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Sample records for programmable clock manager

  1. Programmable Clock Waveform Generation for CCD Readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, J. de; Castilla, J.; Martinez, G.; Marin, J.

    2006-07-01

    Charge transfer efficiency in CCDs is closely related to the clock waveform. In this paper, an experimental framework to explore different FPGA based clock waveform generator designs is described. Two alternative design approaches for controlling the rise/fall edge times and pulse width of the CCD clock signal have been implemented: level-control and time-control. Both approaches provide similar characteristics regarding the edge linearity and noise. Nevertheless, dissimilarities have been found with respect to the area and frequency range of application. Thus, while the time-control approach consumes less area, the level control approach provides a wider range of clock frequencies since it does not suffer capacitor discharge effect. (Author) 8 refs.

  2. Design and implementation of SFQ programmable clock generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, M.; Nakajima, N.; Fujiwara, K.; Yoshikawa, N.; Fujimaki, A.; Terai, H.; Yorozu, S.

    2004-01-01

    We have designed and implemented an SFQ programmable clock generator (PCG), which can generate the variable number of SFQ pulses according to its internal state. The PCG is composed of an SFQ ring oscillator, a control circuit which counts up the number of SFQ pulses and stops the operation of the ring oscillator, and a decoder which defines the initial state of the control circuit. The PCG can generate the variable number of SFQ pulses ranging from 2 to 2 N , where N is the number of T flip-flops in the control circuit. The oscillation frequency of the PCG is designed to be ranging from 6.2 to 18.8 GHz. In this study, we have implemented a PCG generating SFQ pulses ranging from 2 to 2 4 using a cell-based design methodology and confirmed its correct functionality

  3. NNP Life Management Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hervia Ruperez, F.

    1996-01-01

    Around the world, power station owners are increasingly concerned to optimise Plant Life Management. In response, they are setting up Life Management programmes, of more or less ambitious scope and depth. Strategic, economic and security concerns and the close link between life extension work and the improved maintenance practices that are so important today, will increase and global these programmes for monitoring and conservation or mitigation of ageing. These programmes are all based on knowledge of the precise condition of all components and population with the greatest effect on the economics and safety of the plant, and trends in changes in their condition. (Author)

  4. The European Programme Manager

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larson, Anne; Bergman, E.; Ehlers, S.

    The publication is a result of a cooperation between organisations in six European countries with the aim to develop a common European education for programme managers. It contains of a description of the different elements of the education together with a number of case-studies from the counties...

  5. A programmable finite state module for use with the Fermilab Tevatron Clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beechy, D.

    1987-10-01

    A VME module has been designed which implements several programmable finite state machines that use the Tevatron Clock signal as inputs. In addition to normal finite state machine type outputs, the module, called the VME Finite State Machine, or VFSM, records a history of changes of state so that the exact path through the state diagram can be determined. There is also provision for triggering and recording from an external digitizer so that samples can be taken and recorded under very precisely defined circumstances

  6. How do you manage early or late clock-ins? .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Cathy L

    2013-08-01

    My current practice has historically been very strict with hourly employees. The workday is 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. for most employees. They are to clock in and out at exactly those times unless overtime has been approved. (Staff working with late patients are exempt.) My business manager is constantly fighting over clock-ins 15 to 20 minutes early or late, with similar clock-outs. Staff may have a stop to make and would like to make up those 15 minutes. We do grant paid time off in an initial minimum block of 30 minutes to assist with some of this. ... The issue is not overtime, as we're well aware that we have to pay for it when appropriate. It's simply to streamline our policy and make it fair. ... I'm looking for practice policies that deal with employee variances from the 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. clock-ins. For example, someone wants to come in 30 minutes early in order to leave 30 minutes early for an appointment. Or someone comes in 22 minutes late due to traffic and wants either to make it up or to take the minimal half-hour paid-time-off time.

  7. Management and Communication programme

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2005-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the launch of three new courses in the Management and Communication programme: 1.     Managing Time (Open to all Staff Members) The objectives are: To enhance your personal effectiveness through better organisation skills To acquire ways of making the most of your time through improved work habits To reduce stress For the description of this course, please see:  http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/external/training/MANCO/P9798/S8E_e.asp 2.     Service Orientation (Open to all Staff Members working in a service-related function) The objectives are: To understand the key elements in an effective client/service provider relationship To develop a client focused approach to providing services For the description of this course, please see:  http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/external/training/MANCO/P9798/serv_e.asp 3.   Introduction to Leadership (Open to Staff in Career Paths E & above, including newly appointed supervisors and Secti...

  8. Management and Communication programme

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2005-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the launch of three new courses in the Management and Communication programme: 1.     Managing Time (Open to all Staff Members) The objectives are: To enhance your personal effectiveness through better organisation skills To acquire ways of making the most of your time through improved work habits To reduce stress For the description of this course, please see:  http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/external/training/MANCO/P9798/S8E_e.asp 2.     Service Orientation (Open to all Staff Members working in a service-related function) The objectives are: To understand the key elements in an effective client/service provider relationship To develop a client focused approach to providing services For the description of this course, please see:  http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/external/training/MANCO/P9798/serv_e.asp 3.   Introduction to Leadership (Open to Staff in Career Paths E & above, including newly appointed supervisors and Sect...

  9. Energy Management Programmes for Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-05

    The IEA Policy Pathway publications provide details on how to implement specific recommendations drawn from the IEA 25 Energy Efficiency Policy Recommendations. This Policy Pathway, jointly produced by the International Energy Agency and the Institute for Industrial Productivity, develops the critical steps for policy makers implementing energy management programmes for industry. Optimising energy use in industry is essential to improve industrial competitiveness and achieve wider societal goals such as energy security, economic recovery and development, climate change mitigation and environmental protection. While there is significant potential to decrease energy consumption in this sector, opportunities to improve energy efficiency are still under-exploited. Energy management programmes have shown to be instrumental in addressing many of the barriers that inhibit wide-scale uptake of energy management in industry. The Policy Pathway builds on lessons learned from country experiences and provides actionable guidance on how to plan and design, implement, evaluate and monitor energy management programmes for industry.

  10. The IAEA Accident Management Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabanov, L.; Jankowski, M.; Mauersberger, H.

    1993-01-01

    Accident prevention and mitigation programmes and the Emergency Response System (ERS) are important elements of the Agency's activities in the area of nuclear power plant (NPP) safety. Safety Codes and Guides on siting, design, quality assurance and the operation of NPPs have been produced and are used by NPP operating organizations. Nuclear safety evaluation services are provided by the IAEA. The Emergency Response System and the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) have been developed. The framework for the development of an accident management programme has been set up. The main goal is to develop an Accident Management Manual to provide a systematic, structured approach to the development and implementation of an accident management programme at NPPs. An outline of the Manual has been distributed and the first draft is available. The component parts are: Co-ordinated research programmes (CRPs) on severe accident management and containment behaviour; the use of vulnerability analysis; mitigation of the effects of hydrogen, and generic symptom oriented emergency operating procedures. The IAEA provides guidance by the dissemination of information on methods for accident management; collates information on approaches in this field in different organizations and countries; and arranges exchange of experience and the promulgation of knowledge through the training of NPP managers and senior technical staff. (orig.)

  11. The IAEA Accident Management Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabanov, L.; Jankowski, M.; Mauersberger, H. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria))

    1993-02-01

    Accident prevention and mitigation programmes and the Emergency Response System (ERS) are important elements of the Agency's activities in the area of nuclear power plant (NPP) safety. Safety Codes and Guides on siting, design, quality assurance and the operation of NPPs have been produced and are used by NPP operating organizations. Nuclear safety evaluation services are provided by the IAEA. The Emergency Response System and the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) have been developed. The framework for the development of an accident management programme has been set up. The main goal is to develop an Accident Management Manual to provide a systematic, structured approach to the development and implementation of an accident management programme at NPPs. An outline of the Manual has been distributed and the first draft is available. The component parts are: Co-ordinated research programmes (CRPs) on severe accident management and containment behaviour; the use of vulnerability analysis; mitigation of the effects of hydrogen, and generic symptom oriented emergency operating procedures. The IAEA provides guidance by the dissemination of information on methods for accident management; collates information on approaches in this field in different organizations and countries; and arranges exchange of experience and the promulgation of knowledge through the training of NPP managers and senior technical staff. (orig.).

  12. Management & communication programme

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2006-01-01

    Calendar of courses for September to December 2006 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum 2nd semester 2006 Titres Dates Langue Quality Management 18, 19 September Bilingual Managing Teams 19, 20, 21 September English Communiquer efficacement - résidentiel 20, 21, 22 septembre Bilingue Personal Awareness & Impact 26, 27, 28 September Bilingual Introduction to Leadership 4, 5, 6 October Bilingue IProject Scheduling & Costing 12, 13 October English CDP-SL part 1 17, 18, 19 October English Personal Awareness & Impact 23, 24 October Bilingual Communicating to Convince 23, 24, 25 October Bilingual CDP-GL part 2 25, 26, 27 October English CDP-GL part 1 22, 23, 24 November Bilingual Risk Management 20, 21 December Bilingual Communication curriculum 2nd semester 2006 Titres Dates Langue Techniques d'exposé et de présentation 18, 19 septembre + 16 octobre Français Communi...

  13. Managing Employee Assistance Programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidenberg, Olive C.; Cordery, John L.

    1990-01-01

    Interviews with 20 branch managers and 20 accountants in an Australian bank determined factors influencing the success of an employee assistance program (EAP). It was found that policies requiring supervisors to act against normal managerial practice doom EAPs to failure. Organizational analysis to integrate the EAP within existing organizational…

  14. System-wide power management control via clock distribution network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan; Gooding, Thomas M.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Liebsch, Thomas A.; Reed, Don D.

    2015-05-19

    An apparatus, method and computer program product for automatically controlling power dissipation of a parallel computing system that includes a plurality of processors. A computing device issues a command to the parallel computing system. A clock pulse-width modulator encodes the command in a system clock signal to be distributed to the plurality of processors. The plurality of processors in the parallel computing system receive the system clock signal including the encoded command, and adjusts power dissipation according to the encoded command.

  15. Auditing emergency management programmes: Measuring leading indicators of programme performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsic, Heather

    Emergency Management Programmes benefit from review and measurement against established criteria. By measuring current vs required programme elements for their actual currency, completeness and effectiveness, the resulting timely reports of achievements and documentation of identified gaps can effectively be used to rationally support prioritised improvement. Audits, with their detailed, triangulated and objectively weighted processes, are the ultimate approach in terms of programme content measurement. Although Emergency Management is often presented as a wholly separate operational mechanism, distinct and functionally different from the organisation's usual management structure, this characterisation is only completely accurate while managing an emergency itself. Otherwise, an organisation's Emergency Management Programme is embedded within that organisation and dependent upon it. Therefore, the organisation's culture and structure of management, accountability and measurement must be engaged for the programme to exist, much less improve. A wise and successful Emergency Management Coordinator does not let the separate and distinct nature of managing an emergency obscure their realisation of the need for an organisation to understand and manage all of the other programme components as part of its regular business practices. This includes its measurement. Not all organisations are sufficiently large or capable of supporting the use of an audit. This paper proposes that alternate, less formal, yet effective mechanisms can be explored, as long as they reflect and support organisational management norms, including a process of relatively informal measurement focused on the organisation's own perception of key Emergency Management Programme performance indicators.

  16. Competences and life management programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunatti, S.; Bergara, A.; Ranalli, J.; Versaci, R.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The nuclear industry is, at present, at a crucial juncture, where it has to decide about the future of the first generation of nuclear plants, which are approaching the end of their licensed service life. At the same time, long term experience and new advances have established that it is possible to extend the life of nuclear plants beyond their initially licensed life by another 20-30 years. Extending the operating life of existing nuclear plants will help to reduce the short term need for new generating capacity - without new capital costs. However, these extensions must take place in the context of careful safety analysis and monitoring of equipment ageing concerns. A nuclear power plant must be managed in a safe and efficient manner throughout all the life cycle stages from design through decommissioning. The consequences of management decisions about nuclear power plants can have profound economic impacts for the nuclear power plant owner, and possibly for the national economy. In addition, the consequence of a major failure or accident can have catastrophic national socio-economic effects that may be felt internationally. The safe and effective management of a nuclear power plant therefore requires dramatically different perspectives in time from the majority of other industries. The impact of some decisions extends beyond the normal strategic perspective of both owners and governments. The integration of activities for ageing management, safety management and business management of a nuclear power plant are an essential element of 'life cycle management'. The loss of information at any stage of a nuclear power plants life deprives people, at later stages, of knowledge that could be important to safe, economic completion of work or which could aid the analysis of problems and options. It is costly to go through the learning process again, with a risk of potential events or incidents, programme delays, physical injury and increased regulatory

  17. Policy Pathways: Energy Management Programmes for Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-06

    The IEA Policy Pathway publications provide details on how to implement specific recommendations drawn from the IEA 25 Energy Efficiency Policy Recommendations. This Policy Pathway, jointly produced by the International Energy Agency and the Institute for Industrial Productivity, develops the critical steps for policy makers implementing energy management programmes for industry. Optimising energy use in industry is essential to improve industrial competitiveness and achieve wider societal goals such as energy security, economic recovery and development, climate change mitigation and environmental protection.While there is significant potential to decrease energy consumption in this sector, opportunities to improve energy efficiency are still under-exploited. Energy management programmes have shown to be instrumental in addressing many of the barriers that inhibit wide-scale uptake of energy management in industry. The Policy Pathway builds on lessons learned from country experiences and provides actionable guidance on how to plan and design, implement, evaluate and monitor energy management programmes for industry.

  18. Indian programme on radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wattal, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of radioactive waste management is protection of human health, environment and future generation. This article describes, briefly, the Indian programme on management of different radioactive wastes arising in the entire nuclear fuel cycle adhering to this objective. (author)

  19. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendrier des cours prévus de septembre à décembre 2007
Calendar of courses for September to December 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Management Curriculum / curriculum Management Personal Awareness & Impact (English) 10, 11, 12 September, (full) Managing by Project (English) 9, 10 October (2 places disponibles) Personal Awareness & Impact (English) 15, 16, 17 October, (full) Introduction to Leadership (English) 17, 18, 19 October, (full) Quality Management (Bilingual) 18, 19 October (10 places available) Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (full) Communicating Effectively – residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (full) Risk Management (English) 13, 14 December (6 places available) Communication Curriculum / curriculum communication Stress Management (English) 25, 26 September (6 places...

  20. Spent fuel management in France: Programme status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudat, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    France's programme is best characterized as a closed fuel cycle including reprocessing, Plutonium recycling in PWR and use of breeder reactors. The current installed nuclear capacity is 52.5 GWe from 55 units. The spent fuel management scheme chosen is reprocessing. This paper describes the national programme, spent nuclear fuel storage, reprocessing and contracts for reprocessing of spent fuel from various countries. (author). 5 figs, 2 tabs

  1. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendrier des cours prévus de septembre à décembre 2007 Calendar of courses for September to December 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier.   Management Curriculum / curriculum Management NEW COURSE - Dealing with Conflict, 5 & 12 October (6 places available) Managing by Project (English) 9, 10 October (Full) Personal Awareness & Impact (English) 15, 16, 17 October\t(Full) Introduction to Leadership (English) 17, 18, 19 October\t(Full) Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (1 place available) Communicating Effectively – residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) Risk Management (English) 13, 14 December (6 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercice) - 
Session to be scheduled from November 2007 to January 2008 &...

  2. International Nuclear Management Programmes -- INMP-- (VNMU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    • INMP is an IAEA-facilitated collaboration for universities to provide master’s degree programs in nuclear management, targeting managers or future managers working in the nuclear sector. • There are currently no full master’s degree programmes specializing in management for the nuclear sector. • Managers at NPP are typically engineers with few chances of formal management education. • In newcomer countries to nuclear energy, working towards the introduction of nuclear power, often lack technical or managerial experience in nuclear energy

  3. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendrier des cours prévus de septembre à décembre 2007 Calendar of courses for September to December 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Management Curriculum / curriculum Management Managing by Project (English)\t9, 10 October (Full) Personal Awareness & Impact (English)\t15, 16, 17 October, (Full) Introduction to Leadership (English)\t17, 18, 19 October, (Full) Managing Teams (English)\t13, 14, 15 November\t(1 place available)) Communicating Effectively – residential (Bilingual)\t20, 21, 22 November (Full) Risk Management (English)\t13, 14 December (6 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercice) Session to be scheduled from November 2007 to January 2008 Communication Curriculum / curriculum communication Stress Management (English)\t25, 26 September (4 p...

  4. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from October to December 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Leadership - 2 October, 29 October + 1 December - (full) CDP-SL for new supervisors, part 1 - 5, 6, 7 October - (2 places available) Introduction to Leadership - 7, 8, 9 October - (4 places available) Voice your Leadership - 13, 14 October - (full) Managing Teams - 10, 11, 12 November - (7 places available) Risk Management - 17, 18 November - (6 places available) Dealing with Conflict - 20, 27 November - (5 places available) CDP pour nouveaux superviseurs, part 1 - 30 novembre, 1, 2 décembre - (4 places disponibles) Communication Curriculum Making presentations - 14, 15 October + 9 November - (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe - 19, 20 octobre - (7 places disponibles) Gestion du stress - 20, 21 octobre - (8 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement - 21, 22 octobre + 9, 10 novemb...

  5. CLOCK gene is implicated in weight reduction in obese patients participating in a dietary programme based on the Mediterranean diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: The success of obesity therapy is dependent on the genetic background of the patient. Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput (CLOCK), one of the transcription factors from the positive limb of the molecular clock, is involved in metabolic alterations. Objective: To investigate whethe...

  6. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Calendar of courses for February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Management Curriculum Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (3 + 2 days) 3, 4, 5 February (part 1) + 13, 14 May 2009 (part 2) (full) Core Development Package for Group Leaders (part 2) 24, 25, 26 February (full) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (2 places available) Quality Management 25, 26 March (10 places available) Introduction to Leadership 1, 2, 3 April (3 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact 5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (places available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits\t5 + 12 June (8 places available) (Session in English or in French) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (4 places available) Communication Curriculum Managing stress\t23, 24 February (6 places available) Negotiating Effectively\t3, 4 March (2 places available) Négociation efficace\t17, 18 mar...

  7. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (3 + 2 days) 3, 4, 5 February (part 1) + 13, 14 May 2009 (part 2)\t(full) Core Development Package for Group Leaders (part 2) 24, 25, 26 February (full) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (2 places available) Quality Management\t25, 26 March (10 places available) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (3 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (places available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits\t5 + 12 June (8 places available) (Session in English or in French) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (4 places available) Communication Curriculum Managing stress\t23, 24 February (6 places available) Negotiating Effectively\t3, 4 March (2 places available) Négociation efficace\t17, 18 mars (6 places d...

  8. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from September to December 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Project Scheduling & Costing\t3, 4 September (full) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t15, 16, 17 September (5 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up\t17, 18 September (2 places available) Project Management\t22, 23 September (full) Personal Awareness & Impact\t22, 23, 24 September (full) Introduction to Leadership\t7, 8, 9 October (full) Managing Teams\t10, 11, 12 November (full) Communication Curriculum Managing Time\t22 September + 27 October + 18 November (8 places available) Making presentations\t14, 15 October + 9 November (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t19, 20 octobre (2 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t21, 22 octobre + 9, 10 novembre (1 place disponible) Techniques d’exposé et de présentations\t10, 11 novembre + 8 décembre (1...

  9. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from September to December 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Project Scheduling & Costing\t3, 4 September (2 places available) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t15, 16, 17 September (6 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up\t17, 18 September (full) Project Management\t22, 23 September (full) Personal Awareness & Impact\t22, 23, 24 September (full) Introduction to Leadership\t7, 8, 9 October (full) Managing Teams\t10, 11, 12 November (full) Communication Curriculum Managing Time\t22 September + 27 October + 18 November (3 places available) Making presentations\t14, 15 October + 9 November (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t19, 20 octobre (complet) Communiquer efficacement\t21, 22 octobre + 9, 10 novembre (complet) Techniques d’exposé et de présentations\t10, 11 novembre + 8 décembre (1 place disponible) Serv...

  10. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from September to December 2009 Please check our web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Project Scheduling & Costing\t3, 4 September (2 places available) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t15, 16, 17 September (6 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up\t17, 18 September (full) Project Management\t22, 23 September (full) Personal Awareness & Impact\t22, 23, 24 September (full) Introduction to Leadership\t7, 8, 9 October (full) Managing Teams\t10, 11, 12 November (full) Communication Curriculum Managing Time\t22 September + 27 October + 18 November (3 places available) Making presentations\t14, 15 October + 9 November (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t19, 20 octobre (complet) Communiquer efficacement\t21, 22 octobre + 9, 10 novembre (complet) Techniques d’exposé et de présentations\t10, 11 novembre + 8 décembre (1 place disponible) Service Orientation/Orienta...

  11. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from November to December 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Managing Teams\t10, 11, 12 November (4 places available) CDP pour nouveaux superviseurs, part 1\t30 novembre, 1, 2 décembre (2 places disponibles) Managing by Project\t1, 2 December (full) Communication Curriculum Techniques d’exposé et de présentations\t10, 11 novembre + 8 décembre (complet) Managing Stress\t10, 11 November (6 places available) Communicating Effectively\t11, 12 November + 8, 9 December (4 places available) Orientation service\t12, 13 novembre (5 places disponibles) Gestion du stress\t17, 18 novembre (6 places disponibles) Animer ou participer à une réunion de travail\t9, 10, 11 décembre (3 places disponibles) If you are interested in attending any of the above course sessions, please talk to your supervisor and/or your DTO, and apply electronically via EDH from the course description p...

  12. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (Full) Quality Management\t25, 26 March\t(6 places available) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (2 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (1 place available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits\t5 + 12 June (3 places available) (Session in English or in French) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (3 places available) Communication Curriculum Negotiating Effectively\t3, 4 March (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t26, 27 mars (4 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 avril + 27 mai + 23 juin (9 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t27, 28 avril + 26, 27 mai (4 places disponibles) Service Orientation\t28, 29 April (6 places available) Communicating Effectively in your Team\t29, 30 April (7 places available) Nég...

  13. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    Calendar of courses for October to December 2008 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Management Curriculum Introduction to Leadership\t15, 16, 17 October (Full) Personal Awareness & Impact\t22, 23, 24 October (full) Core Development Package for Group Leaders (part 2)\t11, 12, 13 November (full) Risk Management\t13, 14 November (5 places available) Managing Teams\t18, 19, 20 November (2 places available) Communicating to Convince\t19, 20 November (5 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (3 + 2 days) 25, 26, 27 November (part 1) + 3, 4 March 2009 (part 2) (full) Core Development Package pour nouveaux superviseurs et chefs de section (3 + 2 jours) 9, 10, 11 décembre (partie 1) + 21, 22 avril 2009 (partie 2) (full) Communication Curriculum Communicating Effectively\t21, 22 October + 27, 28 November (4 places available)\tCommuniquer efficacement\t23, 24 octobre + 2...

  14. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (2 places available) 3, 4, 5 June (full) Quality Management\t12, 13 May (6 places available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits (Session in English or in French)\t5 + 12 June (2 places available) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (2 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up\t30 June + 1 July (6 places available) Communicating to Convince\t22, 23 June (7 places available) Communication Curriculum Négociation efficace\t5, 6 mai (3 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 mai + 23 juin + 7 juillet (3 places disponibles) Making presentations\t13, 14 May + 11 June (Full) Writing of Successful FP7 Proposals\t26 May (20 places available) Communicating Effectively\t8, 29 May + 22, 23 June (2 places available) If you are interested in attending any of the above course sessio...

  15. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (Full) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (1 place available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (1 place available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits (Session in English or in French)\t5 + 12 June (3 places available) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (3 places available) Communication Curriculum Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t26, 27 mars\t(4 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 avril + 27 mai + 23 juin (8 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t27, 28 avril + 26, 27 mai (3 places disponibles) Service Orientation\t28, 29 April (6 places available) Communicating Effectively in your Team\t29, 30 April (7 places available) Négociation efficace\t5, 6 mai (6 places disponibles) Animer ou par...

  16. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (Full) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (1 place available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (full) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits (Session in English or in French)\t5 + 12 June (2 places available) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (3 places available) Communication Curriculum Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t26, 27 mars\t(5 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 avril + 27 mai + 23 juin (7 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t27, 28 avril + 26, 27 mai (3 places disponibles) Service Orientation\t28, 29 April (5 places available) Communicating Effectively in your Team\t29, 30 April (7 places available) Négociation efficace\t5, 6 mai (6 places disponibles) Animer ou participer à une réunion de travail/Chairing ...

  17. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (Full) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (1 place available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (full) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits (Session in English or in French)\t5 + 12 June (2 places available) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (3 places available) Communication Curriculum Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t26, 27 mars\t(5 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 avril + 27 mai + 23 juin (7 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t27, 28 avril + 26, 27 mai (3 places disponibles) Service Orientation\t28, 29 April (5 places available) Communicating Effectively in your Team\t29, 30 April (7 places available) Négociation efficace\t5, 6 mai (6 places disponibles) Animer ou participer à un...

  18. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendar of courses for November to December 2007Calendrier des cours prévus de novembre à décembre 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary.Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (Full) Communicating effectively - residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) FP7 Training - How to Negotiate and Administer Framework 7 Grant Agreements (English) 21 November (12 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (English) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (français) 5, 6, 7 décembre (4 places disponibles) Core Development Pa...

  19. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendar of courses for November to December 2007Calendrier des cours prévus de novembre à décembre 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary.Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (Full) Communicating effectively - residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) FP7 Training - How to Negotiate and Administer Framework 7 Grant Agreements (English) 21 November (7 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (English) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (français) 5, 6, 7 décembre (2 places disponibles) Core Development Pac...

  20. The Spanish radioactive waste management programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beceiro, A.R.

    1994-01-01

    All radioactive waste management activities in Spain are controlled by the Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos, installed by royal decree in 1984. The programme for low- and intermediate-level wastes is well advanced. A near-surface repository for these type of wastes has been in operation since October 1992. The programme for high-level wastes including spent fuel from the operating nuclear power plants is progressing stepwise. As the first step, effforts are made to secure the temporary storage of spent fuel. Final disposal is envisaged in an deep repository in one of the main geological media available in Spain, namely, granite, salt and clay. (orig.) [de

  1. Sub-nanosecond clock synchronization and trigger management in the nuclear physics experiment AGATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellato, M; Isocrate, R; Rampazzo, G; Bazzacco, D; Bortolato, D; Triossi, A; Chavas, J; Mengoni, D; Recchia, F

    2013-01-01

    The new-generation spectrometer AGATA, the Advanced GAmma Tracking Array, requires sub-nanosecond clock synchronization among readout and front-end electronics modules that may lie hundred meters apart. We call GTS (Global Trigger and Synchronization System) the infrastructure responsible for precise clock synchronization and for the trigger management of AGATA. It is made of a central trigger processor and nodes, connected in a tree structure by means of optical fibers operated at 2Gb/s. The GTS tree handles the synchronization and the trigger data flow, whereas the trigger processor analyses and eventually validates the trigger primitives centrally. Sub-nanosecond synchronization is achieved by measuring two different types of round-trip times and by automatically correcting for phase-shift differences. For a tree of depth two, the peak-to-peak clock jitter at each leaf is 70 ps; the mean phase difference is 180 ps, while the standard deviation over such phase difference, namely the phase equalization repeatability, is 20 ps. The GTS system has run flawlessly for the two-year long AGATA campaign, held at the INFN Legnaro National Laboratories, Italy, where five triple clusters of the AGATA sub-array were coupled with a variety of ancillary detectors

  2. Sub-nanosecond clock synchronization and trigger management in the nuclear physics experiment AGATA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellato, M.; Bortolato, D.; Chavas, J.; Isocrate, R.; Rampazzo, G.; Triossi, A.; Bazzacco, D.; Mengoni, D.; Recchia, F.

    2013-07-01

    The new-generation spectrometer AGATA, the Advanced GAmma Tracking Array, requires sub-nanosecond clock synchronization among readout and front-end electronics modules that may lie hundred meters apart. We call GTS (Global Trigger and Synchronization System) the infrastructure responsible for precise clock synchronization and for the trigger management of AGATA. It is made of a central trigger processor and nodes, connected in a tree structure by means of optical fibers operated at 2Gb/s. The GTS tree handles the synchronization and the trigger data flow, whereas the trigger processor analyses and eventually validates the trigger primitives centrally. Sub-nanosecond synchronization is achieved by measuring two different types of round-trip times and by automatically correcting for phase-shift differences. For a tree of depth two, the peak-to-peak clock jitter at each leaf is 70 ps; the mean phase difference is 180 ps, while the standard deviation over such phase difference, namely the phase equalization repeatability, is 20 ps. The GTS system has run flawlessly for the two-year long AGATA campaign, held at the INFN Legnaro National Laboratories, Italy, where five triple clusters of the AGATA sub-array were coupled with a variety of ancillary detectors.

  3. Creating meaningful business continuity management programme metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Brian

    2010-11-01

    The popular axiom, 'what gets measured gets done', is often applied in the quality management and continuous improvement disciplines. This truism is also useful to business continuity practitioners as they continually strive to prove the value of their organisation's investment in a business continuity management (BCM) programme. BCM practitioners must also remain relevant to their organisations as executives focus on the bottom line and maintaining stakeholder confidence. It seems that executives always find a way, whether in a hallway or elevator, to ask BCM professionals about the company's level of readiness. When asked, they must be ready with an informed response. The establishment of a process to measure business continuity programme performance and organisational readiness has emerged as a key component of US Department of Homeland Security 'Voluntary Private Sector Preparedness (PS-Prep) Program' standards where the overarching goal is to improve private sector preparedness for disasters and emergencies. The purpose of this paper is two-fold: to introduce continuity professionals to best practices that should be considered when developing a BCM metrics programme as well as providing a case study of how a large health insurance company researched, developed and implemented a process to measure BCM programme performance and company readiness.

  4. Quality Management in Slovenian Education Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Alič

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Product and service quality, effective process management, continuous improvement and innovation are some essential conditions for making a successful business. They are often emphasised by managers of successful organizations, by authors of professional and scientific papers and even by politicians and journalists. Quality management standards and models, such as ISO 9001 and EFQM model appeared in assistance to the needs of organisations to assure stable product and service quality, to improve it and to make the production process and its supporting processes effective. It has been 28 years since the standard ISO 9001 appeared. Now it is the most widely spread global standard implemented in more than 1.100.000 organizations worldwide. If quality management was proved to be an important approach to make organizations operate better and thus to contribute to well-being of the society, it would be expected that it is somehow included in our regular school programmes on all the levels. We expect that learning and living quality approaches in childhood and youth would be the least costly way to improve the culture of quality in the society and to implement it in our organizations as well. The paper gives some insight in the situation by searching for quality management related programmes and approaches in our primary, secondary and tertiary school programmes. The purpose of this paper is only to highlight the issue of teaching for quality in our regular education programmes – just to become aware of it and to find some improvement opportunities. There should be still some more detailed research on this topic to give strong suggestions.

  5. A novel power-efficient high-speed clock management unit using quantum-dot cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abutaleb, M. M.

    2017-01-01

    Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) is one of the most attractive alternatives for complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology. The QCA widely supports a new paradigm in the field of nanotechnology that has the potential for high density, low power, and high speed. The clock manager is an essential building block in the new microwave and radio frequency integrated circuits. This paper describes a novel QCA-based clock management unit (CMU) that provides innovative clocking capabilities. The proposed CMU is achieved by utilizing edge-triggered D-type flip-flops (D-FFs) in the design of frequency synthesizer and phase splitter. Edge-triggered D-FF structures proposed in this paper have the successful QCA implementation and simulation with the least complexity and power dissipation as compared to earlier structures. The frequency synthesizer is used to generate new clock frequencies from the reference clock frequency based on a combination of power-of-two frequency dividers. The phase splitter is integrated with the frequency synthesizer to generate four clock signals that are 90"o out of phase with each other. This paper demonstrates that the proposed QCA CMU structure has a superior performance. Furthermore, the proposed CMU is straightforwardly scalable due to the use of modular component architecture.

  6. A novel power-efficient high-speed clock management unit using quantum-dot cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abutaleb, M. M., E-mail: mustafa-abotaleb@h-eng.helwan.edu.eg [Helwan University, Department of Electronics, Communications and Computer Engineering (Egypt)

    2017-04-15

    Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) is one of the most attractive alternatives for complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology. The QCA widely supports a new paradigm in the field of nanotechnology that has the potential for high density, low power, and high speed. The clock manager is an essential building block in the new microwave and radio frequency integrated circuits. This paper describes a novel QCA-based clock management unit (CMU) that provides innovative clocking capabilities. The proposed CMU is achieved by utilizing edge-triggered D-type flip-flops (D-FFs) in the design of frequency synthesizer and phase splitter. Edge-triggered D-FF structures proposed in this paper have the successful QCA implementation and simulation with the least complexity and power dissipation as compared to earlier structures. The frequency synthesizer is used to generate new clock frequencies from the reference clock frequency based on a combination of power-of-two frequency dividers. The phase splitter is integrated with the frequency synthesizer to generate four clock signals that are 90{sup o} out of phase with each other. This paper demonstrates that the proposed QCA CMU structure has a superior performance. Furthermore, the proposed CMU is straightforwardly scalable due to the use of modular component architecture.

  7. Update on Waste Management Policies and Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    In addition to the regular items on national, international and NEA programme activities, this edition of the Bulletin contains two special contributions. First, a special editorial by Dr. Rudolf Rometsch, President of the Swiss National Cooperative for the Storage of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA) and current Chairman of the NEA Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC), provides his personal reflections on the significance and relevance of the recent ''TRANSNUKLEAR AFFAIR'' to the waste management community. Secondly, the recently released Goguel Report from France is featured in the ''Topical Report'' section. This report provides a useful examination of site selection criteria for geological waste repositories [fr

  8. Update on waste management policies and programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    The NEA Nuclear Waste Bulletin has been prepared by the Radiation Protection and Waste Management Division of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency to provide a means of communication amongst the various technical and policy groups within the waste management community. In particular, it is intended to provide concise information on current radioactive waste management activities, policies and programmes in Member countries and at the NEA. It is also intended that the Bulletin assists in the communication of recent developments in a variety of areas contributing to the development of acceptable technology for the management and disposal of nuclear waste (e.g., performance assessment, in-situ investigations, repository engineering, scientific data bases, regulatory developments, etc.). For practical purposes, the Bulletin does not include an exhaustive description of national programmes. The reader is therefore invited to go back to the information given in previous bulletins and, if necessary, to contact national correspondents in order to obtain a more complete picture of on-going activities. (authors)

  9. Indian radioactive waste management programme: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Kanwar; Ozarde, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    The salient features of the closed fuel cycle are recovery and recycle of uranium and plutonium for reconversion as fuel. Emphasis is also being given to separation of useful isotopes of cesium and strontium for use in healthcare and in heat source applications and partitioning of minor actinides for transmutation. This finally leaves a very small percentage of material present in the spent fuel as radioactive waste, which needs to be managed. Radioactive waste management practices in India have roots in indigenous research and development in view of the importance accorded to it from the very inception of the country's nuclear energy programme. India's experience in the management of radioactive waste from research and power reactors, fuel reprocessing, and allied facilities is rich and comparable with international practices. (author)

  10. The screening approach for review of accident management programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misak, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture the screening approach for review of accident management programmes are presented. It contains objective trees for accident management: logic structure of the approach; objectives and safety functions for accident management; safety principles

  11. Olympic Dam operations - environmental management programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This is the 3rd Annual Report pertaining to the Olympic Dam Operations Environmental Management Programme and covers the period 1st March, 1989 to 28th February, 1990. The monitoring programe has provided detailed assessment of meteorological data, vegetation, fauna, soil stability, soil salinity, hydrogeology and well-fields both inside and outside the operations area. Mine site rehabilitation is considered to be progressing satisfactorily. Out of the 851 drill pad sites 72% have been rehabilitated to the stage where natural soil stability and plant cover has been achieved. Drill pad sites that have received good rainfall within one year of being ripped have rehabilitated very succesfully. Sites that receive no significant rainfall for more than two years, particularly on dune slopes may require re-ripping before successful regeneration can occur. To improve the drill pad site rehabilitation monitoring programme it is recommended that 200 drill sites be analysed each year. Air emission and solid waste data are also presented. This program is considered to be particularly successful in relation to SO 2 assessment. 90 tabs., 63 figs., ills

  12. A 45 ps time digitizer with a two-phase clock and dual-edge two-stage interpolation in a field programmable gate array device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szplet, R.; Kalisz, J.; Jachna, Z.

    2009-02-01

    We present a time digitizer having 45 ps resolution, integrated in a field programmable gate array (FPGA) device. The time interval measurement is based on the two-stage interpolation method. A dual-edge two-phase interpolator is driven by the on-chip synthesized 250 MHz clock with precise phase adjustment. An improved dual-edge double synchronizer was developed to control the main counter. The nonlinearity of the digitizer's transfer characteristic is identified and utilized by the dedicated hardware code processor for the on-the-fly correction of the output data. Application of presented ideas has resulted in the measurement uncertainty of the digitizer below 70 ps RMS over the time interval ranging from 0 to 1 s. The use of the two-stage interpolation and a fast FIFO memory has allowed us to obtain the maximum measurement rate of five million measurements per second.

  13. A 45 ps time digitizer with a two-phase clock and dual-edge two-stage interpolation in a field programmable gate array device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szplet, R; Kalisz, J; Jachna, Z

    2009-01-01

    We present a time digitizer having 45 ps resolution, integrated in a field programmable gate array (FPGA) device. The time interval measurement is based on the two-stage interpolation method. A dual-edge two-phase interpolator is driven by the on-chip synthesized 250 MHz clock with precise phase adjustment. An improved dual-edge double synchronizer was developed to control the main counter. The nonlinearity of the digitizer's transfer characteristic is identified and utilized by the dedicated hardware code processor for the on-the-fly correction of the output data. Application of presented ideas has resulted in the measurement uncertainty of the digitizer below 70 ps RMS over the time interval ranging from 0 to 1 s. The use of the two-stage interpolation and a fast FIFO memory has allowed us to obtain the maximum measurement rate of five million measurements per second

  14. Challenges to a successful waste management programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bars, Y.

    2005-01-01

    I have chosen to testify about my personal experience as a practitioner in the development and implementation of sensitive public policies and about some of the lessons I have learnt in various related fields. Those fields do not only include Andra, but also the exchanges from which I benefit within EDRAM, the club (that I currently chair) of agency directors responsible for those programmes, as well as within the Forum for Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) of the DECD/NEA. Last but not least, I would also introduce some lessons from my previous activities in the city planning, and in the management of water projects. In order to succeed, a sound policy relating to a sustainable radioactive-waste management must be able to take up a certain number of challenges. Three of those challenges seem essential to me: combining the technical and social aspects of the issue; organizing a suitable context in which the definition and the implementation of the policy will take place; and achieving a solid implementation locally. (author)

  15. The Swedish programme for radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjurstroem, S.; Forsstroem, H.

    1986-10-01

    The following systems and facilities are currently in operation and under implementation: a sea transportation system for all kinds of nuclear waste, a central facility for interim storage of spent fuel (CLAB) and a central underground repository for final disposal of low and medium level reactor waste (SFR). For the remaining steps - final disposal of highly active and longlived radioactive residues - a concept, based on encapsulation of the fuel elements in copper canisters and final storage of the canisters in a repository situated 500 m down in crystalline rock (KBS-3), has been developed and approved by the government in accordance with the Swedish nuclear legislation. Although a feasible method for final disposal of the highly active residues has been shown, the Swedish legislation requires that research be carried out to reach the best possible base for the final decision around the year 2000. In parallel with this a geological investigation programme is carried out to find a suitable site for a final repository. The final site selection is foreseen at the end of the 1990's. All costs for the management of radioactive waste from the nuclear power plants are carried by a fee determined annually. The fee is 0.019 SEK/kWh for 1986

  16. Remote management and programmable automata; Telegestion et automate programmable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This document is the proceedings of the meeting organized by the French association of refrigeration (AFF) during the ELEC 2000 exhibition about the measurement, recording, data transmission, automation, diagnosis and management of refrigeration systems. An example of the energy saving made in a supermarket context thanks to the operation control of a refrigerating machinery is presented. (J.S.)

  17. Logistics management in Universal Immunisation Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachani, D; Bansal, R D

    1990-01-01

    The review of the National Immunization Programme of India in 1989 focused attention to the issue of storage and distribution of vaccines. Cold-chain equipment such as walk-in-coolers (WICs), deep freezers, ice-lined refrigerators (ILRs), and vaccine carriers proliferated after the introduction of the universal immunization program (UIP) but the available units fell short of the official targets in 1988, especially ILRs (7500 proposed and 2876 available) and vaccine carriers (250,000 proposed and 35,500 available). Some states had over 6 months of supplies of vaccines whose management posed problems of losing potency: oral polio virus (OPV) potency was acceptable in 63% of stock in 1988. Syringes, needles, stoves, pressure-cooker sterilizers, dial thermometers, and refrigerator repair kits were in short supply especially at the primary health care (PHC) level. Only 1/3 of subcenters had sterilizers and 58% had vaccines carriers. Logistics management on the state level required provision of vaccines based on previous use and eligible population with even distribution throughout the year. On the district level WICs were needed for every district with 1.5 million inhabitants. Recording of vaccine requirement, utilization, and storage would aid target allocations and avoid wastage. On the institutional and PHC level an ILR and a transporting vehicle was needed. The number of women and children eligible for immunization had to be calculated based on real population figures. Cold-chain capacity of 30,000-40,000 vials was required for a district as well as about 500 reusable syringes and needles a year along with vaccination cards exceeding the number of women and children by 10% for recordkeeping at the PHC center.

  18. JYT - Publicly financed nuclear waste management research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.

    1993-06-01

    The nuclear waste management research in Finland is funded both by the state and the utilities (represented in cooperation by the Nuclear Waste Commission of the Finnish power companies). A coordinated research programme (JYT) comprising the publicly financed waste management studies was started in 1989 and continues until 1993. The utilities continue to carry out a parallel research programme according to their main financial and operational responsibility for nuclear waste management. The research programme covers the following main topic areas: (1) Bedrock characteristics, groundwater and repository, (2) Release and transport of radionuclides, (3) Performance and safety assessment of repositories, and (4) Waste management technology and costs

  19. JYT - Publicly financed nuclear waste management research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.

    1992-07-01

    The nuclear waste management research in Finland is funded both by the state and the utilities (represented in cooperation by the Nuclear Waste Commission of the Finnish power companies). A coordinated research programme (JYT) comprising the publicly financed waste management studies was started in 1989 and continues until 1993. The utilities continue to carry out a parallel research programme according to their main financial and operational responsibility for nuclear waste management. The research programme covers the following main topic areas: (1) Bedrock characteristics, groundwater and repository, (2) Release and transport of radionuclides, (3) Performance and safety assessment of repositories, and (4) Waste management technology and costs

  20. JYT - Publicly financed nuclear waste management research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.

    1991-07-01

    The nuclear waste management research in Finland is funded both by the state and the utilities (represented in cooperation by the Nuclear Waste Commission of the Finnish power companies). A coordinated research programme (JYT) comprising the publicly financed waste management studies was started in 1989 and continues until 1993. The utilities continue to carry out a parallel research programme according to their main financial and operational responsibility for nuclear waste management. The research programme covers the following main topic areas: (1) Bedrock characteristics, groundwater and repository, (2) Release and transport of radionuclides, (3) Performance and safety assessment of repositories, and (4) Waste management technology and costs

  1. Finnish Research Programme on Nuclear Waste Management (KYT). Framework Programme for 2002-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasilainen, K.

    2002-12-01

    The new Finnish research programme on nuclear waste management (KYT) will be conducted in 2002 - 2005. This framework programme describes the starting point, the basic aims and the organisation of the research programme. The starting point of the KYT programme is derived from the present state and future challenges of Finnish nuclear waste management. The research programme is funded mainly by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Posiva Oy, Fortum Oyj, Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO), and the National Technology Agency (Tekes). As both regulators and implementors are involved, the research programme concentrates on neutral research topics that must be studied in any case. Methods and tools for experimental and theoretical studies fall in this category. State of the art -reviews on relevant topics also create national know-how. Topics that directly belong to licensing activities of nuclear waste management are excluded from the research programme. KYT carries out technical studies that increase national know-how in the area of nuclear waste management. The aim is to maintain and develop basic expertise needed in the operations derived from the national nuclear waste management plan. The studies have been divided into strategic studies and studies enhancing the long-term safety of spent nuclear fuel disposal. Strategic studies support the overall feasibility of Finnish nuclear waste management. These studies include basic options and overall safety principles related to nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear waste management. In addition, general cost estimates as well as general safety considerations related to transportations, low- and medium level wastes, and decommissioning are included in strategic studies. Studies supporting the long-term safety of spent fuel disposal include issues related to performance assessment methodology, release of radionuclides from the repository, behaviour of bedrock and groundwater

  2. Dose management programmes at Kaiga Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayan, P.; Prabhakaran, V.; Managavi, Sadashiv B.; Danannavar, Veerendra; Biju, P.; Manoj Kumar, M.; Shrikrishna, U.V.

    2001-01-01

    Kaiga Generating Station (KGS) has two units of pressurized heavy water reactors of 220 MWe each capacity. KGS-2 started power generation since 1999 and KGS-1 since 2000. Several programmes such as assessment of radioactive condition, training on radiological safety aspects, job planning in radioactive areas, etc. are conducted periodically to implement an effective dose control programmes in KGS. These efforts are briefly discussed in this report. Facilities and techniques to implement ALARA programs are also highlighted in this report. (author)

  3. Management of area-wide integrated pest management programmes that integrate the sterile insect technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, V.A.; Vreysen, M.J.B.; Reyes Flores, J.; Regidor Fernandez, E.E.; Teruya, T.; Barnes, B.; Gomez Riera, P.; Lindquist, D.; Loosjes, M.

    2005-01-01

    Effective management of area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programmes that integrate the sterile insect technique (SIT) is key to success. Programme planning includes collection of baseline data and a feasibility assessment. The optimal management structure is where the programme can be implemented effectively and flexibly, independent of government politics, bureaucracy, and even corruption that impede timely goal achievement. Ideally, programmes include both public and private management, and require strong and steady financial support. Governments and donors are the most common sources of funds, but a mixture of public, community, and private funds is now the trend. Interrupted cash flow severely restrains programme performance. Physical support of programme operations must be reliable, and led by a maintenance professional. It is essential to have full-time, well-paid, and motivated staff led by a programme manger with technical and management experience. Programme failure is usually due to poor management and inadequate public support, and not to poor technology. (author)

  4. Spinoffs from radiological emergency preparedness programmes to generic emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    In the USA, the radiological emergency preparedness (REP) programme for nuclear power plants is being used to enhance emergency management programmes for other types of emergencies. The REP programme is particularly useful in developing plans and preparedness measures for chemical accidents. The Integrated Emergency Management System (IEMS) approach provides a means for maximizing relationships between the REP programme and other programmes. IEMS essentially involves applying common elements of planning and preparedness to all types of emergencies, while recognizing that unique characteristics of specific natural and man-made emergencies require special planning and preparedness considerations. Features of the REP programme that make it compatible with the IEMS approach and useful in coping with other types of emergencies are: (1) the close co-operation between the national nuclear regulatory and emergency management organizations; (2) the programme integration among all levels of government, the nuclear power industry, public interest groups and the general public and (3) the comprehensiveness and sophistication of the programme. The REP programme in the USA represents a state-of-the-art emergency management capability. Some of its elements are readily transferrable to most other types of emergency preparedness programmes, while other elements can be adapted more readily to other hazard-specific programmes. The Bhopal accident has been a catalyst for this adaptation to chemical accidents, in such areas as furnishing hazard-specific information to the public, alert and notification systems, definition of the hazards and risks involved, establishing planning zones and developing close working relationships among the industry, the public and government

  5. The Plant Circadian Clock: From a Simple Timekeeper to a Complex Developmental Manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Sabrina E; Kay, Steve A

    2016-12-01

    The plant circadian clock allows organisms to anticipate the predictable changes in the environment by adjusting their developmental and physiological traits. In the last few years, it was determined that responses known to be regulated by the oscillator are also able to modulate clock performance. These feedback loops and their multilayer communications create a complex web, and confer on the clock network a role that exceeds the measurement of time. In this article, we discuss the current knowledge of the wiring of the clock, including the interplay with metabolism, hormone, and stress pathways in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana We outline the importance of this system in crop agricultural traits, highlighting the identification of natural alleles that alter the pace of the timekeeper. We report evidence supporting the understanding of the circadian clock as a master regulator of plant life, and we hypothesize on its relevant role in the adaptability to the environment and the impact on the fitness of most organisms. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  6. Ineffective programme management on the delivery of health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    outsourced to the Department of Public Works and the Independent. Development .... achieve a common strategic or business goal. ... Since programme management ... civil and structural engineering together with quantity surveying. The.

  7. The IAEA's high level radioactive waste management programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saire, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the different activities that are performed under the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) high level radioactive waste management programme. The Agency's programme is composed of five main activities (information exchange, international safety standards, R ampersand D activities, advisory services and special projects) which are described in the paper. Special emphasis is placed on the RADioactive WAste Safety Standards (RADWASS) programme which was implemented in 1991 to document international consensus that exists on the safe management of radioactive waste. The paper also raises the question about the need for regional repositories to serve certain countries that do not have the resources or infrastructure to construct a national repository

  8. Prediction of GNSS satellite clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broederbauer, V.

    2010-01-01

    interval 2-3 ns are obtained. This represents a distance-error of 60-90 cm. A comparison of the results from GNSS-VC/static to the predicted Ultra-Rapid-clocks of the ACs of the IGS confirms the very good quality of our clock solution which is at the level of the best AC solutions. The use of GNSS-VC/static for GLONASS-satellite-clocks is problematic. The GLONASS satellite clocks show a hard to characterize behaviour covering a number of jumps and breaks in the time-series within just a few hours. Therefore the prediction of GLONASS-satellite-clocks seems not reasonable at this time. In view of more stable clocks upcoming with the new GLONASS satellite generation K a similar model as used to characterize the GPS Rubidium clock might be applicable. The results of GNSS-VC/static are affected by a three-hours-delay. Thus an almost real-time solution to obtain high quality clock predictions has been established in parallel. The programme GNSS-VC/kalman enables to evaluate the parameters of the prediction-model by a Kalman-filter approach. Because of the short prediction-interval of just six hours the model is reduced to a simple quadratic polynomial. Input-data are RT-clock-corrections evaluated with the programme RTR-Control [Opitz, 2010] based on the observation data provided by the IGS-RT project. The clock correction polynomial coefficients are estimated every minute. After an initialization period of the filter (about 30 minutes) the mean error of the polynomial parameters as well as the evaluated clock corrections is below 2 ns for most of the satellite clock (author) [de

  9. Public sector's research programme on nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.

    2000-06-01

    According to the Finnish nuclear energy legislation, each producer of nuclear waste is responsible for the safe handling, management and disposal of the waste as well as for the arising costs. Authorities supervise and control the implementation of the national waste management programme and set the necessary safety and other requirements. In these tasks the authorities are supported by a research programme on nuclear waste management that is independent of the implementing organisations and power companies. The main objective of the research programme has been to provide the authorities with information and research results relevant for the safety of nuclear waste management. The main emphasis in this research programme has been devoted to the final disposal of spent fuel. The whole area of the research programme has been subdivided into the following main topic areas: (1) Behaviour of bedrock (2) Geohydrology and geochemistry, (3) Release of radionuclides from repository and subsequent transport in bedrock, (4) Engineered safety barriers of the repository, system, (5) Performance and safety assessment of spent fuel disposal facilities, (6) Waste management technology and costs (7) Evaluation of the contents and scope of and observation of the realisation of the environmental impact assessment procedure for the siting of spent nuclear fuel disposal facility, and research on other societal and sociopolitical issues, and (8) Public information, attitude, and image issues for waste management facilities. The research programme has generated considerably increased information on the behaviour of the natural and technical release barriers of the disposal system and thereby contributed to building of confidence on the long-term safety of geological disposal of spent fuel. Furthermore, increased confidence among the public in the affected candidate municipalities has probably been achieved by the complementary studies conducted within the research programme on topics

  10. Guide to Effective Purchasing. Operational Management Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frediani, Pam

    This manual is intended to help create and sustain good relations between purchasers and suppliers of foods and related products. It is designed to guide anyone involved in the purchasing function: purchasing officers and managers in medium and large establishments, food and beverage managers, catering managers, chefs, caterers, restaurateurs,…

  11. Nuclear knowledge management in radioactive waste management programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetere, Claudia L.; Gomiz, Pablo R.; Lavalle, Myriam; Masset, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    In late 2007, the Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM) group of the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), understanding the need to preserve knowledge related with radioactive waste, formulated the CONRRaD Project with the aim of developing and implementing a sustainable knowledge management system. The CONRRaD Project was highly focused on minimising the loss of radioactive waste management knowledge related to processes and facilities as a consequence of staff ageing and retiring, promoting transfer and preservation so as to ensure that future generations interpret and improve the management of waste, protecting the environment and people's health. The National Programme for Radioactive Waste Management (NPRWM) has the responsibility of maintaining a documented record system to preserve the knowledge that is available and relates to the facilities for radioactive wastes treatment, conditioning, packaging, storing and disposal of low-level radioactive wastes. The STOReR system has been designed with the aim of ensuring traceability through all the steps of radioactive waste management from generation to storage or disposal. Apart from upgrading an application in use since 2001, the new software includes improvements in the inventory calculations according to the current regulations. Basically, the system consists of two applications. One application called PAGE is on the Net and it is available for the producers. These producers are the facilities that generate radioactive waste as a consequence of their normal operation. PAGE enables the producers to access all the services provided by AGE more easily. Not only are producers the users of PAGE, but there are also authorised owners of radioactive sources and devices because AGE provides transitory or permanent storage of these elements. The other application called STOReR is the main one which provides the capabilities needed to support the whole system, such as the databases storage and management. STORe

  12. Designing a portfolio management programme to optimize cash-flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassom, D.

    1996-01-01

    The design and implementation of any portfolio management programme must, by definition, be tailored to the drivers and particular objectives of the company owning the assets. This paper will concentrate on one of the most important driving forces, namely managing cash-flow. Five key steps are required to achieve an effective portfolio management programme: 1. establish targets/goals; 2. describe and value the assets in your company's portfolio; 3. identify and catalogue potential 'customers'; 4. construct appropriate deal structures and other strategies to achieve your targets; 5. work hard and do deals. (author)

  13. Financial aspects of veterinary herd health management programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifende, V I; Derks, M; Hooijer, G A; Hogeveen, H

    2014-09-06

    Veterinary herd health management (VHHM) programmes have been shown to be economically effective in the past. However, no current information is available on costs and benefits of these programmes. This study compared economics and farm performance between participants and non-participants in VHHM programmes in 1013 dairy farms with over 40 cows. Milk Production Registration (MPR) data and a questionnaire concerning VHHM were used. Based on the level of participation in VHHM (as indicated in the questionnaire), costs of the programmes were calculated using a normative model. The economic value of the production effects was similarly calculated using normative modelling based on MPR data. Participants in VHHM had a better performance with regard to production, but not with regard to reproduction. Over 90 per cent of the VHHM participants were visited at least once every six weeks and most participants discussed at least three topics. In most farms, the veterinarian did the pregnancy checks as part of the VHHM programmes. There was a benefit to cost ratio of about five per cow per year for VHHM participants, and a mean difference in net returns of €30 per cow per year after adjusting for the cost of the programme. This portrays that participation in a VHHM programme is cost-efficient. There is, however, much unexplained variation in the net returns, possibly due to diverse approaches by veterinarians towards VHHM or by other factors not included in this analysis, like nutritional quality or management abilities of the farmer. British Veterinary Association.

  14. Evaluation of constrained mobility for programmability in network management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohoris, C.; Liotta, A.; Pavlou, G.; Ambler, A.P.; Calo, S.B.; Kar, G.

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, a significant amount of research work has addressed the use of code mobility in network management. In this paper, we introduce first three aspects of code mobility and argue that constrained mobility offers a natural and easy approach to network management programmability. While

  15. TEACHING METHODS IN MBA AND LIFELONG LEARNING PROGRAMMES FOR MANAGERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarošová, Eva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Teaching methods in MBA and Lifelong Learning Programmes (LLP for managers should be topically relevant in terms of content as well as the teaching methods used. In terms of the content, the integral part of MBA and Lifelong Learning Programmes for managers should be the development of participants’ leadership competencies and their understanding of current leadership concepts. The teaching methods in educational programmes for managers as adult learners should correspond to the strategy of learner-centred teaching that focuses on the participants’ learning process and their active involvement in class. The focus on the participants’ learning process also raises questions about whether the programme’s participants perceive the teaching methods used as useful and relevant for their development as leaders. The paper presents the results of the analysis of the responses to these questions in a sample of 54 Czech participants in the MBA programme and of lifelong learning programmes at the University of Economics, Prague. The data was acquired based on written or electronically submitted questionnaires. The data was analysed in relation to the usefulness of the teaching methods for understanding the concepts of leadership, leadership skills development as well as respondents’ personal growth. The results show that the respondents most valued the methods that enabled them to get feedback, activated them throughout the programme and got them involved in discussions with others in class. Implications for managerial education practices are discussed.

  16. Evaluation of the Finnish nuclear waste management programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    In response to a request from Finland in November 1992, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) set up a Team of four experts (representatives from Belgium, Canada, Germany and Switzerland) to review the Finnish nuclear waste management programme within the auspices of IAEA's Waste Management programme (WATRP). During the early summer of 1993, the Team reviewed a large amount of documentation supplied by the Finnish industry, government and research organizations. The radioactive waste management programme areas within the Team's terms of reference included: (1) work being done in siting and building a conditional facility for spent nuclear fuel and siting and constructing a co-located repository, (2) the plans and activities for conditioning and disposing of the low and intermediate level waste from Finland's NPPs and (3) the plans for decommissioning Finland's reactors when that becomes necessary. The evaluation work and the recommendations of the Team are detailed in the report

  17. Final report. The Watercourse Management Programme; Sluttrapport. Vassdragsdriftprogrammet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skarboevik, Eva; Berg, Gry; Faugli, Per Einar

    1997-10-01

    In Norway, there was a need to provide quick answers to questions related to the management and use of river systems. To this end, the Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Administration (NVE) in 1988-1994 conducted the research and development programme described in this report. In the mid-eighties, river management came into focus. The importance of coordination, multi-use planning and multi-use assessments was constantly being stressed and the natural environment, recreation and health were incorporated into the decision-making processes. The programme has contributed to the Norwegian section of the UNESCO project Flow Regimes from International Experimental and Network Data (FRIEND). 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. New nuclear programmes must not neglect waste management - 59077

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCombie, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Many established nuclear power programmes have learned to their dismay that waste management and disposal are not tasks that can be postponed at will if public and political acceptance is a prerequisite for progress. In fact, some programmes that recognised this back in the 1970's and 1980's moved into leading positions in repository development. This happened, for example, in Sweden and Switzerland where already in the 1970's Laws were passed specifying that safe disposal must be demonstrated before new nuclear plants could operate. In recent years, it has become recognised that, in order to ensure that the radioactive wastes in any country are managed safely, it is necessary to have an established legislative and regulatory framework and also to create the necessary organizations for implementation and for oversight of waste management operations and facility development. Guidance on these issues is given in the Joint Convention and a number of other IAEA documents. The IAEA, and also the EC, have in addition published key overarching advisory documents for new nuclear programmes. These are useful for strategic planning but, when it comes to actual implementation projects, the advice tends to imply that all nuclear programmes, however large or small, should be pressing ahead urgently towards early operation of geological repositories. In practice, however, in small programmes there are neither economic nor technical drivers for early implementation of deep geological repositories. Constructing simpler facilities for the disposal of the larger volume of low-level wastes has higher priority. Nevertheless, in all countries political decisions have to be taken and policies set in place to ensure that geological disposal will implemented without unjustified delay. This paper distils out a set of key messages for new programmes. Amongst the most critical are the following. Even if disposal is far off, planning and organization should begin at the initiation of the

  19. International Nuclear Management Academy Requirements for University Master’s Programmes in Nuclear Technology Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosbois, J. de; Hirose, H.; Adachi, F.; Liu, L.; Hanamitsu, K.; Kosilov, A.; Roberts, J.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The development of any national nuclear energy programme is dependent on the successful development of qualified human resources, through a sustainable nuclear education and training programmes supported by government and industry. Among the broad range of specialists needed for the continued safe and economic utilization of nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, are a most vital component—managers. The International Nuclear Management Academy (INMA) is an IAEA facilitated collaboration framework in which universities provide master’s degree programmes focusing on the management aspect for the nuclear sector. INMA master’s programmes in Nuclear Technology Management (NTM) specify a common set of competency requirements that graduates should acquire to prepare them to become competent managers. This paper presents an overview of the INMA collaboration framework and the requirements for partner universities to implement master’s programmes in Nuclear Technology Management. (author

  20. Decamp Clock Board Firmware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente, J. de; Castilla, J.; Martinez, G.

    2007-01-01

    Decamp (Dark Energy Survey Camera) is a new instrument designed to explore the universe aiming to reveal the nature of Dark Energy. The camera consists of 72 CCDs and 520 Mpixels. The readout electronics of DECam is based on the Monsoon system. Monsoon is a new image acquisition system developed by the NOAO (National Optical Astronomical Observatory) for the new generation of astronomical cameras. The Monsoon system uses three types of boards inserted in a Eurocard format based crate: master control board, acquisition board and clock board. The direct use of the Monsoon system for DECam readout electronics requires nine crates mainly due to the high number of clock boards needed. Unfortunately, the available space for DECam electronics is constrained to four crates at maximum. The major drawback to achieve such desired compaction degree resides in the clock board signal density. This document describes the changes performed at CIEMAT on the programmable logic of the Monsoon clock board aiming to meet such restricted space constraints. (Author) 5 refs

  1. Decamp Clock Board Firmware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, J. de; Castilla, J.; Martinez, G.

    2007-09-27

    Decamp (Dark Energy Survey Camera) is a new instrument designed to explore the universe aiming to reveal the nature of Dark Energy. The camera consists of 72 CCDs and 520 Mpixels. The readout electronics of DECam is based on the Monsoon system. Monsoon is a new image acquisition system developed by the NOAO (National Optical Astronomical Observatory) for the new generation of astronomical cameras. The Monsoon system uses three types of boards inserted in a Eurocard format based crate: master control board, acquisition board and clock board. The direct use of the Monsoon system for DECam readout electronics requires nine crates mainly due to the high number of clock boards needed. Unfortunately, the available space for DECam electronics is constrained to four crates at maximum. The major drawback to achieve such desired compaction degree resides in the clock board signal density. This document describes the changes performed at CIEMAT on the programmable logic of the Monsoon clock board aiming to meet such restricted space constraints. (Author) 5 refs.

  2. Indian programme on radioactive waste management

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These can be disposed of to the environment and are not likely to cause any ... The overall philosophy for the safe management of radioactive ... power plants and other fuel cycle facilities in order to keep the air in the working area and the.

  3. The Radioactive Waste Management Programme in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beceiro, A. R.; Vico, E.

    2000-01-01

    In 1984 the Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos (ENRESA) was set up in order to be responsible for all radioactive waste management activities in the country. ENRESA is a state-owned company, the shareholders of which are CIEMAT (Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, formerly (JEN) and SEPI (Sociedad Estatal de Participaciones Industriales), both institutions dependent on the Ministry of Industry and Energy. ENRESA has a broad scope of responsibilities, including not only the management of L/ILW, HLW and spent fuel but also the decommissioning of nuclear installations, as well as the rehabilitation of uranium mining and milling facilities when required. The policy on radioactive waste management is defined by the Government, and the strategies are developed by ENRESA in accordance with the General Radioactive Waste Management Plan. This Plan is a strategic document which must be submitted yearly by ENRESA to the Government, for its approval when the Ministry of Industry and Energy decided so. The plan, in general terms, contains the main aspects related to waste generation and forecasts, as well as the strategies and technical solutions to be prepared, along with the associated economic and financial aspects. ENRESA's activities are financed by the waste producers. On the one hand the nucleoelectric sector pays a percentage fee on all the electricity sales, while small producers pay tariffs according to the services provided, both are approved by the Government. The fifth General Radioactive Waste Plan, approved by the Government in July 1999, is currently in force and contains the strategies for the management of radioactive wastes and decommissioning of nuclear installations in Spain. (author)

  4. The radioactive waste management programme in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beceiro, Alvaro R.; Vico, Elena

    2002-01-01

    In 1984 the Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos (ENRESA) was set up in order to be responsible for all radioactive waste management activities in the country. ENRESA is a state-owned company, the shareholders of which are CIEMAT (Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, formerly (JEN) and SEPI (Sociedad Estatal de Participaciones Industriales), both institutions dependent on the Spanish Government. ENRESA has a broad scope of responsibilities, including not only the management of L/ILW, HLW and spent fuel but also the decommissioning of nuclear installations, as well as the rehabilitation of uranium mining and milling facilities when required. The policy on radioactive waste management is defined by the Government, and the strategies are developed by ENRESA in accordance with the General Radioactive Waste Management Plan. This Plan is a strategic document which must be submitted yearly by ENRESA to the Government, for its approval when the Ministry of Economy decided so. The plan, in general terms, contains the main aspects related to waste generation and forecasts, as well as the strategies and technical solutions to be prepared, along with the associated economic and financial aspects. ENRESA's activities are financed by the waste producers. On the one hand the nucleoelectric sector pays a percentage fee on all the electricity sales, while small producers pay tariffs according to the services provided, both are approved by the Government. The Fifth General Radioactive Waste Plan, approved by the Government in July 1999, is currently in force and contains the strategies for the management of radioactive wastes and decommissioning of nuclear installations in Spain. (author)

  5. Network-Embedded Management and Applications Understanding Programmable Networking Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Wolter, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Despite the explosion of networking services and applications in the past decades, the basic technological underpinnings of the Internet have remained largely unchanged. At its heart are special-purpose appliances that connect us to the digital world, commonly known as switches and routers. Now, however, the traditional framework is being increasingly challenged by new methods that are jostling for a position in the next-generation Internet. The concept of a network that is becoming more programmable is one of the aspects that are taking center stage. This opens new possibilities to embed software applications inside the network itself and to manage networks and communications services with unprecedented ease and efficiency. In this edited volume, distinguished experts take the reader on a tour of different facets of programmable network infrastructure and application exploit it. Presenting the state of the art in network embedded management and applications and programmable network infrastructure, the book c...

  6. The costs assessment of the RENEL's programme for radwaste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barariu, Gh.; Andreescu, N.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents first economical assessment of the Radwaste Management Programme of the Romanian Electricity Authority - Nuclear Power Group (RENEL-GEN) until closing all foreseeable activities in the field of nuclear waste processing and disposal. (Author) 1 Tab., 7 Refs

  7. Financial aspects of veterinary herd health management programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ifende, V.I.; Derks, M.; Hooijer, G.A.; Hogeveen, H.

    2014-01-01

    Veterinary herd health management (VHHM) programmes are meant to support herd health and farmers’ income (Brand and Guard 1996). They were introduced in the Netherlands in the 1970s (Sol and Renkema 1984) and at present many veterinarians provide them to farmers. VHHM comprises a basic structure of

  8. Management of Adult Education Programme in Abia State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adult Education is the instruction or controlled experiences for the mature person so that he/she may attain social, economic, cultural, political or technical competence or individual development. The importance of management in adult education programme cannot be over emphasized because of the vital role it plays in ...

  9. Experience of the Spanish radioactive management programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beceiro, A.R.; Zuloaga, P.; Espejo, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The important results achieved in the last 12 years , since the ENRESA inception, are reported. The establishment and start-up of the low and intermediate level waste management system (waste acceptance criteria and verification laboratories, waste collection and transport systems and conditioning facilities, temporary storage and disposal) is capable of managing wastes of these categories forecast to be produced in Spain up to the year 2013. The capacity to store temporarily the spent fuel on site at the operating NPPs is being increased to met practically the needs up to end of these plants' operating lifetime. This is being achieved through the re-racking of spent fuel pools and the use of metallic casks, depending on the technical possibilities of each plant. These increase in the capacity for spent fuel temporary storage will allow work on geological prospecting and technology development to progress over the next two decades, prior to construction of a geological disposal facility. All these tasks are being carried out in accordance with the established program initiated in 1987 which is requiring important technological financial and communication-related efforts. The financial, technological and waste management means required for dismantling of nuclear installations at the end of their operating lifetime have been established; thus, for instance, the works involved in dismantling and tailing dyke remodeling at the disused uranium mill in Andujar were completed. The engineering project for the dismantling of the Vandellos I NPP is going ahead according to schedule and was submitted to the Authorities during the first half of 1994, the starting of work being expected for the end of 1997. This overall set of results represents an appreciable improvement in Spain's capacity to solve environmental problems and a substantial reduction in the potential risk associated with the radioactive wastes accumulation. (authors)

  10. A regional programme to improve skin cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeoch, Graham R; Sycamore, Mark J; Shand, Brett I; Simcock, Jeremy W

    2015-12-01

    In 2008, public specialist and general practice services in Canterbury were unable to manage demand for skin cancer treatment. Local clinicians decided the solution was to develop a see-and-treat skin excision clinic staffed by plastic surgeons and general practitioners (GPs), and the introduction of subsidised excisions in general practice. This paper describes the collaboration between clinicians, managers and funders and the results and quality management measures of these initiatives. There is an increasing incidence of skin cancer. GPs in Canterbury were unable to meet increasing demand for skin cancer treatment because some lacked confidence and competence in skin cancer management. There was no public funding for primary care management of skin cancer, driving patients to fully funded secondary care services. Secondary care services were at capacity, with no coordinated programme across primary and secondary care. The programme has resulted in a greater number of skin cancers being treated by the public health system, a reduction in waiting times for treatment, and fewer minor skin lesions being referred to secondary care. Quality measures have been achieved and are improving steadily. Development of the programme has improved working relationships between primary and secondary care clinicians. The strategy was to facilitate the working relationship between primary and secondary care and increase the capacity for skin lesion excisions in both sectors. Skin cancer management can be improved by a coordinated approach between primary and secondary care.

  11. Developing a national programme of flood risk management measures: Moldova

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramsbottom David

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A Technical Assistance project funded by the European Investment Bank has been undertaken to develop a programme of flood risk management measures for Moldova that will address the main shortcomings in the present flood management system, and provide the basis for long-term improvement. Areas of significant flood risk were identified using national hydraulic and flood risk modelling, and flood hazard and flood risk maps were then prepared for these high risk areas. The flood risk was calculated using 12 indicators representing social, economic and environmental impacts of flooding. Indicator values were combined to provide overall estimates of flood risk. Strategic approaches to flood risk management were identified for each river basin using a multi-criteria analysis. Measures were then identified to achieve the strategic approaches. A programme of measures covering a 20-year period was developed together with a more detailed Short-Term Investment Plan covering the first seven years of the programme. Arrangements are now being made to implement the programme. The technical achievements of the project included national hydrological and hydraulic modelling covering 12,000 km of river, the development of 2-dimensional channel and floodplain hydraulic models from a range of topographic and bathymetric data, and an integrated flood risk assessment that takes account of both economic and non-monetary impacts.

  12. Aspects of Knowledge Management Programme Implementation into Management System of NPP Operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudakov, V.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The paper deals with the implementation of KM tools and approaches in NPPs of Slovenské elektrárne. The case study emphasizes the importance of KM programme introduction into the existing management system of the company taking into account sustainability and successful of the programme and demonstrates some practical examples. (author

  13. Appendix: Data management and data archive for the HYREX Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Roberts

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the mid 1980s, changes in political imperatives plus technological changes in computer hardware and software have heightened the awareness of the economic value and importance of quality datasets to scientific research. The Natural Environment Research Council’s (NERC interdisciplinary Thematic and Special Topic Programmes have highlighted the need for a coherent data management policy to provide and preserve these quality datasets for posterity. The Hydrological Radar EXperiment (HYREX Special Topic Programme brought together multi-disciplinary researchers from UK public sector laboratories and universities. In this paper, the HYREX data management strategy, its problems and its solutions are discussed. The HYREX data archive, situated at NERC’s British Atmospheric Data Centre, is described. Keywords: radar, data, archive, web, storm, flood

  14. Programme

    OpenAIRE

    Hobday, E, fl. 1905, artist

    2003-01-01

    A photograph of an illustrated programme listing dances. The illustration shows a snake charmer playing to a snake while another man watches. Buildings and trees can be seen behind a wall in the distance. In the lower right-hand corner of the programme is the signature 'E. Hobday'. The programme is almost certainly related to the Punjab Ball, Lahore. It is placed next to the Punjab Ball Menu in the album and the Menu is also illustrated by 'E. Hobday'.

  15. Flexible programmable logic module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Perry J.; Hutchinson, Robert L.; Pierson, Lyndon G.

    2001-01-01

    The circuit module of this invention is a VME board containing a plurality of programmable logic devices (PLDs), a controlled impedance clock tree, and interconnecting buses. The PLDs are arranged to permit systolic processing of a problem by offering wide data buses and a plurality of processing nodes. The board contains a clock reference and clock distribution tree that can drive each of the PLDs with two critically timed clock references. External clock references can be used to drive additional circuit modules all operating from the same synchronous clock reference.

  16. Research and technology programmes supporting waste management in BNFL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairhall, G.A.; Horner, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Waste Management is a major activity of BNFL in the UK and at various locations internationally. To support these activities extensive programmes of Research and Technology have been undertaken for many years. This involves practical studies involving active and non-active work at laboratory and pilot plant scale. Extensive use is also made of theoretical and modelling techniques. Current work is aimed at underpinning and improving current operations supporting the design and safety cases of new plant and addressing waste management activities of the future including decommissioning. (authors)

  17. A VMEbus clock system for accelerator control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beechy, D.G.; McClure, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    Because an accelerator has many systems which must operate with a high degree of synchronization, a clock signal is typically generated which carries timing information to the various accelerator components. This paper discusses two VMEbus modules designed to generate and receive this clock signal. Together they implement a clock system which can generate timing markers with 200 nanosecond resolution and can generate timing delays of over one hour with one microsecond resolution. The Clock Generator module contains both a time line generator programmed to produce clock events at specific times and eight programmable input channels to produce clock events when externally triggered. Additional clock events are generated directly from the VMEbus. Generators can be cascaded for added capability. The Clock Timer module receives the signal from the generator. It can be programmed to recognize specific clock events which act as triggers to the eight timing channels on the module. Each timing channel is programmed with a 32-bit delay value. The channels are clocked at 1 MHz. At the end of the delay period, a timer channel produces an output pulse and optionally can generate a bus interrupt

  18. Disease management programmes in Germany: a fundamental fault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Stefan

    2006-12-01

    In 2001 Germany introduced disease management programmes (DMPs) in order to give sick funds an incentive to improve the treatment of the chronically ill. By 1 March 2005, a total of 3275 programmes had been approved, 2760 for diabetes, 390 for breast cancer and 125 for coronary heart disease, covering roughly 1 million patients. German DMPs show a major fault regarding financial incentives. Sick funds increase their transfers from the risk adjustment scheme when their clients enroll in DMPs. Since this money is a lump sum, sick funds do not necessarily foster treatment of the chronically ill. Similarly, reimbursement of physicians is also not well targeted to the needs of DMPs. Preliminary evidence points to poor performance of German DMPs.

  19. A high precision time-to-digital converter based on multi-phase clock implemented within Field-Programmable-Gate-Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Kai; Liu Shubin; An Qi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the design of a coarse-fine interpolation Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) is implemented in an ALTERA's Cyclone FPGA. The carry-select chain performs as the tapped delay line. The Logic Array Block (LAB) having a propagation delay of 165 ps in the chain is synthesized as delay cell. Coarse counters triggered by the global clock count the more significant bits of the time data. This clock is also fed through the delay line, and LABs create the copies. The replicas are latched by the tested event signal, and the less significant bits are encoded from the latched binary bits. Single-shot resolution of the TDC can be 60 ps. The worst Differential Nonlinearity (DNL) is about 0.2 Least Significant Bit (LSB, 165 ps in this TDC module), and the Integral Nonlinearity (INL) is 0.6 LSB. In comparison with other architectures using the synchronous global clock to sample the taps, this architecture consumed less electric power and logic cells, and is more stable. (authors)

  20. Impact of an occupation-based self-management programme on chronic disease management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, Lynn

    2013-02-01

    There is a need for the development and evaluation of occupational therapy interventions enabling participation and contributing to self-management for individuals with multiple chronic conditions. This pilot study aimed to assess the feasibility and potential impact of an occupation-based self-management programme for community living individuals with multiple chronic conditions.

  1. Four African Nations Agree to Water Management Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Seeking to improve their management of water resources, four northeast African nations today agreed at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to establish a long-term framework for utlizing a key underground water system. Chad, Egypt, Libya and Sudan signed a Strategic Action Programme (SAP) that aims to optimize the equitable use of the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System, a huge water resource that lies beneath the four nations. The SAP also commits the countries to strengthen and build upon a previously existing regional coordination mechanism, in part by establishing a new Joint Authority for the Nubian Aquifer System. The Programme lays the groundwork for improving cooperation among the four arid nations and for strengthening their capacity to monitor and manage the aquifer effectively. With growing populations and decreasing water availability from other sources in the region, the aquifer is under mounting pressure. Removing water without a clear understanding of transboundary and other implications threatens water quality and has the potential to harm biodiversity and accelerate land degradation. The agreement resulted from a joint Technical Cooperation project of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the IAEA. ''I congratulate all involved on this significant achievement,'' said IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano. ''Water is a key resource, and effective management and use of such water resources is essential for the future. The agreement of the Strategic Action Programme is the result of real cooperation between the four States, the Agency and UNDP-GEF. I am confident that this Programme will be a success and will benefit the people of the region. This positive project experience benefits strengthened and expanded cooperation between the IAEA and the UNDP-GEF.'' ''UNDP would like to congratulate the

  2. The DOE technology development programme on severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhold, R.J.; Moore, R.A.; Theofanous, T.G.

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a programme in technology development aimed at resolving the technical issues in severe accident management strategies for advanced and evolutionary light water reactors (LWRs). The key objective of this effort is to achieve a robust defense-in-depth at the interface between prevention and mitigation of severe accidents. The approach taken towards this goal is based on the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM). Applications of ROAAM to the severe accident management strategy for the US AP600 advanced LWR have been effective both in enhancing the design and in achieving acceptance of the conclusions and base technology developed in the course of the work. This paper presents an overview of that effort and its key technical elements

  3. Management of Industrial Processes with Programmable Logic Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Tufoi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In a modern economy, automation (the control is primarily to raise the competitiveness of a product, either directly through price or quality, or indirectly through the improvement of working conditions of staff productive. The control of industrial processes involves the management of dynamic systems that have continuous states. These systems are described by differential equations and, in general, analog inputs and outputs. Management of these systems is achieved, in general, with classical automation, by automation or with analog computers which contains modules with input / output analog performance. If states, inputs and outputs of a system can be modeled using binary variables, then these systems can be driven with Programmable Logic Controller.

  4. Waste management assessment and technical review programme. WATRP. An international peer review service for radioactive waste management activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    International Atomic Energy Agency provides international peer review services in radioactive waste management to those Member States that have established radioactive waste management programmes. Such services are provided within Waste Management Assessment and Technical Review Programme (WATRP). The main objective of WATRP is to provide international expertise and information on a requested subject in the field of radioactive waste management and to validate that programmes and activities are sound and performing well. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Management of radioactive wastes - an overview of the Indian programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, K.T.; Sunder Rajan, N.S.; Balu, K.; Khan, A.A.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of the management of radioactive wastes with particular reference to the Indian Nuclear Programme is presented. The initial design philosophy of the radwaste management system is discussed in relation to accepting a calculated, minimum discharge of radioactivity to the environment. A brief report of the operational experience with the low and intermediate level radwaste systems is given. Factors that influence the review of the present philosophy for future adoption are presented. Some methods being developed for decreasing release of the radioactivity to the environment are discussed. Among techniques considered are solar evaporation, delay and decay of fission rare gases from power reactors and concentration and storage of Kr 85 from fuel reprocessing plants. Problems in the management of high level and alph-bearing wastes are discussed with particular reference to the nature of the waste generated and the policy under implementation for their management. The matrices, solidification processes, modes of interim storage and criteria for selection of site for ultimate dispensation of the solidified high level wastes in geological formations are described. An approach towards the solution of the probelm of management of alpha-bearing waste is also presented

  6. Relativistic Ideal Clock

    OpenAIRE

    Bratek, Łukasz

    2015-01-01

    Two particularly simple ideal clocks exhibiting intrinsic circular motion with the speed of light and opposite spin alignment are described. The clocks are singled out by singularities of an inverse Legendre transformation for relativistic rotators of which mass and spin are fixed parameters. Such clocks work always the same way, no matter how they move. When subject to high accelerations or falling in strong gravitational fields of black holes, the clocks could be used to test the clock hypo...

  7. [Health locus of control of patients in disease management programmes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnee, M; Grikscheit, F

    2013-06-01

    Health locus of control beliefs plays a major role in improving self-management skills of the chronically ill - a main goal in disease management programmes (DMP). This study aims at characterising participants in disease management regarding their health locus of control. Data are based on 4 cross-sectional postal surveys between spring and autumn of 2006 and 2007 within the Health Care Monitor of the Bertelsmann Foundation. Among the 6 285 respondents, 1 266 are chronically ill and not enrolled in a DMP and 327 are participating in a DMP. A high internal locus of control (HLC) occurs significantly less often in DMP patients than in normal chronically ill patients (and healthy people) controlling for age, gender and social class. With increasing age, a high internal locus of control is also significantly less likely. When comparing healthy people, the chronically ill and the DMP participants a social gradient of a high internal locus of control belief can be observed. The weaker internal and higher doctor-related external locus of control of DMP participants should be carefully observed by the physician when trying to strengthen the patients' self-management skills. Evaluators of DMP should take into account the different baselines of DMP patients and relevant control groups and incorporate these differences into the evaluation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Water management. A core task of the Wismut remediation programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Michael; Meyer, Juergen; Jenk, Ulf; Kassahun, Andrea; Schramm, Andrea; Baacke, Delf; Forbrig, Norbert; Metschies, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Water management and conventional technical water treatment are by far the most cost-intensive long-term tasks of the Wismut remediation programme. Over the medium term, there is no viable alternative to the operation of active systems to catch and treat contaminated mine waters at the Ronneburg, Schlema, Koenigstein, Poehla, Seelingstaedt and Heimsdorf sites. Based on the status quo this paper outlines the key issues of the Wismut GmbH water management strategy over the medium and long term. lt is focused primarily on achieving protection goals for potentially impacted water bodies in the surroundings of Wismut sites and on optimising associated remediation expenditure as well as on creating the prerequisites for achieving low post-remedial care and maintenance or walk-away system status over the long term. The topic of this paper is the presentation of priority tasks related to future water management at Wismut sites in Saxony and Thuringia. The reflections are based on experiences and lessons learned and take into account current statutory management requirements referring to ground and surface water bodies affected by Wismut. The paper is based on a presentation made at the International Mining Symposium WISSYM 2015 on 2nd September 2015 in Bad Schlema, Germany.

  9. Operational programs for national radioactive waste and spent fuel management programme in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznik, Nadja; Kralj, Metka; Mele, Irena

    2007-01-01

    The first separate National Radioactive Waste and Spent Fuel Management Programme (National Programme) was prepared in Slovenia in 2005 as a supplementary part of the National Environmental Action Programme and was adopted in February 2006 by the Slovenian Parliament. The new National Programme includes all topics being relevant for the management of the radioactive waste and spent fuel which are produced in Slovenia, from the legislation and identification of different waste streams, to the management of radioactive waste and spent fuel, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and management of (TE)NORM in the near future from 2006 up to the 2015. The National Programme identified the existing and possible future problems and proposed the technical solutions and action plans for two distinctive periods: 2006-2009 and 2010- 2015. According to the requirement of Act on Protection against Ionising Radiation and Nuclear Safety the national Agency for Radwaste Management (ARAO) prepared the operational programmes for the four year period with technical details on implementation of the National programme. ARAO gained the detailed plans of different involved holders and proposed 9 operational programmes with aims, measures, individual organizations in charge, expenses and resources for each of the programmes. The Operational programmes were already reviewed by the Ministry of Environment and Physical Planning and are under acceptance. The orientation of the radioactive waste management according to the National Programme and operational activities within additional limitations based on the strategical decisions of Slovenian Government is presented in the paper. (authors)

  10. A Masters Programme in Telecommunications Management--Demand-Based Curriculum Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaibeh, Khaled M.; Kaylani, Hazem; Murphy, Noel; Brennan, Conor; Itradat, Awni; Al-Bataineh, Mohammed; Aloqlah, Mohammed; Salhieh, Loay; Altarazi, Safwan; Rawashdeh, Nathir; del Carmen Bas Cerdá, María; Conchado Peiró, Andrea; Al-Zoubi, Asem; Harb, Bassam; Bany Salameh, Haythem

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a curriculum design approach for a Masters Programme in Telecommunications Management based on demand data obtained from surveying the needs of potential students of the proposed programme. Through online surveys disseminated at telecom companies in Jordan, it was possible to measure the demand for such a programme and to…

  11. Improving Educational Objectives of the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering Programme at Kuwait University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldowaisan, Tariq; Allahverdi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the process of developing programme educational objectives (PEOs) for the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering programme at Kuwait University, and the process of deployment of these PEOs. Input of the four constituents of the programme, faculty, students, alumni, and employers, is incorporated in the development and…

  12. Evaluating disease management programme effectiveness: an introduction to instrumental variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Ariel; Adams, John L

    2006-04-01

    This paper introduces the concept of instrumental variables (IVs) as a means of providing an unbiased estimate of treatment effects in evaluating disease management (DM) programme effectiveness. Model development is described using zip codes as the IV. Three diabetes DM outcomes were evaluated: annual diabetes costs, emergency department (ED) visits and hospital days. Both ordinary least squares (OLS) and IV estimates showed a significant treatment effect for diabetes costs (P = 0.011) but neither model produced a significant treatment effect for ED visits. However, the IV estimate showed a significant treatment effect for hospital days (P = 0.006) whereas the OLS model did not. These results illustrate the utility of IV estimation when the OLS model is sensitive to the confounding effect of hidden bias.

  13. Internal Clock Drift Estimation in Computer Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham Marouani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Most computers have several high-resolution timing sources, from the programmable interrupt timer to the cycle counter. Yet, even at a precision of one cycle in ten millions, clocks may drift significantly in a single second at a clock frequency of several GHz. When tracing the low-level system events in computer clusters, such as packet sending or reception, each computer system records its own events using an internal clock. In order to properly understand the global system behavior and performance, as reported by the events recorded on each computer, it is important to estimate precisely the clock differences and drift between the different computers in the system. This article studies the clock precision and stability of several computer systems, with different architectures. It also studies the typical network delay characteristics, since time synchronization algorithms rely on the exchange of network packets and are dependent on the symmetry of the delays. A very precise clock, based on the atomic time provided by the GPS satellite network, was used as a reference to measure clock drifts and network delays. The results obtained are of immediate use to all applications which depend on computer clocks or network time synchronization accuracy.

  14. Lego clocks: building a clock from parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Michael; Simons, Mirre J P; Merrow, Martha

    2008-06-01

    A new finding opens up speculation that the molecular mechanism of circadian clocks in Synechococcus elongatus is composed of multiple oscillator systems (Kitayama and colleagues, this issue, pp. 1513-1521), as has been described in many eukaryotic clock model systems. However, an alternative intepretation is that the pacemaker mechanism-as previously suggested-lies primarily in the rate of ATP hydrolysis by the clock protein KaiC.

  15. Chronic Disease Management Programmes: an adequate response to patients’ needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijken, Mieke; Bekkema, Nienke; Boeckxstaens, Pauline; Schellevis, François G.; De Maeseneer, Jan M.; Groenewegen, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background  Inspired by American examples, several European countries are now developing disease management programmes (DMPs) to improve the quality of care for patients with chronic diseases. Recently, questions have been raised whether the disease management approach is appropriate to respond to patient‐defined needs. Objective  In this article we consider the responsiveness of current European DMPs to patients’ needs defined in terms of multimorbidity, functional and participation problems, and self‐management. Method  Information about existing DMPs was derived from a survey among country‐experts. In addition, we made use of international scientific literature. Results  Most European DMPs do not have a solid answer yet to the problem of multimorbidity. Methods of linking DMPs, building extra modules to deal with the most prevalent comorbidities and integration of case management principles are introduced. Rehabilitation, psychosocial and reintegration support are not included in all DMPs, and the involvement of the social environment of the patient is uncommon. Interventions tailored to the needs of specific social or cultural patient groups are mostly not available. Few DMPs provide access to individualized patient information to strengthen self‐management, including active engagement in decision making. Conclusion  To further improve the responsiveness of DMPs to patients’ needs, we suggest to monitor ‘patient relevant outcomes’ that might be based on the ICF‐model. To address the needs of patients with multimorbidity, we propose a generic comprehensive model, embedded in primary care. A goal‐oriented approach provides the opportunity to prioritize goals that really matter to patients. PMID:22712877

  16. A programme management approach for supporting a transition to integrated flood management in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijke, J.S.; Van Herk, S.; Zevenbergen, C.; Ashley, R.

    2012-01-01

    In the Netherlands and many other developed countries, flood management is transitioning from sectoral engineering approaches to more integrated approaches. The 2.3 billion Euro Room for the River programme plays an important role in this transition, because it is the first large scale

  17. Disease management programmes for patients with coronary heart disease--an empirical study of German programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gapp, Oliver; Schweikert, Bernd; Meisinger, Christa; Holle, Rolf

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate healthcare and outcomes of disease management programmes (DMPs) for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) in primary care, and to assess selection of enrollment for these programmes. A cross-sectional survey of 2330 statutorily insured patients with a history of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was performed in 2006 by the population-based KORA Myocardial Infarction Register from the region of Augsburg, Germany. Patients enrolled in DMP-CHDs receive evidence-based care, with patients not enrolled receiving standard care. To control for selection bias, a propensity score approach was used. Main factors influencing DMP participation were age (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.96-0.99), diabetes (OR 1.56, CI 1.25-1.95) and time since last heart attack (OR 0.98, CI 0.95-0.99). Significantly more patients enrolled in DMP-CHDs stated that they received medical counselling for smoking (OR 3.77, CI 1.07-13.34), nutrition (OR 2.15, 1.69-2.74) and for physical activity (OR 2.58, 1.99-3.35). Furthermore, prescription of statins (OR 1.58, CI 1.24-2.00), antiplatelets (OR 1.96, CI 1.43-2.69) and beta-blockers (not significant) were higher in the DMP group. With respect to outcomes, we did not see relevant differences in quality of life and body mass index, and only a minor reduction in smoking. Enrollment into DMPs for CHD exhibits systematic selection effects. Participants tend to experience--at least on a short to medium term and for AMI patients--better quality of healthcare services. However, since DMP-CHDs were initiated only 2 years ago, we were unable to identify significant improvements in health outcomes. Only the reduction in smoking provides a first indication of better quality outcomes following DMP-CHD. Thus, policy-makers must provide appropriate incentives to sickness funds and physicians in order to ensure initiation and continuation of high quality DMPs.

  18. Developing an education programme for schools on radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curd, P.J.; Hutchins, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    United Kingdom Nirex Ltd. is responsible for the development of a deep disposal facility for Britain's solid low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. In line with their technical programme Nirex has a substantial public information programme costing in excess of Brit-pounds 1M per year. An important part of this programme is the need to develop an effective education programme for schools. This paper details the development and content of this education programme and the rationale behind the development in its current form

  19. IAEA Perspectives and Programme on Nuclear Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosbois, J. de

    2016-01-01

    Full text: There are many challenging issues facing Member States with respect to knowledge management. Each country’s situation and history with nuclear technology is different and strategic issues and immediate priorities are not the same. Member States recognize nuclear technology is inherently complex and requires advanced specialization and expertise. Maintaining a competent workforce is always of concern, especially in organizations with an aging workforce. Countries making major transitions such as gearing up for new build construction or decommissioning projects face particular challenges. Licensed nuclear facilities operate under a range of different organizational business models. For example, some rely heavily on outsourced and external services, and different approaches are needed to ensure critical knowledge is available and maintained. For countries phasing out nuclear power, critical knowledge must be maintained to ensure decommissioning and environmental remediation of sites is done in a responsible manner. Newcomer countries have the difficult challenge of building up their needed workforce competencies to be ready in time to support construction and commissioning schedules. The capture, preservation, transfer and overall management of design knowledge over the technology lifecycle is another important issue that is needed to ensure both the economics and safety of nuclear facilities over their lifetimes, and is especially important to ensure life extension and refurbishment projects can be implemented cost effectively. This presentation will present an overall perspective of the major knowledge management challenges and issues facing the nuclear sector and provide an overview of the IAEA’s nuclear knowledge management programme and initiatives that support Member States in addressing them. (author

  20. Impact of social responsibility programmes in stakeholder satisfaction: an empirical study of Portuguese managers' perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, L.; Ramos, A.; Rosa, A.; Sampaio, P.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between social responsibility programmes of organizations and stakeholder satisfaction. Based on stakeholder theory, an online survey was administered to managers of Portuguese organizations with certified management systems. The findings suggest that stakeholder satisfaction is indeed increased with a social responsibility programme, as suggested by Freeman’s stakeholder theory. The components of social responsibility programmes that we discussed in t...

  1. Tourism and Management Study Programme through Blended Learning: Development and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonova, Ivana

    2018-01-01

    This paper introduces and discusses a tourism and management study programme at the Faculty of Informatics and Management (FIM), University of Hradec Králové. It begins with description of the programme, along with a summary of its history and is considered in the light of changes in accreditation requirements. Students' interest in the programme…

  2. Evaluation of a communication and stress management training programme for infertile couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lone; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Boivin, Jackey

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluates a patient education programme focussed on improving communication and stress management skills among couples in fertility treatment.......This study evaluates a patient education programme focussed on improving communication and stress management skills among couples in fertility treatment....

  3. Cost Analysis of Chronic Disease Self-Management Programmes Being Delivered in South Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Timothy F.; Palmer, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic disease accounts for the majority of healthcare costs. The Chronic Disease Self-Management Programme (CDSMP) has been shown to be effective in reducing the burden of chronic disease. Objectives: The objective of this study was to measure the cost of delivering the Chronic Disease Self-Management Programme (CDSMP) in order to…

  4. Reducing Wildlife Damage with Cost-Effective Management Programmes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl R Krull

    Full Text Available Limiting the impact of wildlife damage in a cost effective manner requires an understanding of how control inputs change the occurrence of damage through their effect on animal density. Despite this, there are few studies linking wildlife management (control, with changes in animal abundance and prevailing levels of wildlife damage. We use the impact and management of wild pigs as a case study to demonstrate this linkage. Ground disturbance by wild pigs has become a conservation issue of global concern because of its potential effects on successional changes in vegetation structure and composition, habitat for other species, and functional soil properties. In this study, we used a 3-year pig control programme (ground hunting undertaken in a temperate rainforest area of northern New Zealand to evaluate effects on pig abundance, and patterns and rates of ground disturbance and ground disturbance recovery and the cost effectiveness of differing control strategies. Control reduced pig densities by over a third of the estimated carrying capacity, but more than halved average prevailing ground disturbance. Rates of new ground disturbance accelerated with increasing pig density, while rates of ground disturbance recovery were not related to prevailing pig density. Stochastic simulation models based on the measured relationships between control, pig density and rate of ground disturbance and recovery indicated that control could reduce ground disturbance substantially. However, the rate at which prevailing ground disturbance was reduced diminished rapidly as more intense, and hence expensive, pig control regimes were simulated. The model produced in this study provides a framework that links conservation of indigenous ecological communities to control inputs through the reduction of wildlife damage and suggests that managers should consider carefully the marginal cost of higher investment in wildlife damage control, relative to its marginal conservation

  5. The Community's R and D programme on the management and storage of radioactive waste. Shared-cost action programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMenamin, T.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1975 the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) has been operating a series of shared-cost action programmes in the field of radioactive waste management with the primary objective of developing methods to protect the public and the environment against the potential hazards of radioactive waste. Member States with small, as well as sizeable, nuclear programmes have been taking part. The choice and type of topics for the programme have depended largely on the work being carried out nationally by these countries with the programmes acting as a support and extension to national projects. To this end they have acted as a catalyst in encouraging and promoting cross-border cooperation and have provided a unique opportunity to compare results and ideas leading to improved quality and efficiency. The list of publications covers reports, proceedings, communications and information leaflets produced and published in the framework of the cost-sharing research programmes of the Commission of the European Communities on radioactive waste management and disposal. The list, which is regularly updated, includes: reports of contractors on research supported by the Commission; reports on research in coordinated actions, assembled and edited by the Commission staff or on behalf of the Commission; proceedings of meetings, conferences and workshops organized and edited by the Commission staff; scientific reports, communications, annual progress reports and information leaflets produced and edited by the Commission staff. Not included are contributions of contractors and staff to national or international meetings, workshops, conferences and expert groups

  6. The Management of innovation: Lessons from a Danish Development Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lennie

    1997-01-01

    The paper reports from an ongoing Danish development programme entitled "Process and Product Development in the Building Industry". The programme is a joint initiatvie, initiated by the Ministry of Housing and Building and the Ministry of Busines and Industry. In a competition in 1994 four...... consortia representing actors of the whole value chain were chosen to carry out innovation projects during a 4-year period, including experimental building projects. The paper describes the programme with respect to its background and organisation, the basic development ideas of the four consortia...... in the consortia.Keywords: R&D programme, innovation, experimental building projects, consortia....

  7. ClockWork: a Real-Time Feasibility Analysis Tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, P.G.; Hanssen, F.T.Y.; Mullender, Sape J.

    ClockWork shows that we can improve the flexibility and efficiency of real-time kernels. We do this by proposing methods for scheduling based on so-called Real-Time Transactions. ClockWork uses Real-Time Transactions which allow scheduling decisions to be taken by the system. A programmer does not

  8. The management of cardiovascular disease in the Netherlands: analysis of different programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane M. Cramm

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disease management programmes are increasingly used to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of chronic care delivery.But, disease management programme development and implementation is a complex undertaking that requires effective decision-making.Choices made in the earliest phases of programme development are crucial, as they ultimately impact costs, outcomes and sustainability. Methods: To increase our understanding of the choices that primary healthcare practices face when implementing such programmes and to stimulate successful implementation and sustainability, we compared the early implementation of eight cardiovascular disease management programmes initiated and managed by healthcare practices in various regions of the Netherlands. Using a mixed-methods design, we identified differences in and challenges to programme implementation in terms of context, patient characteristics, disease management level, healthcare utilisation costs, development costs and health-related quality of life. Results: Shifting to a multidisciplinary, patient-centred care pathway approach to disease management is demanding for organisations, professionals and patients, and is especially vulnerable when sustainable change is the goal. Funding is an important barrier to sustainable implementation of cardiovascular disease management programmes, although development costs of the individual programmes varied considerably in relation to the length of the development period. The large number of professionals involved in combination with duration of programme development was the largest cost drivers. While Information and Communication Technology systems to support the new care pathways did not directly contribute to higher costs, delays in implementation indirectly did. Conclusions: Developing and implementing cardiovascular disease management programmes is time-consuming and challenging. Multidisciplinary, patient-centred care demands multifaceted changes

  9. The management of cardiovascular disease in the Netherlands: analysis of different programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane M. Cramm

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disease management programmes are increasingly used to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of chronic care delivery.But, disease management programme development and implementation is a complex undertaking that requires effective decision-making.Choices made in the earliest phases of programme development are crucial, as they ultimately impact costs, outcomes and sustainability.Methods: To increase our understanding of the choices that primary healthcare practices face when implementing such programmes and to stimulate successful implementation and sustainability, we compared the early implementation of eight cardiovascular disease management programmes initiated and managed by healthcare practices in various regions of the Netherlands. Using a mixed-methods design, we identified differences in and challenges to programme implementation in terms of context, patient characteristics, disease management level, healthcare utilisation costs, development costs and health-related quality of life.Results: Shifting to a multidisciplinary, patient-centred care pathway approach to disease management is demanding for organisations, professionals and patients, and is especially vulnerable when sustainable change is the goal. Funding is an important barrier to sustainable implementation of cardiovascular disease management programmes, although development costs of the individual programmes varied considerably in relation to the length of the development period. The large number of professionals involved in combination with duration of programme development was the largest cost drivers. While Information and Communication Technology systems to support the new care pathways did not directly contribute to higher costs, delays in implementation indirectly did.Conclusions: Developing and implementing cardiovascular disease management programmes is time-consuming and challenging. Multidisciplinary, patient-centred care demands multifaceted changes in

  10. The management of cardiovascular disease in the Netherlands: analysis of different programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane M; Tsiachristas, Apostolos; Walters, Bethany H; Adams, Samantha A; Bal, Roland; Huijsman, Robbert; Rutten-Van Mölken, Maureen P M H; Nieboer, Anna P

    2013-01-01

    Disease management programmes are increasingly used to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of chronic care delivery. But, disease management programme development and implementation is a complex undertaking that requires effective decision-making. Choices made in the earliest phases of programme development are crucial, as they ultimately impact costs, outcomes and sustainability. To increase our understanding of the choices that primary healthcare practices face when implementing such programmes and to stimulate successful implementation and sustainability, we compared the early implementation of eight cardiovascular disease management programmes initiated and managed by healthcare practices in various regions of the Netherlands. Using a mixed-methods design, we identified differences in and challenges to programme implementation in terms of context, patient characteristics, disease management level, healthcare utilisation costs, development costs and health-related quality of life. Shifting to a multidisciplinary, patient-centred care pathway approach to disease management is demanding for organisations, professionals and patients, and is especially vulnerable when sustainable change is the goal. Funding is an important barrier to sustainable implementation of cardiovascular disease management programmes, although development costs of the individual programmes varied considerably in relation to the length of the development period. The large number of professionals involved in combination with duration of programme development was the largest cost drivers. While Information and Communication Technology systems to support the new care pathways did not directly contribute to higher costs, delays in implementation indirectly did. Developing and implementing cardiovascular disease management programmes is time-consuming and challenging. Multidisciplinary, patient-centred care demands multifaceted changes in routine care. As care pathways become more complex, they

  11. The management of cardiovascular disease in the Netherlands: analysis of different programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane M.; Tsiachristas, Apostolos; Walters, Bethany H.; Adams, Samantha A.; Bal, Roland; Huijsman, Robbert; Rutten-Van Mölken, Maureen P.M.H.; Nieboer, Anna P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Disease management programmes are increasingly used to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of chronic care delivery. But, disease management programme development and implementation is a complex undertaking that requires effective decision-making. Choices made in the earliest phases of programme development are crucial, as they ultimately impact costs, outcomes and sustainability. Methods To increase our understanding of the choices that primary healthcare practices face when implementing such programmes and to stimulate successful implementation and sustainability, we compared the early implementation of eight cardiovascular disease management programmes initiated and managed by healthcare practices in various regions of the Netherlands. Using a mixed-methods design, we identified differences in and challenges to programme implementation in terms of context, patient characteristics, disease management level, healthcare utilisation costs, development costs and health-related quality of life. Results Shifting to a multidisciplinary, patient-centred care pathway approach to disease management is demanding for organisations, professionals and patients, and is especially vulnerable when sustainable change is the goal. Funding is an important barrier to sustainable implementation of cardiovascular disease management programmes, although development costs of the individual programmes varied considerably in relation to the length of the development period. The large number of professionals involved in combination with duration of programme development was the largest cost drivers. While Information and Communication Technology systems to support the new care pathways did not directly contribute to higher costs, delays in implementation indirectly did. Conclusions Developing and implementing cardiovascular disease management programmes is time-consuming and challenging. Multidisciplinary, patient-centred care demands multifaceted changes in routine care. As

  12. Managing high-risk patients: the Mass General care management programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis L Kodner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Massachusetts General Care Management Program (Mass General CMP or CMP was designed as a federally supported demonstration to test the impact of intensive, practice-based care management on high-cost Medicare fee-for-service (FFS beneficiaries—primarily older persons—with multiple hospitalisations and multiple chronic conditions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program operated over a 6-year period in two phases (3 years each. It started during the first phase at Massachusetts General Hospital, a major academic medical centre in Boston, Massachusetts in collaboration with Massachusetts General Physicians Organisation. During the second phase, the programme expanded to two more affiliated sites in and around the Boston area, including a community hospital, as well as incorporated several modifications primarily focused on the management of transitions to post-acute care in skilled nursing facilities. At the close of the demonstration in July 2012, Mass General Massachusetts General Care Management Program became a component of a new Pioneer accountable care organisation (ACO. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program is focused on individuals meeting defined eligibility criteria who are offered care that is integrated by a case manager embedded in a primary care practice. The demonstration project showed substantial cost savings compared to fee-for-service patients served in the traditional Medicare system but no impact on hospital readmissions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program does not rest upon a “whole systems” approach to integrated care. It is an excellent example of how an innovative care co-ordination programme can be implemented in an existing health-care organisation without making fundamental changes in its underlying structure or the way in which direct patient care services are paid for. The accountable care organisation version of the Massachusetts General Care Management Program

  13. Nuclear power plant ageing management programmes in foreign countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simola, K.; Laakso, K.; Pekkonen, A.

    1992-09-01

    The report describes ageing studies of nuclear power plants and research programmes on plant life extension in foreign countries. Ageing studies are aimed to ascertain that the availability and safety of components and structures can be maintained throughout the plant lifetime. In life extension programmes the purpose is to evaluate the technical and economical possibilities to extend the plant lifetime beyond the originally planned operation period, without reducing the plant safety. The main emphasis of the report is put on the ageing and life extension programmes in the United States. Besides the U.S. studies, research on plant life extension possibilities conducted in France and Japan are also described. Examples of studies performed in other nuclear energy producing countries are given. These examples are mainly related to the development of maintenance programmes and techniques

  14. Programmable Relations for Managing Change During Software Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-15

    POSTGRES [37], in which attributes of relations can include abstract data types, although not other relations. POSTGRES [39] also includes other...that programmability of this type is missing from both POSTGRES and ALGRES. Nevertheless, programmable implementations are not mutually incompatible...December 1975. [37] L. A. Rowe and Michael R. Stonebraker. "The POSTGRES Data Model". In Proc. of the 13th VLDB Conference, pages 83-96, 1987. [38

  15. The integration of studio cycling into a worksite stress management programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Matthew M; Soyring, Jason E; Jenkins, Sarah M; Daniels, Denise C; Berkland, Bridget E; Werneburg, Brooke L; Hagen, Philip T; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco; Warren, Beth A; Olsen, Kerry D

    2014-04-01

    High stress is a prevalent problem in the worksite. To reduce stress, improve productivity, reduce absenteeism, and lower healthcare costs, many companies offer exercise classes or stress management programmes. Although physical activity is an important component of stress management, few worksites have integrated physical activity into their comprehensive stress reduction programmes. The purpose of this single-arm pilot project was to examine the potential effectiveness of an integrated exercise (studio cycling) and cognitive-behavioural stress management programme. Eighty-four adults, 75% female, mostly aged 40+ years, participated in an integrated 12-week cycling studio and cognitive-behavioural stress management programme. Participants experienced a significant and clinically meaningful reduction on the Perceived Stress Scale (p manage stress at the programme's end and at a 1-month follow-up. Participants also reported having significantly improved overall health, improved nutritional habits, higher physical activity level, greater confidence in their ability to follow a healthy diet, higher spiritual well-being, improved sleep, receiving more support for maintaining healthy living and improved quality of life at the completion of the 12-week programme and 1-month follow-up. These findings provide further support for an integrated exercise and stress management programme. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. POST GRADUATE PROGRAMME IN DIETETICS &FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT (MSCDFSM PROGRAMME of IGNOU: Access through the Lucknow Regional Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. DOROTHY

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU which was established initially as a Single mode Distance Teaching Institution (DTI in the year 1985 opened its campus to face-to-face education in the year 2008 and thus now is a Dual mode Distance Teaching Institution (DTI. The Post Graduate Programme (Master of Science in Dietetics and Food Service Management (MScDFSM Programme of IGNOU offered through the Distance Learning Mode from the year 2005 has been the boon in developing human resources involved in Nutrition and Dietetics services and also serves as a mode for continuing education among the professionals on-the-job. Accessibility to the programme is independent of the qualification earned at the Bachelor’s level as at IGNOU flexibility of the qualification is ensured for fulfilling the eligibility criteria into the MScDFSM Programme so that the diverse needs of the aspirants are accommodated at entry level itself. The Programme is unique in that it has compulsory Dissertation and Internship besides the Theory and Practical Courses. The Self-Study is enriched by the Teacher inbuilt Self-instructional Study Materials coupled with compulsory submission of the Tutor Marked Assignments (TMA which phase learning and initiate the didactic communication between the Academic Counsellor (who facilitate the Academic Transactions at the field level functionary - the Learner Support Centre and the Learner. The MSc DFSM Programme of IGNOU, as the distance learning programme offered by the School of Continuing Education (SOCE of IGNOU in the Indian Sub-Continent only. This paper discusses how the MScDFSM Programme of IGNOU is contributing to the staff development of in-service Nutritionists and Dietitians through the distance education/learning mode in Lucknow (Uttar Pradesh, North India Regional Centre. This paper also highlights the Institutions, which served as the Learner Support Centres from the year 2005 (when the programme was launched till 2011

  17. Continuous Improvement in the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering Programme at Kuwait University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldowaisan, Tariq; Allahverdi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the process employed by the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering programme at Kuwait University to continuously improve the programme. Using a continuous improvement framework, the paper demonstrates how various qualitative and quantitative analyses methods, such as hypothesis testing and control charts, have been…

  18. Programme evaluation: Can it improve human resource management practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Louw

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: This is the final article in the special edition on human resource (HR programmes and evaluation. Its starting point is that programme evaluation is the application of a wide range of social science research methods that provide credible information about the need, use, planning, effectiveness and cost of a programme. Research purpose: The purpose of this article is to review the other articles in this volume, and to draw out general conclusions about their contributions to knowledge in the field. Motivation for the study: If evaluations are undertaken in the HR domain in South Africa, they remain mostly unpublished, and thus cannot contribute to a knowledge base for the field. Research design, approach and method: This article provides a theory-based approach to programme evaluation. The seven articles were analysed in terms of two major functions of programme evaluation, namely to ask ‘How does a programme work?’, and ‘Does it work?‘ Main findings: Eight overarching themes are identified in the articles included in this volume. Practical/managerial implications: The evidence discussed here can be used to make better decisions, promote organisational learning, improve practice, and enhance employee wellbeing. Contribution/value-add: The main contribution of this concluding article is its argument that research and theory in this field can enhance the work of HR professionals, by providing evidence about how ‘good’ a programme is, and why it is good. This adds substantial value in a world characterised by accountability and evidence-based practice.

  19. Nuclear waste management programme 2003 for the Loviisa and Olkiluoto nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-09-01

    A joint company Posiva Oy founded by nuclear energy producing Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) and Fortum Power and Heat Oy coordinates the research work of the companies on nuclear waste management in Finland. In Posiva's Nuclear Waste Management Programme 2003, an account of the nuclear waste management measures of TVO and Fortum is given as required by the sections 74 and 75 of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Degree. At first, nuclear waste management situation and the programme of activities are reported. The nuclear waste management research for the year 2003 and more generally for the years 2003-2007 is presented

  20. GPS Composite Clock Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, James R.

    2008-01-01

    The GPS composite clock defines GPS time, the timescale used today in GPS operations. GPS time is illuminated by examination of its role in the complete estimation and control problem relative to UTC/TAI. The phase of each GPS clock is unobservable from GPS pseudorange measurements, and the mean phase of the GPS clock ensemble (GPS time) is unobservable. A new and useful observability definition is presented, together with new observability theorems, to demonstrate explicitly that GPS time is...

  1. ''RESURS'' - The Russian scientific-technical programme for NPP equipment lifetime monitoring, estimation, prediction and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emelyanov, V.

    1994-01-01

    RESURS programme is described implementation of which will allow to work out regulatory-methodological basis providing legal and technical solution of NPP equipment lifetime management, prediction, monitoring and estimation problems

  2. Planning and management support for NPP personnel SAT-based training programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziakova, M.

    1998-01-01

    Planning and management support for NPP personnel SAT-based training programmes is described for the following job positions: reactor operator; turbine operator; reactor maintenance worker; pump maintenance worker; chemistry foreman; health physics foreman; electric maintenance worker

  3. Precision Clock Evaluation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Tests and evaluates high-precision atomic clocks for spacecraft, ground, and mobile applications. Supports performance evaluation, environmental testing,...

  4. Effects of a group-based reproductive management extension programme on key management outcomes affecting reproductive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlie, Tom S; Morton, John M; Heuer, Cord; McDougall, Scott

    2015-02-01

    A group-based reproductive management extension programme has been designed to help managers of dairy herds improve herd reproductive performance. The aims of this study were, firstly, to assess effects of participation by key decision makers (KDMs) in a farmer action group programme in 2009 and 2010 on six key management outcomes (KMOs) that affect reproductive performance over 2 years (2009-2010 and 2010-2011), and secondly, to describe KDM intentions to change management behaviour(s) affecting each management outcome after participation in the programme. Seasonal calving dairy herds from four regions of New Zealand were enrolled in the study. Intentions to modify management behaviour were recorded using the formal written action plans developed during the extension programme. KMOs assessed were calving pattern of the herd, pre-calving heifer liveweight, pre-calving and premating body condition score (BCS), oestrus detection, anoestrus cow management and bull management. Participation was associated with improvements in heifer liveweight, more heifers calving in the first 6 weeks of the seasonal calving period, premating BCS and oestrus detection. No significant effects were observed on anoestrus cow management or bull management. KDMs with greater numbers of proposed actions had lower 6 week in-calf rates in the second study year than KDMs who proposed fewer actions. A more effective strategy to ensure more appropriate objectives is proposed. Strategies to help KDMs to implement proposed actions more successfully should be investigated to improve the programme further. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Talent Management Programmes at British, American and Canadian Universities: Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boichenko, Maryna

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with the peculiarities of talent management programmes implementation at the top British, American and Canadian universities. The essence of the main concepts of research--talent and talent management--has been revealed. Talent management is referred to as the systematic attraction, identification, development, engagement,…

  6. Preparation of the National Radioactive Waste and Spent Fuel Management Programme in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralj, M.; Zeleznik, N.; Mele, I.; Veselic, M.

    2006-01-01

    The first separate National Radioactive Waste and Spent Fuel Management Programme (National Programme) was prepared in Slovenia in 2005, as a separate part of the National Environmental Action Programme that was adopted in June 2005. In the previous National Environmental Action Programme from the year 1999, the radioactive waste and spent fuel management was mentioned only briefly in the paragraph on radiation and nuclear safety with two main objectives: to provide an effective management of radioactive waste, and to keep the environmental ionising radiation under control. The new National Programme from 2005 includes all topics being relevant for the management of the radioactive waste and spent fuel, from the legislation and identification of different waste streams in Slovenia, to the management of radioactive waste and spent fuel, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and management of (TE)NORM. It deals also with the relevant actors in the radioactive waste management, communication and information activities, and the financial aspects of the radioactive waste and spent fuel management. The National Programme was already adopted by the Slovenian Government in October 2005 and will go to Parliament proceedings. The Technical bases for the National Programme was prepared by ARAO and presented to the government in the beginning of 2005. The frames for this document were taken from relevant strategic documents: the Programme of decommissioning the nuclear power plant Krsko and the radioactive waste and spent fuel management, prepared in 2004 by Slovenian and Croatian experts (ARAO and APO), the Proposal of LILW Management Strategy (1999), the Strategy of Spent Fuel Management (1996), and the Resolution on the National Energy Programme (2004). ARAO made a detailed study on the amount and types of radioactive waste produced in Slovenia and future arising with emphasis on the minimization on radioactive waste production. It considered all producers of LILW and

  7. Managing "Spoiled Identities": Parents' Experiences of Compulsory Parenting Support Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    While recent years have seen a rapid growth of research exploring the usefulness of parenting support programmes, no empirical research to date has specifically explored experiences of compulsory parenting support. The present study examines the narrative accounts of 17 parents who, through a Parenting Order, were made to participate in such…

  8. The Fermilab D0 Master Clock System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotolo, C.; Fachin, M.; Chappa, S.; Rauch, M.; Needles, C.; Dyer, A.

    1991-11-01

    The Clock System provides bunch crossing related timing signals to various detector subsystems. Accelerator synchronization and monitoring as well as timing signal generation and distribution are discussed. The system is built using three module types implemented in Eurostandard hardware with a VME communications interface. The first two types of modules are used to facilitate synchronization with the accelerator and to generate 23 timing signals that are programmable with one RF bucket (18.8 ns) resolution and 1 ns accuracy. Fifty-four of the third module type are used to distribute the timing signals and two synchronous 53 MHz and 106 MHz clocks to various detector subsystems. 6 refs., 5 figs

  9. Implementation of accident management programmes in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    good practices and developments in Member States and is intended as reference material for NPPs, as well as an information source for other organizations such as regulatory bodies. It is a follow-up to the IAEA report on Accident Management Programmes in Nuclear Power Plants, published in 1994, and reflects the considerable progress made since that time. The objective of this report is to provide a description of the elements to be addressed by the team responsible for developing and implementing a plant specific AMP at an NPP. Although it is intended primarily for use by NPP operators, utilities and their technical support organizations, it can also facilitate preparation of the relevant national regulatory requirements. Important event sequences that may lead to severe accidents shall be identified using a combination of probabilistic methods, deterministic methods and sound engineering judgement. These event sequences shall then be reviewed against a set of criteria aimed at determining which severe accidents should be addressed in the design. Potential design or procedural changes that could either reduce the likelihood of these selected events, or mitigate their consequences, should these selected events occur, shall be evaluated, and shall be implemented if reasonably practicable. Consideration shall be given to the plant full design capabilities, including the possible use of some systems (i.e. safety and non-safety systems) beyond their originally intended function and anticipated operating conditions, and the use of additional temporary systems to return the plant to a controlled state and/or to mitigate the consequences of a severe accident, provided that it can be shown that the systems are able to function in the environmental conditions to be expected. For multiunit plants, consideration shall be given to the use of available means and/or support from other units, provided that the safe operation of the other units is not compromised. Accident management

  10. Introducing innovation in a management development programme for a UK primary care organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul; Hampson, Libby; Scott, Jonathan; Bower, Karen

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the introduction of innovation as part of a management development programme at a primary care organisation, a legal form known as a Primary Care Trust (PCT), in the UK. The paper draws on experience of managing a successful management development programme for a PCT. The report of the case study analyses the key events that took place between 2008 and 2010, from direct observation, surveys, discussion and documentary evidence. The Northern PCT has partnerships with a number of educational providers to deliver their leadership and management development programmes. A close working relationship had developed and the programme is bespoke - hence it is current and of practical use to the UK's National Health Service (NHS). In addition, there are regular meetings, with module leaders gaining a firsthand understanding of the organisation's needs and aspirations. This has resulted in a very focused and personalised offering and a genuine involvement in the programme and individuals concerned. The research was conducted among a relatively small sample, and there is a lack of previous literature evidence to make significant comparisons. The paper identifies key implications for practitioners and educators in this area. This paper is one of few to investigate innovation and improvement in the NHS, and is unique in that it uses the lenses of a management development programme to explore this important, and under-researched, topic.

  11. Egyptian "Star Clocks"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, Sarah

    Diagonal, transit, and Ramesside star clocks are tables of astronomical information occasionally found in ancient Egyptian temples, tombs, and papyri. The tables represent the motions of selected stars (decans and hour stars) throughout the Egyptian civil year. Analysis of star clocks leads to greater understanding of ancient Egyptian constellations, ritual astronomical activities, observational practices, and pharaonic chronology.

  12. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  13. Proceedings of the Specialist Meeting on Severe Accident Management Programme Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-04-15

    Effective Accident Management planning can produce both a reduction in the frequency of severe accidents at nuclear power plants as well as the ability to mitigate a severe accident. The purpose of an accident management programme is to provide to the responsible plant staff the capability to cope with the complete range of credible severe accidents. This requires that appropriate instrumentation and equipment are available within the plant to enable plant staff to diagnose the faults and to implement appropriate strategies. The programme must also provide the necessary guidance, procedures, and training to assure that appropriate corrective actions will be implemented. One of the key issues to be discussed is the transition from control room operations and the associated emergency operating procedures to a technical support team approach (and the associated severe accident management strategies). Following a proposal made by the Senior Group of Experts on Severe Accident Management (SESAM), the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations decided to sponsor a Specialist Meeting on Severe Accident Management Programme Development. The general objectives of the Specialist Meeting were to exchange experience, views, and information among the participants and to discuss the status of severe accident management programmes. The meeting brought together utilities, accident management programme developers, personnel training programme developers, regulators, and researchers. In general, the tone of the Specialist Meeting - designed to promote progress, as contrasted with conferences or symposia where the state-of-the-art is presented - was to be rather practical, and focus on accident management programme development, applications, results, difficulties and improvements. As shown by the conclusions of the meeting, there is no doubt that this objective was widely attained.

  14. Proceedings of the Specialist Meeting on Severe Accident Management Programme Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    Effective Accident Management planning can produce both a reduction in the frequency of severe accidents at nuclear power plants as well as the ability to mitigate a severe accident. The purpose of an accident management programme is to provide to the responsible plant staff the capability to cope with the complete range of credible severe accidents. This requires that appropriate instrumentation and equipment are available within the plant to enable plant staff to diagnose the faults and to implement appropriate strategies. The programme must also provide the necessary guidance, procedures, and training to assure that appropriate corrective actions will be implemented. One of the key issues to be discussed is the transition from control room operations and the associated emergency operating procedures to a technical support team approach (and the associated severe accident management strategies). Following a proposal made by the Senior Group of Experts on Severe Accident Management (SESAM), the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations decided to sponsor a Specialist Meeting on Severe Accident Management Programme Development. The general objectives of the Specialist Meeting were to exchange experience, views, and information among the participants and to discuss the status of severe accident management programmes. The meeting brought together utilities, accident management programme developers, personnel training programme developers, regulators, and researchers. In general, the tone of the Specialist Meeting - designed to promote progress, as contrasted with conferences or symposia where the state-of-the-art is presented - was to be rather practical, and focus on accident management programme development, applications, results, difficulties and improvements. As shown by the conclusions of the meeting, there is no doubt that this objective was widely attained

  15. Use of herd management programmes to improve the reproductive performance of dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, S; Heuer, C; Morton, J; Brownlie, T

    2014-05-01

    There has been a long history of herd health and production management programmes in many dairy industries around the world, but evidence for the efficacy of such programmes is limited. In response to a perceived decline in fertility of dairy cows, a herd reproductive management programme (InCalf) was introduced in New Zealand in 2007. This programme uses a management cycle approach that includes an assessment of the current herd status, identification of areas for improvement, development of a plan, implementation of this plan and finally a review process. The programme uses facilitators who work with farmers either in a one-to-one manner or in a formalised group setting that involves a series of meetings over a 12-month period (the farmer action group). The hypothesis that involvement in a reproductive management programme would improve herd reproductive performance was tested using a herd-level controlled randomised study (the National Herd Fertility Study) involving herds in four geographic regions of New Zealand over 2 years. Within each region, herds were ranked on the basis of the 6-week in-calf rate (i.e. the proportion of the herd pregnant in the first 6 weeks of the seasonal breeding programme) in the year preceding commencement of the study and then randomly assigned to be involved in a farmer action group or left as untreated controls. The key outcome variable of the study was the 6-week in-calf rate. Pregnancy diagnosis was undertaken at 12 weeks after the start of the seasonal breeding programme, which allowed determination of conception dates and hence calculation of the 6-week in-calf rate. Additional measurements including heifer live weight and body condition score (pre-calving and pre-mating) were undertaken to test whether treatment resulted in measurable changes in some of the key determinants of herd reproductive performance. Involvement in the farmer action group of InCalf resulted in a 2 percentage point increase in the 6-week in-calf rate

  16. Patient level cost of diabetes self-management education programmes: an international evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Gerardine; O'Donnell, Shane; Quigley, Etáin; Cullen, Kate; Gibney, Sarah; Levin-Zamir, Diane; Ganahl, Kristin; Müller, Gabriele; Muller, Ingrid; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Chang, Wushou Peter; Van Den Broucke, Stephan

    2017-06-04

    The objective of this study was to examine the value of time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) in understanding the process and costs of delivering diabetes self-management education (DSME) programmes in a multicountry comparative study. Outpatient settings in five European countries (Austria, Denmark, Germany, Ireland, UK) and two countries outside Europe, Taiwan and Israel. Providers of DSME programmes across participating countries (N=16) including healthcare professionals, administrators and patients taking part in DSME programmes. Primary measure: time spent by providers in the delivery of DSME and resources consumed in order to compute programme costs. Secondary measures: self-report measures of behavioural self-management and diabetes disease/health-related outcomes. We found significant variation in costs and the processes of how DSME programmes are provided across and within countries. Variations in costs were driven by a combination of price variances, mix of personnel skill and efficiency variances. Higher cost programmes were not found to have achieved better relative outcomes. The findings highlight the value of TDABC in calculating a patient level cost and potential of the methodology to identify process improvements in guiding the optimal allocation of scarce resources in diabetes care, in particular for DSME that is often underfunded. This study is the first to measure programme costs using estimates of the actual resources used to educate patients about managing their medical condition and is the first study to map such costs to self-reported behavioural and disease outcomes. The results of this study will inform clinicians, managers and policy makers seeking to enhance the delivery of DSME programmes. The findings highlight the benefits of adopting a TDABC approach to understanding the drivers of the cost of DSME programmes in a multicountry study to reveal opportunities to bend the cost curve for DSME. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  17. Application of a theoretical framework to foster a cardiac-diabetes self-management programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C-J Jo; Chang, A M

    2014-09-01

    This paper analyses and illustrates the application of Bandura's self-efficacy construct to an innovative self-management programme for patients with both type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. Using theory as a framework for any health intervention provides a solid and valid foundation for aspects of planning and delivering such an intervention; however, it is reported that many health behaviour intervention programmes are not based upon theory and are consequently limited in their applicability to different populations. The cardiac-diabetes self-management programme has been specifically developed for patients with dual conditions with the strategies for delivering the programme based upon Bandura's self-efficacy theory. This patient group is at greater risk of negative health outcomes than that with a single chronic condition and therefore requires appropriate intervention programmes with solid theoretical foundations that can address the complexity of care required. The cardiac-diabetes self-management programme has been developed incorporating theory, evidence and practical strategies. This paper provides explicit knowledge of the theoretical basis and components of a cardiac-diabetes self-management programme. Such detail enhances the ability to replicate or adopt the intervention in similar or differing populations and/or cultural contexts as it provides in-depth understanding of each element within the intervention. Knowledge of the concepts alone is not sufficient to deliver a successful health programme. Supporting patients to master skills of self-care is essential in order for patients to successfully manage two complex, chronic illnesses. Valuable information has been provided to close the theory-practice gap for more consistent health outcomes, engaging with patients for promoting holistic care within organizational and cultural contexts. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  18. MANAGEMENT & COMMUNICATION: Programme of Seminars September to December 2003

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. MANAGEMENT & COMMUNICATION Nathalie Dumeaux tel. 78144 management.communication@cern.ch Situation : 13.10.2003 Dates Days Places Available Bilingual seminars Interpersonal Communication (Module 1-CM) 21, 22, 23 October 3 non* Managing a CERN unit - to be a Manager (Module 2) 28, 29 October 2 non Quality Management 10, 11, 12 November 3 oui Managing a CERN unit - to be a Manager (Module 3) 11, 12 November 2 non Risk Management 11, 12 December 2 oui Seminars In English Communicating Effectively (first part) 12, 13 November & 4...

  19. Management & Communication - Programme of Seminars September to December 2003

    CERN Document Server

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2003-01-01

    Situation : 23.09.2003 Dates Days Available Séminaires bilingues/Bilingual seminars Managing a CERN unit - to be a Manager/ Gérer une unité au CERN - Etre Manager (Module 1) 7, 8, 9, 10 octobre 3 non Communication interpersonnelle/ Interpersonal Communication (Module 1-CM) 21, 22, 23 octobre 3 non Managing a CERN unit - to be a Manager/ Gérer une unité au CERN - Etre Manager (Module 2) 28, 29 octobre 2 non Gestion de la qualité/Quality Management 10, 11, 12 novembre 3 oui Managing a CERN unit - to be a Manager/ Gérer une unité au CERN - Etre Manager (Module 3) 11, 12 novembre 2 non Gestion des risques /Risk Management 11, 12 décembre 2 oui Seminars In English Communicating Effectively (first part) 12, 13 November 4 yes Communicating Effectively (second part) 11, 12 December Communicating effectively in your team 19, 20 November 2 no Performance Appraisal Training MAPS 26, 27, 28 November 3 yes Managing by Project 3, 4 December 3 n...

  20. Nuclear and radiation safety assurance federal target programme management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryukov, O.V.; Vasil'ev, V.A.; Nikishin, D.A.; Linge, I.I.; Obodinskij, A.N.

    2012-01-01

    The Federal Program Nuclear and Radiation Safety Assurance for 2008-2015 is presented. Specifics of Federal target program management as well as changes to program management are discussed. Data on evaluation of management effectiveness is given. Further efforts to resolve the nuclear legacy problem in Russia are also presented [ru

  1. Managing Environmental Impact Assessment for Construction and Operation in New Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This publication describes the environmental impact assessment (EIA) process, its utilization and the necessary infrastructure for such a process in order to provide a holistic approach for EIA in new nuclear power programmes. It also emphasizes the environmental aspects unique to a nuclear power programme, assuming that a State embarking on such a programme already has an environmental regulatory framework for the industrial projects in place. This publication also describes the phased implementation of the EIA programme in accordance with the phases described in IAEA Nuclear Energy Series No. NG-G-3.1. This publication is addressed to senior managers, project managers or coordinators and technical specialists of government authorities and agencies, including regulatory bodies, operating organizations and supporting industries, and other organizations involved in environmental issues

  2. Development of a self-managed loaded exercise programme for rotator cuff tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, Chris; Malliaras, Peter; Mawson, Sue; May, Stephen; Walters, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes a self-managed loaded exercise programme which has been designed to address the pain and disability associated with rotator cuff tendinopathy. The intervention has been developed with reference to current self-management theory and with reference to the emerging benefit of loaded exercise for tendinopathy. This self-managed loaded exercise programme is being evaluated within the mixed methods SELF study (ISRCTN 84709751) which includes a pragmatic randomised controlled trial conducted within the UK National Health Service. Copyright © 2012 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Public sector's research programme on spent fuel management in Finland supporting the authorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.; Rasilainen, K.

    2000-01-01

    A multiphase research program launched in 1989 to support Finnish authorities in their activities concerning spent fuel management is reviewed. The Finnish program for spent fuel management has so far managed to keep its original time schedule at least partly due to clearly defined responsibilities between the nuclear energy producing industry and the authorities. It appears that the public sector's research programme has been successful in its supporting role, because authorities have had good possibilities to adjust the emphasis and volume of the research programme from the very beginning. (author)

  4. Evaluating disease management programme effectiveness: an introduction to the regression discontinuity design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Ariel; Adams, John L; Roberts, Nancy

    2006-04-01

    Although disease management (DM) has been in existence for over a decade, there is still much uncertainty as to its effectiveness in improving health status and reducing medical cost. The main reason is that most programme evaluations typically follow weak observational study designs that are subject to bias, most notably selection bias and regression to the mean. The regression discontinuity (RD) design may be the best alternative to randomized studies for evaluating DM programme effectiveness. The most crucial element of the RD design is its use of a 'cut-off' score on a pre-test measure to determine assignment to intervention or control. A valuable feature of this technique is that the pre-test measure does not have to be the same as the outcome measure, thus maximizing the programme's ability to use research-based practice guidelines, survey instruments and other tools to identify those individuals in greatest need of the programme intervention. Similarly, the cut-off score can be based on clinical understanding of the disease process, empirically derived, or resource-based. In the RD design, programme effectiveness is determined by a change in the pre-post relationship at the cut-off point. While the RD design is uniquely suitable for DM programme evaluation, its success will depend, in large part, on fundamental changes being made in the way DM programmes identify and assign individuals to the programme intervention.

  5. Radioactive waste management: outline of the research programme of the Commission of the European Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bresesti, M.

    1980-01-01

    The lines of activity, the main achievements and the perspectives of the research programme of the Commission of the European Communities on radioactive waste management, are presented. In particular an overall view of the activity on chemical separation and nuclear transmutation of actinides is given, as introduction to the various presentations of the JRC staff on specific aspects of this waste management strategy

  6. University Lawyers: A Study of Legal Risk, Risk Management and Role in Work Integrated Learning Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Craig; Klopper, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Work integrated learning (WIL) is in growing demand by multiple stakeholders within the higher education sector in Australia. There are significant and distinct legal risks to universities associated with WIL programmes. University lawyers, along with WIL administrators and university management, are responsible for managing legal risk. This…

  7. Postgraduate Programmes on Environmental Water Resources Engineering and Management in Greek Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latinopoulos, Pericles; Angelidis, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    The management of complex water problems is nowadays being practised through new ways and approaches. Therefore, water engineers, planners and managers should be appropriately educated through modern undergraduate curricula and by well-designed postgraduate specialisation programmes. Within this framework, a study of the specific characteristics…

  8. Summary and conclusions of the specialist meeting on severe accident management programme development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The CSNI Specialist meeting on severe accident management programme development was held in Rome and about seventy experts from thirteen countries attended the meeting. A total of 27 papers were presented in four sessions, covering specific aspects of accident management programme development. It purposely focused on the programmatic aspects of accident management rather than on some of the more complex technical issues associated with accident management strategies. Some of the major observations and conclusions from the meeting are that severe accident management is the ultimate part of the defense in depth concept within the plant. It is function and success oriented, not event oriented, as the aim is to prevent or minimize consequences of severe accidents. There is no guarantee it will always be successful but experts agree that it can reduce the risks significantly. It has to be exercised and the importance of emergency drills has been underlined. The basic structure and major elements of accident management programmes appear to be similar among OECD member countries. Dealing with significant phenomenological uncertainties in establishing accident management programmes continues to be an important issue, especially in confirming the appropriateness of specific accident management strategies

  9. Developing international alumni activities in Mikkeli University of Applied Sciences : Case Business Management degree programme

    OpenAIRE

    Honkaniemi, Meri

    2014-01-01

    My thesis focuses on international alumni activities in Mikkeli University of Applied Sciences. My aim was to find development ideas and recommendations for the international side of the alumni activities. I intended to offer realistic suggestions enough in order to make them work in practice too. I put also my effort on finding recommendations for Business Management programme, because I wanted to make sure that international alumni activities get attention in degree programme level too. ...

  10. Information system fur the management of a regulatory programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, P.; Mrabit, K.; Miaw, S.

    1998-01-01

    A Regulatory Programme to monitor safety of activities involving radiation sources, implies the existence of a Regulatory Authority empowered by legislation to issue radiation protection regulations and to monitor compliance with those regulations. The core element of the programme is a system of notification and authorization (registration and licensing), inspection and enforcement. The efficiency of this system is largely dependent on the availability of reliable information on the inventory of radiation sources and installations, the administrative status of the facilities (authorization), prompt processing of inspection reports and follow up of regulatory actions, including monitoring deadlines. Essential data relevant to safety, such as personal dosimetry for occupationally exposed individuals, inspection findings and incident reports would provide, in addition, an insight on the overall safety of the country. A simple but comprehensive Regulatory Authority Information System (RAIS) linked to the authorization and inspection process will largely facilitate regulatory decisions and actions. A readily available and reliable information from the various regulatory activities will facilitate planning, optimization of resources, monitoring safety related data, disseminating safety information, making decisions and follow up regulatory actions including monitoring dead lines. The implementation of the system in more than 50 countries will contribute to experience exchange and harmonization of regulatory activities. (author)

  11. Flexible clock systems : Adjusting the temporal programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Daan R.; Riede, Sjaak J.; Heideman, Paul D.; Hau, Michaela; van der Vinne, Vincent; Hut, Roelof A.

    2017-01-01

    Under natural conditions, many aspects of the abiotic and biotic environment vary with time of day, season or even era, while these conditions are typically kept constant in laboratory settings. The timing information contained within the environment serves as critical timing cues for the internal

  12. Medical care of type 2 diabetes in German disease management programmes: a population-based evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Reneé G; Schunk, Michaela V; Meisinger, Christine; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Leidl, Reiner; Holle, Rolf

    2011-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes disease management programmes (DDMPs) are offered by German social health insurance to promote healthcare consistent with evidence-based medical guidelines. The aim of this study was to compare healthcare quality and medical endpoints between diabetes management programme participants and patients receiving usual care designated as controls. All patients with type 2 diabetes (age range: 36-81) in a cross-sectional survey of a cohort study, performed by the Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg, received a self-administered questionnaire regarding their diabetes care. Physical examination and laboratory tests were also performed. The analysis only included patients with social health insurance and whose participation status in a diabetes disease management program was validated by the primary physician (n = 166). Regression analyses, adjusting for age, sex, education, diabetes duration, baseline waist circumference and clustering regarding primary physician were conducted. Evaluation of healthcare processes showed that those in diabetes disease management programmes (n = 89) reported medical examination of eyes and feet and medical advice regarding diet [odds ratio (OR): 2.39] and physical activity (OR: 2.87) more frequently, received anti-diabetic medications (OR: 3.77) and diabetes education more often (OR: 2.66) than controls. Both groups had satisfactory HbA(1c) control but poor low-density lipoprotein cholesterol control. Blood pressure goals (management programmes (OR: 2.21). German diabetes disease management programmes are associated with improved healthcare processes and blood pressure control. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol control must be improved for all patients with diabetes. Further research will be required to assess the long-term effects of this diabetes disease management programme. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. The central role of national programme management for the achievement of malaria elimination: a cross case-study analysis of nine malaria programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith Gueye, Cara; Newby, Gretchen; Tulloch, Jim; Slutsker, Laurence; Tanner, Marcel; Gosling, Roland D

    2016-09-22

    A malaria eradication goal has been proposed, at the same time as a new global strategy and implementation framework. Countries are considering the strategies and tools that will enable progress towards malaria goals. The eliminating malaria case-study series reports were reviewed to identify successful programme management components using a cross-case study analytic approach. Nine out of ten case-study reports were included in the analysis (Bhutan, Cape Verde, Malaysia, Mauritius, Namibia, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Turkey, Turkmenistan). A conceptual framework for malaria elimination programme management was developed and data were extracted and synthesized. Findings were reviewed at a consultative workshop, which led to a revision of the framework and further data extraction and synthesis. Success factors of implementation, programme choices and changes, and enabling factors were distilled. Decentralized programmes enhanced engagement in malaria elimination by sub-national units and communities. Integration of the malaria programme into other health services was also common. Decentralization and integration were often challenging due to the skill and experience levels of newly tasked staff. Accountability for programme impact was not clarified for most programmes. Motivation of work force was a key factor in maintaining programme quality but there were few clear, detailed strategies provided. Different incentive schemes targeted various stakeholders. Training and supervision, although not well described, were prioritized by most programmes. Multi-sectoral collaboration helped some programmes share information, build strategies and interventions and achieve a higher quality of implementation. In most cases programme action was spurred by malaria outbreaks or a new elimination goal with strong leadership. Some programmes showed high capacity for flexibility through introduction of new strategies and tools. Several case-studies described methods for monitoring

  14. Future strategic directions for radioactive waste management programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    The NEA Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC) has identified six strategic areas as priorities for work in the coming years. These strategic areas, listed in this paper, are described in a NEA publication (Strategic Areas in Waste Management: the viewpoint and work orientations of the NEA RWMC

  15. Programme on radioactive waste management of the C.E.C.: orientations, motivations, organization and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    The Commission of the European Communities favours the development of nuclear energy to contribute to the solution of the energy problems. The Commission favours also the development of a complete nuclear fuel cycle including reprocessing and fast breeders. Thus the Commission is interested in the setting-up of effective solutions to problems of radioactive waste management. The Commission is operating by means of a Direct Action Programme, developed in the Joint Research Centre, and of an Indirect Action Programme, developed under contracts with national laboratories and industries. The programmes of the Commission cover all of the most important aspects of radioactive waste conditioning and disposal. The Commission is operating in strict connection with international organizations; collaboration agreements are in preparation with non-Community countries. The Plan of Action (1980 to 1992) in the Field of Radioactive Waste Management, recently approved by the Council, entrusts to the Commission a wider role in the implementation of the waste management policies

  16. Publicly administrated nuclear waste management research programme 1994-1996. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuori, S. [ed.] [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-09-01

    The main objective of the JYT-programme has been to provide the authorities with independent information and research results relevant for the safety of nuclear waste management. The main emphasis in this research programme has been devoted to the final disposal of spent fuel. The whole area of the research programme has been subdivided into following main topic areas: (1) bedrock structure and stability, rock investigation methods and characteristics and flow of ground water, (2) release of radionuclides from a repository and subsequent transport in the bedrock, (3) performance and safety assessment of repositories and other phases of nuclear waste management, (4) natural analogue studies, (5) waste management technology and costs and (6) socio political and other societal issues and environmental impact assessment.

  17. The Ottawa Panel guidelines on programmes involving therapeutic exercise for the management of hand osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Thevenot, Odette; MacKiddie, Olivia; Taki, Jade; Wells, George A; Guitard, Paulette; Léonard, Guillaume; Paquet, Nicole; Aydin, Sibel Z; Toupin-April, Karine; Cavallo, Sabrina; Moe, Rikke Helene; Shaikh, Kamran; Gifford, Wendy; Loew, Laurianne; De Angelis, Gino; Shallwani, Shirin Mehdi; Aburub, Ala' S; Mizusaki Imoto, Aline; Rahman, Prinon; Álvarez Gallardo, Inmaculada C; Cosic, Milkana Borges; Østerås, Nina; Lue, Sabrina; Hamasaki, Tokiko; Gaudreault, Nathaly; Towheed, Tanveer E; Koppikar, Sahil; Kjeken, Ingvild; Mahendira, Dharini; Kenny, Glen P; Paterson, Gail; Westby, Marie; Laferrière, Lucie; Longchamp, Guy

    2018-06-01

    To identify programmes involving therapeutic exercise that are effective for the management of hand osteoarthritis and to provide stakeholders with updated, moderate to high-quality recommendations supporting exercises for hand osteoarthritis. A systematic search and adapted selection criteria included comparable trials with exercise programmes for managing hand osteoarthritis. Based on the evaluated evidence, a panel of experts reached consensus through a Delphi approach endorsing the recommendations. A hierarchical alphabetical grading system (A, B, C+, C, C-, D-, D, D+, E, F) was based on clinical importance (≥15%) and statistical significance ( P 12 weeks) trials for physical function and pinch strength. Despite that many programmes involving exercise with positive recommendations for clinical outcomes are available to healthcare professionals and hand osteoarthritis patients that aid in the management of hand osteoarthritis, there is a need for further research to isolate the specific effect of exercise components.

  18. Publicly administrated nuclear waste management research programme 1994-1996. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.

    1997-09-01

    The main objective of the JYT-programme has been to provide the authorities with independent information and research results relevant for the safety of nuclear waste management. The main emphasis in this research programme has been devoted to the final disposal of spent fuel. The whole area of the research programme has been subdivided into following main topic areas: (1) bedrock structure and stability, rock investigation methods and characteristics and flow of ground water, (2) release of radionuclides from a repository and subsequent transport in the bedrock, (3) performance and safety assessment of repositories and other phases of nuclear waste management, (4) natural analogue studies, (5) waste management technology and costs and (6) socio political and other societal issues and environmental impact assessment

  19. Atomic and gravitational clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canuto, V.M.; City Coll., New York; Goldman, I.

    1982-01-01

    Atomic and gravitational clocks are governed by the laws of electrodynamics and gravity respectively. While the strong equivalence principle (SEP) assumes that the two clocks have been synchronous at all times, recent planetary data seem to suggest a possible violation of the SEP. Past analysis of the implications of an SEP violation on different physical phenomena revealed no disagreement. However, these studies assumed that the two different clocks can be consistently constructed within the framework. The concept of scale invariance, and the physical meaning of different systems of units, are now reviewed and the construction of two clocks that do not remain synchronous-whose rates are related by a non-constant function βsub(a)-is demonstrated. The cosmological character of βsub(a) is also discussed. (author)

  20. Clock synchronization and dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovannetti, Vittorio; Lloyd, Seth; Maccone, Lorenzo; Wong, Franco N C

    2002-01-01

    We present a method to defeat effects of dispersion of timing signals when synchronizing clocks. It is based on the recently proposed 'conveyor belt synchronization' scheme and on the quantum dispersion cancellation effect

  1. Management & Communication: Programme of Seminars September to December 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2004-01-01

    Situation : 13.07.2004 Bilingual seminars Dates Days Places Available Project Management 13, 14, 15 September 3 oui Introduction to Management 20, 21, 22 September 3 oui Managing by project 28, 29 September 2 oui Project Management Case study 8 October 1 oui Communication Techniques - 1 20, 21, 22 October 3 oui Quality Management 8, 9 November 2 oui Risk Management 6, 7 December 2 oui Seminars in English Communicating effectively 20 September, 1 october + 2, 3 November 4 yes Communicating effectively in your team 14, 15 October 2 yes Séminaires en Français Communiquer efficacement 21, 22 septembre + 12, 13 octobre 4 oui Techniques d'exposé et de présentation 27, 28 septembre + 18 octobre 3 oui Animer ou participer à une réunion de travail 15, 16, 17 novembre 3 oui * If you are interested in a seminar where there are no places available, please fill in an application form and we will contact you as soon as a new session is organised. MANAGEMENT & COMMUNICA...

  2. Evaluation of programme for energy management in buildings; Evaluering av program for energiledelse i bygg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Enova SF needed to evaluate the programmes for energy management for greater and smaller building owners. The question was: What has been the impact of the Buildings Network and the energy management programmes for greater and smaller building owners on energy conservation and economic life , and are the programmes operated efficiently? The buildings which participated in the Buildings Network in 1996 - 2002 had an average reduction of the energy consumption of about 7 per cent, which is somewhat less than the supposed potential of 10 per cent. There is some uncertainty in this calculation and the true figure is probably 1 or 2 per cent higher. Whether this energy conservation tendency has continued after Enova took over the responsibility for the programme in 2002 is too early to measure. It is very probable that the public support to the projects has triggered off the saving, that is, there has been few free riders. After 2002, Enova has made the programme more efficient and the cost per building has been halved in the period 2001 - 2003. But some of the original infrastructure of the programme has been discontinued.

  3. Contract Management Monitoring And Evaluation Of Ghana School Feeding Programme At Atwima Kwanwoma District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrews Osei Mensah

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ghana School Feeding Programme was introduced at Atwima Kwanwoma District and other parts of the country in 2008 to alleviate hunger and to provide good nutrition for pupils in the public basic schools. Caterers were given contract to provide food to the school pupils on every school-going day under Ghana school feeding programme. Some years have lapsed and there is the need to look back and evaluate this programme taking into consideration the award and management of those contracts. The study also examined how the programme is monitored and evaluated. Data was collected from 80 respondents comprising 29 school pupils and 51 other actors through the use of questionnaire and interview guide It was realised that caterers who are well experience in catering services were awarded contracts based on their past experience and financial abilities through submission of their certificates but not necessarily through bidding. The main component of managing the caterers contract included monitoring payment of debt and problems solving as well as supervision through visiting the schools on quarterly basis. The programme has helped to increase enrolment and retaining pupils in school. It was found out that food giving to the pupils was not served on time not regularly bases and was not sufficient to the pupils as well. The health component of the programme has not been successful as expected. It is recommended that fruits and variety of foods need to be introduced together with de-worming the pupils.

  4. Management of remanent lifetime. Short-term benefits of the maintenance evaluation and improvement programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainero Garcia, J.

    1993-01-01

    Remanent Lifetime Management, which is scientifically based on knowing the degradatory phenomena associated with aging, today allows us to optimize plant life through a long-term maintenance strategy combining preventive maintenance and condition monitoring programmes. Within a project for Remanent Lifetime Management (RLM), the determination of methods of control and mitigation of degradations due to aging depends on the programme of Maintenance Evaluation and Improvement (MEI). This programme, underpinned by the analysis of degradatory phenomena to which plant components are subjected, evaluates current maintenance practices and defines the complementary actions which would facilitate establishment of a long-term strategy to control aging. Together with this main objective of the RLM project, the MEI programme achieves short-term benefits since, right from the beginning, it offers solutions to mitigate and guard against degradations in crucial plant components, and generally sets out a programme to control aging. The MEI programme further serves as a tool to reach the final objectives of the new 10CFR50.65 rule, 'Requirements for Maintenance Programs for NPPs'. The MEI always offers the option should the Utility Owner decide to extend plant life. (author)

  5. Using employee assistance programmes to achieve total quality management

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Comm. As global competition among organisations intensifies, it has become increasingly important for an organisation to identify and develop a competitive advantage over its rivals. Increasingly, as service quality and customer delight has caught the attention of managers, awareness is dawning on management that they depend on employees to communicate and deliver value to customers. Therefore, although organisations declare that customer is king, reality has dictated that often the cust...

  6. Information systems for administration, clinical documentation and quality assurance in an Austrian disease management programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Peter; Truskaller, Thomas; Rakovac, Ivo; Bruner, Fritz; Zanettin, Dominik; Pieber, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    5.9% of the Austrian population is affected by diabetes mellitus. Disease Management is a structured treatment approach that is suitable for application to the diabetes mellitus area and often is supported by information technology. This article describes the information systems developed and implemented in the Austrian disease management programme for type 2 diabetes. Several workflows for administration as well as for clinical documentation have been implemented utilizing the Austrian e-Health infrastructure. De-identified clinical data is available for creating feedback reports for providers and programme evaluation.

  7. Designing and implementing a geographical information system: A guide for managers of area-wide pest management programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-04-01

    Over the past two decades, the use of computer software and mapping methods known as geographical information systems (GIS) has been adopted by an ever growing variety of professionals. Every activity that deals with location dependent information can use GIS, and agriculture is no exception. The potential of GIS and remote sensing (RS) to facilitate the planning and implementation of areawide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programmes is enormous but unfortunately, these methods are still much underused. AW-IPM programmes, especially those that integrate the sterile insect technique (SIT) with other surveillance and control methods, would benefit considerably by drawing on GIS/RS. These programmes are often implemented over large areas of even tens of thousands of square kilometres, where surveillance methods are deployed and large data sets are systematically generated on a daily basis. The acquisition of geo-referenced data sets on pest presence/absence, relative abundance, disease prevalence, crop damage, etc., that will allow accurate spatial and temporal analysis is important for proper and timely decision making to efficiently plan and implement any operational pest management programme. Animal health and plant protection officials and pest control programme managers might be intuitively aware of the importance of employing GIS as an analytical tool. However, they often lack a deeper understanding of its capabilities. Since GIS is a desk exercise using computers, data analysis is often left to the computer staff without proper directives from the programme managers on programmatic needs. This is unfortunate as it will usually NOT bring the desired GIS-processed information to the decision makers. This manual targets area-wide pest control programme administrators and managers of FAO and IAEA Member States in an attempt to demonstrate the type of data processing and spatial analysis that can be expected of GIS. The manual does not aim to provide

  8. Management & communication: Programme of Seminars October to December 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Situation : 11.10.2004 Bilingual seminar Dates Days Places available Communication Techniques - 1 20, 21, 22 October 3 oui Quality Management 8, 9 November 2 oui Risk Management 6, 7 December 2 oui Project Management - Case Study 22 November 1 oui Seminars in English Communicating effectively in your team 14, 15 October 2 yes Performance Appraisal - MAPS 24, 25, 26 November 3 yes Performance Appraisal - MAPS 8, 9, 10 December 3 yes Séminaires en Français Appréciation des performances - MAPS 1, 2, 3 d&eacut...

  9. Management & Communication: Programme of Seminars January to March 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. MANAGEMENT & COMMUNICATION Nathalie Dumeaux tel. 78144 management.communication@cern.ch Situation : 20.01.2004 DatesDaysPlaces Available** Bilingual seminars Communication Techniques-1/Techniques de communication-1 16, 17, 18 March 3 non Project Management/Gestion de projet 17, 18, 19 March 3 oui Seminars in English Communicating effectively 22, 23 January & 19, 20 February 4 yes Performance Appraisal MAPS 4, 5, 6 February 3 yes Performance Appraisal -MAPS 11, 12, 13 February 3 yes Séminaires en Français Formation à l'entreti...

  10. Best Practices in the Management of an Operating Experience Programme at Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-08-01

    The IAEA Fundamental Safety Principles (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1) state the need for operating organizations to establish a programme for the feedback and analysis of operating experience in nuclear power plants. Such a programme ensures that operating experience is analysed, events important to safety are reviewed in depth, lessons learned are disseminated to the staff of the organization and to the relevant national and international organizations and corrective actions are effectively implemented. In IAEA Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) and Peer Review of the effectiveness of the Operational Safety Performance Experience Review (PROSPER) missions, weaknesses in the management of operating experience (OE) programmes have been identified as one of the root causes of the recurrence of events. This publication has been developed to provide advice and assistance to nuclear installation managers and related institutions, including contractors and support organizations, to strengthen and enhance the management of their OE processes. In this publication, a number of barriers to the successful management of an OE programme have been identified. Managers are encouraged to review and evaluate these barriers with a view to identifying and eliminating them within their own organizations

  11. A precise clock distribution network for MRPC-based experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.; Cao, P.; Shang, L.; An, Q.

    2016-01-01

    In high energy physics experiments, the MRPC (Multi-Gap Resistive Plate Chamber) detectors are widely used recently which can provide higher-resolution measurement for particle identification. However, the application of MRPC detectors leads to a series of challenges in electronics design with large number of front-end electronic channels, especially for distributing clock precisely. To deal with these challenges, this paper presents a universal scheme of clock transmission network for MRPC-based experiments with advantages of both precise clock distribution and global command synchronization. For precise clock distributing, the clock network is designed into a tree architecture with two stages: the first one has a point-to-multipoint long range bidirectional distribution with optical channels and the second one has a fan-out structure with copper link inside readout crates. To guarantee the precision of clock frequency or phase, the r-PTP (reduced Precision Time Protocol) and the DDMTD (digital Dual Mixer Time Difference) methods are used for frequency synthesis, phase measurement and adjustment, which is implemented by FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) in real-time. In addition, to synchronize global command execution, based upon this clock distribution network, synchronous signals are coded with clock for transmission. With technique of encoding/decoding and clock data recovery, signals such as global triggers or system control commands, can be distributed to all front-end channels synchronously, which greatly simplifies the system design. The experimental results show that both the clock jitter (RMS) and the clock skew can be less than 100 ps.

  12. A Necessary Evil: The Experiences of Managers Implementing Downsizing Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, Ernesto; D'Cruz, Premilla

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a phenomenological study, which describes the experiences of human resource (HR) managers implementing a downsizing program in a steel manufacturing organization in India. Data were collected through conversational interviews. Following van Manens sententious analytic approach, the core theme of a necessary…

  13. Employee Assistance Programmes: The Emperor's New Clothes of Stress Management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Andrew R.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the employee assistance program (EAP), a benefit increasingly provided by United Kingdom employers that claims to reduce the effects of stress on individuals and organizations, provide a management tool to improve workplace performance and productivity, and respond to critical incidents. Describes EAPs, their history, development and…

  14. Evaluation of a pilot hypertension management programme for Guatemalan adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza Montano, Carlos; Fort, Meredith; deRamirez, Miriam; Cruz, Judith; Ramirez-Zea, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    Corazón Sano y Feliz is a hypertension management intervention developed to address deficiencies in the management of hypertensive patients in Guatemala. From 2007 to 2009, Corazón Sano y Feliz was pilot-tested in the community of Mixco. Corazón Sano y Feliz comprises a clinical risk assessment and treatment component implemented primarily by nurses, and a health education component implemented by community health workers. To accomplish our secondary objective of determining Corazon Sano y Feliz's potential for change at the patient level, we implemented a one-group pretest-posttest study design to examine changes in clinical measures, knowledge and practices between baseline and the end of the 6-month intervention. Two nurses and one physician set up a hypertension clinic to manage patients according to risk level. Twenty-nine community health workers were trained in CVD risk reduction and health promotion and in turn led six educational sessions for patients. Comparing baseline and 6-month measures, the intervention achieved significant improvements in mean knowledge and behaviour (increase from 54.6 to 59.1 out of a possible 70 points) and significant reductions of mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure (27.2 and 7.7 mmHg), body mass index (from 26.5 to 26.2 kg/m(2)) and waist circumference (89.6-88.9 cm). In this pilot study we obtained preliminary evidence that this community-oriented hypertension management and health promotion intervention model was feasible and achieved significant reduction in risk factors. If scaled up, this intervention has the potential to substantially reduce CVD burden. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Monitoring and Evaluation of an Early Childhood Development Programme: Implications for Leadership and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Sarah; Papatheodorou, Theodora; James, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The article aims to discuss preliminary findings from a participatory monitoring and evaluation (M&E) framework, used in a community-based early childhood development (ECD) programme in KwaZulu-Natal South Africa, and their implications for leadership and management. The purposes of the M&E were for LETCEE, the implementing organization,…

  16. Chinese Postgraduate Choices When Considering a UK Business and Management Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manns, Yihan; Swift, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    This research investigated Chinese students' decision making processes for enrolling on a postgraduate taught business and management programme in a UK university, based on structured interviews, followed by a survey of just over 450 respondents. The validity and reliability of the research instrument were assessed prior to issuing the survey.…

  17. An Innovative Supply Chain Management Programme Structure: Broadening the SCM Skill Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okongwu, Uche

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a matrix structure for training Supply Chain Management (SCM) professionals. It is an innovative programme structure that combines two approaches: cross-border and inter-organisational. It enables the students to comprehend complex and specific business environments and to understand the diverse nature of SCM systems in both…

  18. Why do managers allocate resources to workplace health promotion programmes in countries with national health coverage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Angela M; Sharp, David J

    2007-06-01

    There is extensive evidence that worksite health promotion (WHP) programmes reduce healthcare costs and improve employee productivity. In many countries, a large proportion of healthcare costs are borne by the state. While the full benefits of WHP are still created, they are shared between employers and the state, even though the employer bears the full (after-tax) cost. Employers therefore have a lower incentive to implement WHP activity. We know little about the beliefs of managers with decision responsibility for the approval and implementation of WHP programmes in this context. This article reports the results of a study of the attitudes of Canadian senior general managers (GMs) and human resource managers (HRMs) in the auto parts industry in Ontario, Canada towards the consequences of increasing discretionary spending on WHP, using Structural Equation Modelling and the Theory of Planned Behaviour. We identified factors that explain managers' intentions to increase discretionary spending on wellness programmes. While both senior GMs and HRMs are motivated primarily by their beliefs that WHP reduces indirect costs of health failure, GMs were also motivated by their moral responsibility towards employees (but surprisingly HRMs were not). Importantly, HRMs, who usually have responsibility for WHP, felt constrained by a lack of power to commit resources. Most importantly, we found no social expectation that organizations should provide WHP programmes. This has important implications in an environment where the adoption of WHP is very limited and cost containment within the healthcare system is paramount.

  19. CSIR NYENDA programme: traffic management R&D capacity building - balancing the opportunities and constraints

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Labuschagne, FJJ

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The CSIR's NyendaWeb programme is developed to provide support to the road safety and traffic management fraternity particularly to efforts aimed at stopping the carnage on South African roads and then also to achieve sustainability in transport...

  20. Atomic clocks for geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlstäubler, Tanja E.; Grosche, Gesine; Lisdat, Christian; Schmidt, Piet O.; Denker, Heiner

    2018-06-01

    We review experimental progress on optical atomic clocks and frequency transfer, and consider the prospects of using these technologies for geodetic measurements. Today, optical atomic frequency standards have reached relative frequency inaccuracies below 10‑17, opening new fields of fundamental and applied research. The dependence of atomic frequencies on the gravitational potential makes atomic clocks ideal candidates for the search for deviations in the predictions of Einstein’s general relativity, tests of modern unifying theories and the development of new gravity field sensors. In this review, we introduce the concepts of optical atomic clocks and present the status of international clock development and comparison. Besides further improvement in stability and accuracy of today’s best clocks, a large effort is put into increasing the reliability and technological readiness for applications outside of specialized laboratories with compact, portable devices. With relative frequency uncertainties of 10‑18, comparisons of optical frequency standards are foreseen to contribute together with satellite and terrestrial data to the precise determination of fundamental height reference systems in geodesy with a resolution at the cm-level. The long-term stability of atomic standards will deliver excellent long-term height references for geodetic measurements and for the modelling and understanding of our Earth.

  1. RD and D-Programme 2004. Programme for research, development and demonstration of methods for the management and disposal of nuclear waste, including social science research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-09-01

    SKB (the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co), which is owned by the companies that operate the Swedish nuclear power plants, has been assigned the task of managing and disposing of the spent nuclear fuel from the reactors. The Nuclear Activities Act requires a programme of comprehensive research and development and other measures that are needed to manage and dispose of nuclear waste in a safe manner and to decommission and dismantle the nuclear power plants. SKB is now presenting RD and D-Programme 2004 in fulfilment of this requirement. The programme describes SKB's plans for the period 2005-2010. The period of immediate concern is 2005-2007. The level of detail for the three subsequent years is naturally lower.The programme provides a basis for designing systems for safe management and disposal of the radioactive waste from the nuclear power plants. SKB's plan is to implement deep disposal of the spent fuel in accordance with the KBS-3 method. In the RD and D-Programme we describe our activities and planning for this line of action and the work that is being conducted on alternative methods. Review of the programme can contribute valuable outside viewpoints. The regulatory authorities and the Government can clarify how they look upon different parts of the programme and stipulate guidelines for the future. Municipalities and other stakeholders can, after studying the programme, offer their viewpoints to SKB, the regulatory authorities or the Government.The goal for the period up to the end of 2008 is to be able to submit permit applications for the encapsulation plant and the deep repository. This RD and D-Programme therefore differs from the preceding ones in that it concentrates on questions relating to technology development for these facilities. The programmes for safety assessment and research on the long-term processes that take place in the deep repository are then linked together with the programmes for technology development. Another new

  2. RD and D-Programme 2004. Programme for research, development and demonstration of methods for the management and disposal of nuclear waste, including social science research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-09-01

    SKB (the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co), which is owned by the companies that operate the Swedish nuclear power plants, has been assigned the task of managing and disposing of the spent nuclear fuel from the reactors. The Nuclear Activities Act requires a programme of comprehensive research and development and other measures that are needed to manage and dispose of nuclear waste in a safe manner and to decommission and dismantle the nuclear power plants. SKB is now presenting RD and D-Programme 2004 in fulfilment of this requirement. The programme describes SKB's plans for the period 2005-2010. The period of immediate concern is 2005-2007. The level of detail for the three subsequent years is naturally lower.The programme provides a basis for designing systems for safe management and disposal of the radioactive waste from the nuclear power plants. SKB's plan is to implement deep disposal of the spent fuel in accordance with the KBS-3 method. In the RD and D-Programme we describe our activities and planning for this line of action and the work that is being conducted on alternative methods. Review of the programme can contribute valuable outside viewpoints. The regulatory authorities and the Government can clarify how they look upon different parts of the programme and stipulate guidelines for the future. Municipalities and other stakeholders can, after studying the programme, offer their viewpoints to SKB, the regulatory authorities or the Government.The goal for the period up to the end of 2008 is to be able to submit permit applications for the encapsulation plant and the deep repository. This RD and D-Programme therefore differs from the preceding ones in that it concentrates on questions relating to technology development for these facilities. The programmes for safety assessment and research on the long-term processes that take place in the deep repository are then linked together with the programmes for technology development. Another

  3. RD and D-Programme 2004. Programme for research, development and demonstration of methods for the management and disposal of nuclear waste, including social science research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-09-01

    SKB (the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co), which is owned by the companies that operate the Swedish nuclear power plants, has been assigned the task of managing and disposing of the spent nuclear fuel from the reactors. The Nuclear Activities Act requires a programme of comprehensive research and development and other measures that are needed to manage and dispose of nuclear waste in a safe manner and to decommission and dismantle the nuclear power plants. SKB is now presenting RD and D-Programme 2004 in fulfilment of this requirement. The programme describes SKB's plans for the period 2005-2010. The period of immediate concern is 2005-2007. The level of detail for the three subsequent years is naturally lower.The programme provides a basis for designing systems for safe management and disposal of the radioactive waste from the nuclear power plants. SKB's plan is to implement deep disposal of the spent fuel in accordance with the KBS-3 method. In the RD and D-Programme we describe our activities and planning for this line of action and the work that is being conducted on alternative methods. Review of the programme can contribute valuable outside viewpoints. The regulatory authorities and the Government can clarify how they look upon different parts of the programme and stipulate guidelines for the future. Municipalities and other stakeholders can, after studying the programme, offer their viewpoints to SKB, the regulatory authorities or the Government.The goal for the period up to the end of 2008 is to be able to submit permit applications for the encapsulation plant and the deep repository. This RD and D-Programme therefore differs from the preceding ones in that it concentrates on questions relating to technology development for these facilities. The programmes for safety assessment and research on the long-term processes that take place in the deep repository are then linked together with the programmes for technology development. Another new

  4. Clinical experience with a chronic pain management programme in Hong Kong Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Alice K Y; Chu, M C; Chen, P P; Ma, M; Gin, Tony

    2007-10-01

    To describe experience with a chronic pain management programme in Hong Kong Chinese patients. Prospective study. Regional hospital, Hong Kong. Patients with chronic pain who participated in the first six Comprehensive Out-patient Pain Engagement programmes between 2002 and 2005. Comprehensive Out-patient Pain Engagement is a 14-day structured, multidisciplinary out-patient programme conducted over 6 weeks. It includes pain education, cognitive re-conceptualisation, training in communication skills and coping strategies, graded physical exercises and functional activities training. It aims to improve patient function and quality of life, despite persistent pain. Changes in scores from baseline values after joining the programme, with respect to several assessment tools. These included the following: visual analogue pain scale, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Patient Self-efficacy Questionnaire, Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, Medical Outcome Survey-Short Form 36 Questionnaire, and duration of physical tolerances, medication utilisation, and work status records. Forty-five patients were available for analysis. After the Comprehensive Out-patient Pain Engagement programme, improvements in Medical Outcome Survey-Short Form 36 Questionnaire (role physical and vitality), Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Patient Self-efficacy Questionnaire, and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure were demonstrated (P<0.05). The duration of standing and sitting tolerances increased (P<0.05). An improvement in employment rate was also evident (P=0.01). The initial results of our management programme in Chinese patients with chronic pain are encouraging. This type of programme should be promoted more widely in this group of patients, as it appears to improve physical function, psychological well-being, and productivity.

  5. A psycho-educational programme to facilitate principals’ management of union members’ aggression in schools

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Ph.D. (Educational Psychology) The researcher explored and described principals’ management of union members’ aggression in schools. The overarching aim was to assist principals who experience aggression from union members in the schools they head. To accomplish this, the researcher developed, implemented and evaluated a psycho-educational programme to manage union members’ aggression through the facilitation of their mental health. Union members’ aggressive behaviour and attitudes have be...

  6. Technical, environmental and regulatory aspects of waste management and their reflection in the IAEA programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, D.K.

    1982-01-01

    Within the IAEA training course on waste management this paper is intended to overview technological, radiological, encironmental, regulatory and institutional aspects of importance in establishing a waste management policy for nuclear power programmes; the objectives and results of IAEA activities in this field; and some current issues from a national and international perspective with special consideration on the needs of countries embarking on nuclear power. (orig./RW)

  7. Workforce planning and knowledge management for new nuclear programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molloj, B.; Mazur, T.; ); Kosilov, A.; Pastori, Z.; )

    2010-01-01

    The authors discusses the report Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power produced by the IAEA to provide guidance on the use of integrated workforce planning as a tool to effectively develop these resources. The report describes three distinct phases in the development of a national infrastructure. It shows how to elaborate a workforce plan for implementing a national nuclear power program. The authors emphasize that the nuclear power field, comprising industry, government authorities, regulators, R and D organizations and educational institutions, relies for its continued success on a specialized, highly trained and motivated workforce. The role of knowledge management in nuclear power is underlined [ru

  8. Staff Retention. Personnel Management Module. Operational Management Programme. Increasing Opportunities for Supervisors and Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jennifer

    This self-instructional unit for supervisors and managers in the British hotel and catering industry is based on the view that problems in staff recruitment and retention are directly linked to the level of job satisfaction. The document begins with an introduction and advice on how to use the unit. Five sections cover the following topics: (1)…

  9. Public relations and political support in area-wide integrated pest management programmes that integrate the sterile insect technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, V.A.; Regidor Fernandez, E.E.; Reyes Flores, J.; Teruya, T.; Barnes, B.; Gomez Riera, P.; Lindquist, D.; Reuben, R.

    2005-01-01

    The public relations component of area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programmes that integrate the sterile insect technique (SIT) has a large impact on programme success. Full-time professionals should direct public relations activities and secure vital political support from governments and community organizations. Good communication among programme staff, and between programme staff and the public, is required to maintain participation and support, and to keep the work goal-oriented even when some programme activities are controversial. The media can be valuable and effective partners by informing the public about the real facts and activities of a programme, especially if this is done in a non-technical and straightforward way. Ongoing research support improves the programme technology, provides technical credibility on contentious issues, and solves operational problems. Programme failure can result from poor public relations and inadequate public support. (author)

  10. Using intervention mapping (IM) to develop a self-management programme for employees with a chronic disease in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detaille, S.I.; van der Gulden, J.W.J.; Engels, J.A.; Heerkens, Y.F.; van Dijk, F.J.H.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Employees with a chronic disease often encounter problems at work because of their chronic disease. The current paper describes the development of a self-management programme based on the Chronic Disease Self-Management Programme (CDSMP) of Stanford University to help employees

  11. Using intervention mapping (IM) to develop a self-management programme for employees with a chronic disease in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detaille, S.I.; Gulden, J.W.J. van der; Engels, J.A.; Heerkens, Y.H.; Dijk, F.J. van

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Employees with a chronic disease often encounter problems at work because of their chronic disease. The current paper describes the development of a self-management programme based on the Chronic Disease Self-Management programme (CDSMP) of Stanford University to help employees with a

  12. Using intervention mapping (IM) to develop a self-management programme for employees with a chronic disease in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detaille, Sarah I.; van der Gulden, Joost W. J.; Engels, Josephine A.; Heerkens, Yvonne F.; van Dijk, Frank J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Employees with a chronic disease often encounter problems at work because of their chronic disease. The current paper describes the development of a self-management programme based on the Chronic Disease Self-Management programme (CDSMP) of Stanford University to help employees with a chronic

  13. Decommissioning Programme Management: reducing risk and cost while accelerating schedules through improved planning, Earned Value Management and safe work execution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, S.E.

    2008-01-01

    CH2M HILL experience includes more than two decades of managing nuclear facilities and providing clean-up and operations support for commercial and government facilities worldwide. Our expertise ranges from decommissioning and defence sector businesses to nuclear technology development and innovation. Our approach places top priority on the safe execution of work while reducing both risk and cost. Our nuclear services include: programme management, nuclear safety analysis, radiological protection, radioactive waste management, nuclear remediation, nuclear materials and waste transportation management, nuclear safeguards and security services, and nuclear decontamination and decommissioning. This paper will discuss our approach which has resulted in a strong track record of accelerating schedules and reducing costs of major nuclear programmes, including Rocky Flats, Idaho, and our work at UKAEA sites. (author)

  14. THE INFLUENCE OF ORGANISATIONAL CULTURE ON THE TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roldán, José L.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to examine the relationships between different types of cultures and effectiveness in Total Quality Management (TQM implementation. Using Cameron’s framework, we have tested the connection between a quality culture taxonomy and TQM programme performance using data from a survey carried out with 113 Spanish companies that have implemented TQM systems. A structural equation modelling is proposed to assess the links between both types of constructs using the Partial Least Squares (PLS technique. The most substantial results confirm, in the sample analysed, the relationship between quality culture types and the TQM programme performance, and there being different influence levels of the quality cultures.

  15. Establishing an independent mobile health programme for chronic disease self-management support in Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Piette

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mobile health (m-health work in low and middle-income countries (LMICs mainly consists of pilot programmes with an unclear path to scaling and dissemination. We describe the deployment and testing of an m-health platform for non-communicable disease (NCD self-management support in Bolivia. Methods: 364 primary care patients in La Paz with diabetes or hypertension completed surveys about their use of mobile phones, health and access to care. 165 of those patients then participated in a 12-week demonstration of automated telephone monitoring and self-management support. Weekly Interactive Voice Response (IVR calls were made from a platform established at a university in La Paz, under the direction of the regional health ministry. Results: 37% of survey respondents spoke indigenous languages at home, and 38% had six or fewer years of education. 82% had a mobile phone; half (45% used text messaging with a standard phone, and 9% had a smartphone. Smartphones were least common among patients who were older, spoke indigenous languages, or had less education. IVR programme participants completed 1007 self-management support calls, with an overall response rate of 51%. IVR call completion was lower among older adults, but was not related to patients’ ethnicity, health status or healthcare access. IVR health and self-care reports were consistent with information reported during baseline interviews. Patients’ likelihood of reporting excellent, very good, or good health (versus fair or poor health via IVR increased during programme participation, and was associated with better medication adherence. Patients completing follow-up interviews were satisfied with the programme, with 19/20 (95% reporting that they would recommend it to a friend. Conclusions: By collaborating with LMICs, m-health programmes can be transferred from higher-resource centres to LMICs and implemented in ways that improve access to self-management support among people

  16. Training Programmes in Sustainable Forest Management in Austria, Croatia and Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvija Krajter Ostoić

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: During the Erasmus+ project “Cooperation for Innovative Approach in Sustainable Forest Management Training (CIA2SFM” a study of the existing vocational education and training (VET and lifelong learning (LLL programmes in the field of sustainable forest management (SFM was conducted in Austria, Croatia and Slovenia. The aim of this paper is to get an overview of and analyse SFM-related VET and LLL programmes in the study area, with an emphasis on the identification of good practice examples and providing recommendations for improvement. Materials and Methods: A combined approach of literature review, Internet search and consultations with training providers was applied in order to collect data on training programmes conducted in the period 2006-2015 in Austria, Croatia and Slovenia. The programmes were analysed based on topics, types of methods used, existence of specified learning outcomes, programme evaluation by participants and how the programme was advertised. The analysis employed basic descriptive statistics. Topics were grouped into broader themes. Only training programmes targeting private forest owners, forestry professionals, and forestry entrepreneurs were analysed. Three examples of good practice in each country were selected based on collaboratively developed criteria. Results: In Austria, Croatia and Slovenia numerous training courses related to SFM were conducted in the analysed period, predominantly addressing target groups in forestry sector and covering a variety of topics. The relative importance of themes varied among countries. In order to facilitate the knowledge uptake by participants various methods were applied. Although indoor ex-cathedra approaches prevailed, it could be recognized that there is a growth in interest for foster demonstrations in the field, organizing field trips, emphasize on practical work and combining methods and approaches in most countries. Conclusions: Even if national

  17. Designing financial-incentive programmes for return of medical service in underserved areas: seven management functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bärnighausen Till

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In many countries worldwide, health worker shortages are one of the main constraints in achieving population health goals. Financial-incentive programmes for return of service, whereby participants receive payments in return for a commitment to practise for a period of time in a medically underserved area, can alleviate local and regional health worker shortages through a number of mechanisms. First, they can redirect the flow of those health workers who would have been educated without financial incentives from well-served to underserved areas. Second, they can add health workers to the pool of workers who would have been educated without financial incentives and place them in underserved areas. Third, financial-incentive programmes may improve the retention in underserved areas of those health workers who participate in a programme, but who would have worked in an underserved area without any financial incentives. Fourth, the programmes may increase the retention of all health workers in underserved areas by reducing the strength of some of the reasons why health workers leave such areas, including social isolation, lack of contact with colleagues, lack of support from medical specialists and heavy workload. We draw on studies of financial-incentive programmes and other initiatives with similar objectives to discuss seven management functions that are essential for the long-term success of financial-incentive programmes: financing (programmes may benefit from innovative donor financing schemes, such as endowment funds, international financing facilities or compensation payments; promotion (programmes should use tested communication channels in order to reach secondary school graduates and health workers; selection (programmes may use selection criteria to ensure programme success and to achieve supplementary policy goals; placement (programmes should match participants to areas in order to maximize participant satisfaction and

  18. Designing financial-incentive programmes for return of medical service in underserved areas: seven management functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bärnighausen, Till; Bloom, David E

    2009-06-26

    In many countries worldwide, health worker shortages are one of the main constraints in achieving population health goals. Financial-incentive programmes for return of service, whereby participants receive payments in return for a commitment to practise for a period of time in a medically underserved area, can alleviate local and regional health worker shortages through a number of mechanisms. First, they can redirect the flow of those health workers who would have been educated without financial incentives from well-served to underserved areas. Second, they can add health workers to the pool of workers who would have been educated without financial incentives and place them in underserved areas. Third, financial-incentive programmes may improve the retention in underserved areas of those health workers who participate in a programme, but who would have worked in an underserved area without any financial incentives. Fourth, the programmes may increase the retention of all health workers in underserved areas by reducing the strength of some of the reasons why health workers leave such areas, including social isolation, lack of contact with colleagues, lack of support from medical specialists and heavy workload. We draw on studies of financial-incentive programmes and other initiatives with similar objectives to discuss seven management functions that are essential for the long-term success of financial-incentive programmes: financing (programmes may benefit from innovative donor financing schemes, such as endowment funds, international financing facilities or compensation payments); promotion (programmes should use tested communication channels in order to reach secondary school graduates and health workers); selection (programmes may use selection criteria to ensure programme success and to achieve supplementary policy goals); placement (programmes should match participants to areas in order to maximize participant satisfaction and retention); support (programmes

  19. Views of commissioners, managers and healthcare professionals on the NHS Health Check programme: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Katie; Harte, Emma; Martin, Adam; MacLure, Calum; Griffin, Simon J; Mant, Jonathan; Meads, Catherine; Saunders, Catherine L; Walter, Fiona M; Usher-Smith, Juliet A

    2017-11-15

    To synthesise data concerning the views of commissioners, managers and healthcare professionals towards the National Health Service (NHS) Health Check programme in general and the challenges faced when implementing it in practice. A systematic review of surveys and interview studies with a descriptive analysis of quantitative data and thematic synthesis of qualitative data. An electronic literature search of MEDLINE, Embase, Health Management Information Consortium, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Global Health, PsycInfo, Web of Science, OpenGrey, the Cochrane Library, NHS Evidence, Google Scholar, Google, ClinicalTrials.gov and the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number registry from 1 January 1996 to 9 November 2016 with no language restriction and manual screening of reference lists of all included papers. Primary research reporting views of commissioners, managers or healthcare professionals on the NHS Health Check programme and its implementation in practice. Of 18 524 citations, 15 articles met the inclusion criteria. There was evidence from both quantitative and qualitative studies that some commissioners and general practice (GP) healthcare professionals were enthusiastic about the programme, whereas others raised concerns around inequality of uptake, the evidence base and cost-effectiveness. In contrast, those working in pharmacies were all positive about programme benefits, citing opportunities for their business and staff. The main challenges to implementation were: difficulties with information technology and computer software, resistance to the programme from some GPs, the impact on workload and staffing, funding and training needs. Inadequate privacy was also a challenge in pharmacy and community settings, along with difficulty recruiting people eligible for Health Checks and poor public access to some venues. The success of the NHS Health Check Programme relies on engagement by those responsible for its

  20. Self-management programmes for people living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a call for a reconceptualisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsdottir, Helga

    2013-03-01

    To synthesise findings from previously published studies on the effectiveness of self-management programmes for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Self-management is a widely valued concept to address contemporary issues of chronic health problems. Yet, findings of self-management programmes for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are indecisive. Literature review of (1) previously published systematic reviews and (2) an integrative literature review. Synthesis of findings from previously published systematic reviews (n = 4) of the effectiveness of self-management programmes for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and an integrated review that was performed on papers published between January 2007-June 2012 (n = 9). Findings demonstrate that there are few studies on the effectiveness of self-management programmes on people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease despite more than a decade of research activities. Outcomes of the studies reveal some increase in health-related quality of life and reduction in use of healthcare resources. The methodological approaches vary, and the sample size is primarily small. Families are not acknowledged. Features of patient-centredness exist in self-management programmes, particularly in the more recent articles. The effectiveness of self-management programmes for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remains indecisive. A reconceptualisation of self-management programmes is called for with attention to a family-centred, holistic and relational care focusing on living with and minimising the handicapping consequences of the health problems in their entirety. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Patients' experiences of a multidisciplinary team-led community case management programme: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowing, Alice; Dickinson, Claire; Gorman, Tom; Robinson, Louise; Duncan, Rachel

    2016-09-09

    To explore the views and experiences of patients on the care they have received while enrolled on the Northumberland High Risk Patient Programme (NHRPP). This programme involved case finding of frail patients using a multidisciplinary team (MDT)-led community case management programme, and support of patients through care planning and regular reviews using primary, community, secondary and social care professionals. A qualitative study using semistructured interviews, which were digitally recorded, transcribed and subject to thematic analysis. Community patients receiving primary care in the county of Northumberland, England. 23 participants took part, of which 16 were patients enrolled on the NHRPP, and 7 carers. GP practices were selected purposively by size, deprivation and location, and patients identified and invited by General Practitioners to participate. 4 main themes emerged from the data: awareness and understanding of the NHRPP, confidence in the primary healthcare team, limitations of home care and the active role of being a patient. Despite having a low level of awareness of the details of the NHRPP, participants did think that its broad aim made sense. Participants discussed their high level of satisfaction with their care and access to team members. However, some limitations of alternatives to hospital care were identified, including the need to consider psychological as well as medical needs, the importance of overnight care and the needs of those without informal carers. Finally, participants discussed the active nature of being a patient under the NHRPP if they were to contribute fully to planning and managing their own care. This study has identified that a programme of MDT-led case management was generally very well received by patients and their families. However, a number of factors were identified that could improve the implementation of the programme and further research needs to be undertaken to address these. Published by the BMJ

  2. [Evaluation of disease management programmes--assessing methods and initial outcomes from a health economic perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Dana Sophie; Braun, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation represents a substantial component of the concept of Disease Management Programmes. This and the fact that the implementation of Disease Management Programmes constitutes a major change in the German healthcare system require that the criteria established by the German Federal Social Insurance Authority (Bundesversicherungsamt) be carefully reviewed. The present paper focuses on the evaluation method and the economic data. The pre-/-post study design used in the evaluation is known to be vulnerable to threats to internal validity. The objective of this paper is to analyze whether these threats to internal validity which have been known theoretically are confirmed by the results of the final reports. A review of the final reports of health insurance companies like the AOK, Barmer and a group of the BKK in Westfalen-Lippe shows that this question can be answered in the affirmative. The pre-/-post design without control groups is unable to recognize the failure or success of the Disease Management concept. The reasons include a high drop-out rate as well as the lack of consideration of the characteristics of chronic disease. Hence the evaluation method has failed to prove the quality of Disease Management Programmes in Germany. This is why consistent further development is needed.

  3. Financial incentives for disease management programmes and integrated care in German social health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greb, Stefan; Focke, Axel; Hessel, Franz; Wasem, Jürgen

    2006-10-01

    As a result of recent health care reforms sickness funds and health care providers in German social health insurance face increased financial incentives for implementing disease management and integrated care. Sickness funds receive higher payments form the risk adjustment system if they set up certified disease management programmes and induce patients to enrol. If health care providers establish integrated care projects they are able to receive extra-budgetary funding. As a consequence, the number of certified disease management programmes and the number of integrated care contracts is increasing rapidly. However, contracts about disease management programmes between sickness funds and health care providers are highly standardized. The overall share of health care expenses spent on integrated care still is very low. Existing integrated care is mostly initiated by hospitals, is based on only one indication and is not fully integrated. However, opportunity to invest in integrated care may open up innovative processes, which generate considerable productivity gains. What is more, integrated care may serve as gateway for the introduction of more widespread selective contracting.

  4. Pain management: evaluating the effectiveness of an educational programme for surgical nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pi-Chu; Chiang, Hsiao-Wen; Chiang, Ting-Ting; Chen, Chyang-Shiong

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a pain management education programme in improving the nurses' knowledge about, attitude towards and application of relaxation therapy. Pain of surgical patients has long been an existing problem of health care. Nursing staff need to be educated continuously to develop the professional ability of pain management. A quasi-study design with pre- and posttest and post- and posttest was used. Subjects were chosen from a medical centre in Taipei by convenience sampling. The total sample size of 81 was segregated into a study group of 42 and control group of 39 participants. The study group attended a seven-session pain management programme totalling 15 hours. The control group received no pain management training. Scaled measurements were taken on pain management knowledge and attitude and relaxation therapy practice. (1) Scores for pain management knowledge differed significantly between the two groups (F = 40.636, p = 0.001). (2) Attitudes towards pain management differed between the two groups (F = 8.328, p = 0.005) and remained stable over time (F = 1.603, p = 0.205). (3) Relaxation therapy practice differed significantly between the two groups, with the study group better than the control group (F = 4.006, p = 0.049). (4) Relaxation therapy was applied to nearly all (97.5%) of the patients cared for by study group nurses. All of the instructed patients performed this technique one to three times per day postsurgery. Continuing education can improve nurses' knowledge about, attitude towards and behaviour of pain management. Results of this study could be used to guide the development and implementation of continuing education programmes for nursing staff to enhance patients' care knowledge and skills.

  5. Implementation and evaluation of a clinical data management programme in a primary care centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweeney, J

    2014-11-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) support clinical management, administration, quality assurance, research, and service planning. The aim of this study was to evaluate a clinical data management programme to improve consistency, completeness and accuracy of EHR information in a large primary care centre with 10 General Practitioners (GPs). A Clinical Data Manager was appointed to implement a Data Management Strategy which involved coding consultations using ICPC-2 coding, tailored support and ongoing individualised feedback to clinicians. Over an eighteen month period there were improvements in engagement with and level of coding. Prior to implementation (August 2011) 4 of the 10 GPs engaged in regular coding and 69% of their consultation notes were coded. After 12 months, all 10 GPs and 6 nurses were ICPC-2 coding their consultations and monthly coding levels had increased to 98%. This structured Data Management Strategy provides a feasible sustainable way to improve information management in primary care.

  6. The Community's R and D Programme on radioactive waste management and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the R and D actions to be achieved by 1980 is the demonstration of either the technical potential or, for further advanced projects, the feasibility and even the industrial availability of methods for treating and storing radwaste. The following aspects are investigated: - processing of solid waste from reactors, reprocessing plants and the plutonium fuel fabrication; - intermediate and terminal storage of high activity and alpha wastes; - advanced waste management methods as the storage of gaseous wastes. This report presents the most important results achieved under the programme. In addition to the scientific-technical R and D actions, a survey of the legal, administrative and financial problems encountered in radwaste management and storage is an essential part of the Communities' programme

  7. The Community's research and development programme on radioactive waste management and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlowski, S.; Gandolfo, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    This is the first annual progress report of the European Community's 1985-89 programme of research on radioactive waste management and disposal, carried out by public organizations and private firms in the Community under cost-sharing contracts with the Commission of the European Communities. The 1985-89 programme is aiming at perfecting and demonstrating a system for managing the radioactive waste produced by the nuclear industry, ensuring at the various stages the best possible protection of man and the environment. This first report describes the work to be carried out under the research contracts already concluded before end of 1986 as well as the initial work performed and the first results obtained. For each contract, paragraph C ''Progress of work and obtained results'' was prepared by the contractor under the responsibility of the project leader

  8. Radiological impact of the management of radioactive waste arising from the Argentine Nuclear Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migliori de Beninson, A.; Cancio, D.

    1984-01-01

    The Argentine nuclear programme, as it stands at present, provides for the construction of four nuclear power plants in addition to those of Atucha I and Embalse and for the establishment of such fuel cycle facilities as are required to supply all of these plants. This paper evaluates the radiological impact (collective dose commitment) expected from the management of the radioactive wastes arising in the facilities mentioned above throughout the useful life of the reactors. The maximum individual doses to be expected as a result of the planned high-level-waste repository are also estimated. The evaluations presented are partly specific to the sites under consideration, but they also include estimates of the total collective dose commitments resulting from the management of radioactive waste under the Argentine nuclear programme. (author)

  9. Spanish recruitment programmes for Latin Americans in countries of origin: a flexible management framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mª López-Sala

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, countries whose markets needed seasonal labour have sought new ways of importing foreign workers through channelling and recruitment programmes in countries of origin. This article seeks to demonstrate that, in the case of Spain, the effective development of this process has only been possible because of a flexible and dynamic system in which bilateral agreements have played a major role, among them those signed with some Latin American countries. Flexible management of these programmes has been implemented via legislation, via the institutions and actors involved, and via the immigrants themselves, who have managed (or been forced to adapt to the changes of a labour market conditioned by the globalisation of labour and capital.

  10. Management of the camera electronics programme for the World Space Observatory ultraviolet WUVS instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Gayatri; Clapp, Matthew; Salter, Mike; Waltham, Nick; Beardsley, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    World Space Observatory Ultraviolet (WSO-UV) is a major international collaboration led by Russia and will study the universe at ultraviolet wavelengths between 115 nm and 320 nm. The WSO Ultraviolet Spectrograph (WUVS) subsystem is led by a consortium of Russian institutes and consists of three spectrographs. RAL Space is contracted by e2v technologies Ltd to provide the CCD readout electronics for each of the three WUVS channels. The programme involves the design, manufacturing, assembly and testing of each Camera Electronics Box (CEB), its associated Interconnection Module (ICM), Electrical Ground Support Equipment (EGSE) and harness. An overview of the programme will be presented, from the initial design phase culminating in the development of an Engineering Model (EM) through qualification whereby an Engineering Qualification Model (EQM) will undergo environmental testing to characterize the performance of the CEB against the space environment, to the delivery of the Flight Models (FMs). The paper will discuss the challenges faced managing a large, dynamic project. This includes managing significant changes in fundamental requirements mid-programme as a result of external political issues which forced a complete re-design of an existing CEB with extensive space heritage but containing many ITAR controlled electronic components to a new, more efficient solution, free of ITAR controlled parts. The methodology and processes used to ensure the demanding schedule is maintained through each stage of the project will be presented including an insight into planning, decision-making, communication, risk management, and resource management; all essential to the continued success of the programme.

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF ORGANISATIONAL CULTURE ON THE TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME PERFORMANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Roldán, José L.; Leal-Rodríguez, Antonio L.; Leal, Antonio G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to examine the relationships between different types of cultures and effectiveness in Total Quality Management (TQM) implementation. Using Cameron’s framework, we have tested the connection between a quality culture taxonomy and TQM programme performance using data from a survey carried out with 113 Spanish companies that have implemented TQM systems. A structural equation modelling is proposed to assess the links between both types of constructs using the Partial Least Square...

  12. Eu-funded nuclear research on plant life management in the 4. and 5. framework programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaitre, P.; Van Goethem, G.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper an overview will be given of the European Union EURATOM research in the field of plant life management and ageing of structural components. The results obtained so far in the projects executed under the 5. framework programme (FP-5/1999-2002) will be presented and discussed in detail. The objectives of the 5. framework programme, which is end-user driven, are: 1) to develop a common basis for the continued safe operation and prolonging the safe operational life-spans of existing nuclear installations; 2) to develop better methods for their inspection, maintenance and management (both in terms of performance and occupational exposure). The following three sections were proposed under this heading of the work programme: Integrity of equipment and structures, on-line monitoring, inspection and maintenance, and organisation and management of safety. Besides the traditional technological challenges, socio-economic concerns are also taken on board, such as public acceptance and cost of the nuclear option as well as plant simplification and man-technology-organisation interaction. An additional challenge for the EU consists of the enlargements process towards Central and Eastern European Countries in the coming years. Therefore FP5 pays attention also to plant safety assessments of VVER reactors and to the spreading of the new safety culture in these candidate countries in co-operation with similar activities run at the Commission especially under the programmes of Tacis/Phare and of the Joint Research Centre (JRC). In the area of plant life management so far 18 projects have been selected for funding by the European Commission. Most of them are costs shared actions, which means that the European Commission on the one hand and the project partners on the other hand provide each 50 % of the necessary funding. The total contract value of the selected projects is about 18 million euros. (authors)

  13. Planning and management support for NPP personnel SAT-based training programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziakova, M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper deals with planning and management support for NPP personnel SAT based training programmes based on IAEA TC Project SLR/0/003 on upgrading NPP personnel training, with the aim of upgrading NPP safety and reliability of NPP operation and maintenance. The costs needed include both Slovak and IAEA sources. Five stages of the Project are defined: planning; organizing; motivating; implementation; control, review and accountability

  14. Eu-funded nuclear research on plant life management in the 4. and 5. framework programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaitre, P.; Van Goethem, G. [European Commission, Dir. General Research, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2001-07-01

    In this paper an overview will be given of the European Union EURATOM research in the field of plant life management and ageing of structural components. The results obtained so far in the projects executed under the 5. framework programme (FP-5/1999-2002) will be presented and discussed in detail. The objectives of the 5. framework programme, which is end-user driven, are: 1) to develop a common basis for the continued safe operation and prolonging the safe operational life-spans of existing nuclear installations; 2) to develop better methods for their inspection, maintenance and management (both in terms of performance and occupational exposure). The following three sections were proposed under this heading of the work programme: Integrity of equipment and structures, on-line monitoring, inspection and maintenance, and organisation and management of safety. Besides the traditional technological challenges, socio-economic concerns are also taken on board, such as public acceptance and cost of the nuclear option as well as plant simplification and man-technology-organisation interaction. An additional challenge for the EU consists of the enlargements process towards Central and Eastern European Countries in the coming years. Therefore FP5 pays attention also to plant safety assessments of VVER reactors and to the spreading of the new safety culture in these candidate countries in co-operation with similar activities run at the Commission especially under the programmes of Tacis/Phare and of the Joint Research Centre (JRC). In the area of plant life management so far 18 projects have been selected for funding by the European Commission. Most of them are costs shared actions, which means that the European Commission on the one hand and the project partners on the other hand provide each 50 % of the necessary funding. The total contract value of the selected projects is about 18 million euros. (authors)

  15. Spent fuel management: current status and prospects of the IAEA programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    This report, which is a result of the second IAEA Advisory Group Meeting, is intended to provide the reader with an overview of the status of Spent Fuel Management Programmes in a number of leading countries, with a description of the past IAEA activities in this field of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and with the Agency's plans for the next 2-3 years, based on the proposals of Member States. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the 16 papers in this report

  16. The application of modern project management principles and processes in major nuclear decommissioning programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayliss, C. R.

    2003-01-01

    The UKAEA has embarked upon an accelerated programme of decommissioning works. This has resulted in a review of its project management systems and processes. This paper describes these processes and their application to nuclear decommissioning and associated new build construction projects. Efficiencies from these processes are necessary. In addition this paper describes how UKAEA, where appropriate, utilizes modern forms of alliance contract so as to work in partnership with its contractors. (author)

  17. Development of a balance, safe mobility and falls management programme for people with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Hilary; Endacott, Ruth; Haas, Bernhard; Marsden, Jonathan; Freeman, Jennifer

    2017-08-07

    To utilise stakeholder input to inform the structure, format and approach of a multiple sclerosis (MS) balance, safe mobility and falls management programme. Using a three-round nominal group technique, participants individually rated their agreement with 20 trigger statements, followed by a facilitated group discussion and re-rating. Three mixed groups included service users (n = 15) and providers (n = 19). Quantitative analysis determined agreement, whilst qualitative responses were analysed thematically. Median scores for each of the 20 trigger statements did not change significantly over sequential rounds, however, deviations around the medians indicated more agreement amongst participants over time. Key recommendations were: Aims and approach: The programme should be tailored to the needs of people with MS. Falls and participation-based outcomes are equally important. Structure and format: The programme should balance expected burden and anticipated benefit, moving away from models requiring weekly attendance and promoting and supporting self-efficacy. Optimising engagement: Support to maintain engagement and intensity of practice over the long term is essential. Sustainability: Adequate funding is necessary. Staff should have MS specific knowledge and experience. Participants collaboratively identified critical components of a MS balance, safe mobility and falls management programme. They also highlighted the importance of a collaborative, user-centred, MS-specific approach. Implications for Rehabilitation People with multiple sclerosis need condition-specific interventions focussed on maximising balance and safe mobility and reducing falls. Programme design should support self-efficacy and flexible engagement. Adequate support and funding are seen as essential by both service users and providers.

  18. Practical implementation of optimal management strategies in conservation programmes: a mate selection method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández, J.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The maintenance of genetic diversity is, from a genetic point of view, a key objective of conservation programmes. The selection of individuals contributing offspring and the decision of the mating scheme are the steps on which managers can control genetic diversity, specially on ‘ex situ’ programmes. Previous studies have shown that the optimal management strategy is to look for the parents’ contributions that yield minimum group coancestry (overall probability of identity by descent in the population and, then, to arrange mating couples following minimum pairwise coancestry. However, physiological constraints make it necessary to account for mating restrictions when deciding the contributions and, therefore, these should be implemented in a single step along with the mating plan. In the present paper, a single-step method is proposed to optimise the management of a conservation programme when restrictions on the mating scheme exist. The performance of the method is tested by computer simulation. The strategy turns out to be as efficient as the two-step method, regarding both the genetic diversity preserved and the fitness of the population.

  19. The Communities R and D Programme: radioactive waste management and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The European Community's programme is the first and to this date the only joint international action dealing with those issues, which might well become decisive for the future of nuclear energy -the management and storage of radioactive waste. The first Annual Progress Report describes the scope and the state of advancement of this indirect action programme. At present 24 research contracts with research institutes in almost every member country of the EC are either signed or in the final stages of negociation. The objective of the R and D actions to be achieved by 1980 is the demonstration of either the technical potential or, for further advanced projects, the feasibility and even the industrial availability of methods for treating and stoping radwaste. The following aspects are investigated: processing of solid waste from reactors, reprocessing plants and the plutonium manufacture; intermediate and terminal storage of high activity and alpha wastes; advanced waste management methods as the storage of gaseous waste and the separation and transmutation of actinides. In addition to the scientific-technical R and D actions, a survey of the legal, administrative and financial problems encountered in radwaste management and storage is an essential part of the Communities' programme

  20. Technology transfer on long-term radioactive waste management - a feasible option for small nuclear programmes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mele, I.; Mathieson, J.

    2007-01-01

    The EU project CATT - Co-operation and technology transfer on long-term radioactive waste management for Member States with small nuclear programmes investigated the feasibility of countries with small nuclear programmes implementing long-term radioactive waste management solutions within their national borders, through collaboration on technology transfer with those countries with advanced disposal concepts. The main project objective was to analyse the existing capabilities of technology owning Member States and the corresponding requirements of potential technology acquiring Member States and, based on the findings, to develop a number of possible collaboration models and scenarios that could be used in a technology transfer scheme. The project CATT was performed as a specific support action under the EU sixth framework programme and it brought together waste management organisations from six EU Member States: UK, Bulgaria, Germany, Lithuania, Slovenia and Sweden. In addition, the EC Joint Research Centre from the Netherlands also participated as a full partner. The paper summarises the analyses performed and the results obtained within the project. (author)

  1. Applicability of Non-Modular Assessment in Construction Management and Allied Undergraduate Programmes: Perspective of the Academics Involved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedawatta, Gayan

    2018-01-01

    Undergraduate programmes on construction management and other closely related built environment disciplines are currently taught and assessed on a modular basis. This is the case in the UK and in many other countries globally. However, it can be argued that professionally oriented programmes like these are better assessed on a non-modular basis,…

  2. An Empirical Comparative Investigation of Operations Management Programmes: Demand, Content and Entrance Criteria within the Context of Internationalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengbo; Chen, Xuezhong; Edgar, David; Zhao, Yang

    2013-01-01

    In higher education institutes (HEIs), Operations Management programmes (OMPs) are among those programmes attracting a substantial amount of international student enrollment. With the current situation that the government is reducing its funding input, the UK HEIs' financial balance relies more than before on the international students who pay…

  3. Identification of the factors associated with outcomes in a Condition Management Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demou Evangelia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A requirement of the Government’s Pathways to Work (PtW agenda was to introduce a Condition Management Programme (CMP. The aim of the present study was to identify the differences between those who engaged and made progress in this telephone-based biopsychosocial intervention, in terms of their health, and those who did not and to determine the client and practitioner characteristics and programme elements associated with success in a programme aimed at improving health. Methods Data were obtained from the CMP electronic spreadsheets and clients paper-based case records. CMP standard practice was that questionnaires were administered during the pre- and post-assessment phases over the telephone. Each client’s record contains their socio-demographic data, their primary health condition, as well as the pre- and post-intervention scores of the health assessment tool administered. Univariate and multivariate statistical analysis was used to investigate the relationships between the database variables. Clients were included in the study if their records were available for analysis from July 2006 to December 2007. Results On average there were 112 referrals per month, totalling 2016 referrals during the evaluation period. The majority (62.8% of clients had a mental-health condition. Successful completion of the programme was 28.5% (575 “completers”; 144 “discharges”. Several factors, such as age, health condition, mode of contact, and practitioner characteristics, were significant determinants of participation and completion of the programme. The results showed that completion of the CMP was associated with a better mental-health status, by reducing the number of clients that were either anxious, depressed or both, before undertaking the programme, from 74% to 32.5%. Conclusions Our findings showed that an individual's characteristics are associated with success in the programme, defined as completing the intervention

  4. The community's R and D programme on radioactive waste management and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The objective of the R and D actions is the demonstration of either the technical potential or, for further advanced projects, the feasibility and even the industrial availability of methods for treating and storing radwaste. The following aspects are investigated: processing of solid waste from reactors, reprocessing plants and the plutonium manufacture; intermediate and terminal storage of high activity and alpha waste; advanced waste management methods as the storage of gaseous waste. In addition to the scientific-technical R and D actions, a survey of the legal, administrative and financial problems encountered in radwaste management and storage is an essential part of the Communities' programme

  5. Management of uncertainties and the role of risk in Andra programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grevoz, A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper aims at presenting some aspects of the management of uncertainties in the programmes of Andra for the study of a deep geological repository for high level, long-lived wastes. After presenting very briefly the context of risk-management in the French safety rules, it will discuss how Andra has attempted to link the notions of uncertainties and risk in its 'Dossier 2001' for the clay medium, how this could be made compatible with a deterministic safety approach, what feedback it got from this first exercise, and what are the perspectives for future work. (author)

  6. Executing A Customer Relationship Management Programme In An Emerging Market: An Empirical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinyele Samuel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Retail financial services in all markets, including emerging markets, are undergoing major transaction, driven by change, deregulation and customer sophistication. Customer service and specifically relationship management in particular, are crucial to attaining a sustainable competitive advantage in the marketplace. The execution of a one- to- one programme within an emerging economy is the focus of this paper, specifically in the financial services environment. The steps in the execution of customer relationship management (CRM as proposed by Peppers, Rogers and Dorf (1999b are examined and the effect on customer service in an emerging market is investigated. The findings indicates that there are positive associations with these steps and customer service.

  7. Comparisons of mental clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paivio, A

    1978-02-01

    Subjects in three experiments were presented with pairs of clock times and were required to choose the one in which the hour and minute hand formed the smaller angle. In Experiments 1 and 2, the times were presented digitally, necessitating a transformation into symbolic representations from which the angular size difference could be inferred. The results revealed orderly symbolic distance effects so that comparison reaction time increased as the angular size difference decreased. Moreover, subjects generally reported using imagery to make the judgment, and subjects scoring high on test of imagery ability were faster than those scoring low on such tests. Experiment 3 added a direct perceptual condition in which subjects compared angles between pairs of hands on two drawn (analog) clocks, as well as a mixed condition involving one digital and one analog clock time. The results showed comparable distance effects for all conditions. In addition, reaction time increased from the perceptual, to the mixed, to the pure-digital condition. These results are consistent with predictions from an image-based dual-coding theory.

  8. Publicly administrated nuclear waste management research programme 1994-1996. General plan for the research programme and research plan for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The nuclear energy legislation of Finland includes detailed stipulations concerning nuclear waste management. Each producer of nuclear waste is responsible for the safe handling, management and disposal of the waste, and for the financing of these operations. The authorities supervise and control the implementation of the national waste management programme and set the necessary safety and other requirements. The principal goal of the JYT programme is to provide the authorities with information and research results relevant for the safety of nuclear waste management in order to support the various activities of the authorities. The whole field of the research programme is subdivided into the following main topic areas: (1) bedrock structure and stability, rock investigation methods, and characteristics and flow of groundwater, (2) release of radionuclides from a repository and subsequent migration in the bedrock, (3) performance and safety assessment of repositories and other phases of nuclear waste management (4) natural analogue studies, (5) waste management technology and costs and (6) sociopolitical and other societal issues and environmental impact assessment

  9. Development of Verbal Expressive Skills Management Programme (VESMP for Patients with Brocas Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humaira Shamim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Disorders of communication, including aphasia (mainly post stroke caused by the left hemisphere brain damage, is a major community health issue. The prevalence of aphasia after stroke is 25% in Pakistan in which Broca’s aphasia is predominant in stroke patients who have anterior lesion in the frontal lobe of the left hemispheres. The verbal expressive skills management programme (VESMP is the software which developed augmented management for patients to enhance verbal expressive skills for patients with severe Broca’s aphasia from different geographic areas. Moreover, the software increases the independencies which are not observed in other traditional techniques. This study is the pathway for maintaining and improving the functional life of patients. Objectives: The main objective was to develop the verbal expressive skills management programme (VESMP to enhance verbal expressive skills of patients with severe Broca’s aphasia. Methodology: Initially a pilot study with eight cases is carried out. The nonprobability purposive sampling technique was used to recruit the patients with severe aphasia who received therapy through VESMP programme on their smart phones. It contains seven domains: spontaneous speech, comprehension, naming, reading, writing, imitation, and automated speech. The programme was developed in Urdu language and its content was selected from grade three Urdu Punjab text books. The program was then updated with the help of guidance and feedback received from five experts of the relevant field. The patients scoring is recorded for each domain on basis of correct responses. The study was conducted in YUSRA general hospital and Pakistan Railway Hospital, Rawalpindi. The study includes patients that are 40+ years old, and have three months of post stroke with diagnosis of chronic Broca’s Aphasias, patients with severe cognitive impairment were excluded from the study. The pre-and post score was recorded for each

  10. COMET: a multicomponent home-based disease-management programme versus routine care in severe COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Romain; Casan-Clara, Pere; Koehler, Dieter; Tognella, Silvia; Viejo, Jose Luis; Dal Negro, Roberto W; Díaz-Lobato, Salvador; Reissig, Karina; Rodríguez González-Moro, José Miguel; Devouassoux, Gilles; Chavaillon, Jean-Michel; Botrus, Pierre; Arnal, Jean-Michel; Ancochea, Julio; Bergeron-Lafaurie, Anne; De Abajo, Carlos; Randerath, Winfried J; Bastian, Andreas; Cornelissen, Christian G; Nilius, Georg; Texereau, Joëlle B; Bourbeau, Jean

    2018-01-01

    The COPD Patient Management European Trial (COMET) investigated the efficacy and safety of a home-based COPD disease management intervention for severe COPD patients.The study was an international open-design clinical trial in COPD patients (forced expiratory volume in 1 s management intervention or to the usual management practices at the study centre. The disease management intervention included a self-management programme, home telemonitoring, care coordination and medical management. The primary end-point was the number of unplanned all-cause hospitalisation days in the intention-to-treat (ITT) population. Secondary end-points included acute care hospitalisation days, BODE (body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnoea and exercise) index and exacerbations. Safety end-points included adverse events and deaths.For the 157 (disease management) and 162 (usual management) patients eligible for ITT analyses, all-cause hospitalisation days per year (mean±sd) were 17.4±35.4 and 22.6±41.8, respectively (mean difference -5.3, 95% CI -13.7 to -3.1; p=0.16). The disease management group had fewer per-protocol acute care hospitalisation days per year (p=0.047), a lower BODE index (p=0.01) and a lower mortality rate (1.9% versus 14.2%; pmanagement intervention did not significantly reduce unplanned all-cause hospitalisation days, but reduced acute care hospitalisation days and mortality in severe COPD patients. Copyright ©ERS 2018.

  11. Professional commitment to changing chronic illness care: results from disease management programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, Karin; Strating, Mathilde; Huijsman, Robbert; Nieboer, Anna

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate to what extent primary care professionals are able to change their systems for delivering care to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and what professional and organizational factors are associated with the degree of process implementation. Quasi-experimental design with 1 year follow-up after intervention. Three regional COPD management programmes in the Netherlands, in which general practices cooperated with regional hospitals. All participating primary care professionals (n = 52). COPD management programme. Professional commitment, organizational context and degree of process implementation. Professionals significantly changed their systems for delivering care to COPD patients, namely self-management support, decision support, delivery system design and clinical information systems. Associations were found between organizational factors, professional commitment and changes in processes of care. Group culture and professional commitment appeared to be, to a moderate degree, predictors of process implementation. COPD management was effective; all processes improved significantly. Moreover, theoretically expected associations between organizational context and professional factors with the implementation of COPD management were indeed confirmed to some extent. Group culture and professional commitment are important facilitators.

  12. Changes to the way support programme tasks are managed in the IAEA's Department of Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khlebnikov, N.; Hamilton, A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Department of Safeguards and the 16 Member State Support Programmes jointly manage about 250 tasks. Recently, in response to a number of events, the Department has reorganized the manner in which these tasks are proposed and managed. The presentation and paper will document the following: The need to change - Although there have been a number of significant successes it has been recognised that both the way in which tasks are proposed and the management of tasks could be better performed. In particular the Report of the External Auditor 1999 stated the following: With respect to the R and D Programme the Agency 'has had difficulty in defining and prioritising tasks'; 'Ideas for tasks have come from operational units but not always in a coordinated manner'; 'I support the Agency's consideration of a move towards more centralised planning of task priorities' and the application of the 'general principles of good programme or project management. The tone of these comments was generally repeated by Member State Support Programme Co-ordinators at their meeting in November 1999 and by the Programme Performance Assessment System Report on Equipment Development. Of course the Department already knew that improvements could be made. The 'old' system - Prior to the changes three structures dominated the organisation. Firstly, a task approval process that did not allow for the application of the Department's priorities in a coordinated manner. Each task proposal was judged on its individual merits. Secondly, the distribution of task management responsibilities throughout the Department again did not allow easy coordination. Finally the focus on Member State task review meetings which did not allow the coordination of tasks in a particular subject area. The consequences of this were almost certainly the duplication of tasks, the performance of the wrong tasks and poor prioritisation of work. All at a time when the Department was generally short of resources. The

  13. Quality of care in patients with psoriasis: an initial clinical study of an international disease management programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Korte, J; Van Onselen, J; Kownacki, S; Sprangers, M A G; Bos, J D

    2005-01-01

    Patients with psoriasis have to cope with their disease for many years or even throughout their entire life. To provide optimal care, a disease management programme was developed. This programme consisted of disease education, disease management training, and psychological support, together with topical treatment. To test a disease management programme in dermatological practice, to assess patients' satisfaction with this programme, and adherence to topical treatment. Additionally, disease severity and quality of life were assessed. An initial clinical investigation was conducted in 10 European treatment centres. A total of 330 patients were included. Patient satisfaction, adherence, disease severity and quality of life were measured with study-specific and standardized self-report questionnaires. Patients reported a high degree of satisfaction with the programme, and a high degree of adherence to topical treatment. Disease severity and quality of life significantly improved. The programme was well received by the participating professionals. The disease management programme was found to be a useful tool in the management of psoriasis, providing patients with relief from the burden of psoriasis in everyday life. A full-scale evaluation is recommended.

  14. Transfer of radioactive waste management expertise from Switzerland to other countries with small nuclear power programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, I.; Birkhaeuser, Ph.; Kickmaier, W.; Vomvoris, S.; Zuidema, P.

    2000-01-01

    A legal requirement which coupled demonstration of the feasibility of nuclear waste disposal to the extension of reactor operational licenses beyond 1985 acted to force rapid development of the Swiss radioactive waste management programme. Over a period of almost 30 years and at a cost of approximately 800 M CHF Nagra has become established as a centre of excellence in this field. Resources include highly experienced manpower, literature and databases supporting development of national repositories for L/ILW and HLW/TRU and state-of-the-art R and D infrastructure (including 2 underground laboratories, hot-laboratory facilities at PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute), modelling groups at universities etc.). This paper reviews Nagra's experience and considers various ways in which expertise can be transferred to other small countries to minimise duplication of effort and optimise development of their own national programmes. (author)

  15. Rabies prevention and management of cats in the context of trap-neuter-vaccinate-release programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebling, A D; Johnson, D; Blanton, J D; Levin, M; Slate, D; Fenwick, G; Rupprecht, C E

    2014-06-01

    Domestic cats are an important part of many Americans' lives, but effective control of the 60-100 million feral cats living throughout the country remains problematic. Although trap-neuter-vaccinate-return (TNVR) programmes are growing in popularity as alternatives to euthanizing feral cats, their ability to adequately address disease threats and population growth within managed cat colonies is dubious. Rabies transmission via feral cats is a particular concern as demonstrated by the significant proportion of rabies post-exposure prophylaxis associated with exposures involving cats. Moreover, TNVR has not been shown to reliably reduce feral cat colony populations because of low implementation rates, inconsistent maintenance and immigration of unsterilized cats into colonies. For these reasons, TNVR programmes are not effective methods for reducing public health concerns or for controlling feral cat populations. Instead, responsible pet ownership, universal rabies vaccination of pets and removal of strays remain integral components to control rabies and other diseases. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. The UK's Surplus Source Disposal Programme: successful management of a national radioactive legacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Clive; Burns, Philip; Wakerley, Malcolm; Watson, Isabelle; Cook, Marianne; Moloney, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Between 2004 and 2009, the Surplus Source Disposal Programme (SSDP) arranged and subsidised the safe disposal or recycling of more than 11 000 unwanted radioactive items containing in total more than 8.5 x 10 14 Bq of activity, from some 500 sites throughout the United Kingdom. Sources were removed principally from universities, schools and colleges, museums, and hospitals. SSDP was funded by the UK Government and managed by the Environment Agency. The programme was delivered at a total cost of Pounds 7.14 million, nearly Pounds 2 million less than its initial budget. This was a big success for health and safety, the environment, business and the public purse. Current legislative requirements under the High Activity Sealed Sources Directive, which came into effect during 2005, will prevent a build-up of high activity surplus sources in future. Continuing vigilance may be needed to avoid a build-up of lower activity disused sources. (note)

  17. The UK's Surplus Source Disposal Programme: successful management of a national radioactive legacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Clive [Environment Agency, Block 1, Government Buildings, Burghill Road, Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol BS10 6BF (United Kingdom); Burns, Philip [Formerly of the Environment Agency, Olton Court, 10 Warwick Road, Solihull B92 7HX (United Kingdom); Wakerley, Malcolm [Formerly of the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Ergon House, 17 Smith Square, London SW1P 3JR (United Kingdom); Watson, Isabelle [Scottish Environment Protection Agency, 5 Redwood Crescent, Peel Park, East Kilbride G74 5PP (United Kingdom); Cook, Marianne [Scottish Government, Victoria Quay, Edinburgh EH6 6QQ (United Kingdom); Moloney, Barry [Safeguard International (now EnergySolutions), B168, Harwell Campus, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QT (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    Between 2004 and 2009, the Surplus Source Disposal Programme (SSDP) arranged and subsidised the safe disposal or recycling of more than 11 000 unwanted radioactive items containing in total more than 8.5 x 10{sup 14} Bq of activity, from some 500 sites throughout the United Kingdom. Sources were removed principally from universities, schools and colleges, museums, and hospitals. SSDP was funded by the UK Government and managed by the Environment Agency. The programme was delivered at a total cost of Pounds 7.14 million, nearly Pounds 2 million less than its initial budget. This was a big success for health and safety, the environment, business and the public purse. Current legislative requirements under the High Activity Sealed Sources Directive, which came into effect during 2005, will prevent a build-up of high activity surplus sources in future. Continuing vigilance may be needed to avoid a build-up of lower activity disused sources. (note)

  18. Using a Voltage Domain Programmable Technique for Low-Power Management Cell-Based Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Hwa Cheng

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Multi-voltage technique is an effective way to reduce power consumption. In the proposed cell-based voltage domain programmable (VDP technique, the high and low voltages applied to logic gates are programmable. The flexible voltage domain reassignment allows the chip performance and power consumption to be dynamically adjusted. In the proposed technique, the power switches possess the feature of flexible programming after chip manufacturing. This VDP method does not use an external voltage regulator to regulate the supply voltage level from outside of the chip but can be easily integrated within the design. This novel technique is proven by use of a video decoder test chip, which shows 55% and 61% power reductions compared to conventional single-Vdd and low-voltage designs, respectively. This power-aware performance adjusting mechanism shows great power reduction with a good power-performance management mechanism.

  19. NDA generic research programme for higher activity waste management issues - 16390

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, James; Brownridge, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    NDA has a responsibility to ensure decommissioning activities are sufficiently technically underpinned and appropriate Research and Development (Rand D) is carried out. The NDA funds research and development (R and D) indirectly via the Site Licence Companies (SLCs) or directly. The main component of directly funded R and D is the NDA Direct Research Portfolio (DRP). The DRP is split into four framework areas: - University Interactions; - Waste Processing; - Material Characterisation; - Actinide and Strategic Nuclear Materials. These four framework areas were competed through an Official Journal of European Union (OJEU) process in 2008. Although all four areas involve waste management, Waste Processing and Material Characterisation specifically deal with Higher Activity Waste (HAW) waste management issues. The Waste Processing area was awarded to three groups: (i) National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL), (ii) Consortium led by Hyder Consulting Ltd, and (iii) Consortium led by UKAEA Ltd. The Material Characterisation area was awarded to three groups: (i) NNL, (ii) Serco, and (iii) Consortium led by UKAEA Ltd. The initial work in Waste Processing and Material Characterisation was centered on establishing a forward research programme to address the generic needs of the UK civil nuclear industry and the NDA strategic drivers for waste management and land quality. This has been achieved by the four main framework contractors from the Waste Processing and Materials Characterisation areas working together with the NDA to identify the key research themes and begin the development of the NDA's HAW Management Research Programme. The process also involves active engagement with both industry and regulators via the Nuclear Waste Research Forum (NWRF). The NDA's HAW Management Research Programme includes a number of themes: - Optimisation of Interim Store Operation and Design; - Alternative Waste Encapsulants; - Waste Package Integrity; - Alternative Waste treatment methods

  20. The European Communities' research programme on management of low and intermediate level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, R.; Cecille, L.

    1989-01-01

    In the European Communities' third R and D programme on Management and Disposal of Radioactive Wastes a large number of projects have been commissioned to develop treatment and conditioning processes for low and intermediate level wastes and to qualify the conditioned waste forms. The paper presents the main objectives of this research and summarizes some of the more important studies. In liquid waste treatment, the research includes processes to separate actinides by new extractive methods and application of selective inorganic ion exchangers as well as electrochemically controlled ion exchange processes and a series of purification methods involving membrane techniques. The most important issue of solid waste management in the programme is the treatment and conditioning of plutonium containing wastes, for which a strategic study had been commissioned to optimize the choice between different treatment and conditioning options. Processes being studied include two advanced decontamination techniques and a variety of conditioning methods for incinerator ash and fuel element hulls. Another task of the programme is devoted to the qualification of waste forms. This comprises the characterization of the most common low and intermediate level waste products with respect to leaching, waste form stability, radiation resistance and compatibility with the respective disposal environments. In the course of the programme, the development of methods for quality assurance and in particular quality control has become an important issue: the control of the nuclide inventory, of the chemical composition of the wastes and of the correct operation of treatment and conditioning processes is being investigated in special laboratories. (author). 21 refs, 4 tabs

  1. Implementing case-based teaching strategies in a decentralised nursing management programme in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zethu Nkosi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Case-based education has a long history in the disciplines of education, business, law and the health professions. Research suggests that students who learn via a case-based method have advanced critical thinking skills and a greater ability for application of knowledge in practice. In medical education, case-based methodology is widely used to facilitate knowledge transfer from theoretical knowledge to application in patient care. Nursing education has also adopted case-based methodology to enhance learner outcomes and critical thinking.Objectives: The objectives of the study was to describe a decentralised nursing management education programme located in Durban, South Africa and describe the perceptions of nursing faculty facilitators regarding implementation of this teaching method.Method: Data was collected through the use of one-on-one interviews and also focus groups amongst the fifteen facilitators who were using a case-based curriculum to teach the programme content. The average facilitator was female, between 41 and 50 years of age, working part-time, educated with a baccalaureate degree, working as a professional nurse for between 11 and 20 years; slightly more than half had worked as a facilitator for three or more years.Results: The facilitators identified themes related to the student learners, the learning environment, and strengths and challenges of using facilitation to teach the content through cases. Decentralised nursing management educational programmes can meet the needs of nurses who are located in remote areas which are characterised by poor transportation patterns and limited resources and have great need for quality healthcare services.Conclusion: Nursing faculty facilitators need knowledgeable and accessible contact with centrally based full-time nursing faculty in order to promote high quality educational programmes.

  2. Are cardiovascular disease risk assessment and management programmes cost effective? A systematic review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John Tayu; Lawson, Kenny D; Wan, Yizhou; Majeed, Azeem; Morris, Stephen; Soljak, Michael; Millett, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    The World Health Organization recommends that countries implement population-wide cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk assessment and management programmes. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review to evaluate whether this recommendation is supported by cost-effectiveness evidence. Published economic evaluations were identified via electronic medical and social science databases (including Medline, Web of Science, and the NHS Economic Evaluation Database) from inception to March 2016. Study quality was evaluated using a modified version of the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards. Fourteen economic evaluations were included: five studies based on randomised controlled trials, seven studies based on observational studies and two studies using hypothetical modelling synthesizing secondary data. Trial based studies measured CVD risk factor changes over 1 to 3years, with modelled projections of longer term events. Programmes were either not, or only, cost-effective under non-verified assumptions such as sustained risk factor changes. Most observational and hypothetical studies suggested programmes were likely to be cost-effective; however, study deigns are subject to bias and subsequent empirical evidence has contradicted key assumptions. No studies assessed impacts on inequalities. In conclusion, recommendations for population-wide risk assessment and management programmes lack a robust, real world, evidence basis. Given implementation is resource intensive there is a need for robust economic evaluation, ideally conducted alongside trials, to assess cost effectiveness. Further, the efficiency and equity impact of different delivery models should be investigated, and also the combination of targeted screening with whole population interventions recognising that there multiple approaches to prevention. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Web system for dosimetric data management of internal monitoring programme at IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Vanesa R. de; Rodriguez Junior, Orlando; Todo, Alberto S.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The internal monitoring programme are carried out for the occupationally exposed workers that develop activities in the radioisotope production plant, fuel cycle facilities, waste management installations, cyclotron and the reactor facility at Institute of Nuclear Energy and Research (IPEN). According to the National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), Regulation NN-3.01, the dose of each worker should be maintained at least for a period of 30 years. With this purpose, an online system, called 'IntDosWeb', was developed with the objective of the management for data dosimetric of internal monitoring programme. The system IntDosWeb, based on free software, was developed in programming language PHP and environment database PostgreSQL. This system is to be available at the local net, Intranet. The database maintains information about identification of the worker that handles non-sealed radioactive sources, physical and chemical characteristics of the radionuclides, monitoring types, measurement data and the dose. This system is able to generate annual reports of the individuals and the historical dose. Several simulation cases have been put into effect to check the on-line software functional capabilities. The users can access the dosimetric information according to following database field: monitoring period, monitoring type, intake pattern, radionuclide type and monitoring data from a specific installation or from each worker. The system was tested in the routinely service of internal dosimetry at IPEN. The rastreability of the information made in the internal monitoring programme was a success and also guaranteeing the reliability and integrity of the stored information. The IntDosWeb was shown as a helpful tool for analysis of the committed effective dose in the radiation protection programme, besides obeying the legal demands of the Brazilian Regulatory Commission. (author)

  4. Implementing case-based teaching strategies in a decentralised nursing management programme in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zethu Nkosi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Case-based education has a long history in the disciplines of education, business, law and the health professions. Research suggests that students who learn via acase-based method have advanced critical thinking skills and a greater ability for application of knowledge in practice. In medical education, case-based methodology is widely used to facilitate knowledge transfer from theoretical knowledge to application in patient care. Nursing education has also adopted case-based methodology to enhance learner outcomes and critical thinking. Objectives: The objectives of the study was to describe a decentralised nursing management education programme located in Durban, South Africa and describe the perceptions of nursing faculty facilitators regarding implementation of this teaching method. Method: Data was collected through the use of one-on-one interviews and also focus groups amongst the fifteen facilitators who were using a case-based curriculum to teach the programme content. The average facilitator was female, between 41 and 50 years of age,working part-time, educated with a baccalaureate degree, working as a professional nurse for between 11 and 20 years; slightly more than half had worked as a facilitator for three or more years. Results: The facilitators identified themes related to the student learners, the learning environment, and strengths and challenges of using facilitation to teach the content through cases. Decentralised nursing management educational programmes can meet the needs of nurses who are located in remote areas which are characterised by poor transportation patterns and limited resources and have great need for quality healthcare services. Conclusion: Nursing faculty facilitators need knowledgeable and accessible contact with centrally based full-time nursing faculty in order to promote high quality educational programmes.

  5. Patient satisfaction with a pilot chronic pain management programme in Cape Town, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Parker

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The goals of a chronic pain management clinic includeincreasing patient knowledge about pain, developing pain management skillsand increasing patients’ confidence in their pain management abilities.A  Chronic Pain Management Programme (CPMP based on evidence basedguidelines was developed at a chronic pain management clinic to facilitatepatient discharge to a primary healthcare level. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore patient satisfaction with, acceptability of and the perceived success which could be due to the CPMP developed at the Chronic Pain Management Clinic of Groote Schuur Hospital,Cape Town.Methods: Patients (n=14 were referred to the pilot study from the Chronic Pain Management Clinic. A s a pilot, four courses were run over a period ofone year. In order to reach the research aim, an eleven-question, structuredopen-ended interview was conducted with all participants. Results: Fourteen patients enrolled in the CPMP. Responses were favourable with participants emphasising the roleof increased knowledge about pain, the role of exercise and of stress management techniques. Participants also recog-nised a positive change in behaviours and attitudes following participation in the CPMP.Conclusions: Findings suggest that participants found the format of the course acceptable as regards course content,structure and delivery. Participant responses suggest that the course was acceptable and perceived as useful. However,future courses would benefit from refresher courses or structured support groups.

  6. Saltwell PIC Skid Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) Software Configuration Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the procedures and guidelines necessary for computer software configuration management activities during the operation and maintenance phases of the Saltwell PIC Skids as required by LMH-PRO-309/Rev. 0, Computer Software Quality Assurance, Section 2.6, Software Configuration Management. The software configuration management plan (SCMP) integrates technical and administrative controls to establish and maintain technical consistency among requirements, physical configuration, and documentation for the Saltwell PIC Skid Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) software during the Hanford application, operations and maintenance. This SCMP establishes the Saltwell PIC Skid PLC Software Baseline, status changes to that baseline, and ensures that software meets design and operational requirements and is tested in accordance with their design basis

  7. Saltwell Leak Detector Station Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WHITE, K.A.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides the procedures and guidelines necessary for computer software configuration management activities during the operation and maintenance phases of the Saltwell Leak Detector Stations as required by HNF-PRO-309/Rev.1, Computer Software Quality Assurance, Section 2.4, Software Configuration Management. The software configuration management plan (SCMP) integrates technical and administrative controls to establish and maintain technical consistency among requirements, physical configuration, and documentation for the Saltwell Leak Detector Station Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) software during the Hanford application, operations and maintenance. This SCMP establishes the Saltwell Leak Detector Station PLC Software Baseline, status changes to that baseline, and ensures that software meets design and operational requirements and is tested in accordance with their design basis

  8. Meddling in the KBS Programme and Swedish Success in Nuclear Waste Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Mark (Univ. of Goeteborg, Goeteborg (Sweden)), e-mail: mark.elam@sts.gu.se; Sundqvist, Goeran (Univ. of Oslo, Oslo (Norway))

    2010-09-15

    In this paper the intention is to analyse and re/describe the qualities that underlie the current fame and good standing of Swedish nuclear waste management (the so-called KBS Programme). Inspired by work in the actor-network theory tradition, we want to argue that the success of the KBS Programme can be best accounted for with reference to qualities which are the reverse of those you might otherwise expect. While you might imagine its good name to be ascribable to the constancy, solidity and singularity of the solution being advanced, we want to argue that it is rather the infidelity, fluidity and heterogeneity of this solution that can best account for the leading position of Swedish nuclear waste management today. In fact, we wish to assert that it is through the effacement of the inherent importance of the latter set of qualities, that the KBS Programme has been able to promote a vision of itself as successfully imbued with the former set. The enduring template for Swedish nuclear waste management was established in 1977 through the Nuclear Stipulation Act. This gave rise to the cultivation of a new expertise within the Swedish nuclear industry of demonstrating indubitable solutions to nuclear waste problems close at hand. Thus, while it may appear that the KBS Programme has always been about the conception, and step by step implementation of a completely coherent and largely unvarying approach to the geological disposal of nuclear waste, this can be seen as effacing another reality. Bringing this other reality back into view, we see that for the KBS Programme, attaining the goal of the geological disposal of nuclear waste has never been as important as maintaining the ability to demonstrate its attainability. The KBS Programme is firstly a long-running programme in the material semiotics of nuclear fuel safety and the production of palpable signs of the accomplishment of geological disposal close at hand. This production of palpable signs has extended to the

  9. Meddling in the KBS Programme and Swedish Success in Nuclear Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran

    2010-09-01

    In this paper the intention is to analyse and re/describe the qualities that underlie the current fame and good standing of Swedish nuclear waste management (the so-called KBS Programme). Inspired by work in the actor-network theory tradition, we want to argue that the success of the KBS Programme can be best accounted for with reference to qualities which are the reverse of those you might otherwise expect. While you might imagine its good name to be ascribable to the constancy, solidity and singularity of the solution being advanced, we want to argue that it is rather the infidelity, fluidity and heterogeneity of this solution that can best account for the leading position of Swedish nuclear waste management today. In fact, we wish to assert that it is through the effacement of the inherent importance of the latter set of qualities, that the KBS Programme has been able to promote a vision of itself as successfully imbued with the former set. The enduring template for Swedish nuclear waste management was established in 1977 through the Nuclear Stipulation Act. This gave rise to the cultivation of a new expertise within the Swedish nuclear industry of demonstrating indubitable solutions to nuclear waste problems close at hand. Thus, while it may appear that the KBS Programme has always been about the conception, and step by step implementation of a completely coherent and largely unvarying approach to the geological disposal of nuclear waste, this can be seen as effacing another reality. Bringing this other reality back into view, we see that for the KBS Programme, attaining the goal of the geological disposal of nuclear waste has never been as important as maintaining the ability to demonstrate its attainability. The KBS Programme is firstly a long-running programme in the material semiotics of nuclear fuel safety and the production of palpable signs of the accomplishment of geological disposal close at hand. This production of palpable signs has extended to the

  10. Knowledge management as a support mechanism for improving software programmes in micro, small and medium-sized companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Capote

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Organisations have been forced to change their philosophy due to the vast amount of information made available when running software process improvement (SPI programmes and working in a way leading to maintaining and converting this information into knowledge in order to adapt and integrate changes quickly and thereby ensuring re-maining in the competitive market. This article presents some of the most significant antecedents in defining and im-plementing knowledge management (KM in SPI programmes which have been adapted for use in small software companies, as such management represents a philosophy of true organisational capital for companies involved in software improvement projects. The advisability of implementing KM in SPI programmes or projects arising from pri-mary knowledge management targets is analysed, as is its adaptation for such projects according to identified needs, especially related to documenting and manipulating tangible and intangible products produced in an SPI pro-gramme.

  11. Radioisotope clocks in archaeology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedges, R E.M. [Oxford Univ. (UK). Research Lab. for Archaeology

    1979-09-06

    Methods of absolute dating which use the rate of disintegration of a radioactive nucleus as the clock, are reviewed. The use of the abundant radioisotopes (/sup 40/K, Th and U) and of the rare radioisotopes (/sup 14/C, /sup 10/Be, /sup 26/Al, /sup 32/Si, /sup 36/Cl, /sup 41/Ca, /sup 53/Mn) is discussed and radiation integration techniques (fission track dating, thermoluminescence and related techniques) are considered. Specific fields of use of the various methods and their accuracy are examined.

  12. Methodologies for steering clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadsey, Harold

    1995-01-01

    One of the concerns of the PTTI community is the coordination of one time scale with another. This is accomplished through steering one clock system to another, with a goal of a zero or constant offset in time and frequency. In order to attain this goal, rate differences are calculated and allowed for by the steering algorithm. This paper will present several of these different methods of determining rate differences. Ideally, any change in rate should not cause the offset to change sign (overshoot) by any amount, but certainly not by as much as its previous absolute value. The advantages and disadvantages of each depend on the user's situation.

  13. Clocks and special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacRoberts, D.T.

    1980-01-01

    A kinematic theory without precise definitions of the 'space' and 'time' used is an uninterpreted calculus. The definition of 'time' in special relativity is based on light propagation and the 'constant velocity of light' is a tautological consequence of the definition. When this definition is reified in a 'clock' the phenomenon of 'time dilation' occurs, in terms of the defined time, but is not reciprocal between moving systems; the postulate of relativity is not observed. The new definition of time is compatible with an ether theory without the relativity principle. The derivation of the Lorentz transformations, which requires both postulates, is purely formalistic and is not ontologically sound. (Auth.)

  14. Light and the human circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roenneberg, Till; Kantermann, Thomas; Juda, Myriam; Vetter, Céline; Allebrandt, Karla V

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock can only reliably fulfil its function if it is stably entrained. Most clocks use the light-dark cycle as environmental signal (zeitgeber) for this active synchronisation. How we think about clock function and entrainment has been strongly influenced by the early concepts of the field's pioneers, and the astonishing finding that circadian rhythms continue a self-sustained oscillation in constant conditions has become central to our understanding of entrainment.Here, we argue that we have to rethink these initial circadian dogmas to fully understand the circadian programme and how it entrains. Light is also the prominent zeitgeber for the human clock, as has been shown experimentally in the laboratory and in large-scale epidemiological studies in real life, and we hypothesise that social zeitgebers act through light entrainment via behavioural feedback loops (zeitnehmer). We show that human entrainment can be investigated in detail outside of the laboratory, by using the many 'experimental' conditions provided by the real world, such as daylight savings time, the 'forced synchrony' imposed by the introduction of time zones, or the fact that humans increasingly create their own light environment. The conditions of human entrainment have changed drastically over the past 100 years and have led to an increasing discrepancy between biological and social time (social jetlag). The increasing evidence that social jetlag has detrimental consequences for health suggests that shift-work is only an extreme form of circadian misalignment, and that the majority of the population in the industrialised world suffers from a similarly 'forced synchrony'.

  15. Post Graduate Programme in Dietetics & Food Service Management (MSCDFSM) Programme of IGNOU: Access through the Lucknow Regional Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorothy, J. S.; Kumar, Ashwini

    2014-01-01

    Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU) which was established initially as a Single mode Distance Teaching Institution (DTI) in the year 1985 opened its campus to face-to-face education in the year 2008 and thus now is a Dual mode Distance Teaching Institution (DTI). The Post Graduate Programme (Master of Science) in Dietetics and Food…

  16. Monitoring sterile and wild insects in area-wide integrated pest management programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vreysen, M.J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Insect pest control programmes, which integrate the release of sterile insects, can be efficient only if the released insects have an optimal biological quality. Frequent monitoring of the quality of reared insects after being released in the field is an important but often neglected component of area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programmes that integrate the sterile insect technique (SIT). Parameters of sterile insects, which should be monitored regularly, are sexual competitiveness of the released insects, and related components, e.g. survival, mobility, dispersal characteristics, and spatial occupation of the habitat. A well-balanced monitoring programme will, at any given time, provide essential feedback on the progress being made. This information is prerequisite to efficient implementation of the release and cost-efficient use of sterile insects. The type of monitoring to be done will be determined largely by the particular biology of the target insect species. The most important parameter in relation to the release of sterile insects is the rate of sterility induced in the wild insect pest population; it will provide the best evidence that any observed changes, e.g. in the density of the target insect, are caused by the release of sterile insects. (author)

  17. Medication therapy management services in community pharmacy: a pilot programme in HIV specialty pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenquist, Ashley; Best, Brookie M; Miller, Teresa A; Gilmer, Todd P; Hirsch, Jan D

    2010-12-01

    Pharmacist-provided medication therapy management services (MTMS) have been shown to increase patient's adherence to medications, improve health outcomes and reduce overall medical costs. The purpose of this study was to describe a pilot programme that provided pharmacy-based MTMS for patients with HIV/AIDS in the state of California, USA. Pharmacists from the 10 pilot pharmacies were surveyed using an online data collection tool. Information was collected to describe the types of MTMS offered, proportion of patients actively using specific MTMS, pharmacist beliefs regarding effect on patient outcomes and barriers to providing MTMS, ability to offer MTMS without pilot programme funding and specialized pharmacist or staff training. Each responding pharmacy (7 of 10) varied in the number of HIV/AIDS patients served and prescription volume. All pharmacists had completed HIV/AIDS-related continuing education programmes, and some had other advanced training. The type of MTMS being offered varied at each pharmacy with 'individualized counselling by a pharmacist when overuse or underuse was detected' and 'refill reminders by telephone' being actively used by the largest proportion of patients. Most, but not all, pharmacists cited reimbursement as a barrier to MTMS provision. Pharmacists believed the MTMS they provide resulted in improved satisfaction (patient and provider), medication usage, therapeutics response and patient quality of life. The type of MTMS offered, and proportion of patients actively using, varied among participating pilot pharmacies. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. CRITICAL INCIDENTS AND CRITICAL INCIDENT STRESS MANAGEMENT (CISM – AN EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAMME (EAP PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terblanche, Lourie

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Employees are increasingly becoming victims of critical incidents. From a systems theory point of view, it is necessary to acknowledge the impact of critical incidents not only on the personal life of the employee, but on the workplace itself. Employees respond differently to critical incidents, which makes it even more complicated when this reaches the point of requiring therapeutic intervention. The most common response to critical incidents may be the risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and/or depression. This reality requires management – through the Employee Assistance Programme (EAP – to be able to effectively deal with such critical incidents.

  19. Aspects of nuclear waste management after a 4-year Nordic programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moberg, L.

    1990-01-01

    Six areas of concern in nuclear waste management have been dealt with in a four-year Nordic research programme. They include work in two international projects, Hydrocoin dealing with modelling of groundwater flow in crystalline rock, and Biomovs, concerned with biosphere models. Geologic questions of importance to the prediction of future behaviour are examined. Waste quantities from the decommissioning of nuclear power stations are estimated, and total amounts of waste to be transported in the Nordic countries are evaluated. Waste amounts from a hypothetical reactor accident are also calculated. (author)

  20. A Light Clock Satisfying the Clock Hypothesis of Special Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The design of the FMEL, a floor-mirrored Einstein-Langevin "light clock", is introduced. The clock provides a physically intuitive manner to calculate and visualize the time dilation effects for a spatially extended set of observers (an accelerated "frame") undergoing unidirectional acceleration or observers on a rotating cylinder of constant…

  1. RDandD Programme 2007. Programme for research, development and demonstration of methods for the management and disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-09-01

    The programme describes in general terms the planned measures and the facilities that are needed for the task, with a focus on the plans for the period 2008-2013. The period of immediate concern is 2008-2010. The level of detail for the three subsequent years is naturally lower. The programme provides a basis for designing systems to manage and dispose of the radioactive waste from the nuclear power plants. SKB intends to dispose of the spent nuclear fuel in accordance with the KBS-3 method. In the RDandD Programme we describe our activities and the planning for it. We also deal with societal research and other methods for disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The planning for low- and intermediate-level waste, as well as for the societal research, is presented in separate parts. The upcoming review of the programme can contribute valuable outside viewpoints. The regulatory authorities and the Government can clarify how they view different parts of the activity. Municipalities and other stakeholders can, after studying the programme, offer their viewpoints to SKB, the regulatory authorities or the Government. The most important milestone during the coming three-year period is to submit applications under the Nuclear Activities Act for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel and under the Environmental Code for the final repository system. RDandD programme 2007 therefore focuses on the technology development that is needed to realize the final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The site investigations in Forsmark and Laxemar will be concluded in 2007. The work of compiling the applications for the final repository is under way. In contrast to the immediately preceding programmes, RDandD Programme 2007 therefore also contains a summary of the site investigation phase and a look ahead at the steps that remain before the final repository can be put into operation. RDandD Programme 2007 consists of six parts: Part I SKB's plan of action; Part II Final repository for spent

  2. RDandD Programme 2007. Programme for research, development and demonstration of methods for the management and disposal of nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-09-15

    The programme describes in general terms the planned measures and the facilities that are needed for the task, with a focus on the plans for the period 2008-2013. The period of immediate concern is 2008-2010. The level of detail for the three subsequent years is naturally lower. The programme provides a basis for designing systems to manage and dispose of the radioactive waste from the nuclear power plants. SKB intends to dispose of the spent nuclear fuel in accordance with the KBS-3 method. In the RDandD Programme we describe our activities and the planning for it. We also deal with societal research and other methods for disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The planning for low- and intermediate-level waste, as well as for the societal research, is presented in separate parts. The upcoming review of the programme can contribute valuable outside viewpoints. The regulatory authorities and the Government can clarify how they view different parts of the activity. Municipalities and other stakeholders can, after studying the programme, offer their viewpoints to SKB, the regulatory authorities or the Government. The most important milestone during the coming three-year period is to submit applications under the Nuclear Activities Act for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel and under the Environmental Code for the final repository system. RDandD programme 2007 therefore focuses on the technology development that is needed to realize the final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The site investigations in Forsmark and Laxemar will be concluded in 2007. The work of compiling the applications for the final repository is under way. In contrast to the immediately preceding programmes, RDandD Programme 2007 therefore also contains a summary of the site investigation phase and a look ahead at the steps that remain before the final repository can be put into operation. RDandD Programme 2007 consists of six parts: Part I SKB's plan of action; Part II Final repository for spent

  3. RDandD Programme 2007. Programme for research, development and demonstration of methods for the management and disposal of nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-09-15

    The programme describes in general terms the planned measures and the facilities that are needed for the task, with a focus on the plans for the period 2008-2013. The period of immediate concern is 2008-2010. The level of detail for the three subsequent years is naturally lower. The programme provides a basis for designing systems to manage and dispose of the radioactive waste from the nuclear power plants. SKB intends to dispose of the spent nuclear fuel in accordance with the KBS-3 method. In the RDandD Programme we describe our activities and the planning for it. We also deal with societal research and other methods for disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The planning for low- and intermediate-level waste, as well as for the societal research, is presented in separate parts. The upcoming review of the programme can contribute valuable outside viewpoints. The regulatory authorities and the Government can clarify how they view different parts of the activity. Municipalities and other stakeholders can, after studying the programme, offer their viewpoints to SKB, the regulatory authorities or the Government. The most important milestone during the coming three-year period is to submit applications under the Nuclear Activities Act for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel and under the Environmental Code for the final repository system. RDandD programme 2007 therefore focuses on the technology development that is needed to realize the final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The site investigations in Forsmark and Laxemar will be concluded in 2007. The work of compiling the applications for the final repository is under way. In contrast to the immediately preceding programmes, RDandD Programme 2007 therefore also contains a summary of the site investigation phase and a look ahead at the steps that remain before the final repository can be put into operation. RDandD Programme 2007 consists of six parts: Part I SKB's plan of action; Part II Final repository for

  4. An optical clock to go

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Andrew D.

    2018-05-01

    Bringing next-generation atomic clocks out of the lab is not an easy task, but doing so will unlock many new possibilities. As a crucial first step, a portable atomic clock has now been deployed for relativistic geodesy measurements in the Alps.

  5. Food and Beverage Management: An Introduction. Food and Beverage Management Module. Operational Management Programme. Increasing Opportunities for Supervisors and Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter

    This self-instructional unit for supervisors and managers in the British hotel and catering industry is designed to prepare them for the more detailed units in this series, including those on food and beverage control, production, and provision. The document begins with advice on how to use the unit. Three sections cover the following topics: (1)…

  6. Evaluation of the impact of intervention programmes on education organisations: Application to a Quality Management System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Díaz, Mª Jose; Rodríguez-Mantilla, Jesús Miguel; Jover-Olmeda, Gonzalo

    2017-08-01

    This paper analyses the importance of evaluating the various components of the programmes or actions carried out by education organisations. It highlights the need to assess the impact of the intervention on the organisation and consider how changes are consolidated over time in interaction with the context. We propose an impact evaluation model and as an example have chosen the implementation of Quality Management Systems in schools. The paper analyses the results obtained in 40 schools in three regions (Spanish Autonomous Communities) with varying levels of implementation. The results show overall impact on these education centres as the teachers and management teams of the centres perceive it. This impact is more evident in some of the dimensions considered in the study than in others. The results also confirm the differences between regional contexts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Irradiated Fuel Management Advisory Programme (IFMAP). An interregional technical co-operation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    Delays in the implementation of the fuel reprocessing option in some countries, the complete abandonment of this option in other countries, and delays in the availability of final spent fuel disposal in almost all countries, has led to increasingly long periods of 'interim' spent fuel storage. The problem of the management of irradiated fuels has therefore increased in importance for many Member States. For power reactors or research reactors, irradiated fuel management includes all of the procedures involving irradiated fuel from the time that it is discharged from the reactor core until it is either reprocessed or placed in a permanent disposal site. Although the IAEA has had programmes in this area in the past and has ongoing activities at present, there is a clear need to provide support to individual Member States which require advice and/or assistance in the resolution of particular questions and concerns

  8. Waste management research abstracts no. 22. Information on radioactive waste programmes in progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    The research abstracts contained in this issue have been collected during recent months and cover the period between January 1992 - February 1994 (through July 1994 for abstracts from the United States). The abstracts reflect research currently in progress in the field of radioactive waste management: environmental impacts, site selection, decontamination and decommissioning, environmental restoration and legal aspects of radioactive waste management. Though the information contained in this publication covers a wide range of programmes in many countries, the WMRA should not be interpreted as providing a complete survey of on-going research and IAEA Member States. For the first time, the abstracts published in document are only in English language. In addition, the abstracts received for this issue have been assigned INIS subject category codes and thesaurus terms to facilitate searches and also to fully utilize established sets of technical categories and terms

  9. Ottawa Panel Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Patient Education Programmes in the Management of Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health Education Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop guidelines and recommendations on patient education programmes of any type, targeted specially to individuals with OA and which were designed to improve the clinical effectiveness of managing OA. Methods: The Ottawa Methods Group contacted specialized organizations that focus on management for…

  10. Evaluation of a self-management programme for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Ap; Anderson, Jk; Wallace, Lm; Kennedy-Williams, P

    2014-06-30

    Self-management is becoming an important part of treatment for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We conducted a longitudinal survey of patients with COPD who attended a 7-week group-based lay and clinician co-delivered COPD self-management programme (SMP)to see whether they became more activated, enjoyed better health status, and quality of life, were less psychologically distressed and improved their self-management abilities. The main analysis was a per-protocol analysis (N = 131), which included only patients who attended ≥5 SMP sessions and who returned a 6-month follow-up questionnaires. Changes in the mean values of the patient outcomes were compared over time using paired t tests and general linear model for repeated measures. Patient activation significantly improved 6 months after the SMP (p management abilities (self-monitoring and insight p = 0.03), constructive attitude shift (p = 0.04), skills and technique acquisition, (p management abilities. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Case management in early psychosis intervention programme: Perspectives of clients and caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Horng Hien; Yong, Yee Huei; Shahwan, Shazana; Cetty, Laxman; Vaingankar, Janhavi; Hon, Charlene; Lee, Helen; Loh, Christopher; Abdin, Edimansyah; Subramaniam, Mythily

    2017-12-14

    This qualitative study explored the perspectives of clients and caregivers on case management provided by the Singapore Early Psychosis Intervention Programme (EPIP), with the intent to understand the salient aspects of case management from their perspective. Clients and their caregivers were recruited from the EPIP outpatient clinics. Focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted at a community centre outside the hospital with 47 clients and 19 caregivers. Facilitators were experienced researchers who were not involved in the care of the clients and trained in qualitative research methodologies. All FGDs were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim with all participants' identifiers omitted to protect confidentiality. Qualitative data analysis was conducted using thematic analysis. There were 11 themes that emerged from the FGDs: therapeutic alliance, holistic monitoring, collaborative role with other care providers, counselling and guidance, crisis management, bridging role, client-centred care, client empowerment and strength building, psychoeducation/education on illness, support and problem solving. "Problem solving" surfaced only from the client FGDs; the remaining themes were common to both groups. The voices of clients and caregivers are important to EPIP case management service. This study has provided insights into their perspectives, understandings and lived experiences of case management and its impact on clients and caregivers. © 2017 The Authors Early Intervention in Psychiatry Published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. High Precision Clock Bias Prediction Model in Clock Synchronization System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zan Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Time synchronization is a fundamental requirement for many services provided by a distributed system. Clock calibration through the time signal is the usual way to realize the synchronization among the clocks used in the distributed system. The interference to time signal transmission or equipment failures may bring about failure to synchronize the time. To solve this problem, a clock bias prediction module is paralleled in the clock calibration system. And for improving the precision of clock bias prediction, the first-order grey model with one variable (GM(1,1 model is proposed. In the traditional GM(1,1 model, the combination of parameters determined by least squares criterion is not optimal; therefore, the particle swarm optimization (PSO is used to optimize GM(1,1 model. At the same time, in order to avoid PSO getting stuck at local optimization and improve its efficiency, the mechanisms that double subgroups and nonlinear decreasing inertia weight are proposed. In order to test the precision of the improved model, we design clock calibration experiments, where time signal is transferred via radio and wired channel, respectively. The improved model is built on the basis of clock bias acquired in the experiments. The results show that the improved model is superior to other models both in precision and in stability. The precision of improved model increased by 66.4%~76.7%.

  13. Clocks around Sgr A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angélil, Raymond; Saha, Prasenjit

    2014-11-01

    The S stars near the Galactic Centre and any pulsars that may be on similar orbits can be modelled in a unified way as clocks orbiting a black hole, and hence are potential probes of relativistic effects, including black hole spin. The high eccentricities of many S stars mean that relativistic effects peak strongly around pericentre; for example, orbit precession is not a smooth effect but almost a kick at pericentre. We argue that concentration around pericentre will be an advantage when analysing redshift or pulse-arrival data to measure relativistic effects, because cumulative precession will be drowned out by Newtonian perturbations from other mass in the Galactic Centre region. Wavelet decomposition may be a way to disentangle relativistic effects from Newton perturbations. Assuming a plausible model for Newtonian perturbations on S2, relativity appears to be strongest in a two-year interval around pericentre, in wavelet modes of time-scale ≈6 months.

  14. Options for Management of Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste for Countries Developing New Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world.' One way this objective is achieved is through the publication of a range of technical series. Two of these are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III.A.6 of the IAEA Statute, the safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property'. The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are written primarily in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own programmes. The principal users are the regulatory bodies in Member States and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series comprises reports designed to encourage and assist R and D on, and application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia, and government officials, among others. This information is presented in guides, reports on technology status and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series complements the IAEA Safety Standards Series. Today, numerous countries are considering construction of their first nuclear power plant or the expansion of a small nuclear power programme, and many of these countries have limited experience in managing radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. They often have limited information about available technologies and approaches for safe and long term management of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel arising from power reactors. The lack of basic know-how and of a credible waste management strategy could present a major challenge or even an obstruction for countries wishing to

  15. PHARAO space atomic clock: new developments on the laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccoccio, Muriel; Loesel, Jacques; Coatantiec, Claude; Simon, Eric; Laurent, Philippe; Lemonde, Pierre; Maksimovic, I.; Abgrall, M.

    2017-11-01

    The PHARAO project purpose is to open the way for a new atomic clock generation in space, where laser cooling techniques and microgravity allow high frequency stability and accuracy. The French space agency, CNES is funding and managing the clock construction. The French SYRTE and LKB laboratories are scientific and technical advisers for the clock requirements and the follow-up of subsystem development in industrial companies. EADS SODERN is developing two main subsystems of the PHARAO clock: the Laser Source and the Cesium Tube where atoms are cooled, launched, selected and detected by laser beams. The Laser Source includes an optical bench and electronic devices to generate the laser beams required. This paper describes PHARAO and the role laser beams play in its principle of operation. Then we present the Laser Source design, the technologies involved, and the status of development. Lastly, we focus of a key equipment to reach the performances expected, which is the Extended Cavity Laser Diode.

  16. Effect of multidisciplinary disease management for hospitalized heart failure under a national health insurance programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Chun-Tai; Liu, Min-Hui; Hsu, Kuang-Hung; Fu, Tieh-Cheng; Wang, Jong-Shyan; Huang, Yu-Yen; Yang, Ning-I; Wang, Chao-Hung

    2015-09-01

    Multidisciplinary disease management programmes (MDPs) for heart failure have been shown to be effective in Western countries. However, it is not known whether they improve outcomes in a high population density country with a national health insurance programme. In total, 349 patients hospitalized because of heart failure were randomized into control and MDP groups. All-cause death and re-hospitalization related to heart failure were analyzed. The median follow-up period was approximately 2 years. Mean patient age was 60 years; 31% were women; and 50% of patients had coronary artery disease. MDP was associated with fewer all-cause deaths [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.49, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.27-0.91, P = 0.02] and heart failure-related re-hospitalizations (HR = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.25-0.77, P = 0.004). MDP was still associated with better outcomes for all-cause death (HR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.29-0.98, P = 0.04) and heart failure-related re-hospitalization (HR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.26-0.81, P = 0.007), after adjusting for age, diuretics, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, hypertension, sodium, and albumin. However, MDPs' effect on all-cause mortality and heart failure-related re-hospitalization was significantly attenuated after adjusting for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor blockers or β-blockers. A stratified analysis showed that MDP combined with guideline-based medication had synergistic effects. MDP is effective in lowering all-cause mortality and re-hospitalization rates related to heart failure under a national health insurance programme. MDP synergistically improves the effectiveness of guidelines-based medications for heart failure.

  17. Impact of a community-based integrated management of childhood illnesses (IMCI) programme in Gegharkunik, Armenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael E; Harutyunyan, Tsovinar L

    2009-03-01

    Maternal and child health status in the Martuni region of Gegharkunik marz, Armenia, precipitously declined following Armenia's independence in 1991. In response, the American Red Cross (ARC) and the Armenian Red Cross Society (ARCS) implemented the WHO community-level Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI) strategy, complementing recent clinical IMCI training in the region in which 387 community health volunteers from 16 villages were trained as peer educators, and approximately 5000 caretakers of children under age 5 were counselled on key nutrition and health practices. A pre-post independent sample design was used to assess the programme's impact. The evaluation instrument collected respondent demographic characteristics and knowledge, attitudes and practices consistent with 10 health indicators typical of child survival interventions. At baseline and at follow-up, 300 mothers were interviewed using a stratified simple random sampling of households with at least one child less than age 2. The assessment confirmed the population's poor health status and limited knowledge and application of recommended child care practices. The campaign reached its target: at follow-up, 67% had seen media messages within the past month, 82% had received the IMCI informational booklet, and 30% had seen other materials. Evidence of the success of the programme included the following: exclusive breastfeeding increased 31.4%, maternal knowledge of child illness signs increased 30%, knowledge of HIV increased 28.5%, and physician attended deliveries increased 15%. This evaluation documented the significant and substantial impact of the community IMCI programme on both knowledge and practice in rural areas of Armenia. Consideration should be given to continuing and expanding this project as a complement to health sector development activities in this region.

  18. Physiological links of circadian clock and biological clock of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Chang, Hung-Chun

    2017-07-01

    Circadian rhythms orchestrate biochemical and physiological processes in living organisms to respond the day/night cycle. In mammals, nearly all cells hold self-sustained circadian clocks meanwhile couple the intrinsic rhythms to systemic changes in a hierarchical manner. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus functions as the master pacemaker to initiate daily synchronization according to the photoperiod, in turn determines the phase of peripheral cellular clocks through a variety of signaling relays, including endocrine rhythms and metabolic cycles. With aging, circadian desynchrony occurs at the expense of peripheral metabolic pathologies and central neurodegenerative disorders with sleep symptoms, and genetic ablation of circadian genes in model organisms resembled the aging-related features. Notably, a number of studies have linked longevity nutrient sensing pathways in modulating circadian clocks. Therapeutic strategies that bridge the nutrient sensing pathways and circadian clock might be rational designs to defy aging.

  19. Effectiveness of a tinnitus management programme: a 2-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sørensen Jan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tinnitus impairs the possibility of leading a normal life in 0.5–1% of the population. While neither medical nor surgical treatment appears effective, counselling may offer some relief. An intervention combining counselling and hearing devices is offered to clients referred to the Centre for Help Aids and Communication (CHC in southern Denmark. The aims of this exploratory study were to examine i the characteristics of CHC's clients and their tinnitus, ii the effectiveness of the treatment, and iii whether particular client groups benefit more than others. Methods One hundred new clients presenting with tinnitus completed the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI three times – before their first consultation, after one month and after 1–2 years. The scores were tested for significant differences over time using tests for paired data. Logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with a clinically important difference (i.e. THI score improvement of at least 20 points. Results At final follow-up, total THI score was significantly lower than baseline, i.e. 29.8 (CI 25.5–34.2 vs. 37.2 (CI 33.1–37.2, p Conclusion The tinnitus management programme appeared to provide significant benefit to many clients at a relatively low cost. It would be useful to conduct a randomised controlled study comparing the current programme with alternative forms of combination counselling/sound therapy approaches.

  20. The potential inclusion of value management subject for postgraduate programmes in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Mat, M.; Karim, S. B. Abd; Amran, N. A. E.

    2018-02-01

    The development of construction industry is increasing tremendously. To complement with this scenario, Value Management (VM) is needed to achieve the optimum function by reducing or eliminating the unnecessary cost that does not contribute to the product, system or service. As VM has been increasingly applied to enhance and improve value in construction projects, the purpose of this study is to implement VM as a subject for master’s students at selected public universities in Malaysia. The research is conducted to investigate the potential inclusion of VM as a subject at master degree programmes in Malaysia. Questionnaire survey was designed and delivered to existing master students to explore the current understanding of VM as well as the possibility of introducing VM as a subject. The results showed that the level of awareness on VM is high, yet the understanding of VM is low. This research presents the result of implementing VM as a subject learning for master’s level programme at selected public universities in Malaysia.

  1. European Climate Change Programme. Working Group II. Impacts and Adaptation. Water Management. Sectoral Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    Adaptation is a new policy area for the European climate change policy. The Impacts and Adaptation Workgroup has been set up as part of European Climate Change Programme (ECCP II). The main objective of the workgroup is to explore options to improve Europe's resilience to Climate Change Impacts, to encourage the integration of climate change adaptation into other policy areas at the European, national and regional level and to define the role of EU-wide policies complementing action by Member States. The aim of this initial programme of work is to identify good practice in the development of adaptation policy and foster learning from different sectoral experiences and explore a possible EU role in adaptation policies. The Commission has led a series of 10 sectoral meetings looking at adaptation issues for different sectors. One of these meetings looked at the impacts on the water cycle and water resources management and prediction of extreme events in particular. This report summarises the state of play in the Water Resources sector in relation to adaptation to climate change on the basis of the information gathered at the stakeholder meeting on 11 April, 2006

  2. Quality indicators for in-hospital geriatric co-management programmes: a systematic literature review and international Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Grootven, Bastiaan; McNicoll, Lynn; Mendelson, Daniel A; Friedman, Susan M; Fagard, Katleen; Milisen, Koen; Flamaing, Johan; Deschodt, Mieke

    2018-03-16

    To find consensus on appropriate and feasible structure, process and outcome indicators for the evaluation of in-hospital geriatric co-management programmes. An international two-round Delphi study based on a systematic literature review (searching databases, reference lists, prospective citations and trial registers). Western Europe and the USA. Thirty-three people with at least 2 years of clinical experience in geriatric co-management were recruited. Twenty-eight experts (16 from the USA and 12 from Europe) participated in both Delphi rounds (85% response rate). Participants rated the indicators on a nine-point scale for their (1) appropriateness and (2) feasibility to use the indicator for the evaluation of geriatric co-management programmes. Indicators were considered appropriate and feasible based on a median score of seven or higher. Consensus was based on the level of agreement using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method. In the first round containing 37 indicators, there was consensus on 14 indicators. In the second round containing 44 indicators, there was consensus on 31 indicators (structure=8, process=7, outcome=16). Experts indicated that co-management should start within 24 hours of hospital admission using defined criteria for selecting appropriate patients. Programmes should focus on the prevention and management of geriatric syndromes and complications. Key areas for comprehensive geriatric assessment included cognition/delirium, functionality/mobility, falls, pain, medication and pressure ulcers. Key outcomes for evaluating the programme included length of stay, time to surgery and the incidence of complications. The indicators can be used to assess the performance of geriatric co-management programmes and identify areas for improvement. Furthermore, the indicators can be used to monitor the implementation and effect of these programmes. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All

  3. Importance of strategic management in the implementation of private medicine retailer programmes: case studies from three districts in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsh Vicki

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The home-management of malaria strategy seeks to improve prompt and effective anti-malarial drug use through the informal sector, with a potential channel being the Private Medicine Retailers (PMRs. Previous evaluations of PMR programmes focused on their impact on retailer knowledge and practices, with limited evidence about the influence of implementation processes on the impacts at scale. This paper examines how the implementation processes of three PMR programmes in Kenya, each scaled up within a district, contributed to the outcomes observed. These were a Ministry of Health programme in Kwale district; and two programmes supported by non-governmental organizations in collaboration with government in Kisii Central and Bungoma districts. Methods The research methods included 24 focus group discussions with clients and PMRs, 19 in-depth interviews with implementing actors, document review and a diary of events. The data were analysed using the combination of a broad policy analysis framework and more specific scaling up/diffusion of innovations frameworks. Results The Kisii programme, a case study of successful implementation, was underpinned by good relationships between district health managers and a “resource team”, supported by a memorandum of understanding which enabled successful implementation. It had flexible budgetary and decision making processes which were responsive to local contexts, and took account of local socio-economic activities. In contrast, the Kwale programme, which had implementation challenges, was characterised by a complex funding process, with lengthy timelines, that was tied to the government financial management system which constrained implementation Although there was a flexible funding system in Bungoma, a perceived lack of transparency in fund management, inadequate management of inter-organisational relationships, and inability to adapt and respond to changing circumstances led to

  4. Importance of strategic management in the implementation of private medicine retailer programmes: case studies from three districts in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuya, Timothy; Amin, Abdinasir; Molyneux, Sassy; Akhwale, Willis; Marsh, Vicki; Gilson, Lucy

    2010-07-02

    The home-management of malaria strategy seeks to improve prompt and effective anti-malarial drug use through the informal sector, with a potential channel being the Private Medicine Retailers (PMRs). Previous evaluations of PMR programmes focused on their impact on retailer knowledge and practices, with limited evidence about the influence of implementation processes on the impacts at scale. This paper examines how the implementation processes of three PMR programmes in Kenya, each scaled up within a district, contributed to the outcomes observed. These were a Ministry of Health programme in Kwale district; and two programmes supported by non-governmental organizations in collaboration with government in Kisii Central and Bungoma districts. The research methods included 24 focus group discussions with clients and PMRs, 19 in-depth interviews with implementing actors, document review and a diary of events. The data were analysed using the combination of a broad policy analysis framework and more specific scaling up/diffusion of innovations frameworks. The Kisii programme, a case study of successful implementation, was underpinned by good relationships between district health managers and a "resource team", supported by a memorandum of understanding which enabled successful implementation. It had flexible budgetary and decision making processes which were responsive to local contexts, and took account of local socio-economic activities. In contrast, the Kwale programme, which had implementation challenges, was characterised by a complex funding process, with lengthy timelines, that was tied to the government financial management system which constrained implementation Although there was a flexible funding system in Bungoma, a perceived lack of transparency in fund management, inadequate management of inter-organisational relationships, and inability to adapt and respond to changing circumstances led to implementation difficulties. For effective scaling up of PMR

  5. Childhood obesity management shifting from health care system to school system: intervention study of school-based weight management programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Albert; Ho, Mandy; Keung, Vera M W; Kwong, Amy C M

    2014-11-03

    Home and school environments conducive for unhealthy eating and physical inactivity are precursors of obesity. The aim of this study is evaluation of the effectiveness of a multi-component school-based weight management programme for overweight and obese primary school children via a home-school joint venture. This study made use of variety of behavioural modification strategies integrating into the Health Promoting School approach to promote healthy lifestyles. The participants were overweight and obese students aged between 8 and 12 from six participating schools. The interventions involved students attending ten 75 minutes after-school sessions and one 3-hour week-end session of practical interactive and fun activities on healthy eating and exercise, and meal plan together with parents and printed tailor-made management advices. Parents received an introductory seminar with 2 sets of specially designed exercise for their overweight children. The tools to measure bodyweight and fat percentage and standing height were bio-impedance body fat scale and a portable stadiometer. Self-administered questionnaire was used to measure knowledge, attitudes and behaviours. McNemar test was utilized to compare the proportions of behaviour changes within the same group to assess for the trends of changes. BMI z-score and body fat percentage of intervention participants at baseline, 4 month and 8 month were compared pair-wisely using tests of within subject contrasts in repeated measures ANOVA to assess for programme sustainability. Those students in the intervention group reduced their BMI z-score (-0.21, 95% CI -0.34 to -0.07, P = 0.003) and body fat (-2.67%, 95% CI -5.12 to -0.22, P = 0.033) compared to wait list control group with statistical significant, and the intervention group also had a significant reduction in BMI z-score (-0.06, 95% CI -0.11, -0.007, P = 0.028) and body fat (-1.71%, 95% CI, -3.44 to 0.02, P = 0.052) after a 4 month maintenance period. Improvement of

  6. Can we reduce preventable heart failure readmissions in patients enrolled in a Disease Management Programme?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phelan, D

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Disease Management Programmes (DMPs) are successful in reducing hospital readmissions in heart failure (HF). However, there remain a number of patients enrolled in a DMP who are readmitted with HF. The primary aim of the study was to determine the proportion of preventable readmissions (PR). The secondary aim was to recognise patient characteristics which would identify certain patients at risk of having a PR. METHODS: A retrospective chart search was performed on patients readmitted over a 1-year period. RESULTS: 38.5% of readmissions were classified as PR. None of these patients made prior contact with the DMP. Admission levels of BNP, potassium, urea and creatinine were significantly lower in the PR group. CONCLUSION: DMP have proven benefits in reducing hospital readmission nonetheless a significant proportion of these readmissions are preventable. Further work is required to prospectively analyse why these patients fail to contact the DMP.

  7. Nurse- and peer-led self-management programme for patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator; a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Eijk Jacques

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of cardiovascular disease is increasing. Improved treatment options increase survival after an acute myocardial infarction or sudden cardiac arrest, although patients often have difficulty adjusting and regaining control in daily life. In particular, patients who received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD experience physical and psychological problems. Interventions to enhance perceived control and acceptance of the device are therefore necessary. This paper describes a small-scale study to explore the feasibility and the possible benefits of a structured nurse- and peer-led self-management programme ('Chronic Disease Self-Management Program' – CDSMP among ICD patients. Methods Ten male ICD patients (mean age = 65.5 years participated in a group programme, consisting of six sessions, led by a team consisting of a nurse specialist and a patient with cardiovascular disease. Programme feasibility was evaluated among patients and leaders by measuring performance of the intervention according to protocol, attendance and adherence of the participating ICD patients, and patients' and leaders' opinions about the programme. In addition, before and directly after attending the intervention, programme benefits (e.g. perceived control, symptoms of anxiety and depression, and quality of life were assessed. Results The programme was conducted largely according to protocol. Eight patients attended at least four sessions, and adherence ranged from good to very good. On average, the patients reported to have benefited very much from the programme, which they gave an overall report mark of 8.4. The leaders considered the programme feasible as well. Furthermore, improvements were identified for general self-efficacy expectancies, symptoms of anxiety, physical functioning, social functioning, role limitations due to physical problems, and pain. Conclusion This study suggests that a self-management programme led by a

  8. Rights and Responsibilities. Supervisory Skills Module. Operational Management Programme. Increasing Opportunities for Supervisors and Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rodney

    This self-instructional unit for supervisors and managers in the British hotel and catering industry is designed to consolidate the work covered in a 1-day course. The document begins with an introduction and advice on how to use the unit. The following topics are covered: (1) the law and personnel procedures; (2) consultation and negotiation; (3)…

  9. Overview of the solid radioactive waste management programme for Cernavoda NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raducea, D.

    2001-01-01

    The wastes generated from nuclear power plants have a very large diversity, and can be grouped into non-radioactive and radioactive wastes. These two types are manipulated completely different ways from each other. Among radioactive wastes, solid radioactive wastes are important, because of their diversity, their method of treatment and of their volume compared to the others types. The strategy for their treatment and characterisation has a dynamic character and allows modification after the identification of new solutions at the international level, or after the production of new waste types. The Radioactive Waste Management concept for Cernavoda NPP established the general approach required for the collection, handling, conditioning and storage of radioactive wastes, while maintaining acceptable levels of safety for workers, members of the public and the environment. The radioactive waste management programme has the following major characteristics: plant operation at all times ensures that radioactive wastes are minimised; procedures are established to ensure that radiation doses to operating staff and members of the public are in accordance with ALARA and contamination from collection, transportation and storage of wastes are eliminated; all staff is trained and qualified to carry out their responsibilities. This presentation does not address the management of spent fuel, contaminated heavy water and the disposal of the solid radioactive wastes.(author)

  10. Liquid-waste management systems improvement programmes at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emelity, L.A.; Stanley, P.M.; Buchholz, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Programmes at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) are approximately 50% nuclear weapons related and 50% general energy research and development. Since its beginning in the 1940s, liquid industrial wastes have been contaminated with isotopes of plutonium, americium, uranium and various beta-gamma emitters, but management and treatment efforts were, owing to the proportions of the various isotopes, directed primarily at the alpha emitters. The evolution in management methods at LASL since the 1940s has been reported in previous papers. This treatise discusses the most recent three-phase effort to modernize the systems to the probable standards of the next twenty years. The first phase, provision of a double-encased, continuously monitored sewer system will soon be under construction. The second phase, modernization of the treatment facilities, has been funded and is in the final design stage. The third phase, not funded as of this date, will provide lined, monitored solar evaporation ponds for total management of the treated industrial wastes with no release of any liquid to the environment. (author)

  11. IAEA's radioactive waste management programme a change in direction for the 1990's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saire, Donald E.

    1991-01-01

    The IAEA has been assisting Member States in the management and disposal of radioactive wastes for almost three decades. This assistance has largely been in the form of providing an international form for the exchange of information on subjects of mutual interest and in offering technical assistance from developed Member States to developing Member States. In the 1980's, the Agency's programme concentrated on the collection, review and publication of state-of-the-art technology covering such subject fields as handling and processing of wastes from nuclear power plants and fuel cycle facilities, gaseous waste management, near-surface disposal of low-and intermediate-level radioactive wastes, deep geological disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes, radiological and environmental effects of waste disposal and the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear installations. While the Agency still plans to serve as the main forum for the exchange of information on radioactive waste management two new areas of activity will receive emphasis in the 1990's

  12. Certified Integral Programme Management for R&D European Projects in Marine Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Ayoze; Hildebrandt, silvia; Quevedo, Eduardo; Meme, Simone; Loustau, Josefina; Hernandez-Brito, Joaquin; Llinás, Octavio

    2017-04-01

    The Oceanic Platform of the Canary Islands (PLOCAN) is a multipurpose service centre with novel land-based and sea-based infrastructures to support research, technology development an innovation in the marine and maritime sectors. Its mission is to promote long-term observation and sustainability of the ocean, providing a cost-effective combination of services, such as observatories, test site, base for underwater vehicles, training and innovation hub. PLOCAN has been actively participating in the European Commission Blue Growth strategy to support sustainable growth in the marine and maritime sectors as a whole. As a result, during the period 2014-2016, there has been a particularly high increase in the number of projects in execution in the organization. In order to successfully manage this situation, the development of a robust, effective and certified programme management system has turned out to be essential. To do so, an integral management methodology was specifically created and has successfully passed the ISO 9001:2008 certification in 2016.

  13. MAREANO: The national seafloor mapping programme of Norway - providing new knowledge for making informed management decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsnes, T.; Bjarnadóttir, L. R.

    2017-12-01

    MAREANO (Marine AREA database for NOrwegian waters) is a state funded programme that has been mapping the seabed in Norwegian waters since 2005. Core datasets include detailed bathymetric data, video transect data and physical samples of the seabed. Integrated knowledge of the geology, habitats and the environmental status of the seabed is gained from the combined datasets and all results are presented on www.mareano.no. The results from MAREANO serve as a baseline of scientific information for decision-makers and which is actively used by ocean management agencies. Since 2005 the programme has grown and matured a great deal. Funding has increased twentyfold (now about 13 mill. USD), and the size of seabed mapped is now tenfold (about 22000 km2 annually). With this expansion the programme has evolved a more complex structure, regulating its activities more strictly and adhering to long-term plans. During this time the number of products has also increased, and so has the need for reviewing and improving methods. In 2015 MAREANO prepared a comprehensive report which documented and evaluated current methods and reviewed sampling/mapping standards based on management needs. Whilst the methods adopted by MAREANO to date have largely proved effective, several recent advances in technology within the various fields of seabed mapping offer great potential for improvements. Since 2014 MAREANO has been testing out some of this new technology such as acquisition of seabed data with improved resolution and autonomy in data collection, using AUVs equipped with synthetic aperture sonar and ROVs with underwater hyperspectral-sensors. Recently, MAREANO scientists have also been exploring new, more automated methods for data interpretation, classification and modelling. Preliminary results are promising and these new methods are expected to help to streamline the map production workflow in the future, thereby reducing production costs, while making even better maps that are both

  14. The women's heart health programme: a pilot trial of sex-specific cardiovascular management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Ting Ting; Chan, Siew Pang; Wai, Shin Hnin; Ang, Zhou; Kyu, Kyu; Lee, Kim Yee; Ching, Anne; Comer, Sarah; Tan, Naomi Qiu Pin; Thong, Elizabeth Grace Hui En; Nang, Tracy; Dutta, Mohan; Lam, Carolyn S P

    2018-04-16

    There is increasing knowledge of sex-specific differences in cardiovascular disease and recognition of sex disparities in management. In our study, we investigated whether a cardiovascular programme tailored to the specific needs of women could lead to improved outcomes. We randomised 100 female patients to receive cardiology follow-up with the conventional sex-neutral cardiac programme (control), or the sex-tailored Women's Heart Health Programme (intervention). The intervention group was managed by an all-women multidisciplinary team and received culture-centred health intervention workshops, designed through in-depth interviews with the participants. The primary outcome was cardiovascular risk factor improvement at 1 year. Secondary outcomes include cardiovascular event rates, quality of life scores, and self-reported improvement in knowledge, attitudes, intentions and practices. Generalised structural equation model analysis was used to determine if the intervention group had better outcomes at alpha level 0.1. The mean age was 67.3 ± 12.7 years, with an ethnic distribution of 70% Chinese, 18% Malays, and 12% Indians. The majority of these patients had no formal or primary level of education (63%), and were mostly unemployed (78%). Patients in intervention group had better control of diabetes mellitus (lower HbA1c of 0.63% [CI 0.21-1.04], p = 0.015) and lower body-mass-index (0.74 kg/m 2 [CI 0.02-1.46], p = 0.092) at 1 year, but there was no significant difference in blood pressure or lipid control. Overall, there was a trend towards better risk factor control, 31.6% of intervention group versus 26.5% of control group achieved improvement in at least 1 CV risk factor control to target range. There was no significant difference in incidence of cardiovascular events, quality of life, or domains in knowledge, attitudes, intention and practices. This pilot study is the first of its kind evaluating a new model of care for women with heart disease

  15. Micro Mercury Ion Clock (MMIC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Demonstrate micro clock based on trapped Hg ions with more than 10x size reduction and power; Fractional frequency stability at parts per 1014 level, adequate for...

  16. History of early atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, N.F.

    2005-01-01

    This review of the history of early atomic clocks includes early atomic beam magnetic resonance, methods of separated and successive oscillatory fields, microwave absorption, optical pumping and atomic masers. (author)

  17. Controllable clock circuit design in PEM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yunhua; Wang Peihua; Hu Tingting; Feng Baotong; Shuai Lei; Huang Huan; Wei Shujun; Li Ke; Zhao Jingwei; Wei Long

    2011-01-01

    A high-precision synchronized clock circuit design will be presented, which can supply steady, reliable and anti-jamming clock signal for the data acquirement (DAQ) system of Positron Emission Mammography (PEM). This circuit design is based on the Single-Chip Microcomputer and high-precision clock chip, and can achieve multiple controllable clock signals. The jamming between the clock signals can be reduced greatly with the differential transmission. Meanwhile, the adoption of CAN bus control in the clock circuit can prompt the clock signals to be transmitted or masked simultaneously when needed. (authors)

  18. Controllable clock circuit design in PEM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yunhua; Wang Peilin; Hu Tingting; Feng Baotong; Shuai Lei; Huang Huan; Wei Shujun; Li Ke; Zhao Jingwei; Wei Long

    2010-01-01

    A high-precision synchronized clock circuit design will be presented, which can supply steady, reliable and anti-jamming clock signal for the data acquirement (DAQ) system of Positron Emission Mammography (PEM). This circuit design is based on the Single-Chip Microcomputer and high-precision clock chip, and can achieve multiple controllable clock signals. The jamming between the clock signals can be reduced greatly with the differential transmission. Meanwhile, the adoption of CAN bus control in the clock circuit can prompt the clock signals to be transmitted or masked simultaneously when needed. (authors)

  19. Recent Perspective on the Severe Accident Management Programme for Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Manwoong; Lee, Sukho; Lee, Jungjae; Chung, Kuyoung

    2017-01-01

    Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMGs), has been developed to help operators to prevent or mitigate the impacts of accidents at nuclear power plants. Severe accident management was first introduced in the 1990s with the creation of SAMGs following recognition that post-Three Mile Island Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) did not adequately address severe core damage conditions. Establishing and maintaining multiple layers of defence against any internal/external hazards is an important measure to reduce radiological risks to the public and environment. This study is intended to suggest future regulatory perspectives to strengthen the prevention and mitigation strategies for severe accidents by review of the current status of revision of IAEA Safety Standard on Severe Accident Management Programmes for Nuclear Power Plants and the combined PWR SAMG. This new IAEA Safety Guide will address guidelines for preparation, development, implementation and review of severe accident management programs during all operating conditions for both reactor and spent fuel pool. This Guide is used by operating organizations of nuclear power plants and their support organizations. It may also be used by national regulatory bodies and technical support organizations as a reference for developing their relevant safety requirements and for conducting reviews and safety assessments for SAMP including SAMG. The Pressurized Water Reactor Owner’s Group (PWROG) is upgrading the original generic Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMGs) into single Severe Accident Guidelines (SAGs) for the PWR SAMG aims to consolidate the advantages of each of the separate vendor severe accident (SA) mitigation methods. This new PWROG SAGs changes the SAMG process to be made that can improve SA response. Changes have been made that guidance is available for control room operators when the TSC is not activated thus allowing for timely accident response. Other changes were made to the guidance

  20. Current Status of the United Kingdom Programme for Long-Term Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, C. H.; Hooper, A. J.; Mathieson, J.

    2002-01-01

    In 1997, the UK programme for the deep disposal of radioactive waste was ''stopped dead in its tracks'' with the refusal by the Secretary of State for the Environment to allow Nirex to go ahead with its plans for an underground Rock Characterisation Facility at Sellafield in north-west England. Since that time a House of Lords' Select Committee has held an inquiry into what went wrong and what the way ahead should be. In addition, Nirex and the nuclear industry players have also been analyzing the past with a view to learning from the experience in taking things forward. In Nirex's view this is essentially an ethical issue; the waste exists and we should deal with it in this generation. Three areas need to be better addressed if a successful program of management of the nation's radioactive waste is to be achieved: the process of how policy development and implementation can be achieved; the structure of the nuclear industry and its relationship to the waste management organization; and the behavior of the players in their interaction with stakeholders. All three are underpinned by the need for transparency. In recognition that developing a policy for managing radioactive waste has to be achieved with the support of all stakeholders, the Government instigated a consultation exercise in September 2001. The initial phase of this initiative is essentially a consultation about consultation and is intended to decide on how the next stages of a six year policy development program should be addressed. In addition to this exercise, the Government is undertaking a fundamental review of the structuring of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) and British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL). They are both shareholders in Nirex and in November 2001 the Government announced the setting up of a Liabilities Management Authority (LMA) to manage the long-term nuclear liabilities that are publicly owned, particularly through those organizations. The future of Nirex will be

  1. Time without clocks - an attempt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpman, G.

    1978-01-01

    A definition of time intervals separating two states of systems of elementary particles and observers is attempted. The definition is founded on the notion of instant state of the system and uses no information connected with the use of a clock. Applying the definition to a classical clock and to a sample of unstable particles, results are obtained in agreement with experiment. However, if the system contains 'few' elementary particles, the properties of the time interval present some different features. (author)

  2. Physical Layer Ethernet Clock Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    42 nd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting 77 PHYSICAL LAYER ETHERNET CLOCK SYNCHRONIZATION Reinhard Exel, Georg...oeaw.ac.at Nikolaus Kerö Oregano Systems, Mohsgasse 1, 1030 Wien, Austria E-mail: nikolaus.keroe@oregano.at Abstract Clock synchronization ...is a service widely used in distributed networks to coordinate data acquisition and actions. As the requirement to achieve tighter synchronization

  3. The experience of facilitators and participants of long term condition self-management group programmes: A qualitative synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen; Lewis, Sophie; Willis, Karen; Rogers, Anne; Wyke, Sally; Smith, Lorraine

    2017-12-01

    Our aim was to systematically review the qualitative literature about the experiences of both facilitators and participants in a range of group-based programmes to support the self-management of long-term conditions. We searched 7 databases using the terms 'self-management', 'group' and 'qualitative'. Full text articles meeting the inclusion criteria were retrieved for review. A thematic synthesis approach was used to analyse the studies. 2126 articles were identified and 24 were included for review. Group participants valued being with similar others and perceived peer support benefits. Facilitators (HCP and lay) had limited group specific training, were uncertain of purpose and prioritised education and medical conformity over supportive group processes and the promotion of self-management agency and engagement. Overall, studies prioritised positive descriptions. Group programmes' medical self-management focus may reduce their ability to contribute to patient-valued outcomes. Further research is needed to explore this disconnect. This review supports broadening the scope of group-based programmes to foreground shared learning, social support and development of agency. It is of relevance to developers and facilitators of group self-management programmes and their ability to address the burden of long-term conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The impact on sleep of a multidisciplinary cognitive behavioural pain management programme: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Jennifer M; Blake, Catherine; Power, Camillus K; O'Keeffe, Declan; Kelly, Valerie; Horan, Sheila; Spencer, Orla; Fullen, Brona M

    2011-01-10

    Reduced sleep quality is a common complaint among patients with chronic pain, with 50-80% of patients reporting sleep disturbance. Improvements in pain and quality of life measures have been achieved using a multidisciplinary cognitive behavioural therapy pain management programme (CBT-PMP) that aims to recondition attitudes to pain, and improve patients' self-management of their condition. Despite its high prevalence in patients with chronic pain, there is very limited objective evidence for the effect of this intervention on sleep quality. The primary research objective is to investigate the short-term effect of a multidisciplinary CBT-PMP on subjective (measured by Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index) and objective sleep quality (measured by Actigraphy) in patients with chronic pain by comparison with a control group. The secondary objectives will investigate changes in function and mood, and then explore the relationship between objective and subjective sleep quality and physical and psychological outcome measures. Patients who fulfil the inclusion criteria for attendance on the multidisciplinary CBT-PMP in the Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin and are currently listed on the PMP waiting list will be invited to participate in this pilot study. Potential patients will be screened for sleep disturbance [determined by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI)]. Those patients with a sleep disturbance (PSQI >5) will be assigned to either the intervention group (immediate treatment), or control group (deferred treatment, i.e. the PMP they are listed for is more than six months away) based on where they appear on the waiting list. Baseline measures of sleep, function, and mood will be obtained using a combination of self-report questionnaires (the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Short Form 36 health survey, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia), and functional outcome measures. Sleep will be measured for seven days

  5. Higher Education Curriculum for Sustainability: Course Contents Analyses of Purchasing and Supply Management Programme of Polytechnics in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etse, Daniel; Ingley, Coral

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the degree of attention to and the nature of sustainability issues in the curriculum of the Higher National Diploma (HND) Purchasing and Supply Management programme of Ghana. Design/Methodology/Approach: Documentary research is the approach used to analyse the curriculum document for the programme…

  6. The Role of a Short-Term Education Programme in International Nuclear Human Resource Development and Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, K.; Uesaka, M.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The Nuclear Energy Management School is proposed as a good tool to structure the experiences of industries. The importance of a short-term international education programme for gathering knowledge regarding nuclear embarkation projects is discussed in this paper. The results of evaluating education efficiency from 2013 to 2016 will also be introduced in this presentation (or poster). (author

  7. Grip on challenging behaviour: a multidisciplinary care programme for managing behavioural problems in nursing home residents with dementia. Study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, S.A.; Smalbrugge, M.; Zuidema, S.U.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Bosmans, J.E.; Tulder, M.W. van; Eefsting, J.A.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Pot, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Behavioural problems are common in nursing home residents with dementia and they often are burdensome for both residents and nursing staff. In this study, the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a new care programme for managing behavioural problems will be evaluated. METHODS/DESIGN:

  8. Grip on challenging behaviour: a multidisciplinary care programme for managing behavioural problems in nursing home residents with dementia. Study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, S.A.; Smalbrugge, M.; Zuidema, S.U.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Bosmans, J.E.; van Tulder, M.W.; Eefsting, J.A.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Pot, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Behavioural problems are common in nursing home residents with dementia and they often are burdensome for both residents and nursing staff. In this study, the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a new care programme for managing behavioural problems will be evaluated. Methods/Design.

  9. Innovation and Alliances in International Management Programmes; Redefining and Extending the Model. The "Transcontinental Tracks" at Grenoble EM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mark; O'Sullivan, Patrick; Zahner, Martin; Silvestre, Joelle

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe an innovative international management programme that has been developed across four countries for Master-level students. It first analyses the advantages and disadvantages of two of the most common forms of internationalisation in higher education; the student exchange and full-scale offshore…

  10. The Community's R and D programme on management and storage of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMenamin, T.

    1990-05-01

    This list of publications covers reports, proceedings, communications and information leaflets produced and published in the frame of the cost-sharing research programme of the Commission of the European Communities on radioactive waste management and disposal. The list, which is regularly updated, includes: (i) reports of contractors on research supported by the Commission; (ii) reports on research in coordinated actions, assembled and edited by the Commission staff or on behalf of the Commission; (iii) proceedings of meetings, conferences and workshops organized and edited by the Commission staff; (iv) scientific reports, communications, annual progress reports and information leaflets produced and edited by the Commission staff. Not included are contributions of contractors and staff to national or international meetings, workshops, conferences and expert groups. Work performed by the Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) in the field of radioactive waste management is not mentioned here - information on the JRC activities and publications may be found in the annual JRC progress reports and the bi-annual information leaflet EC-Focus

  11. [Methods in health services research. The example of the evaluation of the German disease management programmes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfeld, M; Wirtz, M

    2006-02-01

    According to the established definition of Pfaff, health services research analyses patients' path through the institutions of the health care system. The focus is on development, evaluation and implementation of innovative measures of health care. By increasing its quality health services research strives for an improvement of efficacy and efficiency of the health care system. In order to allow for an appropriate evaluation it is essential to differentiate between structure, process and outcome quality referring to (1) the health care system in its entirety, (2) specific health care units as well as (3) processes of communication in different settings. Health services research comprises a large array of scientific disciplines like public health, medicine, social sciences and social care. For the purpose of managing its tasks adequately a special combination of instruments and methodological procedures is needed. Thus, diverse techniques of evaluation research as well as special requirements for study designs and assessment procedures are of vital importance. The example of the German disease management programmes illustrates the methodical requirements for a scientific evaluation.

  12. Testing measurement invariance of the Learning Programme Management and Evaluation scale across academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maelekanyo C. Mulaudzi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Measurement invariance is one of the most precarious aspects of the scale development process without which the interpretation of research findings on population subgroups may be ambiguous and even invalid. Besides tests for validity and reliability, measurement invariance represents the hallmark for psychometric compliance of a new measuring instrument and provides the basis for inference of research findings across a range of relevant population sub-groups. Research purpose: This study tested the measurement invariance of a Learning Programme Management and Evaluation (LPME scale across levels of academic achievement. Motivation for the study: It is important for any researcher involved in new scale development to ensure that the measurement instrument and its underlying constructs have proper structural alignment and that they both have the same level of meaning and significance across comparable heterogeneous groups. Research design, approach and method: A quantitative, non-experimental, cross-sectional survey design was used, and data were obtained from 369 participants who were selected from three public sector organisations using a probabilistic simple random sampling technique. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences and Analysis of Moment Structures software (versions 21.0.0 were used to analyse the data. Main findings: The findings show that all the four invariance models tested have achieved acceptable goodness-of-fit indices. Furthermore, the findings show that the factorial structure of the LPME scale and the meaning of its underlying constructs are invariant across different levels of academic achievement for human resource development (HRD practitioners and learners or apprentices involved in occupational learning programmes. Practical implications: The findings of this study suggest practical implications for HRD scholars as they are enabled to make informed decisional balance comparisons involving educational

  13. National programme: Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsten, J.

    1986-01-01

    Finland's programmes in the field of reactor pressure components are presented in this paper. The following information on each of these programmes is given: the brief description of the programme; the programme's schedule and duration; the name of the project manager

  14. Impact of an intervention programme on knowledge, attitude and practice of healthcare staff regarding pharmaceutical waste management, Gaza, Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabash, M I; Hussein, R A; Mahmoud, A H; El-Borgy, M D; Abu-Hamad, B A

    2016-09-01

    To assess knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of healthcare staff regarding pharmaceutical waste management; and to determine the impact of an educational programme on the KAP survey items. Pre-post-test intervention study. The pre-intervention phase was performed using a sample of 530 out of 1500 healthcare workers. A predesigned interview questionnaire was used to assess KAP. Next, an educational programme was designed and offered to a subsample of 69 healthcare workers. KAP were re-assessed for the programme attendees using the same interview questionnaire, both immediately (post-test) and six months after the end of the programme (follow-up test). The parametric paired sample t-test was used to assess the difference between pre-test and follow-up test results. Poor knowledge and poor practice levels (scores 50%) detected in the pre-intervention phase were found to improve to satisfactory levels (scores ≥75%) in the follow-up phase. Attitude was found to be positive (score ≥75%) in all phases of the study. The educational programme led to a significant improvement in KAP of healthcare staff regarding pharmaceutical waste management (P<0.001). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Pitfalls of Insulin Pump Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Amy J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to raise awareness about the importance of ensuring that insulin pumps internal clocks are set up correctly at all times. This is a very important safety issue because all commercially available insulin pumps are not GPS-enabled (though this is controversial), nor equipped with automatically adjusting internal clocks. Special attention is paid to how basal and bolus dose errors can be introduced by daylight savings time changes, travel across time zones, and am-pm clock errors. Correct setting of insulin pump internal clock is crucial for appropriate insulin delivery. A comprehensive literature review is provided, as are illustrative cases. Incorrect setting can potentially result in incorrect insulin delivery, with potential harmful consequences, if too much or too little insulin is delivered. Daylight saving time changes may not significantly affect basal insulin delivery, given the triviality of the time difference. However, bolus insulin doses can be dramatically affected. Such problems may occur when pump wearers have large variations in their insulin to carb ratio, especially if they forget to change their pump clock in the spring. More worrisome than daylight saving time change is the am-pm clock setting. If this setting is set up incorrectly, both basal rates and bolus doses will be affected. Appropriate insulin delivery through insulin pumps requires correct correlation between dose settings and internal clock time settings. Because insulin pumps are not GPS-enabled or automatically time-adjusting, extra caution should be practiced by patients to ensure correct time settings at all times. Clinicians and diabetes educators should verify the date/time of insulin pumps during patients’ visits, and should remind their patients to always verify these settings. PMID:25355713

  16. The Effects and Costs of a Group-Based Education Programme for Self-Management of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. A Community-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molsted, Stig; Tribler, Jane; Poulsen, Peter B.; Snorgaard, Ole

    2012-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of Type 2 diabetes necessitates evidence-based self-management education programmes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and costs of an empowerment-based structured diabetes self-management education programme in an unselected group of patients with Type 2 diabetes. Seven hundred and two patients…

  17. A disease management programme for patients with diabetes mellitus is associated with improved quality of care within existing budgets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuten, L M G; Vrijhoef, H J M; Landewé-Cleuren, S; Schaper, N; Van Merode, G G; Spreeuwenberg, C

    2007-10-01

    To assess the impact of a disease management programme for patients with diabetes mellitus (Type 1 and Type 2) on cost-effectiveness, quality of life and patient self-management. By organizing care in accordance with the principles of disease management, it is aimed to increase quality of care within existing budgets. Single-group, pre-post design with 2-year follow-up in 473 patients. Substantial significant improvements in glycaemic control, health-related quality of life (HRQL) and patient self-management were found. No significant changes were detected in total costs of care. The probability that the disease management programme is cost-effective compared with usual care amounts to 74%, expressed in an average saving of 117 per additional life year at 5% improved HRQL. Introduction of a disease management programme for patients with diabetes is associated with improved intermediate outcomes within existing budgets. Further research should focus on long-term cost-effectiveness, including diabetic complications and mortality, in a controlled setting or by using decision-analytic modelling techniques.

  18. Leadership and management for an effective radiation protection programme: A study on open cast diamond mining in Lesotho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thetha, Pakeng

    2016-04-01

    Leadership and Management system commitment to safety is recognised as a fundamental component of an organisation's safety culture. This study focuses on how organisations can integrate leadership and management in achieving an effective radiation protection programme (RPP), in Lesotho's diamond mining industry. The study made a comparative analysis of relevant studies made on similar open pit mines and industries around the world. The findings suggest that, leaders and managers should ensure that prior radiological assessment is done in order to streamline the radiation protection programme to satisfy the needs of the individual mining companies thus making it more effective. Furthermore there is a need to ensure that leadership and management are integrated at every level of the organization in the implementation of the RPP. Lesotho Diamond Mining industry has no radiation protection programme in place thus its effectiveness could not be assessed. Leaders and managers should be involved at all levels of the organization from site specific radiological evaluation, design, funding, training and implementation of the RPP. Senior managers, supervisors and workers have the responsibility to ensure the protection of those occupationally exposed the public, the environment and future generations by implementing the RPP effectively and efficiently. (au)

  19. Assessing the Food Safety Attitudes and Awareness of Managers of School Feeding Programmes in Mpumalanga, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibanyoni, J J; Tabit, F T

    2017-08-01

    The managers of school feeding programmes are responsible for ensuring the safety of the food which is provided to schoolchildren, but very few studies have been conducted on the food safety knowledge and awareness of these managers. The objective of this study is to evaluate the food safety attitudes and awareness of managers of the National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP) in schools in Mpumalanga, a province of South Africa. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted in which questionnaires were used to collect data from 300 NSNP food service managers. The majority of schools offering NSNP meals were located in informal settlements and most were found to lack basic resources such as electricity (power supplies to the food preparation facility) and potable tap water in their kitchens. No school was found to have implemented the hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP) programme, and only a few staff had received food safety training. Food safety implementation is worst in informal schools in rural areas due to limited resources and infrastructure. The NSNP food service managers in some schools-especially those located in rural settlements-were found to have little knowledge and awareness of HACCP. These results indicate an urgent need to provide NSNP managers with food safety training and resources (potable water supplies, electricity, dedicated food preparation facilities), particularly in schools in rural settlements.

  20. An information system to manage the rollout of the antiretroviral treatment programme in the Free State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.E. Kotzé

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome epidemic, caused by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus, is a global crisis which threatens development gains, economies, and societies. Within sub-Saharan Africa, where the epidemic began the earliest and the HIV prevalence is the highest, African countries have death rates not seen before. In South Africa the epidemic has a devastating impact which creates profound suffering on individuals and their families, and the impact on the socio-economic level is of great concern. The eradication of HIV/AIDS represents one of humanity’s greatest challenges, which requires co-operation and comprehensive collaboration between many different role players. In this endeavour clinical information plays a major role. To combat the effect of the disease, the Free State Department of Health started with the provisioning of antiretroviral therapy in the public health sector. The objective of this paper was to address the challenges they faced in order to develop and implement an information system to manage the rollout of antiretroviral treatment effectively. They started with a paper-based system to collect vital information. It was followed by a palm computer project that was initiated to electronically capture the data collected by the paper-based system. This system was then replaced by a comprehensive Hospital and Clinic Information System which was acquired and customised for the antiretroviral data collection process. Research partners developed a standalone antiretroviral data warehouse for collecting information associated with the monitoring and evaluation of the Free State antiretroviral and HIV/ AIDS treatment programme. The data warehouse successfully produced several management information reports to the antiretroviral management team. A need was identified to design a comprehensive antiretroviral data warehouse that will integrate data from several operational sources which are all associated with HIV/AIDS.

  1. Sound Clocks and Sonic Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Scott L.; Menicucci, Nicolas C.

    2017-10-01

    Sound propagation within certain non-relativistic condensed matter models obeys a relativistic wave equation despite such systems admitting entirely non-relativistic descriptions. A natural question that arises upon consideration of this is, "do devices exist that will experience the relativity in these systems?" We describe a thought experiment in which `acoustic observers' possess devices called sound clocks that can be connected to form chains. Careful investigation shows that appropriately constructed chains of stationary and moving sound clocks are perceived by observers on the other chain as undergoing the relativistic phenomena of length contraction and time dilation by the Lorentz factor, γ , with c the speed of sound. Sound clocks within moving chains actually tick less frequently than stationary ones and must be separated by a shorter distance than when stationary to satisfy simultaneity conditions. Stationary sound clocks appear to be length contracted and time dilated to moving observers due to their misunderstanding of their own state of motion with respect to the laboratory. Observers restricted to using sound clocks describe a universe kinematically consistent with the theory of special relativity, despite the preferred frame of their universe in the laboratory. Such devices show promise in further probing analogue relativity models, for example in investigating phenomena that require careful consideration of the proper time elapsed for observers.

  2. Circadian clocks, epigenetics, and cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Masri, Selma; Kinouchi, Kenichiro; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The interplay between circadian rhythm and cancer has been suggested for more than a decade based on the observations that shift work and cancer incidence are linked. Accumulating evidence implicates the circadian clock in cancer survival and proliferation pathways. At the molecular level, multiple control mechanisms have been proposed to link circadian transcription and cell-cycle control to tumorigenesis.The circadian gating of the cell cycle and subsequent control of cell proliferation is an area of active investigation. Moreover, the circadian clock is a transcriptional system that is intricately regulated at the epigenetic level. Interestingly, the epigenetic landscape at the level of histone modifications, DNA methylation, and small regulatory RNAs are differentially controlled in cancer cells. This concept raises the possibility that epigenetic control is a common thread linking the clock with cancer, though little scientific evidence is known to date.This review focuses on the link between circadian clock and cancer, and speculates on the possible connections at the epigenetic level that could further link the circadian clock to tumor initiation or progression.

  3. Titan's methane clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Romani, P. N.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Flasar, F. M.

    2010-04-01

    Measurements of the 12C/13C and D/H isotopic ratios in Titan's methane show intriguing differences from the values recorded in the giant planets. This implies that either (1) the atmosphere was differently endowed with material at the time of formation, or (2) evolutionary processes are at work in the moon's atmosphere - or some combination of the two. The Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer Instrument (GCMS) found 12CH4/13CH4 = 82 +/- 1 (Niemann et al. 2005), some 7% lower than the giant planets' value of 88 +/- 7 (Sada et al. 1996), which closely matches the terrestrial inorganic standard of 89. The Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) has previously reported 12CH4/13CH4 of 77 +/-3 based on nadir sounding, which we now revise upwards to 80 +/- 4 based on more accurate limb sounding. The CIRS and GCMS results are therefore in agreement about an overall enrichment in 13CH4 of ~10%. The value of D/H in Titan's CH4 has long been controversial: historical measurements have ranged from about 8-15 x 10-5 (e.g. Coustenis et al. 1989, Coustenis et al. 2003). A recent measurement based on CIRS limb data by Bezard et al. (2007) puts the D/H in CH4 at (13 +/- 1) x 10-5, very much greater than in Jupiter and Saturn, ~2 x 10-5 (Mahaffy et al. 1998, Fletcher et al. 2009). To add complexity, the 12C/13C and D/H vary among molecules in Titan atmosphere, typically showing enhancement in D but depletion in 13C in the daughter species (H2, C2H2, C2H6), relative to the photochemical progenitor, methane. Jennings et al. (2009) have sought to interpret the variance in carbon isotopes as a Kinetic Isotope Effect (KIE), whilst an explanation for the D/H in all molecules remains elusive (Cordier et al. 2008). In this presentation we argue that evolution of isotopic ratios in Titan's methane over time forms a ticking 'clock', somewhat analogous to isotopic ratios in geochronology. Under plausible assumptions about the initial values and subsequent replenishment, various

  4. Task 9. Deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. The role of quality management, hardware certification and accredited training in PV programmes in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, M. C. [Institute for Sustainable Power, Highlands Ranch, CO (United States); Oldach, R.; Bates, J. [IT Power Ltd, The Manor house, Chineham (United Kingdom)

    2003-09-15

    This report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at the role of quality management, hardware certification and accredited training in PV programmes in developing countries. The objective of this document is to provide assistance to those project developers that are interested in implementing or improving support programmes for the deployment of PV systems for rural electrification. It is to enable them to address and implement quality assurance measures, with an emphasis on management, technical and training issues and other factors that should be considered for the sustainable implementation of rural electrification programmes. It is considered important that quality also addresses the socio-economic and the socio-technical aspects of a programme concept. The authors summarise that, for a PV programme, there are three important areas of quality control to be implemented: quality management, technical standards and quality of training.

  5. Suggested Guidelines for Transparency and Participation in Nuclear Waste Management Programmes. Deliverable 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, Josefin Paeivioe; Andersson, Kjell; Bolado, Ricardo; Drottz Sjoeberg, Britt-Marie; Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran; Kojo, Matti; Meskens, Gaston; Pritrsky, Jozef; Richardson, Phil; Soneryd, Linda; Steinerova, Lucie; Szerszynski, Bronislaw; Wene, Clas-Otto; Vojtechova, Hana

    2010-02-01

    The ARGONA project intended to demonstrate how participation and transparency link to the political and legal systems and how new approaches can be implemented in nuclear waste management programmes. Thereby, studies have been done of the institutional and cultural context within which processes of participation and transparency take place in order to understand how the processes can be applied. The project also included studies of theory in order to build participation and transparency on a firm ground, a number of case studies in Czech Republic, Finland, Sweden and UK, as well as implementation in Czech Republic to make a difference, learn and demonstrate. These proposed guidelines are thus the result of observations and conclusions made in these efforts, and should not be regarded as an attempt to give a comprehensive set of guidelines for nuclear waste management or even for the implementation of transparency and participation therein. However, it is the hope among the ARGONA participants that they can give relevant thoughts and stimulation to those involved in the nuclear waste management area, especially organizations that have, or may become, responsible for the implementation of processes of transparency and participation, such as implementing organizations, government agencies, regulators as well as regional and local communities. It should be recognized that some of the proposed guidelines may be more relevant for a certain type of bodies (such as an implementer) than for another type (such as local community) and vice versa. Some of the proposed guidelines are also relevant at broader societal level and for the European Union bodies. It will be up to the respective reader to judge the relevance for her or his organization. The suggested guidelines are followed by more detailed recommendations on how to combine the two basic forms of mediation that have been identified in ARGONA, namely mediation by demonstration and mediation by dialogue in Annex 1

  6. Resolving a double standard for risk management of thalidomide: an evaluation of two different risk management programmes in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooba, Nobuhiro; Sato, Tsugumichi; Watanabe, Hikaru; Kubota, Kiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Thalidomide, once withdrawn because of its teratogenicity, has now been re-launched worldwide. In Japan, thalidomide has been imported by individual doctors since around the year 2000. In October 2008, it was approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) on the condition that the manufacturer implemented a risk management programme termed the Thalidomide Education and Risk Management System (TERMS). It is likely that the imports of thalidomide will be used off-label to treat diseases other than MM. Thus, the MHLW is also planning to introduce a web-based registration system, referred to as the Safety Management System for Unapproved Drugs (SMUD), for thalidomide imported by individual doctors. To evaluate the difference between TERMS and SMUD and establish a way to resolve the 'double standard' for risk management of thalidomide treatment in Japan. The fraction of patients with disorders other than MM was estimated by the volume of annual imports obtained from the MHLW and records of the imports for patients with MM, other oncological diseases (ODs) and non-ODs in 2007 through a major supplier covering 63% of the total imported thalidomide. The information for TERMS was obtained from web pages of the manufacturer and the MHLW. The components of TERMS were compared with those in SMUD. Provided that the distribution of the indication for thalidomide (MM) in 2007, estimated from the records of imports through the major supplier, is representative of the entire nation, it is estimated that on average 866 patients, including 851 (98.3%) with MM, are using thalidomide on any one day. However, if the major supplier's imports, which account for 63% of the total imports, are not representative of the nation as a whole, possibly only half of the patients treated with thalidomide in Japan have MM. This would be the case in a scenario where the remaining 37% of imports are exclusively used to treat disorders other than

  7. Integrating an incident management system within a continuity of operations programme: case study of the Bank of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loop, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Carrying out critical business functions without interruption requires a resilient and robust business continuity framework. By embedding an industry-standard incident management system within its business continuity structure, the Bank of Canada strengthened its response plan by enabling timely response to incidents while maintaining a strong focus on business continuity. A total programme approach, integrating the two disciplines, provided for enhanced recovery capabilities. While the value of an effective and efficient response organisation is clear, as demonstrated by emergency events around the world, incident response structures based on normal operating hierarchy can experience unique challenges. The internationally-recognised Incident Command System (ICS) model addresses these issues and reflects the five primary incident management functions, each contributing to the overall strength and effectiveness of the response organisation. The paper focuses on the Bank of Canada's successful implementation of the ICS model as its incident management and continuity of operations programmes evolved to reflect current best practices.

  8. Food and Beverage Control. Food and Beverage Management Module. Operational Management Programme. Increasing Opportunities for Supervisors and Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter

    This self-instructional unit for supervisors and managers in the British hotel and catering industry is intended to consolidate work covered in a 1-day course. The unit covers the key management functions needed to implement an effective purchasing and supply policy. The document begins with an introduction and advice on how to use the unit. The…

  9. Impact of parental weight status on a school-based weight management programme designed for Mexican-American children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, J P; Johnston, C A; Hernandez, D C; LeNoble, J; Papaioannou, M A; Foreyt, J P

    2016-10-01

    While overweight and obese children are more likely to have overweight or obese parents, less is known about the effect of parental weight status on children's success in weight management programmes. This study was a secondary data analysis of a randomized controlled trial and investigated the impact of having zero, one or two obese parents on children's success in a school-based weight management programme. Sixty-one Mexican-American children participated in a 24-week school-based weight management intervention which took place in 2005-2006. Children's heights and weights were measured at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. Parental weight status was assessed at baseline. Repeated measures anova and ancova were conducted to compare changes in children's weight within and between groups, respectively. Within-group comparisons revealed that the intervention led to significant decreases in standardized body mass index (zBMI) for children with zero (F = 23.16, P weight management programme appears to be most efficacious for children with one or no obese parents compared to children with two obese parents. These results demonstrate the need to consider parental weight status when engaging in childhood weight management efforts. © 2015 World Obesity.

  10. Ageing Management Programme for the IEA-R1 Reactor in São Paulo, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanathan, L. V. [Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN), National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    IEA-R1 is a swimming pool type reactor. It is moderated and cooled by light water and uses graphite and beryllium as reflector elements. First criticality was achieved on 16 September 1957, and the reactor is currently operating at 4.0 MW on a 64 h per week cycle. In 1996, a reactor ageing study was established to determine general deterioration of systems and components such as cooling towers, secondary cooling system, piping, pumps, specimen irradiation devices, radiation monitoring system, fuel elements, rod drive mechanisms, nuclear and process instrumentation, and safety system. The basic structure of the reactor from the original design has been maintained, but several improvements and modifications have been made over the years to various components, systems and structures. During the period 1996–2005 the reactor power was increased from 2 MW to 5 MW and the operational cycle from 8 h per day for 5 days a week to 120 h continuous per week, mainly to increase production of {sup 99}Mo. Prior to increasing reactor power, several modifications were made to the reactor system and its components. Simultaneously, a vigorous ageing management, inspection and modernization programme was put in place.

  11. Ageing Management Programme: An Experience of In-Service Inspection of the Kartini Heat Exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitiswati, S., E-mail: nitis@batan.go.id [Centre for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety, National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), Jakarta (Indonesia); Syarip,; Tjiptono, T.; Wantana, [Centre for Accelerator and Material Process Technology, National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    2014-08-15

    This paper discusses an experience on ISI of the Kartini reactor heat exchanger, as part of the implementation of an ageing management programme. Kartini reactor is located in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The heat exchanger was constructed for 250 kW capacity. The type of heat exchanger is shell with tube recirculation. Tube material is stainless steel 304, and the shell and baffle plate materials are carbon steel. The heat exchanger has 72 tubes, its outer and inner diameters respectively are 19 and 16 mm, and tube thickness is 1.5 mm. The aim of ISI was to obtain and evaluate the heat exchanger’s condition including the detection of any possible local tube thinning, pitting corrosion or gradual thinning, and determine whether any degradation or deterioration of the heat exchanger could have a significant impact to safety. The heat exchanger was inspected utilizing eddy current equipment in 2003 and 2006. Inspection results in 2003 determined that 12 heat exchanger tubes have a thinning degradation level ranging from 10% up to 60% of the outer diameter due to pitting corrosion. Deterioration of baffle plates has been linked to general corrosion attack. Inspection results in 2006 showed a consistent thinning degradation level with the previous inspection in 2003. So far heat exchanger performance is still satisfactory, as defined by the transfer of primary heat for a 2°C difference between inlet and outlet as required. (author)

  12. A programmable motion phantom for quality assurance of motion management in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, L.; Franich, R.D.; Kron, T.; Taylor, M.L.; Johnston, P.N.; McDermott, L.N.; Callahan, J.

    2012-01-01

    A commercially available motion phantom (QUASAR, Modus Medical) was modified for programmable motion control with the aim of reproducing patient respiratory motion in one dimension in both the anterior–posterior and superior–inferior directions, as well as, providing controllable breath-hold and sinusoidal patterns for the testing of radiotherapy gating systems. In order to simulate realistic patient motion, the DC motor was replaced by a stepper motor. A separate 'chest-wall' motion platform was also designed to accommodate a variety of surrogate marker systems. The platform employs a second stepper motor that allows for the decoupling of the chest-wall and insert motion. The platform's accuracy was tested by replicating patient traces recorded with the Varian real-time position management (RPM) system and comparing the motion platform's recorded motion trace with the original patient data. Six lung cancer patient traces recorded with the RPM system were uploaded to the motion platform's in-house control software and subsequently replicated through the phantom motion platform. The phantom's motion profile was recorded with the RPM system and compared to the original patient data. Sinusoidal and breath-hold patterns were simulated with the motion platform and recorded with the RPM system to verify the systems potential for routine quality assurance of commercial radiotherapy gating systems. There was good correlation between replicated and actual patient data (P 0.003). Mean differences between the location of maxima in replicated and patient data-sets for six patients amounted to 0.034 cm with the corresponding minima mean equal to 0.010 cm. The upgraded motion phantom was found to replicate patient motion accurately as well as provide useful test patterns to aid in the quality assurance of motion management methods and technologies.

  13. Perceptions of the impact of an advanced training programme on the management skills of health professionals in Gauteng, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Mutyabule

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. South Africa’s health sector spans the private and the public sectors. Within the sectors, health managers take on strategic leadership roles without formal training in management or leadership – a trend more common in the public sector than the private sector. Health managers are selected based on their clinical skills rather than their leadership or management skills. Objective. To compare self-rated competencies in management and leadership before and after training of the participants; to assess participants’ experience of the training programme; and to evaluate the management and leadership skills of the participants after training. Methods. A cross-sectional, descriptive analytical method and 360° interviewing were used in this study. Participants were evaluated ~18 months after completion of the training programme. A 360° evaluation (360° E of six of the 12 leadership/management competencies was done with the supervisors, colleagues, and subordinates of the participants. Results. All participants rated themselves as improved in 12 managerial and leadership competencies. The 360° E affirmed five of these competencies as improved, with the ability to create and implement a marketing plan rating poorly. Conclusion. Training in management leads to improvement in both leadership and managerial skills of health professionals.

  14. Perceptions of the impact of an advanced training programme on the management skills of health professionals in Gauteng South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Petrucka

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. South Africa’s health sector spans the private and the public sectors. Within the sectors, health managers take on strategic leadership roles without formal training in management or leadership – a trend more common in the public sector than the private sector. Health managers are selected based on their clinical skills rather than their leadership or management skills.Objective. To compare self-rated competencies in management and leadership before and after training of the participants; to assess participants’ experience of the training programme; and to evaluate the management and leadership skills of the participants after training.Methods. A cross-sectional, descriptive analytical method and 360° interviewing were used in this study. Participants were evaluated ~18 months after completion of the training programme. A 360° evaluation (360° E of six of the 12 leadership/management competencies was done with the supervisors, colleagues, and subordinates of the participants.Results. All participants rated themselves as improved in 12 managerial and leadership competencies. The 360° E affirmed five of these competencies  as improved, with the ability to create and implement a marketing plan rating poorly.Conclusion. Training in management leads to improvement in both leadership and managerial skills of health professionals.

  15. Effect of Structured Teaching Programme on Knowledge of School Teachers regarding First Aid Management in Selected Schools of Bangalore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Piyali

    2014-01-01

    Safe childhood is the foundation of a good future. Children face different kinds of accidents at school premises while playing. Prevention of these accidents and their management is essential. A study was therefore conducted among school teachers at Anekal Taluk, Bangalore to make them aware about different accidents of children at school premises and their first aid management. The sample consisted of 30 primary and higher primary school teachers selected by convenience sampling technique. The analysis showed that improvement of knowledge occurred after administering structured teaching programme (STP) on first aid management. Nursing professionals can benefit from the study result at the area of community, administration, research and education.

  16. Naming analog clocks conceptually facilitates naming digital clocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuwissen, M.H.W.; Roelofs, A.P.A.; Levelt, W.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Naming digital clocks (e.g., 2:45, say "quarter to three") requires conceptual operations on the minute and hour information displayed in the input for producing the correct relative time expression. The interplay of these conceptual operations was investigated using a repetition priming paradigm.

  17. Do weight management programmes delivered at professional football clubs attract and engage high risk men? A mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Kate; Gray, Cindy M; Maclean, Alice; Smillie, Susan; Bunn, Christopher; Wyke, Sally

    2014-01-21

    The prevalence of obesity in men in the UK is amongst the highest in Europe but men are less likely than women to use existing weight loss programmes. Developing weight management programmes which are appealing and acceptable to men is a public health priority. Football Fans in Training (FFIT), a men-only weight management programme delivered to groups of men at top professional football clubs, encourages men to lose weight by working with, not against, cultural ideals of masculinity. To inform further development of interventions in football club settings, the current study explored who is attracted to FFIT and why overweight/obese men choose to take part. A mixed-methods study analysing baseline data on 747 men aged 35-65 years with BMI ≥ 28 kg/m2 who were participants in a randomised controlled trial of FFIT, and data from 13 focus group discussions with 63 men who had attended the programme. Objectively-measured mean body mass index was 35.3 kg/m2 (sd 4.9). Overall over 90% of participants were at very high or extremely high risk of future ill-health. Around three-quarters of participants in all age groups were at 'very high' risk of type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease (72%, 73% and 80% of men aged 35-44, 45-54 and 55-64 years respectively). A further 21%, 16% and 13% were at 'extremely high' risk. Qualitative data revealed that the powerful 'draw' of the football club attracted men otherwise reluctant to attend existing weight management programmes. The location and style of delivery of early FFIT sessions fostered team spirit; men appreciated being with others 'like them' and the opportunity to undertake weight management in circumstances that enhanced physical and symbolic proximity to something they valued highly, the football club. The delivery of a weight management intervention via professional football clubs attracted men at high risk of ill-health. The setting enabled men to join a weight management programme in

  18. Integrated planning of laboratory, in-situ, modelling and natural analogue studies in the Swiss radioactive waste management programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, I.G.; Zuidema, P.

    2001-01-01

    After more than 25 years of development, the Swiss radioactive waste management programme has a well established disposal strategy supported by an integrated R and D infrastructure. The process of implementation of repository projects is constrained by political factors, but a dynamic R and D programme is strongly guided by periodic integrated performance assessments and includes: Experimental studies in conventional and ''hot'' laboratories; Projects in underground test facilities and field test sites; Model development verification and validation; Natural and archaeological analogue projects. R and D in the Swiss national programme focuses on filling remaining gaps in system understanding, enhancing confidence via validation and demonstration projects, system optimisation and maintaining state of the art technical capacity in key areas. Increasingly, such work is carried out in collaboration with partner national waste management organisations. In addition, The National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra) provides support services to developing programmes - which allows Nagra to widen its range of experience while providing attractive access to a knowledge base accumulated at a cost of over 750 M CHF. (author)

  19. The impact on sleep of a multidisciplinary cognitive behavioural pain management programme: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horan Sheila

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reduced sleep quality is a common complaint among patients with chronic pain, with 50-80% of patients reporting sleep disturbance. Improvements in pain and quality of life measures have been achieved using a multidisciplinary cognitive behavioural therapy pain management programme (CBT-PMP that aims to recondition attitudes to pain, and improve patients' self-management of their condition. Despite its high prevalence in patients with chronic pain, there is very limited objective evidence for the effect of this intervention on sleep quality. The primary research objective is to investigate the short-term effect of a multidisciplinary CBT-PMP on subjective (measured by Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index and objective sleep quality (measured by Actigraphy in patients with chronic pain by comparison with a control group. The secondary objectives will investigate changes in function and mood, and then explore the relationship between objective and subjective sleep quality and physical and psychological outcome measures. Methods/Design Patients who fulfil the inclusion criteria for attendance on the multidisciplinary CBT-PMP in the Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin and are currently listed on the PMP waiting list will be invited to participate in this pilot study. Potential patients will be screened for sleep disturbance [determined by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI]. Those patients with a sleep disturbance (PSQI >5 will be assigned to either the intervention group (immediate treatment, or control group (deferred treatment, i.e. the PMP they are listed for is more than six months away based on where they appear on the waiting list. Baseline measures of sleep, function, and mood will be obtained using a combination of self-report questionnaires (the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Short Form 36 health survey, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, and functional outcome

  20. Using intervention mapping (IM to develop a self-management programme for employees with a chronic disease in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heerkens Yvonne F

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Employees with a chronic disease often encounter problems at work because of their chronic disease. The current paper describes the development of a self-management programme based on the Chronic Disease Self-Management programme (CDSMP of Stanford University to help employees with a chronic somatic disease cope with these problems at work. The objective of this article is to present the systematic development and content of this programme. Methods The method of intervention mapping (Bartholomew 2006 was used to tailor the original CDSMP for employees with a chronic somatic disease. This paper describes the process of adjusting the CDSMP for this target group. A needs assessment has been carried out by a literature review and qualitative focus groups with employees with a chronic disease and involved health professionals. On the basis of the needs assessment, the relevant determinants of self-management behaviour at work have been identified for the target population and the objectives of the training have been formulated. Furthermore, techniques have been chosen to influence self-management and the determinants of behaviour and a programme plan has been developed. Results The intervention was designed to address general personal factors such as lifestyle, disease-related factors (for example coping with the disease and work-related personal factors (such as self-efficacy at work. The course consists of six sessions of each two and a half hour and intents to increase the self management and empowerment of employees with a chronic somatic disease. Conclusion Intervention mapping has been found to be a useful tool for tailoring in a systematic way the original CDSMP for employees with a chronic somatic disease. It might be valuable to use IM for the development or adjusting of interventions in occupational health care.

  1. Enabling technologies to improve area-wide integrated pest management programmes for the control of screwworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, A S; Vreysen, M J B; Hendrichs, J; Feldmann, U

    2009-06-01

    The economic devastation caused in the past by the New World screwworm fly Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) to the livestock industry in the U.S.A., Mexico and the rest of Central America was staggering. The eradication of this major livestock pest from North and Central America using the sterile insect technique (SIT) as part of an area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programme was a phenomenal technical and managerial accomplishment with enormous economic implications. The area is maintained screwworm-free by the weekly release of 40 million sterile flies in the Darien Gap in Panama, which prevents migration from screwworm-infested areas in Columbia. However, the species is still a major pest in many areas of the Caribbean and South America and there is considerable interest in extending the eradication programme to these countries. Understanding New World screwworm fly populations in the Caribbean and South America, which represent a continuous threat to the screwworm-free areas of Central America and the U.S.A., is a prerequisite to any future eradication campaigns. The Old World screwworm fly Chrysomya bezziana Villeneuve (Diptera: Calliphoridae) has a very wide distribution ranging from Southern Africa to Papua New Guinea and, although its economic importance is assumed to be less than that of its New World counterpart, it is a serious pest in extensive livestock production and a constant threat to pest-free areas such as Australia. In the 1980s repeated introductions and an expansion of Old World screwworm populations were reported in the Middle East; in the 1990s it invaded Iraq and since late 2007 it has been reported in Yemen, where a severe outbreak of myiasis occurred in 2008. Small-scale field trials have shown the potential of integrating the SIT in the control of this pest and various international organizations are considering using the release of sterile insects as part of an AW-IPM approach on a much wider scale

  2. Reduced Voltage Scaling in Clock Distribution Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khader Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel circuit technique to generate a reduced voltage swing (RVS signals for active power reduction on main buses and clocks. This is achieved without performance degradation, without extra power supply requirement, and with minimum area overhead. The technique stops the discharge path on the net that is swinging low at a certain voltage value. It reduces active power on the target net by as much as 33% compared to traditional full swing signaling. The logic 0 voltage value is programmable through control bits. If desired, the reduced-swing mode can also be disabled. The approach assumes that the logic 0 voltage value is always less than the threshold voltage of the nMOS receivers, which eliminate the need of the low to high voltage translation. The reduced noise margin and the increased leakage on the receiver transistors using this approach have been addressed through the selective usage of multithreshold voltage (MTV devices and the programmability of the low voltage value.

  3. RDandD Programme 2010. Programme for research, development and demonstration of methods for the management and disposal of nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-09-15

    RDandD Programme 2010 presents SKB's plans for research, development and demonstration during the period 2011-2016. SKB's activities are divided into two main areas: the programme for low- and intermediate-level waste (the LILW Programme) and the Nuclear Fuel Programme. Operation of the existing facilities takes place within the Operational Process. RDandD Programme 2010 consists of five parts: Part I Overall plan of action Part II The LILW Programme Part III The Nuclear Fuel Programme Part IV Research for assessment of long-term safety Part V Social science research RDandD Programme 2007 was mainly focused on development of technology to realize the final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The efforts described were aimed at gaining a greater knowledge of long-term safety and compiling technical supporting documentation for applications under the Nuclear Activities Act for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel and under the Environmental Code for the final repository system. Many important results from these efforts are reported in this programme. The integrated account of the results will be presented in applications submitted in early 2011. The regulatory review of RDandD Programme 2007 and its supplement called for clarifications of plans and programmes for the final repository for short-lived radioactive waste, SFR, and the final repository for long-lived waste, SFL. This RDandD Programme describes these plans more clearly

  4. RDandD Programme 2010. Programme for research, development and demonstration of methods for the management and disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    RDandD Programme 2010 presents SKB's plans for research, development and demonstration during the period 2011-2016. SKB's activities are divided into two main areas: the programme for low- and intermediate-level waste (the LILW Programme) and the Nuclear Fuel Programme. Operation of the existing facilities takes place within the Operational Process. RDandD Programme 2010 consists of five parts: Part I Overall plan of action Part II The LILW Programme Part III The Nuclear Fuel Programme Part IV Research for assessment of long-term safety Part V Social science research RDandD Programme 2007 was mainly focused on development of technology to realize the final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The efforts described were aimed at gaining a greater knowledge of long-term safety and compiling technical supporting documentation for applications under the Nuclear Activities Act for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel and under the Environmental Code for the final repository system. Many important results from these efforts are reported in this programme. The integrated account of the results will be presented in applications submitted in early 2011. The regulatory review of RDandD Programme 2007 and its supplement called for clarifications of plans and programmes for the final repository for short-lived radioactive waste, SFR, and the final repository for long-lived waste, SFL. This RDandD Programme describes these plans more clearly

  5. RDandD Programme 2010. Programme for research, development and demonstration of methods for the management and disposal of nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-09-15

    RDandD Programme 2010 presents SKB's plans for research, development and demonstration during the period 2011-2016. SKB's activities are divided into two main areas: the programme for low- and intermediate-level waste (the LILW Programme) and the Nuclear Fuel Programme. Operation of the existing facilities takes place within the Operational Process. RDandD Programme 2010 consists of five parts: Part I Overall plan of action Part II The LILW Programme Part III The Nuclear Fuel Programme Part IV Research for assessment of long-term safety Part V Social science research RDandD Programme 2007 was mainly focused on development of technology to realize the final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The efforts described were aimed at gaining a greater knowledge of long-term safety and compiling technical supporting documentation for applications under the Nuclear Activities Act for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel and under the Environmental Code for the final repository system. Many important results from these efforts are reported in this programme. The integrated account of the results will be presented in applications submitted in early 2011. The regulatory review of RDandD Programme 2007 and its supplement called for clarifications of plans and programmes for the final repository for short-lived radioactive waste, SFR, and the final repository for long-lived waste, SFL. This RDandD Programme describes these plans more clearly

  6. Biological clocks: riding the tides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Iglesia, Horacio O; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2013-10-21

    Animals with habitats in the intertidal zone often display biological rhythms that coordinate with both the tidal and the daily environmental cycles. Two recent studies show that the molecular components of the biological clocks mediating tidal rhythms are likely different from the phylogenetically conserved components that mediate circadian (daily) rhythms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Implementation of a mentored professional development programme in laboratory leadership and management in the Middle East and North Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, L A; Confer, D; Scott, E; Livingston, L; Bradburn, C; McGee, A; Furtwangler, T; Downer, A; Mokdad, A H; Flandin, J F; Shotorbani, S; Asghar, H; Tolbah, H E; Ahmed, H J; Alwan, A; Martin, R

    2017-02-01

    Laboratories need leaders who can effectively utilize the laboratories' resources, maximize the laboratories'capacity to detect disease, and advocate for laboratories in a fluctuating health care environment. To address this need, the University of Washington, USA, created the Certificate Program in Laboratory Leadership and Management in partnership with WHO Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean, and implemented it with 17 participants and 11 mentors from clinical and public health laboratories in 10 countries (Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen) in 2014. Designed to teach leadership and management skills to laboratory supervisors, the programme enabled participants to improve laboratory testing quality and operations. The programme was successful overall, with 80% of participants completing it and making impactful changes in their laboratories. This success is encouraging and could serve as a model to further strengthen laboratory capacity in the Region.

  8. A network of (autonomic) clock outputs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalsbeek, A.; Perreau-Lenz, S.; Buijs, R. M.

    2006-01-01

    The circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) is composed of thousands of oscillator neurons, each of which is dependent on the cell-autonomous action of a defined set of circadian clock genes. A major question is still how these individual oscillators are organized into a biological clock

  9. A network of (autonomic) clock outputs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalsbeek, A.; Perreau-Lenz, S.; Buijs, R. M.

    2006-01-01

    The circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) is composed of thousands of oscillator neurons, each dependent on the cell-autonomous action of a defined set of circadian clock genes. A major question is still how these individual oscillators are organized into a biological clock that

  10. Light and the human circadian clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roenneberg, Till; Kantermann, Thomas; Juda, Myriam; Vetter, Céline; Allebrandt, Karla V

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock can only reliably fulfil its function if it is stably entrained. Most clocks use the light-dark cycle as environmental signal (zeitgeber) for this active synchronisation. How we think about clock function and entrainment has been strongly influenced by the early concepts of the

  11. Impact of a fatigue management in work programme on meeting work demands of individuals with rheumatic diseases: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Róisín C; O'Shea, Finbar; Doran, Michele; Connolly, Deirdre

    2018-03-25

    Work disability and job loss are serious consequences of rheumatic diseases (RDs), and fatigue is a symptom of RDs commonly reported to have an impact on work performance. A FAtigue ManagEment in Work (FAME-W) programme was developed to facilitate the self-management of fatigue in work. The present pilot study explored if FAME-W could facilitate individuals with RDs to manage fatigue in work and improve their ability to meet work demands. Twenty-seven individuals with a variety of rheumatic diagnoses completed a 4-week, 2-h occupational therapy-led self-management programme. Each week focused on fatigue-related topics, including fatigue and activity management, pain management and joint protection, mental well-being, effective communication with employers and work colleagues, and employment legislation. Individual workplace ergonomic assessments were also offered. Study measures (work function, fatigue, pain, mood and self-efficacy) were completed prior to starting FAME-W, immediately post-intervention and 12 weeks post-intervention. Participants (56% male) had a mean age of 43 years. No significant improvements were observed immediately post-programme. However, at the 12-week follow-up, significant improvements were reported in meeting work demands (scheduling [p = 0.046], output [p = 0.002], physical [p = 0.003], mental [p = 0.016]), fatigue [p = 0.001], pain [p = 0.01], anxiety [p = 0.001], depression [p physical: p = 0.005; symptoms: p = 0.010; affect: p = 0.010; social: p = 0.001). Significant improvements were reported in participants' ability to meet various demands of their work 3 months post-FAME-W. These findings suggest that FAME-W has the potential to assist individuals with RDs to meet the demands of their work, although further research is required to test the effectiveness of this intervention. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Food and Beverage Production. Food and Beverage Management Module. Operational Management Programme. Increasing Opportunities for Supervisors and Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter

    This self-instructional unit for supervisors and managers in the British hotel and catering industry is intended to consolidate work covered in a 1-day course. The document begins with an introduction and advice on how to use the unit. The following topics are covered in the unit: (1) planning the menu; (2) food production systems; (3) kitchen…

  13. Food and Beverage Provision. Food and Beverage Management Module. Operational Management Programme. Increasing Opportunities for Supervisors and Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter

    This self-instructional unit for supervisors and managers in the British hotel and catering industry is intended to consolidate work covered in a 1-day course. The unit covers the essential elements in the final stage of supplying food and drink--the point at which these items are served and sold to the customer. The document begins with an…

  14. Evaluation of a nurse-led disease management programme for chronic kidney disease: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Frances Kam Yuet; Chow, Susan Ka Yee; Chan, Tony Moon Fai

    2010-03-01

    Patients with end stage renal failure require dialysis and strict adherence to treatment plans to sustain life. However, non-adherence is a common and serious problem among patients with chronic kidney disease. There is a scarcity of studies in examining the effects of disease management programmes on patients with chronic kidney disease. This paper examines whether the study group receiving the disease management programme have better improvement than the control group, comparing outcomes at baseline (O1), at 7 weeks at the completion of the programme (O2) and at 13 weeks (O3). This is a randomized controlled trial. The outcome measures were non-adherence in diet, fluid, dialysis and medication, quality of life, satisfaction, symptom control, complication control and health service utilisation. There was no significant difference between the control and study group for the baseline measures, except for sleep. Significant differences (padherence, sleep, symptom, staff encouragement, overall health and satisfaction. Sustained effects at O3 were noted in the outcome measures of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) non-adherence degree, sleep, symptom, and effect of kidney disease. Many studies exploring chronic disease management have neglected the group with end stage renal failure and this study fills this gap. This study has employed an innovative model of skill mix using specialist and general nurses and demonstrated patient improvement in diet non-adherence, CAPD non-adherence, aspects of quality of life and satisfaction with care. Redesigning chronic disease management programmes helps to optimize the use of different levels of skills and resources to bring about positive outcomes. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ulysses: the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary cognitive behavioural pain management programme-an 8-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullen, B M; Blake, C; Horan, S; Kelley, V; Spencer, O; Power, C K

    2014-06-01

    To characterise a cohort of patients with chronic pain registered to the Ulysses cognitive behavioural pain management programme (CBT-PMP) and to evaluate the effectiveness of the CBT-PMP 6 months post-discharge. A review of patients referred to the Ulysses CBT-PMP from 2002 to 2010 was undertaken. The profile of patients was established. Domains measured included pain, physical and psychological function. Relationships between these factors were explored. Clinically significant changes in outcome measures were established at the 6-month follow-up. In total 553 patients registered to the CBT-PMP, pre-post data were available for 91 % of patients and 52 % at 6 months. The majority of patients were female and aged between 40 and 50 years. Most patients had significant psychological morbidity (76 % depression, 84.5 % anxiety), moderate reports of pain [numerical rating scale, mean (SD) 6.0 (2.2)], and low levels of functional activity. At 6 months follow-up, statistically significant positive findings for physical and psychological outcome measures are supplemented by results showing their clinical significance. With regard to psychological function, a clinically significant change (depending on outcome measure) was shown between 1 in 2 and 1 in 10 patients. Improvements in physical function were lower with rates of 1 in 4 to 1 in 14 reporting significant gains. The effectiveness of the Ulysses CBT-PMP is established with measures of clinically significant change for physical and psychological outcomes contributing to the evidence for this novel approach of analysis. Future research determining benchmarks for CBT-PMP outcomes will assist clinicians in monitoring and enhancing patient's progress in clinical practice.

  16. Impact of 'stretch' targets for cardiovascular disease management within a local pay-for-performance programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape, Utz J; Huckvale, Kit; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem; Millett, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Pay-for-performance programs are often aimed to improve the management of chronic diseases. We evaluate the impact of a local pay for performance programme (QOF+), which rewarded financially more ambitious quality targets ('stretch targets') than those used nationally in the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF). We focus on targets for intermediate outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease and diabetes. A difference-in-difference approach is used to compare practice level achievements before and after the introduction of the local pay for performance program. In addition, we analysed patient-level data on exception reporting and intermediate outcomes utilizing an interrupted time series analysis. The local pay for performance program led to significantly higher target achievements (hypertension: p-value <0.001, coronary heart disease: p-values <0.001, diabetes: p-values <0.061, stroke: p-values <0.003). However, the increase was driven by higher rates of exception reporting (hypertension: p-value <0.001, coronary heart disease: p-values <0.03, diabetes: p-values <0.05) in patients with all conditions except for stroke. Exception reporting allows practitioners to exclude patients from target calculations if certain criteria are met, e.g. informed dissent of the patient for treatment. There were no statistically significant improvements in mean blood pressure, cholesterol or HbA1c levels. Thus, achievement of higher payment thresholds in the local pay for performance scheme was mainly attributed to increased exception reporting by practices with no discernable improvements in overall clinical quality. Hence, active monitoring of exception reporting should be considered when setting more ambitious quality targets. More generally, the study suggests a trade-off between additional incentive for better care and monitoring costs.

  17. Several factors influenced general practitioner participation in the implementation of a disease management programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribe, Anette Riisgaard; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Vedsted, Peter; Bro, Flemming; Kærsvang, Lone; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2014-09-01

    Disease management programmes (DMPs) require a high degree of participation from general practitioners (GPs) in order to succeed. We aimed to describe the participation among Danish GPs in a DMP. A quality improvement project entitled the Chronic Care Compass (CCC) was introduced in 2010 by the Central Denmark Region. The project was based on DMPs targeting persons suffering from three chronic diseases (diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and acute coronary syndrome). All GPs in the region were invited to participate. We obtained data from administrative registries and studied the participation and its association with characteristics of practices and patients. Differences in participation were assessed using binomial regression models. A total of 271 (69.1%) practices participated in the CCC. The participation was 28.9 percentage points (pp) (confidence interval (CI): 14.3; 43.6) lower among GPs who were older than 60 years versus younger than 50 years, 32.2 pp (CI: 19.1; 45.2) lower among GPs who provided few versus many chronic care consultations, 13.7 pp (CI: 1.7; 25.6) lower among GPs with lower versus medium practice gross income, and 16.9 pp (CI:6.1; 27.8) lower among GPs with a patient population with medium versus low degree of socio-economic deprivation. Participation in the CCC was lower among GPs who provided less chronic care, had a lower practice gross income and had a patient population with a higher degree of deprivation. The project was supported by the Research Unit for General Practice, Aarhus University, and the Lundbeck Foundation. not relevant.

  18. The development of an evidence-based physical self-management rehabilitation programme for cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Weert, Ellen; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E. H. M.; May, Anne M.; Korstjens, Irene; Ros, Wynand J. G.; van der Schans, Cees P.

    Objective: This paper describes the development of a physical training programme for cancer patients. Four related but conceptually and empirically distinct physical problems are described: decreased aerobic capacity, decreased muscle strength, fatigue and impaired role physical functioning. The

  19. The development of an evidence-based physical self-management rehabilitation programme for cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Weert, Ellen; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E H M; May, Anne M; Korstjens, Irene; Ros, Wynand J G; van der Schans, Cees

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This paper describes the development of a physical training programme for cancer patients. Four related but conceptually and empirically distinct physical problems are described: decreased aerobic capacity, decreased muscle strength, fatigue and impaired role physical functioning. The

  20. Nuclear waste management in Finland. Final report of public sector's research programme JYT2001 (1997-2001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasilainen, K.

    2002-05-01

    According to Finnish nuclear energy legislation, each producer of nuclear waste is responsible for the safe handling, management, and disposal of its waste, as well as for the costs arising. The Posiva company, owned by the nuclear energy-producing power companies, is in charge of spent nuclear fuel management in Finland. The authorities supervise the management of nuclear waste and issue regulations for this purpose. In these demanding tasks the authorities have been supported by the Public Sector's Research Programme on Nuclear Waste Management (JYT2001). The objective of JYT2001 was to provide the authorities with independent expertise and research results relevant to the safety of nuclear waste management. Emphasis was placed on the geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The research area was divided into (1) technical studies on the safety of spent fuel disposal, and (2) social science studies related to nuclear waste management. The technical studies covered bedrock behaviour, the hydrogeology and geochemistry of the bedrock, the stability of the bentonite buffer, and the migration of radionuclides in the bedrock. In addition, performance assessment methodology was covered, as well as waste management technologies and costs. The social science studies were focussed on observing the Decision in Principle (DiP) process including the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), and media issues related to the spent fuel disposal facility. JYT2001 provided considerable support to the authorities in helping them deal with technical and social science questions. The Government's positive Decision in Principle (DiP) on Posiva's application for a spent fuel disposal facility in Eurajoki was ratified by Parliament in May 2001. The existence of a credible JYT2001 programme, independent of Posiva, obviously contributed to the high level of public confidence in the Finnish nuclear waste management programme. According to the schedule of the Finnish nuclear waste management

  1. The role of intrinsic motivation in a group of low vision patients participating in a self-management programme to enhance self-efficacy and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Kay Chai Peter; Drury, Vicki Blair; Mackey, Sandra

    2014-02-01

    Self-management programmes have previously been found to decrease health problems, enhance quality of life and increase independence. However, there is no literature that examines the influence of the participants' intrinsic motivation on the outcomes of such programmes. This study examined the role of intrinsic motivation in a pilot low vision self-management programme to enhance self-efficacy and quality of life of the programme participants. A positive association was observed between the female participants' perceived choice and perceived competence, two underlying dimensions of the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory. In addition, a positive correlation was observed between the younger participants' perceived competence and the change in their quality of life. The findings provide some support for consideration of participants' intrinsic motivation in the development of effective self-management programmes. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Managing the demands of the preregistration mental health nursing programme: The views of students with mental health conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramluggun, Pras; Lacy, Mary; Cadle, Martha; Anjoyeb, Mahmood

    2018-05-30

    An increasing number of students with a pre-existing mental health condition are enrolling on preregistration mental health nursing programmes. The challenges faced by these students in managing the demands of the programme have not been fully explored. Mental health and well-being is an integral part of providing a healthy university in which students can flourish. The purpose of the study was to explore how students with an underlying mental health issue manage the demands of the mental health nursing programme. The outcomes of the study are aimed at informing inclusive teaching and learning and current student support provision. Ethics approval was given. Students from two universities in South East England who met the criterion of having a pre-existing mental health condition when enrolling on the mental health preregistration nursing programme were invited to take part. Nine students took part in the study. Using an interpretative descriptive design, 1:1 face-to-face, audio-taped, semistructured interviews were undertaken. The data were analysed using a framework approach, and this revealed four main themes: timing of disclosure; managing lived experience in learning environments; students' coping mechanisms, and experience of support. Recommendations for practice was that approved education institutes (AEIs) should ensure they have a robust, inclusive practice by implementing strategies to develop these students' resilience, and enhance their learning and the current support provisions. This will ensure the barriers to disclosing their mental health conditions are recognized and minimized to enable these students to fully contribute to their own learning and teaching experience. © 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  3. Psychosocial behaviour management programme for home-dwelling people with dementia: A cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Miharu; Endo, Kaori; Hirooka, Kayo; Granvik, Eva; Minthon, Lennart; Nägga, Katarina; Nishida, Atsushi

    2018-03-01

    Little is known about the effectiveness of a psychosocial behaviour management programme on home-dwelling people with dementia. We developed a Behaviour Analytics & Support Enhancement (BASE) programme for care managers and professional caregivers of home care services in Japan. We investigated the effects of BASE on challenging behaviour of home-dwelling people with dementia. A cluster-randomized controlled trial was conducted with home care providers from 3 different districts in Tokyo. Each provider recruited persons with dementia aged 65 years or older to receive home care in the BASE programme in August 2016. An online monitoring and assessment system was introduced to the intervention group for repeated measures of challenging behaviour with a total score of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Care professionals in both the intervention and control groups evaluated challenging behaviour of persons with dementia at baseline (September 2016) and follow-up (February 2017). A majority of persons with dementia had Alzheimer disease (59.3%). One-hundred and forty-one persons with dementia were included in the intervention group and 142 in the control group. Multilevel modelling revealed a significant reduction in challenging behaviour in the intervention group after 6 months (mean score, 18.3 to 11.2) compared with that of the control group (11.6 to 10.8; P dwelling people with dementia. Future research should examine the long-term effects of behaviour management programmes on behaviour, nursing home placement, and hospital admission of home-dwelling people with dementia. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Automatic control of clock duty cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaoxin (Inventor); Roper, Weston (Inventor); Seefeldt, James D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    In general, this disclosure is directed to a duty cycle correction (DCC) circuit that adjusts a falling edge of a clock signal to achieve a desired duty cycle. In some examples, the DCC circuit may generate a pulse in response to a falling edge of an input clock signal, delay the pulse based on a control voltage, adjust the falling edge of the input clock signal based on the delayed pulse to produce an output clock signal, and adjust the control voltage based on the difference between a duty cycle of the output clock signal and a desired duty cycle. Since the DCC circuit adjusts the falling edge of the clock cycle to achieve a desired duty cycle, the DCC may be incorporated into existing PLL control loops that adjust the rising edge of a clock signal without interfering with the operation of such PLL control loops.

  5. Circadian clock, cell cycle and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cansu Özbayer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There are a few rhythms of our daily lives that we are under the influence. One of them is characterized by predictable changes over a 24-hour timescale called circadian clock. This cellular clock is coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the anterior hypothalamus. The clock consist of an autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loop compose of four genes/proteins; BMAL1, Clock, Cyrptochrome, and Period. BMAL 1 and Clock are transcriptional factors and Period and Cyrptochrome are their targets. Period and Cyrptochrome dimerize in the cytoplasm to enter the nucleus where they inhibit Clock/BMAL activity.It has been demonstrate that circadian clock plays an important role cellular proliferation, DNA damage and repair mechanisms, checkpoints, apoptosis and cancer.

  6. Molecular cogs of the insect circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasu, Naoto; Shimohigashi, Yasuyuki; Tominaga, Yoshiya; Shimohigashi, Miki

    2003-08-01

    During the last five years, enormous progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of circadian systems, mainly by molecular genetic studies using the mouse and fly. Extensive evidence has revealed that the core clock machinery involves "clock genes" and "clock proteins" functioning as molecular cogs. These participate in transcriptional/translational feedback loops and many homologous clock-components in the fruit fly Drosophila are also expressed in mammalian clock tissues with circadian rhythms. Thus, the mechanisms of the central clock seem to be conserved across animal kingdom. However, some recent studies imply that the present widely accepted molecular models of circadian clocks may not always be supported by the experimental evidence.

  7. Effectiveness of a diabetes education and self management programme (DESMOND) for people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khunti, Kamlesh; Gray, Laura J.; Skinner, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To measure whether the benefits of a single education and self management structured programme for people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus are sustained at three years. Design: Three year follow-up of a multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial in primary care....... Intervention: A structured group education programme for six hours delivered in the community by two trained healthcare professional educators compared with usual care. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome was glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. The secondary outcomes were blood pressure, weight, blood...... lipid levels, smoking status, physical activity, quality of life, beliefs about illness, depression, emotional impact of diabetes, and drug use at three years. Results: HbA1c levels at three years had decreased in both groups. After adjusting for baseline and cluster the difference was not significant...

  8. Planning and management support for NPP personnel SAT-based training programmes. IAEA regional workshop. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Within the European regional TC Project a workshop on Planning and Management Support for NPP Personnel SAT Based Training programmes was held at the Paks NPP Maintenance Training Centre in June 1998. It was organized jointly by IAEA and the Paks NPP. The objective of the workshop was to present the important experience gained by successful implementation of the IAEA Model Project on Strengthening Training for Safe Operation at Paks NPP as well as international experience in developing and carrying out the projects to upgrade NPP personnel training in particular maintenance training, and competence based Systematic Approach to Training (SAT). Twenty five participants from Armenia, Bulgaria, China, Czech republic, Hungary, Romania, Russia, Slovak Republic and Ukraine attended the workshop presenting and exchanging experiences in implementing NPP SAT-based training programmes

  9. Hanle Detection for Optical Clocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the strong inhomogeneous spatial polarization and intensity distribution of spontaneous decay fluorescence due to the Hanle effect, we propose and demonstrate a universe Hanle detection configuration of electron-shelving method for optical clocks. Experimental results from Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard with electron-shelving method show that a designed Hanle detection geometry with optimized magnetic field direction, detection laser beam propagation and polarization direction, and detector position can improve the fluorescence collection rate by more than one order of magnitude comparing with that of inefficient geometry. With the fixed 423 nm fluorescence, the improved 657 nm optical frequency standard signal intensity is presented. The potential application of the Hanle detection geometry designed for facilitating the fluorescence collection for optical lattice clock with a limited solid angle of the fluorescence collection has been discussed. The Hanle detection geometry is also effective for ion detection in ion optical clock and quantum information experiments. Besides, a cylinder fluorescence collection structure is designed to increase the solid angle of the fluorescence collection in Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard.

  10. Understanding the drivers of interprofessional collaborative practice among HIV primary care providers and case managers in HIV care programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavronicolas, Heather A; Laraque, Fabienne; Shankar, Arti; Campbell, Claudia

    2017-05-01

    Care coordination programmes are an important aspect of HIV management whose success depends largely on HIV primary care provider (PCP) and case manager collaboration. Factors influencing collaboration among HIV PCPs and case managers remain to be studied. The study objective was to test an existing theoretical model of interprofessional collaborative practice and determine which factors play the most important role in facilitating collaboration. A self-administered, anonymous mail survey was sent to HIV PCPs and case managers in New York City. An adapted survey instrument elicited information on demographic, contextual, and perceived social exchange (trustworthiness, role specification, and relationship initiation) characteristics. The dependent variable, perceived interprofessional practice, was constructed from a validated scale. A sequential block wise regression model specifying variable entry order examined the relative importance of each group of factors and of individual variables. The analysis showed that social exchange factors were the dominant drivers of collaboration. Relationship initiation was the most important predictor of interprofessional collaboration. Additional influential factors included organisational leadership support of collaboration, practice settings, and frequency of interprofessional meetings. Addressing factors influencing collaboration among providers will help public health programmes optimally design their structural, hiring, and training strategies to foster effective social exchanges and promote collaborative working relationships.

  11. Effects of a dietary self-management programme for community-dwelling older adults: a quasi-experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Su-Hui; Huang, Yu-Ping; Shao, Jung-Hua

    2017-09-01

    Nutritional health plays a crucial role in determining successful ageing and differs by different living area. Although nutritional interventions have long been advocated, little research has directly assessed the effectiveness of nutritional interventions on community-dwelling older adults in urban and rural areas and compared intervention effects on these two populations. To examine the effectiveness of a 12-week dietary self-management programme for salt-, fluid-, fat- and cholesterol-intake behaviours of community-dwelling older adults and to compare these effects in rural- and urban-dwelling older adults. For this quasi-experimental two-group study, older adults (≥65 years old) were recruited from two randomly selected public health centres in a rural north-eastern county and a northern city of Taiwan from January through December 2011. Outcomes included nutritional status, nutritional self-efficacy and health locus of control. Data were collected at baseline and 12 weeks later. To compare changes in outcome variables over time between the control (usual care) and intervention (nutritional programme) groups and between the urban- and rural-dwelling participants in the experimental group, we used generalised estimating equation analysis. Of the 129 participants, 120 completed this study (58 in the intervention group and 62 in the control group). After 12 weeks, the intervention group had significantly better nutritional status and higher internal health locus of control than the control group. Moreover, older rural participants who received the intervention tended towards higher nutritional self-efficacy and internal health locus of control than their urban counterparts. Our research findings support the positive effect of our nutritional self-management programme for community-dwelling older adults. The knowledge gained from this study can help stakeholders recognise the need for healthcare policy to establish effective strategies and sustainable

  12. Challenges in the management of support and care programmes for child-headed households in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human, Sarie P; van Rensburg, Gisela H

    2011-10-01

    The present study reports on data collected in a larger study on 'A situational analysis of child-headed households in South Africa'. The purpose of this study was to explore the management and control of available and required services, resources and safety nets for children in child-headed households. The significance of having a better understanding of the challenges, limitations but importance for government structures to manage and control programmes will enhance the implementation and maintenance of focused and sustainable support structures and programmes which will effectively address the needs of child-headed households. An exploratory and descriptive, quantitative survey was conducted to provide information on government structures at a national level and the nine provinces in South Africa. The population consisted of the Departments of Social Development, Education, Health and Agriculture, at both national and provincial levels. The main findings included a lack of clarity regarding the concept and definition of a child-headed household, lack of empirical data, a diversity of needs and challenges in terms of location and geographical distribution of available infrastructure and support systems; programmes that are not inclusive and integrated; and contradictions in the stipulations and implementation of existing policies and capacity and human resources shortages. It was concluded that the magnitude, uniqueness and complexity of the phenomenon necessitate effective and sound scientific management principles. This is achieved by providing legal clarity of the concept; developing relevant policies and ensuring effective implementation thereof; rigorous monitoring and evaluation based on comprehensive empirical data; and protecting the rights and safety of these children and ensuring an enabling environment for all stakeholders to address needs and challenges. The role of the nurse manager is to ensure a holistic approach to children living in child

  13. Strategy and research programmes in the framework of the law of 30 December 1991 relative to the management of high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    This paper is a summary of the document prepared by the government agencies responsible of the researches on the nuclear wastes management in the framework of the law of the 30 december 1991 and concerning the strategy and the researches programmes relative to the radioactive wastes management. It is organized in six chapters: the principles and the objectives of researches, the analysis of the historical context and the mean tendencies, the evaluation criteria and the researches relevance, the programmes establishment and the priorities definition concerning the five basis operations on the radionuclides, the description of the researches programmes. (A.L.B.)

  14. Entanglement of quantum clocks through gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Ruiz, Esteban; Giacomini, Flaminia; Brukner, Časlav

    2017-03-21

    In general relativity, the picture of space-time assigns an ideal clock to each world line. Being ideal, gravitational effects due to these clocks are ignored and the flow of time according to one clock is not affected by the presence of clocks along nearby world lines. However, if time is defined operationally, as a pointer position of a physical clock that obeys the principles of general relativity and quantum mechanics, such a picture is, at most, a convenient fiction. Specifically, we show that the general relativistic mass-energy equivalence implies gravitational interaction between the clocks, whereas the quantum mechanical superposition of energy eigenstates leads to a nonfixed metric background. Based only on the assumption that both principles hold in this situation, we show that the clocks necessarily get entangled through time dilation effect, which eventually leads to a loss of coherence of a single clock. Hence, the time as measured by a single clock is not well defined. However, the general relativistic notion of time is recovered in the classical limit of clocks.

  15. Changing Times: A Changing Public Sector May Require Changes to Public Management Education Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, Chrissie

    2017-01-01

    It is becoming apparent that the environment in which Executive Masters in Public Administration programmes operate has changed dramatically in the wake of economic crisis and subsequent cuts in public spending. Changes in the funding of public sector organisations has been compounded by a broader "crisis" in the wider public sector…

  16. Programme of research into the management and storage of radioactive waste. Mathematical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, J.

    1984-01-01

    Progress in work on the importance of fractures in rocks to waste disposal studies is reported. The permeability of the fracture system is predicted. Computer programmes are used to solve problems of ground water flow and radionuclide transport, and a new 'dual porosity' mathematical model is assessed for radionuclide transportation. (U.K.)

  17. Implementing care programmes for frail older people: A project management perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bindels, J.; Cox, K.; Abma, T.A.; van Schayck, O.C.P.; Widdershoven, G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the issues that influenced the implementation of programmes designed to identify and support frail older people in the community in the Netherlands. Methods: Qualitative research methods were used to investigate the perspectives of project leaders, project members and members

  18. Study protocol: a mixed methods feasibility study for a loaded self-managed exercise programme for patellofemoral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin E; Hendrick, Paul; Bateman, Marcus; Moffatt, Fiona; Rathleff, Michael Skovdal; Selfe, James; Smith, Toby O; Logan, Pip

    2018-01-01

    Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is one of the most common forms of knee pain in adults under the age of 40, with a prevalence of 23% in the general population. The long-term prognosis is poor, with only one third of people pain-free 1 year after diagnosis. The biomedical model of pain in relation to persistent PFP has recently been called into question. It has been suggested that interventions for chronic musculoskeletal conditions should consider alternative mechanisms of action, beyond muscles and joints. Modern treatment therapies should consider desensitising strategies, with exercises that target movements and activities patients find fearful and painful. High-quality research on exercise prescription in relation to pain mechanisms, not directed at specific tissue pathology, and dose response clearly warrants further investigation. Our primary aim is to establish the feasibility and acceptability of conducting a definitive RCT which will evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a loaded self-managed exercise programme for people with patellofemoral pain. This is a single-centred, multiphase, sequential, mixed-methods trial that will evaluate the feasibility of running a definitive large-scale randomised controlled trial of a loaded self-managed exercise programme versus usual physiotherapy. Initially, 8-10 participants with a minimum 3-month history of PFP will be recruited from an NHS physiotherapy waiting list and interviewed. Participants will be invited to discuss perceived barriers and facilitators to exercise engagement, and the meaning and impact of PFP. Then, 60 participants will be recruited in the same manner for the main phase of the feasibility trial. A web-based service will randomise patients to a loaded self-managed exercise programme or usual physiotherapy. The loaded self-managed exercise programme is aimed at addressing lower limb knee and hip weakness and is positioned within a framework of reducing fear/avoidance with an emphasis on self-management

  19. Characteristics of a self-management support programme applicable in primary health care: a qualitative study of users' and health professionals' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg, Hilde Strøm; Steinsbekk, Aslak; Solbjør, Marit; Granbo, Randi; Garåsen, Helge

    2014-11-08

    Development of more self-management support programmes in primary health care has been one option used to enhance positive outcomes in chronic disease management. At present, research results provide no consensus on what would be the best way to develop support programmes into new settings. The aim of the present study was therefore to explore users' and health professionals' perceptions of what would be the vital elements in a self - management support programme applicable in primary health care, how to account for them, and why. Four qualitative, semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted in Central Norway. The informants possessed experience in development, provision, or participation in a self-management support programme. Data was analysed by the Systematic Text Condensation method. The results showed an overall positive expectation to the potential benefits of development of a self-management support programme in primary health care. Despite somewhat different arguments and perspectives, the users and the health professionals had a joint agreement on core characteristics; a self-management support programme in primary health care should therefore be generic, not disease specific, and delivered in a group- based format. A special focus should be on the everyday- life of the participants. The most challenging aspect was a present lack of competence and experience among health professionals to moderate self-management support programmes. The development and design of a relevant and applicable self-management support programme in primary health care should balance the interests of the users with the possibilities and constraints within each municipality. It would be vital to benefit from the closeness of the patients' every-day life situations. The user informants' perception of a self-management support programme as a supplement to regular medical treatment represented an expanded understanding of the self-management support concept. An exploring

  20. Development and evaluation of a dietary self-management programme for older adults with low literacy and heart disease: pilot study of feasibility and acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jung-Hua; Chen, Su-Hui

    2016-12-01

    To develop a dietary self-management programme for salt-, fluid-, fat- and cholesterol-intake behaviours for older adults with low literacy and heart disease and evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of the programme. Eating behaviours such as fluid, salt, fat and cholesterol intake are an important factor related to heart disease outcomes. People with low literacy have difficulty following recommended health behaviours, but limited research has investigated intervention programmes for this population. Programme development and pilot testing its feasibility and acceptability. Recommendations were also collected from participants and the research assistant for future large-scale interventions. The study had two phases. Phase I consisted of programme development based on previous qualitative findings, a systematic review of the literature, clinical practice experience and expert opinion. In Phase II, we pilot tested the programme from January - June 2014 in a convenience sample of 10 older adults with low literacy, heart disease and recruited from a medical centre in northern Taiwan. Pilot testing showed that our programme was feasible and acceptable to older adults with low literacy and heart disease. Moreover, the final version of the programme was revised based on participants' and the research assistant's recommendations. Our study results suggest that with guidance and assistance, older adults with low literacy and heart disease can be motivated to take action for their health and are empowered by learning how to self-manage their heart-healthy eating behaviours. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The Implementation of E1 Clock Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ziyu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clock transform and recovery is of significant importance in microwave TDM service, and it is always extracted from the E1 line data stream in most cases. However, intrinsically uncertain delay and jitter caused by packet transmission of E1 data information, may lead to the indexes of the data recovery clock exceed the clock performance template. Through analysis of the E1 clock indexes and measuring methods, this paper proposes a new clock recovery method. The method employs two buffers, the first RAM is used as a buffer to deduct excess information, and the second FIFO is used as a buffer to recovery the clock and data. The first buffer has a feedback from the second one, and is able to actively respond to changes in the data link and requests from the second one. The test results validate the effectiveness of the method, and the corresponding scheme is also valuable for the other communication systems.

  2. Role of research and development in life management programme and upgradation of safety of Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupani, B.B.; Vijayan, P.K.; Rama Rao, A.; Sinha, R.K.

    2009-01-01

    At present, India has a fleet of thirteen small size 220 MWe Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) and two medium size 540 MWe PHWRs. Reactor Engineering Division (RED) of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) has pursued multi-faceted Research and Development programmes to support each phase of PHWR i.e. design, construction, commissioning, operation, maintenance, In-Service Inspection, repair and replacement and life extension, This programme is mainly related to life management of coolant channels, development of tooling and techniques for In-service Inspection of coolant channels, development of repair and replacement technology for coolant channels and moderator system, In-house development of technology and equipments like rolled joints to joint dissimilar metals and lancing equipment for steam generator and state-of art diagnostic systems for trouble shooting critical operating systems. The strong R and D support provided in the programme has significantly contributed towards safe operation of PHWRs. This paper gives the highlights of the major activities in above areas with their end uses and capability. (author)

  3. Community R and D programme on radioactive waste management and storage (Shared Cost Action). List of scientific reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebel, W.; Falke, W.

    1984-11-01

    The scientific reports listed herein have been brought out in the scope of the Research and Development programme sponsored by the Commission of the European Communities in the field of Radioactive Waste Management and Storage. The list systematically contains the references of all final R and D reports and equivalent scientific publications drawn up since 1975 on the various contractual research works sponsored by the Commission in its programme on shared cost terms (Shared Cost Action). It states the autor of the work, the title, the EUR report number (where applicable), the way of publication and the contractor's reference (CEC contract number). The content headings are: conditioning of fuel cladding and dissolution residues, immobilization and storage of gaseous waste, treatment of Low and Medium Level waste, processing of alpha contaminated waste, characterization of conditioned Low and Medium Level waste forms, testing of solidified High Level waste forms, shallow land burial of solid Low Level waste, waste disposal in geological formations, safety of radioactive waste disposal, and annual progress reports of the Community programme

  4. Radioactive waste management and public participation in the EU. Lessons learnt from the EURATOM research framework programmes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraro, Gianluca [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Petten (Netherlands); Martell, Meritxell [Merience SCP, Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-12-15

    Since 2000, the EURATOM Framework Programmes have dedicated political attention and economic support to public participation in radioactive waste management (RWM). Although a one-fit-all solution for a participatory RWM does not exist, the diversity that characterizes the European Union (EU) offers a relevant pool of knowledge and experience. The Joint Research Centre has used the knowledge and experience cumulated by relevant EURATOM projects to define a list of general principles for a more participatory approach to RWM. The principles explained in this article can ultimately work as indications for the changes and strategic actions that are needed for a better RWM in the EU.

  5. Radioactive waste management and public participation in the EU. Lessons learnt from the EURATOM research framework programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraro, Gianluca; Martell, Meritxell

    2015-01-01

    Since 2000, the EURATOM Framework Programmes have dedicated political attention and economic support to public participation in radioactive waste management (RWM). Although a one-fit-all solution for a participatory RWM does not exist, the diversity that characterizes the European Union (EU) offers a relevant pool of knowledge and experience. The Joint Research Centre has used the knowledge and experience cumulated by relevant EURATOM projects to define a list of general principles for a more participatory approach to RWM. The principles explained in this article can ultimately work as indications for the changes and strategic actions that are needed for a better RWM in the EU.

  6. The Square Light Clock and Special Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, J. Ronald; Amiri, Farhang

    2012-01-01

    A thought experiment that includes a square light clock is similar to the traditional vertical light beam and mirror clock, except it is made up of four mirrors placed at a 45[degree] angle at each corner of a square of length L[subscript 0], shown in Fig. 1. Here we have shown the events as measured in the rest frame of the square light clock. By…

  7. Space experiments with high stability clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vessot, R.F.C.

    1993-01-01

    Modern metrology depends increasingly on the accuracy and frequency stability of atomic clocks. Applications of such high-stability oscillators (or clocks) to experiments performed in space are described and estimates of the precision of these experiments are made in terms of clock performance. Methods using time-correlation to cancel localized disturbances in very long signal paths and a proposed space borne four station VLBI system are described. (TEC). 30 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  8. Advanced concepts for waste management and nuclear energy production in the EURATOM 5. framework programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugon, M.; Bhatnagar, V.P.; Martin Bermejon, J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper summarises the objectives of the research projects on partitioning and transmutation (P and T) of long-lived radionuclides in nuclear waste and advanced systems for nuclear energy production in the key action on nuclear fission of the EURATOM 5. Framework Programme (FP5) (1998-2002). As these FP5 projects cover the main aspects of P and T, they should provide a basis for evaluating the practicability, on an industrial scale, of P and T for reducing the amount of long-lived radionuclides to be disposed of. Concerning advanced concepts, a cluster of projects is addressing the key technical issues to be solved before implementing high-temperature reactors (HTRs) commercially for energy production. Finally, the European Commissions proposal fora New Framework Programme (2002-2006) is briefly outlined. (authors)

  9. Advanced concepts for waste management and nuclear energy production in the EURATOM fifth framework programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugon, M.; Bhatnagar, V.P.; Martin Bermejo, J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarises the objectives of the research projects on Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) of long lived radionuclides in nuclear waste and advanced systems for nuclear energy production in the key action on nuclear fission of the EURATOM Fifth Framework Programme (FP5) (1998-2002). As these FP5 projects cover the main aspects of P and T, they should provide a basis for evaluating the practicability, on an industrial scale, of P and T for reducing the amount of long lived radionuclides to be disposed of. Concerning advanced concepts, a cluster of projects is addressing the key technical issues to be solved before implementing High Temperature Reactors (HTRs) commercially for energy production. Finally, the European Commission(tm)s proposal for a New Framework Programme (2002-2006) is briefly outlined. (author)

  10. Effectiveness of an NGO primary health care programme in rural Bangladesh: evidence from the management information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Alec; Khan, Mobarak Hossain; Daulatuzzaman, Muhammad; Reid, Joanna

    2004-07-01

    This paper considers evidence of the effectiveness of a non-governmental organization (NGO) primary health care programme in rural Bangladesh. It is based on data from the programme's management information system reported by 27 partner NGOs from 1996-2002. The data indicate relatively high coverage has been achieved for reproductive and child health services, as well as lower infant and child mortality. On the basis of a crude indicator of socio-economic status, the programme is poverty-focused. There is good service coverage among the poorest one-third and others, and the infant and child mortality differential has been eliminated over recent years. A rapid decline in infant mortality among the poorest from 1999-2002 reflects a reduction in neonatal mortality of about 50%. Allowing for some under-reporting and possible misclassification of deaths to the stillbirths category, neonatal mortality is relatively low in the NGO areas. The lower child and maternal mortality for the NGO areas combined, compared with estimates for Bangladesh in recent years, may at least in part be due to high coverage of reproductive and child health services. Other development programmes implemented by many of the NGOs could also have contributed. Despite the limited resources available, and the lower infant and child mortality already achieved, there appears to be scope for further prevention of deaths, particularly those due to birth asphyxia, acute respiratory infection, diarrhoeal disease and accidents. Maternal mortality in the NGO areas was lower in 2000-02 than the most recent estimate for Bangladesh. Further reduction is likely to depend on improved access to qualified community midwives and essential obstetric care at government referral facilities.

  11. A Computer Assisted Program for the Management of Acute Dental Pain: Programmer’s Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-06

    periodontal abscesses ?" option$(l, 1)= " 1. Yes" option$(2, 1)= " 2. No" Iongest=8 numops=2 qrow=2 qcol=5 call piques((ques$)) call prioptions ans=-O call...Osteitis (Dry Socket) DATA 20, Osseous Sequestrum DENTAL Programmer’s Manual A-94 DATA 30, Abscess /Infection/Cellulitis DATA 42, Periodontal Abscess ...DATA 53, Reversible Pulpitis DATA 64, Irreversible Pulpitis DATA 75, Acute Apical Abscess DATA 87, Acute Apical Periodontitis DATA 99, Carious Lesion

  12. Improving malaria treatment and prevention in India by aiding district managers to manage their programmes with local information: a trial assessing the impact of Lot Quality Assurance Sampling on programme outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadez, Joseph J; Devkota, Baburam; Pradhan, Madan Mohan; Meherda, Pramod; Sonal, G S; Dhariwal, Akshay; Davis, Rosemary

    2014-10-01

    This paper reports the first trial of Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) assessing associations between access to LQAS data and subsequent improvements in district programming. This trial concerns India's approach to addressing an increase in malaria-attributable deaths by training community health workers to diagnose, treat and prevent malaria, while using LQAS to monitor sub-district performance and make programme improvements. The Ministry of Health introduced LQAS into four matched high malaria burden districts (Annual Parasite Incidence >5) (N > 5 million). In each sub-district, we sampled four populations in three 6-monthly surveys: households, children LQAS results appeared to support district managers to increase coverage in underperforming areas, especially for vertical strategies in the presence of diligent managers. © 2014 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Outcomes of a Community-Based Paediatric Weight Management Programme in an Irish Midlands Setting

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bennett, AE

    2018-02-01

    Ongoing investigation is needed into feasible approaches which reduce excess weight in childhood. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of an adapted version of the Scottish Childhood Overweight Treatment Trial (SCOTT) in an Irish primary care setting. Families were offered monthly dietitian-led sessions for six months. These sessions targeted dietary habits, family meals, screen time and exercise. Of the 95 children (mean age 7.6 years) referred, 90.5% (n86) were obese and 9.5% (n9) were overweight. Fifty-one (53.7%) families opted into the programme from referral, and 18 completed the programme (64.7% attrition). Statistically significant reductions in body mass index (BMI) were observed between sessions one and six (25.7±4.2kg\\/m2 and 25.3±4.8kg\\/m2, respectively, p<0.01). BMI z-score modestly decreased by 0.2 (p=0.01). Despite these reductions, issues with programme referral, attrition and long-term effectiveness were evident. Further investigation into strategies which reduce paediatric overweight is warranted.

  14. Kids just wanna have fun: Children's experiences of a weight management programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Libby A; Baker, Martyn C; Chadwick, Paul M

    2016-05-01

    To explore children's accounts of their experiences of the UK's largest childhood obesity programme, MEND (Mind, Exercise, Nutrition...Do it!) (See www.mendprogramme.org). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with children who had completed the MEND obesity programme. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Fourteen children spanning diverse areas of London comprised this study (eight male, six female), aged between 11 and 14 years and in secondary school. Participants were interviewed a year after completing one of the London-based MEND obesity programmes. This article focuses on the most common and striking theme to emerge from the original dataset (The complete analysis may be found in L. Watson, Unpublished doctoral thesis): Fun. Subthemes were: 'going with the flow'; active participation in activities that led to new experiences ('actually doing it' - seeing the fun side); the importance of others in the experience of fun ('you do games in unity' - 'it's not as fun on your own'). Children have fun when engaged in interactive and varied activities with opportunity for individual feedback and improvement. When designing childhood obesity programmes, conditions that optimise children's experience of fun should be emphasised over didactic and risk-heavy information pertaining to childhood obesity. What is already known on this subject? Continued growth in childhood obesity and its associated health problems, psychological effects, and economic burden make tackling childhood obesity a public health priority. Multicomponent lifestyle interventions to treat childhood obesity within the community have been shown to reduce overweight and obesity from pre- to post-treatment, increase self-esteem, and are found to be acceptable by parents. MEND is the most widely disseminated evidence-based programme of this kind in the United Kingdom. What does this study add? This study is the first qualitative study

  15. A programmable artificial retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, T.M.; Zavidovique, B.Y.; Devos, F.J.

    1993-01-01

    An artificial retina is a device that intimately associates an imager with processing facilities on a monolithic circuit. Yet, except for simple environments and applications, analog hardware will not suffice to process and compact the raw image flow from the photosensitive array. To solve this output problem, an on-chip array of bare Boolean processors with halftoning facilities might be used, providing versatility from programmability. By setting the pixel memory size to 3 b, the authors have demonstrated both the technological practicality and the computational efficiency of this programmable Boolean retina concept. Using semi-static shifting structures together with some interaction circuitry, a minimal retina Boolean processor can be built with less than 30 transistors and controlled by as few as 6 global clock signals. The successful design, integration, and test of such a 65x76 Boolean retina on a 50-mm 2 CMOS 2-μm circuit are presented

  16. Evaluation of a large scale implementation of disease management programmes in various Dutch regions: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, Karin M M; Rutten-Van Mölken, Maureen P M H; Cramm, Jane M; Huijsman, Robbert; Bal, Roland A; Nieboer, Anna P

    2011-01-10

    Disease management programmes (DMPs) have been developed to improve effectiveness and economic efficiency within chronic care delivery by combining patient-related, professional-directed, and organisational interventions. The benefits of DMPs within different settings, patient groups, and versions remain unclear. In this article we propose a protocol to evaluate a range of current DMPs by capturing them in a single conceptual framework, employing comparable structure, process, and outcome measures, and combining qualitative and quantitative research methods. To assess DMP effectiveness a practical clinical trial will be conducted. Twenty-two disease management experiments will be studied in various Dutch regions consisting of a variety of collaborations between organisations and/or professionals. Patient cohorts include those with cardiovascular diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, stroke, depression, psychotic diseases, and eating disorders. Our methodological approach combines qualitative and quantitative research methods to enable a comprehensive evaluation of complex programmes. Process indicators will be collected from health care providers' data registries and measured via physician and staff questionnaires. Patient questionnaires include health care experiences, health care utilisation, and quality of life. Qualitative data will be gathered by means of interviews and document analysis for an in depth description of project interventions and the contexts in which DMPs are embedded, and an ethnographic process evaluation in five DMPs. Such a design will provide insight into ongoing DMPs and demonstrate which elements of the intervention are potentially (cost)-effective for which patient populations. It will also enable sound comparison of the results of the different programmes. The study will lead to a better understanding of (1) the mechanisms of disease management, (2) the feasibility, and cost-effectiveness of a disease management

  17. Evaluation of a large scale implementation of disease management programmes in various Dutch regions: a study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Disease management programmes (DMPs) have been developed to improve effectiveness and economic efficiency within chronic care delivery by combining patient-related, professional-directed, and organisational interventions. The benefits of DMPs within different settings, patient groups, and versions remain unclear. In this article we propose a protocol to evaluate a range of current DMPs by capturing them in a single conceptual framework, employing comparable structure, process, and outcome measures, and combining qualitative and quantitative research methods. Methods To assess DMP effectiveness a practical clinical trial will be conducted. Twenty-two disease management experiments will be studied in various Dutch regions consisting of a variety of collaborations between organisations and/or professionals. Patient cohorts include those with cardiovascular diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, stroke, depression, psychotic diseases, and eating disorders. Our methodological approach combines qualitative and quantitative research methods to enable a comprehensive evaluation of complex programmes. Process indicators will be collected from health care providers' data registries and measured via physician and staff questionnaires. Patient questionnaires include health care experiences, health care utilisation, and quality of life. Qualitative data will be gathered by means of interviews and document analysis for an in depth description of project interventions and the contexts in which DMPs are embedded, and an ethnographic process evaluation in five DMPs. Such a design will provide insight into ongoing DMPs and demonstrate which elements of the intervention are potentially (cost)-effective for which patient populations. It will also enable sound comparison of the results of the different programmes. Discussion The study will lead to a better understanding of (1) the mechanisms of disease management, (2) the feasibility, and cost

  18. Evaluation of a large scale implementation of disease management programmes in various Dutch regions: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal Roland A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disease management programmes (DMPs have been developed to improve effectiveness and economic efficiency within chronic care delivery by combining patient-related, professional-directed, and organisational interventions. The benefits of DMPs within different settings, patient groups, and versions remain unclear. In this article we propose a protocol to evaluate a range of current DMPs by capturing them in a single conceptual framework, employing comparable structure, process, and outcome measures, and combining qualitative and quantitative research methods. Methods To assess DMP effectiveness a practical clinical trial will be conducted. Twenty-two disease management experiments will be studied in various Dutch regions consisting of a variety of collaborations between organisations and/or professionals. Patient cohorts include those with cardiovascular diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, stroke, depression, psychotic diseases, and eating disorders. Our methodological approach combines qualitative and quantitative research methods to enable a comprehensive evaluation of complex programmes. Process indicators will be collected from health care providers' data registries and measured via physician and staff questionnaires. Patient questionnaires include health care experiences, health care utilisation, and quality of life. Qualitative data will be gathered by means of interviews and document analysis for an in depth description of project interventions and the contexts in which DMPs are embedded, and an ethnographic process evaluation in five DMPs. Such a design will provide insight into ongoing DMPs and demonstrate which elements of the intervention are potentially (cost-effective for which patient populations. It will also enable sound comparison of the results of the different programmes. Discussion The study will lead to a better understanding of (1 the mechanisms of disease management, (2 the

  19. Development of improved attractants and their integration into fruit fly SIT management programmes. Proceedings of a final research coordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-10-01

    Information provided by trapping systems is used to assess the presence, seasonal abundance, spatial distribution, host sequence and infestation levels of fruit fly pests. This information is key for implementation of effective fruit fly control programmes. Most trapping systems commercially available are based on para-pheromones which are male specific. These male specific trapping systems have been used as the main survey tool in area-wide fruit fly control programmes. Nevertheless, in recent years, scientists and programme managers have realized that, in order to improve the efficiency of fruit fly control, it is essential to have a female specific or at least a female biased trapping system. Until the late 1990s, the only fruit fly female biased attractants were based on natural protein baits such as Torula Yeast and hydrolysate proteins. Although these attractants tend to catch more females than males (in average 60% females against 40% males), the proportion in favor of females is insufficient and the attractants are considered to be weak and non-selective. In 1999, as a result of a previous Coordinated Research Project (CRP) entitled 'Development of Female Medfly Attractant Systems for Trapping and Sterility Assessment' the first effective female biased synthetic food lure was developed for the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata, Wied.) (IAEA-TECDOC-1099). This lure, with the commercial name of Biolure, is now being used in large-scale medfly control programmes worldwide. Given this background, and in order to further advance this field, the Joint FAO/IAEA Programme approved in 2000 a five year CRP entitled 'Development of Improved Attractants and their Integration into Fruit Fly SIT Management Programmes'. The research conducted under this CRP focused mainly on developing female biased trapping systems for other fruit fly species of quarantine and economic importance within the Anastrepha, Bactrocera, Ceratitis and Dacus genera and on optimization

  20. Developing skills and competence of employees of the Kujawsko-Pomorskie regional operational programme managing body – research findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Michalcewicz-Kaniowska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the contemporary world it is the employees or the human capital of any company who are responsible for effective management and caring for the future of their business. Organisations change all the time which means that continual staff training should be provided. The purpose of the research was to evaluate the training policy of the managing body of the Kujawsko-Pomorskie Regional Operational Programme (IZ RPO WK-P and its employees’ development potential. The research participants preferred mentoring (47%, coaching (27% and briefing (26% techniques. They also benefited from a range of educational techniques such as training courses, post-graduate studies etc. and a wide choice of subjects. Thus, it is necessary to conduct periodic research on training requirements, focusing on subjects and training techniques.

  1. High Performance Clocks and Gravity Field Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, J.; Dirkx, D.; Kopeikin, S. M.; Lion, G.; Panet, I.; Petit, G.; Visser, P. N. A. M.

    2018-02-01

    Time measured by an ideal clock crucially depends on the gravitational potential and velocity of the clock according to general relativity. Technological advances in manufacturing high-precision atomic clocks have rapidly improved their accuracy and stability over the last decade that approached the level of 10^{-18}. This notable achievement along with the direct sensitivity of clocks to the strength of the gravitational field make them practically important for various geodetic applications that are addressed in the present paper. Based on a fully relativistic description of the background gravitational physics, we discuss the impact of those highly-precise clocks on the realization of reference frames and time scales used in geodesy. We discuss the current definitions of basic geodetic concepts and come to the conclusion that the advances in clocks and other metrological technologies will soon require the re-definition of time scales or, at least, clarification to ensure their continuity and consistent use in practice. The relative frequency shift between two clocks is directly related to the difference in the values of the gravity potential at the points of clock's localization. According to general relativity the relative accuracy of clocks in 10^{-18} is equivalent to measuring the gravitational red shift effect between two clocks with the height difference amounting to 1 cm. This makes the clocks an indispensable tool in high-precision geodesy in addition to laser ranging and space geodetic techniques. We show how clock measurements can provide geopotential numbers for the realization of gravity-field-related height systems and can resolve discrepancies in classically-determined height systems as well as between national height systems. Another application of clocks is the direct use of observed potential differences for the improved recovery of regional gravity field solutions. Finally, clock measurements for space-borne gravimetry are analyzed along with

  2. Diabetes structured self-management education programmes: a narrative review and current innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatterjee, Sudesna; Davies, Melanie J.; Heller, Simon; Speight, Jane; Snoek, Frank J.; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2018-01-01

    Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are associated with long-term complications that can be prevented or delayed by intensive glycaemic management. People who are empowered and skilled to self-manage their diabetes have improved health outcomes. Over the past 20 years, diabetes self-management education

  3. The Implementation of a Positive Behaviour Management Programme in a Primary Classroom: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherley, Carole

    1990-01-01

    Positive behavior management has been recommended as a more acceptable form of classroom management than traditional behavioral modification. This paper discusses the application of stimulus and contingency control methods (positive behavior management) to elicit more socially and academically acceptable behavior from elementary school children.…

  4. CO{sub 2}MPARE. CO2 Model for Operational Programme Assessment in EU Regions. Improved carbon management with EU Regional Policy. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hekkenberg, M. [ECN Policy Studies, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schram, J. [Energies Demain, Montreuil Sous Bois (France); Amerighi, O. [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development ENEA, Rome (Italy); Keppo, I. [University College London UCL, London (United Kingdom); Papagianni, S. [Centre for Renewable Energy Sources and Saving CRES, Pikermi Attiki (Greece); Ten Donkelaar, M. [ENVIROS, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-03-15

    The CO2MPARE model supports national and regional authorities in making balanced decisions for their investment portfolio under their regional development programmes, in particular under their Operational Programmes of EU Regional Policy. The EU's climate objectives require that investments across the EU are channeled towards low-carbon development. The carbon impacts of investments should therefore be seriously considered in the decision making process of regional development programmes. The CO2MPARE model informs national and regional authorities on the impacts that the investments under various Operational Programmes can have in terms of CO2 emissions. Knowing which investments lead either to additional emissions or rather to emission reductions, and what the overall impact of a programme is, represents the first step towards investment decisions that have decarbonisation co-benefits. CO2MPARE estimates the combined carbon impact of all activities that take place under a programme, and provides insights into the relative contributions of the different themes. Through its high aggregation level, it allows comparison of investment scenarios rather than individual projects. As such, it aims to support informed decisions on investment strategies rather than project investment decisions. In doing so, it also helps to build and develop a 'carbon culture' within the authorities directly or indirectly in charge of managing Regional Policy Operational Programmes. The model is primarily aimed at Operational Programmes co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF)

  5. International programme on the health effects of the Chernobyl accident (IPHECA). Report of the management committee meeting Geneva 16-17 March 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident (IPHECA) have been initiated in mid-1991 following its endorsement by the Forty-fourth World Health Assembly in resolution WHA44.36. The report of the Management Committee Meeting outlines the progress made in the implementation of the Programme, and summarises the scientific information obtained to date on the health effects and planned future activities. Status reports were provided by the representatives of Belarus, Russia, Ukraine and the WHO Secretariat. The major projects under the programme include Thyroid project, Hematology project, Dosimetry and Communication Support Services, Brain Damage in utero project and Epidemiological Registry project. 4 tabs

  6. The Effect of Peer-Led Self-Management Education Programmes for Adolescents with Asthma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Connie S.; Melendez-Torres, G. J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Adolescents with asthma face unique challenges due to hormonal changes, psychosocial development and healthcare transition. Peer-led self-management programmes may increase treatment adherence and social adjustment by addressing these challenges. The purpose of this study was to assess whether peer-led self-management programmes…

  7. Long-Term Clock Behavior of GPS IIR Satellites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Epstein, Marvin; Dass, Todd; Rajan, John; Gilmour, Paul

    2007-01-01

    .... Rubidium clocks, as opposed to cesium clocks, have significant long-term drift. The current literature describes an initial model of drift aging for rubidium atomic clocks followed by a long-term characteristic...

  8. A qualitative study of patients' experiences of participating in SPACE for COPD: a Self-management Programme of Activity, Coping and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apps, Lindsay D; Harrison, Samantha L; Mitchell, Katy E; Williams, Johanna E A; Hudson, Nicky; Singh, Sally J

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to understand experiences of participation in a supported self-management programme for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). There is a wealth of clinical trials examining the outcomes of self-management interventions for individuals with COPD, but current understanding regarding patients' perspectives of such complex interventions is limited. Further insight may help to tailor self-management interventions and maximise patient engagement. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with individuals participating in a self-management programme, SPACE for COPD. Interviews took place at 6 weeks and 6 months following the programme. Data were analysed at each time point using inductive thematic analysis, and subsequently re-examined together. 40 interviews were undertaken and four themes emerged from the analysis: perceptions of the programme; lifestyle changes; social support; and disrupting factors and barriers to maintaining routines. SPACE for COPD was acceptable to participants in this study. The importance of education and social support was emphasised at both time points studied, but there were challenges such as comorbidities, ill health of family members and limited maintenance of exercise behaviours over the longer term. Further consideration of the role of carers and partners may help to improve adherence to self-management programmes once healthcare professional support has stopped.

  9. Rationale and methods of the multicenter randomised trial of a heart failure management programme among geriatric patients (HF-Geriatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casado Jose

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disease management programmes (DMPs have been shown to reduce hospital readmissions and mortality in adults with heart failure (HF, but their effectiveness in elderly patients or in those with major comorbidity is unknown. The Multicenter Randomised Trial of a Heart Failure Management Programme among Geriatric Patients (HF-Geriatrics assesses the effectiveness of a DMP in elderly patients with HF and major comorbidity. Methods/Design Clinical trial in 700 patients aged ≥ 75 years admitted with a primary diagnosis of HF in the acute care unit of eight geriatric services in Spain. Each patient should meet at least one of the following comorbidty criteria: Charlson index ≥ 3, dependence in ≥ 2 activities of daily living, treatment with ≥ 5 drugs, active treatment for ≥ 3 diseases, recent emergency hospitalization, severe visual or hearing loss, cognitive impairment, Parkinson's disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, anaemia, or constitutional syndrome. Half of the patients will be randomly assigned to a 1-year DMP led by a case manager and the other half to usual care. The DMP consists of an educational programme for patients and caregivers on the management of HF, COPD (knowledge of the disease, smoking cessation, immunizations, use of inhaled medication, recognition of exacerbations, diabetes (knowledge of the disease, symptoms of hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia, self-adjustment of insulin, foot care and depression (knowledge of the disease, diagnosis and treatment. It also includes close monitoring of the symptoms of decompensation and optimisation of treatment compliance. The main outcome variables are quality of life, hospital readmissions, and overall mortality during a 12-month follow-up. Discussion The physiological changes, lower life expectancy, comorbidity and low health literacy associated with aging may influence the effectiveness of DMPs in HF. The HF-Geriatrics study

  10. RDandD Programme 2010. Programme for research, development and demonstration of methods for the management and disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    The RD and D programme 2010 gives an account of SKB's plans for research, development and demonstration during the period 2011-2016. SKB's activities are divided into two main areas - the programme for Low and Intermediate Level Waste (the Loma program) and the Nuclear Fuel Program. The RD and D Programme 2010 consists of five parts: Part I: Overall Plan, Part II: Loma program, Part III: Nuclear Fuel Program, Part IV: Research on analysis of long-term safety, Part V: Social Science Research. The 2007 RD and D programme was focused primarily on technology development to realize the final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The actions described were aimed at increasing awareness of long-term safety and to obtain technical data for application under the Nuclear Activities Act for the final repository for spent fuel and under the Environmental Code of the repository system. Many important results from these efforts are reported in this program. An overall account of the results will be given in the Licensing application in early 2011. The authorities' review of RD and D programme in 2007 and completion of the program called for clarification of plans and programs for the final repository for short-lived radioactive waste, SFR, and the final repository for waste, SFL. This RD and D program describes these plans in a more detailed way

  11. A clock synchronization skeleton based on RTAI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Y.; Visser, P.M.; Broenink, Johannes F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a clock synchronization skeleton based on RTAI (Real Time Application Interface). The skeleton is a thin layer that provides unified but extendible interfaces to the underlying operating system, the synchronization algorithms and the upper level applications in need of clock

  12. The clock paradox as a cosmological problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, K.Y.

    1975-01-01

    In this paper the clock paradox is discussed within the framework of the general theory of relativity. It is shown that in general the aging asymmetry exists. It is also argued that the clock paradox, according to Mach's principle, is essentially a cosmological problem. (author)

  13. Could Atomic clocks be affected by neutrinos?

    CERN Document Server

    Hanafi, Hanaa

    2016-01-01

    An atomic clock is a clock device that uses an electronic transition frequency of the electromagnetic spectrum of atoms as a frequency standard in order to derive a time standard since time is the reciprocal of frequency. If the electronic transition frequencies are in an "optical region", we are talking in this case about optical atomic clocks. If they are in an "microwave region" these atomic clocks are made of the metallic element cesium so they are called Cesium atomic clocks. Atomic clocks are the most accurate time and frequency standards known despite the different perturbations that can affect them, a lot of researches were made in this domain to show how the transitions can be different for different type of perturbations..Since atomic clocks are very sensitive devices, based on coherent states (A coherent state tends to loose coherence after interacting). One question can arise (from a lot of questions) which is why cosmic neutrinos are not affecting these clocks? The answer to this question requir...

  14. Fast Clock Recovery for Digital Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tell, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    Circuit extracts clock signal from random non-return-to-zero data stream, locking onto clock within one bit period at 1-gigabitper-second data rate. Circuit used for synchronization in opticalfiber communications. Derives speed from very short response time of gallium arsenide metal/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFET's).

  15. Evaluation of the third community programme 'Radioactive waste management and storage' (1985-1989)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaumont, G.; Cottenie, A.; Harrisson, J.; Schmitt-Tegge, J.D.; Schuettenhelm, R.T.E.; Wright, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    This evaluation report fits into the general framework of the Commission's evaluation policy (submitted in the form of a plan of action to the Council. O.J.C14 20.01.87). For the production of evaluation reports of Community research programmes, this plan envisages the use of independent external experts. The report consists of the following six chapters: - A general introduction covering the basis and procedure of the work, - An executive summary, available in each of the Community official languages, - A general review of the problems of radioactive waste, - The main reports, representing the actual evaluation of the programme, - The conclusion, which summarizes the main points, - Finally, policy action recommendations, followed by a recapitulation of the more specific recommendation from chapter IV and by a special note on the problem of public acceptance. At the end of the volume, annexes are added that provide the terms of reference given to the panel, list several more detailed documents which were used by the panel during the evaluation, and list people visited or interviewed by the evaluators

  16. Establishing a national system for radioactive waste management. A publication within the RADWASS programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This Safety Standard is intended to cover the requirements for establishing a national system for safe management of radioactive wastes especially, for solid, liquid and airborne radioactive waste resulting from the nuclear fuel cycle. The main text of the Safety Standard is organized as follows: (a) Section 2 sets out the main objective for radioactive waste management and the principle on which radioactive waste management policy and strategies should be based; (b) Section 3 presents the basic components of a national framework for radioactive waste management; (c) Section 4 outlines the responsibilities of the Member State, the regulatory body and the waste generators and operators of radioactive waste management facilities; and (d) Section 5 describes important features of radioactive waste management

  17. An Overview of a Class of Clock Synchronization Algorithms for Wireless Sensor Networks: A Statistical Signal Processing Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, wireless sensor networks (WSNs have drawn great interest due to their outstanding monitoring and management potential in medical, environmental and industrial applications. Most of the applications that employ WSNs demand all of the sensor nodes to run on a common time scale, a requirement that highlights the importance of clock synchronization. The clock synchronization problem in WSNs is inherently related to parameter estimation. The accuracy of clock synchronization algorithms depends essentially on the statistical properties of the parameter estimation algorithms. Recently, studies dedicated to the estimation of synchronization parameters, such as clock offset and skew, have begun to emerge in the literature. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art clock synchronization algorithms for WSNs from a statistical signal processing point of view. This article focuses on describing the key features of the class of clock synchronization algorithms that exploit the traditional two-way message (signal exchange mechanism. Upon introducing the two-way message exchange mechanism, the main clock offset estimation algorithms for pairwise synchronization of sensor nodes are first reviewed, and their performance is compared. The class of fully-distributed clock offset estimation algorithms for network-wide synchronization is then surveyed. The paper concludes with a list of open research problems pertaining to clock synchronization of WSNs.

  18. The principles of radioactive waste management. A publication within the RADWASS programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This publication defines the objective of radioactive waste management and the associated set of internationally agreed principles. The Safety Fundamentals include the objective of radioactive waste management and fundamental principles of radioactive waste management. The fundamental principles fall into the following general subject areas: protection of human health, protection of the environment, protection beyond national borders, responsibility to future generations and implementation procedures. Each principle is stated, and supporting and explanatory information pertaining to the principle is provided. 1 fig

  19. Processing of visually presented clock times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goolkasian, P; Park, D C

    1980-11-01

    The encoding and representation of visually presented clock times was investigated in three experiments utilizing a comparative judgment task. Experiment 1 explored the effects of comparing times presented in different formats (clock face, digit, or word), and Experiment 2 examined angular distance effects created by varying positions of the hands on clock faces. In Experiment 3, encoding and processing differences between clock faces and digitally presented times were directly measured. Same/different reactions to digitally presented times were faster than to times presented on a clock face, and this format effect was found to be a result of differences in processing that occurred after encoding. Angular separation also had a limited effect on processing. The findings are interpreted within the framework of theories that refer to the importance of representational codes. The applicability to the data of Bank's semantic-coding theory, Paivio's dual-coding theory, and the levels-of-processing view of memory are discussed.

  20. The return to work discussion: a qualitative study of the line manager conversation about return to work and the development of an educational programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Debbie; Allen, Joanna; Rhydderch, Melody; Aylward, Mansel

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the conversation between line manager and employee about return to work to inform the development of an online interactive educational programme for line managers to improve the effectiveness of their discussions. An inductive qualitative approach, using the principles of action research and motivational interviewing were adopted. The results informed the development of the educational programme for line managers. Middle grade line managers in a large public services employer in the UK. Four discussion groups were conducted over a period of 8 months. Line managers explored the challenges of the return to work interview, analysed their interactions with employees and constructed the content of an educational programme. Multiple methods were used to build engagement with participants, including video and role-play. Nine line managers were recruited across 3 business areas. Managers recognised that their conversations focused on the organisations' policies and procedures and the outcome, rather than the interaction. They recognised the strength of shifting style to shared decision-making and guidance rather than process and instruction. These communication strategies were depicted in the educational programme. The content and flow of the return to work discussion is of high importance and influences employee behaviour and return to work outcomes.

  1. Effects of a one week multidisciplinary inpatient self-management programme for patients with fibromyalgia: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamnes Bente

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-management programmes (SMP are recommended for patients with fibromyalgia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate effects of a one week multidisciplinary inpatient self-management programme on psychological distress, skills as a consumer of health services, self-efficacy, and functional and symptomatic consequences of fibromyalgia (FM. Methods A randomised controlled two-armed, assessor-blinded trial with three-week follow-up to evaluate SMP. Primary outcomes were the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-20 and the Effective Musculoskeletal Consumer Scale (EC-17, while secondary outcomes included the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ and Self-efficacy scales for pain, function and symptoms (ASES. Results 150 patients with FM were randomised to one week one SMP (n = 75 or to a waiting list control group (n = 75. Of these, 58 participants in the treatment group and 60 in the control group completed the study. At three weeks’ follow up there was a significant difference in EC-17 (0-100 in favour of the treatment group (mean difference 4.26, 95 CI 0.8 to 7.7, p = 0.02. There were no differences between the groups for any of the other outcomes. Conclusion This study shows that in patients with FM the SMP had no effect on psychological distress, functional and symptomatic consequences and self-efficacy, except for a small short-term effect on skills and behaviour that are important for managing and participating in health care (EC-17. Clinical Trials.gov Id: NCT01035125. Trial registration Clinical Trials.gov Id: NCT01035125

  2. Global synchronization of parallel processors using clock pulse width modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Ellavsky, Matthew R.; Franke, Ross L.; Gara, Alan; Gooding, Thomas M.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Liebsch, Thomas A.; Littrell, Daniel; Ohmacht, Martin; Reed, Don D.; Schenck, Brandon E.; Swetz, Richard A.

    2013-04-02

    A circuit generates a global clock signal with a pulse width modification to synchronize processors in a parallel computing system. The circuit may include a hardware module and a clock splitter. The hardware module may generate a clock signal and performs a pulse width modification on the clock signal. The pulse width modification changes a pulse width within a clock period in the clock signal. The clock splitter may distribute the pulse width modified clock signal to a plurality of processors in the parallel computing system.

  3. Responding to the multidrug-resistant tuberculosis crisis: mainstreaming programmatic management to the Philippine National Tuberculosis Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quelapio, M I D; Mira, N R C; Orillaza-Chi, R B; Belen, V; Muñez, N; Belchez, R; Egos, G E; Evangelista, M; Vianzon, R; Tupasi, T E

    2010-06-01

    The Philippines ranks eighth among 27 priority countries for multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). To describe a model of public-private partnership in MDR-TB management. An exploratory study of integrating MDR-TB management initiated in private-public mix DOTS into the National TB Programme (NTP). Recognising that MDR-TB was a threat to DOTS, the Tropical Disease Foundation initiated MDR-TB management in 1999. An official mandate for the integration of MDR-TB services into the NTP was issued by the Department of Health in 2008. With an increased government budget augmented by support from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, 1294 MDR-TB patients were placed on treatment from 1999 to 2008. The treatment success rate improved from 64% in 1999 to 75% in 2005. There are now five MDR-TB treatment centres with 181 treatment sites in Metro Manila, and three culture centres. People trained include 12 master trainers, 31 trainers, 25 treatment centre and 381 treatment site staff. Mainstreaming into the NTP of this unique model of MDR-TB management through a dynamic public-private collaboration can be considered best practice in implementation science of an evidence-based intervention leading to change in health care policy and practice.

  4. Evaluation of a group based cognitive behavioural therapy programme for menstrual pain management in young women with intellectual disabilities: protocol for a mixed methods controlled clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Menstrual pain which is severe enough to impact on daily activities is very common amongst menstruating females. Research suggests that menstrual pain which impacts on daily functioning may be even more prevalent amongst those with intellectual disabilities. Despite this, little research attention has focused on pain management programmes for those with intellectual disabilities. The aims of this pilot study were to develop and evaluate a theory-based cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) programme for menstrual pain management in young women with intellectual disabilities. Methods/Design The study utilised a mixed methods controlled clinical trial to evaluate elements from a CBT programme called Feeling Better (McGuire & McManus, 2010). The Feeling Better programme is a modular, manualised intervention designed for people with an intellectual disability and their carers. The programme was delivered to 36 young women aged 12 – 30 years who have a Mild - Moderate Intellectual Disability, split between two conditions. The treatment group received the Feeling Better intervention and the control group received treatment as usual. To evaluate the effectiveness of the programme, measures were taken of key pain variables including impact, knowledge, self-efficacy and coping. Process evaluation was conducted to examine which elements of the programme were most successful in promoting change. Discussion Participants in the intervention group were expected to report the use of a greater number of coping strategies and have greater knowledge of pain management strategies following participation in the intervention and at three month follow-up, when compared to control group participants. A significant advantage of the study was the use of mixed methods and inclusion of process evaluation to determine which elements of a cognitive behavioural therapy programme work best for individuals with intellectual disabilities. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials

  5. Management of large scale coolant channel replacement programme for Indian PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, V.K.; Chadda, S.K.; Arya, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    Coolant channel assemblies form most important core components of pressurised heavy water reactors. Zirconium alloy pressure tube which form part of coolant channel assemblies are subjected to environment of high neutron flux, high pressure and temperature. Under those operating environmental conditions, the pressure tubes material undergoes degradation of metallurgical and mechanical properties in addition to dimensional changes. The coolant channels are subjected to an in-service inspection (ISI) programme for monitoring the health particularly of the pressure tubes. The en-mass replacement of pressure tubes is needed after most of the pressure tubes show unacceptable conditions for an assured safe and reliable operation. An overview of various issues pertaining to this aspect is presented. (author). 4 figs

  6. Advances in childhood immunisation in South Africa: where to now? Programme managers' views and evidence from systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiysonge, Charles Shey; Ngcobo, Nthombenhle J; Jeena, Prakash M; Madhi, Shabir A; Schoub, Barry D; Hawkridge, Anthony; Shey, Muki S; Hussey, Gregory D

    2012-07-31

    The Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI) is one of the most powerful and cost-effective public health programmes to improve child survival. We assessed challenges and enablers for the programme in South Africa, as we approach the 2015 deadline for the Millennium Development Goals. Between September 2009 and September 2010 we requested national and provincial EPI managers in South Africa to identify key challenges facing EPI, and to propose appropriate solutions. We collated their responses and searched for systematic reviews on the effectiveness of the proposed solutions; in the Health Systems Evidence, Cochrane Library, and PubMed electronic databases. We screened the search outputs, selected systematic reviews, extracted data, and assessed the quality of included reviews (using AMSTAR) and the quality of the evidence (using GRADE) in duplicate; resolving disagreements by discussion and consensus. Challenges identified by EPI managers were linked to healthcare workers (insufficient knowledge of vaccines and immunisation), the public (anti-immunisation rumours and reluctance from parents), and health system (insufficient financial and human resources). Strategies proposed by managers to overcome the challenges include training, supervision, and audit and feedback; strengthening advocacy and social mobilisation; and sustainable EPI funding schemes, respectively. The findings from reliable systematic reviews indicate that interactive educational meetings, audit and feedback, and supportive supervision improve healthcare worker performance. Structured and interactive communication tools probably increase parents' understanding of immunisation; and reminders and recall, use of community health workers, conditional cash transfers, and mass media interventions probably increase immunisation coverage. Finally, a national social health insurance scheme is a potential EPI financing mechanism; however, given the absence of high-quality evidence of effects, its

  7. Resource-stratified implementation of a community-based breast cancer management programme in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Catherine; Dvaladze, Allison L; Tsu, Vivien; Jeronimo, Jose; Constant, Tara K Hayes; Romanoff, Anya; Scheel, John R; Patel, Shilpen; Gralow, Julie R; Anderson, Benjamin O

    2017-10-01

    Breast cancer incidence and mortality rates continue to rise in Peru, with related deaths projected to increase from 1208 in 2012, to 2054 in 2030. Despite improvements in national cancer control plans, various barriers to positive breast cancer outcomes remain. Multiorganisational stakeholder collaboration is needed for the development of functional, sustainable early diagnosis, treatment and supportive care programmes with the potential to achieve measurable outcomes. In 2011, PATH, the Peruvian Ministry of Health, the National Cancer Institute in Lima, and the Regional Cancer Institute in Trujillo collaborated to establish the Community-based Program for Breast Health, the aim of which was to improve breast health-care delivery in Peru. A four-step, resource-stratified implementation strategy was used to establish an effective community-based triage programme and a practical early diagnosis scheme within existing multilevel health-care infrastructure. The phased implementation model was initially developed by the Breast Cancer Initiative 2·5: a group of health and non-governmental organisations who collaborate to improve breast cancer outcomes. To date, the Community-based Program for Breast Health has successfully implemented steps 1, 2, and 3 of the Breast Cancer Initiative 2·5 model in Peru, with reports of increased awareness of breast cancer among women, improved capacity for early diagnosis among health workers, and the creation of stronger and more functional linkages between the primary levels (ie, local or community) and higher levels (ie, district, region, and national) of health care. The Community-based Program for Breast Health is a successful example of stakeholder and collaborator involvement-both internal and external to Peru-in the design and implementation of resource-appropriate interventions to increase breast health-care capacity in a middle-income Latin American country. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dilatation effect of ''quantum clocks''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chylinski, Z.

    1981-01-01

    The relativistic dilatation effect of the life-time of unstable microparticles combined with quantum symmetry of their description results in the ''quantum-dilatation'' dilemma. It is due to the classical character of the relativity theory which here reveals itself in the classical world-line of the clock necessary in order to deduce the dilatation effect from the Lorentz transformation. It is shown how to solve this dilemma, basing on the relation continuum C 4 . Two types of measurements of time intervals, the direct and indirect one, are analyzed. The former type corresponds to the external space-time continuum, where any direct measurement takes place, and the latter, to the internal relation continuum C 4 , where the internal structures of isolated micro-systems are sunk. (author)

  9. Feasibility of including patients with migration background in a structured heart failure management programme: A prospective case-control study exemplarily on Turkish migrants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Pfister

    Full Text Available Structured management programmes deliver optimized care in heart failure patients and improve outcome. We examined the feasibility of including patients with migration background speaking little or no German in a heart failure management programme.After adaption of script material and staff to Turkish language we aimed to recruit 300 Turkish and 300 German (control group patients within 18 months using the operational basis of a local heart failure management programme for screening, contact and inclusion. Of 488 and 1,055 eligible Turkish and German patients identified through screening, 165 Turkish (34% and 335 German (32% patients consented on participation (p = 0.46. General practitioners contributed significantly more of the Turkish (84% than of the German patients (16%, p<0.001. Contact attempts by programme staff were significantly less successful in Turkish (52% than in German patients (60%, p = 0.005 due to significantly higher rate of missing phone numbers (36% vs 25%, invalid address data (28% vs 7% and being unreachable by phone more frequently (39% vs 26%, all p<0.001. Consent rate was significantly higher in successfully contacted Turkish (63% compared to German patients (50%, p<0.001.The inclusion of Turkish minority patients into a heart failure management programme is feasible with higher consent rate than in Germans. However, effort is high due to inherent logistic adaptions and barriers in identification and contacting of patients.DRKS00007780.

  10. A rapid assessment of a community health worker pilot programme to improve the management of hypertension and diabetes in Emfuleni sub-district of Gauteng Province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndou, Tshipfuralo; van Zyl, Greer; Hlahane, Salamina; Goudge, Jane

    2013-01-24

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) and infectious chronic illnesses are recognised as significant contributing factors to the burden of disease globally, specifically in South Africa, yet clinical management is often poor. The involvement of community health workers (CHWs) in TB and HIV care in South Africa, and other low- and middle-income settings, suggests that they could make an important contribution in the management of NCDs. Using a rapid assessment, this study examines the outcomes of a pilot CHW programme to improve the management of hypertension and diabetes in Gauteng province, South Africa. A record review compared outcomes of patients receiving home visits (n56) with a control group (n168) attending the clinic, matched, as far as possible, on age, gender, and condition. Focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews with CHWs, patients, district, clinic, and NGO staff were used to obtain descriptions of the functioning of the programme and patient experiences. Despite the greater age and co-morbidity among those in the pilot programme, the findings suggest that control of hypertension was improved by CHW home visits in comparison to usual clinic care. However, too few doctor visits, insufficient monitoring of patient outcomes by clinic staff, and a poor procurement process for supplies required by the CHWs hampered the programme's activities. The role of CHWs in the management of hypertension should be given greater consideration, with larger studies being conducted to provide more robust evidence. Adequate training, supervision, and operational support will be required to ensure success of any CHW programme.

  11. Management of remanent lifetime. Short-term benefits of the maintenance evaluation and improvement programme; Gestion de la vida remanente de instalaciones industriales. Extension de vida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sainero Garcia, J [Empresarios Agrupados, Madrid (Spain)

    1993-12-15

    Remanent Lifetime Management, which is scientifically based on knowing the degradatory phenomena associated with aging, today allows us to optimize plant life through a long-term maintenance strategy combining preventive maintenance and condition monitoring programmes. Within a project for Remanent Lifetime Management (RLM), the determination of methods of control and mitigation of degradations due to aging depends on the programme of Maintenance Evaluation and Improvement (MEI). This programme, underpinned by the analysis of degradatory phenomena to which plant components are subjected, evaluates current maintenance practices and defines the complementary actions which would facilitate establishment of a long-term strategy to control aging. Together with this main objective of the RLM project, the MEI programme achieves short-term benefits since, right from the beginning, it offers solutions to mitigate and guard against degradations in crucial plant components, and generally sets out a programme to control aging. The MEI programme further serves as a tool to reach the final objectives of the new 10CFR50.65 rule, 'Requirements for Maintenance Programs for NPPs'. The MEI always offers the option should the Utility Owner decide to extend plant life. (author)

  12. Clock Management Data Analysis for Satellite Communications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gross, Rachel; Melkers, Raimond

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory has installed GPS-based timing systems in several Defense Satellite Communication System "DSCS-III" satellite communication facilities to support the Single Channel Transponder "SCT" program...

  13. Waste management research abstracts no. 16. Information on radioactive waste programmes in progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1985-11-01

    The research abstracts contained in this issue have been collected during recent months ending August 1985. The abstracts reflect research currently in progress in the field of radioactive waste management: environmental impacts, site selection, decontamination and decommissioning, environmental restoration and legal aspects of radioactive waste management. The abstracts have been printed in the language and in the form of submittal and without any changes other than minor editorial ones.

  14. Waste management research abstracts no. 16. Information on radioactive waste programmes in progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    The research abstracts contained in this issue have been collected during recent months ending August 1985. The abstracts reflect research currently in progress in the field of radioactive waste management: environmental impacts, site selection, decontamination and decommissioning, environmental restoration and legal aspects of radioactive waste management. The abstracts have been printed in the language and in the form of submittal and without any changes other than minor editorial ones

  15. Use of geographic information systems and spatial analysis in area-wide integrated pest management programmes that integrate the sterile insect technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, J.St.H.; Vreysen, M.J.B.

    2005-01-01

    The advantages that geographic information systems (GIS) and associated technologies can offer, in terms of the design and implementation of area-wide programmes of insect and/or disease suppression, are becoming increasingly recognised, even if the realization of this potential has not been fully exploited and for some area-wide programmes adoption appears to be progressing slowly. This chapter provides a basic introduction to the science of GIS, Global Positioning System (GPS), and satellite remote sensing (RS), and reviews the principal ways in which these technologies can be used to assist various stages of development of the sterile insect technique (SIT) as part of area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programmes - from the selection of project sites, and feasibility assessments and planning of pre-intervention surveys, to the monitoring and analysis of insect suppression programmes, and the release of sterile insects. Potential barriers to the successful deployment of GIS tools are also discussed. (author)

  16. Safety Priorities and Underestimations in Recreational Scuba Diving Operations: A European Study Supporting the Implementation of New Risk Management Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Lucrezi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Scuba diving is an important marine tourism sector, but requires proper safety standards to reduce the risks and increase accessibility to its market. To achieve safety goals, safety awareness and positive safety attitudes in recreational scuba diving operations are essential. However, there is no published research exclusively focusing on scuba divers’ and dive centres’ perceptions toward safety. This study assessed safety perceptions in recreational scuba diving operations, with the aim to inform and enhance safety and risk management programmes within the scuba diving tourism industry.Materials and Methods: Two structured questionnaire surveys were prepared by the organisation Divers Alert Network and administered online to scuba diving operators in Italy and scuba divers in Europe, using a mixture of convenience and snowball sampling. Questions in the survey included experience and safety offered at the dive centre; the buddy system; equipment and accessories for safe diving activities; safety issues in the certification of new scuba divers; incidents/accidents; and attitudes toward safety.Results: 91 scuba diving centres and 3,766 scuba divers participated in the study. Scuba divers gave importance to safety and the responsiveness of service providers, here represented by the dive centres. However, they underestimated the importance of a personal emergency action/assistance plan and, partly, of the buddy system alongside other safety procedures. Scuba divers agreed that some risks, such as those associated with running out of gas, deserve attention. Dive centres gave importance to aspects such as training and emergency action/assistance plans. However, they were limitedly involved in safety campaigning. Dive centres’ perceptions of safety in part aligned with those of scuba divers, with some exceptions.Conclusion: Greater responsibility is required in raising awareness and educating scuba divers, through participation in

  17. Safety Priorities and Underestimations in Recreational Scuba Diving Operations: A European Study Supporting the Implementation of New Risk Management Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucrezi, Serena; Egi, Salih Murat; Pieri, Massimo; Burman, Francois; Ozyigit, Tamer; Cialoni, Danilo; Thomas, Guy; Marroni, Alessandro; Saayman, Melville

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Scuba diving is an important marine tourism sector, but requires proper safety standards to reduce the risks and increase accessibility to its market. To achieve safety goals, safety awareness and positive safety attitudes in recreational scuba diving operations are essential. However, there is no published research exclusively focusing on scuba divers’ and dive centres’ perceptions toward safety. This study assessed safety perceptions in recreational scuba diving operations, with the aim to inform and enhance safety and risk management programmes within the scuba diving tourism industry. Materials and Methods: Two structured questionnaire surveys were prepared by the organisation Divers Alert Network and administered online to scuba diving operators in Italy and scuba divers in Europe, using a mixture of convenience and snowball sampling. Questions in the survey included experience and safety offered at the dive centre; the buddy system; equipment and accessories for safe diving activities; safety issues in the certification of new scuba divers; incidents/accidents; and attitudes toward safety. Results: 91 scuba diving centres and 3,766 scuba divers participated in the study. Scuba divers gave importance to safety and the responsiveness of service providers, here represented by the dive centres. However, they underestimated the importance of a personal emergency action/assistance plan and, partly, of the buddy system alongside other safety procedures. Scuba divers agreed that some risks, such as those associated with running out of gas, deserve attention. Dive centres gave importance to aspects such as training and emergency action/assistance plans. However, they were limitedly involved in safety campaigning. Dive centres’ perceptions of safety in part aligned with those of scuba divers, with some exceptions. Conclusion: Greater responsibility is required in raising awareness and educating scuba divers, through participation in prevention

  18. Safety Priorities and Underestimations in Recreational Scuba Diving Operations: A European Study Supporting the Implementation of New Risk Management Programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucrezi, Serena; Egi, Salih Murat; Pieri, Massimo; Burman, Francois; Ozyigit, Tamer; Cialoni, Danilo; Thomas, Guy; Marroni, Alessandro; Saayman, Melville

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Scuba diving is an important marine tourism sector, but requires proper safety standards to reduce the risks and increase accessibility to its market. To achieve safety goals, safety awareness and positive safety attitudes in recreational scuba diving operations are essential. However, there is no published research exclusively focusing on scuba divers' and dive centres' perceptions toward safety. This study assessed safety perceptions in recreational scuba diving operations, with the aim to inform and enhance safety and risk management programmes within the scuba diving tourism industry. Materials and Methods: Two structured questionnaire surveys were prepared by the organisation Divers Alert Network and administered online to scuba diving operators in Italy and scuba divers in Europe, using a mixture of convenience and snowball sampling. Questions in the survey included experience and safety offered at the dive centre; the buddy system; equipment and accessories for safe diving activities; safety issues in the certification of new scuba divers; incidents/accidents; and attitudes toward safety. Results: 91 scuba diving centres and 3,766 scuba divers participated in the study. Scuba divers gave importance to safety and the responsiveness of service providers, here represented by the dive centres. However, they underestimated the importance of a personal emergency action/assistance plan and, partly, of the buddy system alongside other safety procedures. Scuba divers agreed that some risks, such as those associated with running out of gas, deserve attention. Dive centres gave importance to aspects such as training and emergency action/assistance plans. However, they were limitedly involved in safety campaigning. Dive centres' perceptions of safety in part aligned with those of scuba divers, with some exceptions. Conclusion: Greater responsibility is required in raising awareness and educating scuba divers, through participation in prevention campaigns

  19. International OECD NEA Workshop: Implementation of the EGIRM methodology for presenting of national RW and SF management programmes - Workshop proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froment, Ludovic; Volckaert, Geert; Garamszeghy, Mike; Lahodova, Zdena; Ilvonen, Mikko; Petry, Elodie; Matuzas, Vaidas; ); KUGEL, Karin; LaZaR, Istvan; Dionisi, Mario; Kinam, Kwon; De Nood, Michiel; Bennett, Peter; Vahr, Henning R.; Grzegrzolka, Andrzej; Madaj, Krzysztof; Virtopeanu, Cornelia Sabina; Samoylov, Andrey; Vedernikova, Marina; Garcia Neri, Emilio; Quiros Gracian, Maria; Gimholt, Eva; Hedberg, Bengt; Stein, Mario; Garrs, Gareth; James, Martin; Heath, Maurice; Lust, Merle; ); Zaccai, Henri; Ciambrella, Massimo; Kwong, Gloria; Lebedev, Vladimir; Smadja, Lisa; )

    2018-03-01

    The NEA, having developed the methodology with the purpose to harmonize the RW and SF inventories reporting within the presentation of the national RW/SF management strategies and disposal routes proposes wide discussion and practical application of the methodology. The methodology was presented by the EGIRM representatives to invited workshop participants. Four topical sessions were held: Session 1 - RW/SF inventory, management strategy and disposal routes - need to harmonise reporting and presenting. This session aimed at providing an understanding why the methodology development and other relevant activities were started and what is the status of international efforts. Reporting needs for the various international programmes and benefits of a common presentation format were discussed in the session. Session 2 - EGIRM methodology - history of development, background, EGIRM objectives, requirements to the methodology. This session aimed at providing an overview of the methodology development process, objectives achieved and requirements addressed. Session 3 - The methodology in details. This session focussed on all details of the developed methodology explaining the role of each element of the presenting scheme with wide provision of examples. Implementation of the methodology for reporting to different programmes were demonstrated. Session 4 - Practical exercises on the methodology application on prosed examples. This session focussed on practical exercises on the methodology application with examples of hypothetical and some national RW/SF inventories proposed by workshop organisers. This document gathers the available presentations given at this workshop: 1.1 - Review of existing programmes requiring/requesting national SF/RW inventory reporting; requirements to reports; supporting documents (NEA Secretariat, V. LEBEDEV); 1.2 - 'Status and Trends' initiative. Status of project and format of SF/RW inventory reporting (IAEA, M. LUST); 1.3 - Joint

  20. Programme of research into the management and storage of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, P.J.; Bradbury, M.H.; Evans, G.V.

    1983-05-01

    The experimental programme on radionuclide behaviour has included (a) the influence of silica colloids on the nature and sorption properties of actinide solutions, (b) the properties of Np and Tc leached from simulated HLW, and (c) the behaviour in the presence of various geological media of leachates arising from ILW encapsulated in concrete. Diffusion measurements, using the iodide ion as tracer, have been made on granites obtained from four different regions of the UK. Analysis of the data has yielded three important rock diffusion parameters, the intrinsic diffusion coefficient, the rock capacity factor and the rock diffusibility parameter. In addition, estimates for the through transport and storage porosities which together make up the total porosity can be obtained from the same data. Permeability measurements made on granite and sandstone have been used to calculate pore apertures and pore internal surface areas. A study of uranium series disequilibrium signatures (uranium content and activity ratios U-234/U-238, Th-230/U-234 and Th-230/Th-232) in waters in granite at Altnabreac, Caithness, has been completed. The main areas of mathematical modelling described are continuum models of groundwater flow, heat transfer and radionuclide transport, flow in fracture networks, and diffusion of radionuclides into the rock matrix. (author)

  1. Transmission delays in hardware clock synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kang G.; Ramanathan, P.

    1988-01-01

    Various methods, both with software and hardware, have been proposed to synchronize a set of physical clocks in a system. Software methods are very flexible and economical but suffer an excessive time overhead, whereas hardware methods require no time overhead but are unable to handle transmission delays in clock signals. The effects of nonzero transmission delays in synchronization have been studied extensively in the communication area in the absence of malicious or Byzantine faults. The authors show that it is easy to incorporate the ideas from the communication area into the existing hardware clock synchronization algorithms to take into account the presence of both malicious faults and nonzero transmission delays.

  2. Circadian clock components in the rat neocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin Fredensborg; Rohde, Kristian; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2013-01-01

    in the rat neocortex. Among these, Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Bmal1, Nr1d1 and Dbp were found to exhibit daily rhythms. The amplitude of circadian oscillation in neocortical clock gene expression was damped and the peak delayed as compared with the SCN. Lesions of the SCN revealed that rhythmic clock gene...... expression in the neocortex is dependent on the SCN. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed that products of the canonical clock gene Per2 are located in perikarya throughout all areas of the neocortex. These findings show that local circadian oscillators driven by the SCN reside within...... neurons of the neocortex....

  3. Nuclear knowledge management - The role of the IAEA and its Technical Cooperation programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents the essentials of sound knowledge management, including NKM: capturing and storing relevant data; conversion of tacit knowledge to explicit knowledge; use information to develop knowledge; networking; building knowledge management culture. An overview is made of the various departments of the IAEA their role from the perspective of KM. It is stated that in addition to consolidating KM-related activities in the departments, there is a need to develop a central focal point, specially to devise strategies for meeting the expected shortages of young professionals and harmonizing and enhancing the training activities. Another area should be strengthening and modernizing INIS and national information services

  4. Approaches to the Measurement of the Impact of Knowledge Management Programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William J.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the problem of knowledge measurement and, in reviewing some of the current alternatives, argues for the importance of metrics to the overall process of knowledge management. Discusses the nature of intellectual capital and emphasizes the significance of knowledge measurement to the information science community. (Contains 10 references.)…

  5. Effects of a comprehensive self-management programme in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monninkhof, E.M.; Valk, P.D.L.P.M. van der; Palen, J.A.M. van der; Herwaarden, C.L.A. van; Zielhuis, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a comprehensive self-management intervention on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), symptoms and walking distance in patients with stable moderately severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study was part of the overall COPD

  6. Lean programm as a method of managing lean changes in the company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suetina Tatiana Aleksandrovna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is about methods and ways of providing changes on enterprices which introduce instruments of lean production. The main accent is how to use metodology of the project management by providing lean-changes. Lean program is proposed as a program of strategic developement of enterprices.

  7. A managed multidisciplinary programme on multi-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Danish university hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Ejdrup; Knudsen, Inge Jenny Dahl

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bacteria-producing extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) enzymes are resistant to commonly used antimicrobials. In 2008, routine monitoring revealed a clonal hospital outbreak of ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL-KP). METHODS: At a 510-bed Danish university hospital...... the application of a managed, multi-faceted intervention that does not require ongoing antibiotic stewardship....

  8. Donor Hemovigilance Programme in managing Blood Transfusion Needs: Complications of Whole Blood Donation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mangwana

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemovigilance like quality systems and audits have become an integral part of Blood Transfusion Services in the developed countries and has contributed greatly to its development. Hemovigilance begins with donors and must enable the collection of information on reactions occurring during the donation of blood, selections of donors and to prevent such incidents. The aim of study was to help identify the trends of adverse events , occurring in blood donors at a tertiary-care hospital, to recommend best practices to improve donor care and safety Materials and Methods: This record-based study was conducted on all adverse events related to allogenic whole blood donations performed over 24 months. All whole blood donations were analyzed. All adverse events occurring during or at the end of the donation were noted using a standardized format and analyzed determining significance at p<0.05. Results: Overall rate was 0.3% with vasovagal reactions constituting 82%, and 18% mild syncopal reactions (p<0.001. Immediate vasovagal reaction with injury was very rare (0.007%. Vasovagal reactions showed a significant association with young age, female gender, first time donation status. Mean age of persons recording adverse effects was 30.23 ± 7.49 years as compared to those without adverse effects, 31.14 ± 8.56 years. Conclusion: Donor safety is an essential perquisite to increase voluntary blood donation. AE analysis helps in identifying the blood donors at risk of AE, applying appropriate motivational strategies, predonation counseling, care during and after donation, developing guidelines and hemovigilance programme in countries with limited resources. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v3i6.8993   Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2013 Vol. 3, 459-463

  9. Community's research and development programme on radioactive waste management and storage shared-cost action (1990-94). Annual progress report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In december 1989 the Council of Ministers of the European Communities adopted the fourth R and D programme on 'Management and Storage of radioactive waste' for the period 1990-1994. Contract negotiations for selected research proposals lead to the signature of contracts with some 93 bodies in charge of carrying out the working programme. This annual report, covering the year 1991 presents for each contract the objectives, the whole research programme and a synopsis of progress and results achieved as prepared by the contractor under the responsibility of the project leader. Part A deals with the study of management systems, treatment and characterization of waste, general aspects of the waste disposal and the safety of geological disposal systems. The running activities on construction and operation of underground facilities in candidated geological media for disposal is presented in part B

  10. The effects and costs of a group-based education programme for self-management of patients with Type 2 diabetes. A community-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølsted, Stig; Tribler, Jane; Poulsen, Peter B.

    2012-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of Type 2 diabetes necessitates evidence-based self-management education programmes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and costs of an empowerment-based structured diabetes self-management education programme in an unselected group of patients with Type...... training in its use. Glycemic control (HbA1c) was found to improve from 7.34 ± 1.34 to 6.88 ± 1.09%, P ... pressure, female waist circumference, lipid profile, quality of life, physical activity and the patients' knowledge of diabetes whilst the number of visits to GPs declined. This study supports the use of an empowerment vision as a basis for an interdisciplinary group-based education programme...

  11. Regulation of circadian clock transcriptional output by CLOCK:BMAL1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Alexandra J.

    2018-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock relies on the transcription factor CLOCK:BMAL1 to coordinate the rhythmic expression of 15% of the transcriptome and control the daily regulation of biological functions. The recent characterization of CLOCK:BMAL1 cistrome revealed that although CLOCK:BMAL1 binds synchronously to all of its target genes, its transcriptional output is highly heterogeneous. By performing a meta-analysis of several independent genome-wide datasets, we found that the binding of other transcription factors at CLOCK:BMAL1 enhancers likely contribute to the heterogeneity of CLOCK:BMAL1 transcriptional output. While CLOCK:BMAL1 rhythmic DNA binding promotes rhythmic nucleosome removal, it is not sufficient to generate transcriptionally active enhancers as assessed by H3K27ac signal, RNA Polymerase II recruitment, and eRNA expression. Instead, the transcriptional activity of CLOCK:BMAL1 enhancers appears to rely on the activity of ubiquitously expressed transcription factors, and not tissue-specific transcription factors, recruited at nearby binding sites. The contribution of other transcription factors is exemplified by how fasting, which effects several transcription factors but not CLOCK:BMAL1, either decreases or increases the amplitude of many rhythmically expressed CLOCK:BMAL1 target genes. Together, our analysis suggests that CLOCK:BMAL1 promotes a transcriptionally permissive chromatin landscape that primes its target genes for transcription activation rather than directly activating transcription, and provides a new framework to explain how environmental or pathological conditions can reprogram the rhythmic expression of clock-controlled genes. PMID:29300726

  12. Clock Drawing in Spatial Neglect: A Comprehensive Analysis of Clock Perimeter, Placement, and Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peii; Goedert, Kelly M.

    2012-01-01

    Clock drawings produced by right-brain-damaged (RBD) individuals with spatial neglect often contain an abundance of empty space on the left while numbers and hands are placed on the right. However, the clock perimeter is rarely compromised in neglect patients’ drawings. By analyzing clock drawings produced by 71 RBD and 40 healthy adults, this study investigated whether the geometric characteristics of the clock perimeter reveal novel insights to understanding spatial neglect. Neglect participants drew smaller clocks than either healthy or non-neglect RBD participants. While healthy participants’ clock perimeter was close to circular, RBD participants drew radially extended ellipses. The mechanisms for these phenomena were investigated by examining the relation between clock-drawing characteristics and performance on six subtests of the Behavioral Inattention Test (BIT). The findings indicated that the clock shape was independent of any BIT subtest or the drawing placement on the test sheet and that the clock size was significantly predicted by one BIT subtest: the poorer the figure and shape copying, the smaller the clock perimeter. Further analyses revealed that in all participants, clocks decreased in size as they were placed farther from the center of the paper. However, even when neglect participants placed their clocks towards the center of the page, they were smaller than those produced by healthy or non-neglect RBD participants. These results suggest a neglect-specific reduction in the subjectively available workspace for graphic production from memory, consistent with the hypothesis that neglect patients are impaired in the ability to enlarge the attentional aperture. PMID:22390278

  13. Transcripts from the Circadian Clock: Telling Time and Season

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Brand (Karl)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe all know it when we wake mere moments before an alarm clock is scheduled to wake us: our body clock made the alarm clock redundant. This phenomenon is driven by an endogenous timer known as the biological, or circadian clock. Each revolution of the Earth about its own axis produces

  14. Pittendrigh: The Darwinian Clock-Watcher

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to our current understanding of how timing systems work in living organisms. .... to periodic factors in the geophysical environment. He postulated .... clocks against temperature, nutrition and light, while the latter needs maintenance of a stable.

  15. Cell-permeable Circadian Clock Proteins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Carl

    2002-01-01

    .... These 'biological clocks' are important to human physiology. For example, psychiatric and medical studies have shown that circadian rhythmicity is involved in some forms of depressive illness, 'jet lag', drug tolerance/efficacy, memory, and insomnia...

  16. The Mechanics of Mechanical Watches and Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Ruxu

    2013-01-01

    "The Mechanics of Mechanical Watches and Clocks" presents historical views and mathematical models of mechanical watches and clocks. Although now over six hundred years old, mechanical watches and clocks are still popular luxury items that fascinate many people around the world. However few have examined the theory of how they work as presented in this book. The illustrations and computer animations are unique and have never been published before. It will be of significant interest to researchers in mechanical engineering, watchmakers and clockmakers, as well as people who have an engineering background and are interested in mechanical watches and clocks. It will also inspire people in other fields of science and technology, such as mechanical engineering and electronics engineering, to advance their designs. Professor Ruxu Du works at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, China. Assistant Professor Longhan Xie works at the South China University of Technology, China.

  17. Cellular Reprogramming–Turning the Clock Back

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 6. Cellular Reprogramming - Turning the Clock Back - Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 2012. Deepa Subramanyam. General Article Volume 18 Issue 6 June 2013 pp 514-521 ...

  18. A GPS Satellite Clock Offset Prediction Method Based on Fitting Clock Offset Rates Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Fuhong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is proposed that a satellite atomic clock offset prediction method based on fitting and modeling clock offset rates data. This method builds quadratic model or linear model combined with periodic terms to fit the time series of clock offset rates, and computes the model coefficients of trend with the best estimation. The clock offset precisely estimated at the initial prediction epoch is directly adopted to calculate the model coefficient of constant. The clock offsets in the rapid ephemeris (IGR provided by IGS are used as modeling data sets to perform certain experiments for different types of GPS satellite clocks. The results show that the clock prediction accuracies of the proposed method for 3, 6, 12 and 24 h achieve 0.43, 0.58, 0.90 and 1.47 ns respectively, which outperform the traditional prediction method based on fitting original clock offsets by 69.3%, 61.8%, 50.5% and 37.2%. Compared with the IGU real-time clock products provided by IGS, the prediction accuracies of the new method have improved about 15.7%, 23.7%, 27.4% and 34.4% respectively.

  19. Objectives, concepts and strategies for the management of radioactive waste arising from nuclear power programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    This Report (also referred to as the Polvani Report) provides a comprehensive description of problems, current practices and policies in the field of radioactive waste management. The day to day management of radioactive waste is, according to the Report, in general satisfactorily covered, both from the point of view of licensing and control and liability and insurance. It points out, however, that the third party liability regime established by the Paris Convention and corresponding national legislation, would seem to be ill-adapted to cover damage resulting from waste ultimately disposed of because it would necessitate the operator's liability and corresponding insurance being maintained for an indefinite period of time. Solutions should therefore be sought providing for compensation by governments. (NEA) [fr

  20. Waste management research abstracts No.19: Information on radioactive waste programmes in progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The research data sheets contained in this issue have been collected up to October 1988. Enquiries for further information concerning a particular data sheet should be addressed to the author(s) at his (their) institute. This issue contains over 840 abstracts that describe research in progress in the field of radioactive waste management. These abstracts present ongoing work in 33 countries and international organizations

  1. An analysis of the management of youth football development programmes established in the Gauteng province

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    M. Phil. (Sport Management) Youth football development has developed into an important, integral part of professional football world-wide. Countries such as Spain, Brazil and the Netherlands have proven that an investment in youth football development has resulted in them becoming the world’s best football playing countries as ranked by International Football Association (FIFA). The investment in youth football development by these countries has resulted in sustained football success. The ...

  2. Dysphagia management in a 3-year dental hygiene education programme in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yoko; Miura, Ai; Saito, Atsushi

    2005-11-01

    This paper reports the development and evaluation of a dysphagia management course taught to the third year dental hygiene students during 2004-2005 as one framework of the new curriculum. The course consisted of lectures by specialists in each field, basic practice and clinical practice at a facility for the elderly. Evaluation of the course showed that improvements were found in students' understanding in certain subjects when compared with that during 2003-2004. Scores on the post-test were statistically significantly higher than those on the pre-test, showing that basic knowledge of the students had been improved. Introductory and follow-up lectures by dental hygiene instructors and appropriate basic practice enhanced the learning process of the students. In the clinical practice, the concept of 'dental hygiene process of care' was incorporated. The dental hygiene process facilitated the students in planning and implementing dental hygiene care that meets the needs of the individual clients. This active learning experience enhanced the students' understanding of dysphagia management. Although further improvements are necessary, this dysphagia management course should help dental hygienists in playing a greater role in the field of oral care and dysphagia rehabilitation.

  3. Clock gene variation in Tachycineta swallows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dor, Roi; Cooper, Caren B; Lovette, Irby J; Massoni, Viviana; Bulit, Flor; Liljesthrom, Marcela; Winkler, David W

    2012-01-01

    Many animals use photoperiod cues to synchronize reproduction with environmental conditions and thereby improve their reproductive success. The circadian clock, which creates endogenous behavioral and physiological rhythms typically entrained to photoperiod, is well characterized at the molecular level. Recent work provided evidence for an association between Clock poly-Q length polymorphism and latitude and, within a population, an association with the date of laying and the length of the incubation period. Despite relatively high overall breeding synchrony, the timing of clutch initiation has a large impact on the fitness of swallows in the genus Tachycineta. We compared length polymorphism in the Clock poly-Q region among five populations from five different Tachycineta species that breed across a hemisphere-wide latitudinal gradient (Fig. 1). Clock poly-Q variation was not associated with latitude; however, there was an association between Clock poly-Q allele diversity and the degree of clutch size decline within breeding seasons. We did not find evidence for an association between Clock poly-Q variation and date of clutch initiation in for any of the five Tachycineta species, nor did we found a relationship between incubation duration and Clock genotype. Thus, there is no general association between latitude, breeding phenology, and Clock polymorphism in this clade of closely related birds.Figure 1Photos of Tachycineta swallows that were used in this study: A) T. bicolor from Ithaca, New York, B) T. leucorrhoa from Chascomús, Argentina, C) T. albilinea from Hill Bank, Belize, D) T. meyeni from Puerto Varas, Chile, and E) T. thalassina from Mono Lake, California, Photographers: B: Valentina Ferretti; A, C-E: David Winkler.

  4. Reduced Kalman Filters for Clock Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhall, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the author's work ontimescales based on Kalman filters that act upon the clock comparisons. The natural Kalman timescale algorithm tends to optimize long-term timescale stability at the expense of short-term stability. By subjecting each post-measurement error covariance matrix to a non-transparent reduction operation, one obtains corrected clocks with improved short-term stability and little sacrifice of long-term stability.

  5. Effects of a Tailored Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Programme on On-Task Behaviour of School Children with ADHD in Addis Ababa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Feruz

    2018-01-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a persistent pattern of behaviours characterized by inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity. This study evaluates the effects of a tailored Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management (IYTCM) programme aimed to improve participating children's on-task behaviour in a group of 6 to 10 year old…

  6. Spouses’ involvement in older patients’ fast-track programmes during total hip replacement using case management intervention. A study protocol of the SICAM-trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Kristensson, Jimmie

    2015-01-01

    Aim To present the protocol of a two-group quasi-experimental study of spouses’ involvement through case management (The SICAM-trial) in older patients’ fast-track programmes during total hip replacement. Background Patients in fast-track programmes are required to take an active part in their tr......Aim To present the protocol of a two-group quasi-experimental study of spouses’ involvement through case management (The SICAM-trial) in older patients’ fast-track programmes during total hip replacement. Background Patients in fast-track programmes are required to take an active part...... in their treatment and rehabilitation. Spouses of older patients can often provide valued practical and emotional support, reducing stress, pain and length of stay – yet they are seldom invited to participate in a supporting role. Design A two-group quasi-experimental design with pre-test and repeated post...... and subsequently include the intervention group to avoid contamination of the control group. A case manager will be recruited to perform the case management intervention. Data will be collected from both groups at baseline, 2 weeks and 3 months after surgery. Outcome measures for patients include: functional...

  7. Didactic Approaches to Child-Managed Play: Analyses of Teacher's Interaction Styles in Kindergartens and After-School Programmes in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løndal, Knut; Greve, Anne

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the nature of teachers' involvement in child-managed play. We approached this didactic issue through analysis of interactional situations in a kindergarten and an after-school programme and by drawing on relational theory and the concept of "pedagogical tact". Qualitative material was gathered from observations and…

  8. Relapses from acute malnutrition and related factors in a community-based management programme in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somassè, Yassinmè Elysée; Dramaix, Michèle; Bahwere, Paluku; Donnen, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Community-based management of acute malnutrition (CMAM) is effective in treating acute malnutrition. However, post-discharge follow-up often lacks. We aimed at assessing the relapse rate and the associated factors in a CMAM programme in Burkina Faso. Discharged children from the community nutrition centre were requested to return at least every 3 months for follow-up. The data of recovered children (weight-for-height z-score ≥-2) who were discharged between July 2010 and June 2011 were collected in 45 villages, randomly selected out of 210 in January 2012. Sociodemographic data, economic variables, information on household food availability and the child's food consumption in the last 24 h were collected from the parents. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression was used to identify the factors associated to relapse. Of the 637 children, 14 (2.2%) died and 218 (34.2%) were lost to follow-up. The relapse rate [95% confidence interval] among the children who returned for follow-up was 15.4 [11.8-19.0] per 100 children-years. The associated factors to relapses in multivariate Cox regression model were mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) at discharge below 125 mm, no oil/fat consumption during the last 24 h and incomplete vaccination. To limit relapses, CMAM programmes should avoid premature discharge before a MUAC of at least 125 mm. Nutrition education should emphasize fat/oil as inexpensive energy source for children. Promoting immunization is essential to promote child growth. Periodic monitoring of discharged children should be organized to detect earlier those who are at risk of relapse. The relapse rate should be a CMAM effectiveness indicator. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Do Caucasian and Asian clocks tick differently?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Barbosa

    Full Text Available The Period 3 and Clock genes are important components of the mammalian molecular circadian system. Studies have shown association between polymorphisms in these clock genes and circadian phenotypes in different populations. Nevertheless, differences in the pattern of allele frequency and genotyping distribution are systematically observed in studies with different ethnic groups. To investigate and compare the pattern of distribution in a sample of Asian and Caucasian populations living in Brazil, we evaluated two well-studied polymorphisms in the clock genes: a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR in PER3 and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in CLOCK. The aim of this investigation was to search for clues about human evolutionary processes related to circadian rhythms. We selected 109 Asian and 135 Caucasian descendants. The frequencies of the shorter allele (4 repeats in the PER3 gene and the T allele in the CLOCK gene among Asians (0.86 and 0.84, respectively were significantly higher than among Caucasians (0.69 and 0.71, respectively. Our results directly confirmed the different distribution of these polymorphisms between the Asian and Caucasian ethnic groups. Given the genetic differences found between groups, two points became evident: first, ethnic variations may have implications for the interpretation of results in circadian rhythm association studies, and second, the question may be raised about which evolutionary conditions shaped these genetic clock variations.

  10. Optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baillard, X.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents the latest achievements regarding the optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms developed at LNE-SYRTE. After a review of the different types of optical clocks that are currently under development, we stress on the concept of optical lattice clock which was first imagined for Sr 87 using the 1 S 0 → 3 P 0 transition. We exhibit the features of this atom, in particular the concept of magic wavelength for the trap, and the achievable performances for this kind of clock. The second part presents the experimental aspects, insisting particularly on the ultra-stable laser used for the interrogation of the atoms which is a central part of the experiment. Among the latest improvements, an optical pumping phase and an interrogation phase using a magnetic field have been added in order to refine the evaluation of the Zeeman effect. Finally, the last part presents the experimental results. The last evaluation of the clock using Sr 87 atoms allowed us to reach a frequency accuracy of 2.6*10 -15 and a measurement in agreement with the one made at JILA (Tokyo university) at the 10 -15 level. On another hand, thanks to recent theoretical proposals, we made a measurement using the bosonic isotope Sr 88 by adapting the experimental setup. This measurement represents the first evaluation for this type of clock, with a frequency accuracy of 7*10 -14 . (author)

  11. Towards Self-Clocked Gated OCDMA Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, S.; Osadola, T.; Glesk, I.

    2013-02-01

    A novel incoherent OCDMA receiver with incorporated all-optical clock recovery for self-synchronization of a time gate for the multi access interferences (MAI) suppression and minimizing the effect of data time jitter in incoherent OCDMA system was successfully developed and demonstrated. The solution was implemented and tested in a multiuser environment in an out of the laboratory OCDMA testbed with two-dimensional wavelength-hopping time-spreading coding scheme and OC-48 (2.5 Gbp/s) data rate. The self-clocked all-optical time gate uses SOA-based fibre ring laser optical clock, recovered all-optically from the received OCDMA traffic to control its switching window for cleaning the autocorrelation peak from the surrounding MAI. A wider eye opening was achieved when the all-optically recovered clock from received data was used for synchronization if compared to a static approach with the RF clock being generated by a RF synthesizer. Clean eye diagram was also achieved when recovered clock is used to drive time gating.

  12. Automatic Clock and Time Signal System of the Astronomical Agency in East Asia Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Sam

    2009-09-01

    We analysed the old automatic clock and time signal system that was used by the national astronomical agency in East Asian Area. Jagyeongnu is a kind of water clock that was operated by the flowing water in Joseon Dynasty. Seowoongwan managed the water clock so as to keep the standard time system in the dynasty from the 16th year (1434) of King Sejong's reign. In 1438 the Okru that was invented in the period. Such kind of clock system already was used in China, which was Shui yun i hsiang t'ai (?) in 1092. During the period Joseon Dynasty, China and Japan had been kept the time system that one day is divided into 12 shin (?2?) or 100 gak (?). However detailed part of the system had a little difference among the three countries. Though the whole system of water clock in Joseon had manufactured on the basis of Chinese, it had been gradually developed by own method and idea. In this study we show the historical records of the standard time keeping system in East Asian history. And then we can inform materials on the structure and functional devises for the purpose of new restoration models about the automatic clock and time system.

  13. Third International Conference on Nuclear Knowledge Management: Challenges and Approaches. Programme and Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate technical expertise and experience, along with a strong safety culture, must be developed and kept available throughout the nuclear technology life cycle. Nuclear equipment, installations and facilities may have long life cycles with changing operational conditions. Advanced and specialized knowledge in nuclear engineering and science is required for the safe and effective design, construction, licensing, commissioning, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of nuclear technology-based systems. The safe use of licensed nuclear facilities and technologies is reliant on the ongoing availability and maintenance of suitable knowledge and expertise, and an adequate understanding of related safety issues. The ability of organizations that operate or utilize nuclear technology to take safe decisions and actions can be affected by knowledge gaps or knowledge loss. Appropriate methods and supporting technology are needed to establish and manage nuclear competencies, information and records, work processes, analysis and verification techniques, and the interpretation of data. Through the presentation and discussion of issues and solutions related to building, collecting, transferring, sharing, maintaining, preserving and utilizing knowledge, the conference will aim to improve awareness of the importance of knowledge management (KM) in the nuclear sector. Member States will have the opportunity to strengthen their capabilities in this area by learning from the experiences of other Member States and other stakeholders. The conference is a follow-up to the first and second conferences organized by the IAEA on nuclear knowledge management (NKM), held in 2004 in Saclay, France (Proceedings in PDF), and in 2007 in Vienna, Austria (Web Archive), respectively. It also builds on the outcomes of the IAEA organized conferences on human resource development held in 2010 in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (Proceedings website), and in 2014 in Vienna, Austria (Web Archive

  14. An Overview of Ageing Management Programme for PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syahirah Abdul Rahman; Mohamad Azman Che Mat Isa; Mohd Zaid Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    The PUSPATI TRIGA reactor (RTP) at Malaysian Nuclear Agency which has been operating for 29 years now faces increasingly serious aging problems. Many components are obsolete whereas genuine parts are no longer in the market. Currently, the aging problem is addressed through periodic maintenance on all systems, structures and components (SSC). As a holistic measure, the Aging Management Program (AMP) was formulated to solve the problems from the grassroots. This paper describes the first stage of the AMP which identifies the strengths and capabilities. This includes identifying the types of aging, responsible parties and relationship between aging problems and safety of RTP. (author)

  15. Materials ageing degradation programme in japan and proactive ageing management in NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, T.

    2013-01-01

    Predictive and preventive maintenance technologies are increasingly of importance for the long term operation (LTO) of Light Water Reactor (LWR) plants. In order for the realization LTO to be successful, it is essential that aging degradation phenomena should be properly managed by using adequate maintenance programs based on foreseeing the aging phenomena and evaluating their rates of development, where Nuclear Power Plants can be continued to operate beyond the original design life depending upon the regulatory authority rules. In combination with Periodic Safety Review (PSR) and adequate maintenance program, a plant life can be extended to 60 years or more. Plant Life Management (PLiM) is based upon various maintenance program as well as systematic safety review updated based upon the state of the art of science and technology. One of the potential life time limiting issue would be materials ageing degradation and therefore an extensive efforts have been paid world-widely. In 2007, NISA launched a national program on Enhanced Ageing Management Program and 4 nationwide clusters were formed to carry out the national program where materials ageing degradation was one of the major topics. In addition to these degradation modes, one important activities in this program is proactive materials degradation management directed by the author which is a kind of the extension program of NRC PMDA program based upon more fundamental approach by a systematic elicitation by the experts nominated from all over the world. NISA program can be divided into two phases, one is from fiscal years (FY) 2006 - 2010 and the other FY 2011. Later phase is focusing more on System Safety due to Fukushima NPP accident. The main objectives of the Phase I is to evaluate potential and complex degradation phenomena and their mechanisms in order to identify future risks of component aging in nuclear power plants. The following items are of particular concern in this phase: (a) investigation of

  16. Training, supervision and quality of care in selected integrated community case management (iCCM) programmes: A scoping review of programmatic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch-Capblanch, Xavier; Marceau, Claudine

    2014-12-01

    To describe the training, supervision and quality of care components of integrated Community Case Management (iCCM) programmes and to draw lessons learned from existing evaluations of those programmes. Scoping review of reports from 29 selected iCCM programmes purposively provided by stakeholders containing any information relevant to understand quality of care issues. The number of people reached by iCCM programmes varied from the tens of thousands to more than a million. All programmes aimed at improving access of vulnerable populations to health care, focusing on the main childhood illnesses, managed by Community Health Workers (CHW), often selected bycommunities. Training and supervision were widely implemented, in different ways and intensities, and often complemented with tools (eg, guides, job aids), supplies, equipment and incentives. Quality of care was measured using many outcomes (eg, access or appropriate treatment). Overall, there seemed to be positive effects for those strategies that involved policy change, organisational change, standardisation of clinical practices and alignment with other programmes. Positive effects were mostly achieved in large multi-component programmes. Mild or no effects have been described on mortality reduction amongst the few programmes for which data on this outcome was available to us. Promising strategies included teaming-up of CHW, micro-franchising or social franchising. On-site training and supervision of CHW have been shown to improve clinical practices. Effects on caregivers seemed positive, with increases in knowledge, care seeking behaviour, or caregivers' basic disease management. Evidence on iCCM is often of low quality, cannot relate specific interventions or the ways they are implemented with outcomes and lacks standardisation; this limits the capacity to identify promising strategies to improve quality of care. Large, multi-faceted, iCCM programmes, with strong components of training, supervision, which

  17. Training, supervision and quality of care in selected integrated community case management (iCCM) programmes: A scoping review of programmatic evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch–Capblanch, Xavier; Marceau, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    Aim To describe the training, supervision and quality of care components of integrated Community Case Management (iCCM) programmes and to draw lessons learned from existing evaluations of those programmes. Methods Scoping review of reports from 29 selected iCCM programmes purposively provided by stakeholders containing any information relevant to understand quality of care issues. Results The number of people reached by iCCM programmes varied from the tens of thousands to more than a million. All programmes aimed at improving access of vulnerable populations to health care, focusing on the main childhood illnesses, managed by Community Health Workers (CHW), often selected bycommunities. Training and supervision were widely implemented, in different ways and intensities, and often complemented with tools (eg, guides, job aids), supplies, equipment and incentives. Quality of care was measured using many outcomes (eg, access or appropriate treatment). Overall, there seemed to be positive effects for those strategies that involved policy change, organisational change, standardisation of clinical practices and alignment with other programmes. Positive effects were mostly achieved in large multi–component programmes. Mild or no effects have been described on mortality reduction amongst the few programmes for which data on this outcome was available to us. Promising strategies included teaming–up of CHW, micro–franchising or social franchising. On–site training and supervision of CHW have been shown to improve clinical practices. Effects on caregivers seemed positive, with increases in knowledge, care seeking behaviour, or caregivers’ basic disease management. Evidence on iCCM is often of low quality, cannot relate specific interventions or the ways they are implemented with outcomes and lacks standardisation; this limits the capacity to identify promising strategies to improve quality of care. Conclusion Large, multi–faceted, iCCM programmes, with strong

  18. Guidelines for the Use of Mathematics in Operational Area-Wide Integrated Pest Management Programmes Using the Sterile Insect Technique with a Special Focus on Tephritid Fruit Flies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barclay, H.L.; Enkerlin, W.R.; Manoukis, N.C.; Reyes-Flores, J.

    2016-01-01

    This guideline attempts to assist managers in the use of mathematics in area-wide Integrated Pest Management (AW-IPM) programmes using the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). It describes mathematical tools that can be used at different stages of suppression/eradication programmes. For instance, it provides simple methods for calculating the various quantities of sterile insects required in the intervention area so that more realistic sterile: fertile rates to suppress pest populations can be achieved. The calculations, for the most part, only involve high school mathematics and can be done easily with small portable computers or calculators. The guideline is intended to be a reference book, to be consulted when necessary. As such, any particular AW-IPM programme using the SIT will probably only need certain sections, and much of the book can be ignored if that is the case. For example, if the intervention area is relatively small and well isolated, then the section on dispersal can safely be ignored, as the boundedness of the area means that dispersal should not be a problem, and so the section on diffusion equations can be ignored. An overview is given in each chapter to try to let the programme manager make a decision about where to put the programme efforts. On the other hand, most SIT programmes have an information system (many of them based on GIS) that produces reliable profiles of historic information. Based on the results of past activities they describe what has happened in the last days or weeks but usually do not explain, or barely explain, what is expected in the following days or weeks. Current AW-IPM progammes using the SIT have produced over many years a vast amount of every-day data from the field operations and from the mass rearing facility and packing and sterile insect releasing centres. With the help of this guideline, that information can be used to develop predictive models for their particular conditions to better plan control measures.

  19. Perspectives on the Nutritional Management of Metabolic Syndrome in Asia: People, Practice and Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phing Chee Huei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous Asian countries have a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome, also associated with cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. Healthcare expenditure varies among Asian countries, and is influenced by poverty factor and large populations. The effect of metabolic syndrome on nutritional management in Asia demonstrates the essential for clinicians to equalize the needs for higher standards of dietetics practice; as they execute optimal care processes with the aim of improving outcomes, alongside setting of workforce limitations, inadequate expertise in metabolic syndrome nutrition practice, as well as ethnic diversity among Asians. This paper presents some aspects of dietetics practice and the possibility that an alteration in practice is mandatory if dietitians are to play an active role in preventing or decelerating the evolution of the metabolic syndrome.

  20. The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate's Review Statement and Evaluation of the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co's RD and D Programme 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-09-01

    According to the Act on Nuclear Activities, the holder of a licence to operate a nuclear reactor must adopt all necessary measures to manage and dispose of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The Act stipulates requirements on a research programme which is to be submitted to the competent regulatory authority once every three years. The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) is the competent authority that evaluates and reviews the programme. SKI distributes the programme to a wide circle of reviewing bodies for comment, including authorities, municipalities, universities and NGOs. The Swedish programme for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel started about 25 years ago. According to the Swedish Nuclear Waste Management Co. (SKB), the planned repository will not be closed until sometime in the 2050's. A series of decisions must be made before this goal is attained. The decision process can therefore be described as a multi-stage process. During each stages, safety will be evaluated and there is a possibility of taking additional time for development work or of selecting improved solutions. SKI's task is to ensure safety compliance throughout all of these stages. In its decision in January 2000, the Government explained that the Programme for Research, Development and Demonstration for the Treatment and Final Disposal of Nuclear Waste (RD and D Programme 98) complied with legislative requirements but that certain supplementary reporting should be conducted by SKB and submitted no later than when the next programme, in accordance with paragraph 12 of the Act on Nuclear Activities, was prepared (September 2001). The supplementary reporting requested by the Government, and which was submitted by SKB to SKI in December 2000, dealt with issues relating to method selection, site selection and the site investigation programme. SKI submitted its review of the supplement to the Government in June 2001 and the Government made a decision on the matter on November 1, 2001