghirardi, GianCarlo

    2007-01-01

    Delivered at Trieste on the occasion of the 25th Anniversary of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, 2 November 1989. The video of this lecture is available here. Please see the PDF for the transcript of the lecture. General remarks by Angelo Bassi and GianCarlo Ghirardi During the autumn of 1989 the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, celebrated the 25th anniversary of its creation. Among the many prestigious speakers, who delivered extremely interesting lectures on that occasion, was the late John Stewart Bell. All lectures have been recorded on tape. We succeeded in getting a copy of John's lecture. In the lecture, many of the arguments that John had lucidly stressed in his writings appear once more, but there are also extremely interesting new remarks which, to our knowledge, have not been presented elsewhere. In particular he decided, as pointed out by the very choice of the title of his lecture, to call attention to the fact that the theory presents two types of difficulties, which Dirac classified as first and second class. The former are those connected with the so-called macro-objectification problem, the latter with the divergences characterizing relativistic quantum field theories. Bell describes the precise position of Dirac on these problems and he stresses appropriately how, contrary to Dirac's hopes, the steps which have led to a partial overcoming of the second class difficulties have not helped in any way whatsoever to overcome those of the first class. He then proceeds to analyse the origin and development of the Dynamical Reduction Program and draws attention to the problems that still affect it, in particular that of a consistent relativistic generalization. When the two meetings Are there quantum jumps? and On the present status of Quantum Mechanics were organized in Trieste and Losinj (Croatia), on 5-10 September 2005, it occurred to us that this lecture, which has never been published, might represent an

  10. MPI Enhancements in John the Ripper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, Edward R; Lin, Michael; Skoczen, Wesley

    2010-01-01

    John the Ripper (JtR) is an open source software package commonly used by system administrators to enforce password policy. JtR is designed to attack (i.e., crack) passwords encrypted in a wide variety of commonly used formats. While parallel implementations of JtR exist, there are several limitations to them. This research reports on two distinct algorithms that enhance this password cracking tool using the Message Passing Interface. The first algorithm is a novel approach that uses numerous processors to crack one password by using an innovative approach to workload distribution. In this algorithm the candidate password is distributed to all participating processors and the word list is divided based on probability so that each processor has the same likelihood of cracking the password while eliminating overlapping operations. The second algorithm developed in this research involves dividing the passwords within a password file equally amongst available processors while ensuring load-balanced and fault-tolerant behavior. This paper describes John the Ripper, the design of these two algorithms and preliminary results. Given the same amount of time, the original JtR can crack 29 passwords, whereas our algorithms 1 and 2 can crack an additional 35 and 45 passwords respectively.

  11. MPI Enhancements in John the Ripper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Edward R.; Lin, Michael; Skoczen, Wesley

    2010-11-01

    John the Ripper (JtR) is an open source software package commonly used by system administrators to enforce password policy. JtR is designed to attack (i.e., crack) passwords encrypted in a wide variety of commonly used formats. While parallel implementations of JtR exist, there are several limitations to them. This research reports on two distinct algorithms that enhance this password cracking tool using the Message Passing Interface. The first algorithm is a novel approach that uses numerous processors to crack one password by using an innovative approach to workload distribution. In this algorithm the candidate password is distributed to all participating processors and the word list is divided based on probability so that each processor has the same likelihood of cracking the password while eliminating overlapping operations. The second algorithm developed in this research involves dividing the passwords within a password file equally amongst available processors while ensuring load-balanced and fault-tolerant behavior. This paper describes John the Ripper, the design of these two algorithms and preliminary results. Given the same amount of time, the original JtR can crack 29 passwords, whereas our algorithms 1 and 2 can crack an additional 35 and 45 passwords respectively.

  12. The Trieste Lecture of John Stewart Bell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassi, Angelo; Ghirardi, GianCarlo

    2007-03-23

    Delivered at Trieste on the occasion of the 25th Anniversary of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, 2 November 1989. The video of this lecture is available here. Please see the PDF for the transcript of the lecture. General remarks by Angelo Bassi and GianCarlo Ghirardi During the autumn of 1989 the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, celebrated the 25th anniversary of its creation. Among the many prestigious speakers, who delivered extremely interesting lectures on that occasion, was the late John Stewart Bell. All lectures have been recorded on tape. We succeeded in getting a copy of John's lecture. In the lecture, many of the arguments that John had lucidly stressed in his writings appear once more, but there are also extremely interesting new remarks which, to our knowledge, have not been presented elsewhere. In particular he decided, as pointed out by the very choice of the title of his lecture, to call attention to the fact that the theory presents two types of difficulties, which Dirac classified as first and second class. The former are those connected with the so-called macro-objectification problem, the latter with the divergences characterizing relativistic quantum field theories. Bell describes the precise position of Dirac on these problems and he stresses appropriately how, contrary to Dirac's hopes, the steps which have led to a partial overcoming of the second class difficulties have not helped in any way whatsoever to overcome those of the first class. He then proceeds to analyse the origin and development of the Dynamical Reduction Program and draws attention to the problems that still affect it, in particular that of a consistent relativistic generalization. When the two meetings Are there quantum jumps? and On the present status of Quantum Mechanics were organized in Trieste and Losinj (Croatia), on 5-10 September 2005, it occurred to us that this lecture, which has never been published, might represent

  13. John Dewey’s Feminist Legacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Vaamonde Gamo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article demonstrates how feminism welcomed and was influenced by the pragmatism of John Dewey. While in real terms his impact on European feminism has been minimal, this was not the case in contemporary America. In this article we study both how Dewey’s ideas were received amongst American feminists, as well as certain aspects of his thinking that could be enormously useful in present-day debates between critical and postmodern feminists. We compare the Deweyan and feminist arguments against the traditional dualisms that acted as philosophical support for social inequality, paying particular attention to mind–body dualism, and the consequent undervaluation of physical and emotional wellbeing. We also show that John Dewey’s proposals were, in fact, more radical than those of the feminists of the day. Indeed, democracy has to be understood as a way of life that affects every dimension of experience, and is crucial to the personal and social growth that enables the unjust social inequalities between men and women to be overcome.

  14. John Napier life, logarithms, and legacy

    CERN Document Server

    Havil, Julian

    2014-01-01

    John Napier (1550–1617) is celebrated today as the man who invented logarithms—an enormous intellectual achievement that would soon lead to the development of their mechanical equivalent in the slide rule: the two would serve humanity as the principal means of calculation until the mid-1970s. Yet, despite Napier’s pioneering efforts, his life and work have not attracted detailed modern scrutiny. John Napier is the first contemporary biography to take an in-depth look at the multiple facets of Napier’s story: his privileged position as the eighth Laird of Merchiston and the son of influential Scottish landowners; his reputation as a magician who dabbled in alchemy; his interest in agriculture; his involvement with a notorious outlaw; his staunch anti-Catholic beliefs; his interactions with such peers as Henry Briggs, Johannes Kepler, and Tycho Brahe; and, most notably, his estimable mathematical legacy. Julian Havil explores Napier’s original development of logarithms, the motivations for his approa...

  15. Co-ordinated research project on use of isotopic techniques to examine the significance of infection and other insults in early childhood to diarrhoea morbidity, mal-assimilation and failure to thrive. Report on the final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been recognized as a major etiologic factor in the development of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease in adults and children. The infection has been linked to the development of gastric cancer, and in 1994 was classified as a group 1 carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The prevalence of H. pylori infection is inversely correlated to the socio-economic development and to unsatisfactory prevailing sanitary conditions. In developing countries, up to 90% of the adult population is colonized with this agent. In contrast, its prevalence in developed countries is lower, ranging from 25 to 50%. H. pylori colonization has been considered a public health problem, since its highest incidence occurs during the first few years of life, when children are growing and developing rapidly. The acquisition of the infection occurs mainly in early childhood, especially in developing countries, but the age at which it is acquired remains unknown. Infection with H. pylori during early infancy could be the initial step of a reaction which facilitates enteric infection in childhood leading to recurrent diarrhoea, malnutrition and growth failure. Micronutrient deficiencies resulting from these conditions may in turn facilitate malnutrition, immunological dysfunction and the persistence of infection. The {sup 13}C-urea breath test ({sup 13}C-UBT), which has been used extensively in developed countries, is a technique that is non invasive, reliable, comparatively cheap and without risk to patients. It is also convenient for use in field-based settings; it is currently considered the 'gold standard' against which all other techniques are compared. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), initiated the current Coordinated Research Project (CRP) with the principal objective of promoting the use of the {sup 13}C-urea breath test technique in the participating countries to study the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori and its impact on

  16. Co-ordinated research project on use of isotopic techniques to examine the significance of infection and other insults in early childhood to diarrhoea morbidity, mal-assimilation and failure to thrive. Report on the final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been recognized as a major etiologic factor in the development of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease in adults and children. The infection has been linked to the development of gastric cancer, and in 1994 was classified as a group 1 carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The prevalence of H. pylori infection is inversely correlated to the socio-economic development and to unsatisfactory prevailing sanitary conditions. In developing countries, up to 90% of the adult population is colonized with this agent. In contrast, its prevalence in developed countries is lower, ranging from 25 to 50%. H. pylori colonization has been considered a public health problem, since its highest incidence occurs during the first few years of life, when children are growing and developing rapidly. The acquisition of the infection occurs mainly in early childhood, especially in developing countries, but the age at which it is acquired remains unknown. Infection with H. pylori during early infancy could be the initial step of a reaction which facilitates enteric infection in childhood leading to recurrent diarrhoea, malnutrition and growth failure. Micronutrient deficiencies resulting from these conditions may in turn facilitate malnutrition, immunological dysfunction and the persistence of infection. The 13 C-urea breath test ( 13 C-UBT), which has been used extensively in developed countries, is a technique that is non invasive, reliable, comparatively cheap and without risk to patients. It is also convenient for use in field-based settings; it is currently considered the 'gold standard' against which all other techniques are compared. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), initiated the current Coordinated Research Project (CRP) with the principal objective of promoting the use of the 13 C-urea breath test technique in the participating countries to study the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori and its impact on health and

  17. Exploring Coordination Structures in Open Source Software Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hillegersberg, Jos; Harmsen, Frank; Hegeman, J.H.; Amrit, Chintan Amrit; Geisberger, Eva; Keil, Patrick; Kuhrmann, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Coordination is difficult to achieve in a large globally distributed project setting. The problem is multiplied in open source software development projects, where most of the traditional means of coordination such as plans, system-level designs, schedules and defined process are not used. In order

  18. Explicitly computing geodetic coordinates from Cartesian coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huaien

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a new form of quartic equation based on Lagrange's extremum law and a Groebner basis under the constraint that the geodetic height is the shortest distance between a given point and the reference ellipsoid. A very explicit and concise formulae of the quartic equation by Ferrari's line is found, which avoids the need of a good starting guess for iterative methods. A new explicit algorithm is then proposed to compute geodetic coordinates from Cartesian coordinates. The convergence region of the algorithm is investigated and the corresponding correct solution is given. Lastly, the algorithm is validated with numerical experiments.

  19. Le strutture dell'immaginazione. Un disegno di John Hejduk / Structures for the Imagination. A John Hejduk's drawing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamberto Amistadi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Un disegno di John Hejduk è l'occasione per riflettere sul rapporto tra ideazione, rappresentazione e realizzazione dell'opera di architettura, seguendo i ragionamenti del maestro americano. Attraverso i mezzi che le sono propri, walls, roofs, boundaries, l'immagine architettonica ha la capacità di evocare e richiamare il senso profondo di situazioni inattese, “rinfrescare” la nostra visione delle cose contro il pericolo dell'automatizzazione. Ne esce un quadro in cui, nel circolo creativo che coinvolge artefice e fruitore, la realtà dell'architettura contribuisce per la sua parte al progetto di “fabbricazione del mondo”. / A drawing by John Hejduk is an opportunity to reflect on the relationship between the creation, representation and realisation of a work of architecture, following the reasoning of the American maestro. Through its own means - walls, roofs, boundaries - the architectural image has the capacity to evoke and invoke the profound sense of unexpected situations, to "refresh" our vision of things against the danger of automation. What emerges is a scenario in which, in the creative circle involving maker and spectator, the reality of architecture contributes to its part in the project of "manufacturing the world"

  20. Translating The Infinities by John Banville

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Abigail Piccinini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - John Banville’s talent as a prose stylist is widely recognized. The polished elegance of his phrases constitutes a continuing and fascinating challenge for his translator, due to the intricacies of the source text, its manifold registers and lexical choices. In his novel The Infinities, in Italian Teoria degli Infiniti, John Banville takes cue from Kleist’s Amphytrion to devise a novel where classicality interweaves with science and science fiction through the invention of a world where the ancient gods intermingle with the humans while waiting for the death of Adam Godley, a famous mathematician who explained how an infinity of worlds exist and interact with each other. To translate this book I had not only to work extensively on lexis and style, but also to do considerable research to render the many literary and non literary references. Some examples of these struggles with the source text during the translation process are given in the present paper. Riassunto - John Banville, autore irlandese noto per la sua prosa raffinata, scrive in una lingua che rappresenta una sfida continua e affascinante per chi lo traduce. La sua complessità stilistica, che sfrutta molteplici registri linguistici e si avvale di scelte lessicali cui spesso è arduo trovare un traducente italiano soddisfacente, costringe il traduttore a fare ricorso a tutte le sottigliezze del proprio mestiere per restituire quanto più possibile l’eleganza dell’originale nella propria lingua. Nel romanzo The Infinities, tradotto in italiano come Teoria degli infiniti (Guanda, Parma 2011, Banville prende spunto dall’Anfitrione di Kleist per costruire un romanzo che guarda alla classicità sconfinando in un misto di scienza e fantascienza con la concezione di un’infinità di mondi paralleli teorizzata dal matematico Adam Godley, il protagonista morente al cui capezzale si radunano uomini e antichi dei in attesa che il cerchio della vita e della morte si compia