WorldWideScience

Sample records for programmed nuclear death

  1. Role of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF in programmed nuclear death during conjugation in Tetrahymena thermophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endoh Hiroshi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Programmed nuclear death (PND, which is also referred to as nuclear apoptosis, is a remarkable process that occurs in ciliates during sexual reproduction (conjugation. In Tetrahymena thermophila, when the new macronucleus differentiates, the parental macronucleus is selectively eliminated from the cytoplasm of the progeny, concomitant with apoptotic nuclear events. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these events are not well understood. The parental macronucleus is engulfed by a large autophagosome, which contains numerous mitochondria that have lost their membrane potential. In animals, mitochondrial depolarization precedes apoptotic cell death, which involves DNA fragmentation and subsequent nuclear degradation. Results We focused on the role of mitochondrial apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF during PND in Tetrahymena. The disruption of AIF delays the normal progression of PND, specifically, nuclear condensation and kilobase-size DNA fragmentation. AIF is localized in Tetrahymena mitochondria and is released into the macronucleus prior to nuclear condensation. In addition, AIF associates and co-operates with the mitochondrial DNase to facilitate the degradation of kilobase-size DNA, which is followed by oligonucleosome-size DNA laddering. Conclusions Our results suggest that Tetrahymena AIF plays an important role in the degradation of DNA at an early stage of PND, which supports the notion that the mitochondrion-initiated apoptotic DNA degradation pathway is widely conserved among eukaryotes.

  2. Programmed cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

  3. Death Valley Lower Carbonate Aquifer Monitoring Program Wells Down gradient of the Proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inyo County

    2006-01-01

    Inyo County has participated in oversight activities associated with the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository since 1987. The overall goal of these studies are the evaluation of far-field issues related to potential transport, by ground water, or radionuclides into Inyo County, including Death Valley, and the evaluation of a connection between the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) and the biosphere. Our oversight and completed Cooperative Agreement research, and a number of other investigators research indicate that there is groundwater flow between the alluvial and carbonate aquifers both at Yucca Mountain and in Inyo County. In addition to the potential of radionuclide transport through the LCA, Czarnecki (1997), with the US Geological Survey, research indicate potential radionuclide transport through the shallower Tertiary-age aquifer materials with ultimate discharge into the Franklin Lake Playa in Inyo County. The specific purpose of this Cooperative Agreement drilling program was to acquire geological, subsurface geology, and hydrologic data to: (1) establish the existence of inter-basin flow between the Amargosa Basin and Death Valley Basin; (2) characterize groundwater flow paths in the LCA through Southern Funeral Mountain Range, and (3) Evaluation the hydraulic connection between the Yucca Mountain repository and the major springs in Death Valley through the LCA

  4. Programmed Cell Death, Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen and p53 Expression in Mouse Colon Mucosa during Diet-Induced Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Risio

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Western‐style diets (WDs trigger and sustain the early phases of tumorigenesis in mouse colon, and when continued throughout the life span lead to the development of dysplastic crypts. In order to evaluate the roles both of cell proliferation and programmed cell death (PCD in WD‐induced tumorigenesis, immunohistochemical detection of proliferating nuclear antigen (PCNA, in situ end labeling (TUNEL of DNA breaks, and p53 protein were carried out in mouse colonic mucosa during prolonged feeding of two WDs. PCNA Labeling Index of colonic crypts was significantly higher in WD‐treated animals than in controls only at the beginning of the nutritional study, the gap rapidly bridged by increased cell proliferation spontaneously occurring in the colonic mucosa during aging. A transient early homeostatic activation of PCD at the base of the crypt also was observed in WD groups. No changes in PCD were seen in the upper third of the crypt or in surface epithelium throughout the study, indicating that PCD in that colonic crypt segment produces a constant flux of cell loss, uninfluenced by homeostatic fluctuations. A major finding was an irreversible, progressive, age‐related decline of PCD at the crypt base in both control and treated animals that occurred during the second half of the rodents  life span. p53 protein was not immunohistochemically detected, suggesting that neither overexpression of wild‐type nor mutated forms of the protein are involved in the above mentioned changes.

  5. A novel mitochondrial nuclease-associated protein: a major executor of the programmed nuclear death in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Eriko; Akematsu, Takahiko; Asano, Tomoya; Endoh, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Programmed nuclear death (PND) in the ciliate Tetrahymena is an apoptosis-like phenomenon that occurs in a restricted space of cytoplasm during conjugation. In the process, only the parental macronucleus is selectively eliminated from the progeny cytoplasm, in conjunction with differentiation of new macronuclei for the next generation. For the last decade, mitochondria have been elucidated to be a crucial executioner like apoptosis: apoptosis-inducing factor and yet-unidentified nucleases localised in mitochondria are major factors for PND. To identify such nucleases, we performed a DNase assay in a PAGE (SDS-DNA-PAGE) using total mitochondrial proteins. Some proteins showed DNase activity, but particularly a 17 kDa protein exhibited the highest and predominant activity. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed a novel mitochondrial nuclease, named TMN1, whose homologue has been discovered only in the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, but not in other eukaryotes. Gene disruption of TMN1 led to a drastic reduction of mitochondrial nuclease activity and blocked nuclear degradation during conjugation, but did not affect accumulation of autophagic and lysosomal machinery around the parental macronucleus. These observations strongly suggest that the mitochondrial nuclease-associated protein plays a key role in PND as a major executor. Taking the novel protein specific to ciliates in consideration, Tetrahymena would have diverted a different protein from common apoptotic factors shared in eukaryotes to PND in the course of ciliate evolution. © 2014 Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Programmed Death-Ligand 1 Immunohistochemistry Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Büttner, Reinhard; Gosney, John R; Skov, Birgit Guldhammer

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Three programmed death-1/programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) inhibitors are currently approved for treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Treatment with pembrolizumab in NSCLC requires PD-L1 immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing. Nivolumab and atezolizumab are approved without PD-L1...

  7. Ontario Hydro's nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCredie, J.

    1984-01-01

    This report briefly describes Ontario Hydro's nuclear program, examining the design and construction status, and the future from Ontario Hydro's perspective. Ontario Hydro relies heavily on nuclear power. Nuclear fuel was responsible for approximately 34% of Ontario Hydro's energy production in 1983. The nuclear proportion was supplied by twelve operating units located: NPD, Douglas Point, Pickering A and B. It is expected that by approximately 1992, 65% of the total energy needs will be generated through nuclear power

  8. IAEA nuclear security program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ek, D. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2006-07-01

    Although nuclear security is a State responsibility, it is nevertheless an international concern, as the consequences of a nuclear security incident would have worldwide impact. These concerns have resulted in the development of numerous international instruments on nuclear security since the terrorist events in the USA on September 11, 2001. The IAEA Office of Nuclear Security has been charged to assist Member States to improvement their nuclear security and to meet the intent of these international obligations in order to ensure a cohesive thread of nuclear security protects the global community. The programs underway and planned by the Office of Nuclear Security will be discussed in this paper. (author)

  9. IAEA nuclear security program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ek, D.

    2006-01-01

    Although nuclear security is a State responsibility, it is nevertheless an international concern, as the consequences of a nuclear security incident would have worldwide impact. These concerns have resulted in the development of numerous international instruments on nuclear security since the terrorist events in the USA on September 11, 2001. The IAEA Office of Nuclear Security has been charged to assist Member States to improvement their nuclear security and to meet the intent of these international obligations in order to ensure a cohesive thread of nuclear security protects the global community. The programs underway and planned by the Office of Nuclear Security will be discussed in this paper. (author)

  10. Vinca nuclear decommissioning program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.; Subotic, K.; Sotic, O.; Plecas, I.; Ljubenov, V.; Peric, A.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper a preliminary program for the nuclear decommissioning in The Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences is presented. Proposed Projects and Activities, planned to be done in the next 10 years within the frames of the Program, should improve nuclear and radiation safety and should solve the main problems that have arisen in the previous period. Project of removal of irradiated spent nuclear fuel from the RA reactor, as a first step in all possible decommissioning strategies and the main activity in the first two-three years of the Program realization, is considered in more details. (author)

  11. Argonne Nuclear Data Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondev, F. [US Nuclear Data Program, U.S. DOE/SC (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Nuclear Data Compilations and Evaluations: - Nuclear structure and decay data compilations and evaluations for the International NSDD network (ENSDF and XUNDL); - AME12 and NuBase12 - in collaboration with G. Audi and M. MacCormick, CSNSM (Orsay), M. Wang, IMP (Lanzhou) and B. Pfeiffer, GSI (Darmstadt) - presentation by M. Wang; - DDEP coordinator - completed; - Horizontal nuclear data evaluation activities -IAEA CRP's, Isomers, Medical Isotopes; Complementary ND research Activities: - CARIBU, FRIB and other RIB facilities, Gretina, IAEA-CRP - emphasis on nuclear structure physics and astrophysics, and their intersection with applied nuclear physics programs.

  12. Argentine nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibovich, H.; Takacs, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    The paper describes Argentina's nuclear program, detailing its objectives, the schedule of construction of nuclear plants and local production of required equipment. The technologies adopted so far, the local industrial and engineering participation, the preliminary study for the construction of the next power station and Argentina's nonproliferation nuclear policy are analyzed. Argentina's point of view on Canadian nonproliferation policy and CANDU reactor export is discussed

  13. National nuclear scientific program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plecas, I.; Matausek, M.V.; Neskovic, N.

    2001-01-01

    National scientific program of the Vinca Institute Nuclear Reactors And Radioactive Waste comprises research and development in the following fields: application of energy of nuclear fission, application of neutron beams, analyses of nuclear safety and radiation protection. In the first phase preparatory activities, conceptual design and design of certain processes and facilities should be accomplished. In the second phase realization of the projects is expected. (author)

  14. Effectiveness of a Death-Education Program in Reducing Death Anxiety of Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Noreen; Lally, Terry

    1991-01-01

    Evaluated effectiveness of death education program in reducing death anxiety experienced by 22 junior and senior nursing students. Subjects were pre- and posttested with State Form of State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and viewed film of death experience. Posttest analysis indicated that death education program was effective in decreasing death anxiety…

  15. Nuclear physics program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    The nuclear physics program objectives, resources, applications and implications of scientific opportunities are presented. The scope of projected research is discussed in conjunction with accelerator facilities and manpower. 25 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Iran's Nuclear Program: Status

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kerr, Paul K

    2008-01-01

    .... Indeed, the UN Security Council has responded to Iran's refusal to suspend work on its uranium enrichment and heavy-water nuclear reactor programs by adopting several resolutions, most recently...

  17. Iran's Nuclear Program: Status

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kerr, Paul K

    2008-01-01

    .... Indeed, the UN Security Council has responded to Iran's refusal to suspend work on its uranium enrichment and heavy-water nuclear reactor programs by adopting several resolutions which imposed sanctions on Tehran...

  18. Detection of programmed cell death in plant embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filonova, Lada H; Suárez, María F; Bozhkov, Peter V

    2008-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of embryogenesis. In plant embryos, PCD functions during terminal differentiation and elimination of the temporary organ, suspensor, as well as during establishment of provascular system. Embryo abortion is another example of embryonic PCD activated at pathological situations and in polyembryonic seeds. Recent studies identified the sequence of cytological events leading to cellular self-destruction in plant embryos. As in most if not all the developmental cell deaths in plants, embryonic PCD is hallmarked by autophagic degradation of the cytoplasm and nuclear disassembly that includes breakdown of the nuclear envelope and DNA fragmentation. The optimized setup of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) allows the routine in situ analysis of nuclear DNA fragmentation in plant embryos. This chapter provides step-by-step procedure of how to process embryos for TUNEL and how to combine TUNEL with immunolocalization of the protein of interest.

  19. An alternative nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldemberg, J.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis of the development of nuclear energy in Brazil is made since its beginning, showing the fundamental policy changes introduced in the end of the 60's with the purchase of the Angra dos Reis I reactor. This decision discouraged the existing efforts of an autonomous development in nuclear energy. The reaction to this policy led to the Nuclear Deal with Germany, which although incorporating some positive aspects is nor capable to lead to nuclear independence. The presently existing options are discussed, as well as the transformation of the Nuclear Program in a R and D Program based only in the reactors I, II and III, located in Angra dos Reis. (Author) [pt

  20. Alternative Nuclear Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldemberg, J.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis of the development of nuclear energy in Brazil is made since its beginning, showing the fundamental policy changes introduced in the end of the 60's with the purchase of the Angra dos Reis I reactor. This decision discouraged the existing efforts of an autonomous development in nuclear energy. The reaction to this policy led to the Nuclear Deal with Germany, which although incorporating some positive aspects is not capable to lead to nuclear independence. The presently existing options are discussed, as well as the transformation of the Nuclear Program in a R and D Program based only in the reactors I, II and III, located in Angra dos Reis. (Author) [pt

  1. India's nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    India made an early commitment to being as self-sufficient as possible in nuclear energy and has largely achieved that goal. The country operates eight nuclear reactors with a total capacity of 1,304 MWe, and it remains committed to an aggressive growth plan for its nuclear industry, with six reactors currently under construction, and as many as twelve more planned. India also operates several heavy water production facilities, fabrication facilities, reprocessing works, and uranium mines and mills. Due to India's decision not to sign the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), the country has had to develop nearly all of its nuclear industry and infrastructure domestically. Overall, India's nuclear power program is self-contained and well integrated, with plans to expand to provide up to ten percent of the country's electrical generating capacity

  2. Romanian nuclear fuel program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budan, O.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents and comments the policy adopted in Romania for the production of CANDU-6 nuclear fuel before and after 1990. The CANDU-6 nuclear fuel manufacturing started in Romania in December 1983. Neither AECL nor any Canadian nuclear fuel manufacturer were involved in the Romanian industrial nuclear fuel production before 1990. After January 1990, the new created Romanian Electricity Authority (RENEL) assumed the responsibility for the Romanian Nuclear Power Program. It was RENEL's decision to stop, in June 1990, the nuclear fuel production at the Institute for Nuclear Power Reactors (IRNE) Pitesti. This decision was justified by the Canadian specialists team findings, revealed during a general, but well enough technically founded analysis performed at IRNE in the spring of 1990. All fuel manufactured before June 1990 was quarantined as it was considered of suspect quality. By that time more than 31,000 fuel bundles had already been manufactured. This fuel was stored for subsequent assessment. The paper explains the reasons which provoked this decision. The paper also presents the strategy adopted by RENEL after 1990 regarding the Romanian Nuclear Fuel Program. After a complex program done by Romanian and Canadian partners, in November 1994, AECL issued a temporary certification for the Romanian nuclear fuel plant. During the demonstration manufacturing run, as an essential milestone for the qualification of the Romanian fuel supplier for CANDU-6 reactors, 202 fuel bundles were produced. Of these fuel bundles, 66 were part of the Cernavoda NGS Unit 1 first fuel load (the balance was supplied by Zircatec Precision Industries Inc. ZPI). The industrial nuclear fuel fabrication re-started in Romania in January 1995 under AECL's periodical monitoring. In December 1995, AECL issued a permanent certificate, stating the Romanian nuclear fuel plant as a qualified and authorised CANDU-6 fuel supplier. The re-loading of the Cernavoda NGS Unit 1 started in the middle

  3. The Chinese nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prenez, J.C.; Bettoun, G.

    2009-01-01

    This series of slides presents the organization of the Chinese nuclear industry and its perspectives for the 2 next decades. The presentation is divided into 5 parts. Part one: the energy sector in China. Due to the economic development of the country this sector is flourishing and reaches an average growth rate of 9% per year. More than fifty per cent of the power plants being built in the world, are located in China. The electricity production stems by far from fossil energies (>80%) but this part is expected to decrease to reach 70% in 2020. Part 2: the Chinese nuclear program. This program is dual: the massive deployment of chinese improved reactors of second generation (the construction of 6 CPR1000 reactors will be launched each year) and the import and assimilation of reactors of the third generation: 4 AP1000 and 2 EPR are being built. Part 3: the organization of the Chinese nuclear sector. The main actors are CNNC (China National Nuclear Corporation), CGNPC (China Guangdong Nuclear Power Corporation), CPI (China Power Investment Corporation), SNPTC (State Nuclear Power Technology Corporation). The main 5 Chinese suppliers are also presented. Part 4: The role of EDF. Today's EDF role is multiple: to be active in the Chinese nuclear program, to go beyond technical assistance to reach partnership, to invest in Chinese power plants, to promote cooperation between French and Chinese actors of the nuclear industry. A lot of joint ventures have been created. Part 5: the Taishan project. Taishan is a coastal site near Macao in the Guangdong province in which 2 EPR are being built, the first concrete was cast in october 2009, 52 months of construction are scheduled and the first unit will be commissioned in end 2013 while the second commissioning is planned for end 2014. (A.C.)

  4. Nuclear program review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, S.; Rosa, L.P.; Carvalho, Joaquim de; Simon, D.N.

    1985-01-01

    A review of the Brazilian Nuclear Program based in Brazilian energy perspectives, in world-wide technology evolution and in international and national economic context is done. The objetive is look for subsidies for new decisions related to the future of program, taking in account the acquired experience and new data created by evolution of internal and external political and technological conjuncture. (M.C.K.) [pt

  5. Ontario Hydro's nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, H.A.

    1982-06-01

    In 1981 Ontario Hydro generated over 100 billion KWh of electrical energy. Approximately one third of this was from nuclear units. There are ten CANDU units (5 250 MW) currently in operation, and another twelve (8 600 MW) are under construction. The presently committed nuclear expansion program is estimated to involve expenditures of 16 billion dollars over the next 10 years. About 10 000 people are employed in the nuclear design and construction program. All projects are generally on schedule, with the stations coming into service during the following time periods: Pickering B, 1983-85; Bruce B, 1984-87; Darlington, 1988-90. The status of each project is reviewed. Planning is underway for some retubing projects, as early as 1985 for Pickering A

  6. Programmed cell death during quinoa perisperm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fernández, María Paula; Maldonado, Sara

    2013-08-01

    At seed maturity, quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) perisperm consists of uniform, non-living, thin-walled cells full of starch grains. The objective of the present study was to study quinoa perisperm development and describe the programme of cell death that affects the entire tissue. A number of parameters typically measured during programmed cell death (PCD), such as cellular morphological changes in nuclei and cytoplasm, endoreduplication, DNA fragmentation, and the participation of nucleases and caspase-like proteases in nucleus dismantling, were evaluated; morphological changes in cytoplasm included subcellular aspects related to starch accumulation. This study proved that, following fertilization, the perisperm of quinoa simultaneously accumulates storage reserves and degenerates, both processes mediated by a programme of developmentally controlled cell death. The novel findings regarding perisperm development provide a starting point for further research in the Amaranthaceae genera, such as comparing seeds with and without perisperm, and specifying phylogeny and evolution within this taxon. Wherever possible and appropriate, differences between quinoa perisperm and grass starchy endosperm--a morphologically and functionally similar, although genetically different tissue--were highlighted and discussed.

  7. The Korean nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chang Tong

    1996-01-01

    Although the world nuclear power industry may appear to be in decline, continued nuclear power demand in Korea indicates future opportunities for growth and prosperity in this country. Korea has one of the world's most vigorous nuclear power programs. Korea has been an active promoter of nuclear power generation since 1978, when the country introduced nuclear power as a source of electricity. Korea now takes pride in the outstanding performance of its nuclear power plants, and has established a grand nuclear power scheme. This paper is aimed at introducing the nuclear power program of Korea, including technological development, international cooperation, and CANDU status in Korea. (author). 2 tabs

  8. National nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa A, D.

    1980-01-01

    The basic concepts of the Nuclear program that Mexico plans are presented, to develop pointing out that it constitutes an outstanding event within the history of the country, that will result in an equilibrated profit of the resources of oil exploitation consolidating each step of its technical evolution; all of this represents a challenge since it establishes a qualitative transformation in the very roots of the National economy. Being certain that oil is a non renovable natural resource, the author points out that Mexican Government has emphasized the promotion of the research of alternate resource of energy in the future. According to this panorama, the quidelines that Mexico must undertake regarding production, distribution and consumption of nuclear energy, will point primarily to a global program, which will avoid the imports of equipment and technicians, to achieve maximum advantages for the Country. It stresses the fact that this program cannot start from zero; since first, Mexico, has to import foreign technology, which once assimilated, will give to the Mexican technicians the starting point to establish the proper solution to the foreseen objectives. Therefore, any kind of International cooperation must tend to accelerate the nuclear development and to obtain the transference to technology, within a frame of respect to Mexican sovereignity. The conclusion is that the task at which Mexico aims must be based on the existing human potentiality and on the one that will be prepared in the future, and also on the knowledge and adequate exploitation of the uranium reserves, having the ININ a prominent role of creating the necessary human infrastructure, the development of a Mexican nuclear energy can be achieved in a medium term. (author)

  9. Nuclear Technology Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, J.E.

    1990-10-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1988. These programs involve R ampersand D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned with examining the feasibility of substituting low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in the production of fission-product 99 Mo. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories

  10. Nuclear Technology Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, J.E. (ed.)

    1990-10-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1988. These programs involve R D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned with examining the feasibility of substituting low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in the production of fission-product {sup 99}Mo. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories.

  11. Nuclear technology programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1989--March 1990. These programs involve R ampersand D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of metal fuel and blanket materials of the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned water waste stream generated in production of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories

  12. Nuclear death: an unprecedented challenge to psychiatry and religion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    The growing danger of a nuclear holocaust has intensified two aspects of the human predicament that concern both religion and psychiatry: the inevitability of death and the disastrous consequences of the characteristic termed pride by theologians and narcissism by psychiatrists. For the first time, humans have power to exterminate themselves and death threatens all ages equally. Pride of power causes leaders to exaggerate their ability to control nuclear weapons; moral pride leads to demonizing enemies. The author considers implications for psychiatrists and clergy, with special reference to preventing a nuclear holocaust

  13. Nuclear death: an unprecedented challenge to psychiatry and religion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, J.D.

    1984-11-01

    The growing danger of a nuclear holocaust has intensified two aspects of the human predicament that concern both religion and psychiatry: the inevitability of death and the disastrous consequences of the characteristic termed pride by theologians and narcissism by psychiatrists. For the first time, humans have power to exterminate themselves and death threatens all ages equally. Pride of power causes leaders to exaggerate their ability to control nuclear weapons; moral pride leads to demonizing enemies. The author considers implications for psychiatrists and clergy, with special reference to preventing a nuclear holocaust.

  14. The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, H.G. de

    1980-01-01

    A survey is initially of the international-and national situation regarding energetic resources. The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Policy and the Brazilian Nuclear Program are dealt with, as well as the Nuclear Cooperation agreement signed with the Federal Republic of Germany. The situation of Brazil regarding Uranium and the main activities of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission are also discussed [pt

  15. Mitochondrial fission proteins regulate programmed cell death in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Fannjiang, Yihru; Cheng, Wen-Chih; Lee, Sarah J.; Qi, Bing; Pevsner, Jonathan; McCaffery, J. Michael; Hill, R. Blake; Basañez, Gorka; Hardwick, J. Marie

    2004-01-01

    The possibility that single-cell organisms undergo programmed cell death has been questioned in part because they lack several key components of the mammalian cell death machinery. However, yeast encode a homolog of human Drp1, a mitochondrial fission protein that was shown previously to promote mammalian cell death and the excessive mitochondrial fragmentation characteristic of apoptotic mammalian cells. In support of a primordial origin of programmed cell death involving mitochondria, we fo...

  16. China's nuclear programs and policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.

    1983-01-01

    Economics and the futility of arms competition with the US and USSR has forced China to shift its nuclear effort to peaceful uses, although its current nuclear-deterrent warrants including China in arms negotiations. China's nuclear program began during the 1950s with an emphasis on weaponry and some development in space technology. Proponents of nuclear power now appear to have refuted the earlier arguments that nuclear-plant construction would be too slow, too dangerous and polluting, and too expensive and the idea that hydro resources would be adequate. The current leadership supports a serious nuclear-power-plant construction program. 6 references

  17. Nuclear Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Ohio State University Research Reactor (OSURR) is licensed to operate at a maximum power level of 500 kW. A pool-type reactor using flat-plate, low enriched fuel elements, the OSURR provides several experimental facilities including two 6-inch i.d. beam ports, a graphite thermal column, several graphite-isotope-irradiation elements, a pneumatic transfer system (Rabbit), various dry tubes, and a Central Irradiation Facility (CIF). The core arrangement and accessibility facilitates research programs involving material activation or core parameter studies. The OSURR control room is large enough to accommodate laboratory groups which can use control instrumentation for monitoring of experiments. The control instrumentation is relatively simple, without a large amount of duplication. This facilitates opportunities for hands-on experience in reactor operation by nuclear engineering students making reactor parameter measurements. For neutron activation analysis and analyses of natural environmental radioactivity, the NRL maintains the gamma ray spectroscopy system (GRSS). It is comprised of two PC-based 8192-channel multichannel analyzers (MCAs) with all the required software for quantitative analysis. A 3 double-prime x 3 double-prime NaI(Tl), a 14 percent Ge(Li), and a High Purity Germanium detector are currently available for use with the spectroscopy system

  18. Mitochondrial fission proteins regulate programmed cell death in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fannjiang, Yihru; Cheng, Wen-Chih; Lee, Sarah J; Qi, Bing; Pevsner, Jonathan; McCaffery, J Michael; Hill, R Blake; Basañez, Gorka; Hardwick, J Marie

    2004-11-15

    The possibility that single-cell organisms undergo programmed cell death has been questioned in part because they lack several key components of the mammalian cell death machinery. However, yeast encode a homolog of human Drp1, a mitochondrial fission protein that was shown previously to promote mammalian cell death and the excessive mitochondrial fragmentation characteristic of apoptotic mammalian cells. In support of a primordial origin of programmed cell death involving mitochondria, we found that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of human Drp1, Dnm1, promotes mitochondrial fragmentation/degradation and cell death following treatment with several death stimuli. Two Dnm1-interacting factors also regulate yeast cell death. The WD40 repeat protein Mdv1/Net2 promotes cell death, consistent with its role in mitochondrial fission. In contrast to its fission function in healthy cells, Fis1 unexpectedly inhibits Dnm1-mediated mitochondrial fission and cysteine protease-dependent cell death in yeast. Furthermore, the ability of yeast Fis1 to inhibit mitochondrial fission and cell death can be functionally replaced by human Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Together, these findings indicate that yeast and mammalian cells have a conserved programmed death pathway regulated by a common molecular component, Drp1/Dnm1, that is inhibited by a Bcl-2-like function.

  19. Programmed cell death for defense against anomaly and tumor formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Sohei; Norimura, Toshiyuki; Nomura, Taisei

    1995-01-01

    Cell death after exposure to low-level radiation is often considered evidence that radiation is poisonous, however small the dose. Evidence has been accumulating to support the notion that cell death after low-level exposure to radiation results from activation of suicidal genes open-quote programmed cell death close-quote or open-quote apoptosis close-quote - for the health of the whole body. This paper gives experimental evidence that embryos of fruit flies and mouse fetuses have potent defense mechanisms against teratogenic or tumorigenic injury caused by radiation and carcinogens, which function through programmed cell death

  20. Metal stress induces programmed cell death in aquatic fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, Maria-Manuel; Almeida, Bruno; Ludovico, Paula; Cassio, Fernanda

    2009-01-01

    Aquatic hyphomycetes are a group of fungi that play a key role in organic matter turnover in both clean and metal-polluted streams. We examined the ability of Cu or Zn to induce programmed cell death (PCD) in three aquatic hyphomycete species through the evaluation of typical apoptotic markers, namely reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, caspase-like activity, nuclear morphological alterations, and the occurrence of DNA strand breaks assessed by TUNEL assay. The exposure to both metals induced apoptotic events in all tested aquatic fungi. The most tolerant fungi either to Zn (Varicosporium elodeae) or Cu (Heliscussubmersus) exhibited higher levels of PCD markers, suggesting that PCD processes might be linked to fungal resistance/tolerance to metal stress. Moreover, different patterns of apoptotic markers were found, namely a PCD process independent of ROS accumulation in V. elodeae exposed to Cu, or independent of caspase-like activity in Flagellospora curta exposed to Zn, or even without the occurrence of DNA strand breaks in F. curta exposed to Cu. This suggests that a multiplicity of PCD pathways might be operating in aquatic hyphomycetes. The occurrence of a tightly regulated cell death pathway, such as PCD, in aquatic hyphomycetes under metal stress might be a part of the mechanisms underlying fungal acclimation in metal-polluted streams, because it would allow the rapid removal of unwanted or damaged cells sparing nutrients and space for the fittest ones.

  1. Plant programmed cell death, ethylene and flower senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, E.J.; Jong, de A.; Hoeberichts, F.A.; Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina, V.

    2005-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) applies to cell death that is part of the normal life of multicellular organisms. PCD is found throughout the animal and plant kingdoms; it is an active process in which a cell suicide pathway is activated resulting in controlled disassembly of the cell. Most cases of PCD

  2. US nuclear power programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGolf, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    In the United States, coal provided 56 percent of the electricity generated in 1992. Nuclear energy was the next largest contributor, supplying 22 percent. Natural gas provided 9 percent, while hydro-electric and renewables together supplied another 9 percent. Currently, the 109 nuclear power plants in the U.S. have an overall generating capacity of 99,000 MWe. To improve efficiency, safety, and performance, the lessons of 30 years of experience with nuclear powerplants are being incorporated into design criteria for the next generation of U.S. plants. The new Advanced Light Water Reactor plants will feature simpler designs, which will enable more cost-effective construction and maintenance. To enhance safety, design margins are being increased, and human factors are being considered and incorporated into the designs

  3. US nuclear power programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGolf, D J

    1994-12-31

    In the United States, coal provided 56 percent of the electricity generated in 1992. Nuclear energy was the next largest contributor, supplying 22 percent. Natural gas provided 9 percent, while hydro-electric and renewables together supplied another 9 percent. Currently, the 109 nuclear power plants in the U.S. have an overall generating capacity of 99,000 MWe. To improve efficiency, safety, and performance, the lessons of 30 years of experience with nuclear powerplants are being incorporated into design criteria for the next generation of U.S. plants. The new Advanced Light Water Reactor plants will feature simpler designs, which will enable more cost-effective construction and maintenance. To enhance safety, design margins are being increased, and human factors are being considered and incorporated into the designs.

  4. Arctic Nuclear Waste Assessment Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edson, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Arctic Nuclear Waste Assessment Program (ANWAP) was initiated in 1993 as a result of US congressional concern over the disposal of nuclear materials by the former Soviet Union into the Arctic marine environment. The program is comprised of appr. 70 different projects. To date appr. ten percent of the funds has gone to Russian institutions for research and logistical support. The collaboration also include the IAEA International Arctic Seas Assessment Program. The major conclusion from the research to date is that the largest signals for region-wide radionuclide contamination in the Arctic marine environment appear to arise from the following: 1) atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons, a practice that has been discontinued; 2) nuclear fuel reprocessing wastes carried in the Arctic from reprocessing facilities in Western Europe, and 3) accidents such as Chernobyl and the 1957 explosion at Chelyabinsk-65

  5. Thai Nuclear Power Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namwong, Ratanachai

    2011-01-01

    The Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT), the main power producer in Thailand, was first interested in nuclear power as an electricity option in 1967 when the electricity demand increased considerably for the first time as a result of the economic and industrial growth. Its viability had been assessed several times during the early seventies in relation to the changing factors. Finally in the late 1970s, the proceeding with nuclear option was suspended for a variety of reasons, for instance, public opposition, economic repercussion and the uncovering of the indigenous petroleum resources. Nonetheless, EGAT continued to maintain a core of nuclear expertise. During 1980s, faced with dwindling indigenous fossil fuel resources and restrictions on the use of further hydro as an energy source, EGAT had essentially reconsidered introducing nuclear power plants to provide a significant fraction to the long term future electricity demand. The studies on feasibility, siting and environmental impacts were conducted. However, the project was never implemented due to economics crisis in 1999 and strong opposition by environmentalists and activists groups. The 1986 Chernobyl disaster was an important cause. After a long dormant period, the nuclear power is now reviewed as one part of the solution for future energy supply in the country. Thailand currently relies on natural gas for 70 percent of its electricity, with the rest coming from oil, coal and hydro-power. One-third of the natural gas consumed in Thailand is imported, mainly from neighbouring Myanmar. According to Power Development Plan (PDP) 2007 rev.2, the total installed electricity capacity will increase from 28,530.3 MW in 2007 to 44,281 MW by the end of plan in 2021. Significantly increasing energy demand, concerns over climate change and dependence on overseas supplies of fossil fuels, all turn out in a favor of nuclear power. Under the current PDP (as revised in 2009), two 1,000- megawatt nuclear

  6. Mitochondrial apoptotic pathways induced by Drosophila programmed cell death regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claveria, Cristina; Torres, Miguel

    2003-01-01

    Multicellular organisms eliminate unwanted or damaged cells by cell death, a process essential to the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Cell death is a tightly regulated event, whose alteration by excess or defect is involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases such as cancer, autoimmune syndromes, and neurodegenerative processes. Studies in model organisms, especially in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, have been crucial in identifying the key molecules implicated in the regulation and execution of programmed cell death. In contrast, the study of cell death in Drosophila melanogaster, often an excellent model organism, has identified regulators and mechanisms not obviously conserved in other metazoans. Recent molecular and cellular analyses suggest, however, that the mechanisms of action of the main programmed cell death regulators in Drosophila include a canonical mitochondrial pathway

  7. Accreditation of nuclear engineering programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, T.G.

    1989-01-01

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) Professional Development and Accreditation Committee (PDAC) has the responsibility for accreditation of engineering and technology programs for nuclear and similarly named programs. This committee provides society liaison with the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), is responsible for the appointment and training of accreditation visitors, nomination of members for the ABET Board and Accreditation Commissions, and review of the criteria for accreditation of nuclear-related programs. The committee is composed of 21 members representing academia and industry. The ABET consists of 19 participating bodies, primarily professional societies, and 4 affiliate bodies. Representation on ABET is determined by the size of the professional society and the number of programs accredited. The ANS, as a participating body, has one member on the ABET board, two members on the Engineering Accreditation Commission, and one on the Technology Accreditation Commission. The ABET board sets ABET policy and the commissions are responsible for accreditation visits

  8. Programs for nuclear data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, R.A.I.

    1975-01-01

    The following report details a number of programs and subroutines which are useful for analysis of data from nuclear physics experiments. Most of them are available from pool pack 005 on the IBM1800 computer. All of these programs are stored there as core loads, and the subroutines and functions in relocatable format. The nature and location of other programs are specified as appropriate. (author)

  9. Nuclear wastes: research programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2003-01-01

    The management of long-living and high level radioactive wastes in France belongs to the framework of the December 30, 1991 law which defines three ways of research: the separation and transmutation of radionuclides, their reversible storage or disposal in deep geologic formations, and their processing and surface storage during long duration. Research works are done in partnership between public research and industrial organizations in many French and foreign laboratories. Twelve years after its enforcement, the impact of this law has overstepped the simple research framework and has led to a deep reflection of the society about the use of nuclear energy. This short paper presents the main results obtained so far in the three research ways, the general energy policy of the French government, the industrial progresses made in the framework of the 1991 law and the international context of the management of nuclear wastes. (J.S.)

  10. Sloan foundation nuclear education program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kursunoglu, B.N.

    1992-01-01

    The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation realized the time had come for a real and significant contribution to the enlightenment of university students concerning nuclear matters. The Sloan Foundation chose to educate the youth of four-year colleges and universities with a curriculum established with the resource information sieved from three workshops for professors in these institutions. The three workshops were organized by groups at Harvard-MIT (two-week Summer Program on Nuclear Weapons and Arms Control), the University of California, San Diego (two-week Summer Seminar on Global Security and Arms Control), and the University of Miami (one-week Winter Workshop on Enlightenment: The Best Security in a Nuclear-Armed World). In this report the author focuses on a unified presentation of the basic facts, aims, and results of the Sloan Foundation Nuclear Education Program based on three workshops directed by Jack Ruina (MIT), Herbert York (USCD), and Behram Kursunoglu (UM) and offered from 1983-1990

  11. Soviet Union's Nuclear Power Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Glasnost has dramatically increased the availability of information about the Soviet Union's nuclear industry. In the future, even more information is likely to become known as Soviet participation in international forums increases. Not only is much more general information now available, but up-to-date details are regularly provided, including information such as the Soviet nuclear industry's strategic direction and goals, recent reactor design changes, safety inspection results, and reports of public opposition and protest. This article summarizes the current status of the Soviet nuclear power program, reconciling the often conflicting reports from various public sources

  12. Nuclear plant aging research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissenberg, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, has established the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program in its Division of Engineering Technology. Principal contractors for this program include Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The program goals are: to identify and characterize time-dependent degradation (aging) of nuclear plant safety-related electrical and mechanical components which could lead to loss of safety function; to identify and recommend methods for detecting and trending aging effects prior to loss of safety function so that timely maintenance can be implemented; and to recommend maintenance practices for mitigating the effects of aging. Research activities include prioritization of system and component aging in nuclear plants, characterization of aging degradation of specific components including identification of functional indicators useful for trending degradation, and testing of practical methods and devices for measuring the functional indicators. Aging assessments have been completed on electric motors, snubbers, motor-operated valves, and check valves. Testing of trending methods and devices for motor-operated valves and check valves is in progress

  13. Checkpoint Inhibition: Programmed Cell Death 1 and Programmed Cell Death 1 Ligand Inhibitors in Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasboas, Jose Caetano; Ansell, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a lymphoid malignancy characterized by a reactive immune infiltrate surrounding relatively few malignant cells. In this scenario, active immune evasion seems to play a central role in allowing tumor progression. Immune checkpoint inhibitor pathways are normal mechanisms of T-cell regulation that suppress immune effector function following an antigenic challenge. Hodgkin lymphoma cells are able to escape immune surveillance by co-opting these mechanisms. The programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) pathway in particular is exploited in HL as the malignant Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells express on their surface cognate ligands (PD-L1/L2) for the PD-1 receptor and thereby dampen the T-cell-mediated antitumoral response. Monoclonal antibodies that interact with and disrupt the PD-1:PD-L1/L2 axis have now been developed and tested in early-phase clinical trials in patients with advanced HL with encouraging results. The remarkable clinical activity of PD-1 inhibitors in HL highlights the importance of immune checkpoint pathways as therapeutic targets in HL. In this review, we discuss the rationale for targeting PD-1 and PD-L1 in the treatment of HL. We will evaluate the published clinical data on the different agents and highlight the safety profile of this class of agents. We discuss the available evidence on the use of biomarkers as predictors of response to checkpoint blockade and summarize the areas under active investigation in the use of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors for the treatment of HL.

  14. Passive Nuclear Plants Program (UPDATE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chimeno, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    The light water passive plants program (PCNP), today Advanced Nuclear Power Plants Program (PCNA), was constituted in order to reach the goals of the Spanish Electrical Sector in the field of advanced nuclear power plants, optimize the efforts of all Spanish initiatives, and increase joint presence in international projects. The last update of this program, featured in revision 5th of the Program Report, reflects the consolidation of the Spanish sector's presence in International programs of the advanced power plants on the basis of the practically concluded American ALWR program. Since the beginning of the program , the PCNP relies on financing from the Electrical sector, Ocide, SEPI-Endesa, Westinghouse, General Electric, as well as from the industrial cooperators, Initec, UTE (Initec- Empresarios Agrupados), Ciemat, Enusa, Ensa and Tecnatom. The program is made up of the following projects, already concluded: - EPRI's Advanced Light Water Plants Certification Project - Westinghouse's AP600 Project - General Electric's SBWR Project (presently paralyzed) and ABWR project Currently, the following project are under development, at different degrees of advance: - EPP project (European Passive Plant) - EBWR project (European Advanced Boiling Water Reactor)

  15. Programmed cell death-1 and programmed cell death ligand-1 antibodies-induced dysthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, Jaafar; Fernandez, Eugenio; Alwan, Heba; Philippe, Jacques

    2018-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies blocking the programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) or its ligand (PD-L1) are a group of immune checkpoints inhibitors (ICIs) with proven antitumor efficacy. However, their use is complicated by immune-related adverse events (irAEs), including endocrine adverse events (eAEs). We review the incidence, time to onset and resolution rate of dysthyroidism induced by PD-1/PD-L1 Ab, and the clinical, biological and radiological findings. We aim to discuss the potential mechanisms of PD-1/PD-L1 Ab-induced dysthyroidism, and to propose a management algorithm. We performed a literature search of available clinical trials regarding PD-1/PD-L1 Ab in the PubMed database. We selected all English language clinical trials that included at least 100 patients. We also present selected case series or reports, retrospective studies and reviews related to this issue. In patients treated with PD-1 Ab, hypothyroidism occurred in 2-10.1% and hyperthyroidism occurred in 0.9-7.8%. When thyroiditis was reported separately, it occurred in 0.34-2.6%. Higher rates were reported when PD-1 Ab were associated with other ICI or chemotherapy. The median time to onset of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism after PD-1 Ab initiation was 23-45 days and 2-3.5 months, respectively. Regarding PD-L1 Ab, hypothyroidism occurred in 0-10% and hyperthyroidism in 0.5-2% of treated patients. The average time to onset of dysthyroidism after PD-L1 Ab was variable and ranged from 1 day after treatment initiation to 31 months. Dysthyroidism occurs in up to 10% of patients treated with PD-1/PD-L1 Ab. Hypothyroidism and reversible destructive thyroiditis are the most frequent endocrine adverse events (eAE) in PD-1/PD-L1 treated patients. Immune and non-immune mechanisms are potentially involved, independently of the presence of thyroid antibodies. © 2018 The authors.

  16. Power program and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernilin, Yu.F.

    1990-01-01

    Main points of the USSR power program and the role of nuclear power in fuel and power complex of the country are considered. Data on dynamics of economic indices of electric power generation at nuclear power plants during 1980-1988 and forecasts till 2000 are presented. It is shown that real cost of 1 kW/h of electric power is equal to 1.3-1.8 cop., and total reduced cost is equal to 1.8-2.4 cop

  17. What history tells us XXI. Apoptosis and programmed cell death

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-04-30

    Apr 30, 2010 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 35; Issue 2. What history tells us XXI. Apoptosis and programmed cell death: when biological categories are blurred. Michel Morange. Series Volume 35 Issue 2 June 2010 pp 177-181 ...

  18. Programmed Cell Death and Postharvest Deterioration of Horticultural Produce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, E.J.; Iakimova, E.T.

    2010-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a process where cells or tissues are broken down in an orderly and predictable manner, whereby nutrients are re-used by other cells, tissues or plant parts. The process of (petal) senescence shows many similarities to autophagic PCD in animal cells including a massive

  19. QA programs in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingson, A.C.

    1976-01-01

    As an overview of quality assurance programs in nuclear power plants, the energy picture as it appears today is reviewed. Nuclear power plants and their operations are described and an attempt is made to place in proper perspective the alleged ''threats'' inherent in nuclear power. Finally, the quality assurance programs being used in the nuclear industry are described

  20. New nuclear build programs status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tankosic, D.; Sabinov, S.

    2010-01-01

    Presentation topics: Reactor technology update OECD OEMs development; Nuclear power sector development projections - global nuclear capacity projections to 2050 (NEA low , high and phase-out scenarios); new nuclear constructions Worley Parsons support to new nuclear Programs around the world; Drivers towards increased nuclear capacity - increased demand of generating capacities; climate change concerns; Security of supply; Economics; Robust to fuel price increases

  1. The control and execution of programmed cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begum, R.; Pathak, N.; Hasnain, S.E.; Sah, N.K.; Athar, M.

    1999-01-01

    Apoptosis or programmed cell death is a highly conserved genetically controlled response of metazoan cells to commit suicide. Non apoptotic programmed cell death seems to operate in single celled eukaryotes implying that evolution of PCD has preceded the evolution of multicellularity. PCD plays a crucial role in the regulation of cellular and tissue homeostasis and any aberrations in apoptosis leads to several diseases including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders and AIDS. The mechanisms by which apoptosis is controlled are varied. In some cells, members of bcl-2 family or p53 are crucial for regulating the apoptosis programme, whereas in other cells Fas ligand is more important. bcl-2 family members have a prime role in the regulation of cell death at all stages including development, whereas cell death during development is independent of p53. bcl-2 family members being localized on the outer mitochondrial membrane, control the mitochondrial homeostasis and cytochrome c redistribution and thereby regulate the cell death process. p53 promotes DNA damage mediated cell death after growth arrest and failed DNA repair. Caspases play a key role in the execution of cell death by mediating highly specific cleavages of crucial cellular proteins collectively manifesting the apoptotic phenotype. Protein inhibitors like crm A, p35 and IAPs could prevent/control apoptosis induced by a broad array of cell death stimuli by several mechanisms specially interfering in caspase activation or caspase activity. Among endonucleases, caspase activated DNase (CAD) plays a crucial role in DNA fragmentation, a biochemical hallmark of apoptosis. As regulation of cell death seems to be as complex as regulation of cell proliferation, multiple kinase mediated regulatory mechanisms might control the apoptotic process. Thus, in spite of intensive research over the past few years, the field of apoptosis still remains fertile to unravel among others, the molecular mechanisms of cytochrome c

  2. The control and execution of programmed cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begum, R.; Pathak, N.; Hasnain, S.E.; Sah, N.K. [National Inst. of Immunology, New Delhi (India). Eukaryotic Gene Expression Lab.; Taneja, T.K.; Mohan, M. [National Inst. of Immunology, New Delhi (India). Eukaryotic Gene Expression Lab.]|[Dept. of Medical Elementology and Toxicology, New Delhi (India); Athar, M. [Dept. of Medical Elementology and Toxicology, New Delhi (India)

    1999-07-01

    Apoptosis or programmed cell death is a highly conserved genetically controlled response of metazoan cells to commit suicide. Non apoptotic programmed cell death seems to operate in single celled eukaryotes implying that evolution of PCD has preceded the evolution of multicellularity. PCD plays a crucial role in the regulation of cellular and tissue homeostasis and any aberrations in apoptosis leads to several diseases including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders and AIDS. The mechanisms by which apoptosis is controlled are varied. In some cells, members of bcl-2 family or p53 are crucial for regulating the apoptosis programme, whereas in other cells Fas ligand is more important. bcl-2 family members have a prime role in the regulation of cell death at all stages including development, whereas cell death during development is independent of p53. bcl-2 family members being localized on the outer mitochondrial membrane, control the mitochondrial homeostasis and cytochrome c redistribution and thereby regulate the cell death process. p53 promotes DNA damage mediated cell death after growth arrest and failed DNA repair. Caspases play a key role in the execution of cell death by mediating highly specific cleavages of crucial cellular proteins collectivley manifesting the apoptotic phenotype. Protein inhibitors like crm A, p35 and IAPs could prevent/control apoptosis induced by a broad array of cell death stimuli by several mechanisms specially interfering in caspase activation or caspase activity. Among endonucleases, caspase activated DNase (CAD) plays a crucial role in DNA fragmentation, a biochemical hallmark of apoptosis. As regulation of cell death seems to be as complex as regulation of cell proliferation, multiple kinase mediated regulatory mechanisms might control the apoptotic process. Thus, in spite of intensive research over the past few years, the field of apoptosis still remains fertile to unravel among others, the molecular mechanisms of cytochrome c

  3. THE PROGRAMED CELL DEATH REGULATORS OF ISOLATED MODEL SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Vatlitsov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The technology evolution creates the prerequisites for the emergence of new informational concept and approaches to the formation of a fundamentally new principles of biological objects understanding. The aim was to study the activators of the programmed cell death in an isolated system model. Cell culture aging parameters were performed on flow cytometer. It had formed the theory that the changes in the concentrations of metal ions and increase their extracellular concentration had formed a negative gradient into the cells.regulation of cell death. It was shown that the metals ions concentrations.

  4. Oxidative Stress and Programmed Cell Death in Yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrugia, Gianluca; Balzan, Rena

    2012-01-01

    Yeasts, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have long served as useful models for the study of oxidative stress, an event associated with cell death and severe human pathologies. This review will discuss oxidative stress in yeast, in terms of sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS), their molecular targets, and the metabolic responses elicited by cellular ROS accumulation. Responses of yeast to accumulated ROS include upregulation of antioxidants mediated by complex transcriptional changes, activation of pro-survival pathways such as mitophagy, and programmed cell death (PCD) which, apart from apoptosis, includes pathways such as autophagy and necrosis, a form of cell death long considered accidental and uncoordinated. The role of ROS in yeast aging will also be discussed.

  5. Nuclear program of South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.S.; James, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    Slightly larger than Portugal, South Korea comprises the lower half on the Korean Peninsula, covering approximately 38 thousand square miles. the Republic of Korea (South Korea) was established in 1948, and until 1962 the country grew slowly. However, through a series of five-year economic plans initiated by South Korean President Park Ching Hee, South Korea has since created an export-oriented economy, which now plays a major role in regional as well as global trade. South Korea has been forced to constantly upgrade its power generation structure in order to sustain the explosive growth it has experienced. Nuclear power has been a major player in this expansion and is expected to play an ever-increasing role. The country presently operates nine nuclear reactors with a total net generating capacity of 7,266 MWe. By the year 2006, the nuclear program is scheduled to grow to 27 reactors, with a net generating capacity exceeding 23 thousand MWe. Once this goal is reached, nuclear-generated power would account for more than 40 percent of the country's total installed electrical capacity

  6. Apoptosis in fish: environmental factors and programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AnvariFar, Hossein; Amirkolaie, Abdolsamad Keramat; Miandare, Hamed Kolangi; Ouraji, Hossein; Jalali, M Ali; Üçüncü, Sema İşisağ

    2017-06-01

    Apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death, is a critical component in maintaining homeostasis and growth in all tissues and plays a significant role in immunity and cytotoxicity. In contrast to necrosis or traumatic cell death, apoptosis is a well-controlled and vital process characterized mainly by cytoplasmic shrinkage, chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation, membrane blebbing and apoptotic bodies. Our understanding of apoptosis is partly based on observations in invertebrates but mainly in mammals. Despite the great advantages of fish models in studying vertebrate development and diseases and the tremendous interest observed in recent years, reports on apoptosis in fish are still limited. Although apoptotic machinery is well conserved between aquatic and terrestrial organisms throughout the history of evolution, some differences exist in key components of apoptotic pathways. Core parts of apoptotic machinery in fish are virtually expressed as equivalent to the mammalian models. Some differences are, however, evident, such as the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis including lack of a C-terminal region in the Fas-associated protein with a death domain in fish. Aquatic species inhabit a complex and highly fluctuating environment, making these species good examples to reveal features of apoptosis that may not be easily investigated in mammals. Therefore, in order to gain a wider view on programmed cell death in fish, interactions between the main environmental factors, chemicals and apoptosis are discussed in this review. It is indicated that apoptosis can be induced in fish by exposure to environmental stressors during different stages of the fish life cycle.

  7. Nuclear Engineering Academic Programs Survey, 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2005-01-01

    This annual report details the number of nuclear engineering bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees awarded at a sampling of academic programs from 1998-2004. It also looks at nuclear engineering degrees by curriculum and the number of students enrolled in nuclear engineering degree programs at 31 U.S. universities in 2004

  8. Megasporogenesis and programmed cell death in Tillandsia (Bromeliaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papini, Alessio; Mosti, Stefano; Milocani, Eva; Tani, Gabriele; Di Falco, Pietro; Brighigna, Luigi

    2011-10-01

    The degeneration of three of four meiotic products is a very common process in the female gender of oogamous eukaryotes. In Tillandsia (and many other angiosperms), the surviving megaspore has a callose-free wall in chalazal position while the other three megaspores are completely embedded in callose. Therefore, nutrients and signals can reach more easily the functional megaspore from the nucellus through the chalazal pole with respect to the other megaspores. The abortion of three of four megaspores was already recognized as the result of a programmed cell death (PCD) process. We investigated the process to understand the modality of this specific type of PCD and its relationship to the asymmetric callose deposition around the tetrad. The decision on which of the four megaspores will be the supernumerary megaspores in angiosperms, and hence destined to undergo programmed cell death, appears to be linked to the callose layer deposition around the tetrad. During supernumerary megaspores degeneration, events leading to the deletion of the cells do not appear to belong to a single type of cell death. The first morphological signs are typical of autophagy, including the formation of autophagosomes. The TUNEL positivity and a change in morphology of mitochondria and chloroplasts indicate the passage to an apoptotic-like PCD phase, while the cellular remnants undergo a final process resembling at least partially (ER swelling) necrotic morphological syndromes, eventually leading to a mainly lipidic cell corpse still separated from the functional megaspore by a callose layer.

  9. The role of mitochondria in yeast programmed cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Ždralević, Maša; Antonacci, Lucia; Passarella, Salvatore; Marra, Ersilia; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian apoptosis and yeast programmed cell death (PCD) share a variety of features including reactive oxygen species production, protease activity and a major role played by mitochondria. In view of this, and of the distinctive characteristics differentiating yeast and multicellular organism PCD, the mitochondrial contribution to cell death in the genetically tractable yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been intensively investigated. In this mini-review we report whether and how yeast mitochondrial function and proteins belonging to oxidative phosphorylation, protein trafficking into and out of mitochondria, and mitochondrial dynamics, play a role in PCD. Since in PCD many processes take place over time, emphasis will be placed on an experimental model based on acetic acid-induced PCD (AA-PCD) which has the unique feature of having been investigated as a function of time. As will be described there are at least two AA-PCD pathways each with a multifaceted role played by mitochondrial components, in particular by cytochrome c.

  10. Status of Iran's nuclear program and negotiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albright, David

    2014-01-01

    Iran's nuclear program poses immense challenges to international security. Its gas centrifuge program has grown dramatically in the last several years, bringing Iran close to a point where it could produce highly enriched uranium in secret or declared gas centrifuge plants before its breakout would be discovered and stopped. To reduce the risk posed by Iran's nuclear program, the P5+1 have negotiated with Iran short term limits on the most dangerous aspects of its nuclear programs and is negotiating long-term arrangements that can provide assurance that Iran will not build nuclear weapons. These long-term arrangements need to include a far more limited and transparent Iranian nuclear program. In advance of arriving at a long-term arrangement, the IAEA will need to resolve its concerns about the alleged past and possibly on-going military dimensions of Iran's nuclear program

  11. Elements of a nuclear criticality safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopper, C.M.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear criticality safety programs throughout the United States are quite successful, as compared with other safety disciplines, at protecting life and property, especially when regarded as a developing safety function with no historical perspective for the cause and effect of process nuclear criticality accidents before 1943. The programs evolved through self-imposed and regulatory-imposed incentives. They are the products of conscientious individuals, supportive corporations, obliged regulators, and intervenors (political, public, and private). The maturing of nuclear criticality safety programs throughout the United States has been spasmodic, with stability provided by the volunteer standards efforts within the American Nuclear Society. This presentation provides the status, relative to current needs, for nuclear criticality safety program elements that address organization of and assignments for nuclear criticality safety program responsibilities; personnel qualifications; and analytical capabilities for the technical definition of critical, subcritical, safety and operating limits, and program quality assurance

  12. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated cytolysis: an example of programmed cell death in the immune system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duke, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    Target cells are programmed to die following interaction with cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Within minutes of exposure to CTL the target cell's nuclear DNA is fragmented. Target cell lysis, as measured by 51 Cr release, occurs about 60 minutes after induction of DNA fragmentation. DNA fragmentation results from the action of an endonuclease which cleaves DNA in the linker region between nucleosomes. The origin of this nuclease, whether transferred to the target by the CTL or endogenous to the target cell, has not been resolved. DNA fragmentation occurs only when appropriately sensitized CTL are used and is not merely the result of cell death because killing of target cells by extreme deviation from homeostasis, by interruption of energy production, or by lysis with antibody and complement does not induce DNA cleavage. When Triton X-100 is added to target cells which have interacted with CTL, the DNA fragments do not remain in association with the nucleus. This observation suggests that breakdown of overall nuclear structure is induced concomitantly with DNA fragmentation. Morphologically, disruption of nuclear structure and DNA fragmentation are observed as widespread chromatin condensation (apoptosis). Apoptosis is observed in metabolically active target cells and is not a consequence of cell death. A cell whose DNA is extensively fragmented is condemmed to die. Induction of oligonucleosome-sized DNA is also an early event in glucocorticoid-induced thymocyte death and death of T cells upon removal of growth factor. Several similarities exist between these systems and CTL-mediated cytolysis suggesting a final common biochemical pathway for all three types of cell death

  13. Overview of the DOE nuclear data program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetstone, S.L.

    1991-01-01

    Numerous researchers receive support from the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) nuclear data program; others work closely with it, attending coordination meetings and contributing to data activities. Since fiscal year (FY) 1988, the nuclear data program has been included in the budget of the Division of Nuclear Physics in the DOE's Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics. The budget for nuclear data consists of two budget categories: nuclear data compilation and evaluation and nuclear data measurements, both of which are contained within the low-energy nuclear physics program. The program has become essentially the sole supporter of the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Center coordinates the production of the ENSDF data base and Nuclear Data Sheets as well as, through the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG138), the production of the ENDF. Two rather large accelerator facilities, completely supported by the program, the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator and the fast neutron generator at Argonne National Laboratory, form the core of the nuclear data measurement activity together with measurement programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory's LAMPF/WNR facility, and at accelerator laboratories at Ohio University, Duke University, the University of Lowell, the University of Michigan, and the Colorado School of Mines. Some history is discussed and future modernizing plans are identified

  14. Underground Nuclear Testing Program, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-09-01

    The Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) continues to conduct an underground nuclear testing program which includes tests for nuclear weapons development and other tests for development of nuclear explosives and methods for their application for peaceful uses. ERDA also continues to provide nuclear explosive and test site support for nuclear effects tests sponsored by the Department of Defense. This Supplement extends the Environmental Statement (WASH-1526) to cover all underground nuclear tests and preparations for tests of one megaton (1 MT) or less at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during Fiscal Year 1976. The test activities covered include numerous continuing programs, both nuclear and non-nuclear, which can best be conducted in a remote area. However, if nuclear excavation tests or tests of yields above 1 MT or tests away from NTS should be planned, these will be covered by separate environmental statements

  15. Long-term treatment of anterior pituitary cells with nitric oxide induces programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velardez, Miguel Omar; Poliandri, Ariel Hernán; Cabilla, Jimena Paula; Bodo, Cristian Carlos Armando; Machiavelli, Leticia Inés; Duvilanski, Beatriz Haydeé

    2004-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a complex role in modulating programmed cell death. It can either protect the cell from apoptotic death or mediate apoptosis, depending on its concentration and the cell type and/or status. In this study, we demonstrate that long-term exposition to NO induces cell death of anterior pituitary cells from Wistar female rats. DETA NONOate (Z)-1-[2-(2-aminoethyl)-N-(2-ammonioethyl)amino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate, 1 mm], a NO donor that releases NO for an extended period of time, decreased cellular viability and prolactin release from primary cultures of anterior pituitary cells. Morphological studies showed an increase in the number of cells with chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation at 24 and 48 h after DETA/NO exposure. DNA internucleosomal fragmentation was also observed at the same time. Reversibility of the NO effect on cellular viability and prolactin release was observed only when the cells were incubated with DETA/NO for less than 6 h. Most apoptotic cells were immunopositive for prolactin, suggesting a high susceptibility of lactotrophs to the effect of NO. The cytotoxic effect of NO is dependent of caspase-9 and caspase-3, but seems to be independent of oxidative stress or nitrosative stress. Our results show that the exposition of anterior pituitary cells to NO for long periods induces programmed cell death of anterior pituitary cells.

  16. Vacuolar processing enzyme in plant programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki eHatsugai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE is a cysteine proteinase originally identified as the proteinase responsible for the maturation and activation of vacuolar proteins in plants, and it is known to be an orthologue of animal asparaginyl endopeptidase (AEP/VPE/legumain. VPE has been shown to exhibit enzymatic properties similar to that of caspase 1, which is a cysteine protease that mediates the programmed cell death (PCD pathway in animals. Although there is limited sequence identity between VPE and caspase 1, their predicted three-dimensional structures revealed that the essential amino-acid residues for these enzymes form similar pockets for the substrate peptide YVAD. In contrast to the cytosolic localization of caspases, VPE is localized in vacuoles. VPE provokes vacuolar rupture, initiating the proteolytic cascade leading to PCD in the plant immune response. It has become apparent that the VPE-dependent PCD pathway is involved not only in the immune response, but also in the responses to a variety of stress inducers and in the development of various tissues. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the contribution of VPE to plant PCD and its role in vacuole-mediated cell death, and it also compares VPE with the animal cell death executor caspase 1.

  17. Nuclear data needs of Indian nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernando, M.P.S.

    2015-01-01

    Currently 17 Pressurised Heavy water Reactors (PHWRs), 2 Boiling water reactors (BWRs) and 1 Pressurised water reactor (PWR) are being operated for power production by Nuclear Power Corporation India Limited (NPCIL). For PHWRs, different types of fuel bundles are simulated by the integral transport theory code, CLUB using a combination of collision probability method and interface current technique and employing IAEA supplied 69 /172 group WIMS cross section library based on ENDF-BVI, BVII. Ring power factors are calculated at different burnups and are used to estimate linear heat rating. The two group neutron cross sections of different type of lattices at different core irradiations are also generated by lattice code CLUB. Wherever reactivity devices are present, supercell approach is adopted and the suitable incremental absorption cross sections are obtained using BOXER which is based on 3-D integral transport theory considering two neutron energy groups. Using the appropriate properties for normal lattices and ones affected by reactivity devices, fuel management and core follow up studies are carried out using 3-D diffusion theory based TRIVENI code. The KAPS-1 power rise transient on March 10, 2004 brought to focus the importance of accurate nuclear data for reactor physics estimation in Indian PHWRs. With IAEA supplied libraries in WIMS format we could satisfactorily resolve the rate of power increase. Stability analysis and sensitivity analysis was carried out for different incore burnup situations resulting from peak flux operation. The quantification of output uncertainties is necessary to adequately establish safety margins of nuclear facilities. The uncertainties in the integral parameters such as reactivity worth and coefficients due to cross section can be assessed using cross section covariance data produced directly from the uncertainties of measurements. Covariance data processing codes and sensitivity analysis tools have to be developed. The part

  18. Management plan for the Nuclear Standards Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-11-01

    This Management Plan was prepared to describe the manner in which Oak Ridge National Laboratory will provide technical management of the Nuclear Standards Program. The organizational structure that has been established within ORNL for this function is the Nuclear Standards Management Center, which includes the Nuclear Standards Office (NSO) already in existence at ORNL. This plan is intended to support the policies and practices for the development and application of technical standards in ETN projects, programs, and technology developments as set forth in a standards policy memorandum from the DOE Program Director for Nuclear Energy

  19. The University of Utah Nuclear Engineering Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevremovic, T.; McDonald, L. IV; Schow, R.

    2016-01-01

    As of 2014, the University of Utah Nuclear Engineering Program (UNEP) manages and maintains over 7,000 ft 2 (~650 m 2 ) nuclear engineering facilities that includes 100 kW TRIGA Mark I and numerous laboratories such as radiochemistry, microscopy, nuclear forensics, nuclear medicine, radiation detection and instrumentation laboratories. The UNEP offers prestigious educational and training programs in the field of faculty reserach: reactor physics, reactor design and operation, advanced numerical modeling and visualizations in radiation transport, radiochemistry, nuclear forensics, radiation detection and detector designs, signal processing, nuclear medicine, nuclear space and nuclear robotic’s engineering and radiological sciences. With the state-of-the-art nuclear instrumentation and state-of-the-art numerical modeling tools, reserach reactor and modernized educational and training programs, we positioned ourselves in the last five years as the fastest growing national nuclear engineering program attracting the students from many disciplines such as but not limited to: chemical engineering, civil engineering, environmental engineering, chemistry, physics, astronomy, medical sciences, and others. From 2012, we uniquely developed and implemented the nuclear power plants’ safety culture paradigm that we use for day-to-day operation, management and maintenance of our facilities, as well as train all our students at undergraduate and graduate levels of studies. We developed also a new distance-learning approaches in sharing knowledge about experiential learning based on no-cost internet-tools combined with the use of mobile technologies. (author)

  20. IAEA Nuclear Security Human Resource Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunegger-Guelich, A.

    2009-01-01

    The IAEA is at the forefront of international efforts to strengthen the world's nuclear security framework. The current Nuclear Security Plan for 2006-2009 was approved by the IAEA Board of Governors in September 2005. This Plan has three main points of focus: needs assessment, prevention, detection and response. Its overall objective is to achieve improved worldwide security of nuclear and other radioactive material in use, storage and transport, and of their associated facilities. This will be achieved, in particular, through the provision of guidelines and recommendations, human resource development, nuclear security advisory services and assistance for the implementation of the framework in States, upon request. The presentation provides an overview of the IAEA nuclear security human resource development program that is divided into two parts: training and education. Whereas the training program focuses on filling gaps between the actual performance of personnel working in the area of nuclear security and the required competencies and skills needed to meet the international requirements and recommendations described in UN and IAEA documents relating to nuclear security, the Educational Program in Nuclear Security aims at developing nuclear security experts and specialists, at fostering a nuclear security culture and at establishing in this way sustainable knowledge in this field within a State. The presentation also elaborates on the nuclear security computer based learning component and provides insights into the use of human resource development as a tool in achieving the IAEA's long term goal of improving sustainable nuclear security in States. (author)

  1. Nuclear Power Infrastructure Development Program: Korean Education Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Yeol; Hwang, Il Soon; Kim, Si Hwan

    2009-01-01

    Many countries have decided nuclear power for next energy resources as one of the long-term energy supply options. IAEA projected nuclear power expansion up to 2030 reaching between 447 GWe and 691 GWe compared to 370 GWe and 2660 TWh at the end of 2006. Both low and high projection is accompanied with new nuclear power plant constructions respectively 178 and 357, about 11 units per year, and most new construction is in North America, the Far East, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia. During the last forty years, thirty three countries have established commercial nuclear power programs but only some of them have developed comprehensive and large scale peaceful nuclear power infrastructure. Although various cooperation and guidance program of nuclear power infrastructure, developing appropriate environment and infrastructure of nuclear power plant is still challenging problems for developing countries launching nuclear power program. With increasing the demand of safety and safeguard from international society, creating appropriate infrastructure becomes essential requirements in national nuclear power program. In the viewpoint of developing countries, without sufficient explanation and proper guidance, infrastructure could be seen only as another barrier in its nuclear power program. The importance of infrastructure development would be obscured by ostensible business and infrastructure program can result in increasing entering barriers to peaceful nuclear power application field without benefits to developing countries and international community. To avoid this situation by providing enough explanation and realistic case example and cooperate with the countries wanting to establish comprehensive nuclear power infrastructure in the peaceful applications, we are creating the education program of infrastructure development with basic guidelines of the IAEA infrastructure series and Korean experiences from least developed country to advanced country

  2. Anhydrobiosis and programmed cell death in plants: Commonalities and Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Singh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Anhydrobiosis is an adaptive strategy of certain organisms or specialised propagules to survive in the absence of water while programmed cell death (PCD is a finely tuned cellular process of the selective elimination of targeted cell during developmental programme and perturbed biotic and abiotic conditions. Particularly during water stress both the strategies serve single purpose i.e., survival indicating PCD may also function as an adaptive process under certain conditions. During stress conditions PCD cause targeted cells death in order to keep the homeostatic balance required for the organism survival, whereas anhydrobiosis suspends cellular metabolic functions mimicking a state similar to death until reestablishment of the favourable conditions. Anhydrobiosis is commonly observed among organisms that have ability to revive their metabolism on rehydration after removal of all or almost all cellular water without damage. This feature is widely represented in terrestrial cyanobacteria and bryophytes where it is very common in both vegetative and reproductive stages of life-cycle. In the course of evolution, with the development of advanced vascular system in higher plants, anhydrobiosis was gradually lost from the vegetative phase of life-cycle. Though it is retained in resurrection plants that primarily belong to thallophytes and a small group of vascular angiosperm, it can be mostly found restricted in orthodox seeds of higher plants. On the contrary, PCD is a common process in all eukaryotes from unicellular to multicellular organisms including higher plants and mammals. In this review we discuss physiological and biochemical commonalities and differences between anhydrobiosis and PCD.

  3. Comparative analysis of programmed cell death pathways in filamentous fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wortman Jennifer R

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fungi can undergo autophagic- or apoptotic-type programmed cell death (PCD on exposure to antifungal agents, developmental signals, and stress factors. Filamentous fungi can also exhibit a form of cell death called heterokaryon incompatibility (HI triggered by fusion between two genetically incompatible individuals. With the availability of recently sequenced genomes of Aspergillus fumigatus and several related species, we were able to define putative components of fungi-specific death pathways and the ancestral core apoptotic machinery shared by all fungi and metazoa. Results Phylogenetic profiling of HI-associated proteins from four Aspergilli and seven other fungal species revealed lineage-specific protein families, orphan genes, and core genes conserved across all fungi and metazoa. The Aspergilli-specific domain architectures include NACHT family NTPases, which may function as key integrators of stress and nutrient availability signals. They are often found fused to putative effector domains such as Pfs, SesB/LipA, and a newly identified domain, HET-s/LopB. Many putative HI inducers and mediators are specific to filamentous fungi and not found in unicellular yeasts. In addition to their role in HI, several of them appear to be involved in regulation of cell cycle, development and sexual differentiation. Finally, the Aspergilli possess many putative downstream components of the mammalian apoptotic machinery including several proteins not found in the model yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusion Our analysis identified more than 100 putative PCD associated genes in the Aspergilli, which may help expand the range of currently available treatments for aspergillosis and other invasive fungal diseases. The list includes species-specific protein families as well as conserved core components of the ancestral PCD machinery shared by fungi and metazoa.

  4. Programmed cell death in periodontitis: recent advances and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, B; Zhou, T; Yang, W L; Liu, J; Shao, L Q

    2017-07-01

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent infectious disease, characterized by destruction of the periodontium, and is the main cause of tooth loss. Periodontitis is initiated by periodontal pathogens, while other risk factors including smoking, stress, and systemic diseases aggravate its progression. Periodontitis affects many people worldwide, but the molecular mechanisms by which pathogens and risk factors destroy the periodontium are unclear. Programmed cell death (PCD), different from necrosis, is an active cell death mediated by a cascade of gene expression events and can be mainly classified into apoptosis, autophagy, necroptosis, and pyroptosis. Although PCD is involved in many inflammatory diseases, its correlation with periodontitis is unclear. After reviewing the relevant published articles, we found that apoptosis has indeed been reported to play a role in periodontitis. However, the role of autophagy in periodontitis needs further verification. Additionally, implication of necroptosis or pyroptosis in periodontitis remains unknown. Therefore, we recommend future studies, which will unravel the pivotal role of PCD in periodontitis, allowing us to prevent, diagnose, and treat the disease, as well as predict its outcomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Chloroplasts activity and PAP-signaling regulate programmed cell death in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Bruggeman, Quentin

    2016-01-09

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a crucial process both for plant development and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. There is accumulating evidence that chloroplasts may play a central role during plant PCD as for mitochondria in animal cells, but it is still unclear whether they participate in PCD onset, execution, or both. To tackle this question, we have analyzed the contribution of chloroplast function to the cell death phenotype of the myoinositol phosphate synthase1 (mips1) mutant that forms spontaneous lesions in a light-dependent manner. We show that photosynthetically active chloroplasts are required for PCD to occur in mips1, but this process is independent of the redox state of the chloroplast. Systematic genetic analyses with retrograde signaling mutants reveal that 3’-phosphoadenosine 5’-phosphate, a chloroplast retrograde signal that modulates nuclear gene expression in response to stress, can inhibit cell death and compromises plant innate immunity via inhibition of the RNA-processing 5’-3’ exoribonucleases. Our results provide evidence for the role of chloroplast-derived signal and RNA metabolism in the control of cell death and biotic stress response. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. On Programmed Cell Death in Plasmodium falciparum: Status Quo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewaldt Engelbrecht

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Conflicting arguments and results exist regarding the occurrence and phenotype of programmed cell death (PCD in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Inconsistencies relate mainly to the number and type of PCD markers assessed and the different methodologies used in the studies. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current state of knowledge and empirical evidence for PCD in the intraerythrocytic stages of P. falciparum. We consider possible reasons for discrepancies in the data and offer suggestions towards more standardised investigation methods in this field. Furthermore, we present genomic evidence for PCD machinery in P. falciparum. We discuss the potential adaptive or nonadaptive role of PCD in the parasite life cycle and its possible exploitation in the development of novel drug targets. Lastly, we pose pertinent unanswered questions concerning the PCD phenomenon in P. falciparum to provide future direction.

  7. On Programmed Cell Death in Plasmodium falciparum: Status Quo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, Dewaldt; Durand, Pierre Marcel; Coetzer, Thérèsa Louise

    2012-01-01

    Conflicting arguments and results exist regarding the occurrence and phenotype of programmed cell death (PCD) in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Inconsistencies relate mainly to the number and type of PCD markers assessed and the different methodologies used in the studies. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current state of knowledge and empirical evidence for PCD in the intraerythrocytic stages of P. falciparum. We consider possible reasons for discrepancies in the data and offer suggestions towards more standardised investigation methods in this field. Furthermore, we present genomic evidence for PCD machinery in P. falciparum. We discuss the potential adaptive or nonadaptive role of PCD in the parasite life cycle and its possible exploitation in the development of novel drug targets. Lastly, we pose pertinent unanswered questions concerning the PCD phenomenon in P. falciparum to provide future direction. PMID:22287973

  8. Programmed death-1 & its ligands: promising targets for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrimali, Rajeev K; Janik, John E; Abu-Eid, Rasha; Mkrtichyan, Mikayel; Khleif, Samir N

    2015-01-01

    Novel strategies for cancer treatment involving blockade of immune inhibitors have shown significant progress toward understanding the molecular mechanism of tumor immune evasion. The preclinical findings and clinical responses associated with programmed death-1 (PD-1) and PD-ligand pathway blockade seem promising, making these targets highly sought for cancer immunotherapy. In fact, the anti-PD-1 antibodies, pembrolizumab and nivolumab, were recently approved by the US FDA for the treatment of unresectable and metastatic melanoma resistant to anticytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 antibody (ipilimumab) and BRAF inhibitor. Here, we discuss strategies of combining PD-1/PD-ligand interaction inhibitors with other immune checkpoint modulators and standard-of-care therapy to break immune tolerance and induce a potent antitumor activity, which is currently a research area of key scientific pursuit.

  9. Programmed cell death and cell extrusion in rat duodenum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schauser, Kirsten; Larsson, Lars-Inge

    2005-01-01

    The small intestinal epithelium is continously renewed through a balance between cell division and cell loss. How this balance is achieved is uncertain. Thus, it is unknown to what extent programmed cell death (PCD) contributes to intestinal epithelial cell loss. We have used a battery...... of techniques detecting the events associated with PCD in order to better understand its role in the turnover of the intestinal epithelium, including modified double- and triple-staining techniques for simultaneously detecting multiple markers of PCD in individual cells. Only a partial correlation between TUNEL...... positivity for DNA fragmentation, c-jun phosphorylation on serine-63, positivity for activated caspase-3 and apoptotic morphology was observed. Our results show that DNA fragmentation does not invariable correlate to activation of caspase-3. Moreover, many cells were found to activate caspase-3 early...

  10. Programmed Cell Death and Caspase Functions During Neural Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yoshifumi; Miura, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a fundamental component of nervous system development. PCD serves as the mechanism for quantitative matching of the number of projecting neurons and their target cells through direct competition for neurotrophic factors in the vertebrate peripheral nervous system. In addition, PCD plays roles in regulating neural cell numbers, canceling developmental errors or noise, and tissue remodeling processes. These findings are mainly derived from genetic studies that prevent cells from dying by apoptosis, which is a major form of PCD and is executed by activation of evolutionarily conserved cysteine protease caspases. Recent studies suggest that caspase activation can be coordinated in time and space at multiple levels, which might underlie nonapoptotic roles of caspases in neural development in addition to apoptotic roles. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Only in dying, life: programmed cell death during plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hautegem, Tom; Waters, Andrew J; Goodrich, Justin; Nowack, Moritz K

    2015-02-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a fundamental process of life. During the evolution of multicellular organisms, the actively controlled demise of cells has been recruited to fulfil a multitude of functions in development, differentiation, tissue homeostasis, and immune systems. In this review we discuss some of the multiple cases of PCD that occur as integral parts of plant development in a remarkable variety of cell types, tissues, and organs. Although research in the last decade has discovered a number of PCD regulators, mediators, and executers, we are still only beginning to understand the mechanistic complexity that tightly controls preparation, initiation, and execution of PCD as a process that is indispensable for successful vegetative and reproductive development of plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Programmed cell death in trypanosomatids and other unicellular organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrabant, Alain; Lee, Nancy; Bertholet, Sylvie; Duncan, Robert; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2003-03-01

    In multicellular organisms, cellular growth and development can be controlled by programmed cell death (PCD), which is defined by a sequence of regulated events. However, PCD is thought to have evolved not only to regulate growth and development in multicellular organisms but also to have a functional role in the biology of unicellular organisms. In protozoan parasites and in other unicellular organisms, features of PCD similar to those in multicellular organisms have been reported, suggesting some commonality in the PCD pathway between unicellular and multicellular organisms. However, more extensive studies are needed to fully characterise the PCD pathway and to define the factors that control PCD in the unicellular organisms. The understanding of the PCD pathway in unicellular organisms could delineate the evolutionary origin of this pathway. Further characterisation of the PCD pathway in the unicellular parasites could provide information regarding their pathogenesis, which could be exploited to target new drugs to limit their growth and treat the disease they cause.

  13. A role for programmed cell death in the microbial loop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica V Orellana

    Full Text Available The microbial loop is the conventional model by which nutrients and minerals are recycled in aquatic eco-systems. Biochemical pathways in different organisms become metabolically inter-connected such that nutrients are utilized, processed, released and re-utilized by others. The result is that unrelated individuals end up impacting each others' fitness directly through their metabolic activities. This study focused on the impact of programmed cell death (PCD on a population's growth as well as its role in the exchange of carbon between two naturally co-occurring halophilic organisms. Flow cytometric, biochemical, ¹⁴C radioisotope tracing assays, and global transcriptomic analyses show that organic algal photosynthate released by Dunalliela salina cells undergoing PCD complements the nutritional needs of other non-PCD D. salina cells. This occurs in vitro in a carbon limited environment and enhances the growth of the population. In addition, a co-occurring heterotroph Halobacterium salinarum re-mineralizes the carbon providing elemental nutrients for the mixoheterotrophic chlorophyte. The significance of this is uncertain and the archaeon can also subsist entirely on the lysate of apoptotic algae. PCD is now well established in unicellular organisms; however its ecological relevance has been difficult to decipher. In this study we found that PCD in D. salina causes the release of organic nutrients such as glycerol, which can be used by others in the population as well as a co-occurring halophilic archaeon. H. salinarum also re-mineralizes the dissolved material promoting algal growth. PCD in D. salina was the mechanism for the flow of dissolved photosynthate between unrelated organisms. Ironically, programmed death plays a central role in an organism's own population growth and in the exchange of nutrients in the microbial loop.

  14. NASA program planning on nuclear electric propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, G.L.; Miller, T.J.

    1992-03-01

    As part of the focused technology planning for future NASA space science and exploration missions, NASA has initiated a focused technology program to develop the technologies for nuclear electric propulsion and nuclear thermal propulsion. Beginning in 1990, NASA began a series of interagency planning workshops and meetings to identify key technologies and program priorities for nuclear propulsion. The high-priority, near-term technologies that must be developed to make NEP operational for space exploration include scaling thrusters to higher power, developing high-temperature power processing units, and developing high power, low-mass, long-lived nuclear reactors. 28 refs

  15. Iran's Nuclear Program: Recent Developments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Squassoni, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspections since 2003 have revealed almost two decades' worth of undeclared nuclear activities in Iran, including uranium enrichment and plutonium separation efforts...

  16. Iran's Nuclear Program: Recent Developments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Squassoni, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspections since 2003 have revealed two decades' worth of undeclared nuclear activities in Iran, including uranium enrichment and plutonium separation efforts...

  17. Iran's Nuclear Program: Recent Developments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Squassoni, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspections since 2003 have revealed almost two decades worth of undeclared nuclear activities in Iran, including uranium enrichment and plutonium separation efforts...

  18. Iran's Nuclear Program: Recent Developments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Squassoni, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspections since 2003 have revealed two decades worth of undeclared nuclear activities in Iran, including uranium enrichment and plutonium separation efforts...

  19. HSE Nuclear Safety Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagley, M.J. [Health and Safety Executive, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    HSE funds two programmes of nuclear safety research: a programme of {approx} 2.2M of extramural research to support the Nuclear Safety Division`s regulatory activities and a programme of {approx} 11M of generic safety research managed by the Nuclear Safety Research Management Unit (NSRMU) in Sheffield, UK. This paper is concerned only with the latter programme; it describes how it is planned and procured and outlines some of the work on structural integrity problems. It also describes the changes that are taking place in the way nuclear safety research is procured in the UK. (author).

  20. HSE Nuclear Safety Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagley, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    HSE funds two programmes of nuclear safety research: a programme of ∼ 2.2M of extramural research to support the Nuclear Safety Division's regulatory activities and a programme of ∼ 11M of generic safety research managed by the Nuclear Safety Research Management Unit (NSRMU) in Sheffield, UK. This paper is concerned only with the latter programme; it describes how it is planned and procured and outlines some of the work on structural integrity problems. It also describes the changes that are taking place in the way nuclear safety research is procured in the UK. (author)

  1. Quality assurance program for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamon, T.H.

    1976-02-01

    The Topical Report presented establishes and provides the basis for the Brown and Root Quality Assurance Program for Nuclear Power Plants from which the Brown and Root Quality Assurance Manual is prepared and implemented. The Quality Assurance Program is implemented by the Brown and Root Power Division during the design, procurement, and construction phases of nuclear power plants. The Brown and Root Quality Assurance Program conforms to the requirements of Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulation 10 CFR 50, Appendix B; to approved industry standards such as ANSI N45.2 and ''Daughter Standards''; or to equivalent alternatives as indicated in the appropriate sections of the report

  2. Quality assurance program for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamon, T.H.

    1976-06-01

    This topical report establishes and provides the basis for the Brown and Root Quality Assurance Program for Nuclear Power Plants from which the Brown and Root Quality Assurance Manual is prepared and implemented. The Quality Assurance Program is implemented by the Brown and Root Power Division during the design, procurement, and construction phases of nuclear power plants. The Brown and Root Quality Assurance Program conforms to the requirements of Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulation 10 CFR 50, Appendix B; to approved industry standards such as ANSI N45.2 and ''Daughter Standards''; or to equivalent alternatives as indicated in the appropriate sections of this report

  3. Nuclear safety training program (NSTP) for dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cretskens, Pieter; Lenie, Koen; Mulier, Guido

    2014-01-01

    European Control Services (GDF Suez) has developed and is still developing specific training programs for the dismantling and decontamination of nuclear installations. The main topic in these programs is nuclear safety culture. We therefore do not focus on technical training but on developing the right human behavior to work in a 'safety culture' environment. The vision and techniques behind these programs have already been tested in different environments: for example the dismantling of the BN MOX Plant in Dessel (Belgium), Nuclear Safety Culture Training for Electrabel NPP Doel..., but also in the non-nuclear industry. The expertise to do so was found in combining the know-how of the Training and the Nuclear Department of ECS. In training, ECS is one of the main providers of education in risky tasks, like elevation and manipulation of charges, working in confined spaces... but it does also develop training on demand to improve safety in a certain topic. Radiation Protection is the core business in the Nuclear Department with a presence on most of the nuclear sites in Belgium. Combining these two domains in a nuclear safety training program, NSTP, is an important stage in a dismantling project due to specific contamination, technical and other risks. It increases the level of safety and leads to a harmonization of different working cultures. The modular training program makes it possible to evaluate constantly as well as in group or individually. (authors)

  4. Inhibition of thromboxane synthase induces lung cancer cell death via increasing the nuclear p27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, Kin Chung; Hsin, Michael K.Y.; Chan, Joey S.Y.; Yip, Johnson H.Y.; Li, Mingyue; Leung, Billy C.S.; Mok, Tony S.K.; Warner, Timothy D.; Underwood, Malcolm J.; Chen, George G.

    2009-01-01

    The role of thromboxane in lung carcinogenesis is not clearly known, though thromboxane B2 (TXB 2 ) level is increased and antagonists of thromboxane receptors or TXA2 can induce apoptosis of lung cancer cells. p27, an atypical tumor suppressor, is normally sequestered in the nucleus. The increased nuclear p27 may result in apoptosis of tumor cells. We hypothesize that the inhibition of thromboxane synthase (TXS) induces the death of lung cancer cells and that such inhibition is associated with the nuclear p27 level. Our experiment showed that the inhibition of TXS significantly induced the death or apoptosis in lung cancer cells. The activity of TXS was increased in lung cancer. The nuclear p27 was remarkably reduced in lung cancer tissues. The inhibition of TXS caused the cell death and apoptosis of lung cancer cells, likely via the elevation of the nuclear p27 since the TXS inhibition promoted the nuclear p27 level and the inhibition of p27 by its siRNA recovered the cell death induced by TXS inhibition. Collectively, lung cancer cells produce high levels of TXB 2 but their nuclear p27 is markedly reduced. The inhibition of TXS results in the p27-related induction of cell death in lung cancer cells.

  5. Inhibition of thromboxane synthase induces lung cancer cell death via increasing the nuclear p27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Kin Chung; Hsin, Michael K.Y.; Chan, Joey S.Y.; Yip, Johnson H.Y.; Li, Mingyue; Leung, Billy C.S. [Department of Surgery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (Hong Kong); Mok, Tony S.K. [Department of Clinical Oncology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (Hong Kong); Warner, Timothy D. [The William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London (United Kingdom); Underwood, Malcolm J. [Department of Surgery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (Hong Kong); Chen, George G., E-mail: gchen@cuhk.edu.hk [Department of Surgery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (Hong Kong)

    2009-10-15

    The role of thromboxane in lung carcinogenesis is not clearly known, though thromboxane B2 (TXB{sub 2}) level is increased and antagonists of thromboxane receptors or TXA2 can induce apoptosis of lung cancer cells. p27, an atypical tumor suppressor, is normally sequestered in the nucleus. The increased nuclear p27 may result in apoptosis of tumor cells. We hypothesize that the inhibition of thromboxane synthase (TXS) induces the death of lung cancer cells and that such inhibition is associated with the nuclear p27 level. Our experiment showed that the inhibition of TXS significantly induced the death or apoptosis in lung cancer cells. The activity of TXS was increased in lung cancer. The nuclear p27 was remarkably reduced in lung cancer tissues. The inhibition of TXS caused the cell death and apoptosis of lung cancer cells, likely via the elevation of the nuclear p27 since the TXS inhibition promoted the nuclear p27 level and the inhibition of p27 by its siRNA recovered the cell death induced by TXS inhibition. Collectively, lung cancer cells produce high levels of TXB{sub 2} but their nuclear p27 is markedly reduced. The inhibition of TXS results in the p27-related induction of cell death in lung cancer cells.

  6. Program summary. Nuclear waste management and fuel cycle programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    This Program Summary Document describes the US Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Waste Management and Fuel Cycle Programs. Particular emphasis is given to near-term, specifically Fiscal Year (FY) 1982, activities. The overall objective of these programs will be achieved by the demonstration of: (1) safe radioactive waste management practices for storage and disposal of high-level waste and (2) advanced technologies necessary to close the nuclear fuel cycle on a schedule which would assure a healthy future for the development of nuclear power in this country

  7. Establishing Requirements for Nuclear Engineering Educational Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraskin, N.I.; Kosilov, A.N.; Sbaffoni, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: » There is no single approach in curricula development. » New programmes must fit into national requirements. » Because of the strong international interdependency of all nations using nuclear energy, it is critically important that a competent staff is engaged at all nuclear power plants in every country. » International approach for benchmarking university programs is to be in place with a direct benefit to the countries with new nuclear power projects

  8. Towards 'green' Vinca - Vinca institute nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subotic, K.; Pesic, M.P.; Ljubenov, V.Lj.; Sotic, O.; Plecas, I.; Milosevic, M.J.; Peric, A.; Pavlovic, R.

    2002-01-01

    In order to solve the main nuclear and radiation safety problems in the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences related to the inadequate storage conditions for the RA research reactor spent fuel, further decommissioning of the RA reactor and construction of central national radioactive waste long term storage, the 'Vinca Nuclear Decommissioning Program' is initiated during first months of 2002. A systematic and interrelated approach to the solving of the problems is proposed. Program will consist of set of Projects and Activities, planned to be done in the next 10 years. Realization of Program should improve nuclear and radiation safety and should solve problems arose in the previous period. The paper describes existing conditions related to the RA reactor and spent fuel pools, the main actions done in previous period, program goals and proposed organization structure. (author)

  9. EPRI nuclear power plant decommissioning technology program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Karen S.; Bushart, Sean P.; Naughton, Michael; McGrath, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is a non-profit research organization that supports the energy industry. The Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning Technology Program conducts research and develops technology for the safe and efficient decommissioning of nuclear power plants. (author)

  10. Nuclear medicine quality assurance program in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levi de Cabrejas, Mariana; Arashiro, Jorge G.; Giannone, Carlos A.

    1999-01-01

    A two steps program has been implemented: the first one is the quality control of the equipment and the second one the development of standard procedures for clinical studies of patients. A training program for doctors and technicians of the nuclear medicine laboratories was carried out. Workshops on instrumentation and quality assurance in nuclear medicine have been organized in several parts of the country. A joint program of the CNEA and the University of Buenos Aires has trained medical physicists. A method has been established to evaluate the capability of the laboratories to produce high quality images and to follow up the implementation of the quality control program

  11. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rummery, T.E.; Rosinger, E.L.J.

    1983-05-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is now well established. This report outlines the generic research and technological development underway in this program to assess the concept of immobilization and subsequent disposal of nuclear fuel waste deep in a stable plutonic rock in the Canadian Shield. The program participants, funding, schedule and associated external review processes are briefly outlined. The major scientific and engineering components of the program, namely, immobilization studies, geoscience research and environmental and safety assessment, are described in more detail

  12. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.S.

    1984-12-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program involves research into the storage and transportation of used nuclear fuel, immobilization of fuel waste, and deep geological disposal of the immobilized waste. The program is now in the fourth year of a ten-year generic research and development phase. The objective of this phase of the program is to assess the safety and environmental aspects of the deep underground disposal of immobilized fuel waste in plutonic rock. The objectives of the research for each component of the program and the progress made to the end of 1983 are described in this report

  13. Review of EPRI Nuclear Human Factors Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanes, L.F.; O'Brien, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Human Factors Program, which is part of the EPRI Nuclear Power Group, was established in 1975. Over the years, the Program has changed emphasis based on the shifting priorities and needs of the commercial nuclear power industry. The Program has produced many important products that provide significant safety and economic benefits for EPRI member utilities. This presentation will provide a brief history of the Program and products. Current projects and products that have been released recently will be mentioned

  14. Lessons learned from Spain's nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Rodriguez, A.

    1993-01-01

    The commercial nuclear program in Spain dates back to the beginning of the 1960s. There are currently nine units in operation, one more has been decommissioned and a further five are in different phases of construction but under nuclear moratorium since 1983. This article gives a general overview of the program, the criteria applied, what it has meant to and required of the industry and, finally, what lessons have been learned. (author) 2 figs

  15. Schedule of the nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heigl, F.

    1977-01-01

    The lecure tries to explain the main phases which must be passed to establish nuclear power plants, the feasibility phase, preconstruction and construction phase. Each phase consists of a lot of activities which are commented. Further the lecture tries to give some ideas of durances and dependence between the phases or activities to get a complete time schedule of the realization of a nuclear power project. (HP) [de

  16. Nuclear Engineering Academic Programs Survey, 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Science and Engineering Education, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2004-01-01

    The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2002 and August 31, 2003. Thirty-three academic programs reported having nuclear engineering programs during the survey time period and all responded (100% response rate). Three of the programs included in last year's report were discontinued or out-of-scope in 2003. One new program has been added to the list. This year the survey data include U.S. citizenship, gender, and race/ethnicity by degree level

  17. Revised inspection program for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates nuclear power plants to assure adequate protection of the public and the environment from the dangers associated with nuclear materials. NRC fulfills this responsibility through comprehensive safety reviews of nuclear facilities, licensing of organizations that use nuclear materials, and continuing inspection. The NRC inspection program is currently conducted from the five regional offices in or near Philadelphia, Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas and San Francisco. Inspectors travel from the regional offices to nuclear power plants in various phases of construction, test and operation in order to conduct inspections. However, in June 1977 the Commission approved a revision to the inspection program that will include stationing inspectors at selected plants under construction and at all plants in operation. In addition, the revised program provides for appraising the performance of licensees on a national basis and involves more direct measurement and observation by NRC inspectors of work and tests in progress. The program also includes enhanced career management consisting of improved training and career development for inspectors and other professionals. The report was requested in the Conference Report on the NRC Authorization for Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1978. The report provides a discussion of the basis for both the current and revised inspection programs, describes these programs, and shows how the NRC inspection force will be trained and utilized. In addition, the report includes a discussion of the actions that will be taken to assure the objectivity of inspectors

  18. Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's intern program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmour, P.E.

    2002-01-01

    The Intern Program was introduced at the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Canada's Nuclear Regulator in response to the current competitive market for engineers and scientists and the CNSC's aging workforce. It is an entry level staff development program designed to recruit and train new engineering and science graduates to eventually regulate Canada's nuclear industry. The program provides meaningful work experience and exposes the interns to the general work activities of the Commission. It also provides them with a broad awareness of the regulatory issues in which the CNSC is involved. The intern program is a two-year program focusing on the operational areas and, more specifically, on the generalist functions of project officers. (author)

  19. Green Vinca - Vinca Institute nuclear decommissioning program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.; Subotic, K.; Ljubenov, V.; Sotic, O.

    2003-01-01

    Current conditions related to the nuclear and radiation safety in the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro are the result of the previous nuclear programs in the former Yugoslavia and strong economic crisis during the previous decade. These conditions have to be improved as soon as possible. The process of establishment and initialisation of the Vinca Institute Nuclear Decommissioning (VIND) Program, known also as the 'Green Vinca' Program supported by the Government of the Republic Serbia, is described in this paper. It is supposed to solve all problems related to the accumulated spent nuclear fuel, radioactive waste and decommissioning of RA research reactor. Particularly, materials associated to the RA reactor facility and radioactive wastes from the research, industrial, medical and other applications, generated in the previous period, which are stored in the Vinca Institute, are supposed to be proper repackaged and removed from the Vinca site to some other disposal site, to be decided yet. Beside that, a research and development program in the modern nuclear technologies is proposed with the aim to preserve experts, manpower and to establish a solid ground for new researchers in field of nuclear research and development. (author)

  20. Death of Prorocentrum donghaiense may be a programmed autolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guanpin; Liu, Yongjian; Li, Bingjun

    2008-08-01

    Prorocentrum donghaiense, one of the dinoflagellate, has continuously caused large scale red tides along the Chinese coast in recent years. These red tides have brought tremendous loss to the local economy and serious impacts to the local environment. Unfortunately, little was known about the mechanism of the fast appearance and extinction of the red tide caused by this alga. In this study, the full-length cDNA of a caspase encoding gene of P. donghaiense was cloned and characterized, and the transcription of this gene during the senescence of the alga was semi-quantitatively determined. The cDNA was 520 bp in length. It contained a 258 bp open reading frame (ORF) which encoded a peptide of 85 amino acids. The amount of transcripts of the caspase encoding gene increased with the senescence of P. donghaiense and started to decrease gradually when the autolysis of P. donghaiense cells took place. We proposed that the death of P. donghaiense may be a caspase mediated programmed autolysis.

  1. Nuclear Criticality Safety Department Qualification Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Department (NCSD) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of highly qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This document defines the Qualification Program to address the NCSD technical and managerial qualification as required by the Y-1 2 Training Implementation Matrix (TIM). This Qualification Program is in compliance with DOE Order 5480.20A and applicable Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) and Y-1 2 Plant procedures. It is implemented through a combination of WES plant-wide training courses and professional nuclear criticality safety training provided within the department. This document supersedes Y/DD-694, Revision 2, 2/27/96, Qualification Program, Nuclear Criticality Safety Department There are no backfit requirements associated with revisions to this document

  2. Creating a safe and stable nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muntzing, L.M.

    1993-01-01

    The institutional framework surrounding the development of the peaceful atom in many countries is composed of laws and implementing regulations. In the United States, this commenced with President Eisenhower's pledge in his 1953 address to the United National General Assembly that the United States would open-quotes devote its entire heart and mind to find the way by which the miraculous inventiveness of man shall not be dedicated to his death but consecrated to his life.close quotes Following this statement by President Eisenhower, the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 was enacted. The 1954 Act declared it to be the policy of the United States that open-quotes the development, use, and control of atomic energy shall be directed so as to make the maximum contribution to the general welfare.close quotes It directed the Atomic Energy Commission to conduct programs of research and development leading to the utilization of atomic energy for medical, biological, agricultural, health, industrial, or commercial purposes, including the generation of usable energy. From this beginning has come a never ending stream of innovations which has already contributed in a monumental way to human betterment. In the process, public and employee health and safety have been protected. Any objective evaluation must conclude that great benefits to the public have been achieved and the risk extraordinarily well managed. This legal and regulatory framework has worked well to benefit the public interest. The concept of laws and regulations defining the uses of peaceful nuclear energy applications has protected the public and operated for the benefit of mankind in many countries. Common principles exist, but diversity is also important

  3. Development of nuclear safety issues program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, J. C.; Yoo, S. O.; Yoon, Y. K.; Kim, H. J.; Jeong, M. J.; Noh, K. W.; Kang, D. K

    2006-12-15

    The nuclear safety issues are defined as the cases which affect the design and operation safety of nuclear power plants and also require the resolution action. The nuclear safety issues program (NSIP) which deals with the overall procedural requirements for the nuclear safety issues management process is developed, in accordance with the request of the scientific resolution researches and the establishment/application of the nuclear safety issues management system for the nuclear power plants under design, construction or operation. The NSIP consists of the following 4 steps; - Step 1 : Collection of candidates for nuclear safety issues - Step 2 : Identification of nuclear safety issues - Step 3 : Categorization and resolution of nuclear safety issues - Step 4 : Implementation, verification and closure The NSIP will be applied to the management directives of KINS related to the nuclear safety issues. Through the identification of the nuclear safety issues which may be related to the potential for accident/incidents at operating nuclear power plants either directly or indirectly, followed by performance of regulatory researches to resolve the safety issues, it will be possible to prevent occurrence of accidents/incidents as well as to cope with unexpected accidents/incidents by analyzing the root causes timely and scientifically and by establishing the proper flow-up or remedied regulatory actions. Moreover, the identification and resolution of the safety issues related to the new nuclear power plants completed at the design stage are also expected to make the new reactor licensing reviews effective and efficient as well as to make the possibility of accidents/incidents occurrence minimize. Therefore, the NSIP developed in this study is expected to contribute for the enhancement of the safety of nuclear power plants.

  4. Development of nuclear safety issues program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, J. C.; Yoo, S. O.; Yoon, Y. K.; Kim, H. J.; Jeong, M. J.; Noh, K. W.; Kang, D. K.

    2006-12-01

    The nuclear safety issues are defined as the cases which affect the design and operation safety of nuclear power plants and also require the resolution action. The nuclear safety issues program (NSIP) which deals with the overall procedural requirements for the nuclear safety issues management process is developed, in accordance with the request of the scientific resolution researches and the establishment/application of the nuclear safety issues management system for the nuclear power plants under design, construction or operation. The NSIP consists of the following 4 steps; - Step 1 : Collection of candidates for nuclear safety issues - Step 2 : Identification of nuclear safety issues - Step 3 : Categorization and resolution of nuclear safety issues - Step 4 : Implementation, verification and closure The NSIP will be applied to the management directives of KINS related to the nuclear safety issues. Through the identification of the nuclear safety issues which may be related to the potential for accident/incidents at operating nuclear power plants either directly or indirectly, followed by performance of regulatory researches to resolve the safety issues, it will be possible to prevent occurrence of accidents/incidents as well as to cope with unexpected accidents/incidents by analyzing the root causes timely and scientifically and by establishing the proper flow-up or remedied regulatory actions. Moreover, the identification and resolution of the safety issues related to the new nuclear power plants completed at the design stage are also expected to make the new reactor licensing reviews effective and efficient as well as to make the possibility of accidents/incidents occurrence minimize. Therefore, the NSIP developed in this study is expected to contribute for the enhancement of the safety of nuclear power plants

  5. Mitochondrial and Nuclear Cross Talk in Cell Death: Parthanatos

    OpenAIRE

    Andrabi, Shaida A.; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2008-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) PARP-1 is an abundant nuclear protein first described to facilitate DNA base excision repair. Recent work has expanded the physiologic functions of PARP-1 and it is clear that the full range of biologic actions of this important protein are not yet fully understood. Regulation of the product of PARP-1, poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), is a dynamic process with poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) playing a major role in the degradation of the polymer. Under pat...

  6. Nuclear programs in India and Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, Zia

    2014-05-01

    India and Pakistan launched their respective nuclear programs in the 1940s and 1950s with considerable foreign technical support, especially from the United States Atoms for Peace Program. The technology and training that was acquired served as the platform for later nuclear weapon development efforts that included nuclear weapon testing in 1974 and in 1998 by India, and also in 1998 by Pakistan - which had illicitly acquired uranium enrichment technology especially from Europe and received assistance from China. As of 2013, both India and Pakistan were continuing to produce fissile material for weapons, in the case of India also for nuclear naval fuel, and were developing a diverse array of ballistic and cruise missiles. International efforts to restrain the South Asian nuclear build-up have been largely set aside over the past decade as Pakistani support became central for the U.S. war in Afghanistan and as U.S. geopolitical and economic interests in supporting the rise of India, in part as a counter to China, led to India being exempted both from U.S non-proliferation laws and international nuclear trade guidelines. In the absence of determined international action and with Pakistan blocking the start of talks on a fissile material cutoff treaty, nuclear weapon programs in South Asia are likely to keep growing for the foreseeable future.

  7. Nuclear programs in India and Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mian, Zia [Program on Science and Global Security, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey (United States)

    2014-05-09

    India and Pakistan launched their respective nuclear programs in the 1940s and 1950s with considerable foreign technical support, especially from the United States Atoms for Peace Program. The technology and training that was acquired served as the platform for later nuclear weapon development efforts that included nuclear weapon testing in 1974 and in 1998 by India, and also in 1998 by Pakistan - which had illicitly acquired uranium enrichment technology especially from Europe and received assistance from China. As of 2013, both India and Pakistan were continuing to produce fissile material for weapons, in the case of India also for nuclear naval fuel, and were developing a diverse array of ballistic and cruise missiles. International efforts to restrain the South Asian nuclear build-up have been largely set aside over the past decade as Pakistani support became central for the U.S. war in Afghanistan and as U.S. geopolitical and economic interests in supporting the rise of India, in part as a counter to China, led to India being exempted both from U.S non-proliferation laws and international nuclear trade guidelines. In the absence of determined international action and with Pakistan blocking the start of talks on a fissile material cutoff treaty, nuclear weapon programs in South Asia are likely to keep growing for the foreseeable future.

  8. Nuclear programs in India and Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mian, Zia

    2014-01-01

    India and Pakistan launched their respective nuclear programs in the 1940s and 1950s with considerable foreign technical support, especially from the United States Atoms for Peace Program. The technology and training that was acquired served as the platform for later nuclear weapon development efforts that included nuclear weapon testing in 1974 and in 1998 by India, and also in 1998 by Pakistan - which had illicitly acquired uranium enrichment technology especially from Europe and received assistance from China. As of 2013, both India and Pakistan were continuing to produce fissile material for weapons, in the case of India also for nuclear naval fuel, and were developing a diverse array of ballistic and cruise missiles. International efforts to restrain the South Asian nuclear build-up have been largely set aside over the past decade as Pakistani support became central for the U.S. war in Afghanistan and as U.S. geopolitical and economic interests in supporting the rise of India, in part as a counter to China, led to India being exempted both from U.S non-proliferation laws and international nuclear trade guidelines. In the absence of determined international action and with Pakistan blocking the start of talks on a fissile material cutoff treaty, nuclear weapon programs in South Asia are likely to keep growing for the foreseeable future

  9. Waste management in Canadian nuclear programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyne, P.J.

    1975-08-01

    The report describes the wide-ranging program of engineering developments and applications to provide the Canadian nuclear industry with the knowledge and expertise it needs to conduct its waste management program. The need for interim dry storage of spent fuel, and the storage and ultimate disposal of waste from fuel reprocessing are examined. The role of geologic storage in AECL's current waste management program is also considered. (R.A.)

  10. Drug of the year: programmed death-1 receptor/programmed death-1 ligand-1 receptor monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Caroline; Soria, Jean-Charles; Eggermont, Alexander M M

    2013-09-01

    Programmed death-1 receptor (PD-1)/its ligand (PD-L1) antibodies have changed the landscape in oncology in 2013. The most mature results have been obtained in advanced melanoma patients. They indicate important response rates and high quality responses or prolonged duration. Also in renal cancer and in lung cancer remarkable activity has been demonstrated. Thus it is clear that these antibodies have a very broad potential and trials in many tumour types are being initiated. Breaking tolerance at the tumour site is a potent phenomenon and the potential for synergy with other checkpoint inhibitors such as ipilimumab have also been demonstrated in 2013. Long term tumour control now seems achievable and thus the concept of a clinical cure is emerging by modulation of the immune system. These antibodies bring immunotherapy to the forefront and indicate that immune-modulation will be a key component of therapeutic strategies from now on. Because of all these reasons PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies are considered 'drug of the year'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nuclear power program and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanya, S.K.; Gupta, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Access to energy is one of the basic requirements for human development. To meet these growing energy needs without creating negative side effects is a challenge. The possibility of global climate change resulting from an increase in GHG concentrations in the atmosphere due to developmental activities is a major global concern. India is passing through the process of economic growth. Although India has not created the problem of climate change, India stands ready to be a part of the solution. The largest chunk of emissions was from electricity generation amounting to 65 percent of the total CO 2 equivalent emissions from the energy sector. Nuclear energy and renewables stand as sources for electricity with minimum GHG emission. Production of electricity from any form of primary energy has some environmental effect. A balanced assessment is needed. Nuclear power is of importance to India because it has potentially unlimited resource base, does not emit GHGs and, depending on location, has potentially favourable economics versus coal. In the long term, if we are to preserve the environment, it will be necessary to tap this source to the maximum extent feasible, In nuclear power stations, all its wastes are contained. India being home to nearly a third of the entire world's thorium, the strategies for large scale deployment of nuclear energy is focused towards utilization of thorium. The electricity potential of 3-stage programme is estimated to be about 2 lakh GWe-yr. Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited is currently operating 20 reactors and has accumulated more than 337 reactor-years of experience in safe operation. A defence-in-depth approach is at the heart of safety philosophy, where there are several lines of defence, one backing another. Radiation is relevant for nuclear, coal, oil, gas and geothermal power plants. The essential task is to prevent excessive amounts now or in the future. One of the guiding principles adopted is to ensure that radiation

  12. Apoptosis (programmed cell death) as an indicator of xenobiotic toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    Xenobiotics alter the frequency and pattern of apoptosis (programmed cell death). Preliminary studies identified the mouse liver, with normally low levels of apoptosis, as a preferable test system to the chicken embryo limb, with normally high levels of apoptosis. The major purposes of these investigations, using the apoptogen and necrogen 1,1-dichloroethylene (DCE), were to determine if increases in apoptosis, (1) could be quantified as a direct result of treatment, (2) were dose- and time-dependent, (3) were independent of necrosis, (4) were associated with mitosis in the control of cell numbers and (5) were limited to specific areas of the liver. To these ends, food-deprived female, CF-1 mice were administered DCE ip under varying experimental conditions. Increased apoptosis occurred in a dose- and time-dependent manner after treatment with 12.5, 40, and 125 mg/kg for 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 8 hr. Peak effects were observed at 4 hr. Apoptosis occurred only in the midzonal/pericentral areas of the liver. At 12.5 mg/kg, there were no effects on biochemical (alanine transaminase) and morphological indices of necrosis, establishing apoptosis as a separate phenomenon from necrosis. Increased 3 H-thymidine incorporation (DNA synthesis), mitosis and the percentage of octaploid hepatocytes occurred from 24-48 hr after treatment with the apoptotic but non-necrotic dose of 40 mg/kg. Apoptosis only occurred in the midzonal/pericentral areas of the liver after multiple doses with DCE, indicating the zonal selectivity of the response. In conclusion, apoptosis, a normally occurring homeostatic process associated with mitosis in the control of cell numbers, is affected by selected xenobiotics in a dose-dependent manner. Xenobiotic-induced apoptosis in the liver occurs at low doses of xenobiotics which cause no other effects on tissue structure or function

  13. Federal Nuclear Energy Program: a synopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This document provides an overview of the new nuclear policy objectives and initiatives and summarizes the Department of Energy programmatic strategy to realize the full nuclear potential. Analyses have been made within the context of prevailing and potential economic conditions, alternative energy options and prior nuclear performance and growth patterns. The Department's organizational structure, which was realigned in June 1982 to conform with the activities mandated by the Administration's policy, is also discussed. The individual program elements for nuclear research and development are described as they contribute to a fully integrated fuel cycle and power generation system. Federal and commercial responsibilities for developmental activity are delinated, and relationship of the programs to broad national energy objectives is specified

  14. Application of the comet assay in studies of programmed cell death (PCD in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Charzyńska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death (PCD in plants is an intensively investigated process. One of the main characteristics of PCD in both animal and plant organisms is the non-random, internucleosomal fragmentation of nuclear DNA, usually analysed using total DNA gel electrophoresis or TUNEL method. In this paper we present application of the "comet assay" (Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis for detection of nDNA degradation in studies of PCD during plant life cycle. We analyzed three types of tissue: anther tapetum, endosperm and mesophyll which were prepared in different ways to obtain a suspension of viable cells (without cell walls. The comet assay gives a possibility of examination of the nDNA degradation in individual cell. This method is significant for studies of the plant tissue differentiation and senescence especially in the cases when it is not possible to isolate large number of cells at the same developmental stage.

  15. Human resources in nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, Sueo

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear power utilization within 2020 horizon is expanding in Asia, particularly in Japan, China, India, Republic of Korea, Vietnam and Indonesia. The nuclear energy policy iof Japan sees the increase of nuclear power contribution for energy security and to control CO 2 emission with the contribution ratio through the 21 st century kept at the current level of 30-40% or even higher. Japan expects its first reprocessing plant to be operational in 2007 and its first commercial fast breeder reactor operational in 2050. Starting with her experience with the operation of its first research reactor in 1957, a power demonstration reactor from USA in 1963; the first commercial 166 MW power plant from UK in 1966 and then its first commercial 375 MW light water reactor from USA in 1970, Japan developed her own nuclear reactor technology. Today, Japan has 55 operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) totaling 49 GW which supply 30% of its electricity needs. There are two NPPs under construction and 11 additional NPPs to be completed by 2017. Japan's experience showed that engineers in the nuclear, mechanical, electrical, material and chemical fields are needed to man their nuclear power plant. For the period 1958 to about 1970, there was a rapid increase in the number of students enrolled for their bachelor of science majoring in nuclear science and technology but this number of enrollees leveled off beyond 1970 up to 2002. For those pursuing their masters of science degree in this field, there was a steady but moderate rise in the number of students from 1958 to 2002. The population of students in the Ph.D program in nuclear science and technology had the lowest number of enrollees and lowest level of increase from 1958 to 2002. The courses offered at the university for nuclear power are nuclear reactor physics and engineering, nuclear reactor safety engineering and radiation safety. Prior to graduation, the students undergo training at a nuclear research institute, nuclear power

  16. Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Standards Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, E.G.

    1980-01-01

    The policy with respect to the development and use of standards in the Department of Energy (DOE) programs concerned with maintaining and developing the nuclear option for the civilian sector (both in the form of the currently used light water reactors and for advanced concepts including the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor), is embodied in a Nuclear Standards Policy, issued in 1978, whose perspectives and philosophy are discussed

  17. Nuclear pharmacy certificate program: distance learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Nuclear Pharmacy Certificate Program (NPCP) was developed to meet the need for licensed pharmacists wishing to change career paths and enter the practice of nuclear pharmacy. Additionally, the NPCP benefits employers that wish to employ a nuclear pharmacist in lieu of waiting for graduates that are available only at one time yearly from a college of pharmacy. The NPCP is not intended to replace traditional nuclear pharmacy education in academic institutions, but to offer an another option to pharmacists and potential employers. The NPCP is divided into two components. One component involves over 130 hours of instruction through videotapes and accompanying workbooks. This component is completed while working in a nuclear pharmacy and with the assistance of a nuclear pharmacist serving as a supervisor. The nuclear pharmacist is available to answer questions and to administer examinations over the videotape material. Examinations are prepared by Purdue faculty and returned for grading. Scores on exams must reflect learning to the same degree as in an academic environment. In the second component of the NPCP, the trainee attends a two-week session in the School of Pharmacy at Purdue University. the trainee must complete a significant portion of the videotape material before the on-campus session. In the on-campus component, videotape material is reinforced and expanded by laboratory exercises and lectures in dedicated, fully-equipped laboratories employed in the School of Pharmacy undergraduate program in nuclear pharmacy. Nuclear pharmacy faculty and consultants provide individualized instruction to each trainee. Assimilation of lecture and laboratory material is determined through several examinations. A comprehensive examination is administered which includes content from the videotape-workbook component of the NPCP. Certification is awarded to trainees who have completed the program and demonstrated their knowledge and competence by examination. Almost 200

  18. Progress of Nuclear Hydrogen Program in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Jae

    2009-01-01

    To cope with dwindling fossil fuels and climate change, it is clear that a clean alternative energy that can replace fossil fuels is required. Hydrogen is considered a promising future energy solution because it is clean, abundant and storable and has a high energy density. As other advanced countries, the Korean government had established a long-term vision for transition to the hydrogen economy in 2005. One of the major challenges in establishing a hydrogen economy is how to produce massive quantities of hydrogen in a clean, safe and economical way. Among various hydrogen production methods, the massive, safe and economic production of hydrogen by water splitting using a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) can provide a success path to the hydrogen economy. Particularly in Korea, where usable land is limited, the nuclear production of hydrogen is deemed a practical solution due to its high energy density. To meet the expected demand for hydrogen, the Korea Atomic Energy Institute (KAERI) launched a nuclear hydrogen program in 2004 together with Korea Institute of Energy Research (KIER) and Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST). Then, the nuclear hydrogen key technologies development program was launched in 2006, which aims at the development and validation of key and challenging technologies required for the realization of the nuclear hydrogen production demonstration system. In 2008, Korean Atomic Energy Commission officially approved a long-term development plan of the nuclear hydrogen system technologies as in the figure below and now the nuclear hydrogen program became the national agenda. This presentation introduces the current status of nuclear hydrogen projects in Korea and the progress of the nuclear hydrogen key technologies development. Perspectives of nuclear process heat applications are also addressed

  19. An epidemiology survey on the worker's accident death in China nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Shouchen; Gao Zenglin; Chang Xuezhang

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the worker's accident death in China nuclear industry, the author adopted epidemiological method, ICD-9 death classification principle in investigating the cause of all deaths in 11 units from their setting up to the end of 1990. There were 786 cases of accident death which was in the second place among all death causation. The crude mortality was 50.98 x 10 -5 , standard mortality 46.56 x 10 -5 , and SMR 1.20 (P>0.01). Average death age was 34.93 years. There wasn't obvious increase or decrease trends over the years (P>0.05). The most accident death was injury suffered on the job (29.90%), the second was suicide (22.52%), third, transport accident (10.81%) and next, drowning (8.40%), accidental fall (6.87%), poisoning (4.20%). Potential life lose was 25743 years. Relative risk (RR) for accident death of male is bigger than that of female. and the higher RR in radiation group compared with non-radiation group, came from uranium geological teams and mines mainly, while without proof of radioactivity itself

  20. The cost of French military nuclear programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrillot, B.

    1999-02-01

    The author tries to find out the real cost of French nuclear weaponry. According to this study the total cost of the French military nuclear programs for 1960-1998 period is about 1499 milliard francs (MdF). This cost can be distributed as follows: i) fabrication of the bomb: 690 MdF; ii) display of the bomb: 727 MdF; iii) control of the bomb: 50 Mdf; iv) protection against nuclear attacks: 9 MdF; and v) dismantling of the bomb: 23 MdF. It goes without saying that these figures exceed by far those given by French authorities. (A.C.)

  1. Nuclear Power Reactor simulator - based training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahab, S.A.S.

    2009-01-01

    nuclear power stations will continue playing a major role as an energy source for electric generation and heat production in the world. in this paper, a nuclear power reactor simulator- based training program will be presented . this program is designed to aid in training of the reactor operators about the principles of operation of the plant. also it could help the researchers and the designers to analyze and to estimate the performance of the nuclear reactors and facilitate further studies for selection of the proper controller and its optimization process as it is difficult and time consuming to do all experiments in the real nuclear environment.this program is written in MATLAB code as MATLAB software provides sophisticated tools comparable to those in other software such as visual basic for the creation of graphical user interface (GUI). moreover MATLAB is available for all major operating systems. the used SIMULINK reactor model for the nuclear reactor can be used to model different types by adopting appropriate parameters. the model of each component of the reactor is based on physical laws rather than the use of look up tables or curve fitting.this simulation based training program will improve acquisition and retention knowledge also trainee will learn faster and will have better attitude

  2. Training within the French nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jusselin, F.

    1987-01-01

    Training dispensed by the EDF Nuclear and Fossil Generation Division has contributed significantly toward successful startup and operation of French nuclear power plants. In 1986, the time-based availability of 900 MW PWRs totaled 85 %. This is just one example of how EDF training programs have benefited from 150 reactor-years of operating experience and the ensuing opportunities for perfecting and testing of training tool effectiveness. These programs have been adopted by utilities in other countries where suitable local facilities are making advantageous use of EDF training experience and methods. EDF expertise is also transferred to these countries indirectly through the simulator manufacturer

  3. The nuclear analysis program at MURR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glascock, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    The University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) has continually upgraded research facilities and programs at the MU research reactor (MURR) throughout its 26-yr history. The Nuclear Analysis Program (NAP) area has participated in these upgrades over the years. As one of the largest activation analysis laboratories on a university campus, the activities of the NAP are broadly representative of the diversity of applications for activation analysis and related nuclear science. This paper describes the MURR's NAP and several of the research, education, and service projects in which the laboratory is currently engaged

  4. Measurement control program for nuclear material accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouns, R.J.; Roberts, F.P.; Merrill, J.A.; Brown, W.B.

    1980-06-01

    A measurement control program for nuclear material accounting monitors and controls the quality of the measurments of special nuclear material that are involved in material balances. The quality is monitored by collecting data from which the current precision and accuracy of measurements can be evaluated. The quality is controlled by evaluations, reviews, and other administrative measures for control of selection or design of facilities, equipment and measurement methods and the training and qualification of personnel who perform SNM measurements. This report describes the most important elements of a program by which management can monitor and control measurement quality

  5. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rummery, T.E.; Rosinger, E.L.J.

    1984-12-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is in the fourth year of a ten-year generic research and development phase. The objective of this phase of the program is to assess the basic safety and environmental aspects of the concept of isolating immobilized fuel waste by deep underground disposal in plutonic rock. The major scientific and engineering components of the program, namely immobilization studies, geoscience research, and environmental and safety assessment, are described. Program funding, scheduling and associated external review processes are briefly outlined

  6. Nuclear DAMP complex-mediated RAGE-dependent macrophage cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ruochan [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Infectious Diseases and State Key Lab of Viral Hepatitis, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Fu, Sha; Fan, Xue-Gong [Department of Infectious Diseases and State Key Lab of Viral Hepatitis, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh, Herbert J. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Tang, Daolin, E-mail: tangd2@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Kang, Rui, E-mail: kangr@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2015-03-13

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), histone, and DNA are essential nuclear components involved in the regulation of chromosome structure and function. In addition to their nuclear function, these molecules act as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) alone or together when released extracellularly. The synergistic effect of these nuclear DNA-HMGB1-histone complexes as DAMP complexes (nDCs) on immune cells remains largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that nDCs limit survival of macrophages (e.g., RAW264.7 and peritoneal macrophages) but not cancer cells (e.g., HCT116, HepG2 and Hepa1-6). nDCs promote production of inflammatory tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) release, triggering reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but not toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and TLR-2, was required for Akt-dependent TNFα release and subsequent cell death following treatment with nDCs. Genetic depletion of RAGE by RNAi, antioxidant N-Acetyl-L-cysteine, and TNFα neutralizing antibody significantly attenuated nDC-induced cell death. These findings provide evidence supporting novel signaling mechanisms linking nDCs and inflammation in macrophage cell death. - Highlights: • Nuclear DAMP complexes (nDCs) selectively induce cell death in macrophages, but not cancer cells. • TNFα-mediated oxidative stress is required for nDC-induced death. • RAGE-mediated Akt activation is required for nDC-induced TNFα release. • Blocking RAGE and TNFα inhibits nDC-induced macrophage cell death.

  7. Programming for a nuclear reactor instrument simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, C.

    1988-01-01

    This note discusses 8086/8087 machine-language programming for simulation of nuclear reactor instrument current inputs by means of a digital-analog converter (DAC) feeding a bank of series input resistors. It also shows FORTRAN programming for generating the parameter tales used in the simulation. These techniques would be generally useful for high-speed simulation of quantities varying over many orders of magnitude

  8. Caspase-independent cell death mediated by apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Hengwen; Yang, Shana; Li, Jianhua; Zhang, Yajie; Gao, Dongsheng; Zhao, Shenting

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer in the world. The aim of radiotherapy is to eradicate cancer cells with ionizing radiation. Except for the caspase-dependent mechanism, several lines of evidence demonstrated that caspase-independent mechanism is directly involved in the cell death responding to irradiation. For this reason, defining the contribution of caspase-independent molecular mechanisms represents the main goal in radiotherapy. In this study, we focused on the role of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), the caspase-independent molecular, in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cell death. We found that ionizing radiation has no function on AIF expression in HepG2 cells, but could induce AIF release from the mitochondria and translocate into nuclei. Inhibition of AIF could reduce ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death. These studies strongly support a direct relationship between AIF nuclear translocation and radiation induced cell death. What's more, AIF nuclear translocation is caspase-independent manner, but not caspase-dependent manner, in this process. These new findings add a further attractive point of investigation to better define the complex interplay between caspase-independent cell death and radiation therapy. - Highlights: • AIF nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 cell death. • AIF mediated cell death induced by ionizing radiation is caspase-independent. • Caspase-independent pathway is involved in ionzing radiation induced HepG2 cell death.

  9. Romanian nuclear power program - status and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirica, T.; Condu, M.; Bilegan, I.C.; Glodeanu, F.; Popescu, D.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents the status and the forecast for the Romanian Nuclear Power Program, as a component of the national strategy of power sector in Romania. The successful commissioning and operation of Cernavoda NPP - Unit 1 consolidated the opinion to go further for completion of Unit 2 to 5 on Cernavoda site. The focus is now on Unit 2, planned to be commissioned in 2001, and on the related projects for radioactive waste treatment and disposal. The Romanian national infrastructure supporting this program is also presented, including the research and development facilities. Romanian nuclear industry represents today one of the most advanced sector in engineering and technology and has the ability to meet the requirements of international codes and standards, proving also excellent quality assurance skills. Romanian nuclear industry has also the capability to compete on third market, for nuclear projects, together with the traditional suppliers. The conclusion of the paper is that for Romania, the nuclear energy is the best solution for future development of power sector, is safe, economic, and ethical. Nuclear sector created in Romania new jobs and activities contributing to the progress of Romanian society. (authors)

  10. Romanian nuclear power program - status and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirica, T.; Condu, M.; Stiopol, M.; Bilegan, I. C.; Glodeanu, F.; Popescu, D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the status and the forecast for the Romanian Nuclear Power Program, as a component of the national strategy of power sector in Romania. The successful commissioning and operation of Cernavoda NPP - Unit 1 consolidated the opinion to go further for completion of Unit 2 to 5 on Cernavoda site. The focus is now on Unit 2, planed to be commissioned in 2001, and on the related projects for radioactive waste treatment and disposal. The Romanian national infrastructure supporting this program is also presented, including the research and development facilities. Romanian nuclear industry represent today one of the most advanced sector in engineering and technology and has the ability to meet the requirements of international codes and standards, proving also excellent quality assurance skills. Romanian nuclear industry has also the capability to compete on third markets, for nuclear projects, together with the traditional suppliers. The conclusion of the paper is that for Romania the nuclear energy is the best solution for future development of power sector, is safe, economic and ethical. Nuclear sector created in Romania new jobs and activities, contributing to the progress of Romanian society. (author). 5 refs

  11. Economic consideration for Indonesia's nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahimsa, D.; Sudarsono, B.

    1987-01-01

    Indonesia experienced relatively high economic growth during the 1970s and the energy supply system was strained to keep up with demand. Several energy studies were thus carried out around 1980, including a nuclear power planning study and a nuclear plant feasibility study. During the 1980s, economic growth rates were subtantially lower, but surprisingly electricity demand remained fairly high. In 1984 it was therefore decided to update previous nuclear power studies. This effort was completed in 1986. Using energy projections and cost estimates developed during the updating of previous nuclear power studies, the paper discusses the economic justification for a nuclear power program in Indonesia. Results of the update, including computer runs of MAED and WASP models supplied by the IAEA, will be presented along with appropriate sensitivity analysis. These results are then analyzed in the light of 1986 developments in international oil price. Preparations for the forthcoming nuclear power program are described, including the construction of a multi-purpose reactor and associated laboratories in Serpong, near Jakarta. (author)

  12. Death analysis of residents in an area of twenty kilometers around Qinshan nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Mingqiang; Lu Zhunrong; Zheng Wen; Sun Peizhi

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To set up a data bank for residents health condition 20 kilometers within around Qinshan nuclear power station. Methods: Combining with retrospective investigation, the relevant data were acquired from medical certification for resident's death reported by all local disease surveillance. Results: The mortality rate of these residents from 1988 to 1999 was 6.92%. The first course of mortality was diseases of respiratory system, the second of circulatory system, and the third was malignant tumor. The first 5 death causes among all male and female persons were diseases of respiratory system and circulatory system, malignant tumor, injuries and poisoning, diseases of digestive system. The mortality rate for malignant tumor was 121.33/100000 (the standard death rate is : 100.13/100000), and liver cancer was the first death cause, while lung and stomach cancers, the second and the third, respectively. The main death causes in juvenile and youth was leukemia, but liver cancer and lung cancer were the main courses of death in the middle-aged, and in old people, lung and liver cancers. Conclusion: The chronic non-infectious diseases in respiratory system, circulatory system etc, are the major death causes in the residents, the mortality rate for malignant tumor in them is lower than that reported by provincial disease surveillance station

  13. SA and ROS are involved in methyl salicylate-induced programmed cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Li Juan; Chen, Wen Li

    2011-07-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically encoded, active process that results in the death of individual cells, tissues, or whole organs, which plays an important role in the life cycles of plants and animals. Previous studies show that methyl salicylate (MeSA) is a defense signal molecular associated with systemic acquired resistance and hypersensitive reaction; however, whether MeSA can induce PCD in plant is still unknown. The morphological changes of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts exposed to MeSA were observed under fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, and the induction of PCD was clearly distinguished by intense perinuclear chromatin margination, condensation of nuclear chromatin and DNA laddering after 3-h exposure of 100 μM MeSA. Our results also showed that salicylic acid (SA) was involved in MeSA-induced PCD by using a transgenic nahG Arabidopsis thaliana line, and the process was mediated by reactive oxygen species, which functioned with SA by making an amplification loop. Our study showed that MeSA could induce PCD in plant cell for the first time.

  14. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dormuth, K.W.; Nuttall, K.

    1987-01-01

    Canada has established an extensive research program to develop and demonstrate the technology for safely disposing of nuclear fuel waste from Canadian nuclear electric generating stations. The program focuses on the concept of disposal deep in plutonic rock, which is abundant in the province of Ontario, Canada's major producer of nuclear electricity. Research is carried out at field research areas in the Canadian Precambrian Shield, and in government and university laboratories. The schedule calls for a document assessing the disposal concept to be submitted to regulatory and environmental agencies in late 1988. This document will form the basis for a review of the concept by these agencies and by the public. No site selection will be carried out before this review is completed. 10 refs.; 2 figs

  15. Portuguese research program on nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varandas, C.A.F.; Cabral, J.A.C.; Manso, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Portuguese research program on nuclear fusion is presented. The experimental activity associated with the tokamak ISTTOK as well as the work carried out in the frame of international collaboration are summarized. The main technological features of ISTTOK are described along with studies on microwave reflectometry. Future plans are briefly described

  16. Nuclear Waste Disposal Program 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-12-01

    This comprehensive brochure published by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA) discusses the many important steps in the management of radioactive waste that have already been implemented in Switzerland. The handling and packaging of waste, its characterisation and inventorying, as well as its interim storage and transport are examined. The many important steps in Swiss management of radioactive waste already implemented and wide experience gained in carrying out the associated activities are discussed. The legal framework and organisational measures that will allow the selection of repository sites are looked at. The various aspects examined include the origin, type and volume of radioactive wastes, along with concepts and designs for deep geological repositories and the types of waste to be stored therein. Also, an implementation plan for the deep geological repositories, the required capacities and the financing of waste management activities are discussed as is NAGRA’s information concept. Several diagrams and tables illustrate the program

  17. Research program on nuclear technology and nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreier, J.

    2010-04-01

    This paper elaborated for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the synthesis report for 2009 made by the SFOE's program leader on the research program concerning nuclear technology and nuclear safety. Work carried out, knowledge gained and results obtained in the various areas are reported on. These include projects carried out in the Laboratory for Reactor Physics and System Behaviour LRS, the LTH Thermohydraulics Laboratory, the Laboratory for Nuclear Materials LNM, the Laboratory for Final Storage Safety LES and the Laboratory for Energy Systems Analysis LEA of the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI. Work done in 2009 and results obtained are reported on, including research on transients in Swiss reactors, risk and human reliability. Work on the 'Proteus' research reactor is reported on, as is work done on component safety. International co-operation in the area of serious accidents and the disposal of nuclear wastes is reported on. Future concepts for reactors and plant life management are discussed. The energy business in general is also discussed. Finally, national and international co-operation is noted and work to be done in 2010 is reviewed

  18. Comparison between worker-deaths in modern industries and in nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Failla, L.

    1977-01-01

    The author examines the statistical data related to the deaths of workers in modern industries. This analysis regards deaths by accident. It regards some particular countries in the world; these particular countries have been selected because their data are comparable. The analysis in modern industry regards different years (1965 - 1974). For the worker deaths caused by professional diseases, some particular considerations are made in this paper. Due to the fact that international statistics for worker deaths due to professional diseases don't exist, it was necessary to resort to the existing correllation between professional diseases and accidents in industry, to extrapolate, with some approximation, the number of deaths due to professional disease. Using these considerations it is possible to find some interesting data. Then the author examines the statistics in order to compare them with those pertinent to nuclear energy. With regard to this topic, the author considers the mortal-risks from radiation exposures. Then the author compares the philosophy that is used in modern industry and in the nuclear energy field. A special discussion is carried on about ICRP conception, expressed in Publication 22; ''Implications of Commission Recommendations that Doses be kept as Low as Readily Achievable''

  19. Comparison between worker-deaths in modern industries and in nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Failla, L.

    1977-01-01

    The statistical data related to the deaths of workers in modern industries, are examined. This analysis regards deaths by accident. It regards some particular countries in the world; these particular countries have been selected because their data are comparable. The analysis in modern industry regards different years. For the worker deaths caused by professional diseases, some particular considerations are made. Due to the fact that international statistics for worker deaths due to professional diseases don't exist, it was necessary to resort to the existing corollation between professional diseases and accidents in industry, to extrapolate, with some approximation, the number of deaths due to professional disease. Using these considerations it is possible to find some interesting data. The statistics are examined in order to compare them with those pertinent to nuclear energy. With regard to this topic, the mortal-risks from radiation exposures are considered. The philosophies used in modern industry and in the nuclear energy field, are compared. A special discussion is carried on about ICRP conception, expressed in Publication 22: 'Implications of Commission Recommendations that Doses be kept as Low as Readily Achievable'

  20. Crosstalks between myo-inositol metabolism, programmed cell death and basal immunity in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Hong Meng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although it is a crucial cellular process required for both normal development and to face stress conditions, the control of programmed cell death in plants is not fully understood. We previously reported the isolation of ATXR5 and ATXR6, two PCNA-binding proteins that could be involved in the regulation of cell cycle or cell death. A yeast two-hybrid screen using ATXR5 as bait captured AtIPS1, an enzyme which catalyses the committed step of myo-inositol (MI biosynthesis. atips1 mutants form spontaneous lesions on leaves, raising the possibility that MI metabolism may play a role in the control of PCD in plants. In this work, we have characterised atips1 mutants to gain insight regarding the role of MI in PCD regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: - lesion formation in atips1 mutants depends of light intensity, is due to PCD as evidenced by TUNEL labelling of nuclei, and is regulated by phytohormones such as salicylic acid - MI and galactinol are the only metabolites whose accumulation is significantly reduced in the mutant, and supplementation of the mutant with these compounds is sufficient to prevent PCD - the transcriptome profile of the mutant is extremely similar to that of lesion mimic mutants such as cpr5, or wild-type plants infected with pathogens. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our results provide strong evidence for the role of MI or MI derivatives in the regulation of PCD. Interestingly, there are three isoforms of IPS in Arabidopsis, but AtIPS1 is the only one harbouring a nuclear localisation sequence, suggesting that nuclear pools of MI may play a specific role in PCD regulation and opening new research prospects regarding the role of MI in the prevention of tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, the significance of the interaction between AtIPS1 and ATXR5 remains to be established.

  1. 2016 LLNL Nuclear Forensics Summer Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Nuclear Forensics Summer Program is designed to give graduate students an opportunity to come to LLNL for 8–10 weeks for a hands-on research experience. Students conduct research under the supervision of a staff scientist, attend a weekly lecture series, interact with other students, and present their work in poster format at the end of the program. Students also have the opportunity to meet staff scientists one-on-one, participate in LLNL facility tours (e.g., the National Ignition Facility and Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry), and gain a better understanding of the various science programs at LLNL.

  2. 2017 LLNL Nuclear Forensics Summer Internship Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-12-13

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Nuclear Forensics Summer Internship Program (NFSIP) is designed to give graduate students an opportunity to come to LLNL for 8-10 weeks of hands-on research. Students conduct research under the supervision of a staff scientist, attend a weekly lecture series, interact with other students, and present their work in poster format at the end of the program. Students can also meet staff scientists one-on-one, participate in LLNL facility tours (e.g., the National Ignition Facility and Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry), and gain a better understanding of the various science programs at LLNL.

  3. 2016 LLNL Nuclear Forensics Summer Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavarin, Mavrik

    2016-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Nuclear Forensics Summer Program is designed to give graduate students an opportunity to come to LLNL for 8-10 weeks for a hands-on research experience. Students conduct research under the supervision of a staff scientist, attend a weekly lecture series, interact with other students, and present their work in poster format at the end of the program. Students also have the opportunity to meet staff scientists one-on-one, participate in LLNL facility tours (e.g., the National Ignition Facility and Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry), and gain a better understanding of the various science programs at LLNL.

  4. Nuclear legislation system and nuclear program outlook in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charoensri, Apisara; Morev, Mikhail N.; Imazu, Hidenori; Kosako, Toshiso; Iimoto, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    In Thailand, radioactive materials are widely used for the industry, medicine, research and development fields. Reported here are background and recent developments in the national nuclear legislation system, including regulation of radiation safety and current status of nuclear program in Thailand. Under the Atomic Energy for Peace Act, the Thai Atomic Energy Commission (Thai AEC) is authorized to approve regulations respecting, the conversion, enrichment, processing, reprocessing, possession, import, export, use, packaging, transport, management and storage of nuclear materials. The most recent developments are related to the New Ministerial Regulation on Licensing Requirements Procedures and Nuclear Material, By-Product or Atomic Energy Processing B. E 2550 (A. D. 2007) issued under the Atomic Energy for Peace Act, B. E. 2504 (A. D. 1961). Currently, the Thai Cabinet is discussing the draft new Atomic Energy for Peace Act which is to revise the Act. The draft Act is to sets forth criteria for protecting individuals, society and the environment from radiation hazards with the perspective for anticipated nuclear power sector development in Thailand. (author)

  5. The protection system to Brazilian Nuclear Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreuzza, Mario Giussepp Santezzi Bertottelli

    1997-01-01

    The Sistema de Protecao ao Programa Nuclear Brasileiro-SIPRON (Protection System to Brazilian Nuclear Program) was established in 1980. It is intended to accomplish in only one system, all the actions related to security and protection for Nuclear Facilities in Brazil. The author presents in detail the protection system SIPRON, describing the system structure and organization, the functions and obligations of the system involved main organizations, as well as, the system operation and behaviour during an postulated occurrence of a nuclear emergency. It is also described an Exercise that happened in June of 1997 at the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Angra I, after two simulated tests in December of 1996 and April of 1997. The NPP Angra I Emergency Plan Exercise was a good opportunity to test the SIPRON structure and preparedness program. It was verified, included by International Atomic Energy Agency observers, the system involved organizations effectiveness and the procedures efficacy to protect the public and the environmental. Finally, it is shown the SIPRON activities of routine, the system obstacles and the expected future performances. (author)

  6. Advancements in nuclear plant maintenance programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meligi, A.E.; Maras, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The viability of the nuclear option as a technology choice for present and future electricity generation will be decided primarily on the basis of operating cost to achieve plant performance objectives. In a nuclear plant, performance is judged not only on availability and output rate but also on safety risk and radiation exposure. Operating, cost is essentially made up of the fuel cost and operation and maintenance (O and M) cost. Over the past decade, the industry average nuclear plant performance has improved significantly; however, this improvement was accompanied by rising O and M cost. The net result was that the nuclear option lost its long-standing economic advantage over the coal option, based on the industry average comparison, around 1987 - with the gap narrowing slightly in the last 2 years. In recent times, gas-fired plants have also become a basis for comparison. The electric generation cost comparisons of various fuel options has led to even greater scrutiny of nuclear plant performance, with the poorer performing plants facing the risk of shutdown. While effective O and M programs improve plant performance, present industry data show that there is no direct correlation between the cost of a plant O and M program and its associated performance. There is a significant number of existing tools and techniques in the O and M area that have proved to be successful and have resulted in significant benefits and payback. This paper presents an overview of the nuclear industry efforts to improve the conduct of O and M activities, describes the basic elements of an effective O and M program, and addresses some of the state-of-the-art tools and techniques to enhance maintenance work planning, training, and procedures

  7. Love is a battlefield: programmed cell death during fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydlauff, Juliane; Groß-Hardt, Rita

    2014-03-01

    Plant development and growth is sustained by the constant generation of tremendous amounts of cells, which become integrated into various types of tissues and organs. What is all too often overlooked is that this thriving life also requires the targeted degeneration of selected cells, which undergo cell death according to genetically encoded programmes or environmental stimuli. The side-by-side existence of generation and demise is particularly evident in the haploid phase of the flowering plants cycle. Here, the lifespan of terminally differentiated accessory cells contrasts with that of germ cells, which by definition live on to form the next generation. In fact, with research in recent years it is becoming increasingly clear that the gametophytes of flowering plants constitute an attractive and powerful system for investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying selective cell death.

  8. Revalidation program for nuclear standby diesel generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muschick, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the program which Duke Power Company carried out to revalidate the diesel engines used in diesel generators for nuclear standby service at Unit 1 of the Catawba Nuclear Station. The diesels operated satisfactorily during the tests, and only relatively minor conditions were noted during the test and inspections, with one exception. This exception was that cracks were detected in the piston skirts. The piston skirts have been replaced with improved design skirts. The diesels have been fully revalidated for their intended service, and have been declared operable

  9. Reactor use in nuclear engineering programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    Nuclear reactors for dual use in training and research were established at about 50 universities in the period since 1950, with assistance by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission and the National Science Foundation. Most of the reactors are in active use for a variety of educational functions--laboratory teaching of undergraduates and graduate students, graduate research, orientation of visitors, and nuclear power plant reactor operator training, along with service to the technical community. As expected, the higher power reactors enjoy a larger average weekly use. Among special programs are reactor sharing and high-school teachers' workshops

  10. Military nuclear activities. The simulation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpuech, A.

    2000-01-01

    The durability of the French nuclear weapon dissuasion has to integrate two kind of problems: the geopolitical situation with the comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty (CTBT) and the aging of weapons. The replacement of decayed weapons requires a complete safety and reliability validation of the new weapons which is performed using simulation. This paper gives a brief presentation of the simulation program and of the technical means developed by the military division of the French atomic energy commission (CEA-DAM): the Airix X-ray radiography installation and the 'megajoule' laser facility. (J.S.)

  11. International Nuclear Model. Volume 3. Program description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andress, D.

    1985-01-01

    This is Volume 3 of three volumes of documentation of the International Nuclear Model (INM). This volume presents the Program Description of the International Nuclear Model, which was developed for the Nuclear and Alternate Fuels Division (NAFD), Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The International Nuclear Model (INM) is a comprehensive model of the commercial nuclear power industry. It simulates economic decisions for reactor deployment and fuel management decision based on an input set of technical economic and scenario parameters. The technical parameters include reactor operating characteristics, fuel cycle timing and mass loss factors, and enrichment tails assays. Economic parameters include fuel cycle costs, financial data, and tax alternatives. INM has a broad range of scenario options covering, for example, process constraints, interregional activities, reprocessing, and fuel management selection. INM reports reactor deployment schedules, electricity generation, and fuel cycle requirements and costs. It also has specialized reports for extended burnup and permanent disposal. Companion volumes to Volume 3 are: Volume 1 - Model Overview, and Volume 2 - Data Base Relationships

  12. Chloroplasts activity and PAP-signaling regulate programmed cell death in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Bruggeman, Quentin; Mazubert, Christelle; Prunier, Florence; Lugan, Raphael; Chan, Kai Xun; Phua, Su Yin; Pogson, Barry J.; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Delarue, Marianne; Benhamed, Moussa; Bergounioux, Catherine; Raynaud, Cé cile

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a crucial process both for plant development and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. There is accumulating evidence that chloroplasts may play a central role during plant PCD as for mitochondria in animal cells

  13. Farewell to the nuclear energy program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangmeister, H.

    1986-01-01

    In summer 1985 Brazil, presided over by Jose Sarney, definitely decided not to go on with the building preparations for Angra III, a third nuclear power plant, and to suspend the planning and projecting of Iguape I and II (Sao Paulo). In view of decisions such as these there is no doubt about the fact that the Brazilian government soon after entering upon its office attaches but secondary importance to the establishment and extension of a national nuclear power industry. The trend already revealed in its rudiments towards the end of the last Brazilian military government of Joao Figueiredo has meanwhile taken on its definite character and direction: financial cuts and retardation of the ambitious nuclear energy program initiated in the 70s with the aim of corroborating Brazil's position as a dynamic promising industrial nation and hegemonial power of the Latin American subcontinent. (orig.) [de

  14. How France launched its donation after cardiac death program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, C; Mourey, F; Prada-Bordenave, E

    2014-02-01

    On the basis of the literature and results presented at the 6th International Conference, donation after cardio-circulatory death provides a significant, practical, additional high quality source of transplantable organs. The vast majority of DCD are 'controlled' Maastricht category III donors. In 2010, the parliamentary information mission on the revision of the bioethics laws invited the Intensive Care Societies to debate and to make recommendations to implement controlled donation after circulatory death. They came to the conclusion that such retrieval is possible in France and insisted on the medical criteria that frame it: the writing of the medical procedures, the ethical aspects and the delay. The major recommendations of the ethics committees were firstly, The WLST decision is independent of the possibility of organ donation; secondly, the strict respect of "The dead donor and organ transplantation rule" and the updated national guidance for the WLST; thirdly, the drafting of a nationally agreed protocol defining the mandatory conditions to determine death and to perform procurement and transplantation. Organ donation after WLST will be authorised only in pilot centres with a locally agreed WLST policy including external second opinion and written transcript of the WLST decision, experienced intensive care staff, a local organ procurement coordination team familiar with DBD and DCD protocols and only in hospitals authorised for organ procurement. It is important to have an optimal and standardized national guidance to limit the known risk factors of graft failure (donor and recipient choice, warm and cold ischemia time), to increase acceptance by medical community and civil society and to improve results and allow more powerful analysis. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Ursodeoxycholic acid suppresses mitochondria-dependent programmed cell death induced by sodium nitroprusside in SH-SY5Y cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Hong Sung; Low, Walter C.

    2012-01-01

    Although ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and its highly water-soluble formula (Yoo's solution; YS) have been shown to prevent neuronal damage, the effects of UDCA or YS against Parkinson's disease (PD)-related dopaminergic cell death has not been studied. This study investigated the protective effects of UDCA and YS on sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced cytotoxicity in human dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells. Both UDCA (50–200 μM) and YS (100–200 μM) dose-dependently prevented SNP (1 mM)-induced cell death. Results showed that both UDCA and YS effectively attenuated the production of total reactive oxygen species (ROS), peroxynitrite (ONOO − ) and nitric oxide (NO), and markedly inhibited the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) loss and intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion. SNP-induced programmed cell death events, such as nuclear fragmentation, caspase-3/7 and -9 activation, Bcl-2/Bax ratio decrease, and cytochrome c release, were significantly attenuated by both UDCA and YS. Furthermore, selective inhibitor of phosphatidylinositiol-3-kinase (PI3K), LY294002, and Akt/PKB inhibitor, triciribine, reversed the preventive effects of UDCA on the SNP-induced cytotoxicity and Bax translocation. These results suggest that UDCA can protect SH-SY5Y cells under programmed cell death process by regulating PI3K-Akt/PKB pathways.

  16. Orphan nuclear receptor TR3 acts in autophagic cell death via mitochondrial signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-jia; Wang, Yuan; Chen, Hang-zi; Xing, Yong-zhen; Li, Feng-wei; Zhang, Qian; Zhou, Bo; Zhang, Hong-kui; Zhang, Jie; Bian, Xue-li; Li, Li; Liu, Yuan; Zhao, Bi-xing; Chen, Yan; Wu, Rong; Li, An-zhong; Yao, Lu-ming; Chen, Ping; Zhang, Yi; Tian, Xu-yang; Beermann, Friedrich; Wu, Mian; Han, Jiahuai; Huang, Pei-qiang; Lin, Tianwei; Wu, Qiao

    2014-02-01

    Autophagy is linked to cell death, yet the associated mechanisms are largely undercharacterized. We discovered that melanoma, which is generally resistant to drug-induced apoptosis, can undergo autophagic cell death with the participation of orphan nuclear receptor TR3. A sequence of molecular events leading to cellular demise is launched by a specific chemical compound, 1-(3,4,5-trihydroxyphenyl)nonan-1-one, newly acquired from screening a library of TR3-targeting compounds. The autophagic cascade comprises TR3 translocation to mitochondria through interaction with the mitochondrial outer membrane protein Nix, crossing into the mitochondrial inner membrane through Tom40 and Tom70 channel proteins, dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential by the permeability transition pore complex ANT1-VDAC1 and induction of autophagy. This process leads to excessive mitochondria clearance and irreversible cell death. It implicates a new approach to melanoma therapy through activation of a mitochondrial signaling pathway that integrates a nuclear receptor with autophagy for cell death.

  17. Internal Dosimetry for Nuclear Power Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wo, Y.M.

    2011-01-01

    Internal dosimetry which refers to dosage estimation from internal part of an individual body is an important and compulsory component in order to ensure the safety of the personnel involved in operational of a Nuclear Power Program. Radionuclides particle may deposit in the human being through several pathways and release wave and/or particle radiation to irradiate that person and give dose to body until it been excreted or completely decayed from the body. Type of radionuclides of concerning, monitoring program, equipment's and technique used to measure the concentration level of such radionuclides and dose calculation will be discussed in this article along with the role and capability of Malaysian Nuclear Agency. (author)

  18. Nuclear chemistry in the traditional chemistry program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleppinger, E.W.

    1993-01-01

    The traditional undergraduate program for chemistry majors, especially at institutions devoted solely to undergraduate education, has limited space for 'special topics' courses in areas such as nuclear and radiochemistry. A scheme is proposed whereby the basic topics covered in an introductury radiochemistry course are touched upon, and in some cases covered in detail, at some time during the four-year sequence of courses taken by a chemistry major. (author) 6 refs.; 7 tabs

  19. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.S.; Rosinger, E.L.J.

    1984-04-01

    This report, the fifth of a series of annual reports, reviews the progress that has been made in the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The report summarizes activities over the past year in the following areas: public interaction; used fuel storage and transportation; immobilization of used fuel and fuel recycle waste; geoscience research related to deep underground disposal; environmental research; and environmental and safety assessment

  20. Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    A comprehensive Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program was implemented by the US NRC office of Nuclear Regulatory Research in 1985 to identify and resolve technical safety issues related to the aging of systems, structures, and components in operating nuclear power plants. This is Revision 2 to the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program Plant. This planes defines the goals of the program the current status of research, and summarizes utilization of the research results in the regulatory process. The plan also describes major milestones and schedules for coordinating research within the agency and with organizations and institutions outside the agency, both domestic and foreign. Currently the NPAR Program comprises seven major areas: (1) hardware-oriented engineering research involving components and structures; (2) system-oriented aging interaction studies; (3) development of technical bases for license renewal rulemaking; (4) determining risk significance of aging phenomena; (5) development of technical bases for resolving generic safety issues; (6) recommendations for field inspection and maintenance addressing aging concerns; (7) and residual lifetime evaluations of major LWR components and structures. The NPAR technical database comprises approximately 100 NUREG/CR reports by June 1991, plus numerous published papers and proceedings that offer regulators and industry important insights to aging characteristics and aging management of safety-related equipment. Regulatory applications include revisions to and development of regulatory guides and technical specifications; support to resolve generic safety issues; development of codes and standards; evaluation of diagnostic techniques; (e.g., for cables and valves); and technical support for development of the license renewal rule. 80 refs., 25 figs., 10 tabs

  1. Turkish nuclear program: a frustrated ambition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cognet, G.

    2016-01-01

    Turkey has launched an ambitious program for the construction of 3 plants involving a total of 12 reactors. Only the Akkuyu and the Sinop projects have been materialized by 2 international agreements. The Akkuyu project will benefit from Russian technology and financing while the Sinop project will rely on a Franco-Japanese technology: the ATMEA reactor. In the eighties there were previous projects on the same sites but they failed due to the lack of financing. Today's economic policy of the Turkish government relies on the construction of big infrastructures in the sectors of transport, defense and energy and nuclear plants are an integral part of it. Turkey's nuclear programme faces various challenges of different types: the seismic risk is very high, the regulation body is consistent for research reactors but not for power plants, there is a lack of trained people in nuclear sciences and engineering, contracts stipulate that local company should be involved in the construction but the industrial sector lacks enterprises that have been certified for working in the nuclear sector, nuclear controversy is emerging in Turkey and diplomatic difficulties with Russia concerning Syria conflict jeopardizes the project. (A.C.)

  2. Legal framework for a nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A. de los; Corretjer, L.

    1977-01-01

    Introduction of a nuclear program requires the establishment of an adequate legal framework as solutions to the problems posed by the use of nuclear energy are not included in Common Law. As far as Spain is concerned, legislation is capable of dealing with the main problems posed in this field. Spain is a Contracting Party in several International Conventions and participates in International Organizations related to this area and takes their recommendations into account when revising its national legislation. Specific Spanish legislation is constituted by Law 25/1964, of April 29th, on Nuclear Energy, which outlines the legal system regarding nuclear energy, and regulates all aspects which refer to same, from the competent organisms and authorities to the sanctions to be imposed for non-fulfilment of the provisions. In order to offer sufficient flexibility, so that it can be adapted to specific circumstances, the Law's provisions are very ample and development is foreseen by means of regulations. So far, two Regulations have been published: Regulation relating to Coverage of Risk of Nuclear Damage, which refers to Civil Responsibility and its Coverage; and Regulation relating to Nuclear and Radioactive Installations, which refers to the authorization and license system. At the present time, the Regulation relating to Radiation Protection is being elaborated and it will replace the present Radiation Protection Ordinances. In addition to the foregoing, reference is made to others which, although they are not specifically ''nuclear'', they include precepts related to this question, such as the Regulation regarding Nuisance, Unhealthy or Dangerous Industries or some Labor Law provisions [es

  3. An analysis of the death of main malignant tumor of inhabitants in nuclear power station area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Mingqiang; Lu Zunrong; Zheng Wen; Chen Guopei

    1997-01-01

    The authors reported the analysis on the death millimeter situation of inhabitants living around one nuclear power station during pre-operation period of 1988∼1991 and 1992∼1993 operating period. Total surrey population in six years is 2585521 person year, gross malignant tumour death rate is 116.38 x 10 -5 , calibrated death rate is 97.04 x 10 -5 , of which male is 129.20 x 10 -5 , female 65.39 x 10 -5 . An extremely significant difference is noted statistically. Individual annual death rate is 112.00 x 10 -5 , 120.15 x 10 -5 , 125.17 x 10 -5 , 116.45 x 10 -5 , 105.42 x 10 -5 and 119.16 x 10 -5 respectively. The statistical difference was no marked. The highest mortality rate is from the liver cancer, then from the cancer of the lung, of the stomach and of the esophagus. 94 cases died from leukemia with a mortality rate of 3.64 x 10 -5 , and 5 died from thyroid carcinoma, accounting for 0.17% of the total death cases

  4. Programmed Necrosis: A Prominent Mechanism of Cell Death following Neonatal Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Chavez-Valdez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the introduction of therapeutic hypothermia, neonatal hypoxic ischemic (HI brain injury remains a common cause of developmental disability. Development of rational adjuvant therapies to hypothermia requires understanding of the pathways of cell death and survival modulated by HI. The conceptualization of the apoptosis-necrosis “continuum” in neonatal brain injury predicts mechanistic interactions between cell death and hydrid forms of cell death such as programmed or regulated necrosis. Many of the components of the signaling pathway regulating programmed necrosis have been studied previously in models of neonatal HI. In some of these investigations, they participate as part of the apoptotic pathways demonstrating clear overlap of programmed death pathways. Receptor interacting protein (RIP-1 is at the crossroads between types of cellular death and survival and RIP-1 kinase activity triggers formation of the necrosome (in complex with RIP-3 leading to programmed necrosis. Neuroprotection afforded by the blockade of RIP-1 kinase following neonatal HI suggests a role for programmed necrosis in the HI injury to the developing brain. Here, we briefly review the state of the knowledge about the mechanisms behind programmed necrosis in neonatal brain injury recognizing that a significant proportion of these data derive from experiments in cultured cell and some from in vivo adult animal models. There are still more questions than answers, yet the fascinating new perspectives provided by the understanding of programmed necrosis in the developing brain may lay the foundation for new therapies for neonatal HI.

  5. A Nuclear Attack on Traumatic Brain Injury: Sequestration of Cell Death in the Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajiri, Naoki; De La Peña, Ike; Acosta, Sandra A; Kaneko, Yuji; Tamir, Sharon; Landesman, Yosef; Carlson, Robert; Shacham, Sharon; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2016-04-01

    Exportin 1 (XPO1/CRM1) plays prominent roles in the regulation of nuclear protein export. Selective inhibitors of nuclear export (SINE) are small orally bioavailable molecules that serve as drug-like inhibitors of XPO1, with potent anti-cancer properties. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) presents with a secondary cell death characterized by neuroinflammation that is putatively regulated by nuclear receptors. Here, we report that the SINE compounds (KPT-350 or KPT-335) sequestered TBI-induced neuroinflammation-related proteins (NF-(k)B, AKT, FOXP1) within the nucleus of cultured primary rat cortical neurons, which coincided with protection against TNF-α (20 ng/mL)-induced neurotoxicity as shown by at least 50% and 100% increments in preservation of cell viability and cellular enzymatic activity, respectively, compared to non-treated neuronal cells (P's nucleus as an efficacious treatment for TBI. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Caspase-independent cell death mediated by apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hengwen [Department of Radiation, Cancer Center of Guangdong General Hospital (Guangdong Academy of Medical Science), Guangzhou, 510080, Guangdong (China); Yang, Shana; Li, Jianhua [Department of Physiology, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, 510182, Guangdong (China); Zhang, Yajie [Department of Pathology, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, 510182, Guangdong (China); Gao, Dongsheng [Department of Oncology, Guangdong Medical College Affiliated Pengpai Memorial Hospital, Hai Feng, 516400, Gungdong (China); Zhao, Shenting, E-mail: zhaoshenting@126.com [Department of Physiology, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, 510182, Guangdong (China)

    2016-03-25

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer in the world. The aim of radiotherapy is to eradicate cancer cells with ionizing radiation. Except for the caspase-dependent mechanism, several lines of evidence demonstrated that caspase-independent mechanism is directly involved in the cell death responding to irradiation. For this reason, defining the contribution of caspase-independent molecular mechanisms represents the main goal in radiotherapy. In this study, we focused on the role of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), the caspase-independent molecular, in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cell death. We found that ionizing radiation has no function on AIF expression in HepG2 cells, but could induce AIF release from the mitochondria and translocate into nuclei. Inhibition of AIF could reduce ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death. These studies strongly support a direct relationship between AIF nuclear translocation and radiation induced cell death. What's more, AIF nuclear translocation is caspase-independent manner, but not caspase-dependent manner, in this process. These new findings add a further attractive point of investigation to better define the complex interplay between caspase-independent cell death and radiation therapy. - Highlights: • AIF nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 cell death. • AIF mediated cell death induced by ionizing radiation is caspase-independent. • Caspase-independent pathway is involved in ionzing radiation induced HepG2 cell death.

  7. Concrete Technology program for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassazadeh, M.; Wrangensten, L.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear power plants in Sweden and Finland were built during the seventies/eighties and it is planned to extend their service life and increase their production capacity. The challenges are now to assess the condition of the concrete structures; to verify whether or not the structures can withstand the prescribed loads and functions; and verify if the structures can be upgraded in order to fulfil the requirements regarding load bearing and functional capacity. A research program was launched whose priority is condition assessment of the reactor containment. The research includes condition of the pre-stressing reinforcement, reinforcement bars, lining, leakage etc. The conditions are assessed both by destructive and non-destructive test methods. The addressed properties are physical, mechanical, electro-chemical and geometrical. The paper presents the organisation of the program, the co-operating partners, the research program, and the content of the on-going and planned research projects

  8. Evolution of GPU nuclear's training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, R.L.; Coe, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    GPU Nuclear Corporation (GPUN) manages the operators of Three Mile Island Unit 1 and Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Stations and the recovery activities at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 plant. From the time it was formed in January 1980 GPUN emphasized the use of behavioral learning objectives as the basis for all its training programs. This paper describes the evolution to a formalized performance based Training System Development (TSD) Process. The Training and Education Department staff increased from 10 in 1979 to the current 120 dedicated professionals, with a corresponding increase in facilities and acquisition of sophisticated Basic Principles Training Simulators and a Three Mile Island Unit 1 control Room Replica Simulator. The impact of these developments and achievement of full INPO accreditation are discussed and related to plant performance improvements

  9. Nuclear programs see a qualified increase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    This March 1995 Nuclear News article is a review of the proposed DOE budget for nuclear energy activities. This proposed budget increases spending by 32.7% and includes increases in nearly every individual program except civilian reactor development. Isotope production and distribution receive the largest increase, followed by termination costs for certain federal reactor projects. There is a 61.9% proposed increase (to $199M) for waste management activities, but with funding from other Departments, the actual budget would be $612M. The majority of this money would go toward Yucca Mountain activities. Except for the cancellation of the Advanced Neutron Source, the Science and Technology portion of the budget shows an overall small increase

  10. The United States nuclear merchant ship program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, E.V.

    1978-01-01

    The issues of financial protection contemplate appropriate financing to permit construction of the involved vessels. In addition, the licensing process will require a demonstrated ability for financial response in the event of injury to persons or damage to property. Since the thrust in the United States is to use the Price-Anderson framework for Insurance and Indemnity, much attention is devoted to this legislation. The pre-existing regime is related to the distinguishing requirements of the Maritime field with proposals being advanced to more nearly parallel the insurance coverage philosophy of Europe, i.e., to utilize insurance pools for the nuclear risks and utilize the conventional insurance market for non-nuclear risks. Public affairs issues impact heavily on legislation efforts and thusly become significant in developing a program for Financial Protection

  11. Construction Improvement for the Korean Nuclear Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T. E.

    1992-01-01

    Construction of the nine Nuclear plants requires an enormous financial investment. The decision to build a nuclear unit is based on both economic and resource requirements. Korea has few natural resources to use for power generation so the use of diversified fuel sources is a part of the planning process. Nuclear has historically had economic advantages over the fossil fueled plant, however, this advantage has been reduced. This is mainly due to increasing decommissioning and waste disposal costs plus the financial outlays associated with gaining public acceptance of new nuclear units. One of the principal means to recover the economic advantage of a nuclear plant is to shorten the time needed for construction. Every extra day of construction costs large sums of money in interest and escalation expenses alone. The challenge is to shorten the construction period to the minimum feasible time and thereby reduce the financing costs. The methods that have to be employed to achieve this goal require the total commitment from the management of all entities involved in the program. Through the application of advanced management and construction techniques a new era in the construction of nuclear plants in Korea will occur. This will include changes to the methods used for managing, planning, licensing, designing and constructing the new plants. The ability to meet the aggressive plan for the construction of new nuclear power plants in Korea rests in the hands of the managers of all the parties involved. These men set all the rules by which the new plants will be constructed. It is their responsibility to tackle the current problems and develop the solutions to enable the plan to be realized. The changes suggested within this paper are major, but the potential benefits will allow the Korean Nuclear Industry to advance into the twenty first Century as a leader. The number of fully trained specialists needed to make this happen will not appear overnight. They will have to be

  12. U.S.-origin nuclear material removal program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messick, C.E.; Galan, J.J. [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). U.S.-Origin Nuclear Material Removal Program

    2014-12-15

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) U.S.-Origin Nuclear Material Removal program, also known as the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program (FRR SNF AP), was established by the U.S. Department of Energy in May 1996. The program's mission provides a disposition pathway for certain U.S. origin spent nuclear fuel and other weapons-grade nuclear material. The program will continue until May 2016 with an additional three year window for fuel cooldown and transportation. This paper provides an update on recent program accomplishments, current program initiatives and future activities.

  13. U.S.-origin nuclear material removal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, C.E.; Galan, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) U.S.-Origin Nuclear Material Removal program, also known as the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program (FRR SNF AP), was established by the U.S. Department of Energy in May 1996. The program's mission provides a disposition pathway for certain U.S. origin spent nuclear fuel and other weapons-grade nuclear material. The program will continue until May 2016 with an additional three year window for fuel cooldown and transportation. This paper provides an update on recent program accomplishments, current program initiatives and future activities.

  14. Biological effects of radiation: The induction of malignant transformation and programmed cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servomaa, K.

    1991-04-01

    In the Chernobyl explosions and fire, powderized nuclear fuel was released from the reactor core, causing an unexpected fallout. X-ray analysis and scanning electron microscopy showed that the isolated single particles were essentially pure uranium. These uranium aerosols contained all of the nonvolatile fission products, including the b-emitters, 95 Zr, 103 Ru, 106 Ru, 141 Ce, and 144 Ce. The hot particles are extremely effective in inducing malignant transformation in mouse fibroblast cells in vitro. The major factor responsible for this effect is focus promotion caused by a wound-mediated permanent increase in cell proliferation (mitogenesis associated with mutagenesis). Transformed foci were analysed for the activation of c-abl, c-erb-A, c-erb-B, c-fms, c-fos, c-myb, c-myc, c-Ha-ras, c-Ki-ras, c-sis, and c-raf oncogenes at the transcriptional level. The pattern of oncogene activation was found to vary from focus to focus. Long interspersed repeated DNA (L1 or LINE makes up a class of mobile genetic elements which can amplify in the cell genome by retroposition. This element is spontaneously transcriptionally activated at a critical population density and later amplified in rat chloroleukaemia cells. UV light and ionizing radiation induce this activation prematurely, and the activation is followed by programmed cell death (apoptosis) in a sequence of events identical to that seen in LIRn activation occurring spontaneously

  15. Ageratum enation virus Infection Induces Programmed Cell Death and Alters Metabolite Biosynthesis in Papaver somniferum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Srivastava

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A previously unknown disease which causes severe vein thickening and inward leaf curl was observed in a number of opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L. plants. The sequence analysis of full-length viral genome and associated betasatellite reveals the occurrence of Ageratum enation virus (AEV and Ageratum leaf curl betasatellite (ALCB, respectively. Co-infiltration of cloned agroinfectious DNAs of AEV and ALCB induces the leaf curl and vein thickening symptoms as were observed naturally. Infectivity assay confirmed this complex as the cause of disease and also satisfied the Koch’s postulates. Comprehensive microscopic analysis of infiltrated plants reveals severe structural anomalies in leaf and stem tissues represented by unorganized cell architecture and vascular bundles. Moreover, the characteristic blebs and membranous vesicles formed due to the virus-induced disintegration of the plasma membrane and intracellular organelles were also present. An accelerated nuclear DNA fragmentation was observed by Comet assay and confirmed by TUNEL and Hoechst dye staining assays suggesting virus-induced programmed cell death. Virus-infection altered the biosynthesis of several important metabolites. The biosynthesis potential of morphine, thebaine, codeine, and papaverine alkaloids reduced significantly in infected plants except for noscapine whose biosynthesis was comparatively enhanced. The expression analysis of corresponding alkaloid pathway genes by real time-PCR corroborated well with the results of HPLC analysis for alkaloid perturbations. The changes in the metabolite and alkaloid contents affect the commercial value of the poppy plants.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of metabolite disorder in orange trees caused by citrus sudden death disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestes, Rosilene A; Colnago, Luiz A; Forato, Lucimara A; Carrilho, Emanuel; Bassanezi, Renato B; Wulff, Nelson A

    2009-01-01

    Citrus sudden death (CSD) is a new disease of sweet orange and mandarin trees grafted on Rangpur lime and Citrus volkameriana rootstocks. It was first seen in Brazil in 1999, and has since been detected in more than four million trees. The CSD causal agent is unknown and the current hypothesis involves a virus similar to Citrus tristeza virus or a new virus named Citrus sudden death-associated virus. CSD symptoms include generalized foliar discoloration, defoliation and root death, and, in most cases, it can cause tree death. One of the unique characteristics of CSD disease is the presence of a yellow stain in the rootstock bark near the bud union. This region also undergoes profound anatomical changes. In this study, we analyse the metabolic disorder caused by CSD in the bark of sweet orange grafted on Rangpur lime by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging. The imaging results show the presence of a large amount of non-functional phloem in the rootstock bark of affected plants. The spectroscopic analysis shows a high content of triacylglyceride and sucrose, which may be related to phloem blockage close to the bud union. We also propose that, without knowing the causal CSD agent, the determination of oil content in rootstock bark by low-resolution NMR can be used as a complementary method for CSD diagnosis, screening about 300 samples per hour.

  17. NCT program at Nuclear Medicine, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noonan, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Neutron Capture Therapy program at Nuclear Medicine, Inc. (NMI) is focused on obtaining Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of the treatment for malignant brain tumors. To minimize both the time and expense of the approval process, research efforts have been strictly focused and Orphan Drug sponsorship of the boron compound, Na 2 B 12 H 11 SH, has been obtained. The significance of Orphan Drug sponsorship and NMI's initial meeting with the FDA to discuss preclinical and clinical protocols are discussed. 9 references, 2 figures

  18. Environmental monitoring program for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roenick, R.G.; Kreter, R.N.

    1984-01-01

    The programs aims to determine the area of largest environmental impact, taking into consideration the various installations in the Resende Industrial Complex. In the present work a mathematical model is applied based on regional data, and after the study of the use of land and waster resources in the area. The work, begin two years before the operation of the installation, has been subsequently modified by the environmental analyses obtained. The background levels of integrated dose are determined, and all the pollutents existing in the air, land and water have been classified, with the object of characterizing the region 20 Kilometers around the nuclear installation. (Author) [pt

  19. Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Projects program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of the Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Projects (ENFDP) program is to provide the NRC licensing staff with data which will allow an assessment of radiation exposure during decommissioning and the implementation of ALARA techniques. The data will also provide information to determine the funding level necessary to ensure timely and safe decommissioning operations. Actual decommissioning costs, methods and radiation exposures are compared with those estimated by the Battelle-PNL and ORNL NUREGs on decommissioning. Exposure reduction techniques applied to decommissioning activities to meet ALARA objectives are described. The lessons learned concerning various decommissioning methods are evaluated

  20. WNT7b mediates macrophage-induced programmed cell death in patterning of the vasculature

    OpenAIRE

    Lobov, Ivan B.; Rao, Sujata; Carroll, Thomas J.; Vallance, Jefferson E.; Ito, Masataka; Ondr, Jennifer K.; Kurup, Savita; Glass, Donald A.; Patel, Millan S.; Shu, Weiguo; Morrisey, Edward E.; McMahon, Andrew P.; Karsenty, Gerard; Lang, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Macrophages have a critical role in inflammatory and immune responses through their ability to recognize and engulf apoptotic cells1. Here we show that macrophages initiate a cell-death programme in target cells by activating the canonical WNT pathway. We show in mice that macrophage WNT7b is a short-range paracrine signal required for WNT-pathway responses and programmed cell death in the vascular endothelial cells of the temporary hyaloid vessels of the developing eye. These findings indica...

  1. IL-1β but not programmed death-1 and programmed death-ligand pathway is critical for the human Th17 response to M. tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Stephen-Victor

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The programmed death-1 (PD-1- programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1 and PD-L2 co-inhibitory pathway has been implicated in the evasion strategies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Specifically, M. tuberculosis-induced PD-L1 orchestrates expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs and suppression of Th1 response. However, the role of PD pathway in regulating Th17 response to M. tuberculosis has not been investigated. In the present report, we demonstrate that M. tuberculosis and M. tuberculosis-derived antigen fractions have differential abilities to mediate human monocyte and dendritic cell (DC-mediated Th17 response and were independent of expression of PD-L1 or PD-L2 on aforementioned antigen-presenting cells. Importantly, we observed that blockade of PD-L1 or PD-1 did not significantly modify either the frequencies of Th17 cells or the production of IL-17 from CD4+ T cells though IFN-γ response was significantly enhanced. On the contrary, IL-1β from monocytes and DCs were critical for the Th17 response to M. tuberculosis. Together, our results indicate that IL-1β but not members of the programmed death pathway is critical for human Th17 response to M. tuberculosis

  2. IL-1β, But Not Programed Death-1 and Programed Death Ligand Pathway, Is Critical for the Human Th17 Response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen-Victor, Emmanuel; Sharma, Varun Kumar; Das, Mrinmoy; Karnam, Anupama; Saha, Chaitrali; Lecerf, Maxime; Galeotti, Caroline; Kaveri, Srinivas V.; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2016-01-01

    The programed death-1 (PD-1)–programed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) and PD-L2 co-inhibitory pathway has been implicated in the evasion strategies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Specifically, M. tuberculosis-induced PD-L1 orchestrates expansion of regulatory T cells and suppression of Th1 response. However, the role of PD pathway in regulating Th17 response to M. tuberculosis has not been investigated. In the present report, we demonstrate that M. tuberculosis and M. tuberculosis-derived antigen fractions have differential abilities to mediate human monocyte- and dendritic cell (DC)-mediated Th17 response and were independent of expression of PD-L1 or PD-L2 on aforementioned antigen-presenting cells. Importantly, we observed that blockade of PD-L1 or PD-1 did not significantly modify either the frequencies of Th17 cells or the production of IL-17 from CD4+ T cells though IFN-γ response was significantly enhanced. On the contrary, IL-1β from monocytes and DCs were critical for the Th17 response to M. tuberculosis. Together, our results indicate that IL-1β, but not members of the programed death pathway, is critical for human Th17 response to M. tuberculosis. PMID:27867382

  3. A comparative study of European nuclear energy programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Presas i Puig, Albert [ed.

    2011-07-01

    The report includes the following contributions: Comparative study of European Nuclear Energy Programs. From international cooperation to the failure of a national program: the Austrian case. The ''go-and-stop'' of the Italian civil nuclear programs, among improvisations, ambitions and conspiracy. Nuclear energy in Spain - a research agenda for economic historians. The Portuguese nuclear program: a peripheral experience under dictatorship (1945-1973). The nuclear energy programs in Switzerland. The rise and decline of an independent nuclear power industry in Sweden, 1945-1970. The German fast breeder program, a historical review. Fast reactors as future visions - the case of Sweden. Transnational flows of nuclear knowledge between the U.S. and the U.K. and continental Europe in the 1950/60s. The Carter administration and its non-proliferation policies: the road to INFCE.

  4. A computer program for the estimation of time of death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, N

    1993-01-01

    In the 1960s Marshall and Hoare presented a "Standard Cooling Curve" based on their mathematical analyses on the postmortem cooling of bodies. Although fairly accurate under standard conditions, the "curve" or formula is based on the assumption that the ambience temperature is constant and that t......In the 1960s Marshall and Hoare presented a "Standard Cooling Curve" based on their mathematical analyses on the postmortem cooling of bodies. Although fairly accurate under standard conditions, the "curve" or formula is based on the assumption that the ambience temperature is constant...... cooling of bodies is presented. It is proposed that by having a computer program that solves the equation, giving the length of the cooling period in response to a certain rectal temperature, and which allows easy comparison of multiple solutions, the uncertainties related to ambience temperature...

  5. The Cuban nuclear program and its Scientific and Technical Infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandarias Cruz, D.; Codorniu Pujals, D.

    1995-01-01

    The present paper shows the aspects including the Cuban Nuclear Program and underlines its close connection with the strategy of economic, social and scientific technical development in the country, the organizing structure of the Cuban nuclear activity is explained. The application of nuclear techniques and research development activity in the nuclear field are also expressed in detailed in this paper

  6. An extensive microarray analysis of AAL-toxin-induced cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana brings new insights into the complexity of programmed cell death in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gechev, T.S.; Gadjev, I.Z.; Hille, J.

    2004-01-01

    A T-DNA knockout of the Arabidopsis homologue of the tomato disease resistance gene Asc was obtained. The asc gene renders plants sensitive to programmed cell death (PCD) triggered by the fungal AAL toxin. To obtain more insights into the nature of AAL-toxin-induced cell death and to identify genes

  7. Senescent cells re-engineered to express soluble programmed death receptor-1 for inhibiting programmed death receptor-1/programmed death ligand-1 as a vaccination approach against breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zehong; Hu, Kang; Feng, Lieting; Su, Ruxiong; Lai, Nan; Yang, Zike; Kang, Shijun

    2018-06-01

    Various types of vaccines have been proposed as approaches for prevention or delay of the onset of cancer by boosting the endogenous immune system. We previously developed a senescent-cell-based vaccine, induced by radiation and veliparib, as a preventive and therapeutic tool against triple-negative breast cancer. However, the programmed death receptor-1/programmed death ligand-1 (PD-1/PD-L1) pathway was found to play an important role in vaccine failure. Hence, we further developed soluble programmed death receptor-1 (sPD1)-expressing senescent cells to overcome PD-L1/PD-1-mediated immune suppression while vaccinating to promote dendritic cell (DC) maturity, thereby amplifying T-cell activation. In the present study, sPD1-expressing senescent cells showed a particularly active status characterized by growth arrest and modified immunostimulatory cytokine secretion in vitro. As expected, sPD1-expressing senescent tumor cell vaccine (STCV/sPD-1) treatment attracted more mature DC and fewer exhausted-PD1 + T cells in vivo. During the course of the vaccine studies, we observed greater safety and efficacy for STCV/sPD-1 than for control treatments. STCV/sPD-1 pre-injections provided complete protection from 4T1 tumor challenge in mice. Additionally, the in vivo therapeutic study of mice with s.c. 4T1 tumor showed that STCV/sPD-1 vaccination delayed tumorigenesis and suppressed tumor progression at early stages. These results showed that STCV/sPD-1 effectively induced a strong antitumor immune response against cancer and suggested that it might be a potential strategy for TNBC prevention. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  8. Update on DOE's Nuclear Energy University Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambregts, Marsha J.

    2009-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy University Program (NEUP) Office assists the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) by administering its University Program. To promote accountable relationships between universities and the Technical Integration Offices (TIOs)/Technology Development Offices (TDOs), a process was designed and administered which includes two competitive Requests for Proposals (RFPs) and two Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) in the following areas: (1) Research and Development (R and D) Grants, (2) Infrastructure improvement, and (3) Scholarships and Fellowships. NEUP will also host periodic reviews of university mission-specific R and D that document progress, reinforce accountability, and assess return on investment; sponsor workshops that inform universities of the Department's research needs to facilitate continued alignment of university R and D with NE missions; and conduct communications activities that foster stakeholder trust, serve as a catalyst for accomplishing NEUP objectives, and provide national visibility of NEUP activities and accomplishments. Year to date efforts to achieve these goals will be discussed.

  9. The cost of avoiding death - nuclear power, regulation and spending on safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, A.

    1988-01-01

    The Sizewell-B Inquiry allowed scrutiny of how public bodies make their decisions. In particular, how much money needs to be spent on safety in the nuclear industry. Decisions which could lead to a loss of life from radioactive emissions are the main consideration. There are two main types of procedure for arriving at a suitable financial limit to avoiding a death - these are discussed. The way in which the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) and, hence, the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) value life in arriving at their decisions is the main issue. Comparisons are made with other bodies. Two major improvements in current procedures are suggested. Progress towards a more soundly based valuation of risk to life by the HSE/NII is hoped for. (U.K.)

  10. Implementing a Death with Dignity program at a comprehensive cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loggers, Elizabeth Trice; Starks, Helene; Shannon-Dudley, Moreen; Back, Anthony L; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Stewart, F Marc

    2013-04-11

    The majority of Death with Dignity participants in Washington State and Oregon have received a diagnosis of terminal cancer. As more states consider legislation regarding physician-assisted death, the experience of a comprehensive cancer center may be informative. We describe the implementation of a Death with Dignity program at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, the site of care for the Fred Hutchinson-University of Washington Cancer Consortium, a comprehensive cancer center in Seattle that serves the Pacific Northwest. Institution-level data were compared with publicly available statewide data from Oregon and Washington. A total of 114 patients inquired about our Death with Dignity program between March 5, 2009, and December 31, 2011. Of these, 44 (38.6%) did not pursue the program, and 30 (26.3%) initiated the process but either elected not to continue or died before completion. Of the 40 participants who, after counseling and upon request, received a prescription for a lethal dose of secobarbital (35.1% of the 114 patients who inquired about the program), all died, 24 after medication ingestion (60% of those obtaining prescriptions). The participants at our center accounted for 15.7% of all participants in the Death with Dignity program in Washington (255 persons) and were typically white, male, and well educated. The most common reasons for participation were loss of autonomy (97.2%), inability to engage in enjoyable activities (88.9%), and loss of dignity (75.0%). Eleven participants lived for more than 6 months after prescription receipt. Qualitatively, patients and families were grateful to receive the lethal prescription, whether it was used or not. Overall, our Death with Dignity program has been well accepted by patients and clinicians.

  11. Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant Safety Upgrading Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, A.; Fagula, L.

    1996-01-01

    Bohunice nuclear Power Plant generation represents almost 50% of the Slovak republic electric power production. Due to such high level of commitment to nuclear power in the power generation system, a special attention is given to safe and reliable operation of NPPs. Safety upgrading and operational reliability improvement of Bohunice V-1 NPP was carried out by the Bohunice staff continuously since the plant commissioning. In the 1990 - 1993 period extensive projects were realised. As a result of 'Small Reconstruction of the Bohunice V-1 NPP', the standards of both the nuclear safety and operational reliability have been significantly improved. The implementation of another modifications that will take place gradually during extended refuelling outages and overhauls in the course of 1996 through 1999, is referred to as the Gradual Reconstruction of the Bohunice V-1 Plant. The general goal of the V-1 NPP safety upgrading is the achievement of internationally acceptable level of nuclear safety. Extensive and financially demanding modification process of Bohunice V-2 NPP is likely to be implemented after a completion of the Gradual Reconstruction of the Bohunice V-1 NPP, since the year 1999. With this in mind, a first draft of the strategy of the Bohunice V-2 NPP upgrading program based on Probabilistic Safety assessment consideration was developed. A number of actions with a general effect on Bohunice site safety is evident. All these activities are aimed at reaching the essential objective of Bohunice NPP Management - to ensure a safe, reliable and effective electric energy and heat generation at the Bohunice site. (author)

  12. Status of Iran's nuclear program and negotiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, David [President, Institute for Science and International Security (ISIS), 236 Massachusetts Avenue, NE 305, Washington, DC 20002 (United States)

    2014-05-09

    Iran's nuclear program poses immense challenges to international security. Its gas centrifuge program has grown dramatically in the last several years, bringing Iran close to a point where it could produce highly enriched uranium in secret or declared gas centrifuge plants before its breakout would be discovered and stopped. To reduce the risk posed by Iran's nuclear program, the P5+1 have negotiated with Iran short term limits on the most dangerous aspects of its nuclear programs and is negotiating long-term arrangements that can provide assurance that Iran will not build nuclear weapons. These long-term arrangements need to include a far more limited and transparent Iranian nuclear program. In advance of arriving at a long-term arrangement, the IAEA will need to resolve its concerns about the alleged past and possibly on-going military dimensions of Iran's nuclear program.

  13. Programed death-1/programed death-ligand 1 expression in lymph nodes of HIV infected patients: results of a pilot safety study in rhesus macaques using anti-programed death-ligand 1 (Avelumab).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Amanda L; Green, Samantha A; Abdullah, Shahed; Le Saout, Cecile; Pittaluga, Stefania; Chen, Hui; Turnier, Refika; Lifson, Jeffrey; Godin, Steven; Qin, Jing; Sneller, Michael C; Cuillerot, Jean-Marie; Sabzevari, Helen; Lane, H Clifford; Catalfamo, Marta

    2016-10-23

    The programed death-1 (PD1)/programed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathway plays a critical role in balancing immunity and host immunopathology. During chronic HIV/SIV infection, there is persistent immune activation accompanied by accumulation of virus-specific cells with terminally differentiated phenotypes and expression of regulatory receptors such as PD1. These observations led us to hypothesize that the PD1/PD-L1 pathway contributes to the functional dysregulation and ineffective viral control, and its blockade may be a potential immunotherapeutic target. Lymph node biopsies from HIV-infected patients (n = 23) were studied for expression of PD1 and PD-L1. In addition, we assessed the safety and biological activity of a human anti-PD-L1 antibody (Avelumab) in chronically SIV-infected rhesus macaques. PD-L1 expression was observed in cells with myloid/macrophage morphology in HIV-infected lymph nodes. Administration of anti-PD-L1 was well tolerated, and no changes in body weights, hematologic, or chemistry parameters were observed during the study. Blockade of PD-L1 led to a trend of transient viral control after discontinuation of treatment. Administration of anti-PD-L1 in chronic SIV-infected rhesus macaques was well tolerated. Overall, these data warrant further investigation to assess the efficacy of anti-PD-L1 treatment on viral control in chronic SIV infection as a prelude to such therapy in humans.

  14. Death losses due to stillbirth, neonatal death and diseases in cloned cattle derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer and their progeny: a result of nationwide survey in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shinya; Nagai, Takashi

    2009-06-01

    To obtain the data concerning death losses due to stillbirth, neonatal death and diseases in cloned cattle derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and their progeny produced by Japanese institutions, a nationwide survey was carried out in July-August, 2006. As a result, lifetime data concerning 482 SCNT cattle (97.5% of cattle produced in the country at that time) and 202 progeny of SCNT cattle were accumulated and the death loss of these cattle was analyzed. Although 1/3 of delivered SCNT calves died during the perinatal period due to stillbirth and neonatal death, incidence of death loss due to diseases in SCNT cattle surviving more than 200 days after birth seems to be the same as these in conventionally bred cattle. In contrast, progeny of SCNT cattle showed the same level in death loss as observed in conventionally bred cattle throughout their lifetime. These results suggest that robust health would be expected in SCNT cattle surviving to adulthood and their progeny.

  15. A shift to organismal stress resistance in programmed cell death mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith E Judy

    Full Text Available Animals have many ways of protecting themselves against stress; for example, they can induce animal-wide, stress-protective pathways and they can kill damaged cells via apoptosis. We have discovered an unexpected regulatory relationship between these two types of stress responses. We find that C. elegans mutations blocking the normal course of programmed cell death and clearance confer animal-wide resistance to a specific set of environmental stressors; namely, ER, heat and osmotic stress. Remarkably, this pattern of stress resistance is induced by mutations that affect cell death in different ways, including ced-3 (cell death defective mutations, which block programmed cell death, ced-1 and ced-2 mutations, which prevent the engulfment of dying cells, and progranulin (pgrn-1 mutations, which accelerate the clearance of apoptotic cells. Stress resistance conferred by ced and pgrn-1 mutations is not additive and these mutants share altered patterns of gene expression, suggesting that they may act within the same pathway to achieve stress resistance. Together, our findings demonstrate that programmed cell death effectors influence the degree to which C. elegans tolerates environmental stress. While the mechanism is not entirely clear, it is intriguing that animals lacking the ability to efficiently and correctly remove dying cells should switch to a more global animal-wide system of stress resistance.

  16. Evolvement of nuclear criticality safety programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketzlach, N.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear criticality safety (NCS) has developed from a discipline requiring the services of personnel with only a background in reactor physics to that involving reactor physics, process engineering, and design as well as administration of the program to ensure all its requirements are implemented. When Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was designed and constructed, the physicists at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) were performing the criticality analyses. A physicist who had no chemical process or engineering experience was brought in from LANL to determine whether the facility would be safe. It was only because of his understanding of the reactor physics principles, scientific intuition, and some luck that the design and construction of the facility led to a safe plant. It took a number of years of experience with facility operations and the dedication of personnel for NCS to reach its present status as a recognized discipline

  17. China's Nuclear Power Program: Options for the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suttmeier, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    The issue of American nuclear cooperation with the People's Republic of China is examined with regards to political relations, commercial benefits to the United States, and nonproliferation. China's interest in nuclear power is examined, and its nuclear program is briefly reviewed from the 1950's to present. China's international nuclear relations with other countries are discussed, and implications for the United States examined, particularly with regards to China's intentions toward nuclear proliferation, danger of diversion of material for nuclear weapons, use of pressurized water reactor technology for Chinese naval reactors, and the terms of the nuclear cooperation agreement

  18. Needs of National Infrastructure for Nuclear Energy Program in Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaushevski, A.; Poceva, S.N.; Spasevska, H.; Popov, N.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of a nuclear energy program is a major undertaking with significant implications for many aspects of national infrastructure, ranging from capacity of the power grid, access roads and production facilities, to the involvement of stakeholders and the development of human resources. For new comers countries without nuclear power, even for those who wish to realize substantial expansion of existing nuclear capacity, it can take up to 10-15 years to develop the necessary infrastructure. One of the crucial problems in nuclear energy implementation are human resources needs and educational infrastructure development in this field. No matter what will be the future energy scenario in the Republic of Macedonia, the nuclear educational program is the first step to have HR in the field of nuclear energy. This paper presents the proposed direction for having HR for establishing national infrastructure in nuclear energy program in Macedonia. This includes establishing and developing of MONEP (Macedonian NEPIO), and the enhancing the capabilities of the national regulatory body in the Republic of Macedonia. Keywords: NEP (Nuclear Energy Program), HR (Human Resources), NEPIO (Nuclear Energy Program Implementation Organization), MONEP Macedonian Organization for Nuclear Energy Program (Macedonian NEPIO), NRB (Nuclear Regulatory Body)

  19. DCD – a novel plant specific domain in proteins involved in development and programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doerks Tobias

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition of microbial pathogens by plants triggers the hypersensitive reaction, a common form of programmed cell death in plants. These dying cells generate signals that activate the plant immune system and alarm the neighboring cells as well as the whole plant to activate defense responses to limit the spread of the pathogen. The molecular mechanisms behind the hypersensitive reaction are largely unknown except for the recognition process of pathogens. We delineate the NRP-gene in soybean, which is specifically induced during this programmed cell death and contains a novel protein domain, which is commonly found in different plant proteins. Results The sequence analysis of the protein, encoded by the NRP-gene from soybean, led to the identification of a novel domain, which we named DCD, because it is found in plant proteins involved in development and cell death. The domain is shared by several proteins in the Arabidopsis and the rice genomes, which otherwise show a different protein architecture. Biological studies indicate a role of these proteins in phytohormone response, embryo development and programmed cell by pathogens or ozone. Conclusion It is tempting to speculate, that the DCD domain mediates signaling in plant development and programmed cell death and could thus be used to identify interacting proteins to gain further molecular insights into these processes.

  20. A tomato metacaspase gene is upregulated during programmed cell death in Botrytis cinerea-infected leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeberichts, F.A.; Have, ten A.; Woltering, E.J.

    2003-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) in plant cells is often accompanied by biochemical and morphological hallmarks similar to those of animal apoptosis. However, orthologs of animal caspases, cysteinyl aspartate-specific proteases that constitute the core component of animal apoptosis, have not yet been

  1. The zinc finger protein ZAT11 modulates paraquat-induced programmed cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qureshi, Muhammad Kamran; Sujeeth, Neerakkal; Gechev, Tsanko S.; Hille, Jacques

    Plants use programmed cell death (PCD) as a tool in their growth and development. PCD is also involved in defense against different kinds of stresses including pathogen attack. In both types of PCD, reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role. ROS is not only a toxic by-product but also

  2. Expression of the Arabidopsis high-affinity hexose transporter STP13 correlates with programmed cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørholm, Morten Helge Hauberg; Nour-Eldin, Hussam H; Brodersen, Peter

    2006-01-01

    GFP expression only in the vascular tissue in emerging petals under non-stressed conditions. Quantitative PCR and the pSTP13-GFP plants show induction of STP13 in programmed cell death (PCD) obtained by treatments with the fungal toxin fumonisin B1 and the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. A role for STP...

  3. The Impact of a Death Education Program for Nurses in a Long-Term Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Stephen; Brown, Isabel

    1983-01-01

    Assessed the impact of a death education program for nursing staff (N=130) of a long-term care institution. Analysis of nurses' chart entries (problem-oriented record format-POR) revealed a statistically significant increase from pre- to post-course in charting of patients' subjective state. (Author/JAC)

  4. Characterization of a serine protease-mediated cell death program activated in human leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, A.R.; Holohan, C.; Torriglia, A.; Lee, B.F.; Stenson-Cox, C.

    2006-01-01

    Tightly controlled proteolysis is a defining feature of apoptosis and caspases are critical in this regard. Significant roles for non-caspase proteases in cell death have been highlighted. Staurosporine causes a rapid induction of apoptosis in virtually all mammalian cell types. Numerous studies demonstrate that staurosporine can activate cell death under caspase-inhibiting circumstances. The aim of this study was to investigate the proteolytic mechanisms responsible for cell death under these conditions. To that end, we show that inhibitors of serine proteases can delay cell death in one such system. Furthermore, through profiling of proteolytic activation, we demonstrate, for the first time, that staurosporine activates a chymotrypsin-like serine protease-dependent cell death in HL-60 cells independently, but in parallel with the caspase controlled systems. Features of the serine protease-mediated system include cell shrinkage and apoptotic morphology, regulation of caspase-3, altered nuclear morphology, generation of an endonuclease and DNA degradation. We also demonstrate a staurosporine-induced activation of a putative 16 kDa chymotrypsin-like protein during apoptosis

  5. The technical feasibility of uranium enrichment for nuclear bomb construction at the parallel nuclear program plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, L.P.

    1990-01-01

    It is discussed the hole of the Parallel Nuclear Program is Brazil and the feasibility of uranium enrichment for nuclear bomb construction. This program involves two research centers, one belonging to the brazilian navy and another to the aeronautics. Some other brazilian institutes like CTA, IPEN, COPESP and CETEX and also taking part in the program. (A.C.A.S.)

  6. Increased anion channel activity is an unavoidable event in ozone-induced programmed cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kadono

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ozone is a major secondary air pollutant often reaching high concentrations in urban areas under strong daylight, high temperature and stagnant high-pressure systems. Ozone in the troposphere is a pollutant that is harmful to the plant. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By exposing cells to a strong pulse of ozonized air, an acute cell death was observed in suspension cells of Arabidopsis thaliana used as a model. We demonstrated that O(3 treatment induced the activation of a plasma membrane anion channel that is an early prerequisite of O(3-induced cell death in A. thaliana. Our data further suggest interplay of anion channel activation with well known plant responses to O(3, Ca(2+ influx and NADPH-oxidase generated reactive oxygen species (ROS in mediating the oxidative cell death. This interplay might be fuelled by several mechanisms in addition to the direct ROS generation by O(3; namely, H(2O(2 generation by salicylic and abscisic acids. Anion channel activation was also shown to promote the accumulation of transcripts encoding vacuolar processing enzymes, a family of proteases previously reported to contribute to the disruption of vacuole integrity observed during programmed cell death. SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, our data indicate that anion efflux is an early key component of morphological and biochemical events leading to O(3-induced programmed cell death. Because ion channels and more specifically anion channels assume a crucial position in cells, an understanding about the underlying role(s for ion channels in the signalling pathway leading to programmed cell death is a subject that warrants future investigation.

  7. Nuclear Security Education Program at the Pennsylvania State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uenlue, Kenan [The Pennsylvania State University, Radiation Science and Engineering Center, University Park, PA 16802-2304 (United States); The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, University Park, PA 16802-2304 (United States); Jovanovic, Igor [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, University Park, PA 16802-2304 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The availability of trained and qualified nuclear and radiation security experts worldwide has decreased as those with hands-on experience have retired while the demand for these experts and skills have increased. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has responded to the continued loss of technical and policy expertise amongst personnel and students in the security field by initiating the establishment of a Nuclear Security Education Initiative, in partnership with Pennsylvania State University (PSU), Texas A and M (TAMU), and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). This collaborative, multi-year initiative forms the basis of specific education programs designed to educate the next generation of personnel who plan on careers in the nonproliferation and security fields with both domestic and international focus. The three universities worked collaboratively to develop five core courses consistent with the GTRI mission, policies, and practices. These courses are the following: Global Nuclear Security Policies, Detectors and Source Technologies, Applications of Detectors/Sensors/Sources for Radiation Detection and Measurements Nuclear Security Laboratory, Threat Analysis and Assessment, and Design and Analysis of Security Systems for Nuclear and Radiological Facilities. The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) Nuclear Engineering Program is a leader in undergraduate and graduate-level nuclear engineering education in the USA. The PSU offers undergraduate and graduate programs in nuclear engineering. The PSU undergraduate program in nuclear engineering is the largest nuclear engineering programs in the USA. The PSU Radiation Science and Engineering Center (RSEC) facilities are being used for most of the nuclear security education program activities. Laboratory space and equipment was made available for this purpose. The RSEC facilities include the Penn State Breazeale

  8. Nuclear Security Education Program at the Pennsylvania State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenlue, Kenan; Jovanovic, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The availability of trained and qualified nuclear and radiation security experts worldwide has decreased as those with hands-on experience have retired while the demand for these experts and skills have increased. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has responded to the continued loss of technical and policy expertise amongst personnel and students in the security field by initiating the establishment of a Nuclear Security Education Initiative, in partnership with Pennsylvania State University (PSU), Texas A and M (TAMU), and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). This collaborative, multi-year initiative forms the basis of specific education programs designed to educate the next generation of personnel who plan on careers in the nonproliferation and security fields with both domestic and international focus. The three universities worked collaboratively to develop five core courses consistent with the GTRI mission, policies, and practices. These courses are the following: Global Nuclear Security Policies, Detectors and Source Technologies, Applications of Detectors/Sensors/Sources for Radiation Detection and Measurements Nuclear Security Laboratory, Threat Analysis and Assessment, and Design and Analysis of Security Systems for Nuclear and Radiological Facilities. The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) Nuclear Engineering Program is a leader in undergraduate and graduate-level nuclear engineering education in the USA. The PSU offers undergraduate and graduate programs in nuclear engineering. The PSU undergraduate program in nuclear engineering is the largest nuclear engineering programs in the USA. The PSU Radiation Science and Engineering Center (RSEC) facilities are being used for most of the nuclear security education program activities. Laboratory space and equipment was made available for this purpose. The RSEC facilities include the Penn State Breazeale

  9. Programed death-1/programed death-ligand 1 expression in lymph nodes of HIV infected patients: results of a pilot safety study in rhesus macaques using anti–programed death-ligand 1 (Avelumab)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Amanda L.; Green, Samantha A.; Abdullah, Shahed; Le Saout, Cecile; Pittaluga, Stefania; Chen, Hui; Turnier, Refika; Lifson, Jeffrey; Godin, Steven; Qin, Jing; Sneller, Michael C.; Cuillerot, Jean-Marie; Sabzevari, Helen; Lane, H. Clifford; Catalfamo, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The programed death-1 (PD1)/programed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathway plays a critical role in balancing immunity and host immunopathology. During chronic HIV/SIV infection, there is persistent immune activation accompanied by accumulation of virus-specific cells with terminally differentiated phenotypes and expression of regulatory receptors such as PD1. These observations led us to hypothesize that the PD1/PD-L1 pathway contributes to the functional dysregulation and ineffective viral control, and its blockade may be a potential immunotherapeutic target. Methods: Lymph node biopsies from HIV-infected patients (n = 23) were studied for expression of PD1 and PD-L1. In addition, we assessed the safety and biological activity of a human anti-PD-L1 antibody (Avelumab) in chronically SIV-infected rhesus macaques. Results: PD-L1 expression was observed in cells with myloid/macrophage morphology in HIV-infected lymph nodes. Administration of anti-PD-L1 was well tolerated, and no changes in body weights, hematologic, or chemistry parameters were observed during the study. Blockade of PD-L1 led to a trend of transient viral control after discontinuation of treatment. Conclusion: Administration of anti-PD-L1 in chronic SIV-infected rhesus macaques was well tolerated. Overall, these data warrant further investigation to assess the efficacy of anti-PD-L1 treatment on viral control in chronic SIV infection as a prelude to such therapy in humans. PMID:27490642

  10. Attracting students to nuclear careers: INPO educational assistance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunkle, M.

    1981-01-01

    The utility industry is responding to a manpower shortage of 2000 at nuclear plants with a concerted analysis of regional training centers and educational assistance programs through the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). University support and cooperation are generally strong. The INPO program includes undergraduate- and graduate-level scholarships and fellowships

  11. Silibinin induces apoptosis via calpain-dependent AIF nuclear translocation in U87MG human glioma cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Yong K

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Silibinin, a natural polyphenolic flavonoid, has been reported to induce cell death in various cancer cell types. However, the molecular mechanism is not clearly defined. Our previous study showed that silibinin induces glioma cell death and its effect was effectively prevented by calpain inhibitor. The present study was therefore undertaken to examine the role of calpain in the silibinin-induced glioma cell death. Methods U87MG cells were grown on well tissue culture plates and cell viability was measured by MTT assay. ROS generation and △ψm were estimated using the fluorescence dyes. PKC activation and Bax expression were measured by Western blot analysis. AIF nuclear translocation was determined by Western blot and immunocytochemistry. Results Silibinin induced activation of calpain, which was blocked by EGTA and the calpain inhibitor Z-Leu-Leu-CHO. Silibinin caused ROS generation and its effect was inhibited by calpain inhibitor, the general PKC inhibitor GF 109203X, the specific PKCδ inhibitor rottlerin, and catalase. Silibinin-induce cell death was blocked by calpain inhibitor and PKC inhibitors. Silibinin-induced PKCδ activation and disruption of △ψm were prevented by the calpain inhibitor. Silibinin induced AIF nuclear translocation and its effect was prevented by calpain inhibitor. Transfection of vector expressing microRNA of AIF prevented the silibinin-induced cell death. Conclusions Silibinin induces apoptotic cell death through a calpain-dependent mechanism involving PKC, ROS, and AIF nuclear translocation in U87MG human glioma cells.

  12. Iran's nuclear program - for power generation or nuclear weapons?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kippe, Halvor

    2008-11-01

    This report addresses the development of a nuclear infrastructure in Iran, and assessments are made on the near-term potential this infrastructure might yield of either nuclear power or nuclear arms production. The most significant facilities are treated in a more elaborate fashion, as these are assumed to have key roles in either a true civilian programme, or in the prospect of weapons-grade fissile material production. The future potential capacity for the latter is calculated under certain presumptions, both in the case that Iran focuses its efforts on uranium-based nuclear weapons, and in the case that it should choose the plutonium path to nuclear weapons. All the conclusions and findings in this report are based on technological considerations. This means that social or political assessments have not prevailed, rather the picture of Iran's nuclear programme is drawn through descriptions and assessments of facilities and systems, and their role in the bigger context. Definite conclusions have not been made as to whether Iran's nuclear programme currently is aimed towards nuclear arms or nuclear power. The secrecy surrounding some of the most prominent nuclear sites together with more or less credible allegations of purely weapons-related activities in the past, make it hard not to conclude that Iran until the disclosures in 2002 made as great an effort as it could on its way on developing nuclear weapons covertly. The scope of today's nuclear programme seems, on the other hand, most likely to be in part to help relieve the ever-increasing need for energy, although considerable deficits to this strategy are identified, at the same time as the Iranian people are united in a giant, high-prestige project in defiance of massive international pressure. Adding to this is a much-feared ability to rapidly being able to redirect their nuclear efforts, and develop nuclear arms in perhaps as little as one year. This so-called break-out scenario, where Iran presumably

  13. Whistleblowers ask Congress to investigate TVA's nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, E.

    1993-01-01

    Congress should investigate the Tennessee Valley Authority's nuclear power plant construction and operations programs as soon as possible, a coalition of Tennessee environmentalists and whistleblowers told reporters at a press conference in Washington, DC. The Foundation for Global Sustainability and four employees of TVA nuclear plants called for congressional action because they contend the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Labor have failed to act to protect whistleblowers who report nuclear safety problems. The foundation contends the economics of nuclear plant construction by TVA do not make sense and in the rush to finish the Watts Bar nuclear plant, which has been under construction for 20 years, TVA has ignored safety issues

  14. PCNuDAT a PC Nuclear Data program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsey, R.R.

    1998-01-01

    The PC program PCNuDat is described which displays nuclear radioactive decay data and thermal cross section data. It requires 45 Megabytes (reduced version of PCNuDat requires 3 Megabytes) of disc space and can be obtained through Internet FTP or WWW from U.S. Nuclear Data Center or Nuclear Data Section of the IAEA. It can be obtained also on CD-ROM upon request sent to Nuclear Data Section. (author)

  15. Department of Energy: Nuclear S&T workforce development programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, Michelle; Bala, Marsha; Beierschmitt, Kelly; Steele, Carolyn; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Bruozas, Meridith A.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories use their expertise in nuclear science and technology (S&T) to support a robust national nuclear S&T enterprise from the ground up. Traditional academic programs do not provide all the elements necessary to develop this expertise, so the DOE has initiated a number of supplemental programs to develop and support the nuclear S&T workforce pipeline. This document catalogs existing workforce development programs that are supported by a number of DOE offices (such as the Offices of Nuclear Energy, Science, Energy Efficiency, and Environmental Management), and by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Naval Reactor Program. Workforce development programs in nuclear S&T administered through the Department of Homeland Security, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Department of Defense are also included. The information about these programs, which is cataloged below, is drawn from the program websites. Some programs, such as the Minority Serving Institutes Partnership Programs (MSIPPs) are available through more than one DOE office, so they appear in more than one section of this document.

  16. High fat programming of beta cell compensation, exhaustion, death and dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Marlon E

    2015-03-01

    Programming refers to events during critical developmental windows that shape progeny health outcomes. Fetal programming refers to the effects of intrauterine (in utero) events. Lactational programming refers to the effects of events during suckling (weaning). Developmental programming refers to the effects of events during both fetal and lactational life. Postnatal programming refers to the effects of events either from birth (lactational life) to adolescence or from weaning (end of lactation) to adolescence. Islets are most plastic during the early life course; hence programming during fetal and lactational life is most potent. High fat (HF) programming is the maintenance on a HF diet (HFD) during critical developmental life stages that alters progeny metabolism and physiology. HF programming induces variable diabetogenic phenotypes dependent on the timing and duration of the dietary insult. Maternal obesity reinforces HF programming effects in progeny. HF programming, through acute hyperglycemia, initiates beta cell compensation. However, HF programming eventually leads to chronic hyperglycemia that triggers beta cell exhaustion, death and dysfunction. In HF programming, beta cell dysfunction often co-presents with insulin resistance. Balanced, healthy nutrition during developmental windows is critical for preserving beta cell structure and function. Thus early positive nutritional interventions that coincide with the development of beta cells may reduce the overwhelming burden of diabetes and metabolic disease. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Programmed cell death in Leishmania: biochemical evidence and role in parasite infectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivas eGannavaram

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Demonstration of features of a programmed cell death (PCD pathway in protozoan parasites initiated a great deal of interest and debate in the field of molecular parasitology. Several of the markers typical of mammalian apoptosis have been shown in Leishmania which suggested the existence of an apoptosis like death in these organisms. However studies to elucidate the down stream events associated with phosphotidyl serine exposure, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release and caspase-like activities in cells undergoing such cell death remain an ongoing challenge. Recent advances in genome sequencing, chemical biology should help solve some of these challenges. Leishmania genetic mutants that lack putative regulators/effectors of PCD pathway should not only help demonstrate the mechanisms of PCD but also provide tools to better understand the putative role for this pathway in population control and in the establishment of a successful infection of the host.

  18. Radiation Monitoring - A Key Element in a Nuclear Power Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, A.S.; El-dally, T.A.

    2008-01-01

    For a nuclear power plant, radiation is especially of great concern to the public and the environment. Therefore, a radiation monitoring program is becoming a critical importance. This program covers all phases of the nuclear plant including preoperational, normal operation, accident and decommissioning. The fundamental objective of radiation monitoring program is to ensure that the health and safety of public inside and around the plant and to confirm the radiation doses are below the dose limits for workers and the public. This paper summarizes the environmental radiation monitoring program for a nuclear power plant

  19. Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering Program - Strategic Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Leslie A. [DOE/NNSA

    2004-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering (NEM R&E) Program is dedicated to providing knowledge, technical expertise, and products to US agencies responsible for monitoring nuclear explosions in all environments and is successful in turning scientific breakthroughs into tools for use by operational monitoring agencies. To effectively address the rapidly evolving state of affairs, the NNSA NEM R&E program is structured around three program elements described within this strategic plan: Integration of New Monitoring Assets, Advanced Event Characterization, and Next-Generation Monitoring Systems. How the Program fits into the National effort and historical accomplishments are also addressed.

  20. Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    The nuclear plant aging research described in this plan is intended to resolve issues related to the aging and service wear of equipment and systems at commercial reactor facilities and their possible impact on plant safety. Emphasis has been placed on identification and characterization of the mechansims of material and component degradation during service and evaluation of methods of inspection, surveillance, condition monitoring and maintenance as means of mitigating such effects. Specifically the goals of the program are as follows: (1) to identify and characterize aging and service wear effects which, if unchecked, could cause degradation of structures, components, and systems and thereby impair plant safety; (2) to identify methods of inspection, surveillance and monitoring, or of evaluating residual life of structures, components, and systems, which will assure timely detection of significant aging effects prior to loss of safety function; and (3) to evaluate the effectiveness of storage, maintenance, repair and replacement practices in mitigating the rate and extent of degradation caused by aging and service wear

  1. Nuclear program of Iran plans and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Described are the history of nuclear energy planning in Iran and the development of the Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP-1) project and its impact on the competency building in national companies, nuclear safety infrastructure, training activities, public awareness and acceptance. The activities of Nuclear Engineering Department is also presented. In order to enhance technical support services to BNPP1 and also to use capabilities of other companies in the international arena and in line with safe and reliable operation of Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant, NPPD/TAVANA Company has attempted to make contact with many companies outside the country

  2. Overall quality assurance program requirements for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This standard contains the requirements for the owner's overall quality assurance program for a nuclear power plant. This program encompasses all phases of a nuclear power plant life cycle, including site evaluation, design, procurement, manufacturing, construction and installation, commissioning, operation, and decommissioning. It covers the activities associated with specifying, directing, and administering the work to be done during these phases, and the evaluation and integrated of the activities and programs of participants

  3. Combined blockade of vascular endothelial growth factor and programmed death 1 pathways in advanced kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, David J; McDermott, David F

    2017-06-01

    Targeted and immune-based therapies have improved outcomes in advanced kidney cancer, yet novel strategies are needed to extend the duration of these benefits and expand them to more patients. Combined inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the programmed death 1 (PD-1)/programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathways with therapeutic agents already in clinical use may offer such a strategy. Here, we describe the development and clinical evaluation of VEGF inhibitors and, separately, PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors. We present preclinical evidence of interaction between these pathways and the rationale for combined blockade. Beyond well-known effects on pathologic angiogenesis, VEGF blockade also may decrease immune tolerance and enhance PD-1/PD-L1 blockade. We conclude with the results of several early trials of combined VEGF and PD-1/PD-L1 blockade, which demonstrate encouraging antitumor activity, and we pose questions for future study.

  4. Development of a Microfluidic Platform to Analyze Evolution of Programmed Bacterial Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-20

    droplet-based microfluidic technology to generate population ‘bottleneck’. This platform will serve as a critical foundation for our long-term goal to...Final Report: Development of a Microfluidic Platform to Analyze Evolution of Programmed Bacterial Death The views, opinions and/or findings contained...Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Microfluidics , systems biology REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM

  5. Nuclear data needs for US fast reactor programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daughtry, J.W.; Rawlins, J.A.

    1985-05-01

    Recent developments in US Fast Reactor Programs are reviewed to provide a background for the nuclear data needs of these programs. Innovative designs, inherent safety, and space nuclear power are receiving increased emphasis. Longstanding and newly-identified nuclear data requirements are reviewed. These requirements are based on information obtained early in 1985 in response to an inquiry sent out by the authors. Finally, plans are outlined for development of an adjusted cross section set for FFTF reload design. The adjustment process suggests some possible changes in ENDF/B-V nuclear data

  6. AREN has going into action for nuclear program in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirica, T.; Mauna, T.

    2000-01-01

    Romania has been a member of world nuclear power community since December 1996 when the first Candu type nuclear unit became fully in service in Cernavoda NPP. The nominal power rating of the Unit is 706 MWe, covering about 10% of country's annual consumption. Now, the major issues of the Romanian nuclear sector is to promote and develop the activities regarding completion of the second unit at the Cernavoda site, connected to the natural uranium chain and waste management. The Romanian 'Nuclear Energy' Association (AREN) operates as a non-governmental and non-profit organization member of the European Nuclear Society and has been involved since 1990 in the nuclear field as a professional society and members of Council of AREN work as volunteers. The main programs developed by AREN are: 1. Nuclear Energy Days, organized in the last i quarter of the year; 2. International Nuclear Energy Symposium - SIEN, organized every two years; 3. Round Tables dedicated to different aspects of the nuclear energy, mainly addressed to the specialists. The intention of this paper is to discuss the impact of the reduction of the Romanian nuclear program on the different categories of people and companies involved in nuclear field, including the difficult aspect of nuclear brain drain. (authors)

  7. NPP Mochovce nuclear safety enhancement program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cech, J.; Baumester, P.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear power plant Mochovce is currently under construction and an extensive nuclear safety enhancement programme is under way. The upgrading and modifications are based on IAEA documents and on those of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic. Based on a contract concluded with Riskaudit from the CEC, safety examinations of the Mochovce design were performed. An extensive list of technical specifications of safety measures is given. (M.D.)

  8. Promotion of Bilateral Cooperative Programs in Nuclear Human Resources Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. J.; Han, K. W.; Nam, Y. M.

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this project is strengthening of bilateral cooperation with those countries for sharing Korea's technology, and providing of education and training on Korean experience regarding national nuclear policy, technology self reliance, and technology itself, in the field of nuclear power generation and the application of radioisotopes and radiation. This project covers an analysis on the need of nuclear human resource development in countries having interest in the introduction of nuclear power and/or promotion of the use of nuclear energy, and provision of courses on 'nuclear power policy, planning and management' and 'design and operation of nuclear research reactor, and application of radiation technology' along with the country specific needs. Education and training of key members in nuclear energy development from Egypt: It was implemented through bilateral cooperation and support by KOICA program. The first part, which targeted staff members from Egypt Nuclear Commission, was held for 2 months providing a KOICA course on policy, planning and management for nuclear power project, and second part was on the job training in Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power and Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, KAERI respectively. On the job training of 1 scientist from Vietnam was implemented on the basis of bilateral cooperation in a research laboratory on radioactive waste treatment technology, at KAERI. Education and training for scientists from South East RCA countries were carried out for 11 participants from Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, China, Pakistan, Malaysia, Philippines, and Bangladesh. The course dealt with nuclear research reactor and radiation application technology. Development of nuclear education and training programs for key persons involved in nuclear power projects from countries of Middle East: The developed program consists of 15 courses addressing 3 technical levels, i.e. high level policy makers, middle level project implementers, and beginners

  9. Promotion of Bilateral Cooperative Programs in Nuclear Human Resources Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E. J.; Han, K. W.; Nam, Y. M. (and others)

    2009-08-15

    The purpose of this project is strengthening of bilateral cooperation with those countries for sharing Korea's technology, and providing of education and training on Korean experience regarding national nuclear policy, technology self reliance, and technology itself, in the field of nuclear power generation and the application of radioisotopes and radiation. This project covers an analysis on the need of nuclear human resource development in countries having interest in the introduction of nuclear power and/or promotion of the use of nuclear energy, and provision of courses on 'nuclear power policy, planning and management' and 'design and operation of nuclear research reactor, and application of radiation technology' along with the country specific needs. Education and training of key members in nuclear energy development from Egypt: It was implemented through bilateral cooperation and support by KOICA program. The first part, which targeted staff members from Egypt Nuclear Commission, was held for 2 months providing a KOICA course on policy, planning and management for nuclear power project, and second part was on the job training in Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power and Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, KAERI respectively. On the job training of 1 scientist from Vietnam was implemented on the basis of bilateral cooperation in a research laboratory on radioactive waste treatment technology, at KAERI. Education and training for scientists from South East RCA countries were carried out for 11 participants from Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, China, Pakistan, Malaysia, Philippines, and Bangladesh. The course dealt with nuclear research reactor and radiation application technology. Development of nuclear education and training programs for key persons involved in nuclear power projects from countries of Middle East: The developed program consists of 15 courses addressing 3 technical levels, i.e. high level policy makers, middle level project

  10. Nuclear Waste Management Program summary document, FY 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Program Summary Document outlines the operational and research and development (R and D) activities of the Office of Nuclear Waste Management (NEW) under the Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, US Department of Energy (DOE). This document focuses on the current and planned activities in waste management for FY 1981. This Program Summary Document (PSD) was prepared in order to explain the Federal nuclear waste management and spent fuel storage programs to Congress and its committees and to interested members of the public, the private sector, and the research community. The national energy policy as it applies to waste management and spent fuel storage is presented first. The program strategy, structure, budget, management approach, and public participation programs are then identified. The next section describes program activities and outlines their status. Finally, the applicability of departmental policies to NEW programs is summarized, including field and regional activities, commercialization plans, and environmental and socioeconomic implications of waste management activities, and international programs. This Nuclear Waste Management Program Summary Document is meant to serve as a guide to the progress of R and D and other energy technology programs in radioactive waste management. The R and D objective is to provide the Nation with acceptable solutions to short- and long-term management problems for all forms of radioactive waste and spent fuel

  11. Nuclear Waste Management Program summary document, FY 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, Sheldon

    1980-03-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Program Summary Document outlines the operational and research and development (R and D) activities of the Office of Nuclear Waste Management (NEW) under the Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, US Department of Energy (DOE). This document focuses on the current and planned activities in waste management for FY 1981. This Program Summary Document (PSD) was prepared in order to explain the Federal nuclear waste management and spent fuel storage programs to Congress and its committees and to interested members of the public, the private sector, and the research community. The national energy policy as it applies to waste management and spent fuel storage is presented first. The program strategy, structure, budget, management approach, and public participation programs are then identified. The next section describes program activities and outlines their status. Finally, the applicability of departmental policies to NEW programs is summarized, including field and regional activities, commercialization plans, and environmental and socioeconomic implications of waste management activities, and international programs. This Nuclear Waste Management Program Summary Document is meant to serve as a guide to the progress of R and D and other energy technology programs in radioactive waste management. The R and D objective is to provide the Nation with acceptable solutions to short- and long-term management problems for all forms of radioactive waste and spent fuel.

  12. A comprehensive program of nuclear engineering and science education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bereznai, G.; Lewis, B.

    2014-01-01

    The University of Ontario Institute of Technology offers undergraduate degrees in nuclear engineering, nuclear power, health physics and radiation science, graduate degrees (masters as well as doctorate) in nuclear engineering, and graduate diplomas that encompass a wide range of nuclear engineering and technology topics. Professional development programs tailored to specific utility needs are also offered, and the sharing of course material between the professional development and university education courses has strengthened both approaches to ensuring the high qualification levels required of professionals in the nuclear industry. (author)

  13. Status of US program for disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.I.

    1991-04-01

    In this paper, a brief history of the United States' program for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and the legislative acts that have guided the program are discussed. The current plans and schedules for beginning acceptance of SNF from the nuclear utilities for disposal are described, and some of the development activities supporting the program are discussed. And finally, the viability of the SNF disposal fee presently paid into the Nuclear Waste Fund by the owners/generators of commercial SNF and high-level waste (HLW) is examined. 12 refs., 9 figs

  14. A state perspective on the Nuclear Waste Policy Act program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stucker, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    The author discusses the problems he sees with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) program. He labels the problems as: against the law, all the eggs in one basket, acceptance rate, and the MRS program. The author comments of five issues that need to be addressed to right the wrongs of the NWPA program

  15. The international framework for safeguarding peaceful nuclear energy programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazer, B.M.

    1980-01-01

    International law, in response to the need for safeguard assurances, has provided a framework which can be utilized by supplier and recipient states. Multilateral treaties have created the International Atomic Energy Agency which can serve a vital role in the establishment and supervision of safeguard agreements for nuclear energy programs. The Non-Proliferation Treaty has created definite obligations on nuclear-weapon and non-nuclear weapon states to alleviate some possibilities of proliferation and has rejuvenated the function of the IAEA in providing safeguards, especially to non-nuclear-weapon states which are parties to the Non-Proliferation treaty. States which are not parties to the Non-Proliferation Treaty may receive nuclear energy co-operation subject to IAEA safeguards. States like Canada, have insisted through the bilateral nuclear energy co-operation agreements that either individual or joint agreement be reached with the IAEA for the application of safeguards. Trilateral treaties among Canada, the recipient state and the IAEA have been employed and can provide the necessary assurances against the diversion of peaceful nuclear energy programs to military or non-peaceful uses. The advent of the Nuclear Suppliers Group and its guidlines has definitely advanced the cause of ensuring peaceful uses of nuclear energy. The ultimate objective should be the creation of an international structure incorporating the application of the most comprehensive safeguards which will be applied universally to all nuclear energy programs

  16. Nuclear medicine research: an evaluation of the ERDA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    Legislation which established the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) January 19, 1975, stipulated that this new agency should be responsible for all activities previously assigned to the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and not specifically assigned to other agencies. Such activities included the nuclear medicine research program of the AEC Division of Biomedical and Environmental Research (DBER). To determine whether continuation of this program under the broader ERDA mission of energy-related research was in fact appropriate, a special task force was appointed in January 1975 by Dr. James L. Liverman, the director of DBER. This task force, comprised of established scientists knowledgeable about issues related to nuclear medicine either currently or in the past, was charged specifically to assess the historical impact of the AEC/ERDA nuclear medicine program on the development of nuclear medicine, the current status of this program, and its future role within the structure of ERDA. The specific recommendations, in brief form, are as follows: the federal government should continue to support the medical application of nuclear technology; ERDA should retain primary responsibility for support and management of federal nuclear medicine research programs; and management and emphasis of the ERDA nuclear medicine program require modification in certain areas, which are set forth

  17. Iranian Nuclear Program: a Threat or a Demand for Equality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Primož Šterbenc

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ever since 2002 relations between the West and Israel on the one hand and Iran on the other have been deteriorating due to the contentious issue of Iranian nuclear programme. Israel and the US have been claiming that there has been a secret Iranian nuclear weapons program, on the grounds that Iran has persisted in its effort to acquire independent uranium enrichment capability and has since 2006 allowed only limited inspections by the International Atomic Energy Agency. Iran has been claiming that its nuclear program is entirely peaceful. Today, one certainly cannot exclude possibility of a military attack on Iranian nuclear facilities. However, one cannot properly understand the problem without taking into account the historical and structural dimensions. Namely, Iran's nuclear policy has been guided by country's determination that it will become independent and self-reliant in every possible field – a result of its very negative historical experience. Thus, Iran has been determined to fully exercise its right to peaceful nuclear development, to which it is entitled according to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. Iran has been striving to overcome the structural dependence of developing countries in the field of nuclear energy, as they have been denied the possibility of comprehensive nuclear development for peaceful purposes by countries possessing developed nuclear industries. The latter have prevented balanced implementation of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons.

  18. The Maryland nuclear science baccalaureate degree program: The university perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janke, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear utilities' efforts in response to industry-wide pressures to provide operations staff with degree opportunities have encountered formidable barriers. This paper describes, from the university's perspective, the development and operation of the University of Maryland University College (UMUC) special baccalaureate program in nuclear science. This program has successfully overcome these problems to provide degree education on-site, on-line, and on time. Program delivery began in 1984 with one utility and a single site. It is currently delivered at eight sites under contract to six utilities with a total active student count of over 500. The first graduates are expected in 1989. The program is an accredited university program and enjoys licensure approval from the six states within which it operates. In addition to meeting US Nuclear Regulatory Commission proposed guidelines for degreed operators, the program increasingly appears as part of utility management development programs for all plant personnel and a factor in employee retention. The owner utilities, the University of Maryland, and the growing user's group are committed to the academic integrity, technical capability, and responsiveness of the program. The full support of this partnership speaks well for the long-term service of the Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Science program to the nuclear power industry

  19. Knockout of Arabidopsis accelerated-cell-death11 encoding a sphingosine transfer protein causes activation of programmed cell death and defense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Peter; Petersen, Morten; Pike, Helen M

    2002-01-01

    by avirulent pathogens. Global transcriptional changes during programmed cell death (PCD) and defense activation in acd11 were monitored by cDNA microarray hybridization. The PCD and defense pathways activated in acd11 are salicylic acid (SA) dependent, but do not require intact jasmonic acid or ethylene...

  20. Evolution of apoptosis-like programmed cell death in unicellular protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczanowski, Szymon; Sajid, Mohammed; Reece, Sarah E

    2011-03-25

    Apoptosis-like programmed cell death (PCD) has recently been described in multiple taxa of unicellular protists, including the protozoan parasites Plasmodium, Trypanosoma and Leishmania. Apoptosis-like PCD in protozoan parasites shares a number of morphological features with programmed cell death in multicellular organisms. However, both the evolutionary explanations and mechanisms involved in parasite PCD are poorly understood. Explaining why unicellular organisms appear to undergo 'suicide' is a challenge for evolutionary biology and uncovering death executors and pathways is a challenge for molecular and cell biology. Bioinformatics has the potential to integrate these approaches by revealing homologies in the PCD machinery of diverse taxa and evaluating their evolutionary trajectories. As the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis in model organisms are well characterised, and recent data suggest similar mechanisms operate in protozoan parasites, key questions can now be addressed. These questions include: which elements of apoptosis machinery appear to be shared between protozoan parasites and multicellular taxa and, have these mechanisms arisen through convergent or divergent evolution? We use bioinformatics to address these questions and our analyses suggest that apoptosis mechanisms in protozoan parasites and other taxa have diverged during their evolution, that some apoptosis factors are shared across taxa whilst others have been replaced by proteins with similar biochemical activities.

  1. Nuclear air cleaning programs in progress in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulcey, P.

    1991-01-01

    A short presentation is given of the nuclear air cleaning programs in progress in France with respect to pressurized water reactors, fuel reprocessing plants, radioactive waste management facilities, and the dismantling of nuclear facilities. The effects of fires in rooms and ventilation ducts in all nuclear facilities is being studied and computer simulation codes are being developed. A brief review of filter development and filter testing is also presented

  2. Introducing Knowledge Management in Study Program of Nuclear Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleslic, S.

    2012-01-01

    to introduce concept of knowledge management in study program of nuclear engineering to prepare future nuclear professionals on adequate actions.(author).

  3. Stress Management in Cyst-Forming Free-Living Protists: Programmed Cell Death and/or Encystment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naveed Ahmed; Iqbal, Junaid

    2015-01-01

    In the face of harsh conditions and given a choice, a cell may (i) undergo programmed cell death, (ii) transform into a cancer cell, or (iii) enclose itself into a cyst form. In metazoans, the available evidence suggests that cellular machinery exists only to execute or avoid programmed cell death, while the ability to form a cyst was either lost or never developed. For cyst-forming free-living protists, here we pose the question whether the ability to encyst was gained at the expense of the programmed cell death or both functions coexist to counter unfavorable environmental conditions with mutually exclusive phenotypes. PMID:25648302

  4. Stress Management in Cyst-Forming Free-Living Protists: Programmed Cell Death and/or Encystment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Ahmed Khan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the face of harsh conditions and given a choice, a cell may (i undergo programmed cell death, (ii transform into a cancer cell, or (iii enclose itself into a cyst form. In metazoans, the available evidence suggests that cellular machinery exists only to execute or avoid programmed cell death, while the ability to form a cyst was either lost or never developed. For cyst-forming free-living protists, here we pose the question whether the ability to encyst was gained at the expense of the programmed cell death or both functions coexist to counter unfavorable environmental conditions with mutually exclusive phenotypes.

  5. The Department of Energy nuclear criticality safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felty, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper broadly covers key events and activities from which the Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) evolved. The NCSP maintains fundamental infrastructure that supports operational criticality safety programs. This infrastructure includes continued development and maintenance of key calculational tools, differential and integral data measurements, benchmark compilation, development of training resources, hands-on training, and web-based systems to enhance information preservation and dissemination. The NCSP was initiated in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 97-2, Criticality Safety, and evolved from a predecessor program, the Nuclear Criticality Predictability Program, that was initiated in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-2, The Need for Critical Experiment Capability. This paper also discusses the role Dr. Sol Pearlstein played in helping the Department of Energy lay the foundation for a robust and enduring criticality safety infrastructure.

  6. Genesis of the Brazilian nuclear power plants program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syllus, G.; Lepecki, W.

    1996-01-01

    The genesis of the Brazilian Nuclear Power Program is described by the authors - who participated in the events - from the beginning of the sixties, until the definition and the start of the implementation in 1975 of the Reference Nuclear Power Program. A description is made of the main events, studies and decisions that contributed to the evolution of the Program: the GTRP (Nuclear Power Plant Working Group); the Thorium Group; the Lane Group; the decision about Angra 1; CNEN's analyses about the reactor line and, finally, the creation of CBTN (Nuclear Technology Brazilian Company), which elaborated the studies that resulted in the final definition of the Program and led to the Brazilian German Agreement and the establishment of NUCLEBRAS. (author)

  7. Industrial development - consequences about the implantation of Brazilian Nuclear Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syllus, C.

    1987-07-01

    The strategy to promote the growing industry participation in the Brazilian Nuclear Program, the difficulties, the measurements adopted for overcoming and the results obtained in terms of industrial development, are presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  8. Nuclear Human Resources Development Program using Educational Core Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yu Sun; Hong, Soon Kwan

    2015-01-01

    KHNP-CRI(Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co.-Central Research Institute) has redesigned the existing Core Simulator(CoSi) used as a sort of training tools for reactor engineers in operating nuclear power plant to support Nuclear Human Resources Development (NHRD) Program focusing on the nuclear department of Dalat university in Vietnam. This program has been supported by MOTIE in Korea and cooperated with KNA(Korea Nuclear Association for International Cooperation) and HYU(Hanyang University) for enhancing the nuclear human resources of potential country in consideration with Korean Nuclear Power Plant as a next candidate energy sources. KHNP-CRI has provided Edu-CoSi to Dalat University in Vietnam in order to support Nuclear Human Resources Development Program in Vietnam. Job Qualification Certificates Program in KHNP is utilized to design a training course for Vietnamese faculty and student of Dalat University. Successfully, knowhow on lecturing the ZPPT performance, training and maintaining Edu-CoSi hardware are transferred by several training courses which KHNP-CRI provides

  9. Nuclear Human Resources Development Program using Educational Core Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yu Sun; Hong, Soon Kwan [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    KHNP-CRI(Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co.-Central Research Institute) has redesigned the existing Core Simulator(CoSi) used as a sort of training tools for reactor engineers in operating nuclear power plant to support Nuclear Human Resources Development (NHRD) Program focusing on the nuclear department of Dalat university in Vietnam. This program has been supported by MOTIE in Korea and cooperated with KNA(Korea Nuclear Association for International Cooperation) and HYU(Hanyang University) for enhancing the nuclear human resources of potential country in consideration with Korean Nuclear Power Plant as a next candidate energy sources. KHNP-CRI has provided Edu-CoSi to Dalat University in Vietnam in order to support Nuclear Human Resources Development Program in Vietnam. Job Qualification Certificates Program in KHNP is utilized to design a training course for Vietnamese faculty and student of Dalat University. Successfully, knowhow on lecturing the ZPPT performance, training and maintaining Edu-CoSi hardware are transferred by several training courses which KHNP-CRI provides.

  10. Effect of calf death loss on cloned cattle herd derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer: clones with congenital defects would be removed by the death loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shinya

    2013-09-01

    To increase public understanding on cloned cattle derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), the present review describes the effect of calf death loss on an SCNT cattle herd. The incidence of death loss in SCNT cattle surviving more than 200 days reached the same level as that in conventionally bred cattle. This process could be considered as removal of SCNT cattle with congenital defects caused by calf death loss. As a result of comparative studies of SCNT cattle and conventionally bred cattle, the substantial equivalences in animal health status, milk and meat productive performance have been confirmed. Both sexes of SCNT cattle surviving to adulthood were fertile and their reproductive performance, including efficiency of progeny production, was the same as that in conventionally bred cattle. The presence of substantial equivalence between their progeny and conventionally bred cattle also existed. Despite these scientific findings, the commercial use of food products derived from SCNT cattle and their progeny has not been allowed by governments for reasons including the lack of public acceptance of these products and the low efficiency of animal SCNT. To overcome this situation, communication of the low risk of SCNT technology and research to improve SCNT efficiency are required. © 2013 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  11. Expression of programmed cell death protein 4 (PDCD4) and miR-21 in urothelial carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Nicolas, E-mail: simplissimus@gmx.de [Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Goeke, Friederike, E-mail: Friederike.goeke@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Pathology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Splittstoesser, Vera, E-mail: Veri.sp@web.de [Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Lankat-Buttgereit, Brigitte, E-mail: Lankatbu@staff.uni-marburg.de [Department of Internal Medicine, Philipps-University of Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35043 Marburg (Germany); Mueller, Stefan C., E-mail: Stefan.mueller@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Ellinger, Joerg, E-mail: Joerg.ellinger@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The tumor suppressor gene PDCD4 is down-regulated in many tumorous entities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate the impact of PDCD4 and its regulating factor miR-21 in urothelial carcinoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We confirm PDCD4 as a tumor suppressor gene and it could be a diagnostic marker for this tumor. -- Abstract: Background: We investigated the role of the programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) tumor suppressor gene in specimens of transitional cell carcinoma and of healthy individuals. Methods: PDCD4 immunohistochemical expression was investigated in 294 cases in histologically proven transitional cell carcinoma in different tumorous stages (28 controls, 122 non-muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma, stages Tis-T1, 119 invasive transitional cell carcinoma stages T2-T4 and 25 metastases). MiR-21 expression, an important PDCD4 regulator, was assessed with real-time PCR analysis and showed inverse correlation to tissue PDCD4 expression. Results: Nuclear and cytoplasmatic PDCD4 immunostaining decreased significantly with histopathological progression of the tumor (p < 0001). Controls showed strong nuclear and cytoplasmatic immunohistochemical staining. MiR-21 up regulation in tissue corresponded to PDCD4 suppression. Conclusions: These data support a decisive role for PDCD4 down regulation in transitional cell carcinoma and confirm miR-21 as a negative regulator for PDCD4. Additionally, PDCD4 immunohistochemical staining turns out to be a possible diagnostic marker for transitional cell carcinoma.

  12. Expression of programmed cell death protein 4 (PDCD4) and miR-21 in urothelial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Nicolas; Göke, Friederike; Splittstößer, Vera; Lankat-Buttgereit, Brigitte; Müller, Stefan C.; Ellinger, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The tumor suppressor gene PDCD4 is down-regulated in many tumorous entities. ► We investigate the impact of PDCD4 and its regulating factor miR-21 in urothelial carcinoma. ► We confirm PDCD4 as a tumor suppressor gene and it could be a diagnostic marker for this tumor. -- Abstract: Background: We investigated the role of the programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) tumor suppressor gene in specimens of transitional cell carcinoma and of healthy individuals. Methods: PDCD4 immunohistochemical expression was investigated in 294 cases in histologically proven transitional cell carcinoma in different tumorous stages (28 controls, 122 non-muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma, stages Tis-T1, 119 invasive transitional cell carcinoma stages T2–T4 and 25 metastases). MiR-21 expression, an important PDCD4 regulator, was assessed with real-time PCR analysis and showed inverse correlation to tissue PDCD4 expression. Results: Nuclear and cytoplasmatic PDCD4 immunostaining decreased significantly with histopathological progression of the tumor (p < 0001). Controls showed strong nuclear and cytoplasmatic immunohistochemical staining. MiR-21 up regulation in tissue corresponded to PDCD4 suppression. Conclusions: These data support a decisive role for PDCD4 down regulation in transitional cell carcinoma and confirm miR-21 as a negative regulator for PDCD4. Additionally, PDCD4 immunohistochemical staining turns out to be a possible diagnostic marker for transitional cell carcinoma.

  13. A novel approach for studying programmed cell death in living plant tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina

    to traditional approaches. Future applications of this type of setup could be used for other types of plant tissues such as leaves or germinating embryos for studying the effects of e.g. biotic and abiotic stresses or for screening of compounds for biological effects. Due to the ease of use and many......Programmed cell death (PCD) is a highly regulated process in which cells are killed as part of developmental programmes or as defence mechanisms against pathogens, but the process is less well understood in plant cells compared to animal cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in PCD...... in plants, but the relationship between and mechanisms behind ROS and PCDhas not yet been fully elucidated due to the involvement of complex signalling networks. Elucidation of these mechanisms and signalling pathways will allow manipulation of cell death in plants, which could help to improve yield...

  14. Programmed cell death during development of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) seed coat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Nathália Bastos; Trindade, Fernanda Gomes; da Cunha, Maura; Oliveira, Antônia Elenir Amâncio; Topping, Jennifer; Lindsey, Keith; Fernandes, Kátia Valevski Sales

    2015-04-01

    The seed coat develops primarily from maternal tissues and comprises multiple cell layers at maturity, providing a metabolically dynamic interface between the developing embryo and the environment during embryogenesis, dormancy and germination of seeds. Seed coat development involves dramatic cellular changes, and the aim of this research was to investigate the role of programmed cell death (PCD) events during the development of seed coats of cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.]. We demonstrate that cells of the developing cowpea seed coats undergo a programme of autolytic cell death, detected as cellular morphological changes in nuclei, mitochondria, chloroplasts and vacuoles, DNA fragmentation and oligonucleosome accumulation in the cytoplasm, and loss of membrane viability. We show for the first time that classes 6 and 8 caspase-like enzymes are active during seed coat development, and that these activities may be compartmentalized by translocation between vacuoles and cytoplasm during PCD events. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Approaches to Education and Training for Kenya's Nuclear Power Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalambuka, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    1. Review of status and development of E and T for the nuclear power program in Kenya; 2. Review of challenges in nuclear E and T, and the initiatives being undertaken to mitigate them: • Recommendations for strategic action; 3. State of nuclear skills in the context of key drivers of the global revival in nuclear energy; 4. Point of view: Education in Applied Nuclear and Radiation physics at Nairobi: • Its growth has helped identify the gaps, and relevant practical approaches for realizing the broad spectrum of technical capacity to conduct a national NPP; 5. Proposed approach to support the E and T infrastructure necessary to allow the country to plan, construct, operate, regulate, and safely and securely handle nuclear facilities sustainably; 6. Specified E and T initiatives in the context of the national industrial development strategy and nuclear energy policy and funding for the complete life cycle and technology localization. (author)

  16. Programs for low-energy nuclear physics data processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antuf'ev, Yu.P.; Dejneko, A.S.; Ekhichev, O.I.; Kuz'menko, V.A.; Mashkarov, Yu.G.; Nemashkalo, B.A.; Skakun, E.A.; Storizhko, V.E.; Shlyakhov, N.A.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose of six computer programs developed in KhPTI of AN USSR for the processing of the experimental data on low energy nuclear physics ia friendly described. The programs are written in Algol-60 language. They are applied to some types of nuclear reactions and permit to process differential cross sections and γ spectra, to compute statistical tensors and excitation functions as well as to analyze some processes by means of theoretical models

  17. Overview of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's safety research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckjord, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    Accomplishments during 1988 of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research and the program of safety research are highlighted, and plans, expections, and needs of the next year and beyond are discussed. Topics discussed include: ECCS Appendix K Revision; pressurized thermal shock; NUREG-1150, or the PRA method performance document; resolution of station blackout; severe accident integration plan; nuclear safety research review committee; and program management

  18. NNSA Program Develops the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Experts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brim, Cornelia P.; Disney, Maren V.

    2015-09-02

    NNSA is fostering the next generation of nuclear security experts is through its successful NNSA Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP). NGFP offers its Fellows an exceptional career development opportunity through hands-on experience supporting NNSA mission areas across policy and technology disciplines. The one-year assignments give tomorrow’s leaders in global nuclear security and nonproliferation unparalleled exposure through assignments to Program Offices across NNSA.

  19. CRECTJ: a computer program for compilation of evaluated nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Tsuneo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-09-01

    In order to compile evaluated nuclear data in the ENDF format, the computer program CRECTJ has been developed. CRECTJ has two versions; CRECTJ5 treats the data in the ENDF/B-IV and ENDF/B-V format, and CRECTJ6 the data in the ENDF-6 format. These programs have been frequently used to make Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (JENDL). This report describes input data and examples of CRECTJ. (author)

  20. The Drivers of Indias Nuclear Weapons Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    of-nerves. 158 Dean Nelson and Tom Hussain, “Militants Attack Pakistan Nuclear Air Base,” The Telegraph, August 16, 2012, http...hermetically sealed for storage and transport,” a process only possible now that India has largely moved to solid-fueled ballistic missiles.273...have become more hands-off with nuclear policy, since achievements in that field do not translate into electoral success. The Indian population

  1. BNL325 - Nuclear reaction data display program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunford, C.L.

    1994-01-01

    A computer code for the graphical display of nuclear reaction data is described. The code, which works on a computer with VMS operating system, can overlay experimental data from an EXFOR/CSISRS table-computation format with evaluated data from ENDF formatted data libraries. Originally, this code has been used at the U.S. National Nuclear Data Center to produce the well-known neutron cross-section atlas published as report BNL-325. (author). 3 tabs

  2. BNL325 - Nuclear reaction data display program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunford, C L

    1994-11-27

    A computer code for the graphical display of nuclear reaction data is described. The code, which works on a computer with VMS operating system, can overlay experimental data from an EXFOR/CSISRS table-computation format with evaluated data from ENDF formatted data libraries. Originally, this code has been used at the U.S. National Nuclear Data Center to produce the well-known neutron cross-section atlas published as report BNL-325. (author). 3 tabs.

  3. Angra nuclear plant - environmental control program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kircher, E.; Cruz, E.S. da

    1989-01-01

    The pre-operational studies, that were elaborated before the beginning of Angra I Power Plant operation, are described in particular the environmental radiological safety area till the fuel loading in the core reactor. Several aspects are included, as socio-economic survey, seismological analysis, Meteorological Program, marine biology, water cooling system, exposure measures of natural radiation, marine sediments characterization in the effluent dispersion area and Environmental Radiological Monitoring Program. The main environmental programs developed for the operational phase of the Angra I Plant are also presented, citing some considerations about the Meteorological Program, Marine Biology Control Program, Temperature and Chlorine Control in Piraquara de Fora Bay, Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program, Sanitary Effluent Control Program and Radiological Emergency Program. (C.G.C.). 2 refs

  4. Overview of the US spent nuclear fuel program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurt, W.L.

    1999-01-01

    This report, Overview of the United States Spent Nuclear Fuel Program, December, 1997, summarizes the U.S. strategy for interim management and ultimate disposition of spent nuclear fuel from research and test reactors. The key elements of this strategy include consolidation of this spent nuclear fuel at three sites, preparation of the fuel for geologic disposal in road-ready packages, and low-cost dry interim storage until the planned geologic repository is opened. The U.S. has a number of research programs in place that are intended to Provide data and technologies to support both characterization and disposition of the fuel. (author)

  5. Matching grant program for university nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajorek, Stephen M.

    2002-01-01

    The grant augmented funds from Westinghouse Electric Co. to enhance the Nuclear Engineering program at KSU. The program was designed to provide educational opportunities and to train engineers for careers in the nuclear industry. It provided funding and access to Westinghouse proprietary design codes for graduate and undergraduate studies on topics of current industrial importance. Students had the opportunity to use some of the most advanced nuclear design tools in the industry and to work on actual design problems. The WCOBRA/TRAC code was used to simulate loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs)

  6. USA program on the waste disposal of nuclear military complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradova, I.

    1992-01-01

    The USA program on the nuclear military complex waste disposal which focuses on the problems of environment protection and recovery is briefly considered. A group of works on the updating of the existing and on the construction of new nuclear weapon undustries is chosen to be the priority direction. The problem of radioactive waste burial in the Hunford nuclear complex is discussed. Total expenses for military enterprise purification from radioactive wastes are estimated as 91.2-129 billion dollars, and expenses for realization of the whole program are estimated as 180 billion dollars for 50 years

  7. EPRI Guide to Managing Nuclear Utility Protective Clothing Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.J.; Kelly, D.M.

    1993-10-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) commissioned a radioactive waste related project (RP2414-34) in 1989 to produce a guide for developing and managing nuclear plant protective clothing programs. Every nuclear facility must coordinate some type of protective clothing program for its radiation workers to ensure proper and safe protection for the wearer and to maintain control over the spread of contamination. Yet, every nuclear facility has developed its own unique program for managing such clothing. Accordingly, a need existed for a reference guide to assist with standardizing protective clothing programs and in controlling the potentially escalating economics of such programs. The initial Guide to Managing Nuclear Utility Protective Clothing Programs, NP-7309, was published in May 1991. Since that time, a number of utilities have reviewed and/or used the report to enhance their protective clothing programs. Some of these utilities requested that a computer program be developed to assist utilities in evaluating the economics of protective clothing programs consistent with the guidance in NP-7309. The PCEVAL computer code responds to that industry need. This report, the PCEVAL User's Manual, provides detailed instruction on use of the software

  8. Review of world nuclear power programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rippon, S.

    1978-01-01

    Political, economic and environmental decisions are still affecting the growth of nuclear power generation throughout the world, but there are signs that proven past performance and increasing prices of energy from conventional sources are becoming overriding factors. In the USA, some uncertainty has been created by the moratorium on reprocessing enacted by the 1978 Non-Proliferation Act. The uncertainty has spread to importers of nuclear fuel and technology, but there is increasing international acceptance of the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. Isotope separation capacity to be installed by the US government, by the joint European organization Urenco and by the French Eurodif should ease the supply of fuel. There is little progress on waste-management policy in the USA, but in Germany a company (DWK) has been formed and a site for a rocksalt repository has been designated at Gorleben. In the UK the Windscale inquiry has a positive significance for nuclear energy generally as well as for reprocessing. An inquiry in Sweden has also come to positive conclusions. The status of nuclear energy in these and a number of other countries is discussed in terms of political and national policies. (N.D.H.)

  9. Monitoring programmed cell death of living plant tissues in microfluidics using electrochemical and optical techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Heiskanen, Arto; Svensson, Birte

    Programmed cell death (PCD) in plants can influence the outcome of yield and quality of crops through its important role in seed germination and the defence process against pathogens. The main scope of the project is to apply microfluidic cell culture for the measurement of electrochemically......, since it is known that reactive oxygen species, which are affected by changes in the redox activity of the cells3, are involved in PCD in plants, but the relationship between and mechanisms behind ROS and PCD is only poorly understood in plant cells4. Recently, it has been shown, using optical detection...

  10. Nuclear engine system simulation (NESS) program update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheil, C.M.; Pelaccio, D.G.; Petrosky, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    The second phase of development of a Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) engine system design analysis code has been completed. The standalone, versatile Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS) code provides an accurate, detailed assessment of engine system operating performance, weight, and sizes. The critical information is required to support ongoing and future engine system and stage design study efforts. This recent development effort included incorporation of an updated solid-core nuclear thermal reactor model that yields a reduced core weight and higher fuel power density when compared to a NERVA type reactor. NESS can now analyze expander, gas generator, and bleed cycles, along with multi-redundant propellant pump feed systems. Performance and weight of efficient multi-stage axial turbopump can now be determined, in addition to the traditional centrifugal pump

  11. Virginia power nuclear power station engineer training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, T.M.; Haberstroh-Timpano, S.

    1987-01-01

    In response to the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) accreditation requirements for technical staff and manager, Virginia Power developed the Nuclear Power Station Engineer Training Programs (NPSETP). The NPSETP is directed toward enhancing the specific knowledge and skills of company engineers, especially newly hired engineers. The specific goals of the program are to promote safe and reliable plant operation by providing engineers and appropriate engineering technicians with (1) station-specific basic skills; (2) station-specific specialized skills in the areas of surveillance and test, plant engineering, nuclear safety, and in-service inspection. The training is designed to develop, maintain, and document through demonstration the required knowledge and skills of the engineers in the identified groups at North Anna and Surry Power Stations. The program responds to American National Standards Institute, INPO, and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission standards

  12. A History of the International Agreement on Iran's Nuclear Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabius, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    In May 2012, in the aftermath of the French presidential election, Iranian nuclear program posed a major challenge concerning both regional security questions and global efforts to prevent nuclear proliferation. The situation was characterized by a diplomatic stalemate, sanctions and the concerning development of Iran's nuclear program. Many fear that Iran's current program development will warrant military intervention in an effort to prevent further success. France therefore decided to implement a policy of 'constructive firmness' in the hope of reaching a robust and verifiable agreement that shows real progress in the international effort to prevent Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons. The following text is an accurate account of the process leading up to this major agreement by one of its main actors

  13. Prolonged Living as a Refugee from the Area Around a Stricken Nuclear Power Plant Increases the Risk of Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Reiichiro

    2015-08-01

    Although it is well known that the Great East Japan Earthquake (March 11, 2011) resulted in a large number of disaster-related deaths, it is not common knowledge that the number of disaster-related deaths continues to increase, even four years after the earthquake, in Fukushima Prefecture, where the nuclear power plant accident occurred. There has been a lack of a minute and critical analysis for the causes for this continuous increase. In this report, the causes for the increase in disaster-related deaths in Fukushima Prefecture were analyzed by aggregating and comparing multiple data released by public organizations (the Reconstruction Agency, the National Police Agency, and Fukushima Prefecture), which may also have implications for developing response strategies to other disasters. The disaster-related death rate, the dead or missing rate, and the refugee rate (the number of disaster-related deaths, dead or missing persons, and refugees per 1,000 people) in each prefecture in stricken areas, and also each city, county, town, and village in Fukushima Prefecture, were calculated and compared with each other. The populations which were used for the calculation of each death rate in the area were based on the number of dead victims who had lived in the area when the earthquake occurred, regardless of where they were at the time of their death. The disaster-related death rate was higher than the dead or missing rate in the area around a stricken nuclear power plant in Fukushima Prefecture. These areas coincide exactly with the Areas under Evacuation Orders because of unsafe radiation levels. The external and internal radiation doses of most of the victims of the Great East Japan Earthquake have appeared not to be so high to harm their health, until now. The psychological stress associated with being displaced from one's home for a long time with an uncertain future may be the cause for these disaster-related deaths. There is an urgent need to recognize refugees

  14. Sulfated lentinan induced mitochondrial dysfunction leads to programmed cell death of tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Yaofeng; Shen, Lili; Qian, Yumei; Yang, Jinguang; Wang, Fenglong

    2017-04-01

    Sulphated lentinan (sLTN) is known to act as a resistance inducer by causing programmed cell death (PCD) in tobacco suspension cells. However, the underlying mechanism of this effect is largely unknown. Using tobacco BY-2 cell model, morphological and biochemical studies revealed that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to sLNT induced PCD. Cell viability, and HO/PI fluorescence imaging and TUNEL assays confirmed a typical cell death process caused by sLNT. Acetylsalicylic acid (an ROS scavenger), diphenylene iodonium (an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases) and protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl hydrazone (a protonophore and an uncoupler of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation) inhibited sLNT-induced H 2 O 2 generation and cell death, suggesting that ROS generation linked, at least partly, to a mitochondrial dysfunction and caspase-like activation. This conclusion was further confirmed by double-stained cells with the mitochondria-specific marker MitoTracker RedCMXRos and the ROS probe H 2 DCFDA. Moreover, the sLNT-induced PCD of BY-2 cells required cellular metabolism as up-regulation of the AOX family gene transcripts and induction of the SA biosynthesis, the TCA cycle, and miETC related genes were observed. It is concluded that mitochondria play an essential role in the signaling pathway of sLNT-induced ROS generation, which possibly provided new insight into the sLNT-mediated antiviral response, including PCD. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Cyclophilin D links programmed cell death and organismal aging in Podospora anserina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brust, Diana; Daum, Bertram; Breunig, Christine; Hamann, Andrea; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Osiewacz, Heinz D

    2010-10-01

    Cyclophilin D (CYPD) is a mitochondrial peptidyl prolyl-cis,trans-isomerase involved in opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). CYPD abundance increases during aging in mammalian tissues and in the aging model organism Podospora anserina. Here, we show that treatment of the P. anserina wild-type with low concentrations of the cyclophilin inhibitor cyclosporin A (CSA) extends lifespan. Transgenic strains overexpressing PaCypD are characterized by reduced stress tolerance, suffer from pronounced mitochondrial dysfunction and are characterized by accelerated aging and induction of cell death. Treatment with CSA leads to correction of mitochondrial function and lifespan to that of the wild-type. In contrast, PaCypD deletion strains are not affected by CSA within the investigated concentration range and show increased resistance against inducers of oxidative stress and cell death. Our data provide a mechanistic link between programmed cell death (PCD) and organismal aging and bear implications for the potential use of CSA to intervene into biologic aging. © 2010 The Authors Aging Cell © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  16. Interplay between autophagy and programmed cell death in mammalian neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Min Chung

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian neural stem cells (NSCs are of particular interestbecause of their role in brain development and function. Recentfindings suggest the intimate involvement of programmed celldeath (PCD in the turnover of NSCs. However, the underlyingmechanisms of PCD are largely unknown. Although apoptosis isthe best-defined form of PCD, accumulating evidence hasrevealed a wide spectrum of PCD encompassing apoptosis,autophagic cell death (ACD and necrosis. This mini-reviewaims to illustrate a unique regulation of PCD in NSCs. Theresults of our recent studies on autophagic death of adulthippocampal neural stem (HCN cells are also discussed. HCNcell death following insulin withdrawal clearly provides areliable model that can be used to analyze the molecularmechanisms of ACD in the larger context of PCD. Moreresearch efforts are needed to increase our understanding of themolecular basis of NSC turnover under degenerating conditions,such as aging, stress and neurological diseases. Efforts aimed atprotecting and harnessing endogenous NSCs will offer novelopportunities for the development of new therapeutic strategiesfor neuropathologies. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(8: 383-390

  17. The United States Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program - Over 151 Million Miles Safely Steamed on Nuclear Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-03-01

    NNSA’s third mission pillar is supporting the U.S. Navy’s ability to protect and defend American interests across the globe. The Naval Reactors Program remains at the forefront of technological developments in naval nuclear propulsion and ensures a commanding edge in warfighting capabilities by advancing new technologies and improvements in naval reactor performance and reliability. In 2015, the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program pioneered advances in nuclear reactor and warship design – such as increasing reactor lifetimes, improving submarine operational effectiveness, and reducing propulsion plant crewing. The Naval Reactors Program continued its record of operational excellence by providing the technical expertise required to resolve emergent issues in the Nation’s nuclear-powered fleet, enabling the Fleet to safely steam more than two million miles. Naval Reactors safely maintains, operates, and oversees the reactors on the Navy’s 82 nuclear-powered warships, constituting more than 45 percent of the Navy’s major combatants.

  18. Applying QA to nuclear-development programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caplinger, W.H.

    1981-12-01

    The application of quality assurance (QA) principles to developmental programs is usually accomplished by tailoring or selecting appropriate requirements from large QA systems. Developmental work at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) covers the complete range from basic research to in-core reactor tests. Desired requirements are selected from the 18 criteria in ANSI/ASME NQA Standard 1 by the cognizant program engineer in conjunction with the quality engineer. These referenced criteria assure that QA for the program is planned, implemented, and maintained. In addition, the WHC QA Manual provides four categories or levels of QA that are assigned to programs or components within the program. These categories are based on safety, reliability, and consequences of failure to provide a cost effective program

  19. Nuclear Engineering Academic Programs Survey, 2002 Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2003-01-01

    The survey includes degrees granted between July 1, 2001 and June 30, 2002. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2002. Thirty-five academic programs were in the survey universe and all responded (100% response rate). One of the 35 programs reported that it was discontinued after the 2001-2002 academic year. Also, two programs were discontinued after the previous academic year (2000-2001) and were not included in 2002 survey

  20. Spanish program of advanced Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco, M.; Redon, R.

    1993-01-01

    The energy Spanish Plan is promoting some actions within the area of advanced reactors. Efforts are focussed onto the European Program of Advanced Reactors, the Program of Passive Plants (EPRI), European Fast Reactor Project and the APWR-1000 Program of INI. Electrical sector utilities and industrial partners supported by the Administration have organized an steering committee. The program of Passive Plants includes activities on Qualification, design and detailed engineering (Qualification project, SBWR project of G.E. and AP600 Project of Westinghouse. The european project on advanced plants has the following Spanish contribution: Analysis of alternative Dossier on European requisites (EUR) and Design of an European Reactor (EPR)

  1. Major accomplishments of America's nuclear rocket program (ROVER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finseth, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    The United States embarked on a program to develop nuclear rocket engines in 1955. This program was known as project Rover. Initially nuclear rockets were considered as a potential backup for intercontinental ballistic missile propulsion but later proposed applications included both a lunar second stage as well as use in manned-Mars flights. Under the Rover program, 19 different reactors were built and tested during the period of 1959-1969. Additionally, several cold flow (non-fuelled) reactors were tested as well as a nuclear fuels test cell. The Rover program was terminated in 1973, due to budget constraints and an evolving political climate. The Rover program would have led to the development of a flight engine had the program continued through a logical continuation. The Rover program was responsible for a number of technological achievements. The successful operation of nuclear rocket engines on a system level represents the pinnacle of accomplishment. This paper will discuss the engine test program as well as several subsystems

  2. Safety program considerations for space nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cropp, L.O.

    1984-08-01

    This report discusses the necessity for in-depth safety program planning for space nuclear reactor systems. The objectives of the safety program and a proposed task structure is presented for meeting those objectives. A proposed working relationship between the design and independent safety groups is suggested. Examples of safety-related design philosophies are given

  3. US Department of Energy Nuclear Research and Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    The presentation includes a discussion of nuclear power in the United States with respect to public opinion, energy consumption, economics, technology, and safety. The focus of the presentation is the advanced light water reactor strategy, liquid metal cooled reactor program, the modular high temperature gas cooled reactor program, and DOE research and test reactor facilities utilization. The discussion includes programmatic status and planning

  4. Program strategy document for the Nuclear Materials Transportation Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferson, R.M.

    1979-07-01

    A multiyear program plan is presented which describes the program of the Nuclear Materials Transportation Technology Center (TIC) at Sandia Laboratories. The work element plans, along with their corresponding work breakdown structures, are presented for TTC activities in the areas of Technology and Information Center, Systems Development, Technology, and Institutional Issues for the years from 1979 to 1985

  5. A frequent flyer program for nuclear mythology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.L.

    1997-01-01

    The anti-nuclear literature contains many erroneous and misleading allegations, collectively constituting a mythology. These are repeated endlessly, however often they are refuted, and are quoted uncritically by the media. Many are collected here, together with my rebuttals. For an explanation of the use here of the term 'frequent flyers', read on... (author)

  6. Programmed system for nuclear power plant protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jover, Pierre.

    1980-06-01

    The progress in the field of microprocessors and large scale integration circuits, have incited to introduce this new technologies into nuclear power plant protection system. The hardware and software design principles are briefly listed; then, a quad-redundant protection system for 1300 MWe PWR, developed in France is described [fr

  7. Organization and development of the Brazilian nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, C. Syllus M.; Alves, R. Nazare; Lepecki, W.; Costa, H.M. da; Grinberg, M.; Grimberg, M.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Program: its development until the present stage, as well as the organizations and the distribution of responsibilities involved in its execution at the present time. The nuclear power policy is established at the Presidency of the Republic and is planned, executed and controlled through the Ministry of Mines and Energy. Directly subject to the Ministry is the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), which has regulatory, standardization, licensing, planning and surveillance functions. The nuclear fundamental research and manpower formation are also under CNEN responsibility. Also subject to the Ministry are two companies responsible for the execution of the Programme: the Centrais Eletricas Brasileiras S.A. - ELETROBRAS, which advises on the granting of permits for the construction and operation of nuclear power plants, and the Empresas Nucleares Brasileiras S.A. - NUCLEBRAS, which holds the monopoly of the nuclear fuel cycle in the country, designs and builds nuclear power plants and provides assistance to the electric utilities as well as promotes the participation of the Brazilian industry in the nuclear field. Besides describing the new distribution of regulatory functions given by law to the CNEN, this paper gives special emphasis to the large industrial complex which is in the process of being established with the setting-up of the many NUCLEBRAS subsidiaries in joint-venture with German firms in the nuclear field, as a consequence of the Industrial Cooperation between Brazil and the Federal Republic of Germany in the Field of the Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy signed between the two countries on June 27, 1975. The programs for these subsidiaries are presented and their participation in the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Programme is discussed. The technology transfer aspects of the industrial activities are also discussed, based on the Government's policy on the subject [es

  8. Impact evaluation of the nuclear training program of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relunia, Estrella D.

    2000-01-01

    This study attempted to determine the factors that influenced the impact of the institute's training program in nuclear science and technology to the institution where the trainee works and to the trainee himself and this study involved engineers, scientists, teachers, medical doctor, technologist and professionals who have successfully completed the PNRI nuclear science and technology training courses

  9. Nuclear data needs within the U. S. Nuclear Criticality Safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKnight, R.D.; Dunn, M.E.; Little, R.C.; Felty, J.R.; McKamy, J.N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper will present the nuclear data needs currently identified within the US Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP). It will identify the priority data needs; it will describe the process of prioritizing those needs; and it will provide brief examples of recent data advances which have successfully addressed some of the priority criticality safety data needs.

  10. Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons and the Nuclear Program of the DPRK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - Park Sang Hoon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the contemporary aspects of the nuclear weapon nonproliferation issue as exemplified by the international approaches to the DPRK nuclear weapons program, as well as the international community efforts to resolve it, in particular via the Six-Party Talks.

  11. Nuclear weapons modernization: Plans, programs, and issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Amy F.

    2017-11-01

    The United States is currently recapitalizing each delivery system in its "nuclear triad" and refurbishing many of the warheads carried by those systems. The plans for these modernization programs have raised a number of questions, both within Congress and among analysts in the nuclear weapons and arms control communities, about the costs associated with the programs and the need to recapitalize each leg of the triad at the same time. This paper covers four distinct issues. It begins with a brief review of the planned modernization programs, then addresses questions about why the United States is pursuing all of these modernization programs at this time. It then reviews the debate about how much these modernization programs are likely to cost in the next decade and considers possible changes that might reduce the cost. It concludes with some comments about congressional views on the modernization programs and prospects for continuing congressional support in the coming years.

  12. Romanian nuclear fuel program: past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budan, O.; Rotaru, I.; Galeriu, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents and comments the policy adopted in Romania for the production of CANDU-6 nuclear fuel before and after 1990. In this paper the word 'past' refers to the period before 1990 and 'present' to the 1990-1997 period. The CANDU-6 nuclear fuel manufacturing started in Romania in December 1983. Neither AECL nor any Canadian nuclear fuel manufacturer were involved in the Romanian industrial nuclear fuel production before 1990. After January 1990, the new created Romanian Electricity Authority (RENEL) assumed the responsibility for the Romanian Nuclear Power Program. It was RENEL's decision to stop, in June 1990, the nuclear fuel production at the Institute for Nuclear Power Reactors (IRNE) Pitesti. This decision was justified by the Canadian specialists team findings, revealed during a general, but well enough technically founded analysis performed at IRNE in the spring of 1990. All fuel manufactured before June 1990 was quarantined as it was considered of suspect quality. By that time more than 31,000 fuel bundles had already been manufactured. This fuel was stored for subsequent assessment. The paper explains the reasons which provoked this decision. The paper also presents the strategy adopted by RENEL after 1990 regarding the Romanian Nuclear Fuel Program. After a complex program done by Romanian and Canadian partners, in November 1994, AECL issued a temporary certification for the Romanian nuclear fuel plant. During the demonstration manufacturing run, as an essential milestone for the qualification of the Romanian fuel supplier for CANDU-6 reactors, 202 fuel bundles were produced. Of these fuel bundles, 66 were part of the Cernavoda NGS Unit 1 first fuel load (the balance was supplied by Zircatec Precision Industries Inc. - ZPI). The industrial nuclear fuel fabrication re-started in Romania in January 1995 under AECL's periodical monitoring. In December 1995, AECL issued a permanent certificate, stating the Romanian nuclear fuel plant as a qualified

  13. Suicide, guns, and buyback programs: An epidemiologic analysis of firearm-related deaths in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Laura; Clinton, Heather; Berntsson, Rob; Williams, Susan S; Rovella, James C; Shapiro, David; Thaker, Shefali; Borrup, Kevin; Lapidus, Garry; Campbell, Brendan T

    2017-12-01

    Gun buyback programs aim to remove unwanted firearms from the community with the goal of preventing firearm injury and death. Buyback programs are held in many communities, but evidence demonstrating their effectiveness is lacking. The purpose of this study is to compare firearms collected at buyback events to crime guns and firearms used in homicides and suicides. Detailed firearm and case data were obtained from the Hartford Police Department and the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner from January through December of 2015. Information was reviewed for guns collected at buyback events, crime guns confiscated by police, and for weapons associated with firearm fatalities. Detailed firearm data included type, manufacturer, model, and caliber (small, ≤ 0.32 caliber; medium, 0.357 caliber to 9 mm; large, ≥ 0.40 caliber). χ analyses were used for comparisons between groups. In 2015, 224 crime guns were seized by the Hartford Police, 169 guns were collected at four community buyback events, and there were 187 firearm-related deaths statewide (105 suicides, 81 homicides, 1 legal intervention). Comparisons between buyback, crime, and fatality-related firearms are shown in the table below. Medium caliber handguns account for the majority of crime guns and fatalities, and buyback programs collected smaller caliber handguns. The demographics of individuals who turn in guns at buyback events and commit suicide are similar: age (buyback, 63 ± 11; suicide, 52 ± 18; homicide, 34 ± 12 years), sex (buyback, 81%; suicide, 91%; homicide, 84% men), and race (buyback, 80%; suicide, 97%; homicide, 47% white). Handguns account for the majority of crime guns and firearm-related fatalities in Connecticut. Buyback programs are both an opportunity to remove unwanted handguns from the community and to remove firearms from the homes of individuals at increased risk of suicide. Epidemiologic/therapeutic study, level IV.

  14. Programmed Cell Death Ligand 1 Expression in Primary Central Nervous System Lymphomas: A Clinicopathological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayano, Azusa; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Takashima, Yasuo; Takeya, Hiroto; Homma, Jumpei; Fukai, Junya; Iwadate, Yasuo; Kajiwara, Koji; Ishizawa, Shin; Hondoh, Hiroaki; Yamanaka, Ryuya

    2017-10-01

    Programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1)/programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) have been shown to predict response to PD-L1/PD-1-targeted therapy. We analyzed PD-L1 expression in primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSLs). PD-L1 protein and mRNA expression were evaluated in 64 PCNSL tissue samples. IFN-γ, IL-10, CD4, and CD8 mRNA expression was also evaluated. PD-L1 protein was detected in tumor cells in 2 (4.1%) cases and in tumor microenvironments in 25 (52%) cases. PD-L1 mRNA positively correlated with IFN-γ (p=0.0024) and CD4 (p=0.0005) mRNA expression. IFN-γ mRNA positively correlated with CD8 mRNA expression (p=0.0001). Furthermore, tumor cell PD-L1 expression correlated positively with overall survival (p=0.0177), whereas microenvironmental PD-L1 expression exhibited an insignificant negative trend with overall survival (p=0.188). PD-L1 was expressed on both tumor and/or tumor-infiltrating immune cells in PCNSL. The biological roles of this marker warrant further investigation. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  15. Harnessing the immune system through programmed death-1 blockade in the management of Hodgkin lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oncale MB

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Melody B Oncale, Hossein Maymani, Loretta J Nastoupil Department of Lymphoma and Myeloma, Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Immunotherapy is a rapidly evolving therapeutic option in the treatment of lymphoma. Neoplastic cells evade immune recognition through the programmed death (PD-1/PD-ligand immune checkpoint pathway. Several novel agents have been developed to restore the immune system’s ability to recognize and destroy cancer cells. Nivolumab and pembrolizumab are two anti-PD-1 antibodies that have demonstrated success in the treatment of refractory Hodgkin lymphoma. Harnessing the immune system’s ability to target neoplastic cells, ideally without the use of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents, is one way in which these novel agents are changing the therapeutic landscape in the treatment of lymphomas. Here, we review the emerging data regarding checkpoint inhibitors in the management of Hodgkin lymphoma, the unique adverse effects encountered with the use of these agents, and a practical approach to the management of these adverse effects. Additionally, we discuss upcoming trials that will further assess the promising future developments of checkpoint inhibition in the treatment of not only Hodgkin lymphoma but also other B cell lymphomas and myeloma. These agents offer immense promise of a future where many lymphomas can be treated without the toxic effects of chemotherapeutic agents. Keywords: Hodgkin lymphoma, programmed death-1, nivolumab, pembrolizumab, lymphoma

  16. Interfaith Program for Public Awareness of Nuclear Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    Planning for the Interfaith Progam for Public Awareness of Nuclear Issues (IPPANI) began at the time of the Falkland Islands crisis. At that time representatives of certain of the faith groups in Toronto became concerned about the moral and ethical implications of Canada's export of fuel for a CANDU nuclear generating plant in Argentina. In order to accomplish its goals, the Planning Committee devised a program to provide unbiased input to the faith groups' deliberations on the ethical and moral issues involved in the nuclear debate. The development of a fair set of questions was aided by obtaining advice from the Canadian Nuclear Association (CNA), and from Energy Probe and others. The work of preparing a suitable agenda was completed early in 1984. Its result was embodied in appendices to the public document promoting the program, which is appended to this report. Invitations were sent to over six hundred individuals and organizations to appear before the panelists as 'presenters'. The resulting invitation list included spokespeople for both 'pro' and 'anti' nuclear positions on each of the three topics, as well as some who were found to be 'in the middle'. The three major topics were domestic nuclear issues, international trade and military uses of nuclear materials and technology. The next task of the Planning Committee is that of embodying the process and its results in an educational program for the supplementary and parochial school systems. The production of this book is the first step in that task

  17. Maintaining quality control in a nontraditional nuclear technology degree program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeSain, G.W.

    1989-01-01

    Regents College, created by the Board of Regents of the University of The State on New York in 1971, has been offering, since January 1985, AS and BS degrees in nuclear technology. The impetus for establishing the nuclear technology degrees came from nuclear utility management and had to do with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission proposed rule regarding degreed operators on shift. There are a variety of ways to earn credits in Regents College degree programs: (1) college courses taken for degree-level credit from regionally accredited colleges; (2) courses sponsored by business, industry, or government that have been evaluated and recommended for credit by the New York National or American Council on Education (ACE's) Program on Noncollegiate Sponsored Instruction (PONSI); (3) military education that has been evaluated by ACE PONSI; (4) approved college-proficiency examinations; and (5) special assessment: an individualized examination of college-level knowledge gained from experience or independent study. Nuclear technology students primarily use college course work, evaluated military education, and proficiency examinations to complete degree programs. However, an increasing number of utilities are having training programs PONSI evaluated, resulting in an increased use of these courses in the nuclear technology degrees. Quality control is a function of several factors described in the paper

  18. Vinca institute nuclear decommissioning program - Establishment and initialisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.; Subotic, K.; Ljubenov, V.; Sotic, O.

    2003-01-01

    Present conditions in The Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences related to the nuclear and radiation safety, as result of ambitious nuclear program in the former Yugoslavia and strong economic crisis during the previous decade, have to be improved as soon as possible. RA research reactor, which extended shutdown stage took almost 18 years, spent nuclear fuel from the RA operation in the water pools within the reactor building and inadequate storage facilities for the low and intermediate radioactive wastes at the Vinca site are the main safety problems that have to be solved. To solve the problems mentioned above, a new 'Vinca Nuclear Decommissioning (VIND) Program' is initiated in the Vinca Institute during 2002. The Program team is assembled from about 60 experts from the Institute and relevant organisations. The Program, known also as the G reen Vinca , will be supported, besides the government funding and expected donation from foreign institutions, by experts' help from the IAEA. The necessary equipment will be obtained through the technical assistance from the IAEA. Close co-operation of the team members with experts and relevant companies from nuclear developed countries is expected. (author)

  19. Program of radiological monitoring environmental a nuclear facility in latency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blas, A. de; Riego, A.; Batalla, E.; Tapia, C.; Garcia, R.; Sanchez, J.; Toral, J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the Radiological Environmental Monitoring program of the Vandellos I nuclear power plant in the latency period. This facility was dismantled to level 2, as defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The program is an adaptation of the implanted one during the dismantling, taking into account the isotopes that may be present, as well as the main transfer routes. Along with the description of the program the results obtained in the latent period from 2005 until 2012 are presented.

  20. Status of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.B.

    1985-10-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is in the fifth year of a ten-year generic research and development phase. The major objective of this phase of the program is to assess the basic safety and environmental aspects of the concept of isolating immobilized fuel waste by deep underground disposal in plutonic rock. The major scientific and engineering components of the program, namely immobilization studies, geoscience research, and environmental and safety assessment, are well established

  1. Initiatives in training program evaluation outside the nuclear utility industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    Training literature is reviewed, and program evaluative practices outside the nuclear utility industry are reported. The findings indicate some innovations in philosophy and practice and program evaluation, although not necessarily in the context of evaluation as a route to assessing the impact of training. Program evaluation is described in the context of the impact of training, suggesting continued efforts to accept a multivariate concept of individual and organizational performance

  2. Application of Nuclear Application Programs to APR1400 Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Do Hyun; Lee, Myeong Soo; Hong, Jin Hyuk

    2012-01-01

    Advanced Power Reactor 1400MWe (APR1400) simulator has been developed and installed at Kori Training Center for operators of ShinKori no.3, 4 nuclear power plant by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power,s Central Research Institute (KHNP CRI). NAPS (Nuclear Application Programs) is a computerbased system which provides operators with past and real-time information for monitoring and controlling NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System), BOP (Balance Of Plant) and Electric system. NAPS consists of several programs such as COLSS (Core Operating Limit Supervisory System), SPADES+ (Safety Parameter Display and Evaluation System), CEA (Control Element Assembly) Application Program, and so on. Each program makes calculations based on its own algorithm and provides information available for operation. In order to use NAPS programs with a simulator even though they are being used in a real plant, they should be modified to add several simulation functions such as reset, snap, run/freeze and backtrack required by ANSI/ANS-3.5 to the original NAPS functionality. On top of that, interfacing programs should be developed for the data communication between respective NAPS programs and simulator sever. The purpose of this paper is to provide the overall architecture of the communication system between NAPS and simulator model, and to describe the method to apply NAPS to APR1400 simulator

  3. Status of nuclear power programs in South America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitalnik, J.

    2010-10-01

    Analysis of nuclear power plants construction in four South American countries - Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Uruguay - is made based on programs set up by government specialized agencies. In Argentina, in a time-span up to 2023, the nuclear power program considers a five-fold increase of the current installed capacity reaching some 5,000 M We. The Brazilian reference scenario will install additional 4,000 M We, up to 2030, to reach a total installed capacity of about 6,000 M We. Other scenarios could bring this total to some 8,000 - 10,000 M We. Chile and Uruguay have started strategic studies to place the nuclear power option in the future energy matrix of the country. The government of Chile set up, in 2007, a Task Group to determine whether nuclear power could be considered a viable option. This Group concluded that nuclear power is a mature, safe competitive, and low carbon emitter technology that could be considered a viable option. A Nuclear Advisory Group was created who made studies to install a nuclear power plant in the 2016-2021 time-span. In December 2008, the Uruguayan Government created a high level Working Group to establish the feasibility conditions for Nuclear Power Generation in the country. (Author)

  4. Behavioral reliability program for the nuclear industry. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, J.C.; Davis, S.O.; Dunnette, M.D.; Meyer, P.; Sharac, J.

    1981-07-01

    The subject of the study was the development of standards for a behavioral observation program which could be used by the NRC licensed nuclear industry to detect indications of emotional instability in its employees who have access to protected and vital areas. Emphasis was placed on those observable characteristics which could be assessed by supervisors or peers in a work environment. The behavioral reliability program, as was defined in this report, encompasses the concept and basic components of the program, the definition of the behavioral reliability program, the definition of the behavioral reliability criterion, and a set of instructions for the creation and implementation of the program by an individual facility

  5. Program nuclear safety research: report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehl, B.

    2001-09-01

    The reactor safety R and D work of forschungszentrum karlsruhe (FZK) had been part of the nuclear safety research project (PSF) since 1990. In 2000, a new organisational structure was introduced and the Nuclear Safety Research Project was transferred into the nuclear safety research programme (NUKLEAR). In addition to the three traditional main topics - Light Water Reactor safety, Innovative systems, Studies related to the transmutation of actinides -, the new Programme NUKLEAR also covers Safety research related to final waste storage and Immobilisation of HAW. These new topics, however, will only be dealt with in the next annual report. Some tasks related to the traditional topics have been concluded and do no longer appear in the annual report; other tasks are new and are described for the first time. Numerous institutes of the research centre contribute to the work programme, as well as several external partners. The tasks are coordinated in agreement with internal and external working groups. The contributions to this report, which are either written in German or in English, correspond to the status of early/mid 2001. (orig.)

  6. Assessment of specialized educational programs for licensed nuclear reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melber, B.D.; Saari, L.M.; White, A.S.; Geisendorfer, C.L.; Huenefeld, J.C.

    1986-02-01

    This report assesses the job-relatedness of specialized educational programs for licensed nuclear reactor operators. The approach used involved systematically comparing the curriculum of specialized educational programs for college credit, to academic knowledge identified as necessary for carrying out the jobs of licenses reactor operators. A sample of eight programs, including A.S. degree, B.S. degree, and coursework programs were studied. Subject matter experts in the field of nuclear operations curriculum and training determined the extent to which individual program curricula covered the identified job-related academic knowledge. The major conclusions of the report are: There is a great deal of variation among individual programs, ranging from coverage of 15% to 65% of the job-related academic knowledge. Four schools cover at least half, and four schools cover less than one-third of this knowledge content; There is no systematic difference in the job-relatedness of the different types of specialized educational programs, A.S. degree, B.S. degree, and coursework; and Traditional B.S. degree programs in nuclear engineering cover as much job-related knowledge (about one-half of this knowledge content) as most of the specialized educational programs

  7. The Maryland nuclear science baccalaureate degree program: The utility perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    In the early 1980s, Wisconsin Public Service Corporation (WPSC) made a firm commitment to pursue development and subsequent delivery of an appropriate, academically accredited program leading to a baccalaureate degree in nuclear science for its nuclear operations personnel. Recognizing the formidable tasks to be accomplished, WPSC worked closely with the University of Maryland University College (UMUC) in curriculum definition, specific courseware development for delivery by computer-aided instruction, individual student evaluation, and overall program implementation. Instruction began on our nuclear plant site in the fall of 1984. The university anticipates conferring the first degrees from this program at WPSC in the fall of 1989. There are several notable results that WPSC achieved from this degree program. First and most importantly, an increase in the level of education of our employees. It should be stated that this program has been well received by WPSC operator personnel. These employees, now armed with plant experience, a formal degree in nuclear science, and professional education in management are real candidates for advancement in our nuclear organization

  8. Nuclear criticality safety program at the Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lell, R.M.; Fujita, E.K.; Tracy, D.B.; Klann, R.T.; Imel, G.R.; Benedict, R.W.; Rigg, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    The Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) is designed to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel commercial-scale remote pyrometallurgical process for metallic fuels from liquid metal-cooled reactors and to show closure of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. Requirements for nuclear criticality safety impose the most restrictive of the various constraints on the operation of FCF. The upper limits on batch sizes and other important process parameters are determined principally by criticality safety considerations. To maintain an efficient operation within appropriate safety limits, it is necessary to formulate a nuclear criticality safety program that integrates equipment design, process development, process modeling, conduct of operations, a measurement program, adequate material control procedures, and nuclear criticality analysis. The nuclear criticality safety program for FCF reflects this integration, ensuring that the facility can be operated efficiently without compromising safety. The experience gained from the conduct of this program in the Fuel cycle Facility will be used to design and safely operate IFR facilities on a commercial scale. The key features of the nuclear criticality safety program are described. The relationship of these features to normal facility operation is also described

  9. Nuclear plant aging research program activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissenberg, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this program is to provide recommendations for use by NRC regarding the availability and capability of diagnostic methods for assuring the operational readiness of NPP safety systems and components

  10. Quality assurance in the nuclear test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shearer, J.N.

    1979-01-01

    In February 1979 Test Program laid the ground work for a new quality assurance structure. The new approach was based on the findings and recommendations of the Ad Hoc QA Program Review panel, which are summarized in this report. The new structure places the responsibility for quality assurance in the hands of the line organizations, both in the programmatic and functional elements of the LLL matrix

  11. NuMA and nuclear lamins are cleaved during viral infection - inhibition of caspase activity prevents cleavage and rescues HeLa cells from measles virus-induced but not from rhinovirus 1B-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taimen, Pekka; Berghaell, Heidi; Vainionpaeae, Raija; Kallajoki, Markku

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear matrix is a structural framework of important nuclear processes. We studied the effect of two different types of viral infections on nuclear matrix. HeLa cells were infected with human rhinovirus 1B (HRV 1B) or measles virus (MV), and Nuclear Mitotic Apparatus protein (NuMA) and lamins A/C and B were used as markers for internal nuclear matrix and peripheral nuclear lamina, respectively. We show that NuMA, lamins, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 are cleaved during viral infection in a virus family-specific manner suggesting that these viruses activate different sets of proteases. Morphologically, NuMA was excluded from the condensed chromatin, lamins showed a folded distribution, and both proteins finally remained around the nuclear fragments. A general caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (z-VAD-FMK) prevented the nuclear disintegration and the cleavage of the proteins studied. Interestingly, z-VAD-FMK rescued MV-infected but not HRV 1B-infected cells from cell death. These results show for the first time that NuMA and lamins are specific target proteins during virus-induced programmed cell death

  12. A critical role for ethylene in hydrogen peroxide release during programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de A.J.; Yakimova, E.T.; Kapchina, V.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2002-01-01

    Camptothecin, a topo isomerase-I inhibitor used in cancer therapy, induces apoptosis in animal cells. In tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells, camptothecin induces cell death that is accompanied by the characteristic nuclear morphological changes such as chromatin condensation and

  13. Possible research program on a large scale nuclear pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The nuclear pressure vessel structural integrity is actually one of the main items in the nuclear plants safety field. An international study group aimed at investigating the feasibility of a ''possible research program'' on a scale 1:1 LWR pressure vessel. This report presents the study group's work. The different research programs carried out or being carried out in various countries of the European Community are presented (phase I of the study). The main characteristics of the vessel considered for the program and an evaluation of activities required for making them available are listed. Research topic priorities from the different interested countries are summarized in tables (phase 2); a critical review by the study group of the topic is presented. Then, proposals for possible experimental programs and combination of these programs are presented, only as examples of possible useful research activities. The documents pertaining to the results of phase I inquiry performed by the study group are reported in the appendix

  14. Sister Lab Program Prospective Partner Nuclear Profile: Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bissani, M; Tyson, S

    2006-01-01

    The Malaysian Deputy Prime Minister Tun Dr Ismail Abdul Rahman suggested in the early 1970s that Malaysia should have a role in the development of nuclear science and technology for peaceful purposes. Accordingly, the Center for the Application of Nuclear Energy (CRANE) was established, with a focus on the development of a scientific and technical pool critical to a national nuclear power program. The Malaysian Cabinet next established the Tun Ismail Atomic Research Center (TIARC) under the Ministry of Science, Technology and the Environment on 19 September 1972, at a site in Bangi, about 35 km south of Kuala Lampur. On 28 June 1982, the PUSPATI reactor, a 1-MW TRIGA MK-II research reactor, first reached criticality. On 10 August 1994, TIARC was officially renamed as the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT). In addition to radioisotope production and neutron radiography conducted at the PUSPATI research reactor, MINT also supports numerous programs employing nuclear technology for medicine, agriculture and industry, and has been involved in both bilateral and multilateral technical cooperation to extend its capabilities. As an energy exporting country, Malaysia has felt little incentive to develop a nuclear energy program, and high level opposition within the government discouraged it further. A recent statement by Malaysia's Science, Technology and Innovation Minister supported this view, indicating that only a near-catastrophic jump in world oil prices might change the government's view. However, the rate at which Malaysia is using its natural gas and oil reserves is expected to force it to reassess the role of nuclear energy in the near future. In addition, the government does intend to construct a radioactive waste repository to dispose of naturally occurring radioactive materials (extracted during tin mining, in particular). Also, Malaysia's growing economy could encourage expansion in Malaysia's existing nuclear-applications programs

  15. Nuclear Waste Treatment Program: Annual report for FY 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkholder, H.C.; Brouns, R.A.; Powell, J.A.

    1987-09-01

    To support DOE's attainment of its goals, Nuclear Waste Treatment Program (NWTP) is to provide technology necessary for the design and operation of nuclear waste treatment facilities by commercial enterprises as part of a licensed waste management system and problem-specific treatment approaches, waste form and treatment process adaptations, equipment designs, and trouble-shooting. This annual report describes progress during FY 1986 toward meeting these two objectives. 29 refs., 59 figs., 25 tabs

  16. Nuclear Waste Treatment Program: Annual report for FY 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkholder, H.C.; Brouns, R.A. (comps.); Powell, J.A. (ed.)

    1987-09-01

    To support DOE's attainment of its goals, Nuclear Waste Treatment Program (NWTP) is to provide technology necessary for the design and operation of nuclear waste treatment facilities by commercial enterprises as part of a licensed waste management system and problem-specific treatment approaches, waste form and treatment process adaptations, equipment designs, and trouble-shooting. This annual report describes progress during FY 1986 toward meeting these two objectives. 29 refs., 59 figs., 25 tabs.

  17. Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, A.J.; Azarm, A.; Baum, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    This progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the Division of Regulatory Applications, Division of Engineering, Division of Safety Issue Resolution, and Division of Systems Research of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research following the reorganization in July 1988. The previous reports have covered the period October 1, 1976 through September 30, 1988

  18. Iraq's shop-till-you-drop nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albright, D.; Hibbs, M.

    1992-01-01

    In a series of articles that began in March 1991, the authors have tried to separate fact from fiction about Iraq's ability to build nuclear weapons and to produce material to fuel them. After exposing Iraq's efforts to enrich uranium and design an atomic bomb, UN and IAEA experts zeroed in on how Iraq put its program together. The basic answer is that along with determination and persistence, Iraq had a great deal of foreign help. Iraq's 'Petrochemical Three,' the secret nuclear program conducted under the authority of its Atomic Energy Commission with links to the Defense Ministry and the Ministry of Industry and Military Industrialization, received massive infusions of money and resources. Like the Manhattan Project that built the first atomic bombs in the United States, Iraq's program simultaneously pursued a number of different technical avenues to the bomb. Not knowing which efforts would succeed, Iraq poured billions of dollars into its multifaceted quest. Providing for these programs required the establishment of elaborate procurement networks in Europe, North America, and Asia. Like the technical quest, the procurement effort was carried out on many fronts at once. Diplomacy and secrecy were required, because few companies would knowingly supply a nuclear weapons program, or even a secret nuclear program that was ostensibly for civil purposes. Iraq showed great ingenuity in hiding its purchases behind such innocuous pursuits as automobile manufacturing, dairy production, and oil refining

  19. Kinematical program package for nuclear reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Nengxiong; Xie Ying

    1988-01-01

    A FORTRAN package is designed to provide users as many conveniences as possible. Besides adopting man-machine interaction mode and setting nuclide mass file, there are still some other features which are, for examples, the functions of offering the initial values for some transcendental equations and evaluating all the kinematic variables in nuclear reactions at low energies of the form of T (p,1)2, T (p,12)3 and T (p,12)34. All these make the users much easier to use the package

  20. Developing engineering capabilities as a support to a nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, A.G.

    1986-04-01

    The performance of a nuclear program needs a quite substantial and diversified volume of technological resources. Its integrated management is one of the basic aspects to be settled. In this regard, the creation of strong engineering organizations with the ability to develop management of the project technical activities as a whole has had success in various countries. These organizations should be provided with suitable means to rapidly assimilate the technology and should serve as a channel and support to local industry in general. The development of a nuclear program also requires the collaboration of other institutions, such as universities and research and development centers. In this sense, engineer and technician training necessities are important both in number and technological qualification, as is the availability of capacities in such different areas as simulation and advanced calculation, geology and soil mechanics, materials, fabrication processes, test laboratories, etc. The volume of technological activities to be developed in relation to a stable, although not necessarily large, nuclear program justifies in itself the assigning of important resources to all the above mentioned activities. However, it should be noted that it has been proved that the nuclear industry is completely pervious as regards other fields of activity. In fact, the more stringent quality requirements are quickly transmitted to other industrial processes, and the engineers trained in this area undergo a far from contemptible turnover towards non-nuclear activities. The basic research area in the nuclear field is not in itself a requirement that has to be in parallel with the development of a nuclear program. However, on medium and long-term bases, it may be interesting for a well balanced commercial program that research activities be established realistically and sensibly, even though short-term practical applications are not necessarily derived from this

  1. Programming for a nuclear reactor instrument simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    A new computerized control system for a transient test reactor incorporates a simulator for pre-operational testing of control programs. The part of the simulator pertinent to the discussion here consists of two microprocessors. An 8086/8087 reactor simulator calculates simulated reactor power by solving the reactor kinetics equations. An 8086 instrument simulator takes the most recent power value developed by the reactor simulator and simulates the appropriate reading on each of the eleven reactor instruments. Since the system is required to run on a one millisecond cycle, careful programming was required to take care of all eleven instruments in that short time. This note describes the special programming techniques used to attain the needed performance

  2. Human factors engineering plan for reviewing nuclear plant modernization programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, John; Higgins, James

    2004-12-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of nuclear power plants (NPPs) involved in the modernization of the plant systems and control rooms. The purpose of a HFE review is to help ensure personnel and public safety by verifying that accepted HFE practices and guidelines are incorporated into the program and nuclear power plant design. Such a review helps to ensure the HFE aspects of an NPP are developed, designed, and evaluated on the basis of a structured top-down system analysis using accepted HFE principles. The review addresses eleven HFE elements: HFE Program Management, Operating Experience Review, Functional Requirements Analysis and Allocation, Task Analysis, Staffing, Human Reliability Analysis, Human-System Interface Design, Procedure Development, Training Program Development, Human Factors Verification and Validation, and Design Implementation

  3. Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization qualification program. Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization (NCSO) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of highly qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This document defines the Qualification Program to address the NCSO technical and managerial qualification as required by the Y-12 Training Implementation Matrix (TIM). It is implemented through a combination of LMES plant-wide training courses and professional nuclear criticality safety training provided within the organization. This Qualification Program is applicable to technical and managerial NCSO personnel, including temporary personnel, sub-contractors and/or LMES employees on loan to the NCSO, who perform the NCS tasks or serve NCS-related positions as defined in sections 5 and 6 of this program

  4. The American Nuclear Society's international student exchange program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornstein, I.

    1988-01-01

    The American Nuclear Society's (ANS's) International Student Exchange Program sponsors bilateral exchanges of students form graduate schools in American universities with students from graduate schools in France, the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), and Japan. The program, now in its 12th year, was initiated in response to an inquiry to Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) from the director of the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay proposing to send French nuclear engineering students to the United States for summer jobs. The laboratory was asked to accept two students to work on some nuclear technology activity and ANS was invited to send American students to France on an exchange basis. To date, 200 students have taken part in the program. It has been a maturing and enriching experience for them, and many strong and enduring friendships have been fostered among the participants, many of whom will become future leaders in their countries

  5. Human factors engineering plan for reviewing nuclear plant modernization programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, John; Higgins, James [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    2004-12-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of nuclear power plants (NPPs) involved in the modernization of the plant systems and control rooms. The purpose of a HFE review is to help ensure personnel and public safety by verifying that accepted HFE practices and guidelines are incorporated into the program and nuclear power plant design. Such a review helps to ensure the HFE aspects of an NPP are developed, designed, and evaluated on the basis of a structured top-down system analysis using accepted HFE principles. The review addresses eleven HFE elements: HFE Program Management, Operating Experience Review, Functional Requirements Analysis and Allocation, Task Analysis, Staffing, Human Reliability Analysis, Human-System Interface Design, Procedure Development, Training Program Development, Human Factors Verification and Validation, and Design Implementation.

  6. Nuclear power programs in the world's developed and developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czibolya, L.

    1983-01-01

    The significance of nuclear power in the world's energy balance related to fossile energy sources is discussed. The general trend of declination of the national power programs could be observed from the seventies as a result of the oil crisis and the economic recession. The main features of the national energy programs including the ratio of the different energy sources in the power supply, the distribution of power production among the different types of nuclear reactors, the time schedules of the national nuclear power programs are reviewed through the examples of some developed and developing countries: USA, FRG, Canada, Japan, France, Sweden, the Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Hungary, Romania, India, and the Republic of Korea. (V.N.)

  7. Nuclear criticality safety specialist training and qualification programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopper, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Nuclear Criticality Safety Division of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) in 1967, the nuclear criticality safety (NCS) community has sought to provide an exchange of information at a national level to facilitate the education and development of NCS specialists. In addition, individual criticality safety organizations within government contractor and licensed commercial nonreactor facilities have developed training and qualification programs for their NCS specialists. However, there has been substantial variability in the content and quality of these program requirements and personnel qualifications, at least as measured within the government contractor community. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief, general history of staff training and to describe the current direction and focus of US DOE guidance for the content of training and qualification programs designed to develop NCS specialists

  8. BNFL nuclear decommissioning liabilities management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colquhoun, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe BNFL's policy and strategy for decommissioning and also to summarize the overall scope of nuclear liabilities in the wider field of waste retrieval and storage, as well as the dismantling and demolition aspects of decommissioning. BNFL's recently established organisational arrangements for discharging all types of these liabilities are explained, together with a review of practical progress in dealing with them. Organisational changes in recent years have amalgamated decommissioning work with operations covering waste storage and retrieval operations. A strategy of minimising residual activity in shutdown plants is pursued, followed by dismantling and demolition on appropriate time scales to minimise risk and cost. Since April 1995, a new BNFL subsidiary, Nuclear Liabilities Management Company Limited has taken responsibility for discharge of BNFL's Waste Retrieval and Decommissioning liabilities on all BNFL sites. NLM has the objectives of optimal and lowest cost management of liabilities and much clearer segregation of physical operations from project specification and planning. The Ministry of Defense (MoD) policy, strategy, work programmes and progress for the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) are also outlined. MoD/AEA has established an equivalent strategy for dealing with its liabilities. (J.S.). 5 refs., 2 figs., 4 appends

  9. Nuclear Materials Stewardship Within the DOE Environmental Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilyeu, J. D.; Kiess, T. E.; Gates, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Program has made significant progress in planning disposition of its excess nuclear materials and has recently completed several noteworthy studies. Since establishment in 1997, the EM Nuclear Material Stewardship Program has developed disposition plans for excess nuclear materials to support facility deactivation. All nuclear materials have been removed from the Miamisburg Environmental Management Project (Mound), and disposition planning is nearing completion for the Fernald Environmental Management Project and the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. Only a few issues remain for materials at the Hanford and Idaho sites. Recent trade studies include the Savannah River Site Canyons Nuclear Materials Identification Study, a Cesium/Strontium Management Alternatives Trade Study, a Liquid Technical Standards Trade Study, an Irradiated Beryllium Reflectors with Tritium study, a Special Performance Assessment Required Trade Study, a Neutron Source Trade Study, and development of discard criteria for uranium. A Small Sites Workshop was also held. Potential and planned future activities include updating the Plutonium-239 storage study, developing additional packaging standards, developing a Nuclear Material Disposition Handbook, determining how to recover or dispose of Pu-244 and U-233, and working with additional sites to define disposition plans for their nuclear materials

  10. Programmed Death-ligand 1 Expression in Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skala, Stephanie L; Liu, Tzu-Ying; Udager, Aaron M; Weizer, Alon Z; Montgomery, Jeffrey S; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Siddiqui, Javed; Cao, Xuhong; Fields, Kristina; Abugharib, Ahmed E; Soliman, Moaaz; Hafez, Khaled S; Miller, David; Lee, Cheryl T; Alva, Ajjai; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Morgan, Todd M; Spratt, Daniel E; Jiang, Hui; Mehra, Rohit

    2017-10-01

    Urothelial carcinoma (UC) is the most common malignancy of the urinary tract. Upper tract (renal pelvis and ureter) urothelial carcinomas (UTUC) account for approximately 5% of UCs but a significant subset are invasive and associated with poor clinical outcomes. To evaluate programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in UTUC. UTUC cases from 1997-2016 were retrospectively identified from the surgical pathology database at a single large academic institution. The cohort included 149 cases: 27 low-grade and 24 high-grade pathologic T (pT)a, 29 pT1, 23 pT2, 38 pT3, and eight pT4. PD-L1 immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed on representative whole tumor sections using anti-PD-L1 primary antibody clone 5H1. PD-L1 expression was evaluated using a previously established cut-off for positivity (≥ 5% membranous staining). Association between PD-L1 IHC expression and clinicopathologic parameters was examined with Fisher's exact test; the effect of PD-L1 expression on cancer-specific mortality was assessed using the Cox proportional hazard model. Approximately one-third (32.7%) of invasive primary UTUC and 23.5% of all primary UTUC (invasive and noninvasive tumors) demonstrated positive PD-L1 expression. Positive PD-L1 expression was associated with high histologic grade, high pathologic stage, and angiolymphatic invasion. Cancer-specific survival was not significantly associated with positive PD-L1 expression using a 5% cut-off. Study limitations include the retrospective nature and the fact that PD-L1 expression by IHC is an imperfect surrogate for response to therapy. Positive PD-L1 expression in approximately one-third of primary invasive UTUC and association with high-risk clinicopathologic features provide a rational basis for further investigation of PD-L1-based immunotherapeutics in these patients. Upper tract urothelial carcinoma is often associated with poor clinical outcome. While current treatment options for advanced upper tract urothelial carcinoma are

  11. Apoptotic-like programmed cell death in fungi: the benefits in filamentous species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neta eShlezinger

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies conducted in the early 1990's showed for the first time that Saccahromyces cerevisiae can undergo cell death with hallmarks of animal apoptosis. These findings came as a surprise, since suicide machinery was unexpected in unicellular organisms. Today, apoptosis in yeast is well documented. Apoptotic death of yeast cells has been described under various conditions and S. cerevisiae homologues of human apoptotic genes have been identified and characterized. These studies also revealed fundamental differences between yeast and animal apoptosis; in S. cerevisiae apoptosis is mainly associated with ageing and stress adaptation, unlike animal apoptosis, which is essential for proper development. Further, many apoptosis regulatory genes are either missing, or highly divergent in S. cerevisiae. Therefore, in this review we will use the term apoptosis-like programmed cell death (PCD instead of apoptosis. Despite these significant differences, S. cerevisiae has been instrumental in promoting the study of heterologous apoptotic proteins, particularly from human. Work in fungi other than S. cerevisiae revealed differences in the manifestation of PCD in single cell (yeasts and multi-cellular (filamentous species. Such differences may reflect the higher complexity level of filamentous species, and hence the involvement of PCD in a wider range of processes and life styles. It is also expected that differences might be found in the apoptosis apparatus of yeast and filamentous species. In this review we focus on aspects of PCD that are unique or can be better studied in filamentous species. We will highlight the similarities and differences of the PCD machinery between yeast and filamentous species and show the value of using S. cerevisiae along with filamentous species to study apoptosis.

  12. Apoptotic-like programed cell death in fungi: the benefits in filamentous species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlezinger, Neta; Goldfinger, Nir; Sharon, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Studies conducted in the early 1990s showed for the first time that Saccharomyces cerevisiae can undergo cell death with hallmarks of animal apoptosis. These findings came as a surprise, since suicide machinery was unexpected in unicellular organisms. Today, apoptosis in yeast is well-documented. Apoptotic death of yeast cells has been described under various conditions and S. cerevisiae homologs of human apoptotic genes have been identified and characterized. These studies also revealed fundamental differences between yeast and animal apoptosis; in S. cerevisiae apoptosis is mainly associated with aging and stress adaptation, unlike animal apoptosis, which is essential for proper development. Further, many apoptosis regulatory genes are either missing, or highly divergent in S. cerevisiae. Therefore, in this review we will use the term apoptosis-like programed cell death (PCD) instead of apoptosis. Despite these significant differences, S. cerevisiae has been instrumental in promoting the study of heterologous apoptotic proteins, particularly from human. Work in fungi other than S. cerevisiae revealed differences in the manifestation of PCD in single cell (yeasts) and multicellular (filamentous) species. Such differences may reflect the higher complexity level of filamentous species, and hence the involvement of PCD in a wider range of processes and life styles. It is also expected that differences might be found in the apoptosis apparatus of yeast and filamentous species. In this review we focus on aspects of PCD that are unique or can be better studied in filamentous species. We will highlight the similarities and differences of the PCD machinery between yeast and filamentous species and show the value of using S. cerevisiae along with filamentous species to study apoptosis.

  13. Apoptotic-like programed cell death in fungi: the benefits in filamentous species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlezinger, Neta; Goldfinger, Nir; Sharon, Amir, E-mail: amirsh@ex.tau.ac.il [Department of Molecular Biology and Ecology of Plants, Tel Aviv University,, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2012-08-07

    Studies conducted in the early 1990s showed for the first time that Saccharomyces cerevisiae can undergo cell death with hallmarks of animal apoptosis. These findings came as a surprise, since suicide machinery was unexpected in unicellular organisms. Today, apoptosis in yeast is well-documented. Apoptotic death of yeast cells has been described under various conditions and S. cerevisiae homologs of human apoptotic genes have been identified and characterized. These studies also revealed fundamental differences between yeast and animal apoptosis; in S. cerevisiae apoptosis is mainly associated with aging and stress adaptation, unlike animal apoptosis, which is essential for proper development. Further, many apoptosis regulatory genes are either missing, or highly divergent in S. cerevisiae. Therefore, in this review we will use the term apoptosis-like programed cell death (PCD) instead of apoptosis. Despite these significant differences, S. cerevisiae has been instrumental in promoting the study of heterologous apoptotic proteins, particularly from human. Work in fungi other than S. cerevisiae revealed differences in the manifestation of PCD in single cell (yeasts) and multicellular (filamentous) species. Such differences may reflect the higher complexity level of filamentous species, and hence the involvement of PCD in a wider range of processes and life styles. It is also expected that differences might be found in the apoptosis apparatus of yeast and filamentous species. In this review we focus on aspects of PCD that are unique or can be better studied in filamentous species. We will highlight the similarities and differences of the PCD machinery between yeast and filamentous species and show the value of using S. cerevisiae along with filamentous species to study apoptosis.

  14. Status of U.S. nuclear waste disposal programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastering, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    Since the days of the Manhattan Project in the early 1940's, the United States has recognized the need for a system of effective nuclear waste management. The evolution of that system has been directed by a series of legislative actions to determine responsibilities and develop procedures. Under these laws, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as the lead agency, is required to plan and implement the programs that will ensure safe and efficient management of nuclear wastes from both civilian and defense activities. This overview paper describes the organization of these programs

  15. Function of endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase in innate immunity-mediated programmed cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaohong; Caplan, Jeffrey; Mamillapalli, Padmavathi; Czymmek, Kirk; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P

    2010-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) initiated at the pathogen-infected sites during the plant innate immune response is thought to prevent the development of disease. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of an ER-localized type IIB Ca2+-ATPase (NbCA1) that function as a regulator of PCD. Silencing of NbCA1 accelerates viral immune receptor N- and fungal-immune receptor Cf9-mediated PCD, as well as non-host pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and the general elicitor cryptogein-induced cell death. The accelerated PCD rescues loss-of-resistance phenotype of Rar1, HSP90-silenced plants, but not SGT1-silenced plants. Using a genetically encoded calcium sensor, we show that downregulation of NbCA1 results in the modulation of intracellular calcium signalling in response to cryptogein elicitor. We further show that NbCAM1 and NbrbohB function as downstream calcium decoders in N-immune receptor-mediated PCD. Our results indicate that ER-Ca2+-ATPase is a component of the calcium efflux pathway that controls PCD during an innate immune response. PMID:20075858

  16. The contribution of the programmed cell death machinery in innate immune cells to lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, FuNien; Perlman, Harris; Cuda, Carla M

    2017-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic multi-factorial autoimmune disease initiated by genetic and environmental factors, which in combination trigger disease onset in susceptible individuals. Damage to the kidney as a consequence of lupus nephritis (LN) is one of the most prevalent and severe outcomes, as LN affects up to 60% of SLE patients and accounts for much of SLE-associated morbidity and mortality. As remarkable strides have been made in unlocking new inflammatory mechanisms associated with signaling molecules of programmed cell death pathways, this review explores the available evidence implicating the action of these pathways specifically within dendritic cells and macrophages in the control of kidney disease. Although advancements into the underlying mechanisms responsible for inducing cell death inflammatory pathways have been made, there still exist areas of unmet need. By understanding the molecular mechanisms by which dendritic cells and macrophages contribute to LN pathogenesis, we can improve their viability as potential therapeutic targets to promote remission. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The bacterial cell cycle checkpoint protein Obg and its role in programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liselot Dewachter

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of programmed cell death (PCD, in which cells initiate their own demise, is not restricted to multicellular organisms. Unicellular organisms, both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, also possess pathways that mediate PCD. We recently identified a PCD mechanism in Escherichia coli that is triggered by a mutant isoform of the essential GTPase ObgE (Obg of E. coli. Importantly, the PCD pathway mediated by mutant Obg (Obg* differs fundamentally from other previously described bacterial PCD pathways and thus constitutes a new mode of PCD. ObgE was previously proposed to act as a cell cycle checkpoint protein able to halt cell division. The implication of ObgE in the regulation of PCD further increases the similarity between this protein and eukaryotic cell cycle regulators that are capable of doing both. Moreover, since Obg is conserved in eukaryotes, the elucidation of this cell death mechanism might contribute to the understanding of PCD in higher organisms. Additionally, if Obg*-mediated PCD is conserved among different bacterial species, it will be a prime target for the development of innovative antibacterials that artificially induce this pathway.

  18. Involvement of Programmed Cell Death in Neurotoxicity of Metallic Nanoparticles: Recent Advances and Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bin; Zhou, Ting; Liu, Jia; Shao, LongQuan

    2016-11-01

    The widespread application of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) or NP-based products has increased the risk of exposure to NPs in humans. The brain is an important organ that is more susceptible to exogenous stimuli. Moreover, any impairment to the brain is irreversible. Recently, several in vivo studies have found that metallic NPs can be absorbed into the animal body and then translocated into the brain, mainly through the blood-brain barrier and olfactory pathway after systemic administration. Furthermore, metallic NPs can cross the placental barrier to accumulate in the fetal brain, causing developmental neurotoxicity on exposure during pregnancy. Therefore, metallic NPs become a big threat to the brain. However, the mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs remain unclear. Programmed cell death (PCD), which is different from necrosis, is defined as active cell death and is regulated by certain genes. PCD can be mainly classified into apoptosis, autophagy, necroptosis, and pyroptosis. It is involved in brain development, neurodegenerative disorders, psychiatric disorders, and brain injury. Given the pivotal role of PCD in neurological functions, we reviewed relevant articles and tried to summarize the recent advances and future perspectives of PCD involvement in the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs, with the purpose of comprehensively understanding the neurotoxic mechanisms of NPs.

  19. The fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol can inhibit plant apoptosis-like programmed cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Diamond

    Full Text Available The Fusarium genus of fungi is responsible for commercially devastating crop diseases and the contamination of cereals with harmful mycotoxins. Fusarium mycotoxins aid infection, establishment, and spread of the fungus within the host plant. We investigated the effects of the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON on the viability of Arabidopsis cells. Although it is known to trigger apoptosis in animal cells, DON treatment at low concentrations surprisingly did not kill these cells. On the contrary, we found that DON inhibited apoptosis-like programmed cell death (PCD in Arabidopsis cells subjected to abiotic stress treatment in a manner independent of mitochondrial cytochrome c release. This suggested that Fusarium may utilise mycotoxins to suppress plant apoptosis-like PCD. To test this, we infected Arabidopsis cells with a wild type and a DON-minus mutant strain of F. graminearum and found that only the DON producing strain could inhibit death induced by heat treatment. These results indicate that mycotoxins may be capable of disarming plant apoptosis-like PCD and thereby suggest a novel way that some fungi can influence plant cell fate.

  20. The TRIUMF nuclear structure program and TIGRESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, P. E.; Andreyev, A.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Becker, J. A.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Churchman, R.; Cline, D.; Cooper, R. J.; Cross, D.; Dashdorj, D.; Demand, G. A.; Dimmock, M. R.; Drake, T.; Finlay, P.; Gagnon, K.; Gallant, A. T.; Green, K. L.; Grint, A. N.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hackman, G.; Harkness, L. J.; Hayes, A. B.; Kanungo, R.; Kulp, W. D.; Leach, K. G.; Lee, G.; Leslie, J. R.; Maharaj, R.; Martin, J.-P.; Mattoon, C.; Mills, W. J.; Morton, A. C.; Nelson, L.; Newman, O.; Nolan, P. J.; Padilla-Rodal, E.; Pearson, C. J.; Phillips, A. A.; Porter-Peden, M.; Ressler, J. J.; Ruiz, C.; Sarazin, F.; Schumaker, M. A.; Scraggs, D. P.; Strange, M. D.; Subramanian, M.; Svensson, C. E.; Waddington, J. C.; Wan, J.; Whitbeck, A.; Williams, S. J.; Wood, J. L.; Wong, J. C.; Wu, C. Y.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2007-08-01

    The isotope separator and accelerator (ISAC) facility located at the TRIUMF laboratory in Vancouver, Canada, is one of the world's most advanced isotope separator on-line-type radioactive ion beam facilities. An extensive γ-ray spectroscopy programme at ISAC is centred around two major research facilities: (i) the 8π γ-ray spectrometer for β-delayed γ-ray spectroscopy experiments with the low-energy beams from ISAC-I, and (ii) the next generation TRIUMF-ISAC gamma-ray escape suppressed spectrometer (TIGRESS) for in-beam experiments with the accelerated radioactive-ion beams. An overview of these facilities and recent results from the diverse programme of nuclear structure and fundamental interaction studies they support is presented.

  1. Change of nuclear administrative system and long-term program for nuclear energy in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, S. W.; Yang, M. H.; Jeong, H. S.

    2001-01-01

    Japanese new governmental adminstrative system was restructured and became in operation from January 1, 2001 including newly establishment of the Ministry of Cabinet. Accordingly, Japanese nuclear administrative system were also changed significantly, in order to reflect the changing policy environment and response to them more efficiently in the use and development of nuclear energy. Atomic Energy Commission, Nuclear Safety Commission administrated by Science and Technology Agency in the past, were moved to the Ministry of Cabinet, and Integrated Science and Technology Council was also newly established under the Ministry of Cabinet. And Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry(METI) is in charge of nuclear energy policy and the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology(MEXT) is in charge of nuclear academic science consequently. At the same time, the revision work of 'Long-term Program for Research, Development and Utilization of Nuclear of Japan' established in 1994, has been carried out from 1999 in order to set up the long term based national nuclear policy towards the 21st century, and finally the results were open to the public in November 2000. Major changes of nuclear policy of Japan the will be good references in the establishing future national nuclear policy for the use and development of nuclear energy

  2. The U.S. program for fusion nuclear technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, J.F.; Haas, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The Fusion Nuclear Technology (FNT) research and development program in the United States is shaped by a hierarchy of documents and by the environment for nuclear energy existing in the United States. The fission nuclear industry in the United States has suffered problems with public perception of safety, waste disposal issues, and economics as influenced by safety and environmental issues. For fusion to be a viable energy alternative, it must offer significant improvements in these areas. The hierarchy of documents defining objectives, plans, and strategy of the U.S. FNT program consists of the Magnetic Fusion Program Plan (MFPP) (February 1985), the Technical Planning Activity Final Report (January 1987), the Finesse Program Report (January 1987), and the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study Final Report (September 1984). In addition, two other documents are also significant in shaping FNT policy. These are the IEA report on Material for Fusion (December 1986) and the Summary of the Report of the Senior Committee on Environmental, Safety, and Economic Aspects of Magnetic Fusion Energy (September 1987). The U.S. Magnetic Fusion Program Plan defines four key technical issues (magnetic confinement systems, properties of burning plasmas, fusion nuclear technology, and fusion materials). (orig./KP)

  3. Oxidative damage and cell-programmed death induced in Zea mays L. by allelochemical stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciniglia, Claudia; Mastrobuoni, Francesco; Scortichini, Marco; Petriccione, Milena

    2015-05-01

    The allelochemical stress on Zea mays was analyzed by using walnut husk washing waters (WHWW), a by-product of Juglans regia post-harvest process, which possesses strong allelopathic potential and phytotoxic effects. Oxidative damage and cell-programmed death were induced by WHWW in roots of maize seedlings. Treatment induced ROS burst, with excess of H2O2 content. Enzymatic activities of catalase were strongly increased during the first hours of exposure. The excess in malonildialdehyde following exposure to WHWW confirmed that oxidative stress severely damaged maize roots. Membrane alteration caused a decrease in NADPH oxidase activity along with DNA damage as confirmed by DNA laddering. The DNA instability was also assessed through sequence-related amplified polymorphism assay, thus suggesting the danger of walnut processing by-product and focusing the attention on the necessity of an efficient treatment of WHWW.

  4. Uveitis induced by programmed cell death protein 1 inhibitor therapy with nivolumab in metastatic melanoma patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Hiroaki; Ishida, Kyoko; Yamada, Wataru; Nishida, Takashi; Takahashi, Nobumichi; Mochizuki, Kiyofumi; Mizuno, Yuki; Matsuyama, Kanako; Takahashi, Tomoko; Seishima, Mariko

    2017-11-01

    Nivolumab, a new immune checkpoint inhibitor, binds to programmed cell death-protein 1 receptors on T cell, blockades binding of its ligands, and augments the immunologic reaction against tumor cells. Augmented immune response, however, may lead to immune-related adverse events. Herein we describe a rare case of bilateral anterior uveitis induced by nivolumab treatment for metastatic melanoma. A 54-year-old woman presented with mild conjunctival redness and blurred vision two months after initiating nivolumab treatment. Ophthalmological examination revealed bilateral non-granulomatous anterior uveitis. The flare values in the anterior chamber were monitored as an objective inflammatory index during nivolumab therapy and clinical time course was reported in this paper. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Daunomycin accumulation and induction of programmed cell death in rat hair follicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Masashi; Larsson, Lars-Inge; Hougaard, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The anthracycline antibiotic daunomycin (DM) is useful for the treatment of leukemia but has side-effects such as alopecia. Using immunocytochemistry, we show that, after a single i.v. injection, DM accumulates in the nuclei of matrix cells and in the outer root sheath of hair follicles. DM......-positive matrix cells are detectable up to 48 h after injection and exhibit a characteristic granular morphology, which is not observed in saline-injected controls. TUNEL-staining has revealed that DM injection induces programmed cell death (PCD) in rat hair follicles. Cells undergoing PCD are detectable as late...... (PCD type 2). Interestingly, little, if any, DM accumulation or apoptosis has been detected in the dermal hair papillae. This may have a bearing on potential regeneration of the hair follicles. Thus, DM accumulates in a characteristic pattern in hair follicles. This accumulation is associated...

  6. Monitoring programmed cell death of living plant tissues in microfluidics using electrochemical and optical techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Zor, Kinga; Heiskanen, Arto

    such as redox activity, O2 and H2O2 concentration, pH, cell viability and release of target enzymes such as α-amylase. We have optimised an intracellular, whole-cell redox activity assay[3] that detects changes in redox activity in barley aleurone layer during PCD. The assay uses a double mediator......This project focuses on developing and applying a tissue culture system with electrochemical and optical detection techniques for tissue culture of barley aleurone layer to increase understanding of the underlying mechanisms of programmed cell death (PCD) in plants. The major advantage......-system to electrochemically measure redox activity via changes in the NADP:NADPH ratio. Experiments show that redox activity changes depend on phytohormone activation or inactivation of aleurone layer metabolism and subsequent PCD. We have also successfully detected PCD induced by phytohormones in barley aleurone layer using...

  7. Waste management in Canadian nuclear programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyne, P.J.

    The objectives of the Canadian radioactive waste management program are described. Recycling actinides through reactors is being studied. Low and medium level waste treatments such as reverse osmosis concentration, immobilization in bitumen and plastics, and incineration are under study. Spent fuel can be stored dry in concrete canisters above ground and ultimate storage of wastes in salt deposits or hard rock is appropriate to Canadian conditions. (E.C.B.)

  8. Untangling the Roles of Anti-Apoptosis in Regulating Programmed Cell Death using Humanized Yeast Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapp, Caitlin; Portt, Liam; Khoury, Chamel; Sheibani, Sara; Eid, Rawan; Greenwood, Matthew; Vali, Hojatollah; Mandato, Craig A.; Greenwood, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Genetically programmed cell death (PCD) mechanisms, including apoptosis, are important for the survival of metazoans since it allows, among things, the removal of damaged cells that interfere with normal function. Cell death due to PCD is observed in normal processes such as aging and in a number of pathophysiologies including hypoxia (common causes of heart attacks and strokes) and subsequent tissue reperfusion. Conversely, the loss of normal apoptotic responses is associated with the development of tumors. So far, limited success in preventing unwanted PCD has been reported with current therapeutic approaches despite the fact that inhibitors of key apoptotic inducers such as caspases have been developed. Alternative approaches have focused on mimicking anti-apoptotic processes observed in cells displaying increased resistance to apoptotic stimuli. Hormesis and pre-conditioning are commonly observed cellular strategies where sub-lethal levels of pro-apoptotic stimuli lead to increased resistance to higher or lethal levels of stress. Increased expression of anti-apoptotic sequences is a common mechanism mediating these protective effects. The relevance of the latter observation is exemplified by the observation that transgenic mice overexpressing anti-apoptotic genes show significant reductions in tissue damage following ischemia. Thus strategies aimed at increasing the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins, using gene therapy or cell penetrating recombinant proteins are being evaluated as novel therapeutics to decrease cell death following acute periods of cell death inducing stress. In spite of its functional and therapeutic importance, more is known regarding the processes involved in apoptosis than anti-apoptosis. The genetically tractable yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has emerged as an exceptional model to study multiple aspects of PCD including the mitochondrial mediated apoptosis observed in metazoans. To increase our knowledge of the process of anti

  9. Nuclear materials control and accountability internal audit program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barham, M.A.; Abbott, R.R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that the Department of Energy Order (DOE) 5633.3, Control and Accountability for Nuclear Materials, includes several requirements for development and implementation of an internal audit program. Martin Marietta Energy System, Inc., manages five sites in Tennessee, Kentucky, and Ohio for the DOE Field Office, Oak Ridge and has a Central Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability (NMC and A) Manager with matrixed responsibility for the NMC and A program at the five sites. The Energy Systems Central NMC and A Manager has developed an NMC and A Internal Audit Handbook which defines the functional responsibilities, performance criteria, and reporting and documentation requirements for the Energy Systems NMC and A Internal Audit Program. The initial work to develop and implement these standards was tested at the K-25 Site when the site hired an internal auditor to meet the DOE requirements for an NMC and A Internal Audit program

  10. The program of reactors and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, Carlos R.

    2001-01-01

    Into de framework of the program of research reactors and nuclear power plants, the operating Argentine reactors are described. The uses of the research reactors in Argentina are summarized. The reactors installed by Argentina in other countries (Peru, Algeria, Egypt) are briefly described. The CAREM project for the design and construction of an innovator small power reactor (27 MWe) is also described in some detail. The next biennial research and development program for reactor is briefly outlined

  11. Underlying chemistry research for the nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgerson, D.F.; Sagert, N.H.; Shoesmith, D.W.; Taylor, P.

    1984-04-01

    This document reviews the underlying chemistry research part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program, carried out in the Research Chemistry Branch. This research is concerned with developing the basic chemical knowledge and under-standing required in other parts of the Program. There are four areas of underlying research: Waste Form Chemistry, Solute and Solution Chemistry, Rock-Water-Waste Interactions, and Abatement and Monitoring of Gas-Phase Radionuclides

  12. Inpo programs for improvement of nuclear power plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edward Moore, C.

    1989-01-01

    The talk shows how key INPO programs help foster improved nuclear power operations. The talk focuses on the results being seen from six key efforts: evaluations, training and accreditation, assistance, events analysis and information exchange, human performance and maintenance. The talk stresses that all INPO programs are geared toward enhanced performance and that progress in key performance areas since 1980 shows that INPO and U.S. industry efforts are achieving desired results

  13. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission natural analogue research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovach, L.A.; Ott, W.R.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the natural analogue research program of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC). It contains information on the regulatory context and organizational structure of the high-level radioactive waste research program plan. It also includes information on the conditions and processes constraining selection of natural analogues, describes initiatives of the US NRC, and describes the role of analogues in the licensing process

  14. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen binds DNA polymerase-β and mediates 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced neuronal death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhentao Zhang

    Full Text Available The mechanisms leading to dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson disease (PD remain poorly understood. We recently reported that aberrant DNA replication mediated by DNA polymerase-β (DNA pol-β plays a causal role in the death of postmitotic neurons in an in vitro model of PD. In the present study, we show that both proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA and DNA pol-β are required for MPP(+-induced neuronal death. PCNA binds to the catalytic domain of DNA pol-β in MPP(+-treated neurons and in post-mortem brain tissues of PD patients. The PCNA-DNA pol-β complex is loaded into DNA replication forks and mediates DNA replication in postmitotic neurons. The aberrant DNA replication mediated by the PCNA-DNA pol-β complex induces p53-dependent neuronal cell death. Our results indicate that the interaction of PCNA and DNA pol-β contributes to neuronal death in PD.

  15. Nuclear Power Plant Fire Protection Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, A.

    1985-07-01

    The goal is to develop test data and analytical capabilities to support the evaluation of: (1) the contribution of fires to the risk from nuclear power plants; (2) the effects of fires on control room equipment and operations; and (3) the effects of actuation of fire suppression systems on safety equipment. A range of fire sources will be characterized with respect to their energy and mass evolution, including smoke, corrosion products, and electrically conductive products of combustion. An analytical method for determining the environment resulting from fire will be developed. This method will account for the source characteristics, the suppression action following detection of the fire, and certain parameters specific to the plant enclosure in which the fire originates, such as the geometry of the enclosure and the ventilation rate. The developing local environment in the vicinity of safety-related equipment will be expressed in terms of temperatures, temperature rise rates, heat fluxes, and moisture and certain species content. The response of certain safe shutdown equipment and components to the environmental conditions will be studied. The objective will be to determine the limits of environmental conditions that a component may be exposed to without impairment of its ability to function

  16. Current emergency programs for nuclear installations in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chino, Masamichi

    2007-01-01

    Large effort has been taken for nuclear emergency programs in Japan especially after the JCO accident. A special law for nuclear emergency was established after the accident. The law extended the scope of emergency preparedness to fuel cycle facilities, research reactors, etc. and clarified the roles and responsibilities of the national government, local governments and license holders. For initial responses, the action levels and action procedures are defined based on environmental doses and specific initial events of NPPs. A senior specialist was dispatched to each site for nuclear emergency and a facility 'Off-site center' to be used as the local emergency headquator was designated at each site. This paper describes the structure of emergency program, responsibility of related organizations and the definition of unusual events for notification and emergency. Emergency preparedness, emergency radiation monitoring and computer-based prediction of on- and off-site situation are also addressed. (author)

  17. Enhancing materials management programs in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassaballa, M.M.; Malak, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Materials management programs for the nuclear utilities in the United States are continually being affected, concurrent with the gradual disappearance of qualified component and replacement parts vendors by regulatory concerns about procurement and materials management. In addition, current economic and competitive pressures are forcing utilities to seek avenues for reducing procurement costs for safety-related items. In response to these concerns, initiatives have been undertaken and engineering guidelines have been developed by the nuclear power industry-sponsored organizations, such as the Electric Power Research Institute and the Nuclear Management Resources Council. It is our experience that successful materials management programs require a multitude of engineering disciplines and experience and are composed of three major elements: strategic procurement plan, parts classification and procurement data base, and enhancement tools. This paper provides a brief description of each of the three elements

  18. Seven principle of highly effective Nuclear Energy Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, Ch.D.; Reed, Ph.D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents seven principles that demand consideration for any country using a nuclear power program or wanting to acquire such a program. These principles are assessing the overall energy system, determining effective use of financial resources for energy development, ensuring high safety standards, implementing best security practices, preventing the spread of nuclear weapons, managing radioactive waste in a safe and secure manner, and enacting a legal framework that encompasses the other principle areas. The paper applies management methods that underscore development of strong independent national capabilities integrated within an interdependent international system. The paper discusses the individual responsibilities of states in all seven principles and offers recommendations for how states can benefit from greater international cooperation in nuclear energy development

  19. Irans Nuclear Program: Tehrans Compliance with International Obligations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-07

    reactors. Iran also has a uranium conversion facility, which converts uranium oxide into several compounds, including uranium hexafluoride. Tehran claims... uranium .  The importation of natural uranium metal and its subsequent transfer for use in laser enrichment experiments, including the production of...investigation of its nuclear activities, suspend its uranium enrichment program, suspend its construction of a heavy-water reactor and related

  20. Nuclear Application Programs Development and Integration for a Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun-Joon; Lee, Tae-Woo [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Co., Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    KEPCO E and C participated in the NAPS (Nuclear Application Programs) development project for BNPP (Barakah Nuclear Power Plant) simulator. The 3KEY MASTER™ was adopted for this project, which is comprehensive simulation platform software developed by WSC (Western Services Corporation) for the development, and control of simulation software. The NAPS based on actual BNPP project was modified in order to meet specific requirements for nuclear power plant simulators. Considerations regarding software design for BNPP simulator and interfaces between the 3KM platform and application programs are discussed. The repeatability is one of functional requirements for nuclear power plant simulators. In order to migrate software from actual plants to simulators, software functions for storing and retrieving plant conditions and program variables should be implemented. In addition, software structures need to be redesigned to meet the repeatability, and source codes developed for actual plants would have to be optimized to reflect simulator’s characteristics as well. The synchronization is an important consideration to integrate external application programs into the 3KM simulator.

  1. The Nordic program for nuclear safety 1990-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    The status of ongoing projects under The Nordic Program for Nuclear Safety (NKS) 1990-1993, and the economy of the programme is presented. A review of projects, projects managers and coordinators, and a list of members of NKS and associated members is included. (CLS)

  2. BIBGTR: nuclear data libraries for the programs Unimug and Anisn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, S.; Caldeira, A.D.

    1989-11-01

    Nuclear data libraries generable by the NJOY for the programs UNIMUG and ANISN, using evaluated data from ENDF/B-IV and ENDF/B-V are described. These libraries will be used by Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators Project of Instituto de Estudos Avancados. (author) [pt

  3. Space Nuclear Safety Program. Progress report, March 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zocher, R.W.; George, T.G.

    1985-08-01

    This technical monthly report covers studies related to the use of 238 PuO 2 in radioisotope power systems carried out for the Office of Special Nuclear Projects of the US Department of Energy by Los Alamos Laboratory. They are divided into: general-purpose heat source, lightweight radioisotope heater unit, and safety technology program. 43 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Strengthening the case that elevated levels of programmed death ligand 1 predict poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong J

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Jian-Hong Zhong,1,* Cheng-Piao Luo,2,* Chun-Yan Zhang,2 Le-Qun Li1 1Hepatobiliary Surgery Department, 2Experimental Department, Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Immunotherapy targeting programmed death receptor 1 and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1 has shown impressive antitumor efficacy in several solid cancers, including advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Since response rates of various cancers to such immunotherapy appear to correlate with PD-L1 expression levels, several studies have examined whether PD-L1 expression correlates with HCC pathology and patient prognosis. In this paper, we analyzed the strength and limitations of a recent meta-analysis of associations of PD-L1 with HCC characteristics and patient prognosis. Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, programmed death ligand 1, hepatic resection, prognoses

  5. Nuclear plant analyzer program for Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shier, W.; Kennett, R.

    1993-01-01

    An interactive nuclear plant analyzer(NPA) has been developed for use by the Bulgarian technical community in the training of plant personnel, the development and verification of plant operating procedures, and in the analysis of various anticipated operational occurrences and accident scenarios. The current NPA includes models for a VVER-440 Model 230 and a VVER-1000 Model 320 and is operational on an IBM RISC6000 workstation. The RELAP5/MOD2 computer code has been used for the calculation of the reactor responses to the interactive commands initiated by the NPA operator. The interactive capabilities of the NPA have been developed to provide considerable flexibility in the plant actions that can be initiated by the operator. The current capabilities for both the VVER-440 and VVER-1000 models include: (1) scram initiation; (2) reactor coolant pump trip; (3) high pressure safety injection system initiation; (4) low pressure safety injection system initiation; (5) pressurizer safety valve opening; (6) steam generator relief/safety valve opening; (7) feedwater system initiation and trip; (8) turbine trip; and (9) emergency feedwater initiation. The NPA has the capability to display the results of the simulations in various forms that are determined by the model developer. Results displayed on the reactor mask are shown through the user defined, digital display of various plant parameters and through color changes that reflect changes in primary system fluid temperatures, fuel and clad temperatures, and the temperature of other metal structures. In addition, changes in the status of various components and systems can be initiated and/or displayed both numerically and graphically on the mask. This paper provides a description of the structure of the NPA, a discussion of the simulation models used for the VVER-440 and the VVER-1000, and an overview of the NPA capabilities. Typical results obtained using both simulation models will be discussed

  6. Nuclear energy and public opinion. Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN) dissemination and extension program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oviedo, Gonzalo Torres; Quintana, Rosamel Mufioz

    2000-01-01

    In Chile, demand for electricity will soon exceed water resources. The country will then face severe energy dependence, with very little control over generation costs, and with increasing emission of contaminating gases into the atmosphere. Nuclear energy may be considered an appropriate and stabilizing alternative for the system in the medium term, the benefits of nuclear generation to be thus extended to a country which has a moderate demand for electricity. This new scenario will require an additional technical and regulating effort by CCHEN and by the state, as well as re-orientation of their activities in connection with public opinion. The Public Nuclear Energy Education Program, initiated in 1976 by CCHEN, has been developed for purposes of achieving public acceptance of nuclear energy as a way of facilitating development of various activities which pertain to CCHEN's scope of action, and of creating a climate which is favorable to acceptance of nuclear energy as an alternative source of energy. Thus, the object is that the public draw informed conclusions on the benefits and risks implicit in the use of isotopes, radiation, and nuclear power generation. The Program consists of activities for high school students aimed at vocational orientation of those who stand out in the science area, training and extension activities for teachers, journalists, and professionals, a program of guided tours of the nuclear centers, a publicity campaign conducted in the various media and, since 1980, massive distribution of brochures and magazines. There are no declared anti-nuclear movements in Chile. Nevertheless, there are opinions against nuclear power in different relevant sectors. Lately, the social communication media have preferred CCHEN as their source of information, a fact which makes it possible for the latter to have access to good coverage of its activities

  7. MIT nuclear reactor laboratory high school teaching program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmez, I.

    1991-01-01

    For the last 6 years, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Nuclear Reactor Laboratory's academic and scientific staff a have been conducting evening seminars for precollege science teachers, parents, and high school students from the New England area. These seminars, as outlined in this paper, are intended to give general information on nuclear technologies with specific emphasis on radiation physics, nuclear medicine, nuclear chemistry, and ongoing research activities at the MIT research reactor. The ultimate goal is to create interest or build on the already existing interest in science and technology by, for example, special student projects. Several small projects have already been completed ranging from environmental research to biological reactions with direct student involvement. Another outcome of these seminars was the change in attitudes of science teachers toward nuclear technology. Numerous letters have been received from the teachers and parents stating their previous lack of knowledge on the beneficial aspects of nuclear technologies and the subsequent inclusion of programs in their curriculum for educating students so that they may also develop a more positive attitude toward nuclear power

  8. Our messages for a broadly acceptable national nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiopol, Mihaela; Bilegan, Iosif Constantin

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Romania started the nuclear power program some 20 years ago by a high level Government decision. During that time no one asked and nobody explained to the people why a NPP is so much required. Before revolution was forbidden to talk or to write about nuclear matters. After the revolution many changes have occurred even in this field. The former ministry of electrical power was transformed into a state owned company 'RENEL' in which were also included the nuclear activities. RENEL was a monopoly responsible for production, transportation and distribution of electricity in Romania. The restructuring process in the energy field was many times asked by the World Bank and International monetary Fund - to split this monopoly system in separately activities: Production, Transportation and Distribution. The first step happened in July 1998, when the nuclear activities were externalised from RENEL, and two new entities were created: 'Nuclearelectrica' National Company - a state own company which includes three branches: - Nuclear Power Production - Cernavoda NPP - Unit 1; - Nuclear Fuel Plant - Pitesti; - Project Development Branch - Cernavoda - Unit 2-5. The second entity is so-called Autonomous Reggie for Nuclear Activities including the Heavy Water production, Nuclear Research Institute and the nuclear engineering activities - CITON. The restructuring process continued and in August 2000, By a Government Ordinance the rest of RENEL was split in more companies: - one for Hydropower production; - one for thermal power production; - one for transport; - one for distribution. The goal of a third step of restructuring process is the privatisation in the power field. Since 1991 a Public Information program has been established and it followed the usual steps. Depending on the evolution of the construction of the first Romanian nuclear power during the years the messages changed. Everybody working in the nuclear field knows now how difficult is to build the

  9. Nuclear waste: Quarterly report on DOE's Nuclear Waste Program as of March 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act established a national program and policy for safely storing, transporting, and disposing of nuclear waste. This fact sheet provides the status of the Department of Energy's program activities. They include (1) the release of a draft amendment to the mission plan in which DOE extends by 5 years its target date for beginning first repository operations and information on DOE's decision to postpone site-specific activities for the second repository; (2) a monitored retrievable storage proposal and related documents; (3) receipts of comments from utilities, state regulators, and others on its Notice of Inquiry on proposals for the calculation of fees for defense waste disposal; and (4) information on the Nuclear Waste Fund collection of over /135.4 million in fees and investment income and obligations of $139 million for program activities. The fund balance as of March 31, 1987, was about $1.5 billion

  10. ROS-mediated abiotic stress-induced programmed cell death in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselin ePetrov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available During the course of their ontogenesis, plants are continuously exposed to a large variety of abiotic stress factors which can damage tissues and jeopardize the survival of the organism unless properly countered. While animals can simply escape and thus evade stressors, plants as sessile organisms have developed complex strategies to withstand them. When the intensity of a detrimental factor is high, one of the defense programs employed by plants is the induction of programmed cell death (PCD. This is an active, genetically controlled process which is initiated to isolate and remove damaged tissues thereby ensuring the survival of the organism. The mechanism of PCD induction usually includes an increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS which are utilized as mediators of the stress signal. Abiotic stress-induced PCD is not only a process of fundamental biological importance, but also of considerable interest to agricultural practice as it has the potential to significantly influence crop yield. Therefore, numerous scientific enterprises have focused on elucidating the mechanisms leading to and controlling PCD in response to adverse conditions in plants. This knowledge may help to develop novel strategies to obtain more resilient crop varieties with improved tolerance and enhanced productivity. The aim of the present review is to summarize the recent advances in research on ROS-induced PCD related to abiotic stress and the role of the organelles in the process.

  11. Nuclear Data Activities in Support of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westfall, R.M.; McKnight, R.D.

    2005-01-01

    The DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) provides the technical infrastructure maintenance for those technologies applied in the evaluation and performance of safe fissionable-material operations in the DOE complex. These technologies include an Analytical Methods element for neutron transport as well as the development of sensitivity/uncertainty methods, the performance of Critical Experiments, evaluation and qualification of experiments as Benchmarks, and a comprehensive Nuclear Data program coordinated by the NCSP Nuclear Data Advisory Group (NDAG).The NDAG gathers and evaluates differential and integral nuclear data, identifies deficiencies, and recommends priorities on meeting DOE criticality safety needs to the NCSP Criticality Safety Support Group (CSSG). Then the NDAG identifies the required resources and unique capabilities for meeting these needs, not only for performing measurements but also for data evaluation with nuclear model codes as well as for data processing for criticality safety applications. The NDAG coordinates effort with the leadership of the National Nuclear Data Center, the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), and the Working Party on International Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee. The overall objective is to expedite the issuance of new data and methods to the DOE criticality safety user. This paper describes these activities in detail, with examples based upon special studies being performed in support of criticality safety for a variety of DOE operations

  12. Off-line programming and simulation in handling nuclear components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.P.

    1993-10-01

    IGRIP was used to create a simulation of the robotic workcell design for handling components at the PANTEX nuclear arms facility. This initial simulation identified problems with the customer's proposed worker layout, and allowed a correction to be proposed. Refinement of the IGRIP simulation allowed the design and construction of a workcell mock-up and accurate off-line programming of the system. IGRIP's off-line programming capabilities are being used to develop the motion control code for the workcell. PNLs success in this area suggests that simulation and off-line programming may be valuable tools for developing robotics in some automation resistant industries

  13. Review of the nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, S.R.

    1980-06-01

    Progress over the previous year in the nuclear fuel waste management program is reviewed. Universities, industry and consultants have become increasingly involved, and the work is being overseen by a Technical Advisory Committee. The program has also been investigated by Ontario's Porter Commission and Select Committe on Ontario Hydro Affairs. A public information program has been extended to cover most of the Canadian Shield region of Ontario. Ontario Hydro is studying spent fuel storage and transportation, while AECL is covering immobilization of spent fuel or processing wastes, geotechnical and geochemical research in the laboratory and in the field, design of disposal facilities, and environmental and safety assessments. (L.L.)

  14. Program SYVAC, for stochastic assessment of nuclear fuel waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, G.R.; Hoffman, K.J.; Donahue, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, the computer program SYVAC, used to assess concepts for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste, is described with regard to the development approach, the basic program structure, and quality assurance. The interrelationships of these aspects are illustrated by detailed descriptions of two concepts of fundamental importance to the program: the method of selecting parameter values from input probability density functions, and the numerical evaluation of the convolution integral. Quality assurance procedures, including different types of comparisons and peer review, are presented

  15. Plans of reorganization of USA nuclear military complex and provision of military program by special nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenovskaya, I.V.

    1996-01-01

    Consideration is given to plans and implementation of the program of reorganization of USA nuclear military complex, related with conducted reduction of nuclear arsenal after concluding the Strategic Nuclear Armament Reduction Treaty. Particular attention is paid to problems of satisfying short-term and long-term requirements in special nuclear materials and in tritium in particular

  16. Main prospects of EDF's nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre Bacher, M.; Jean Pierrard, M.

    1994-01-01

    Today, EDF is at a half way point in its third major standardized series, the N4 1400 MW series. The main objective agreed upon for this N4 series, was to improve the insertion of man in the control loop. After the TMI accident in 1979, selective improvements had already been introduced in the 900 series ; the 1300 series, which was the underway, was also the object of more significant improvements (for instance a digital control system) ; but it still seemed desirable that all the lessons to be learned from the accident be reflected in the third series : the fully computerized instrumentation and control system developed for the N4 series ?comparable to the one developed for Airbus ?is today the first of its kind in the world. The demand increase for electric energy dramatically stopped in 1993. However, the prospect for the coming years is more optimistic. Electricity consumption is expected to increase slowly by an average 2% per year. In this context, EDF is preparing its energy program for the nest century and takes into account that hydraulic generation capacity will remain stable and that the French thermal units fueled with coal are rather old and will have to be replaced.

  17. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Results of work performed from January 1, 1977 through March 31, 1977 on the Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program are presented. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Process Heat and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (impure Helium), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes progress to date on alloy selection for VHTR Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) applications and for DCHT applications. The present status on the simulated reactor helium loop design and on designs for the testing and analysis facilities and equipment is discussed

  18. AECL programs for new applications for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.L.

    1982-05-01

    This document reports the activities of the New Applications Steering Committee (NASC) of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. The NASC is intended to develop future RβD programs, and more specifically to promote certain existing ideas that have not yet become part of established programs, stimulate new idaas, identify needs and opportunities for RβD, evaluate proposals for RβD programs, initiate action on new ideas, and provide feedback to a staff who may be expected to generate ideas. Major areas and technologies that have been studied by the NASC and are covered in this report include oil substitution by nuclear heat and by electricity, energy storage and the role of hydrogen, nuclear energy in liquid fuel production, assessment of Canadian energy resources, and computer modelling of energy systems

  19. University role in nuclear power program in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notea, A.

    1977-01-01

    The academic education in nuclear engineering should be considered as a subsystem within the general nuclear program of the country as well as within the educational structure of the university. The academic trained personnel are of major importance as future participants in decisional and planning steps of the program. Hence, the ''production'' of academic manpower in this field should be started at the earliest steps. The nuclear engineering curriculum should be planned in accordance with the objectives stated by the power program and the challenges foreseen. Obviously, the objectives in a developing country are considerably different from those of developed countries highly advanced in the nuclear power field. The paper analyzes possible objectives in a developing country which intends to implement nuclear power program. In view of these objectives curricula planning for the undergraduate and graduate levels are presented and explained. The courses for undergraduates intend to provide basic information to relatively large numbers of students from various faculties, as they are expected to join the program at various constructional stages. Major emphasise is given to graduates as they will act in the cadre of senior engineers and officials of the country. The research works for theses in developed countries may be highly technical, dealing with crumbs of huge development project carried out on national or international level. Such research works are hardly justified in countries not involved in the project. In developing countries the problems to be confronted with are mainly licensing and siting and to much less extent nuclear power technology. Hence the choice of subjects for theses should be coherent with these directions. Obviously, the subjects are bound to the department manpower and budgetary limitations. As a demonstration two fields were analysed under our local constraints and objectives. Subjects suitable for theses are pointed out. The fields dealt

  20. Sacred values and conflict over Iran's nuclear program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Dehghani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Conflict over Iran's nuclear program, which involves a US-led policy to impose sanctions on Iran, is perceived by each side as a preeminent challenge to its own national security and global peace. Yet, there is little scientific study or understanding of how material incentives and disincentives, such as economic sanctions, psychologically affect the targeted population and potentially influence behaviour. Here we explore the Iranian nuclear program within a paradigm concerned with sacred values. We integrate experiments within a survey of 1997 Iranians. We find that a relatively small but politically significant portion of the Iranian population believes that acquiring nuclear energy has become a sacred value, in the sense that proposed economic incentives and disincentives result in a ``backfire effect'' in which offers of material rewards or punishment lead to increased anger and greater disapproval. This pattern was specific to nuclear energy and did not hold for acquiring nuclear weapons. The present study is the first demonstration of the backfire effect for material disincentives as well as incentives, and on an issue whose apparent sacred nature is recent rather than longstanding.

  1. Energy program and policy about nuclear industry in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malvy, M.

    1985-01-01

    As for the various problems on energy, Japan and France have taken the similar strategy and development program. Both Japan and France lack mineral energy resources, but have the industrial technical ability to make up for this shortage by substitute resources and to limit the dependence on import. Similarly to France, Japan has attained 3 tons in terms of petroleum per 1000 dollars of gross national product, which is about a half of the rate of energy consumption in the U.S., and became one of the advanced countries saving energy most. The consumption of petroleum decreased by 23 % in Japan and 30 % in France from 1973 to 1983. Nuclear power increased to 20 % of the generated output in Japan and to 50 % of that in France. The dependence on imported energy decreased to 80 % in Japan and 60 % in France. The energy policy taken by France was to satisfy demand, to diversity supply sources, to reduce energy cost, and to strengthen stable supply. The total demond of primary energy in 1984 was 191.6 million tons in terms of petroleum. Nuclear power stations generated 182 billion kWh in 1984. The nuclear power program in France, nuclear power stations and nuclear fuel cycle are reported. (Kako, I.)

  2. Study on Nuclear Facility Cyber Security Awareness and Training Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung-Woon; Song, Jae-Gu; Lee, Cheol-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Cyber security awareness and training, which is a part of operational security controls, is defined to be implemented later in the CSP implementation schedule. However, cyber security awareness and training is a prerequisite for the appropriate implementation of a cyber security program. When considering the current situation in which it is just started to define cyber security activities and to assign personnel who has responsibilities for performing those activities, a cyber security awareness program is necessary to enhance cyber security culture for the facility personnel to participate positively in cyber security activities. Also before the implementation of stepwise CSP, suitable education and training should be provided to both cyber security teams (CST) and facility personnel who should participate in the implementation. Since such importance and urgency of cyber security awareness and training is underestimated at present, the types, trainees, contents, and development strategies of cyber security awareness and training programs are studied to help Korean nuclear facilities to perform cyber security activities more effectively. Cyber security awareness and training programs should be developed ahead of the implementation of CSP. In this study, through the analysis of requirements in the regulatory standard RS-015, the types and trainees of overall cyber security training programs in nuclear facilities are identified. Contents suitable for a cyber security awareness program and a technical training program are derived. It is suggested to develop stepwise the program contents in accordance with the development of policies, guides, and procedures as parts of the facility cyber security program. Since any training programs are not available for the specialized cyber security training in nuclear facilities, a long-term development plan is necessary. As alternatives for the time being, several cyber security training courses for industrial control systems by

  3. Study on Nuclear Facility Cyber Security Awareness and Training Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung-Woon; Song, Jae-Gu; Lee, Cheol-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Cyber security awareness and training, which is a part of operational security controls, is defined to be implemented later in the CSP implementation schedule. However, cyber security awareness and training is a prerequisite for the appropriate implementation of a cyber security program. When considering the current situation in which it is just started to define cyber security activities and to assign personnel who has responsibilities for performing those activities, a cyber security awareness program is necessary to enhance cyber security culture for the facility personnel to participate positively in cyber security activities. Also before the implementation of stepwise CSP, suitable education and training should be provided to both cyber security teams (CST) and facility personnel who should participate in the implementation. Since such importance and urgency of cyber security awareness and training is underestimated at present, the types, trainees, contents, and development strategies of cyber security awareness and training programs are studied to help Korean nuclear facilities to perform cyber security activities more effectively. Cyber security awareness and training programs should be developed ahead of the implementation of CSP. In this study, through the analysis of requirements in the regulatory standard RS-015, the types and trainees of overall cyber security training programs in nuclear facilities are identified. Contents suitable for a cyber security awareness program and a technical training program are derived. It is suggested to develop stepwise the program contents in accordance with the development of policies, guides, and procedures as parts of the facility cyber security program. Since any training programs are not available for the specialized cyber security training in nuclear facilities, a long-term development plan is necessary. As alternatives for the time being, several cyber security training courses for industrial control systems by

  4. Sister Lab Program Prospective Partner Nuclear Profile: Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bissani, M; Tyson, S

    2006-01-01

    Indonesia has participated in cooperative technical programs with the IAEA since 1957, and has cooperated with regional partners in all of the traditional areas where nuclear science is employed: in medicine, public health (such as insect control and eradication programs), agriculture (e.g. development of improved varieties of rice), and the gas and oil industries. Recently, Indonesia has contributed significantly to the Reduced Enrichment Research and Training Reactor (RERTR) Program by conducting experiments to confirm the feasibility of Mo-99 production using high-density low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, a primary goal of the RERTR Program. Indonesia's first research reactor, the TRIGA Mark II at Bandung, began operation in 1964 at 250 kW and was subsequently upgraded in 1971 to 1 MW and further upgraded in 2000 to 2 MW. This reactor was joined by another TRIGA Mark II, the 100-kW Kartini-PPNY at Yogyakarta, in 1979, and by the 30-MW G.A. Siwabessy multipurpose reactor in Serpong, which achieved criticality in July 1983. A 10-MW radioisotope production reactor, to be called the RPI-10, also was proposed for construction at Serpong in the late 1990s, but the project apparently was not carried out. In the five decades since its nuclear research program began, Indonesia has trained a cadre of scientific and technical staff who not only operate and conduct research with the current facilities, but also represent the nucleus of a skilled labor pool to support development of a nuclear power program. Although Indonesia's previous on-again, off-again consideration of nuclear power has not gotten very far in the past, it now appears that Indonesia again is giving serious consideration to beginning a national nuclear energy program. In June 2006, Research and Technology Minister Kusmayanto Kadiman said that his ministry was currently putting the necessary procedures in place to speed up the project to acquire a nuclear power plant, indicating that, ''We will need around

  5. Audit program for physical security systems at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minichino, C.

    1982-01-01

    Licensees of nuclear power plants conduct audits of their physical security systems to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 73, Physical Protection of Plants and Materials. Section 73.55, Requirements for physical Protection of Licensed Activities in Nuclear Power Reactors Against Radiological Sabotage, requires that the security programs be reviewed at least every 12 months, that the audit be conducted by individuals independent of both security management and security supervision, and that the audit program review all aspects of the physical security system: hardware, personnel, and operational and maintenance procedures. This report contains information for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and for the licensees of nuclear power reactors who carry out these comprehensive audits. Guidance on the overall management of the audit function includes organizational structure and issues concerning the auditors who perform the review: qualifications, independence, due professional care, and standards. Guidance in the audit program includes purpose and scope of the audit, planning, techniques, post-audit procedures, reporting, and follow-up

  6. Lazarus1, a DUF300 Protein, Contributes to Programmed Cell Death Associated with Arabidopsis acd11 and the Hypersensitive Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinovsky, F.G.; Brodersen, P.; Fiil, B.K.

    2010-01-01

    ) mutant exhibits HR-like accelerated cell death, and cell death execution in acd11 shares genetic requirements for HR execution triggered by one subclass of R proteins. Methodology/Principal Findings: To identify genes required for this PCD pathway, we conducted a genetic screen for suppressors of acd11......Background: Programmed cell death (PCD) is a necessary part of the life of multi-cellular organisms. A type of plant PCD is the defensive hypersensitive response (HR) elicited via recognition of a pathogen by host resistance (R) proteins. The lethal, recessive accelerated cell death 11 (acd11......, here called lazarus (laz) mutants. In addition to known suppressors of R protein-mediated HR, we isolated 13 novel complementation groups of dominant and recessive laz mutants. Here we describe laz1, which encodes a protein with a domain of unknown function (DUF300), and demonstrate that LAZ1...

  7. Commentary on the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng, G.; Shemilt, L.W.

    1981-01-01

    A summary of the first formal review of the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to Atomic Energy of Canada Limited on the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is presented. The Program is described briefly and the composition and role of TAC in relation to the Program is outlined. Salient points and major recommendations are presented from the First Annual Report of TAC in which geoscience aspects of the Program were emphasized. It is the view of the Committee that overall, the whole Waste Management Program is well conceived, that there are many impressive accomplishments of high quality, that detailed research objectives are becoming more clearly delineated, that there is growing clarification as to the most critical areas in which research needs to be accomplished and that the increasing participation by university and industry scientists and engineers is reassuring

  8. Price-Anderson Nuclear Safety Enforcement Program. 1997 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes activities in the Department of Energy's Price-Anderson Amendments Act (PAAA) Enforcement Program in calendar year 1997 and highlights improvements planned for 1998. The DOE Enforcement Program involves the Office of Enforcement and Investigation in the DOE Headquarters Office of Environment, Safety and Health, as well as numerous PAAA Coordinators and technical advisors in DOE Field and Program Offices. The DOE Enforcement Program issued 13 Notices of Violation (NOV's) in 1997 for cases involving significant or potentially significant nuclear safety violations. Six of these included civil penalties totaling $440,000. Highlights of these actions include: (1) Brookhaven National Laboratory Radiological Control Violations / Associated Universities, Inc.; (2) Bioassay Program Violations at Mound / EG ampersand G, Inc.; (3) Savannah River Crane Operator Uptake / Westinghouse Savannah River Company; (4) Waste Calciner Worker Uptake / Lockheed-Martin Idaho Technologies Company; and (5) Reactor Scram and Records Destruction at Sandia / Sandia Corporation (Lockheed-Martin). Sandia / Sandia Corporation (Lockheed-Martin)

  9. Stress analysis program system for nuclear vessel: STANSAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Asao; Michikami, Shinsuke

    1979-01-01

    IHI has developed a computer system of stress analysis and evaluation for nuclear vessels: STANSAS (STress ANalysis System for Axi-symmetric Structure). The system consists of more than twenty independent programs divided into the following six parts. 1. Programs for opening design by code rule. 2. Calculation model generating programs. 3. Load defining programs. 4. Structural analysis programs. 5. Load data/calculation results plotting programs. 6. Stress evaluation programs. Each program is connected with its pre- or post-processor through three data-bases which enable automatic data transfer. The user can make his choice of structural analysis programs in accordance with the problem to be solved. The interface to STANSAS can be easily installed in generalized structural analysis programs such as NASTRAN and MARC. For almost all tables and figures in the stress report, STANSAS has the function to print or plot out. The complicated procedures of ''Design by Analysis'' for pressure vessels have been well standardized by STANSAS. The system will give a high degree of efficiency and confidence to the design work. (author)

  10. Double-digit growth characterizes 1981 nuclear programs abroad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    A 1980 international reactor survey shows a doubling of orders for nuclear power programs outside the US and a nearly 14% increase in nuclear capacity abroad. US manufacturers will not fill any of the 10 new foreign orders of 1980, and they received no new domestic orders. A statistical breakdown lists plants by country, type, net megawatts, year of reactor order, reactor manufacturer, location, date of commercial operation, and primary utility. The report also summarizes fuel-reprocessing and waste-management development in key countries. 1 figure, 1 table

  11. The initial criticality and nuclear commissioning test program at HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choong-Sung; Seo, Chul-Gyo; Jun, Byung-Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Dukjin-Dong 150, Yusung-Ku, Taejon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    The construction of the Korea Multipurpose Research Reactor - HANARO of 3MW, developed by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, was completed at the beginning of this year. The first fuel loading began on February 2 1995, and initial criticality was achieved on February 8, when the core had four 18-element assemblies and thirteen 36-element assemblies. The critical control rod position was 600.8 mm which represents excess reactivity of 0.71 $. Currently the nuclear commissioning test is on going under the zero power range. This paper describes the initial criticality approach of the HANARO, and its nuclear commissioning test program. (author)

  12. Program of nuclear criticality safety experiment at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Iwao; Tachimori, Shoichi; Takeshita, Isao; Suzaki, Takenori; Ohnishi, Nobuaki

    1983-11-01

    JAERI is promoting the nuclear criticality safety research program, in which a new facility for criticality safety experiments (Criticality Safety Experimental Facility : CSEF) is to be built for the experiments with solution fuel. One of the experimental researches is to measure, collect and evaluate the experimental data needed for evaluation of criticality safety of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Another research area is a study of the phenomena themselves which are incidental to postulated critical accidents. Investigation of the scale and characteristics of the influences caused by the accident is also included in this research. The result of the conceptual design of CSEF is summarized in this report. (author)

  13. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's research reactor inspection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constable, George L.

    1977-01-01

    The Division of Reactor Inspection Program's functional responsibilities are presented. The include (a) inspections and investigations necessary to determine whether licensees are complying with license provisions and rules, and to ascertain whether licensed operations are being conducted safely; (b) establishment of bases for the issuance or denial of a construction permit or license; (c) investigation of accidents, incidents, and theft or diversion of special nuclear materials; (d) enforcement actions; and (e) evaluation of licensed operations as a basis for recommending changes to standards and license conditions and for issuance of reports to the nuclear industry and the public

  14. The Evolution of India's Nuclear Program: Implications for the United States

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Creasman, David J

    2008-01-01

    Since India began developing its nuclear program it has continually encountered issues with the United States and other nuclearized countries over whether India should be able to establish a nuclear...

  15. The program of reactors and nuclear power plants; Programa de reactores y centrales nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calabrese, Carlos R [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, General San Martin (Argentina). Centro Atomico Constituyentes

    2001-07-01

    Into de framework of the program of research reactors and nuclear power plants, the operating Argentine reactors are described. The uses of the research reactors in Argentina are summarized. The reactors installed by Argentina in other countries (Peru, Algeria, Egypt) are briefly described. The CAREM project for the design and construction of an innovator small power reactor (27 MWe) is also described in some detail. The next biennial research and development program for reactor is briefly outlined.

  16. Final report to DOE: Matching Grant Program for the Penn State University Nuclear Engineering Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jack S. Brenizer, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The DOE/Industry Matching Grant Program is designed to encourage collaborative support for nuclear engineering education as well as research between the nation's nuclear industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Despite a serious decline in student enrollments in the 1980s and 1990s, the discipline of nuclear engineering remained important to the advancement of the mission goals of DOE. The program is designed to ensure that academic programs in nuclear engineering are maintained and enhanced in universities throughout the U.S. At Penn State, the Matching Grant Program played a critical role in the survival of the Nuclear Engineering degree programs. Funds were used in a variety of ways to support both undergraduate and graduate students directly. Some of these included providing seed funding for new graduate research initiatives, funding the development of new course materials, supporting new teaching facilities, maintenance and purchase of teaching laboratory equipment, and providing undergraduate scholarships, graduate fellowships, and wage payroll positions for students

  17. Evaluation of the Finnish nuclear safety research program 'SAFIR2010'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    A panel of three members has been asked by the Ministry of Employment and the Economy (MEE) to evaluate SAFIR2010, the Finnish research program on nuclear power plant safety. The program was established for the period 2007-2010 to help maintain expertise in nuclear safety, to integrate young people into the research in order to help assure the future availability of expertise, and to support international collaborations. The program is directed by a Steering Group, appointed by MEE, with representatives from all organizations involved with nuclear safety in Finland. SAFIR2010 has consisted of approximately 30 projects from year to year that fall into eight subject areas: 1. Organization and human factors 2. Automation and control room 3. Fuel and reactor physics 4. Thermal hydraulics 5. Severe accidents 6. Structural safety of reactor circuit 7. Construction safety 8. Probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) For each of these areas there are Reference Groups that provide oversight of the projects within their jurisdiction. The panel carried out its evaluation by reviewing copies of relevant documents and, during a one-week period 17-22 January 2010, meeting with key individuals. The results of the panel are provided as general conclusions, responses to questions posed by MEE, challenges and recommendations and comments on specific projects in each subject area. The general conclusions reflect the panel's view that SAFIR2010 is meeting its objectives and carrying out quality research. The questions addressed are: (a.) Are the achieved results in balance with the funding? Are the results exploited efficiently in practice? (b.) How well does the expertise cover the field? Is the entire SAFIR2010 programme balanced to all different fields in nuclear safety? Does it raise efficiently new experts? (c.) Have the 2006 evaluation results been implemented successfully into SAFIR2010 program? (d.) Challenges and recommendations. In general the panel was very positive about SAFIR

  18. A primary liver cancer death's survey and risk factors analysis of the workers in China nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Shouchen; Chang Xuezhang; Gao Zenglin; Xiong Jinlian; Zhang Xuzong; Zhang Zhongren

    1999-07-01

    To evaluate primary liver cancer death in the workers of China nuclear industry and to discuss the risk factors probably for making protection and cure measures, the workers of 11 units are surveyed from the time of foundation to the end of 1990 by groups, trades and sex, and the results are analyzed with the relevant physical examinations, the results in laboratory test, and some clinic epidemiological data concerned. The accumulative rough mortality is 19.20 x 10 -5 , standard mortality 10.09 x 10 -5 , the most is at the age of 35 to 54. SMR 1.00 (P > 0.05), RR value in uranium mines is 3.67 (P < 0.01) and others does not increase. The incidence of hepatomegalia and GPT rising are lower than or about 10%, while the incidence of HBsAg is lower than 8%, a middle-levelled infection in the country. And HBsAg incidence in liver cancer cases is 61.6% and chronic hepatitis in liver cancer cases is 53.4%. The liver cancer case increase in the workers in nuclear industry is not found, but significant increase is found in uranium mine workers; whereas there is no evidence that can be attributed to radiation operation, and the death risk may be considered mainly to be related to HBV infection, then chronic hepatitis or environment factors

  19. Training programs for the systems approach to nuclear security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, D.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In support of United States Government (USG) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) nuclear security programs, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has advocated and practiced a risk-based, systematic approach to nuclear security. The risk equation has been developed and implemented as the basis for a performance-based methodology for the design and evaluation of physical protection systems against a design basis threat (DBT) for theft and sabotage of nuclear and/or radiological materials. Integrated systems must include technology, people, and the man-machine interface. A critical aspect of the human element is training on the systems-approach for all the stakeholders in nuclear security. Current training courses and workshops have been very beneficial but are still rather limited in scope. SNL has developed two primary international classes - the international training course on the physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials, and the design basis threat methodology workshop. SNL is also completing the development of three new courses that will be offered and presented in the near term. They are vital area identification methodology focused on nuclear power plants to aid in their protection against radiological sabotage, insider threat analysis methodology and protection schemes, and security foundations for competent authority and facility operator stakeholders who are not security professionals. In the long term, we envision a comprehensive nuclear security curriculum that spans policy and technology, regulators and operators, introductory and expert levels, classroom and laboratory/field, and local and offsite training options. This training curriculum will be developed in concert with a nuclear security series of guidance documents that is expected to be forthcoming from the IAEA. It is important to note that while appropriate implementation of systems based on such training and documentation can improve the risk reduction, such a

  20. The Nuclear program of Navy: an approach from the budget

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Marco Antonio

    2014-01-01

    After the initiatives arising in the 50s, to conduct scientific research in Brazil, in the nuclear sector, the Brazilian government decided to invest resources in the early '70s, to provide the country with full training in the nuclear fuel cycle, producing reactors research and power and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel in the reactors. This course of action was intended to guarantee the necessary to make stronger our energy matrix, with the use of natural resources (uranium and thorium mines whose reserves are among the largest in the world) for the production of electricity, within view particularly development programs in effect at the time. Meanwhile, the Navy of Brazil, identifying the need to operate nuclear-powered submarines in the security and defense of the South Atlantic, institutionalized in 1979, a nuclear program which aimed to the complete domination independently of the nuclear cycle. Since then, what is realized is that the trajectory of the development of this program, in addition to external difficulties imposed by countries holders of this technology, budget internal issue became relevant. The irregularity of financial transfers caused the delay and the lack of guarantees of future budgets led to the unpredictability of strategic planning, leading the program to the 'vegetative' state for nearly a decade. However, from the 2000s, the possibility of economic exploitation by the expansion of the Brazilian Continental Shelf and the new discoveries of oil in the pre-salt tier shifted the vision balance then attributed to the use of nuclear technology as an energy source only, or intended for research and development in areas such as health and agriculture, reinforced the argument that Brazil must have this technology to 'discourage the concentration of hostile forces within the limits of Brazilian territorial waters'. In this context, the paper describes and analyzes how the Navy Nuclear Program (PNM) amounted to the

  1. Nuclear fuel waste management - biosphere program highlights - 1978 to 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zach, R

    1997-07-01

    The biosphere program in support of the development of the disposal concept for Canadian nuclear fuel waste since 1978 is scheduled for close-out. AECL`s Environmental Science Branch (ESB) was mainly responsible for work in this program. In order to preserve as much information as possible, this report highlights many of the key achievements of the program, particularly those related to the development of the BIOTRAC biosphere model and its supporting research. This model was used for the assessment and review of the disposal concept in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report also treats highlights related to alternative models, external scientific/technical reviews, EIS feedback, and the international BIOMOVS model validation program. Furthermore, it highlights basic aspects of future modelling and research needs in relation to siting a disposal facility. In this, feedback from the various reviews and the EIS is taken into account. Appendices of the report include listings of key ESB staff involved in the program, all the scientific/technical reports and papers produced under the program, contracts let to outside agencies, and issues raised by various participants or intervenors during the EIS review. Although the report is concerned with close-out of the biosphere program, it also provides valuable information for a continuing program concerned with siting a disposal facility. One of the conclusions of the report is that such a program is essential for successfully siting such a facility. (author) Refs.

  2. Nuclear fuel waste management - biosphere program highlights - 1978 to 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zach, R.

    1997-07-01

    The biosphere program in support of the development of the disposal concept for Canadian nuclear fuel waste since 1978 is scheduled for close-out. AECL's Environmental Science Branch (ESB) was mainly responsible for work in this program. In order to preserve as much information as possible, this report highlights many of the key achievements of the program, particularly those related to the development of the BIOTRAC biosphere model and its supporting research. This model was used for the assessment and review of the disposal concept in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report also treats highlights related to alternative models, external scientific/technical reviews, EIS feedback, and the international BIOMOVS model validation program. Furthermore, it highlights basic aspects of future modelling and research needs in relation to siting a disposal facility. In this, feedback from the various reviews and the EIS is taken into account. Appendices of the report include listings of key ESB staff involved in the program, all the scientific/technical reports and papers produced under the program, contracts let to outside agencies, and issues raised by various participants or intervenors during the EIS review. Although the report is concerned with close-out of the biosphere program, it also provides valuable information for a continuing program concerned with siting a disposal facility. One of the conclusions of the report is that such a program is essential for successfully siting such a facility. (author)

  3. Involvement of phospholipase D-related signal transduction in chemical-induced programmed cell death in tomato cell cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Michaeli, R.; Woltering, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) and its product phosphatidic acid (PA) are incorporated in a complex metabolic network in which the individual PLD isoforms are suggested to regulate specific developmental and stress responses, including plant programmed cell death (PCD). Despite the accumulating knowledge,

  4. 'Nuclearelectrica' Company messages for a broadly acceptable nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiopol, Mihaela; Bilegan, C. Iosif

    2001-01-01

    Romania started the nuclear power program about 20 years ago, by a high level Government decision. After 1989 the former Ministry of Electrical Power was transformed into a state owned company, RENEL, in which nuclear activities were also included. RENEL was a monopoly system responsible for production, transport and distribution of electricity in Romania. The deregulation process in the power sector was many times asked by the World Bank and International Monetary Fund, to split this monopoly system in separately activities: Production, Transport and Distribution. The first step occurred in July 1998, when the nuclear activities were externalized from RENEL. In nuclear sector two new entities were created: SN 'Nuclearelectrica' SA, a state own company that includes three branches: - Nuclear Power Production - Cernavoda NPP Unit 1; - Nuclear Fuel Plant-Pitesti; - Project Development Branch - Cernavoda Units 2-5. The second entity is the so-called Romanian Authority (Autonomous Reggie) for Nuclear Activities (RAAN), including as branches the heavy water fabrication plant 'ROMAG PROD', the Nuclear Research Institute (ICN) Pitesti and the Nuclear Engineering and Design Institute (CITON) Bucharest. The rest of conventional power sector was renamed, namely, CONEL. The organization process continued and in August 2000, by a Government Ordinance the CONEL was split into the following companies: - one for hydropower production 'HIDROELECTRICA'; - one for thermal power production 'TERMOELECTRICA'; - one for transport 'TRANSELECTRICA'; - one for distribution 'ELECTRICA'. The goal of a third step of restructuring process is the privatization in the power field. The steps of Romanian Power Sector Restructuring are presented. Since 1991 a Public Information program has been established. Depending on the evolution of the construction of the first Romanian nuclear power station, during the years, the messages changed. Everybody working in the nuclear field knows how difficult is

  5. A Program for Cultivating Nuclear Talent at Engineering Educational Institute in a Remote Area from Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tsuyoshi

    Recently, in Japan, the number of students who hope for finding employment at the nuclear power company has decreased as students‧ concern for the nuclear power industry decreases. To improve the situation, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology launched the program of cultivating talent for nuclear power which supports research and education of nuclear power in the academic year of 2007. Supported by the program, Kushiro College of Technology conducted several activities concerning nuclear power for about a year. The students came to be interested in nuclear engineering through these activities and its results.

  6. A program in medium-energy nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, B.L.; Dhuga, K.S.

    1992-01-01

    This report reviews progress on our nuclear-physics program for the last year, and includes as well copies of our publications and other reports for that time period. The structure of this report follows that of our 1991 Renewal Proposal and Progress Report: Sec. II outlines our research activities aimed at future experiments at CEBAF, NIKHEF, and Bates; Sec. III gives results of our recent research activities at NIKHEF, LAMPF, and elsewhere; Sec. IV provides an update of our laboratory activities at GWU, including the acquisition of our new Nuclear Detector Laboratory at our new Virginia Campus; and Sec. V is a list of our publications, proposals, and other reports. copies of those on medium-energy nuclear physics are reproduced in the Appendix

  7. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission human factors program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Human Factors Program Plan is to ensure that proper consideration is given to human factors in the design and operation of nuclear facilities. This revised plan addresses human factors issues related to the operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs). The three issues of concern are (1) the activities planned to provide the technical bases to resolve the remaining tasks related to human factors as described in NUREG-0660, The NRC Action Plan Developed as a Result of the TMI-2 Accident, and NUREG-0737, Clarification of TMI Action Plan Requirements; (2) the need to address the additional human factors efforts that were identified during implementation of the Action Plan; and (3) the actual fulfillment of those developmental activities specified in Revision 1 of this plan. The plan represents a systematic approach for addressing high priority human factors concerns important to NPP safety in FY 1986 through 1987

  8. Vacuolar and cytoskeletal dynamics during elicitor-induced programmed cell death in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higaki, Takumi; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Goh, Tatsuaki; Hayashi, Teruyuki; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Sano, Toshio; Hasezawa, Seiichiro; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki

    2008-09-01

    Responses of plant cells to environmental stresses often involve morphological changes, differentiation and redistribution of various organelles and cytoskeletal network. Tobacco BY-2 cells provide excellent model system for in vivo imaging of these intracellular events. Treatment of the cell cycle-synchronized BY-2 cells with a proteinaceous oomycete elicitor, cryptogein, induces highly synchronous programmed cell death (PCD) and provide a model system to characterize vacuolar and cytoskeletal dynamics during the PCD. Sequential observation revealed dynamic reorganization of the vacuole and actin microfilaments during the execution of the PCD. We further characterized the effects cryptogein on mitotic microtubule organization in cell cycle-synchronized cells. Cryptogein treatment at S phase inhibited formation of the preprophase band, a cortical microtubule band that predicts the cell division site. Cortical microtubules kept their random orientation till their disruption that gradually occurred during the execution of the PCD twelve hours after the cryptogein treatment. Possible molecular mechanisms and physiological roles of the dynamic behavior of the organelles and cytoskeletal network in the pathogenic signal-induced PCD are discussed.

  9. Sulfur dioxide alleviates programmed cell death in barley aleurone by acting as an antioxidant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha-Sha Wang

    Full Text Available Sulfur dioxide (SO2, a gaseous signaling molecule in animal cells, has recently been found to play a physiological role in plants. Here we studied the role of SO2 in gibberellic acid (GA3-induced programmed cell death (PCD in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. aleurone layers. The application of the SO2 donor (NaHSO3/Na2SO3, 1:3 M/M effectively alleviated PCD in barley aleurone layers in a dose-dependent manner with an optimal concentration of 50 μM. Further investigations showed that SO2 reduced the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, superoxide anion (⋅O2- and malondialdehyde (MDA in aleurone layers. Moreover, the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, ascorbate peroxidase (APX, glutathione reductase (GR and guaiacol peroxidase (POD were enhanced by SO2 donor treatment. Meanwhile, lipoxygenase (LOX activity was attenuated by SO2 donor treatment. Furthermore, an induction of endogenous H2S and NO were also observed in SO2-treated aleurone layers, suggesting interactions of SO2 with other well-known signaling molecules. Taken together, we show that SO2 negatively regulated PCD by acting as an antioxidant to scavenge excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS generated during PCD.

  10. Increased circulating follicular helper T cells with decreased programmed death-1 in chronic renal allograft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jian; Luo, Fengbao; Shi, Qianqian; Xu, Xianlin; He, Xiaozhou; Xia, Ying

    2015-11-03

    Chronic antibody-mediated rejection is a major issue that affects long-term renal allograft survival. Since follicular helper T (Tfh) cells promote the development of antigen-specific B cells in alloimmune responses, we investigated the potential roles of Tfh cells, B cells and their alloimmune-regulating molecules in the pathogenesis of chronic renal allograft rejection in this study. The frequency of Tfh, B cells and the levels of their alloimmune-regulating molecules including chemokine receptor type 5 (CXCR5), inducible T cell co-stimulator (ICOS), programmed death-1 (PD-1), ICOSL, PDL-1 and interleukin-21 (IL-21), of peripheral blood were comparatively measured in 42 primary renal allograft recipients within 1-3 years after transplantation. Among them, 24 patients had definite chronic rejection, while other 18 patients had normal renal function. Tfh-cell ratio was significantly increased with PD-1 down-regulation in the patients with chronic renal allograft rejection, while B cells and the alloimmune-regulating molecules studied did not show any appreciable change in parallel. The patients with chronic renal allograft rejection have a characteristic increase in circulating Tfh cells with a decrease in PD-1 expression. These pathological changes may be a therapeutic target for the treatment of chronic renal allograft rejection and can be useful as a clinical index for monitoring conditions of renal transplant.

  11. Dendritic Cells and Programmed Death-1 Blockade: A Joint Venture to Combat Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteven, Maarten; Van den Bergh, Johan M J; Marcq, Elly; Smits, Evelien L J; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I; Hobo, Willemijn; Lion, Eva

    2018-01-01

    Two decades of clinical cancer research with dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccination have proved that this type of personalized medicine is safe and has the capacity to improve survival, but monotherapy is unlikely to cure the cancer. Designed to empower the patient's antitumor immunity, huge research efforts are set to improve the efficacy of next-generation DC vaccines and to find synergistic combinations with existing cancer therapies. Immune checkpoint approaches, aiming to breach immune suppression and evasion to reinforce antitumor immunity, have been a revelation in the immunotherapy field. Early success of therapeutic antibodies blocking the programmed death-1 (PD-1) pathway has sparked the development of novel inhibitors and combination therapies. Hence, merging immunoregulatory tumor-specific DC strategies with PD-1-targeted approaches is a promising path to explore. In this review, we focus on the role of PD-1-signaling in DC-mediated antitumor immunity. In the quest of exploiting the full potential of DC therapy, different strategies to leverage DC immunopotency by impeding PD-1-mediated immune regulation are discussed, including the most advanced research on targeted therapeutic antibodies, lessons learned from chemotherapy-induced immune activation, and more recent developments with soluble molecules and gene-silencing techniques. An overview of DC/PD-1 immunotherapy combinations that are currently under preclinical and clinical investigation substantiates the clinical potential of such combination strategies.

  12. Programmed cell death in the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium mediates carbon and nitrogen export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Zeev, Edo; Avishay, Itamar; Bidle, Kay D; Berman-Frank, Ilana

    2013-01-01

    The extent of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) export to the deep ocean depends upon the efficacy of the biological pump that transports primary production to depth, thereby preventing its recycling in the upper photic zone. The dinitrogen-fixing (diazotrophic) Trichodesmium spp. contributes significantly to oceanic C and N cycling by forming extensive blooms in nutrient-poor tropical and subtropical regions. These massive blooms generally collapse several days after forming, but the cellular mechanism responsible, along with the magnitude of associated C and N export processes, are as yet unknown. Here, we used a custom-made, 2-m high water column to simulate a natural bloom and to specifically test and quantify whether the programmed cell death (PCD) of Trichodesmium mechanistically regulates increased vertical flux of C and N. Our findings demonstrate that extremely rapid development and abrupt, PCD-induced demise (within 2–3 days) of Trichodesmium blooms lead to greatly elevated excretions of transparent exopolymers and a massive downward pulse of particulate organic matter. Our results mechanistically link autocatalytic PCD and bloom collapse to quantitative C and N export fluxes, suggesting that PCD may have an impact on the biological pump efficiency in the oceans. PMID:23887173

  13. Induction of painless thyroiditis in patients receiving programmed death 1 receptor immunotherapy for metastatic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Steven; Salari, Farnaz; Kashat, Lawrence; Walfish, Paul G

    2015-05-01

    Immunotherapies against immune checkpoints that inhibit T cell activation [cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death 1 (PD-1)] are emerging and promising treatments for several metastatic malignancies. However, the precise adverse effects of these therapies on thyroid gland function have not been well described. We report on 10 cases of painless thyroiditis syndrome (PTS) from a novel etiology, following immunotherapy with anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) during treatment for metastatic malignancies. Six patients presented with transient thyrotoxicosis in which thyrotropin binding inhibitory immunoglobulins (TBII) were absent for all, whereas four patients had evidence of positive antithyroid antibodies. All thyrotoxic patients required temporary beta-blocker therapy and had spontaneous resolution of thyrotoxicosis with subsequent hypothyroidism. Four patients presented with hypothyroidism without a detected preceding thyrotoxic phase, occurring 6-8 weeks after initial drug exposure. All of these patients had positive antithyroid antibodies and required thyroid hormone replacement therapy for a minimum of 6 months. Patients receiving anti-PD-1 mAb therapy should be monitored for signs and symptoms of PTS which may require supportive treatment with beta-blockers or thyroid hormone replacement. The anti-PD-1 mAb is a novel exogenous cause of PTS and provides new insight into the possible perturbations of the immune network that may modulate the development of endogenous PTS, including cases of sporadic and postpartum thyroiditis.

  14. Intracellular energy depletion triggers programmed cell death during petal senescence in tulip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, A K; Ishikawa, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Sawa, Y; Shibata, H

    2008-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) in petals provides a model system to study the molecular aspects of organ senescence. In this study, the very early triggering signal for PCD during the senescence process from young green buds to 14-d-old petals of Tulipa gesneriana was determined. The opening and closing movement of petals of intact plants increased for the first 3 d and then gradually decreased. DNA degradation and cytochrome c (Cyt c) release were clearly observed in 6-d-old flowers. Oxidative stress or ethylene production can be excluded as the early signal for petal PCD. In contrast, ATP was dramatically depleted after the first day of flower opening. Sucrose supplementation to cut flowers maintained their ATP levels and the movement ability for a longer time than in those kept in water. The onset of DNA degradation, Cyt c release, and petal senescence was also delayed by sucrose supplementation to cut flowers. These results suggest that intracellular energy depletion, rather than oxidative stress or ethylene production, may be the very early signal to trigger PCD in tulip petals.

  15. Aetiology of stillbirths and neonatal deaths in rural Ghana: implications for health programming in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmond, Karen M; Quigley, Maria A; Zandoh, Charles; Danso, Samuel; Hurt, Chris; Owusu Agyei, Seth; Kirkwood, Betty R

    2008-09-01

    In developing countries many stillbirths and neonatal deaths occur at home and cause of death is not recorded by national health information systems. A community-level verbal autopsy tool was used to obtain data on the aetiology of stillbirths and neonatal deaths in rural Ghana. Objectives were to describe the timing and distribution of causes of stillbirths and neonatal deaths according to site of death (health facility or home). Data were collected from 1 January 2003 to 30 June 2004; 20,317 deliveries, 696 stillbirths and 623 neonatal deaths occurred over that time. Most deaths occurred in the antepartum period (28 weeks gestation to the onset of labour) (33.0%). However, the highest risk periods were during labour and delivery (intrapartum period) and the first day of life. Infections were a major cause of death in the antepartum (10.1%) and neonatal (40.3%) periods. The most important cause of intrapartum death was obstetric complications (59.3%). There were significantly fewer neonatal deaths resulting from birth asphyxia in the home than in the health facilities and more deaths from infection. Only 59 (20.7%) mothers of neonates who died at home reported that they sought care from an appropriate health care provider (doctor, nurse or health facility) during their baby's illness. The results from this study highlight the importance of studying community-level data in developing countries and the high risk of intrapartum stillbirths and infectious diseases in the rural African mother and neonate. Community-level interventions are urgently needed, especially interventions that reduce intrapartum deaths and infection rates in the mother and infant.

  16. Pneumonitis and pneumonitis-related death in cancer patients treated with programmed cell death-1 inhibitors: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui P

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Peng-Fei Cui,1–3,* Jun-Xun Ma,1,* Fei-Xue Wang,1,* Jing Zhang,1 Hai-Tao Tao,1 Yi Hu1 1First Department of Medical Oncology, 2Department of Graduate Administration, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, 3Health Bureau of the 75709 Army, Central Theater of the Chinese PLA, Wuhan, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: We conducted a meta-analysis of published clinical trials to determine the relationship between the risks of pneumonitis and pneumonitis-related death and programmed cell death-1 (PD-1 inhibitor treatment in patients with cancer.Materials and methods: We examined clinical trials from the Medline and Google Scholar databases. Data from original studies and review articles were also cross-referenced and evaluated. Randomized Phase II and Phase III trials of pembrolizumab and nivolumab treatment in patients with cancer were eligible for the analysis. Information about the participants, all-grade and high-grade pneumonitis, and pneumonitis-related death was extracted from each study and analyzed.Results: After the exclusion of ineligible studies, 12 clinical trials were included in the analysis. The odds ratio (OR for all-grade pneumonitis after PD-1 inhibitor treatment was 4.59 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.51–8.37; P<0.00001, and the OR for high-grade pneumonitis after PD-1 inhibitor treatment was 3.83 (95% CI: 1.54–9.48; P=0.004. The OR for pneumonitis-related death after PD-1 inhibitor treatment was 2.47 (95% CI: 0.41–14.81; P=0.32. Moreover, the OR for all-grade pneumonitis after nivolumab/ipilimumab combination therapy versus nivolumab monotherapy was 3.54 (95% CI: 1.52–8.23; P=0.003, and that for high-grade pneumonitis after nivolumab/ipilimumab combination therapy versus nivolumab monotherapy was 2.35 (95% CI: 0.45–12.13; P=0.31. Treated cancer appeared to have no effect on the risk of pneumonitis.Conclusion: Our data showed that PD-1 inhibitors were associated with increased risks of all

  17. Nuclear regulation. NRC's security clearance program can be strengthened

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fultz, Keith O.; Kruslicky, Mary Ann; Bagnulo, John E.

    1988-12-01

    Because of the national security implications of its programs, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) investigates the background of its employees and consultants as well as others to ensure that they are reliable and trustworthy. If the investigation indicates that an employee will not endanger national security, NRC grants a security clearance that allows access to classified information, material, and facilities. NRC also requires periodic checks for some clearance holders to ensure their continued clearance eligibility. The Chairman, Subcommittee on Environment, Energy, and Natural Resources, House Committee on Government Operations, asked GAO to review NRC's personnel security clearance program and assess the procedures that NRC uses to ensure that those who operate nuclear power plants do not pose a threat to the public. The Atomic Energy Act of 1954 requires NRC to conduct background investigations of its employees and consultants as well as others who have access to classified information, material, or facilities. To do this, NRC established a personnel security clearance program. Under NRC policies, a security clearance is granted after the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) or the Federal Bureau of Investigation checks the background of those applying for an NRC clearance. NRC also periodically reassesses the integrity of those holding the highest level clearance. NRC employees, consultants, contractors, and licensees as well as other federal employees hold approximately 10,600 NRC clearances. NRC does not grant clearances to commercial nuclear utility employees unless they require access to classified information or special nuclear material. However, the utilities have voluntarily established screening programs to ensure that their employees do not pose a threat to nuclear plants. NRC faces a dilemma when it hires new employees. Although its policy calls for new hires to be cleared before they start work, the security clearance process takes so long

  18. The Nuclear Astrophysics program at n_TOF (CERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colonna N.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An important experimental program on Nuclear Astrophysics is being carried out at the n_TOF since several years, in order to address the still open issues in stellar and primordial nucleosynthesis. Several neutron capture reactions relevant to s-process nucleosynthesis have been measured so far, some of which on important branching point radioisotopes. Furthermore, the construction of a second experimental area has recently opened the way to challenging measurements of (n, charged particle reactions on isotopes of short half-life. The Nuclear Astrophysics program of the n_TOF Collaboration is here described, with emphasis on recent results relevant for stellar nucleosynthesis, stellar neutron sources and primordial nucleosynthesis.

  19. Revised experimental program on the nuclear ship 'Mutsu'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Yuichi

    1985-01-01

    The experimental program on the nuclear ship ''Mutsu'' has been revised by the Government. And, the responsible organization for n. s. Mutsu was turned to Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) from Japan Nuclear-ship Development Agency. The revised, new experimental program is as follows. (1) Experimental navigation of n. s. Mutsu is made with the already loaded 1st reactor core for about one year. (2) The mooring port for n. s. Mutsu is in a minimum scale. (3) Upon termination of the experimental navigation, n. s. Mutsu is immediately decommissioned. (4) Power-up test and experimental navigation of n. s. Mutsu are made in fiscal 1989 to 1990. The policy of research and development with n. s. Mutsu and the works assigned to JAERI with n. s. Mutsu are described. (Mori, K.)

  20. Professional development for nuclear power programs in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanter, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    Countries entering nuclear power programs for the first time find that inadequate planning for the development of trained manpower is a critical factor in the success of their programs. This requires the early training of a team for the planning and acquisition effort to be followed by training for the supervision of construction. In addition, there is the more readily recognized training for operation. Typical manpower needs for such projects have been documented by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The basic academic training of engineers and scientists, which should be available within the country; advanced academic training, which is often secured in institutions abroad; specialized training abroad by international agencies; specialized training by the vendors of nuclear equipment; and the development of indigenous training. This paper outlines all of these avenues but will concentrate on the training available through international agencies and on the development of indigenous training capability

  1. Geoscience research for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is assessing the concept of deep disposal of nuclear fuel waste in plutonic rock. As part of that assessment, a broad program of geoscience and geotechnical work has been undertaken to develop methods for characterizing sites, incorporating geotechnical data into disposal facility design, and incorporating geotechnical data into environmental and safety assessment of the disposal system. General field investigations are conducted throughout the Precambrian Shield, subsurface investigations are conducted at designated field research areas, and in situ rock mass experiments are being conducted in an Underground Research Laboratory. Samples from the field research areas and elsewhere are subjected to a wide range of tests and experiments in the laboratory to develop an understanding of the physical and chemical processes involved in ground-water-rock-waste interactions. Mathematical models to simulate these processes are developed, verified and validated. 114 refs.; 13 figs

  2. Overview of the NRC nuclear waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaro, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    The NRC has firmly established waste management as a high-priority effort and has made the commitment to act rapidly and methodically to establish a sound regulatory base for licensing waste management activities. We believe the priorities for NRC work in waste management are consistent with the needs of the overall national waste management program. Present licensing procedures and criteria are adequate for the short term, and priority attention is being given to the longer term, when the quantities of waste to be managed will be greater and licensing demands will increase. Recognizing that its decision will affect industry, other governmental jurisdictions, private interest groups, and the public at large, NRC has encouraged and will continue to encourage their participation in planning our program. We also recognize that the problems of nuclear waste management are international in scope. Many waste management problems (e.g., potential for contamination of oceans and atmosphere, need for isolation of some wastes for longer periods than governments and political boundaries have remained stable in the past), require a set of internationally acceptable and accepted solutions. The wastes from the U.S. nuclear industry will account for only about one third of the nuclear waste generated in the world. Therefore, we propose to cooperate and where appropriate take the lead in establishing acceptable worldwide policies, standards and procedures for handling nuclear wastes

  3. Aging mitigation and improved programs for nuclear service diesel generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoopingarner, K.R.; Zaloudek, F.R.

    1989-12-01

    Recent NRC sponsored aging research work on nuclear service diesel generators has resulted in a recommendation that an improved engine management program should be adopted for aging mitigation and reliability improvement. The center of attention should be to ensure diesel-generator operational readiness. This report emphasizes a ''healthy engine concept'' and recommends parameters to be monitored to determine engine condition. The proposed program and approach recommended in this report represent balanced management where diesel generator testing, inspections, monitoring, trending, training, and maintenance all have appropriate importance. Fast-starting and fast-loading test of nuclear service diesels causes very rapid wear of certain engine components. This report documents this aging and wear mechanism and recommends ways to largely eliminate this unique aging stressor. Current periodic intrusive maintenance and engine overhaul practice have been found to be less favorable for safety assurance than engine overhauls based on monitoring and trending results or on a need to correct specific engine defects. This report recommends that the periodic overhaul requirements be re-evaluated. Diesel generator research on aging and wear is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The research reported in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), which is operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle Memorial Institute. 23 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs

  4. Technical basis for the proposed high efficiency nuclear fuel program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, P.E.; Herring, J.S.; Crawford, D.C.; Neimark, L.E.

    1999-01-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fired electricity generating stations will dramatically increase over the next 20 years. Nuclear energy is the only fully developed technology able to supply large amounts of electricity without generation of greenhouse gases. However, the problem of noncompetitive economics and public concerns about radioactive waste disposal, safety, and nuclear weapons proliferation may prevent the reemergence of nuclear power as a preferred option for new electric energy generation in the U.S. This paper discusses a new research program to help address these issues, by developing fuel designs capable of burnup values in excess of 60 MWD/kgU. The objectives of the program are to: improve the reliability and robustness of light water reactor fuel, thereby improving safety margins; Significantly increase the energy generated by each fuel loading, thereby achieving longer operating cycles, higher capacity factors, and lower cost electric power; Significantly reduce the volume of spent nuclear fuel discharged for disposal by allowing more energy to be extracted from each fuel element prior to discharge; Develop fuel that is much more proliferation resistant. (author)

  5. A program to assess microbial impacts on nuclear waste containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, J.; Meike, A.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we discuss aspects of a comprehensive program to identify and bound potential effects of microorganisms on long-term nuclear waste containment, using as examples, studies conducted within the Yucca Mountain Project. A comprehensive program has been formulated which cuts across standard disciplinary lines to address the specific concerns of microbial activity in a radioactive waste repository. Collectively, this program provides bounding parameters of microbial activities that modify the ambient geochemistry and hydrology, modify corrosion rates, and transport and transform radionuclides under conditions expected to be encountered after geological waste emplacement. This program is intended to provide microbial reaction rates and bounding conditions in a form that can be integrated into existing chemical and hydrological models. The inclusion of microbial effects will allow those models to more accurately assess long term repository integrity

  6. Non-linear nuclear engineering models as genetic programming application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domingos, Roberto P.; Schirru, Roberto; Martinez, Aquilino S.

    1997-01-01

    This work presents a Genetic Programming paradigm and a nuclear application. A field of Artificial Intelligence, based on the concepts of Species Evolution and Natural Selection, can be understood as a self-programming process where the computer is the main agent responsible for the discovery of a program able to solve a given problem. In the present case, the problem was to find a mathematical expression in symbolic form, able to express the existent relation between equivalent ratio of a fuel cell, the enrichment of fuel elements and the multiplication factor. Such expression would avoid repeatedly reactor physics codes execution for core optimization. The results were compared with those obtained by different techniques such as Neural Networks and Linear Multiple Regression. Genetic Programming has shown to present a performance as good as, and under some features superior to Neural Network and Linear Multiple Regression. (author). 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tabs

  7. Training and qualification program for nuclear criticality safety technical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    A training and qualification program for nuclear criticality safety technical staff personnel has been developed and implemented. The program is compliant with requirements and provides evidence that a systematic approach has been taken to indoctrinate new technical staff. Development involved task analysis to determine activities where training was necessary and the standard which must be attained to qualify. Structured mentoring is used where experienced personnel interact with candidates using checksheets to guide candidates through various steps and to provide evidence that steps have been accomplished. Credit can be taken for the previous experience of personnel by means of evaluation boards which can credit or modify checksheet steps. Considering just the wealth of business practice and site specific information a new person at a facility needs to assimilate, the program has been effective in indoctrinating new technical staff personnel and integrating them into a productive role. The program includes continuing training

  8. ERDA nuclear energy center program. Phase I. Program definition. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    This Phase I report describes the procedures used and the results obtained from a survey of SINB states and major utilities to determine their interest in participating in an ERDA-sponsored study to investigate the technical, economic, and institutional practicality of establishing a potential Nuclear Energy Center at a specific site. The State of South Carolina was the only SINB member to express positive interest in ERDA's Nuclear Energy Center Program, and to offer to submit a proposal through the SINB to select and evaluate a site in South Carolina having the potential for being developed into a Nuclear Energy Center

  9. A quality assurance program for nuclear power reactor materials tests at the Ford nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    The University of Michigan Nuclear Reactor Laboratory Quality Assurance Program has been established to assure that materials testing services provided to electric utilities produce accurate results in accordance with industry standards, sound engineering practice, and customer requirements. The program was prepared to comply with applicable requirements of 10CFR50, Appendix B, of the Code of Federal Regulations and a standard of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), N45.2. The paper discusses the quality assurance program applicability, organization, qualification and training of personnel, material identification and control, examination and testing, measuring and test equipment, nonconforming test equipment, records, audits, and distribution

  10. Nuclear quality assurance programs, their role and their impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lex, B.L.

    1978-01-01

    The major steps in the development of control and instrumentation design requirements for a nuclear station, the execution of the detailed design and the procurement, installation and start-up of the control equipment and systems are outlined. The principal quality assurance program requirements related to each of these steps are described and the impact of these requirements on the conduct of the work are examined. (author)

  11. Review of the ISTC innovative nuclear programs (information review)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tocheny, L. V. [ISTC - International Science and Technology Center, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    The information will be included in the review, with special attention on details of corresponding experimental programs: Novel reactor concepts, fit with GIF and INPRO: Supercritical Pressure Water aspects, Heavy metals (Lead, Lead-Bismuth) technology, HTGR critical modeling, engineering. Molten salts. Reactor data benchmarking, Accelerator Driven Systems (experimental modelling), Nuclear data measurements, Severe accident study (corium modelling, QUENCH, Chernobyl), Experimental Analysis of Hydraulically Induced Vibrations in Compact Curling Tube Steam Generators. (authors)

  12. Tank waste remediation system nuclear criticality safety program management review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRADY RAAP, M.C.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the results of an internal management review of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) criticality safety program, performed in advance of the DOE/RL assessment for closure of the TWRS Nuclear Criticality Safety Issue, March 1994. Resolution of the safety issue was identified as Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-40-12, due September 1999

  13. Emergency medical assistance programs for nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linnemann, R.E.; Mettler, F.A. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    This paper deals with a simple but practical medical support of geographically distributed nuclear reactors in isolated areas. A staff of experts at a centre devote their full attention to accident prevention and preparedness at reactor sites. They establish and maintain emergency medical programs at reactor sites and nearby support hospitals. The emphasis is on first aid and emergency treatment by medical attendants who are not and cannot be experts in radiation but do know how to treat patients. (author)

  14. Modelling the work flow of a nuclear waste management program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeyer Mortensen, K. [Aarhus Univ., Computer Science Dept. (Denmark); Pinci, V. [Meta Software Corporation, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1997-03-01

    In this paper we describe a modelling project to improve a nuclear waste management program in charge of the creation of a new system for the permanent disposal of nuclear waste. SADT (Structural Analysis and Design Technique) is used in order to provide a work-flow description of the functions to be performed by the waste management program. This description is then translated into a number of Coloured Petri Nets (CPN or CP-nets) corresponding to different program functions where additional behavioural inscriptions provide basis for simulation. Each of these CP-nets is simulated to produce timed event charts that are useful for understanding the behaviour of the program functions under different scenarios. Then all the CPN models are linked together to form a single stand-alone application that is useful for validating the interaction and cooperation between the different program functions. A technique for linking executable CPN models is developed for supporting large modelling projects and parallel development of independent CPN models. (au) 11 refs.

  15. Modelling the work flow of a nuclear waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeyer Mortensen, K.; Pinci, V.

    1997-03-01

    In this paper we describe a modelling project to improve a nuclear waste management program in charge of the creation of a new system for the permanent disposal of nuclear waste. SADT (Structural Analysis and Design Technique) is used in order to provide a work-flow description of the functions to be performed by the waste management program. This description is then translated into a number of Coloured Petri Nets (CPN or CP-nets) corresponding to different program functions where additional behavioural inscriptions provide basis for simulation. Each of these CP-nets is simulated to produce timed event charts that are useful for understanding the behaviour of the program functions under different scenarios. Then all the CPN models are linked together to form a single stand-alone application that is useful for validating the interaction and cooperation between the different program functions. A technique for linking executable CPN models is developed for supporting large modelling projects and parallel development of independent CPN models. (au) 11 refs

  16. Effect of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery and Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor Antagonists on Metastatic Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Molly; Nordmann, Tyler; Sperduto, Paul W; Clark, H. Brent; Hunt, Matthew A

    2017-01-01

    Learning objectives To evaluate radiation-induced changes in patients with brain metastasis secondary to malignant melanoma who received treatment with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) and programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) receptor antagonists. Introduction  Stereotactic radiosurgery and chemotherapeutics are used together for treatment of metastatic melanoma and have been linked to delayed radiation-induced vasculitic leukoencephalopathy (DRIVL). There have been reports of more intense interactions with new immunotherapeutics targeting PD-1 receptors, but their interactions have not been well described and may result in an accelerated response to GKRS. Here we present data on subjects treated with this combination from a single institution. Methods Records from patients who underwent treatment for metastatic melanoma to the brain with GKRS from 2011 to 2016 were reviewed. Demographics, date of brain metastasis diagnosis, cause of death when applicable, immunotherapeutics, and imaging findings were recorded. The timing of radiation therapy and medications were also documented.  Results A total of 79 subjects were treated with GKRS, and 66 underwent treatment with both GKRS and immunotherapy. Regarding the 30 patients treated with anti-PD-1 immunotherapy, 21 patients received pembrolizumab, seven patients received nivolumab, and two patients received pembrolizumab and nivolumab. Serial imaging was available for interpretation in 25 patients, with 13 subjects who received GKRS and anti-PD-1 immunotherapy less than six weeks of each other. While four subjects had indeterminate/mixed findings on subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nine subjects were noted to have progression. Two of these patients showed progression but subsequent imaging revealed a decrease in progression or improvement on MRI to previously targeted lesions by GKRS. None of the 13 subjects had surgery following their combined therapies. Conclusions This data suggests that there is need for

  17. Basis for snubber aging research: Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.P.; Palmer, G.R.; Werry, E.V.; Blahnik, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes a research plan to address the safety concerns of aging in snubbers used on piping and equipment in commercial nuclear power plants. The work is to be performed under Phase 2 of the Snubber Aging Study of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the prime contractor. Research conducted by PNL under Phase 1 provided an initial assessment of snubber operating experience and was primarily based on a review of licensee event reports. The work proposed is an extension of Phase 1 and includes research at nuclear power plants and in test laboratories. Included is technical background on the design and use of snubbers in commercial nuclear power applications; the primary failure modes of both hydraulic and mechanical snubbers are discussed. The anticipated safety, technical, and regulatory benefits of the work, along with concerns of the NRC and the utilities, are also described. 21 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  18. Nuclear waste treatment program: Annual report for FY 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouns, R.A.; Powell, J.A.

    1988-09-01

    Two of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear waste management-related goals are to ensure that waste management is not an obstacle to the further development of light-water reactors and the closure of the nuclear fuel cycle and to fulfill its institutional responsibility for providing safe storage and disposal of existing and future nuclear wastes. As part of its approach to achieving these goals, the Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology of DOE established what is now called the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program (NWTP) at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory during the second half of FY 1982. To support DOE's attainment of its goals, the NWTP is to provide technology necessary for the design and operation of nuclear waste treatment facilities by commercial enterprises as part of a licensed waste management system and problem-specific treatment approaches, waste form and treatment process adaptations, equipment designs, and trouble-shooting assistance, as required to treat existing wastes. This annual report describes progress during FY 1987 towards meeting these two objectives. 24 refs., 59 figs., 24 tabs

  19. Development of the nuclear power program of the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, L.D.; Corpus, G.C.

    1976-01-01

    In 1958, Republic Act 2067, referred to as the Philippine Science Act of 1958, was enacted into law. This Act created, among other things, the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) as the principal agency responsible for the promotion of atomic energy for peaceful purposes. The idea of the Philippine Government in creating PAEC was to develop the country's capability in nuclear and reactor technology to meet anticipated manpower needs in large-scale application of nuclear energy for the production of electrical energy. The national demand for electric power and energy was then increasing steadily with the growth in industry, in economic activities, in population, and with the improvement of the standard of living of the Filipino people. The PAEC acquired a 1-MW nuclear research reactor and envisioned it to serve as the starting nucleus of the nuclear power program. Through its installation and subsequent operation, it aimed to attract the interest of engineers and technologists to the nuclear field, while simultaneously building its capability to undertake research on atomic energy and radioisotope applications

  20. AEC sets five year nuclear safety research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    The research by the government for the establishment of means of judging the adequacy of safety measures incorporated in nuclear facilities, including setting safety standards and collecting documents of general criteria, and the research by the industry on safety measures and the promotion of safety-related technique are stated in the five year program for 1976-80 reported by subcommittees, Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). Four considerations on the research items incorporated in the program are 1) technical programs relating to the safety of nuclear facilities and the necessary criteria, 2) priority of the relevant items decided according to their impact on circumstances, urgency, the defence-indepth concept and so on, 3) consideration of all relevant data and documents collected, and research subjects necessary to quantify safety measurement, and 4) consideration of technological actualization, the capability of each research body, the budget and the time schedule. In addition, seven major themes decided on the basis of these points are 1) reactivity-initiated accident, 2) LOCA, 3) fuel behavior, 4) structural safety, 5) radioactive release, 6) statistical method of safety evaluation, and 7) seismic characteristics. The committee has deliberated the appropriate division of researches between the government and the industry. A set of tables showing the nuclear safety research plan for 1976-80 are attached. (Iwakiri, K.)

  1. THE NUCLEAR MATERIAL MEASUREMENT PROGRAM PLAN FOR GOSATOMNADZOR OF RUSSIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokov, Dmitry; Byers, Kenneth R.

    2003-01-01

    As the Russian State regulatory agency responsible for oversight of nuclear material control and accounting (MC and A), Gosatomnadzor of Russia determines the status of the MC and A programs at Russian facilites by testing the nuclear material inventory for accounting record accuracy. Currently, Gosatomnadzor is developing and implementing an approach to planning and conducting MC and A inspections using non-destructive assay (NDA) instruments that will provide for consistent application of MC and A measurement inspection objectives throughtout Russia. This Gosatomnadzor NDA Program Plan documents current NDA measurement capability in all regions of Gosatomnadzor; provides justification for upgrades to equipment, procedures and training; and defines the inspector-facility operator interface as it relates to NDA measurement equipment use. This plan covers a three-year measurement program cycle, but will be reviewed and updated annually to ensure that adequate inspection resources are available to meet the demands of the inspection schedule. This paper presents the elements of this plan and describes the process by which Gosatomnadzor ensures that its NDA instruments are effectively utilized, procedures are developed and certified, and inspection personnel are properly trained to provide assurance that Russian nuclear facilities are in compliance with Russian MC and A regulations.

  2. The French A.E.C. nuclear robotic program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foult, T.

    1991-01-01

    The new French nuclear robotic program launched by the CEA was started at the beginning of 1988 for the duration of two years and with the total subsidy of about 130 million French franc. This program includes the following four steps: the definition of model missions dedicated to inspection and intervention in nuclear environment, the system analysis to define the systems, functions and specifications required to perform these model missions, the technological development required to achieve these systems, and the design of demonstration models with the partial integration of the above developments. The whole program including these four steps is called SYROCO (modular SYstem for RObots COoperating in radioactive environment). The repair of leak in a pipe in a reprocessing cell, the model mission in a PWR nuclear power plant, autonomous load bearing mobile robots, squirrel concept light modular carrier concept, radiation hardening, mechanic, perception of environment, communication, control and simulation and the demonstration models are described. SHERPA project, perception management, force controlled manipulator, squirrel project, light modular carrier, processes and NAB model mission simulation are particularly mentioned

  3. A Unique Master's Program in Combined Nuclear Technology and Nuclear Chemistry at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skarnemark, Gunnar; Allard, Stefan; Ekberg, Christian; Nordlund, Anders

    2009-01-01

    The need for engineers and scientists who can ensure safe and secure use of nuclear energy is large in Sweden and internationally. Chalmers University of Technology is therefore launching a new 2-year master's program in Nuclear Engineering, with start from the autumn of 2009. The program is open to Swedish and foreign students. The program starts with compulsory courses dealing with the basics of nuclear chemistry and physics, radiation protection, nuclear power and reactors, nuclear fuel supply, nuclear waste management and nuclear safety and security. There are also compulsory courses in nuclear industry applications and sustainable energy futures. The subsequent elective courses can be chosen freely but there is also a possibility to choose informal tracks that concentrate on nuclear chemistry or reactor technology and physics. The nuclear chemistry track comprises courses in e.g. chemistry of lanthanides, actinides and transactinides, solvent extraction, radioecology and radioanalytical chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals. The program is finished with a one semester thesis project. This is probably a unique master program in the sense of its combination of deep courses in both nuclear technology and nuclear chemistry.

  4. The protection system to Brazilian Nuclear Program; O sistema de protecao ao Programa Nuclear Brasileiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreuzza, Mario Giussepp Santezzi Bertottelli [Secretaria de Assuntos Estrategicos (SAE), Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    1997-12-31

    The Sistema de Protecao ao Programa Nuclear Brasileiro-SIPRON (Protection System to Brazilian Nuclear Program) was established in 1980. It is intended to accomplish in only one system, all the actions related to security and protection for Nuclear Facilities in Brazil. The author presents in detail the protection system SIPRON, describing the system structure and organization, the functions and obligations of the system involved main organizations, as well as, the system operation and behaviour during an postulated occurrence of a nuclear emergency. It is also described an Exercise that happened in June of 1997 at the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Angra I, after two simulated tests in December of 1996 and April of 1997. The NPP Angra I Emergency Plan Exercise was a good opportunity to test the SIPRON structure and preparedness program. It was verified, included by International Atomic Energy Agency observers, the system involved organizations effectiveness and the procedures efficacy to protect the public and the environmental. Finally, it is shown the SIPRON activities of routine, the system obstacles and the expected future performances. (author) 3 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Role of a Transcriptional Regulator in Programmed Cell Death and Plant Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julie M. Stone

    2008-09-13

    The long-term goal of this research is to understand the role(s) and molecular mechanisms of programmed cell death (PCD) in the controlling plant growth, development and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. We developed a genetic selection scheme to identify A. thaliana FB1-resistant (fbr) mutants as a way to find genes involved in PCD (Stone et al., 2000; Stone et al., 2005; Khan and Stone, 2008). The disrupted gene in fbr6 (AtSPL14) responsible for the FB1-insensitivity and plant architecture phenotypes encodes a plant-specific SBP DNA-binding domain transcriptional regulator (Stone et al., 2005; Liang et al., 2008). This research plan is designed to fill gaps in the knowledge about the role of SPL14 in plant growth and development. The work is being guided by three objectives aimed at determining the pathways in which SPL14 functions to modulate PCD and/or plant development: (1) determine how SPL14 functions in plant development, (2) identify target genes that are directly regulated by SPL14, and (3) identify SPL14 modifications and interacting proteins. We made significant progress during the funding period. Briefly, some major accomplishments are highlighted below: (1) To identify potential AtSPL14 target genes, we identified a consensus DNA binding site for the AtSPL14 SBP DNA-binding domain using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential selection (SELEX) and site-directed mutagenesis (Liang et al., 2008). This consensus binding site was used to analyze Affymetrix microarray gene expression data obtained from wild-type and fbr6 mutant plants to find possible AtSPL14-regulated genes. These candidate AtSPL14-regulated genes are providing new information on the molecular mechanisms linking plant PCD and plant development through modulation of the 26S proteasome. (2) Transgenic plants expressing epitope-tagged versions of AtSPL14 are being used to confirm the AtSPL14 targets (by ChIP-PCR) and further dissect the molecular interactions (Nazarenus, Liang

  6. Death and Death Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Gonca Karakus; Zehra Ozturk; Lut Tamam

    2012-01-01

    Although death and life concepts seem so different from each other, some believe that death and life as a whole that death is accepted as the goal of life and death completes life. In different cultures, societies and disciplines, there have been very different definitions of death which changes according to personality, age, religion and cultural status of the individual. Attitudes towards death vary dramatically according to individuals. As for the death anxiety, it is a feeling which start...

  7. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume II. Proliferation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this volume is limited to an assessment of the relative effects that particular choices of nuclear-power systems, for whatever reasons, may have on the possible spread of nuclear-weapons capabilities. This volume addresses the concern that non-nuclear-weapons states may be able to initiate efforts to acquire or to improve nuclear-weapons capabilities through civilian nuclear-power programs; it also addresses the concern that subnational groups may obtain and abuse the nuclear materials or facilities of such programs, whether in nuclear-weapons states (NWS's) or nonnuclear-weapons states (NNW's). Accordingly, this volume emphasizes one important factor in such decisions, the resistance of nuclear-power systems to the proliferation of nuclear-weapons capabilities

  8. Chemistry technician performance evaluation program Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shawver, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The Arizona Nuclear Power Project (ANPP), a three-reactor site located 50 miles west of Phoenix, Arizona, has developed and implemented a program for evaluating individual chemistry technician analytical performance on a routine basis. About 45 chemistry technicians are employed at the site, 15 at each operating unit. The technicians routinely perform trace level analyses for impurities of concern to PWRs. Each month a set of blind samples is provided by an outside vendor. The blind samples contain 16 parameters which are matrixed to approximate the PWR's primary and secondary cycles. Nine technicians receive the samples, three from each operating unit, and perform the required analyses. Acceptance criteria for successful performance on the blind parameters is based on the values found in the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Document 83-016, Revision 2, August 1989, Chemistry Quality Control Program. The goal of the program is to have each technician demonstrate acceptable performance on each of 16 analytical parameters. On completion of each monthly set, a summary report of all of the analytical results for the sample set is prepared. From the summary report, analytical bias can be detected, technician performance is documented, and overall laboratory performance can be evaluated. The program has been very successful at satisfying the INPO requirement that the analytical performance of each individual technician should be checked on at least a six-month frequency for all important parameters measured. This paper describes the program as implemented at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station and provides a summary report and trend and bias graphs for illustrative purposes

  9. The United States foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance program: Proposal to modify the program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, C.E.

    2005-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the Department of State (DOS), adopted the Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel in May 1996. The policy was slated to expire in May 2009. However, in October 2003, a petition requesting a program extension was delivered to the United States Secretary of Energy from a group of research reactor operators from foreign countries. In April 2004, the Secretary directed DOE undertake an analysis, as required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), to consider potential extension of the Program. On December 1, 2004, a Federal Register Notice was issued approving the program extension. This paper discusses the findings from the NEPA analysis and the potential changes in the program that may result from implementation of the proposed changes. (author)

  10. The manpower training and development programs of NUCLEBRAS for the Brazilian nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitalnik, J.; Lerner Neto, C.; Stilben, V.; Botelho, O.

    1984-01-01

    As technology transfer is one of the main objectives of the Brazilian Nuclear Program, the principal aim of manpower training has been to provide the conditions for absorbing this technology. The strategy used for such a program required a quantitative and qualitative planning of manpower needs, through medium-range and long-term forecasts, with the condition of maximum utilization of the existing educational infra-structure. On-the-job training which is considered one of the most important means for technology transfer, was given highest priority. Also, management development was considered very important for the implementation of the Nuclear Program. This paper shows the results achieved from 1973 up to now by the manpower training and development programs. (Author) [pt

  11. Plutonium recycle in PWR reactors (Brazilian Nuclear Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubini, L.A.

    1978-02-01

    An evaluation is made of the material requirements of the nuclear fuel cycle with plutonium recycle. It starts from the calculation of a reference reactor and allows the evaluation of demand under two alternatives of nuclear fuel cycle for Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR): without plutonium recycle; and with plutonium recycle. Calculations of the reference reactor have been carried out with the CELL-CORE codes. For plutonium recycle, the concept of uranium and plutonium homogeneous mixture has been adopted, using self-produced plutonium at equilibrium, in order to get minimum neutronic perturbations in the reactor core. The refueling model studied in the reference reactor was the 'out-in' scheme with a constant number of changed fuel elements (approximately 1/3 of the core). Variations in the material requirements were studied considering changes in the installed nuclear capacity of PWR reactors, the capacity factor of these reactors, and the introduction of fast breeders. Recycling plutonium produced inside the system can reach economies of about 5%U 3 O 8 and 6% separative work units if recycle is assumed only after the 5th operation cycle of the thermal reactors. The cumulative amount of fissile plutonium obtained by the Brazilian Nuclear Program of PWR reactors by 1991 should be sufficient for a fast breeder with the same capacity as Angra 2. For the proposed fast breeder programs, the fissile plutonium produced by thermal reactors is sufficient to supply fast breeder initial necessities. Howewer, U 3 O 8 and SWU economy with recycle is not significant when the proposed fast breeder program is considered. (Author) [pt

  12. Practical standard for nuclear power plant life management programs: 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-03-01

    The standard specifies the method of implementing nuclear power plant life management programs. The plant life management programs evaluate the integrity of the plant structures, systems and components, assessing if appropriate measures are taken against existing aging phenomena, if there are possibilities of occurrence and development of aging phenomena and if a sufficient level of margin is maintained to assure the integrity throughout the future operating period. The programs also assess the validity of the current maintenance activities, such as trend monitoring, walkdowns, periodic tests and inspections, repair and replacement work for the purpose of preventive maintenance, and utilization of lessons learned from past trouble experience, in order to newly identify maintenance measures. The technical evaluation on aging phenomena is conducted to establish the 10 year maintenance program for nuclear power plants until the plant reaches 30 years of service. The standard was established and issued by the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) through the discussion of experts in the associated fields. (T. Tanaka)

  13. Development of nonlinear dynamic analysis program for nuclear piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamichika, Ryoichi; Izawa, Masahiro; Yamadera, Masao

    1980-01-01

    In the design for nuclear power piping, pipe-whip protection shall be considered in order to keep the function of safety related system even when postulated piping rupture occurs. This guideline was shown in U.S. Regulatory Guide 1.46 for the first time and has been applied in Japanese nuclear power plants. In order to analyze the dynamic behavior followed by pipe rupture, nonlinear analysis is required for the piping system including restraints which play the role of an energy absorber. REAPPS (Rupture Effective Analysis of Piping Systems) has been developed for this purpose. This program can be applied to general piping systems having branches etc. Pre- and post- processors are prepared in this program in order to easily input the data for the piping engineer and show the results optically by use of a graphic display respectively. The piping designer can easily solve many problems in his daily work by use of this program. This paper describes about the theoretical background and functions of this program and shows some examples. (author)

  14. Inflammation promotes oral squamous carcinoma immune evasion via induced programmed death ligand-1 surface expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wanlu; Lu, Libing; Feng, Yun; Chen, Jiao; Li, Yan; Kong, Xiangli; Chen, Sixiu; Li, Xiaoyu; Chen, Qianming; Zhang, Ping

    2013-05-01

    The association between inflammation and cancer provides a new target for tumor biotherapy. The inflammatory cells and molecules within the tumor microenvironment have decisive dual roles in antitumor immunity and immune evasion. In the present study, phytohemagglutinin (PHA) was used to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to simulate the tumor inflammatory microenvironment. The effect of immune cells and inflammatory cytokines on the surface expression of programmed cell death-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) and tumor immune evasion was investigated using flow cytometry (FCM) and an in vivo xenotransplantation model. Based on the data, PHA-activated, but not resting, immune cells were able to promote the surface expression of PD-L1 in Tca8113 oral squamous carcinoma cells via the secretion of inflammatory cytokines, but not by cell-cell contact. The majority of the inflammatory cytokines had no significant effect on the proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis of the Tca8113 cells, although they each induced the expression of PD-L1 in a dose-dependent manner. In total, 99% of the Tca8113 cells expressed PD-L1 following treatment with the supernatant of PHA-stimulated PBMCs. The PHA-supernatant pretreated Tca8113 cells unusually induced Tca8113 antigen-specific CD8 + T cell apoptosis in vitro and the evasion of antigen-specific T cell attraction in a nude mouse tumor-bearing model. These results indicate a new mechanism for the promotion of tumor immune evasion by the tumor inflammatory microenvironment.

  15. Development and Fit-for-Purpose Validation of a Soluble Human Programmed Death-1 Protein Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yan G; Yuan, Xiling; Newitt, John A; Peterson, Jon E; Gleason, Carol R; Haulenbeek, Jonathan; Santockyte, Rasa; Lafont, Virginie; Marsilio, Frank; Neely, Robert J; DeSilva, Binodh; Piccoli, Steven P

    2015-07-01

    Programmed death-1 (PD-1) protein is a co-inhibitory receptor which negatively regulates immune cell activation and permits tumors to evade normal immune defense. Anti-PD-1 antibodies have been shown to restore immune cell activation and effector function-an exciting breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy. Recent reports have documented a soluble form of PD-1 (sPD-1) in the circulation of normal and disease state individuals. A clinical assay to quantify sPD-1 would contribute to the understanding of sPD-1-function and facilitate the development of anti-PD-1 drugs. Here, we report the development and validation of a sPD-1 protein assay. The assay validation followed the framework for full validation of a biotherapeutic pharmacokinetic assay. A purified recombinant human PD-1 protein was characterized extensively and was identified as the assay reference material which mimics the endogenous analyte in structure and function. The lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) was determined to be 100 pg/mL, with a dynamic range spanning three logs to 10,000 pg/mL. The intra- and inter-assay imprecision were ≤15%, and the assay bias (percent deviation) was ≤10%. Potential matrix effects were investigated in sera from both normal healthy volunteers and selected cancer patients. Bulk-prepared frozen standards and pre-coated Streptavidin plates were used in the assay to ensure consistency in assay performance over time. This assay appears to specifically measure total sPD-1 protein since the human anti-PD-1 antibody, nivolumab, and the endogenous ligands of PD-1 protein, PDL-1 and PDL-2, do not interfere with the assay.

  16. Programmed cell death promotes male sterility in the functional dioecious Opuntia stenopetala (Cactaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Rentería, Lluvia; Orozco-Arroyo, Gregorio; Cruz-García, Felipe; García-Campusano, Florencia; Alfaro, Isabel; Vázquez-Santana, Sonia

    2013-09-01

    The sexual separation in dioecious species has interested biologists for decades; however, the cellular mechanism leading to unisexuality has been poorly understood. In this study, the cellular changes that lead to male sterility in the functionally dioecious cactus, Opuntia stenopetala, are described. The spatial and temporal patterns of programmed cell death (PCD) were determined in the anthers of male and female flowers using scanning electron microscopy analysis and histological observations, focusing attention on the transition from bisexual to unisexual development. In addition, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling assays were used as an indicator of DNA fragmentation to corroborate PCD. PCD was detected in anthers of both female and male flowers, but their patterns differed in time and space. Functionally male individuals developed viable pollen, and normal development involved PCD on each layer of the anther wall, which occurred progressively from the inner (tapetum) to the outer layer (epidermis). Conversely, functional female individuals aborted anthers by premature and displaced PCD. In anthers of female flowers, the first signs of PCD, such as a nucleus with irregular shape, fragmented and condensed chromatin, high vacuolization and condensed cytoplasm, occurred at the microspore mother cell stage. Later these features were observed simultaneously in all anther wall layers, connective tissue and filament. Neither pollen formation nor anther dehiscence was detected in female flowers of O. stenopetala due to total anther disruption. Temporal and spatial changes in the patterns of PCD are responsible for male sterility of female flowers in O. stenopetala. Male fertility requires the co-ordination of different events, which, when altered, can lead to male sterility and to functionally unisexual individuals. PCD could be a widespread mechanism in the determination of functionally dioecious species.

  17. DHS National Technical Nuclear Forensics Program FY 10 Summary Report: Graduate Mentoring Assistance Program (GMAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finck, Martha R.

    2011-01-01

    This program provides practical training to DHS graduate fellows in the DOE laboratory complex. It involves coordinating students, their thesis advisors, and their laboratory project mentors in establishing a meaningful program of research which contributes to the graduate student's formation as a member of the nuclear forensics community. The summary report details the student/mentor experience and future plans after the first summer practicum. This program provides practical training to DHS graduate fellows in the DOE laboratory complex. It involves coordinating students, their thesis advisors, and their laboratory project mentors in establishing a meaningful program of research which contributes to the graduate student's formation as a member of the nuclear forensics community. This final written report includes information concerning the overall mentoring experience, including benefits (to the lab, the mentors, and the students), challenges, student research contributions, and lab mentor interactions with students home universities. Idaho National Laboratory hosted two DHS Nuclear Forensics graduate Fellows (nuclear engineering) in summer 2011. Two more Fellows (radiochemistry) are expected to conduct research at the INL under this program starting in 2012. An undergraduate Fellow (nuclear engineering) who worked in summer 2011 at the laboratory is keenly interested in applying for the NF Graduate Fellowship this winter with the aim of returning to INL. In summary, this program appears to have great potential for success in supporting graduate level students who pursue careers in nuclear forensics. This relatively specialized field may not have been an obvious choice for some who have already shown talent in the traditional areas of chemistry or nuclear engineering. The active recruiting for this scholarship program for candidates at universities across the U.S. brings needed visibility to this field. Not only does this program offer critical practical training

  18. Environmental Radiological Impact of Nuclear Power. Monitoring and Control Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    Radioactive contamination of the environment and public exposure to ionizing radiation may result from releases from programmed or accidental operations in regulated activities, or they may be due to preexisting situations such as contamination caused by past accidents, radioactive rain caused by nuclear tests, or increased natural radioactivity resulting from human activities. In many cases, both the emission sources and the environment should be monitored to determine the risk to the population and verify to what extent the limits and conditions established by competent authorities are being observed. Monitoring can be divided into three categories: monitoring of the emission source, of the receiving medium and of members of the public; individual monitoring of the population is extremely rare and would only be considered when estimated doses substantially exceed the annual public dose limit. In practices likely to produce significant radioactive releases, as is the case of nuclear fuel cycle facilities, the limits and conditions for monitoring and controlling them and the requirements for environmental radiological monitoring are established in the licensing process. Programs implemented during normal operation of the facilities form the basis for monitoring in the event of accidents. in addition to environmental radiological monitoring associated with facilities, different countries have monitoring programs outside the facilities zones of influence, in order to ascertain the nationwide radiological fund and determine possible increases in this fund. In Spain, the facilities that generate radioactive waste have effluent storage, treatment and removal systems and radiological monitoring programs based on site and discharge characteristics. The environmental radiological monitoring system is composed of the network implemented by the owners in the nuclear fuel cycle facilities zones of influence, and by nationwide monitoring networks managed by the Consejo de

  19. Program change management during nuclear power plant decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushart, Sean; Kim, Karen; Naughton, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Decommissioning a nuclear power plant is a complex project. The project involves the coordination of several different departments and the management of changing plant conditions, programs, and regulations. As certain project Milestones are met, the evolution of such plant programs and regulations can help optimize project execution and cost. This paper will provide information about these Milestones and the plant departments and programs that change throughout a decommissioning project. The initial challenge in the decommissioning of a nuclear plant is the development of a definitive plan for such a complex project. EPRI has published several reports related to decommissioning planning. These earlier reports provided general guidance in formulating a Decommissioning Plan. This Change Management paper will draw from the experience gained in the last decade in decommissioning of nuclear plants. The paper discusses decommissioning in terms of a sequence of major Milestones. The plant programs, associated plans and actions, and staffing are discussed based upon experiences from the following power reactor facilities: Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant, Yankee Nuclear Power Station, and the Haddam Neck Plant. Significant lessons learned from other sites are also discussed as appropriate. Planning is a crucial ingredient of successful decommissioning projects. The development of a definitive Decommissioning Plan can result in considerable project savings. The decommissioning plants in the U.S. have planned and executed their projects using different strategies based on their unique plant circumstances. However, experience has shown that similar project milestones and actions applied through all of these projects. This allows each plant to learn from the experiences of the preceding projects. As the plant transitions from an operating plant through decommissioning, the reduction and termination of defunct programs and regulations can help optimize all facets of

  20. Lessons learned in planning the Canadian Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, M.; Brooks, S.; Miller, J.; Neal, P.; Mason, R.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) and Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) began implementing a $7B CDN, 70-year Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP) to deal with legacy decommissioning and environmental issues at AECL nuclear sites. The objective of the NLLP is to safely and cost-effectively reduce the nuclear legacy liabilities and associated risks based on sound waste management and environmental principles in the best interest of Canadians. The NLLP comprises a number of interlinked decommissioning, waste management and environmental restoration activities that are being executed at different sites by various technical groups. Many lessons about planning and executing such a large, diverse Program have been learned in planning the initial five-year 'start-up' phase (concluded 2011 March), in planning the three-year second phase (currently being commenced), and in planning individual and interacting activities within the Program. The activities to be undertaken in the start-up phase were planned by a small group of AECL technical experts using the currently available information on the liabilities. Several internal and external reviews of the Program during the start-up phase examined progress and identified several improvements to planning. These improvements included strengthening communications among the groups within the Program, conducting more detailed advance planning of the interlinked activities, and being cautious about making detailed commitments for activities for which major decisions had yet to be made. The second phase was planned by a dedicated core team. More and earlier input was solicited from the suppliers than in the planning for the first phase. This was to ensure that the proposed program of work was feasible, and to be able to specify in more detail the resources that would be required to carry it out. The NLLP has developed several processes to assist in the detailed planning of the numerous projects and

  1. Nuclear power reactor analysis, methods, algorithms and computer programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matausek, M.V

    1981-01-01

    Full text: For a developing country buying its first nuclear power plants from a foreign supplier, disregarding the type and scope of the contract, there is a certain number of activities which have to be performed by local stuff and domestic organizations. This particularly applies to the choice of the nuclear fuel cycle strategy and the choice of the type and size of the reactors, to bid parameters specification, bid evaluation and final safety analysis report evaluation, as well as to in-core fuel management activities. In the Nuclear Engineering Department of the Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences (NET IBK) the continual work is going on, related to the following topics: cross section and resonance integral calculations, spectrum calculations, generation of group constants, lattice and cell problems, criticality and global power distribution search, fuel burnup analysis, in-core fuel management procedures, cost analysis and power plant economics, safety and accident analysis, shielding problems and environmental impact studies, etc. The present paper gives the details of the methods developed and the results achieved, with the particular emphasis on the NET IBK computer program package for the needs of planning, construction and operation of nuclear power plants. The main problems encountered so far were related to small working team, lack of large and powerful computers, absence of reliable basic nuclear data and shortage of experimental and empirical results for testing theoretical models. Some of these difficulties have been overcome thanks to bilateral and multilateral cooperation with developed countries, mostly through IAEA. It is the authors opinion, however, that mutual cooperation of developing countries, having similar problems and similar goals, could lead to significant results. Some activities of this kind are suggested and discussed. (author)

  2. Nuclear energy: Brazilian Nuclear Program behind the scenes and the reflections in the national society and economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grippi, Sidney

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear energy in the world, the Brazilian nuclear program, the industrial and social risks of nuclear segment, 20th century and the radiation accidents, the ionizing radiation effects in living beings, radioactive wastes, the Earth Letter and a list of CNEN regulations are presented

  3. Nye County, Nevada 1992 nuclear waste repository program: Program overview. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an overview of the Nye County FY92 Nuclear Waste Repository Program (Program). Funds to pay for Program costs will come from the Federal Nuclear Waste Fund, which was established under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA). In early 1983, the Yucca Mountain was identified as a potentially suitable site for the nation's first geologic repository for spent reactor fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Later that year, the Nye County Board of County Commissioners (Board) established the capability to monitor the Federal effort to implement the NWPA and evaluate the potential impacts of repository-related activities on Nye County. Over the last eight years, the County's program has grown in complexity and cost in order to address DOE's evolving site characterization studies, and prepare for the potential for facility construction and operation. Changes were necessary as well, in response to Congress's redirection of the repository program specified in the amendments, to the NWPA approved in 1987. In early FY 1991, the County formally established a project office to plan and implement its program of work. The Repository Project Office's (RPO) mission and functions are provided in Section 2.0. The RPO organization structure is described in Section 3.0

  4. Improving human reliability through better nuclear power plant system design: Program for advanced nuclear power studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golay, M.W.

    1993-01-01

    The project on ''Development of a Theory of the Dependence of Human Reliability upon System Designs as a Means of Improving Nuclear Power Plant Performance'' was been undertaken in order to address the problem of human error in advanced nuclear power plant designs. Lack of a mature theory has retarded progress in reducing likely frequencies of human errors. Work being pursued in this project is to perform a set of experiments involving human subjects who are required to operate, diagnose and respond to changes in computer-simulated systems, relevant to those encountered in nuclear power plants, which are made to differ in complexity in a systematic manner. The computer program used to present the problems to be solved also records the response of the operator as it unfolds

  5. Foreign Material Exclusion Program at CNE Cernavoda Nuclear Generating Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urjan, Daniel [S.N. ' Nuclearelectrica' SA, CNE Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant, Medgidiei 2 Street, 905200 Cernavoda, Constanta (Romania)

    2008-07-01

    In the face of a continuing attention to operations and maintenance costs at nuclear power plants, the future of the industry depends largely upon increasing plant availability and improving operating efficiency. The success in achieving these objectives is dependent upon the success of each plant's equipment maintenance program. Preventing the introduction of foreign materials into a nuclear power plant system or component requires a careful, thoughtful, and professional approach by all site personnel. This paper describes a proactive approach to prevent the introduction of foreign material into systems and components, by providing an overview of technical considerations required to develop, implement, and manage a foreign material exclusion program at CNE Cernavoda Unit 1 and 2 Nuclear Power Station. It is also described an example of Foreign Material Intrusion which happened during the 2003 planned maintenance outage at Cernavoda Unit no.1. This paper also defines personnel responsibilities and key nomenclature and a means for evaluating prospective work tasks and activities against standardized criteria, in order to identify the appropriate level of the required FME controls. (author)

  6. Nuclear technology programs semiannual progress report, April--September 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, J.E.

    1991-08-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Program of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1989. These programs involve R ampersand D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of metal fuel and blanket materials of the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned with developing a process for separating the organic and inorganic constitutents of the red-water waste stream generated in production of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories. 154 refs., 154 figs., 100 tabs

  7. Foreign Material Exclusion Program at CNE Cernavoda Nuclear Generating Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urjan, Daniel [S.N. ' Nuclearelectrica' SA, CNE Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant, Medgidiei 2 Street, 905200 Cernavoda, Constanta (Romania)

    2008-07-01

    In the face of a continuing attention to operations and maintenance costs at nuclear power plants, the future of the industry depends largely upon increasing plant availability and improving operating efficiency. The success in achieving these objectives is dependent upon the success of each plant's equipment maintenance program. Preventing the introduction of foreign materials into a nuclear power plant system or component requires a careful, thoughtful, and professional approach by all site personnel. This paper describes a proactive approach to prevent the introduction of foreign material into systems and components, by providing an overview of technical considerations required to develop, implement, and manage a foreign material exclusion program at CNE Cernavoda Unit 1 and 2 Nuclear Power Station. It is also described an example of Foreign Material Intrusion which happened during the 2003 planned maintenance outage at Cernavoda Unit no.1. This paper also defines personnel responsibilities and key nomenclature and a means for evaluating prospective work tasks and activities against standardized criteria, in order to identify the appropriate level of the required FME controls. (author)

  8. Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, April-- September 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, J.E. (ed.)

    1992-06-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1990. These programs involve R D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories.

  9. Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, April-- September 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, J.E. [ed.

    1992-06-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1990. These programs involve R&D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

  10. Program to justify life extension of older nuclear piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burr, T.K.; Dwight, J.E. Jr.; Morton, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has a history of more than 40 years devoted to the operation of nuclear reactors designed for research and experiments. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is one such operating reactor whose mission requires continued operation for an additional 25 years or more. Since the ATR is approaching its design life of twenty years, life extension evaluations have been initiated. Of particular importance are the associated high temperature, high pressure loop piping system supporting in--reactor experiments. Failure of this piping could challenge core safety margins. Since regulatory rules for nuclear power plant life extension are only in the formulation stage, the current technical guidance on this subject provided by the Department of Energy (DOE) or the commercial nuclear industry is incomplete. In the interim, order to assure continued safe operation of this piping beyond its initial design life, a program has been developed to provide the necessary technical justification for life extension. This paper describes a program that establishes Section 11 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code as the governing criteria document, retains B31.1 as the Code of record for Section 11 activities, specifies additional inservice inspection requirements more strict than Section 11, and relies heavily on flaw detection and fracture mechanics evaluations. 18 refs., 2 figs

  11. Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, October 1988--March 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, J.E. [ed.

    1990-12-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1988--March 1989. These programs involve R&D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of metal fuel and blanket materials of the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned with examining the feasibility of substituting low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in the production of fission product {sup 99}Mo. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories. 127 refs., 76 figs., 103 tabs.

  12. Nuclear technology programs; Semiannual progress report, October 1989--March 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, J.E. [ed.

    1992-01-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1989--March 1990. These programs involve R&D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of metal fuel and blanket materials of the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned water waste stream generated in production of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

  13. Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, October 1988--March 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, J.E.

    1990-12-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1988--March 1989. These programs involve R ampersand D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of metal fuel and blanket materials of the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned with examining the feasibility of substituting low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in the production of fission product 99 Mo. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories. 127 refs., 76 figs., 103 tabs

  14. Nuclear technology programs. Semiannual progress report, April--September 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April through September 1991. These programs involve R ampersand D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories

  15. Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, April-- September 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-06-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1990. These programs involve R ampersand D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories

  16. Foreign Material Exclusion Program at CNE Cernavoda Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urjan, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    In the face of a continuing attention to operations and maintenance costs at nuclear power plants, the future of the industry depends largely upon increasing plant availability and improving operating efficiency. The success in achieving these objectives is dependent upon the success of each plant's equipment maintenance program. Preventing the introduction of foreign materials into a nuclear power plant system or component requires a careful, thoughtful, and professional approach by all site personnel. This paper describes a proactive approach to prevent the introduction of foreign material into systems and components, by providing an overview of technical considerations required to develop, implement, and manage a foreign material exclusion program at CNE Cernavoda Unit 1 and 2 Nuclear Power Station. It is also described an example of Foreign Material Intrusion which happened during the 2003 planned maintenance outage at Cernavoda Unit no.1. This paper also defines personnel responsibilities and key nomenclature and a means for evaluating prospective work tasks and activities against standardized criteria, in order to identify the appropriate level of the required FME controls. (author)

  17. Factor of radioactive waste on nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Abdul Malik Syed Zain

    2009-01-01

    Global warming phenomena and rising oil prices have brought the excitement of open space use of nuclear power. Arguments in favor of this technology range in terms of more environmentally friendly, energy diversification and cost efficiency has prompted the government to widen the choice of nuclear power be considered as a serious alternative. Despite the attractive factors to the use of these powers, there are also factors that stem from the continued development of nuclear power. These include the factor of safety, security, security of fuel supply, and public attention is often associated with radioactive waste management. This article attempts to debate specific to radioactive waste management factors that impact on public acceptance of a country's nuclear power program, especially in Malaysia. Starting from the absence of radioactive waste management policy to model uncertainty of the landfill and complications in selecting a repository site shows the basic infrastructure is still lacking. In addition, previous experience handling thorium waste has not reached a final settlement after several years of implementation. It reinforced the perception about the level of public confidence in the competence and attitude of local workers who are not very encouraging to pursue this advanced.

  18. AN AUDIT OF THE SUDDEN-INFANT-DEATH-SYNDROME PREVENTION PROGRAM IN THE AUCKLAND REGION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obdeijn, M. C.; Tonkin, S.; Mitchell, E. A.

    1995-01-01

    Aim. An audit of the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) prevention programme in the Auckland region. Methods. 107 health professionals working in antenatal classes, postnatal wards, domiciliary midwifery and the Plunket Society were interviewed. Results. Maternal smoking and infant sleeping

  19. Rational Design of Regulators of Programmed Cell Death in Human Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cowburn, David

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a better understanding of the intricate pathways of cell death and their contributions to breast cancers, with the goal of designing potential therapeutic...

  20. Assessment of the human resources infrastructure for nuclear energy program in Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaushevski, A.; Spasevska, H.; Nikolova-Poceva, S.; Popov, P.

    2015-01-01

    Macedonia is a country with no nuclear power and research reactors. The nuclear application is currently only in the medical industry, agriculture and food industry, accompanied by radiation measuring and protection activities in these sectors. On the other side the energy needs have been increasing in the last ten years, which resulted in electrical energy import of about 20–30% (around 3000 GWh). Nuclear power is one of the options for satisfying energy needs in the next 50 years. One of the crucial problems in nuclear energy implementation are human resources needs and educational infrastructure development in this field. No matter what will be the future energy scenario in the Republic of Macedonia, the nuclear educational program is the first step to have HR in the field of nuclear energy. This paper presents the proposed direction for having HR in nuclear energy program in a small country such as the Republic of Macedonia. Taking into account the existing national education program related to nuclear topics and in particular to nuclear power, and following the guidance and recommendations from the international nuclear educational programs at the IAEA, EHRO and others, the planning of the educational nuclear programs and human resources development in the Republic of Macedonia has been carried out. This includes the enhancing the capabilities of the national regulatory body in the Republic of Macedonia. (authors) Keywords: NEP (Nuclear Energy Program), HR (Human Resources), NEPIO (Nuclear Energy Program Implementation Organization), NRB (Nuclear Regulatory Body), NPP