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Sample records for progressive systemic sclerosis

  1. Gastric emptying abnormalities in progressive systemic sclerosis

    Sridhar, K.; Magyar, L.; Lange, R.; McCallum, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The authors studied gastric emptying (GE) in patients with peripheral manifestations of progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) using a radionuclide method. 18 patients underwent esophageal manometry and a GE study using chicken liver labeled in vivo with Tc-99m sulfur colloid as a marker of solid emptying. GE was also measured in 13 normal volunteers. 4 PSS patients with normal esophageal motility also had normal GE. The GE of 14 PSS patients with abnormal esophageal motility was significantly (p < 0.05) delayed; with 67.4% retention of isotope after 2 hours compared to 49.8 in normals. The authors conclude that GE of solids is slow in approximately 2/3 of PSS patients with abnormal esophageal motility but is normal if the esophagus is uninvolved; Delayed GE may contribute to the severity of gastroesophageal reflux in PSS patients and the degree of dysphasgia; and Metoclopramide accelerates GE in PSS patients and should have a valuable therapeutic role

  2. Plasma exchange in progressive systemic sclerosis

    Mohammad Bagher Owlia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SSc is an autoimmune systemic disease of unknown etiology. Present treatment modalities have limited impact on clinical/ laboratory outcomes. For the first time in our center, we used plasma exchange (PEx in a rather young woman with recent onset but progressive SSc. She is a 39-year-old woman with a recent history of skin stiffness, Raynaud’s phenomenon, nail fold capillary changes and newly diagnosis of SSc presented to us due to worsening her clinical symptoms even after initiation of routine remedies such as low dose oral prednisolone, Ca-channel blockers, azathioprine and pentoxyfylline. After obtaining written consent, interdisciplinary discussion with experts in this field and agreement we started a series of plasma exchange with FFP replacement for her. A dramatic clinical response was observed in respect to Raynaud’s phenomenon, skin stiffness, tendon rub after three sessions of PEx. Her modified Rodnan skin score (MRSS dropped from 36 (before commencement of therapy to 28 in day 4 and 18 in day 20 after 15 sessions of PEx. In conclusion PEx could significantly modify the course of SSc as observed in our case study. Elimination of culprit immune mediators/cytokines/autoantibodies could be the possible mechanism of action of PEx. 

  3. Progressive Systemic sclerosis, manifested like malabsorption syndrome. Case report

    Ortiz Piza, Gabriel Jaime; Gonzalez Vasquez, Carlos Mario

    2005-01-01

    We report the case of a 32 year old woman whose first manifestation of systemic sclerosis was malabsorption syndrome. The small bowel series was the clue to the diagnosis, confirmed by laboratory tests and progression of the disease

  4. Abnormalities of esophageal and gastric emptying in progressive systemic sclerosis

    Maddern, G.J.; Horowitz, M.; Jamieson, G.G.; Chatterton, B.E.; Collins, P.J.; Roberts-Thomson, P.

    1984-01-01

    Gastric and esophageal emptying were assessed using scintigraphic techniques in 12 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis and 22 normal volunteers. Esophageal emptying was significantly delayed in the patient group, with 7 of the 12 patients beyond the normal range. Gastric emptying was slower in patients than in controls, with 9 patients being outside the normal range for solid emptying and 7 patients outside the normal range for liquid emptying. Findings from gastric and esophageal emptying tests generally correlated well with symptoms of dysphagia and gastroesophageal reflux. However, 2 patients with normal emptying studies had symptomatic heartburn, and 2 patients with delay of both solid and liquid gastric emptying gave no history of gastroesophageal reflux. Delayed gastric emptying may be an important factor in the development of upper gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis

  5. Abnormalities of esophageal and gastric emptying in progressive systemic sclerosis

    Maddern, G.J.; Horowitz, M.; Jamieson, G.G.; Chatterton, B.E.; Collins, P.J.; Roberts-Thomson, P.

    1984-10-01

    Gastric and esophageal emptying were assessed using scintigraphic techniques in 12 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis and 22 normal volunteers. Esophageal emptying was significantly delayed in the patient group, with 7 of the 12 patients beyond the normal range. Gastric emptying was slower in patients than in controls, with 9 patients being outside the normal range for solid emptying and 7 patients outside the normal range for liquid emptying. Findings from gastric and esophageal emptying tests generally correlated well with symptoms of dysphagia and gastroesophageal reflux. However, 2 patients with normal emptying studies had symptomatic heartburn, and 2 patients with delay of both solid and liquid gastric emptying gave no history of gastroesophageal reflux. Delayed gastric emptying may be an important factor in the development of upper gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis.

  6. 131I albumin of patients carrying progressive systemic sclerosis study

    Cossermelli, W.; Carvalho, N.; Papaleo Netto, M.

    1974-01-01

    131 I albumin metabolic changes were studied in 14 female patients with progressive systemic sclerosis. A statistical study of the gathered data disclosed increased distribution and turnover half-life and diminished turnover rate of radioactive substance. Since T/2 of turnover and turnover rate are the result produced by the albumin synthesis and degradation, they are probably lowered during active disease causing hypoalbuminemia. The aminoacids also are probably absorbed by other protein like the gammaglobuline synthesis [pt

  7. 67Gallium lung scans in progressive systemic sclerosis

    Baron, M.; Feiglin, D.; Hyland, R.; Urowitz, M.B.; Shiff, B.

    1983-01-01

    67 Gallium lung scans were performed in 19 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis (scleroderma). Results were expressed quantitatively as the 67 Gallium Uptake Index. The mean total pulmonary 67 Gallium Uptake Index in patients was significantly higher than that in controls (41 versus 25), and 4 patients (21%) fell outside the normal range. There were no clinical or laboratory variables that correlated with the 56 Gallium uptake. Increased pulmonary 67 Gallium uptake in scleroderma may prove useful as an index of pulmonary disease activity

  8. Radiology of the hand in progressive systemic sclerosis

    Scutellari, P N; Orzincolo, C; Delli Gatti, I. and others

    1986-01-01

    Radiographs and xerographs of the hands of 35 patients with progressive systematic sclerosis (PSS), as defined by the ARA, were reviewed. Patients with ''overlap'' syndromes (i.e., mixed connective tissue disease, systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis) have been excluded. Soft tissue changes included atrophy (hidebound skin), and dystrophic calcifications, particularly in CREST patients (calcinosis, Raynaud phenomenon, esophageal dysmobility, sclerodactily and telangectasia). The most common bony change is resorption of distal phalanges; diffuse osteoporosis is also frequent; the distal interphalangeal and first carpometacarpal joints involvement appear as a distinctive feature of this e....

  9. Nifedipine and thallium-201 myocardial perfusion in progressive systemic sclerosis

    Kahan, A.; Devaux, J.Y.; Amor, B.

    1986-01-01

    Heart disease in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis may be due in part to myocardial ischemia caused by a disturbance of the coronary microcirculation. To determine whether abnormalities of myocardial perfusion in this disorder are potentially reversible, we evaluated the effect of the coronary vasodilator nifedipine on myocardial perfusion assessed by thallium-201 scanning in 20 patients. Thallium-201 single-photon-emission computerized tomography was performed under control conditions and 90 minutes after 20 mg of oral nifedipine. The mean (+/- SD) number of left ventricular segments with perfusion defects decreased from 5.3 +/- 2.0 to 3.3 +/- 2.2 after nifedipine (P = 0.0003). Perfusion abnormalities were quantified by a perfusion score (0 to 2.0) assigned to each left ventricular segment and by a global perfusion score (0 to 18) for the entire left ventricle. The mean perfusion score in segments with resting defects increased from 0.97 +/- 0.24 to 1.26 +/- 0.44 after nifedipine (P less than 0.00001). The mean global perfusion score increased from 11.2 +/- 1.7 to 12.8 +/- 2.4 after nifedipine (P = 0.003). The global perfusion score increased by at least 2.0 in 10 patients and decreased by at least 2.0 in only 1. These observations reveal short-term improvement in thallium-201 myocardial perfusion with nifedipine in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis. The results are consistent with a potentially reversible abnormality of coronary vasomotion in this disorder, but the long-term therapeutic effects of nifedipine remain to be determined

  10. Relapsing and Progressive Tumefactive Demyelinating Form of Central Nervous System Involvement in a Patient with Progressive Systemic Sclerosis

    Kim, Ho Kyun; Lee, Hui Joong

    2013-01-01

    White matter hyper intensities (WMHI) on MRI are not rare in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS). In this presentation, WMHI were developed in both middle cerebellar peduncles and temporal white matter in a patient with PSS, and regressed after medication of high dose steroid. However, new lesions were developed in the subcortices of both precentral gyri, and progressed rapidly to tumefactive hyperintensity on MRI. We report an unusual relapsing and progressive tumefactive demyelinating form of central nervous system involvement in PSS.

  11. Gallium-67 uptake by the thyroid associated with progressive systemic sclerosis

    Sjoberg, R.J.; Blue, P.W.; Kidd, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    Although thyroidal uptake of gallium-67 has been described in several thyroid disorders, gallium-67 scanning is not commonly used in the evaluation of thyroid disease. Thyroidal gallium-67 uptake has been reported to occur frequently with subacute thyroiditis, anaplastic thyroid carcinoma, and thyroid lymphoma, and occasionally with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and follicular thyroid carcinoma. A patient is described with progressive systemic sclerosis who, while being scanned for possible active pulmonary involvement, was found incidentally to have abnormal gallium-67 uptake only in the thyroid gland. Fine needle aspiration cytology of the thyroid revealed Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Although Hashimoto's thyroiditis occurs with increased frequency in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis, thyroidal uptake of gallium-67 associated with progressive systemic sclerosis has not, to our knowledge, been previously described. Since aggressive thyroid malignancies frequently are imaged by gallium-67 scintigraphy, fine needle aspiration cytology of the thyroid often is essential in the evaluation of thyroidal gallium-67 uptake

  12. Chronic progressive multiple sclerosis

    Buffoli, A.; Micheletti, E.; Capra, R.; Mattioli, F.; Marciano', N.

    1991-01-01

    A long-lasting immunological suppression action seems to be produced by total lymphoid irradiation; some authors emphasize the favorable effect of this treatment on chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. In order to evaluate the actual role of TLI, 6 patients affected with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis were submitted to TLI with shaped and personalized fields at the Istituto del Radio, University of Brescia, Italy. The total dose delivered was 19.8 Gy in 4 weeks, 1.8 Gy/day, 5d/w; a week elapsed between the first and the second irradiation course. Disability according to Kurtzke scale was evaluated, together with blood lymphocyte count and irradiation side-effects, over a mean follow-up period of 20.8 months (range: 13-24). Our findings indicate that: a) disease progression was not markedly reduced by TLI; b) steroid hormones responsivity was restored after irradiation, and c) side-effects were mild and tolerable

  13. /sup 131/I albumin study of patients carrying progressive systemic sclerosis

    Cossermelli, W; Carvalho, N; Papaleo Netto, M [Sao Paulo Univ. (Brazil). Centro de Medicina Nuclear

    1974-05-01

    /sup 131/I albumin metabolic changes were studied in 14 female patients with progressive systemic sclerosis. A statistical study of the gathered data disclosed increased distribution and turnover half-life and diminished turnover rate of radioactive substance. Since T/2 of turnover and turnover rate are the result produced by the albumin synthesis and degradation, they are probably lowered during active disease causing hypoalbuminemia. The aminoacids also are probably absorbed by other protein like the gammaglobuline synthesis.

  14. Evaluation of quatitative scintigraphic method in diagnosis of esophagic involvement of Progressive Systemic Sclerosis

    Von Muehlen, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty patients with Progressive Systemic Sclerosis are studied by scintigraphic methodology. The esophageal transit method is used for liquid and solid meals. The results are compared with the ones of a control group, without or not gastrintestinal problems but without autoimmune diasese. 99 sup(m)Tc-sulfurcolloid is used as labelling compound. The studies were done in supine and orthostatical position. (M.A.C.) [pt

  15. Gallium-67 uptake by the thyroid associated with progressive systemic sclerosis

    Sjoberg, R.J.; Blue, P.W.; Kidd, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    Although thyroidal uptake of gallium-67 has been described in several thyroid disorders, gallium-67 scanning is not commonly used in the evaluation of thyroid disease. Thyroidal gallium-67 uptake has been reported to occur frequently with subacute thyroiditis, anaplastic thyroid carcinoma, and thyroid lymphoma, and occasionally with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and follicular thyroid carcinoma. A patient is described with progressive systemic sclerosis who, while being scanned for possible active pulmonary involvement, was found incidentally to have abnormal gallium-67 uptake only in the thyroid gland. Fine needle aspiration cytology of the thyroid revealed Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Although Hashimoto's thyroiditis occurs with increased frequency in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis, thyroidal uptake of gallium-67 associated with progressive systemic sclerosis has not, to our knowledge, been previously described. Since aggressive thyroid malignancies frequently are imaged by gallium-67 scintigraphy, fine needle aspiration cytology of the thyroid often is essential in the evaluation of thyroidal gallium-67 uptake.

  16. Radioimmunoassay determination of urinary prostaglandins in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis

    Ramirez P, P.; Erbessd, M.L.; Mares, G.; Recinos, G.; Graef S, A.; Lavalle, C.

    1985-01-01

    The results of urinary determinations of E-2 prostaglandines by radioimmunoassay (RIA) in 24-hour urine are presented for three groups: progressive systemic sclerotic patients with normotension and with elevated or normal APR, progressive systemic sclerotic patients with hypertension and with normal or low APR, control group of normal subjects. In a recent report of progressive systemic sclerosis in patients we demonstrated changes in the urine concentratrion of APR levels, sodium excretion and in total blood volume. Based on these findings we felt the need to perform quantifications of E-2 prostaglandines (PGE-2) in 24-hour recently taken urine samples stored at 70 0 and measure the sodium amounts excreted in the urine. We concluded that urinary determination of E-2 prostaglandines was the most suitable for our study as it allowed the establishment of relationships between APR, aldosterone and metabolic sodium balance. (author)

  17. Defining active progressive multiple sclerosis

    Sellebjerg, Finn; Börnsen, Lars; Ammitzbøll, Cecilie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unknown whether disease activity according to consensus criteria (magnetic resonance imaging activity or clinical relapses) associate with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) changes in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). OBJECTIVE: To compare CSF biomarkers in active and inactive...

  18. Physiologic abnormalities of cardiac function in progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma

    Follansbee, W.P.; Curtiss, E.I.; Medsger, T.A. Jr.; Steen, V.D.; Uretsky, B.F.; Owens, G.R.; Rodnan, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    To investigate cardiopulmonary function in progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma, we studied 26 patients with maximal exercise and redistribution thallium scans, rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculography, pulmonary-function testing, and chest roentgenography. Although only 6 patients had clinical evidence of cardiac involvement, 20 had abnormal thallium scans, including 10 with reversible exercise-induced defects and 18 with fixed defects (8 had both). Seven of the 10 patients who had exercise-induced defects and underwent cardiac catheterization had normal coronary angiograms. Mean resting left ventricular ejection fraction and mean resting right ventricular ejection fraction were lower in patients with post-exercise left ventricular thallium defect scores above the median (59 +/- 13 per cent vs. 69 +/- 6 per cent, and 36 +/- 12 per cent vs. 47 +/- 7 per cent, respectively). The authors conclude that in progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of myocardial perfusion are common and appear to be due to a disturbance of the myocardial microcirculation. Both right and left ventricular dysfunction appear to be related to this circulatory disturbance, suggesting ischemically mediated injury

  19. Gradual progression of intrapulmonary lymph nodes associated with usual interstitial pneumonia in progressive systemic sclerosis on chest radiographs and CT

    Ohm, Joon Young; Chung, Myung Hee; Kim, Seon Mun [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Hyun [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    A 40 year old female visited the clinic for evaluation of Raynaud's phenomenon for a period of four years. The initial chest radiograph showed a fine reticular density and ground glass opacity with lower lobe predominance. These findings are consistent interstitial fibrosis. Additionally, high resolution CT showed multiple, small, coexisting nodular opacities, ranging from 3 to 7 mm in size in both lungs. These nodules grew up to 1.5 cm and showed moderate enhancement. Because of the rareness of intrapulmonary lymph node in patient of progressive systemic sclerosis, we couldn't exclude the possibility of malignancy. These nodules are turned out to be intrapulmonary lymph nodes on video assisted thoracoscopic lung biopsy.

  20. Transcription factor fos-related antigen-2 induces progressive peripheral vasculopathy in mice closely resembling human systemic sclerosis.

    Maurer, Britta; Busch, Nicole; Jüngel, Astrid; Pileckyte, Margarita; Gay, Renate E; Michel, Beat A; Schett, Georg; Gay, Steffen; Distler, Jörg; Distler, Oliver

    2009-12-08

    Microvascular damage is one of the first pathological changes in systemic sclerosis. In this study, we investigated the role of Fos-related antigen-2 (Fra-2), a transcription factor of the activator protein-1 family, in the peripheral vasculopathy of systemic sclerosis and examined the underlying mechanisms. Expression of Fra-2 protein was significantly increased in skin biopsies of systemic sclerosis patients compared with healthy controls, especially in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. Fra-2 transgenic mice developed a severe loss of small blood vessels in the skin that was paralleled by progressive skin fibrosis at 12 weeks of age. The reduction in capillary density was preceded by a significant increase in apoptosis in endothelial cells at week 9 as detected by immunohistochemistry. Similarly, suppression of Fra-2 by small interfering RNA prevented human microvascular endothelial cells from staurosporine-induced apoptosis and improved both the number of tubes and the cumulative tube lengths in the tube formation assay. In addition, cell migration in the scratch assay and vascular endothelial growth factor-dependent chemotaxis in a modified Boyden chamber assay were increased after transfection of human microvascular endothelial cells with Fra-2 small interfering RNA, whereas proliferation was not affected. Fra-2 is present in human systemic sclerosis and may contribute to the development of microvasculopathy by inducing endothelial cell apoptosis and by reducing endothelial cell migration and chemotaxis. Fra-2 transgenic mice are a promising preclinical model to study the mechanisms and therapeutic approaches of the peripheral vasculopathy in systemic sclerosis.

  1. Vitamin D Levels Predict Multiple Sclerosis Progression

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters February 3, 2014 Vitamin D Levels Predict Multiple Sclerosis Progression Among people ... sclerosis (MS), those with higher blood levels of vitamin D had better outcomes during 5 years of ...

  2. Effects of cisapride on colonic transit in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis

    Wang, S.J.; Lin, W.Y.; Lan, J.L.; Chen, D.Y.; Chen, Y.H.; Hsieh, T.Y.

    2002-01-01

    Progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) may involve any portion of the gastrointestinal tract including the colon. Constipation is common in patients with PSS. Cisapride, a benzamide derivative, is a potentially useful agent in the treatment if chronic idiopathic constipation. The effect of cisapride on colonic transit was evaluated in 16 PSS patients by radionuclide colonic transit method. Static images were acquired at regular times, then the geometric center (GC) values were calculated. Each patient received cisapride orally three times a day for a week. The median GC at 4 hours was 0.351 in patients before treatment and 0.775 after treatment. The difference is significant with a p value of 0.026. The median GC at 24 hours was 1.957 in patients before treatment and significantly increased to 2.509 after treatment. The p value was 0.038. Clinically, twelve patients had symptoms of constipation and 8 of them showed improvement of the symptoms after administration of cisapride. The result showed acceleration in colonic transit in response to cisapride. We conclude that cisapride is effective in the treatment of constipation in patients with PSS

  3. Demyelination versus remyelination in progressive multiple sclerosis

    Bramow, Stephan; Frischer, Josa M; Lassmann, Hans

    2010-01-01

    The causes of incomplete remyelination in progressive multiple sclerosis are unknown, as are the pathological correlates of the different clinical characteristics of patients with primary and secondary progressive disease. We analysed brains and spinal cords from 51 patients with progressive...... multiple sclerosis by planimetry. Thirteen patients with primary progressive disease were compared with 34 with secondary progressive disease. In patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, we found larger brain plaques, more demyelination in total and higher brain loads of active demyelination...... compared with patients with primary progressive disease. In addition, the brain density of plaques with high-grade inflammation and active demyelination was highest in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and remained ~18% higher than in primary progressive multiple sclerosis after adjustments...

  4. Progressive systemic sclerosis: high-resolution computed tomography findings; Esclerose sistemica progressiva: aspectos na tomografia computadorizada de alta resolucao

    Gasparetto, Emerson L.; Pimenta, Rodrigo; Ono, Sergio E.; Escuissato, Dante L. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Hospital de Clinicas. Servico de Radiologia Medica]. E-mail: dante.luiz@onda.com.br; Inoue, Cesar [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2005-09-15

    Objective: To describe the high-resolution computed tomography findings in the lung of patients with systemic sclerosis, independently of the respiratory symptoms. Materials and methods: Seventy-three high-resolution computed tomography scans of 44 patients with clinical diagnosis of systemic sclerosis were reviewed and defined by the consensus of two radiologists. Results: Abnormalities were seen in 91.8% (n = 67) of the scans. The most frequent findings were reticular pattern (90.4%), ground-glass opacities (63%), traction bronchiectasis and bronchiolectasis (56.2%), esophageal dilatation (46.6%), honeycombing pattern (28.8%) and signs of pulmonary hypertension (15.6%). In most cases the lesions were bilateral (89%) and symmetrical (58.5%). The lesions were predominantly located in the basal (91.2%) and peripheral (92.2%) regions. Conclusion: In the majority of the patients, progressive systemic sclerosis can cause pulmonary fibrosis mainly characterized by reticular pattern with basal and peripheral distribution on high-resolution computed tomography. (author)

  5. Transcription factor Fos-Related Antigen-2 induces progressive peripheral vasculopathy in mice closely resembling human systemic sclerosis

    Maurer, B; Busch, N; Jüngel, A; Pileckyte, M; Gay, R E; Michel, B A; Schett, G; Gay, S; Distler, J; Distler, O

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Microvascular damage is one of the first pathological changes in systemic sclerosis. In this study, we investigated the role of Fos-related antigen-2 (Fra-2), a transcription factor of the activator protein-1 family, in the peripheral vasculopathy of systemic sclerosis and examined the underlying mechanisms. Methods and Results-Expression of Fra-2 protein was significantly increased in skin biopsies of systemic sclerosis patients compared with healthy controls, especially in endo...

  6. The esophageal transit in normal persons and in carrier of Chagas disease and progressive systemic sclerosis. A scintiscanning study

    Oliveira, R.B. de.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this study is determine, by a scintiscanning method, how 10 ml of water, swallowed at one time, transit by the esophagus of normal persons and carriers of diseases, that attacking the esophagus motility. The other aim was determine the characteristics of the transit by the esophagus in carriers of chagasic esophagus diseases and of progressive systemic sclerosis. The study of esophageal transit was made by the technetium 99, with a gamma camera for detecting and quantifying the radioactivity. Several images of the esophageal transit, with persons in supine and seat positions, for processing the radioactivity curves x time are studied and compared. (C.G.C.)

  7. Progressive multiple sclerosis: from pathogenic mechanisms to treatment.

    Correale, Jorge; Gaitán, María I; Ysrraelit, María C; Fiol, Marcela P

    2017-03-01

    During the past decades, better understanding of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis disease mechanisms have led to the development of several disease-modifying therapies, reducing relapse rates and severity, through immune system modulation or suppression. In contrast, current therapeutic options for progressive multiple sclerosis remain comparatively disappointing and challenging. One possible explanation is a lack of understanding of pathogenic mechanisms driving progressive multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, diagnosis is usually retrospective, based on history of gradual neurological worsening with or without occasional relapses, minor remissions or plateaus. In addition, imaging methods as well as biomarkers are not well established. Magnetic resonance imaging studies in progressive multiple sclerosis show decreased blood-brain barrier permeability, probably reflecting compartmentalization of inflammation behind a relatively intact blood-brain barrier. Interestingly, a spectrum of inflammatory cell types infiltrates the leptomeninges during subpial cortical demyelination. Indeed, recent magnetic resonance imaging studies show leptomeningeal contrast enhancement in subjects with progressive multiple sclerosis, possibly representing an in vivo marker of inflammation associated to subpial demyelination. Treatments for progressive disease depend on underlying mechanisms causing central nervous system damage. Immunity sheltered behind an intact blood-brain barrier, energy failure, and membrane channel dysfunction may be key processes in progressive disease. Interfering with these mechanisms may provide neuroprotection and prevent disability progression, while potentially restoring activity and conduction along damaged axons by repairing myelin. Although most previous clinical trials in progressive multiple sclerosis have yielded disappointing results, important lessons have been learnt, improving the design of novel ones. This review discusses mechanisms involved

  8. Lung disease associated with progressive systemic sclerosis. Assessment of interlobar variation by bronchoalveolar lavage and comparison with noninvasive evaluation of disease activity

    Miller, K.S.; Smith, E.A.; Kinsella, M.; Schabel, S.I.; Silver, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    Progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS), or scleroderma, is a disease of unknown etiology that involves many organ systems, including the lungs. The interstitial lung disease of systemic sclerosis is becoming an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality. This process has been previously evaluated with single-site bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), gallium scanning, pulmonary function testing, and, occasionally, by open lung biopsy. As BAL has been shown to correlate well with open lung biopsy in systemic sclerosis, we sought to determine if single-site BAL accurately reflects alveolitis in a second site in the lung, and if BAL results correlate with other noninvasive tests of lung inflammation: gallium uptake, chest radiography, or arterial blood gas analysis. We performed 17 studies in 13 patients with scleroderma and found no significant lobar differences in lavage results or gallium scanning. By our criteria for normal versus active alveolitis, only two of 17 patient lavages would have been classified as normal by one side and abnormal by the other side. Although percent gallium uptake was equal bilaterally and supported the concept of alveolitis uniformity, gallium uptake intensity did not correlate with activity as measured by BAL. Furthermore, chest radiograph and arterial blood gas analysis did not correlate with BAL results or gallium scanning. We believe these data support the suitability of single-site lavage in the investigation of systemic-sclerosis-associated alveolitis and diminish the importance of gallium scanning in the investigation of systemic sclerosis pulmonary disease

  9. Cannabinoid-induced effects on the nociceptive system: a neurophysiological study in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Conte, Antonella; Bettolo, Chiara Marini; Onesti, Emanuela; Frasca, Vittorio; Iacovelli, Elisa; Gilio, Francesca; Giacomelli, Elena; Gabriele, Maria; Aragona, Massimiliano; Tomassini, Valentina; Pantano, Patrizia; Pozzilli, Carlo; Inghilleri, Maurizio

    2009-05-01

    Although clinical studies show that cannabinoids improve central pain in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) neurophysiological studies are lacking to investigate whether they also suppress these patients' electrophysiological responses to noxious stimulation. The flexion reflex (FR) in humans is a widely used technique for assessing the pain threshold and for studying spinal and supraspinal pain pathways and the neurotransmitter system involved in pain control. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study we investigated cannabinoid-induced changes in RIII reflex variables (threshold, latency and area) in a group of 18 patients with secondary progressive MS. To investigate whether cannabinoids act indirectly on the nociceptive reflex by modulating lower motoneuron excitability we also evaluated the H-reflex size after tibial nerve stimulation and calculated the H wave/M wave (H/M) ratio. Of the 18 patients recruited and randomized 17 completed the study. After patients used a commercial delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol mixture as an oromucosal spray the RIII reflex threshold increased and RIII reflex area decreased. The visual analogue scale score for pain also decreased, though not significantly. Conversely, the H/M ratio measured before patients received cannabinoids remained unchanged after therapy. In conclusion, the cannabinoid-induced changes in the RIII reflex threshold and area in patients with MS provide objective neurophysiological evidence that cannabinoids modulate the nociceptive system in patients with MS.

  10. Evidence for chronic inflammation as a component of the interstitial lung disease associated with progressive systemic sclerosis

    Rossi, G.A.; Bitterman, P.B.; Rennard, S.I.; Ferrans, V.J.; Crystal, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) is a generalized disorder characterized by fibrosis of many organs including the lung parenchyma. Unlike most other interstitial disorders, traditional concepts of the interstitial lung disease associated with PSS have held it to be a ''pure'' fibrotic disorder without a significant inflammatory component. To directly evaluate whether an active alveolitis is associated with this disorder, patients with chronic interstitial lung disease and PSS were studied by open lung biopsy, gallium-67 scanning, and bronchoalveolar lavage. Histologic evaluation of the biopsies demonstrated that the interstitial fibrosis of PSS is clearly associated with the presence of macrophages, lymphocytes, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, both in the interstitium and on the alveolar epithelial surface. Gallium-67 scans were positive in 77% of the patients, showing diffuse, primarily lower zone uptake, suggestive of active inflammation. Consistent with the histologic findings, bronchoalveolar lavage studies demonstrated a mild increase in the proportions of neutrophils and eosinophils with occasional increased numbers of lymphocytes. Importantly, alveolar macrophages from patients with PSS showed increased release of fibronectin and alveolar-macrophage-derived growth factor, mediators that together stimulate lung fibroblasts to proliferate, thus suggesting at least one mechanism modulating the lung fibrosis of these patients

  11. Improved pulmonary function following pirfenidone treatment in a patient with progressive interstitial lung disease associated with systemic sclerosis

    Zarir F Udwadia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pirfenidone is an anti-fibrotic drug which has been approved for the management of patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF. However, its role in interstitial lung disease (ILD due to other causes such as systemic sclerosis (SSc is not clear. We present a case of a patient with SSc associated ILD who showed a subjective as well as objective improvement in lung function with pirfenidone.

  12. Epidemiological and biochemical aspects of progression in multiple sclerosis

    Koch, Marcus Werner

    2008-01-01

    Patients with a progressive form of multiple sclerosis have the worst prognosis. They can expect that their symptoms will steadily worsen, and there is currently no treatment that has a proven effect on progressive multiple sclerosis. The underlying pathophysiology of the progressive forms of

  13. The natural history of primary progressive multiple sclerosis

    Koch, Marcus; Kingwell, Elaine; Rieckmann, Peter; Tremlett, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Background: Primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) carries the worst prognosis of the multiple sclerosis (MS) subtypes and is currently untreatable. A previous analysis of the British Columbia MS database challenged the view that disability progression is rapid in PPMS, but identified few

  14. Psychological functioning in primary progressive versus secondary progressive multiple sclerosis

    Vleugels, L; Pfennings, L E; Pouwer, F

    1998-01-01

    Psychological functioning in two types of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is assessed: primary progressive (PP) and secondary progressive (SP) patients. On the basis of differences in clinical course and underlying pathology we hypothesized that primary progressive patients and secondary...... progressive patients might have different psychological functioning. Seventy patients treated in an MS centre were examined cross-sectionally. Forty had an SP course of MS and 30 a PP course. The 33 male and 37 female patients had a mean age of 48.4 years (SD 11.2) and mean age of onset of MS of 30.7 years...... (SD 11.1). Patients completed questionnaires measuring among others the following aspects of psychological functioning: depression (BDI, SCL-90), anxiety (STAI, SCL-90), agoraphobia (SCL-90), somatic complaints (SCL-90), hostility (SCL-90) and attitude towards handicap (GHAS). Patients with a PP...

  15. Myocardial function and perfusion in the CREST syndrome variant of progressive systemic sclerosis. Exercise radionuclide evaluation and comparison with diffuse scleroderma

    Follansbee, W.P.; Curtiss, E.I.; Medsger, T.A. Jr.; Owens, G.R.; Steen, V.D.; Rodnan, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    Myocardial function and perfusion were evaluated in 22 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis with the CREST syndrome using exercise and radionuclide techniques, pulmonary function testing, and chest roentgenography. The results were compared with a similar study of 26 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma. The prevalence of thallium perfusion abnormalities was similar in the groups with CREST syndrome and diffuse scleroderma, (64 percent versus 77 percent), but the defects were significantly smaller in the CREST syndrome (p less than 0.01). Reperfusion thallium defects in the absence of extramural coronary artery disease were seen in 38 percent of patients with diffuse scleroderma. This finding was not seen in any of the patients with the CREST syndrome. In diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of both right and left ventricular function were related to larger thallium perfusion defects. In the CREST syndrome, abnormalities of left ventricular function were minor, were seen only during exercise, and were unrelated to thallium perfusion defects. Abnormal resting right ventricular function was seen in 36 percent of the patients with the CREST syndrome and was associated with an isolated decrease in diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide. It is concluded that the cardiac manifestations of the CREST syndrome are distinct from those found in diffuse scleroderma. Unlike diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of left ventricular function in the CREST syndrome are minor and are unrelated to abnormalities of coronary perfusion. Right ventricular dysfunction in the CREST syndrome appears to be primarily related to pulmonary vascular disease

  16. Emerging drugs for primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Narayan, Ram Narendra; Forsthuber, Thomas; Stüve, Olaf

    2018-04-24

    The identification of effective therapies for progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) has remains a priority and challenge for the global MS community. Despite a few proposed mechanisms, a more complete understanding of the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of these MS phenotypes, animal models that incorporate these pathogenic characteristics, novel trial designs, drug repurposing strategies, and new models of collaboration between clinical and basic science personnel may be required in identifying effective therapies. Areas covered: Here, we review the current knowledge on putative pathogenic mechanisms in primary progressive MS (PPMS). Also, the rationale and outcomes of key phase II or III trial initiatives in PPMS are summarized. Future perspectives are outlined. Expert opinion: The recent approval of ocrelizumab is a major milestone forward in the therapy of PPMS. One reason for success of this drug is appropriate patient selection. The ultimate goal in PPMS therapy should be the reversal of disability, and the arrest of disease progression. Our current understanding of PPMS suggests that a combination of immune-modulatory, myelin-restorative, and neuro-regenerative therapies particularly early in the disease course would be a reasonable strategy. Finally, selection of appropriate patients, selection of appropriate outcomes and monitoring therapy is again crucial for success of therapeutic strategies.

  17. Environmental Mycobiome Modifiers of Inflammation and Fibrosis in Systemic Sclerosis

    2016-09-01

    autoimmune systemic sclerosis and cancer: disease stratification, co-expression networks and genetic polymorphisms” Cancer Mechanisms Program, Norris ...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This project is focused on Systemic Sclerosis (SSc), a progressive fibrotic disease characterized by skin fibrosis and damage to...quantitative manner. Our studies suggest that disease pathogenesis includes a common environmental fungal trigger, Rhodotorula glutinis, which we

  18. Skin scoring in systemic sclerosis

    Zachariae, Hugh; Bjerring, Peter; Halkier-Sørensen, Lars

    1994-01-01

    Forty-one patients with systemic sclerosis were investigated with a new and simple skin score method measuring the degree of thickening and pliability in seven regions together with area involvement in each region. The highest values were, as expected, found in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis...... (type III SS) and the lowest in limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (type I SS) with no lesions extending above wrists and ancles. A positive correlation was found to the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen, a serological marker for synthesis of type III collagen. The skin score...

  19. High-dose erythropoietin in patients with progressive multiple sclerosis

    Schreiber, Karen; Magyari, Melinda; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Erythropoietin (EPO) is a part of an endogenous neuroprotective system in the brain and may address pathophysiological mechanisms in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a treatment effect of EPO on progressive MS. METHODS: This was a single-center, randomized......, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial, in which 52 patients with secondary or primary progressive MS were allocated to treatment with recombinant EPO (48,000 IU) or placebo, administered intravenously 17 times during 24 weeks. Patients had an Expanded Disability Status Score (EDSS) from 4 to 6......: This study provides class II evidence that treatment with high-dose EPO is not an effective treatment in patients with moderately advanced progressive MS....

  20. Selected methods of rehabilitation in systemic sclerosis

    Agnieszka Gerkowicz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis is a chronic connective tissue disease characterized by microvascular abnormalities, immune disturbances and progressive fibrosis of the skin and internal organs. Skin involvement may result in contractures, leading to marked loss of hand mobility, adversely affecting the performance of daily activities and decreasing the quality of life. Face involvement not only causes functional loss, but also lowers the self-esteem of patients. Increasing attention has recently been focused on the need to rehabilitate patients with systemic sclerosis in order to prevent the development of joint contractures and loss of mobility. The study presents a review of the current literature on rehabilitation possibilities in patients with systemic sclerosis, with a special focus on physiotherapy methods.

  1. Primary progressive multiple sclerosis in the Polish population

    Waldemar Brola

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was the epidemiological analysis and evaluation of selected clinical and sociodemographic factors in Polish patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Methods: The study included patients from 7 provinces in central and eastern Poland registered in the Registry of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis on 31 December 2016. The incidence of various forms of the disease was compared, and clinical, demographic and social disparities between relapsing-remitting and primary progressive multiple sclerosis were analysed. Results: Of 3,199 registered patients, 2,188 persons (66.2% had the relapsing-remitting form of multiple sclerosis, 774 (24.2% had the secondary progressive type and 307 (9.6% suffered from primary progressive disease. The first symptoms of primary progressive multiple sclerosis appeared almost 10 years later than in patients with the relapsing-remitting type (39.2 ± 11.4 vs. 29.8 ± 9.8. The period from the first symptoms to diagnosis was more than twice as long in patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (5.8 ± 3.4 as in those with relapsing-remitting disease (2.4 ± 1.6. The average degree of disability in the Expanded Disability Status Scale was similar and amounted to 3.2 ± 2.1 for relapsing-remitting and 3.6 ± 2.4 for primary progressive multiple sclerosis. The relapsing-remitting form was observed more often in women (2.4:1, and the primary progressive form appeared with equal frequency in both sexes (1:1. Disease-modifying treatment was received by 34% of patients with relapsing-remitting and in only 1.9% of patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Conclusions: The primary progressive form affects approximately 10% of Polish patients with multiple sclerosis. The first symptoms appear at about 40 years of age with equal frequency in both sexes, and its diagnosis takes more than twice as much time as in the case of relapsing-remitting multiple

  2. Esclerose sistêmica progressiva: aspectos na tomografia computadorizada de alta resolução Progressive systemic sclerosis: high-resolution computed tomography findings

    Emerson L. Gasparetto

    2005-09-01

    the majority of the patients, progressive systemic sclerosis can cause pulmonary fibrosis mainly characterized by reticular pattern with basal and peripheral distribution on high-resolution computed tomography.

  3. Plasma lipid peroxidation and progression of disability in multiple sclerosis

    Koch, M.; Mostert, J.; Arutjunyan, A. V.; Stepanov, M.; Teelken, A.; Heersema, D.; De Keyser, J.

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS), but its relation to disease progression is uncertain. To evaluate the relationship of plasma lipid peroxidation with progression of disability in MS, we measured blood plasma fluorescent lipid peroxidation

  4. Progression of regional grey matter atrophy in multiple sclerosis

    Marinescu, Razvan V; Young, Alexandra L; Firth, Nicholas C; Jorge Cardoso, M; Tur, Carmen; De Angelis, Floriana; Cawley, Niamh; Brownlee, Wallace J; De Stefano, Nicola; Laura Stromillo, M; Battaglini, Marco; Ruggieri, Serena; Gasperini, Claudio; Filippi, Massimo; Rocca, Maria A; Rovira, Alex; Sastre-Garriga, Jaume; Geurts, Jeroen J G; Vrenken, Hugo; Wottschel, Viktor; Leurs, Cyra E; Uitdehaag, Bernard; Pirpamer, Lukas; Enzinger, Christian; Ourselin, Sebastien; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A; Chard, Declan; Thompson, Alan J; Barkhof, Frederik; Alexander, Daniel C; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2018-01-01

    Abstract See Stankoff and Louapre (doi:10.1093/brain/awy114) for a scientific commentary on this article. Grey matter atrophy is present from the earliest stages of multiple sclerosis, but its temporal ordering is poorly understood. We aimed to determine the sequence in which grey matter regions become atrophic in multiple sclerosis and its association with disability accumulation. In this longitudinal study, we included 1417 subjects: 253 with clinically isolated syndrome, 708 with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, 128 with secondary-progressive multiple sclerosis, 125 with primary-progressive multiple sclerosis, and 203 healthy control subjects from seven European centres. Subjects underwent repeated MRI (total number of scans 3604); the mean follow-up for patients was 2.41 years (standard deviation = 1.97). Disability was scored using the Expanded Disability Status Scale. We calculated the volume of brain grey matter regions and brainstem using an unbiased within-subject template and used an established data-driven event-based model to determine the sequence of occurrence of atrophy and its uncertainty. We assigned each subject to a specific event-based model stage, based on the number of their atrophic regions. Linear mixed-effects models were used to explore associations between the rate of increase in event-based model stages, and T2 lesion load, disease-modifying treatments, comorbidity, disease duration and disability accumulation. The first regions to become atrophic in patients with clinically isolated syndrome and relapse-onset multiple sclerosis were the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus, followed by the middle cingulate cortex, brainstem and thalamus. A similar sequence of atrophy was detected in primary-progressive multiple sclerosis with the involvement of the thalamus, cuneus, precuneus, and pallidum, followed by the brainstem and posterior cingulate cortex. The cerebellum, caudate and putamen showed early atrophy in relapse

  5. Progression of regional grey matter atrophy in multiple sclerosis.

    Eshaghi, Arman; Marinescu, Razvan V; Young, Alexandra L; Firth, Nicholas C; Prados, Ferran; Jorge Cardoso, M; Tur, Carmen; De Angelis, Floriana; Cawley, Niamh; Brownlee, Wallace J; De Stefano, Nicola; Laura Stromillo, M; Battaglini, Marco; Ruggieri, Serena; Gasperini, Claudio; Filippi, Massimo; Rocca, Maria A; Rovira, Alex; Sastre-Garriga, Jaume; Geurts, Jeroen J G; Vrenken, Hugo; Wottschel, Viktor; Leurs, Cyra E; Uitdehaag, Bernard; Pirpamer, Lukas; Enzinger, Christian; Ourselin, Sebastien; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A; Chard, Declan; Thompson, Alan J; Barkhof, Frederik; Alexander, Daniel C; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2018-06-01

    See Stankoff and Louapre (doi:10.1093/brain/awy114) for a scientific commentary on this article.Grey matter atrophy is present from the earliest stages of multiple sclerosis, but its temporal ordering is poorly understood. We aimed to determine the sequence in which grey matter regions become atrophic in multiple sclerosis and its association with disability accumulation. In this longitudinal study, we included 1417 subjects: 253 with clinically isolated syndrome, 708 with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, 128 with secondary-progressive multiple sclerosis, 125 with primary-progressive multiple sclerosis, and 203 healthy control subjects from seven European centres. Subjects underwent repeated MRI (total number of scans 3604); the mean follow-up for patients was 2.41 years (standard deviation = 1.97). Disability was scored using the Expanded Disability Status Scale. We calculated the volume of brain grey matter regions and brainstem using an unbiased within-subject template and used an established data-driven event-based model to determine the sequence of occurrence of atrophy and its uncertainty. We assigned each subject to a specific event-based model stage, based on the number of their atrophic regions. Linear mixed-effects models were used to explore associations between the rate of increase in event-based model stages, and T2 lesion load, disease-modifying treatments, comorbidity, disease duration and disability accumulation. The first regions to become atrophic in patients with clinically isolated syndrome and relapse-onset multiple sclerosis were the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus, followed by the middle cingulate cortex, brainstem and thalamus. A similar sequence of atrophy was detected in primary-progressive multiple sclerosis with the involvement of the thalamus, cuneus, precuneus, and pallidum, followed by the brainstem and posterior cingulate cortex. The cerebellum, caudate and putamen showed early atrophy in relapse-onset multiple

  6. Esophageal transit scintigraphy in systemic sclerosis

    Marek Chojnowski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis is a rare connective tissue disease, distinctive features of which are fibrosis and microangiopathy. The esophagus is one of the most commonly involved internal organs. Most patients experience dysphagia, difficulties in swallowing and gastro-esophageal reflux. However, in up to one third of cases, the initial onset of esophageal disease may be clinically silent. There are several diagnostic modalities available for assessing both morphological and functional abnormalities of the esophagus. If structural abnormalities are suspected, endoscopy is the method of choice. Functional evaluation is best achieved with manometry. Both endoscopy and manometry are invasive techniques, with low patient acceptance. Barium-contrast study is well tolerated, but qualitative assessment of functional abnormalities is imprecise. Esophageal scintigraphy is an easy, non-invasive, sensitive and specific diagnostic modality. It can detect esophageal dysfunction even in asymptomatic patients. In patients already diagnosed with systemic sclerosis, scintigraphy is useful in evaluating severity and progression of the disease.

  7. Association between systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis: lupoid sclerosis

    Medina, Yimy F; Martinez, Jose B; Fernandez, Andres R; Quintana, Gerardo; Restrepo, Jose Felix; Rondon, Federico; Gamarra, Antonio Iglesias

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) with/without antiphospholipid syndrome are autoimmune illnesses. It has been described in many occasions the association of these two illnesses and the clinical picture of MS with characteristics of laboratory of SLE. When they affect to the central nervous system they can make it in a defined form for each illness or they can also make it in interposed or combined form of the two illnesses what has been called lupoid sclerosis; making that in some cases difficult the differentiation of the two illnesses and therefore to address the treatment. We present four cases of lupoid sclerosis, discuss the clinical and laboratory characteristics of this entity and we make a differentiation of the multiple sclerosis with the neurological affectation of SLE especially for images and laboratory results.

  8. Progress in the diagnosis and treatment of multiple sclerosis

    Shi-fang HOU

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The growing number of disease modifying drugs (DMDs approved for multiple sclerosis (MS treatment is a significant step forward and provides new options for MS patients. This article summarizes the clinical research highlights of MS, including clinical manifestations, accessory examinations, diagnostic criteria and progress of treatment. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.10.004

  9. Systemic Inflammation in Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Involves Follicular T-Helper, Th17- and Activated B-Cells and Correlates with Progression

    Romme Christensen, Jeppe; Börnsen, Lars; Ratzer, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    with disease progression, using flow cytometry and gene expression analysis of CD4(+) and CD8(+)T-cells, B-cells, monocytes and dendritic cells. Furthermore, gene expression of cerebrospinal fluid cells was studied. Flow cytometry studies revealed increased frequencies of ICOS(+)TFH-cells in peripheral blood...... increased in PPMS and SPMS. In the analysis of B-cells, we found a significant increase of plasmablasts and DC-SIGN(+) and CD83(+)B-cells in SPMS. ICOS(+)TFH-cells and DC-SIGN(+)B-cells correlated with disease progression in SPMS patients. Gene expression analysis of peripheral blood cell subsets...... substantiated the flow cytometry findings by demonstrating increased expression of IL21, IL21R and ICOS in CD4(+)T-cells in progressive MS. Cerebrospinal fluid cells from RRMS and progressive MS (pooled SPMS and PPMS patients) had increased expression of TFH-cell and plasmablast markers. In conclusion...

  10. Procollagen Type I and III Aminoterminal Propeptide Levels and Severity of Interstitial Lung Disease in Mexican Women With Progressive Systemic Sclerosis.

    Gonzalez-Lopez, Laura; Rocha-Muñoz, Alberto D; Olivas-Flores, Eva M; Garcia-Gonzalez, Araceli; Peguero-Gómez, Ana R; Flores-Navarro, Juan; Villa-Manzano, Alberto I; Zavaleta-Muñiz, Soraya A; Salazar-Paramo, Mario; Mejía, Mayra; Juárez-Contreras, Pablo; Vazquez-Del Mercado, Monica; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto G; Trujillo-Hernández, Benjamin; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo H; Gamez-Nava, Jorge I

    2015-09-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a frequent complication in progressive systemic sclerosis (SSc), being present in 25% to 90% of cases. To evaluate whether serum levels of procollagen typei and iii aminoterminal propeptide (PINP and PIIINP) correlate with severity and patterns of ILD in Mexican women with SSc. Thirty three SSc patients were assessed for disease characteristics and anti-topoisomerase antibodies (topoi), and also underwent pulmonary function tests and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Nineteen patients had ILD+SSc, and 14 had no lung involvement (no ILD-SSc); data were compared with those from 45 healthy controls. PINP and PIIINP were assessed in all 3 groups. Patients with SSc had higher PINP and PIIINP vs controls (P=.001, P<.001, respectively). Compared to no ILD-SSc patients, those with ILD+SSc had longer disease duration in years (P=.005), higher modified Rodnan skin score (P<.001), higher Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability-Index scores (P<.001), higher topoi U/mL (P<.001), PINP (49.28±28.63 vs. 32.12±18.58μg/L, P=.05), and PIIINP (4.33±1.03 vs. 2.67±1.26μg/L, P<.001) levels. ILD severity based on total HRCT correlated with PINP (r=.388, P=.03) and PIIINP (P=.594, P<.001). On adjusted analysis, ILD severity was associated with disease duration (P=.037), PIIINP (P=.038), and topoi (P=.045). PINP and PIIINP are useful markers for severe ILD+SSc, suggesting they could play a role in the follow-up of this complication in SSc. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Immune system alterations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Hovden, H; Frederiksen, J L; Pedersen, S W

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a disease of which the underlying cause and pathogenesis are unknown. Cumulatative data clearly indicates an active participation by the immune system in the disease. An increasingly recognized theory suggests a non-cell autonomous mechanism, meaning that multiple...... cells working together are necessary for the pathogenesis of the disease. Observed immune system alterations could indicate an active participation in this mechanism. Damaged motor neurons are able to activate microglia, astrocytes and the complement system, which further can influence each other...... and contribute to neurodegeneration. Infiltrating peripheral immune cells appears to correlate with disease progression, but their significance and composition is unclear. The deleterious effects of this collaborating system of cells appear to outweigh the protective aspects, and revealing this interplay might...

  12. Cognitive-Linguistic Deficit and Speech Intelligibility in Chronic Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Green, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis is a disabling neurological disease with varied symptoms, including dysarthria and cognitive and linguistic impairments. Association between dysarthria and cognitive-linguistic deficit has not been explored in clinical multiple sclerosis studies. Aims: In patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis, the…

  13. Monthly oral methylprednisolone pulse treatment in progressive multiple sclerosis

    Ratzer, Rikke; Iversen, Pernille; Börnsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a large unmet need for treatments for patients with progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Phase 2 studies with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker outcomes may be well suited for the initial evaluation of efficacious treatments. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of monthly oral...... methylprednisolone pulse treatment on intrathecal inflammation in progressive MS. METHODS: In this open-label phase 2A study, 15 primary progressive and 15 secondary progressive MS patients received oral methylprednisolone pulse treatment for 60 weeks. Primary outcome was changes in CSF concentrations of osteopontin...... no change in the CSF concentration of osteopontin, but we observed significant improvement in clinical scores, MTR, DTI and some secondary CSF outcome measures. Adverse events were well-known side effects to methylprednisolone. CONCLUSION: Monthly methylprednisolone pulse treatment was safe, but had...

  14. Structural MRI correlates of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis progression.

    Senda, Joe; Atsuta, Naoki; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Bagarinao, Epifanio; Imai, Kazunori; Yokoi, Daichi; Riku, Yuichi; Masuda, Michihito; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Watanabe, Hazuki; Ito, Mizuki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Naganawa, Shinji; Sobue, Gen

    2017-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) presents with varying degrees of brain degeneration that can extend beyond the corticospinal tract (CST). Furthermore, the clinical course and progression of ALS varies widely. Brain degeneration detected using structural MRI could reflect disease progression. On study registration, 3-Tesla volumetric MRI and diffusion tensor imaging scans were obtained at baseline in 38 healthy controls and 67 patients with sporadic ALS. Patients had Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R) scores of ≥36 and did not have the chromosome 9, open reading frame 72 repeat expansion. Six months later, changes in ALSFRS-R (ΔALSFRS-R) scores were calculated and patients were grouped into three categories, namely, patients with slow progression with ΔALSFRS-R scores ≤3 (n=19), intermediate progression with ΔALSFRS-R scores =4, 5 and 6 (n=36) and rapid progression with ΔALSFRS-R scores ≥7 (n=12). We analysed voxel-based morphometry and tract-based spatial statistics among these subgroups and controls. In comparison with controls, patients with ALS showed grey matter atrophy and decreased fractional anisotropy beyond the motor cortex and CST, especially in the frontotemporal lobes and basal ganglia. Moreover, the degree of change was highly proportional to ΔALSFRS-R at the 6-month assessment. A more rapid disease progression and poorer functional decline were associated with greater involvement of the extra-motor cortex and basal ganglia, suggesting that the spatial extent of brain involvement can be an indicator of the progression in ALS. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Erasmus Syndrome: Silicosis and Systemic Sclerosis.

    Jain, Shubhra; Joshi, Vinod; Rathore, Yogendra S; Khippal, Narendra

    2017-01-01

    Several occupational hazards, especially exposure to silica, have been implicated as causal factors for the development of scleroderma-like disorders. Compared to other connective tissue disorders, silica-associated systemic sclerosis (SA-SS) is relatively rare. Silica-induced scleroderma is indistinguishable from idiopathic systemic sclerosis. However, the former expresses a high predisposition of pulmonary involvement and anti-Scl-70 antibody. We report the case of a 42-year-old male, stone cutter by occupation, who was diagnosed as simple chronic silicosis and developed systemic sclerosis.

  16. Effect of total lymphoid irradiation in chronic progressive multiple sclerosis

    Cook, S.D.; Devereux, C.; Troiano, R.; Hafstein, M.P.; Zito, G.; Hernandez, E.; Lavenhar, M.; Vidaver, R.; Dowling, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI; 1980 cGy) or sham irradiation was given to 40 patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) in a prospective, randomised, double-blind study. During mean follow-up of 21 months, MS patients treated with TLI has less functional decline than sham-irradiated MS patients (p<0.01). A significant relation was noted between absolute blood lymphocyte counts in the first year after TLI and subsequent course, patients with higher lymphocyte counts generally having a worse prognosis (p<0.01). TLI was well tolerated and associated with only mild short-term, and to date, long-term side-effects. (author)

  17. Development of systemic lupus erythematosus in-patient with systemic sclerosis

    Martinez, Jose B; Medina, Yimmy F; Restrepo, Jose Felix; Rondon, Federico; Iglesias G, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    A 56 years old woman with systemic sclerosis consult by rapidly progressive deterioration of his pulmonary and renal function developing a superposition syndrome with systemic lupus erythematosus, unusual presentation that respond to high doses of corticosteroid and ciclophos- phamide. This is the first reported case in the literature of a superposition syndrome that begins with systemic sclerosis. The clinical finding, immunologic profile and its possible association are discussed

  18. ECTRIMS/ACTRIMS 2017: Closing in on neurorepair in progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Kremer, David; Küry, Patrick; Hartung, Hans-Peter

    2018-04-01

    While there is now a multitude of potent medications for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), effective therapies targeting neurodegeneration in progressive multiple sclerosis types are still lacking. Stimulation of neurorepair in this disease remains a pathogenetically defined treatment goal. However, therapeutic progress is slowed by the still inadequate tool set to capture "regeneration/repair" in MS and to define appropriate outcomes in clinical trials. In this review, we discuss studies investigating promising regenerative agents for progressive MS which were recently presented during the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS)/Americas Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ACTRIMS) 2017 meeting in Paris.

  19. Localized Scleroderma, Systemic Sclerosis and Cardiovascular Risk

    Hesselvig, Jeanette Halskou; Kofoed, Kristian; Wu, Jashin J

    2018-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that patients with systemic sclerosis have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. To determine whether patients with systemic sclerosis or localized scleroderma are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, a cohort study of the entire Danish population aged ≥ 18...... and ≤ 100 years was conducted, followed from 1997 to 2011 by individual-level linkage of nationwide registries. Multivariable adjusted Cox regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) for a composite cardiovascular disease endpoint. A total of 697 patients with localized scleroderma and 1......,962 patients with systemic sclerosis were identified and compared with 5,428,380 people in the reference population. In systemic sclerosis, the adjusted HR was 2.22 (95% confidence interval 1.99-2.48). No association was seen between patients with localized scleroderma and cardiovascular disease. In conclusion...

  20. A review on potential roles of vitamins in incidence, progression, and improvement of multiple sclerosis

    Matin Khosravi-Largani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is an inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease, with unknown etiology. Vitamins, as important micronutrients playing different roles in body, seem to be important in MS pathogenesis. In vitro, in vivo and human studies, supports the protective role of some vitamins in MS occurrence or progression. Current study reviews recent insights and reports about the importance of vitamins in MS incidence or progression. In accordance, the importance of all water and fat-soluble vitamins in MS pathogenesis based on observational studies in human population and their role in the function of immune system as well as possible therapeutic opportunities are discussed in depth throughout this review. Keywords: Multiple sclerosis, Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, Vitamin A, Vitamin E, Vitamin D, Folic acid, Vitamin B 12, Vitamins

  1. Monthly oral methylprednisolone pulse treatment in progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Ratzer, Rikke; Iversen, Pernille; Börnsen, Lars; Dyrby, Tim B; Romme Christensen, Jeppe; Ammitzbøll, Cecilie; Madsen, Camilla Gøbel; Garde, Ellen; Lyksborg, Mark; Andersen, Birgit; Hyldstrup, Lars; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Siebner, Hartwig R; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2016-06-01

    There is a large unmet need for treatments for patients with progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Phase 2 studies with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker outcomes may be well suited for the initial evaluation of efficacious treatments. To evaluate the effect of monthly oral methylprednisolone pulse treatment on intrathecal inflammation in progressive MS. In this open-label phase 2A study, 15 primary progressive and 15 secondary progressive MS patients received oral methylprednisolone pulse treatment for 60 weeks. Primary outcome was changes in CSF concentrations of osteopontin. Secondary outcomes were other CSF biomarkers of inflammation, axonal damage and demyelination; clinical scores; magnetic resonance imaging measures of disease activity, magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI); motor evoked potentials; and bone density scans. We found no change in the CSF concentration of osteopontin, but we observed significant improvement in clinical scores, MTR, DTI and some secondary CSF outcome measures. Adverse events were well-known side effects to methylprednisolone. Monthly methylprednisolone pulse treatment was safe, but had no effect on the primary outcome. However, improvements in secondary clinical and MRI outcome measures suggest that this treatment regimen may have a beneficial effect in progressive MS. © The Author(s), 2015.

  2. HLA typing in systemic sclerosis

    M. Faré

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between Systemic Sclerosis (SSc and HLA antigens, and to correlate these antigens with the clinical manifestations of the disease. Materials and methods: 55 patients were stratified according a to the cutaneous involvement b to the positivity of Scl- 70 and anticentromere antibody and c to the internal organ involvement, in particular we used HRCT to demonstrate lung fibrosis, echocardiography for the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension, blood creatinine, urinalysis and arterial hypertension to demonstrate renal failure, and esophagus double-countrast barium swallow for the diagnosis of esophagopathy. The control group consisting of 2000 healthy Caucasian subjects was recruited from the same population. Results: the frequency of the antigens A23 (p=0.003, RR=3.69, B18 (p<0.0001, RR=3.57, and DR11 (p<0.0001, RR=6.18 was statistically increased in the patients population compared with the healthy controls. Although there is no any significant correlation between HLA antigens and different clinical subsets of scleroderma, antigens B18 and DR11 could be associated with more severe clinical features. Conclusions: the presence of a significant association between SSc and specific HLA antigens (A23, B18, and DR11 could link the HLA system with SSc.

  3. The treatment of skin ulcers in patients with systemic sclerosis

    M. Matucci- Cerinic; F. Braschi; A. Moggi Pignone; L. Amanzi; G. Fiori

    2011-01-01

    Systemic Sclerosis (Ssc) is a complex disease of the connective tissue, characterized by progressive thickening and fibrosis of the skin and the internal organs and by diffused damage of the microvascular system. The fibrosis ones of the skin associated to the characteristic vascular alterations lead to the genesis of ulcers, more or less extended, often multiple, peripheral localization, chronic course, painful, able to influence patient’s quality of life. Indeed, immunity reactivity, the th...

  4. Financial Capacity and its Cognitive Predictors in Progressive Multiple Sclerosis.

    Gerstenecker, Adam; Myers, Terina; Lowry, Kathleen; Martin, Roy C; Triebel, Kristen L; Bashir, Khurram; Marson, Daniel C

    2017-12-01

    Financial capacity is a cognitively-complex activity of daily living that has been shown to decline in a number of neurocognitive disorders. Although it has been well established that cognitive decline is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), little is known about possible financial capacity impairment in people with MS. Thus, the objective of the current study is to investigate financial capacity and its neurocognitive correlates in MS. Data from 22 people with progressive MS and a healthy comparison group composed of 18 adults were analyzed. MS diagnoses were made by a board-certified neurologist with experience in MS. Study participants were administered the Financial Capacity Instrument, a performance-based measure of financial capacity, and neuropsychological battery. Overall financial capacity and most complex financial domains were significantly poorer for people with progressive MS in relation to the healthy comparison group, and a number of cognitive variables were associated with financial capacity declines. Financial capacity is a complex cognitively-mediated functional ability that was impaired in 50% of the current sample of people with progressive MS. These results indicate that people with progressive MS are at greater risk for showing impairment in complex financial tasks and should be clinically monitored for possible deficits in financial capacity. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Progressive multiple sclerosis, cognitive function, and quality of life.

    Højsgaard Chow, Helene; Schreiber, Karen; Magyari, Melinda; Ammitzbøll, Cecilie; Börnsen, Lars; Romme Christensen, Jeppe; Ratzer, Rikke; Soelberg Sørensen, Per; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2018-02-01

    Patients with progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) often have cognitive impairment in addition to physical impairment. The burden of cognitive and physical impairment progresses over time, and may be major determinants of quality of life. The aim of this study was to assess to which degree quality of life correlates with physical and cognitive function in progressive MS. This is a retrospective study of 52 patients with primary progressive ( N  = 18) and secondary progressive MS ( N  = 34). Physical disability was assessed using the Expanded Disability Status Scale, Timed 25 Foot Walk (T25FW) test and 9-Hole Peg Test (9HPT). Cognitive function was assessed using Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT), Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test, and Trail Making Test B (TRAIL-B). In addition, quality of life was assessed by the Short Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire. Only measures of cognitive function correlated with the overall SF-36 quality of life score and the Mental Component Summary score from the SF-36. The only physical measure that correlated with a measure of quality of life was T25FW test, which correlated with the Physical Component Summary from the SF-36. We found no other significant correlations between the measures of cognitive function and the overall physical measures but interestingly, we found a possible relationship between the 9HPT score for the nondominant hand and the SDMT and TRAIL-B. Our findings support inclusion of measures of cognitive function in the assessment of patients with progressive MS as these correlated closer with quality of life than measures of physical impairment.

  6. The Role of PPAR Gamma in Systemic Sclerosis

    Andréa Tavares Dantas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrosis is recognized as an important feature of many chronic diseases, such as systemic sclerosis (SSc, an autoimmune disease of unknown etiology, characterized by immune dysregulation and vascular injury, followed by progressive fibrosis affecting the skin and multiple internal organs. SSc has a poor prognosis because no therapy has been shown to reverse or arrest the progression of fibrosis, representing a major unmet medical need. Recently, antifibrotic effects of PPARγ ligands have been studied in vitro and in vivo and some theories have emerged leading to new insights. Aberrant PPARγ function seems to be implicated in pathological fibrosis in the skin and lungs. This antifibrotic effect is mainly related to the inhibition of TGF-β/Smad signal transduction but other pathways can be involved. This review focused on recent studies that identified PPARγ as an important novel pathway with critical roles in regulating connective tissue homeostasis, with emphasis on skin and lung fibrosis and its role on systemic sclerosis.

  7. Endothelin-1 in systemic sclerosis

    C. Pizzorni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated endothelin-1 (ET-1 plasma levels in patients affected by primary Raynaud’s phenomenon (PRP, as well as in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc and secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon (SRP. Furthermore, ET-1 levels were investigated in SSc patients with different patterns of peripheral microvascular damage, as evaluated by nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC. Methods: 23 PRP patients, 67 SSc patients according to ACR criteria, and 23 healthy subjects were enrolled. SSc microvascular involvement was classified in three different patterns (Early, Active, and Late by NVC, as previously described. Results: ET-1 was found significantly higher in both PRP and SRP, when compared with controls (median ±IQR: 3.3±2.8, 2.7±2.2, 2.0±2.2, respectively (p=0.05. No statistically significant difference of ET-1 levels was observed between PRP and SRP patients. ET-1 was found higher in patients with Late NVC pattern, when compared with both Active and Early NVC patterns (median±IQR: 3.4±2.5, 2.4±2.2, 2.5±2.1, respectively, but without statistical significance. Patients with Late NVC pattern showed significantly higher ET-1 plasma levels than controls (p=0.03. No correlation was found between ET-1 levels and disease duration in both groups, as well as between ET-1 levels and age of patients. Conclusions: These data support previous studies, reporting increased ET-1 plasma levels in both PRP and SRP patients. Interestingly, patients with the Late NVC pattern of microangiopathy showed higher ET-1 plasma levels than controls. The high levels of ET-1 detected in the Late NVC pattern of microangiopathy might be related to the larger fibrotic involvement typical of the advanced stages of disease.

  8. Brain viscoelasticity alteration in chronic-progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Kaspar-Josche Streitberger

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Viscoelastic properties indicate structural alterations in biological tissues at multiple scales with high sensitivity. Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE is a novel technique that directly visualizes and quantitatively measures biomechanical tissue properties in vivo. MRE recently revealed that early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS is associated with a global decrease of the cerebral mechanical integrity. This study addresses MRE and MR volumetry in chronic-progressive disease courses of MS. METHODS: We determined viscoelastic parameters of the brain parenchyma in 23 MS patients with primary or secondary chronic progressive disease course in comparison to 38 age- and gender-matched healthy individuals by multifrequency MRE, and correlated the results with clinical data, T2 lesion load and brain volume. Two viscoelastic parameters, the shear elasticity μ and the powerlaw exponent α, were deduced according to the springpot model and compared to literature values of relapsing-remitting MS. RESULTS: In chronic-progressive MS patients, μ and α were reduced by 20.5% and 6.1%, respectively, compared to healthy controls. MR volumetry yielded a weaker correlation: Total brain volume loss in MS patients was in the range of 7.5% and 1.7% considering the brain parenchymal fraction. All findings were significant (P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic-progressive MS disease courses show a pronounced reduction of the cerebral shear elasticity compared to early relapsing-remitting disease. The powerlaw exponent α decreased only in the chronic-progressive stage of MS, suggesting an alteration in the geometry of the cerebral mechanical network due to chronic neuroinflammation.

  9. The Therapeutic Potential of the Ketogenic Diet in Treating Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    Mithu Storoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, multiple sclerosis has been viewed as an entirely inflammatory disease without acknowledgment of the significant neurodegenerative component responsible for disease progression and disability. This perspective is being challenged by observations of a dissociation between inflammation and neurodegeneration where the neurodegenerative component may play a more significant role in disease progression. In this review, we explore the relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis. We review evidence that the ketogenic diet can improve mitochondrial function and discuss the potential of the ketogenic diet in treating progressive multiple sclerosis for which no treatment currently exists.

  10. Serum uric acid, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, and apolipoprotein E genotype in benign vs. progressive multiple sclerosis

    Ramsaransing, GSM; Heersema, DJ; De Keyser, J

    The majority of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience gradual progression of disability, either as secondary progressive MS (SPMS) or primary progressive MS (PPMS). A subgroup with relapsing-remitting MS shows a benign course with little or no disease progression and minimal disability

  11. Exercise and disease progression in multiple sclerosis: can exercise slow down the progression of multiple sclerosis?

    Dalgas, Ulrik; Stenager, Egon

    2012-01-01

    studies evaluating the effects on clinical outcome measures, (2) cross-sectional studies evaluating the relationship between fitness status and MRI findings, (3) cross-sectional and longitudinal studies evaluating the relationship between exercise/physical activity and disability/relapse rate and, finally......, (4) longitudinal exercise studies applying the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) animal model of MS. Data from intervention studies evaluating disease progression by clinical measures (1) do not support a disease-modifying effect of exercise; however, MRI data (2), patient-reported data...... (3) and data from the EAE model (4) indicate a possible disease-modifying effect of exercise, but the strength of the evidence limits definite conclusions. It was concluded that some evidence supports the possibility of a disease-modifying potential of exercise (or physical activity) in MS patients...

  12. One year in review 2017: systemic sclerosis.

    Barsotti, Simone; Bruni, Cosimo; Orlandi, Martina; Della Rossa, Alessandra; Marasco, Emiliano; Codullo, Veronica; Guiducci, Serena

    2017-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a rare acquired systemic disease characterised by heterogeneous evolution and outcome. Each year novel insights into the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of this severe disease have been published. We herewith provide our overview of the most significant literature contributions published over the last year.

  13. Fructose Malabsorption in Systemic Sclerosis

    Marie, Isabelle; Leroi, Anne-Marie; Gourcerol, Guillaume; Levesque, Hervé; Ménard, Jean-François; Ducrotte, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The deleterious effect of fructose, which is increasingly incorporated in many beverages, dairy products, and processed foods, has been described; fructose malabsorption has thus been reported in up to 2.4% of healthy subjects, leading to digestive clinical symptoms (eg, pain, distension, diarrhea). Because digestive involvement is frequent in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), we hypothesized that fructose malabsorption could be responsible for intestinal manifestations in these patients. The aims of this prospective study were to: determine the prevalence of fructose malabsorption, in SSc; predict which SSc patients are at risk of developing fructose malabsorption; and assess the outcome of digestive symptoms in SSc patients after initiation of standardized low-fructose diet. Eighty consecutive patients with SSc underwent fructose breath test. All SSc patients also completed a questionnaire on digestive symptoms, and a global symptom score (GSS) was calculated. The prevalence of fructose malabsorption was as high as 40% in SSc patients. We also observed a marked correlation between the presence of fructose malabsorption and: higher values of GSS score of digestive symptoms (P = 0.000004); and absence of delayed gastric emptying (P = 0.007). Furthermore, in SSc patients with fructose malabsorption, the median value of GSS score of digestive symptoms was lower after initiation of standardized low-fructose diet (4 before vs. 1 after; P = 0.0009). Our study underscores that fructose malabsorption often occurs in SSc patients. Our findings are thus relevant for clinical practice, highlighting that fructose breath test is a helpful, noninvasive method by: demonstrating fructose intolerance in patients with SSc; and identifying the group of SSc patients with fructose intolerance who may benefit from low-fructose diet. Interestingly, because the present series also shows that low-fructose diet resulted in a marked decrease of gastrointestinal

  14. Fluoxetine in Progressive Multiple Sclerosis (FLUOX-PMS) : study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Cambron, Melissa; Mostert, Jop; Haentjens, Patrick; D'Hooghe, Marie; Nagels, Guy; Willekens, Barbara; Heersema, Dorothea; Debruyne, Jan; Van Hecke, Wim; Algoed, Luc; De Klippel, Nina; Fosselle, Erwin; Laureys, Guy; Merckx, Henri; Van Wijmeersch, Bart; Vanopdenbosch, Ludo; Verhagen, Wim; Hupperts, Raymond; Hengstman, Gerald; Michiels, Veronique; Van Merhaegen-Wieleman, Annick; De Keyser, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Background: Currently available disease-modifying treatments acting by modifying the immune response are ineffective in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), which is caused by a widespread axonal degeneration. Mechanisms suspected to be involved in this widespread axonal degeneration are reduced

  15. Exploring potential mechanisms of action of natalizumab in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis

    Sellebjerg, Finn; Cadavid, Diego; Steiner, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    progressive MS (SPMS), for which approved disease-modifying therapies are limited. In this review, we summarize the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the development of SPMS and the rationale and clinical potential for natalizumab, which is currently approved for the treatment of relapsing forms of MS......Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common and chronic central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disease and a leading cause of permanent disability. Patients most often present with a relapsing-remitting disease course, typically progressing over time to a phase of relentless advancement in secondary......, to exert beneficial effects in reducing disease progression unrelated to relapses in SPMS. In both forms of MS, active brain-tissue injury is associated with inflammation; but in SPMS, the inflammatory response occurs at least partly behind the blood-brain barrier and is followed by a cascade of events...

  16. Setting a research agenda for progressive multiple sclerosis: the International Collaborative on Progressive MS.

    Fox, Robert J; Thompson, Alan; Baker, David; Baneke, Peer; Brown, Doug; Browne, Paul; Chandraratna, Dhia; Ciccarelli, Olga; Coetzee, Timothy; Comi, Giancarlo; Feinstein, Anthony; Kapoor, Raj; Lee, Karen; Salvetti, Marco; Sharrock, Kersten; Toosy, Ahmed; Zaratin, Paola; Zuidwijk, Kim

    2012-11-01

    Despite significant progress in the development of therapies for relapsing MS, progressive MS remains comparatively disappointing. Our objective, in this paper, is to review the current challenges in developing therapies for progressive MS and identify key priority areas for research. A collaborative was convened by volunteer and staff leaders from several MS societies with the mission to expedite the development of effective disease-modifying and symptom management therapies for progressive forms of multiple sclerosis. Through a series of scientific and strategic planning meetings, the collaborative identified and developed new perspectives on five key priority areas for research: experimental models, identification and validation of targets and repurposing opportunities, proof-of-concept clinical trial strategies, clinical outcome measures, and symptom management and rehabilitation. Our conclusions, tackling the impediments in developing therapies for progressive MS will require an integrated, multi-disciplinary approach to enable effective translation of research into therapies for progressive MS. Engagement of the MS research community through an international effort is needed to address and fund these research priorities with the ultimate goal of expediting the development of disease-modifying and symptom-relief treatments for progressive MS.

  17. Setting a research agenda for progressive multiple sclerosis: The International Collaborative on Progressive MS

    Thompson, Alan; Baker, David; Baneke, Peer; Brown, Doug; Browne, Paul; Chandraratna, Dhia; Ciccarelli, Olga; Coetzee, Timothy; Comi, Giancarlo; Feinstein, Anthony; Kapoor, Raj; Lee, Karen; Salvetti, Marco; Sharrock, Kersten; Toosy, Ahmed; Zaratin, Paola; Zuidwijk, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant progress in the development of therapies for relapsing MS, progressive MS remains comparatively disappointing. Our objective, in this paper, is to review the current challenges in developing therapies for progressive MS and identify key priority areas for research. A collaborative was convened by volunteer and staff leaders from several MS societies with the mission to expedite the development of effective disease-modifying and symptom management therapies for progressive forms of multiple sclerosis. Through a series of scientific and strategic planning meetings, the collaborative identified and developed new perspectives on five key priority areas for research: experimental models, identification and validation of targets and repurposing opportunities, proof-of-concept clinical trial strategies, clinical outcome measures, and symptom management and rehabilitation. Our conclusions, tackling the impediments in developing therapies for progressive MS will require an integrated, multi-disciplinary approach to enable effective translation of research into therapies for progressive MS. Engagement of the MS research community through an international effort is needed to address and fund these research priorities with the ultimate goal of expediting the development of disease-modifying and symptom-relief treatments for progressive MS. PMID:22917690

  18. Progressive decline of decision-making performances during multiple sclerosis.

    Simioni, Samanta; Ruffieux, Christiane; Kleeberg, Joerg; Bruggimann, Laure; du Pasquier, Renaud A; Annoni, Jean-Marie; Schluep, Myriam

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate longitudinally, using the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), the dynamics of decision-making capacity at a two-year interval (median: 2.1 years) in a group of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) (n = 70) and minor neurological disability [Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) attention), behavior, handicap, and perceived health status were also investigated. Standardized change scores [(score at retest-score at baseline)/standard deviation of baseline score] were computed. Results showed that IGT performances decreased from baseline to retest (from 0.3, SD = 0.4 to 0.1, SD = 0.3, p = .005). MS patients who worsened in the IGT were more likely to show a decreased perceived health status and emotional well-being (SEP-59; p = .05 for both). Relapsing rate, disability progression, cognitive, and behavioral changes were not associated with decreased IGT performances. In conclusion, decline in decision making can appear as an isolated deficit in MS.

  19. Primary progressive multiple sclerosis diagnostic criteria: a reappraisal.

    Montalban, X; Sastre-Garriga, J; Filippi, M; Khaleeli, Z; Téllez, N; Vellinga, M M; Tur, C; Brochet, B; Barkhof, F; Rovaris, M; Miller, D H; Polman, C H; Rovira, A; Thompson, A J

    2009-12-01

    The diagnostic criteria used in primary progressive (PP) and relapsing-remitting (RR) multiple sclerosis (MS) show substantial differences. This introduces complexity in the diagnosis of MS which could be resolved if these criteria could be unified in terms of the requirements for dissemination in space (DIS). The aim of this study was to assess whether a single algorithm may be used to demonstrate DIS in all forms of MS. Five sets of RRMS criteria for DIS were applied to a cohort of 145 patients with established PPMS (mean disease duration: 11 years - PPMS-1): C1: Barkhof-Tintoré (as in 2005 McDonald's criteria); C2: Swanton et al. (as in JNNP 2006); C3: presence of oligoclonal bands plus two lesions (as in McDonald's criteria); C4 and C5: a two-step approach was also followed (patients not fulfilling C1 or C2 were then assessed for C3). Two sets of PPMS criteria for DIS were applied: C6: Thompson et al. (as in 2001 McDonald's criteria); C7: 2005 McDonald criteria. A second sample of 55 patients with less than 5 years of disease duration (PPMS-2) was also analysed using an identical approach. For PPMS-1/PPMS-2, fulfilment was: C1:73.8%/66.7%; C2:72.1%/59.3%; C3:89%/79.2%; C4:96%/92.3%; C5:96%/85.7%; C6:85.8%/78.7%; C7:91%/80.4%. Levels of fulfilment suggest that the use of a single set of criteria for DIS in RRMS and PPMS might be feasible, and reinforce the added value of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings to increase fulfilment in PPMS. Unification of the DIS criteria for both RRMS and PPMS could be considered in further revisions of the MS diagnostic criteria.

  20. Phonological Fluency Strategy of Switching Differentiates Relapsing-Remitting and Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Messinis, L.; Kosmidis, M. H.; Vlahou, C.; Malegiannaki, A. C.; Gatzounis, G.; Dimisianos, N.; Karra, A.; Kiosseoglou, G.; Gourzis, P.; Papathanasopoulos, P.

    2013-01-01

    The strategies used to perform a verbal fluency task appear to be reflective of cognitive abilities necessary for successful daily functioning. In the present study, we explored potential differences in verbal fluency strategies (switching and clustering) used to maximize word production by patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) versus patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS). We further assessed impairment rates and potential differences in the sensi...

  1. Systemic sclerosis: a world wide global analysis.

    Coral-Alvarado, Paola; Pardo, Aryce L; Castaño-Rodriguez, Natalia; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze epidemiological tendencies of systemic sclerosis (SSc) around the world in order to identify possible local variations in the presentation and occurrence of the disease. A systematic review of the literature was performed through electronic databases using the keywords "Systemic Sclerosis" and "Clinical Characteristics." Out of a total of 167 articles, 41 were included in the analysis. Significant differences in the mean age at the time of diagnosis, subsets of SSc, clinical characteristics, and presence of antibodies were found between different regions of the word. Because variations in both additive and nonadditive genetic factors and the environmental variance are specific to the investigated population, ethnicity and geography are important characteristics to be considered in the study of SSc and other autoimmune diseases.

  2. [Large vessels vasculopathy in systemic sclerosis].

    Tejera Segura, Beatriz; Ferraz-Amaro, Iván

    2015-12-07

    Vasculopathy in systemic sclerosis is a severe, in many cases irreversible, manifestation that can lead to amputation. While the classical clinical manifestations of the disease have to do with the involvement of microcirculation, proximal vessels of upper and lower limbs can also be affected. This involvement of large vessels may be related to systemic sclerosis, vasculitis or atherosclerotic, and the differential diagnosis is not easy. To conduct a proper and early diagnosis, it is essential to start prompt appropriate treatment. In this review, we examine the involvement of large vessels in scleroderma, an understudied manifestation with important prognostic and therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Mapping and predicting mortality from systemic sclerosis

    Elhai, Muriel; Meune, Christophe; Boubaya, Marouane

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the causes of death and risk factors in systemic sclerosis (SSc). METHODS: Between 2000 and 2011, we examined the death certificates of all French patients with SSc to determine causes of death. Then we examined causes of death and developed a score associated with all-ca....... With the emergence of new therapies, these important observations should help caregivers plan and refine the monitoring and management to prolong these patients' survival....

  4. New ELISA Kits using C3 Binding Glycoprotein from Cuscuta europea Detect Mainly IgM CIC in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Progressive Systemic Sclerosis, but not in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Spaska Angelova Stanilova

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Elevated levels of circulating immune complexes (CIC, containing IgG, IgM or IgA antibodies were detected in the sera of patients with autoimmune diseases. This might indicate a different biological meaning of the three isotypes of immunoglobulin (Ig in the CIC. Each CIC assay detected only certain classes and subclasses of Ig in CIC material or fixed complement protein. In this study, a new method based on C3binding glycoprotein named CIF-ELISA and a well-known method ANTI-C3 ELISA, were used for quantitative assessment of IgM-CIC, IgG-CIC and IgA-CIC levels in human sera. A modified CIF-ELISA and ANTI-C3 ELISA for simultaneous detection of CIC, containing IgG, IgM and IgA, (stCIC, were also performed. The assays were evaluated on the same specially prepared samples: 55 normal sera, 99 sera from rheumatoid arthritis (RA, 88 sera from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, and 27 sera from progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS. We found that the sensitivity of the tests used varied depending on the diseases studied. CIF-ELISA displayed higher sensitivity of IgM-CIC when compared to ANTI-C3 ELISA in RA patients (40.0 and 20.95%, respectively and PSS (44.43 and 37.04%, respectively. Results for the sensitivity of IgA-CIC were in adverse direction in the RA group (14.28 and 19.05% and PSS (14.81 and 25.93% by both methods. It was also established that the concordance of IgM-CIC positives by both methods was 48.84% in RA and 46.67% in PSS, while in SLE it was 18.78%. These results are most probably due to the different assay abilities to detect antibody isotype of the CIC material and help to explain what specific role each Ig isotype in CIC has in the course of the disease.

  5. Self-reported levels of education and disability progression in multiple sclerosis

    D'hooghe, M. B.; Haentjens, P.; Van Remoortel, A.; De Keyser, J.; Nagels, G.

    2016-01-01

    ObjectivesThe purpose of our study is to investigate whether socioeconomic indicators such as education, financial concerns, employment, and living status are associated with disease progression in relapsing-onset and progressive-onset Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Materials and methodsWe performed a

  6. Systematic approach to understanding the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis.

    Zuo, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Lihua; Luo, Hui; Li, Yisha; Zhu, Honglin

    2017-10-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a complex heterogeneous autoimmune disease. Progressive organ fibrosis is a major contributor to SSc mortality. Despite extensive efforts, the underlying mechanism of SSc remains unclear. Efforts to understand the pathogenesis of SSc have included genomics, epigenetics, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic studies in the last decade. This review focuses on recent studies in SSc research based on multi-omics. The combination of these technologies can help us understand the pathogenesis of SSc. This review aims to provide important information for disease identification, therapeutic targets and potential biomarkers. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: comparison with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Casanova, Bonaventura; Jarque, Isidro; Gascón, Francisco; Hernández-Boluda, Juan Carlos; Pérez-Miralles, Francisco; de la Rubia, Javier; Alcalá, Carmen; Sanz, Jaime; Mallada, Javier; Cervelló, Angeles; Navarré, Arantxa; Carcelén-Gadea, María; Boscá, Isabel; Gil-Perotin, Sara; Solano, Carlos; Sanz, Miguel Angel; Coret, Francisco

    2017-07-01

    The main objective of our work is to describe the long-term results of myeloablative autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (AHSCT) in multiple sclerosis patients. Patients that failed to conventional therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS) underwent an approved protocol for AHSCT, which consisted of peripheral blood stem cell mobilization with cyclophosphamide and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), followed by a conditioning regimen of BCNU, Etoposide, Ara-C, Melphalan IV, plus Rabbit Thymoglobulin. Thirty-eight MS patients have been transplanted since 1999. Thirty-one patients have been followed for more than 2 years (mean 8.4 years). There were 22 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients and 9 secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) patients. No death related to AHSCT. A total of 10 patients (32.3%) had at least one relapse during post-AHSCT evolution, 6 patients in the RRMS group (27.2%) and 4 in the SPMS group (44.4%). After AHSCT, 7 patients (22.6%) experienced progression of disability, all within SP form. By contrast, no patients with RRMS experienced worsening of disability after a median follow-up of 5.4 years, 60% of them showed a sustained reduction in disability (SRD), defined as the improvement of 1.0 point in the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) sustains for 6 months (0.5 in cases of EDSS ≥ 5.5). The only clinical variable that predicted a poor response to AHSCT was a high EDSS in the year before transplant. AHSCT using the BEAM-ATG scheme is safe and efficacious to control the aggressive forms of RRMS.

  8. Capillaroscopy 2016: new perspectives in systemic sclerosis

    Carmen Pizzorni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SSc is an autoimmune disorder of unknown aetiology characterized by early impairment of the microvascular system. Nailfold microangiopathy and decreased peripheral blood perfusion are typical clinical aspects of SSc. The best method to evaluate vascular injury is nailfold videocapillaroscopy, which detects peripheral capillary morphology, and classifies and scores the abnormalities into different patterns of microangiopathy. Microangiopathy appears to be the best evaluable predictor of the disease development and has been observed to precede the other symptoms by many years. Peripheral blood perfusion is also impaired in SSc, and there are different methods to assess it: laser Doppler and laser speckle techniques, thermography and other emerging techniques.

  9. Neuroprotection in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis and Progressive Multiple Sclerosis by Cannabis-Based Cannabinoids.

    Pryce, Gareth; Riddall, Dieter R; Selwood, David L; Giovannoni, Gavin; Baker, David

    2015-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the major immune-mediated, demyelinating, neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system. Compounds within cannabis, notably Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) can limit the inappropriate neurotransmissions that cause MS-related problems and medicinal cannabis is now licenced for the treatment of MS symptoms. However, the biology indicates that the endocannabinoid system may offer the potential to control other aspects of disease. Although there is limited evidence that the cannabinoids from cannabis are having significant immunosuppressive activities that will influence relapsing autoimmunity, we and others can experimentally demonstrate that they may limit neurodegeneration that drives progressive disability. Here we show that synthetic cannabidiol can slow down the accumulation of disability from the inflammatory penumbra during relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in ABH mice, possibly via blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels. In addition, whilst non-sedating doses of Δ9-THC do not inhibit relapsing autoimmunity, they dose-dependently inhibit the accumulation of disability during EAE. They also appear to slow down clinical progression during MS in humans. Although a 3 year, phase III clinical trial did not detect a beneficial effect of oral Δ9-THC in progressive MS, a planned subgroup analysis of people with less disability who progressed more rapidly, demonstrated a significant slowing of progression by oral Δ9-THC compared to placebo. Whilst this may support the experimental and biological evidence for a neuroprotective effect by the endocannabinoid system in MS, it remains to be established whether this will be formally demonstrated in further trials of Δ9-THC/cannabis in progressive MS.

  10. Clinical presentation in patients with systemic sclerosis

    Silvarino, R.; Rebella, M.; Alonso, J.; Cairoli, E.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease characterized by endothelial damage, and skin, vessel and internal organ fibrosis and inflammation. There are differences in terms of frequency, severity and prognosis for the different ethnic groups, what reinforces the importance of the study in each geographical region with the purpose of enabling early diagnosis of its incipient symptoms.Methods: we conducted a descriptive and retrospective study form March 2006 through March 2008, including patients with a final diagnosis of systemic sclerosis, who are treated at the Systemic Autoimmune Diseases Unit at the Clinicas Hospital. Results: 31 women were included in the study, average follow-up of patients was 39.2 months, and average age at the time of diagnosis was 47.6 years. Eleven patients (35,5) presented diffuse disease and 20 (64.5) of them evidenced limited disease. Thirty patients presented Raynaud's phenomenon. In 92 of cases capilaroscopy showed a sclerodermiform pattern. In terms of the respiratory system, we found interstitial pathology in 25 of cases, pulmonary arterial hypertension in 22.2 and are restrictive pattern in respiratory function studies in 35.5. Also, 67.7 presented digestive manifestations and 9.6 developed sclerodermic renal crisis. We found anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) in 29 out of 31 patients (93,5) patients; 16 presented anticentromere antibodies and five anti-topoisomerasa-I antibodies. The four patients (12.9)who died during follow-up presented common elements such as diffuse sclerosis, digital ulcers and severe respiratory compromise. Conclusions: the clinical and immune characteristics found in our study were similar to those described in other series. Should there be no specific treatment, it is essential to perform regular assessment of visceral impact in order to control and delay complications which result in high morbimortality rates. (author) [es

  11. MDCT imaging of calcinosis in systemic sclerosis

    Freire, V.; Becce, F.; Feydy, A.; Guérini, H.; Campagna, R.; Allanore, Y.; Drapé, J.-L.

    2013-01-01

    Calcinosis is a typical feature of systemic sclerosis (SSc) and can be found in many different tissues including the superficial soft tissues, periarticular structures, muscles, and tendons. It can also provoke erosive changes on bones. Investigation is conducted most often with plain radiographs. However, when a more detailed assessment is necessary, multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is helpful owing to its multiplanar reformat (MPR) ability. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the various appearances of calcinosis in SSc patients as visualized at MDCT

  12. Irreversible neurological worsening following high-dose corticosteroids in advanced progressive multiple sclerosis

    Koch, M; De Keyser, J

    2006-01-01

    Background: A course of high-dose corticosteroids has been shown to hasten recovery from a relapse of multiple sclerosis (MS). Some patients with progressive MS ask for a course with corticosteroids outside a relapse, hoping to gain some functional improvement. Objective: To describe 4 patients with

  13. Sunlight exposure and sun sensitivity associated with disability progression in multiple sclerosis

    D'hooghe, M. B.; Haentjens, P.; Nagels, G.; Garmyn, M.; De Keyser, J.

    Background: Sunlight and vitamin D have been inversely associated with the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). Objective: We investigated sunlight exposure and sun sensitivity in relation to disability progression in MS. Methods: We conducted a survey among persons with MS, registered by the Flemish MS

  14. Secondary Progressive and Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Leads to Motor-Related Decreased Anatomical Connectivity

    Lyksborg, Mark; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Sørensen, Per S.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) damages central white matter pathways which has considerable impact on disease-related disability. To identify disease-related alterations in anatomical connectivity, 34 patients (19 with relapsing remitting MS (RR-MS), 15 with secondary progressive MS (SP-MS) and 20 healthy...

  15. Diagnosis and Management of Systemic Sclerosis: A Practical Approach.

    Lee, Jason J; Pope, Janet E

    2016-02-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a devastating multisystem rheumatologic condition that is characterized by autoimmunity, tissue fibrosis, obliterative vasculopathy and inflammation. Clinical presentation and course of the condition vary greatly, which complicates both diagnosis and corresponding treatment. In this regard, recent advances in disease understanding, both clinically and biochemically, have led to newer classification criteria for systemic sclerosis that are more inclusive than ever before. Still, significant disease modifying therapies do not yet exist for most patients. Therefore, organ-based management strategies are employed and research has been directed within this paradigm focusing on either the most debilitating symptoms, such as Raynaud's phenomenon, digital ulcers and cutaneous sclerosis, or life-threatening organ involvement such as interstitial lung disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension. The current trends in systemic sclerosis diagnosis, evidence-based treatment recommendations and potential future directions in systemic sclerosis treatment are discussed.

  16. Brain magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Mohamed, Reem H A; Nassef, Amr A

    2010-02-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a multisystem disease where functional and structural abnormalities of small blood vessels prevail. Recently, transient ischemic attacks, ischemic stroke, and hemorrhages have been reported as primary consequence of vascular central nervous system affection in systemic sclerosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered to be the most sensitive diagnostic technique for detecting symptomatic and asymptomatic lesions in the brain in cases of multifocal diseases. Evaluate brain changes in patients with systemic sclerosis using MRI. Thirty female patients with systemic sclerosis aged 27-61 years, with disease duration of 1-9 years and with no history of other systemic disease or cerebrovascular accidents, were enrolled. An age-matched female control group of 30 clinically normal subjects, underwent brain MR examination. Central nervous system involvement in the form of white matter hyperintense foci of variable sizes were found in significantly abundant forms in systemic sclerosis patients on MR evaluation than in the age-related control group, signifying a form of central nervous system vasculopathy. Such foci showed no definite correlation with disease duration, yet they showed significant correlation to severity of peripheral vascular disease, headaches, fainting attacks and depression in the group under study. Asymptomatic as well as symptomatic central nervous system ischemic vasculopathy is not uncommon in systemic sclerosis patients and MRI is considered a sensitive noninvasive screening tool for early detection of CNS involvement in patients with systemic sclerosis.

  17. Masticatory muscle pain and progressive mouth opening limitation caused by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a case report.

    Pang, Kang Mi; Park, Ji Woon

    2015-01-01

    This article reports a case of masticatory muscle pain and progressive limited mouth opening secondary to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), popularly known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The symptoms were first mistaken as those of temporomandibular disorders, before fatty degeneration of all masticatory muscles were discovered on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). ALS should be considered in the differential diagnosis process when the patient presents with longstanding progressive mouth opening limitation associated with pain. MRI could facilitate the diagnostic process.

  18. [Cognitive function in patients with systemic sclerosis].

    Straszecka, J; Jonderko, G; Kucharz, E J; Brzezińska-Wcisło, L; Kotulska, A; Bogdanowski, T

    1997-09-01

    Central nervous system involvement is seldom reported in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Cognitive functions were determined in 21 patients with definite SSc and 42 healthy controls. Thyroid function was also measured in order to eliminate the effect of hypothyroidism on cognitive functioning. It was found that the SSc patients with normal thyroid function showed defective long-term and recent memory, learning ability, criticism, perception and visuo-perceptual skills, their simple reaction time was prolonged. Similar but less advanced cognitive defects were shown in the SSc patients with overt or latent hypothyroidism. The obtained results indicate that the central nervous system involvement is more common in patients with SSc than it has been reported earlier.

  19. Different cognitive profiles of Brazilian patients with relapsing-remitting and primary progressive multiple sclerosis

    Dóra-Neide Rodrigues

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment is a symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS. Different clinical forms of multiple sclerosis have different cognitive profiles, according to findings of previous studies which used extensive batteries of neuropsychological tests. OBJECTIVE: To investigate cognitive profiles of Brazilian patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS and primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS by using a brief battery of neuropsychological tests. METHOD: Sixty-six patients, within 18-65 of age and 3-18 years of education, were paired with healthy control subjects, regarding gender, age, and education level. RESULTS: On Symbol Digit Modalities Test and Hooper Visual Organization Test, cognition was affected in 50% in RRMS and 69% in PPMS. Fluency of "F" was impaired in 24% of RRMS and 81% of PPMS. Immediate recall was affected in 32% of RRMS and in 63% of PPMS; whereas late recall, in 46% of relapsing-remitting and in 69% of primary progressive. CONCLUSION: Cognitive profiles of relapsing-remitting and primary progressive patients are different

  20. A proposal of criteria for the classification of systemic sclerosis.

    Nadashkevich, Oleg; Davis, Paul; Fritzler, Marvin J

    2004-11-01

    Sensitive and specific criteria for the classification of systemic sclerosis are required by clinicians and investigators to achieve higher quality clinical studies and approaches to therapy. A clinical study of systemic sclerosis patients in Europe and Canada led to a set of criteria that achieve high sensitivity and specificity. Both clinical and laboratory investigations of patients with systemic sclerosis, related conditions and diseases with clinical features that can be mistaken as part of the systemic sclerosis spectrum were undertaken. Laboratory investigations included the detection of autoantibodies to centromere proteins, Scl-70 (topoisomerase I), and fibrillarin (U3-RNP). Based on the investigation of 269 systemic sclerosis patients and 720 patients presenting with related and confounding conditions, the following set of criteria for the classification of systemic sclerosis was proposed: 1) autoantibodies to: centromere proteins, Scl-70 (topo I), fibrillarin; 2) bibasilar pulmonary fibrosis; 3) contractures of the digital joints or prayer sign; 4) dermal thickening proximal to the wrists; 5) calcinosis cutis; 6) Raynaud's phenomenon; 7) esophageal distal hypomotility or reflux-esophagitis; 8) sclerodactyly or non-pitting digital edema; 9) teleangiectasias. The classification of definite SSc requires at least three of the above criteria. Criteria for the classification of systemic sclerosis have been proposed. Preliminary testing has defined the sensitivity and specificity of these criteria as high as 99% and 100%, respectively. Testing and validation of the proposed criteria by other clinical centers is required.

  1. Sodium intake and multiple sclerosis activity and progression in BENEFIT

    Fitzgerald, Kathryn C; Munger, Kassandra L; Hartung, Hans-Peter

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether a high-salt diet, as measured by urinary sodium concentration, is associated with faster conversion from clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) to multiple sclerosis (MS) and MS activity and disability. METHODS: BENEFIT was a randomized clinical trial comparing early versus...... delayed interferon beta-1b treatment in 465 patients with a CIS. Each patient provided a median of 14 (interquartile range = 13-16) spot urine samples throughout the 5-year follow-up. We estimated 24-hour urine sodium excretion level at each time point using the Tanaka equations, and assessed whether...... in T2 lesion volume: -0.11, 95% CI = -0.25 to 0.04; change in EDSS: -0.01, 95% CI = -0.09 to 0.08; relapse rate: HR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.56-1.07). Results were similar in categorical analyses using quintiles. INTERPRETATION: Our results, based on multiple assessments of urine sodium excretion over 5...

  2. Usefulness of optic nerve ultrasound to predict clinical progression in multiple sclerosis.

    Pérez Sánchez, S; Eichau Madueño, S; Rus Hidalgo, M; Domínguez Mayoral, A M; Vilches-Arenas, A; Navarro Mascarell, G; Izquierdo, G

    2018-03-21

    Progressive neuronal and axonal loss are considered the main causes of disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The disease frequently involves the visual system; the accessibility of the system for several functional and structural tests has made it a model for the in vivo study of MS pathogenesis. Orbital ultrasound is a non-invasive technique that enables various structures of the orbit, including the optic nerve, to be evaluated in real time. We conducted an observational, ambispective study of MS patients. Disease progression data were collected. Orbital ultrasound was performed on all patients, with power set according to the 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) principle. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) data were also collected for those patients who underwent the procedure. Statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS version 22.0. Disease progression was significantly correlated with ultrasound findings (P=.041 for the right eye and P=.037 for the left eye) and with Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score at the end of the follow-up period (P=.07 for the right eye and P=.043 for the left eye). No statistically significant differences were found with relation to relapses or other clinical variables. Ultrasound measurement of optic nerve diameter constitutes a useful, predictive factor for the evaluation of patients with MS. Smaller diameters are associated with poor clinical progression and greater disability (measured by EDSS). Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Elevated interleukin-12 in progressive multiple sclerosis correlates with disease activity and is normalized by pulse cyclophosphamide therapy

    Comabella, M; Balashov, K; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh

    1998-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is postulated to be a Th1-type cell-mediated autoimmune disease. We investigated cytokine profiles in patients with progressive multiple sclerosis by using intracytoplasmic staining. We found increased IL-12 production by monocytes and increased IFN-gamma production by T cells...

  4. The Gas6/TAM System and Multiple Sclerosis.

    Bellan, Mattia; Pirisi, Mario; Sainaghi, Pier Paolo

    2016-10-28

    Growth arrest specific 6 (Gas6) is a multimodular circulating protein, the biological actions of which are mediated by the interaction with three transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors: Tyro3, Axl, and MerTK, collectively named TAM. Over the last few decades, many progresses have been done in the understanding of the biological activities of this highly pleiotropic system, which plays a role in the regulation of immune response, inflammation, coagulation, cell growth, and clearance of apoptotic bodies. Recent findings have further related Gas6 and TAM receptors to neuroinflammation in general and, specifically, to multiple sclerosis (MS). In this paper, we review the biology of the Gas6/TAM system and the current evidence supporting its potential role in the pathogenesis of MS.

  5. Work Disability in Early Systemic Sclerosis

    Sandqvist, Gunnel; Hesselstrand, Roger; Petersson, Ingemar F

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study work disability (WD) with reference to levels of sick leave and disability pension in early systemic sclerosis (SSc). METHODS: Patients with SSc living in the southern part of Sweden with onset of their first non-Raynaud symptom between 2003 and 2009 and with a followup of 36...... months were included in a longitudinal study. Thirty-two patients (26 women, 24 with limited SSc) with a median age of 47.5 years (interquartile range 43-53) were identified. WD was calculated in 30-day intervals from 12 months prior to disease onset until 36 months after, presented as the prevalence...... of WD per year (0-3) and as the period prevalence of mean net days per month (± SD). Comparisons were made between patients with different disease severity and sociodemographic characteristics, and between patients and a reference group (RG) from the general population. RESULTS: Seventy-eight percent...

  6. D-penicillamine in systemic sclerosis? Yes!

    Medsger, T A; Lucas, M; Wildy, K S; Baker, C

    2001-01-01

    The use of D-penicillamine in systemic sclerosis (SSc) has been controversial. We have reviewed the major published studies on this drug in SSc with diffuse cutaneous (dc) involvement and summarized our own recent experience in dcSSc patients treated with and without D-penicillamine. We conclude that D-penicillamine favourably alters the natural history of skin involvement in dcSSc, even when used in low dose. Furthermore, recurrence of diffuse skin change after discontinuation of D-penicillamine and improvement in skin thickening after reinitiation of the drug support its effectiveness. We believe that the rheumatologic community should use D-penicillamine in patients with early dcSSc.

  7. Autoantibodies in systemic sclerosis: Unanswered questions

    CRISTIANE eKAYSER

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SSc is an autoimmune disease characterized by vascular abnormalities, and cutaneous and visceral fibrosis. Serum autoantibodies directed to multiple intracellular antigens are present in more than 95% of patients and are considered a hallmark of SSc. They are helpful biomarkers for the early diagnosis of SSc and are associated with distinctive clinical manifestations. With the advent of more sensitive, multiplexed immunoassays, new and old questions about the relevance of autoantibodies in SSc are emerging. In this review we discuss the clinical relevance of autoantibodies in SSc emphasizing the more recently published data. Moreover, we will summarize recent advances regarding the stability of SSc autoantibodies over the course of disease, whether they are mutually exclusive and their potential roles in the disease pathogenesis.

  8. A composite measure to explore visual disability in primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Poretto, Valentina; Petracca, Maria; Saiote, Catarina; Mormina, Enricomaria; Howard, Jonathan; Miller, Aaron; Lublin, Fred D; Inglese, Matilde

    2017-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide complementary information on visual system damage in multiple sclerosis (MS). The objective of this paper is to determine whether a composite OCT/MRI score, reflecting cumulative damage along the entire visual pathway, can predict visual deficits in primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS). Twenty-five PPMS patients and 20 age-matched controls underwent neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation, spectral-domain OCT, and 3T brain MRI. Differences between groups were assessed by univariate general linear model and principal component analysis (PCA) grouped instrumental variables into main components. Linear regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between low-contrast visual acuity (LCVA), OCT/MRI-derived metrics and PCA-derived composite scores. PCA identified four main components explaining 80.69% of data variance. Considering each variable independently, LCVA 1.25% was significantly predicted by ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GCIPL) thickness, thalamic volume and optic radiation (OR) lesion volume (adjusted R 2 0.328, p  = 0.00004; adjusted R 2 0.187, p  = 0.002 and adjusted R 2 0.180, p  = 0.002). The PCA composite score of global visual pathway damage independently predicted both LCVA 1.25% (adjusted R 2 value 0.361, p  = 0.00001) and LCVA 2.50% (adjusted R 2 value 0.323, p  = 0.00003). A multiparametric score represents a more comprehensive and effective tool to explain visual disability than a single instrumental metric in PPMS.

  9. CSF inflammation and axonal damage are increased and correlate in progressive multiple sclerosis

    Romme Christensen, Jeppe; Börnsen, Lars; Khademi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mechanism underlying disease progression in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) is uncertain. Pathological studies found widespread inflammation in progressive MS brains correlating with disease progression and axonal damage. OBJECTIVES: To study cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers...... and clarify whether inflammation and axonal damage are associated in progressive MS. METHODS: Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we analysed CSF from 40 secondary progressive (SPMS), 21 primary progressive (PPMS), and 36 relapsing-remitting (RRMS) and 20 non-inflammatory neurological disease...... (NIND) patients. Twenty-two of the SPMS patients participated in an MBP8298 peptide clinical trial and had CSF follow-up after one year. RESULTS: Compared to NIND patients, inflammatory biomarkers osteopontin and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) were increased in all MS patients while CXCL13...

  10. Discontinuing disease-modifying therapy in progressive multiple sclerosis: can we stop what we have started?

    Lonergan, Roisin

    2012-02-01

    Disease-modifying therapy is ineffective in disabled patients (Expanded Disability Status Scale [EDSS] > 6.5) with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) without relapses, or in primary progressive MS. Many patients with secondary progressive MS who initially had relapsing MS continue to use disease-modifying therapies. The enormous associated costs are a burden to health services. Regular assessment is recommended to guide discontinuation of disease-modifying therapies when no longer beneficial, but this is unavailable to many patients, particularly in rural areas. The objectives of this study are as follows: 1. To observe use of disease-modifying therapies in patients with progressive multiple sclerosis and EDSS > 6.5. 2. To examine approaches used by a group of international MS experts to stopping-disease modifying therapies in patients with secondary progressive MS without relapses. During an epidemiological study in three regions of Ireland (southeast Dublin city, and Wexford and Donegal Counties), we recorded details of disease-modifying therapies in patients with progressive MS and EDSS > 6.5. An e-questionnaire was sent to 26 neurologists with expert knowledge of MS, asking them to share their approach to stopping disease-modifying therapies in patients with secondary progressive MS. Three hundred and thirty-six patients were studied: 88 from southeast Dublin, 99 from Wexford and 149 from Donegal. Forty-four had EDSS > 6.5: 12 were still using disease-modifying therapies. Of the surveyed neurologists, 15 made efforts to stop disease-modifying therapies in progressive multiple sclerosis, but most did not insist. A significant proportion (12 of 44 patients with progressive MS and EDSS > 6.5) was considered to be receiving therapy without benefit. Eleven of the 12 were from rural counties, reflecting poorer access to neurology services. The costs of disease-modifying therapies in this group (>170,000 euro yearly) could be re-directed towards development

  11. Systemic sclerosis with normal or nonspecific nailfold capillaroscopy.

    Fichel, Fanny; Baudot, Nathalie; Gaitz, Jean-Pierre; Trad, Salim; Barbe, Coralie; Francès, Camille; Senet, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    In systemic sclerosis (SSc), a specific nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC) pattern is observed in 90% of cases and seems to be associated with severity and progression of the disease. To describe the characteristics of SSc patients with normal or nonspecific (normal/nonspecific) NVC. In a retrospective cohort study, clinical features and visceral involvements of 25 SSc cases with normal/nonspecific NVC were compared to 63 SSc controls with the SSc-specific NVC pattern. Normal/nonspecific NVC versus SSc-specific NVC pattern was significantly associated with absence of skin sclerosis (32 vs. 6.3%, p = 0.004), absence of telangiectasia (47.8 vs. 17.3%, p = 0.006) and absence of sclerodactyly (60 vs. 25.4%, p = 0.002), and less frequent severe pulmonary involvement (26.3 vs. 58.2%, p = 0.017). Normal/nonspecific NVC in SSc patients appears to be associated with less severe skin involvement and less frequent severe pulmonary involvement. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Complement is activated in progressive multiple sclerosis cortical grey matter lesions.

    Watkins, Lewis M; Neal, James W; Loveless, Sam; Michailidou, Iliana; Ramaglia, Valeria; Rees, Mark I; Reynolds, Richard; Robertson, Neil P; Morgan, B Paul; Howell, Owain W

    2016-06-22

    The symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) are caused by damage to myelin and nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. Inflammation is tightly linked with neurodegeneration, and it is the accumulation of neurodegeneration that underlies increasing neurological disability in progressive MS. Determining pathological mechanisms at play in MS grey matter is therefore a key to our understanding of disease progression. We analysed complement expression and activation by immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridisation in frozen or formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded post-mortem tissue blocks from 22 progressive MS cases and made comparisons to inflammatory central nervous system disease and non-neurological disease controls. Expression of the transcript for C1qA was noted in neurons and the activation fragment and opsonin C3b-labelled neurons and glia in the MS cortical and deep grey matter. The density of immunostained cells positive for the classical complement pathway protein C1q and the alternative complement pathway activation fragment Bb was significantly increased in cortical grey matter lesions in comparison to control grey matter. The number of cells immunostained for the membrane attack complex was elevated in cortical lesions, indicating complement activation to completion. The numbers of classical (C1-inhibitor) and alternative (factor H) pathway regulator-positive cells were unchanged between MS and controls, whilst complement anaphylatoxin receptor-bearing microglia in the MS cortex were found closely apposed to cortical neurons. Complement immunopositive neurons displayed an altered nuclear morphology, indicative of cell stress/damage, supporting our finding of significant neurodegeneration in cortical grey matter lesions. Complement is activated in the MS cortical grey matter lesions in areas of elevated numbers of complement receptor-positive microglia and suggests that complement over-activation may contribute to the worsening pathology that underlies the

  13. Determinants of mortality in systemic sclerosis: a focused review.

    Poudel, Dilli Ram; Jayakumar, Divya; Danve, Abhijeet; Sehra, Shiv Tej; Derk, Chris T

    2017-11-07

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) is an autoimmune rheumatic disorder that is characterized by fibrosis, vascular dysfunction, and autoantibody production that involves most visceral organs. It is characterized by a high morbidity and mortality rate, mainly due to disease-related complications. Epidemiological data describing mortality and survival in this population have been based on both population and observational studies. Multiple clinical and non-clinical factors have been found to predict higher likelihood of death among thepatients. Here, we do an extensive review of the available literature, utilizing the PubMed database, to describe scleroderma and non-scleroderma related determinants of mortality in this population. We found that even though the mortality among the general population has declined, scleroderma continues to carry a very high morbidity and mortality rate, however we have made some slow progress in improving the mortality among scleroderma patients over the last few decades.

  14. Comprehensive approach to systemic sclerosis patients during pregnancy.

    Rueda de León Aguirre, Alexandra; Ramírez Calvo, José Antonio; Rodríguez Reyna, Tatiana Sofía

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease that usually affects women, with a male:female ratio of 1:4-10. It was thought that there was a prohibitive risk of fatal complications in the pregnancies of patients with SSc. It is now known that the majority of these women undergo a normal progression of pregnancy if the right time is chosen and a close obstetric care is delivered. The obstetric risk will depend on the subtype and clinical stage of the disease, and the presence and severity of the internal organ involvement during the pregnancy. The management of these pregnancies should be provided in a specialized center, with a multidisciplinary team capable of identifying and promptly treating complications. Treatment should be limited to drugs with no teratogenic potential, except when renal crises or severe cardiovascular complications develop. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Immunological effects of methylprednisolone pulse treatment in progressive multiple sclerosis

    Ratzer, R; Romme Christensen, J; Romme Nielsen, B

    2014-01-01

    phenotypes investigated, 25 changed at nominal significance from baseline to week 12 (pmultiple comparisons, we found 5 subpopulations that changed compared to baseline. No pattern were suggesting modulation of Th17 or TFH cells. CONCLUSION: Methylprednisolone pulse treatment has......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of monthly oral methylprednisolone pulse treatment in progressive MS. METHODS: 30 progressive MS patients were treated with oral methylprednisolone every month. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. RESULTS: Out of 102 leukocyte...

  16. Validation of potential classification criteria for systemic sclerosis.

    Johnson, S.R.; Fransen, J.; Khanna, D.; Baron, M.; Hoogen, F. van den; Medsger TA, J.r.; Peschken, C.A.; Carreira, P.E.; Riemekasten, G.; Tyndall, A.; Matucci-Cerinic, M.; Pope, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Classification criteria for systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma) are being updated jointly by the American College of Rheumatology and European League Against Rheumatism. Potential items for classification were reduced to 23 using Delphi and nominal group techniques. We evaluated the

  17. Physiotherapy Rehabilitation for People With Progressive Multiple Sclerosis: A Systematic Review.

    Campbell, Evan; Coulter, Elaine H; Mattison, Paul G; Miller, Linda; McFadyen, Angus; Paul, Lorna

    2016-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of physiotherapy interventions, including exercise therapy, for the rehabilitation of people with progressive multiple sclerosis. Five databases (Cochrane Library, Physiotherapy Evidence Database [PEDro], Web of Science Core Collections, MEDLINE, Embase) and reference lists of relevant articles were searched. Randomized experimental trials, including participants with progressive multiple sclerosis and investigating a physiotherapy intervention or an intervention containing a physiotherapy element, were included. Data were independently extracted using a standardized form, and methodologic quality was assessed using the PEDro scale. Thirteen studies (described by 15 articles) were identified and scored between 5 and 9 out of 10 on the PEDro scale. Eight interventions were assessed: exercise therapy, multidisciplinary rehabilitation, functional electrical stimulation, botulinum toxin type A injections and manual stretches, inspiratory muscle training, therapeutic standing, acupuncture, and body weight-supported treadmill training. All studies, apart from 1, produced positive results in at least 1 outcome measure; however, only 1 article used a power calculation to determine the sample size and because of dropouts the results were subsequently underpowered. This review suggests that physiotherapy may be effective for the rehabilitation of people with progressive multiple sclerosis. However, further appropriately powered studies are required. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Insulin-like growth factor system in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Wilczak, N; de Keyser, J; Cianfarani, S; Clemmons, DR; Savage, MO

    2005-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is a neurotrophic factor with insulin-like metabolic activities, and possesses potential clinical applications, particularly in neurodegenerative disorders. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a chronic progressive devastating disorder of the central nervous

  19. Unmet patient needs in systemic sclerosis.

    Rubenzik, Tamara T; Derk, Chris T

    2009-04-01

    Assessment of systemic sclerosis patients has not directly addressed functioning from the patient's perspective. With this study, we aim to gain our patient's point of view by using a questionnaire to describe their unmet needs and understanding what demographic parameters influence these. A computer randomization program selected 50 patients, from 242 systemic sclerosis patients actively followed at our rheumatology clinic, to receive a survey about unmet needs. Twenty-five patients responded to the survey. Of 81 questions, 9 provided demographic data, whereas 72 questions addressed physical, daily living, psychologic, spiritual, existential, health services, health information, social support, and employment issues. A 4-point scale from no need to high need was used to rate all questions. Significant need was considered any issue for which more than 50% of patients reported a high need. The Fisher exact test was used to compare different demographic variables to unmet patient needs. The psychologic/spiritual/existential category had 9 questions reaching significance, the health services category had 5 significant questions, the physical category had 4 significant questions. Patients who had not attended college were more likely to have higher needs than patients who completed a college degree. Unmarried patients reported higher needs in 8 measures as compared with married patients, and patients in rural areas had higher needs in social support needs. The greatest prevalence of unmet needs in scleroderma patients were in the psychologic/spiritual/existential domain, such as being unable to do things they used to do, fear that the disease will worsen, anxiety and stress, feeling down or depressed, fears of physical disability, uncertainty about the future, change in appearance, keeping a positive outlook, and feeling in control. Significant differences were observed in unmet needs based on education, marital status, location, knowledge of disease, and age

  20. The US Network of Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Centers: Development, Progress, and Next Steps

    Casper, T. Charles; Rose, John W.; Roalstad, Shelly; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Aaen, Gregory; Belman, Anita; Chitnis, Tanuja; Gorman, Mark; Krupp, Lauren; Lotze, Timothy E.; Ness, Jayne; Patterson, Marc; Rodriguez, Moses; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Browning, Brittan; Graves, Jennifer; Tillema, Jan-Mendelt; Benson, Leslie; Harris, Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating diseases in the pediatric population have received an increasing level of attention by clinicians and researchers. The low incidence of these diseases in children creates a need for the involvement of multiple clinical centers in research efforts. The Network of Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Centers was created initially in 2006 to improve the diagnosis and care of children with demyelinating diseases. In 2010, the Network shifted its focus to multicenter research while continuing to advance the care of patients. The Network has obtained support from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, the Guthy-Jackson Charitable Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health. The Network will continue to serve as a platform for conducting impactful research in pediatric demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system. This article provides a description of the history and development, organization, mission, research priorities, current studies, and future plans of the Network. PMID:25270659

  1. Gastrointestinal transit in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Fynne, Lotte; Worsøe, Jonas; Gregersen, Tine; Schlageter, Vincent; Laurberg, Søren; Krogh, Klaus

    2011-10-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease characterized by fibrosis and collagen deposits. Gastrointestinal symptoms of SSc, including abdominal pain, bloating and discomfort, are common but diffuse and their pathophysiology remains obscure. To investigate the pathophysiology of abdominal pain and discomfort in individuals with SSc. A total of 15 individuals with SSc (13 women, median age 58 years), all suffering from diffuse abdominal symptoms, and 17 healthy volunteers (12 women, median age 52 years) were evaluated with the Motility Tracking System, MTS-1, measuring gastric emptying (GE) and velocity through the small intestine. SSc patients were also examined for bacterial overgrowth using the hydrogen breath test and with radiopaque markers to determine the total gastrointestinal transit time (GITT). Assessed with the MTS-1, the velocity through the proximal small intestine was significantly reduced in SSc patients (median 0.525 m/h, range 0.11-1.15) when compared to healthy subjects (median 0.91 m/h, range 0.51-1.74) (p = 0.02). Prolonged GE was found in 4 SSc patients (27%) but in none of the healthy volunteers (p = 0.04). Only 3 SSc patients (21%) had positive breath tests for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. GITT was >3 days in 8 patients (53%). Slow small intestinal transit was associated with a prolonged GITT (p < 0.05). Velocity through the small intestine is significantly reduced in SSc patients with diffuse abdominal symptoms.

  2. Lipocalin-2 is increased in progressive multiple sclerosis and inhibits remyelination

    Al Nimer, Faiez; Elliott, Christina; Bergman, Joakim

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine the regulation of lipocalin-2 (LCN2) in multiple sclerosis (MS) and its potential functional relevance with regard to myelination and neurodegeneration. METHODS: We determined LCN2 levels in 3 different studies: (1) in CSF and plasma from a case-control study...... natalizumab treatment in a cohort study of 17 patients with progressive MS. Correlation to neurofilament light, a marker of neuroaxonal injury, was tested. The effect of LCN2 on myelination and neurodegeneration was studied in a rat in vitro neuroglial cell coculture model. RESULTS: Intrathecal production....... Treatment with natalizumab in progressive MS reduced LCN2 levels an average of 13% (p

  3. Mutant TDP-43 within motor neurons drives disease onset but not progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Ditsworth, Dara; Maldonado, Marcus; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Sun, Shuying; Seelman, Amanda; Drenner, Kevin; Arnold, Eveline; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Pizzo, Donald; Ravits, John; Cleveland, Don W; Da Cruz, Sandrine

    2017-06-01

    Mutations in TDP-43 cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal paralytic disease characterized by degeneration and premature death of motor neurons. The contribution of mutant TDP-43-mediated damage within motor neurons was evaluated using mice expressing a conditional allele of an ALS-causing TDP-43 mutant (Q331K) whose broad expression throughout the central nervous system mimics endogenous TDP-43. TDP-43 Q331K mice develop age- and mutant-dependent motor deficits from degeneration and death of motor neurons. Cre-recombinase-mediated excision of the TDP-43 Q331K gene from motor neurons is shown to delay onset of motor symptoms and appearance of TDP-43-mediated aberrant nuclear morphology, and abrogate subsequent death of motor neurons. However, reduction of mutant TDP-43 selectively in motor neurons did not prevent age-dependent degeneration of axons and neuromuscular junction loss, nor did it attenuate astrogliosis or microgliosis. Thus, disease mechanism is non-cell autonomous with mutant TDP-43 expressed in motor neurons determining disease onset but progression defined by mutant acting within other cell types.

  4. Cardiac transplant in young female patient diagnosed with diffuse systemic sclerosis.

    Bennasar, Guillermo; Carlevaris, Leandro; Secco, Anastasia; Romanini, Felix; Mamani, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SS) in a multifactorial and systemic, chronic, autoimmune disease that affects the connective tissue. We present this clinical case given the low prevalence of diffuse SS with early and progressive cardiac compromise in a young patient, and treatment with cardiac transplantation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  5. Female Gender and Reproductive Factors Affecting Risk, Relapses and Progression in Multiple Sclerosis

    D'hooghe, M. B.; D'Hooghe, T.; De Keyser, J.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory demyelinating and degenerative disease of the central nervous system, is a frequent cause of neurological disability in young adults. Female predominance has increased over the last decades. Although female gender carries a higher risk of developing

  6. Systemic sclerosis, birth order and parity.

    Russo, Paul A J; Lester, Susan; Roberts-Thomson, Peter J

    2014-06-01

    A recent study identified increasing birth order to be a risk factor for the development of systemic sclerosis (SSc). This finding supports the theory that transplacental microchimerism may be a key pathological event in the initiation of SSc. We investigated the relationship between birth order and parity and the age of onset of SSc in South Australia. A retrospective analysis of patient data in the South Australian Scleroderma Register was performed. Data were obtained from a mailed questionnaire. Control data was collected prospectively using a similar questionnaire. The relationship between birth order, family size or parity and risk of subsequent development of SSc was analyzed by mixed effects logistic regression analysis. Three hundred and eighty-seven index probands were identified and compared with 457 controls. Controls were well matched for gender, but not for age. No statistically significant relationship was identified between SSc and birth order, parity in females, family size, age at first pregnancy in females or gender of first child in parous females. Our data suggests that parity, age at first pregnancy and the gender of the first child are not relevant factors in our understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of SSc. Birth order and family size in both genders also appears irrelevant. These results argue against microchimerism as being relevant in the pathogenesis of SSc and add further support to the theory that stochastic events may be important in the etiopathogenesis of SSc. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Associations between Systemic Sclerosis and Thyroid Diseases

    Poupak Fallahi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We have reviewed scientific literature about the association of systemic sclerosis (SSc and thyroid disorders. A high incidence, and prevalence, of new cases of autoimmune thyroiditis (AT and/or hypothyroidism have been shown in sclerodermic patients (overall in the female gender. An association among a Th1 immune-predominance, low vitamin D levels, and AT have been also shown in SSc patients. Cases of Graves’ disease (GD have been described in SSc patients, too, according with the higher prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity. It has been also shown a higher prevalence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC, in association with AT, in SSc patients. However, in order to confirm results about GD and thyroid cancer, studies in larger number of patients with SSc are needed. During the follow-up of SSc patients it would be appropriate to monitor carefully their thyroid status. The abovementioned data strongly suggest a periodic thyroid function follow-up in female SSc patients [showing a borderline high (although in the normal range thyroid-stimulating hormone level, antithyroid peroxidase antibody positivity, and a small thyroid with a hypoechoic pattern], and, when necessary, appropriate treatments. In conclusion, most of the studies show an association among SSc, AT, and hypothyroidism, such as an increased prevalence of TC overall in SSc patients with AT. Only few cases of GD have been also described in SSc.

  8. High resolution computed tomography in patients with various forms of systemic sclerosis

    Lewszuk, A.; Rozycki, J.; Tarasow, E.; Kowal-Bielecka, O.

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary lesions are, besides renal and cardiac complications, one of the main causes of mortality among patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma). Pathologic changes in the respiratory system take the form of interstitial fibrosis clinically manifested by progressive exertion dyspnea and abnormalities of respiratory restriction type in functional tests. The aim of the study was systematization of pulmonary lesion symptomatology in conventional chest radiography and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in patients with various forms of scleroderma, as well as determination of the frequency and localization of the particular lesion types. The study was carried out in a group of 49 patients with systemic sclerosis (47 women and 2 men), who underwent conventional radiography and high resolution computed tomography of the chest. In patients with systemic sclerosis, HRCT revealed most frequently interstitial changes of ground glass type, as well as linear and reticular opacities, whereas bronchiectasis and honeycombing type lesions were less frequent. Pulmonary lesions were seen with increasing frequency towards the lung base and were localized mainly in the posterior, inferior and peripheral parts of the lungs. Comparison of the patients with limited and diffuse scleroderma demonstrated that the diffuse form is associated with more frequent involvement of the respiratory system and more advanced pulmonary lesions. The observed characteristics of pulmonary lesions show similarity between interstitial lung disease in the course of systemic sclerosis and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), which supports classification of interstitial lung disease associated with scleroderma as belonging to that group of interstitial inflammations. (author)

  9. Genetic Factors Associated with Risk and Disability Progression of Multiple Sclerosis in Slovak Population

    Hanysova Sandra

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of our study was to determine the relation of particular genetic variants in selected genes (GSTM1, GSTT1 null genotypes; rs1695 GSTP1; rs10735781 EVI5 to the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS development and find out the possible association with disease disability progression rate. Material and methods: Our study included 202 MS patients and 174 healthy control volunteers. MS patients were divided according to disability progression rate to three groups - slowly progressing, mid-rate progressing and rapidly progressing. All DNA samples were isolated from venous blood. Genotyping was performed by PCR-RFLP and multiplex PCR. Results: Our analysis showed that GSTT1 null genotype (OR 0.56; 95%CI 0.33 -0.95; p=0.04 and GSTM1, GSTT1 double null genotype (OR 0.32; 95%CI 0.14 - 0.74; p=0.006 are potentially protective in relation to MS. We observed similar result in GSTT1 null genotype in association with mid-rate progression (OR 0.48; 95%CI 0.24 - 0.97; p=0.05. Frequency of GSTM1 and GSTT1 double null genotype is significantly lower in subgroup of MS patients with progression rate defined as slow (OR 0.22; 95%CI 0.05 - 0.98; p=0.05 and middle (OR 0.33; 95%CI 0.11 - 0.99; p=0.045. We did not show any significant association of genetic changes rs1695 in GSTP1 and rs10735781 in EVI5 with MS or rate of disease progression. Conclusions: Genetic basis of multiple sclerosis is still not fully elucidated. Further research may clarify our results and confirm the value of studied factors for clinical practice.

  10. Illness trajectories in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: How illness progression is related to life narratives and interpersonal relationships.

    Cipolletta, Sabrina; Gammino, Giorgia Rosamaria; Palmieri, Arianna

    2017-12-01

    To identify illness trajectories in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis by analysing personal, social and functional dimensions related to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis progression. Previous studies have considered some psychological distinct variables that may moderate illness progression, but no research has combined an extensive qualitative understanding of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients' psychological characteristics and illness progression. A mixed-methods approach was used to combine quantitative and qualitative measures. Illness progression was assessed through a longitudinal design. Eighteen patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis attending a Neurology Department in northern Italy participated in the study. Semi-structured interviews to explore personal experience, and dependency grids to assess the distribution of dependency; ALSFRS-R and neuropsychological screening were, respectively, used to measure physical and cognitive impairment. To assess the progression of the disease, ALSFRS-R was re-administered after 8 months and mortality rate was considered. Data were analysed using the grounded theory approach. Illness progression changed according to the perception of the disease, the trust placed in medical care, self-construction and the distribution of dependency. Based on these categories, cases that had similar experiences were grouped, and four illness trajectories were identified: aggressiveness, threat, constriction and guilt. The findings suggest that it is possible to identify different illness trajectories in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Personalised intervention strategies may be construed based on the different trajectories identified. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Early- versus Late-Onset Systemic Sclerosis

    Alba, Marco A.; Velasco, César; Simeón, Carmen Pilar; Fonollosa, Vicent; Trapiella, Luis; Egurbide, María Victoria; Sáez, Luis; Castillo, María Jesús; Callejas, José Luis; Camps, María Teresa; Tolosa, Carles; Ríos, Juan José; Freire, Mayka; Vargas, José Antonio; Espinosa, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Peak age at onset of systemic sclerosis (SSc) is between 20 and 50 years, although SSc is also described in both young and elderly patients. We conducted the present study to determine if age at disease onset modulates the clinical characteristics and outcome of SSc patients. The Spanish Scleroderma Study Group recruited 1037 patients with a mean follow-up of 5.2 ± 6.8 years. Based on the mean ± 1 standard deviation (SD) of age at disease onset (45 ± 15 yr) of the whole series, patients were classified into 3 groups: age ≤30 years (early onset), age between 31 and 59 years (standard onset), and age ≥60 years (late onset). We compared initial and cumulative manifestations, immunologic features, and death rates. The early-onset group included 195 patients; standard-onset group, 651; and late-onset, 191 patients. The early-onset group had a higher prevalence of esophageal involvement (72% in early-onset compared with 67% in standard-onset and 56% in late-onset; p = 0.004), and myositis (11%, 7.2%, and 2.9%, respectively; p = 0.009), but a lower prevalence of centromere antibodies (33%, 46%, and 47%, respectively; p = 0.007). In contrast, late-onset SSc was characterized by a lower prevalence of digital ulcers (54%, 41%, and 34%, respectively; p < 0.001) but higher rates of heart conduction system abnormalities (9%, 13%, and 21%, respectively; p = 0.004). Pulmonary hypertension was found in 25% of elderly patients and in 12% of the youngest patients (p = 0.010). After correction for the population effects of age and sex, standardized mortality ratio was shown to be higher in younger patients. The results of the present study confirm that age at disease onset is associated with differences in clinical presentation and outcome in SSc patients. PMID:24646463

  12. PROSPECTS FOR USING TOCILIZUMAB IN SYSTEMIC SCLEROSIS

    L. P. Ananyeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin 6 (IL-6 is one of the key cytokines that are involved in inflammation and that has pleiotropic properties. Diverse effects of IL-6 result from the transmission of an intracellular signal in two ways: via direct binding to a membrane receptor having a molecular mass of 80 kDA (a classical way or absorption of the IL-6 complex with its soluble receptor on another transmembrane receptor – gp-130 (trans-signaling. Different signaling pathways lead to various consequences. The classical way of signal transmission activates mainly protective and regenerative processes; trans-signaling has a proinflammatory potential. The review gives schemes of signal stimuli and shows that IL-6 and its receptors are a dynamic intricately organized regulatory system that can adapt to stress-induced homeostatic changes. It considers in detail evidence suggesting the effect of IL-6 on the development and maintenance of a number of systemic sclerosis (SS-specific pathogenetic disorders, such as the activation of the endothelium, the development and maintenance of inflammation, and excessive deposition of extracellular matrix components in tissues. Endothelial cell activation during trans-signaling gives rise to an enhanced adhesion molecule expression, chemokine release, and further production of IL-6. Excessive secretion of the latter may initiate a fibrosing process and favor the further development of pathologicalconditions. Autoimmune disorders theoretically associated with IL-6 overproduction occur in SS. Elevated blood IL-6 concentrations in SS are related to disease clinical parameters, such as activity, severity, worse prognosis, and reduced survival. Taken together, the data presented suggest that IL-6 blocking may have a therapeutic potential in SS. The first clinical data on successfully using the IL-6 receptor antagonist tocilizumab to treat SS are given.

  13. CX3CR1 is a modifying gene of survival and progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Alan Lopez-Lopez

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the association of functional variants of the human CX3CR1 gene (Fractalkine receptor with the risk of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, the survival and the progression rate of the disease symptoms in a Spanish ALS cohort. 187 ALS patients (142 sporadic [sALS] and 45 familial and 378 controls were recruited. We investigated CX3CR1 V249I (rs3732379 and T280M (rs3732378 genotypes and their haplotypes as predictors of survival, the progression rate of the symptoms (as measured by ALSFRS-R and FVC decline and the risk of suffering ALS disease. The results indicated that sALS patients with CX3CR1 249I/I or 249V/I genotypes presented a shorter survival time (42.27 ± 4.90 than patients with 249V/V genotype (67.65 ± 7.42; diff -25.49 months 95%CI [-42.79,-8.18]; p = 0.004; adj-p = 0.018. The survival time was shorter in sALS patients with spinal topography and CX3CR1 249I alleles (diff =  -29.78 months; 95%CI [-49.42,-10.14]; p = 0.003. The same effects were also observed in the spinal sALS patients with 249I-280M haplotype (diff =  -27.02 months; 95%CI [-49.57, -4.48]; p = 0.019. In the sALS group, the CX3CR1 249I variant was associated with a faster progression of the disease symptoms (OR = 2.58; 95IC% [1.32, 5.07]; p = 0.006; adj-p = 0.027. There was no evidence for association of these two CX3CR1 variants with ALS disease risk. The association evidenced herein is clinically relevant and indicates that CX3CR1 could be a disease-modifying gene in sALS. The progression rate of the disease's symptoms and the survival time is affected in patients with one or two copies of the CX3CR1 249I allele. The CX3CR1 is the most potent ALS survival genetic factor reported to date. These results reinforce the role of the immune system in ALS pathogenesis.

  14. Tomography patterns of lung disease in systemic sclerosis

    Bastos, Andrea de Lima; Correa, Ricardo de Amorim; Ferreira, Gilda Aparecida, E-mail: andrealb@ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2016-09-15

    Currently, lung impairment is the leading factor responsible for the morbidity and mortality associated with systemic sclerosis. Therefore, the recognition of the various tomography patterns becomes decisive in the clinical management of these patients. In high-resolution computed tomography studies, the most common pattern is that of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. However, there are other forms of lung involvement that must also be recognized. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the main changes resulting from pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis and the corresponding radiological findings, considering the current classification of interstitial diseases. We searched the Medline (PubMed), Lilacs, and SciELO databases in order to select articles related to pulmonary changes in systemic sclerosis and published in English between 2000 and 2015. The pulmonary changes seen on computed tomography in systemic sclerosis are varied and are divided into three main categories: interstitial, alveolar, and vascular. Interstitial changes constitute the most common type of pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis. However, alveolar and vascular manifestations must also be recognized and considered in the presence of atypical clinical presentations and inadequate treatment responses. (author)

  15. Tomography patterns of lung disease in systemic sclerosis

    Bastos, Andrea de Lima; Correa, Ricardo de Amorim; Ferreira, Gilda Aparecida

    2016-01-01

    Currently, lung impairment is the leading factor responsible for the morbidity and mortality associated with systemic sclerosis. Therefore, the recognition of the various tomography patterns becomes decisive in the clinical management of these patients. In high-resolution computed tomography studies, the most common pattern is that of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. However, there are other forms of lung involvement that must also be recognized. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the main changes resulting from pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis and the corresponding radiological findings, considering the current classification of interstitial diseases. We searched the Medline (PubMed), Lilacs, and SciELO databases in order to select articles related to pulmonary changes in systemic sclerosis and published in English between 2000 and 2015. The pulmonary changes seen on computed tomography in systemic sclerosis are varied and are divided into three main categories: interstitial, alveolar, and vascular. Interstitial changes constitute the most common type of pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis. However, alveolar and vascular manifestations must also be recognized and considered in the presence of atypical clinical presentations and inadequate treatment responses. (author)

  16. Tomography patterns of lung disease in systemic sclerosis

    Andréa de Lima Bastos

    Full Text Available Abstract Currently, lung impairment is the leading factor responsible for the morbidity and mortality associated with systemic sclerosis. Therefore, the recognition of the various tomography patterns becomes decisive in the clinical management of these patients. In high-resolution computed tomography studies, the most common pattern is that of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. However, there are other forms of lung involvement that must also be recognized. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the main changes resulting from pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis and the corresponding radiological findings, considering the current classification of interstitial diseases. We searched the Medline (PubMed, Lilacs, and SciELO databases in order to select articles related to pulmonary changes in systemic sclerosis and published in English between 2000 and 2015. The pulmonary changes seen on computed tomography in systemic sclerosis are varied and are divided into three main categories: interstitial, alveolar, and vascular. Interstitial changes constitute the most common type of pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis. However, alveolar and vascular manifestations must also be recognized and considered in the presence of atypical clinical presentations and inadequate treatment responses.

  17. Penile involvement in Systemic Sclerosis: New Diagnostic and Therapeutic Aspects

    Antonio Aversa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic Sclerosis (SSc is a connective tissue disorder featuring vascular alterations and an immunological activation leading to a progressive and widespread fibrosis of several organs such as the skin, lung, gastrointestinal tract, heart, and kidney. Men with SSc are at increased risk of developing erectile dysfunction (ED because of the evolution of early microvascular tissutal damage into corporeal fibrosis. The entity of penile vascular damage in SSc patients has been demonstrated by using Duplex ultrasonography and functional infra-red imaging and it is now clear that this is a true clinical entity invariably occurring irrespective of age and disease duration and constituting the ‘‘sclerodermic penis’’. Once-daily phosphodiesterase type-5 (PDE5 inhibitors improve both sexual function and vascular measures of cavernous arteries by improving surrogate markers of endothelial dysfunction, that is, plasma endothelin-1 and adrenomedullin levels, which may play a potential role in preventing progression of penile fibrosis and ED. Also, the beneficial effect of long-term PDE5i add-on therapy to SSc therapy in the treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon is described.

  18. Impaired heel to toe progression during gait is related to reduced ankle range of motion in people with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Psarakis, Michael; Greene, David; Moresi, Mark; Baker, Michael; Stubbs, Peter; Brodie, Matthew; Lord, Stephen; Hoang, Phu

    2017-11-01

    Gait impairment in people with Multiple Sclerosis results from neurological impairment, muscle weakness and reduced range of motion. Restrictions in passive ankle range of motion can result in abnormal heel-to-toe progression (weight transfer) and inefficient gait patterns in people with Multiple Sclerosis. The purpose of this study was to determine the associations between gait impairment, heel-to-toe progression and ankle range of motion in people with Multiple Sclerosis. Twelve participants with Multiple Sclerosis and twelve healthy age-matched participants were assessed. Spatiotemporal parameters of gait and individual footprint data were used to investigate group differences. A pressure sensitive walkway was used to divide each footprint into three phases (contact, mid-stance, propulsive) and calculate the heel-to-toe progression during the stance phase of gait. Compared to healthy controls, people with Multiple Sclerosis spent relatively less time in contact phase (7.8% vs 25.1%) and more time in the mid stance phase of gait (57.3% vs 33.7%). Inter-limb differences were observed in people with Multiple Sclerosis between the affected and non-affected sides for contact (7.8% vs 15.3%) and mid stance (57.3% and 47.1%) phases. Differences in heel-to-toe progression remained significant after adjusting for walking speed and were correlated with walking distance and ankle range of motion. Impaired heel-to-toe progression was related to poor ankle range of motion in people with Multiple Sclerosis. Heel-to-toe progression provided a sensitive measure for assessing gait impairments that were not detectable using standard spatiotemporal gait parameters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The role of klotho in systemic sclerosis

    R. Talotta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to evaluate the role of klotho in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc, through the measurement of its serum concentration in SSc patients compared to healthy controls, and to assess the association with cutaneous and visceral involvement. Blood samples obtained from both SSc patients and healthy controls were analysed by an ELISA assay for the detection of human klotho. SSc patients were globally evaluated for disease activity and assessed through the modified Rodnan’s Skin Score, Medsger’s scale, pulmonary function tests, 2D-echocardiography, nailfold capillaroscopy and laboratory tests. Our cohort consisted of 69 SSc patients (61 females, mean age 64.5±12.5 years, median disease duration 9.0 (IQR 8 years and 77 healthy controls (28 females, mean age 49.7±10.2 years. In the group of SSc patients, 19 (27.5% suffered from a diffuse form of SSc. All patients were receiving IV prostanoids, and some of them were concomitantly treated with immunosuppressive drugs (prednisone, hydroxychloroquine, mofetil mycophenolate, methotrexate, cyclosporin A and azathioprine. The median serum concentration of klotho was significantly lower in patients compared to controls (0.23 ng/mL vs 0.60 ng/mL; p<0.001. However, Spearman’s test showed no significant association between klotho serum levels and disease activity, concerning either clinical, laboratory or instrumental findings. Our data show a significant deficit of klotho in SSc patients although any significant association was detected between klotho serum concentration and the clinical, laboratory or instrumental features of the disease. However, due to the limits of the study, further investigations are required.

  20. Nutritional support in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Ortiz-Santamaria, Vera; Puig, Celia; Soldevillla, Cristina; Barata, Anna; Cuquet, Jordi; Recasens, Asunción

    2014-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic multisystem autoimmune disease which involves the gastrointestinal tract in about 90% of cases. It may contribute to nutritional deterioration. To assess whether the application of a nutritional support protocol to these patients could improve their nutritional status and quality of life. Single center prospective study, performed on an outpatient basis, in a county hospital. The Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) was used to screen risk for malnutrition. Health questionnaire SF-36 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were used to assess quality of life and psychopathology respectively. Weight, height, energy and protein requirements, macronutrient intake and nutritional biochemical parameters were evaluated. Nutritional intervention was performed in patients at risk for malnutrition. Of the 72 patients, 12.5% were at risk for malnutrition. Iron deficiency anemia (18.35%) and vitamin D deficiency (54%) were the most frequently observed nutritional deficits. The questionnaires on psychopathology and quality of life showed a high prevalence of anxiety and depression, and lower level poor quality of life in the physical and mental component. No significant improvements were observed in the weight, food intake, nutritional biochemical parameters, psychopathology and quality of life follow-up. Dietary intervention was able to maintain body weight and food intake. Iron deficiency anemia and vitamin D deficiency improved with iron and vitamine D supplements. No deterioration was observed in psychological assessment or quality of life. Studies with larger numbers of patients are needed to assess the efficacy of this intervention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Interstitial Lung disease in Systemic Sclerosis

    Ooi, G.C.; Mok, M.Y.; Tsang, K.W.T.; Khong, P.L.; Fung, P.C.W.; Chan, S.; Tse, H.F.; Wong, R.W.S.; Lam, W.K.; Lau, C.S.; Wong, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate high-resolution CT (HRCT) parameters of inflammation and fibrosis in systemic sclerosis (SSc), for correlation with lung function, skin scores and exercise tolerance. Material and Methods: : 45 SSc patients (40 women, 48.5±13.4 years), underwent thoracic HRCT, lung function assessment, and modified Rodnan skin scores. Exercise tolerance was also graded. HRCT were scored for extent of 4 HRCT patterns of interstitial lung disease (ILD): ground glass opacification (GGO), reticular, mixed and honeycomb pattern in each lobe. Total HRCT score, inflammation index (GGO and mixed score) and fibrosis index (reticular and honeycomb scores) were correlated with lung function and clinical parameters. Results: ILD was present in 39/45 (86.7%) patients. Abnormal (<80% predicted) forced vital capacity (FVC), total lung capacity (TLC) and carbon monoxide diffusion factor (DLco) were detected in 30%, 22% and 46% of patients. Total HRCT score correlated with FVC (r=0.43, p=0.008), FEV1 (forced expiratory volume) (r=-0.37, p=0.03), TLC (r=-0.47, p=0.003), and DLCO (r=-0.43, p=0.008); inflammatory index with DLCO (r=-0.43, p=0.008) and exercise tolerance (r=-0.39, p < 0.05); and fibrosis index with FVC (r=-0.31, p=0.05) and TLC (r=-0.38, p=0.02). Higher total HRCT score, and inflammation and fibrosis indices were found in patients with abnormal lung function. Conclusion: Qualitative HRCT is able to evaluate inflammation and fibrosis, showing important relationships with diffusion capacity and lung volume, respectively

  2. Adie’s Tonic Pupil in Systemic Sclerosis: A Rare Association

    Anusha Venkataraman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare association of Adie’s tonic pupil in a patient with systemic sclerosis who was otherwise systemically stable. This paper is an effort to unravel whether the tonic pupil and systemic sclerosis are an association by chance (which may be the case or systemic sclerosis is the source of the tonic pupil.

  3. Impact of natalizumab on ambulatory improvement in secondary progressive and disabled relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Diego Cadavid

    Full Text Available There is an unmet need for disease-modifying therapies to improve ambulatory function in disabled subjects with multiple sclerosis.Assess the effects of natalizumab on ambulatory function in disabled subjects with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS or secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS.We retrospectively reviewed ambulatory function as measured by timed 25-foot walk (T25FW in clinical trial subjects with an Expanded Disability Status Scale score ≥3.5, including RRMS subjects from the phase 3 AFFIRM and SENTINEL trials, relapsing SPMS subjects from the phase 2 MS231 study, and nonrelapsing SPMS subjects from the phase 1b DELIVER study. For comparison, SPMS subjects from the intramuscular interferon beta-1a (IM IFNβ-1a IMPACT study were also analyzed. Improvement in ambulation was measured using T25FW responder status; response was defined as faster walking times over shorter (6-9-month or longer (24-30-month treatment periods relative to subjects' best predose walking times.There were two to four times more T25FW responders among disabled MS subjects in the natalizumab arms than in the placebo or IM IFNβ-1a arms. Responders walked 25 feet an average of 24%-45% faster than nonresponders.Natalizumab improves ambulatory function in disabled RRMS subjects and may have efficacy in disabled SPMS subjects. Confirmation of the latter finding in a prospective SPMS study is warranted.

  4. Characterization of annual disease progression of multiple sclerosis patients: A population-based study

    Freilich, Jonatan; Manouchehrinia, Ali; Trusheim, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Previous research characterizing factors influencing multiple sclerosis (MS) disease progression has typically been based on time to disease milestones (Kaplan-Meier, Cox hazard regression, etc.). A limitation of these methods is the handling of the often large groups of patients not reaching...... the milestone. To characterize clinical factors influencing MS disease progression as annual transitions from each Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). The annual progression of 11,964 patients from the Swedish MS Registry was analysed with 10 multinomial logistic regressions, that is, one for transition...... from each full EDSS with explanatory variables age, sex, age at onset, time in current EDSS, highest prior EDSS, MS course and treatment. All factors (except sex) investigated had statistically significant impacts on transitions from at least one EDSS. However, significance and size of the effect...

  5. Systemic Vasculitis During the Course of Systemic Sclerosis

    Quéméneur, Thomas; Mouthon, Luc; Cacoub, Patrice; Meyer, Olivier; Michon-Pasturel, Ulrique; Vanhille, Philippe; Hatron, Pierre-Yves; Guillevin, Loïc; Hachulla, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Although the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) has been reported in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), the association of SSc and systemic vasculitis has rarely been described. We obtained information on cases of systemic vasculitis associated with SSc in France from the French Vasculitis Study Group and all members of the French Research Group on Systemic Sclerosis. We identified 12 patients with systemic vasculitis associated with SSc: 9 with ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis (AASV) and 3 with mixed cryoglobulinemia vasculitis (MCV). In all AASV patients, SSc was of the limited type. The main complication of SSc was pulmonary fibrosis. Only 2 patients underwent a D-penicillamine regimen before the occurrence of AASV. The characteristics of AASV were microscopic polyangiitis (n = 7) and renal limited vasculitis (n = 2). Anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies were found in 8 of the 9 patients. The Five Factor Score was above 1 in 3 of the 9 patients. Of the 3 patients with MCV, Sjögren syndrome was confirmed in 2. We compared our findings with the results of a literature review (42 previously reported cases of AASV with SSc). Although rare, vasculitis is a complication of SSc. AASV is the most frequent type, and its diagnosis can be challenging when the kidney is injured. Better awareness of this rare association could facilitate earlier diagnosis and appropriate management to reduce damage. PMID:23263715

  6. [The treatment of skin ulcers in patients with systemic sclerosis].

    Fiori, G; Amanzi, L; Moggi Pignone, A; Braschi, F; Matucci-Cerinic, M

    2004-01-01

    Systemic Sclerosis (Ssc) is a complex disease of the connective tissue, characterized by progressive thickening and fibrosis of the skin and the internal organs and by diffused damage of the microvascular system. The fibrosis ones of the skin associated to the characteristic vascular alterations lead to the genesis of ulcers, more or less extended, often multiple, peripheral localization, chronic course, painful, able to influence patient's quality of life. Indeed, immunity reactivity, the thinning and the loss of elasticity of the skin, the peripheral neurological damage and the eventual drug assumption that can reduce regenerative/reparative abilities, can easily make an ulcer chronic and become infected complicating still more the patient disease, rendering more difficult the cure often, ulcer evolves to gangrene, and in some cases, in amputation too. For all these reasons, we have begun to study ulcers therapy (local and systemic), considering this activity it leave integrating of the charitable distance of the sclerodermic patient, putting to point on strategy both diagnostic and therapeutic, but above all with the primary scope, if possible, is to prevent ulcers, in contrary case, to alleviate the pain and to render the quality of the life of the patient better.

  7. The treatment of skin ulcers in patients with systemic sclerosis

    M. Matucci- Cerinic

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic Sclerosis (Ssc is a complex disease of the connective tissue, characterized by progressive thickening and fibrosis of the skin and the internal organs and by diffused damage of the microvascular system. The fibrosis ones of the skin associated to the characteristic vascular alterations lead to the genesis of ulcers, more or less extended, often multiple, peripheral localization, chronic course, painful, able to influence patient’s quality of life. Indeed, immunity reactivity, the thinning and the loss of elasticity of the skin, the peripheral neurological damage and the eventual drug assumption that can reduce regenerative/reparative abilities, can easy chronicizzate an ulcer and become infected complicating still more the patient disease, rendering more difficult the cure often, ulcer evolves to gangrene, and in some cases, in amputation too. For all these reasons, we have begun to study ulcers therapy (local and systemic, considering this activity it leave integrating of the charitable distance of the sclerodermico patient, putting to point on strategy both diagnostic and therapeutic, but above all with the primary scope, if possible, is to prevent ulcers, in contrary case, to alleviate the pain and to render the quality of the life of the patient better.

  8. Reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration is associated with physical disability in progressive multiple sclerosis

    Solanky, Bhavana S.; Muhlert, Nils; Tur, Carmen; Edden, Richard A. E.; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A. M.; Miller, David H.; Thompson, Alan J.; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is thought to be the major cause of ongoing, irreversible disability in progressive stages of multiple sclerosis. Gamma-aminobutyric acid is the principle inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. The aims of this study were to investigate if gamma-aminobutyric acid levels (i) are abnormal in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis compared with healthy controls; and (ii) correlate with physical and cognitive performance in this patient population. Thirty patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and 17 healthy control subjects underwent single-voxel MEGA-PRESS (MEscher-GArwood Point RESolved Spectroscopy) magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T, to quantify gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the prefrontal cortex, right hippocampus and left sensorimotor cortex. All subjects were assessed clinically and underwent a cognitive assessment. Multiple linear regression models were used to compare differences in gamma-aminobutyric acid concentrations between patients and controls adjusting for age, gender and tissue fractions within each spectroscopic voxel. Regression was used to examine the relationships between the cognitive function and physical disability scores specific for these regions with gamma-aminobuytric acid levels, adjusting for age, gender, and total N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamine-glutamate complex levels. When compared with controls, patients performed significantly worse on all motor and sensory tests, and were cognitively impaired in processing speed and verbal memory. Patients had significantly lower gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the hippocampus (adjusted difference = −0.403 mM, 95% confidence intervals −0.792, −0.014, P = 0.043) and sensorimotor cortex (adjusted difference = −0.385 mM, 95% confidence intervals −0.667, −0.104, P = 0.009) compared with controls. In patients, reduced motor function in the right upper and lower limb was associated with lower gamma-aminobutyric acid

  9. Optical Elastography of Systemic Sclerosis Skin

    2017-09-01

    ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Road, Houston, TX The University of Texas Health Science ...o What was the impact on society beyond science and technology? Nothing to Report. 5.CHANGES/PROBLEMS: o Changes in approach and reasons for...Sclerosis Patient-Derived Data Role: PI Time Commitment: 0.24 calendar mos Supporting Agency: Momenta Pharmaceuticals , Inc Name and Address of the

  10. Monitoring Progression of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Using Ultrasound Morpho-Textural Muscle Biomarkers: A Pilot Study.

    Martínez-Payá, Jacinto J; Ríos-Díaz, José; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc; Vázquez-Costa, Juan F; Del Baño-Aledo, María Elena

    2018-01-01

    The need is increasing for progression biomarkers that allow the loss of motor neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to be monitored in clinical trials. In this prospective longitudinal study, muscle thickness, echointensity, echovariation and gray level co-occurrence matrix textural features are examined as possible progression ultrasound biomarkers in ALS patients during a 5-mo follow-up period. We subjected 13 patients to 3 measurements for 20 wk. They showed a significant loss of muscle, an evident tendency to loss of thickness and increased echointensity and echovariation. In regard to textural parameters, muscle heterogeneity tended to increase as a result of the neoformation of non-contractile tissue through denervation. Considering some limitations of the study, the quantitative muscle ultrasound biomarkers evaluated showed a promising ability to monitor patients affected by ALS. Copyright © 2018 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Screening for pulmonary arterial hypertension in systemic sclerosis

    J-L. Vachiéry

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The onset and progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc can be particularly aggressive; however, effective treatments are available. Therefore, early identification of patients with suspected PAH, confirmation of diagnosis, and intervention is essential. PAH may be challenging to diagnose in its earliest stages, particularly in populations that have multiple causes of breathlessness, and, therefore, screening is required. The optimal screening tools and methodology are, as yet, unknown, and this is confounded by a lack of consensus over which patients to screen. Current practice favours annual screening of all SSc patients using Doppler echocardiography to detect elevated right heart pressures. This will typically identify most patients with the various forms of pulmonary hypertension found in SSc. The optimum thresholds for Doppler echocardiography are still subject to investigation, especially for patients with mild pulmonary hypertension, and this technique may, therefore, yield a significant number of false-positives and a currently unknown number of false-negatives. Confirmatory right heart catheterisation remains necessary in all suspected cases. Further research is needed to identify the optimal tools and the screening approach with greatest specificity and selectivity.

  12. Differential motor neuron involvement in progressive muscular atrophy: a comparative study with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Riku, Yuichi; Atsuta, Naoki; Yoshida, Mari; Tatsumi, Shinsui; Iwasaki, Yasushi; Mimuro, Maya; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Ito, Mizuki; Senda, Jo; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Koike, Haruki; Sobue, Gen

    2014-05-14

    Progressive muscular atrophy (PMA) is a clinical diagnosis characterised by progressive lower motor neuron (LMN) symptoms/signs with sporadic adult onset. It is unclear whether PMA is simply a clinical phenotype of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in which upper motor neuron (UMN) signs are undetectable. To elucidate the clinicopathological features of patients with clinically diagnosed PMA, we studied consecutive autopsied cases. Retrospective, observational. Autopsied patients. We compared clinicopathological profiles of clinically diagnosed PMA and ALS using 107 consecutive autopsied patients. For clinical analysis, 14 and 103 patients were included in clinical PMA and ALS groups, respectively. For neuropathological evaluation, 13 patients with clinical PMA and 29 patients with clinical ALS were included. Clinical features, UMN and LMN degeneration, axonal density in the corticospinal tract (CST) and immunohistochemical profiles. Clinically, no significant difference between the prognosis of clinical PMA and ALS groups was shown. Neuropathologically, 84.6% of patients with clinical PMA displayed UMN and LMN degeneration. In the remaining 15.4% of patients with clinical PMA, neuropathological parameters that we defined as UMN degeneration were all negative or in the normal range. In contrast, all patients with clinical ALS displayed a combination of UMN and LMN system degeneration. CST axon densities were diverse in the clinical PMA group, ranging from low values to the normal range, but consistently lower in the clinical ALS group. Immunohistochemically, 85% of patients with clinical PMA displayed 43-kDa TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) pathology, while 15% displayed fused-in-sarcoma (FUS)-positive basophilic inclusion bodies. All of the patients with clinical ALS displayed TDP-43 pathology. PMA has three neuropathological background patterns. A combination of UMN and LMN degeneration with TDP-43 pathology, consistent with ALS, is the major pathological

  13. Systemic sclerosis in a patient with pityriasis rubra pilaris | Frikha ...

    Pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP) is a rare, chronic erythematous squamous disorder of unknown etiology. It has been found in association with several autoimmune diseases, including thyroiditis, myositis, myasthenia gravis and vitiligo. Herein we report a case of systemic sclerosis in a patient with classic adult pityriasis rubra ...

  14. Immunochip Analysis Identifies Multiple Susceptibility Loci for Systemic Sclerosis

    Mayes, Maureen D.; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Gorlova, Olga; Martin, Jose Ezequiel; Zhou, Xiaodong; Chen, Wei V.; Assassi, Shervin; Ying, Jun; Tan, Filemon K.; Arnett, Frank C.; Reveille, John D.; Guerra, Sandra; Terue, Maria; Carmona, Francisco David; Gregersen, Peter K.; Lee, Annette T.; Lopez-Isac, Elena; Ochoa, Eguzkine; Carreira, Patricia; Simeon, Carmen Pilar; Castellvi, Ivan; Angel Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Padyukov, Leonid; Aarcon-Riquelme, Marta; Wijmenga, Cisca; Beretta, Lorenzo; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Kreuter, Alexander; Distler, Jorg H. W.; Voskuy, Alexandre E.; Schuerwegh, Annemie J.; Hesselstrand, Roger; Nordin, Annika; Airo, Paolo; Lunardi, Claudio; Shiels, Paul; van Laar, Jacob M.; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Denton, Christopher; Wigley, Fredrick M.; Hummers, Laura K.; Varga, John; Hinchcliff, Monique E.; Baron, Murray; Hudson, Marie; Pope, Janet E.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 1,833 systemic sclerosis (SSc) cases and 3,466 controls were genotyped with the Immunochip array. Classical alleles, amino acid residues, and SNPs across the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region were imputed and tested. These analyses resulted in a model composed of six polymorphic

  15. Clinical risk assessment of organ manifestations in systemic sclerosis

    Walker, U A; Tyndall, A; Czirják, L

    2007-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multisystem autoimmune disease, which is classified into a diffuse cutaneous (dcSSc) and a limited cutaneous (lcSSc) subset according to the skin involvement. In order to better understand the vascular, immunological and fibrotic processes of SSc and to guide its tre...... treatment, the EULAR Scleroderma Trials And Research (EUSTAR) group was formed in June 2004....

  16. Clinical prediction of 5-year survival in systemic sclerosis

    Fransen, Julie Munk; Popa-Diaconu, D; Hesselstrand, R

    2011-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is associated with a significant reduction in life expectancy. A simple prognostic model to predict 5-year survival in SSc was developed in 1999 in 280 patients, but it has not been validated in other patients. The predictions of a prognostic model are usually less accura...

  17. Treatment outcome in early diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis

    Herrick, Ariane L; Pan, Xiaoyan; Peytrignet, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The rarity of early diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc) makes randomised controlled trials very difficult. We aimed to use an observational approach to compare effectiveness of currently used treatment approaches. METHODS: This was a prospective, observational cohort study...

  18. Characteristics of joint involvement and relationships with systemic inflammation in systemic sclerosis

    Avouac, Jerome; Walker, Ulrich; Tyndall, Alan

    2010-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of and independent factors associated with joint involvement in a large population of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc).......To determine the prevalence of and independent factors associated with joint involvement in a large population of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc)....

  19. Adjustment modes in the trajectory of progressive multiple sclerosis: a qualitative study and conceptual model.

    Bogosian, Angeliki; Morgan, Myfanwy; Bishop, Felicity L; Day, Fern; Moss-Morris, Rona

    2017-03-01

    We examined cognitive and behavioural challenges and adaptations for people with progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) and developed a preliminary conceptual model of changes in adjustment over time. Using theoretical sampling, 34 semi-structured interviews were conducted with people with MS. Participants were between 41 and 77 years of age. Thirteen were diagnosed with primary progressive MS and 21 with secondary progressive MS. Data were analysed using a grounded theory approach. Participants described initially bracketing the illness off and carrying on their usual activities but this became problematic as the condition progressed and they employed different adjustment modes to cope with increased disabilities. Some scaled back their activities to live a more comfortable life, others identified new activities or adapted old ones, whereas at times, people disengaged from the adjustment process altogether and resigned to their condition. Relationships with partners, emotional reactions, environment and perception of the environment influenced adjustment, while people were often flexible and shifted among modes. Adjusting to a progressive condition is a fluid process. Future interventions can be tailored to address modifiable factors at different stages of the condition and may involve addressing emotional reactions concealing/revealing the condition and perceptions of the environment.

  20. Sunlight exposure and sun sensitivity associated with disability progression in multiple sclerosis.

    D'hooghe, M B; Haentjens, P; Nagels, G; Garmyn, M; De Keyser, J

    2012-04-01

    Sunlight and vitamin D have been inversely associated with the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated sunlight exposure and sun sensitivity in relation to disability progression in MS. We conducted a survey among persons with MS, registered by the Flemish MS society, Belgium, and stratified data according to relapsing-onset and progressive-onset MS. We used Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox proportional hazard regression analyses with time to Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) 6 as outcome measure. Hazard ratios for the time from onset and from birth were calculated for the potentially predictive variables, adjusting for age at onset, gender and immunomodulatory treatment. 704 (51.3%) of the 1372 respondents had reached EDSS 6. In relapsing-onset MS, respondents reporting equal or higher levels of sun exposure than persons of the same age in the last 10 years had a decreased risk of reaching EDSS 6. In progressive-onset MS, increased sun sensitivity was associated with an increased hazard of reaching EDSS 6. The association of higher sun exposure with a better outcome in relapsing-onset MS may be explained by either a protective effect or reverse causality. Mechanisms underlying sun sensitivity might influence progression in progressive-onset MS.

  1. [Pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis. Alveolitis, fibrosis and pulmonar arterial hypertension].

    Navarro, Carmen

    2006-11-01

    Pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis. Alveolitis, fibrosis and pulmonar arterial hypertension Lung disease is present in most of the patients with systemic sclerosis and is now the most important cause of mortality. Interstitial lung disease and pulmonary hypertension are, so far, the main disorders found and both are difficult to detect at the earliest stages. However, diagnostic tools such as immunological test, lung function test, high resolution CT, bronchoalveolar lavage, echocardiography, right-side cardiac catheterization, or lung biopsy are necessary to accurately evaluate the clinical status and allow to improve the management organ-specific ad hoc. Progress in immunological and vascular therapies as well as other emergence drugs offer new expectations to scleroderma patients. Copyright © 2006 Elsevier España S.L. Barcelona. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Progressive supranuclear palsy presenting as primary lateral sclerosis but lacking parkinsonism, gaze palsy, aphasia, or dementia.

    Nagao, Shigeto; Yokota, Osamu; Nanba, Reiko; Takata, Hiroshi; Haraguchi, Takashi; Ishizu, Hideki; Ikeda, Chikako; Takeda, Naoya; Oshima, Etsuko; Sakane, Katsuaki; Terada, Seishi; Ihara, Yuetsu; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2012-12-15

    We report an autopsy case of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) that clinically showed only slowly progressive and symmetric upper motor neuron syndrome over a disease course of 12 years. A female patient initially exhibited dysarthria at the age of 65, followed by gait disturbance and dysphagia. Neurological examination at age 67 disclosed pseudobulbar palsy, spastic gait, hyperreflexia, and presence of bilateral Hoffmann and Babinski signs. However, muscle atrophy, weakness, evidence of denervation on electromyography, vertical gaze palsy, parkinsonism, gait freezing, aphasia, speech apraxia, or dementia was not noted throughout the course. She was clinically diagnosed as having motor neuron disease consistent with so-called primary lateral sclerosis. Pathological examination disclosed histopathological features of PSP, including argyrophilic and tau-positive tufted astrocytes, neurofibrillary tangles, coiled bodies, and thread-like processes in the motor cortex and superior frontal gyrus, and to a lesser degree, in the basal ganglia and brain stem nuclei. In addition, severe fibrillary gliosis was noted in the precentral gyrus and corticospinal tract, being consistent with upper motor neuron syndrome observed in this case. No TAR-DNA binding protein 43-positive lesion, FUS pathology, Bunina body, or Lewy body-like hyaline inclusion was noted in the motor cortex or lower motor neurons. These findings suggest that when tau pathology is prominent in the motor cortex but is minimal in the basal ganglia and brain stem nuclei, a PSP case can lack all classic clinical features of PSP and show only slowly progressive upper motor syndrome, consistent with clinical picture of primary lateral sclerosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Progression and effect of cognitive-behavioral changes in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Bock, Meredith; Duong, Y-Nhy; Kim, Anthony; Allen, Isabel; Murphy, Jennifer; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine

    2017-12-01

    To prospectively evaluate the progression of cognitive-behavioral function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and examine the association of cognitive-behavioral deficits with disease progression, patient quality of life (QOL), and caregiver burden. We evaluated cognitive-behavioral function using the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Cognitive Behavioral Screen at enrollment and after 7 months in a cohort of patients with ALS. Paired t tests were used to evaluate the change in the 2 assessments. Linear regression and Kruskal-Wallis tests were applied to investigate how initial cognitive or behavioral status related to outcomes. The mean test-retest interval was 6.8 months (SD 1.6). Cognitive status of the study population (n = 49) overall did not change over the study period ( p = 0.06) despite progression of motor weakness ( p cognitive change. Patients initially classified as behaviorally normal showed increased behavioral problems over time ( t = -2.8, p = 0.009). Decline in cognitive (β = -1.3, p = 0.03) and behavioral (β = -0.76, p = 0.002) status predicted increasing caregiver burden. Behavioral abnormalities predicted decline in forced vital capacity and ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised score ( p = 0.008, 0.012) in the study population and patient QOL in the most severely affected group ( t = 4.3, p = 0.003). Cognitive-behavioral change is a key aspect of disease heterogeneity in ALS. Executive function in ALS overall remains stable over 7 months as detected by an administered screening tool. However, patients may develop caregiver-reported behavioral symptoms in that time period. Screening for caregiver-reported symptoms has a particular utility in predicting future clinical decline, increased caregiver burden, and worsening patient QOL.

  4. Phonological fluency strategy of switching differentiates relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients.

    Messinis, L; Kosmidis, M H; Vlahou, C; Malegiannaki, A C; Gatzounis, G; Dimisianos, N; Karra, A; Kiosseoglou, G; Gourzis, P; Papathanasopoulos, P

    2013-01-01

    The strategies used to perform a verbal fluency task appear to be reflective of cognitive abilities necessary for successful daily functioning. In the present study, we explored potential differences in verbal fluency strategies (switching and clustering) used to maximize word production by patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) versus patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS). We further assessed impairment rates and potential differences in the sensitivity and specificity of phonological versus semantic verbal fluency tasks in discriminating between those with a diagnosis of MS and healthy adults. We found that the overall rate of impaired verbal fluency in our MS sample was consistent with that in other studies. However, we found no differences between types of MS (SPMS, RRMS), on semantic or phonological fluency word production, or the strategies used to maximize semantic fluency. In contrast, we found that the number of switches differed significantly in the phonological fluency task between the SPMS and RRMS subtypes. The clinical utility of semantic versus phonological fluency in discriminating MS patients from healthy controls did not indicate any significant differences. Further, the strategies used to maximize performance did not differentiate MS subgroups or MS patients from healthy controls.

  5. System xC- is a mediator of microglial function and its deletion slows symptoms in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mice.

    Mesci, Pinar; Zaïdi, Sakina; Lobsiger, Christian S; Millecamps, Stéphanie; Escartin, Carole; Seilhean, Danielle; Sato, Hideyo; Mallat, Michel; Boillée, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease and evidence from mice expressing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-causing SOD1 mutations suggest that neurodegeneration is a non-cell autonomous process where microglial cells influence disease progression. However, microglial-derived neurotoxic factors still remain largely unidentified in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. With excitotoxicity being a major mechanism proposed to cause motor neuron death in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, our hypothesis was that excessive glutamate release by activated microglia through their system [Formula: see text] (a cystine/glutamate antiporter with the specific subunit xCT/Slc7a11) could contribute to neurodegeneration. Here we show that xCT expression is enriched in microglia compared to total mouse spinal cord and absent from motor neurons. Activated microglia induced xCT expression and during disease, xCT levels were increased in both spinal cord and isolated microglia from mutant SOD1 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mice. Expression of xCT was also detectable in spinal cord post-mortem tissues of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and correlated with increased inflammation. Genetic deletion of xCT in mice demonstrated that activated microglia released glutamate mainly through system [Formula: see text]. Interestingly, xCT deletion also led to decreased production of specific microglial pro-inflammatory/neurotoxic factors including nitric oxide, TNFa and IL6, whereas expression of anti-inflammatory/neuroprotective markers such as Ym1/Chil3 were increased, indicating that xCT regulates microglial functions. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mice, xCT deletion surprisingly led to earlier symptom onset but, importantly, this was followed by a significantly slowed progressive disease phase, which resulted in more surviving motor neurons. These results are consistent with a deleterious contribution of microglial-derived glutamate during symptomatic

  6. Association between systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis: lupoid sclerosis; Asociacion de LES y esclerosis multiple: esclerosis lupoide.

    Medina, Yimy F; Martinez, Jose B; Fernandez, Andres R; Quintana, Gerardo; Restrepo, Jose Felix; Rondon, Federico; Gamarra, Antonio Iglesias

    2010-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) with/without antiphospholipid syndrome are autoimmune illnesses. It has been described in many occasions the association of these two illnesses and the clinical picture of MS with characteristics of laboratory of SLE. When they affect to the central nervous system they can make it in a defined form for each illness or they can also make it in interposed or combined form of the two illnesses what has been called lupoid sclerosis; making that in some cases difficult the differentiation of the two illnesses and therefore to address the treatment. We present four cases of lupoid sclerosis, discuss the clinical and laboratory characteristics of this entity and we make a differentiation of the multiple sclerosis with the neurological affectation of SLE especially for images and laboratory results.

  7. Soluble beta-amyloid precursor protein is related to disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Petra Steinacker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biomarkers of disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS could support the identification of beneficial drugs in clinical trials. We aimed to test whether soluble fragments of beta-amyloid precursor protein (sAPPα and sAPPß correlated with clinical subtypes of ALS and were of prognostic value. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a cross-sectional study including patients with ALS (N = 68 with clinical follow-up data over 6 months, Parkinson's disease (PD, N = 20, and age-matched controls (N = 40, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF levels of sAPPα a, sAPPß and neurofilaments (NfH(SMI35 were measured by multiplex assay, Progranulin by ELISA. CSF sAPPα and sAPPß levels were lower in ALS with a rapidly-progressive disease course (p = 0.03, and p = 0.02 and with longer disease duration (p = 0.01 and p = 0.01, respectively. CSF NfH(SMI35 was elevated in ALS compared to PD and controls, with highest concentrations found in patients with rapid disease progression (p<0.01. High CSF NfH(SMI3 was linked to low CSF sAPPα and sAPPß (p = 0.001, and p = 0.007, respectively. The ratios CSF NfH(SMI35/CSF sAPPα,-ß were elevated in patients with fast progression of disease (p = 0.002 each. CSF Progranulin decreased with ongoing disease (p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides new CSF candidate markers associated with progression of disease in ALS. The data suggest that a deficiency of cellular neuroprotective mechanisms (decrease of sAPP is linked to progressive neuro-axonal damage (increase of NfH(SMI35 and to progression of disease.

  8. High doses of biotin in chronic progressive multiple sclerosis: a pilot study.

    Sedel, Frédéric; Papeix, Caroline; Bellanger, Agnès; Touitou, Valérie; Lebrun-Frenay, Christine; Galanaud, Damien; Gout, Olivier; Lyon-Caen, Olivier; Tourbah, Ayman

    2015-03-01

    No drug has been found to have any impact on progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Biotin is a vitamin acting as a coenzyme for carboxylases involved in key steps of energy metabolism and fatty acids synthesis. Among others, biotin activates acetylCoA carboxylase, a potentially rate-limiting enzyme in myelin synthesis. The aim of this pilot study is to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of high doses of biotin in patients suffering from progressive MS. Uncontrolled, non-blinded proof of concept study 23 consecutive patients with primary and secondary progressive MS originated from three different French MS reference centers were treated with high doses of biotin (100-300mg/day) from 2 to 36 months (mean=9.2 months). Judgement criteria varied according to clinical presentations and included quantitative and qualitative measures. In four patients with prominent visual impairment related to optic nerve injury, visual acuity improved significantly. Visual evoked potentials in two patients exhibited progressive reappearance of P100 waves, with normalization of latencies in one case. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-MRS) in one case showed a progressive normalization of the Choline/Creatine ratio. One patient with left homonymous hemianopia kept on improving from 2 to 16 months following treatment׳s onset. Sixteen patients out of 18 (89%) with prominent spinal cord involvement were considered as improved as confirmed by blinded review of videotaped clinical examination in 9 cases. In all cases improvement was delayed from 2 to 8 months following treatment׳s onset. These preliminary data suggest that high doses of biotin might have an impact on disability and progression in progressive MS. Two double-blind placebo-controlled trials are on going. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Association between DPP6 polymorphism and the risk of progressive multiple sclerosis in Northern and Southern Europeans

    Brambilla, Paola; Esposito, Federica; Lindstrom, Eva

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of the dipeptidyl-peptidase-6 (DPP6) gene in the etiopathogenesis of progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (PrMS). This gene emerged as a candidate gene in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) performed in an Italian sample of PrMS and controls in which...

  10. Exploring Wellness Interventions in Progressive Multiple Sclerosis: an Evidence-Based Review.

    Venasse, Myriam; Edwards, Thomas; Pilutti, Lara A

    2018-04-10

    There has been recent interest in the role of lifestyle and wellness-based approaches in the treatment and management of multiple sclerosis (MS). These approaches may be particularly relevant for patients with progressive MS, considering limited therapeutic options currently available. The purpose of this review is to examine the role of wellness-based interventions including exercise training, emotional well-being therapies, and dietary modification in patients with progressive MS. We conducted a literature search on the efficacy of wellness-based interventions in patients with progressive MS published between 1985 and July 2017. The level of evidence for each trial was evaluated using the American Academy of Neurology criteria. Overall, 21 articles reporting on 16 wellness-based interventions were identified: ten trials involved exercise training, three involved emotional wellness therapies, two involved dietary modification, and one was a combined wellness intervention. There is level C evidence (possibly effective; one class II study) for the efficacy of aerobic exercise training on cardiorespiratory fitness in patients with progressive MS. There is level B evidence (probably effective; one class I study) for the efficacy of mindfulness training on psychological distress, depression, anxiety, pain, and quality of life in patients with progressive MS. There is inadequate evidence (level U) for efficacy of dietary modification (one class III study and one class IV study) and combined wellness interventions involving exercise training, meditation, and dietary modification (one class IV study). High-quality research is needed to provide evidence-based recommendations for wellness behaviors and lifestyle change in patients with progressive MS.

  11. Systemic Sclerosis and the Gastrointestinal Tract-Clinical Approach.

    Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda; Brun, Rita; Braun, Marius

    2016-10-31

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multisystem disease characterized by functional and structural abnormalities of small blood vessels, fibrosis of the skin and internal organs, immune system activation, and autoimmunity. The gastrointestinal tract is involved in nearly all patients and is a source of significant morbidity and even mortality. The aim of this review is to summarize the pathogenesis and to provide a clinical approach to these patients.

  12. The role of platelets in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis

    Giuseppe A. eRamirez

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SSc is an inflammatory disease of unknown etiology characterized by widespread organ dysfunction due to fibrosis and ischemia. Its nebulous pathogenic background and the consequent absence of an etiological therapy prevent the adoption of satisfying treatment strategies, able to improve patients' quality of life and survival and stimulate researchers to identify a unifying pathogenic target. Platelets show a unique biological behavior, lying at the crossroads between vascular function, innate and adaptive immunity and regulation of cell proliferation. Consequently they are also emerging players in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases, including systemic sclerosis. In the setting of SSc platelets are detectable in a persistent activated state, which is intimately linked to the concomitant presence of an injured endothelium and to the widespread activation of the innate and adaptive immune system. As a consistent circulating source of bioactive compounds platelets contribute to the development of many characteristic phenomena of SSc, such as fibrosis and impaired vascular tone.

  13. Multi-parametric spinal cord MRI as potential progression marker in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    El Mendili, Mohamed-Mounir; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Pelegrini-Issac, Mélanie; Rossignol, Serge; Morizot-Koutlidis, Régine; Marchand-Pauvert, Véronique; Iglesias, Caroline; Sangari, Sina; Katz, Rose; Lehericy, Stéphane; Benali, Habib; Pradat, Pierre-François

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate multimodal MRI of the spinal cord in predicting disease progression and one-year clinical status in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. After a first MRI (MRI1), 29 ALS patients were clinically followed during 12 months; 14/29 patients underwent a second MRI (MRI2) at 11±3 months. Cross-sectional area (CSA) that has been shown to be a marker of lower motor neuron degeneration was measured in cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord from T2-weighted images. Fractional anisotropy (FA), axial/radial/mean diffusivities (λ⊥, λ//, MD) and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) were measured within the lateral corticospinal tract in the cervical region. Imaging metrics were compared with clinical scales: Revised ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R) and manual muscle testing (MMT) score. At MRI1, CSA correlated significantly (Pleg ALFSRS-R scores. One year after MRI1, CSA predicted (Pleg ALSFRS-R subscore. From MRI1 to MRI2, significant changes (PDTI metrics predicted ALS disease progression. Cord atrophy was a better biomarker of disease progression than diffusion and MTR. Our study suggests that multimodal MRI could provide surrogate markers of ALS that may help monitoring the effect of disease-modifying drugs.

  14. [Multiple sclerosis management system 3D. Moving from documentation towards management of patients].

    Schultheiss, T; Kempcke, R; Kratzsch, F; Eulitz, M; Pette, M; Reichmann, H; Ziemssen, T

    2012-04-01

    The increasing therapeutic options for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis require a specific treatment and risk management to recognize the individual response as well as potential side effects. To switch from pure MS documentation to MS management by implementing a new multiple sclerosis management and documentation tool may be of importance. This article presents the novel computer-based patient management system "multiple sclerosis management system 3D" (MSDS 3D). MSDS 3D allows documentation and visualization of visit schedules and mandatory examinations via defined study modules by integration of data input from patients, attending physicians and MS nurses. It provides forms for the documentation of patient visits as well as clinical and diagnostic findings. Information is collected via interactive touch screens. A specific module which is part of MSDS 3D's current version allows the monthly monitoring of patients under treatment with natalizumab. A checklist covering clinical signs of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and a detailed questionnaire about the handling of natalizumab in practice have additionally been added. The MS patient management system MSDS 3D has successfully been implemented and is currently being evaluated in a multi-centre setting. Advanced assessment of patient data may allow improvements in clinical practice and research work. The addition of a checklist and a questionnaire into the natalizumab module may support the recognition of PML during its early, treatable course.

  15. Brain reserve against physical disability progression over 5 years in multiple sclerosis.

    Sumowski, James F; Rocca, Maria A; Leavitt, Victoria M; Meani, Alessandro; Mesaros, Sarlota; Drulovic, Jelena; Preziosa, Paolo; Habeck, Christian G; Filippi, Massimo

    2016-05-24

    The brain reserve hypothesis links larger maximal lifetime brain growth (MLBG, estimated with intracranial volume [ICV]) with lower risk for cognitive decline/dementia. We examined whether larger MLBG is also linked to less physical disability progression over 5 years in a prospective sample of treatment-naive patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Physical disability was measured with the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) at baseline and 5-year follow-up in 52 treatment-naive Serbian patients with MS. MRI measured disease burden (cerebral atrophy, T2 lesion volume) and MLBG: a genetically determined, premorbid (established during adolescence, stable thereafter) patient characteristic estimated with ICV (adjusted for sex). Logistic regression tested whether MLBG (smaller vs larger) predicts disability progression (stable vs worsened) independently of disease burden. Disability progression was observed in 29 (55.8%) patients. Larger MLBG predicted lower risk for progression (odds ratio 0.13, 95% confidence interval 0.02-0.78), independently of disease burden. We also calculated absolute change in EDSS scores, and observed that patients with smaller MLBG showed worse EDSS change (0.91 ± 0.71) than patients with larger MLBG (0.42 ± 0.87). Larger MLBG was linked to lower risk for disability progression in patients with MS over 5 years, which is the first extension of the brain reserve hypothesis to physical disability. MLBG (ICV) represents a clinically available metric that may help gauge risk for future disability in patients with MS, which may advance the science and practice of early intervention. Potential avenues for future research are discussed. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  16. Systemic Sclerosis Sine Scleroderma in Mexican Patients. Case Reports.

    Vera-Lastra, Olga; Sauceda-Casas, Christian Alexis; Domínguez, María Del Pilar Cruz; Alvarez, Sergio Alberto Mendoza; Sepulceda-Delgado, Jesús

    2017-01-03

    Systemic sclerosis sine scleroderma (ssSSc) is a form of systemic sclerosis that is characterized by Raynaud's phenomenon (RP), visceral involvement without thickening of skin and anticentromere antibodies (ACA). We studied 10 ssSsc patients with a prevalence of 2%. The clinical signs were: RP 9/10, esophageal manifestations 8/10, pulmonary arterial hypertension 4/10, interstitial lung disease 4/10, cardiac signs 3/10 and ACA 8/10. In patients with RP, esophageal dysmotility, interstitial lung disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension should be tested for ACA in order to establish a prompt diagnosis and treatment of ssSSc. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  17. Lymphatic microangiopathy of the skin in systemic sclerosis.

    Leu, A J; Gretener, S B; Enderlin, S; Brühlmann, P; Michel, B A; Kowal-Bielecka, O; Hoffmann, U; Franzeck, U K

    1999-03-01

    The cutaneous capillary lymphatic system in patients with systemic sclerosis was investigated using fluorescence microlymphography. The distal upper limbs of 16 healthy controls (mean age 62.3+/-13.1 yr) and 16 patients with systemic sclerosis (mean age 58.9+/-13.6 yr) were examined and the following parameters were evaluated: (a) single lymphatic capillaries; (b) lymphatic capillary network and cutaneous backflow; (c) extension of the stained lymphatics; (d) diameter of single lymphatic capillaries. At the finger level, lymphatic capillaries were lacking in five patients, while they were present in all controls (P < 0.05). Extension of the stained lymphatics was increased in 11 patients (8.1+/-6.0 mm) compared to the 16 healthy controls (2.0+/-1.2 mm) (P < 0.0001). Cutaneous backflow was observed in three patients (P < 0.05). At the hand level, lymphatic network extension was significantly different between patients (3.8+/-2.4 mm) and controls (1.2+/-0.8 mm) (P < 0.01); however, no significant differences were found at the forearm level. Lesional skin in patients with systemic sclerosis exhibits evidence of lymphatic microangiopathy.

  18. Environmental Mycobiome Modifiers of Inflammation and Fibrosis in Systemic Sclerosis

    2016-09-01

    shown that PBMCs and macrophages from SSc patients (monocytes isolated from peripheral blood of SSc patients that are differentiated in autologous...systemic sclerosis, pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary arterial hypertension ” Scleroderma Research Foundation Annual Workshop, San Francisco, CA 2/16...Cruz), and patient sera for 1 h at room temperature. Secondary antibodies (anti-goat-Cy3, anti-mouse-Cy2, and anti-human-Cy5) were purchased from

  19. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients with systemic sclerosis

    Saara Rawn

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO is common in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc yet often goes underrecognized in clinical practice. In patients with SSc, untreated SIBO may result in marked morbidity and possible mortality. The pathogenesis of SIBO is multifactorial and relates to immune dysregulation, vasculopathy, and dysmotility. This article reviews various diagnostic approaches and therapeutic options for SIBO. Treatment modalities mainly include prokinetics, probiotics, and antibiotics.

  20. Surgical management of gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Yan, Jingliang; Strong, Andrew T; Sharma, Gautam; Gabbard, Scott; Thota, Prashanti; Rodriguez, John; Kroh, Matthew

    2018-02-12

    Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) is frequently associated with both gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and simultaneous esophageal dysmotility. Anti-reflux procedures in this patient population must account for the existing physiology of each patient and likely disease progression. We aim to compare perioperative and intermediate outcomes of fundoplication versus gastric bypass for the treatment of GERD. After IRB approval, patients with systemic sclerosis undergoing fundoplication or gastric bypass for the treatment of GERD from 2004 to 2016 were identified. Demographics, perioperative data, immediate complications, and symptom improvement were retrieved and analyzed. Fourteen patients with systemic sclerosis underwent surgical treatment of GERD during the defined study period. Average body mass index was 26 kg/m 2 . Seven fundoplications (2 Nissens, 4 Toupets, and 1 Dor) and 7 Roux-en-Y gastric bypasses (RYGB) were performed. No 30-day mortality was observed in either group. Median follow-up was 97 months for the fundoplication group (range 28-204 months), and 19 months for the RYGB group (range 1-164 months). Preoperatively, dysphagia, heartburn, and regurgitation were present in 71% (n = 10), 86% (n = 12), and 64% (n = 9) of patients, respectively. Eleven patients had pH study prior to surgical intervention, and 91% of them had abnormal acid exposure. Esophagitis was evident in 85% (n = 11) of patients during preoperative upper endoscopy, and two patients had Barrett's esophagus. Impaired esophageal motility was present in all RYGB patients and 71% of fundoplication patients. Of the patients who had assessment of their GERD symptoms at follow-up, all five patients in the RYGB group and only 3 (50%) patients in the fundoplication group reported symptom improvement or resolution. Laparoscopic RYGB as an anti-reflux procedure is safe and may provide an alternative to fundoplication in the treatment of GERD for systemic sclerosis patients

  1. Abnormalities of small bowel and colon in systemic sclerosis

    Scutellari, P.N.; Cinotti, A.; Cavallari, L.; Orzincolo, C.; Dovigo, L.; Trotta, F.; Menegale, G.

    1990-01-01

    A series of 21 subjects (2 males and 19 females) affected with systemic sclerosis, was examined by small bowel (oral and intubation methods) and colon enema. The underlying process responsible for abnormalities in the small bowel and colon in systemic sclerosis is a variable and pacthy destruction of the muscularis propria, that produces the structural and functional changes detected on X-ray: Pathologic condition is the same affecting the esophagus. The scout film of the abdomen often reveals colonic distension and fecal impaction, so that it may be quite difficult to prepare adequately the patients for a barium enema. Peristalsis may be virtually absent in short segments, and transit time may be several time longer than that in normal patients. For these reasons, intestinal pseudo-obstruction may appear in systemic sclerosis. The observed radiographic changes are: 1) in the small bowel: a) dilatation of the gut, especially in its proximal portions (duodenum and jejunum), in which the valvulae conniventes are straightened, normal or thinned; b) presence of diverticula, 2-4 cm in diameter, with hemispherical shape without the neck-like opening into the bowel lumen; 2) in the colon, the characteristic finding is an increase in size of individual haustra, forming sacculations or pseudo-diverticula, usually on the antemesenteric border of the transverse colon, better demonstrated on post-evacuation film. Moreover, loss of colonic haustration is also observed associated to colonic elongation and dilatation

  2. Gastric antral vascular ectasia--a cause of refractory anaemia in systemic sclerosis.

    Busteed, S

    2012-02-03

    Recurrent gastrointestinal haemorrhage is an uncommon manifestation of systemic sclerosis. We report a case of gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE) in a patient with systemic sclerosis. Failure to recognise the condition as a cause of gastrointestinal bleeding may delay the instigation of appropriate treatment. GAVE should be considered in the differential diagnosis of anaemia in patients with autoimmune conditions such as systemic sclerosis and primary biliary cirrhosis.

  3. Endurance training is feasible in severely disabled patients with progressive multiple sclerosis

    Skjerbæk, Ag; Næsby, M; Lützen, Karin

    2014-01-01

    This study tested whether upper-body endurance training (ET) is feasible and can be performed at sufficient intensity to induce cardiovascular adaptations in severely disabled patients with progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Eleven progressive MS patients (6.5 ≤ EDSS ≤ 8.0) scheduled for a four......-week inpatient rehabilitation program were randomized to a control group (CON, n = 5) that received standard individualized MS rehabilitation or an intervention group (EXE, n = 6) that in addition received 10 sessions of predominantly upper-body ET. One patient dropped out of the EXE group (drop-out rate: 1....../6~17%) and no adverse events were recorded. The EXE group completed on average 9.3±0.8 sessions (~96.0±5%). During the ET sessions an average heart rate of 93.9±9.3beats*min(-1) were sustained corresponding to 91.6±6.8% of the maximal pre-intervention heart rate. In the EXE group a trend toward a time*group interaction...

  4. Intersections of pathways involving biotin and iron relative to therapeutic mechanisms for progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Heidker, Rebecca M; Emerson, Mitchell R; LeVine, Steven M

    2016-12-01

    While there are a variety of therapies for relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), there is a lack of treatments for progressive MS. An early study indicated that high dose biotin therapy has beneficial effects in approximately 12-15% of patients with progressive MS. The mechanisms behind the putative improvements seen with biotin therapy are not well understood, but have been postulated to include: 1) improving mitochondrial function which is impaired in MS, 2) increasing synthesis of lipids and cholesterol to facilitate remyelination, and 3) affecting gene expression. We suggest one reason that a greater percentage of patients with MS didn't respond to biotin therapy is the inaccessibility or lack of other nutrients, such as iron. In addition to biotin, iron (or heme) is necessary for energy production, biosynthesis of cholesterol and lipids, and for some protective mechanisms. Both biotin and iron are required for myelination during development, and by inference, remyelination. However, iron can also play a role in the pathology of MS. Increased deposition of iron can occur in some CNS structures possibly promoting oxidative damage while low iron levels can occur in other areas. Thus, the potential, detrimental effects of iron need to be considered together with the need for iron to support metabolic demands associated with repair and/or protective processes. We propose the optimal utilization of iron may be necessary to maximize the beneficial effects of biotin. This review will examine the interactions between biotin and iron in pathways that may have therapeutic or pathogenic implications for MS.

  5. Pulmonary function tests as outcomes for systemic sclerosis interstitial lung disease.

    Caron, Melissa; Hoa, Sabrina; Hudson, Marie; Schwartzman, Kevin; Steele, Russell

    2018-06-30

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in systemic sclerosis (SSc). We performed a systematic review to characterise the use and validation of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) as surrogate markers for systemic sclerosis-associated interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD) progression.Five electronic databases were searched to identify all relevant studies. Included studies either used at least one PFT measure as a longitudinal outcome for SSc-ILD progression ( i.e. outcome studies) and/or reported at least one classical measure of validity for the PFTs in SSc-ILD ( i.e. validation studies).This systematic review included 169 outcome studies and 50 validation studies. Diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide ( D LCO ) was cumulatively the most commonly used outcome until 2010 when it was surpassed by forced vital capacity (FVC). FVC (% predicted) was the primary endpoint in 70.4% of studies, compared to 11.3% for % predicted D LCO Only five studies specifically aimed to validate the PFTs: two concluded that D LCO was the best measure of SSc-ILD extent, while the others did not favour any PFT. These studies also showed respectable validity measures for total lung capacity (TLC).Despite the current preference for FVC, available evidence suggests that D LCO and TLC should not yet be discounted as potential surrogate markers for SSc-ILD progression. Copyright ©ERS 2018.

  6. Systemic sclerosis in a stone cutter

    Khanna N

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Several occupational hazards especially exposure to silica have been implicated as eliciting factors for the development of scleroderma-like disorders. We here report a case of manual stone-cutter who developed progressive scleroderma, interstitial lung disease and decreased oesophageal motility after several years of exposure to silica dust.

  7. The prevalence of median neuropathy at wrist in systemic sclerosis patients at Srinagarind Hospital

    Thanaporn Nimitbancha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the prevalence and factor related with median neuropathy at wrist (MNW in systemic sclerosis patients. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen, Thailand. Participants: Systemic sclerosis patients who attended the Scleroderma Clinic, Srinagarind Hospital. Materials and Methods: Seventyfive systemic sclerosis patients were prospectively evaluated by questionnaire, physical examination, and electrodiagnostic study. The questionnaire consisted of the symptoms, duration, and type of systemic sclerosis. The physical examination revealed skin score of systemic sclerosis, pinprick sensation of median nerve distribution of both hands, and weakness of both abductor pollicis brevis muscles. The provocative test which were Tinel′s sign and Phalen′s maneuver were also examined. Moreover, electrodiagnostic study of the bilateral median and ulnar nerves was conducted. Results: The prevalence of MNW in systemic sclerosis patients was 44% - percentage of mild, moderate, and severe were 28%, 9.3%, and 6.7%, respectively. The prevalence of asymptomatic MNW was 88%. There were no association between the presence of MNW and related factors of systemic sclerosis. Conclusions: MNW is one of the most common entrapment neuropathies in systemic sclerosis patients. Systemic sclerosis patients should be screened for early signs of MNW.

  8. Novel Neuroprotective Multicomponent Therapy for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Designed by Networked Systems.

    Mireia Herrando-Grabulosa

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of motor neuron function for which there is no effective treatment. One of the main difficulties in developing new therapies lies on the multiple events that contribute to motor neuron death in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Several pathological mechanisms have been identified as underlying events of the disease process, including excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, altered axonal transport, proteasome dysfunction, synaptic deficits, glial cell contribution, and disrupted clearance of misfolded proteins. Our approach in this study was based on a holistic vision of these mechanisms and the use of computational tools to identify polypharmacology for targeting multiple etiopathogenic pathways. By using a repositioning analysis based on systems biology approach (TPMS technology, we identified and validated the neuroprotective potential of two new drug combinations: Aliretinoin and Pranlukast, and Aliretinoin and Mefloquine. In addition, we estimated their molecular mechanisms of action in silico and validated some of these results in a well-established in vitro model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis based on cultured spinal cord slices. The results verified that Aliretinoin and Pranlukast, and Aliretinoin and Mefloquine promote neuroprotection of motor neurons and reduce microgliosis.

  9. Antiphospholipid Syndrome - A Case Report of Pulmonary Thromboembolism, Followed with Acute Myocardial Infarction in Patient with Systemic Sclerosis

    Marija Vavlukis

    2015-11-01

    CONCLUSION: The acquired antiphospholipid syndrome is common condition in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, but relatively rare in patients with systemic sclerosis. Never the less, we have to be aware of it when treating the patients with systemic sclerosis.

  10. Multi-parametric spinal cord MRI as potential progression marker in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Mohamed-Mounir El Mendili

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate multimodal MRI of the spinal cord in predicting disease progression and one-year clinical status in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After a first MRI (MRI1, 29 ALS patients were clinically followed during 12 months; 14/29 patients underwent a second MRI (MRI2 at 11±3 months. Cross-sectional area (CSA that has been shown to be a marker of lower motor neuron degeneration was measured in cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord from T2-weighted images. Fractional anisotropy (FA, axial/radial/mean diffusivities (λ⊥, λ//, MD and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR were measured within the lateral corticospinal tract in the cervical region. Imaging metrics were compared with clinical scales: Revised ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R and manual muscle testing (MMT score. RESULTS: At MRI1, CSA correlated significantly (P<0.05 with MMT and arm ALSFRS-R scores. FA correlated significantly with leg ALFSRS-R scores. One year after MRI1, CSA predicted (P<0.01 arm ALSFSR-R subscore and FA predicted (P<0.01 leg ALSFRS-R subscore. From MRI1 to MRI2, significant changes (P<0.01 were detected for CSA and MTR. CSA rate of change (i.e. atrophy highly correlated (P<0.01 with arm ALSFRS-R and arm MMT subscores rate of change. CONCLUSION: Atrophy and DTI metrics predicted ALS disease progression. Cord atrophy was a better biomarker of disease progression than diffusion and MTR. Our study suggests that multimodal MRI could provide surrogate markers of ALS that may help monitoring the effect of disease-modifying drugs.

  11. The development of an MRI lesion quantifying system for multiple sclerosis patients undergoing treatment

    Moin, Paymann; Ma, Kevin; Amezcua, Lilyana; Gertych, Arkadiusz; Liu, Brent

    2009-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that affects approximately 2.5 million people worldwide. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an established tool for the assessment of disease activity, progression and response to treatment. The progression of the disease is variable and requires routine follow-up imaging studies. Currently, MRI quantification of multiple sclerosis requires a manual approach to lesion measurement and yields an estimate of lesion volume and interval change. In the setting of several prior studies and a long treatment history, trends related to treatment change quickly become difficult to extrapolate. Our efforts seek to develop an imaging informatics based MS lesion computer aided detection (CAD) package to quantify and track MS lesions including lesion load, volume, and location. Together, with select clinical parameters, this data will be incorporated into an MS specific e- Folder to provide decision support to evaluate and assess treatment options for MS in a manner tailored specifically to an individual based on trends in MS presentation and progression.

  12. A proposed modification to the McDonald 2010 criteria for the diagnosis of primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Kelly, S B

    2013-07-01

    The diagnostic criteria for primary-progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) have undergone revision over the last 20 years. Cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal bands (CSFOBs) have received less emphasis in recent revisions of the McDonald criteria. The aim of this study was to examine the sensitivity of the diagnostic criteria for PPMS with particular reference to spinal cord criteria and examine the utility of CSFOBs in a cohort of PPMS patients.

  13. Drug repurposing: a systematic approach to evaluate candidate oral neuroprotective interventions for secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Hanna M Vesterinen

    Full Text Available To develop and implement an evidence based framework to select, from drugs already licenced, candidate oral neuroprotective drugs to be tested in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.Systematic review of clinical studies of oral putative neuroprotective therapies in MS and four other neurodegenerative diseases with shared pathological features, followed by systematic review and meta-analyses of the in vivo experimental data for those interventions. We presented summary data to an international multi-disciplinary committee, which assessed each drug in turn using pre-specified criteria including consideration of mechanism of action.We identified a short list of fifty-two candidate interventions. After review of all clinical and pre-clinical evidence we identified ibudilast, riluzole, amiloride, pirfenidone, fluoxetine, oxcarbazepine, and the polyunsaturated fatty-acid class (Linoleic Acid, Lipoic acid; Omega-3 fatty acid, Max EPA oil as lead candidates for clinical evaluation.We demonstrate a standardised and systematic approach to candidate identification for drug rescue and repurposing trials that can be applied widely to neurodegenerative disorders.

  14. [Living with a chronic progressive form of multiple sclerosis--a balance act].

    Hellige, Barbara

    2002-12-01

    There are only a few studies in the German speaking countries available which address the subject of the experience of chronically ill people during the course of their illness. Therefore it was the intent of this present study to find answers for central nurse science issues: How do people who suffer from a chronically progressive course of multiple sclerosis experience the downward trajectory? Which strategies do they develop in order to integrate the disease into their lives? In what ways does the scientific paradigm of medicine influence the perceptions of the illness and the life with it? After an analysis of the national and international state of nursing research follows a description of the methodology of the Grounded Theory and the individual examination steps of the study. The second part examines some essentials of the study. The results show that the trajectory is characterized by four phases. At first the ill person concentrates on the social discussion of the pathogenesis and the medical paradigma. But with physical experiences, exchange with other affected people and acquired information, those concerned develop a very case-specific knowledge. Often disillusioned by the medication strategies, based on the experience that their subjectivity and their individuality are not taken into account, they increasingly disapprove the deficit-oriented perspective of the professionals. They develop distinctly self-caring potentialities. To identify and support this self-care potentialities should be the very core of nursing.

  15. Risk factors for progressive axonal degeneration of the retinal nerve fibre layer in multiple sclerosis patients.

    Garcia-Martin, Elena; Pueyo, Victoria; Almarcegui, Carmen; Martin, Jesus; Ara, Jose R; Sancho, Eva; Pablo, Luis E; Dolz, Isabel; Fernandez, Javier

    2011-11-01

    To quantify structural and functional degeneration in the retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) over a 2-year time period, and to analyse the effect of prior optic neuritis (ON) as well as the duration and incidence of MS relapses. 166 MS patients and 120 healthy controls underwent assessment of visual acuity and colour vision, visual field examination, optical coherence tomography, scanning laser polarimetry and visual evoked potentials (VEPs). All subjects were re-evaluated after a period of 12 and 24 months. Changes in the optic nerve were detected by structural measurements but not by functional assessments. Changes registered in MS patients were greater than changes in healthy controls (p<0.05). Eyes with previous ON showed a greater reduction of parameters in the baseline evaluation, but RNFL atrophy was not significantly greater in the longitudinal study. Patients with MS relapses showed a greater reduction of RNFL thickness and VEP amplitude compared with non-relapsing cases. Patients with and without treatment showed similar measurement reduction, but the non-treated group had a significantly higher increase in Expanded Disability Status Scale (p=0.029). MS causes progressive axonal loss in the optic nerve, regardless of a history of ON. This ganglion cell atrophy occurs in all eyes but is more marked in MS eyes than in healthy eyes.

  16. Leptomeningeal Contrast Enhancement Is Associated with Disability Progression and Grey Matter Atrophy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Gleb Makshakov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptomeningeal contrast enhancement (LMCE on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a newly recognized possible biomarker in multiple sclerosis (MS, associated with MS progression and cortical atrophy. In this study, we aimed to assess the prevalence of LMCE foci and their impact on neurodegeneration and disability. Materials. 54 patients with MS were included in the study. LMCE were detected with a 3 Tesla scanner on postcontrast fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR sequence. Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS score, number of relapses during 5 years from MS onset, and number of contrast-enhancing lesions on T1 weighted MRI were counted. Results. LMCE was detected in 41% (22/54 of patients. LMCE-positive patients had longer disease duration (p=0,0098 and higher EDSS score (p=0,039, but not a higher relapse rate (p=0,091. No association of LMCE with higher frequency of contrast-enhancing lesions on T1-weighted images was detected (p=0,3842. Analysis of covariates, adjusted for age, sex, and disease duration, revealed a significant effect of LMCE on the cortex volume (p=0.043, F=2.529, the total grey matter volume (p=0.043, F=2.54, and total ventricular volume (p=0.039, F=2.605. Conclusions. LMCE was shown to be an independent and significant biomarker of grey matter atrophy and disability in MS.

  17. Brain MRI screening showing evidences of early central nervous system involvement in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Mohammed, Reem Hamdy A; Sabry, Yousriah Y; Nasef, Amr A

    2011-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a multisystem autoimmune collagen disease where structural and functional abnormalities of small blood vessels prevail. Transient ischemic attacks, ischemic stroke, and hemorrhage have been reported as primary consequence of vascular central nervous system affection in systemic sclerosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered to be the most sensitive diagnostic technique for detecting symptomatic and asymptomatic lesions in the brain in cases of multifocal diseases. The objective of this study is to detect subclinical as well as clinically manifest cerebral vasculopathy in patients with systemic sclerosis using magnetic resonance imaging. As much as 30 female patients with systemic sclerosis aged 27-61 years old, with disease duration of 1-9 years and with no history of other systemic disease or cerebrovascular accidents, were enrolled. Age-matched female control group of 30 clinically normal subjects, underwent brain magnetic resonance examination. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in the form of white matter hyperintense foci of variable sizes were found in significantly abundant forms in systemic sclerosis patients on magnetic resonance evaluation than in age-related control group, signifying a form of CNS vasculopathy. Such foci showed significant correlation to clinical features of organic CNS lesion including headaches, fainting attacks and organic depression as well as to the severity of peripheral vascular disease with insignificant correlation with disease duration. In conclusion, subclinical as well as clinically manifest CNS ischemic vasculopathy is not uncommon in systemic sclerosis patients and magnetic resonance imaging is considered a sensitive noninvasive screening tool for early detection of CNS involvement in patients with systemic sclerosis.

  18. Pneumatosis Intestinalis as the Initial Presentation of Systemic Sclerosis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Farshid Ejtehadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI is an uncommon pathology characterised by the presence of gas within the intestinal wall. It has been associated with various conditions, including connective tissue diseases. This is the first report of PI being the initial presentation of systemic sclerosis. Case Presentation. The patient, a 75-year-old female, presented with an 8-month history of worsening dysphagia and epigastric pain, as well as other nonspecific symptoms. Initial investigations with an oesophagogastroduodenoscopy diagnosed Candida oesophagitis and also identified an extrinsic compression of the gastric antrum. Subsequently a CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed moderately dilated small bowel loops and PI. Due to the patient’s stability, non-critical clinical condition, conservative management was instituted. More detailed investigations confirmed the diagnosis of systemic sclerosis with positive anticentromeric and antinuclear antibodies. The patient improved on methotrexate and was discharged with appropriate outpatient follow-up. Discussion. PI is a rare but well-documented pathology associated with connective tissue diseases, such as systemic sclerosis. In most cases, conservative management is preferable to surgical intervention, depending on the patient’s clinical presentation and progress. This is the first report of PI being the initial presentation of a patient with systemic sclerosis responsive to conservative management.

  19. The role of information system in multiple sclerosis management.

    Ajami, Sima; Ahmadi, Golchehreh; Etemadifar, Masoud

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of central nervous system. The multiple sclerosis information system (MSIS), such as other information system (IS), depends on identification, collection and processing of data for producing useful information. Lack of the integrated IS for collecting standard data causes undesirable effects on exchanging, comparing, and managing. The aim of this study was to recognize the role of the IS in the MS management and determine the advantages and barriers in implementing of the MSIS. The present study was a nonsystematized review that was done in order to recognize the role of the IS in the MS management. In this study, electronic scientific resources such as scientific magazines and books and published topics at conferences were used. We used key words (IS, chronic disease management, and multiple sclerosis), their combination or their synonyms in title, key words, abstracts, and text of English articles and published reports from 1980 until 2013, and by using search engines such as Google, Google Scholar and scientific databases and electronic issues such as iPubMed, sufficiently important difference, Scopus, Medlib, and Magiran for gathering information. More than 200 articles and reports were collected and assessed and 139 of them. Findings showed that the MSIS can reduce of disease expenses through continuously collecting correct, accurate, sufficient, and timely patients and disease nature information; recoding; editing; processing; exchanging, and distributing among different health care centers. Although the MSIS has many advantages; but, we cannot ignore cultural, economic, technical, organizational, and managerial barriers. Therefore, it is necessary to do studies for preventing, reducing, and controlling them. One of the ways is to recognize the advantages of the MSIS and usage information technology in optimizing disease management.

  20. Nailfold video-capillaroscopy in systemic sclerosis.

    Cutolo, M; Pizzorni, C; Sulli, A

    2004-12-01

    The Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) is the most common and significant clinical condition supporting microvascular analysis as soon as possible. Microvascular involvement is a key feature of RP, and several rheumatic diseases are characterized by the presence of the RP. Nailfold capillary microscopy shows an impressive cost/effectiveness ratio: it is simple, noninvasive and inexpensive.Well-recognized videocapillaroscopic patterns (NVC) have been described mainly in scleroderma (SSc) patients complaining of a secondary RP. The peripheral microvascular damage in SSc is characterized by increasing structural alterations of the capillaries (giant capillaries and microhemorrhages) with progressive decrease of their density. The detection of the scleroderma NCV allows early differentiation between primary RP (functional, not disease associated), and secondary RP (disease associated). Other major NVC patterns have been described in the field of rheumatic diseases. Interestingly, correlations are evident between the NCV and the clinical symptoms, severity of the disease and the laboratory findings. Further clinical and epidemiological studies, as well as a standardized and computerized quantitation of the observed damages are required.

  1. Radiological changes of the hands of systemic sclerosis

    Brun, B.; Serup, J.; Hagdrup, H.

    1983-01-01

    Radiological examination of the hands was performed in 41 patients with systemic sclerosis. Pathological changes were found in 39 patients. Eighteen patients had subcutaneous calcifications and 11 had atrophy of the finger pulps. Bone resorption of ungual tufts was found in 11 patients. Juxta-articular osteoporosis was seen in 9 patients and periarticular bone erosions in 8 patients indicating erosive arthropathy. Osteoarthritis and generalized osteoporosis were seen in 10 and 7 patients, respectively. Radiological examination of the hands is recommended during treatment. (Authors)

  2. Association of systemic sclerosis and psoriatic arthritis: a case report

    A. Musio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The association of Systemic Sclerosis (SSc and Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA is unfrequent; only few cases are reported in literature. We describe a case of a patient with SSc following the onset of PsA. The disease begun with tenosynovitis, polyarthritis in association with psoriasis. After two years, Raynaud’s phenomenon and sclerodactyly appeared, and, later, pulmonary interstizial fibrosis and esophageal dysfunction. The existence of a common pathogenesis of the two diseases, SSc and PsA, is discussed.

  3. Limited Mouth Opening Secondary to Diffuse Systemic Sclerosis

    Tomoko Wada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SSc is a relatively rare condition with an immunologically mediated pathogenesis. For reasons that are not clearly understood, dense collagen is deposited in the connective tissues of the body in extraordinary amounts. Although its dramatic effects are seen in association with the skin, the disease is often quite serious with visceral organ involvement. We describe a case of limited mouth opening secondary to diffuse SSc, improvement in mouth opening with passive jaw stretch exercises, and the challenges involved in performing dental procedures for such patients.

  4. Pulmonary dystrophic Calcinosis associated to systemic sclerosis: Report of the first case in Colombia

    Mendez Patarroyo, Paul; Rojas, Adriana; Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix; Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    The association of pulmonary calcinosis with systemic sclerosis has not been described in the medical literature. There are two type of lung calcification: dystrophic and metastatic; in the collagen vascular diseases the most frequent is the dystrophic calcinosis, seen mainly in dermatomyositis and scleroderma. We describe the first case of dystrophic calcinosis associated with systemic sclerosis

  5. Cardio-pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis: A study at a tertiary care center

    Geetakiran Arakkal

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: In our patients, pulmonary involvement was more common than cardiac involvement. Interstitial lung disease and cardiac involvement were more commonly seen in diffuse systemic sclerosis whereas pulmonary hypertension was more frequent in limited systemic sclerosis. Hence, it is important to screen the patients for cardiopulmonary involvement for early diagnosis and treatment and a better prognostic outcome.

  6. Corpus callosum atrophy as a marker of clinically meaningful cognitive decline in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. Impact on employment status.

    Papathanasiou, Athanasios; Messinis, Lambros; Zampakis, Petros; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis

    2017-09-01

    Cognitive impairment in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is more frequent and pronounced in secondary progressive MS (SPMS). Cognitive decline is an important predictor of employment status in patients with MS. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) markers have been used to associate tissue damage with cognitive dysfunction. The aim of the study was to designate the MRI marker that predicts cognitive decline in SPMS and explore its effect on employment status. 30 SPMS patients and 30 healthy participants underwent neuropsychological assessment using the Trail Making Test (TMT) parts A and B, semantic and phonological verbal fluency task and a computerized cognitive screening battery (Central Nervous System Vital Signs). Employment status was obtained as a quality of life measure. Brain MRI was performed in all participants. We measured total lesion volume, third ventricle width, thalamic and corpus callosum atrophy. The frequency of cognitive decline for our SPMS patients was 80%. SPMS patients differed significantly from controls in all neuropsychological measures. Corpus callosum area was correlated with cognitive flexibility, processing speed, composite memory, executive functions, psychomotor speed, reaction time and phonological verbal fluency task. Processing speed and composite memory were the most sensitive markers for predicting employment status. Corpus callosum area was the most sensitive MRI marker for memory and processing speed. Corpus callosum atrophy predicts a clinically meaningful cognitive decline, affecting employment status in our SPMS patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Gray Matter Correlates of Cognitive Performance Differ between Relapsing-Remitting and Primary-Progressive Multiple Sclerosis.

    Laura E Jonkman

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory/demyelinating and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS. Most patients experience a relapsing-remitting (RR course, while about 15-20% of patients experience a primary progressive (PP course. Cognitive impairment affects approximately 40-70% of all MS patients and differences in cognitive impairment between RR-MS and PP-MS have been found. We aimed to compare RR-MS and PP-MS patients in terms of cognitive performance, and to investigate the MRI correlates of cognitive impairment in the two groups using measures of brain volumes and cortical thickness. Fifty-seven patients (42 RR-MS, 15 PP-MS and thirty-eight matched controls underwent neuropsychological (NP testing and MRI. PP-MS patients scored lower than RR-MS patients on most of the NP tests in absence of any specific pattern. PP-MS patients showed significantly lower caudate volume. There was no significant difference in MRI correlates of cognitive impairment between the two groups except for a prevalent association with MRI measures of cortical GM injury in RR-MS patients and with MRI measures of subcortical GM injury in PP-MS patients. This suggests that although cognitive impairment results from several factors, cortical and subcortical GM injury may play a different role depending on the disease course.

  8. Exercise Training in Progressive Multiple Sclerosis: A Comparison of Recumbent Stepping and Body Weight-Supported Treadmill Training.

    Pilutti, Lara A; Paulseth, John E; Dove, Carin; Jiang, Shucui; Rathbone, Michel P; Hicks, Audrey L

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is evidence of the benefits of exercise training in multiple sclerosis (MS); however, few studies have been conducted in individuals with progressive MS and severe mobility impairment. A potential exercise rehabilitation approach is total-body recumbent stepper training (TBRST). We evaluated the safety and participant-reported experience of TBRST in people with progressive MS and compared the efficacy of TBRST with that of body weight-supported treadmill training (BWSTT) on outcomes of function, fatigue, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Methods: Twelve participants with progressive MS (Expanded Disability Status Scale scores, 6.0-8.0) were randomized to receive TBRST or BWSTT. Participants completed three weekly sessions (30 minutes) of exercise training for 12 weeks. Primary outcomes included safety assessed as adverse events and patient-reported exercise experience assessed as postexercise response and evaluation of exercise equipment. Secondary outcomes included the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite, the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale, and the Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 questionnaire scores. Assessments were conducted at baseline and after 12 weeks. Results: Safety was confirmed in both exercise groups. Participants reported enjoying both exercise modalities; however, TBRST was reviewed more favorably. Both interventions reduced fatigue and improved HRQOL (P ≤ .05); there were no changes in function. Conclusions: Both TBRST and BWSTT seem to be safe, well tolerated, and enjoyable for participants with progressive MS with severe disability. Both interventions may also be efficacious for reducing fatigue and improving HRQOL. TBRST should be further explored as an exercise rehabilitation tool for patients with progressive MS.

  9. Application of the 2012 revised diagnostic definitions for paediatric multiple sclerosis and immune-mediated central nervous system demyelination disorders

    van Pelt, E. Danielle; Neuteboom, Rinze F.; Ketelslegers, Immy A.; Boon, Maartje; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene E.; Hintzen, Rogier Q.

    Background Recently, the International Paediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group (IPMSSG) definitions for the diagnosis of immune-mediated acquired demyelinating syndromes (ADS) of the central nervous system, including paediatric multiple sclerosis (MS), have been revised. Objective To evaluate the

  10. Sera from remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients disrupt the blood-brain barrier.

    Shimizu, Fumitaka; Tasaki, Ayako; Sano, Yasuteru; Ju, Mihua; Nishihara, Hideaki; Oishi, Mariko; Koga, Michiaki; Kawai, Motoharu; Kanda, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Pathological destruction of blood-brain barrier (BBB) has been thought to be the initial key event in the process of developing multiple sclerosis (MS). The purpose of the present study was to clarify the possible molecular mechanisms responsible for the malfunction of BBB by sera from relapse-remitting MS (RRMS) and secondary progressive MS (SPMS) patients. We evaluated the effects of sera from the patients in the relapse phase of RRMS (RRMS-R), stable phase of RRMS (RRMS-S) and SPMS on the expression of tight junction proteins and vascular cell adhesion protein-1 (VCAM-1), and on the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs). Sera from the RRMS-R or SPMS patients decreased the claudin-5 protein expression and the TEER in BMECs. In RRMS-R, this effect was restored after adding an MMP inhibitor, and the MMP-2/9 secretion by BMECs was significantly increased after the application of patients' sera. In SPMS, the immunoglobulin G (IgG) purified from patients' sera also decreased the claudin-5 protein expression and the TEER in BMECs. The sera and purified IgG from all MS patients increased the VCAM-1 protein expression in BMECs. The up-regulation of autocrine MMP-2/9 by BMECs after exposure to sera from RRMS-R patients or the autoantibodies against BMECs from SPMS patients can compromise the BBB. Both RRMS-S and SPMS sera increased the VCAM-1 expression in the BBB, thus indicating that targeting the VCAM-1 in the BBB could represent a possible therapeutic strategy for even the stable phase of MS and SPMS.

  11. Sera from remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients disrupt the blood-brain barrier.

    Fumitaka Shimizu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pathological destruction of blood-brain barrier (BBB has been thought to be the initial key event in the process of developing multiple sclerosis (MS. The purpose of the present study was to clarify the possible molecular mechanisms responsible for the malfunction of BBB by sera from relapse-remitting MS (RRMS and secondary progressive MS (SPMS patients. METHODS: We evaluated the effects of sera from the patients in the relapse phase of RRMS (RRMS-R, stable phase of RRMS (RRMS-S and SPMS on the expression of tight junction proteins and vascular cell adhesion protein-1 (VCAM-1, and on the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs. RESULTS: Sera from the RRMS-R or SPMS patients decreased the claudin-5 protein expression and the TEER in BMECs. In RRMS-R, this effect was restored after adding an MMP inhibitor, and the MMP-2/9 secretion by BMECs was significantly increased after the application of patients' sera. In SPMS, the immunoglobulin G (IgG purified from patients' sera also decreased the claudin-5 protein expression and the TEER in BMECs. The sera and purified IgG from all MS patients increased the VCAM-1 protein expression in BMECs. CONCLUSIONS: The up-regulation of autocrine MMP-2/9 by BMECs after exposure to sera from RRMS-R patients or the autoantibodies against BMECs from SPMS patients can compromise the BBB. Both RRMS-S and SPMS sera increased the VCAM-1 expression in the BBB, thus indicating that targeting the VCAM-1 in the BBB could represent a possible therapeutic strategy for even the stable phase of MS and SPMS.

  12. Intracortical excitability in patients with relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Conte, A; Lenzi, D; Frasca, V; Gilio, F; Giacomelli, E; Gabriele, M; Bettolo, C Marini; Iacovelli, E; Pantano, P; Pozzilli, C; Inghilleri, M

    2009-06-01

    We designed this study to investigate possible correlations between variables measuring primary motor cortex excitability detected by single and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and the severity of clinical manifestations in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Thirty patients with MS in remission, 16 with relapsing-remitting (RR), 14 with secondary progressive disease (SP) and 17 healthy subjects participated in the study. In each subject, the central motor conduction time (CMCT) was calculated, and single-pulse and paired-pulse TMS at 3 and 10 ms interstimulus intervals was delivered over the primary motor cortex of the dominant hemisphere to measure the amplitude of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), motor threshold (MTh), intracortical inhibition (ICI) and facilitation (ICF). Correlations were determined between the patients' TMS findings and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (lesion load) and clinical features (expanded disability status scale, EDSS score). EDSS scores were significantly higher in SPMS than in RRMS patients. The MTh was significantly higher, and the MEP was significantly smaller in SPMS patients than in RRMS patients and control subjects. All patients had longer CMCTs than healthy subjects. In all patients, paired-pulse TMS elicited an inhibited test MEP at the 3-ms ISI and a facilitated test MEP at the 10 ms ISI. Post hoc analysis showed that ICI was significantly lower in SPMS patients than in those with RRMS and healthy subjects. EDSS scores correlated significantly with TMS measures (MEP, ICI, CMCT and MTh), but not with MRI lesion load. It was found that intracortical excitability as measured with TMS differs according to the clinical course of MS; it remains normal in patients with low EDSS scores and is altered in patients with high EDSS scores.

  13. Incidence and predictors of cutaneous manifestations during the early course of systemic sclerosis

    Wirz, Elina G; Jaeger, Veronika K; Allanore, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To longitudinally map the onset and identify risk factors for skin sclerosis and digital ulcers (DUs) in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) from an early time point after the onset of Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) in the European Scleroderma Trials and Research (EUSTAR) cohort. METHODS...

  14. Erasmus syndrome: Association of silicosis and systemic sclerosis

    Reena K Sharma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicosis is an inflammatory disease of the lung characterized by irreversible lung fibrosis which develops from prolonged pulmonary inhalation and retention of crystalline silica and immune reaction. It mainly appears as an occupational hazard in persons involved in stone-quarrying, mining, and sand blasting. Crystalline silica is not only known to be responsible for silicosis but also for other autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, rheumatoid arthritis (RA-Caplan syndrome, systemic sclerosis (SSc, and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA-related vasculitis. Erasmus syndrome is the association of silica exposure and subsequent development of SSc. The limited numbers of cases reported in the literature were miners and only sporadically involved in other professionals. Here, we report a case of a 52 -year-old stone cutter who developed silicosis and SSc after 25 years of exposure.

  15. Environmental Pollution by Benzene and PM10 and Clinical Manifestations of Systemic Sclerosis: A Correlation Study.

    Borghini, Alice; Poscia, Andrea; Bosello, Silvia; Teleman, Adele Anna; Bocci, Mario; Iodice, Lanfranco; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; La Milìa, Daniele Ignazio; Moscato, Umberto

    2017-10-26

    Atmospheric air pollution has been associated with a range of adverse health effects. The environment plays a causative role in the development of Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). The aim of the present study is to explore the association between particulate (PM 10 ) and benzene (B) exposure in Italian patients with systemic sclerosis and their clinical characteristics of the disease. A correlation study was conducted by enrolling 88 patients who suffer from SSc at the Fondazione Policlinico "A. Gemelli" in Rome (Italy) in the period from January 2013 to January 2014. The average mean concentrations of B (in 11 monitoring sites) and PM 10 (in 14 sites) were calculated using data from the Regional Environmental Protection Agency's monitoring stations located throughout the Lazio region (Italy) and then correlated with the clinical characteristics of the SSc patients. Of the study sample, 92.5% were female. The mean age was 55 ± 12.9 years old and the mean disease duration from the onset of Raynaud's phenomenon was 13.0 ± 9.4 years. The Spearman's correlation showed that concentrations of B correlate directly with the skin score (R = 0.3; p ≤ 0.05) and inversely with Diffusing Lung Carbon Monoxide (DLCO) results (R = -0.36; p = 0.04). This study suggests a possible role of B in the development of diffuse skin disease and in a worse progression of the lung manifestations of SSc.

  16. A systematic review of overlapping microRNA patterns in systemic sclerosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Bagnato, Gianluca; Roberts, William Neal; Roman, Jesse; Gangemi, Sebastiano

    2017-06-30

    Lung fibrosis can be observed in systemic sclerosis and in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, two disorders where lung involvement carries a poor prognosis. Although much has been learned about the pathogenesis of these conditions, interventions capable of reversing or, at the very least, halting disease progression are not available. Recent studies point to the potential role of micro messenger RNAs (microRNAs) in cancer and tissue fibrogenesis. MicroRNAs are short non-coding RNA sequences (20-23 nucleotides) that are endogenous, evolutionarily conserved and encoded in the genome. By acting on several genes, microRNAs control protein expression. Considering the above, we engaged in a systematic review of the literature in search of overlapping observations implicating microRNAs in the pathogenesis of both idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and systemic sclerosis (SSc). Our objective was to uncover top microRNA candidates for further investigation based on their mechanisms of action and their potential for serving as targets for intervention against lung fibrosis. Our review points to microRNAs of the -29 family, -21-5p and -92a-3p, -26a-5p and let-7d-5p as having distinct and counter-balancing actions related to lung fibrosis. Based on this, we speculate that readjusting the disrupted balance between these microRNAs in lung fibrosis related to SSc and IPF may have therapeutic potential. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  17. L-selectin and skin damage in systemic sclerosis.

    James V Dunne

    Full Text Available L-selectin ligands are induced on the endothelium of inflammatory sites. L-selectin expression on neutrophils and monocytes may mediate the primary adhesion of these cells at sites of inflammation by mediating the leukocyte-leukocyte interactions that facilitate their recruitment. L-selectin retains functional activity in its soluble form. Levels of soluble L-selectin have been reported as both elevated and lowered in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc. This preliminary study seeks to discern amongst these disparate results and to discover whether there is an association between L-selectin concentrations in plasma and skin damage in SSc patients.Nineteen cases with limited systemic sclerosis (lSSc and 11 cases with diffuse systemic sclerosis (dSSc were compared on a pairwise basis to age- and sex-matched controls. Criteria of the American College of Rheumatology were used to diagnose SSc. Skin involvement was assessed using the modified Rodnan skin score (mRSS. We find no association between mRSS and plasma L-selectin concentration in lSSc cases (p = 0.9944 but a statistically significant negative correlation in dSSc cases (R(2 = 73.11 per cent, p = 0.0008. The interpretation of the slope for dSSc cases is that for each increase of 100 ng/ml in soluble L-selectin concentration, the mRSS drops 4.22 (95 per cent CI: 2.29, 6.16. There was also a highly statistically significant negative correlation between sL-selectin and disease activity (p = 0.0007 and severity (p = 0.0007 in dSSc cases but not in lSSc cases (p = 0.2596, p = 0.7575, respectively.No effective treatments exist for skin damage in SSc patients. Nor is there a laboratory alternative to the modified Rodnan skin score as is the case for other organs within the body. Modulation of circulating L-selectin is a promising target for reducing skin damage in dSSc patients. Plasma levels of soluble L-selectin could serve as an outcome measure for dSSc patients in

  18. Spotlight on siponimod and its potential in the treatment of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis: the evidence to date

    Gajofatto A

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Alberto Gajofatto Department of Neuroscience, Biomedicine and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, Italy Abstract: Siponimod (BAF312 is a synthetic molecule belonging to the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P modulator family, which has putative neuroprotective properties and well-characterized immunomodulating effects mediated by sequestration of B and T cells in secondary lymphoid organs. Compared to fingolimod (ie, precursor of the S1P modulators commercially available for the treatment of relapsing–remitting [RR] multiple sclerosis [MS], siponimod exhibits selective affinity for types 1 and 5 S1P receptor, leading to a lower risk of adverse events that are mainly induced by S1P3 receptor activation, such as bradycardia and vasoconstriction. In addition, S1P1 and S1P5 receptors are expressed by neurons and glia and could mediate a possible neuroprotective effect of the drug. A Phase II clinical trial of siponimod for RR MS showed a significant effect of the active drug compared to placebo on reducing gadolinium-enhancing lesions on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI after 3 months of treatment. In a recently completed Phase III trial, treatment with siponimod was associated with a significant reduction in disability progression in secondary progressive (SP MS patients compared to placebo. In this article, current evidence supporting siponimod efficacy for SP MS is reviewed. Keywords: multiple sclerosis, siponimod, progression, disability, treatment

  19. CUTANEOUS MYXOID CYST ON THE SCLEROTIC FINGER IN A PATIENT WITH DIFFUSE SYSTEMIC SCLEROSIS

    Taeko Nakamura-Wakatsuki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Skin tumors occurring on the scleroderma fingers are rarely seen. Swollen fingers are hallmarks of systemic sclerosis, and mucin deposition in the lesional skin is a constant feature in systemic sclerosis. Here we describe a case of cutaneous myxoid cyst on the flexor aspect of the sclerotic fingers in a patient with severe diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis. Cutaneous myxoid cyst is a relatively common benign tumor; however, cases of cutaneous myxoid cysts developing on the scleroderma fingers have not been reported to date. Mucin deposition in the sclerotic skin may be a predisposing factor in the induction of myxoid cyst on the scleroderma finger in our patient.

  20. Prolonged Barium-Impaction Ileus in Two Lung Transplant Recipients With Systemic Sclerosis: Case Report.

    Tokman, S; Hays, S R; Leard, L E; Bush, E L; Kukreja, J; Kleinhenz, M E; Golden, J A; Singer, J P

    2015-12-01

    Lung transplantation can be a life-saving measure for people with end-stage lung disease from systemic sclerosis. However, outcomes of lung transplantation may be compromised by gastrointestinal manifestations of systemic sclerosis, which can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal and gastric disease can be managed by enteral feeding with the use of a gastrojejunal feeding tube. In this report, we describe the clinical courses of 2 lung transplant recipients with systemic sclerosis who experienced severe and prolonged barium-impaction ileus after insertion of a percutaneous gastrojejunal feeding tube. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Connexin 43 astrocytopathy linked to rapidly progressive multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica.

    Katsuhisa Masaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS and neuromyelitis optica (NMO occasionally have an extremely aggressive and debilitating disease course; however, its molecular basis is unknown. This study aimed to determine a relationship between connexin (Cx pathology and disease aggressiveness in Asian patients with MS and NMO. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Samples included 11 autopsied cases with NMO and NMO spectrum disorder (NMOSD, six with MS, and 20 with other neurological diseases (OND. Methods of analysis included immunohistochemical expression of astrocytic Cx43/Cx30, oligodendrocytic Cx47/Cx32 relative to AQP4 and other astrocytic and oligodendrocytic proteins, extent of demyelination, the vasculocentric deposition of complement and immunoglobulin, and lesion staging by CD68 staining for macrophages. Lesions were classified as actively demyelinating (n=59, chronic active (n=58 and chronic inactive (n=23. Sera from 120 subjects including 30 MS, 30 NMO, 40 OND and 20 healthy controls were examined for anti-Cx43 antibody by cell-based assay. Six NMO/NMOSD and three MS cases showed preferential loss of astrocytic Cx43 beyond the demyelinated areas in actively demyelinating and chronic active lesions, where heterotypic Cx43/Cx47 astrocyte oligodendrocyte gap junctions were extensively lost. Cx43 loss was significantly associated with a rapidly progressive disease course as six of nine cases with Cx43 loss, but none of eight cases without Cx43 loss regardless of disease phenotype, died within two years after disease onset (66.7% vs. 0%, P=0.0090. Overall, five of nine cases with Cx43 loss and none of eight cases without Cx43 loss had distal oligodendrogliopathy characterized by selective myelin associated glycoprotein loss (55.6% vs. 0.0%, P=0.0296. Loss of oligodendrocytic Cx32 and Cx47 expression was observed in most active and chronic lesions from all MS and NMO/NMOSD cases. Cx43-specific antibodies were absent in NMO/NMOSD and MS patients. CONCLUSIONS

  2. Registry Evaluation of Digital Ulcers in Systemic Sclerosis

    Felice Galluccio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital ulcers are a very frequent complication of systemic sclerosis affecting about half of the SSc patients, and about 75% of the affected patients have their first DU episode within 5 years from their first non-Raynaud symptom. The lack of adequate classification criteria as well as the lack of knowledge of the development of DU have contributed to the opening of specific registries to better understand the natural history of these lesions. For these reason, specific disease registries play a fundamental role in this field of research. Thanks to the systematic collection of data and their subsequent analysis and comparison between different cohorts, it is possible to improve understanding of the underlying trigger mechanisms of DU development and to determine temporal trends. In the future, the development of recommendations for the management of DU remains of pivotal importance to prevent DU development and obtain rapid healing as well as reduction of pain and disability.

  3. From Localized Scleroderma to Systemic Sclerosis: Coexistence or Possible Evolution.

    Dilia, Giuggioli; Michele, Colaci; Emanuele, Cocchiara; Amelia, Spinella; Federica, Lumetti; Clodoveo, Ferri

    2018-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) and localized scleroderma (LoS) are two different diseases that may share some features. We evaluated the relationship between SSc and LoS in our case series of SSc patients. We analysed the clinical records of 330 SSc patients, in order to find the eventual occurrence of both the two diseases. Eight (2.4%) female patients presented both the two diagnoses in their clinical histories. Six developed LoS prior to SSc; in 4/6 cases, the presence of autoantibodies was observed before SSc diagnosis. Overall, the median time interval between LoS and SSc diagnosis was 18 (range 0-156) months. LoS and SSc are two distinct clinical entities that may coexist. Moreover, as anecdotally reported in pediatric populations, we suggested the possible development of SSc in adult patients with LoS, particularly in presence of Raynaud's phenomenon or antinuclear antibodies before the SSc onset.

  4. Cardiac tamponade preceding skin involvement in systemic sclerosis

    L. Bozzola

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of pericardial involvement in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc is high on autoptic or echocardiographic studies, but the clinical recognition of pericarditis with or without effusion is rare. We describe a case of a 71-year-old female with no previous history of heart disease, who presented with a large pericardial effusion and tamponade that required pericardial drain. She had suffered from Raynaud’s phenomenon since 25 years. Six weeks after hospital discharge she complained of skin hardening on left leg. Pericardial tamponade is a very rare manifestation of SSc and occurs both early or late in the course of the disease, but in our case it preceded the recognition of scleroderma. We have only identified two other cases of pericardial effusion preceding cutaneous involvement in scleroderma.

  5. Systemic sclerosis complicated with localized scleroderma-like lesions induced by Köbner phenomenon.

    Saigusa, Ryosuke; Asano, Yoshihide; Yamashita, Takashi; Takahashi, Takehiro; Nakamura, Kouki; Miura, Shunsuke; Ichimura, Yohei; Toyama, Tetsuo; Taniguchi, Takashi; Sumida, Hayakazu; Tamaki, Zenshiro; Miyazaki, Miki; Yoshizaki, Ayumi; Sato, Shinichi

    2018-03-01

    Scleroderma is a chronic disease of unknown etiology characterized by skin fibrosis and is divided into two clinical entities: systemic sclerosis (SSc) and localized scleroderma (LSc). In general, LSc is rarely complicated with SSc, but a certain portion of SSc patients manifests bilateral symmetric LSc-like lesions on the trunk and extremities. We investigated SSc patients with LSc-like lesions to clarify the underlying pathophysiology. Nine SSc cases complicated with LSc-like lesions were clinically and histologically characterized. SSc patients with LSc-like lesions exhibited multiple progressive hyper- and/or hypo-pigmented plaques with mild sclerosis symmetrically distributed on the trunk and extremities, especially abdominal region. In histological assessment, epidermal IL-1α expression was elevated in both forearms and LSc-like lesions of these patients to a greater extent than in forearms of control patients (SSc patients without LSc-like lesions). Of note, the infiltration and degranulation of mast cells were evident throughout the dermis of LSc-like lesions, while detectable to a lesser extent in forearms of SSc patients with LSc-like lesions and control patients. The epidermis of SSc patients with LSc-like lesions seems to possess an inflammatory phenotype, leading to the activation of mast cells in the dermis of mechanically stressed skin. Köbner phenomenon may be involved in the induction of LSc-like lesions in a certain subset of SSc. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Progress on HELIAS systems studies

    Warmer, Felix; Beidler, Craig D.; Dinklage, Andreas; Feng, Yuehe; Geiger, Joachim; Schauer, Felix; Turkin, Yuriy; Wolf, Robert; Xanthopoulos, Pavlos [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Kemp, Richard; Knight, Peter; Ward, David [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-01

    In order to study and design next-step fusion devices such as DEMO, comprehensive systems codes are commonly employed. For the HELIAS-line, stellarator-specific models have been developed, implemented, and verified within the systems code PROCESS. This systems code ansatz is complemented by self-consistent modeling of plasma scenarios employing a predictive 1-D neoclassical transport code which has been augmented with a model for the edge anomalous transport based on 3-D ITG turbulence simulations. This approach is investigated to ultimately allow one to conduct stellarator system studies, develop design points of HELIAS burning plasma devices, and to facilitate a direct comparison between tokamak and stellarator DEMO and power plant designs. The work reports on the progress towards these goals.

  7. Multiple sclerosis

    Grunwald, I.Q.; Kuehn, A.L.; Backens, M.; Papanagiotou, P.; Shariat, K.; Kostopoulos, P.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most common chronic inflammatory disease of myelin with interspersed lesions in the white matter of the central nervous system. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in the diagnosis and monitoring of white matter diseases. This article focuses on key findings in multiple sclerosis as detected by MRI. (orig.) [de

  8. Oral and periodontal manifestations associated with systemic sclerosis: A case series and review

    Rekha Jagadish; Dhoom Singh Mehta; P Jagadish

    2012-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a rare connective tissue disorder with a wide range of oral manifestations. This case series reports significant oral and periodontal changes and also makes an attempt to correlate oral and systemic findings in these patients which enable the clinician for a better diagnosis and evolve a comprehensive treatment plan. Six patients with a known diagnosis of systemic sclerosis were included. After obtaining the patient's informed consent, relevant medical history, oral mani...

  9. Skeletal Muscle Remodelling as a Function of Disease Progression in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Jensen, L; Jørgensen, L H; Bech, R D

    2016-01-01

    Muscle weakness is considered the pivotal sign of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Knowledge about the skeletal muscle degeneration/regeneration process and the myogenic potential is limited in ALS patients. Therefore, we investigate these processes in a time course perspective by analysing s...

  10. Serum homocysteine levels in relation to clinical progression in multiple sclerosis

    Teunissen, C.E.; Killestein, J.; Kragt, J.J.; Polman, C.H.; Dijkstra, C.D.; Blom, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Elevated homocysteine levels are associated with various neurodegenerative diseases and have even been identified as a risk factor for some of these. Homocysteine levels may be elevated in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) but large studies are lacking and the relation with disease

  11. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Epileptogenesis and Seizure Progression in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 1 Deficient Mouse Models

    2016-10-01

    dysregulation in epileptogenesis in the developing brain? 2) What are the molecular mechanisms downstream of mTOR hyperactivation that trigger epileptogenesis...underlying epilepsy. Hopefully, a knowledge of these mechanisms will aid in a rational development of therapies. KEYWORDS Tuberous Sclerosis, Epilepsy

  12. Vitamin D as an Early Predictor of Multiple Sclerosis Activity and Progression

    Ascherio, A.; Munger, K.L.; White, R.; Kochert, K.; Simon, K.C.; Polman, C.H.; Freedman, M.S.; Hartung, H.P.; Miller, D. H.; Montalban, X.; Edan, G.; Barkhof, F.; Pleimes, D.; Radu, E.W.; Sandbrink, R.; Kappos, L.; Pohl, C.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: It remains unclear whether vitamin D insufficiency, which is common in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), has an adverse effect on MS outcomes. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D), a marker of vitamin D status, predict disease

  13. Erythrocyte membrane fatty acids in benign and progressive forms of multiple sclerosis

    Koch, M; Ramsaransing, GSM; Fokkema, MR; Heersema, DJ; De Keyser, J

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no good explanation why a proportion of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) have a relatively benign form of the disease. An imbalance between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids (FA) might influence the disease course of MS. AIM: To assess whether the erythrocyte membrane

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal bands and progression of disability in multiple sclerosis

    Koch, M.; Heersema, D.; Mostert, J.; Teelken, A.; De Keyser, J.

    Antibody-mediated inflammation is believed to contribute to tissue injury in multiple sclerosis (MS). The majority of patients with MS have oligoclonal bands (OCB), corresponding to antibodies against a variety of antigens, in their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The relation of CSF OCB and disease

  15. Benign pneumoperitoneum in progressive systemic sklerosis

    Reinbold, W.D.; Wenz, W.; Lang, B.; Freiburg Univ.

    1986-01-01

    The sclerodermatitis-specific vasculitis results in disturbed blood supply and, in rare cases, in a perforation of the intestinal wall. Prognosis is unfavourable for the intestinal pneumatosis described in sclero dermatitis. An asymptomatic benign pneumoperitoneum due to intestinal systemic sclerosis was reported for the first time in 1966. This rare complication in slerodermitis was observed in further individual cases. We want to report another case with pseudo-obstruction of the intestines and pneumoperitoneum. (orig./SHA) [de

  16. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of MD1003 (high-dose biotin) in the treatment of progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Peyro Saint Paul, Laure; Debruyne, Danièle; Bernard, Delphine; Mock, Donald M; Defer, Gilles L

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, potentially highly disabling neurological disorder. No disease-modifying treatments are approved in the progressive and not active forms of the disease. High doses of biotin were tested in an open-label pilot study involving 23 patients with progressive MS and reported positive results. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 154 progressive MS patients confirmed the beneficial effect of MD1003 (high-dose biotin) on reversing or stabilizing disability progression, with a good safety profile. It is proposed that MD1003 in progressive MS 1) increases energy production in demyelinated axons and/or 2) enhances myelin synthesis in oligodendrocytes. Biotin is highly bioavailable; absorption and excretion are rapid. The major route of elimination is urinary excretion. A high oral dose of biotin seems generally well tolerated but a few important safety concerns were identified: 1) teratogenicity in one species and 2) interference with some biotin-based laboratory immunoassays. The animal toxicity data are limited at such high doses. Further preclinical studies would be useful to address the mechanism of action of MD1003. Assessment of clinical benefit duration in responders will be also very important to set. Results of randomized, placebo-controlled trial are reassuring and provide hope for the treatment of progressive MS.

  17. Targeting demyelination and virtual hypoxia with high-dose biotin as a treatment for progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Sedel, Frédéric; Bernard, Delphine; Mock, Donald M; Tourbah, Ayman

    2016-11-01

    Progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) is a severely disabling neurological condition, and an effective treatment is urgently needed. Recently, high-dose biotin has emerged as a promising therapy for affected individuals. Initial clinical data have shown that daily doses of biotin of up to 300 mg can improve objective measures of MS-related disability. In this article, we review the biology of biotin and explore the properties of this ubiquitous coenzyme that may explain the encouraging responses seen in patients with progressive MS. The gradual worsening of neurological disability in patients with progressive MS is caused by progressive axonal loss or damage. The triggers for axonal loss in MS likely include both inflammatory demyelination of the myelin sheath and primary neurodegeneration caused by a state of virtual hypoxia within the neuron. Accordingly, targeting both these pathological processes could be effective in the treatment of progressive MS. Biotin is an essential co-factor for five carboxylases involved in fatty acid synthesis and energy production. We hypothesize that high-dose biotin is exerting a therapeutic effect in patients with progressive MS through two different and complementary mechanisms: by promoting axonal remyelination by enhancing myelin production and by reducing axonal hypoxia through enhanced energy production. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Oligodendrocytes in Health and Disease'. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical pattern of systemic sclerosis in Central Ukraine. Association between clinical manifestations of systemic sclerosis and hypertension.

    Semenov, Viktor; Kuryata, Olexandr; Lysunets, Tatiana

    2018-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a rare disease of connective tissue, manifestations of which may vary in different geographical areas. We aimed to describe the clinical portrait of patients with SSc in Dnipropetrovsk region and to investigate how initial clinical and laboratory characteristics are connected with the presence of hypertension in SSc onset. Patients were enrolled to this study from the registry of SSc patients, established in the Rheumatology Department, Mechnikov Dnipropetrovsk Regional Clinic, Dnipro. This registry contains histories of new cases of SSc from 1993 to 2014. Patients are followed-up and receive treatment according to EULAR and local standards. Diagnosis of SSc was based on ACR and EULAR Criteria for systemic Sclerosis. Two patients developed scleroderma renal crisis during follow-up. This report is a cross-sectional study. We analysed only data of the first visit to a rheumatologist. In total 148 patients (median age [IQR] - 47 [40; 52] years) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Male/female ratio was 1 : 20.1. The most frequent clinical signs were Raynaud's phenomenon and arthritis. The prevalence of skin lesion in dcSSc patients was twice as high as in lcSSc patients. Pulmonary fibrosis occurred significantly more commonly in dcSSc patients. Hypertension occurred in 26-33% in both groups. Patients with hypertension at the SSc onset were seven years older than normotensive patients. More hypertensive patients were classified as lcSSc. Mean GFR was dramatically lower in hypertensive patients. The most common clinical form in our study was diffuse cutaneous subset of SSc. Hypertension in patients with SSc may be associated with local cutaneous subset of SSc and renal impairment. The strongest predictors of clinical form of SSc are signs of fibrosis (skin lesion and pulmonary fibrosis) and inflammation (arthritis and elevated CRP).

  19. Subtle involvement of the sympathetic nervous system in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Oey, P.L.; Vos, P.E.; Wieneke, G.H.; Wokke, J.H.J.; Blankestijn, P.J.; Karemaker, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The literature on the involvement of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is conflicting. We therefore investigated several aspects of autonomic function, namely muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), blood pressure, cardiac function (electrocardiogram; ECG),

  20. Subtle involvement of the sympathetic nervous system in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Oey, P. Liam; Vos, Pieter E.; Wieneke, George H.; Wokke, John H. J.; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Karemaker, John M.

    2002-01-01

    The literature on the involvement of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is conflicting. We therefore investigated several aspects of autonomic function, namely muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), blood pressure, cardiac function (electrocardiogram; ECG),

  1. Lung structure and function relation in systemic sclerosis: Application of lung densitometry

    Ninaber, Maarten K., E-mail: m.k.ninaber@lumc.nl [Department of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands); Stolk, Jan; Smit, Jasper; Le Roy, Ernest J. [Department of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands); Kroft, Lucia J.M. [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands); Els Bakker, M. [Division of Image Processing, Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands); Vries Bouwstra, Jeska K. de; Schouffoer, Anne A. [Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands); Staring, Marius; Stoel, Berend C. [Division of Image Processing, Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • A quantitative CT parameter of lung parenchyma in systemic sclerosis is presented. • We examine the optimal percentage threshold for the percentile density. • The 85th percentile density threshold correlated significantly with lung function. • A lung structure–function relation is confirmed. • We report applicability of Perc85 in progression mapping of interstitial lung disease. - Abstract: Introduction: Interstitial lung disease occurs frequently in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Quantitative computed tomography (CT) densitometry using the percentile density method may provide a sensitive assessment of lung structure for monitoring parenchymal damage. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the optimal percentile density score in SSc by quantitative CT densitometry, against pulmonary function. Material and methods: We investigated 41 SSc patients by chest CT scan, spirometry and gas transfer tests. Lung volumes and the nth percentile density (between 1 and 99%) of the entire lungs were calculated from CT histograms. The nth percentile density is defined as the threshold value of densities expressed in Hounsfield units. A prerequisite for an optimal percentage was its correlation with baseline DLCO %predicted. Two patients showed distinct changes in lung function 2 years after baseline. We obtained CT scans from these patients and performed progression analysis. Results: Regression analysis for the relation between DLCO %predicted and the nth percentile density was optimal at 85% (Perc85). There was significant agreement between Perc85 and DLCO %predicted (R = −0.49, P = 0.001) and FVC %predicted (R = −0.64, P < 0.001). Two patients showed a marked change in Perc85 over a 2 year period, but the localization of change differed clearly. Conclusions: We identified Perc85 as optimal lung density parameter, which correlated significantly with DLCO and FVC, confirming a lung parenchymal structure–function relation in SSc. This provides

  2. Lung structure and function relation in systemic sclerosis: Application of lung densitometry

    Ninaber, Maarten K.; Stolk, Jan; Smit, Jasper; Le Roy, Ernest J.; Kroft, Lucia J.M.; Els Bakker, M.; Vries Bouwstra, Jeska K. de; Schouffoer, Anne A.; Staring, Marius; Stoel, Berend C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A quantitative CT parameter of lung parenchyma in systemic sclerosis is presented. • We examine the optimal percentage threshold for the percentile density. • The 85th percentile density threshold correlated significantly with lung function. • A lung structure–function relation is confirmed. • We report applicability of Perc85 in progression mapping of interstitial lung disease. - Abstract: Introduction: Interstitial lung disease occurs frequently in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Quantitative computed tomography (CT) densitometry using the percentile density method may provide a sensitive assessment of lung structure for monitoring parenchymal damage. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the optimal percentile density score in SSc by quantitative CT densitometry, against pulmonary function. Material and methods: We investigated 41 SSc patients by chest CT scan, spirometry and gas transfer tests. Lung volumes and the nth percentile density (between 1 and 99%) of the entire lungs were calculated from CT histograms. The nth percentile density is defined as the threshold value of densities expressed in Hounsfield units. A prerequisite for an optimal percentage was its correlation with baseline DLCO %predicted. Two patients showed distinct changes in lung function 2 years after baseline. We obtained CT scans from these patients and performed progression analysis. Results: Regression analysis for the relation between DLCO %predicted and the nth percentile density was optimal at 85% (Perc85). There was significant agreement between Perc85 and DLCO %predicted (R = −0.49, P = 0.001) and FVC %predicted (R = −0.64, P < 0.001). Two patients showed a marked change in Perc85 over a 2 year period, but the localization of change differed clearly. Conclusions: We identified Perc85 as optimal lung density parameter, which correlated significantly with DLCO and FVC, confirming a lung parenchymal structure–function relation in SSc. This provides

  3. A system out of breath: how hypoxia possibly contributes to the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis.

    Hal, T.W. van; Bon, L. van; Radstake, T.R.D.J.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease characterized by vascular alterations and immunological disturbances and fibrosis, the order of which remains to be fully determined. Clinically, patients show clear signs of hypoxia in skin and internal organs. The low oxygen tension is potentially

  4. Designing an Electronic Patient Management System for Multiple Sclerosis: Building a Next Generation Multiple Sclerosis Documentation System.

    Kern, Raimar; Haase, Rocco; Eisele, Judith Christina; Thomas, Katja; Ziemssen, Tjalf

    2016-01-08

    Technologies like electronic health records or telemedicine devices support the rapid mediation of health information and clinical data independent of time and location between patients and their physicians as well as among health care professionals. Today, every part of the treatment process from diagnosis, treatment selection, and application to patient education and long-term care may be enhanced by a quality-assured implementation of health information technology (HIT) that also takes data security standards and concerns into account. In order to increase the level of effectively realized benefits of eHealth services, a user-driven needs assessment should ensure the inclusion of health care professional perspectives into the process of technology development as we did in the development process of the Multiple Sclerosis Documentation System 3D. After analyzing the use of information technology by patients suffering from multiple sclerosis, we focused on the needs of neurological health care professionals and their handling of health information technology. Therefore, we researched the status quo of eHealth adoption in neurological practices and clinics as well as health care professional opinions about potential benefits and requirements of eHealth services in the field of multiple sclerosis. We conducted a paper-and-pencil-based mail survey in 2013 by sending our questionnaire to 600 randomly chosen neurological practices in Germany. The questionnaire consisted of 24 items covering characteristics of participating neurological practices (4 items), the current use of network technology and the Internet in such neurological practices (5 items), physicians' attitudes toward the general and MS-related usefulness of eHealth systems (8 items) and toward the clinical documentation via electronic health records (4 items), and physicians' knowledge about the Multiple Sclerosis Documentation System (3 items). From 600 mailed surveys, 74 completed surveys were returned

  5. Incidence and prevalence of systemic sclerosis in Campo Grande, State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil.

    Horimoto, Alex Magno Coelho; Matos, Erica Naomi Naka; Costa, Márcio Reis da; Takahashi, Fernanda; Rezende, Marcelo Cruz; Kanomata, Letícia Barrios; Locatelli, Elisangela Possebon Pradebon; Finotti, Leandro Tavares; Maegawa, Flávia Kamy Maciel; Rondon, Rosa Maria Ribeiro; Machado, Natália Pereira; Couto, Flávia Midori Arakaki Ayres Tavares do; Figueiredo, Túlia Peixoto Alves de; Ovidio, Raphael Antonio; Costa, Izaias Pereira da

    Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease which shows extreme heterogeneity in its clinical presentation and that follows a variable and unpredictable course. Although some discrepancies in the incidence and prevalence rates between geographical regions may reflect methodological differences in the definition and verification of cases, they may also reflect true local differences. To determine the prevalence and incidence of systemic sclerosis in the city of Campo Grande, state capital of Mato Grosso do Sul (MS), Brazil, during the period from January to December 2014. All health care services of the city of Campo Grande - MS with attending in the specialty of Rheumatology were invited to participate in the study through a standardized form of clinical and socio-demographic assessment. Physicians of any specialty could report a suspected case of systemic sclerosis, but necessarily the definitive diagnosis should be established by a rheumatologist, in order to warrant the standardization of diagnostic criteria and exclusion of other diseases resembling systemic sclerosis. At the end of the study, 15 rheumatologists reported that they attended patients with systemic sclerosis and sent the completed forms containing epidemiological data of patients. The incidence rate of systemic sclerosis in Campo Grande for the year 2014 was 11.9 per million inhabitants and the prevalence rate was 105.6 per million inhabitants. Systemic sclerosis patients were mostly women, white, with a mean age of 50.58 years, showing the limited form of the disease with a mean duration of the disease of 8.19 years. Regarding laboratory tests, 94.4% were positive for antinuclear antibody, 41.6% for anti-centromere antibody and 19.1% for anti-Scl70; anti-RNA Polymerase III was performed in 37 patients, with 16.2% positive. The city of Campo Grande, the state capital of MS, presented a lower incidence/prevalence of systemic sclerosis in comparison with those numbers found in US studies and close

  6. Mortality and causes of death of 344 Danish patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Halberg, P; Ullman, S

    1998-01-01

    To determine survival, mortality and causes of death in Danish patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), and to analyse how these parameters are influenced by demographic variables and the extent of skin involvement.......To determine survival, mortality and causes of death in Danish patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), and to analyse how these parameters are influenced by demographic variables and the extent of skin involvement....

  7. Is multiple sclerosis a length-dependent central axonopathy? The case for therapeutic lag and the asynchronous progressive MS hypotheses.

    Giovannoni, Gavin; Cutter, Gary; Sormani, Maria Pia; Belachew, Shibeshih; Hyde, Robert; Koendgen, Harold; Knappertz, Volker; Tomic, Davorka; Leppert, David; Herndon, Robert; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Ciccarelli, Olga; Selwood, David; di Cantogno, Elisabetta Verdun; Ben-Amor, Ali-Frederic; Matthews, Paul; Carassiti, Daniele; Baker, David; Schmierer, Klaus

    2017-02-01

    Trials of anti-inflammatory therapies in non-relapsing progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) have been stubbornly negative except recently for an anti-CD20 therapy in primary progressive MS and a S1P modulator siponimod in secondary progressive MS. We argue that this might be because trials have been too short and have focused on assessing neuronal pathways, with insufficient reserve capacity, as the core component of the primary outcome. Delayed neuroaxonal degeneration primed by prior inflammation is not expected to respond to disease-modifying therapies targeting MS-specific mechanisms. However, anti-inflammatory therapies may modify these damaged pathways, but with a therapeutic lag that may take years to manifest. Based on these observations we propose that clinically apparent neurodegenerative components of progressive MS may occur in a length-dependent manner and asynchronously. If this hypothesis is confirmed it may have major implications for the future design of progressive MS trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Impact of Five VDR Polymorphisms on Multiple Sclerosis Risk and Progression: a Case-Control and Genotype-Phenotype Study.

    Křenek, Pavel; Benešová, Yvonne; Bienertová-Vašků, Julie; Vašků, Anna

    2018-04-01

    Vitamin D receptor polymorphisms have been the target of many studies focusing on multiple sclerosis. However, previously reported results have been inconclusive. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between five vitamin D receptor polymorphisms (EcoRV, FokI, ApaI, TaqI, and BsmI) and multiple sclerosis susceptibility and its course. The study was carried out as a case-control and genotype-phenotype study, consisted of 296 Czech multiple sclerosis patients and 135 healthy controls. Genotyping was carried out using polymerase chain reaction and restriction analysis. In multiple sclerosis men, allele and/or genotype distributions differed in EcoRV, TaqI, BsmI, and ApaI polymorphisms as compared to controls (EcoRV, p a = 0.02; Taq, p g = 0.02, p a = 0.02; BsmI, p g = 0.02, p a = 0.04; ApaI, p g = 0.008, p a = 0.005). In multiple sclerosis women, differences in the frequency of alleles and genotypes were found to be significant in ApaI (controls vs multiple sclerosis women: p g = 0.01, p a = 0.05). Conclusive results were observed between multiple sclerosis women in the case of EcoRV [differences in Expanded Disability Status Scale (p = 0.05); CT genotype was found to increase the risk of primary progressive multiple sclerosis 5.5 times (CT vs CC+TT p corr = 0.01, sensitivity 0.833, specificity 0.525, power test 0.823)] and FokI [borderline difference in Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (p = 0.05)]. Our results indicate that the distribution of investigated vitamin D receptor polymorphisms is a risk factor for multiple sclerosis susceptibility and progression in the Czech population. The association between disease risk and polymorphisms was found to be stronger in men. The association of disease progression with polymorphisms was observed only in women.

  9. Plasma D-dimer concentration in patients with systemic sclerosis

    Montagnana Martina

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic sclerosis (SSc is an autoimmune disorder of the connective tissue characterized by widespread vascular lesions and fibrosis. Little is known so far on the activation of the hemostatic and fibrinolytic systems in SSc, and most preliminary evidences are discordant. Methods To verify whether SSc patients might display a prothrombotic condition, plasma D-dimer was assessed in 28 consecutive SSc patients and in 33 control subjects, matched for age, sex and environmental habit. Results and discussion When compared to healthy controls, geometric mean and 95% confidence interval (IC95% of plasma D-dimer were significantly increased in SSc patients (362 ng/mL, IC 95%: 361–363 ng/mL vs 229 ng/mL, IC95%: 228–231 ng/mL, p = 0.005. After stratifying SSc patients according to disease subset, no significant differences were observed between those with limited cutaneous pattern and controls, whereas patients with diffuse cutaneous pattern displayed substantially increased values. No correlation was found between plasma D-dimer concentration and age, sex, autoantibody pattern, serum creatinine, erythrosedimentation rate, nailfold videocapillaroscopic pattern and pulmonary involvement. Conclusion We demonstrated that SSc patients with diffuse subset are characterized by increased plasma D-dimer values, reflecting a potential activation of both the hemostatic and fibrinolytic cascades, which might finally predispose these patients to thrombotic complications.

  10. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Two Patients with Systemic Sclerosis

    Tracy M. Frech

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal tract (GIT is the most common extracutaneous organ system damaged in systemic sclerosis (SSc and is the presenting feature in 10% of patients. The esophagus as the portion of the GIT is the most commonly affected and there is an association of gastroesophageal reflux (GER with SSc interstitial lung disease (ILD. Thus, an aggressive treatment for GER is recommended in all SSc patients with ILD; however, it is recognized that a long-term benefit to this treatment is needed to understand its impact. In this case report we discuss the presence of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE in two SSc patients and discuss the role for early EGD in SSc patients with moderate-severe GER symptoms for tissue study. Assessment of esophageal biopsy specimens for the presence of eosinophils and possibly ANA can help elucidate disease pathogenesis and direct therapy, as the presence of EoE in SSc has important management considerations, particularly with regards to dietary modification strategies.

  11. Serum osteopontin and vitronectin levels in systemic sclerosis.

    Gundogdu, Baris; Yolbas, Servet; Yilmaz, Musa; Aydin, Suleyman; Koca, Sulayman Serdar

    2017-11-01

    Osteopontin a matricellular protein has pro-fibrotic effects and binds integrin such as αvβ1 and αvβ3. Vitronectin is one of the integrin αvβ3 ligands and is a multifunctional glycoprotein. The aim of the present study was to evaluate serum osteopontin and vitronectin levels in a cohort of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Eighty-six patients with SSc, 46 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and 38 healthy controls (HC) were enrolled in the study. Serum osteopontin, vitronectin, IL-6, and TGF-β levels were analyzed. Serum osteopontin levels were higher in the SSc and SLE groups compared to the HC group (p < 0.01 and p < 0.001, respectively). However, it was not correlated with disease activity and severity scores in the SSc group. On the other hand, serum vitronectin levels were lower in the SSc group than in the SLE and HC groups (p < 0.001 for both). These results may suggest that osteopontin levels may be increased due to the inflammatory process and osteopontin has not a specific role on fibrosis in SSc. On the other hand, serum vitronectin levels decrease in SSc in contrast to SLE. It may be concluded that the one cause of decreased serum vitronectin levels in SSc may be its accumulation in fibrotic area.

  12. T Helper Cells in the Immunopathogenesis of Systemic Sclerosis – Current Trends

    Krasimirova E.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SSc is a chronic progressive autoimmune disease characterized by skin and multiorgan involvement with alterations in both the innate and adaptive immunities. The hallmark of the disease is widespread fibrosis engaging the skin and multiple internal organs, as well as the musculoskeletal system. There is mounting evidence that T cells are key players in the pathogenesis of scleroderma. The current review discusses the role of the different T helper (Th lymphocyte subsets in the processes of inflammation and fibrosis, characteristics for the pathogenesis of the disease. Cytokines produced by Th cell populations have a major effect on endothelial cells and fibroblasts in the context of favoring/inhibiting the vasculopathy and the fibrosis spread. The Th2 pro-fibrotic cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 have been shown to induce collagen synthesis by fibroblasts, whereas IFN-γ demonstrates an inhibitory effect. Increased Th17 cells are present in the scleroderma skin infiltrates. The combination of IL-17, IFN-γ and TGF-β levels in CD45RO and CD45RA cells from patients with SSc is useful to distinguish between the limited and the diffuse phenotype of the disease. There are accumulating data for functional and numerical alterations in the Tregs in SSc. High levels of TNF-α which might reduce the suppressive ability of Tregs have been described. According to some studies, the number of Tregs in scleroderma skin biopsies has been decreased against the normal absolute number of Tregs in peripheral blood of the same patients, which suggests suppressed immunomodulatory response. Other studies reported increased frequency of Tregs in peripheral blood of patients with systemic sclerosis and established a correlation with disease activity. The main immunological challenge remains the identification of the trigger of the autoimmune response in SSc, the causes for preferential Th2-type cell responses and the immunological differences between the

  13. CSF inflammatory biomarkers responsive to treatment in progressive multiple sclerosis capture residual inflammation associated with axonal damage.

    Romme Christensen, Jeppe; Komori, Mika; von Essen, Marina Rode; Ratzer, Rikke; Börnsen, Lars; Bielekova, Bibi; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2018-05-01

    Development of treatments for progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) is challenged by the lack of sensitive and treatment-responsive biomarkers of intrathecal inflammation. To validate the responsiveness of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammatory biomarkers to treatment with natalizumab and methylprednisolone in progressive MS and to examine the relationship between CSF inflammatory and tissue damage biomarkers. CSF samples from two open-label phase II trials of natalizumab and methylprednisolone in primary and secondary progressive MS. CSF concentrations of 20 inflammatory biomarkers and CSF biomarkers of axonal damage (neurofilament light chain (NFL)) and demyelination were analysed using electrochemiluminescent assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In all, 17 natalizumab- and 23 methylprednisolone-treated patients had paired CSF samples. CSF sCD27 displayed superior standardised response means and highly significant decreases during both natalizumab and methylprednisolone treatment; however, post-treatment levels remained above healthy donor reference levels. Correlation analyses of CSF inflammatory biomarkers and NFL before, during and after treatment demonstrated that CSF sCD27 consistently correlates with NFL. These findings validate CSF sCD27 as a responsive and sensitive biomarker of intrathecal inflammation in progressive MS, capturing residual inflammation after treatment. Importantly, CSF sCD27 correlates with NFL, consistent with residual inflammation after anti-inflammatory treatment being associated with axonal damage.

  14. One-Dimensional-Ratio Measures of Atrophy Progression in Multiple Sclerosis as Evaluated by Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Martola, J.; Wiberg Kristoffersen, M.; Aspelin, P.; Stawiarz, L.; Fredrikson, S.; Hillert, J.; Bergstroem, J.; Flodmark, O.

    2009-01-01

    Background: For decades, normalized one-dimensional (1D) measures have been used in the evaluation of brain atrophy. In multiple sclerosis (MS), the use of normalized linear measures over longitudinal follow-up remains insufficiently documented. Purpose: To evaluate the association between different regional atrophy measures and disability in MS patients over four decades in a longitudinal cross-sectional study. Material and Methods: 37 consecutively selected MS patients were included. At baseline, patients had a range of disease duration (1-33 years) and age (24-65 years). Each patient was followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for a mean of 9.25 years (range 7.3-10 years). Four 1D measures were applied at three time points on axial 5-mm T1-weighted images. Three clinical MS subgroups were represented: relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), secondary progressive MS (SPMS), and primary progressive MS (PPMS). Results: There were significant changes in all 1D ratios during follow-up. The Evans ratio (ER) and the bifrontal ratio (BFR) were associated with the development of disability. Changes of ER and BFR reflected more aggressive disease progression, as expressed by MS severity score (MSSS). Conclusion: All four normalized ratios showed uniform atrophy progression, suggesting a consistent rate of atrophy over long-term disease duration independent of MS course. Disability status correlated with 1D measures, suggesting that serial evaluation of Evans and bifrontal ratios might contribute to the radiological evaluation of MS patients

  15. Analysis of the human brain in primary progressive multiple sclerosis with mapping of the spatial distributions using H-1 MR spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging

    Sijens, PE; Irwan, R; Potze, JH; Mostert, JP; De Keyser, J; Oudkerk, M

    Primary progressive multiple sclerosis (ppMS; n=4) patients and controls (n=4) were examined by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in order to map choline (Cho), creatine and N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion

  16. Systemic disease manifestations associated with epilepsy in tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Jeong, Anna; Wong, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most disabling symptoms of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in affected individuals. The relationship between systemic disease manifestations and the presence of epilepsy has not been thoroughly investigated. This study utilizes a multicenter TSC Natural History Database including 1,816 individuals to test the hypothesis that systemic disease manifestations of TSC are associated with epilepsy. Univariate analysis was used to identify patient characteristics (e.g., age, gender, race, and TSC mutation status) associated with the presence of epilepsy. Individual logistic regression models were built to examine the association between epilepsy and each candidate systemic or neurologic disease variable, controlling for the patient characteristics found to be significant on univariate analysis. Finally, a multivariable logistic regression model was constructed, using the variables found to be significant on the individual analyses as well as the patient characteristics that were significant on univariate analysis. Nearly 88% of our cohort had a history of epilepsy. After adjusting for age, gender, and TSC mutation status, multiple systemic disease manifestations including cardiac rhabdomyomas (odds ratio [OR] 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-3.9, p = 0.002), retinal hamartomas (OR 2.1, CI 1.0-4.3, p = 0.04), renal cysts (OR 2.1, CI 1.3-3.4, p = 0.002), renal angiomyolipomas (OR 3.0, CI 1.8-5.1, p epilepsy. In the multivariable logistic regression model, cardiac rhabdomyomas (OR 1.9, CI 1.0-3.5, p = 0.04) remained significantly associated with the presence of epilepsy. The identification of systemic disease manifestations such as cardiac rhabdomyomas that confer a higher risk of epilepsy development in TSC could contribute to disease prognostication and assist in the identification of individuals who may receive maximal benefit from potentially novel, targeted, preventative therapies. Wiley

  17. Circulating angiostatin serum level in patients with systemic sclerosis

    Zofia Gerlicz-Kowalczuk

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Systemic sclerosis (SSc is achronic connective tissue disease characterized by microangiopathy with inadequate angiogenesis. Angiostatin (AS is a potent antiangiogenic factor specifically inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells. Aim : To evaluate the level of angiostatin in the serum of patients with SSc. Material and methods : Serum levels of AS were measured in 20 SSc patients and 12 healthy controls. Results : A statistically significant difference in the serum levels of AS in SSc patients was observed compared to the control group (636.51 vs. 869.20 ng/ml; p = 0.012. Significant correlations between limited and disseminated SSc (lSSc/dSSc were not found, however, a difference between lSSc and the control group was demonstrated (620.00 vs. 869.20 ng/ml; p = 0.011. The serum level of AS was not associated positively with organ changes caused by SSc. However, a statistically significant lower serum level of AS was observed in patients with SSc and no esophageal (p = 0.008 or pulmonary changes (p = 0.007 compared to the control group. Conclusions : Our results reveal significant differences in AS level in SSc patients compared to the healthy controls, and suggest that a low level of AS may occur as a result of impaired angiogenesis.

  18. Vascular Remodelling and Mesenchymal Transition in Systemic Sclerosis

    Pier Andrea Nicolosi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrosis of the skin and of internal organs, autoimmunity, and vascular inflammation are hallmarks of Systemic Sclerosis (SSc. The injury and activation of endothelial cells, with hyperplasia of the intima and eventual obliteration of the vascular lumen, are early features of SSc. Reduced capillary blood flow coupled with deficient angiogenesis leads to chronic hypoxia and tissue ischemia, enforcing a positive feed-forward loop sustaining vascular remodelling, further exacerbated by extracellular matrix accumulation due to fibrosis. Despite numerous developments and a growing number of controlled clinical trials no treatment has been shown so far to alter SSc natural history, outlining the need of further investigation in the molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. We review some processes potentially involved in SSc vasculopathy, with attention to the possible effect of sustained vascular inflammation on the plasticity of vascular cells. Specifically we focus on mesenchymal transition, a key phenomenon in the cardiac and vascular development as well as in the remodelling of injured vessels. Recent work supports the role of transforming growth factor-beta, Wnt, and Notch signaling in these processes. Importantly, endothelial-mesenchymal transition may be reversible, possibly offering novel cues for treatment.

  19. Evaluation and management of esophageal manifestations in systemic sclerosis.

    Denaxas, Konstantinos; Ladas, Spyros D; Karamanolis, George P

    2018-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multisystemic autoimmune connective tissue disorder; in the gastrointestinal tract, the esophagus is the most commonly affected organ. Symptoms of esophageal disease are due to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and esophageal motor dysfunction. Since the development of high-resolution manometry (HRM), this method has been preferred for the study of SSc patients with esophageal involvement. Using HRM, classic scleroderma esophagus, defined as absent or ineffective peristalsis of the distal esophagus in combination with a hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter, was found in as many as 55% of SSc patients. Endoscopy is the appropriate test for evaluating dysphagia and identifying evidence and possible complications of GERD. In the therapeutic area, treatment ranges from general supportive measures to the administration of drugs such as proton pump inhibitors and/or prokinetics. However, as many SSc patients do not respond to existing therapies, there is an urgent need for new therapeutic modalities. Buspirone, a 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptor agonist, could be a putative therapeutic option, as it was found to exert a significant beneficial effect in SSc patients with esophageal involvement. This review summarizes our knowledge concerning the evaluation and management of esophageal manifestations in SSc patients, including emerging therapeutic modalities.

  20. Use of tocilizumab in systemic sclerosis: A brief literature review.

    Fernández-Codina, A; Fernández-Fernández, J; Fernández-Pantiga, A

    2018-03-27

    The available treatments for systemic sclerosis (SS) have limited effectiveness. Treatment with tocilizumab (TCZ), a biological drug that inhibits interleukin 6 (IL-6), has recently been proposed. In this study, we conducted a literature review to assess the safety and efficacy of TCZ in SS. We found 52 articles, 10 of which we selected after evaluating the articles. In a randomised clinical trial, TCZ showed a nonsignificant improvement in the degree of skin induration, while another observational study showed neutral results. In this same clinical trial, the functional respiratory parameters showed a certain degree of stabilization. The safety profile of TCZ is acceptable; however, the current evidence regarding treatment of SS with TCZ is highly limited, although the drug could have a beneficial effect in skin disorder. New clinical trials are needed to determine the usefulness of TCZ in SS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  1. Elephantiasis nostras verrucosa in a patient with systemic sclerosis.

    Chatterjee, S; Karai, L J

    2009-12-01

    Elephantiasis nostras verrucosa (ENV) is an unusual skin condition characterized by dermal fibrosis and hyperkeratotic verrucous lesions resulting from chronic nonfilarial lymphoedema. The condition is similar to 'elephantiasis tropica', in which elephantiasis develops secondary to filariasis. Lymphatic obstruction can be primary or due to various causes such as surgery, tumour, radiation, congestive heart failure or obesity. Recurrent attacks of cellulitis lead to further impairment of lymphatic drainage, causing permanent swelling, dermal fibrosis and epidermal thickening. We report a case of a 56-year-old man with systemic sclerosis (SS), who presented with painful lesions on both legs, consistent with ENV. He developed extensive, fungating, papillomatous lesions on the skin of the legs, toes and dorsa of the feet over a period of 3 years. Histology revealed dense dermal fibrosis, oedema of the papillary dermis and extensive pseudo-epitheliomatous changes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of ENV in which SS was considered to be the primary cause for the impairment of lymphatic flow.

  2. Gastrointestinal mucosal abnormalities using videocapsule endoscopy in systemic sclerosis.

    Marie, I; Antonietti, M; Houivet, E; Hachulla, E; Maunoury, V; Bienvenu, B; Viennot, S; Smail, A; Duhaut, P; Dupas, J-L; Dominique, S; Hatron, P-Y; Levesque, H; Benichou, J; Ducrotté, P

    2014-07-01

    To date, there are no large studies on videocapsule endoscopy in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Consequently, the prevalence and features of gastrointestinal mucosal abnormalities in SSc have not been determined. To determine both prevalence and characteristics of gastrointestinal mucosal abnormalities in unselected patients with SSc, using videocapsule endoscopy. To predict which SSc patients are at risk of developing potentially bleeding gastrointestinal vascular mucosal abnormalities. Videocapsule endoscopy was performed on 50 patients with SSc. Prevalence of gastrointestinal mucosal abnormalities was 52%. Potentially bleeding vascular mucosal lesions were predominant, including: watermelon stomach (34.6%), gastric and/or small intestinal telangiectasia (26.9%) and gastric and/or small intestinal angiodysplasia (38.5%). SSc patients with gastrointestinal vascular mucosal lesions more often exhibited: limited cutaneous SSc (P = 0.06), digital ulcers (P = 0.05), higher score of nailfold videocapillaroscopy (P = 0.0009), anaemia (P = 0.02), lower levels of ferritin (P correlation between gastrointestinal vascular mucosal lesions and presence of severe extra-digestive vasculopathy (digital ulcers and higher nailfold videocapillaroscopy scores). This latter supports the theory that SSc-related diffuse vasculopathy is responsible for both cutaneous and digestive vascular lesions. Therefore, we suggest that nailfold videocapillaroscopy may be a helpful test for managing SSc patients. In fact, nailfold videocapillaroscopy score should be calculated routinely, as it may result in identification of SSc patients at higher risk of developing potentially bleeding gastrointestinal vascular mucosal lesions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Esophageal hypomotility in systemic sclerosis. Close relationship with pulmonary involvement

    Kinuya, Keiko; Nakajima, Kenichi; Kinuya, Seigo; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Tonami, Norihisa; Takehara, Kazuhiko

    2001-01-01

    Esophageal motility was assessed in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) by scintigraphy and compared with extent of scleroderma, duration of disease, index of anti-topoisomerase I antibody (topo I), and pulmonary involvement. A multiple-swallow test was performed in 47 patients with SSc in the supine position with 99m Tc-DTPA. A region of interest on the entire esophagus was defined and the retention ratio (RR) was calculated from a time-activity curve. Patients with diffuse scleroderma had higher RRs than those with limited scleroderma (48.8% vs. 30.0%; p CO ) had higher RRs than those with normal %DL CO (40.5% vs. 19.6%; p=0.03). Patients with reduced % vital capacity (%VC) had higher RRs than those with normal %VC (54.6% vs. 25.0%; p<0.005). Patients with pulmonary fibrosis had higher RRs than those who were negative (58.5% vs. 20.3%; p<0.00005). Esophageal dysfunction in patients with SSc showed a correlation with the extent of scleroderma, positive topo I, and pulmonary involvement. The RR can be an objective clinical marker for the severity of organ fibrosis. (author)

  4. Esophageal hypomotility in systemic sclerosis. Close relationship with pulmonary involvement

    Kinuya, Keiko [Tonami General Hospital, Toyama (Japan); Nakajima, Kenichi; Kinuya, Seigo; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Tonami, Norihisa; Takehara, Kazuhiko

    2001-04-01

    Esophageal motility was assessed in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) by scintigraphy and compared with extent of scleroderma, duration of disease, index of anti-topoisomerase I antibody (topo I), and pulmonary involvement. A multiple-swallow test was performed in 47 patients with SSc in the supine position with {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA. A region of interest on the entire esophagus was defined and the retention ratio (RR) was calculated from a time-activity curve. Patients with diffuse scleroderma had higher RRs than those with limited scleroderma (48.8% vs. 30.0%; p<0.05). There was no correlation between the RRs and the duration of disease. Patients with positive topo I had higher RRs than those who were negative (53.8% vs. 29.7%; p<0.05). Patients with reduced % diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (%DL{sub CO}) had higher RRs than those with normal %DL{sub CO} (40.5% vs. 19.6%; p=0.03). Patients with reduced % vital capacity (%VC) had higher RRs than those with normal %VC (54.6% vs. 25.0%; p<0.005). Patients with pulmonary fibrosis had higher RRs than those who were negative (58.5% vs. 20.3%; p<0.00005). Esophageal dysfunction in patients with SSc showed a correlation with the extent of scleroderma, positive topo I, and pulmonary involvement. The RR can be an objective clinical marker for the severity of organ fibrosis. (author)

  5. Radiological evaluation of swallowing and clinical patterns of systemic sclerosis

    Montesi, A.; Pesaresi, A.; Cavalli, M.L.; Serri, L.; Salmistraro, D.; Candela, M.; Gabrielli, A.

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-one patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) were studied by means of videofluoroscopy in order to evaluate the abnormalities in the oral-pharyngeal and esophageal phases of deglutition and to correlate the radiological patterns with the clinical features of the disease. Thirteen patients (25.5%) exhibited swallowing disorders such as oral leakage, retention, penetration, mild or moderate aspiration and abnormal upper esophageal sphincter behavior. These dysfunctions were more evident in patients with esophageal motility abnormalities. A normal radiological pattern in the esophagus was not associated with swallowing alterations. Remarkably, patients with oral-pharyngeal disorders had a higher incidence of lung diseases. Forty-five patients (88%) exhibited disorders of the esophageal phase of deglutition, such as mild or severe motility abnormalities or hiatal hernia, gastro-esophageal reflux, reflux esophagitis, and stricture. Radiological findings in the esophagus can be abnormal in the early stages of the disease. On the other hand, the radiological pattern of esophageal motility can be occasionally negative in advanced or extensive disease. This indicates a discrepancy between clinical symptoms and radiological picture of the esophagus. The radiological examination of the oral-pharyngeal and esophageal phases of deglutition is important in patients with scleroderma in order to evaluate visceral involvement, motility disorders, and risk of aspiration. Such radiological information can be useful in preventing esophagitis and pulmonary complications

  6. Multiple Sclerosis

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the myelin sheath, the material that surrounds and protects your nerve cells. This damage slows down ...

  7. Preliminary analysis of the very early diagnosis of systemic sclerosis (VEDOSS) EUSTAR multicentre study: evidence for puffy fingers as a pivotal sign for suspicion of systemic sclerosis.

    Minier, T.; Guiducci, S.; Bellando-Randone, S.; Bruni, C.; Lepri, G.; Czirjak, L.; Distler, O.; Walker, U.A.; Fransen, J.; Allanore, Y.; Denton, C.; Cutolo, M.; Tyndall, A.; Muller-Ladner, U.; Matucci-Cerinic, M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The EULAR (European League Against Rheumatism) Scleroderma Trials and Research Group (EUSTAR) has identified preliminary criteria for very early diagnosis of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Our aim was to assess the prevalence of each proposed diagnostic item in a large observational patient

  8. Validating predictors of disease progression in a large cohort of primary-progressive multiple sclerosis based on a systematic literature review.

    Jan-Patrick Stellmann

    Full Text Available New agents with neuroprotective or neuroregenerative potential might be explored in primary-progressive Multiple Sclerosis (PPMS--the MS disease course with leading neurodegenerative pathology. Identification of patients with a high short-term risk for progression may minimize study duration and sample size. Cohort studies reported several variables as predictors of EDSS disability progression but findings were partially contradictory.To analyse the impact of published predictors on EDSS disease progression in a large cohort of PPMS patients.A systematic literature research was performed to identify predictors for disease progression in PPMS. Individual case data from the Sylvia Lawry Centre (SLC and the Hamburg MS patient database (HAPIMS was pooled for a retrospective validation of these predictors on the annualized EDSS change.The systematic literature analysis revealed heterogeneous data from 3 prospective and 5 retrospective natural history cohort studies. Age at onset, gender, type of first symptoms and early EDSS changes were available for validation. Our pooled cohort of 597 PPMS patients (54% female had a mean follow-up of 4.4 years and mean change of EDSS of 0.35 per year based on 2503 EDSS assessments. There was no significant association between the investigated variables and the EDSS-change.None of the analysed variables were predictive for the disease progression measured by the annualized EDSS change. Whether PPMS is still unpredictable or our results may be due to limitations of cohort assessments or selection of predictors cannot be answered. Large systematic prospective studies with new endpoints are needed.

  9. Use of sugammadex in a patient with progressive muscular atrophy and in a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Yoo, Jae Hwa; Kim, Soon Im; Park, Sun Young; Jun, Mi Roung; Kim, Yong Eun; Kim, Hyoung June

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: We herein present 2 cases involving the combination of rocuronium and sugammadex in patients with motor neuron disease. The patients were a 54-year-old man with progressive muscular atrophy who underwent removal of internal fixators in the arm and leg, and a 66-year-old woman with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who underwent skin grafting in the left lower leg. General anesthesia was induced with propofol, rocuronium, and remifentanil and maintained with desflurane and remifentanil. At the end of the surgical procedure, we administered sugammadex. Three or 4 minutes after administration of sugammadex, the patients began to breathe spontaneously and were extubated without complications. Conclusion: Sugammadex can be used successfully to reverse neuromuscular blockade in patients with motor neuron disease. PMID:28591053

  10. Rituximab for the therapy of systemic sclerosis: a series of 10 cases in a single center.

    Vilela, Verônica Silva; Maretti, Giselle Baptista; Gama, Lívia Marques da Silva; Costa, Claudia Henrique da; Rufino, Rogério Lopes; Levy, Roger A

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic autoimmune disease with a high morbidity and mortality. Although cyclophosphamide is effective for severe and refractory cases, there is demand for new treatments. The biological treatment with B-cell depletion with rituximab (RTX) has demonstrated efficacy for this demand in open-label studies. This study was conducted with the aim to retrospectively evaluate all patients who used RTX for the treatment of SSc in our center. We retrospectively evaluated medical records of all patients with SSc who used RTX to treat this disease from January 2009 to January 2015. Systemic, cutaneous, and pulmonary involvement data and laboratory results before and six months after the first infusion of RTX were collected. Ten patients received treatment during the study period and were included in this series. All patients had a diffuse form of the disease. Five patients suffered from an early (duration of disease shorter or equal to four years), rapidly progressive disease, and another five received RTX at late stages of the disease. In both groups of patients, stabilization of the pulmonary picture was observed, with a fall in the skin score in those patients with early forms of the disease. Similar to findings in previous studies, RTX was effective in treating early and rapidly progressive forms of SSc. We also found that patients with long-term illness may benefit from the treatment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  11. Characteristic cerebrospinal fluid cytokine/chemokine profiles in neuromyelitis optica, relapsing remitting or primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Takuya Matsushita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Differences in cytokine/chemokine profiles among patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO, relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS, and primary progressive MS (PPMS, and the relationships of these profiles with clinical and neuroimaging features are unclear. A greater understanding of these profiles may help in differential diagnosis. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured 27 cytokines/chemokines and growth factors in CSF collected from 20 patients with NMO, 26 with RRMS, nine with PPMS, and 18 with other non-inflammatory neurological diseases (OND by multiplexed fluorescent bead-based immunoassay. Interleukin (IL-17A, IL-6, CXCL8 and CXCL10 levels were significantly higher in NMO patients than in OND and RRMS patients at relapse, while granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF and CCL4 levels were significantly higher in NMO patients than in OND patients. In NMO patients, IL-6 and CXCL8 levels were positively correlated with disability and CSF protein concentration while IL-6, CXCL8, G-CSF, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and IFN-γ were positively correlated with CSF neutrophil counts at the time of sample collection. In RRMS patients, IL-6 levels were significantly higher than in OND patients at the relapse phase while CSF cell counts were negatively correlated with the levels of CCL2. Correlation coefficients of cytokines/chemokines in the relapse phase were significantly different in three combinations, IL-6 and GM-CSF, G-CSF and GM-CSF, and GM-CSF and IFN-γ, between RRMS and NMO/NMOSD patients. In PPMS patients, CCL4 and CXCL10 levels were significantly higher than in OND patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest distinct cytokine/chemokine alterations in CSF exist among NMO, RRMS and PPMS. In NMO, over-expression of a cluster of Th17- and Th1-related proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines is characteristic, while in PPMS, increased CCL4 and CXCL10 levels may reflect on-going low grade T cell

  12. Progranulin genetic polymorphisms influence progression of disability and relapse recovery in multiple sclerosis.

    Vercellino, Marco; Fenoglio, Chiara; Galimberti, Daniela; Mattioda, Alessandra; Chiavazza, Carlotta; Binello, Eleonora; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Giobbe, Dario; Scarpini, Elio; Cavalla, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Progranulin (GRN) is a multifunctional protein involved in inflammation and repair, and also a neurotrophic factor critical for neuronal survival. Progranulin is strongly expressed in multiple sclerosis (MS) brains by macrophages and microglia. In this study we evaluated GRN genetic variability in 400 MS patients, in correlation with clinical variables such as disease severity and relapse recovery. We also evaluated serum progranulin levels in the different groups of GRN variants carriers. We found that incomplete recovery after a relapse is correlated with an increased frequency of the rs9897526 A allele (odds ratio (OR) 4.367, p = 0.005). A more severe disease course (Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score > 5) is correlated with an increased frequency of the rs9897526 A allele (OR 1.886, p = 0.002) and of the rs5848 T allele (OR 1.580, p = 0.019). Carriers of the variants associated with a more severe disease course (rs9897526 A, rs5848 T) have significantly lower levels of circulating progranulin (80.5 ± 9.1 ng/mL vs. 165.7 ng/mL, p = 0.01). GRN genetic polymorphisms likely influence disease course and relapse recovery in MS. © The Author(s), 2015.

  13. Sex-Based Differences in Multiple Sclerosis (MS): Part II: Rising Incidence of Multiple Sclerosis in Women and the Vulnerability of Men to Progression of this Disease.

    Dunn, Shannon E; Gunde, Eva; Lee, Hyunwoo

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that a number of autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS) predominantly affect women and there has been much attention directed toward understanding why this is the case. Past research has revealed a number of sex differences in autoimmune responses that can account for the female bias in MS. However, much less is known about why the incidence of MS has increased exclusively in women over the past half century. The recency of this increase suggests that changing environmental or lifestyle factors are interacting with biological sex to increase MS risk predominantly in females. Indeed, a number of recent studies have identified sex-specific differences in the effect of environmental factors on MS incidence. The first part of this chapter will overview this evidence and will discuss the possible scenarios of how the environment may be interacting with autoimmune mechanisms to contribute to the preferential rise in MS incidence in women. Despite the strong female bias in MS incidence, culminating evidence from natural history studies, and imaging and pathology studies suggests that males who develop MS may exhibit a more rapid decline in disability and cognitive functioning than women. Very little is known about the biological basis of this more rapid deterioration, but some insights have been provided by studies in rodent models of demyelination/remyelination. The second part of this chapter will overview the evidence that males with relapsing-onset MS undergo a more rapid progression of disease than females and will discuss potential biological mechanisms that account for this sex difference.

  14. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in combination with immunoablative protocol in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis: A 10-year follow-up of the first transplanted patient

    Obradović Dragana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Multiple sclerosis (MS is an immunemediated disease of the central nervous system that affects young individuals and leads to severe disability. High dose immunoablation followed by autologous hemopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT has been considered in the last 15 years as potentialy effective therapeutic approach for agressive MS. The most recent long-time follow-up results suggest that AHSCT is not only effective for highly aggressive MS, but for relapsing-remitting MS as well, providing long-term remission, or maybe even cure. We presented a 10- year follow-up of the first MS patient being treated by immunoablation therapy and AHSCT. Case report. A 27-year-old male experienced the first symptoms - intermitent numbness and paresthesia of arms and legs of what was treated for two years by psychiatrist as anxiety disorder. After he developed severe paraparesis he was admitted to the Neurology Clinic and diagnosed with MS. Our patient developed aggressive MS with frequent relapses, rapid disability progression and transition to secondary progressive form 6 years after MS onset [the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS 7.0 Ambulation Index (AI 7]. AHSCT was performed, cyclophosphamide was used for hemopoietic stem cell mobilization and the BEAM protocol was used as conditionig regimen. No major adverse events followed the AHSCT. Neurological impairment improved, EDSS 6.5, AI 6 and during a 10-year followup remained unchanged. Brain MRI follow-up showed the absence of gadolinium enhancing lesions and a mild progression of brain atrophy. Conclusion. The patient with rapidly evolving, aggressive, noninflammatory MS initialy improved and remained stable, without disability progression for 10 years, after AHSCT. This kind of treatment should be considered in aggressive MS, or in disease modifying treatment nonresponsive MS patients, since appropriately timed AHSCT treatment may not only prevent disability progression but reduce

  15. A System Out of Breath: How Hypoxia Possibly Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Systemic Sclerosis

    van Hal, T. W.; van Bon, L.; Radstake, T. R. D. J.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease characterized by vascular alterations and immunological disturbances and fibrosis, the order of which remains to be fully determined. Clinically, patients show clear signs of hypoxia in skin and internal organs. The low oxygen tension is potentially caused by a yet to be indentified circuitry involving the three features that typify SSc. In addition, once present, the hypoxia creates a vicious circle of ongoing pathology. In this paper, we pro...

  16. Traces of disease in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Verstraete, E.

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive disease of the motor system involving both upper motor neurons in the brain and lower motor neurons in the spinal cord. Patients suffer from progressive wasting and weakness of limb, bulbar and respiratory muscles. Onset and disease course in ALS

  17. Localized Scleroderma, Systemic Sclerosis and Cardiovascular Risk: A Danish Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Hesselvig, Jeanette Halskou; Kofoed, Kristian; Wu, Jashin J; Dreyer, Lene; Gislason, Gunnar; Ahlehoff, Ole

    2018-03-13

    Recent findings indicate that patients with systemic sclerosis have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. To determine whether patients with systemic sclerosis or localized scleroderma are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, a cohort study of the entire Danish population aged ≥ 18 and ≤ 100 years was conducted, followed from 1997 to 2011 by individual-level linkage of nationwide registries. Multivariable adjusted Cox regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) for a composite cardiovascular disease endpoint. A total of 697 patients with localized scleroderma and 1,962 patients with systemic sclerosis were identified and compared with 5,428,380 people in the reference population. In systemic sclerosis, the adjusted HR was 2.22 (95% confidence interval 1.99-2.48). No association was seen between patients with localized scleroderma and cardiovascular disease. In conclusion, systemic sclerosis is a significant cardiovascular disease risk factor, while patients with localized scleroderma are not at increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

  18. Dipyridamole thallium imaging for detecting cardiac involvement in patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma)

    Ishida, Yoshio; Matsubara, Noboru; Tani, Akihiro; Morozumi, Takakazu; Hori, Masatsugu; Kitabatake, Akira; Kamada, Takenobu; Kimura, Kazufumi; Kozuka, Takahiro (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1990-02-01

    Dipyridamole thallium-201 imaging was carried out in 21 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) to assess its value in detecting impaired myocardium and coronary microcirculation associated with PSS. Depending upon the degree of cardiac function, the patients were classified as having either ejection fraction of 50% or more (Group I, n=17) or less than 50% (Group II, n=4). In Group I, four patients had transient defect in which perfusion defects were seen on early images but not seen on delayed images; three had reverse redistribution in which defects were not seen on early images but seen on delayed images; and three had persistent defects which were seen on both early and delayed images. A decreased washout of thallium-201 was seen in 9 patients. In an analysis of both perfusion defects and washout rate, 13 patients (76%) in Group I were found to have abnormal findings. This suggests that disturbed coronary microcirculation or impaired myocardium may frequently develop even when EF is normal. All of the patients categorized as having a decreased cardiac function (Group II) had perfusion defect, suggesting the presence of myocardial fibrosis. In PSS, deterioration of cardiac function seemed to be associated with progression of myocardial fibrosis. Dipyridamole thallium imaging may be a sensitive method for detecting cardiac lesions in PSS. It also has the potential for detecting decreased coronary flow reserve or slightly impaired myocardium even without decreased EF. (N.K.).

  19. Oral and periodontal manifestations associated with systemic sclerosis: A case series and review.

    Jagadish, Rekha; Mehta, Dhoom Singh; Jagadish, P

    2012-04-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a rare connective tissue disorder with a wide range of oral manifestations. This case series reports significant oral and periodontal changes and also makes an attempt to correlate oral and systemic findings in these patients which enable the clinician for a better diagnosis and evolve a comprehensive treatment plan. Six patients with a known diagnosis of systemic sclerosis were included. After obtaining the patient's informed consent, relevant medical history, oral manifestations including periodontal findings and oral hygiene index simplified index were recorded. In these patients, oral changes included restricted mouth opening and, resorption of the mandible. The periodontal changes observed were gingival recession, absence or minimal gingival bleeding on probing, and widened periodontal ligament space, radiographically. Patients with systemic sclerosis often show wide range of oral manifestations, which is of major concern for the dentist.

  20. Oral and periodontal manifestations associated with systemic sclerosis: A case series and review

    Rekha Jagadish

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis is a rare connective tissue disorder with a wide range of oral manifestations. This case series reports significant oral and periodontal changes and also makes an attempt to correlate oral and systemic findings in these patients which enable the clinician for a better diagnosis and evolve a comprehensive treatment plan. Six patients with a known diagnosis of systemic sclerosis were included. After obtaining the patient′s informed consent, relevant medical history, oral manifestations including periodontal findings and oral hygiene index simplified index were recorded. In these patients, oral changes included restricted mouth opening and, resorption of the mandible. The periodontal changes observed were gingival recession, absence or minimal gingival bleeding on probing, and widened periodontal ligament space, radiographically. Patients with systemic sclerosis often show wide range of oral manifestations, which is of major concern for the dentist.

  1. RARE CASE OF SYSTEMIC SCLEROSIS IN A CHILD AGED 4 MONTHS

    S.S. Postnikov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article provides a clinical and morphologic description of a rare case of systemic sclerosis along with the beginning of the diseases during the infancy. In the clinical picture, the researchers identified occurrences of the systemic vasculitis: abundant cyanotic and red spotty rash with atrophy in the middle, thick edemas of legs and ankles, necrosis of the nail bone of the left little finger, banti's syndrome. In the histological picture, most characteristic peculiarities were: 3 stages of systemic sclerosis process development — inflammation, hardening and atrophy; disorganization of collagenous corium fibers; nidi of calcification along the borderline of corium and hypoderm; multiple ulcers of small and large intestines, perforation of one of which caused peritonitis and fatal outcome of the patient.Key words: infants, vasculitis, systemic sclerosis.

  2. Abscisic acid ameliorates the systemic sclerosis fibroblast phenotype in vitro

    Bruzzone, Santina, E-mail: santina.bruzzone@unige.it [Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Biochemistry, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 1, 16132 Genova (Italy); Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Research, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 9, 16132 Genova (Italy); Advanced Biotechnology Center, Largo Rosanna Benzi 10, 16132 Genova (Italy); Battaglia, Florinda [Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Research, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 9, 16132 Genova (Italy); Mannino, Elena [Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Biochemistry, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 1, 16132 Genova (Italy); Parodi, Alessia [Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Research, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 9, 16132 Genova (Italy); Fruscione, Floriana [Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Biochemistry, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 1, 16132 Genova (Italy); Advanced Biotechnology Center, Largo Rosanna Benzi 10, 16132 Genova (Italy); Basile, Giovanna [Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Biochemistry, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 1, 16132 Genova (Italy); Salis, Annalisa; Sturla, Laura [Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Biochemistry, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 1, 16132 Genova (Italy); Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Research, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 9, 16132 Genova (Italy); Negrini, Simone; Kalli, Francesca; Stringara, Silvia [Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Research, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 9, 16132 Genova (Italy); Filaci, Gilberto [Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Research, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 9, 16132 Genova (Italy); Department of Internal Medicine, Viale Benedetto XV 6, 16132 Genova (Italy); and others

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ABA is an endogenous hormone in humans, regulating different cell responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ABA reverts some of the functions altered in SSc fibroblasts to a normal phenotype. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UV-B irradiation increases ABA content in SSc cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SSc fibroblasts could benefit from exposure to ABA and/or to UV-B. -- Abstract: The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) has been recently identified as an endogenous hormone in humans, regulating different cell functions, including inflammatory processes, insulin release and glucose uptake. Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic inflammatory disease resulting in fibrosis of skin and internal organs. In this study, we investigated the effect of exogenous ABA on fibroblasts obtained from healthy subjects and from SSc patients. Migration of control fibroblasts induced by ABA was comparable to that induced by transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}). Conversely, migration toward ABA, but not toward TGF-{beta}, was impaired in SSc fibroblasts. In addition, ABA increased cell proliferation in fibroblasts from SSc patients, but not from healthy subjects. Most importantly, presence of ABA significantly decreased collagen deposition by SSc fibroblasts, at the same time increasing matrix metalloproteinase-1 activity and decreasing the expression level of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1). Thus, exogenously added ABA appeared to revert some of the functions altered in SSc fibroblasts to a normal phenotype. Interestingly, ABA levels in plasma from SSc patients were found to be significantly lower than in healthy subjects. UV-B irradiation induced an almost 3-fold increase in ABA content in SSc cultures. Altogether, these results suggest that the fibrotic skin lesions in SSc patients could benefit from exposure to high(er) ABA levels.

  3. Abscisic acid ameliorates the systemic sclerosis fibroblast phenotype in vitro

    Bruzzone, Santina; Battaglia, Florinda; Mannino, Elena; Parodi, Alessia; Fruscione, Floriana; Basile, Giovanna; Salis, Annalisa; Sturla, Laura; Negrini, Simone; Kalli, Francesca; Stringara, Silvia; Filaci, Gilberto

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► ABA is an endogenous hormone in humans, regulating different cell responses. ► ABA reverts some of the functions altered in SSc fibroblasts to a normal phenotype. ► UV-B irradiation increases ABA content in SSc cultures. ► SSc fibroblasts could benefit from exposure to ABA and/or to UV-B. -- Abstract: The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) has been recently identified as an endogenous hormone in humans, regulating different cell functions, including inflammatory processes, insulin release and glucose uptake. Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic inflammatory disease resulting in fibrosis of skin and internal organs. In this study, we investigated the effect of exogenous ABA on fibroblasts obtained from healthy subjects and from SSc patients. Migration of control fibroblasts induced by ABA was comparable to that induced by transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Conversely, migration toward ABA, but not toward TGF-β, was impaired in SSc fibroblasts. In addition, ABA increased cell proliferation in fibroblasts from SSc patients, but not from healthy subjects. Most importantly, presence of ABA significantly decreased collagen deposition by SSc fibroblasts, at the same time increasing matrix metalloproteinase-1 activity and decreasing the expression level of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1). Thus, exogenously added ABA appeared to revert some of the functions altered in SSc fibroblasts to a normal phenotype. Interestingly, ABA levels in plasma from SSc patients were found to be significantly lower than in healthy subjects. UV-B irradiation induced an almost 3-fold increase in ABA content in SSc cultures. Altogether, these results suggest that the fibrotic skin lesions in SSc patients could benefit from exposure to high(er) ABA levels.

  4. Hand and wrist involvement in systemic sclerosis: US features.

    Freire, Véronique; Bazeli, Ramin; Elhai, Muriel; Campagna, Raphaël; Pessis, Éric; Avouac, Jérôme; Allanore, Yannick; Drapé, Jean-Luc; Guérini, Henri

    2013-12-01

    To characterize ultrasonographic (US) features in the hand of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and to evaluate the sensitivity of US in the detection of calcinosis and acroosteolysis. The local ethics committee approved this study, and oral informed consent was obtained. A total of 44 consecutive patients with SSc (34 women; mean age, 56.1 years ± 12.1 [standard deviation]; 10 men; mean age, 45.0 years ± 14.0) and 30 healthy control subjects (20 women; mean age, 46.3 years ± 12.1; 10 men; mean age, 39.6 years ± 10.8) were included between October 2010 and December 2011. Bilateral US, including Doppler assessment of the wrists, hands, and fingers, was performed, and presence of synovitis, tenosynovitis with or without a layered appearance, calcifications, acroosteolysis, and distal vascularization was recorded. Radiography of both hands was performed to assess for acroosteolysis and calcinosis. Frequency of US features, sensitivity of US for calcinosis and acroosteolysis, and respective confidence intervals were calculated. Synovitis was found in 17 patients (39%). Tenosynovitis was found in 12 patients (27%), and it had a layered pattern in 15 (41%) of 37 cases. Calcinosis was found in 17 patients (39%) with US, with a sensitivity of 89%. Acroosteolysis was found in nine (20%) patients with US and in 10 (23%) patients with radiography, with 90% sensitivity for US. Distal vascularization was detected in 26 patients (59%) and 30 control subjects (100%) and was in contact with the acroosteolysis bed in seven (78%) of nine patients with SSc. US can be used to assess features of SSc, including synovitis, tenosynovitis, calcinosis, acroosteolysis, and distal vascularization and is sensitive for calcinosis and acroosteolysis detection. A layered pattern (similar to the appearance of an artichoke heart) of tenosynovitis was seen commonly. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2013.

  5. New insight on the Xq28 association with systemic sclerosis

    Carmona, F David; Cénit, M Carmen; Diaz-Gallo, Lina-Marcela; Broen, Jasper C A; Simeón, Carmen P; Carreira, Patricia E; Callejas-Rubio, José-Luis; Fonollosa, Vicente; López-Longo, Francisco J; González-Gay, Miguel A; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Kreuter, Alexander; Distler, Jörg H W; Madhok, Rajan; Shiels, Paul; van Laar, Jacob M; Schuerwegh, Annemie J; Vonk, Madelon C; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Fonseca, Carmen; Denton, Christopher P; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Arnett, Frank C; Tan, Filemon K; Assassi, Shervin; Radstake, Timothy R D J; Mayes, Maureen D; Martín, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether the systemic sclerosis (SSc)-associated IRAK1 non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism rs1059702 is responsible for the Xq28 association with SSc or whether there are other independent signals in the nearby methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2). Methods We analysed a total of 3065 women with SSc and 2630 unaffected controls from five independent Caucasian cohorts. Four tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms of MECP2 (rs3027935, rs17435, rs5987201 and rs5945175) and the IRAK1 variant rs1059702 were genotyped using TaqMan predesigned assays. A meta-analysis including all cohorts was performed to test the overall effect of these Xq28 polymorphisms on SSc. Results IRAK1 rs1059702 and MECP2 rs17435 were associated specifically with diffuse cutaneous SSc (PFDR=4.12×10−3, OR=1.27, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.47, and PFDR=5.26×10−4, OR=1.30, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.48, respectively), but conditional logistic regression analysis showed that the association of IRAK1 rs1059702 with this subtype was explained by that of MECP2 rs17435. On the other hand, IRAK1 rs1059702 was consistently associated with presence of pulmonary fibrosis (PF), because statistical significance was observed when comparing SSc patients PF+ versus controls (PFDR=0.039, OR=1.30, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.58) and SSc patients PF+ versus SSc patients PF− (p=0.025, OR=1.26, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.55). Conclusions Our data clearly suggest the existence of two independent signals within the Xq28 region, one located in IRAK1 related to PF and another in MECP2 related to diffuse cutaneous SSc, indicating that both genes may have an impact on the clinical outcome of the disease. PMID:23444193

  6. Gastric involvement in systemic sclerosis: a prospective study.

    Marie, I; Levesque, H; Ducrotté, P; Denis, P; Hellot, M F; Benichou, J; Cailleux, N; Courtois, H

    2001-01-01

    This study aims to assess the prevalence of gastric electrical activity dysfunction with cutaneous electrogastrography (EGG), disturbances of gastric emptying function using radiopaque pellets, and gastric endoscopic abnormalities in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). We also investigate for an association between EGG and gastric-emptying data with clinical manifestations and esophageal motor disturbances. Fasting and postprandial gastric electrical activity was studied in 22 consecutive patients with SSc (17 with and 5 without clinical gastric manifestations) and 22 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. Gastric emptying of radiopaque pellets and gastroscopy were also performed in SSc patients. The prevalence of EGG disturbances was as high as 81.82% in SSc patients. SSc patients exhibited, compared with controls, higher median percentage of dominant frequency in bradygastria during the fasting period and lower median values for postprandial electrical power and postprandial to fasting ratio for electrical power. Gastric emptying of radiopaque pellets was delayed in 11 SSc patients, and gastroscopy demonstrated "watermelon stomach" in 3 SSc patients. No correlation was found between the severity of gastric impairment and clinical presentation, SSc duration and subsets, and esophageal manometric impairment. Our study underlines the high frequency of gastric dysfunction in SSc patients. It suggests the usefulness of EGG in SSc in noninvasively detecting disorders of gastric electrical activity at an early stage and symptomatic patients with gastroparesis (because there was a correlation between values of postprandial to fasting ratio for electrical power of watermelon stomach diagnosis should be excluded in SSc patients presenting with gastrointestinal hemorrhage or with anemia related to iron deficiency.

  7. Solvent oriented hobbies and the risk of systemic sclerosis.

    Nietert, P J; Sutherland, S E; Silver, R M; Pandey, J P; Dosemeci, M

    1999-11-01

    To examine whether those participating in solvent oriented hobbies (SOH) are at greater risk of developing systemic sclerosis (SSc), and if the association is modified by the presence of the anti-Scl70 antibody. Patients with SSc and controls were recruited from a university hospital rheumatology clinic. Recreational hobby and occupational histories were obtained along with blood samples. Cumulative scores were created for participation in SOH. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios associated with SOH exposure after adjustment for sex, age at diagnosis, and occupational solvent exposure, and to examine the association between SOH exposure and the presence of anti-Scl70. Solvent exposure based on hobbies and occupations was determined for 178 cases (141 women, 37 men) and 200 controls (138 women, 62 men). Overall participation in SOH was not associated with SSc. However, odds of high cumulative SOH exposure was 3 times greater in those patients with SSc testing positive for the anti-Scl70 antibody compared to patients testing negative (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.1, 7.9), and twice as great as controls (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.1, 5.9). While patients with SSc did not participate more often in SOH than controls over all, odds of high cumulative SOH exposure was greater among patients with SSc testing positive for anti-Scl70 compared to those testing negative and compared to controls. These results provide further evidence that environmental agents may play a role in the development of Ssc.

  8. Central Hemodynamics and Arterial Stiffness in Systemic Sclerosis.

    Bartoloni, Elena; Pucci, Giacomo; Cannarile, Francesca; Battista, Francesca; Alunno, Alessia; Giuliani, Marco; Cafaro, Giacomo; Gerli, Roberto; Schillaci, Giuseppe

    2016-12-01

    Although microvascular disease is a hallmark of systemic sclerosis (SSc), a higher prevalence of macrovascular disease and a poorer related prognosis have been reported in SSc than in the general population. The simultaneous assessment of prognostically relevant functional properties of larger and smaller arteries, and their effects on central hemodynamics, has never been performed in SSc using the state-of-the-art techniques. Thirty-four women with SSc (aged 61±15 years, disease duration 17±12 years, and blood pressure 123/70±18/11 mm Hg) and 34 healthy women individually matched by age and mean arterial pressure underwent the determination of carotid-femoral (aortic) and carotid-radial (upper limb) pulse wave velocity (a direct measure of arterial stiffness), aortic augmentation (a measure of the contribution of reflected wave to central pulse pressure), and aortobrachial pulse pressure amplification (brachial/aortic pulse pressure) through applanation tonometry (SphygmoCor). Patients and controls did not differ by carotid-femoral or carotid-radial pulse wave velocity. Aortic augmentation index corrected for a heart rate of 75 bpm (AIx@75) was higher in women with SSc (30.9±16% versus 22.2±12%; P=0.012). Patients also had a lower aortobrachial amplification of pulse pressure (1.22±0.18 versus 1.33±0.25; P=0.041). SSc was an independent predictor of AIx@75 (direct) and pulse pressure amplification (inverse). Among patients, age, mean arterial pressure, and C-reactive protein independently predicted carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity. Age and mean arterial pressure were the only predictors of AIx@75. Women with SSc have increased aortic augmentation and decreased pulse pressure amplification (both measures of the contribution of reflected wave to central waveform) but no changes in aortic or upper limb arterial stiffness. Microvascular involvement occurs earlier than large artery stiffening in SSc. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Fertility and pregnancy outcome in women with systemic sclerosis.

    Steen, V D; Medsger, T A

    1999-04-01

    To determine fertility and pregnancy outcome in women with systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma) who had disease onset before age 45 years. All living women with scleroderma who had first been evaluated at the University of Pittsburgh Scleroderma Clinic after January 1, 1972 were sent a detailed self-administered questionnaire in 1986 specifically concerning pregnancy outcomes and infertility. This group was compared with 2 race- and age-matched control groups, one comprising women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and one comprising healthy neighborhood women identified by random-digit dialing. We determined the number, history, treatment, and outcome of women who either had never been pregnant or had attempted to become pregnant unsuccessfully for more than 1 year. We also obtained data regarding pregnancy outcomes, including the frequency of miscarriage, premature births, small full-term infants, perinatal deaths, and births of live healthy infants. The study group comprised 214 women with SSc, 167 with RA, and 105 neighborhood controls. There were no significant differences in the overall rates of miscarriage, premature births, small full-term births, or neonatal deaths between the 3 groups. Women with SSc were more likely than those without SSc to have adverse outcomes of pregnancy after the onset of their rheumatic disease, particularly premature births (also seen in RA women after disease onset) and small full-term infants. Although a significantly greater number of women with SSc had never been pregnant, there were no significant differences in the frequency of never having been pregnant or of infertility in the 3 groups after adjustment for contributing factors. This study indicates that women with SSc have acceptable pregnancy outcomes compared with those of women with other rheumatic disease and healthy neighborhood controls. Infertility was not a frequent problem. We believe that there are no excessive pregnancy risks to women with SSc or their infants

  10. Multiple sclerosis

    Stenager, Egon; Stenager, E N; Knudsen, Lone

    1994-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study of 117 randomly selected patients (52 men, 65 women) with definite multiple sclerosis, it was found that 76 percent were married or cohabitant, 8 percent divorced. Social contacts remained unchanged for 70 percent, but outgoing social contacts were reduced for 45 percent......, need for structural changes in home and need for pension became greater with increasing physical handicap. No significant differences between gender were found. It is concluded that patients and relatives are under increased social strain, when multiple sclerosis progresses to a moderate handicap...

  11. Retinoic acid for treatment of systemic sclerosis and morphea: A literature review.

    Thomas, Renee M; Worswick, Scott; Aleshin, Maria

    2017-03-01

    Systemic sclerosis and morphea are connective tissue diseases characterized by tightening, thickening, and hardening of the skin, leading to significant morbidity. Unfortunately, current treatment options have limited efficacy for many patients. Cutaneous manifestations of these diseases arise from excess collagen deposition and fibrosis in the skin, through pathogenic mechanisms which have yet to be extensively detailed at the causal immune and cellular levels. Research elucidating the mechanism of action of retinoic acid on collagen production in the skin and case series highlighting the success of retinoic acid on the skin manifestations of systemic sclerosis and on morphea demonstrate its promise as a treatment. Herein they will briefly review the treatment options for both systemic sclerosis and morphea, and will discuss the potential of retinoic acid as a therapy and the supporting evidence from the literature, highlighting the previously published basic science and clinical studies investigating the role of retinoic acid in the treatment of sclerotic skin diseases. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Safety and efficacy of subcutaneous tocilizumab in adults with systemic sclerosis (faSScinate) : a phase 2, randomised, controlled trial

    Khanna, Dinesh; Denton, Christopher P.; Jahreis, Angelika; van Laar, Jacob M.; Frech, Tracy M.; Anderson, Marina E.; Baron, Murray; Chung, Lorinda; Fierlbeck, Gerhard; Lakshminarayanan, Santhanam; Allanore, Yannick; Pope, Janet E.; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Steen, Virginia; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Lafyatis, Robert; Stifano, Giuseppina; Spotswood, Helen; Chen-Harris, Haiyin; Dziadek, Sebastian; Morimoto, Alyssa; Sornasse, Thierry; Siegel, Jeffrey; Furst, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Systemic sclerosis is a rare disabling autoimmune disease with few treatment options. The efficacy and safety of tocilizumab, an interleukin 6 receptor-α inhibitor, was assessed in the faSScinate phase 2 trial in patients with systemic sclerosis. Methods We did this double-blind,

  13. Identification of risk factors associated with onset and progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Wang, Ming-Dong; Little, Julian; Gomes, James; Cashman, Neil R; Krewski, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Although amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was identified as a neurological condition 150 years ago, risk factors related to the onset and progression of ALS remain largely unknown. Monogenic mutations in over 30 genes are associated with about 10% of ALS cases. The age at onset of ALS and disease types has been found to influence ALS progression. The present study was designed to identify additional putative risk factors associated with the onset and progression of ALS using systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. Risk factors that may be associated with ALS include: 1) genetic mutations, including the intermediate CAG repeat expansion in ATXN2; 2) previous exposure to heavy metals such as lead and mercury; 3) previous exposure to organic chemicals, such as pesticides and solvents; 4) history of electric shock; 5) history of physical trauma/injury (including head trauma/injury); 6) smoking (a weak risk factor for ALS in women); and 6) other risk factors, such as participating in professional sports, lower body mass index, lower educational attainment, or occupations requiring repetitive/strenuous work, military service, exposure to Beta-N-methylamino-l-alanin and viral infections. Risk factors that may be associated with ALS progression rate include: 1) nutritional status, including vitamin D deficiency; 2) comorbidities; 3) ethnicity and genetic factors; 4) lack of supportive care; and 4) smoking. The extent to which these associations may be causal is discussed, with further research recommended to strengthen the evidence on which determinations of causality may be based. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Does nailfold capillaroscopy help predict future outcomes in systemic sclerosis? A systematic literature review.

    Paxton, Dolcie; Pauling, John D

    2018-02-14

    Nailfold capillaroscopy (NC) is an important diagnostic tool in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Confirmation of NC as a prognostic factor could facilitate earlier intervention and slow disease progression in SSc. We undertook a systematic literature review to evaluate the prognostic value of NC in predicting SSc disease progression. Standardised searches of EMBASE and MEDLINE were undertaken to identify longitudinal studies of adult subjects with SSc reporting the prognostic value of NC for any aspect of disease progression and/or survival. Non-English, non-original research, animal studies, non-adult studies and non-full length reports were excluded from the analysis (PROSPERO 2017:CRD42017071719). Wide heterogeneity in study design, prognostic factor measurement and study outcomes necessitated a qualitative data synthesis. The "QUality In Prognosis Studies" (QUIPS) risk-of-bias tool was used to assess study quality. Study selection, data extraction and risk-of-bias assessment were each undertaken independently by 2 reviewers and consensus reached where necessary. Of 942 retrieved articles, 18 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies (17/18, 94%) reported positive associations between baseline NC appearances (using a variety of qualitative, semi-quantitative and quantitative NC endpoints) and clinical outcomes including digital ulcer (DU) occurrence/healing, survival, disease progression (using domains of Medsger disease severity scale), calcinosis, skin progression, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), and/or a composite analysis of "cardiovascular events". Application of the QUIPS tool identified a moderate-high risk of potential bias in 6/18 studies for study participation, 3/18 studies for study attrition, 10/18 for prognostic factor measurement, 5/18 for outcome measurement, 13/18 for confounders and 13/18 for statistical analyses. Study quality limited the strength of the conclusions drawn from these studies. The most important source of

  15. Relationship between the Increased Haemostatic Properties of Blood Platelets and Oxidative Stress Level in Multiple Sclerosis Patients with the Secondary Progressive Stage

    Agnieszka Morel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is the autoimmune disease of the central nervous system with complex pathogenesis, different clinical courses and recurrent neurological relapses and/or progression. Despite various scientific papers that focused on early stage of MS, our study targets selective group of late stage secondary progressive MS patients. The presented work is concerned with the reactivity of blood platelets in primary hemostasis in SP MS patients. 50 SP MS patients and 50 healthy volunteers (never diagnosed with MS or other chronic diseases were examined to evaluate the biological activity of blood platelets (adhesion, aggregation, especially their response to the most important physiological agonists (thrombin, ADP, and collagen and the effect of oxidative stress on platelet activity. We found that the blood platelets from SP MS patients were significantly more sensitive to all used agonists in comparison with control group. Moreover, the platelet hemostatic function was advanced in patients suffering from SP MS and positively correlated with increased production of O2-∙ in these cells, as well as with Expanded Disability Status Scale. We postulate that the increased oxidative stress in blood platelets in SP MS may be primarily responsible for the altered haemostatic properties of blood platelets.

  16. Relationship between disease characteristics and orofacial manifestations in systemic sclerosis: Canadian Systemic Sclerosis Oral Health Study III.

    Baron, Murray; Hudson, Marie; Tatibouet, Solène; Steele, Russell; Lo, Ernest; Gravel, Sabrina; Gyger, Geneviève; El Sayegh, Tarek; Pope, Janet; Fontaine, Audrey; Masetto, Ariel; Matthews, Debora; Sutton, Evelyn; Thie, Norman; Jones, Niall; Copete, Maria; Kolbinson, Dean; Markland, Janet; Nogueira, Getulio; Robinson, David; Fritzler, Marvin; Gornitsky, Mervyn

    2015-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma) is associated with decreased saliva production and interincisal distance, more missing teeth, and periodontal disease. We undertook this study to determine the clinical correlates of SSc with these oral abnormalities. Subjects were recruited from the Canadian Scleroderma Research Group cohort. Detailed dental and clinical examinations were performed according to standardized protocols. Associations between dental abnormalities and selected clinical and serologic manifestations of SSc were examined. One hundred sixty-three SSc subjects were included: 90% women, mean ± SD age 56 ± 11 years, mean ± SD disease duration 14 ± 8 years, 72% with limited cutaneous disease, and 28% with diffuse cutaneous disease. Decreased saliva production was associated with Sjögren's syndrome-related autoantibodies (β = -43.32; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] -80.89, -5.75), but not with disease severity (β = -2.51; 95% CI -8.75, 3.73). Decreased interincisal distance was related to disease severity (β = -1.02; 95% CI -1.63, -0.42) and the modified Rodnan skin thickness score (β = -0.38; 95% CI -0.53, -0.23). The number of missing teeth was associated with decreased saliva production (relative risk [RR] 0.97; 95% CI 0.94, 0.99), worse hand function (RR 1.52; 95% CI 1.13, 2.02), and the presence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD; RR 1.68 [95% CI 1.14, 2.46]). No clinical or serologic variables were correlated with periodontal disease. In SSc, diminished interincisal distance is related to overall disease severity. Decreased saliva production is related to concomitant Sjögren's syndrome antibodies. Tooth loss is associated with poor upper extremity function, GERD, and decreased saliva. The etiology of excess periodontal disease is likely multifactorial and remains unclear. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Systemic sclerosis biomarkers discovered using mass-spectrometry-based proteomics: a systematic review.

    Bălănescu, Paul; Lădaru, Anca; Bălănescu, Eugenia; Băicuş, Cristian; Dan, Gheorghe Andrei

    2014-08-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease with incompletely known physiopathology. There is a great challenge to predict its course and therapeutic response using biomarkers. To critically review proteomic biomarkers discovered from biological specimens from systemic sclerosis patients using mass spectrometry technologies. Medline and Embase databases were searched in February 2014. Out of the 199 records retrieved, a total of 20 records were included, identifying 116 candidate proteomic biomarkers. Research in SSc proteomic biomarkers should focus on biomarker validation, as there are valuable mass-spectrometry proteomics studies in the literature.

  18. Systemic Sclerosis and Silicone Breast Implant: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Antonios Psarras

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmentally induced systemic sclerosis is a well-recognized condition, which is correlated with exposure to various chemical compounds or drugs. However, development of scleroderma-like disease after exposure to silicone has always been a controversial issue and, over time, it has triggered spirited debate whether there is a certain association or not. Herein, we report the case of a 35-year-old female who developed Raynaud’s phenomenon and, finally, systemic sclerosis shortly after silicone breast implantation surgery.

  19. A Case with Systemic Sclerosis Following Exposure To Silica and Vibration

    Aslı Ürkmez

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammatory, vascular and sclerotic changes in the internal organs. Although the etiology is not known with certainty; silica dust, which is one of the environmental risk factors, can lead to scleroderma by some immunological changes. In this case, a mine worker, who worked in a mercury mine during a 15-year period, developed systemic sclerosis due to exposure to chronic silica and vibration, is presented. (Turk J Dermatol 2012; 6: 45-7

  20. A wireless body measurement system to study fatigue in multiple sclerosis

    Yu, F.; Bilberg, A.; Stenager, E.; Rabotti, C.; Zhang, B.; Mischi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue is reported as the most common symptom by patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The physiological and functional parameters related to fatigue in MS patients are currently not well established. A new wearable wireless body measurement system, named Fatigue Monitoring System (FAMOS), was

  1. Advancing the understanding of progression in multiple sclerosis: an interview with Shibeshih Belachew.

    Belachew, Shibeshih

    2018-02-01

    Shibeshih Belachew speaks to Laura Dormer, Commissioning Editor: Dr Shibeshih Belachew, MD, PhD, is a Senior Medical Director for Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Disease Area in Global Product Development Medical Affairs at Roche (Basel, Switzerland). Prior to joining Roche in January 2016, he was Director of MS Franchise and Head of Medical Director's office for Biogen Region Europe and Canada. Previously at Biogen he also served as a Director in Global Neurology for the natalizumab program in Cambridge (MA, USA). Prior to joining industry, he was a Clinical Professor of Neurology at the University of Liège in Belgium. Shibeshih completed neurology postgraduate training at the University of Liège and has a PhD in Biomedical Science in the field of Developmental Neurobiology. Shibeshih has been a post-doctoral fellow in the Laboratory of Cellular and Synaptic Neurophysiology at the National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, MD, USA) and later at the Center for Neuroscience Research of Children's National Medical Center in Washington DC. He is a member of the Belgian Neurological Society.

  2. Nailfold capillaroscopy in systemic sclerosis: data from the EULAR scleroderma trials and research (EUSTAR) database.

    Ingegnoli, Francesca; Ardoino, Ilaria; Boracchi, Patrizia; Cutolo, Maurizio

    2013-09-01

    The aims of this study were to obtain cross-sectional data on capillaroscopy in an international multi-center cohort of Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) and to investigate the frequency of the capillaroscopic patterns and their disease-phenotype associations. Data collected between June 2004 and October 2011 in the EULAR Scleroderma Trials and Research (EUSTAR) registry were examined. Patients' profiles based on clinical and laboratory data were obtained by cluster analysis and the association between profiles and capillaroscopy was investigated by multinomial logistic regression. 62 of the 110 EUSTAR centers entered data on capillaroscopy in the EUSTAR database. 376 of the 2754 patients (13.65%) were classified as scleroderma pattern absent, but non-specific capillary abnormalities were noted in 55.48% of the cases. Four major patients' profiles were identified characterized by a progressive severity for skin involvement, as well as an increased number of systemic manifestations. The "early" and "active" scleroderma patterns were generally observed in patients with mild/moderate skin involvement and a low number of disease manifestations, while the "late" scleroderma pattern was found more frequently in the more severe forms of the disease. These data indicate the importance of capillaroscopy in SSc management and that capillaroscopic patterns are directly related to the extent of organ involvement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dysregulation of the Autophagy-Endolysosomal System in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Related Motor Neuron Diseases

    Asako Otomo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a heterogeneous group of incurable motor neuron diseases (MNDs characterized by a selective loss of upper and lower motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Most cases of ALS are sporadic, while approximately 5–10% cases are familial. More than 16 causative genes for ALS/MNDs have been identified and their underlying pathogenesis, including oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunction, neural inflammation, protein misfolding and accumulation, dysfunctional intracellular trafficking, abnormal RNA processing, and noncell-autonomous damage, has begun to emerge. It is currently believed that a complex interplay of multiple toxicity pathways is implicated in disease onset and progression. Among such mechanisms, ones that are associated with disturbances of protein homeostasis, the ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy, have recently been highlighted. Although it remains to be determined whether disease-associated protein aggregates have a toxic or protective role in the pathogenesis, the formation of them results from the imbalance between generation and degradation of misfolded proteins within neuronal cells. In this paper, we focus on the autophagy-lysosomal and endocytic degradation systems and implication of their dysfunction to the pathogenesis of ALS/MNDs. The autophagy-endolysosomal pathway could be a major target for the development of therapeutic agents for ALS/MNDs.

  4. A systematic review of the effect of moderate intensity exercise on function and disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Lui, Andrew J; Byl, Nancy N

    2009-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an idiopathic disease of adults affecting upper and lower motor neurons. In one to four years, progressive weakness, spasticity, and respiratory insufficiency compromise independence and survival. Current medical treatment is limited to medication and supportive care. The benefit and harm of moderate physical exercise are controversial. This review examined current research related to moderate exercise for maintaining independence without accelerating disease progression in persons with ALS. An evidence-based search was conducted using keywords alone and in combination (ALS, exercise, Lou Gehrig's disease, physical therapy) to search PubMed, PEDro, Hooked on Evidence, Ovid, and Cochrane databases. Human and animal models were included and graded on level of evidence and strength of recommendations for developing guidelines to practice. A secondary reviewer evaluated all selected studies, and statistics were calculated. The search yielded the following nine studies: four small clinical studies, one clinical systematic review, and four randomized, controlled trials based on animal models. In human studies, there were small to moderate effect sizes supporting the benefit of moderate exercise in persons with early-stage ALS, with no adverse affects on disease progression or survival time. In transgenic mice with superoxide dismutase-1 ALS, moderate exercise most often had a moderate effect size for increasing life span. Large randomized clinical trials are needed to develop specific exercise guidelines. However, evidence suggests that moderate exercise is not associated with adverse outcomes in persons with early-stage ALS. Moderate exercise programs can be safely adapted to abilities, interests, specific response to exercise, accessibility, and family support.

  5. Aortic pulse wave velocity measurement in systemic sclerosis patients

    M. Sebastiani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Systemic sclerosis (SSc is characterized by endothelial dysfunction and widespread microangiopathy. However, a macrovascular damage could be also associated. Aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV is known to be a reliable indicator of arterial stiffness and a useful prognostic predictor of cardiovascular events. Moreover, aPWV may be easily measured by non-invasive, user-friendly tool. Aim of our study was to evaluate aPWV alterations in a series of SSc patients. Methods. The aPWV was evaluated in 35 consecutive female SSc patients and 26 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. aPWV alterations were correlated with cardiopulmonary involvement. Results. A significant increase of aPWV was observed in SSc patients compared to controls (9.4±3.2 m/s vs 7.3±1 m/s; P=0.002. In particular, 14/35 (40% SSc patients and only 1/26 (4% controls (P=0.0009 showed increased aPWV (>9 m/s cut-off value. Moreover, echocardiography evaluation showed an increased prevalence of right atrial and ventricular dilatation (atrial volume: 23.6±6.2 mL vs 20.3±4.3 mL, P=0.026; ventricular diameter 19.5±4.9 mm vs 15.9±1.6 mm; P=0.001 associated to higher values of pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PAPs in SSc patients (31.5±10.4 mmHg vs 21.6±2.9 mmHg; P50 years old. Furthermore, altered aPWV was more frequently associated with limited cutaneous pattern, longer disease duration (≥5 years, and/or presence of anticentromere antibody (ACA. Conclusions. A significantly higher prevalence of abnormally increased aPWV was evidenced in SSc patients compared to healthy controls. The possibility of more pronounced and diffuse vascular damage in a particular SSc subset (ACA-positive subjects with limited cutaneous scleroderma and longer disease duration might be raised.

  6. Vitamin D, parathyroid hormone, and acroosteolysis in systemic sclerosis.

    Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda; Furst, Daniel E; Markovits, Doron; Rozin, Alexander; Clements, Philip J; Nahir, Abraham Menahem; Balbir-Gurman, Alexandra

    2008-11-01

    .Sclerodactyly with acroosteolysis (AO) and calcinosis are prominent features of systemic sclerosis (SSc), but the pathogenesis of these findings is poorly understood. Vitamin D and parathyroid hormone (PTH) have a crucial role in bone metabolism and resorption and may affect AO and calcinosis. We assessed vitamin D and PTH in patients with SSc. Medical records of 134 consecutive patients with SSc (American College of Rheumatology criteria) followed at the rheumatology department during the years 2003-2006 were reviewed for clinical assessment, laboratory evaluation [including 25(OH) vitamin D, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, PTH, creatinine, and albumin]; imaging data confirming AO and/or calcinosis. Patients followed routinely at least once a year were included (81 patients). Of these, 60 patients' medical records were found to have complete, relevant clinical, laboratory, and radiographic imaging. Thirteen patients had diffuse disease and 47 limited disease - 51 women and 9 men, 44 Jews and 16 Arabs; mean age 55 +/- 14 years; disease duration 8 +/- 6 years. AO with or without calcinosis was observed in 42 patients (70%). Vitamin D deficiency was found in 46% of patients (16 out of 44 Jewish patients, 10 out of 16 Arab patients). PTH was elevated in 21.7% of patients. Significant correlations were observed between acroosteolysis and PTH (p = 0.015), calcinosis (p = 0.009), and disease duration (p = 0.008), and between PTH and vitamin D levels (p = 0.01). All patients had normal serum concentrations of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and albumin, and liver and kidney functions. In this group of Mediterranean patients with SSc, the incidence of vitamin D deficiency and secondary hyperparathyroidism was surprisingly high. This finding correlated with the occurrence of AO and calcinosis. Low levels of vitamin D may reflect silent malabsorption and might be a risk factor for secondary hyperparathyroidism and bone resorption. Traditional dress habits and low

  7. Central nervous system involvement in primary Sjogren`s syndrome manifesting as multiple sclerosis.

    Liu, Jing-Yao; Zhao, Teng; Zhou, Chun-Kui

    2014-04-01

    Central nervous system symptoms in patients with primary Sjogren`s syndrome are rare. They can present as extraglandular manifestations and require a differential diagnosis from multiple sclerosis. Due to a variety of presentations, Sjogren`s syndrome with neurologic involvement may be difficult to diagnose. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old woman who was first diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2010, but who was subsequently diagnosed with primary Sjogren`s syndrome 2 years later after showing signs of atypical neurologic manifestations. Therefore, primary Sjogren`s syndrome should be suspected in patients who present with atypical clinical and radiologic neurologic manifestations.

  8. Imaging spinal cord atrophy in progressive myelopathies: HTLV-I-associated neurological disease (HAM/TSP) and multiple sclerosis (MS).

    Azodi, Shila; Nair, Govind; Enose-Akahata, Yoshimi; Charlip, Emily; Vellucci, Ashley; Cortese, Irene; Dwyer, Jenifer; Billioux, B Jeanne; Thomas, Chevaz; Ohayon, Joan; Reich, Daniel S; Jacobson, Steven

    2017-11-01

    Previous work measures spinal cord thinning in chronic progressive myelopathies, including human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Quantitative measurements of spinal cord atrophy are important in fully characterizing these and other spinal cord diseases. We aimed to investigate patterns of spinal cord atrophy and correlations with clinical markers. Spinal cord cross-sectional area was measured in individuals (24 healthy controls [HCs], 17 asymptomatic carriers of HTLV-1 (AC), 47 HAM/TSP, 74 relapsing-remitting MS [RRMS], 17 secondary progressive MS [SPMS], and 40 primary progressive MS [PPMS]) from C1 to T10. Clinical disability scores, viral markers, and immunological parameters were obtained for patients and correlated with representative spinal cord cross-sectional area regions at the C2 to C3, C4 to C5, and T4 to T9 levels. In 2 HAM/TSP patients, spinal cord cross-sectional area was measured over 3 years. All spinal cord regions are thinner in HAM/TSP (56 mm 2 [standard deviation, 10], 59 [10], 23 [5]) than in HC (76 [7], 83 [8], 38 [4]) and AC (71 [7], 78 [9], 36 [7]). SPMS (62 [9], 66 [9], 32 [6]) and PPMS (65 [11], 68 [10], 35 [7]) have thinner cervical cords than HC and RRMS (73 [9], 77 [10], 37 [6]). Clinical disability scores (Expanded Disability Status Scale [p = 0.009] and Instituto de Pesquisas de Cananeia [p = 0.03]) and CD8 + T-cell frequency (p = 0.04) correlate with T4 to T9 spinal cord cross-sectional area in HAM/TSP. Higher cerebrospinal fluid HTLV-1 proviral load (p = 0.01) was associated with thinner spinal cord cross-sectional area. Both HAM/TSP patients followed longitudinally showed thoracic thinning followed by cervical thinning. Group average spinal cord cross-sectional area in HAM/TSP and progressive MS show spinal cord atrophy. We further hypothesize in HAM/TSP that is possible that neuroglial loss from a thoracic inflammatory

  9. Systemic sclerosis and localized scleroderma--current concepts and novel targets for therapy.

    Distler, Oliver; Cozzio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic autoimmune disease with a high morbidity and mortality. Skin and organ fibrosis are key manifestations of SSc, for which no generally accepted therapy is available. Thus, there is a high unmet need for novel anti-fibrotic therapeutic strategies in SSc. At the same time, important progress has been made in the identification and characterization of potential molecular targets in fibrotic diseases over the recent years. In this review, we have selected four targeted therapies, which are tested in clinical trials in SSc, for in depths discussion of their preclinical characterization. Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) stimulators such as riociguat might target both vascular remodeling and tissue fibrosis. Blockade of interleukin-6 might be particularly promising for early inflammatory stages of SSc. Inhibition of serotonin receptor 2b signaling links platelet activation to tissue fibrosis. Targeting simultaneously multiple key molecules with the multityrosine kinase-inhibitor nintedanib might be a promising approach in complex fibrotic diseases such as SSc, in which many partially independent pathways are activated. Herein, we also give a state of the art overview of the current classification, clinical presentation, diagnostic approach, and treatment options of localized scleroderma. Finally, we discuss whether the novel targeted therapies currently tested in SSc could be used for localized scleroderma.

  10. Is there an association between glaucoma and capillaroscopy in patients with systemic sclerosis?

    Gomes, Beatriz Fiuza; Souza, Rebeca; Valadão, Thiago; Kara-Junior, Newton; Moraes, Haroldo Vieira; Santhiago, Marcony R

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the relationship between glaucoma diagnosis and the nailfold capillaroscopy pattern in patients with systemic sclerosis. An observational study in a cohort of patients with SSc was conducted. Patients with at least one nailfold videocapillaroscopy and one ophthalmology examination at the same year were included. Data collected were: age, sex; type of systemic sclerosis according to the degree of skin impairment, self-reported ethnicity, disease duration, current use and dosage of systemic corticosteroid, current use and dosage of bosentan ® , intraocular pressure, central corneal thickness, diagnosis of glaucoma and capillaroscopy pattern. Thirty-one patients with systemic sclerosis were enrolled, 23% had glaucoma. There was no statistically significant association between glaucoma diagnosis and the capillaroscopic pattern (p = 0.86). There was also no significant difference (p = 0.66) regarding intraocular pressure between patients with mild (13.9 ± 3.8 mmHg) and severe capillaroscopic pattern (14.4 ± 2.8 mmHg). The odds ratio of glaucoma for severe capillaroscopic pattern compared to mild was 1.6 (95% confidence interval: 0.3-9.5). Up to 23% of patients with SSc have glaucoma. The high prevalence of glaucoma in SSc suggests a possible systemic vascular disturbance as the cause. However, there seems to be no significant association between the capillaroscopy pattern and glaucoma in systemic sclerosis. Further research is required to improve the understanding of glaucoma in the context of systemic sclerosis.

  11. A gender gap in primary and secondary heart dysfunctions in systemic sclerosis

    Elhai, Muriel; Avouac, Jérôme; Walker, Ulrich A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In agreement with other autoimmune diseases, systemic sclerosis (SSc) is associated with a strong sex bias. However, unlike lupus, the effects of sex on disease phenotype and prognosis are poorly known. Therefore, we aimed to determine sex effects on outcomes. METHOD: We performed...

  12. The effect of captopril on thallium 201 myocardial perfusion in systemic sclerosis

    Kahan, A.; Devaux, J.Y.; Amor, B.; Menkes, C.J.; Weber, S.; Venot, A.; Strauch, G.

    1990-01-01

    In systemic sclerosis, abnormalities of myocardial perfusion are common and may be caused by a disturbance of the coronary microcirculation. We evaluated the long-term effect of captopril (75 to 150 mg per day) on thallium 201 myocardial perfusion in 12 normotensive patients with systemic sclerosis. Captopril significantly decreased the mean (+/- SD) number of segments with thallium 201 myocardial perfusion defects (6.5 +/- 1.9 at baseline and 4.4 +/- 2.7 after 1 year of treatment with captopril; p less than 0.02) and increased the mean global thallium score (9.6 +/- 1.7 at baseline and 11.4 +/- 2.1 after captopril; p less than 0.05). In a control group of eight normotensive patients with systemic sclerosis who did not receive captopril, no significant modification in thallium results occurred. Side effects with captopril included hypotension (six patients), taste disturbances (one patient), and skin rash (one patient). These side effects subsided when the dosage was reduced. These findings demonstrate that captopril improves thallium 201 myocardial perfusion in patients with systemic sclerosis and may therefore have a beneficial effect on scleroderma myocardial disease

  13. Metallothionein expression in the central nervous system of multiple sclerosis patients

    Penkowa, M; Espejo, C; Ortega-Aznar, A

    2003-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a major chronic demyelinating and inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) in which oxidative stress likely plays a pathogenic role in the development of myelin and neuronal damage. Metallothioneins (MTs) are antioxidant proteins induced in the CNS...

  14. Molecular and cellular profiling of systemic sclerosis and its preclinical stages

    Cossu, Marta

    2017-01-01

    The development of unrestrained fibrosis in the skin and internal organs is the hallmark of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Nevertheless, it is known that fibrosis is preceded by vascular and immune modifications. On the basis of SSc-specific autoantibodies and nailfold capillary lesions it is possible to

  15. Molecular subtypes of systemic sclerosis in association with anti-centromere antibodies and digital ulcers

    Bos, C. L.; van Baarsen, L. G. M.; Timmer, T. C. G.; Overbeek, M. J.; Basoski, N. M.; Rustenburg, F.; Baggen, J. M. C.; Thiesen, H. J.; Dijkmans, B. A. C.; van der Pouw Kraan, T. C. T. M.; Voskuyl, A. E.; Verweij, C. L.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify molecular profiles that may distinguish clinical subtypes in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Large-scale gene expression profiling was performed on peripheral blood (PB) from 12 SSc patients and 6 healthy individuals. Significance analysis of microarrays,

  16. High serum levels of YKL-40 in patients with systemic sclerosis are associated with pulmonary involvement

    Nordenbaek, C; Johansen, J S; Halberg, P

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: YKL-40, a growth factor of connective tissue cells, is elevated in sera from patients with diseases characterized by inflammation, tissue remodelling, or fibrosis. The aim of the study was to determine serum YKL-40 levels in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and to explore any po...

  17. Expression of specific chemokines and chemokine receptors in the central nervous system of multiple sclerosis patients

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Tani, M; Jensen, J

    1999-01-01

    Chemokines direct tissue invasion by specific leukocyte populations. Thus, chemokines may play a role in multiple sclerosis (MS), an idiopathic disorder in which the central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory reaction is largely restricted to mononuclear phagocytes and T cells. We asked whether...

  18. Influence of the IL6 Gene in Susceptibility to Systemic Sclerosis

    Cenit, M.C.; Simeon, C.P.; Vonk, M.C.; Callejas-Rubio, J.L.; Espinosa, G.; Carreira, P.; Blanco, F.J.; Narvaez, J.; Tolosa, C.; Roman-Ivorra, J.A.; Gomez-Garcia, I.; Garcia-Hernandez, F.J.; Gallego, M.; Garcia-Portales, R.; Egurbide, M.V.; Fonollosa, V.; Garcia de la Pena, P.; Lopez-Longo, F.J.; Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; The Spanish Scleroderma, G.; Hesselstrand, R.; Riemekasten, G.; Witte, T.J.M. de; Voskuyl, A.E.; Schuerwegh, A.J.; Madhok, R.; Fonseca, C.; Denton, C.; Nordin, A.; Palm, O.; Laar, J.M. van; Hunzelmann, N.; Distler, J.H.; Kreuter, A.; Herrick, A.; Worthington, J.; Koeleman, B.P.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.; Martin, J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a genetically complex autoimmune disease; the genetic component has not been fully defined. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) plays a crucial role in immunity and fibrosis, both key aspects of SSc. We investigated the influence of IL6 gene in the susceptibility and

  19. Influence of TYK2 in systemic sclerosis susceptibility : a new locus in the IL-12 pathway

    López-Isac, Elena; Campillo-Davo, Diana; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Guerra, Sandra G; Assassi, Shervin; Simeón, Carmen Pilar; Carreira, Patricia; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; García de la Peña, Paloma; Beretta, Lorenzo; Santaniello, Alessandro; Bellocchi, Chiara; Lunardi, Claudio; Moroncini, Gianluca; Gabrielli, Armando; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Kreuter, Alexander; Distler, Jörg Hw; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; de Vries-Bouwstra, Jeska; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Denton, Christopher P; Fonseca, Carmen; Radstake, Timothy Rdj; Mayes, Maureen D; Martín, Javier

    OBJECTIVES: TYK2 is a common genetic risk factor for several autoimmune diseases. This gene encodes a protein kinase involved in interleukin 12 (IL-12) pathway, which is a well-known player in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Therefore, we aimed to assess the possible role of this locus

  20. The STAT4 gene influences the genetic predisposition to systemic sclerosis phenotype.

    Rueda, B.; Broen, J.; Simeon, C.; Hesselstrand, R.; Diaz, B.; Suarez, H.; Ortego-Centeno, N.; Riemekasten, G.; Fonollosa, V.; Vonk, M.C.; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den; Sanchez-Roman, J.; Aguirre-Zamorano, M.A.; Garcia-Portales, R.; Pros, A.; Camps, M.T.; Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; Coenen, M.J.H.; Airo, P.; Beretta, L.; Scorza, R.; Laar, J. van; Gonzalez-Escribano, M.F.; Nelson, J.L.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.; Martin, J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of STAT4 gene in the genetic predisposition to systemic sclerosis (SSc) susceptibility or clinical phenotype. A total of 1317 SSc patients [896 with limited cutaneous SSc (lcSSc) and 421 with diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc)] and 3113 healthy

  1. The two-year progression of structural and functional cerebral MRI in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    R.A.L. Menke

    2018-01-01

    A longer period of follow-up, though necessarily involving more slowly-progressive cases, demonstrated widespread changes in both grey and white matter structural MRI measures. The mixed picture of regional decreases and increases in FC is compatible with compensatory change, in what should be viewed as a brain-based disease characterised by larger-scale disintegration of motor and frontal projection cerebral networks.

  2. Association between use of interferon beta and progression of disability in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Shirani, Afsaneh; Zhao, Yinshan; Karim, Mohammad Ehsanul; Evans, Charity; Kingwell, Elaine; van der Kop, Mia L; Oger, Joel; Gustafson, Paul; Petkau, John; Tremlett, Helen

    2012-07-18

    Interferon beta is widely prescribed to treat multiple sclerosis (MS); however, its relationship with disability progression has yet to be established. To investigate the association between interferon beta exposure and disability progression in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. Retrospective cohort study based on prospectively collected data (1985-2008) from British Columbia, Canada. Patients with relapsing-remitting MS treated with interferon beta (n = 868) were compared with untreated contemporary (n = 829) and historical (n = 959) cohorts. The main outcome measure was time from interferon beta treatment eligibility (baseline) to a confirmed and sustained score of 6 (requiring a cane to walk 100 m; confirmed at >150 days with no measurable improvement) on the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) (range, 0-10, with higher scores indicating higher disability). A multivariable Cox regression model with interferon beta treatment included as a time-varying covariate was used to assess the hazard of disease progression associated with interferon beta treatment. Analyses also included propensity score adjustment to address confounding by indication. The median active follow-up times (first to last EDSS measurement) were as follows: for the interferon beta-treated cohort, 5.1 years (interquartile range [IQR], 3.0-7.0 years); for the contemporary control cohort, 4.0 years (IQR, 2.1-6.4 years); and for the historical control cohort, 10.8 years (IQR, 6.3-14.7 years). The observed outcome rates for reaching a sustained EDSS score of 6 were 10.8%, 5.3%, and 23.1% in the 3 cohorts, respectively. After adjustment for potential baseline confounders (sex, age, disease duration, and EDSS score), exposure to interferon beta was not associated with a statistically significant difference in the hazard of reaching an EDSS score of 6 when either the contemporary control cohort (hazard ratio, 1.30; 95% CI, 0.92-1.83; P = .14) or the historical control cohort (hazard ratio, 0

  3. Prediction of improvement in skin fibrosis in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis: a EUSTAR analysis.

    Dobrota, Rucsandra; Maurer, Britta; Graf, Nicole; Jordan, Suzana; Mihai, Carina; Kowal-Bielecka, Otylia; Allanore, Yannick; Distler, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    Improvement of skin fibrosis is part of the natural course of diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc). Recognising those patients most likely to improve could help tailoring clinical management and cohort enrichment for clinical trials. In this study, we aimed to identify predictors for improvement of skin fibrosis in patients with dcSSc. We performed a longitudinal analysis of the European Scleroderma Trials And Research (EUSTAR) registry including patients with dcSSc, fulfilling American College of Rheumatology criteria, baseline modified Rodnan skin score (mRSS) ≥7 and follow-up mRSS at 12±2 months. The primary outcome was skin improvement (decrease in mRSS of >5 points and ≥25%) at 1 year follow-up. A respective increase in mRSS was considered progression. Candidate predictors for skin improvement were selected by expert opinion and logistic regression with bootstrap validation was applied. From the 919 patients included, 218 (24%) improved and 95 (10%) progressed. Eleven candidate predictors for skin improvement were analysed. The final model identified high baseline mRSS and absence of tendon friction rubs as independent predictors of skin improvement. The baseline mRSS was the strongest predictor of skin improvement, independent of disease duration. An upper threshold between 18 and 25 performed best in enriching for progressors over regressors. Patients with advanced skin fibrosis at baseline and absence of tendon friction rubs are more likely to regress in the next year than patients with milder skin fibrosis. These evidence-based data can be implemented in clinical trial design to minimise the inclusion of patients who would regress under standard of care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. Design progress of HYPER system

    Park, Won S.; Hwang, Woan; Kim, Yong H.; Nam-Il Tak; Song, Tae Y.

    2001-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been performing accelerator driven system related research and development called HYPER for the transmutation of nuclear waste and energy production through the transmutation process. HYPER program is within the framework of the national mid and long-term nuclear research plan. KAERI is aiming to develop the system concept and a type of roadmap by the year of 2001 and complete the conceptual design of HYPER system by the year 2006. Some major design features of HYPER system have been developed. Burnable poison concept is being developed to keep the core reactivity swing less than 10%. In order to increase the proliferation resistance, a pyrochemical process is employed for the separation. The trade-off studies for the fuel fabrication are being performed. A dispersion type is believed to have advantages in terms of achieving high discharge burnup. The long-lived fission products such as Tc-99 and I-129 will be destroyed using the localized thermal neutrons separately in the HYPER. A calcium hydride is employed as moderator. SSC-H(Super System Code-HYPER) is being developed to simulate the behavior of coolant systems. The thermal hydraulic properties of Pb-Bi are implemented to SSC-H. The design optimization of target and beam window is performed using FLUENT and ANSYS computer codes. In addition, beam irradiation test is performed to estimate the hardness of window material (9Cr-2WVTa) due to the proton using KeV order accelerator. Beam diameter and window thickness are optimized based on the simulation results. (author)

  5. Subscriber Response System. Progress Report.

    Callais, Richard T.

    Results of preliminary tests made prior and subsequent to the installation of a two-way interactive communication system which involves a computer complex termed the Local Processing Center and subscriber terminals located in the home or business location are reported. This first phase of the overall test plan includes tests made at Theta-Com…

  6. Progress with the Magnet Systems

    Miele, P

    B0 reaches 20.5 kA The B0 toroid model coil is a model of the BT coils with the same cross section and reduced length of 9 m. The same design and construction concepts have been implemented on B0 to validate the manufacturing technologies and concepts of the BT coils. The B0 realization is the result of a collaboration of CEA/INFN-LASA/CERN. A facility was built at CERN in order to test first the B0 model coil and thereafter the operation of the BT coils before installation. The infrastructure required to perform the tests includes a Helium refrigerator providing forced He flow for the cold mass and thermal shield cooling up to 100 g/s at 4.5 K and 60 K respectively; a 6V/24kA electrical system; the vacuum system able to provide 10-4 mbar; the safety system with appropriate quench protection unit and the systems for control and diagnostics. Because of its exceptional size, it is not feasible to assemble and test the BT as an integrated toroid on surface prior to underground installation. Therefore to repr...

  7. Multiple sclerosis - etiology and diagnostic potential.

    Kamińska, Joanna; Koper, Olga M; Piechal, Kinga; Kemona, Halina

    2017-06-30

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of autoimmune originate. The main agents responsible for the MS development include exogenous, environmental, and genetic factors. MS is characterized by multifocal and temporally scattered central nervous system (CNS) damage which lead to the axonal damage. Among clinical courses of MS it can be distinguish relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPSM), primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS), and progressive-relapsing multiple sclerosis (RPMS). Depending on the severity of signs and symptoms MS can be described as benign MS or malignant MS. MS diagnosis is based on McDonald's diagnostic criteria, which link clinical manifestation with characteristic lesions demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, and visual evoked potentials. Among CSF laboratory tests used to the MS diagnosis are applied: Tibbling & Link IgG index, reinbegrams, and CSF isoelectrofocusing for oligoclonal bands detection. It should be emphasized, that despite huge progress regarding MS as well as the availability of different diagnostics methods this disease is still a diagnostic challenge. It may result from fact that MS has diverse clinical course and there is a lack of single test, which would be of appropriate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for quick and accurate diagnosis.

  8. Multiple sclerosis - etiology and diagnostic potential

    Joanna Kamińska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of autoimmune originate. The main agents responsible for the MS development include exogenous, environmental, and genetic factors. MS is characterized by multifocal and temporally scattered central nervous system (CNS damage which lead to the axonal damage. Among clinical courses of MS it can be distinguish relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS, secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPSM, primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS, and progressive-relapsing multiple sclerosis (RPMS. Depending on the severity of signs and symptoms MS can be described as benign MS or malignant MS. MS diagnosis is based on McDonald’s diagnostic criteria, which link clinical manifestation with characteristic lesions demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis, and visual evoked potentials. Among CSF laboratory tests used to the MS diagnosis are applied: Tibbling & Link IgG index, reinbegrams, and CSF isoelectrofocusing for oligoclonal bands detection. It should be emphasized, that despite huge progress regarding MS as well as the availability of differentdiagnostics methods this disease is still a diagnostic challenge. It may result from fact that MS has diverse clinical course and there is a lack of single test, which would be of appropriate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for quick and accurate diagnosis.

  9. Progress with the AGR system

    Merrett, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    The AGR programme was initiated in 1965 with the ordering of the Dungeness 'B' reactor, followed by Hinkley point 'B' (1965), Hunterston 'B' (1968), Hartlepool (1970), Heysham I (1970) and the two latest stations at Heysham II and Torness. The paper reviews the achievements and prospects for the AGR system under 6 topic headings. These include: operational experience at Hinkley Point 'B' and Hunterston'B', commissioning of Dungeness 'B', Hartlepool and Heysham I, Heysham II/Torness design, Heysham II/Torness programme and finally future prospects. (U.K.)

  10. There is a need for new systemic sclerosis subset criteria. A content analytic approach.

    Johnson, S R; Soowamber, M L; Fransen, J; Khanna, D; Van Den Hoogen, F; Baron, M; Matucci-Cerinic, M; Denton, C P; Medsger, T A; Carreira, P E; Riemekasten, G; Distler, J; Gabrielli, A; Steen, V; Chung, L; Silver, R; Varga, J; Müller-Ladner, U; Vonk, M C; Walker, U A; Wollheim, F A; Herrick, A; Furst, D E; Czirjak, L; Kowal-Bielecka, O; Del Galdo, F; Cutolo, M; Hunzelmann, N; Murray, C D; Foeldvari, I; Mouthon, L; Damjanov, N; Kahaleh, B; Frech, T; Assassi, S; Saketkoo, L A; Pope, J E

    2018-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is heterogenous. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the purpose, strengths and limitations of existing SSc subset criteria, and identify ideas among experts about subsets. We conducted semi-structured interviews with randomly sampled international SSc experts. The interview transcripts underwent an iterative process with text deconstructed to single thought units until a saturated conceptual framework with coding was achieved and respondent occurrence tabulated. Serial cross-referential analyses of clusters were developed. Thirty experts from 13 countries were included; 67% were male, 63% were from Europe and 37% from North America; median experience of 22.5 years, with a median of 55 new SSc patients annually. Three thematic clusters regarding subsetting were identified: research and communication; management; and prognosis (prediction of internal organ involvement, survival). The strength of the limited/diffuse system was its ease of use, however 10% stated this system had marginal value. Shortcomings of the diffuse/limited classification were the risk of misclassification, predictions/generalizations did not always hold true, and that the elbow or knee threshold was arbitrary. Eighty-seven percent use more than 2 subsets including: SSc sine scleroderma, overlap conditions, antibody-determined subsets, speed of progression, and age of onset (juvenile, elderly). We have synthesized an international view of the construct of SSc subsets in the modern era. We found a number of factors underlying the construct of SSc subsets. Considerations for the next phase include rate of change and hierarchal clustering (e.g. limited/diffuse, then by antibodies).

  11. The circulating cell-free microrna profile in systemic sclerosis is distinct from both healthy controls and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Steen, S. O.; Iversen, L. V.; Carlsen, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the expression profile of cell-free circulating microRNA (miRNA) in systemic sclerosis (SSc), healthy controls (HC), and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods. Total RNA was purified from plasma and 45 different, mature miRNA were measured using quantitative PCR assays...

  12. The experience of transitioning from relapsing remitting to secondary progressive multiple sclerosis: views of patients and health professionals.

    O'Loughlin, Emer; Hourihan, Susan; Chataway, Jeremy; Playford, E Diane; Riazi, Afsane

    2017-09-01

    The majority of people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS) initially present with discreet periods of relapses followed by partial remission of symptoms (RRMS). Over time, most pwMS transition to secondary progressive MS (SPMS), characterized by a gradual accumulation of disability. This study aimed to explore the experiences, coping and needs associated with transitioning from RRMS to SPMS. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews with nine pwMS and seven specialist MS health professionals (HPs). Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. Four major themes were identified: "Is this really happening?"; "Becoming a reality"; "A life of struggle"; and "Brushing oneself off and moving on." Findings suggested a process of moving from uncertainty towards confirmation of one's diagnostic label. Being reclassified with SPMS served as a turning point for many, and was accompanied by a range of cognitive, emotional and behavioral responses. The value of adequate information and support surrounding the transition, and the potential benefit of education and support for health professionals in relation to the transition were indicated. Understanding pwMS' experiences of the transition is essential if clinicians are to provide pwMS with appropriate support during the transition. Implications for Rehabilitation The timing and delivery of preparatory education for patients about the transition to SPMS should be carefully considered. Sufficient information and follow-up support following the reclassification of SPMS is crucial but sometimes lacking. The importance of sensitive communication of the reclassification of SPMS was highlighted. MS Specialist health professionals may potentially benefit from training and support around communication of the reclassification of SPMS. Given the potential negative psychological impact of the transition, the psychological wellbeing of the patients during the transition to SPMS should be monitored and responded to appropriately.

  13. The effects of progressive muscular relaxation as a nursing procedure used for those who suffer from stress due to multiple sclerosis

    Paolla Gabrielle Nascimento Novais

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the effect of progressive muscle relaxation as a nursing procedure on the levels of stress for sufferers of multiple sclerosis. Method: random clinical trials conducted at the Neurology outpatients unit at a University Hospital. The sample consisted of 40 patients who were being monitored as outpatients (20 in a control group and 20 in an experimental group. The Progressive Muscle Relaxation technique was used. The control variables were collected through interviews that were recorded on forms and on the Perceived Stress Scale that we used. Five meetings were held every fortnight covering a period of eight weeks. The experimental group was advised to carry out daily progressive muscle relaxation activities. After eight weeks of these activities, they were evaluated again to measure their levels of stress. In order to analyze the data used, the software package Statistics for Social Sciences version 19.0 was used. Results: the application of the t test showed a significant reduction in the Perceived Stress Scale scores in the experimental group (p<0.001, which in turn proved that there was a reduction in the levels of stress after the application of the relaxation practic-es. Conclusion: the progressive muscle relaxation activities contributed to the reduction in stress levels for multiple sclerosis suffers and thus can be used in nursing for patients. Clinical Trials Identifier: NCT 02673827.

  14. CCR1+/CCR5+ mononuclear phagocytes accumulate in the central nervous system of patients with multiple sclerosis

    Trebst, C; Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Kivisäkk, P

    2001-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (monocytes, macrophages, and microglia) are considered central to multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis. Molecular cues that mediate mononuclear phagocyte accumulation and activation in the central nervous system (CNS) of MS patients may include chemokines RANTES/CCL5...

  15. 'Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency' in multiple sclerosis. Is multiple sclerosis a disease of the cerebrospinal venous outflow system?

    Wattjes, M.P.; Doepp, F.; Bendszus, M.; Fiehler, J.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic impaired venous outflow from the central nervous system has recently been claimed to be associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology. This resulted in the term chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) in MS. The concept of CCSVI is based on sonography studies showing that impaired venous outflow leading to pathological reflux is almost exclusively present in MS patients but not in healthy controls. Based on these findings, a new pathophysiological concept has been introduced suggesting that chronic venous outflow obstruction and venous reflux in the CNS result in pathological iron depositions leading to inflammation and neurodegeneration. The theory of CCSVI in MS has rapidly generated tremendous interest in the media and among patients and the scientific community. In particular, the potential shift in treatment concepts possibly leading to an interventional treatment approach including balloon angioplasty and venous stent placement is currently being debated. However, results from recent studies involving several imaging modalities have raised substantial concerns regarding the CCSVI concept in MS. In this review article, we explain the concept of CCSVI in MS and discuss this hypothesis in the context of MS pathophysiology and imaging studies which have tried to reproduce or refute this theory. In addition, we draw some major conclusions focusing in particular on the crucial question as to whether interventional treatment options are expedient. In conclusion, the present conclusive data confuting the theory of CCSVI in MS should lead to reluctance with respect to the interventional treatment of possible venous anomalies in MS patients. (orig.)

  16. Impaired quality of life in patients with systemic sclerosis compared to the general population and chronic dermatoses

    Bretterklieber, Agnes; Painsi, Clemens; Avian, Alexander; Wutte, Nora; Aberer, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Background Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a rare and potentially life threatening autoimmune disorder. The burden of disease compared to other dermatoses is unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess both the quality of life in patients with SSc and the variables that are associated with poor quality of life. Forty-one patients with systemic sclerosis (29 limited, 2 diffuse, 10 undifferentiated forms) were assessed with respect to their health status and compared to published data for the ...

  17. Genetic risk and a primary role for cell-mediated immune mechanisms in multiple sclerosis

    Sawcer, Stephen; Hellenthal, Garrett; Pirinen, Matti

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a common disease of the central nervous system in which the interplay between inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes typically results in intermittent neurological disturbance followed by progressive accumulation of disability. Epidemiological studies have shown that g...

  18. Radiological pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis associated to limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis: a case report.

    Hassoun, D; Dirou, S; Arrigoni, P P; Durant, C; Hamidou, M; Néel, A; Agard, C

    2018-05-18

    Pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) is a very rare interstitial lung disease (ILD) characterized by progressive fibrotic lesions of the visceral pleura and the sub-pleural parenchyma, affecting predominantly the upper lobes. PPFE may occur in different contextes like bone marrow or lung transplantations, but also in the context of telomeropathy with mutations of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), telomerase RNA component (TERC) or regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1 (RTEL1) genes. PPFE-like lesions have recently been described in patients with connective tissue disease (CTD)-related ILD. We report here the first detailed case of PPFE associated to systemic sclerosis (SSc) in a woman free of telomeropathy mutations. A caucasian 46 year old woman was followed for SSc in a limited form with anti-centromere Ab since 1998, and seen in 2008 for a routine visit. Her SSc was stable, and she had no respiratory signs. Pulmonary function tests showed an isolated decreased cTLCO at 55.9% (of predicted value). Cardiac ultrasonography was normal. Thoracic CT-scan showed upper lobes predominant mild and focal pleural and subpleural thickenings, suggestive of PPFE, with a slight worsening at 8 years of follow-up. She remained clinically stable. Biology only found a moderate and stable peripheral thrombocytopenia, and sequencing analysis did not find any mutations in TERT and TERC genes. ILD is frequent in SSc but isolated PPFE has never been described so far. In our case, PPFE is not related to telomeropathy, has indolent outcome and seems to have good prognosis. PPFE might be an extremely rare form of SSc-related ILD, although a fortuitous association remains possible.

  19. The role of MRI of the brain and spinal cord, and CSF examination for the diagnosis of primary progressive multiple sclerosis

    Nilsson, P; Sandberg-Wollheim, M; Norrving, B

    2007-01-01

    The clinical applicability of the revised McDonald diagnostic criteria of primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) was assessed in 17 patients with a longstanding PPMS diagnosis (mean 15 years). All patients were re-evaluated with clinical examinations, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI...... the revised McDonald criteria for positive scans. No contrast-enhancing lesion was observed despite administration of triple doses of gadolinium. In total, 12 patients fulfilled the revised McDonald MRI criteria for PPMS. Of the remaining five patients who incompletely fulfilled the revised MRI criteria, all...

  20. A system out of breath: how hypoxia possibly contributes to the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis.

    van Hal, T W; van Bon, L; Radstake, T R D J

    2011-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease characterized by vascular alterations and immunological disturbances and fibrosis, the order of which remains to be fully determined. Clinically, patients show clear signs of hypoxia in skin and internal organs. The low oxygen tension is potentially caused by a yet to be indentified circuitry involving the three features that typify SSc. In addition, once present, the hypoxia creates a vicious circle of ongoing pathology. In this paper, we provide an overview of the evidence that points towards the mechanisms causing hypoxia in SSc. In addition, data that suggest how hypoxia itself may orchestrate worsening of symptoms is presented. Altogether, it is clear that hypoxia is an important hallmark in SSc patients. By providing an overview of the mechanisms at play and the possible therapeutic avenues that have emerged, we hope to stimulate researchers to provide novel clues into the conundrum in SSc patients.

  1. A System Out of Breath: How Hypoxia Possibly Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Systemic Sclerosis

    T. W. van Hal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SSc is an autoimmune disease characterized by vascular alterations and immunological disturbances and fibrosis, the order of which remains to be fully determined. Clinically, patients show clear signs of hypoxia in skin and internal organs. The low oxygen tension is potentially caused by a yet to be indentified circuitry involving the three features that typify SSc. In addition, once present, the hypoxia creates a vicious circle of ongoing pathology. In this paper, we provide an overview of the evidence that points towards the mechanisms causing hypoxia in SSc. In addition, data that suggest how hypoxia itself may orchestrate worsening of symptoms is presented. Altogether, it is clear that hypoxia is an important hallmark in SSc patients. By providing an overview of the mechanisms at play and the possible therapeutic avenues that have emerged, we hope to stimulate researchers to provide novel clues into the conundrum in SSc patients.

  2. Correlation between serum E-selectin levels and panoramic nailfold capillaroscopy in systemic sclerosis.

    Valim, V; Assis, L S S; Simões, M F J; Trevisani, V F M; Pucinelli, M L C; Andrade, L E C

    2004-09-01

    E-selectin is expressed by the activated endothelium and its plasma levels are increased in patients with systemic sclerosis. Eighteen patients fulfilling the American Rheumatism Association criteria for systemic sclerosis, 15 females and 3 males, 42-70 years old, 9 with diffuse and 9 with limited forms, were sequentially recruited for this study. Serum E-selectin levels were determined by commercially available ELISA and their association with nailfold capillaroscopic abnormalities was investigated. Nailfold capillaries were analyzed by 16X magnification wide-field capillaroscopy. Two parameters on capillaroscopy were used to correlate to serum E-selectin: deletion and ectasia. Data were analyzed statistically by the Student t-test and Spearman correlation. Two-tailed P values below 0.05 were considered significant. E-selectin range was 38 to 200 ng/ml (80 +/- 39.94). There was a correlation between serum E-selectin levels and the deletion capillaroscopic score (r = 0.50, P capillaroscopy. The stronger correlation of deletion score in capillaroscopy in early disease suggests that serum E-selectin levels might be a useful biochemical marker of disease activity in systemic sclerosis.

  3. Altered Dermal Fibroblasts in Systemic Sclerosis Display Podoplanin and CD90.

    Nazari, Banafsheh; Rice, Lisa M; Stifano, Giuseppina; Barron, Alexander M S; Wang, Yu Mei; Korndorf, Tess; Lee, Jungeun; Bhawan, Jag; Lafyatis, Robert; Browning, Jeffrey L

    2016-10-01

    Tissue injury triggers the activation and differentiation of multiple cell types to minimize damage and initiate repair processes. In systemic sclerosis, these repair processes appear to run unchecked, leading to aberrant remodeling and fibrosis of the skin and multiple internal organs, yet the fundamental pathological defect remains unknown. We describe herein a transition wherein the abundant CD34(+) dermal fibroblasts present in healthy human skin disappear in the skin of systemic sclerosis patients, and CD34(-), podoplanin(+), and CD90(+) fibroblasts appear. This transition is limited to the upper dermis in several inflammatory skin diseases, yet in systemic sclerosis, it can occur in all regions of the dermis. In vitro, primary dermal fibroblasts readily express podoplanin in response to the inflammatory stimuli tumor necrosis factor and IL-1β. Furthermore, we show that on acute skin injury in both human and murine settings, this transition occurs quickly, consistent with a response to inflammatory signaling. Transitioned fibroblasts partially resemble the cells that form the reticular networks in organized lymphoid tissues, potentially linking two areas of fibroblast research. These results allow for the visualization and quantification of a basic stage of fibroblast differentiation in inflammatory and fibrotic diseases in the skin. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Proton spectroscopy study of the masseter in patients with systemic sclerosis

    Marcucci, Marcelo; Abdala, Nitamar

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate metabolite concentration in the masseter of patients with systemic sclerosis, by analyzing creatine, choline, lipid and lactate levels, and correlating them with the presence of mandibular osteolysis. Materials and methods: The sample included 25 individuals, 15 of them with diagnosis of systemic sclerosis, divided into two groups according to the presence (group I) or absence (group II) of osteolysis, and 10 healthy individuals (group III, control). All of them were submitted to proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy with PRESS sequence and 3D acquisition. Results: Metabolite analysis showed that the creatine and lipid levels were the same for the three groups. Patients in group I presented higher levels of choline when compared with group III. On the other hand, lower lactate levels were observed in groups I and II when compared with the healthy individuals. Creatine/lipid and choline/lactate ratios were the same in the three groups. Conclusion: Lower lactate levels were observed in the patients with systemic sclerosis (groups I and II). Choline levels were increased in the patients with mandibular osteolysis (group I). Creatine/choline, lipid/lactate and choline/lipid ratios were different among the three groups. Further studies are necessary to understand the role played by the masseter in the development of mandibular osteolysis. (author)

  5. Metabolic therapy with Deanna Protocol supplementation delays disease progression and extends survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS mouse model.

    Csilla Ari

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a neurodegenerative disorder of motor neurons causing progressive muscle weakness, paralysis, and eventual death from respiratory failure. There is currently no cure or effective treatment for ALS. Besides motor neuron degeneration, ALS is associated with impaired energy metabolism, which is pathophysiologically linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and glutamate excitotoxicity. The Deanna Protocol (DP is a metabolic therapy that has been reported to alleviate symptoms in patients with ALS. In this study we hypothesized that alternative fuels in the form of TCA cycle intermediates, specifically arginine-alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG, the main ingredient of the DP, and the ketogenic diet (KD, would increase motor function and survival in a mouse model of ALS (SOD1-G93A. ALS mice were fed standard rodent diet (SD, KD, or either diets containing a metabolic therapy of the primary ingredients of the DP consisting of AAKG, gamma-aminobutyric acid, Coenzyme Q10, and medium chain triglyceride high in caprylic triglyceride. Assessment of ALS-like pathology was performed using a pre-defined criteria for neurological score, accelerated rotarod test, paw grip endurance test, and grip strength test. Blood glucose, blood beta-hydroxybutyrate, and body weight were also monitored. SD+DP-fed mice exhibited improved neurological score from age 116 to 136 days compared to control mice. KD-fed mice exhibited better motor performance on all motor function tests at 15 and 16 weeks of age compared to controls. SD+DP and KD+DP therapies significantly extended survival time of SOD1-G93A mice by 7.5% (p = 0.001 and 4.2% (p = 0.006, respectively. Sixty-three percent of mice in the KD+DP and 72.7% of the SD+DP group lived past 125 days, while only 9% of the control animals survived past that point. Targeting energy metabolism with metabolic therapy produces a therapeutic effect in ALS mice which

  6. Metabolic therapy with Deanna Protocol supplementation delays disease progression and extends survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) mouse model.

    Ari, Csilla; Poff, Angela M; Held, Heather E; Landon, Carol S; Goldhagen, Craig R; Mavromates, Nicholas; D'Agostino, Dominic P

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a neurodegenerative disorder of motor neurons causing progressive muscle weakness, paralysis, and eventual death from respiratory failure. There is currently no cure or effective treatment for ALS. Besides motor neuron degeneration, ALS is associated with impaired energy metabolism, which is pathophysiologically linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and glutamate excitotoxicity. The Deanna Protocol (DP) is a metabolic therapy that has been reported to alleviate symptoms in patients with ALS. In this study we hypothesized that alternative fuels in the form of TCA cycle intermediates, specifically arginine-alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG), the main ingredient of the DP, and the ketogenic diet (KD), would increase motor function and survival in a mouse model of ALS (SOD1-G93A). ALS mice were fed standard rodent diet (SD), KD, or either diets containing a metabolic therapy of the primary ingredients of the DP consisting of AAKG, gamma-aminobutyric acid, Coenzyme Q10, and medium chain triglyceride high in caprylic triglyceride. Assessment of ALS-like pathology was performed using a pre-defined criteria for neurological score, accelerated rotarod test, paw grip endurance test, and grip strength test. Blood glucose, blood beta-hydroxybutyrate, and body weight were also monitored. SD+DP-fed mice exhibited improved neurological score from age 116 to 136 days compared to control mice. KD-fed mice exhibited better motor performance on all motor function tests at 15 and 16 weeks of age compared to controls. SD+DP and KD+DP therapies significantly extended survival time of SOD1-G93A mice by 7.5% (p = 0.001) and 4.2% (p = 0.006), respectively. Sixty-three percent of mice in the KD+DP and 72.7% of the SD+DP group lived past 125 days, while only 9% of the control animals survived past that point. Targeting energy metabolism with metabolic therapy produces a therapeutic effect in ALS mice which may prolong

  7. G-CSF prevents the progression of structural disintegration of white matter tracts in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a pilot trial.

    Thomas Duning

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The hematopoietic protein Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF has neuroprotective and -regenerative properties. The G-CSF receptor is expressed by motoneurons, and G-CSF protects cultured motoneuronal cells from apoptosis. It therefore appears as an attractive and feasible drug candidate for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. The current pilot study was performed to determine whether treatment with G-CSF in ALS patients is feasible.Ten patients with definite ALS were entered into a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial. Patients received either 10 µg/kg BW G-CSF or placebo subcutaneously for the first 10 days and from day 20 to 25 of the study. Clinical outcome was assessed by changes in the ALS functional rating scale (ALSFRS, a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery, and by examining hand activities of daily living over the course of the study (100 days. The total number of adverse events (AE and treatment-related AEs, discontinuation due to treatment-related AEs, laboratory parameters including leukocyte, erythrocyte, and platelet count, as well as vital signs were examined as safety endpoints. Furthermore, we explored potential effects of G-CSF on structural cerebral abnormalities on the basis of voxel-wise statistics of Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI, brain volumetry, and voxel-based morphometry.Treatment was well-tolerated. No significant differences were found between groups in clinical tests and brain volumetry from baseline to day 100. However, DTI analysis revealed significant reductions of fractional anisotropy (FA encompassing diffuse areas of the brain when patients were compared to controls. On longitudinal analysis, the placebo group showed significant greater and more widespread decline in FA than the ALS patients treated with G-CSF.Subcutaneous G-CSF treatment in ALS patients appears as feasible approach. Although exploratory analysis of clinical data showed no significant effect

  8. Central nervous system remyelination in culture — A tool for multiple sclerosis research

    Zhang, Hui; Jarjour, Andrew A.; Boyd, Amanda; Williams, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system which only affects humans. This makes it difficult to study at a molecular level, and to develop and test potential therapies that may change the course of the disease. The development of therapies to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis is a key research aim, to both aid restoration of electrical impulse conduction in nerves and provide neuroprotection, reducing disability in patients. Testing a remyelination therapy in the many and various in vivo models of multiple sclerosis is expensive in terms of time, animals and money. We report the development and characterisation of an ex vivo slice culture system using mouse brain and spinal cord, allowing investigation of myelination, demyelination and remyelination, which can be used as an initial reliable screen to select the most promising remyelination strategies. We have automated the quantification of myelin to provide a high content and moderately-high-throughput screen for testing therapies for remyelination both by endogenous and exogenous means and as an invaluable way of studying the biology of remyelination. PMID:21515259

  9. Central nervous system remyelination in culture--a tool for multiple sclerosis research.

    Zhang, Hui; Jarjour, Andrew A; Boyd, Amanda; Williams, Anna

    2011-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system which only affects humans. This makes it difficult to study at a molecular level, and to develop and test potential therapies that may change the course of the disease. The development of therapies to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis is a key research aim, to both aid restoration of electrical impulse conduction in nerves and provide neuroprotection, reducing disability in patients. Testing a remyelination therapy in the many and various in vivo models of multiple sclerosis is expensive in terms of time, animals and money. We report the development and characterisation of an ex vivo slice culture system using mouse brain and spinal cord, allowing investigation of myelination, demyelination and remyelination, which can be used as an initial reliable screen to select the most promising remyelination strategies. We have automated the quantification of myelin to provide a high content and moderately-high-throughput screen for testing therapies for remyelination both by endogenous and exogenous means and as an invaluable way of studying the biology of remyelination. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gait Characteristics in Adolescents With Multiple Sclerosis.

    Kalron, Alon; Frid, Lior; Menascu, Shay

    2017-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a progressive autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. A presentation of multiple sclerosis before age18 years has traditionally been thought to be rare. However, during the past decade, more cases have been reported. We examined gait characteristics in 24 adolescents with multiple sclerosis (12 girls, 12 boys). Mean disease duration was 20.4 (S.D. = 24.9) months and mean age was 15.5 (S.D. = 1.1) years. The mean expanded disability status scale score was 1.7 (S.D. = 0.7) indicating minimal disability. Outcomes were compared with gait and the gait variability index value of healthy age-matched adolescents. Adolescents with multiple sclerosis walked slower with a wider base of support compared with age-matched healthy control subjects. Moreover, the gait variability index was lower in the multiple sclerosis group compared with the values in the healthy adolescents: 85.4 (S.D. = 8.1) versus 96.5 (S.D. = 7.4). We present gait parameters of adolescents with multiple sclerosis. From a clinical standpoint, our data could improve management of walking dysfunction in this relatively young population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Trends and progress in system identification

    Eykhoff, Pieter

    1981-01-01

    Trends and Progress in System Identification is a three-part book that focuses on model considerations, identification methods, and experimental conditions involved in system identification. Organized into 10 chapters, this book begins with a discussion of model method in system identification, citing four examples differing on the nature of the models involved, the nature of the fields, and their goals. Subsequent chapters describe the most important aspects of model theory; the """"classical"""" methods and time series estimation; application of least squares and related techniques for the e

  12. Progressive systemic scleroderma (A case report)

    Han, Jung Suh; Kwon, Chung Sik

    1974-01-01

    This is a report of a rare case of progressive systemic scleroderma involving the skin, lungs, bones, esophagus, duodenum, and colon in a 27 year old Korean female whose chief complaints were generalized edema, knee joint pain, hard and indurated skin lesions on the anterior chest, neck, both upper and lower extremities with loss of pain and touch sensation for one year. A review of literature is submitted

  13. Progressive systemic scleroderma (A case report)

    Han, Jung Suh; Kwon, Chung Sik [Chonnam University College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1974-10-15

    This is a report of a rare case of progressive systemic scleroderma involving the skin, lungs, bones, esophagus, duodenum, and colon in a 27 year old Korean female whose chief complaints were generalized edema, knee joint pain, hard and indurated skin lesions on the anterior chest, neck, both upper and lower extremities with loss of pain and touch sensation for one year. A review of literature is submitted.

  14. Systems level analysis of systemic sclerosis shows a network of immune and profibrotic pathways connected with genetic polymorphisms.

    J Matthew Mahoney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SSc is a rare systemic autoimmune disease characterized by skin and organ fibrosis. The pathogenesis of SSc and its progression are poorly understood. The SSc intrinsic gene expression subsets (inflammatory, fibroproliferative, normal-like, and limited are observed in multiple clinical cohorts of patients with SSc. Analysis of longitudinal skin biopsies suggests that a patient's subset assignment is stable over 6-12 months. Genetically, SSc is multi-factorial with many genetic risk loci for SSc generally and for specific clinical manifestations. Here we identify the genes consistently associated with the intrinsic subsets across three independent cohorts, show the relationship between these genes using a gene-gene interaction network, and place the genetic risk loci in the context of the intrinsic subsets. To identify gene expression modules common to three independent datasets from three different clinical centers, we developed a consensus clustering procedure based on mutual information of partitions, an information theory concept, and performed a meta-analysis of these genome-wide gene expression datasets. We created a gene-gene interaction network of the conserved molecular features across the intrinsic subsets and analyzed their connections with SSc-associated genetic polymorphisms. The network is composed of distinct, but interconnected, components related to interferon activation, M2 macrophages, adaptive immunity, extracellular matrix remodeling, and cell proliferation. The network shows extensive connections between the inflammatory- and fibroproliferative-specific genes. The network also shows connections between these subset-specific genes and 30 SSc-associated polymorphic genes including STAT4, BLK, IRF7, NOTCH4, PLAUR, CSK, IRAK1, and several human leukocyte antigen (HLA genes. Our analyses suggest that the gene expression changes underlying the SSc subsets may be long-lived, but mechanistically interconnected

  15. [The application of high-frequency and iTBS transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of spasticity in the patients presenting with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis].

    Korzhova, J E; Chervyakov, A V; Poydasheva, A G; Kochergin, I A; Peresedova, A V; Zakharova, M N; Suponeva, N A; Chernikova, L A; Piradov, M A

    Spasticity is considered to be a common manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Muscle relaxants are not sufficiently effective; more than that, some of them often cause a variety of adverse reactions. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be a promising new tool for the treatment of spasticity. The objective of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of the two TMS protocols: rhythmic (high-frequency) TMS (rTMS) and stimulation with the theta bursts (iTBS) in terms of their ability to reduce spasticity in the patients presenting with multiple sclerosis. Twenty two patients with secondary-progressive multiple sclerosis were pseudo-randomized into two groups: those in the first (high-frequency) group received the treatment with the use of rTMS therapy at a frequency of 10 Hz; the patients of the second group, underwent stimulation with the theta bursts (iTBS). All the patients received 10 sessions of either stimulation applied to the primary motor area (M1) of both legs. The effectiveness of TMS protocols was evaluated before therapy and after 10 sessions of stimulation based on the Modified Ashworth scale (MAS), the expanded disability status scale (EDSS), and the Kurtzke functional scale (Kfs). In addition, the patients were interviewed before treatment, after 10 rTMS sessions, immediately after and within 2 and 12 weeks after the completion of the treatment using questionnaires for the evaluation of spasticity (SESS) , fatigue, and dysfunction of the pelvic organs (severity of defecation and urination disorders), fatigue. The study has demonstrated a significant reduction in spasticity in the patients of both groups at the end of the TMS protocol based on the MAS scale. There was no significant difference between the outcomes of the two protocols. Both had positive effect on the concomitant «non-motor» symptoms (fatigue, dysfunction of the pelvic organs). High-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation (10 sessions of rTMS therapy at a frequency

  16. Development of protein biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid for secondary progressive multiple sclerosis using selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (SRM-MS

    Jia Yan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS. It involves damage to the myelin sheath surrounding axons and to the axons themselves. MS most often presents with a series of relapses and remissions but then evolves over a variable period of time into a slowly progressive form of neurological dysfunction termed secondary progressive MS (SPMS. The reasons for this change in clinical presentation are unclear. The absence of a diagnostic marker means that there is a lag time of several years before the diagnosis of SPMS can be established. At the same time, understanding the mechanisms that underlie SPMS is critical to the development of rational therapies for this untreatable stage of the disease. Results Using high performance liquid chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC; we have established a highly specific and sensitive selected reaction monitoring (SRM assay. Our multiplexed SRM assay has facilitated the simultaneous detection of surrogate peptides originating from 26 proteins present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Protein levels in CSF were generally ~200-fold lower than that in human sera. A limit of detection (LOD was determined to be as low as one femtomol. We processed and analysed CSF samples from a total of 22 patients with SPMS, 7 patients with SPMS treated with lamotrigine, 12 patients with non-inflammatory neurological disorders (NIND and 10 healthy controls (HC for the levels of these 26 selected potential protein biomarkers. Our SRM data found one protein showing significant difference between SPMS and HC, three proteins differing between SPMS and NIND, two proteins between NIND and HC, and 11 protein biomarkers showing significant difference between a lamotrigine-treated and untreated SPMS group. Principal component analysis (PCA revealed that these 26 proteins were correlated, and could be represented by four principal components. Overall, we established an

  17. A single dose of a neuron-binding human monoclonal antibody improves brainstem NAA concentrations, a biomarker for density of spinal cord axons, in a model of progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Watzlawik, Jens O; Warrington, Arthur E; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-04-29

    Intracerebral infection of susceptible mouse strains with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) results in chronic demyelinating disease with progressive axonal loss and neurologic dysfunction similar to progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). We previously showed that as the disease progresses, a marked decrease in brainstem N-acetyl aspartate (NAA; metabolite associated with neuronal integrity) concentrations, reflecting axon health, is measured. We also demonstrated stimulation of neurite outgrowth by a neuron-binding natural human antibody, IgM12. Treatment with either the serum-derived or recombinant human immunoglobulin M 12 (HIgM12) preserved functional motor activity in the TMEV model. In this study, we examined IgM-mediated changes in brainstem NAA concentrations and central nervous system (CNS) pathology. (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) showed that treatment with HIgM12 significantly increased brainstem NAA concentrations compared to controls in TMEV-infected mice. Pathologic analysis demonstrated a significant preservation of axons in the spinal cord of animals treated with HIgM12. This study links drug efficacy of slowing deficits with axon preservation and NAA concentrations in the brainstem in a model of progressive MS. HIgM12-mediated changes of NAA concentrations in the brainstem are a surrogate marker of axon injury/preservation throughout the spinal cord. This study provides proof-of-concept that a neuron-reactive human IgM can be therapeutic and provides a biomarker for clinical trials.

  18. Interferon Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis

    Alajbegovic, Azra; Deljo, Dervis; Alajbegovic, Salem; Djelilovic-Vranic, Jasminka; Todorovic, Ljubica; Tiric-Campara, Merita

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) differ: treatment of relapse, treatment slow the progression of the disease (immunomodulators and immunosuppression), and symptomatic treatment. The aim: The aim of this study is to analyze the application of interferon therapy in the treatment of MS-E: Process the disease, patients with multiple sclerosis who have passed the commission for multiple sclerosis at the Neurology Clinic of Clinical Center of Sarajevo University as a refere...

  19. Correlation between serum E-selectin levels and panoramic nailfold capillaroscopy in systemic sclerosis

    Valim V.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available E-selectin is expressed by the activated endothelium and its plasma levels are increased in patients with systemic sclerosis. Eighteen patients fulfilling the American Rheumatism Association criteria for systemic sclerosis, 15 females and 3 males, 42-70 years old, 9 with diffuse and 9 with limited forms, were sequentially recruited for this study. Serum E-selectin levels were determined by commercially available ELISA and their association with nailfold capillaroscopic abnormalities was investigated. Nailfold capillaries were analyzed by 16X magnification wide-field capillaroscopy. Two parameters on capillaroscopy were used to correlate to serum E-selectin: deletion and ectasia. Data were analyzed statistically by the Student t-test and Spearman correlation. Two-tailed P values below 0.05 were considered significant. E-selectin range was 38 to 200 ng/ml (80 ± 39.94. There was a correlation between serum E-selectin levels and the deletion capillaroscopic score (r = 0.50, P < 0.035. This correlation was even stronger within the first 48 months of diagnosis (r = 0.63, P < 0.048. On the other hand, no association was observed between selectin and ectasia. Patients with diffuse disease presented higher serum E-selectin levels than patients with limited disease, although the difference was not statistically significant (96.44 ± 48.04 vs 63.56 ± 21.77 ng/dl; P = 0.08. The present study is the first showing a correlation between soluble serum E-selectin levels and alterations in capillaroscopy. The stronger correlation of deletion score in capillaroscopy in early disease suggests that serum E-selectin levels might be a useful biochemical marker of disease activity in systemic sclerosis.

  20. Correlation between serum E-selectin levels and panoramic nailfold capillaroscopy in systemic sclerosis

    V. Valim

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available E-selectin is expressed by the activated endothelium and its plasma levels are increased in patients with systemic sclerosis. Eighteen patients fulfilling the American Rheumatism Association criteria for systemic sclerosis, 15 females and 3 males, 42-70 years old, 9 with diffuse and 9 with limited forms, were sequentially recruited for this study. Serum E-selectin levels were determined by commercially available ELISA and their association with nailfold capillaroscopic abnormalities was investigated. Nailfold capillaries were analyzed by 16X magnification wide-field capillaroscopy. Two parameters on capillaroscopy were used to correlate to serum E-selectin: deletion and ectasia. Data were analyzed statistically by the Student t-test and Spearman correlation. Two-tailed P values below 0.05 were considered significant. E-selectin range was 38 to 200 ng/ml (80 ± 39.94. There was a correlation between serum E-selectin levels and the deletion capillaroscopic score (r = 0.50, P < 0.035. This correlation was even stronger within the first 48 months of diagnosis (r = 0.63, P < 0.048. On the other hand, no association was observed between selectin and ectasia. Patients with diffuse disease presented higher serum E-selectin levels than patients with limited disease, although the difference was not statistically significant (96.44 ± 48.04 vs 63.56 ± 21.77 ng/dl; P = 0.08. The present study is the first showing a correlation between soluble serum E-selectin levels and alterations in capillaroscopy. The stronger correlation of deletion score in capillaroscopy in early disease suggests that serum E-selectin levels might be a useful biochemical marker of disease activity in systemic sclerosis.

  1. Tuberous sclerosis complex surveillance and management: recommendations of the 2012 International Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Consensus Conference.

    Krueger, Darcy A; Northrup, Hope

    2013-10-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a genetic disorder affecting every organ system, but disease manifestations vary significantly among affected individuals. The diverse and varied presentations and progression can be life-threatening with significant impact on cost and quality of life. Current surveillance and management practices are highly variable among region and country, reflective of the fact that last consensus recommendations occurred in 1998 and an updated, comprehensive standard is lacking that incorporates the latest scientific evidence and current best clinical practices. The 2012 International Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Consensus Group, comprising 79 specialists from 14 countries, was organized into 12 separate subcommittees, each led by a clinician with advanced expertise in tuberous sclerosis complex and the relevant medical subspecialty. Each subcommittee focused on a specific disease area with important clinical management implications and was charged with formulating key clinical questions to address within its focus area, reviewing relevant literature, evaluating the strength of data, and providing a recommendation accordingly. The updated consensus recommendations for clinical surveillance and management in tuberous sclerosis complex are summarized here. The recommendations are relevant to the entire lifespan of the patient, from infancy to adulthood, including both individuals where the diagnosis is newly made as well as individuals where the diagnosis already is established. The 2012 International Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Consensus Recommendations provide an evidence-based, standardized approach for optimal clinical care provided for individuals with tuberous sclerosis complex. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiographic changes of the distal phalangeal tuft of the hands in subjects with systemic sclerosis. Systematic review.

    Izquierdo, Yojhan Edilberto; Calvo Páramo, Enrique; Castañeda, Luisa María; Gómez, Sandra Viviana; Zambrano, Fernán Santiago

    To determine abnormal plain radiograph findings of the distal phalanx tuft of the hand (DPTH) associated with systemic sclerosis in adults. A systematic review was developed following the parameters of the PRISMA guidelines in databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIREME, Scielo, Google Scholar and others including as primary outcomes alterations of DPTH (erosions, resorption, sclerosis and proliferation) detected by simple radiography in subjects with systemic sclerosis. The prevalence of radiographic findings was synthesized using the fixed effects model. The statistical associations were expressed in terms of relative risk or odds ratio with their respective confidence intervals and p values. Twenty-two observational studies were included; the prevalence of DPTH resorption was 28.3% (95% CI: 0.256-0.312; p < .001); I 2 =80.4%, the prevalence of calcinosis was 15.6% (95% CI: 0.113-0.210; p < .001); I 2 =0%. No study reported proliferation or erosions and only one study described sclerosis of DPTH in 5 individuals. Resorption and calcinosis of DPTH are the characteristic radiographic findings in patients with systemic sclerosis. However, new studies with greater methodological strength are needed to establish associations between these phenomena and their presence in other connective tissue diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  3. Coexistence of systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis. A case report and literature review.

    Jácome Sánchez, Elisa Carolina; García Castillo, María Ariana; González, Victor Paredes; Guillén López, Fernando; Correa Díaz, Edgar Patricio

    2018-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) are autoimmune diseases, the coexistence of which is uncommon in patients. Owing to the rarity of this condition, the distinction between MS and SLE is a diagnostic challenge for neurologists. We present a case report in which MS and SLE were present in the same patient. There are few case reports in the world on the association between MS and SLE. The following case report is the first of its kind in which both MS and SLE are present in a patient from a country with low prevalence of MS such as Ecuador.

  4. Analysis of the association between CD40 and CD40 ligand polymorphisms and systemic sclerosis

    Teruel, María; Simeón Aznar, Carmen Pilar; Broen, Jasper C.; Vonk, Madelon C.; Carreira, Patricia; Camps García, María Teresa; García-Portales, Rosa; Delgado-Frías, Esmeralda; Gallego, Maria; Espinosa Garriga, Gerard; Spanish Scleroderma Group; Beretta, Lorenzo; Airó, Paolo; Lunardi, Claudio; Riemekasten, Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible role of CD40 and CD40 ligand (CD40LG) genes in the susceptibility and phenotype expression of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Methods: In total, 2,670 SSc patients and 3,245 healthy individuals from four European populations (Spain, Germany, The Netherlands, and Italy) were included in the study. Five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of CD40 (rs1883832, rs4810485, rs1535045) and CD40LG (rs3092952, rs3092920) were genot...

  5. Bilateral vocal fold immobility in a patient with overlap syndrome rheumatoid arthritis/systemic sclerosis.

    Ingegnoli, Francesca; Galbiati, Valentina; Bacciu, Andrea; Zeni, Silvana; Fantini, Flavio

    2007-10-01

    Bilateral vocal fold immobility (BVFI) can be the result of a primary disorder or as an iatrogenic complication of surgery or intubation. Laryngeal involvement can be a rare complication of connective tissue disorders and it usually occurs in association with other symptoms and signs that indicate active disease. We present a case of BVFI in a patient with an overlap syndrome rheumatoid arthritis/systemic sclerosis, referred to our division because of dysphonia and dyspnea. The video-laryngostroboscopy showed the presence of BVFI. Physical examination, blood tests, lung and neck high resolution computed tomography scans did not demonstrate significant abnormalities. She was treated with pulses of intravenous methylprednisolone with slow improvement.

  6. Metaheuristics progress in complex systems optimization

    Doerner, Karl F; Greistorfer, Peter; Gutjahr, Walter; Hartl, Richard F; Reimann, Marc

    2007-01-01

    The aim of ""Metaheuristics: Progress in Complex Systems Optimization"" is to provide several different kinds of information: a delineation of general metaheuristics methods, a number of state-of-the-art articles from a variety of well-known classical application areas as well as an outlook to modern computational methods in promising new areas. Therefore, this book may equally serve as a textbook in graduate courses for students, as a reference book for people interested in engineering or social sciences, and as a collection of new and promising avenues for researchers working in this field.

  7. MD1003 (high-dose biotin) for the treatment of progressive multiple sclerosis: A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Tourbah, Ayman; Lebrun-Frenay, Christine; Edan, Gilles; Clanet, Michel; Papeix, Caroline; Vukusic, Sandra; De Sèze, Jerome; Debouverie, Marc; Gout, Olivier; Clavelou, Pierre; Defer, Gilles; Laplaud, David-Axel; Moreau, Thibault; Labauge, Pierre; Brochet, Bruno; Sedel, Frédéric; Pelletier, Jean

    2016-11-01

    Treatment with MD1003 (high-dose biotin) showed promising results in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) in a pilot open-label study. To confirm the efficacy and safety of MD1003 in progressive MS in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Patients (n = 154) with a baseline Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score of 4.5-7 and evidence of disease worsening within the previous 2 years were randomised to 12-month MD1003 (100 mg biotin) or placebo thrice daily, followed by 12-month MD1003 for all patients. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with disability reversal at month 9, confirmed at month 12, defined as an EDSS decrease of ⩾1 point (⩾0.5 for EDSS 6-7) or a ⩾20% decrease in timed 25-foot walk time compared with the best baseline among screening or randomisation visits. A total of 13 (12.6%) MD1003-treated patients achieved the primary endpoint versus none of the placebo-treated patients (p = 0.005). MD1003 treatment also reduced EDSS progression and improved clinical impression of change compared with placebo. Efficacy was maintained over follow-up, and the safety profile of MD1003 was similar to that of placebo. MD1003 achieves sustained reversal of MS-related disability in a subset of patients with progressive MS and is well tolerated. © The Author(s), 2016.

  8. Potential of Progressive Construction Systems in Slovakia

    Kozlovska, Maria; Spisakova, Marcela; Mackova, Daniela

    2017-10-01

    Construction industry is a sector with rapid development. Progressive technologies of construction and new construction materials also called modern methods of construction (MMC) are developed constantly. MMC represent the adoption of construction industrialisation and the use of prefabrication of components in building construction. One of these modern methods is also system Varianthaus, which is based on, insulated concrete forms principle and provides complete production plant for wall, ceiling and roof elements for a high thermal insulation house construction. Another progressive construction system is EcoB, which represents an insulated precast concrete panel based on combination of two layers, insulation and concrete, produced in a factory as a whole. Both modern methods of construction are not yet known and wide-spread in the Slovak construction market. The aim of this paper is focused on demonstration of MMC using potential in Slovakia. MMC potential is proved based on comparison of the selected parameters of construction process - construction costs and construction time. The subject of this study is family house modelled in three material variants - masonry construction (as a representative of traditional methods of construction), Varianthaus and EcoB (as the representatives of modern methods of construction). The results of this study provide the useful information in decision-making process for potential investors of construction.

  9. Recovery from severe dysphagia in systemic sclerosis - myositis ...

    Background: Dysphagia is common in inflammatory myopathies and usually responds to corticosteroids. Severe dysphagia requiring feeding by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is associated with significant morbidity and high mortality. Clinical case: A 56-year old African Black woman initially presented with systemic ...

  10. Multiple sclerosis in South America: month of birth in different latitudes does not seem to interfere with the prevalence or progression of the disease

    Yara Dadalti Fragoso

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess whether the month of birth in different latitudes of South America might influence the presence or severity of multiple sclerosis (MS later in life. Methods Neurologists in four South American countries working at MS units collected data on their patients' month of birth, gender, age, and disease progression. Results Analysis of data from 1207 MS patients and 1207 control subjects did not show any significant variation in the month of birth regarding the prevalence of MS in four latitude bands (0–10; 11–20; 21–30; and 31–40 degrees. There was no relationship between the month of birth and the severity of disease in each latitude band. Conclusion The results from this study show that MS patients born to mothers who were pregnant at different Southern latitudes do not follow the seasonal pattern observed at high Northern latitudes.

  11. Neuromuscular adaptations to long-term progressive resistance training translates to improved functional capacity for people with multiple sclerosis and is maintained at follow-up

    Kjolhede, T.; Vissing, K.; de Place, L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Progressive resistance training (PRT) is acknowledged to effectively improve muscle strength for people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), but diverging results exist regarding whether such improvements translates to improved functional capacity, possibly relating to insufficient duration......: This study was a randomised controlled trial, with a training group and a waitlist group undergoing supervised PRT for 24 weeks initially or after 24 weeks of habitual lifestyle, respectively. Functional capacity, isometric muscle strength of knee extensors and flexors, neural drive and thigh muscle cross......-sectional area was measured at baseline, after 24 and 48 weeks. RESULTS: The training group significantly improved neuromuscular function of the knee extensors and flexors, which translated to improvements in functional capacity. Furthermore, the improved functional capacity was maintained after 24 weeks of self...

  12. EULAR recommendations for the treatment of systemic sclerosis: a report from the EULAR Scleroderma Trials and Research group (EUSTAR)

    Kowal-Bielecka, O.; Landewé, R.; Avouac, J.; Chwiesko, S.; Miniati, I.; Czirjak, L.; Clements, P.; Denton, C.; Farge, D.; Fligelstone, K.; Földvari, I.; Furst, D. E.; Müller-Ladner, U.; Seibold, J.; Silver, R. M.; Takehara, K.; Toth, B. Garay; Tyndall, A.; Valentini, G.; van den Hoogen, F.; Wigley, F.; Zulian, F.; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco

    2009-01-01

    The optimal treatment of systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a challenge because the pathogenesis of SSc is unclear and it is an uncommon and clinically heterogeneous disease affecting multiple organ systems. The aim of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) Scleroderma Trials and Research group

  13. A comparison between nailfold capillaroscopy patterns in adulthood in juvenile and adult-onset systemic sclerosis

    Ingegnoli, Francesca; Boracchi, Patrizia; Gualtierotti, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Qualitative capillaroscopy patterns in juvenile- and adult-onset systemic sclerosis (SSc) were studied in adulthood using data from the EULAR Scleroderma Trials and Research (EUSTAR) database. METHODS: Data collected between June 2004 and April 2013 were examined with focus on capillar......OBJECTIVE: Qualitative capillaroscopy patterns in juvenile- and adult-onset systemic sclerosis (SSc) were studied in adulthood using data from the EULAR Scleroderma Trials and Research (EUSTAR) database. METHODS: Data collected between June 2004 and April 2013 were examined with focus...... on capillaroscopy. In this retrospective exploratory study, series of patients with juvenile-onset SSc were matched with series of adult-onset SSc having the same gender and autoantibody profile. RESULTS: 30 of 123 patients with juvenile-onset and 2108 of 7133 with adult-onset SSc had data on capillaroscopy...... in 61% of juvenile- and 55.5% of adult-onset SSc. The OR was 1.06 and 95% CI 0.34-3.56. CONCLUSION: This is the first exploratory study on the comparison of capillaroscopy between juvenile- and adult-onset SSc in adulthood. Juvenile-onset SSc had an increase prevalence of scleroderma pattern...

  14. Multiple sclerosis documentation system (MSDS): moving from documentation to management of MS patients.

    Ziemssen, Tjalf; Kempcke, Raimar; Eulitz, Marco; Großmann, Lars; Suhrbier, Alexander; Thomas, Katja; Schultheiss, Thorsten

    2013-09-01

    The long disease duration of multiple sclerosis and the increasing therapeutic options require a individualized therapeutic approach which should be carefully documented over years of observation. To switch from MS documentation to an innovative MS management, new computer- and internet-based tools could be implemented as we could demonstrate with the novel computer-based patient management system "multiple sclerosis management system 3D" (MSDS 3D). MSDS 3D allows documentation and management of visit schedules and mandatory examinations via defined study modules by integration of data input from various sources (patients, attending physicians and MS nurses). It provides forms for the documentation of patient visits as well as clinical and diagnostic findings. Information can be collected via interactive touch screens. Specific modules allow the management of highly efficacious treatments as natalizumab or fingolimod. MSDS can be used to transfer the documented data to databases as, e.g. the registry of the German MS society or REGIMS. MSDS has already been implemented successfully in clinical practice and is currently being evaluated in a multicenter setting. High-quality management and documentation are crucial for improvements in clinical practice and research work.

  15. Acro-osteolysis as an indicator of severity in systemic sclerosis.

    Arana-Ruiz, Juan Carlos; Amezcua-Guerra, Luis Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a rare disease that predominantly affects women. The Medsger severity scale has been used to assess the severity, but it requires expensive and poorly accessible studies and it does not include complications such acrosteolysis, calcinosis, pericardial disease or hypothyroidism that occur on a relatively frequent basis in this disease. There is no study that considers if comorbidities, such as primary biliary cirrhosis, are related to gravity. To determine the correlation between severity and the presence of such complications. 40 patients with systemic sclerosis, dividing them into tertiles according to severity were studied. Dichotomous variables were described using percentages, while dimensional by averages+SD. Statistical inference was performed using chi square test or Kruskal-Wallis test with Dunn post-test, as appropriate. A significance at P<.05 was set. Of all the complications studied there were only differences in severity with acrosteolysis. Within comorbidities, primary biliary cirrhosis is not associated with gravity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  16. Reduced levels of S-nitrosothiols in plasma of patients with systemic sclerosis and Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Kundu, Devi; Abraham, David; Black, Carol M; Denton, Christopher P; Bruckdorfer, K Richard

    2014-12-01

    S-Nitrosothiols (RSNOs) are bioactive forms of nitric oxide which are involved in cell signalling and redox regulation of vascular function. Circulating S-nitrosothiols are predominantly in the form of S-nitrosoalbumin. In this study plasma concentrations of S-nitrosothiols were measured in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) where NO metabolism is known to be abnormal. Venous blood was collected from 16 patients with Raynaud's phenomenon (RP), 45 with systemic sclerosis (SSc) (34 patients had limited SSc (IcSSc) and 11 diffuse cutaneous disease (dcSSc)). Twenty six healthy subjects were used as controls. Plasma S-nitrosothiol concentrations were measured by chemiluminescence. The measurements were related to the extent of biological age, capillary/skin scores and disease duration. Plasma RSNO levels in patients with Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) and in those with SSc was significantly lower compared to the concentrations in control subjects. In SSc, plasma S-nitrosothiols were often below the level of detection (1nM). Low S-nitrosothiol concentrations were observed in the blood of patients with SSc and patients with RP indicating a profound disturbance of nitric oxide metabolism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A B Cell-Driven Autoimmune Pathway Leading to Pathological Hallmarks of Progressive Multiple Sclerosis in the Marmoset Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Model

    Bert A. ’t Hart

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The absence of pathological hallmarks of progressive multiple sclerosis (MS in commonly used rodent models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE hinders the development of adequate treatments for progressive disease. Work reviewed here shows that such hallmarks are present in the EAE model in marmoset monkeys (Callithrix jacchus. The minimal requirement for induction of progressive MS pathology is immunization with a synthetic peptide representing residues 34–56 from human myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG formulated with a mineral oil [incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA]. Pathological aspects include demyelination of cortical gray matter with microglia activation, oxidative stress, and redistribution of iron. When the peptide is formulated in complete Freund’s adjuvant, which contains mycobacteria that relay strong activation signals to myeloid cells, oxidative damage pathways are strongly boosted leading to more intensive pathology. The proven absence of immune potentiating danger signals in the MOG34–56/IFA formulation implies that a narrow population of antigen-experienced T cells present in the monkey’s immune repertoire is activated. This novel pathway involves the interplay of lymphocryptovirus-infected B cells with MHC class Ib/Caja-E restricted CD8+ CD56+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

  18. Microglia activation in multiple sclerosis black holes predicts outcome in progressive patients: an in vivo [(11)C](R)-PK11195-PET pilot study.

    Giannetti, Paolo; Politis, Marios; Su, Paul; Turkheimer, Federico; Malik, Omar; Keihaninejad, Shiva; Wu, Kit; Reynolds, Richard; Nicholas, Richard; Piccini, Paola

    2014-05-01

    The pathophysiological correlates and the contribution to persisting disability of hypointense T1-weighted MRI lesions, black holes (BH), in multiple sclerosis (MS) are still unclear. In order to study the in vivo functional correlates of this MRI finding, we used 11C-PK11195 PET (PK-PET) to investigate changes in microglial activity. Ten relapsing and 9 progressive MS subjects had a PK-PET scan and a MRI scan alongside a full clinical assessment, including the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) for evaluation of disability. We studied the PK binding potential of the specifically bound radioligand relative to the non-displaceable radioligand in tissue (BPND) in T1 BHs. Out of a total of 1242 BHs identified, 947 were PK enhancing. The PKBPND was correlated with the EDSS (r=0.818; pholes" representing loss of axons and myelin, but display inflammatory activity in the form of activated microglia. The significant association between PKBPND, neurological impairment and outcome in progressive subjects supports a role for activated microglia in disability progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Tuberous sclerosis complex: Recent advances in manifestations and therapy.

    Wataya-Kaneda, Mari; Uemura, Motohide; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Hirata, Haruhiko; Osuga, Keigo; Kagitani-Shimono, Kuriko; Nonomura, Norio

    2017-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by generalized involvement and variable manifestations with a birth incidence of 1:6000. In a quarter of a century, significant progress in tuberous sclerosis complex has been made. Two responsible genes, TSC1 and TSC2, which encode hamartin and tuberin, respectively, were discovered in the 1990s, and their functions were elucidated in the 2000s. Hamartin-Tuberin complex is involved in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-protein kinase B-mammalian target of rapamycin signal transduction pathway, and suppresses mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activity, which is a center for various functions. Constitutive activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 causes variable manifestations in tuberous sclerosis complex. Recently, genetic tests were launched to diagnose tuberous sclerosis complex, and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitors are being used to treat tuberous sclerosis complex patients. As a result of these advances, new diagnostic criteria have been established and an indispensable new treatment method; that is, "a cross-sectional medical examination system," a system to involve many experts for tuberous sclerosis complex diagnosis and treatments, was also created. Simultaneously, the frequency of genetic tests and advances in diagnostic technology have resulted in new views on symptoms. The numbers of tuberous sclerosis complex patients without neural symptoms are increasing, and for these patients, renal manifestations and pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis have become important manifestations. New concepts of tuberous sclerosis complex-associated neuropsychiatric disorders or perivascular epithelioid cell tumors are being created. The present review contains a summary of recent advances, significant manifestations and therapy in tuberous sclerosis complex. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  20. Multiple sclerosis

    ... indwelling catheter Osteoporosis or thinning of the bones Pressure sores Side effects of medicines used to treat the ... Daily bowel care program Multiple sclerosis - discharge Preventing pressure ulcers Swallowing problems Images Multiple sclerosis MRI of the ...

  1. A wireless body measurement system to study fatigue in multiple sclerosis

    Yu, Fei; Rabotti, Chiara; Bilberg, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue is reported as the most common symptom by patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The physiological and functional parameters related to fatigue in MS patients are currently not well established. A new wearable wireless body measurement system, named Fatigue Monitoring System (FAMOS......), was developed to study fatigue in MS. It can continuously measure electrocardiogram, body-skin temperature, electromyogram and motions of feet. The goal of this study is to test the ability of distinguishing fatigued MS patients from healthy subjects by the use of FAMOS. This paper presents the realization...... of the measurement system including the design of both hardware and dedicated signal processing algorithms. Twenty-six participants including 17 MS patients with fatigue and 9 sex- and age-matched healthy controls were included in the study for continuous 24 h monitoring. The preliminary results show significant...

  2. Coincidence of tuberous sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus-a case report.

    Carrasco Cubero, Carmen; Bejarano Moguel, Verónica; Fernández Gil, M Ángeles; Álvarez Vega, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis, also called Bourneville Pringle disease, is a phakomatosis with potential dermal, nerve, kidney and lung damage. It is characterized by the development of benign proliferations in many organs, which result in different clinical manifestations. It is associated with the mutation of two genes: TSC1 (hamartin) and TSC2 (tuberin), with the change in the functionality of the complex target of rapamycin (mTOR). MTOR activation signal has been recently described in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its inhibition could be beneficial in patients with lupus nephritis. We report the case of a patient who began with clinical manifestations of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) 30 years after the onset of SLE with severe renal disease (tipe IV nephritis) who improved after treatment with iv pulses of cyclophosphamide. We found only two similar cases in the literature, and hence considered the coexistence of these two entities of great interest. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  3. Patients' Perspectives and Experiences Living with Systemic Sclerosis: A Systematic Review and Thematic Synthesis of Qualitative Studies.

    Nakayama, Ayano; Tunnicliffe, David J; Thakkar, Vivek; Singh-Grewal, Davinder; O'Neill, Sean; Craig, Jonathan C; Tong, Allison

    2016-07-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic, progressive autoimmune disease with major end-organ involvement. Much attention has been focused on the management of physical and clinical manifestations; however, the effect of the disease and treatment on the patient's identity, relationships, functioning, and mental well-being are less known. We aimed to describe the patients' perspectives and experiences of living with SSc. Electronic databases were searched to October 2014. Thematic synthesis was used to analyze the findings. We included 26 studies involving 463 patients. Six key themes were identified: distressing appearance transformation (disturbing facial changes, stigmatizing sickness, unrecognizable self), palpable physical limitations (bodily restrictions, frustrating mind-body disconnect, pervasive fatigue, disabling pain), social impairment (breaking intimacy, struggling to fulfill family responsibilities, maintaining work, losing independence), navigating uncertainty (diagnostic ambiguity, medically fending for oneself, unpredictable course of illness), alone and misunderstood (fearful avoidance of fellow patients, invisible suffering), and gradual acceptance and relative optimism (adapting to change and accepting limitations, taking a positive spin, cautious hoping, empowering relationships, valuing medical support). SSc is a rare and unpredictable illness that undermines patients' sense of certainty and control and impairs their self-image, identity, and daily functioning. Patient-centered care that encompasses strategies to promote self-esteem, resilience, and self-efficacy may help to improve treatment satisfaction and health and quality of life outcomes for patients with SSc.

  4. Tuberous sclerosis

    Krishnan S

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Although tuberous sclerosis has been described with a diagnostic triad, it is not present consistently in all cases. Variety of skin manifestations were reported in tuberous sclerosis. This studay was undertaken to assess the frequency of various skin changes in tuberous sclerosis. Ten consecutive cases of tuberous sclerosis were studied. Angiofibroma was the commonest cutaneous manifestation. Atypical fibroxanthoma, dermatofibroma and neurofibroma were also noticed as interesting associations.

  5. In vivo imaging of system xc- as a novel approach to monitor multiple sclerosis

    Martin, Abraham; Szczupak, Boguslaw; Arrieta, Ander; Vazquez-Villoldo, Nuria; Soria, Federico N.; Domercq, Maria; Matute, Carlos; Gomez-Vallejo, Vanessa; Llop, Jordi; Padro, Daniel; Plaza-Garcia, Sandra; Reese, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate excitotoxicity contributes to oligodendroglial and axonal damage in multiple sclerosis pathology. Extracellular glutamate concentration in the brain is controlled by cystine/glutamate antiporter (system xc-), a membrane antiporter that imports cystine and releases glutamate. Despite this, the system xc - activity and its connection to the inflammatory reaction in multiple sclerosis (MS) is largely unknown. Longitudinal in vivo magnetic resonance (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies with 2-[ 18 F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG), [ 11 C]-(R)-1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-1(1-methylpropyl) -3-isoquinolinecarbox amide ([ 11 C]PK11195) and (4S)-4-(3- 18 F-fluoropropyl)-L-glutamate ([ 18 F]FSPG) were carried out during the course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induction in rats. [ 18 F]FSPG showed a significant increase of system xc - function in the lumbar section of the spinal cord at 14 days post immunization (dpi) that stands in agreement with the neurological symptoms and ventricle edema formation at this time point. Likewise, [ 18 F]FDG did not show significant changes in glucose metabolism throughout central nervous system and [ 11 C]PK11195 evidenced a significant increase of microglial/macrophage activation in spinal cord and cerebellum 2 weeks after EAE induction. Therefore, [ 18 F]FSPG showed a major capacity to discriminate regions of the central nervous system affected by the MS in comparison to [ 18 F]FDG and [ 11 C]PK11195. Additionally, clodronate-treated rats showed a depletion in microglial population and [ 18 F]FSPG PET signal in spinal cord confirming a link between neuroinflammatory reaction and cystine/glutamate antiporter activity in EAE rats. Altogether, these results suggest that in vivo PET imaging of system xc - could become a valuable tool for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of MS. (orig.)

  6. Distinct evolution of TLR-mediated dendritic cell cytokine secretion in patients with limited and diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis.

    Bon, L. van; Popa, C.; Huibens, R.J.F.; Vonk, M.C.; York, M.; Simms, R.; Hesselstrand, R.; Wuttge, D.M.; Lafyatis, R.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease and accumulating evidence suggests a role for Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated activation of dendritic cells (DCs). OBJECTIVE: To map TLR-mediated cytokine responses of DCs from patients with SSc. METHODS: 45 patients with SSc were

  7. An MIF promoter polymorphism is associated with susceptibility to pulmonary arterial hypertension in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis

    Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Campillo-Davo, Diana; Lopez-Isac, Elena; Carmona, Francisco David; Simeon, Carmen P.; Carreira, Patricia; Callejas-Rubio, Jose Luis; Castellvi, Ivan; Fernandez-Nebro, Antonio; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Rubio-Rivas, Manel; Garcia-Hernandez, Francisco J.; Madronero, Ana Belen; Beretta, Lorenzo; Santaniello, Alessandro; Lunardi, Claudio; Airo, Paolo; Hoffmann-Vold, Anna-Maria; Kreuter, Alexander; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Vonk, Madelon C.; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; de Vries-Bouwstra, Jeska; Shiels, Paul; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Radstake, Timothy R.D.J.; Martin, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a fibrotic immune-mediated disease of unknown etiology. Among its clinical manifestations, pulmonary involvement is the leading cause of mortality in patients with SSc. However, the genetic factors involved in lung complication are not well defined. We aimed to

  8. Multiple sclerosis: a study of CXCL10 and CXCR3 co-localization in the inflamed central nervous system

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Trebst, Corinna; Kivisäkk, Pia

    2002-01-01

    T-cell accumulation in the central nervous system (CNS) is considered crucial to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). We found that the majority of T cells within the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compartment expressed the CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR), independent of CNS inflammation...

  9. Demographic, clinical and antibody characteristics of patients with digital ulcers in systemic sclerosis: data from the DUO Registry

    Denton, Christopher P.; Krieg, Thomas; Guillevin, Loic; Schwierin, Barbara; Rosenberg, Daniel; Silkey, Mariabeth; Zultak, Maurice; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Stetter, M.; Lackner, K.; Tomi, N.; Hafner, F.; Brodmann, M.; Kuen-Spiegel, M.; Kolle, H.; Raffier, B.; Hamberger, N.; Metz, S.; Siebel, C.; Trummer, M.; Thonhofer, R.; Illmer, X.; Trautinger, F.; Schmidt, P.; Rintelen, B.; Sautner, J.; Willfort-Ehringer, A.; Margeta, C.; Monshi, B.; Pirkhammer, D.; Richter, L.; Holzer, G.; Minmair, G.; Broll, H.; Takacs, M.; Hirschl, M.; Mesaric, P.; Feldmann, R.; Semmelweis, K.; Hundstorfer, M.; Reinhart, V.; Maurer, B.; Verner, D.; Distler, O.; Schmidt-Bosshard, R.; Bohmova, J.; Prochazkova, L.; Nemec, P.; Fojtik, Z.; Soukup, T.; Smrzova, A.; Suchy, D.; Zemanova, I.; Becvar, R.; Gawlik, A.; Koch, M.; Rauen, T.; Voss, B.; Kurthen, R.; Unholzer, A.; Starz, H.; Welzel, J.; Plaumann, K.; Merk, B.; Bloching, H. H.; Moosig, F.; Frey, P.; Kahl, S.; Schleenbecker, H.; Storck-Mueller, K.; Schwarting, A.; Hazenbiller, A.; Nichelmann, V.; Flaig, W.; Rumbaur, C.; Boesenberg, I.; Schmeiser, T.; Marx, J.; Mayer, L.; Stein, T.; Ochs, W.; Rasche, C.; Worm, M.; Riemekasten, G.; Deuschle, K.; Becker, M.; Kleiner, H. J.; Schulze, K.; Tiggers, C.; Peters, J.; Kirschke, J.; Schaefer, C.; Monshausen, M.; Mengden, T.; Sadeghlar, F.; Seidel, M.; Hillebrecht, C.; Andresen, J.; Reemtsen, R.; Stoeckl, F.; Sperling, S.; Podda, M.; Wagner, N.; Guenzel, J.; Wuerzburg, I.; Luethke, K.; Enderlein, M.; Kayser, M.; Gerber, A.; Haust, M.; Hoff, N. P.; Mota, R.; Akanay-Diesel, S.; Jahnke, K.; Mettler, S.; Toeller, S.; Zwenger, S.; Klein, E.; Hahn, K.; Beyer, C.; Distler, J.; Katzemich, A.; Erfurt-berge, C.; Sticherling, M.; Schuch, F.; Rapp, P.; Mitchell, A.; Freundlieb, C.; Rushentsova, U.; Himsel, A.; Henkemeier, U.; Eilbacher, P.; Ullrich-Guenther, C.; Neul, S.; Oelsner, M.; Hermanns, G.; Fiene, M.; Gause, A.; Mensing, C.; Klings, D.; Mensing, H.; Messall, J.; Zuper, R.; May, D.; Bruckner, L.; Sheikh, N.; Aries, P.; Kirchberg, S.; Funkert, A.; Blank, N.; Lupaschko, S.; Schwuerzer-Voit, M.; Meier, L.; Herr, U.; Meier, U.; Neek, G.; Wernitzsch, H.; Pfoehler, C.; Assmann, G.; Vosswinkel, J.; Krog, B.; Wollersdorfer, E.; Oltmann-Schroeder, J.; Zeuner, R.; Uhlig, S.; Barth, S.; Huegel, R.; Glaeser, R.; Rabe, B.; Schuster, J.; Scholz, J.; Kremer, K.; Robakidze-Torbahn, M.; Moinzadeh, P.; Mittag, M.; Dohse, A.; Muhlack, A.; Schultz, L.; Schult, S.; Frambach, Y.; Kettenbach, A.; Fell, I.; Schweda, K.; Steinbrink, K.; Podobinska, M.; Harmuth, W.; Nielen, C.; Kaczmarczyk, A.; Kellner, C.; von Oelhafen, J.; von Bildering, P. B.; Kunze, S.; Niedermeier, A.; Messer, G.; Sardy, M.; Bekou, V.; Belloni, B.; Huettig, B.; Ziai, M.; Hein, R.; Hallecker, A.; Gaubitz, M.; Hallermann, C.; Schmidt, K.; Herrgott, I.; Hildebrandt, B.; Eiden, E.; Guertler, I.; Gernot Scheibl, E.; Brand, H.; Kaeding, U.; Weiss, E.; Reischel, N.; Kern, S.; Baumann, C.; Hellmich, B.; Loeffler, C.; Pflugfelder, J.; Karaenke, P.; Ruchenburg, J.; Blume, J.; Zabel, M.; Deppermann, N.; Chromik, S.; Metzler, C.; Krupp, E.; Rumpel, H.; Krause Rostock, J.-O.; Kneitz, C.; Federow, I.; Schneider, K.; Semmler, M.; Hapke, S.; Barnd, A.; Linke, M.; Kampe-Juzak, E.; Knoebel, K.; Niefanger, K.; Wilhelm, H. U.; Lauterwein, B.; Fierlbeck, G.; Schanz, S.; Pfeiffer, C.; Hassel, R.; Wahn, H.; Schildt, K.; von Elling, A.; Boro, D.; Ebel, J.; Ahmadi, K.; Moritz, D.; Dietl, S.; Dyballa, J.; Alsheimer, B.; Schuetz, N.; Schuart, T.; Mueglich, C.; Tony, H. P.; Marina, P.; Deininger, F.; Hartmann, F.; Olsen, A. B.; Sondergaard, K. H.; Naderi, Y.; Iversen, L. V.; Karlsmark, T.; Knudsen, J. B.; Gil, J. G.; Lopez, J. C. F.; Tasende, J. A. P.; Gonzales, M. F.; Sandoval, A. A.; del Carmen Torres Martin, M.; Corteguera, M.; Barca, B. A.; Montes, I. C.; de la Torre, R. G.; Victoria Egurbide, M.; Pros, A.; Munoz, J.; Simeon, C. P.; Espinosa, G.; Espinposa, G.; Rodriguez, M. A. P.; Castellvi, I.; Mascaro, J. M.; Bellido, D.; Manzanedo, V. S.; Huertas, M. P.; Sanchez, M. D. M.; Trenado, M. S. S.; Garcia, P. V.; Gines Martinez, F.; Angeles Aquirre, M.; del Rio, A. H.; Vazquez, J. L. G.; Coleman, J. V.; Lopez, M. R.; Sanchez, P. S.; Aizpuru, E. M. F.; Mateo, F. J. N.; Callejas, J. L.; Ortego, N.; Santo, M. P.; Rubio, M.; Martin, I.; Cruz, A.; Crespo, M.; Ramos, P. C.; Fernandez, A. S.-A.; Filloy, J. A. M.; Rodriguez, T. R. V.; Marhuenda, A. R.; Blanco, J. J. R.; Hernan, M. G. B.; Mendoza, A. Z.; de la Puente, C.; Rabaneda, E. V.; de Vicuna, R. G.; del Mar Ripoll Macias, M.; del la Pena Lefebvre, P. G.; de Ramon, E.; Camps, M. T.; Fernandez, C.; Miguelez, R.; Uson, J.; Delgado, E. G.; Villaverde, V.; Maceiras, F.; Cruz, J.; Mosquera, J. A.; Mera, A.; Pampin, E. P.; Blanco, J. S.; Maneiro, J. R.; Diaz, J. J.; Losada, L.; Caamano, M.; Fernandez, S.; Insua, S. A.; Laurin, C. U.; Sanchez, J.; Fernandez, N. C.; Becerra, N. D.; Garcia, A.; Nicolas, G. M.; del Carmen Ortega de la O, M.; Rueda, A.; Calvo, J.; Roman Ivorra, J.; Sancho Alegre, J. J.; Barbado, J.; Montes, J.; Saez, L.; Kaarto, A.; Makinen, H.; Madaule, S.; Dadban, A.; Lok, C.; Ferrandiz, D.; Moiton, M. P.; Magy-Bertrand, N.; Taieb, A.; Droitcourt, C.; Belin, E.; Balquiere, S.; Prey, S.; Boulon, C.; Constans, J.; Richez, C.; Sassolas, B.; Misery, L.; Greco, M.; collet, E.; Berthier, S.; Leguy-Seguin, V.; Imbert, B.; Carpentier, P.; Blaise, S.; Maillard, H.; Beneton, N.; Launay, D.; Hachulla, E.; Woijtasik, G.; Charlanne, H.; Lambert, M.; Jourdain, N.; Hatron, P. Y.; Morell, S.; Spars, A.; Couraud, A.; Doeffel-hantz, V.; Fauchais, A. L.; Vidal, E.; Goudran, G.; Bezanahary, H.; Boussely, N.; Manea, P.; Dumonteil, S.; Loustaud-ratti, V.; Hot, A.; Coppere, B.; Desmurs-Clavel, H.; Ninet, J.; Girard-Madoux, M. H.; Granel, B.; Keynote, A.; Khau van Kien, A.; Rullier, P.; Le Quellec, A.; Riviere, S.; Bessis, D.; Cohen, J. D.; Farcas, C.; Granel-brocard, F.; Agard, C.; Durant, C.; Fuzibet, J. G.; Queyrel, V.; Berezne, A.; Guillevin, L.; Mouthon, L.; Frances, C.; Toledano, C.; Cabane, J.; Tiev, K.; Farge, D.; Keshtmand, H.; Lazareth, I.; Priollet, P.; Michon-Pasturel, U.; Wipff, J.; Assous, N.; Cartry, O.; Kostrzwewa, E.; Doutre, M. S.; Blum, L.; Reguiai, Z.; Letremy, A.; Perlat, A.; Cazalets-lacoste, C.; Decaux, O.; Jego, P.; Duval-modeste, A. B.; Deboves, O.; Sordet, C.; Chatelus, E.; Chiffot, H.; Sibillia, J.; Couret, B.; Moulis, G.; Sailler, L.; Adoue, D.; Gaches, F.; Diot, E.; Skowron, F.; Zenone, T.; Quemeneur, T.; Kyndt, X.; Wahl, D.; Zuily, S.; Moline, T.; Bravetti, V.; Galanopoulos, N.; Vasilopoulos, D.; Vlachoyannopoulos, P.; Kritikos, I.; Tsifetaki, N.; Koutroumbas, A.; Garyfallos, A.; Athanassiou, P.; Aslanidis, S.; Kamali, S.; Dimitroulas, T.; Galanopoulo, V.; Elezoglou, A.; Grier, A.; Murray, M.; O'Rourke, M.; Gabrielli, A.; Lapadula, G.; Serafino, L.; Terlizzi, N.; Bellissimo, S.; Stisi, S.; Malavolta, N.; Airo, P.; Vacca, A.; Battaglia, E.; Foti, R.; Mazzuca, S.; Bortoluzzi, A.; Trotta, F.; Galluccio, F.; Marucci, A.; Cantatore, F.; Bucci, R.; Puppo, F.; de Angeli, R.; Grassi, W.; Cipriani, P.; Mazzone, A.; Faggioli, P.; Severino, A.; Scorza, R.; Belloli, L.; Ughi, N.; Antivalle, M.; del Papa, N.; Maglione, W.; Zeni, S.; Ferri, C.; Colaci, M.; Varcasia, G.; Cuomo, G.; Cozzi, F.; Triolo, G.; Gatti, S.; Montecucco, C. M.; Doveri, M.; Nigro, A.; Olivieri, I.; Bajoochi, G.; Rosato, E.; Salsano, F.; Faustini, F.; Ferraccioli, G.; Colonna, L.; Pallotta, S.; Riccieri, V.; Mussi, A.; Bellisai, F.; Galeazzi, M.; Fusaro, E.; Saracco, M.; Pellerito, R.; Masolini, P.; de Vita, S.; Lombardi, S.; Lunardi, C.; Moolenburgh, J. D.; Heurkens, A. H. M.; Voskuyl, A.; Hak, A. E.; Stroes, E. S. K.; Remans, J.; Gerdes, V.; van Woerkom, J. M.; de Long, A. J. L.; Kaasjager, H. A. H.; Visser, H.; Janssen, M.; van Guldener, C.; van Neer, F.; Vos, P.; Peters, A. J.; Hulsmans, H.; Ronday, K.; Goekoop, R.; Ewals, J.; Valentijn, R.; de Bois, M.; Westedt, M. L.; Siewertsz van Reesema, D.; Knifjj-Dutmer, E.; Stolk, J. N.; Willems, H.; Kuiper-geertsma, D. G.; Baudaoin, P.; Fretter, P.; Westra, R.; Sonnaville, P. B. J.; Smit, A.; Bootsma, H.; Brouwer, L.; Bijl, M.; Molders, N.; Lebrun, C.; van der Veen, M. J.; Noordzij, M.; Houben, H.; Landewe, R. M. B.; Vercoutere, W.; Jahangier de Veen, Z. N.; Zijlstra, T. R.; Ubels, F.; Bruyn, G.; Jansen, P.; Schuerwegh, A.; Huizinga, T. W. J.; Paassen, P.; Hurkens, T.; Geurts, M.; van den Hoogen, F.; Vonk, M.; Jacobs, P. J. C.; Groenendael, J. H. L. M.; Seys, P.; van Zeben, D.; van Paassen, H.; Groenendael, J.; Han, K. H.; Wlarvens, M.; van Hagen, M.; van Daele, P.; Dolhain, R.; Gerards, A. H.; van der Lubbe, P.; Kanter, M. D. E.; Muller, W. H.; Ton, E.; van Krugten, M.; van Gameren, I.; Lanting, P.; den Hengst, C.; Gjessdal, C. G.; Hjertaker, S. L.; Madland, T. M.; Bendvold, A.; Bitter, H.; Hoffmann-Vold, A. M.; Midtvedt, O.; Bakland, G.; Aslkaksen, H. K.; Seip, M.; Kalstad, S.; Koldingsnes, W.; Grandauent, B.; Nordvag, B. Y.; Stran, E. K.; Skomsvoll, J.; Andersen, M.; Thomsen, R. S.; Pedersen, T.; Bakkeheim, V.; Cordeiro, A.; Alves, J.; Oliveira, S.; Coelho, P.; Resende, C.; Ponte, C.; Almeida, I.; Silva, I.; Santos, C.; Camara, I.; Costa, J.; Hellstrom, H.; Mohammad, A.; Lind, I.; Lind, K.; Bracin, T.; Liljequist, E.; Vingren, T.; Ostenson, A.; Hermansson, E.; Thorsson, C.; Soderlin, M.; Nordin, A.; Waldheim, E.; Vengemyr, K.; Albertsson, K.; Karlsson, M. L.; Rydvald, Y.; Rizk, M.; Dolnicar, A. S.; Lukac, J.; James, J.; McHugh, N.; Cole, S.; Brown, S.; Hamilton, A.; Faizal, A.; Hall, F.; Murphy, K.; Skingle, S.; Harris, H.; Madhok, F.; Hampson, R.; Baguley, E.; Ogunbambi G, O.; Lamb, J.; Anderson, M.; Moots, R.; White-Alao, B.; Morrison, C.; Dobson, J.; Gordon, P.; Salerno, R.; Denton, C.; Parker, L.; Ochiel, R.; Vincent, R.; Zimba, S.; Ngcozana, T.; Xu, Y.; D'Cruz, D.; Choong, L. M.; Herrick, A.; Wragg, E.; Manning, J.; Moore, T.; Kelsey, C.; Chakravarty, K.; Skyes, H.; Athiveer, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Digital Ulcers Outcome (DUO) Registry was designed to describe the clinical and antibody characteristics, disease course and outcomes of patients with digital ulcers associated with systemic sclerosis (SSc). The DUO Registry is a European, prospective, multicentre, observational, registry of SSc

  10. Influence of clinical features, serum antinuclear antibodies, and lung function on survival of patients with systemic sclerosis

    Jacobsen, Søren; Ullman, S; Shen, G Q

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the independent contribution of several clinical and laboratory variables to the mortality of a cohort of Danish patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). METHODS: A cohort of 174 patients with incident SSc was retrospectively identified using clinical charts and study record...

  11. The magnitude of cytokine production by stimulated CD56+ cells is associated with early stages of systemic sclerosis

    Cossu, Marta; van Bon, L.; Nierkens, S; Bellocchi, Chiara; Santaniello, Alessandro; Dolstra, H.; Beretta, Lorenzo; Radstake, TRDJ

    2016-01-01

    Immune activation is a hallmark of systemic sclerosis (SSc). However, the immunological alterations that occur in preclinical and non-fibrotic SSc and that differentiate these subjects from those with primary Raynaud's phenomenon (PRP) or healthy controls (HC) are poorly defined. We isolated CD56+

  12. Exercise echocardiography for the assessment of pulmonary hypertension in systemic sclerosis: a systematic review.

    Baptista, Rui; Serra, Sara; Martins, Rui; Teixeira, Rogério; Castro, Graça; Salvador, Maria João; Pereira da Silva, José António; Santos, Lèlita; Monteiro, Pedro; Pêgo, Mariano

    2016-07-02

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) complicates the course of systemic sclerosis (SSc) and is associated with poor prognosis. The elevation of systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (sPAP) during exercise in patients with SSc with normal resting haemodynamics may anticipate the development of PAH. Exercise echocardiography (ExEcho) has been proposed as a useful technique to identify exercise-induced increases in sPAP, but it is unclear how to clinically interpret these findings. In this systematic review, we summarize the available evidence on the role of exercise echocardiography to estimate exercise-induced elevations in pulmonary and left heart filling pressures in patients with systemic sclerosis. We conducted a systematic review of the literature using MEDLINE, Cochrane Library and Web of Knowledge, using the vocabulary terms: ('systemic sclerosis' OR 'scleroderma') AND ('exercise echocardiography') AND ('pulmonary hypertension'). Studies including patients with SSc without a prior diagnosis of PAH, and subjected to exercise echocardiography were included. All searches were limited to English and were augmented by review of bibliographic references from the included studies. The quality of evidence was assessed by the Effective Public Health Practice Project system. We identified 15 studies enrolling 1242 patients, who were mostly middle-aged and female. Several exercise methods were used (cycloergometer, treadmill and Master's two step), with different protocols and positions (supine, semi-supine, upright); definition of a positive test also varied widely. Resting estimated sPAP levels varied from 18 to 35 mm Hg, all in the normal range. The weighted means for estimated sPAP were 22.2 ± 2.9 mmHg at rest and 43.0 ± 4.3 mmHg on exercise; more than half of the studies reported mean exercise sPAP ≥40 mmHg. The assessment of left ventricular diastolic function on peak exercise was reported in a minority of studies; however, when assessed, surrogate

  13. Matrix metalloproteinases: a review of their structure and role in systemic sclerosis.

    Peng, Wen-jia; Yan, Jun-wei; Wan, Ya-nan; Wang, Bing-xiang; Tao, Jin-hui; Yang, Guo-jun; Pan, Hai-feng; Wang, Jing

    2012-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are the main enzymes involved in arterial wall extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation and remodeling, whose activity has been involved in various normal and pathologic processes, such as inflammation, fibrosis. As a result, the MMPs have come to consider as both therapeutic targets and diagnostic tools for the treatment and diagnosis of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a rare autoimmune disease of unknown etiology characterized by an excessive over-production of collagen and other ECM, resulting in skin thickening and fibrosis of internal organs. In recent years, abnormal expression of MMPs has been demonstrated with the pathogenesis of SSc, and the association of different polymorphisms on MMPs genes with SSc has been extensively studied. This review describes the structure, function and regulation of MMPs and shortly summarizes current understanding on experimental findings, genetic associations of MMPs in SSc.

  14. Modulation of Fibrosis in Systemic Sclerosis by Nitric Oxide and Antioxidants

    Audrey Dooley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma: SSc is a multisystem, connective tissue disease of unknown aetiology characterized by vascular dysfunction, autoimmunity, and enhanced fibroblast activity resulting in fibrosis of the skin, heart, and lungs, and ultimately internal organ failure, and death. One of the most important and early modulators of disease activity is thought to be oxidative stress. Evidence suggests that the free radical nitric oxide (NO, a key mediator of oxidative stress, can profoundly influence the early microvasculopathy, and possibly the ensuing fibrogenic response. Animal models and human studies have also identified dietary antioxidants, such as epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, to function as a protective system against oxidative stress and fibrosis. Hence, targeting EGCG may prove a possible candidate for therapeutic treatment aimed at reducing both oxidant stress and the fibrotic effects associated with SSc.

  15. Onset Symptoms, Tobacco Smoking, and Progressive-Onset Phenotype Are Associated With a Delayed Onset of Multiple Sclerosis, and Marijuana Use With an Earlier Onset

    Chunrong Tao

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Age at symptom onset (ASO is a prognostic factor that could affect the accrual of disability in multiple sclerosis (MS patients. Some factors are known to influence the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS, but their influence on the ASO is less well-investigated.Objective: Examine the associations between known or emerging MS risk factors and ASO.Methods: This was a multicenter study, incident cases (n = 279 with first clinical diagnosis of demyelinating event aged 18–59 years recruited at four Australian centres (latitudes 27°-43°S, from 1 November 2003 to 31 December 2006. Environmental/behavioral variables and initial symptoms were recorded at baseline interview. Linear regression was used to assess the association between risk factors and ASO.Results: Five factors were significantly associated with ASO: a history of tobacco smoking was associated with 3.05-years later ASO (p = 0.002; a history of marijuana use was associated with 6.03-years earlier ASO (p < 0.001; progressive-onset cases had 5.61-years later ASO (p = 0.001; an initial presentation of bowel & bladder and cerebral dysfunctional were associated with 3.39 (p = 0.017 and 4.37-years (p = 0.006 later ASO, respectively. Other factors, including sex, offspring number, latitude of study site, history of infectious mononucleosis, HLA-DR15 & HLA-A2 genotype, 25(OHD levels, and ultraviolet radiation exposure were not associated with ASO. Including all five significant variables into one model explained 12% of the total variance in ASO.Conclusion: We found a novel association between a history of tobacco smoking and later onset, whereas marijuana use was associated with earlier onset. Behavioral factors seem important drivers of MS onset timing although much of the variance remains unexplained.

  16. Isolated pulmonary veno-occlusive disease and pulmonary arterial thrombosis in systemic sclerosis – a lethal combination

    Arun Jeevagan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Arun JeevaganGeneral Medicine, Ipswich NHS Hospital, UKBackground: Isolated pulmonary hypertension secondary to systemic sclerosis is not uncommon. Our patient with systemic sclerosis presented with a very aggressive form of pulmonary hypertension due to a lethal combination of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD and pulmonary arterial thrombosis. This combined presentation has never before been reported in medical literature.Case report: A 75-year-old woman with a 4-month history of atypical chest pains was admitted with a 3-week history of worsening symptoms of shortness of breath, reduced exercise tolerance, and bilateral pitting edema. On examination she had thickened skin in her hands, telangiectasia on her face, maculopapular rash in her legs, raised jugular venous pressure, and bilateral pitting edema. Her autoimmune profile revealed positive anticentromere antibodies, and her echocardiogram showed right ventricular systolic pressure of 91 mmHg. She also had renal impairment secondary to hypoperfusion. A diagnosis of isolated pulmonary hypertension secondary to limited systemic sclerosis was made. As she was clinically improving on slow diuretic infusion and awaiting transfer to a specialist center for management of pulmonary hypertension, our patient died due to cardiopulmonary arrest. Her postmortem revealed that she died of a combination of PVOD and pulmonary arteriopathy due to thrombosis.Conclusion: This is clearly a unique case both in presentation and difficulty of management. Pulmonary vasodilators used in therapy of pulmonary arteriopathy can be detrimental in patients with PVOD. There is no definitive investigation, curative treatment, or management, that exists for a combination of PVOD and pulmonary arteriopathy due to thrombosis secondary to systemic sclerosis.Keywords: pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, pulmonary arterial hypertension, systemic sclerosis, pulmonary arteriopathy with thrombosis

  17. Sample size requirements for one-year treatment effects using deep gray matter volume from 3T MRI in progressive forms of multiple sclerosis.

    Kim, Gloria; Chu, Renxin; Yousuf, Fawad; Tauhid, Shahamat; Stazzone, Lynn; Houtchens, Maria K; Stankiewicz, James M; Severson, Christopher; Kimbrough, Dorlan; Quintana, Francisco J; Chitnis, Tanuja; Weiner, Howard L; Healy, Brian C; Bakshi, Rohit

    2017-11-01

    The subcortical deep gray matter (DGM) develops selective, progressive, and clinically relevant atrophy in progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (PMS). This patient population is the target of active neurotherapeutic development, requiring the availability of outcome measures. We tested a fully automated MRI analysis pipeline to assess DGM atrophy in PMS. Consistent 3D T1-weighted high-resolution 3T brain MRI was obtained over one year in 19 consecutive patients with PMS [15 secondary progressive, 4 primary progressive, 53% women, age (mean±SD) 50.8±8.0 years, Expanded Disability Status Scale (median, range) 5.0, 2.0-6.5)]. DGM segmentation applied the fully automated FSL-FIRST pipeline ( http://fsl.fmrib.ox.ac.uk ). Total DGM volume was the sum of the caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, and thalamus. On-study change was calculated using a random-effects linear regression model. We detected one-year decreases in raw [mean (95% confidence interval): -0.749 ml (-1.455, -0.043), p = 0.039] and annualized [-0.754 ml/year (-1.492, -0.016), p = 0.046] total DGM volumes. A treatment trial for an intervention that would show a 50% reduction in DGM brain atrophy would require a sample size of 123 patients for a single-arm study (one-year run-in followed by one-year on-treatment). For a two-arm placebo-controlled one-year study, 242 patients would be required per arm. The use of DGM fraction required more patients. The thalamus, putamen, and globus pallidus, showed smaller effect sizes in their on-study changes than the total DGM; however, for the caudate, the effect sizes were somewhat larger. DGM atrophy may prove efficient as a short-term outcome for proof-of-concept neurotherapeutic trials in PMS.

  18. The Systemic Lupus Erythematosus IRF5 Risk Haplotype Is Associated with Systemic Sclerosis

    Beretta, Lorenzo; Simeón, Carmen P.; Carreira, Patricia E.; Callejas, José Luis; Fernández-Castro, Mónica; Sáez-Comet, Luis; Beltrán, Emma; Camps, María Teresa; Egurbide, María Victoria; Airó, Paolo; Scorza, Raffaella; Lunardi, Claudio; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Kreuter, Alexander; Distler, Jörg H. W.; Madhok, Rajan; Shiels, Paul; van Laar, Jacob M.; Fonseca, Carmen; Denton, Christopher; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Schuerwegh, Annemie J.; Vonk, Madelon C.; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; Martín, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a fibrotic autoimmune disease in which the genetic component plays an important role. One of the strongest SSc association signals outside the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region corresponds to interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), a major regulator of the type I IFN pathway. In this study we aimed to evaluate whether three different haplotypic blocks within this locus, which have been shown to alter the protein function influencing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility, are involved in SSc susceptibility and clinical phenotypes. For that purpose, we genotyped one representative single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of each block (rs10488631, rs2004640, and rs4728142) in a total of 3,361 SSc patients and 4,012 unaffected controls of Caucasian origin from Spain, Germany, The Netherlands, Italy and United Kingdom. A meta-analysis of the allele frequencies was performed to analyse the overall effect of these IRF5 genetic variants on SSc. Allelic combination and dependency tests were also carried out. The three SNPs showed strong associations with the global disease (rs4728142: P  = 1.34×10−8, OR  = 1.22, CI 95%  = 1.14–1.30; rs2004640: P  = 4.60×10−7, OR  = 0.84, CI 95%  = 0.78–0.90; rs10488631: P  = 7.53×10−20, OR  = 1.63, CI 95%  = 1.47–1.81). However, the association of rs2004640 with SSc was not independent of rs4728142 (conditioned P  = 0.598). The haplotype containing the risk alleles (rs4728142*A-rs2004640*T-rs10488631*C: P  = 9.04×10−22, OR  = 1.75, CI 95%  = 1.56–1.97) better explained the observed association (likelihood P-value  = 1.48×10−4), suggesting an additive effect of the three haplotypic blocks. No statistical significance was observed in the comparisons amongst SSc patients with and without the main clinical characteristics. Our data clearly indicate that the SLE risk haplotype also influences SSc predisposition, and that

  19. Progress in switching technology for METS systems

    Honig, E.M.; Swannack, C.E.; Warren, R.W.; Whitaker, D.H.

    1977-01-01

    Three distinct sets of switching requirements have emerged from design optimization studies of large superconducting magnetic energy storage systems, such as the METS system to power the adiabatic plasma compression field in the proposed theta-pinch SFTR. Extremely low joule loss cryogenic disconnects are required between storage coils in the liquid helium environment to allow charging the coils in series over a prolonged time, then to isolate the coils for parallel fast discharging into the load. Another switch must break the current in the series charging loop and absorb the energy from the stray inductance. This action will allow the subsequent opening of the cryogenic disconnects under near zero current condition. The current now has been transferred to the many paralleled circuits, each containing a high current, high voltage interrupter. The opening and arc commutation of the interrupter starts the energy transfer into the load. The primary activities associated with cryogenic disconnect have been testing and development of contact materials, configurations, and closing forces for carrying 26 kA with a resistance less than 40 nΩ, and development of an actuating system that is both reliable and fast acting in a liquid helium environment. The charging loop switch will include a continuous duty switch and a vacuum interrupter. The continuous duty switch resistance can be an order of magnitude larger than that of the cryogenic disconnect because it does not present a refrigeration load. The HVDC interrupter must break 26 kA and withstand 60 kV during the energy transfer time of 700 μs. Testing in progress already has shown successful interruption using single vacuum interrupters up to 31 kA and 66 kV

  20. Oral fingolimod in primary progressive multiple sclerosis (INFORMS): a phase 3, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Lublin, Fred; Miller, David H; Freedman, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    progression, and two of the following criteria: positive brain MRI; positive spinal cord MRI; or positive cerebrospinal fluid. Additional eligibility criteria included disease duration of 2-10 years and objective evidence of disability progression in the previous 2 years. Patients and study investigators were...

  1. Arginase-1 expressing microglia in close proximity to motor neurons were increased early in disease progression in canine degenerative myelopathy, a model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Toedebusch, Christine M; Snyder, John C; Jones, Maria R; Garcia, Virginia B; Johnson, Gayle C; Villalón, Eric L; Coates, Joan R; Garcia, Michael L

    2018-04-01

    Toxicity within superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1)-associated familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is non-cell autonomous with direct contribution from microglia. Microglia exhibit variable expression of neuroprotective and neurotoxic molecules throughout disease progression. The mechanisms regulating microglial phenotype within ALS are not well understood. This work presents a first study to examine the specific microglial phenotypic response in close association to motor neurons in a naturally occurring disease model of ALS, canine degenerative myelopathy (DM). Microglia closely associated with motor neurons were increased in all stages of DM progression, although only DM Late reached statistical significance. Furthermore, the number of arginase-1 expressing microglia per motor neuron were significantly increased in early stages of DM, whereas the number of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-expressing microglia per motor neuron was indistinguishable from aged controls at all stages of disease. Fractalkine, a chemotactic molecule for microglia, was expressed in motor neurons, and the fractalkine receptor was specifically localized to microglia. However, we found no correlation between microglial response and lumbar spinal cord fractalkine levels. Taken together, these data suggest that arginase-1-expressing microglia are recruited to the motor neuron early in DM disease through a fractalkine-independent mechanism. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Survey of diagnostic and treatment practices for multiple sclerosis (MS) in Europe. Part 2: Progressive MS, paediatric MS, pregnancy and general management.

    Fernández, O; Delvecchio, M; Edan, G; Fredrikson, S; Giovannoni, G; Hartung, H-P; Havrdova, E; Kappos, L; Pozzilli, C; Soerensen, P S; Tackenberg, B; Vermersch, P; Comi, G

    2018-05-01

    The European Charcot Foundation supported the development of a set of surveys to understand current practice patterns for the diagnosis and management of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Europe. Part 2 of the report summarizes survey results related to secondary progressive MS (SPMS), primary progressive MS (PPMS), pregnancy, paediatric MS and overall patient management. A steering committee of MS neurologists developed case- and practice-based questions for two sequential surveys distributed to MS neurologists throughout Europe. Respondents generally favoured changing rather than stopping disease-modifying treatment (DMT) in patients transitioning from relapsing-remitting MS to SPMS, particularly with active disease. Respondents would not initiate DMT in patients with typical PPMS symptoms, although the presence of ≥1 spinal cord or brain gadolinium-enhancing lesion might affect that decision. For patients considering pregnancy, respondents were equally divided on whether to stop treatment before or after conception. Respondents strongly favoured starting DMT in paediatric MS with active disease; recommended treatments included interferon, glatiramer acetate and, in John Cunningham virus negative patients, natalizumab. Additional results regarding practice-based questions and management are summarized. Results of part 2 of the survey of diagnostic and treatment practices for MS in Europe largely mirror results for part 1, with neurologists in general agreement about the treatment and management of SPMS, PPMS, pregnancy and paediatric MS as well as the general management of MS. However, there are also many areas of disagreement, indicating the need for evidence-based recommendations and/or guidelines. © 2018 EAN.

  3. Alterations in the hypothalamic melanocortin pathway in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Vercruysse, Pauline; Sinniger, Jérôme; El Oussini, Hajer; Scekic-Zahirovic, Jelena; Dieterlé, Stéphane; Dengler, Reinhard; Meyer, Thomas; Zierz, Stephan; Kassubek, Jan; Fischer, Wilhelm; Dreyhaupt, Jens; Grehl, Torsten; Hermann, Andreas; Grosskreutz, Julian; Witting, Anke; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Spreux-Varoquaux, Odile; Ludolph, Albert C; Dupuis, Luc

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease, leads to death within 3 to 5 years after onset. Beyond progressive motor impairment, patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis suffer from major defects in energy metabolism, such as weight loss, which are well correlated with survival. Indeed, nutritional intervention targeting weight loss might improve survival of patients. However, the neural mechanisms underlying metabolic impairment in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis remain elusive, in particular due to the lack of longitudinal studies. Here we took advantage of samples collected during the clinical trial of pioglitazone (GERP-ALS), and characterized longitudinally energy metabolism of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in response to pioglitazone, a drug with well-characterized metabolic effects. As expected, pioglitazone decreased glycaemia, decreased liver enzymes and increased circulating adiponectin in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, showing its efficacy in the periphery. However, pioglitazone did not increase body weight of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis independently of bulbar involvement. As pioglitazone increases body weight through a direct inhibition of the hypothalamic melanocortin system, we studied hypothalamic neurons producing proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and the endogenous melanocortin inhibitor agouti-related peptide (AGRP), in mice expressing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked mutant SOD1(G86R). We observed lower Pomc but higher Agrp mRNA levels in the hypothalamus of presymptomatic SOD1(G86R) mice. Consistently, numbers of POMC-positive neurons were decreased, whereas AGRP fibre density was elevated in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of SOD1(G86R) mice. Consistent with a defect in the hypothalamic melanocortin system, food intake after short term fasting was increased in SOD1(G86R) mice. Importantly, these findings were replicated in two other amyotrophic

  4. ASSESSMENT OF THE SENSITIVITY OF NEW CRITERIA FOR SYSTEMIC SCLEROSIS IN RUSSIAN PATIENT POPULATION

    O. A. Koneva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SS is a progressive connective tissue disease, the prognosis of which largely depends on the time of adequate therapy initiation. Low sensitivity of the 1980 American College of Rheumatology (ACR SS classification criteria for identifying patients with early stage of the disease, and with its limited form in particular, has necessitated revision of existing SS diagnostic standards and elaboration of more sensitive criteria that allow to establish the diagnosis when the first sign of the disease appear.Objective: to compare the sensitivity of the novel SS criteria of ACR and European League against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR 2013 and the 1980 ACR criteria in different stages of the disease.Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 302 patients who had been diagnosed by experts as having SS and followed up at the V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology in 2007–2013. The patients’ mean age was 49±13 years (18 to 80 years; male to female ratio – 1:9 (31 and 271, that of patients with diffuse and limited SS – 1:2 (105 and 197; mean duration of the disease from the first non-Raynaud’s syndrome was 8.2±7.0 years (6 months to 36 years. Physical examination, nailfold capillaroscopy, chest radiography or computed tomography, echocardiography for the determination of pulmonary artery systolic pressure and SS-specific antibodies evaluation were performed.Results. 273 (90% patients fulfilled the novel ACR/EULAR 2013 SS criteria. 76 (25% patients had skin thickening above the metacarpophalangeal (MPC joints in both hands; 263 (87% – finger skin thickening [70 (23% – finger swelling, 192 (64% – thickening of all fingers distal to the MPC joints], 141 (47% – digital ischemia [79 (26% – digital pitting scars, 20 (7% – digital ulcers, 42 (14% – digital pitting scars and ulcers], 134 (44% – telangiectasias, 276 (91% – capillaroscopic changes, 225 (78% – pulmonary hypertension (PH or

  5. Correlations between skin blood perfusion values and nailfold capillaroscopy scores in systemic sclerosis patients.

    Ruaro, B; Sulli, A; Pizzorni, C; Paolino, S; Smith, V; Cutolo, M

    2016-05-01

    To correlate blood perfusion (BP) values assessed by laser speckle contrast analysis (LASCA) in selected skin areas of hands and face with nailfold capillary damage scores in systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients. Seventy SSc patients (mean SSc duration 6 ± 5 years) and 70 volunteer healthy subjects were enrolled after informed consent. LASCA was performed at different areas of the face (forehead, tip of nose, zygomas and perioral region) and at dorsal and volar regions of hands. Microvascular damage was assessed and scored by nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC) and the microangiopathy evolution score (MES) was calculated. SSc patients showed a significantly lower BP than healthy subjects at fingertips, periungual areas and palm of hands (pnailfold capillaroscopy scores of microangiopathy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection in systemic sclerosis patients

    Zakrzewska, K.; Corcioli, F.; Carlsen, Karen Marie

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our previous reports suggested a possible association between parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection and systemic sclerosis (SSc), based on higher prevalence of B19V DNA in SSc patients in respect to controls. METHODS: In the present study, to further evaluate the differences in the pattern...... of B19 infection in SSc, skin biopsies and bone marrow samples from patients and controls were analysed for B19V DNA detection, genotyping and viral expression. RESULTS: B19V DNA was detected in skin biopsies from 39/49 SSc patients and from 20/28 controls. Bone marrow showed positive in 17/29 SSc...... in the skin of genotype 1-positive patients and not in control skins. CONCLUSION: The results outline some differences in the rate of persistence of B19V DNA, in the simultaneous persistence of 2 genotypes and in the pattern of viral expression among SSc patients and controls Udgivelsesdato: 2009...

  7. Workplace barriers encountered by employed persons with systemic sclerosis.

    Poole, Janet L; Anwar, Sahar; Mendelson, Cindy; Allaire, Saralynn

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an auto-immune connective tissue disease characterized by fibrosis of skin, blood vessels, and internal organs that results in significant disability. To identify the work barriers faced by people with systemic sclerosis (SSc) in maintaining employment. Thirty-six people with SSc who were working more than 8 hours per week completed the Work Experience Survey, which contains lists of potential work barriers, including the ability to travel to and from work; get around at work; perform essential job functions, including physical, cognitive, and task-related activities; work with others; and manage work conditions. Thirty-three participants completed and returned the questionnaires, most of whom were female, and working full time and in professional careers. Principal disease symptoms included fatigue, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal involvement, and leg or hand/wrist pain. All participants reported some barriers with a mean of 18 barriers per participant. At least three quarters of participants cited outside temperature (82%), cold temperatures inside the workplace (76%), and household work (76%), as barriers. The next most common barriers were using both hands (64%), arranging and taking part in social activities (64%), being able to provide self-care (61%) and working 8 hours (58%). Participants reported a wide range of barriers, from cold temperatures, to physical job, fatigue related, and non-workplace demands, in maintaining the worker role. The barriers reflect the disease symptoms they reported. Identifying workplace barriers facilitates the creation of job accommodations or adaptations that will allow people with SSc to continue working.

  8. The Role of the Gut Microbiome in Multiple Sclerosis Risk and Progression: Towards Characterization of the "MS Microbiome".

    Pröbstel, Anne-Katrin; Baranzini, Sergio E

    2018-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the prototypic complex disease, in which both genes and the environment contribute to its pathogenesis. To date, > 200 independent loci across the genome have been associated with MS risk. However, these only explain a fraction of the total phenotypic variance, suggesting the possible presence of additional genetic factors, and, most likely, also environmental factors. New DNA sequencing technologies have enabled the sequencing of all kinds of microorganisms, including those living in and around humans (i.e., microbiomes). The study of bacterial populations inhabiting the gut is of particular interest in autoimmune diseases owing to their key role in shaping immune responses. In this review, we address the potential crosstalk between B cells and the gut microbiota, a relevant scenario in light of recently approved anti-B-cell therapies for MS. In addition, we review recent efforts to characterize the gut microbiome in patients with MS and discuss potential challenges and future opportunities. Finally, we describe the international MS microbiome study, a multicenter effort to study a large population of patients with MS and their healthy household partners to define the core MS microbiome, how it is shaped by disease-modifying therapies, and to explore potential therapeutic interventions.

  9. Orion Absolute Navigation System Progress and Challenges

    Holt, Greg N.; D'Souza, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The Orion spacecraft is being designed as NASA's next-generation exploration vehicle for crewed missions beyond Low-Earth Orbit. The navigation system for the Orion spacecraft is being designed in a Multi-Organizational Design Environment (MODE) team including contractor and NASA personnel. The system uses an Extended Kalman Filter to process measurements and determine the state. The design of the navigation system has undergone several iterations and modifications since its inception, and continues as a work-in-progress. This paper seeks to benchmark the current state of the design and some of the rationale and analysis behind it. There are specific challenges to address when preparing a timely and effective design for the Exploration Flight Test (EFT-1), while still looking ahead and providing software extensibility for future exploration missions. The primary measurements in a Near-Earth or Mid-Earth environment consist of GPS pseudorange and deltarange, but for future explorations missions the use of star-tracker and optical navigation sources need to be considered. Discussions are presented for state size and composition, processing techniques, and consider states. A presentation is given for the processing technique using the computationally stable and robust UDU formulation with an Agee-Turner Rank-One update. This allows for computational savings when dealing with many parameters which are modeled as slowly varying Gauss-Markov processes. Preliminary analysis shows up to a 50% reduction in computation versus a more traditional formulation. Several state elements are discussed and evaluated, including position, velocity, attitude, clock bias/drift, and GPS measurement biases in addition to bias, scale factor, misalignment, and non-orthogonalities of the accelerometers and gyroscopes. Another consideration is the initialization of the EKF in various scenarios. Scenarios such as single-event upset, ground command, pad alignment, cold start are discussed as are

  10. An assessment of treatment guidelines, clinical practices, demographics, and progression of disease among patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in Japan, the United States, and Europe.

    Takei, Koji; Tsuda, Kikumi; Takahashi, Fumihiro; Hirai, Manabu; Palumbo, Joseph

    2017-10-01

    There is an increasing clinical research focus on neuroprotective agents in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, it is unclear how generalisable clinical study trial results are between different countries and regions. To assess similarities and differences in clinical practice and treatment guidelines for ALS, and also to compare the demographics and rate of progression of disease in patients with ALS enrolled in clinical trials in Japan, the US, and Europe. We performed a review of clinical studies published since 2000 to compare the demographics and characteristics of patients with ALS. Progression of ALS disease was assessed in patients receiving placebo. The changes per month in ALSFRS-R score were calculated and compared between the studies. Overall, diagnostic criteria, recognition of ALS symptoms, comorbidities, use of riluzole, and nutritional, and respiratory support were similar. Regarding demographics and characteristics, there were no clear differences in the incidence of sporadic ALS (range 91-98%), bulbar onset (range 11-41%), and median time from onset to diagnosis (range 9-14 months) among the populations despite the difference in race between regions. However, use of tracheostomy-based invasive respiratory support was higher in Japan (29-38%) than in the US (4%) and Europe (1-31%). Rate of progression of disease was similar between the US and Europe study populations (range -0.89 to -1.60 points/month), and the Japanese study populations (range -1.03 to -1.21 points/month). There is evidence to support the generalisability of data from the Japanese ALS trial experience to the US and Europe populations in early to mid-stage of ALS.

  11. Global and 3D Spatial Assessment of Neuroinflammation in Rodent Models of Multiple Sclerosis

    Gupta, Shashank; Utoft, Regine Egeholm; Hasseldam, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a progressive autoimmune inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). T cells play a key role in the progression of neuroinflammation in MS and also in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) animal models for the disease. A te...

  12. Earnings and Financial Compensation from Social Security Systems Correlate Strongly with Disability for Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

    Kavaliunas, Andrius; Wiberg, Michael; Tinghög, Petter; Glaser, Anna; Gyllensten, Hanna; Alexanderson, Kristina; Hillert, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients earn lower incomes and receive higher benefits. However, there is limited knowledge of how this is correlated with their disability. To elucidate sources and levels of income among MS patients with different disability, assessed with the Expanded Disability Status Scale. A total of 7929 MS patients aged 21-64 years and living in Sweden in 2010 were identified for this cross-sectional study. Descriptive statistics, logistic and truncated linear regression models were used to estimate differences between MS patients regarding earnings, disability pension, sickness absence, disability allowance, unemployment compensation, and social assistance. The average level of earnings was ten times lower and the average level of health- related benefits was four times higher when comparing MS patients with severe and mild disability. MS patients with severe disability had on average SEK 166,931 less annual income from earnings and SEK 54,534 more income from benefits compared to those with mild disability. The combined average income for MS patients was 35% lower when comparing patients in the same groups. The adjusted risk ratio for having earnings among MS patients with severe disability compared to the patients with mild disability was 0.33 (95% CI 0.29-0.39), while the risk ratio for having benefits was 1.93 (95% CI 1.90-1.94). Disease progression affects the financial situation of MS patients considerably. Correlations between higher disability and patient income were observed, suggesting that earnings and benefits could be used as measures of MS progression and proxies of disability.

  13. Survival and causes of death in systemic sclerosis patients: a single center registry report from Iran.

    Poormoghim, Hadi; Andalib, Elham; Jalali, Arash; Ghaderi, Afshin; Ghorbannia, Ali; Mojtabavi, Nazanin

    2016-07-01

    The aims of the study were to determine prognostic factors for survival and causes of death in a cohort of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). This was a cohort study of SSc patients in single rheumatologic center from January 1998 to August 2012. They fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology classification criteria for SSc or had calcinosis Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, telangiectasia or sine sclerosis. Causes of death were classified as SSc related and non-SSc related. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazard regression models were used in univariate and multivariate analysis to analyse survival in subgroups and determine prognostic factors of survival. The study includes 220 patients (192 female, 28 male). Out of thirty-two (14.5 %) who died, seventeen (53.1 %) deaths were SSc related and in nine (28.1 %) non-SSc-related causes, and in six (18.8 %) of patients causes of death were not defined. Overall survival rate was 92.6 % (95 % CI 87.5-95.7 %) after 5 years and 82.3 % (95 % CI 73.4-88.4 %) after 10 years. Pulmonary involvement was a major SSc-related cause of death, occurred in seven (41.1 %) patients. Cardiovascular events were leading cause of in overall death (11) 34.3 % and 6 in non-SSc-related death. Independent risk factors for mortality were age >50 at diagnosis (HR 5.10) advance pulmonary fibrosis (HR 11.5), tendon friction rub at entry (HR 6.39), arthritis (HR 3.56). In this first Middle Eastern series of SSc registry, pulmonary and cardiac involvements were the leading cause of SSc-related death.

  14. Measuring standing balance in multiple sclerosis: Further progress towards an automatic and reliable method in clinical practice.

    Keune, Philipp M; Young, William R; Paraskevopoulos, Ioannis T; Hansen, Sascha; Muenssinger, Jana; Oschmann, Patrick; Müller, Roy

    2017-08-15

    Balance deficits in multiple sclerosis (MS) are often monitored by means of observer-rated tests. These may provide reliable data, but may also be time-consuming, subject to inter-rater variability, and potentially insensitive to mild fluctuations throughout the clinical course. On the other hand, laboratory assessments are often not available. The Nintendo Wii Balance Board (WBB) may represent a low-cost solution. The purpose of the current study was to examine the methodological quality of WBB data in MS (internal consistency, test-retest reliability), convergent validity with observer-rated tests (Berg Balance Scale, BBS; Timed-Up and Go Test, TUG), and discriminative validity concerning clinical status (Expanded Disability Status Scale, EDSS). Standing balance was assessed with the WBB for 4min in 63 MS patients at two assessment points, four months apart. Additionally, patients were examined with the BBS, TUG and the EDSS. A period of 4min on the WBB provided data characterized by excellent internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Significant correlations between WBB data and results of the BBS and TUG were obtained after merely 2min on the board. An EDSS median-split revealed that higher EDSS values (>3) were associated with significantly increased postural sway on the WBB. WBB measures reflecting postural sway are methodologically robust in MS, involving excellent internal consistency and test-retest reliability. They are also characterized by convergent validity with other considerably lengthier observer-rated balance measures (BBS) and sensitive to broader clinical characteristics (EDSS). The WBB may hence represent an effective, easy-to-use monitoring tool for MS patients in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. In vivo imaging of system xc- as a novel approach to monitor multiple sclerosis

    Martin, Abraham; Szczupak, Boguslaw; Arrieta, Ander [CIC biomaGUNE, Molecular Imaging Unit, San Sebastian (Spain); Vazquez-Villoldo, Nuria; Soria, Federico N.; Domercq, Maria; Matute, Carlos [University of the Basque Country, Department of Neurosciences, Leioa (Spain); UPV/EHU, Achucarro Basque Center for Neuroscience, Zamudio (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red de Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Leioa (Spain); Gomez-Vallejo, Vanessa; Llop, Jordi [CIC biomaGUNE, Molecular Imaging Unit, San Sebastian (Spain); CIC biomaGUNE, Radiochemistry and Nuclear Imaging, San Sebastian (Spain); Padro, Daniel; Plaza-Garcia, Sandra; Reese, Torsten [CIC biomaGUNE, Molecular Imaging Unit, San Sebastian (Spain); CIC biomaGUNE, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, San Sebastian (Spain)

    2016-06-15

    Glutamate excitotoxicity contributes to oligodendroglial and axonal damage in multiple sclerosis pathology. Extracellular glutamate concentration in the brain is controlled by cystine/glutamate antiporter (system xc-), a membrane antiporter that imports cystine and releases glutamate. Despite this, the system xc{sup -} activity and its connection to the inflammatory reaction in multiple sclerosis (MS) is largely unknown. Longitudinal in vivo magnetic resonance (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies with 2-[{sup 18}F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG), [{sup 11}C]-(R)-1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-1(1-methylpropyl) -3-isoquinolinecarbox amide ([{sup 11}C]PK11195) and (4S)-4-(3-{sup 18}F-fluoropropyl)-L-glutamate ([{sup 18}F]FSPG) were carried out during the course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induction in rats. [{sup 18}F]FSPG showed a significant increase of system xc{sup -} function in the lumbar section of the spinal cord at 14 days post immunization (dpi) that stands in agreement with the neurological symptoms and ventricle edema formation at this time point. Likewise, [{sup 18}F]FDG did not show significant changes in glucose metabolism throughout central nervous system and [{sup 11}C]PK11195 evidenced a significant increase of microglial/macrophage activation in spinal cord and cerebellum 2 weeks after EAE induction. Therefore, [{sup 18}F]FSPG showed a major capacity to discriminate regions of the central nervous system affected by the MS in comparison to [{sup 18}F]FDG and [{sup 11}C]PK11195. Additionally, clodronate-treated rats showed a depletion in microglial population and [{sup 18}F]FSPG PET signal in spinal cord confirming a link between neuroinflammatory reaction and cystine/glutamate antiporter activity in EAE rats. Altogether, these results suggest that in vivo PET imaging of system xc{sup -} could become a valuable tool for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of MS. (orig.)

  16. MIF functional polymorphisms (-794 CATT5-8 and -173 G>C) are associated with MIF serum levels, severity and progression in male multiple sclerosis from western Mexican population.

    Castañeda-Moreno, V A; De la Cruz-Mosso, U; Torres-Carrillo, N; Macías-Islas, M A; Padilla-De la Torre, O; Mireles-Ramírez, M A; González-Pérez, O; Ruiz-Sandoval, J L; Huerta, M; Trujillo, X; Ortuño-Sahagún, D; Jf, Muñoz-Valle

    2018-07-15

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a cytokine associated with tissue damage in multiple autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. The role of MIF in multiple sclerosis (MS) and the contribution of its polymorphisms are unknown in our population. Therefore, we decided to investigate the genetic association of -794 CATT 5-8 (rs5844572) and -173 G>C (rs755622) MIF polymorphisms with MS, clinical variables and MIF serum levels in the population of western Mexico. 230 MS patients diagnosed according to McDonald criteria and 248 control subjects (CS) were recruited for this study, both polymorphisms were genotyped by PCR and PCR-RFLP and MIF serum levels were measured by ELISA kit. Severity and progression of MS were evaluated by EDSS and MSSS scores, respectively. Genotypes carrying the 5 repeats alleles of -794 CATT 5-8 MIF polymorphism present higher MIF serum levels in comparison with no carriers, and the presence of 5,7 heterozygous genotype contribute to the increase of disease severity and damage progression in MS patients. Notably when we stratified by sex, an effect of risk alleles (7 repeats and -173*C) of both MIF polymorphisms on EDSS and MSSS scores on males was found (p < 0.01). This study suggests that polymorphic alleles of MIF polymorphisms could act as sex-specific disease modifiers that increase the severity and progression of MS in male Mexican-Mestizo western population. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of the human brain in primary progressive multiple sclerosis with mapping of the spatial distributions using 1H MR spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging

    Sijens, Paul E.; Irwan, Roy; Potze, Jan Hendrik; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Mostert, Jop P.; Keyser, Jacques de

    2005-01-01

    Primary progressive multiple sclerosis (ppMS; n=4) patients and controls (n=4) were examined by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in order to map choline (Cho), creatine and N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion constant (ADC). After chemical shift imaging (point-resolved spectroscopy, repetition time/echo time 1,500 ms/135 ms) of a supraventricular volume of interest of 8 x 8 x 2 cm 3 (64 voxels) MRS peak areas were matched to the results of DTI for the corresponding volume elements. Mean FA and NAA values were reduced in the ppMS patients (P<0.01, both) and the ADC increased (P<0.02). The spatial distribution of NAA showed strong correlation to ADC in both ppMS patients and controls (r =-0.74 and r= -0.70; P<0.00001, both), and weaker correlations to FA (r=0.49 and r=0.41; P<0.00001, all). FA and ADC also correlated significantly with Cho in patients and controls (P<0.00001, all). The relationship of Cho and NAA to the ADC and the FA and thus to the content of neuronal structures suggests that these metabolite signals essentially originate from axons (NAA) and the myelin sheath (Cho). This is of interest in view of previous reports in which Cho increases were associated with demyelination and the subsequent breakdown of neurons. (orig.)

  18. Chitotriosidase (CHIT1) is increased in microglia and macrophages in spinal cord of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and cerebrospinal fluid levels correlate with disease severity and progression.

    Steinacker, Petra; Verde, Federico; Fang, Lubin; Feneberg, Emily; Oeckl, Patrick; Roeber, Sigrun; Anderl-Straub, Sarah; Danek, Adrian; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Fassbender, Klaus; Fliessbach, Klaus; Foerstl, Hans; Giese, Armin; Jahn, Holger; Kassubek, Jan; Kornhuber, Johannes; Landwehrmeyer, G Bernhard; Lauer, Martin; Pinkhardt, Elmar Hans; Prudlo, Johannes; Rosenbohm, Angela; Schneider, Anja; Schroeter, Matthias L; Tumani, Hayrettin; von Arnim, Christine A F; Weishaupt, Jochen; Weydt, Patrick; Ludolph, Albert C; Yilmazer Hanke, Deniz; Otto, Markus

    2018-03-01

    Neurochemical markers of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) that reflect underlying disease mechanisms might help in diagnosis, staging and prediction of outcome. We aimed at determining the origin and differential diagnostic and prognostic potential of the putative marker of microglial activation chitotriosidase (CHIT1). Altogether 316 patients were included, comprising patients with sporadic ALS, ALS mimics (disease controls (DCo)), frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and healthy controls (Con). CHIT1 and neurofilament levels were determined in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood and analysed with regard to diagnostic sensitivity and specificity and prognostic performance. Additionally, postmortem tissue was analysed for CHIT1 expression. In ALS, CHIT1 CSF levels were higher compared with Con (pdifferential diagnosis and prediction of disease progression in ALS and, therefore, seems suitable as a supplemental marker for patient stratification in therapeutic trials. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Characteristics of lesional and extra-lesional cortical grey matter in relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis: A magnetisation transfer and diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Yaldizli, Özgür; Pardini, Matteo; Sethi, Varun; Muhlert, Nils; Liu, Zheng; Tozer, Daniel J; Samson, Rebecca S; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia Am; Yousry, Tarek A; Miller, David H; Chard, Declan T

    2016-02-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), diffusion tensor and magnetisation transfer imaging are both abnormal in lesional and extra-lesional cortical grey matter, but differences between clinical subtypes and associations with clinical outcomes have only been partly assessed. To compare mean diffusivity, fractional anisotropy and magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) in cortical grey matter lesions (detected using phase-sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) imaging) and extra-lesional cortical grey matter, and assess associations with disability in relapse-onset MS. Seventy-two people with MS (46 relapsing-remitting (RR), 26 secondary progressive (SP)) and 36 healthy controls were included in this study. MTR, mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were measured in lesional and extra-lesional cortical grey matter. Mean fractional anisotropy was higher and MTR lower in lesional compared with extra-lesional cortical grey matter. In extra-lesional cortical grey matter mean fractional anisotropy and MTR were lower, and mean diffusivity was higher in the MS group compared with controls. Mean MTR was lower and mean diffusivity was higher in lesional and extra-lesional cortical grey matter in SPMS when compared with RRMS. These differences were independent of disease duration. In multivariate analyses, MTR in extra-lesional more so than lesional cortical grey matter was associated with disability. Magnetic resonance abnormalities in lesional and extra-lesional cortical grey matter are greater in SPMS than RRMS. Changes in extra-lesional compared with lesional cortical grey matter are more consistently associated with disability. © The Author(s), 2015.

  20. Comparison of triple dose versus standard dose gadolinium-DTPA for detection of MRI enhancing lesions in patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Filippi, M; Campi, A; Martinelli, V; Colombo, B; Yousry, T; Canal, N; Scotti, G; Comi, G

    1995-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate whether a triple dose of gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) increases the sensitivity of brain MRI for detecting enhancing lesions in patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS). T1 weighted brain MRI was obtained for 10 patients with PPMS in two sessions. In the first session, one scan was obtained five to seven minutes after the injection of 0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA (standard dose). In the second session, six to 24 hours later, one scan before and two scans five to seven minutes and one hour after the injection of 0.3 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA (triple dose) were obtained. Four enhancing lesions were detected in two patients when the standard dose of Gd-DTPA was used. The numbers of enhancing lesions increased to 13 and the numbers of patients with such lesions to five when the triple dose of Gd-DTPA was used and to 14 and six in the one hour delayed scans. The mean contrast ratio for enhancing lesions detected with the triple dose of Gd-DTPA was higher than those for lesions present in both the standard dose (P DTPA many more enhancing lesions can be detected in patients with PPMS. This is important both for planning clinical trials and for detecting the presence of inflammation in vivo in the lesions of such patients. Images PMID:8530944

  1. Progression of a series of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis treated for 7 years with natalizumab using the "no evidence of disease activity" parameter.

    Pato Pato, A; Costa Arpín, E; Rodríguez Regal, A; Rodríguez Constenla, I; Cimas Hernando, I; Muñoz Pousa, I; Naya Ríos, L; Lorenzo González, J R; Amigo Jorrín, M C; Prieto González, J M

    2018-05-10

    The safety and effectiveness of natalizumab in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) has been demonstrated in clinical trials. However, due to the limitations of these trials, it is important to know how the condition behaves under long-term clinical practice conditions. To determine the long-term effectiveness of natalizumab in patients with RRMS by means of annual evaluation of the "no evidence of disease activity" (NEDA) parameter, which includes number of relapses, disability (measured with the Expanded Disability Status Scale), and brain MRI parameters. We performed a retrospective study of patients with RRMS from 3 centres who were treated with one or more doses of natalizumab. Each year, we evaluated NEDA status and safety based on the percentage of patients who discontinued treatment with natalizumab and experienced adverse reactions. The study included 89 patients, most of whom received treatment for 2 to 4 years, with a follow-up period of up to 7 years. Natalizumab significantly reduces the radiological and clinical progression of the disease, as well as the annual rate of relapses. The NEDA parameter demonstrates the effectiveness of the drug, with values of 75.28% for year one and 66.67% for year 7. Twenty-five patients (28.1%) dropped out after a median of 4 years. Fourteen of these patients (56%) dropped out due to the appearance of anti-JC virus antibodies, either in isolation or associated with another cause. Four dropouts (16%) were due to treatment ineffectiveness, with one patient dying due to progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Natalizumab is highly effective as measured by the NEDA long-term remission parameter. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Nailfold capillaroscopy and blood flow laser-doppler analysis of the microvascular damage in systemic sclerosis: preliminary results

    C. Pizzorni

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Systemic sclerosis (SSc is characterized by altered microvascular structure and function. Nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC is the tool to evaluate capillary morphological structure and laser-Doppler Blood flowmetry (LDF can be used to estimate cutaneous blood flow of microvessels. The aim of this study was to investigate possible relationships between capillary morphology and blood flow in SSc. Methods: 27 SSc patients and 12 healthy subjects were enrolled. SSc microvascular involvement, as evaluated by NVC, was classified in three different patterns (“Early”, “Active”, “Late”. LDF analysis was performed at the II, III, IV, V hand fingers in both hands and both at cutaneous temperature and at 36°C. Statistical evaluation was carried out by non-parametric procedures. Results: Blood flow was found significantly lower in SSc patients when compared with healthy subjects (p<0.05. The heating of the probe to 36°C induced a significant increase in peripheral blood flow in all subjects compared to baseline (p <0.05, however, the amount of variation was significantly lower in patients with SSc, compared with healthy controls (p <0.05. The SSc patients with NVC “Late” pattern, showed lower values of peripheral blood flow than patients with NVC “Active” or “Early” patterns (p<0.05. Moreover, a negative correlation between the tissue perfusion score and the progression of the SSc microangiopathy was observed, as well as between the tissue perfusion and the duration of the Raynaud’s phenomenon (p <0.03. Conclusions: LDF can be employed to evaluate blood perfusion in the microvascular circulation in SSc patients. The blood flow changes observed with the LDF seem to correlate with the severity of microvascular damage in SSc as detected by NVC.

  3. [Nailfold capillaroscopy and blood flow laser-doppler analysis of the microvascular damage in systemic sclerosis: preliminary results].

    Secchi, M E; Sulli, A; Pizzorni, C; Cutolo, M

    2009-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is characterized by altered microvascular structure and function. Nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC) is the tool to evaluate capillary morphological structure and laser-Doppler Blood flowmetry (LDF) can be used to estimate cutaneous blood flow of microvessels. The aim of this study was to investigate possible relationships between capillary morphology and blood flow in SSc. Twenty-seven SSc patients and 12 healthy subjects were enrolled. SSc microvascular involvement, as evaluated by NVC, was classified in three different patterns ("Early", "Active", "Late"). LDF analysis was performed at the II, III, IV, V hand fingers in both hands and both at cutaneous temperature and at 36 degrees C. Statistical evaluation was carried out by non-parametric procedures. Blood flow was found significantly lower in SSc patients when compared with healthy subjects (p<0.05). The heating of the probe to 36 degrees C induced a significant increase in peripheral blood flow in all subjects compared to baseline (p <0.05), however, the amount of variation was significantly lower in patients with SSc, compared with healthy controls (p <0.05). The SSc patients with NVC "Late" pattern, showed lower values of peripheral blood flow than patients with NVC "Active" or "Early" patterns (p<0.05). Moreover, a negative correlation between the tissue perfusion score and the progression of the SSc microangiopathy was observed, as well as between the tissue perfusion and the duration of the Raynaud's phenomenon (p <0.03). LDF can be employed to evaluate blood perfusion in the microvascular circulation in SSc patients. The blood flow changes observed with the LDF seem to correlate with the severity of microvascular damage in SSc as detected by NVC.

  4. "It's Not Me, It's Not Really Me." Insights From Patients on Living With Systemic Sclerosis: An Interview Study.

    Sumpton, Daniel; Thakkar, Vivek; O'Neill, Sean; Singh-Grewal, Davinder; Craig, Jonathan C; Tong, Allison

    2017-11-01

    Patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) experience severe physical limitations and psychological morbidity, but their lived experience remains underrepresented and is reflected in the scarcity of evidence-based patient-centered interventions. We aimed to describe patients' perspectives of SSc to inform strategies to improve their care. Face-to-face semistructured interviews were conducted with 30 adult patients with limited cutaneous or diffuse cutaneous SSc in Australia. Transcripts were thematically analyzed using HyperRESEARCH software. Six themes were identified: bodily malfunction (restrictive pain, debilitating physical changes, pervasive exhaustion), deprivation of social function (loss of work and career, social isolation, threat to traditional roles, loss of intimacy), disintegration of identity (stigmatizing physical changes, disassociated self-image, extinguished hopes, alone and powerless, invisibility of illness), insecurity of care (unrecognized disease, ambiguity around diagnosis and cause, information insufficiency, resigning to treatment limitations, seeking reassurance, fear of progression), avoiding the sick role (evading thoughts of sickness, protecting family, favorable comparison), and perseverance and hope (positive stoicism, optimism about treatment and monitoring, taking control of own health, pursuing alternative treatments, transcending illness through support). SSc inflicts major bodily and social restrictions that crush patients' identity and self-image. Uncertainties about the cause, diagnosis, and prognosis can undermine confidence in care, leading to anxiety and therapeutic nihilism. Access to psychosocial care to support the patients' role and functioning capacity, as well as communication and education that explicitly address their concerns regarding management may potentially improve treatment satisfaction, self-efficacy, adherence, and outcomes in patients with SSc. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  5. The treatment of diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis with autologous hemopoietic stem cells transplantation (HSCT: our experience on 2 cases

    A. Tyndall

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is a treatment option which may be considered for severe diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc patients not responding to cyclophophamide (CY. We present two cases of dcSSc not responding to CY >10 g who were successfully treated with HSCT. Patients and methods: Two dcSSc patients were unresponsive to monthly i.v. pulse of CYC (0.75 g m2. Both patients had significant reduction of DLCO and mild-moderate pulmonary hypertension and HSCT was considered due to the rapid progression of the disease. Following informed consent and ethics committee approval, HSCT was performed. Mobilisation was performed with CY 4g/m2 and recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rHu GCSF followed by a successful apheresis (CD34+ cells, >7X106. Conditioning regimens were: CY 100mg/kg body weight plus thiotepa 10 mg/ kg in the first patient and CY 200 mg/kg in the second. Both graft products were CD34 selected. No arrythmias occurred during the procedure and no other severe side effects were observed during hospitalisation. Results: Follow up: Patients underwent a monthly follow up with physical examination, pulmonary function tests and echocardiography every 3 months. Chest CT has been performed 6 months post transplantation. The following was observed: skin score (from 40 to 10 for the first patient and from 38 to 12 for the second one, LVEF and pulmonary function remained stable, PAP decreased from 45 mmHg to 35 mmHg and from 40 to 32 mmHg. No late complications or cardiac toxicity was observed. Conclusion: These two dcSSc cases demonstrate that HSCT may be successfully performed without serious side effects in cases in whom despite a cumulative CY dose was ineffective. This suggests an “immunological threshold” effect which may be exploited in other severe, therapy refractory autoimmune cases.

  6. Early Magnetic Resonance Detection of Natalizumab-Related Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy in a Patient with Multiple Sclerosis

    Guglielmo Manenti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy is usually based on the clinical presentation, on the demonstration of the brain lesions at the magnetic resonance imaging examination, and on the detection of the JC virus DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid with high sensitive polymerase chain reaction. The role of magnetic resonance imaging specifically in natalizumab-associated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy is strengthening, and it is gaining importance not only as an irreplaceable diagnostic tool but also as a surveillance and risk stratifying tool in treated patients. While other imaging techniques such as computed tomography lack sensitivity and specificity, magnetic resonance performed with morphological and functional sequences offers clinicians the possibility to early identify the stage of the disease and the emergence of an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome after natalizumab blood removal plasmapheresis.

  7. [Evaluation of the equilibrium system in patients with multiple sclerosis based on qualitative assessment with videonystagmography].

    Kenig, Dagmara; Kantor, Ireneusz; Jurkiewicz, Dariusz

    2005-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (SM) is the most frequent inflammatory-demyelinating disease of central nervous system. The character of SM disease provokes that its most frequent symptoms are vertigo, equilibrium disorders and ataxia. Objective method of vertigo estimation is evaluation of the nystagmus via videonystagmography registration (VNG). This examination allows to simultaneously assess the vertical and horizontal component of the nystagmus. It is considered that mainly the vertical nystagmus is characteristic to equilibrium system impairments of the central nervous system, caused also by SM. The study was carried out on 40 patients (28 women, 12 men) with SM diagnosed as a result of neurological examination. 7 patients (17.5%) suffered from sham - movement vertigo, while 33 patients (82.5%) suffered from instability of posture and walking deviation. The videonystagmography examination resulted in the following: deviation of the eye movement was recorded in 26 patients (65%) during either in saccadic test and in smooth pursuit test, optokinetic nystagmus recorded: dissymetric and variable amplitude result in 24 patients (60%), presence of vertical nystagmus component in 30 patients (75%), positional test: directional-changable nystagmus in 8 patients (20%), pendular nystagmus in 4 patients (10%), presence of vertical nystagmus component in 31 patients (77.5%), caloric test: impairments of one of the labyrinth recorded in 12 patients (30%). SM is still the diagnostic and therapeutic problem. During the mentioned tests we have found the quantitative and qualitative changes in VNG recordings. This may be helpful in SM diagnosis, mainly during its early stages.

  8. Clinical and diagnostic significance of activity of enzymes participating in endoergic reactions of patients systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis

    LA Zborovskaya

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To improve quality of diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and systemic sclerosis (SS. Material and methods. 30 pts with SLE and 30 with SS were included. Besides complex clinical, instrumental and laboratory examination activity and isoenzymes of succinate dehydrogenase (SDG, fumarate hydrase (FH, malate dehydrogenase (MDG, cytochrome oxidase (CO were evaluated trice (at admission, after two weeks and at discharge with original methods. 30 healthy persons were included in the control group. Results. SLE and SS pts had significant changes of energy metabolism enzymes depended on clinical features of the disease. Enzyme indices at minimal activity of SLE and SS were more informative than most of traditional laboratory tests. Comparative analysis of enzyme indices in SLE and SS pts revealed some features with along with clinical, instrumental and traditional laboratory data should be consider in diagnosis of these diseases. Enzyme indices correlated with changes of pts clinical state what allow to use them as criteria of treatment efficacy.

  9. In systemic sclerosis, anxiety and depression assessed by hospital anxiety depression scale are independently associated with disability and psychological factors.

    Del Rosso, A; Mikhaylova, S; Baccini, M; Lupi, I; Matucci Cerinic, M; Maddali Bongi, S

    2013-01-01

    Background. Anxious and depressive symptoms are frequent in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). Our objective is to assess their prevalence and association with district and global disability and psychological variables. Methods. 119?SSc patients were assessed by Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS). Clinical depression and anxiety were defined for HADS score cutoff ?8. Patients were assessed for psychological symptoms (RSES, COPE-NIV), hand (HAMIS, CHFDS, fist closure, and hand opening) and face d...

  10. [Future challenges in multiple sclerosis].

    Fernández, Óscar

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis occurs in genetically susceptible individuals, in whom an unknown environmental factor triggers an immune response, giving rise to a chronic and disabling autoimmune disease. Currently, significant progress is being made in our knowledge of the frequency and distribution of multiple sclerosis and its risk factors, genetics, pathology, pathogenesis, diagnostic and prognostic markers, and treatment. This has radically changed patients' and clinicians' expectations of multiple sclerosis and has raised hope that there will soon be a way to control the disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. The association of illness perceptions with physical and mental health in systemic sclerosis patients: an exploratory study.

    Arat, Seher; Verschueren, Patrick; De Langhe, Ellen; Smith, Vanessa; Vanthuyne, Marie; Diya, Luwis; Van den Heede, Koen; Blockmans, Daniel; De Keyser, Filip; Houssiau, Frédéric A; Westhovens, René

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between illness perceptions and the ability to cope with physical and mental health problems in a large cohort of systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients. This was a cross-sectional study in 217 systemic sclerosis patients from the Belgian Systemic Sclerosis Cohort. Illness perception and coping were measured by the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire and a coping questionnaire--the Coping Orientation of Problem Experience inventory (COPE). Physical and mental health-related quality of life was measured by the 36-item short-form health survey (SF-36), as were disease activity and several severity parameters. The relationship between illness perceptions and the ability to cope with physical/mental health problems was examined using multiple linear regression analysis. According to LeRoy's classification, 49 patients had limited SSc (lSSc), 129 had limited cutaneous SSc (lcSSc) and 39 had diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc). Median disease duration was five years and the modified Rodnan skin score was 4. Good physical health was significantly associated with the lcSSc subtype and low disease activity (p consequences' and strong 'illness identity' correlated with poor physical health (p mental health was associated with low illness identity scores and low 'emotional response' scores (p mental health compared with the illness perception items. Illness representations contribute more than classical disease characteristics to physical and mental health. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Nailfold Capillaroscopy - Its Role in Diagnosis and Differential Diagnosis of Microvascular Damage in Systemic Sclerosis.

    Lambova, Sevdalina; Hermann, W; Muller-Ladner, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    In the nailfold area, specific diagnostic microvascular abnormalities are easily recognized via capillaroscopic examination in systemic sclerosis (SSc). They are termed "scleroderma" type capillaroscopic pattern, which includes presence of dilated, giant capillaries, haemorrhages, avascular areas, and neoangiogenic capillaries and are observed in the majority of SSc patients (in more than 90%). LeRoy and Medsger (2001) proposed criteria for early diagnosis of SSc with inclusion of the abnormal capillaroscopic changes and suggested to prediagnose SSc prior to the development of other manifestations of the disease. It is a new era in the diagnosis of SSc. At present, an international multicenter project is performed. It aims validation of criteria for very early diagnosis of SSc (project VEDOSS (Very Early Diagnosis of Systemic Sclerosis) and is organized by European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) Scleroderma Trials and Reasearch. Very recently the first results of the VEDOSS project were processed and new EULAR/ACR (American College of Rheumatology) classification criteria have been validated and published (2013), in which the characteristic capillaroscopic changes have been included. Our observations confirm the high frequency of the specific capillaroscopic changes of the fingers in SSc, which have been found in 97.2% of the cases from the studied patient population. We have performed for the first time capillaroscopic examinations of the toes in SSc. Interestingly,"scleroderma type" capillaroscopic pattern was also found at the toes in a high proportion of patients - 66.7%, but it is significantly less frequent as compared with fingers (97.2%, p<0.05). In our opinion, the examination of the toes of SSc patients should be considered as it suggests an additional opportunity for evaluation of the microvascular changes in these patients although the observed changes are in a lower proportion of cases. Thus, capillaroscopic examination is a cornerstone for the very

  13. Ventilation distribution and small airway function in patients with systemic sclerosis

    B.R.A. Silva

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the importance of traditional pulmonary function tests (PFTs in managing systemic sclerosis (SSc, many patients with pulmonary disease diagnosed by computed tomography (CT present with normal PFTs. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of the nitrogen single-breath washout (N2SBW test in diagnosing SSc and to correlate N2SBW parameters with the PFT indexes used in the follow-up of these patients, clinical data, and CT findings. Methods: Cross-sectional study in which 52 consecutive SSc patients were subjected to spirometry, body plethysmography, analysis of the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO, analysis of respiratory muscle strength, N2SBW testing, and CT analysis. Results: Twenty-eight patients had a forced vital capacity (FVC that was 120% of the predicted value, while 15 patients had a closing volume/vital capacity (CV/VC that was >120% of the predicted value. A significant difference in Phase III slopeN2SBW was observed when the patients with predominant traction bronchiectasis and honeycombing were compared to the patients with other CT patterns (p < 0.0001. The Phase III slopeN2SBW was correlated with FVC (rs = −0.845, p < 0.0001 and DLCO (rs = −0.600, p < 0.0001, and the CV/VC was correlated with FVC (rs = −0.460, p = 0.0006 and residual volume/total lung capacity (rs = 0.328, p = 0.017. Conclusion: Ventilation heterogeneity is a frequent finding in SSc patients that is associated with restrictive damage, changes in pulmonary diffusion, and CT patterns. In addition, approximately one-third of the patients presented with findings that were compatible with small airway disease. Keywords: Systemic sclerosis, Respiratory function tests, Nitrogen single-breath washout test

  14. Specific oxidative stress parameters differently correlate with nailfold capillaroscopy changes and organ involvement in systemic sclerosis.

    Riccieri, Valeria; Spadaro, Antonio; Fuksa, Leos; Firuzi, Omidreza; Saso, Luciano; Valesini, Guido

    2008-02-01

    Oxidative stress is suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc). The aim of the present study was to clarify such a hypothesis by determination of four different plasmatic parameters of oxidative stress, and to define its role in the microvascular damage, assessed by nailfold capillaroscopy (NC). Plasma samples of 18 patients with SSc were analyzed. The biomarkers measured were: total antioxidant capacity, hydroperoxides (ROOHs), and sulfhydryl (SH) and carbonyl (CO) groups. Each patient had a detailed clinical assessment and underwent an NC. The results showed significantly increased ROOHs in SSc patients compared to control group (5.02 +/- 0.24 vs 3.28 +/- 0.19 micromol/l; p capillaroscopy semiquantitative rating scale score (p < 0.05) and with the rating system for avascular areas (p < 0.03). The levels of CO groups inversely correlated with modified Rodnan's skin score (p < 0.039) and were lower in patients with pulmonary fibrosis (p < 0.045), while the levels of SH groups were lower in those presenting gastrointestinal involvement (p < 0.029). The obtained data indicate augmented free radical-mediated injury in SSc and also show correlations among oxidative abnormalities, some clinical findings, and signs of a more severe microvascular involvement. These results give more evidence to the connection between oxidative impairment and SSc.

  15. Neuropathic pain in Systemic Sclerosis patients: A cross-sectional study.

    Sousa-Neves, Joana; Cerqueira, Marcos; Santos-Faria, Daniela; Afonso, Carmo; Teixeira, Filipa

    2018-01-31

    To investigate if patients with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) show a higher prevalence of neuropathic pain (NP) in comparison with controls. To study the relationship between clinical variables of the disease and NP among SSc patients. 48 patients and 45 controls were included. Presence of NP was assessed applying the DN4 "Douleur Neuropathique en 4 Questions" questionnaire. Different clinical variables were also assessed in patients. Statistical analysis included parametric, nonparametric tests and multivariate logistic regression. NP was significantly higher in SSc patients (56.2% vs 13.3%, p<0.001). Mean Modified Rodnan Skin Score was independently associated with the presence of NP (p<0.05, OR 1.90). Peripheral nervous system involvement in SSc is not well studied and, as far as the authors are aware, this is the first study published evaluating NP in SSc patients and controls. These findings should raise the awareness of the clinician to recognize and address the presence of NP in these patients, especially in those with severe skin involvement. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  16. Serum amyloid A is a marker for pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis.

    Katja Lakota

    Full Text Available Inflammation in systemic sclerosis (SSc is a prominent, but incompletely characterized feature in early stages of the disease. The goal of these studies was to determine the circulating levels, clinical correlates and biological effects of the acute phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA, a marker of inflammation, in patients with SSc. Circulating levels of SAA were determined by multiplex assays in serum from 129 SSc patients and 98 healthy controls. Correlations between SAA levels and clinical and laboratory features of disease were analyzed. The effects of SAA on human pulmonary fibroblasts were studied ex vivo. Elevated levels of SAA were found in 25% of SSc patients, with the highest levels in those with early-stage disease and diffuse cutaneous involvement. Significant negative correlations of SAA were found with forced vital capacity and diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide. Patients with elevated SAA had greater dyspnea and more frequent interstitial lung disease, and had worse scores on patient-reported outcome measures. Incubation with recombinant SAA induced dose-dependent stimulation of IL-6 and IL-8 in normal lung fibroblasts in culture. Serum levels of the inflammatory marker SAA are elevated in patients with early diffuse cutaneous SSc, and correlate with pulmonary involvement. In lung fibroblasts, SAA acts as a direct stimulus for increased cytokine production. These findings suggest that systemic inflammation in SSc may be linked to lung involvement and SAA could serve as a potential biomarker for this complication.

  17. Does dysfunction of the mirror neuron system contribute to symptoms in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

    Eisen, Andrew; Lemon, Roger; Kiernan, Matthew C; Hornberger, Michael; Turner, Martin R

    2015-07-01

    There is growing evidence that mirror neurons, initially discovered over two decades ago in the monkey, are present in the human brain. In the monkey, mirror neurons characteristically fire not only when it is performing an action, such as grasping an object, but also when observing a similar action performed by another agent (human or monkey). In this review we discuss the origin, cortical distribution and possible functions of mirror neurons as a background to exploring their potential relevance in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We have recently proposed that ALS (and the related condition of frontotemporal dementia) may be viewed as a failure of interlinked functional complexes having their origins in key evolutionary adaptations. This can include loss of the direct projections from the corticospinal tract, and this is at least part of the explanation for impaired motor control in ALS. Since, in the monkey, corticospinal neurons also show mirror properties, ALS in humans might also affect the mirror neuron system. We speculate that a defective mirror neuron system might contribute to other ALS deficits affecting motor imagery, gesture, language and empathy. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prospective evaluation of frequency of signs of systemic sclerosis in 76 patients with morphea.

    Lipsker, Dan; Bessis, Didier; Cosnes, Anne; Kluger, Nicolas; Lutz, Virginie; Sauleau, Erik; Francès, Camille

    2015-01-01

    Some authors consider that morphoea and systemic sclerosis (SSc) could be part of the same disease spectrum. The aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence of signs indicative of SSc in a cohort of patients with morphoea. This is a prospective multi-centre study performed in four French academic dermatology departments: 76 patients with morphoea and 101 age- and sex-matched controls, who underwent complete clinical examination, were enrolled. A systemic search for signs indicative of SSc (e.g. Raynaud's phenomenon, reflux) was performed with the help of a standardised questionnaire. There were 58 women and 18 men (ration=3/1) with a median age of 59 years. Mean age at diagnosis was 54 years (extremes, 13-87). 49 subjects had plaque morphoea, 9 had generalised morphoea and 18 had linear morphoea. Mean duration of morphoea was 7.9 years. Signs possibly indicative of SSc were noted in four patients of the control group and in 8 patients with morphoea. This difference was not statistically significant (p=0.129). Further investigations ruled out SSc in all patients. Signs indicative of SSc are statistically not more frequently present in patients with morphoea than in controls and this study does not support the view that those 2 entities are part of a common disease spectrum.

  19. [Current therapy of multiple sclerosis].

    Antonio García Merino, J

    2014-12-01

    Since the introduction of interferon beta 1 b for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, there has been a progressive increase in the number of drugs available for this disease. Currently, 11 drugs have been approved in Spain, and their indications depend on specific clinical characteristics. The present article reviews these indications and also discusses other medications without official approval that have also been used in multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Systems analysis department annual progress report 1986

    Grohnheit, P.E.; Larsen, H.; Vestergaard, N.K.

    1987-02-01

    The report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1986. The activities may be classified as energy systems analysis and risk and reliability analysis. The report includes a list of staff members. (author)

  1. Glucocorticoid receptor haplotypes conferring increased sensitivity (BclI and N363S) are associated with faster progression of multiple sclerosis

    Melief, Jeroen; Koper, Jan W; Endert, Erik

    2016-01-01

    As high cortisol levels are implicated in suppressed disease activity of multiple sclerosis (MS), glucocorticoid receptor (GR) polymorphisms that affect glucocorticoid (GC) sensitivity may impact on this by changing local immunomodulation or regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA...

  2. Adenocarcinoma do pulmão em doente com esclerodermia: Um caso clínico Lung adenocarcinoma associated with systemic sclerosis: A case report

    João Bento

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A esclerodermia é uma doença do tecido conjuntivo de etiologia desconhecida, que tem sido associada a um risco acrescido de malignidade. O cancro do pulmão é a neoplasia mais frequente, nestes doentes. Apresenta-se o caso clínico de uma mulher de 42 anos, não fumadora, com esclerodermia, que desenvolveu agravamento progressivo do seu estado geral e derrame pleural com características de exsudado, sem evidência de infecção ou malignidade. A TAC torácica mostrou zonas de fibrose, a broncofibroscopia, os lavados brônquico e broncoalveolar foram normais. Foi excluída neoplasia extrapulmonar. Na pleuroscopia, observaram-se formações nodulares, cujas biópsias revelaram tratar-se de adenocarcinoma pulmonar. Iniciou quimioterapia, desenvolvendo ao 48.º dia neutropenia febril e sépsis, vindo a morrer 12 dias depois. Salientamos este caso pela relação, apesar de rara, entre a esclerodermia e o cancro do pulmão e pela importância de uma vigilância pulmonar cuidadosa, em indivíduos com esta doença reumatológica, pelo risco acrescido de neoplasia.Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma is a connective tissue disorder of unknown aetiology characterised by immune abnormalities, which has been related to an increased risk of malignancy. Lung cancer is the most prevalent among these patients. We present a clinical case of a 42 years old non smoker female with systemic sclerosis. She presented progressive general health status worsening and an exudative pleural effusion, with no evidence of infection or malignancy. Chest high resolution computed tomography revealed pulmonary fibrosis. Bronchoscopy, bronchial and bronchoalveolar lavage were normal. Extra-pulmonary malignancies were excluded. Pleural nodularities were found on pleuroscopy and the biopsy was compatible with lung adenocarcinoma. Chemotherapy was then started, which complicated with febrile neutropenia, sepsis and patient death 12 days after. The purpose of this case report is to

  3. Prevalence and clinical significance of cathepsin G antibodies in systemic sclerosis

    M. Favaro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence and clinical significance of cathepsin G antibodies in patients affected with systemic sclerosis (SSc, scleroderma. Methods: 115 patients affected by SSc, 55 (47,8% with diffuse scleroderma (dSSc and 60 (52,2% with limited scleroderma (lSSc, were tested for cathepsin G antibodies by ELISA method. Moreover these sera were evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF on ethanol and formalin fixed human neutrophils. Results: By means of the ELISA method 16 (13,9% patients were found to be sera positive for anti-cathepsin G, 2 (12.5% of which showed a perinuclear fluorescence pattern (P-ANCA and 4 (25% an atypical ANCA staining, while 10 (62,5% were negative on IIF. The IIF on scleroderma sera revealed 5 (4,3% P-ANCA and 18 (15,7% atypical ANCA patterns. The anti-cathepsin G antibodies significantly prevailed in scleroderma sera (p=0.02 when their frequency was compared with that of healthy controls; while they were not significantly associated to any clinical or serological features of SSc patients. Conclusions: The anti-cathepsin G antibodies were significantly frequent in scleroderma sera; however, no clinical correlations were found. Thus, the significance of their presence in SSc still needs to be clarified.

  4. Features of systemic sclerosis-rheumatoid arthritis overlap syndrome (SS-RA overlap syndrome

    O. V. Desinova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To reveal clinico-laboratory, immunologic and immunogenetic features of systemic sclerosis-rheumatoid arthritis overlap syndrome (SS-RA.Material and methods. 32 pts with SS-RA (1 male, 31 female aged 22 to 74 years with disease onset at 18 to 69 years and disease duration from 1 to 35 years were included. Complex laboratory and instrumental examination was performed including nailfold capillaroscopy. A part of pts was also evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging of hands. Serum level of rheumatoid factor, antinuclear factor, circulating immune complexes, C-reactive protein, antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide (ACCP was evaluated. Genotyping of DRB1 alleles was performed.Results. Characteristic features of SS-RA were prevalence of limited skin damage, less prominent peripheral and visceral symptoms of SS, presence of anti-topoisomerase antibodies and erosive arthritis, high laboratory and immunological activity, more frequent association with DRB1*01.Conclusion. SS-RA possesses its own clinical features and can be considered as a distinct subtype of SS.

  5. Association between nailfold capillaroscopy findings and pulmonary function tests in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Castellví, Ivan; Simeón-Aznar, Carmen Pilar; Sarmiento, Mónica; Fortuna, Ana; Mayos, Mercedes; Geli, Carme; Diaz-Torné, César; Moya, Patricia; De Llobet, Josep Maria; Casademont, Jordi

    2015-02-01

    To determine whether there is an association between different capillaroscopic findings and pulmonary function tests in systemic sclerosis (SSc). We did a retrospective observational study in a cohort of patients with SSc and early SSc. Patients with at least 1 nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC) magnified 120× were included. Pathological findings were giant capillaries, angiogenesis, and density loss. Findings were compared with lung function values: percent expected value of forced vital capacity (FVC), DLCO, and FVC/DLCO ratio. Other variables collected were sex and SSc type, and the presence of digital ulcers (DU), interstitial lung disease (ILD), scleroderma renal crisis, and/or pulmonary hypertension (PH). Of 136 patients with SSc, 85 had undergone an NVC. The frequency of ILD, DU, and PH was 24.1%, 28.7%, and 17.2%, respectively. Data analysis showed that patients with density loss had worse FVC% (86.91 ± 19.42 vs 101.13 ± 16.06, p < 0.01) and DLCO% (71.43 ± 21.19 vs 85.9 ± 19.81, p < 0.01) compared to those without. Patients with loss of density present worse FVC and DLCO values. Prospective studies are warranted to determine whether NVC is useful for studying pulmonary function in SSc.

  6. Nailfold capillaroscopy by digital microscope in an Indian population with systemic sclerosis.

    Bhakuni, Darshan S; Vasdev, Vivek; Garg, M K; Narayanan, Krishanan; Jain, Rahul; Mullick, Gautam

    2012-02-01

    Nailfold capillaroscopy (NFC) is a simple, non-invasive method with exceptional predictive value for the analysis of microvascular abnormalities, especially in systemic sclerosis (SSc) but remains underutilized due to cost factors of the nailfold videocapillaroscope, lack of expertise and availability issues. The aim of this study was to establish the utility of an inexpensive digital microscope to study NFC changes in SSc in correlation with disease subsets and extent of skin involvement. Twenty-two diffuse cutaneous SSc (DSS), 20 limited cutaneous SSc (LSS) patients and 42 controls were evaluated with NFC using a digital microscope at 30× and 100× magnification. Digital micrographs were used to study qualitative and quantitative changes in microvasculature. The capillary density was significantly less in all cases of SSc as compared to controls (5.3 ± 1.4 vs. 8.7 ± 1.2; P Nailfold capillaroscopy changes in SSc are related to disease subset and MRSS. NFC with digital microscope is a simplified, inexpensive, outpatient procedure with results comparable to previous studies. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2011 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Nailfold capillaroscopy abnormalities as predictors of mortality in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Kayser, Cristiane; Sekiyama, Juliana Y; Próspero, Lucas C; Camargo, Cintia Z; Andrade, Luis E C

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral microangiopathy is a hallmark of systemic sclerosis (SSc) and can be early detected by nailfold capillaroscopy (NFC). This study aimed to examine whether more severe peripheral microangiopathy at NFC are predictive factor for death in SSc patients. 135 SSc patients who performed NFC between June 2001 and July 2009 were included. The following NFC parameters were evaluated: number of capillary loops/mm, avascular score (scored from 0 to 3), and number of enlarged and giant capillary loops. Univariate and multivariate regression models were used to analyse the association of mortality with NFC and clinical parameters. At the time of the analysis (August 2010), 123 patients were alive, and 12 were dead. By univariate analysis, male gender, forced vital capacity 1.5 on NFC were associated with a significantly increase risk of death. By multivariate analysis, an avascular score >1.5 was the only independent predictor of death (hazard ratio 2.265). Survival rates from diagnosis at 1, 5 and 10 years were lower in patients with avascular score >1.5 (97%, 86%, and 59%, respectively) compared with those with avascular score ≤1.5 (97%, 97%, and 91% respectively) (p=0.009 by log rank test). Avascular scores higher than 1.5 at NFC was an independent predictor of death in SSc, suggesting that NFC can be useful for predicting SSc outcome.

  8. Esophageal transit scintigraphy and structured questionnaire in patients with systemic sclerosis with endoscopically proven reflux esophagitis

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Inaki, Anri; Hiramatsu, Takashi; Hasegawa, Minoru; Fujimoto, Manabu; Takehara, Kazuhiko; Kinuya, Seigo

    2009-01-01

    Esophageal complications are common in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). The relationship between gastroesophageal reflux (GER) symptoms and dysmotility was examined in endoscopically confirmed patients suspected of having reflux esophagitis. A total of 32 patients with limited and diffuse type SSc (lSSc, dSSc) were examined based on a structured questionnaire score (QS) of GER symptoms, retention fraction of esophageal scintigraphy at 90 s (R 90 ) and gastric emptying time. The QS was significantly higher in the reflux esophagitis group than in the non-esophagitis group (5.4±3.5, 1.4±2.9, P=0.003). When the non-esophagitis group was further divided into lSSc and dSSc groups, R 90 was higher in the reflux esophagitis group (31±18%) and the non-esophagitis group with dSSc (34±32%) than in the non-esophagitis group with lSSc (8±3%, P=0.02). Both high R 90 ≥15% and QS≥4 indicated reflux esophagitis. Conversely, both normal R 90 and QS indicated no reflux esophagitis. A combination of esophageal scintigraphy and structured questionnaire demonstrated different aspects of esophageal dysfunction, namely dysmotility and GER. Patients with high QS and dysmotility may be indicated for further evaluation including endoscopic examination and medical treatment.(author)

  9. Epidemiology of systemic sclerosis: incidence, prevalence, survival, risk factors, malignancy, and environmental triggers.

    Barnes, Jammie; Mayes, Maureen D

    2012-03-01

    To identify the recent data regarding prevalence, incidence, survival, and risk factors for systemic sclerosis (SSc) and to compare these data to previously published findings. SSc disease occurrence data are now available for Argentina, Taiwan, and India and continue to show wide variation across geographic regions. The survival rate is negatively impacted by older age of onset, male sex, scleroderma renal crisis, pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary arterial hypertension, cancer, and antitopoisomerase and anti-U1 antibodies. It appears that silica exposure confers an increased risk for developing scleroderma, but this exposure accounts for a very small proportion of male patients. Smoking is not associated with increased SSc susceptibility. Malignancies are reported in scleroderma at an increased rate, but the magnitude of this risk and the type of cancer vary among reports. Prevalence and incidence of SSc appears to be greater in populations of European ancestry and lower in Asian groups. Exposure to silica dust appears to be an environmental trigger, but this only accounts for a small proportion of male cases. Evidence for increased risk of neoplasia is suggestive, but the magnitude of the risk and the types of malignancies vary among reports.

  10. Current Approaches to the Treatment of Systemic-Sclerosis-Associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (SSc-PAH).

    Sobanski, Vincent; Launay, David; Hachulla, Eric; Humbert, Marc

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a severe condition causing significant morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Despite the use of specific treatments, SSc-PAH survival remains poorer than in idiopathic PAH (IPAH). Recent therapeutic advances in PAH show a lower magnitude of response in SSc-PAH and a higher risk of adverse events, as compared to IPAH. The multifaceted underlying mechanisms and the multisystem nature of SSc probably explain part of the worse outcomes in SSc-PAH compared to IPAH. This review describes the current management of SSc-PAH with an emphasis on the impact of the different organ involvements in the prognosis and treatment response. An earlier detection of PAH and a better characterization of the clinical phenotypes of SSc-PAH are warranted in clinical practice and future trials. Determinants of prognosis, surrogate markers of clinical improvement or worsening, and relevance of the common endpoints used in clinical trials should be evaluated in this specific population. A multidisciplinary approach in expert referral centers is mandatory for SSc-PAH management.

  11. Perceived functioning has ethnic-specific associations in systemic sclerosis: another dimension of personalized medicine.

    McNearney, Terry A; Hunnicutt, Sonya E; Fischbach, Michael; Friedman, Alan W; Aguilar, Martha; Ahn, Chul W; Reveille, John D; Lisse, Jeffrey R; Baethge, Bruce A; Goel, Niti; Mayes, Maureen D

    2009-12-01

    To measure self-reported physical and mental functioning and associated clinical features at study entry in 3 ethnic groups with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Sixty Hispanic, 39 African American, and 104 Caucasian patients with recent-onset SSc ( fatigue scores > IBQ > clinical variables (hypertension, skin score, and percentage predicted DLCO). Scleroderma-HAQ scores had ethnic-specific associations with IBQ > AHI scores > most clinical and laboratory variables. Decreased mental component summary (MCS) scores associated with AHI > ISEL. Ethnic-specific immunogenetic variables HLA-DQB1*0202 (Caucasian) and HLA-DRB 1*11 (African American), and HLA-DQA1*0501 (Hispanic) also associated with MCS. Antinuclear autoantibodies, anti-topoisomerase I, and RNA polymerases I and III also demonstrated associations with functioning in African American and Hispanic groups. Clinical, psychosocial, and immunogenetic variables had ethnic-specific associations with perceived physical and mental functioning. Consideration of ethnic-specific psychological and behavioral support in designing more personalized, relevant therapeutic interventions for the patient may improve therapeutic efficacy in SSc.

  12. Recovery from severe dysphagia in systemic sclerosis - myositis overlap: a case report.

    Chinniah, Keith J; Mody, Girish M

    2017-06-01

    Dysphagia is common in inflammatory myopathies and usually responds to corticosteroids. Severe dysphagia requiring feeding by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is associated with significant morbidity and high mortality. A 56-year old African Black woman initially presented with systemic sclerosis (SSC) - myositis overlap and interstitial lung disease. She responded to high dose corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide followed by azathioprine, with improvement in her lung function and regression of the skin changes. Six years later she had a myositis flare with severe dysphagia. Her myositis improved after high doses of corticosteroids, azathioprine and two doses of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). As her dysphagia persisted, she was fed via a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube and given a course of rituximab. Her dysphagia gradually resolved and the PEG tube was removed within two months. She received another dose of rituximab six months later and continued low dose prednisone and azathioprine. Her muscle power improved, weight returned to normal and she remained well 20 months after hospital discharge. Our patient with SSC-myositis overlap and severe dysphagia requiring PEG feeding, improved with high dose corticosteroids, azathioprine, two courses of IVIG and rituximab, and remained in remission 20 months after hospital discharge.

  13. The challenge of establishing treatment efficacy for cutaneous vascular manifestations of systemic sclerosis.

    Pauling, John D

    2018-05-01

    The cutaneous vascular manifestations of systemic sclerosis (SSc) comprise Raynaud's phenomenon, cutaneous ulceration, telangiectasia formation and critical digital ischaemia; each of which are associated with significant disease-related morbidity. Despite the availability of multiple classes of vasodilator therapy, many of which have been the subject of RCTs, a limited number of pharmacological interventions are currently approved for the management of cutaneous vascular manifestations of SSc. Areas covered: A major challenge has been demonstrating treatment efficacy with examples of promising therapies yielding contrasting results in controlled trial settings. Differences between consensus best-practice guidelines, evidence-based recommendations and marketing approvals in different jurisdictions has resulted in geographic variation in clinical practice concerning the management of cutaneous vascular manifestations of SSc. Difficulty demonstrating treatment efficacy risks waning industry engagement for drug development programmes in this field. This article highlights the key challenges in establishing treatment efficacy and barriers that must be overcome to support successful clinical trial programmes across the spectrum of cutaneous vascular manifestations of SSc. Expert commentary: The paucity of approved treatments for cutaneous vascular manifestations of SSc relates as much to challenges in clinical trial design and the need for reliable clinical trial endpoints, as to lack of therapeutic options.

  14. [Screening of pulmonary hypertension in a Spanish cohort of patients with systemic sclerosis].

    García Hernández, Francisco José; Castillo Palma, María Jesús; Montero Mateos, Enrique; González León, Rocío; López Haldón, José Eduardo; Sánchez Román, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an important cause of morbimortality in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Evolution is worse than that of subjects with idiopathic PAH, but prognosis improves when PAH is diagnosed early. The aim of this research is to describe results of a screening program for diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension (PH) carried out in a cohort of Spanish patients with SSc. PH screening was performed by transthoracic doppler echocardiography (TTDE) in 184 patients with SSc. Patients with systolic pulmonary arterial pressure estimated by TTDE>35 mmHg were evaluated per protocol to confirm diagnosis and type of PH. PAH was diagnosed in 25 patients (13.6%). Patients with diffuse and limited SSc developed PAH in a similar degree, 9/60 (15%) vs. 16/100 (16%), with no cases among patients with SSc "sine scleroderma" or "pre-scleroderma" (P<.001). The only clinical or epidemiological data characterizing patients with PAH were older age (mean age 67 years for patients with PAH vs. 56 years for those without PAH, P=.007), limited SSc, a trend toward shorter evolution of the underlying disease (median 8 years for patients with PAH vs. 10 years for those without PAH, P=.73), and a higher frequency of positive anticentromere antibodies (16 patients [64%] with PAH vs. 70 (48,3%) without PAH, P=.19). Prevalence of PAH in SSc was high and supports the implementation of a regular screening program. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Esophageal symptoms and their lack of association with high-resolution manometry in systemic sclerosis patients.

    Arana-Guajardo, Ana Cecilia; Barrera-Torres, Gustavo; Villarreal-Alarcón, Miguel Ángel; Vega-Morales, David; Esquivel-Valerio, Jorge Antonio

    2017-12-16

    The esophageal involvement in systemic sclerosis (SSc) causes impact in the morbidity and mortality. High resolution manometry assesses esophageal involvement. Our aim was to categorize esophageal motor disorder in patients with SSc by HRM. We carried out an observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study. All patients underwent HRM as well as semi-structured interviews to assess frequency and severity of upper GI symptoms. Patients also completed the gastroesophageal reflux questionnaire (Carlsson-Dent). We included 19 patients with SSc, 1 with morphea, and 1 with scleroderma sine scleroderma. Dysphagia and heartburn were the most frequent symptoms (61% each). We found an abnormal HRM in 15 (71.4%) patients. We found no statistically significant association between clinical or demographic variables and an abnormal HRM, or between any upper GI symptom and HRM findings. We observed a high prevalence of esophageal symptoms and of HRM abnormalities. However, there was no clear association between symptomatology and HRM findings. HRM does not seem to accurately predict upper GI symptomatology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  16. [Hashimoto thyroiditis may be associated with a subset of patients with systemic sclerosis with pulmonary hypertension].

    Costa, Ciliana Cardoso B; Medeiros, Morgana; Watanabe, Karen; Martin, Patricia; Skare, Thelma L

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies show an association between autoimmune thyroiditis and systemic sclerosis (SSc) and suggest that this condition may interfere with the ES phenotype. However these studies evaluate the autoimmune thyroiditis as a whole and none of them specifically addresses Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) in SSc. To investigate the presence of HT in SSc patients and its possible association with disease manifestations. Clinical manifestations of hypothyroidism, TSH and anti-thyroid auto antibodies (anti-TPO. anti TBG and TRAb) were studied in 56 patients with SSc. SSc patients with HT were compared with SSc patients without thyroiditis. HT was observed in 19.64% of patients with SSc. No association was observed between HT and the different forms of disease or profile of autoantibodies. Likewise, there was no difference between the mean modified Rodnan score and presence of Raynaud's phenomenon, scars, digital necrosis, myositis, arthritis, sicca symptoms, esophageal dysmotility and scleroderma renal crisis when the groups were compared. On the other hand, patients with HT had higher frequency of pulmonary hypertension in relation to patients without HT (66.6% vs 22.5%, p=0.016). In the studied sample patients with ES and HT had higher prevalence of pulmonary hypertension. Long-term follow-up studies with a larger number of TH and SSc patients are needed to confirm these data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. High Rhodotorula sequences in skin transcriptome of patients with diffuse systemic sclerosis.

    Arron, Sarah T; Dimon, Michelle T; Li, Zhenghui; Johnson, Michael E; Wood, Tammara A; Feeney, Luzviminda; Angeles, Jorge G; Lafyatis, Robert; Whitfield, Michael L

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested a role for pathogens as a trigger of systemic sclerosis (SSc), although neither a pathogen nor a mechanism of pathogenesis is known. Here we show enrichment of Rhodotorula sequences in the skin of patients with early, diffuse SSc compared with that in normal controls. RNA-seq was performed on four SSc patients and four controls, to a depth of 200 million reads per patient. Data were analyzed to quantify the nonhuman sequence reads in each sample. We found little difference between bacterial microbiome and viral read counts, but found a significant difference between the read counts for a mycobiome component, R. glutinis. Normal samples contained almost no detected R. glutinis or other Rhodotorula sequence reads (mean score 0.021 for R. glutinis, 0.024 for all Rhodotorula). In contrast, SSc samples had a mean score of 5.039 for R. glutinis (5.232 for Rhodotorula). We were able to assemble the D1-D2 hypervariable region of the 28S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of R. glutinis from each of the SSc samples. Taken together, these results suggest that R. glutinis may be present in the skin of early SSc patients at higher levels than in normal skin, raising the possibility that it may be triggering the inflammatory response found in SSc.

  18. Incidence of childhood linear scleroderma and systemic sclerosis in the UK and Ireland.

    Herrick, Ariane L; Ennis, Holly; Bhushan, Monica; Silman, Alan J; Baildam, Eileen M

    2010-02-01

    Childhood scleroderma encompasses a rare, poorly understood spectrum of conditions. Our aim was to ascertain the incidence of childhood scleroderma in its different forms in the UK and Ireland, and to describe the age, sex, and ethnicity of the cases. The members of 5 specialist medical associations including pediatricians, dermatologists, and rheumatologists were asked to report all cases of abnormal skin thickening suspected to be localized (including linear) scleroderma or systemic sclerosis (SSc) in children scleroderma and 7 (7%) with SSc. This gave an incidence rate per million children per year of 3.4 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 2.7-4.1) for localized scleroderma, including an incidence rate of 2.5 (95% CI 1.8-3.1) for linear scleroderma, and 0.27 (95% CI 0.1-0.5) for SSc. Of the 87 localized cases, 62 (71%) had linear disease. Of localized disease cases, 55 (63%) were female, 71 (82%) were classified as white British, and the patients' mean age when first seen in secondary care was 10.4 years. Of the 7 SSc cases, all were female, 6 (86%) were white British, and the mean age when first seen was 12.1 years. The median delay between onset and being first seen was 13.1 months for localized scleroderma and 7.2 months for SSc. These data provide additional estimates of the incidence of this rare disorder and its subforms.

  19. Clinical and laboratory features of systemic sclerosis complicated with localized scleroderma.

    Toki, Sayaka; Motegi, Sei-ichiro; Yamada, Kazuya; Uchiyama, Akihiko; Kanai, Sahori; Yamanaka, Masayoshi; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2015-03-01

    Localized scleroderma (LSc) primarily affects skin, whereas systemic sclerosis (SSc) affects skin and various internal organs. LSc and SSc are considered to be basically different diseases, and there is no transition between them. However, LSc and SSc have several common characteristics, including endothelial cell dysfunction, immune activation, and excess fibrosis of the skin, and there exist several SSc cases complicated with LSc during the course of SSc. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of SSc patients with LSc remain unclear. We investigated the clinical and laboratory features of 8 SSc patients with LSc among 220 SSc patients (3.6%). The types of LSc included plaque (5/8), guttate (2/8), and linear type (1/8). All cases were diagnosed as having SSc within 5 years before or after the appearance of LSc. In three cases of SSc with LSc (37.5%), LSc skin lesions preceded clinical symptoms of SSc. Young age, negative antinuclear antibody, and positive anti-RNA polymerase III antibody were significantly prevalent in SSc patients with LSc. The positivity of anticentromere antibody tended to be prevalent in SSc patients without LSc. No significant difference in the frequency of complications, such as interstitial lung disease, reflux esophagitis, and pulmonary artery hypertension, was observed. The awareness of these characteristic of SSc with LSc are essential to establish an early diagnosis and treatment. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  20. Transcriptional Activity of Nuclear Factor κB Family Genes in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis.

    Lis-Święty, Anna; Gola, Joanna; Mazurek, Urszula; Brzezińska-Wcisło, Ligia

    2017-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease of unknown etiology and unclear pathogenesis. Evaluation of the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) family genes IκBα, p50, p52, p65, and c-Rel, potentially involved in the regulation of immunity, inflammation, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling in SSc, was carried out. The study included 19 patients with limited SSc, 11 patients with early SSc, and 10 healthy persons constituting the control group. Real-time QRT-PCR was used to evaluate the mRNAs in peripheral blood samples. The patients with early SSc showed a decrease in transcriptional activity of IκBα inhibitor and c-Rel subunit. Transcriptional activity decrease in the other patients with limited SSc included genes encoding c-Rel and p50, subunits of NF-κB factor. Deregulation of intracellular signal transduction by NF-κB takes place at the beginning of SSc and in its fibrosis stage. Associations between clinical variables and NF-κB related gene expression as well as the activation of NF-κB family members in SSc patients should be addressed in future studies. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  1. The role of nailfold capillary dropout on mortality in systemic sclerosis.

    Tieu, Joanna; Hakendorf, Paul; Woodman, Richard J; Patterson, Karen; Walker, Jenny; Roberts-Thomson, Peter

    2018-05-01

    Semi-quantitative wide-field nailfold capillaroscopy (NFC) is a simple technique with proven utility in the early diagnosis of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Its role in prognosis, however, remains uncertain. To investigate the possible utility of NFC in predicting survival. Patients with SSc listed on the South Australian Scleroderma Register (SASR) with prior NFC performed at Flinders Medical Centre from 1991 to 2015 were included in this study. Baseline demographic data, diagnosis, scleroderma antibody status and mortality status were also collected for each patient. The cohort consisted of 99 patients with limited cutaneous SSc, 30 patients with diffuse cutaneous SSc and 23 with an overlap scleroderma syndrome. Fifty-six patients died during the period of study (censured end June 2015). Patients with diffuse scleroderma had significantly greater capillary dropout compared with limited and overlap scleroderma (P dropout scores (log-rank χ 2 = 8.75, P = 0.003) and antibody status (log-rank χ 2 = 13.94, P = 0.003) were associated with mortality. ANOVA showed a significant association between antibody status and capillary dropout (P dropout attenuated the impact of autoantibody group on survival. Nailfold capillary dropout was significantly associated with mortality and the severity of dropout attenuates survival dictated by antibody status. Together these observations support the hypothesis that capillary dropout is on the causal pathway between induction of scleroderma associated autoantibodies and mortality. © 2018 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  2. Serum Endoglin Levels in Patients Suffering from Systemic Sclerosis and Elevated Systolic Pulmonary Arterial Pressure

    Paola Ximena Coral-Alvarado

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is the main cause of morbimortality in systemic sclerosis (SSc. Increased Eng expression has been demonstrated in SSc patients. Objective. Ascertaining serum levels of Eng in SSc patients with and without elevated systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (sPAP and comparing them with that of healthy volunteers. Methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out. A commercial ELISA kit was used for measuring serum concentrations of Eng in 60 subjects: 40 patients with SSc with and without elevated sPAP, compared to 20 healthy control subjects. Elevated sPAP was detected by echocardiogram. Results. No association between positive Eng and elevated sPAP was found when compared to the SSc without elevated sPAP group (OR=2.85; 0.65–12.88 95% CI; P=.11; however, an association was found between positive Eng and elevated sPAP compared to healthy controls (OR=23.22; 2.46–1050.33 95% CI; P=.001, and weak association was found between the positive Eng with SSc without elevated sPAP group compared to healthy controls (OR=8.14, 0.8–393.74 95% CI; P=.046. Conclusion. Raised serum levels of Eng in SSc patients compared to healthy controls were found, suggesting a role for Eng in SSc vasculopathy and not just in elevated sPAP. However, prospective studies are needed to verify such observations.

  3. STAT4 is a genetic risk factor for systemic sclerosis in a Chinese population.

    Yi, L; Wang, J C; Guo, X J; Gu, Y H; Tu, W Z; Guo, G; Yang, L; Xiao, R; Yu, L; Mayes, M D; Assassi, S; Jin, L; Zou, H J; Zhou, X D

    2013-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an immune-mediated and complex genetic disease. An association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the STAT4 gene with SSc has been reported in European Caucasians, North Americans and Japanese. We undertook the current study to examine whether the STAT4 SNPs are also associated with susceptibility to SSc and SSc subsets in a Han Chinese population. A total of 453 Han Chinese patients with SSc and 534 healthy controls were examined in the study. The SNPs rs7574865, rs10168266 and rs3821236 of the STAT4 gene were examined with SNP TaqMan assays. The T-allele carriers of rs7574865 and rs10168266 were strongly associated with the presence of anti-topoisomerase I (ATA) and pulmonary fibrosis in SSc patients, as well as with diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc). The presence of anti-centromere (ACA) and limited cutaneous SSc (lcSSc) did not show significant association with any of the examined SNPs. The results were consistent with previous reports in other ethnic populations in supporting the notion that polymorphisms of STAT4 may play an important role in susceptibility to SSc. It also revealed different genetic aspects of SSc subsets in a Han Chinese population.

  4. A meta-analysis of the association between cytokine gene polymorphisms and systemic sclerosis.

    Peng, Wen-jia; Pan, Hai-feng; Tao, Jin-hui; Wang, Bing-xiang; Lu, Man-man; Wang, Song; He, Qian; Wang, Jing

    2012-09-01

    We conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis to quantitatively evaluate the association of cytokine gene polymorphisms with systemic sclerosis (SSc) susceptibility. Electronic databases were used to identify published studies before July 2011. In total, 23 case-control studies including 3524 SSc cases and 6086 healthy controls were included in the meta-analysis. We examined the relationship between five gene polymorphisms [cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) -1722T/C, CTLA-4 -318C/T, CTLA-4 +49A/G, angiotensin-converting enzyme I/D, STAT-4 rs7574865] and susceptibility to SSc. The combined odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was calculated to estimate the strength of the association in a fixed or random effect model. Heterogeneity and publication bias were also assessed. We found a significant association between SSc and STAT rs7574865 (TT vs. GG: OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.36-0.54; TT vs. TG + GG: OR 0.48, 95% CI 0.39-0.59; TT + TG vs. GG: OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.66-0.83; T vs. G: OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.66-0.79), but there were no other statistically significant associations with other gene polymorphisms. Our study suggested that SSc is associated with STAT gene rs7574865 polymorphism.

  5. Molecular stratification and precision medicine in systemic sclerosis from genomic and proteomic data.

    Martyanov, Viktor; Whitfield, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize recent advances into the pathogenesis and treatment of systemic sclerosis (SSc) from genomic and proteomic studies. Intrinsic gene expression-driven molecular subtypes of SSc are reproducible across three independent datasets. These subsets are a consistent feature of SSc and are found in multiple end-target tissues, such as skin and esophagus. Intrinsic subsets as well as baseline levels of molecular target pathways are potentially predictive of clinical response to specific therapeutics, based on three recent clinical trials. A gene expression-based biomarker of modified Rodnan skin score, a measure of SSc skin severity, can be used as a surrogate outcome metric and has been validated in a recent trial. Proteome analyses have identified novel biomarkers of SSc that correlate with SSc clinical phenotypes. Integrating intrinsic gene expression subset data, baseline molecular pathway information, and serum biomarkers along with surrogate measures of modified Rodnan skin score provides molecular context in SSc clinical trials. With validation, these approaches could be used to match patients with the therapies from which they are most likely to benefit and thus increase the likelihood of clinical improvement.

  6. Design and development of an ethnically-diverse imaging informatics-based eFolder system for multiple sclerosis patients.

    Ma, Kevin C; Fernandez, James R; Amezcua, Lilyana; Lerner, Alex; Shiroishi, Mark S; Liu, Brent J

    2015-12-01

    MRI has been used to identify multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions in brain and spinal cord visually. Integrating patient information into an electronic patient record system has become key for modern patient care in medicine in recent years. Clinically, it is also necessary to track patients' progress in longitudinal studies, in order to provide comprehensive understanding of disease progression and response to treatment. As the amount of required data increases, there exists a need for an efficient systematic solution to store and analyze MS patient data, disease profiles, and disease tracking for both clinical and research purposes. An imaging informatics based system, called MS eFolder, has been developed as an integrated patient record system for data storage and analysis of MS patients. The eFolder system, with a DICOM-based database, includes a module for lesion contouring by radiologists, a MS lesion quantification tool to quantify MS lesion volume in 3D, brain parenchyma fraction analysis, and provide quantitative analysis and tracking of volume changes in longitudinal studies. Patient data, including MR images, have been collected retrospectively at University of Southern California Medical Center (USC) and Los Angeles County Hospital (LAC). The MS eFolder utilizes web-based components, such as browser-based graphical user interface (GUI) and web-based database. The eFolder database stores patient clinical data (demographics, MS disease history, family history, etc.), MR imaging-related data found in DICOM headers, and lesion quantification results. Lesion quantification results are derived from radiologists' contours on brain MRI studies and quantified into 3-dimensional volumes and locations. Quantified results of white matter lesions are integrated into a structured report based on DICOM-SR protocol and templates. The user interface displays patient clinical information, original MR images, and viewing structured reports of quantified results. The GUI also

  7. Systems Analysis Department annual progress report 1998

    1999-01-01

    The report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risø National Laboratory during 1998. The department undertakes research within Energy Systems Analysis, Integrated Energy, Environment and Development Planning - UNEP Centre, IndustrialSafety and Reliability, Man/Machine Interac....../Machine Interaction, and Technology Scenarios. The report includes lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members....

  8. Systems Analysis Department annual progress report 1999

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risø National Laboratory during 1999. The department is undertaking research within Energy Systems Analysis, Energy, Environment and Development Planning - UNEP Centre, Safety,Realiability and Human Factors, and Technology...

  9. FY2015 Vehicle Systems Annual Progress Report

    None, None

    2016-01-31

    The Vehicle Systems research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research focuses on addressing critical barriers to advancing light-, medium-, and heavy-duty vehicle systems to help maximize the number of electric miles driven and increase the energy efficiency of transportation vehicles.

  10. FY2016 Vehicle Systems Annual Progress Report

    None, None

    2017-10-31

    Vehicle Systems is concerned with advancing light-, medium-, and heavy-duty (HD) vehicle systems to support DOE’s goals of developing technologies for the U.S. transportation sector that enhance national energy security,increase U.S. competitiveness in the global economy, and support improvement of U.S. transportation and energy infrastructure.

  11. Systems Analysis Department. Annual Progress Report 1999

    Larsen, Hans; Olsson, Charlotte; Loevborg, Leif [eds.

    2000-03-01

    This report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1999. The department is undertaking research within Energy Systems Analysis, Energy, Environment and Development Planning-UNEP Centre, Safety, Reliability and Human Factors, and Technology Scenarios. The report includes summary statistics and lists of publications, committees and staff members. (au)

  12. Systems Analysis department. Annual progress report 1997

    Larsen, Hans; Olsson, Charlotte; Petersen, Kurt E

    1998-03-01

    The report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1997. The department is undertaking research within Energy systems Analysis, Integrated Energy, Environment and Development Planning - UNEP Centre, Industrial Safety and Reliability and Man/Machine Interaction. The report includes lists of publications lectures, committees and staff members. (au) 110 refs.

  13. Systems Analysis Department. Annual progress report 1996

    Larsen, H; Olsson, C; Petersen, K E [eds.

    1997-03-01

    The report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1996. The department is undertaking research within Simulation and Optimisation of Energy Systems, Energy and Environment in Developing Countries - UNEP Centre, Integrated Environmental and Risk Management and Man/Machine Interaction. The report includes lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au) 131 refs.

  14. Energy Systems Group. Annual Progress Report 1984

    Grohnheit, Poul Erik; Larsen, Hans Hvidtfeldt; Villadsen, B.

    The report describes the work of the Energy Systems Group at Risø National Laboratory during 1984. The activities may be roughly classified as development and use of energy-economy models, energy systems analysis, energy technology assessment and energy planning. The report includes a list of staff...

  15. Systems Analysis Department annual progress report 1998

    Larsen, Hans; Olsson, Charlotte; Loevborg, Leif [eds.

    1999-03-01

    The report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1998. The department undertakes research within Energy Systems Analysis, Integrated Energy, Environment and Development Planning - UNEP Centre, Industrial Safety and Reliability, Man/Machine Interaction and Technology Scenarios. The report includes lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au) 111 refs.

  16. Energy Systems Group annual progress report 1984

    Grohnheit, P.E.; Larsen, H.; Villadsen, B.

    1985-02-01

    The report describes the work of the Energy Systems Group at Risoe National Laboratory during 1984. The activities may be roughly classified as development and use of energy-economy models, energy systems analysis, energy technology assessment and energy planning. The report includes a list of staff members. (author)

  17. On the respiratory mechanics measured by forced oscillation technique in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Ingrid Almeida Miranda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pulmonary complications are the most common cause of death and morbidity in systemic sclerosis (SSc. The forced oscillation technique (FOT offers a simple and detailed approach to investigate the mechanical properties of the respiratory system. We hypothesized that SSc may introduce changes in the resistive and reactive properties of the respiratory system, and that FOT may help the diagnosis of these abnormalities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested these hypotheses in controls (n = 30 and patients with abnormalities classified using spirometry (n = 52 and pulmonary volumes (n = 29. Resistive data were interpreted with the zero-intercept resistance (Ri and the slope of the resistance (S as a function of frequency. Reactance changes were evaluated by the mean reactance between 4 and 32 Hz (Xm and the dynamic compliance (Crs,dyn. The mechanical load was evaluated using the absolute value of the impedance in 4 Hz (Z4Hz. A compartmental model was used to obtain central (R and peripheral (Rp resistances, and alveolar compliance (C. The clinical usefulness was evaluated by investigating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC. The presence of expiratory flow limitation (EFL was also evaluated. For the groups classified using spirometry, SSc resulted in increased values in Ri, R, Rp and Z4Hz (p0.90. In groups classified by pulmonary volume, SSc resulted in reductions in S, Xm, C and Crs,dyn (p0.80. It was also observed that EFL is not common in patients with SSc. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides evidence that the respiratory resistance and reactance are changed in SSc. This analysis provides a useful description that is of particular significance for understanding respiratory pathophysiology and to ease the diagnosis of respiratory abnormalities in these patients.

  18. The role of immune cells, glia and neurons in white and gray matter pathology in multiple sclerosis

    Bernstock, Joshua D.; Pluchino, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is one of the most common causes of chronic neurological disability beginning in early to middle adult life. Multiple sclerosis is idiopathic in nature, yet increasing correlative evidence supports a strong association between one’s genetic predisposition, the environment and the immune system. Symptoms of multiple sclerosis have primarily been shown to result from a disruption in the integrity of myelinated tracts within the white matter of the central nervous system. However, recent research has also highlighted the hitherto underappreciated involvement of gray matter in multiple sclerosis disease pathophysiology, which may be especially relevant when considering the accumulation of irreversible damage and progressive disability. This review aims at providing a comprehensive overview of the interplay between inflammation, glial/neuronal damage and regeneration throughout the course of multiple sclerosis via the analysis of both white and gray matter lesional pathology. Further, we describe the common pathological mechanisms underlying both relapsing and progressive forms of multiple sclerosis, and analyze how current (as well as future) treatments may interact and/or interfere with its pathology. Understanding the putative mechanisms that drive disease pathogenesis will be key in helping to develop effective therapeutic strategies to prevent, mitigate, and treat the diverse morbidities associated with multiple sclerosis. PMID:25802011

  19. Challenges and progress in turbomachinery design systems

    Van den Braembussche, R A

    2013-01-01

    This paper first describes the requirements that a modern design system should meet, followed by a comparison between design systems based on inverse design or optimization techniques. The second part of the paper presents the way these challenges are realized in an optimization method combining an Evolutionary theory and a Metamodel. Extensions to multi-disciplinary, multi-point and multi-objective optimization are illustrated by examples

  20. Visual Evoked Potential and Magnetic Resonance Imaging are More Effective Markers of Multiple Sclerosis Progression than Laser Polarimetry with Variable Corneal Compensation.

    Kantorová, Ema; Ziak, Peter; Kurča, Egon; Koyšová, Mária; Hladká, Mária; Zeleňák, Kamil; Michalik, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the role of laser polarimetry and visual evoked potentials (VEP) as potential biomarkers of disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). A total of 41 patients with MS (82 eyes) and 22 age-related healthy volunteers (44 eyes) completed the study. MS patients were divided into two groups, one (ON) with a history of optic neuritis (17 patients, 34 eyes) and another group (NON) without it (24 patients, 48 eyes). The MS patients and controls underwent laser polarimetry (GDx) examination of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). In the MS group, we also examined: Kurtzke "expanded disability status scale" (EDSS), the duration of the disorder, VEP - latency and amplitude, and conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Our results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA, Mann-Whitney, and Spearman correlation analyses. In the MS group, brain atrophy and new T2 brain lesions in MRI correlated with both VEP latencies and amplitudes. Separate comparisons revealed VEP latency testing to be less sensitive in ON than in NON-patients. In ON patients, VEP amplitudes correlated mildly with brain atrophy (r = -0.15) and strongly with brain new MRI lesions (r = -0.8). In NON-patients, highly significant correlation of new MRI brain lesions with VEP latencies (r = 0.63, r = 0.6) and amplitudes (r = -0.3, r = -4.2) was found. EDSS also correlated with brain atrophy in this group (r = 0.5). Our study did not find a correlation of GDx measures with MRI tests. The GDx method was not able to detect whole brain demyelinization and the degeneration process, but was only able to reveal the involvement of optic nerves in ON and NON-patients. In our study, we found that both methods (VEP and GDx) can be used for the detection of optic nerve damage, but VEP was found to be superior in evaluating whole brain demyelinization and axonal degeneration. Both VEP and MRI, but not GDx, have an important role in monitoring

  1. Visual evoked potential and magnetic resonance imaging are more effective markers of multiple sclerosis progression than laser polarimetry with variable corneal compensation

    Ema eKantorová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Backround: The aim of our study was to assess the role of laser polarimetry and visual evoked potentials as potential biomarkers of disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS. Participants: A total of 41 patients with MS (82 eyes and 22 age-related healthy volunteers (44 eyes completed the study. MS patients were divided into two groups, one (ON with a history of optic neuritis (17 patients, 34 eyes and another group (NON without it (24 patients, 48 eyes. The MS patients and controls underwent laser polarimetry (GDx examination of the retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL. In the MS group we also examined: Kurtzke Expanded disability status scale (EDSS, the duration of the disorder, visual evoked potentials (VEP – latency and amplitude – and conventional brain MRI. Results: In the MS group, brain atrophy and new T2 brain lesions in MRI correlated with both VEP latencies and amplitudes. Separate comparisons revealed VEP latency testing to be less sensitive in ON than in NON patients. In ON patients, VEP amplitudes correlated mildly with brain atrophy (r =-0.15 and strongly with brain new MRI lesions (r = -0.8. In NON patients, highly significant correlation of new MRI brain lesions with VEP latencies (r = 0.63, r = 0.6, and amplitudes ( r = -0.3, r = -4.2 was found. EDSS also correlated with brain atrophy in this group (r = 0.5. Our study did not find a correlation of GDx measures with MRI tests. The GDx method was not able to detect whole brain demyelinisation and the degeneration process, but was only able to reveal the involvement of optic nerves in ON and NON patients.Conclusions: In our study, we found that both methods (VEP and GDx can be used for detection of optic nerve damage, but VEP was found to be superior in evaluating whole brain demyelinisation and axonal degeneration. Both VEP and MRI, but not GDx, have an important role in monitoring disease progression in MS patients, independent of the ON history.

  2. Orion Absolute Navigation System Progress and Challenge

    Holt, Greg N.; D'Souza, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The absolute navigation design of NASA's Orion vehicle is described. It has undergone several iterations and modifications since its inception, and continues as a work-in-progress. This paper seeks to benchmark the current state of the design and some of the rationale and analysis behind it. There are specific challenges to address when preparing a timely and effective design for the Exploration Flight Test (EFT-1), while still looking ahead and providing software extensibility for future exploration missions. The primary onboard measurements in a Near-Earth or Mid-Earth environment consist of GPS pseudo-range and delta-range, but for future explorations missions the use of star-tracker and optical navigation sources need to be considered. Discussions are presented for state size and composition, processing techniques, and consider states. A presentation is given for the processing technique using the computationally stable and robust UDU formulation with an Agee-Turner Rank-One update. This allows for computational savings when dealing with many parameters which are modeled as slowly varying Gauss-Markov processes. Preliminary analysis shows up to a 50% reduction in computation versus a more traditional formulation. Several state elements are discussed and evaluated, including position, velocity, attitude, clock bias/drift, and GPS measurement biases in addition to bias, scale factor, misalignment, and non-orthogonalities of the accelerometers and gyroscopes. Another consideration is the initialization of the EKF in various scenarios. Scenarios such as single-event upset, ground command, and cold start are discussed as are strategies for whole and partial state updates as well as covariance considerations. Strategies are given for dealing with latent measurements and high-rate propagation using multi-rate architecture. The details of the rate groups and the data ow between the elements is discussed and evaluated.

  3. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS): three letters that change the people's life. For ever

    Oliveira,Acary Souza Bulle; Pereira,Roberto Dias Batista

    2009-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease affecting the motor nervous system. It causes progressive and cumulative physical disabilities in patients, and leads to eventual death due to respiratory muscle failure. The disease is diverse in its presentation, course, and progression. We do not yet fully understand the cause or causes of the disease, nor the mechanisms for its progression; thus, we lack effective means for treating this disease. Currently, we rely on a mu...

  4. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, a Multisystem Pathology: Insights into the Role of TNFα

    Tortarolo, Massimo; Lo Coco, Daniele; Veglianese, Pietro; Vallarola, Antonio; Giordana, Maria Teresa; Marcon, Gabriella; Beghi, Ettore; Poloni, Marco; Strong, Michael J.; Iyer, Anand M.; Aronica, Eleonora; Bendotti, Caterina

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is considered a multifactorial, multisystem disease in which inflammation and the immune system play important roles in development and progression. The pleiotropic cytokine TNFα is one of the major players governing the inflammation in the central nervous system

  5. Nailfold capillaroscopy for prediction of novel future severe organ involvement in systemic sclerosis.

    Smith, Vanessa; Riccieri, Valeria; Pizzorni, Carmen; Decuman, Saskia; Deschepper, Ellen; Bonroy, Carolien; Sulli, Alberto; Piette, Yves; De Keyser, Filip; Cutolo, Maurizio

    2013-12-01

    Assessment of associations of nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC) scleroderma (systemic sclerosis; SSc) ("early," "active," and "late") with novel future severe clinical involvement in 2 independent cohorts. Sixty-six consecutive Belgian and 82 Italian patients with SSc underwent NVC at baseline. Images were blindly assessed and classified into normal, early, active, or late NVC pattern. Clinical evaluation was performed for 9 organ systems (general, peripheral vascular, skin, joint, muscle, gastrointestinal tract, lung, heart, and kidney) according to the Medsger disease severity scale (DSS) at baseline and in the future (18-24 months of followup). Severe clinical involvement was defined as category 2 to 4 per organ of the DSS. Logistic regression analysis (continuous NVC predictor variable) was performed. The OR to develop novel future severe organ involvement was stronger according to more severe NVC patterns and similar in both cohorts. In simple logistic regression analysis the OR in the Belgian/Italian cohort was 2.16 (95% CI 1.19-4.47, p = 0.010)/2.33 (95% CI 1.36-4.22, p = 0.002) for the early NVC SSc pattern, 4.68/5.42 for the active pattern, and 10.14/12.63 for the late pattern versus the normal pattern. In multiple logistic regression analysis, adjusting for disease duration, subset, and vasoactive medication, the OR was 2.99 (95% CI 1.31-8.82, p = 0.007)/1.88 (95% CI 1.00-3.71, p = 0.050) for the early NVC SSc pattern, 8.93/3.54 for the active pattern, and 26.69/6.66 for the late pattern versus the normal pattern. Capillaroscopy may be predictive of novel future severe organ involvement in SSc, as attested by 2 independent cohorts.

  6. Separate Influences of Birth Order and Gravidity/Parity on the Development of Systemic Sclerosis

    COCKRILL, TONYA; del JUNCO, DEBORAH J.; ARNETT, FRANK C.; ASSASSI, SHERVIN; TAN, FILEMON K.; McNEARNEY, TERRY; FISCHBACH, MICHAEL; PERRY, MARILYN; MAYES, MAUREEN D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Birth order has been valuable in revealing the role of environmental influences on the risk of developing certain diseases such as allergy and atopy. In addition, pregnancy has profound effects on the immune system such as short-term effects that permit fetal survival as well as longer-term effects that could influence late-onset diseases. In order to better evaluate these influences, we studied the association of birth order and gravidity/parity as risk factors for systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma). Methods Data regarding SSc cases and their unaffected sibling controls were obtained from the Scleroderma Family Registry and DNA Repository. The case-sibling design was used to minimize confounding due to differences in age, race, ethnicity, or calendar time. The gravidity/parity analysis was based on sibships with at least one SSc-affected and one unaffected sister. Results Birth order was examined in 974 sibships, comparing SSc cases (n = 987) with their unaffected siblings (n = 3,088). The risk of scleroderma increased with increasing birth order (odds ratio [OR] 1.25, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.06–1.50 for birth order 2–5; OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.57–3.15 for birth order 6–9; and OR 3.53, 95% CI 1.68–7.45 for birth order 10–15). Gravidity/parity was analyzed in 168 sibships (256 unaffected sisters, 172 SSc cases). We found an association between a history of one or more pregnancies and SSc (OR 2.8). Conclusion Birth order and pregnancy were independently associated with a higher risk of developing SSc. These findings suggest that immune development in early childhood and/or pregnancy-associated events, including but not limited to microchimerism, plays a role in SSc susceptibility. PMID:20391489

  7. Proangiogenic hematopoietic cells of monocytic origin: roles in vascular regeneration and pathogenic processes of systemic sclerosis.

    Yamaguchi, Yukie; Kuwana, Masataka

    2013-02-01

    New blood vessel formation is critical, not only for organ development and tissue regeneration, but also for various pathologic processes, such as tumor development and vasculopathy. The maintenance of the postnatal vascular system requires constant remodeling, which occurs through angiogenesis, vasculogenesis, and arteriogenesis. Vasculogenesis is mediated by the de novo differentiation of mature endothelial cells from endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Early studies provided evidence that bone marrow-derived CD14⁺ monocytes can serve as a subset of EPCs because of their expression of endothelial markers and ability to promote neovascularization in vitro and in vivo. However, the current consensus is that monocytic cells do not give rise to endothelial cells in vivo, but function as support cells, by promoting vascular formation and repair through their immediate recruitment to the site of vascular injury, secretion of proangiogenic factors, and differentiation into mural cells. These monocytes that function in a supporting role in vascular repair are now termed monocytic pro-angiogenic hematopoietic cells (PHCs). Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multisystem connective tissue disease characterized by excessive fibrosis and microvasculopathy, along with poor vascular formation and repair. We recently showed that in patients with SSc, circulating monocytic PHCs increase dramatically and have enhanced angiogenic potency. These effects may be induced in response to defective vascular repair machinery. Since CD14⁺ monocytes can also differentiate into fibroblast-like cells that produce extracellular matrix proteins, here we propose a new hypothesis that aberrant monocytic PHCs, once mobilized into circulation, may also contribute to the fibrotic process of SSc.

  8. Novel identification of the IRF7 region as an anticentromere autoantibody propensity locus in systemic sclerosis

    Carmona, F David; Gutala, Ramana; Simeón, Carmen P; Carreira, Patricia; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Vicente-Rabaneda, Esther; García-Hernández, Francisco J; de la Peña, Paloma García; Fernández-Castro, Mónica; Martínez-Estupiñán, Lina; Egurbide, María Victoria; Tsao, Betty P; Gourh, Pravitt; Agarwal, Sandeep K; Assassi, Shervin; Mayes, Maureen D; Arnett, Frank C; Tan, Filemon K; Martín, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Objective Systemic sclerosis (SSc) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are related chronic autoimmune diseases of complex aetiology in which the interferon (IFN) pathway plays a key role. Recent studies have reported an association between IRF7 and SLE which confers a risk to autoantibody production. A study was undertaken to investigate whether the IRF7 genomic region is also involved in susceptibility to SSc and the main clinical features. Methods Two case-control sets of Caucasian origin from the USA and Spain, comprising a total of 2316 cases of SSc and 2347 healthy controls, were included in the study. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the PHRF1-IRF7-CDHR5 locus were genotyped using TaqMan allelic discrimination technology. A meta-analysis was performed to test the overall effect of these genetic variants on SSc. Results Four out of five analysed SNPs were Significantly associated with the presence of anticentromere autoantibodies (ACA) in the patients with SSc in the combined analysis (rs1131665: pFDR=6.14 × 10−4, OR=0.78; rs4963128: pFDR=6.14 × 10−4, OR=0.79; rs702966: pFDR=3.83 × 10−3, OR=0.82; and rs2246614: pFDR=3.83 × 10−3, OR=0.83). Significant p values were also obtained when the disease was tested globally; however, the statistical significance was lost when the ACA-positive patients were excluded from the study, suggesting that these associations rely on ACA positivity. Conditional logistic regression and allelic combination analyses suggested that the functional IRF7 SNP rs1131665 is the most likely causal variant. Conclusions The results show that variation in the IRF7 genomic region is associated with the presence of ACA in patients with SSc, supporting other evidence that this locus represents a common risk factor for autoantibody production in autoimmune diseases. PMID:21926187

  9. Separate influences of birth order and gravidity/parity on the development of systemic sclerosis.

    Cockrill, Tonya; del Junco, Deborah J; Arnett, Frank C; Assassi, Shervin; Tan, Filemon K; McNearney, Terry; Fischbach, Michael; Perry, Marilyn; Mayes, Maureen D

    2010-03-01

    Birth order has been valuable in revealing the role of environmental influences on the risk of developing certain diseases such as allergy and atopy. In addition, pregnancy has profound effects on the immune system such as short-term effects that permit fetal survival as well as longer-term effects that could influence late-onset diseases. In order to better evaluate these influences, we studied the association of birth order and gravidity/parity as risk factors for systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma). Data regarding SSc cases and their unaffected sibling controls were obtained from the Scleroderma Family Registry and DNA Repository. The case-sibling design was used to minimize confounding due to differences in age, race, ethnicity, or calendar time. The gravidity/parity analysis was based on sibships with at least one SSc-affected and one unaffected sister. Birth order was examined in 974 sibships, comparing SSc cases (n = 987) with their unaffected siblings (n = 3,088). The risk of scleroderma increased with increasing birth order (odds ratio [OR] 1.25, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.06-1.50 for birth order 2-5; OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.57-3.15 for birth order 6-9; and OR 3.53, 95% CI 1.68-7.45 for birth order 10-15). Gravidity/parity was analyzed in 168 sibships (256 unaffected sisters, 172 SSc cases). We found an association between a history of one or more pregnancies and SSc (OR 2.8). Birth order and pregnancy were independently associated with a higher risk of developing SSc. These findings suggest that immune development in early childhood and/or pregnancy-associated events, including but not limited to microchimerism, plays a role in SSc susceptibility.

  10. Association of the FAM167A-BLK region with systemic sclerosis.

    Ito, Ikue; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Kawasaki, Aya; Hasegawa, Minoru; Ohashi, Jun; Kawamoto, Manabu; Fujimoto, Manabu; Takehara, Kazuhiko; Sato, Shinichi; Hara, Masako; Tsuchiya, Naoyuki

    2010-03-01

    An association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the FAM167A (previously referred to as C8orf13)-BLK region with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has been demonstrated in Caucasians and in Asians. Recent studies have shown that many genes, including IRF5, STAT4, and PTPN22, are shared susceptibility genes in multiple autoimmune diseases. We undertook the current study to examine whether the FAM167A-BLK region is also associated with susceptibility to systemic sclerosis (SSc). Japanese patients with SSc (n = 309) and healthy controls (n = 769) were enrolled in a 2-tiered case-control association study. In tier 1, 124 patients and 412 controls were tested to determine association of 16 tag SNPs encompassing the FAM167A-BLK region with SSc. In tier 2, an additional 185 patients and 357 controls were analyzed for SNP rs13277113. Two haplotype blocks that correspond approximately to FAM167A and BLK were observed. In tier 1 of the study, the rs13277113A allele in the BLK block exhibited the most significant association with SSc after correction for multiple testing (permutated P = 0.024). Two SNP haplotypes formed by rs13277113 and the most significant SNP in the FAM167A block did not exhibit stronger association. When samples from tier 1 and tier 2 were combined, the rs13277113A allele was significantly associated with SSc (odds ratio 1.45 [95% confidence interval 1.17-1.79], P = 6.1 x 10(-4)). Association or a tendency toward association of rs13277113A with SSc was observed regardless of a patient's autoantibody profile or whether a patient had diffuse cutaneous or limited cutaneous SSc. Our findings indicate that the rs13277113A allele is associated not only with SLE but also with SSc and that the FAM167A-BLK region is a common genetic risk factor for both SLE and SSc.

  11. Patients' views and needs about systemic sclerosis and its management: a qualitative interview study.

    Mouthon, Luc; Alami, Sophie; Boisard, Anne-Sophie; Chaigne, Benjamin; Hachulla, Eric; Poiraudeau, Serge

    2017-05-30

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic connective-tissue disease responsible for reduced life expectancy, disability and a decreased quality of life. In order to optimize patients-physicians relationship and care strategy we aimed to survey views of patients on SSc and its management to reveal potential hurdles and improve health care strategies. A qualitative study combined semi-structured interviews, focus groups, and a direct observation of an information session was performed between November 2008 and January 2009. Twenty-five patients with SSc were included. They encounter difficulties to have a clear representation of their disease. Physical, psychological, and social repercussions of SSc may lead to a psychological distress and different coping strategies, which widely differ among interviewed patients. Patients' views on their therapeutic journey and the management of their disease highlighted strong expectations about patient-physician relationship. These expectations were numerous, complex and sometimes ambivalent. Patients expected physicians to be human and attentive but also involved in research in the field and to provide psychological and affective support to help them to accept the uncertainty of disease evolution and lack of curative treatment. They also expected more individualized management, improvements in diagnosis and follow-up organization, more efforts in education and information, comprehensive behaviors and support from working colleagues and relatives, and increased funding from the health care system. Our results suggest that SSc management could be optimized, particularly with more attention to the patient-practitioner relationship. Patient profiles should be more precisely defined in terms of coping strategies and treatment preferences to propose more individualized options.

  12. Tuberous Sclerosis

    ... National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Esclerosis tuberosa Order NINDS Publications Patient Organizations Child Neurology ... National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Esclerosis tuberosa Order NINDS Publications Definition Tuberous sclerosis (TSC) ...

  13. Progranulin Overproduction Due to Fli-1 Deficiency Contributes to the Resistance of Dermal Fibroblasts to Tumor Necrosis Factor in Systemic Sclerosis.

    Ichimura, Yohei; Asano, Yoshihide; Akamata, Kaname; Noda, Shinji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Takahashi, Takehiro; Toyama, Tetsuo; Tada, Yayoi; Sugaya, Makoto; Sato, Shinichi; Kadono, Takafumi

    2015-12-01

    Progranulin is a growth factor that is active in wound repair and is an antagonist of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors, regulating fibroblast activation, angiogenesis, and inflammation. Because long-standing activation of gene programs related to wound healing is a hallmark of systemic sclerosis (SSc), we sought to investigate the role of progranulin in SSc. Progranulin expression levels in human and murine skin samples were determined by immunohistochemical analysis and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The role of progranulin in fibroblast activation was examined using a gene-silencing technique. Progranulin levels in serum obtained from 60 patients with SSc and 16 healthy control subjects were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Progranulin expression was increased in SSc dermal fibroblasts compared with normal dermal fibroblasts, both in vivo and in vitro. Transcription factor Fli-1, a deficiency of which is involved in the activation of SSc dermal fibroblasts, served as a potent repressor of the progranulin gene, and Fli-1(+/-) mice and bleomycin-treated wild-type mice exhibited up-regulated expression of progranulin in dermal fibroblasts. SSc dermal fibroblasts were resistant to the antifibrotic effect of TNF, but this resistance was reversed by gene silencing of progranulin. Serum progranulin levels were elevated in patients with early diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc), especially in those with inflammatory skin symptoms, and were positively correlated with the C-reactive protein level. Progranulin overproduction due to Fli-1 deficiency may contribute to the constitutive activation of SSc dermal fibroblasts by antagonizing the antifibrotic effect of TNF. Progranulin may also be involved in the inflammatory process associated with progressive skin sclerosis in early dcSSc. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  14. Progress report: 1996 Radiation Safety Systems Division

    Bhagwat, A.M.; Sharma, D.N.; Abani, M.C.; Mehta, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    The activities of Radiation Safety Systems Division include (i) development of specialised monitoring systems and radiation safety information network, (ii) radiation hazards control at the nuclear fuel cycle facilities, the radioisotope programmes at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) and for the accelerators programme at BARC and Centre for Advanced Technology (CAT), Indore. The systems on which development and upgradation work was carried out during the year included aerial gamma spectrometer, automated environment monitor using railway network, radioisotope package monitor and air monitors for tritium and alpha active aerosols. Other R and D efforts at the division included assessment of risk for radiation exposures and evaluation of ICRP 60 recommendations in the Indian context, shielding evaluation and dosimetry for the new upcoming accelerator facilities and solid state nuclear track detector techniques for neutron measurements. The expertise of the divisional members was provided for 36 safety committees of BARC and Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB). Twenty three publications were brought out during the year 1996. (author)

  15. Optical Coherence Tomography-A New Diagnostic Tool to Evaluate Axonal Degeneration in Multiple Sclerosis: A Review

    Nilüfer Kale

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system with a wide spectrum of clinical signs and symptoms. Multiple sclerosis lesions have a predilection for the optic nerves, periventricular white matter, brainstem, spinal cord, and cerebellum. The mechanisms responsible for multiple sclerosis are complex and heterogeneous across patients and disease stages. No specific markers exist for the definite diagnosis and prognosis of multiple sclerosis. The afferent visual pathway, which extends from the retina to the primary visual cortex including the optic nerve, is one of the most commonly affected sites in multiple sclerosis (94-99%. Pathology of affected optic nerves exhibits inflammation, demyelination, gliosis, axonal injury, and thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL. The RNFL is composed of unmyelinated axons, and measuring RNFL thickness is a viable method to monitor axonal loss reflecting disease progression. Optical coherence tomography is a noninvasive and reproducible tool in assessing the impact of multiple sclerosis on the thickness of the RNFL. Assessment of the afferent visual pathway using clinical, imaging and electrophysiological methods provides insights into the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis and may also serve a prognostic role in multiple sclerosis

  16. Inhibition of myeloperoxidase by N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide reduces experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-induced injury and promotes oligodendrocyte regeneration and neurogenesis in a murine model of progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Yu, Guoliang; Zheng, Shikan; Zhang, Hao

    2018-02-07

    It is known that oxidative stress produced by proinflammatory myeloid cells plays an important role in demyelination and neuronal injury in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a pro-oxidative enzyme released from myeloid cells during inflammation. It has been shown that MPO-dependent oxidative stress plays important roles in inducing tissue injury in many inflammatory diseases. In this report, we treated NOD experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice, a murine model of progressive MS, with N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide (KYC), a novel specific MPO inhibitor. Our data showed that KYC treatment not only attenuated MPO-mediated oxidative stress but also reduced demyelination and axonal injury in NOD EAE mice. More importantly, we found that KYC treatment increased oligodendrocyte regeneration and neurogenesis in NOD EAE mice. Taken together, our data suggests that targeting MPO should be a good therapeutic approach for reducing oxidative injury and preserving neuronal function in progressive MS patients.

  17. Lidocaine for systemic sclerosis: a double-blind randomized clinical trial

    Trevisani Virgínia FM

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma; SSc is an orphan disease with the highest case-specific mortality of any connective-tissue disease. Excessive collagen deposit in affected tissues is a key for the disease's pathogenesis and comprises most of the clinical manifestations. Lidocaine seems to be an alternative treatment for scleroderma considering that: a the patient's having excessive collagen deposits in tissues affected by scleroderma; b the patient's demonstrating increased activity of the enzyme prolyl hydroxylase, an essential enzyme for the biosynthesis of collagen; and c lidocaine's reducing the activity of prolyl hydroxylase. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of lidocaine in treating scleroderma. Methods A randomized double-blind clinical trial included 24 patients with scleroderma randomized to receive lidocaine or placebo intravenously in three cycles of ten days each, with a one-month interval between them. Outcomes: cutaneous (modified Rodnan skin score, oesophageal (manometry and microvascular improvement (nailfold capillaroscopy; improvement in subjective self-assessment and in quality of life (HAQ. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the groups for any outcome after the treatment and after 6-months follow-up. Improvement in modified Rodnan skin score occurred in 66.7% and 50% of placebo and lidocaine group, respectively (p = 0.408. Both groups showed an improvement in subjective self-assessment, with no difference between them. Conclusions Despite the findings of a previous cohort study favouring the use of lidocaine, this study demonstrated that lidocaine at this dosage and means of administration showed a lack of efficacy for treating scleroderma despite the absence of significant adverse effects. However, further similar clinical trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy of lidocaine when administered in different dosages and by other means.

  18. Assessment of nailfold capillaroscopy in systemic sclerosis by different optical magnification methods.

    Mazzotti, N G; Bredemeier, M; Brenol, C V; Xavier, R M; Cestari, T F

    2014-03-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is characterized by target-organ fibrosis and microvascular dysfunction, which can be assessed using nailfold capillaroscopy. Dermoscopy is a useful and easily performed method for diagnosing skin lesions. To compare conventional capillaroscopy, using the gold-standard method (conventional stereomicroscope nailfold capillaroscopy; SNFC), with polarized light noncontact dermoscopy (PNCD) and nonpolarized light contact dermoscopy (NPCD), and to evaluate their accuracy in diagnosing characteristic SSc-related alterations. The study enrolled 45 patients with SSc. Capillaroscopy images and photographs were taken with three devices, SNFC, NPCD and PNCD, and these images were randomly analysed by a blinded observer. The scleroderma pattern was found in 83% of patients. PNCD and NPCD were highly sensitive in identifying the presence of focal capillary loss (96.4% and 100%, respectively), haemorrhage (96.2% and 92%, respectively), and scleroderma (91.9%, 94.6%), and showed high specificity for haemorrhage and enlarged loops. The intra-observer kappa values for detection of the scleroderma pattern by SNFC images, NPCD and PNCD were moderate to good: (κ = 0.71 (95% CI 0.44-0.95), κ = 0.60 (95% CI 0.35-0.83) and κ = 0.60 (95% CI 0.32-0.86), respectively. Evaluation of haemorrhage presence gave high kappa values for all methods: κ = 0.77 (95% CI 0.57-0.95), κ = 0.90 (95% CI 0.76-1.00) and κ = 0.95 (95% CI 0.85-1.00), respectively. Both polarized and nonpolarized dermoscopy are reliable methods for valuation of nailfold capillaroscopy in patients with SSc. They are easy to perform, with good rates of accuracy and results that are comparable with traditional capillaroscopy. © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  19. Clinical significance of high-sensitivity C- reactive protein in systemic sclerosis

    T. A. Nevskaya

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine diagnostic and prognostic significance of high-sensitivity Creactive protein (hsCRP in systemic sclerosis (SS, to define relationship of this factor with activity of the disease and cardiovascular pathology, to assess role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in induction of acute phase proteins synthesis in SS.Material and methods. Serum levels of hsCRP, interleukin (IL 6, IL 1β, IL1ra, IL 10, sIL2r were evaluated by enzyme immunoassay (EIA in 40 pts with SS and 24 subjects of control group. Relationship with clinical features of the disease, endothelial dysfunction, capillaries structure changes, sub-clinical atherosclerosis, total coronary risk and some traditional cardiovascular risk factors was analyzed. Instrumental assessment included nailfold capillaroscopy, sonographic duplex examination of carotids , brachial arte ry sonographic examination. HsCRP prognostic significance was assessed in 51 pts with SS.Results. Elevated levels of hsCRP were found in 32% of SS pts and correlated with activity and severity of the disease, HAQ and SHAQ. Direct correlation of hsCRP with skin fibrosis distribution, interstitial lung disease, arthritis, laboratory indices of SS activity (ESR, sIL2r and Scl-70 was revealed. HsCRP concentration in SS did not depend on character and intensity of cardiovascular pathology, subclinical atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction and proinflammatory cytokines production.Conclusion. HsCRP in SS reflects intensity of immuno-inflammatory process, correlates with T-cell activation markers and can be used as index of the disease activity, severity of skin and lung fibrosis.

  20. Nailfold capillaroscopy in systemic sclerosis: is there any difference between videocapillaroscopy and dermatoscopy?

    Dogan, Sibel; Akdogan, Ali; Atakan, Nilgün

    2013-11-01

    Vasculopathy is known to destroy nailfold capillary pattern (NCP) in systemic sclerosis (SSc). There are several methods for the evaluation of NCP of which the most common are dermatoscopy and videocapillaroscopy (VCAP). No study has been reported in the literature comparing these two techniques for their diagnostic value. To compare the diagnostic value of dermatoscopy and VCAP which are widely used to determine changes in the NCP in SSc patients. A total of 382 nailfolds were visualized. NCP was evaluated in 39 SSc patients using dermatoscopy and VCAP. Defined dermatoscopic groups were matched with early, active and late phase NCP groups determined by VCAP for comparisons. Both dermatoscopy and VCAP demonstrated distinct NCP of SSc efficiently. According to dermatoscopic NCP, capillary dilatation, giant capillaries and disrupted vascular configuration were able to be visualized. VCAP revealed early phase NCP in N = 8 (20,5%), active phase in N = 18 (46,2%) and late phase NCP in N = 13 (33.3%) of the patients. Statistical evaluation of grouped data resulted a Cohen kappa value (K) = 0,527. Although VCAP was able to facilitate a more detailed evaluation of NCP, there was no difference between dermatoscopy and VCAP for the identification of distinct NCP in SSc. We suggest that dermatoscopy is efficient enough to identify pathognomonic changes in NCP in SSc as well as VCAP and find dermatoscopy as a very easy applicable and convenient method than VCAP although VCAP facilitates a more detailed evaluation of NCP. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.