WorldWideScience

Sample records for program year evaluation

  1. An Evaluation of State Energy Program Accomplishments: 2002 Program Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweitzer, M.

    2005-07-13

    cost savings and emissions reductions associated with SEP activities performed by the states during the 2002 program year, based on primary data provided by the states themselves. This is the second systematic evaluation of SEP accomplishments performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for DOE. A report documenting the findings of the first study was published in January 2003 (Schweitzer et.al., 2003).

  2. National Evaluation of the Weatherization Assistance Program: Preliminary Evaluation Plan for Program Year 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ternes, Mark P [ORNL; Schweitzer, Martin [ORNL; Tonn, Bruce Edward [ORNL; Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL; Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL

    2007-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Weatherization Assistance Program was created by Congress in 1976 under Title IV of the Energy Conservation and Production Act. The purpose and scope of the Program as currently stated in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 10CFR 440.1 is 'to increase the energy efficiency of dwellings owned or occupied by low-income persons, reduce their total residential expenditures, and improve their health and safety, especially low-income persons who are particularly vulnerable such as the elderly, persons with disabilities, families with children, high residential energy users, and households with high energy burden' (Code of Federal Regulations, 2005). DOE sponsored a comprehensive evaluation of the Program in the early 1990's to provide policy makers and program implementers with up-to-date and reliable information they needed for effective decision making and cost-effective operations. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) managed the five part study which was based primarily on data from Program Year (PY) 1989 and supplemented by data from 1991-92 (Brown, Berry, and Kinney, 1994). In more recent years, ORNL has conducted four metaevaluations of the Program's energy savings using studies conducted by individual states between the years 1990-1996 (Berry, 1997), 1996-1998 (Schweitzer and Berry, 1999), 1993-2002 (Berry and Schweitzer, 2003), and 1993-2005 (Schweitzer, 2005). DOE announced through its Weatherization Program Notice 05-1 (DOE, 2004) that it would undertake a new national evaluation of the Program because the Program that was evaluated comprehensively in the early 1990's is vastly different from the Program of today. The Program has incorporated new funding sources, management principles, audit procedures, and energy-efficiency measures in response to findings and recommendations resulting from the 1989 National Evaluation, the Weatherization Plus strategic planning process, and other

  3. First year evaluation of EPA's radon contractor proficiency (RCP) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed a voluntary program to evaluate radon reduction contractors and provide this information to the public, as part of activities mandated by the Indoor Radon Abatement Act (IRAA) of 1988. The Radon Contractor Proficiency Program consists of several elements that collectively help to ensure the proficiency of radon mitigators and give the public greater confidence in their capability. Contractors who participate in the program must pass a written examination, adhere to mitigation guidelines, keep records of work, meet continuing education requirements and pass a re-examination every two years. Upon meeting the program's requirements, mitigators are listed in EPA's National RCP Proficiency Report. The first Report released on May 15, 1990 listed 636 contractors. The second Report, to be release in August, will list 895 contractors, representing an increase of 40 per cent

  4. NATIONAL EVALUATION OF THE WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM DURING THE ARRA PERIOD: PROGRAM YEARS 2009-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward [ORNL; Rose, Erin M [ORNL; Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL; Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL; Ternes, Mark P [ORNL; Schweitzer, Martin [ORNL; Hendrick, Timothy P [ORNL

    2012-08-01

    This report describes the third major evaluation of the Program, encompassing program years 2009 to 2011. In this report, this period of time is referred to as the ARRA Period. This is a special period of time for the Program because the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 has allocated $5 billion of funding for the Program. In normal program years, WAP s annual appropriation is in the range of $200-250 million, supporting the weatherization of approximately 100,000 homes. With the addition of ARRA funding during these program years, the expectation is that weatherization activity will exceed 300,000 homes per year. In addition to saving energy and reducing low-income energy bills, expanded WAP funding is expected to stimulate the economy by providing new jobs in the weatherization field and allowing low-income households to spend more money on goods and services by spending less on energy.

  5. Energy Extension Service Pilot Program: evaluation report after two years. Volume I. Evaluation summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-04-01

    The EES pilot program was initiated in August 1977, when 10 states were selected on a competitive basis for participation. The pilot states (Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming) devoted the first 6 months to start-up activities. This document is a follow-up report to the three volume Evaluation Summary of the first year of the pilot EES program published in September 1979. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the impacts and costs of the two years of the pilot program, and to check the consistency of findings over the two year period. The analysis addresses the following: (1) were the impact findings of Year I and Year II consistent, or did Year I and Year II attitudes and behavior vary. If variation existed, could it be attributed to program changes as the EES progressed from a start-up phase (Year I) to more normal service delivery (Year II); and (2) did costs of service delivery change (again reflecting start-up and normal service delivery costs). Did cost changes affect conclusions about the relative cost effectiveness of delivering services to different target audiences.

  6. Summary of Program Evaluation Results: 1985-1986 School Year Pre-Kindergarten Educational Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Robert W.; And Others

    Reported are findings of the 1985-86 program evaluation of the prenatal-to-preschool and preschool programs operating under the auspices of the Kamehameha Schools/Bishop Estate. Evaluation of the prenatal-to-preschool program (the Kupulani Program) included item analysis of the Questions about Pregnancy Test, development of a revised data…

  7. An evaluation of vocational high schools in Indonesia: A comparison between four-year and three-year programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soenarto Soenarto

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The research aimed to gain insights into the quality of four-year program vocational high school (VHS in Indonesia compared to four-year program VHS. This research was conducted based on the school graduate standard, business sector and industrial sector (or Dunia Usaha dan Dunia Industri (DUDI – or the performance of the graduates and alumni (the graduates’ satisfaction. The research was conducted using Discrepancy Evaluation Model using 16 VHSs (eight four-year program VHSs and eight three-year program VHSs. The result shows that from the standpoint of the school, the graduates of the four-year program VHS are higher in quality than those of the three-year program VHS. The four-year program VHS graduates are more qualified in seven aspects: teamwork, discipline, tenacity, theoretical knowledge, confidence, creativity, and leadership. Meanwhile, using DUDI standpoint, the four-year program VHS graduates are also higher in quality than the three-year program VHS graduates. In addition, the four-year program VHS graduates are better in the quality of their discipline, tenacity, theoretical knowledge, practical skills, confidence, carefulness, creativity, and leadership. The four-year program VHS graduates have a higher level of satisfaction in terms of income than the three-year program VHS graduates. The higher quality of the four-year program VHS graduates has resulted from longer duration of the internship program (PKL that provides them with reliable experience and skills concerning work-related problem-solving activities.

  8. Applying Matched Sampling to Evaluate a University Tutoring Program for First-Year Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walvoord, Mark E.; Pleitz, Jacob D.

    2016-01-01

    Our study used a case-control matching design to assess the influence of a voluntary tutoring program in improving first-year students' Grade Point Averages (GPA). To evaluate program effectiveness, we applied case-control matching to obtain 215 pairs of students with or without participation in tutoring, but matched on high school GPA and…

  9. Evaluation of the Science, Technology, and Engineering Leadership Program, Year Two

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolanin, Natalie L.; Wade, Julie H.

    2013-01-01

    The Office of Shared Accountability (OSA) conducted an evaluation of the implementation of the second year (2011-2012) of the Science, Technology, and Engineering Leadership Program (STELP) in Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS). Funding for STELP, including the evaluation study, is provided by a grant from the Howard Hughes Medical…

  10. Evaluation of the Science, Technology, and Engineering Leadership Program, Year Three

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolanin, Natalie; Wade, Julie

    2014-01-01

    The Office of Shared Accountability conducted an evaluation of the implementation of the third and final year (2012-2013) of the "Science, Technology, and Engineering Leadership Program" (STELP) in Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS). Funding for STELP, including the evaluation study, is provided by a grant from the Howard…

  11. The Parent-Child Home Program in Western Manitoba: A 20-Year Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gfellner, Barbara M.; McLaren, Lorraine; Metcalfe, Arron

    2008-01-01

    This article is a 20-year evaluation of the Parent-Child Home Program (PCHP) of Child and Family Services in Western Manitoba. Following Levenstein's (1979, 1988) approach, home visitors model parent-child interchanges using books and toys to enhance children's cognitive development through appropriate parenting behaviors. The evaluation provides…

  12. A 5-year evaluation of a smoking cessation incentive program for chemical employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, G W; Lacy, S E; Sprafka, J M; Arceneaux, T G; Potts, T A; Kravat, B A; Gondek, M R; Bond, G G

    1991-11-01

    This 5-year study of the Dow Chemical Texas Operations 1984-1985 Smoking Cessation Incentive Program (SCIP) evaluated the smoking habits of 1,097 participants and 1,174 nonparticipants. We observed, via questionnaire and saliva cotinine data, that participants were 2.3 times more likely to be long-term (greater than or equal to 5 years) nonusers of tobacco than nonparticipants (10.2% vs 4.4%, P less than or equal to 0.01). However, smoking cessation rates for 3-4 years, 1-2 years, and less than 1 year were similar for participants who remained smokers at the conclusion of SCIP and nonparticipants. Age and the interaction between the management job category and having quit smoking for at least 30 days sometime prior to the worksite program were important predictors of smoking cessation among participants. Thirty-six percent of the participants who were considered exsmokers of 6 months duration at the conclusion of the program in 1985 remained long-term quitters 5 years later. Stress and enjoyment of smoking were the two most important reasons provided by participants for recidivism. The results of this 5-year evaluation demonstrate the heterogeneity of employee participation and success with a worksite smoking cessation program.

  13. [Evaluation of needle exchange program at Pereiro de Aguiar prison (Ourense, Spain): ten years of experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-Castro, V; Crespo-Leiro, M R; García-Marcos, L S; Pérez-Rivas, M; Alonso-Conde, A; García-Fernández, I; Lorenzo-Guisado, A; Sánchez-Fernández, J L; Seara-Selas, M; Sanjosé-Vallejo, R

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of NEPs in prison to reduce the prevalence of infections associated with intravenous drug use and to know more about acceptance of the program by inmates and staff. cross-sectional observational study at baseline, 6 and 12 months and 10 years of program development. Interviews were conducted with program users, as well as random sample surveys of officials at the various cuts, and a random sample of inmates from the centre after10 years. Activity indicators of the program were recorded continuously, and the prevalence of HIV, HBV and HCV at baseline and after 10 years was evaluated. For the statistical analysis, the chi-square test was used with the Yates correction when necessary. In ten years we have supplied a total of 15,962 syringes to 429 users, (average 20.2 users/month), and 11,327 (70.9%) were returned. The prevalence of HIV infection decreased from 21% in 1999 to 8.5% in 2009, HCV prevalence from 40% to 26.1% (p living conditions in prison. After ten years of development of the NEP, there was a significant decrease in the prevalence of HIV and HCV in the prison population at the centre, and the program is accepted as beneficial by most of the inmates and staff participating in the survey.

  14. UNAVCO's Education and Community Engagement Program: Evaluating Five years of Geoscience Education and Community Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlevoix, D. J.; Dutilly, E.

    2017-12-01

    In 2013, UNAVCO, a facility co-sponsored by the NSF and NASA, received a five-year award from the NSF: Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and EarthScope (GAGE). Under GAGE, UNAVCO's Education and Community Engagement (ECE) program conducts outreach and education activities, in essence broader impacts for the scientific community and public. One major challenge of this evaluation was the breadth and depth of the dozens of projects conducted by the ECE program under the GAGE award. To efficiently solve this problem of a large-scale program evaluation, we adopted a deliberative democratic (DD) approach that afforded UNAVCO ECE staff a prominent voice in the process. The evaluator directed staff members to chose the projects they wished to highlight as case studies of their finest broader impacts work. The DD approach prizes inclusion, dialogue, and deliberation. The evaluator invited ECE staff to articulate qualities of great programs and develop a case study of their most valuable broader impacts work. To anchor the staff's opinion in more objectivity than opinion, the evaluator asked each staff member to articulate exemplary qualities of their chosen project, discuss how these qualities fit their case study, and helped staff to develop data collection systems that lead to an evidence-based argument in support of their project's unique value. The results of this evaluation show that the individual ECE work areas specialized in certain kinds of projects. However, when viewed at the aggregate level, ECE projects spanned almost the entire gamut of NSF broader impacts categories. Longitudinal analyses show that since the beginning of the GAGE award, many projects grew in impact from year 1 to year 5. While roughly half of the ECE projects were prior work projects, by year five at least 33% of projects were newly developed under GAGE. All selected case studies exemplified how education and outreach work can be productively tied to UNAVCO's core mission of promoting geodesy.

  15. The Brazilian National Intercomparison Program (PNI/IRD/CNEN): evaluation of 15 years of data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauhata, Luiz; Vianna, Maria Elizabeth Couto M.; Oliveira, Antonio Eduardo de; Ferreira, Ana Cristina; Braganca, Maura Julia C.; Clain, Almir Faria; Quelvia de Faria, Rute

    2006-01-01

    The Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria has been coordinating the National Intercomparison Program (PNI) for 15 years, from 1991 to 2005. The objective is to evaluate the analytical performance of the laboratories in low-level activity concentration radionuclide assays in environmental samples. This work presents an evaluation of PNI data from 42 intercomparison runs, which distributed to 22 Brazilian laboratories 2511 samples evaluating 5768 radionuclide assays involving 32 radionuclides in the period from 1991 to 2004. The laboratory performance was evaluated using the Normalized Standard Deviation used by the U.S. EPA. For comparison aims, the Normalized Deviation, used by BIPM was also applied. Laboratory performance were grouped and evaluated in three periods of 5 years each. The first period shows, an average value of good performance of 71.2%, the second shows an average of 78.6% and the last an average of 82.3%. Performance for each kind of radionuclide is also presented

  16. Three-year emergency medicine training program in The Netherlands: first evaluation from the residents' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Salomon Willem; Gaakeer, Menno Iskander; Veugelers, Rebekka

    2013-07-26

    The Netherlands' 3-year training in Emergency Medicine (EM) was formally approved and introduced in November 2008. To identify areas for improvement, we conducted the first evaluation of this curriculum from the residents' perspective. A questionnaire was composed on ten aspects of the curriculum. It contained multiple-choice, open and opinion questions; answers to the latter were classified using the Likert scale. The questionnaires were mailed to all enrolled residents. We mailed questionnaires to all 189 enrolled residents, and 105 responded (55.6%). Although they were satisfied with their training overall, 96.2% thought it was currently too short: 18.3% desired extension to 4 years, 76.0% to 5 and 1.9% to 6 years. Nevertheless, residents expected that they would function effectively as emergency physicians (EPs) after finishing their 3-year training program. Bedside teaching was assessed positively by 35.2%. All rotations were assessed positively, with the general practice rotation seen as contributing the least to the program. According to 43.7%, supervising EPs were available for consultation; 40.7% thought that, in a clinical capacity, the EP was sufficiently present during residents' shifts. When EPs were present, 82.5% found them to be easily accessible, and 66.6% viewed them as role models. In the Emergency Medicine Departments (EDs) with a higher number of EPs employed, residents tended to perceive better supervision and were more likely to see their EPs as role models. While residents were stimulated to do research, actual support and assistance needed to be improved. Although overall, the current training program was evaluated positively, the residents identified four areas for improvement: (1) in training hospitals, trained EPs should be present more continuously for clinical supervision; (2) bedside teaching should be improved, (3) scientific research should be facilitated more and (4) the training program should be extended.

  17. Evaluation of the School Breakfast Program Pilot Project: Findings from the First Year of Implementation. Nutrition Assistance Program Report Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Joan E.; Bernstein, Lawrence S.; Crepinsek, May Kay; Daft, Lynn M.; Murphy, J. Michael

    In 1998, Congress authorized implementation of a 3-year pilot breakfast program involving 4,300 students in elementary schools in 6 school districts representing a range of economic and demographic characteristics. The program began in the 2000-01 school year. This lengthy report presents the findings from the pilot's first year. The study had two…

  18. Year One Evaluation of "Encendiendo Una Llama" Bilingual Gifted and Talented Program. Report 80-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barstow, Daniel; Roby, Wallace R.

    The document reports activities of "Encendiendo Una Llama," a bilingual gifted and talented program serving 60 students in grades K through 6 in a school day resource room component or in an after school program. Twelve program objectives are outlined in terms of proposed activities, proposed evaluation, actual results, and…

  19. Program evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings from the panel on program evaluation. Some of the papers included are the following: Seattle City Light's Industrial Retrofit Demonstration Project Uses Quasi-Experimental Research Design and Metering to Measure Savings, Evaluation for PUCs, and The Takeback Effect Low-income Weatherizations Fact or Fiction

  20. [Therapeutic education of elderly patients under antivitamin - K treatment: evaluation of the program after 5 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiriat, N; Peyron, I; Bernard-Charrière, S; Monti, A; Pariel, S; Pautas, E

    2014-09-01

    Elderly people with vitamin K antagonists (VKA) have a higher risk of potentially serious hemorrhagic complications. An education program for patients (EPP) aged > or = 75 years with VKA was set up in 2008 in a French geriatric hospital. It includes individual and group sessions conducted by a nurse and a geriatrician. The aim of this study was to assess this EPP after 5 years. Strengths, weaknesses and difficulties of implementation were highlighted, and some improvements were proposed. This study is an external audit conducted by a pharmacist trained in EPP. Files of consecutive patients included in the program between may 2008 and March 2013 were reviewed allowing the data collection of patients characteristics and results of the different sessions. The educational objectives were assessed by the rate of correct responses to the questionnaires during the program. The results are presented taking into account the changes made during the 5 years of the program. One hundred forty-three patients, mean age 83.3 +/- 6.5 years, were included in the EPP. 51 sessions were conducted (2.8 patients/session on average). 58% of selected patients were hospitalized. The mean time between the start of anticoagulant treatment and the incLusion in the program was 48.9 +/- 71 months. For 95 patients (66.4%) the medication management at home required a caregiver who was present for sessions in 82 cases (57.3%). The questionnaires form and the organisation of the sessions were gradually improved between 2008 and the end of 2010. Thus, the impact of the EPP has been estimated from November 2010 to March 2013. The correct responses rates before and after the sessions were respectively: 47.8% vs 91.3% for knowledge of INR target values, 25.4% vs 91.3% for knowledge of hemorrhagic signs, 14.9% vs 87.0% for knowledge of the situations or the medications that may disturb the INR equilibrium. Furthermore, the mean number of correct responses, for the 23 patients participating in the entire

  1. Evaluation of a five-year Bloomberg Global Road Safety Program in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Hoe, C; Özkan, T; Lajunen, T J; Vursavas, F; Sener, S; Hyder, A A

    2017-03-01

    Turkey was included in the Bloomberg Philanthropies funded Global Road Safety Program (2010-14) with Ankara and Afyonkarahisar (Afyon) selected for interventions to manage speed and encourage seat-belt use. The objectives of this study are to present the monitoring and evaluation findings of seat-belt use and speed in Afyon and Ankara over the five years and to assess overall impact of the program on road traffic injury, and death rates in Turkey. Quasi-experimental before after without comparison. In collaboration with the Middle East Technical University, roadside observations and interviews were coupled with secondary data to monitor changes in risk factors and outcomes at the two intervention sites. The percentage of seat-belt use among drivers and front-seat passengers in Afyon and Ankara increased significantly between 2010 and 2014 with increased self-reported use and preceded by an increase in tickets (fines) for not using seat belts. There were uneven improvements in speed reduction. In Afyon, the average speed increased significantly from 46.3 km/h in 2012 to about 52.7 km/h in 2014 on roads where the speed limits were 50 km/h. In Ankara, the average speed remained less than 55 km/h during the program period (range: 50-54 km/h; P < 0.005) for roads where the speed limits were 50 km/h; however, the average speed on roads with speed limits of 70 km/h decreased significantly from 80.6 km/h in 2012 to 68.44 km/h in 2014 (P < 0.005). The program contributed to increase in seat-belt use in Afyon and Ankara and by drawing political attention to the issue can contribute to improvements in road safety. We are optimistic that the visible motivation within Turkey to substantially reduce road traffic injuries will lead to increased program implementation matched with a robust evaluation program, with suitable controls. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. The FAA's postmortem forensic toxicology self-evaluated proficiency test program: the second seven years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Arvind K; Craft, Kristi J; Cardona, Patrick S; Rogers, Paul B; Canfield, Dennis V

    2009-05-01

    During toxicological evaluations of samples from fatally injured pilots involved in civil aviation accidents, a high degree of quality control/quality assurance (QC/QA) is maintained. Under this philosophy, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) started a forensic toxicology proficiency-testing (PT) program in July 1991. In continuation of the first seven years of the PT findings reported earlier, PT findings of the next seven years are summarized herein. Twenty-eight survey samples (12 urine, 9 blood, and 7 tissue homogenate) with/without alcohols/volatiles, drugs, and/or putrefactive amine(s) were submitted to an average of 31 laboratories, of which an average of 25 participants returned their results. Analytes in survey samples were correctly identified and quantitated by a large number of participants, but some false positives of concern were reported. It is anticipated that the FAA's PT program will continue to serve the forensic toxicology community through this important part of the QC/QA for laboratory accreditations.

  3. Evaluation of the five-year Bloomberg Philanthropies Global Road Safety Program in the Russian Federation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Paichadze, N; Gritsenko, E; Klyavin, V; Yurasova, E; Hyder, A A

    2017-03-01

    Road traffic injuries are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. In Russia, a road safety program was implemented in Lipetskaya and Ivanovskaya oblasts (regions) as part of a 10-country effort funded by Bloomberg Philanthropies. The program was focused on increasing seat belt and child restraint use and reducing speeding. The primary goals of this monitoring and evaluation study are to assess trends in seat belt use, child restraint use, and speed compliance in the two oblasts over the 5 years and to explore the overall impact of the program on road traffic injury and death rates. Primary data via roadside observations and interviews, and secondary data from official government sources were collected and analyzed for this study. Our results indicate significant improvements in seat belt wearing and child seat use rates and in prevalence of speeding in both intervention oblasts. The observations were consistent with the results from the roadside interviews. In Lipetskaya, restraint use by all occupants increased from 52.4% (baseline, October 2010) to 77.4% (final round, October 2014) and child restraint use increased from 20.9% to 54.1% during the same period. In Ivanovskaya, restraint use by all occupants increased from 48% (baseline, April 2012) to 88.7% (final round, October 2014) and child restraint use increased from 20.6% to 89.4% during the same period. In Lipetskaya, the overall prevalence of speeding (vehicles driving above speed limit) declined from 47.0% (baseline, July 2011) to 30.4% (final round, October 2014) and a similar pattern was observed in Ivanovskaya where the prevalence of speeding decreased from 54.6% (baseline, March 2012) to 46.6% (final round, October 2014). Through 2010-2014, the road traffic crash and injury rates per 100,000 population decreased in Lipetskaya oblast (191.5 and 246.9 in 2010 and 170.4 and 208.6 in 2014, respectively) and slightly increased in Ivanovskaya oblast (184.4 and 236.0 in 2010 and 186.7 and 243

  4. Results from a Multi-Modal Program Evaluation of a Four Year Statewide Juvenile Sex Offender Treatment and Reentry Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Lee A.; Dailey, Frances L. L.; Merino, Carrie; Crump, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    The results of the Program Evaluation show the OJJ Statewide Sex Offender Treatment program is exceptionally productive in meeting over 90% of its established performance markers. These markers included successful screening and assessment of risk and psychosocial needs, completion of initial and master treatment plans, establishment of sex…

  5. Review and evaluation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission safety research program for Fiscal Year 1983. Report to the Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-02-01

    Public Law 95-209 includes a requirement that the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards submit an annual report to Congress on the safety research program of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report presents the results of the ACRS review and evaluation of the NRC safety research program for Fiscal Year 1983. The report contains a number of comments and recommendations

  6. Energy Extension Service Pilot Program: evaluation report after two years. Volume II. State reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-04-01

    This report, Vol. II, presents a discussion of the operations of the ten EES pilot state programs during the period from October 1, 1977 through September 30, 1979. Each of the ten pilot states - Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming - received a grant of approximately $1.1 million to develop and implement an 18-month program beginning on October 1, 1977. In September 1978, each State received an additional $370,000 for service-delivery programs for the extension of the pilot program, April 1979 through September 1979. A case-study description of the operations of the pilot program in each State is provided here, with special attention given to the two programs selected in each State for more-detailed study and survey research. Although the thrust of this volume is descriptive, some survey data and analyses are presented for the emphasis programs. Two telephone surveys of clients and a non-client sample were conducted, one at the end of the first year of the pilot program (October 1977 - September 1978) and one at the end of the second year (October 1978 - September 1979).

  7. Energy extension service pilot program evaluation report: the first year. Volume II: pilot state reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    Volume II of the Energy Extension Service Evaluation presents a discussion of the operations of the ten EES pilot-state programs during the period from October 1, 1977 through September 30, 1978. Each of the ten pilot states - Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming - received a grant of approximately $1.1 million to develop and implement a 19-month program beginning on October 1, 1977. Volume II provides a case-study description of the operations of the pilot program in each state, with special attention given to the two programs selected in each state for more detailed study and survey research. Some survey data and analysis are presented for the emphasis programs.

  8. A leadership development program for surgeons: First-year participant evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradarelli, Jason C; Jaffe, Gregory A; Lemak, Christy Harris; Mulholland, Michael W; Dimick, Justin B

    2016-08-01

    In a dynamic health care system, strong leadership has never been more important for surgeons. Little is known about how to design and conduct effectively a leadership program specifically for surgeons. We sought to evaluate critically a Leadership Development Program for practicing surgeons by exploring how the program's strengths and weaknesses affected the surgeons' development as physician-leaders. At a large academic institution, we conducted semistructured interviews with 21 surgical faculty members who applied voluntarily, were selected, and completed a newly created Leadership Development Program in December 2012. Interview transcripts underwent qualitative descriptive analysis with thematic coding based on grounded theory. Themes were extracted regarding surgeons' evaluations of the program on their development as physician-leaders. After completing the program, surgeons reported personal improvements in the following 4 areas: self-empowerment to lead, self-awareness, team-building skills, and knowledge in business and leadership. Surgeons felt "more confident about stepping up as a leader" and more aware of "how others view me and my interactions." They described a stronger grasp on "giving feedback" as well as a better understanding of "business/organizational issues." Overall, surgeon-participants reported positive impacts of the program on their day-to-day work activities and general career perspective as well as on their long-term career development plans. Surgeons also recommended areas where the program could potentially be improved. These interviews detailed self-reported improvements in leadership knowledge and capabilities for practicing surgeons who completed a Leadership Development Program. A curriculum designed specifically for surgeons may enable future programs to equip surgeons better for important leadership roles in a complex health care environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of a Family-based Substance Abuse Prevention Program Targeted for the Middle School Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Antonia; Pilgrim, Colleen; Hendrickson, Peggy; Buresl, Sue

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates family-based substance abuse prevention program implemented in a rural community for families with middle school students. In comparison with nonparticipants, students had higher family cohesion, less family fighting, greater school attachment, higher self-esteem, and believed alcohol should be consumed at an older age, at one-year…

  10. Clinical audits in a postgraduate general practice training program: an evaluation of 8 years' experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Al-Baho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical audit can be of valuable assistance to any program which aims to improve the quality of health care and its delivery. Yet without a coherent strategy aimed at evaluating audits' effectiveness, valuable opportunities will be overlooked. Clinical audit projects are required as a part of the formative assessment of trainees in the Family Medicine Residency Program (FMRP in Kuwait. This study was undertaken to draw a picture of trainees' understanding of the audit project with attention to the knowledge of audit theory and its educational significance and scrutinize the difficulties confronted during the experience. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The materials included the records of 133 audits carried out by trainees and 165 post course questionnaires carried out between 2004 and 2011. They were reviewed and analyzed. The majority of audit projects were performed on diabetic (44.4% and hypertensive (38.3% care. Regarding audits done on diabetic care, they were carried out to assess doctors' awareness about screening for smoking status (8.6%, microalbuminuria (19.3%, hemoglobin A1c (15.5%, retinopathy (10.3%, dyslipidemia (15.8%, peripheral neuropathy (8.8%, and other problems (21.7%. As for audits concerning hypertensive care, they were carried out to assess doctors' awareness about screening for smoking status (38.0%, obesity (26.0%, dyslipidemia (12.0%, microalbuminuria (10.0% and other problems (14.0%. More than half the participants (68.48% who attended the audit course stated that they 'definitely agreed' about understanding the meaning of clinical audit. Most of them (75.8% 'definitely agreed' about realizing the importance of clinical audit in improving patients' care. About half (49.7% of them 'agreed' that they can distinguish between 'criteria' and 'standards'. CONCLUSION: The eight years of experience were beneficial. Trainees showed a good understanding of the idea behind auditing the services provided. They

  11. New York Power Authority/New York City Housing Authority refrigerator replacement program, first program year evaluation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, L.F.; Lewis, G. [Synertech Systems Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States); Pratt, R.G.; Miller, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Acting as an energy services provider, the New York Power Authority (NYPA) has initiated a long-term project through which 20,000 refrigerators per year will be replaced with the most energy-efficient units possible in apartments managed by the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA). Using bulk purchasing as an incentive to appliance manufacturers to produce energy-efficient refrigerators suitable for use in apartments, replaced in the first year of the program, which ended in December 1996. These units, kWh per year. Savings were determined by field testing and laboratory testing of 220 existing refrigerators and 56 newly-installed units. In the next program year, a 15.0-cubic-foot Maytag refrigerator, newly-designed in response to bulk purchasing incentives, is being installed. The new unit has a label rating of 437 kWh per year, 31 percent better than 1993 energy standards. Old refrigerators removed from apartments are {open_quotes}demanufactured{close_quotes} in an environmentally-appropriate way and both metals and refrigerants are recovered for reuse.

  12. A Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluation of "Time to Read", a Volunteer Tutoring Program for 8- to 9-Year-Olds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sarah; Connolly, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Tutoring is commonly employed to prevent early reading failure, and evidence suggests that it can have a positive effect. This article presents findings from a large-scale ("n" = 734) randomized controlled trial evaluation of the effect of "Time to Read"--a volunteer tutoring program aimed at children aged 8 to 9 years--on…

  13. An Evaluation of the Model School Division (MSD) Preschool Program for the School Year 1973-74.

    Science.gov (United States)

    District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC. Dept. of Research and Evaluation.

    This study was designed to assess the extent to which children served by the Model Schools Division Preschool Program developed socially, intellectually, physically and emotionally during the 1973-74 school year. This evaluation was also designed to measure the appropriateness of the learning environment and the amount of services provided by the…

  14. Year 2000 program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapp, D.

    1999-01-01

    The steps that Enbridge Consumer Gas Company has taken to prepare for year 2000 were highlighted in a series of overhead viewgraphs which accompanied this presentation. The company's Y2K program was initiated early in 1998 with an initial assessment of the true magnitude of the problem. The transportation and distribution divisions of the company are running separate but coordinated programs. The methodology is to perform an inventory of all components, conduct risk assessments and to determine a compliance strategy to remediate any problems so that all critical systems can be Y2K ready by June, 1999. The second part of this presentation reviewed the company's business continuity planning. This included: (1) an overview of natural gas, (2) BCP methodology, (3) risk assessment, (4) supply chain management, (5) best practices, and (6) program status. 2 figs

  15. Evaluation of the Fourth and Final Year of the Even Start--Padres y Progreso Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Carla J.; And Others

    The Even Start--Padres y Progreso program was a nationally funded program in Houston (Texas) designed to prepare young children to enter school not only by offering early childhood education, but also assisting their families with adult literacy/English as a second language, parenting skills training, and employment skills training. The program…

  16. A Second Year Evaluation of the ESEA Title III Urban Leadership Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerichs, Allen H.

    The Urban Leadership Program, funded under Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, was carried out among sixth graders at the Albert Einstein School in Chicago, Illinois. The primary purpose of the program was to develop skills and competence to prepare participants for survival and success in a large urban environment. A…

  17. Evaluation of the pharmacy practice program in the 6-year pharmaceutical education curriculum in Japan: community pharmacy practice program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Miho; Hirano, Sachi; Fujii, Yuki; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to highlight concerns with the current pharmacy practice program and suggest aspects for improvement. A further aim of the study was to enhance the educational effects of the program, from the students' point of view. We surveyed 1,607 pharmacy students in Japan who had completed the pharmacy practice program in either 2010 or 2011. The students completed a self-descriptive questionnaire comprising 48 questions examining their experience of the pharmacy practice program. For community pharmacy practice, four factors were extracted through exploratory analysis: "satisfactory learning (pharmacy)," "support system of the university," "creation and clarification of the training plan," and "dialogue with patients." When comparing the mean values for each of the four factors between 2011 and 2012, the 2012 group scored significantly higher (p programs. From the results of McNemar's test, from 2011 to 2012, there was a significant decrease in the number of students who were unable to experience "charge system of patients" at neither hospitals nor pharmacies (p program introduced some initiatives. Furthermore, conducting training at multiple facilities deepens student learning and assists with the correction of problems, such as the disparities within the teaching system and learning content at each of the training facilities.

  18. [Evaluation of the program "Strong families: love and limits" in families with teenagers aged 10 to 14 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corea V, M Loreto; Zubarew G, Tamara; Valenzuela M, M Teresa; Salas P, Francisca

    2012-06-01

    "Strong Families" is a family program aimed at preventing risk behaviors in adolescents from 10 to 14 years of age. It has been developed by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) and is based on the Iowa Strengthening Families Program. This program has been certified and has been proven to effectively prevent adolescent drug and alcohol abuse in several countries around the globe. To evaluate the Strong Families Program toward adjusting current parenting styles, aiming to decrease risk behaviors in Chilean adolescents. A quasi-experimental study involving 120 families, selected from 6 schools within the Metropolitan Region of Santiago, Chile. A group of 129 adolescents and 124 parents were chosen by convenience to be intervened. A control group of 223 adolescents and 165 parents were not intervened. The families that underwent intervention attended to 7 educational sessions. The intervened and control groups were evaluated before intervention as well as 6 months after intervention, by means of self-administered evaluation tools. The intervened parents showed significant parenting changes six months after intervention, which resulted in less yelling (p = 0.007), insults (p = 0.002) and lack of control when their children misbehaved (p = 0.008). Regarding the risk behaviors in the intervened and control adolescents, no changes were observed in terms of the consumption rate of tobacco, alcohol or illegal drug use, or in sexual risk behaviors. After six months of intervention, the Program proved to be effective in modifying parenting styles. However, no changes were observed in risk behaviors among adolescents, which could occur within a longer period of time, as reported in other studies.

  19. Improved functional capacity evaluation performance predicts successful return to work one year after completing a functional restoration rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fore, Lisa; Perez, Yoheli; Neblett, Randy; Asih, Sali; Mayer, Tom G; Gatchel, Robert J

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate whether functional capacity evaluation (FCE) scores are responsive to functional restoration treatment, and to assess the ability of FCEs at program discharge to predict work outcomes. An interdisciplinary cohort study of prospectively collected data. A functional restoration center. A consecutive sample of 354 patients with chronic disabling occupational musculoskeletal disorders (CDOMDs) completed a functional restoration program consisting of quantitatively directed exercise progression and multi-modal disability management with interdisciplinary medical supervision. Each patient participated in an FCE at admission and discharge from treatment. The results of each FCE yielded the physical demand level (PDL) at which patients were functioning. Patients were initially divided into 5 PDL groups, based on job-of-injury lifting, carrying, and pushing/pulling requirements, for the pre- to posttreatment responsiveness analyses. Patients were subsequently divided into 5 PDL groups, based on their performance on the FCE upon program completion. Outcome measures included admission-to-discharge changes in PDLs and 2 specific FCE lifting tasks: isokinetic lifting; and the Progressive Isoinertial Lifting Evaluation (PILE). Socioeconomic outcomes were also evaluated, including post-discharge work return and work retention 1-year after treatment completion. Overall, 96% of the patients demonstrated improvement in their PDLs from admission to discharge. A majority of patients (56%) were able to achieve a discharge PDL that was comparable to their estimated job-of-injury lifting requirement or higher (P work return (P work retention (P work return after treatment completion and work retention 1 year later. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of the Program in Medical Education for the Urban Underserved (PRIME-US) at the UC Berkeley-UCSF Joint Medical Program (JMP): The First 4 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokal-Gutierrez, Karen; Ivey, Susan L; Garcia, Roxanna M; Azzam, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Medical educators, clinicians, and health policy experts widely acknowledge the need to increase the diversity of our healthcare workforce and build our capacity to care for medically underserved populations and reduce health disparities. The Program in Medical Education for the Urban Underserved (PRIME-US) is part of a family of programs across the University of California (UC) medical schools aiming to recruit and train physicians to care for underserved populations, expand the healthcare workforce to serve diverse populations, and promote health equity. PRIME-US selects medical students from diverse backgrounds who are committed to caring for underserved populations and provides a 5-year curriculum including a summer orientation, a longitudinal seminar series with community engagement and leadership-development activities, preclerkship clinical immersion in an underserved setting, a master's degree, and a capstone rotation in the final year of medical school. This is a mixed-methods evaluation of the first 4 years of the PRIME-US at the UC Berkeley-UC San Francisco Joint Medical Program (JMP). From 2006 to 2010, focus groups were conducted each year with classes of JMP PRIME-US students, for a total of 11 focus groups; major themes were identified using content analysis. In addition, 4 yearly anonymous, online surveys of all JMP students, faculty and staff were conducted and analyzed. Most PRIME-US students came from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds and ethnic backgrounds underrepresented in medicine, and all were committed to caring for underserved populations. The PRIME-US students experienced many program benefits including peer support, professional role models and mentorship, and curricular enrichment activities that developed their knowledge, skills, and sustained commitment to care for underserved populations. Non-PRIME students, faculty, and staff also benefited from participating in PRIME-sponsored seminars and community-based activities

  1. A dozen years of American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) International Mini-Fellowship: program evaluation and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioachimescu, Octavian C; Wickwire, Emerson M; Harrington, John; Kristo, David; Arnedt, J Todd; Ramar, Kannan; Won, Christine; Billings, Martha E; DelRosso, Lourdes; Williams, Scott; Paruthi, Shalini; Morgenthaler, Timothy I

    2014-03-15

    Sleep medicine remains an underrepresented medical specialty worldwide, with significant geographic disparities with regard to training, number of available sleep specialists, sleep laboratory or clinic infrastructures, and evidence-based clinical practices. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) is committed to facilitating the education of sleep medicine professionals to ensure high-quality, evidence-based clinical care and improve access to sleep centers around the world, particularly in developing countries. In 2002, the AASM launched an annual 4-week training program called Mini-Fellowship for International Scholars, designed to support the establishment of sleep medicine in developing countries. The participating fellows were generally chosen from areas that lacked a clinical infrastructure in this specialty and provided with training in AASM Accredited sleep centers. This manuscript presents an overview of the program, summarizes the outcomes, successes, and lessons learned during the first 12 years, and describes a set of programmatic changes for the near-future, as assembled and proposed by the AASM Education Committee and recently approved by the AASM Board of Directors. Ioachimescu OC; Wickwire EM; Harrington J; Kristo D; Arnedt JT; Ramar K; Won C; Billings ME; DelRosso L; Williams S; Paruthi S; Morgenthaler TI. A dozen years of American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) international mini-fellowship: program evaluation and future directions.

  2. Thermoelectric Materials Evaluation Program. Annual technical report for fiscal year 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinderman, J.D.

    1979-10-01

    Optimization was initiated with respect to performance, operating temperatures, and thermoelectric properties of an N-type material based on rare earth (neodymium and gadolinium) selenide technology. Effort was expanded to experimentally describe the chemical, electrical and physical behavior of P-type thermoelectric material over a range of temperatures. Emphasis was changed in P-type material research from basic properties to sublimation suppression by wrapping, and to the understanding of contact resistance problems at the hot end. Analytical performance calculations were made as an aid in couple development. In the area of module development an evaluation of the reduction of bypass-heat loss was made and module M-22R was placed on test. Parts were fabricated for M23R. Data on long term operating characteristics, ingradient compatibility, and reliability of elements and couples was obtained

  3. A 1-year follow-up evaluation of a sexual-health education program for Spanish adolescents compared with a well-established program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Alexandra; Espada, José P; Orgilés, Mireia

    2016-02-01

    Competencies for adolescents with a healthy sexuality (COMPAS) is the only school-based sexual health promotion program in Spain that has been found to be as effective as an evidence-based intervention (¡Cuídate!) in the short term. This study's aim was to compare data from a 12-month follow-up evaluation on the effects of COMPAS on adolescents' sexual risks (knowledge, attitudes, perceived norms, sexual risk perception and intentions) and sexual behaviours (age of the first sex, consistent condom use and multiple partners) with an evidence-based intervention (¡Cuídate!) and a control group. Eighteen schools from five provinces of Spain were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: COMPAS, ¡Cuídate! and a control group. The adolescents (N = 1563; 34% attrition) were evaluated 1 week before and after the program, and 1 year post-program implementation. We found that the COMPAS program was as effective as ¡Cuídate!, the evidence-based program, in increasing the adolescents' knowledge about sexually transmitted infections and in fostering favourable attitudes about condom use and people living with HIV/AIDS. COMPAS was more effective than ¡Cuídate! in increasing the adolescents' perceptions of their peer's consistent condom use and the age delay of their first vaginal intercourse. However, it was less effective in maintaining the adolescents' intentions to use condoms and in delaying the age of their first oral sex experience. COMPAS was as effective as ¡Cuídate! in reducing sexual risk among adolescents. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  4. The Three-Year (1995-1997) Workplace Literacy Program at Chinatown Manpower Project, Inc. Final Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedenberg, Joan E.

    An external evaluation was conducted of the Workplace Literacy Program at Chinatown Manpower Project, Inc., which provided oral and written job-specific instruction in English as a second language to Chinese garment workers. The program was designed for underemployed garment industry workers with low English proficiency, including seamstresses,…

  5. Toward an Evaluation Framework for Doctoral Education in Social Work: A 10-Year Retrospective of One PhD Program's Assessment Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Kia J.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a framework for evaluation in social work doctoral education and details 10 years of successes and challenges in one PhD program's use of the framework, including planning and implementing specific assessment activities around student learning outcomes and larger program goals. The article argues that a range of…

  6. Evaluation of a Continuing Professional Development program for first year student pharmacists undergoing an Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyin Tofade

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate a live and online training program for first year pharmacy students in implementing Continuing Professional Development (CPD principles (Reflect, Plan, Act, and Evaluate, writing SMART learning objectives, and documenting learning activities prior to and during a hospital introductory professional practice experience. Design: Cohort Study. Setting: Introductory professional practice experience. Participants: First year (PY1 students at the University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy. Intervention: Live training or online training to introduce the concept of Continuing Professional Development in practice. Main Outcomes: Implementation of CPD principles through 1 completed pre-rotation education action plans with specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-bound (SMART learning objectives; and 2 completed learning activity worksheets post-rotation indicating stimuli for learning, resources used and accomplished learning. objectives; and 3 documented suggestions and content feedback for future lectures and pharmaceutical care lab experiences. Results:Out of the whole cohort (N=154, 14 (87.5% live (in person trainees and 122 (88% online trainees submitted an education action plan. Objectives were scored using a rubric on a scale of 1-5. A rating of 5 means "satisfactory", 3 means "work in progress" and 1 means "unacceptable". There were significant differences between the mean live trainee scores and the mean online trainee scores for the following respective section comparisons: Specific 4.7 versus 3.29 (p Conclusion: Live trainees performed significantly better than online trainees in writing SMART learning objectives. With focused training, students are more capable of implementing principles of CPD.   Type: Original Research

  7. Measures of Student Non-Cognitive Skills and Political Tolerance after Two Years of the Louisiana Scholarship Program. Louisiana Scholarship Program Evaluation Report #2. Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jonathan N.; Cheng, Albert; Hitt, Collin E.; Wolf, Patrick J.; Greene, Jay P.

    2016-01-01

    This report examines the short-term effects of the Louisiana Scholarship Program (LSP) on students' non-cognitive skills and civic values. While a growing number of studies have evaluated K-12 school voucher programs along academic dimensions, few have focused on the development of non-cognitive skills and civic values. This study aims to address…

  8. The Inquiry Based Science and Technology Education Program (IN-STEP): The Evaluation of the First Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Thomas B.

    2008-01-01

    This is the first report on the evaluation of the Inquiry Based Science and Technology Education Program (IN-STEP), an innovative and ambitious science education initiative for lower secondary schools being undertaken by a public-private partnership in Thailand funded by MSD-Thailand, an affiliate of Merck & Co. IN-STEP is a public-private…

  9. Evaluation Program initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide the Department of Energy's (DOE) safeguards and security community with some insights on an important management initiative by the Office of Security Evaluations (OSE). The paper will present the ''what, where, who, when, and why'' of a new Evaluation Program. The Evaluation Program will be comprised of a continuing series of regular and special evaluations of DOE safeguards and security programs and policies. The evaluations will be integrative and ''crosscutting,'' i.e. will extend across DOE organizational lines. Evaluations will be offered as positive advisories to DOE managers with safeguards and security responsibilities and will not be rated. They will complement the ongoing OSE Inspection Program of inspections conducted by OSE's Inspection Division. The purpose for the evaluations is to establish an accurate and current assessment of the effectiveness and status of safeguards and security programs and policies and to provide DOE managers with required information on program and policy effectiveness

  10. Milwaukee Parental Choice Program. First Year Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, John F.

    A preliminary evaluation and report were conducted of the Milwaukee (Wisconsin) Public Schools' (MPS) Parental Choice Program (PCP) following its first year of operation. The state legislated program provides an opportunity for students meeting specific criteria to attend private, non-sectarian schools in Milwaukee. A payment from public funds…

  11. [Results and evaluation of 3 years of a large scale mammography program in the Ariana area of Tunisia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchlaka, A; Ben Abdallah, M; Ben Aissa, R; Zaanouni, E; Kribi, L; Smida, S; M'barek, F; Ben Hamida, A; Boussen, H; Gueddana, N

    2009-07-01

    To asses and analyse the results of 3 years large scale mammography screening of breast cancer in Ariana state in Tunisia. This program, managed by the Family and Population National Office, was addressing to women aged from 49 to 69 years old residing in a area with adds up a population of 459 700 inhabitants including 52,729 women in the target age population. The screening was including a breast clinical examination and a mammography with two incidences face and external profile. The women was invited at their residence or were sensitized in the reproductive health centers, care and base health centers or by a close relation which heard of the program. An enlightened assent was submitted to the women who wished to profit from the screening. In three years, 9093 mammography were carried out of which 8244 were retained in the analyses, that is to say a rate participation of 9.6%. The rate of women recalled for suspect test was of 18.1% and it was of 13.1% among women of more than 50 years. The rate of practiced surgical biopsies was of 0.5% and the positive predictive value was of 45.5%. The average time between the date of screening and the result of the screening was 9.7 days, more important in the event of tests requiring a complementary assessment (61.7 days). On the whole 40 cancers were detected by the program, that is to say a rough rate of detected cancers, of 4.9 per thousand, in conformity with the recommendations. The percentage of invasive cancers detect an important rate of cancers of which cancers infra-private clinics.

  12. Evaluation of a primary prevention program for anxiety disorders using story books with children aged 9-12 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Stéphane; Gervais, Jean; Gagnier, Nadia; Loranger, Claudie

    2013-10-01

    This article reports the results of a study evaluating a book-supported primary prevention program "Dominique's Handy Tricks" for anxiety disorders in children aged 9-12 years. This cognitive-behavioural program is delivered using a combination of storybooks and workshop sessions. The originality of the program comes from the use of storybooks that were not developed specifically for anxiety management. Every session is based on a story describing characters facing common stressors and how they manage to cope with their daily problems. In our randomized control trial with 46 children, participation in the program led to a significant improvement in coping skills, perceived self-efficacy, anxiety sensitivity, as well as in symptoms of anxiety and fear. The theoretical and practical elements underlying the delivery of this primary prevention program are described. It is suggested that such an approach, without any labelling specific to anxiety disorders, can be useful in primary prevention programs.

  13. The Development of a Service-Learning Program for First-Year Students Based on the Hallmarks of High Quality Service-Learning and Rigorous Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bradley H.; Gahagan, James; McQuillin, Samuel; Haywood, Benjamin; Cole, Caroline Pender; Bolton, Clay; Wampler, Mary Katherine

    2011-01-01

    We describe six hallmarks of high quality service-learning and explain how these considerations guided the development of a Transitional Coaching Program (TCP) during the first three years of implementation. We have demonstrated that the TCP is acceptable, feasible, and sustainable. Improvements have been seen in the degree of impact on learning…

  14. Evaluating an employee wellness program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sankar; Wendel, Jeanne

    2013-12-01

    What criteria should be used to evaluate the impact of a new employee wellness program when the initial vendor contract expires? Published academic literature focuses on return-on-investment as the gold standard for wellness program evaluation, and a recent meta-analysis concludes that wellness programs can generate net savings after one or two years. In contrast, surveys indicate that fewer than half of these programs report net savings, and actuarial analysts argue that return-on-investment is an unrealistic metric for evaluating new programs. These analysts argue that evaluation of new programs should focus on contract management issues, such as the vendor's ability to: (i) recruit employees to participate and (ii) induce behavior change. We compute difference-in-difference propensity score matching estimates of the impact of a wellness program implemented by a mid-sized employer. The analysis includes one year of pre-implementation data and three years of post-implementation data. We find that the program successfully recruited a broad spectrum of employees to participate, and it successfully induced short-term behavior change, as manifested by increased preventive screening. However, the effects on health care expenditures are positive (but insignificant). If it is unrealistic to expect new programs to significantly reduce healthcare costs in a few years, then focusing on return-on-investment as the gold standard metric may lead to early termination of potentially useful wellness programs. Focusing short-term analysis of new programs on short-term measures may provide a more realistic evaluation strategy.

  15. A report on evaluation of research and development subjects in fiscal year 2001. Evaluation subject on the 'Middle- and long-term business program'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-09-01

    The middle- and long-term business program determined by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) is for elucidation of middle- and long-term targets to be expanded by JNC and is a base to promote individual R and D. This program is to be revised at a chance established on new long-term plan on research, development and application of nuclear energy on November, 2000 by the Committee of Atomic Energy under consideration of condition change after March, 1999. This report is a summary of evaluation results on the present middle- and long-term business program established by JNC, especially at a center of its revised portion, as a form of opinion. The evaluated results are described on two forms of the subject evaluation committees on the fast reactor and fuel cycle and on the wastes processing and disposal. (G.K.)

  16. Fiscal year 1987 program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    The Defense TRU Waste Program (DTWP) is the focal point for the Department of Energy in national planning, integration, operation, and technical development for TRU waste management. The scope of this program extends from the point of TRU waste generation through delivery to a permanent repository. The TRU program maintains a close interface with repository development to ensure program compatibility and coordination. The defense TRU program does not directly address commercial activities that generate TRU waste. Instead, it is concerned with providing alternatives to manage existing and future defense TRU wastes. The FY 87 Program Plan is consistent with the Defense TRU Waste Program goals and objectives stated in the Defense Transuranic Waste Program Strategy Document, January 1984. The roles of participants, the responsibilities and authorities for Operations, and Research ampersand Development (R ampersand D), the organizational interfaces and communication channels for R ampersand D and the establishment of procedures for planning, reporting, and budgeting of Operations and R ampersand D activities meet requirements stated in the Technical Management Plan for the Transuranic Waste Management Program. Detailed budget planning (i.e., programmatic funding and capital equipment) is presented for FY 87; outyear budget projections are presented for future years

  17. Evaluating a Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantzreb, Arthur C.

    Problems in evaluating the success of an institutional resource development program are examined and suggestions are offered for effective assessment. Such a program is seen as a sequence of events in the artful management of people, from the planning stage to obtaining a financial commitment in writing from persons who want to share their assets…

  18. Evaluation of two-year Jewish genetic disease screening program in Atlanta: insight into community genetic screening approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yunru; Liu, Shuling; Grinzaid, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Improvements in genetic testing technologies have led to the development of expanded carrier screening panels for the Ashkenazi Jewish population; however, there are major inconsistencies in current screening practices. A 2-year pilot program was launched in Atlanta in 2010 to promote and facilitate screening for 19 Jewish genetic diseases. We analyzed data from this program, including participant demographics and outreach efforts. This retrospective analysis is based on a de-identified dataset of 724 screenees. Data were obtained through medical chart review and questionnaires and included demographic information, screening results, response to outreach efforts, and follow-up behavior and preferences. We applied descriptive analysis, chi-square tests, and logistic regression to analyze the data and compare findings with published literature. The majority of participants indicated that they were not pregnant or did not have a partner who was pregnant were affiliated with Jewish organizations and reported 100 % AJ ancestry. Overall, carrier frequency was 1 in 3.9. Friends, rabbis, and family members were the most common influencers of the decision to receive screening. People who were older, had a history of pregnancy, and had been previously screened were more likely to educate others (all p influencers who then encouraged screening in the target population. Educating influencers and increasing overall awareness were the most effective outreach strategies.

  19. 175 Years of Linear Programming

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 10. 175 Years of Linear Programming - Max Flow = Min Cut. Vijay Chandru M R Rao. Series Article Volume 4 Issue 10 October 1999 pp 22-39. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  20. 175 Years of Linear Programming

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 5. 175 Years of Linear Programming - Pune's Gift. Vijay Chandru M R Rao. Series Article Volume 4 Issue 5 May ... Computer Science and Automation, IISc Bangalore 560012, India. Director, Indian Institute of Management, Bannerghatta Road, ...

  1. Introducing Program Evaluation Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca GÂRBOAN

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Programs and project evaluation models can be extremely useful in project planning and management. The aim is to set the right questions as soon as possible in order to see in time and deal with the unwanted program effects, as well as to encourage the positive elements of the project impact. In short, different evaluation models are used in order to minimize losses and maximize the benefits of the interventions upon small or large social groups. This article introduces some of the most recently used evaluation models.

  2. Two-year process evaluation of a pilot program to increase elementary children's physical activity during school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Collin A; Weaver, R Glenn; Egan, Cate A; Brian, Ali; Vazou, Spyridoula

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine implementation processes in elementary classrooms during a 2-year (Fall 2014 to Spring 2016) pilot intervention program, Partnerships for Active Children in Elementary Schools (PACES). We examined (a) the effect of PACES on the extent of movement integration (MI) and (b) changes in teachers' perceptions regarding MI. Purposively selected classrooms (grades 1-3) across four schools (3 intervention, 1 control) participated in the study. The sample included classroom teachers (N = 12) in Fall 2014 and Spring 2015, but the number of participants dropped to eight in Fall 2015 and Spring 2016. PACES consisted of three partnership approaches (a virtual community of practice, community-based participatory research, and university service learning) intended to increase the extent of MI in the intervention classrooms. We collected process data using the System for Observing Student Movement in Academic Routines and Transitions (SOSMART) and teacher interviews. PACES did not significantly impact the extent of observed MI. Interviews indicated that the intervention had both strengths and limitations. Building interpersonal support for teachers is important to their use of MI. A different measurement schedule (e.g., collecting MI data each day of the school week) may be required to more thoroughly capture MI instances. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluating the effect of a year-long film focused environmental education program on Ugandan student knowledge of and attitudes toward great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeds, Austin; Lukas, Kristen E; Kendall, Corinne J; Slavin, Michelle A; Ross, Elizabeth A; Robbins, Martha M; van Weeghel, Dagmar; Bergl, Richard A

    2017-08-01

    Films, as part of a larger environmental education program, have the potential to influence the knowledge and attitudes of viewers. However, to date, no evaluations have been published reporting the effectiveness of films, when used within primate range countries as part of a conservation themed program. The Great Ape Education Project was a year-long environmental education program implemented in Uganda for primary school students living adjacent to Kibale National Park (KNP) and Bwindi Impenetrable National Park (BINP). Students viewed a trilogy of conservation films about great apes, produced specifically for this audience, and participated in complementary extra-curricular activities. The knowledge and attitudes of students participating in the program from KNP, but not BINP were assessed using questionnaires prior to (N = 1271) and following (N = 872) the completion of the program. Following the program, students demonstrated a significant increase in their knowledge of threats to great apes and an increase in their knowledge of ways that villagers and students can help conserve great apes. Additionally, student attitudes toward great apes improved following the program. For example, students showed an increase in agreement with liking great apes and viewing them as important to the environment. These data provide evidence that conservation films made specifically to address regional threats and using local actors and settings can positively influence knowledge of and attitudes toward great apes among students living in a primate range country. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The Incredible Years Parents and Babies Program:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Maiken W.; Klest, Sihu; Sandoy, Tróndur Møller

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Infancy is an important period of life; adverse experiences during this stage can have both immediate and lifelong impacts on the child’s mental health and well-being. This study evaluates the effects of the Incredible Years Parents and Babies (IYPB) program as a universal intervention...

  5. Office of Technology Development's Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing and Evaluation Mid-Year Program Review. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This document presents brief summaries of waste management, remedial action, decommissioning/decontamination, and waste processing programs and issues currently being developed at Department of Energy Facilities

  6. Office of Technology Development`s Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing and Evaluation Mid-Year Program Review. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This document presents brief summaries of waste management, remedial action, decommissioning/decontamination, and waste processing programs and issues currently being developed at Department of Energy Facilities.

  7. The school evaluation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, E.; Harrison, J.; Turner, W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on a pilot program to provide classroom and field training to school facility operators that was implemented by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Radiation Programs in 1989. This program consisted of two phases. The first phase developed and delivered a three-day workshop in Nashville, Tennessee. As a result of the workshop a second phase was initiated. The second phase investigated several school buildings with elevated indoor radon levels in the Western United States. Radon entry mechanisms were identified. Measurements to evaluate soil depressurization as a radon control method were made and HVAC systems were characterized. Measurements were made to evaluate HVAC modification as a radon control method. Building shell tightness measurements were made and information was collected to judge the suitability of potential sites for additional EPA sponsored 'hands on' school training. Physical and institutional problem areas were identified

  8. Office of Technology Development's Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing and Evaluation Mid-Year Program Review. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This document, Volume 2, presents brief summaries of programs being investigated at USDOE sites for waste processing, remedial action, underground storage tank remediation, and robotic applications in waste management

  9. Development and evaluation of a community immersion program during preclinical medical studies: a 15-year experience at the University of Geneva Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastonay, P; Zesiger, V; Klohn, A; Soguel, L; Mpinga, E K; Vu, Nv; Bernheim, L

    2013-01-01

    Significant changes in medical education have occurred in recent decades because of new challenges in the health sector and new learning theories and practices. This might have contributed to the decision of medical schools throughout the world to adopt community-based learning activities. The community-based learning approach has been promoted and supported by the World Health Organization and has emerged as an efficient learning strategy. The aim of the present paper is to describe the characteristics of a community immersion clerkship for third-year undergraduate medical students, its evolution over 15 years, and an evaluation of its outcomes. A review of the literature and consensus meetings with a multidisciplinary group of health professionals were used to define learning objectives and an educational approach when developing the program. Evaluation of the program addressed students' perception, achievement of learning objectives, interactions between students and the community, and educational innovations over the years. The program and the main learning objectives were defined by consensus meetings among teaching staff and community health workers, which strengthened the community immersion clerkship. Satisfaction, as monitored by a self-administered questionnaire in successive cohorts of students, showed a mean of 4.4 on a five-point scale. Students also mentioned community immersion clerkship as a unique community experience. The learning objectives were reached by a vast majority of students. Behavior evaluation was not assessed per se, but specific testimonies show that students have been marked by their community experience. The evaluation also assessed outcomes such as educational innovations (eg, students teaching other students), new developments in the curriculum (eg, partnership with the University of Applied Health Sciences), and interaction between students and the community (eg, student development of a website for a community health

  10. Review and evaluation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Safety Research Program for Fiscal Years 1984 and 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    This is the sixth report by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) that has been prepared in response to the Congressional requirement for an annual report on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Reactor Safety Research Program. Part I is a compilation of our general comments and recommendations regarding the NRC Safety Research Program, and includes budget recommendations and an identification of matters of special importance that deserve increased emphasis. It is intended to serve as an Executive Summary. Part II is divided into ten chapters, each of which represents a Decision Unit of the NRC research program. In each chapter, specific comments are included on the research involved in the Decision Unit, an assessment of priorities, and recommendations regarding new directions and levels of funding

  11. Program mid-year summaries research, development, demonstration, testing and evaluation: Office of Technology Development, FY 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This mid-year review provides a summary of activities within the Office of Technology Development with individual presentations being made to DOE HQ and field management staff. The presentations are by EM-541, 542, 551, and 552 organizations

  12. Evaluation of Hawaii's Healthy Start Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Anne K.; McFarlane, Elizabeth C.; Windham, Amy M.; Rohde, Charles A.; Salkever, David S.; Fuddy, Loretta; Rosenberg, Leon A.; Buchbinder, Sharon B.; Sia, Calvin C. J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes Hawaii's Healthy Start Program (HST), its ongoing evaluation study, and evaluation findings at the end of two of a planned three years of family-program participation and follow-up. HST uses home visitors to help prevent abusive and neglectful parenting. Found significant differences in program implementation among the three…

  13. A randomized trial to evaluate the effectiveness of an individual, education-based safe transport program for drivers aged 75 years and older

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keay Lisa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are concerns over safety of older drivers due to increased crash involvement and vulnerability to injury. However, loss of driving privileges can dramatically reduce independence and quality of life for older members of the community. The aim of this trial is to examine the effectiveness of a safe transport program for drivers aged 75 years and older at reducing driving exposure but maintaining mobility. Methods and design A randomised trial will be conducted, involving 380 drivers aged 75 years and older, resident in urban and semi-rural areas of North-West Sydney. The intervention is an education program based on the Knowledge Enhances Your Safety (KEYS program, adapted for the Australian context. Driving experience will be measured objectively using an in-vehicle monitoring device which includes a global positioning system (GPS to assess driving exposure and an accelerometer to detect rapid deceleration events. Participation will be assessed using the Keele Assessment of Participation (KAP. Data will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis; the primary outcomes include driving exposure, rapid deceleration events and scores for KAP. Secondary outcomes include self-reported measures of driving, socialisation, uptake of alternative forms of transport, depressive symptoms and mood. A detailed process evaluation will be conducted, including examination of the delivery of the program and uptake of alternative forms of transport. A subgroup analysis is planned for drivers with reduced function as characterized by established cut-off scores on the Drivesafe assessment tool. Discussion This randomised trial is powered to provide an objective assessment of the efficacy of an individually tailored education and alternative transportation program to promote safety of older drivers but maintain mobility. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000543886.

  14. The Effects of the Louisiana Scholarship Program on Student Achievement after Two Years. Louisiana Scholarship Program Evaluation Report #1. Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jonathan N.; Wolf, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    The Louisiana Scholarship Program (LSP) is a statewide initiative offering publicly-funded vouchers to enroll in local private schools to students in low-performing schools with family income no greater than 250 percent of the poverty line. Initially established in 2008 as a pilot program in New Orleans, the LSP was expanded statewide in 2012.…

  15. Motor carrier evaluation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portsmouth, James

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ), Transportation Management Program (TMP) has the overall responsibility to provide a well-managed transportation program for the safe, efficient, and economical transportation of DOE-owned materials. The DOE-TMP has established an excellent safety record in the transportation of hazardous materials including radioactive materials and radioactive wastes. This safety record can be maintained only through continued diligence and sustained effort on the part of the DOE-TMP, its field offices, and the contractors' organizations. Key elements in the DOE'S effective hazardous and radioactive materials shipping program are (1) integrity of packages, (2) strict adherence to regulations and procedures, (3) trained personnel, (4) complete management support, and (5) use of the best commercial carriers. The DOE Motor Carrier Evaluation Program was developed to better define the criteria and methodology needed to identify motor carriers for use in the transportation of Highway Route Controlled Quantities (HRCQ), Truck Load (TL) quantities of radioactive materials, hazardous materials and waste. (author)

  16. Traffic Control Device Evaluation Program : FY 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    This report presents findings on the activities conducted in the Traffic Control Device Evaluation Program during the 2017 fiscal year. The research on sponsored changeable message signs (continued from the previous year) was terminated by the Federa...

  17. Development and evaluation of a community immersion program during preclinical medical studies: a 15-year experience at the University of Geneva Medical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chastonay P

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available P Chastonay,1,2 V Zesiger,1 A Klohn,1 L Soguel,3 E K Mpinga,1,4 NV Vu,2 L Bernheim5 1Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, 2Unit of Development and Research in Medical Education, University of Geneva, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, 3Nutrition and Dietetics Department, University of Applied Sciences, Geneva, 4Swiss School of Public Health, Zurich, 5Department of Neurosciences, University of Geneva, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland Background: Significant changes in medical education have occurred in recent decades because of new challenges in the health sector and new learning theories and practices. This might have contributed to the decision of medical schools throughout the world to adopt community-based learning activities. The community-based learning approach has been promoted and supported by the World Health Organization and has emerged as an efficient learning strategy. The aim of the present paper is to describe the characteristics of a community immersion clerkship for third-year undergraduate medical students, its evolution over 15 years, and an evaluation of its outcomes. Methods: A review of the literature and consensus meetings with a multidisciplinary group of health professionals were used to define learning objectives and an educational approach when developing the program. Evaluation of the program addressed students' perception, achievement of learning objectives, interactions between students and the community, and educational innovations over the years. Results: The program and the main learning objectives were defined by consensus meetings among teaching staff and community health workers, which strengthened the community immersion clerkship. Satisfaction, as monitored by a self-administered questionnaire in successive cohorts of students, showed a mean of 4.4 on a five-point scale. Students also mentioned community immersion clerkship as a unique community experience. The learning objectives were reached by a

  18. Evaluation of a fall-prevention program in older people after femoral neck fracture: a one-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, M; Stenvall, M; Olofsson, B; Gustafson, Y

    2008-06-01

    A randomized, controlled fall-prevention study including 199 patients operated on for femoral neck fracture reduced inpatient falls and injuries. No statistically significant effects of the intervention program could be detected after discharge. It seems that fall-prevention must be part of everyday life in fall-prone old people. This study evaluates whether a postoperative multidisciplinary, multifactorial fall-prevention program performed by a geriatric team that reduced inpatient falls and injuries had any continuing effect after discharge. The intervention consisted of staff education, systematic assessment and treatment of fall risk factors and vitamin D and calcium supplementation. The randomized, controlled trial with a one-year follow-up at Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, included 199 patients operated on for femoral neck fracture, aged > or = 70 years. After one year 44 participants had fallen 138 times in the intervention group compared with 55 participants and 191 falls in the control group. The crude postoperative fall incidence was 4.16/1,000 days in the intervention group vs. 6.43/1,000 days in the control group. The incidence rate ratio was 0.64 (95% CI: 0.40-1.02, p = 0.063). Seven new fractures occurred in the intervention group and 11 in the control group. A team applying comprehensive geriatric assessment and rehabilitation, including prevention and treatment of fall-risk factors, reduced inpatient falls and injuries, but no statistically significant effects of the program could be detected after discharge. It seems that fall-prevention must be part of everyday life in fall-prone elderly.

  19. Family group interventions in an early psychosis program: A re-evaluation of practice after 10 years of service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Kate; Starbuck, Rachael; Petrakis, Melissa

    2017-08-01

    The role of family in supporting service users in coping with illness and engaging in relapse prevention in early psychosis is important. Taking on this caring though is stressful and challenging, and it has been found that support and information for carers assists in their coping and reduces isolation. To evaluate the current utility of a psychoeducation group program in a public adult mental health service, for the families of people experiencing early psychosis. A purpose-designed pre- and post-intervention questionnaire was administered to quantitatively measure group participants' changes in perceptions of their understanding of mental illness and its treatment through attending the group. Additional qualitative items were used to determine other knowledge, benefits and any critical feedback. The group program continues to result in highly significant improvements in family members' understanding of psychosis, recovery, medications, relapse prevention and substance co-morbidities. Additional feedback reaffirmed previous findings that family members find group peer support valuable and that this reduces isolation and the experience of stigma. The current evaluation, conducted following 10 years of early psychosis group work, found there to be efficacy in family peer support groups and that it is important to provide family interventions in public early psychosis mental health services.

  20. Multi-Year Program Plan - Building Regulatory Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-10-01

    This document presents DOE’s multi-year plan for the three components of the Buildings Regulatory Program: Appliance and Equipment Efficiency Standards, ENERGY STAR, and the Building Energy Codes Program. This document summarizes the history of these programs, the mission and goals of the programs, pertinent statutory requirements, and DOE’s 5-year plan for moving forward.

  1. A systematic meta-review of evaluations of youth violence prevention programs: Common and divergent findings from 25 years of meta-analyses and systematic reviews☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matjasko, Jennifer L.; Vivolo-Kantor, Alana M.; Massetti, Greta M.; Holland, Kristin M.; Holt, Melissa K.; Cruz, Jason Dela

    2018-01-01

    Violence among youth is a pervasive public health problem. In order to make progress in reducing the burden of injury and mortality that result from youth violence, it is imperative to identify evidence-based programs and strategies that have a significant impact on violence. There have been many rigorous evaluations of youth violence prevention programs. However, the literature is large, and it is difficult to draw conclusions about what works across evaluations from different disciplines, contexts, and types of programs. The current study reviews the meta-analyses and systematic reviews published prior to 2009 that synthesize evaluations of youth violence prevention programs. This meta-review reports the findings from 37 meta-analyses and 15 systematic reviews; the included reviews were coded on measures of the social ecology, prevention approach, program type, and study design. A majority of the meta-analyses and systematic reviews were found to demonstrate moderate program effects. Meta-analyses yielded marginally smaller effect sizes compared to systematic reviews, and those that included programs targeting family factors showed marginally larger effects than those that did not. In addition, there are a wide range of individual/family, program, and study moderators of program effect sizes. Implications of these findings and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:29503594

  2. 175 Years of Linear Programming

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    polynomial-time solvability of linear programming, that is, testing if a polyhedron Q E ~ ... Q is rational, i.e. all extreme points and rays of Q are ra- tional vectors or ..... rithrll terminates with an interior solution, a post-processing step is usually ...

  3. Assessing the Effectiveness of a Mathematics-Focused, Instructional Technology Program for Grades 6-8: A 5-Year Trend Analysis of NASA CONNECT(tm) Evaluation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Nanci A.; Perry, Jeannine B.; Giersch, Christopher E.; Lambert, Matthew A.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA CONNECT is a research-, inquiry, and standards-based, integrated mathematics, science, and technology series of 30-minute instructional distance learning (television and web-based) programs for students in grades 6 8. Respondents who evaluated the programs in the series over the first five seasons (1998-99 through 2002-03) reported that (1) they used the programs in the series; (2) the goals and objectives for the series were met; (3) the programs were aligned with the national mathematics, science, and technology standards; (4) the program content was developmentally appropriate for the grade level; and (5) the programs in the series enhanced and enriched the teaching of mathematics, science, and technology.

  4. Toy Control Program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, H A; Ormond, C; Seeger, B R

    1991-08-01

    The Toy Control Program for the Apple IIe microcomputer is a software and hardware package developed for the training of single-switch scanning skills. The specially designed scanning programs provide on screen visual feedback and activate a battery-powered toy to reinforce performance. This study examined whether the training of preschool subjects in single-switch scanning skills with the Toy Control Program would result in increased task completion scores and increased levels of attention to task, as compared with conditions of toy activation only and microcomputer programs with screen reinforcement only. The results showed that the subjects paid significantly more attention to the toys as reinforcers (p less than .01). No significant difference was found for the performance results of the three conditions. These findings support the use of a program like the Toy Control Program, which integrates the instructional capabilities of a computer with the reinforcement potential of a toy and the creativity of a therapist.

  5. Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) - Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs : Annual Report For Fiscal Year, October 2007 – September 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerstenberger, Ryan [Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation

    2009-07-27

    This progress report describes work performed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWSRO) portion of the Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation Project (HRPP) during the 2008 fiscal year. A total of 64,736 hatchery winter steelhead, 12,108 hatchery summer steelhead, and 68,426 hatchery spring Chinook salmon smolts were acclimated and released in the Hood River basin during the spring. The HRPP exceeded program goals for a release of and 50,000 winter steelhead but fell short of the steelhead release goals of 30,000 summer steelhead and 75,000 spring Chinook in 2008. Passive Integrated Transponders (PIT) tags were implanted in 6,652 hatchery winter steelhead, and 1,196 hatchery summer steelhead, to compare migratory attributes and survival rates of hatchery fish released into the Hood River. Water temperatures were recorded at six locations within the Hood River subbasin to monitor for compliance with Oregon Department of Environmental Quality water quality standards. A preseason spring Chinook salmon adult run forecast was generated, which predicted an abundant return adequate to meet escapement goal and brood stock needs. As a result the tribal and sport fisheries were opened. A tribal creel was conducted from May 22 to July 18 during which an estimated 172 spring Chinook were harvested. One hundred sixteen Spring Chinook salmon redds were observed and 72 carcasses were inspected on 19.4 miles of spawning grounds throughout the Hood River Basin during 2008. Annual salvage operations were completed in two irrigation canals resulting in the liberation of 1,641 fish back to the Hood River.

  6. Employee wellness program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Well-designed wellness programs can keep healthy employees healthy, support employees with : health risks to improve their health behaviors, and facilitate organizational efforts to achieve : workforce performance goals. : Productivity lost through a...

  7. Guidance for training program evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    An increased concern about the training of nuclear reactor operators resulted from the incident at TMI-2 in 1979. Purpose of this guide is to provide a general framework for the systematic evaluation of training programs for DOE Category-A reactors. The primary goal of such evaluations is to promote continuing quality improvements in the selection, training and qualification programs

  8. Evaluation of a Voluntary Tutoring Program in Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics for First-Year Undergraduates at Universidad Andres Bello, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Verónica A.; Acuña, Fabiola C.; Quiero, Felipe J.; López, Margarita; Zahn, Carmen I.

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the preliminary results of a tutoring program that provides personalized academic assistance to first-year undergraduates enrolled in introductory chemistry, physics and mathematics courses at Universidad Andres Bello (UNAB), in Concepción, Chile. Intervened courses have historically large enrolments, diverse student population…

  9. Technical evaluation report on the Third 10-year Interval Inservice Inspection Program Plan: Florida Power and Light Company, Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant, Units 3 and 4 (Docket Numbers 50-250 and 50-251)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.W.; Feige, E.J.; Galbraith, S.G.; Porter, A.M.

    1995-02-01

    This report presents the results of the evaluation of the Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant, Units 3 and 4, Third 10-Year Interval Inservice Inspection Program Plan, Revision 0, submitted September 9, 1993, including the requests for relief from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI, requirements that the licensee has determined to be impractical. The Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant, Units 3 and 4, Third 10-Year Interval Inservice Inspection Program Plan is evaluated in Section 2 of this report. The inservice inspection (ISI) program plan is evaluated for (a) compliance with the appropriate edition/addenda of Section XI, (b) acceptability of the examination sample, (c) correctness of the application of system or component examination exclusion criteria, and (d) compliance with ISI-related commitments identified during previous Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews. The requests for relief are evaluated in Section 3 of this report

  10. Evaluation of a standardized patient education program for inpatient asthma rehabilitation: Impact on patient-reported health outcomes up to one year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäuerle, Kathrin; Feicke, Janine; Scherer, Wolfgang; Spörhase, Ulrike; Bitzer, Eva-Maria

    2017-05-01

    To modify and evaluate a patient education program for adult asthma patients in consideration of quality criteria for teaching. This was a prospective single-center controlled trial in an inpatient rehabilitation center. The control group (n=215) received the usual lecture-based education program, and the intervention group (n=209) the modified patient education program. Data were assessed at admission, discharge, 6 and 12 months post discharge. The primary outcome was asthma control, the secondary outcomes were asthma knowledge, quality of life, and program acceptance. Analysis of change was performed by ANCOVA for each follow-up, adjusting for baseline values. Statistically significant increases in all health outcomes and in asthma control were maintained in both groups at 12 months: CG: +1.9 (95%-CI 1.3-2.6) IG: +1.6 (95%-CI 0.8-2.3). We observed no significant differences between the programs for asthma control and quality of life. Regarding practical asthma knowledge, after 12 months, a group*time interaction emerged with a small effect size (P=0.06, η2=0.01). The modified program was not superior to traditional patient education concerning asthma control. It permanently increased self-management knowledge. Structured and behavioral patient education fosters patient's disease management ability. Possible ways of improving asthma control need to be explored. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Toward utilization of data for program management and evaluation: quality assessment of five years of health management information system data in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisingizwe, Marie Paul; Iyer, Hari S; Gashayija, Modeste; Hirschhorn, Lisa R; Amoroso, Cheryl; Wilson, Randy; Rubyutsa, Eric; Gaju, Eric; Basinga, Paulin; Muhire, Andrew; Binagwaho, Agnès; Hedt-Gauthier, Bethany

    2014-01-01

    Health data can be useful for effective service delivery, decision making, and evaluating existing programs in order to maintain high quality of healthcare. Studies have shown variability in data quality from national health management information systems (HMISs) in sub-Saharan Africa which threatens utility of these data as a tool to improve health systems. The purpose of this study is to assess the quality of Rwanda's HMIS data over a 5-year period. The World Health Organization (WHO) data quality report card framework was used to assess the quality of HMIS data captured from 2008 to 2012 and is a census of all 495 publicly funded health facilities in Rwanda. Factors assessed included completeness and internal consistency of 10 indicators selected based on WHO recommendations and priority areas for the Rwanda national health sector. Completeness was measured as percentage of non-missing reports. Consistency was measured as the absence of extreme outliers, internal consistency between related indicators, and consistency of indicators over time. These assessments were done at the district and national level. Nationally, the average monthly district reporting completeness rate was 98% across 10 key indicators from 2008 to 2012. Completeness of indicator data increased over time: 2008, 88%; 2009, 91%; 2010, 89%; 2011, 90%; and 2012, 95% (pservice output increased from 3% (2011) to 9% (2012). Eighty-three percent of districts reported ratios between related indicators (ANC/DTP1, DTP1/DTP3) consistent with HMIS national ratios. Conclusion and policy implications: Our findings suggest that HMIS data quality in Rwanda has been improving over time. We recommend maintaining these assessments to identify remaining gaps in data quality and that results are shared publicly to support increased use of HMIS data.

  12. FY08 VPP Program Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dossett, Sharon D.

    2008-01-01

    The Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) is a recognized third-party certification of worker safety and health program excellence, based on industry best practices that focus on management leadership and employee involvement, as well as other safety and health program elements. This Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) VPP Program Evaluation is the FY-2008 report of the PNNL VPP Steering Committee regarding the status of VPP at PNNL. It is an update of the previous annual report dated January, 2007 and was completed in January 2008. An annual evaluation of the status of VPP is required of all sites that participate in the DOE-VPP. This report provides a detailed summary of the PNNL VPP Steering Committee’s evaluation of program performance and documents both strengths and improvement opportunities related to the various aspects of the VPP model.

  13. Californium-252 Program Equipment Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattin, Fred Rhea [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Kenton [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ezold, Julie G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-12-01

    To successfully continue the 252Cf production and meet the needs of the customers, a comprehensive evaluation of the Building 7920 processing equipment was requested to identify equipment critical to the operational continuity of the program.

  14. USAF Weapon System Evaluation Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    During this task period, Schafer Corporation provided engineering services and analysis to the USAF at Eglin AFB, Florida in direct support of the USAF Air-to-Surface Weapon System Evaluation Program (WSEP...

  15. Developmental Kindergarten Program Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, George T.; Cushing, Katherine S.

    The evaluation of the Developmental Kindergarten (DK) Program at the Harrison School District #2, Colorado Springs, Colorado, involved pre- and post-testing of student academic gains and interviewing of principals and teachers. The program aimed to provide developmentally appropriate activities for students believed to be "at risk" of…

  16. Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This document comprises the Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan, and is a follow-up to the `Natural Gas Strategic Plan and Program Crosscut Plans,` dated July 1995. DOE`s natural gas programs are aimed at simultaneously meeting our national energy needs, reducing oil imports, protecting our environment, and improving our economy. The Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan represents a Department-wide effort on expanded development and use of natural gas and defines Federal government and US industry roles in partnering to accomplish defined strategic goals. The four overarching goals of the Natural Gas Program are to: (1) foster development of advanced natural gas technologies, (2) encourage adoption of advanced natural gas technologies in new and existing markets, (3) support removal of policy impediments to natural gas use in new and existing markets, and (4) foster technologies and policies to maximize environmental benefits of natural gas use.

  17. Motor carrier evaluation program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portsmouth, J.H.; Maxwell, J.E.; Boness, G.O.; Rice, L.E.

    1991-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Transportation Management Program (TMP) has established a program to assist the DOE field offices and their contractors in evaluating the motor carriers used to transport DOE-owned hazardous and radioactive materials. This program was initiated to provide the DOE field offices with the tools necessary to help ensure, during this period of motor carrier deregulation, that only highly qualified carriers transport radioactive and hazardous commodities for the DOE. This program will assist DOE in maintaining their excellent performance record in the safe transportation of hazardous commodities. The program was also developed in response to public concern surrounding the transportation of hazardous materials. Representatives of other federal agencies, states, and tribal governments, as well as the news media, have expressed concern about the selection and qualification of carriers engaged in the transportation of Highway Route-Controlled Quantities (HRCQ) and Truckload (TL) quantities of radioactive material for the DOE. 8 refs

  18. Evaluating Dermatology Residency Program Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashack, Kurt A; Burton, Kyle A; Soh, Jonathan M; Lanoue, Julien; Boyd, Anne H; Milford, Emily E; Dunnick, Cory; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-03-16

    Internet resources play an important role in how medical students access information related to residency programs.Evaluating program websites is necessary in order to provide accurate information for applicants and provide information regarding areas of website improvement for programs. To date, dermatology residency websites (D  WS) have not been evaluated.This paper evaluates dermatology residency websites based on availability of predefined measures. Using the FREIDA (Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database) Online database, authors searched forall accredited dermatology program websites. Eligible programs were identified through the FREIDA Online database and had a functioning website. Two authors independently extracted data with consensus or third researcher resolution of differences. This data was accessed and archived from July 15th to July 17th, 2015.Primary outcomes measured were presence of content on education, resident and faculty information, program environment, applicant recruitment, schedule, salary, and website quality evaluated using an online tool (WooRank.com). Out of 117 accredited dermatology residencies, 115 had functioning webpages. Of these, 76.5% (75) had direct links found on the FRIEDA Online database. Most programs contained information on education, faculty, program environment, and applicant recruitment. However, website quality and marketing effectiveness were highly variable; most programs were deemed to need improvements in the functioning of their webpages. Also, additional information on current residents and about potential away rotations were lacking from most websites with only 52.2% (60) and 41.7% (48) of programs providing this content, respectively. A majority of dermatology residency websites contained adequate information on many of the factors we evaluated. However, many were lacking in areas that matter to applicants. We hope this report will encourage dermatology residencyprograms

  19. A middle evaluation report on R and D subjects in 2000 fiscal year. Evaluation subject; 'draft of total program on ground disposal research on the high level radioactive wastes'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-11-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) consulted the titled middle evaluation to the Subject Evaluation Committee (SEC) according to the Schematic indication on practice procedure of evaluation common to the generalized national R and D' and so on. By receiving the consult, SEC on wastes treatment and disposal carried out evaluation of this subject on basis of documents proposed from JNC and discussions at SEC according to an evaluation procedure determined by SEC. The program is to contribute to actualization of safe disposal of the high level radioactive wastes at a technical side. In order to promote the program to practice of the disposal without delay and to transfer its next stage smoothly, it is essential for JNC to prepare an R and D plan after the second summary. From these, this program is precise and adequate in its aim and meaning, high in its importance and agreeable to policy of government and needs of society. Here was summarized by the evaluation results with documents proposed by JNC. As a result of the evaluation, it was shown that as general directionality of this program was judged to be valid, its contents has some places without matching or always clearness with schedule of government and executing groups on practice of disposal. And, it was also shown that some points required for notice on promotion of this program. (G.K.)

  20. Twenty-six years of post-release monitoring of Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris): evaluation of a cooperative rehabilitation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adimey, Nicole M.; Ross, Monica; Hall, Madison; Reid, James P.; Barlas, Margie E.; Keith Diagne, Lucy W; Bonde, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    The rescue, rehabilitation, and release of Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) into the wild has occurred since 1974; however, a comprehensive evaluation of the outcomes of the releases has never been conducted. Herein, we examined data for 136 Florida manatees that were rehabilitated and released with telemetry tags between 1988 and 2013 to determine release outcome of each individual as either success (acclimation) or failure after at least 1 y. Ten predictor variables were statistically evaluated for potential relationships to release outcome. To assess the contribution of each predictor variable to release outcome, each variable was tested for significance in univariate analyses. Manatees born in captivity experienced poor success after release (14%), whereas the overall success of wild-born individuals was higher (72%). When compared with other variables in our dataset, number of days in captivity was the strongest predictor for determining success. Manatees rescued as calves and held in captivity for more than 5 y had a high likelihood of failure, while subadults and adults had a high likelihood of success, regardless of the amount of time spent in captivity. Ensuring the success of individual manatees after release is critical for evaluating the contribution of the manatee rehabilitation program to the growth of the wild population.

  1. Research and development program, fiscal year 1974

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1972-04-01

    The biomedical program of the Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Biology for Fiscal Year 1974 is conducted within the scope of the following categories: Effects of Radiation of Living Organisms; Molecular and Cellular Radiobiology; Land and Fresh Water Environmental Sciences; Radiological and Health Physics and Instrumentation; and Nuclear Medical Research. (ACR)

  2. Child Development Program Evaluation Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiene, Richard J.

    The Child Development Program Evaluation Scale (CDPES) is actually two scales in one, a licensing scale and a quality scale. Licensing predictor items have been found to predict overall compliance of child day care centers with state regulations in four states. Quality scale items have been found to predict the overall quality of child day care…

  3. Handbook of evaluation of utility DSM programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirst, E.; Reed, J. [eds.; Bronfman, B.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Hicks, E.; Hirst, E.; Hoffman, M.; Keating, K.; Michaels, H.; Nadel, S.; Peters, J.; Reed, J.; Saxonis, W.; Schoen, A.; Violette, D.

    1991-12-01

    Program evaluation has become a central issue in the world of utility integrated resource planning. The DSM programs that utilities were operating to meet federal requirements or to improve customer relations are now becoming big business. DSM is being considered an important resource in a utility`s portfolio of options. In the last five years, the amount of money that utilities have invested in DSM has grown exponentially in most regulatory jurisdictions. Market analysts are now talking about DSM being a $30 billion industry by the end of the decade. If the large volume of DSM-program investments was not enough to highlight the importance of evaluation, then the introduction of regulatory incentives has really focused the spotlight. This handbook was developed through a process that involved many of those people who represent the diverse constituencies of DSM-program evaluation. We have come to recognize the many technical disciplines that must be employed to evaluate DSM programs. An analysis might start out based on the principles of utility load research to find out what happened, but a combination of engineering and statistical methods must be used to ``triangulate`` an estimate of what would have happened without the program. The difference, of course, is that elusive but prized result of evaluation: what happened as the direct result of the DSM program. Technical performance of DSM measures is not the sole determinant of the answer, either. We also recognize the importance of such behavioral attributes of DSM as persistence and free ridership. Finally, DSM evaluation is meaningless without attention to planning an approach, communicating results to relevant decision-makers, and focusing as much on the process as the impacts of the program. These topics are all covered in this handbook.

  4. One-Year Follow-Up Evaluation of the Sexually Transmitted Disease/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Intervention Program in a Marine Corps Sample

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Booth-Kewley, Stephanie

    2000-01-01

    ...)/HIV prevention programs designed specifically for U.S. military populations. The object of the present study was to determine whether a behavioral intervention known as the STD/HIV Intervention Program (SHIP...

  5. The Spiral-Interactive Program Evaluation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaleel, Ibrahim Adamu

    1988-01-01

    Describes the spiral interactive program evaluation model, which is designed to evaluate vocational-technical education programs in secondary schools in Nigeria. Program evaluation is defined; utility oriented and process oriented models for evaluation are described; and internal and external evaluative factors and variables that define each…

  6. Interim Evaluation of the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum of the Project P.A.T.H.S.: First Year of the Full Implementation Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the implementation quality of the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes in the full implementation phase, 100 schools were randomly selected to participate in personal and/or telephone interviews regarding the quality of the implementation process of the Tier 1 Program. In the interviews, the participants described the responses of the students to the program, the perceived benefits of the program, the perceived good aspects of the program, and the areas requiring improvement, difficulties encountered in the implementation process, and perceived attributes of the worker-support scheme (“Co-Walker Scheme”. Results showed that most workers perceived that the students had positive responses to the program and the program was beneficial to the students. They also identified several good aspects in the program, although negative comments on the program design and difficulties in the implementation process were also recorded. Roughly half of the respondents had positive comments on the “Co-Walker Scheme”. In sum, the respondents generally regarded the program as beneficial to the students and they were satisfied with the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum in the full implementation phase, although some implementation difficulties were also expressed.

  7. Modern moulage: evaluating the use of 3-dimensional prosthetic mimics in a dermatology teaching program for second-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Amit; Haley, Heather-Lyn; Hatem, David

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a teaching method that uses 3-dimensional (3D) silicone-based prosthetic mimics of common serious lesions and eruptions and to compare learning outcomes with those achieved through the conventional method of lectures with 2-dimensional (2D) images. Prospective and comparative. University of Massachusetts Medical School. Ninety second-year medical students. A 1-hour teaching intervention using a lecture with 2D images (2D group) or using 3D prosthetic mimics of lesions and eruptions (3D group). Mean scores in the domains of morphology, lesion and rash recognition, lesion and rash management, and overall performance assessed at baseline, immediately after, and 3 months after each group's respective teaching intervention. Immediately after the teaching intervention, the 3D group had significantly higher mean percentage scores than did the 2D group for overall performance (71 vs 65, P = .03), lesion recognition (65 vs 56, P = .02), and rash management (80 vs 67, P = .01). Three months later, the 3D group still had significantly higher mean percentage scores than did the 2D group for lesion recognition (47 vs 40, P = .03). The 3D group better recognized lesions at 3 months compared with at baseline, whereas the 2D group was no better at recognizing lesions at 3 months compared with at baseline. Despite limited curricular time, the novel teaching method using 3D prosthetic mimics of lesions and eruptions improves immediate and long-term learning outcomes, in particular, lesion recognition. It is also a preferred teaching format among second-year medical students.

  8. An Embedded Librarian Program: Eight Years On.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiburger, Gary; Martin, Jennifer R; Nuñez, Annabelle V

    2016-01-01

    This article examines an embedded librarian program eight years after implementation in a large academic health center. Librarians were physically moved into the colleges of pharmacy, public health, and nursing. Statistics are reported as well as comments from the participating librarians and faculty members. Strong relationships have been built between librarians, faculty members, and students. Locating the librarians among faculty and students led to a better understanding of client needs and an increased awareness of librarian competencies and services resulting in partnerships and greater utilization of library services.

  9. ENergy and Power Evaluation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    In the late 1970s, national and international attention began to focus on energy issues. Efforts were initiated to design and test analytical tools that could be used to assist energy planners in evaluating energy systems, particularly in developing countries. In 1984, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned Argonne National Laboratory`s Decision and Information Sciences Division (DIS) to incorporate a set of analytical tools into a personal computer-based package for distribution in developing countries. The package developed by DIS staff, the ENergy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP), covers the range of issues that energy planners must face: economic development, energy demand projections, supply-and-demand balancing, energy system expansion, and environmental impact analysis. Following the original DOE-supported development effort, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), with the assistance from the US Department of State (DOS) and the US Department of Energy (DOE), provided ENPEP training, distribution, and technical support to many countries. ENPEP is now in use in over 60 countries and is an international standard for energy planning tools. More than 500 energy experts have been trained in the use of the entire ENPEP package or some of its modules during the international training courses organized by the IAEA in collaboration with Argonne`s Decision and Information Sciences (DIS) Division and the Division of Educational Programs (DEP). This report contains the ENPEP program which can be download from the internet. Described in this report is the description of ENPEP Program, news, forums, online support and contacts.

  10. Key Royale bridge five year evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This report describes the design, construction, instrumentation, and five-year evaluation of the Key Royale Bridge substructure. The primary focus was the evaluation of the implementation of highly reactive supplementary cementitious materials (SCM) ...

  11. Heuristic Evaluation for Novice Programming Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kölling, Michael; McKay, Fraser

    2016-01-01

    The past few years has seen a proliferation of novice programming tools. The availability of a large number of systems has made it difficult for many users to choose among them. Even for education researchers, comparing the relative quality of these tools, or judging their respective suitability for a given context, is hard in many instances. For designers of such systems, assessing the respective quality of competing design decisions can be equally difficult.\\ud Heuristic evaluation provides...

  12. Strategies for Evaluating a Freshman Studies Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketkar, Kusum; Bennett, Shelby D.

    1989-01-01

    The study developed an economic model for the evaluation of Seaton Hall University's freshman studies program. Two techniques used to evaluate the economic success of the program are break-even analysis and elasticity coefficient. (Author/MLW)

  13. Ten years' experience of Directly Observed Treatment Short-course (DOTS) in Gambella Regional State, Ethiopia: An evaluation of tuberculosis control program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisay, Solomon; Mengistu, Belete; Erku, Woldargay; Woldeyohannes, Desalegne

    2016-12-01

    World Health Organization (WHO) declared tuberculosis (TB) as a global public health emergency and recommended DOTS as a standard strategy for controlling the disease. TB is one of the major causes of infectious diseases in the world, and 25% of all avoidable deaths in developing countries. About a third of the world's population is estimated to be infected with tubercle bacilli, and hence at risk of developing active disease. The objective of the study was, therefore, to evaluate the impact of DOTS strategy on smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis case finding and their treatment outcomes in Gambella Regional State, Ethiopia. A retrospective health facility-based descriptive study was employed. Quarterly data were collected by using WHO structured reporting format for TB case finding and treatment outcome from all DOTS implementing health facilities in the region. A total of 10,024 TB cases (all forms) were registered and reported between the periods from 2003 up to 2012. Out of these, 4100 (40.9%) were smear-positive pulmonary TB, 3164 (31.6%) were smear-negative pulmonary TB and 2760 (27.5%) had extra-pulmonary TB. An average case detection rate (CDR) 1 of 40.9% (SD=0.1) and treatment success rate (TSR) 2 of 55.7% (SD=0.28) for smear-positive pulmonary TB including other forms of TB were reported for the specified years period. Additionally, the average mean values of treatment defaulter and treatment failure rates were 4.2% and 0.3%, respectively. The recommended TSR set by WHO was achieved as it was already been fulfilled more than 85% from 2009 up to 2011 in the region and the reported CDR was far below (40.9%) for smear-positive pulmonary TB including other forms of TB from the target. Therefore, extensive efforts should be established to maintain the achieved TSR and to increase the low level of CDR for all forms of TB cases through implementing alternative case finding strategies. Copyright © 2016.

  14. Evaluation of otolaryngology residency program websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svider, Peter F; Gupta, Amar; Johnson, Andrew P; Zuliani, Giancarlo; Shkoukani, Mahdi A; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Folbe, Adam J

    2014-10-01

    Prior to applying or interviewing, most prospective applicants turn to the Internet when evaluating residency programs, making maintenance of a comprehensive website critical. While certain "intangibles" such as reputation may not be communicated effectively online, residency websites are invaluable for conveying other aspects of a program. Prior analyses have reported that certain criteria such as research experience and didactics are important considerations for applicants. To evaluate the comprehensiveness of otolaryngology residency websites. Review of otolaryngology residency program websites. Websites of 99 civilian residency programs were searched for the presence of 23 criteria. Presence of 23 criteria for application process, incentives, instruction, research, clinical training, and other. Only 5 programs contained at least three-quarters of the criteria analyzed; on average programs reported less than 50% of information sought. Among the 99 residency program websites, a description of the following criteria was noted: comprehensive faculty listing (88%), didactics (80%), contact e-mail (77%), current residents (74%), description of facilities (70%), intern schedule (70%), research requirements (69%), otolaryngology rotation schedule (64%), other courses (61%), ERAS (Electronic Residency Application Service) link (55%), year-to-year responsibility progression (47%), call schedule (40%), active/past research projects (37%), area information (34%), message from the program director (33%) or chair (23%), selection criteria (30%), salary (directly on site) (23%), surgical statistics (18%), parking (9%), and meal allowance (7%). The mean (SD) percentage present of factors encompassing "clinical training" was 55% (23%), significantly higher than the mean (SD) percentage of factors covered under the "incentives" category (19% [11%]; P = .01). The proportion of overall criteria present on websites did not differ on organizing programs by region (range, 42

  15. Design, implementation and evaluation of a community health training program in an integrated problem-based medical curriculum: a fifteen-year experience at the University of Geneva Faculty of Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Chastonay

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the literature the need for relevance in medical education and training has been stressed. In the last 40 years medical schools have been challenged to train doctors competent to respond to community health needs. In the mid-90s the University of Geneva Faculty of Medicine introduced an integrated medical curriculum. In this initiative a particular emphasis was put in introducing a 6-year longitudinal and multidisciplinary Community Health Program (CHP. Objectives: The aims of the present article are to describe the conception, elaboration and implementation of the CHP as well as its evolution over 15 years and the evaluation of its outcomes. Methods: The CHP was at its origin elaborated by a small group of highly motivated teachers and later on developed by a multi-disciplinary group of primary care physicians, epidemiologists, public health and bio-ethics specialists, occupational health professionals, lawyers and historians. Evaluation of the program outcomes included educational innovations, new developments of the curriculum and interactions between students and the community. Results: The CHP learning objectives and teaching modalities were defined by the multi-disciplinary group in consensus meetings which triggered a collaborative spirit among teachers and facilitated further developments. The evaluation procedures allowed the monitoring of students’ satisfaction which remained high over the years, students’ active participation which decreased over time and success at certifying exams which was globally as good as in basic life sciences. The evaluation also assessed outcomes such as educational innovations, new developments of the curriculum and interactions between students and the community. Conclusion: As suggested in the literature, our experience shows that the students’ direct exposure and practice in the community health environment is an effective training approach to broaden students’ education by

  16. Research and examinations at the Tono Mines. Fiscal year's programs (Heisei 12 fiscal year). Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    This program showed details on the research and examination program of the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute to be carried out at the Tono Mines in the Heisei 12 fiscal year, according to the 'Fundamental program on research and examinations at the Tono Mines' established on October, 1998. And, this program is carried out under an aim at understanding of transfer and delay performance of materials in deposit rocks with uranium and geological features such as fault, and at development of technology and apparatus for general investigation and evaluation of geological environment, as a stratum science research. Here were described on research and examination of mechanical stability on the rock board, research and examination of geological environment around a tunnel, research and examination of material transfer in the rock board, and research and examination of the Tsukiyoshi stratum abstractly before 1999 and in details at 2000 fiscal years. (G.K.)

  17. Evaluating OO example programs for CS1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Börstler, Jürgen; Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Bennedsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Example programs play an important role in learning to program. They work as templates, guidelines, and inspiration for learners when developing their own programs. It is therefore important to provide learners with high quality examples. In this paper, we discuss properties of example programs...... that might affect the teaching and learning of object-oriented programming. Furthermore, we present an evaluation instrument for example programs and report on initial experiences of its application to a selection of examples from popular introductory programming textbooks....

  18. Interim reliability evaluation program (IREP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, D.D.; Murphy, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The Interim Reliability Evaluation Program (IREP), sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is currently applying probabilistic risk analysis techniques to two PWR and two BWR type power plants. Emphasis was placed on the systems analysis portion of the risk assessment, as opposed to accident phenomenology or consequence analysis, since the identification of risk significant plant features was of primary interest. Traditional event tree/fault tree modeling was used for the analysis. However, the study involved a more thorough investigation of transient initiators and of support system faults than studies in the past and substantially improved techniques were used to quantify accident sequence frequencies. This study also attempted to quantify the potential for operator recovery actions in the course of each significant accident

  19. Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deal, D.E.; Case, J.B.; Deshler, R.M.; Drez, P.E.; Myers, J.; Tyburski, J.R.

    1987-12-01

    The Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) Phase II Report is an interim report which updates the data released in the BSEP Phase I Report. Direct measurements and observations of the brine that seeps into the WIPP repository excavations were continued through the period between August 1986 and July 1987. That data is included in Appendix A, which extends the observation period for some locations to approximately 900 days. Brine observations at 87 locations are presented in this report. Although WIPP underground workings are considered ''dry,'' small amounts of brine are present. Part of that brine migrates into the repository in response to pressure gradients at essentially isothermal conditions. The data presented in this report is a continuation of moisture content studies of the WIPP facility horizon that were initiated in 1982, as soon as underground drifts began to be excavated. Brine seepages are manifested by salt efflorescences, moist areas, and fluid accumulations in drillholes. 35 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs

  20. ECOLOGICAL MONITORING AND COMPLIANCE PROGRAM CALENDAR YEAR 2005 REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BECHTEL NEVADA ECOLOGICAL SERVICES

    2006-03-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during the Calendar Year 2005. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive and protected/regulated species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

  1. Groundwater Protection Program Calendar Year 1998 Evaluation of Groundwater Quality Data for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    1999-01-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the water quality monitoring data obtained by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) in the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1998. The East Fork Regime contains many confirmed and potential sources of groundwater and surface water contamination associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Applicable provisions of DOE Order 5400.1A - General Environmental Protection Program - require evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality near the Y-12 Plant to: (1) gauge groundwater quality in areas that are, or could be, affected by plant operations, (2) determine the quality of surface water and groundwater where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) property line, and (3) identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at the Y-12 Plant. The following sections of this report contain relevant background information (Section 2.0); describe the results of the respective data evaluations required under DOE Order 5400.1A (Section 3.0); summarize significant findings of each evaluation (Section 4.0); and list the technical reports and regulatory documents cited for more detailed information (Section 5.0). All of the illustrations (maps and trend graphs) and data summary tables referenced in each section are presented in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively

  2. Groundwater Protection Program Calendar Year 1998 Evaluation of Groundwater and Surface Water Quality Data for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    1999-01-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the water quality monitoring data obtained by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) in the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1998. The Bear Creek Regime contains many confirmed and potential sources of groundwater and surface water contamination associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Applicable provisions of DOE Order 5400.1A - General Environmental Protection Program - require evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality near the Y-12 Plant to: (1) gauge groundwater quality in areas that are, or could be, affected by plant operations, (2) determine the quality of surface water and groundwater where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) property line, and (3) identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality. The following sections of this report contain relevant background information (Section 2.0); describe the results of the respective data evaluations required under DOE Order 5400.1A (Section 3.0); summarize significant findings of each evaluation (Section 4.0); and list the technical reports and regulatory documents cited for more detailed information (Section 5.0). All of the figures (maps and trend graphs) and data tables referenced in each section are presented in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively

  3. Groundwater Protection Program Calendar Year 1998 Evaluation of Groundwater Quality Data for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1999-09-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the water quality monitoring data obtained by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) in the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1998. The East Fork Regime contains many confirmed and potential sources of groundwater and surface water contamination associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Applicable provisions of DOE Order 5400.1A - General Environmental Protection Program - require evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality near the Y-12 Plant to: (1) gauge groundwater quality in areas that are, or could be, affected by plant operations, (2) determine the quality of surface water and groundwater where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) property line, and (3) identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at the Y-12 Plant. The following sections of this report contain relevant background information (Section 2.0); describe the results of the respective data evaluations required under DOE Order 5400.1A (Section 3.0); summarize significant findings of each evaluation (Section 4.0); and list the technical reports and regulatory documents cited for more detailed information (Section 5.0). All of the illustrations (maps and trend graphs) and data summary tables referenced in each section are presented in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively.

  4. Groundwater Protection Program Calendar Year 1998 Evaluation of Groundwater and Surface Water Quality Data for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1999-09-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the water quality monitoring data obtained by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) in the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1998. The Bear Creek Regime contains many confirmed and potential sources of groundwater and surface water contamination associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Applicable provisions of DOE Order 5400.1A - General Environmental Protection Program - require evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality near the Y-12 Plant to: (1) gauge groundwater quality in areas that are, or could be, affected by plant operations, (2) determine the quality of surface water and groundwater where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) property line, and (3) identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality. The following sections of this report contain relevant background information (Section 2.0); describe the results of the respective data evaluations required under DOE Order 5400.1A (Section 3.0); summarize significant findings of each evaluation (Section 4.0); and list the technical reports and regulatory documents cited for more detailed information (Section 5.0). All of the figures (maps and trend graphs) and data tables referenced in each section are presented in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively.

  5. Addressing the Academic Gap Between 4- and 6-Year Pharmacy Programs in South Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Sujin; Song, Seungyeon; Lee, Sangmi; Kwon, Kwangil; Kim, Eunyoung

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To address the academic gap (or lack of adequate training and programs) between 4- and 6-year pharmacy programs and suggest methods for reducing this gap and to evaluate pharmacists’ perceptions of preceptorship.

  6. Future Years Defense Program (FYDP) Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    computer miniframe . Intelligence Telecommunications Page E-330 of 1748DoD 7045.7-H, March, 2004 03 Command, Control, Comm, Intel, & SpaceProgram...communications programs, i.e., STARCOM, NAVCOM, and AIRCOM. Costs of equipment - computer miniframes , peripheral devices, communications processors...the general service communications programs, i.e., STARCOM, NAVCOM, and AIRCOM. Costs of equipment - computer miniframes , peripheral devices

  7. Avaliação de dois anos de um programa educacional para pacientes ambulatoriais adultos com asma Two-year evaluation of an educational program for adult outpatients with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciene Angelini

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o conhecimento da doença e a melhora clínica de portadores de asma persistente moderada e grave antes e após a sua participação em um programa de educação realizado durante as visitas ambulatoriais de rotina. MÉTODOS: Trata-se de um estudo piloto, prospectivo que envolveu 164 pacientes durante um período de dois anos. O programa de educação, oferecido para pequenos grupos nos dias de consulta, consistiu de aulas expositivas divididas em três módulos: fisiopatologia, controle ambiental e tratamento, incluindo o treinamento da técnica inalatória. Para a avaliação do programa, foram utilizados questionários padronizados sobre a melhora clínica e conhecimento da doença. RESULTADOS: Em um ano, 120 pacientes completaram três visitas, e 51 pacientes foram reavaliados em dois anos. A média de idade dos pacientes foi de 44 anos, 70% eram do sexo feminino, e 43% tinham até oito anos de educação formal. A intervenção educacional aumentou o conhecimento da doença de forma significativa (p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the understanding of asthma and the clinical improvement in patients with moderate or severe persistent asthma prior to and after their participation in an educational program presented during the routine outpatient visits. METHODS: This was a prospective pilot study involving 164 patients over a two-year period. The educational program, presented to small groups on outpatient visit days, consisted of lectures divided into three parts: pathophysiology; environmental control; and treatment, including training in the inhalation technique. The program was evaluated using standardized questionnaires on clinical improvement and understanding of the disease. RESULTS: By the end of the first year, 120 patients had completed three visits, and 51 of those patients were revaluated at the end of the second year. The mean age of the patients was 44 years, 70% were female, and 43% had up to eight years of schooling

  8. Right timing in formative program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jori; Freeman, Melissa; Roulston, Kathy

    2014-08-01

    Since many educational researchers and program developers have limited knowledge of formative evaluation, formative data may be underutilized during the development and implementation of an educational program. The purpose of this article is to explain how participatory, responsive, educative, and qualitative approaches to formative evaluation can facilitate a partnership between evaluators and educational researchers and program managers to generate data useful to inform program implementation and improvement. This partnership is critical, we argue, because it enables an awareness of when to take appropriate action to ensure successful educational programs or "kairos". To illustrate, we use examples from our own evaluation work to highlight how formative evaluation may facilitate opportune moments to (1) define the substance and purpose of a program, (2) develop understanding and awareness of the cultural interpretations of program participants, and (3) show the relevance of stakeholder experiences to program goals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Calendar Year 2000 Groundwater Monitoring Data Evaluation Report for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    2001-01-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 2000 in the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime). The East Fork Regime encompasses many confirmed and potential sources of groundwater and surface water contamination associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared under the auspices of the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), this report addresses applicable provisions of DOE Order 5400.1 (General Environmental Protection Program) that require: (1) an evaluation of the quantity and quality of groundwater and surface water in areas that are, or could be, affected by Y-12 operations, (2) an evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality in areas where contaminants from Y-12 operations are most likely to migrate beyond the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) property line, and (3) an evaluation of long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12. The following sections of this report contain relevant background information (Section 2.0); describe the results of the respective data evaluations required under DOE Order 5400.1 (Section 3.0); summarize significant findings of each evaluation (Section 4.0); and list the technical reports and regulatory documents cited for more detailed information (Section 5.0). Illustrations (maps and trend graphs) are presented in Appendix A. Brief data summary tables referenced in each section are contained within the text; supplemental information and extensive data tables are provided in Appendix B

  10. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Calendar Year 2000 Groundwater Monitoring Data Evaluation Report for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2001-09-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 2000 in the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime). The Bear Creek Regime encompasses many confirmed and potential sources of groundwater and surface water contamination associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure A.1). Prepared by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), this report addresses applicable provisions of DOE Order 5400.1 (General Environmental Protection Program) that require: (1) an evaluation of the quantity and quality of groundwater and surface water in areas that are, or could be, affected by Y-12 operations, (2) an evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality in areas where contaminants from Y-12 operations are most likely to migrate beyond the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) property line, and (3) an evaluation of long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12. The following sections of this report contain relevant background information (Section 2.0); describe the results of the respective data evaluations required under DOE Order 5400.1 (Section 3.0); summarize significant findings of each evaluation (Section 4.0); and list the technical reports and regulatory documents cited for more detailed information (Section 5.0). Illustrations (maps and trend graphs) are presented in Appendix A. Brief data summary tables referenced in each section are contained within the sections. Supplemental information and extensive data tables are provided in Appendix B.

  11. Embedding Evidence-based Practice Education into a Post-graduate Physiotherapy Program: Eight Years of pre-Post Course Evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perraton, L; Machotka, Z; Grimmer, K; Gibbs, C; Mahar, C; Kennedy, K

    2017-04-01

    Little has been published about the effectiveness of training postgraduate physiotherapy coursework students in research methods and evidence-based practice (EBP) theory. Graduate qualities in most universities include lifelong learning. Inclusion of EBP in post-graduate coursework students' training is one way for students to develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement current best evidence in their clinical practice after graduation, thereby facilitating lifelong learning. This paper reports on change in confidence and anxiety in knowledge of statistical terminology and concepts related to research design and EBP in eight consecutive years of post-graduate physiotherapy students at one Australian university. Pre-survey/post-survey instruments were administered to students in an intensive 3-week post-graduate course, which taught health research methods, biostatistics and EBP. This course was embedded into a post-graduate physiotherapy programme from 2007 to 2014. The organization and delivery of the course was based on best pedagogical evidence for effectively teaching adult physiotherapists. The course was first delivered each year in the programme, and no other course was delivered concurrently. There were significant improvements in confidence, significantly decreased anxiety and improvements in knowledge of statistical terminology and concepts related to research design and EBP, at course completion. Age, gender and country of origin were not confounders on learning outcomes, although there was a (non-significant) trend that years of practice negatively impacted on learning outcomes (p = 0.09). There was a greater improvement in confidence in statistical terminology than in concepts related to research design and EBP. An intensive teaching programme in health research methods and biostatistics and EBP, based on best practice adult physiotherapy learning principles, is effective immediately post-course, in decreasing anxiety and increasing

  12. Evaluation of demand-side management programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolbe, A.L.; O'Loughlin, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    Over the past few years, the attention accorded to demand-side management (DSM) measures has called into question the traditional cost minimization approach for evaluating such programs. Two broad approaches to DSM seem to be generally used: one examining the problem from multiple perspectives and the other including various practical methods used in-house by utility planners. Whatever the standard used to evaluate DSM, there remains at least one problem which cannot be quantified. The customers who participate in a DSM program cannot only take into account the effects of DSM on their electricity bills; their comfort can also be affected. This lowering of comfort constitutes a legitimate cost which can explain why some apparently sensible DSM measures are not adopted. A method is proposed to incorporate this cost. It establishes a way to evaluate DSM program tradeoffs that, from the perspective of standard economic theory, maximizes social welfare; explains why at least one of the perspectives in the multiple perspective approach needs to be modified to incorporate all customer costs; and outlines how the proposed standard can be implemented. 8 refs

  13. Energy-efficient buildings program evaluations. Volume 2: Evaluation summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A.D.; Mayi, D.; Edgemon, S.D.

    1997-04-01

    This document presents summaries of code and utility building program evaluations reviewed as the basis for the information presented in Energy-Efficient Buildings Program Evaluations, Volume 1: Findings and Recommendations, DOE/EE/OBT-11569, Vol. 1. The main purpose of this volume is to summarize information from prior evaluations of similar programs that may be useful background for designing and conducting an evaluation of the BSGP. Another purpose is to summarize an extensive set of relevant evaluations and provide a resource for program designers, mangers, and evaluators.

  14. School Health: Findings from Evaluated Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.

    This publication presents findings from evaluations of many school health programs from across the United States. Each program includes at least one of the following eight components of a comprehensive school health program: health education, clinical services, counseling and mental health services, school environment, school food programs,…

  15. Evaluation of Summer Bridge Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Lisa D.; Paz, Chiara C.

    2009-01-01

    Many colleges and universities in the United States offer summer programs for their incoming students. While programs are structured and administered in a variety of ways and target various student populations, the most common type of summer bridge program aims to serve historically underrepresented students and students of low socioeconomic…

  16. Educators Exchange: A Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, William B.

    The Educators Exchange Program (EEP) was established under a training and educational exchange agreement reached by California's San Diego Community College District (SDCCD) and the republic of Mexico. In the program, the District provided a 4-week technological training program to faculty at Centros de Capacitacion Tecnologica Industrial…

  17. The Evaluation of an Employee Assistance Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gam, John; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Presents the results of an evaluative study of an employee assistance program sponsored by the Russell Corporation, an apparel manufacturing firm. Results suggested that the program is beneficial in terms of both productivity enhancement and humanitarianism. (Author)

  18. Evaluation of one-year results of the full-face respirator quantitative man-test fitting program at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, B.J.; Cross, J.; Ellis, K.P.; Richards, C.P.; Rodriques, R.

    1976-01-01

    In August 1975, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory began to quantitatively fit all employees who are or may be required to wear any type of full-face respirator. After one year, 306 employees have been fitted. A total of 1362 tests were made, using seven makes of full-face respirators. Of the 306 employees fitted, 284 were tested using more than one make of full-face mask. All employees fitted could get a maximum use limit (MUL) of at least 100, 8 percent has a MUL of 100 to 499 on at least one of the makes of masks tested, 11 percent had an MUL of 500 to 999, 13 percent had an MUL of 1000 to 1999, 24 percent had an MUL of 2000 to 4999, and 44 percent had an MUL greater than 5000. These numbers were derived using the average of the peak leakages occurring during each of six exercises performed while wearing each mask. If the overall average leakage occurring during the six exercises rather than the peak average is used in the calculations, 90 percent of the employees could obtain an MUL over 1000 on at least one make of mask

  19. Evaluating adolescent pregnancy programs: rethinking our priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahler, G J; DuCette, J P

    1991-01-01

    Noting that impact evaluations of adolescent pregnancy programs are characterized by poor quality, the authors recommend using a different standard in assessing the value of programs. While the number of adolescent pregnancy programs has multiplied during the last 3 decades, little is known about their impact in ameliorating the negative consequences of too-early childbearing. An ideal evaluation of these programs would randomly select and randomly assign subjects to experimental and control groups. But evaluations conducted by individual program generally face obstacles that limit the randomness of the study. most individual programs lack the financial resources and do not employ the full-time professional evaluators needed to carry out a valid evaluation. These factors result in too short an evaluation period, incomplete and inaccurate data, and lack of randomness in the assignment of control groups. To more accurately assess the impact of the programs, the authors recommend that individual programs focus on process evaluation and collection of complete and reliable data on their clients. From the onset, a program should have a clear description of its content, logic of intervention, and method of implementation. It should maintain thorough records on client characteristics, service utilization, and should conduct long-term follow-ups. For rigorous impact evaluations, programs should rely on 3rd party entities. These independent organizations -- universities or research institutes -- do not have a stake in the outcome of the evaluation, making the study all the more objective. Furthermore, they provide experienced researchers.

  20. Evaluation of Mexico's Universal Vaccination Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    This article summarizes findings from an evaluation of Mexico's Universal Vaccination Program during 1990-97, the progress achieved, the lessons learned, and objectives under decentralization. The evaluation assessed the cold chain and logistics systems, and the feasibility of vaccine production within Gerencia General de Biologicos y Reactivos. In 1996, 97% of children aged 1-4 years completed the full immunization schedule. Over the past 7 years, the incidence of preventable diseases declined. There were no poliomyelitis cases in the prior 7 years, no diphtheria cases in the prior 6 years, and a gradual decline in morbidity due to measles in the prior 5 years. Several government sectors are giving high priority to vaccination activities. Sufficient resources have been allocated for immunization. The government is planning on adding new vaccines that would benefit the adult population and/or prevent congenital defects. There is close coordination within institutions of the National Health System and with other public health organizations, such as PAHO and UNICEF. It is recommended that the central government perform high quality epidemiological surveillance and improve rapid analysis capacity, especially at the local and regional levels. Improvement is needed in the reporting capacity at the local level, to feed recent data to the central level in a timely fashion, and to use analysis to improve operations. Epidemiological training is needed at the operations level, as is private sector involvement at all levels. Underreporting of morbidity occurs. Regionalization must be monitored to ensure maximizing of resources.

  1. Solar energy program evaluation: an introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    deLeon, P.

    1979-09-01

    The Program Evaluation Methodology provides an overview of the practice and methodology of program evaluation and defines more precisely the evaluation techniques and methodologies that would be most appropriate to government organizations which are actively involved in the research, development, and commercialization of solar energy systems. Formal evaluation cannot be treated as a single methodological approach for assessing a program. There are four basic types of evaluation designs - the pre-experimental design; the quasi-experimental design based on time series; the quasi-experimental design based on comparison groups; and the true experimental design. This report is organized to first introduce the role and issues of evaluation. This is to provide a set of issues to organize the subsequent sections detailing the national solar energy programs. Then, these two themes are integrated by examining the evaluation strategies and methodologies tailored to fit the particular needs of the various individual solar energy programs. (MCW)

  2. Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program, 1991 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deal, D.E.; Abitz, R.J.; Myers, J.; Martin, M.L.; Milligan, D.J.; Sobocinski, R.W.; Lipponer, P.P.J. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Belski, D.S. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

    1993-09-01

    The data presented in this report are the result of Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) during 1991. These BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the WIPP. When excavations began at the WIPP in 1982, small brine seepages (weeps) were observed on the walls. Brine studies began as part of the Site Validation Program and were formalized as a program in its own right in 1985. During nine years of observations (1982--1991), evidence has mounted that the amount of brine seeping into the WIPP excavations is limited, local, and only a small fraction of that required to produce hydrogen gas by corroding the metal in the waste drums and waste inventory. The data through 1990 is discussed in detail and summarized by Deal and others (1991). The data presented in this report describes progress made during the calendar year 1991 and focuses on four major areas: (1) quantification of the amount of brine seeping across vertical surfaces in the WIPP excavations (brine ``weeps); (2) monitoring of brine inflow, e.g., measuring brines recovered from holes drilled downward from the underground drifts (downholes), upward from the underground drifts (upholes), and from subhorizontal holes; (3) further characterization of brine geochemistry; and (4) preliminary quantification of the amount of brine that might be released by squeezing the underconsolidated clays present in the Salado Formation.

  3. A comparative evaluation of sequence classification programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazinet Adam L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A fundamental problem in modern genomics is to taxonomically or functionally classify DNA sequence fragments derived from environmental sampling (i.e., metagenomics. Several different methods have been proposed for doing this effectively and efficiently, and many have been implemented in software. In addition to varying their basic algorithmic approach to classification, some methods screen sequence reads for ’barcoding genes’ like 16S rRNA, or various types of protein-coding genes. Due to the sheer number and complexity of methods, it can be difficult for a researcher to choose one that is well-suited for a particular analysis. Results We divided the very large number of programs that have been released in recent years for solving the sequence classification problem into three main categories based on the general algorithm they use to compare a query sequence against a database of sequences. We also evaluated the performance of the leading programs in each category on data sets whose taxonomic and functional composition is known. Conclusions We found significant variability in classification accuracy, precision, and resource consumption of sequence classification programs when used to analyze various metagenomics data sets. However, we observe some general trends and patterns that will be useful to researchers who use sequence classification programs.

  4. Materials Sciences programs, fiscal year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    Purpose of this report is to provide a convenient compilation and index of the DOE Materials Sciences Division programs. The report is divided into six sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the Small Business Innovation Research Program, Sections D and E have information on DOE collaborative research centers, Section F gives distribution of funding, and Section G has various indexes

  5. Materials Sciences programs, Fiscal Year 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    This report provides a convenient compilation and index of the DOE Materials Sciences Division programs. The report is divided into six sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the Small Business Innovation Research program, Section D has information on DOE collaborative research centers, Section E gives distributions of funding, and Section F has various indexes

  6. AAAS Communicating Science Program: Reflections on Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braha, J.

    2015-12-01

    The AAAS Center for Public Engagement (Center) with science builds capacity for scientists to engage public audiences by fostering collaboration among natural or physical scientists, communication researchers, and public engagement practitioners. The recently launched Leshner Leadership Institute empowers cohorts of mid-career scientists to lead public engagement by supporting their networks of scientists, researchers, and practitioners. The Center works closely with social scientists whose research addresses science communication and public engagement with science to ensure that the Communicating Science training program builds on empirical evidence to inform best practices. Researchers ( Besley, Dudo, & Storkdieck 2015) have helped Center staff and an external evaluator develop pan instrument that measures progress towards goals that are suggested by the researcher, including internal efficacy (increasing scientists' communication skills and confidence in their ability to engage with the public) and external efficacy (scientists' confidence in engagement methods). Evaluation results from one year of the Communicating Science program suggest that the model of training yields positive results that support scientists in the area that should lead to greater engagement. This talk will explore the model for training, which provides a context for strategic communication, as well as the practical factors, such as time, access to public engagement practitioners, and technical skill, that seems to contribute to increased willingness to engage with public audiences. The evaluation program results suggest willingness by training participants to engage directly or to take preliminary steps towards engagement. In the evaluation results, 38% of trained scientists reported time as a barrier to engagement; 35% reported concern that engagement would distract from their work as a barrier. AAAS works to improve practitioner-researcher-scientist networks to overcome such barriers.

  7. Senior Program Officer, Evaluation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... provides technical assistance to program staff and partners on evaluation ... monitoring and evaluation approaches; working with colleagues to maintain the ... provides technical supervision and assistance, including analysis of interim ...

  8. Program and budget for the coming year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1961-09-15

    The program of work for 1962, submitted by the IAEA Board of Governors to the fifth session of the Agency's General Conference, envisages some expansion of scientific activities, while maintaining a major emphasis on the provision of technical assistance in the form of training facilities, services of experts and supply of equipment. The Board has pointed out that the Agency's initial activities to help start or develop nuclear energy programs in various Member States are beginning to bear fruit and as a consequence new needs are emerging.

  9. Program and budget for the coming year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1961-01-01

    The program of work for 1962, submitted by the IAEA Board of Governors to the fifth session of the Agency's General Conference, envisages some expansion of scientific activities, while maintaining a major emphasis on the provision of technical assistance in the form of training facilities, services of experts and supply of equipment. The Board has pointed out that the Agency's initial activities to help start or develop nuclear energy programs in various Member States are beginning to bear fruit and as a consequence new needs are emerging

  10. Materials Sciences Programs. Fiscal Year 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a convenient compilation and index of the DOE Materials Sciences Division programs. This compilation is primarily intended for use by administrators, managers, and scientists to help coordinate research. The report is divided into six sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the Small Business Innovation Research Program, Sections D and E have information on DOE collaborative research centers, Section F gives distribution of funding, and Section G has various indexes

  11. Materials Sciences programs. Fiscal year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a convenient compilation and index of the DOE Materials Sciences Division programs. This compilation is intended for use by administrators, managers, and scientists to help coordinate research and as an aid in selecting new programs. The report is divided into five sections. Section A contains all laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has information on DOE collaborative research centers, Section D shows distribution of funding, and Section E has various indices

  12. Materials sciences programs: Fiscal year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a convenient compilation and index of the DOE Materials Science Division programs. This compilation is primarily intended for use by administrators, managers, and scientists to help coordinate research. The report is divided into eight sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the Small Business Innovation Research Program, Section D describes the Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials and E has information on major user facilities. F describes other user facilities, G as a summary of funding levels and H has indices characterizing research projects.

  13. Materials sciences programs fiscal year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a convenient compilation and index of the DOE Materials Sciences Division programs. This compilation is primarily intended for use by administrators, managers, and scientists to help coordinate research. The report is divided into eight sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the Small Business Innovation Research Program, Section D describes the Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials and E has information on major user facilities. F describes other user facilities, G as a summary of funding levels and H has indices characterizing research projects.

  14. Language Program Evaluation: Decisions, Problems, and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James Dean

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the evaluation of second and foreign language programs, focusing on whether such evaluations should be summative or formative; use outside experts or program staff; emphasize qualitative or quantitative data; and concentrate on the process or the product. An annotated bibliography discusses six important works in the field. (78…

  15. Methods for evaluation of industry training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morisseau, D.S.; Roe, M.L.; Persensky, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    The NRC Policy Statement on Training and Qualification endorses the INPO-managed Training Accreditation Program in that it encompasses the elements of effective performance-based training. Those elements are: analysis of the job, performance-based learning objectives, training design and implementation, trainee evaluation, and program evaluation. As part of the NRC independent evaluation of utilities implementation of training improvement programs, the staff developed training review criteria and procedures that address all five elements of effective performance-based training. The staff uses these criteria to perform reviews of utility training programs that have already received accreditation. Although no performance-based training program can be said to be complete unless all five elements are in place, the last two, trainee and program evaluation, are perhaps the most important because they determine how well the first three elements have been implemented and ensure the dynamic nature of training. This paper discusses the evaluation elements of the NRC training review criteria. The discussion will detail the elements of evaluation methods and techniques that the staff expects to find as integral parts of performance-based training programs at accredited utilities. Further, the review of the effectiveness of implementation of the evaluation methods is discussed. The paper also addresses some of the qualitative differences between what is minimally acceptable and what is most desirable with respect to trainee and program evaluation mechanisms and their implementation

  16. Materials Sciences programs, Fiscal Year 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    The Materials Sciences Division constitutes one portion of a wide range of research supported by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences. This report contains a listing of research underway in FY 1983 together with a convenient index to the program

  17. Materials Sciences programs, Fiscal year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-02-01

    This report provides a compilation and index of the DOE Materials Sciences Division programs; the compilation is to assist administrators, managers, and scientists to help coordinate research. The report is divided into 7 sections: laboratory projects, contract research projects, small business innovation research, major user facilities, other user facilities, funding level distributions, and indexes.

  18. Materials sciences programs, Fiscal year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The Division of Materials Sciences is responsible for basic research and research facilities in materials science topics important to the mission of the Department of Energy. The programmatic divisions under the Office of Basic Energy Sciences are Chemical Sciences, Engineering and Geosciences, and Energy Biosciences. Materials Science is an enabling technology. The performance parameters, economics, environmental acceptability and safety of all energy generation, conversion, transmission and conservation technologies are limited by the properties and behavior of materials. The Materials Sciences programs develop scientific understanding of the synergistic relationship among synthesis, processing, structure, properties, behavior, performance and other characteristics of materials. Emphasis is placed on the development of the capability to discover technologically, economically, and environmentally desirable new materials and processes, and the instruments and national user facilities necessary for achieving such progress. Materials Sciences subfields include: physical metallurgy, ceramics, polymers, solid state and condensed matter physics, materials chemistry, surface science and related disciplines where the emphasis is on the science of materials. This report includes program descriptions for 517 research programs including 255 at 14 DOE National Laboratories, 262 research grants (233 of which are at universities), and 29 Small Business Innovation Research Grants. Five cross-cutting indices located at the rear of this book identify all 517 programs according to principal investigator(s), materials, techniques, phenomena, and environment.

  19. Preliminary evaluation of the BIODOSE computer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, N.A.; Ng, Y.C.

    1979-09-01

    The BIODOSE computer program simulates the environmental transport of radionuclides released to surface water and predicts the dosage to humans. We have evaluated the program for its suitability to the needs of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Waste Management Program. In particular, it is an evaluation to determine whether BIODOSE models account for the significant pathways and mechanisms resulting in radiological doses to man. In general, BIODOSE is a satisfactory code for converting radionuclide releases to the aqueous environment into doses to man

  20. Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan Research and Development 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2008-01-01

    Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan 2008 for research and development, including residential and commercial integration, lighting, HVAC and water heating, envelope, windows, and analysis tools.

  1. Aspect-oriented programming evaluated

    CERN Document Server

    Kleinschmager, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Hauptbeschreibung Aspect-oriented-programming is a relatively new technique that has evolved on top of the already well-established approach of object-oriented programming. When it is used correctly, it promises to remove many redundant parts of a code that appear repeatedly in an application, essentially untangling the original code. Thus, it can lead to a cleaner, more separated software design, to greater modularity and maintainability. Time-savings in software engineering can also be huge cost-savings, and anything that increases software quality is a welcome sight in an industr

  2. Research and development program, fiscal year 1970

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1968-04-01

    The biomedical program of the Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Biology for FY 1970 is conducted within the scope of the following categories: Somatic Effects of Radiation; Combating Detrimental Effects of Radiation; Molecular and Cellular Level Studies; Environmental Radiation Studies; Radiological and Health Physics and Instrumentation; Cancer Research; and Selected Beneficial Applications. The overall objectives of the Laboratory within these areas of the Biology and Medicine Program may be summarized as follows: (1) investigation of the effects of ionizing radiation on systems of biological significance and on living organisms; (2) assessment and study of the immediate and long term consequences of the environmental radioactivity on flora, fauna, and man; (3) development of beneficial uses of ionizing radiation and radioactive substances in medicine and biology; and (4) the conduct of training and educational activities in fields related to the biological and medical aspects of radiation.

  3. Materials sciences programs: Fiscal year 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The Division of Materials Sciences is located within the DOE in the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The Division of Materials Sciences is responsible for basic research and research facilities in strategic materials science topics of critical importance to the mission of the Department and its Strategic Plan. Materials Science is an enabling technology. The performance parameters, economics, environmental acceptability and safety of all energy generation, conversion, transmission and conservation technologies are limited by the properties and behavior of materials. The Materials Sciences programs develop scientific understanding of the synergistic relationship amongst the synthesis, processing, structure, properties, behavior, performance and other characteristics of materials. Emphasis is placed on the development of the capability to discover technologically, economically, and environmentally desirable new materials and processes, and the instruments and national user facilities necessary for achieving such progress. Materials Sciences sub-fields include physical metallurgy, ceramics, polymers, solid state and condensed matter physics, materials chemistry, surface science and related disciplines where the emphasis is on the science of materials. This report includes program descriptions for 458 research programs including 216 at 14 DOE National Laboratories, 242 research grants (233 for universities), and 9 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grants. The report is divided into eight sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the SBIR Program, Section D describes the Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials and E has information on major user facilities. F contains descriptions of other user facilities; G, a summary of funding levels; and H, indices characterizing research projects.

  4. Materials sciences programs, fiscal year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The Division of Materials Sciences is located within the DOE in the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The Division of Materials Sciences is responsible for basic research and research facilities in strategic materials science topics of critical importance to the mission of the Department and its Strategic Plan. Materials Science is an enabling technology. The performance parameters, economics, environmental acceptability and safety of all energy generation, conversion, transmission and conservation technologies are limited by the properties and behavior of materials. The Materials Sciences programs develop scientific understanding of the synergistic relationship amongst the synthesis, processing, structure, properties, behavior, performance and other characteristics of materials. Emphasis is placed on the development of the capability to discover technologically, economically, and environmentally desirable new materials and processes, and the instruments and national user facilities necessary for achieving such progress. Materials Sciences sub-fields include physical metallurgy, ceramics, polymers, solid state and condensed matter physics, materials chemistry, surface science and related disciplines where the emphasis is on the science of materials. This report includes program descriptions for 458 research programs including 216 at 14 DOE National Laboratories, 242 research grants (233 for universities), and 9 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grants. The report is divided into eight sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the SBIR Program, Section D describes the Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials and E has information on major user facilities. F contains descriptions of other user facilities; G, a summary of funding levels; and H, indices characterizing research projects

  5. Materials Sciences programs, Fiscal Year 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The Materials Sciences Division supports basic research on materials properties and phenomena important to all energy systems. This report contains a listing of research underway in FY 1992 together with an index to the Division's programs. Recent publications from Division-sponsored panel meetings and workshops are listed. The body of the report is arranged under the following section headings: laboratories, grant and contract research, small business innovation research, major user facilities, other user facilities, funding levels, and index

  6. Materials sciences programs, fiscal year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The Division of Materials Sciences is located within the DOE in the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The Division of Materials Sciences is responsible for basic research and research facilities in strategic materials science topics of critical importance to the mission of the Department and its Strategic Plan. Materials Science is an enabling technology. The performance parameters, economics, environmental acceptability and safety of all energy generation, conversion, transmission and conservation technologies are limited by the properties and behavior of materials. The Materials Sciences programs develop scientific understanding of the synergistic relationship amongst the synthesis, processing, structure, properties, behavior, performance and other characteristics of materials. Emphasis is placed on the development of the capability to discover technologically, economically, and environmentally desirable new materials and processes, and the instruments and national user facilities necessary for achieving such progress. Materials Sciences sub-fields include physical metallurgy, ceramics, polymers, solid state and condensed matter physics, materials chemistry, surface science and related disciplines where the emphasis is on the science of materials. This report includes program descriptions for 458 research programs including 216 at 14 DOE National Laboratories, 242 research grants (233 for universities), and 9 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grants. The report is divided into eight sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the SBIR Program, Section D describes the Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials and E has information on major user facilities. F contains descriptions of other user facilities; G, a summary of funding levels; and H, indices characterizing research projects.

  7. Environmental Biosciences Program Report for Year Three

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2006-07-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  8. Environmental Biosciences Program Report for Year 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2005-10-15

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  9. Methodologies for evaluation of AECB regulatory program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarranton, G.A.; Gray, B.J.; Yarranton, M.

    1986-05-01

    AECB (Atomic Energy Control Board) commissioned this report to obtain information about methods of planning and conducting evaluation of its regulatory program. The report begins with a bibliography consisting of 280 abstracts assembled from an extensive search of international literature. Each cited publication describes or uses methods applicable to the evaluation of regulatory programs. The report continues with a review of the methodologies found in the literature. It identifies the most relevant references for each step in program evaluation: the commissioning of evaluation; the identification of evaluation issues; the defining of questions; the answering of questions; the reporting of reslts, and the implementation of recommendations. Finally, the report examines the applicability, advantages and disadvantages of the different evaluation methods and makes recommendations about the selection of methods and their application to the AECB program

  10. Practical strategies for nursing education program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewallen, Lynne Porter

    2015-01-01

    Self-evaluation is required for institutions of higher learning and the nursing programs within them. The literature provides information on evaluation models and instruments, and descriptions of how specific nursing education programs are evaluated. However, there are few discussions in the nursing education literature of the practical aspects of nursing education program evaluation: how to get started, how to keep track of data, who to involve in data collection, and how to manage challenging criteria. This article discusses the importance of program evaluation in the academic setting and provides information on practical ways to organize the evaluation process and aggregate data, and strategies for gathering data from students, graduates, alumni, and employers of graduates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluating Workplace English Language Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekkens, Kristin; Winke, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Companies across the United States provide workplace English classes to non-native-English-speaking employees to increase productivity, retention, and on-the-job safety. Institutions that financially support the programs often require evidence of learning through standardized tests as a prerequisite for continued funding. However, the tests…

  12. Environmental restoration and waste management: Robotics technology development program: Robotics 5-year program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This plan covers robotics Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing and Evaluation activities in the Program for the next five years. These activities range from bench-scale R ampersand D to full-scale hot demonstrations at DOE sites. This plan outlines applications of existing technology to near-term needs, the development and application of enhanced technology for longer-term needs, and initiation of advanced technology development to meet those needs beyond the five-year plan. The objective of the Robotic Technology Development Program (RTDP) is to develop and apply robotics technologies that will enable Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER ampersand WM) operations at DOE sites to be safer, faster and cheaper. Five priority DOE sites were visited in March 1990 to identify needs for robotics technology in ER ampersand WM operations. This 5-Year Program Plan for the RTDP detailed annual plans for robotics technology development based on identified needs. In July 1990 a forum was held announcing the robotics program. Over 60 organizations (industrial, university, and federal laboratory) made presentations on their robotics capabilities. To stimulate early interactions with the ER ampersand WM activities at DOE sites, as well as with the robotics community, the RTDP sponsored four technology demonstrations related to ER ampersand WM needs. These demonstrations integrated commercial technology with robotics technology developed by DOE in support of areas such as nuclear reactor maintenance and the civilian reactor waste program. 2 figs

  13. Strategies for Evaluating Complex Environmental Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, V.

    2011-12-01

    Evidence for the effectiveness of environmental education programs has been difficult to establish for many reasons. Chief among them are the lack of clear program objectives and an inability to conceptualize how environmental education programs work. Both can lead to evaluations that make claims that are difficult to substantiate, such as significant changes in student achievement levels or behavioral changes based on acquisition of knowledge. Many of these challenges can be addressed by establishing the program theory and developing a logic model. However, claims of impact on larger societal outcomes are difficult to attribute solely to program activities. Contribution analysis may offer a promising method for addressing this challenge. Rather than attempt to definitively and causally link a program's activities to desired results, contribution analysis seeks to provide plausible evidence that can reduce uncertainty regarding the 'difference' a program is making to observed outcomes. It sets out to verify the theory of change behind a program and, at the same time, takes into consideration other influencing factors. Contribution analysis is useful in situations where the program is not experimental-there is little or no scope for varying how the program is implemented-and the program has been funded on the basis of a theory of change. In this paper, the author reviews the feasibility of using contribution analysis as a way of evaluating the impact of the GLOBE program, an environmental science and education program. Initially conceptualized by Al Gore in 1995, the program's implementation model is based on worldwide environmental monitoring by students and scientists around the globe. This paper will make a significant and timely contribution to the field of evaluation, and specifically environmental education evaluation by examining the usefulness of this analysis for developing evidence to assess the impact of environmental education programs.

  14. Evaluation of film dosemeters by linear programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kragh, P.; Nitschke, J.

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation method for multi-component dosemeters is described which uses linear programming in order to decrease the dependence on energy and direction. The results of this method are more accurate than those obtained with the evaluation methods so far applied in film dosimetry. In addition, systematic errors can be given when evaluating individual measurements. Combined linear programming, as a special case of the presented method, is described taking a film dosemeter of particular type as an example. (orig.) [de

  15. Evaluation of educational programs: an affiliate survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerker, B

    1996-08-01

    The Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA) conducted a survey in 1996 to investigate the use of educational program evaluation among its affiliates. Of the 153 surveys mailed out, 55 (36%) were returned. Evaluations of school-based educational programs were conducted consistently by 19% of respondents and occasionally by 72%; non-school-based programs were evaluated consistently by 31% of associations and occasionally by 64%. In both types of presentations, evaluations were likely to consist of pre- and post-testing, post-tests alone, or informal discussions with participants. The outcome variables most often measured were participant satisfaction with the presentation, knowledge gained, and behavioral change. 75% of educational directors recognized the value of evaluations for purposes such as program planning, providing a baseline, and procuring funding; 80% were interested in doing more evaluations. However, directors identified numerous obstacles to evaluation: insufficient time, lack of expertise or models, problems conducting meaningful impact evaluations, limited funds for this purpose, and fear that results would be disappointing. Despite its low response rate, this survey identified a need for PPFA's Education Department to promote program evaluation among its affiliates, provide staff training, and develop meaningful program impact measures.

  16. Environmental Biosciences Program Report for Year 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2007-04-30

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this

  17. The advanced test reactor strategic evaluation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, B.J.

    1989-01-01

    Since the Chernobly accident, the safety of test reactors and irradiation facilities has been critically evaluated from the public's point of view. A systematic evaluation of all safety, environmental, and operational issues must be made in an integrated manner to prioritize actions to maximize benefits while minimizing costs. Such a proactive program has been initiated at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This program, called the Strategic Evaluation Program (STEP), is being conducted for the ATR to provide integrated safety and operational reviews of the reactor against the standards applied to licensed commercial power reactors. This has taken into consideration the lessons learned by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) and the follow-on effort known as the Integrated Safety Assessment Program (ISAP). The SEP was initiated by the NRC to review the designs of older operating nuclear power plants to confirm and document their safety. The ATR STEP objectives are discussed

  18. Photovoltaic Energy Program Overview, Fiscal Year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis-Taylor, P.

    2001-03-02

    This ''annual report'' details the FY 2000 achievements of the U.S. Department of Energy PV Program in the categories of Research and Development, Technology Development, and Systems Engineering and Applications. Highlights include development of a record-breaking concentrator solar cell that is 32.4% efficient; fabrication of a record CIGS (copper indium gallium diselenide) cell at 18.8% efficiency; sharing an R and D 100 award with Siemens Solar Industries and the California Energy Commission for development and deployment of commercial CIS thin-film modules; and support for the efforts of the PV Industry Roadmap Workshop.

  19. Putting program evaluation into practice: enhancing the Girls Just Wanna Have Fun program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Corliss N; Kendellen, Kelsey; Halsall, Tanya; Forneris, Tanya

    2015-04-01

    In recent years there has been a call for increased community physical activity and sport programs for female youth that are deliberately structured to foster positive developmental outcomes. In addition, researchers have recognized the need to empirically evaluate such programs to ensure that youth are provided with optimal opportunities to thrive. This study represents a utilization-focused evaluation of Girls Just Wanna Have Fun, a female-only physical activity-based life skills community program. A utilization-focused evaluation is particularly important when the evaluation is to help stakeholders utilize the findings in practice. The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to gain an understanding of the ongoing successes and challenges after year two of program implementation and (b) to examine how the adaptations made based on feedback from the first year evaluation were perceived as impacting the program. From interviews with youth participants and program leaders, three main themes with eight sub-themes emerged. The main themes were: (a) applying lessons learned can make a significant difference, (b) continually implementing successful strategies, and (c) ongoing challenges. Overall, this evaluation represents an important step in understanding how to improve program delivery to better meet the needs of the participants in community-based programming. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. FY-2007 PNNL Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Program Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Patrick A.; Fisher, Julie A.; Goheen, Steven C.; Isern, Nancy G.; Madson, Vernon J.; Meicenheimer, Russell L.; Pugh, Ray; Schneirla, Keri A.; Shockey, Loretta L.; Tinker, Mike R.

    2008-08-15

    This document reports the results of the FY-2007 PNNL VPP Program Evaluation, which is a self-assessment of the operational and programmatic performance of the Laboratory related to worker safety and health. The report was compiled by a team of worker representatives and safety professionals who evaluated the Laboratory's worker safety and health programs on the basis of DOE-VPP criteria. The principle elements of DOE's VPP program are: Management Leadership, Employee Involvement, Worksite Analysis, Hazard Prevention and Control, and Safety and Health Training.

  1. FY-2007 PNNL Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Program Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, Patrick A.; Fisher, Julie A.; Goheen, Steven C.; Isern, Nancy G.; Madson, Vernon J.; Meicenheimer, Russell L.; Pugh, Ray; Schneirla, Keri A.; Shockey, Loretta L.; Tinker, Mike R.

    2008-01-01

    This document reports the results of the FY-2007 PNNL VPP Program Evaluation, which is a self-assessment of the operational and programmatic performance of the Laboratory related to worker safety and health. The report was compiled by a team of worker representatives and safety professionals who evaluated the Laboratory's worker safety and health programs on the basis of DOE-VPP criteria. The principle elements of DOE's VPP program are: Management Leadership, Employee Involvement, Worksite Analysis, Hazard Prevention and Control, and Safety and Health Training.

  2. PNNL FY2005 DOE Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Program Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Patrick A.; Madson, Vernon J.; Isern, Nancy G.; Haney, Janice M.; Fisher, Julie A.; Goheen, Steven C.; Gulley, Susan E.; Reck, John J.; Collins, Drue A.; Tinker, Mike R.; Walker, Landon A.; Wynn, Clifford L.

    2005-01-31

    This document reports the results of the FY 2005 PNNL VPP Program Evaluation, which is a self-assessment of the operational and programmatic performance of the Laboratory related to worker safety and health. The report was compiled by a team of worker representatives and safety professionals who evaluated the Laboratory's worker safety and health programs on the basis of DOE-VPP criteria. The principle elements of DOE's VPP program are: Management Leadership, Employee Involvement, Worksite Analysis, Hazard Prevention and Control, and Safety and Health Training.

  3. Research and development program, fiscal year 1966

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1964-04-01

    The biomedical program of the Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Biology for FY 1966 is conducted within the scope of the following categories: Somatic Effects of Radiation; Combating Detrimental Effects of Radiation; Molecular and Cellular Level Studies; Environmental Radiation Studies; Radiological and Health Physics and Instrumentation; Chemical Toxicity; Cancer Research; and Selected Beneficial Applications. The overall objectives of the Laboratory within these areas of the Biology and Medicine program may be summarized as follows: (1) investigation of the effects of ionizing radiation on living organisms and systems of biological significance; (2) investigation of the dynamic aspects of physiological and biochemical processes in man, animals and plants and how these processes are modified by radiation and related pathological states; (3) the assessment and study of the immediate and long term consequences of the operation or detonation of nuclear devices on the fauna, and flora in man's environment and on man; (4) the development of methods of minimizing or preventing the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation; (5) research in, and development of, beneficial uses of ionizing radiation and radioactive substances in medicine and biology; (6) research in the development of new and more efficient radiation detection devices; (7) research, including field studies, as mutually agreed upon by the Commission and the University, in connection with the conduct of weapon tests and biomedical and civil effects experiments at such tests conducted at continental and overseas test sites; and (8) the conduct of training and educational activities in the biological and medical aspects of radiation and related fields.

  4. Groundwater Protection Program Calendar Year 1998 Evaluation of Groundwater Quality Data for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant (Figure 1). Groundwater monitoring is performed at several hazardous and nonhazardous waste management facilities located in the regime per the requirements of applicable operating/post closure permits and governing state/federal regulations and guidelines, including DOE Order 5400.1A - General Environmental Protection Program. Applicable provisions of DOE Order 5400.1A require evaluation of available monitoring data with regard to: (1) groundwater quality in areas that are, or could be, affected by Y-12 Plant operations, (2) the quality of surface water and groundwater where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) property line, and (3) long-term trends in groundwater quality at the Y-12 Plant. This report presents the results of these DOE Order 5400.1A evaluations based on available data for the network of monitoring wells and springs in the Chestnut Ridge Regime sampled during calendar year (CY) 1998. The following sections of this report contain relevant background information (Section 2.0); describe the results of the respective data evaluations required under DOE Order 5400.1A (Section 3.0); summarize significant findings of each evaluation (Section 4.0); and list the technical reports and regulatory documents cited for more detailed information (Section 5.0). All of the illustrations (maps and trend graphs) and data summary tables referenced in each section are presented in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively

  5. Groundwater Protection Program Calendar Year 1998 Evaluation of Groundwater Quality Data for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none

    1999-09-01

    The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant (Figure 1). Groundwater monitoring is performed at several hazardous and nonhazardous waste management facilities located in the regime per the requirements of applicable operating/post closure permits and governing state/federal regulations and guidelines, including DOE Order 5400.1A - General Environmental Protection Program. Applicable provisions of DOE Order 5400.1A require evaluation of available monitoring data with regard to: (1) groundwater quality in areas that are, or could be, affected by Y-12 Plant operations, (2) the quality of surface water and groundwater where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) property line, and (3) long-term trends in groundwater quality at the Y-12 Plant. This report presents the results of these DOE Order 5400.1A evaluations based on available data for the network of monitoring wells and springs in the Chestnut Ridge Regime sampled during calendar year (CY) 1998. The following sections of this report contain relevant background information (Section 2.0); describe the results of the respective data evaluations required under DOE Order 5400.1A (Section 3.0); summarize significant findings of each evaluation (Section 4.0); and list the technical reports and regulatory documents cited for more detailed information (Section 5.0). All of the illustrations (maps and trend graphs) and data summary tables referenced in each section are presented in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively.

  6. Innovative strategies for nursing education program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Lachel; Butts, Janie B; Bishop, Sandra B; Green, Lisa; Johnson, Kathy; Mattison, Haley

    2010-06-01

    Nursing programs are mandated by accreditation bodies to report data significant to program quality and outcomes. The history at one school of nursing in the southern United States revealed the program evaluation committee experienced roadblocks in retrieving such information. Creative approaches were adopted to overcome some of the barriers to program evaluation, including the use of more technological-based approaches to engage alumni who embrace this technology as a way of life. Among the many advantages of these approaches were convenience, ease of administration and analysis, cost effectiveness, and more meaningful data. The advantages far outweighed the few disadvantages incurred, with the most prominent being potential sampling bias. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Program plan recognition for year 2000 tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Deursen (Arie); S. Woods; A. Quilici

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThere are many commercial tools that address various aspects of the Year 2000 problem. None of these tools, however, make any documented use of plan-based techniques for automated concept recovery. This implies a general perception that plan-based techniques is not useful for this

  8. NASA Year 2000 (Y2K) Program Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    NASA initiated the Year 2000 (Y2K) program in August 1996 to address the challenges imposed on Agency software, hardware, and firmware systems by the new millennium. The Agency program is centrally managed by the NASA Chief Information Officer, with decentralized execution of program requirements at each of the nine NASA Centers, Headquarters and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The purpose of this Program Plan is to establish Program objectives and performance goals; identify Program requirements; describe the management structure; and detail Program resources, schedules, and controls. Project plans are established for each NASA Center, Headquarters, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  9. A Practical Approach to Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Linda J.; Sampson, John F.

    1990-01-01

    The Research and Evaluation Support Services Unit of the New South Wales (Australia) Department of Education conducts program evaluations to provide information to senior management for decision making. The 10-step system used is described, which provides for planning, evaluation, and staff development. (TJH)

  10. Quasi-Experimental Evaluation of a Student Mentoring Program

    OpenAIRE

    Sandner, Malte

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents evidence from a natural-experiment which evaluates the effectiveness of a student mentoring program. The mentoring includes several compulsory, scheduled, faceto- face appointments between a mentor and a student in the first study year. All mentors are graduated and employed by the institution. For the evaluation, I use the fact that the mentoring is only offered to students in an economics and management program, whereas it is not offered to students in an industrial engi...

  11. Seriously Implementing Health Capacity Strengthening Programs in Africa; Comment on “Implementation of a Health Management Mentoring Program: Year-1 Evaluation of Its Impact on Health System Strengthening in Zambézia Province, Mozambique”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Velez Lapão

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Faced with the challenges of healthcare reform, skills and new capabilities are needed to support the reform and it is of crucial importance in Africa where shortages affects the health system resilience. Edwards et al provides a good example of the challenge of implementing a mentoring program in one province in a sub-Saharan country. From this example, various aspects of strengthening the capacity of managers in healthcare are examined based on our experience in action-training in Africa, as mentoring shares many characteristics with action-training. What practical lessons can be drawn to promote the strengthening so that managers can better intervene in complex contexts? Deeper involvement of health authorities and more rigorous approaches are seriously desirable for the proper development of health capacity strengthening programs in Africa.

  12. Clinical Investigation Program Fiscal Year 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    Cervical Dysphagia : Criteria for Patient Selection. Gary P. Wratten Surg Symposium, El Paso, TX, Apr 1987 Kreder KJ: A Massive Testicular Tumor in a...Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Ann Meeting, Chicago, IL, Sep 1987 Parkinson DW, Reinker KA: Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis and Renal...Osteodystrophy: A Case Report with Five Years Follow-Up, 28th Ann Society of Military Orthopaedic Surgeons, Colorado Springs, CO, Nov 1986 Parkinson

  13. Solid Waste Program Fiscal Year 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan WBS 1.2.1, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document contains the Fiscal Year 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan for the Solid Waste Program at the Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington. The Solid Waste Program treats, stores, and disposes of a wide variety of solid wastes consisting of radioactive, nonradioactive and hazardous material types. Solid waste types are typically classified as transuranic waste, low-level radioactive waste, low-level mixed waste, and non-radioactive hazardous waste. This report describes the mission, goals and program strategies for the Solid Waste Program for fiscal year 1996 and beyond.

  14. Solid Waste Program Fiscal Year 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan WBS 1.2.1, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document contains the Fiscal Year 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan for the Solid Waste Program at the Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington. The Solid Waste Program treats, stores, and disposes of a wide variety of solid wastes consisting of radioactive, nonradioactive and hazardous material types. Solid waste types are typically classified as transuranic waste, low-level radioactive waste, low-level mixed waste, and non-radioactive hazardous waste. This report describes the mission, goals and program strategies for the Solid Waste Program for fiscal year 1996 and beyond

  15. Measuring Externalities in Program Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Wendy

    2005-01-01

    Impact evaluations of development programmes usually focus on a comparison of participants with a control group. However, if the programme generates externalities for non-participants such an approach will capture only part of the programme's impact. Based on a unique large-scale quantitative survey

  16. GLOBE Mission Earth: The evaluation of the first year's implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaktylou, N. E.; Hedley, M. L.; Darche, S.; Harris-Stefanakis, E.; Silberglitt, M. D.; Struble, J.; Bingham, P.; Czajkowski, K.

    2017-12-01

    Here we present the evaluation findings for the first year of implementation of the `Mission Earth' Program.`Mission Earth' proposes the systematic embedding of GLOBE (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment) resources and NASA assets into the curricula of schools along the K-12 continuum, leveraging existing partnerships and networks. The main goal of the program is to create developmentally appropriate, vertically-integrated K-12 materials and activities,, supported by high quality professional development and ongoing support, engaging teachers from all grades. Its team consists of 5 geographically distributed universities and research institutions that have developed a curriculum progression following research-based best practices, have conducted the year's trainings for selected cohorts of teachers. The evaluation is a continuous process over the program's five year duration to examine implementation and opportunities for improvement. A broad set of data collection tools include a diagnostic component (needs assessment for teachers, capacity assessment for the school environment) and an assessment of implementation component (surveys for teachers and trainers, pre- and post tests for students, classroom observations, teacher interviews, portfolios). The tools used are validated instruments or ones modified to serve the program needs. The patterns emerging from the data provided information on: i) the quality of the intervention as to its design and content, ii) the alignment with the needs of the participants, iii) the implementation phase, iii) changes in the content knowledge of the students and their attitudes toward science, iv) changes in the facility of teachers to teach science in their classrooms after the professional development and materials provided, v) challenges and facilitators of implementation. Based on findings the program evaluation identifies additions/adjustments to be adopted in the following year.

  17. Motivation for Evaluation: A roadmap for Improving Program Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, J. J.; Bohon, W.; Bravo, T. K.; Dorr, P. M.; Hubenthal, M.; Johnson, J. A.; Sumy, D. F.; Welti, R.; Davis, H. B.

    2016-12-01

    Over the past year, the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program has undertaken a new effort to increase the rigor with which it evaluates its programs and products. More specifically we sought to make evaluation an integral part of our EPO staff's work, enable staff to demonstrate why we do the activities we do, enhance the impact or our products and programs, and empower staff to be able to make evidence-based claims. The challenges we faced included a modest budget, finding an applicable approach to both new and legacy programs ranging from formal and informal education to public outreach, and implementing the process without overwhelming staff. The Collaborative Impact Analysis Method (IAM; Davis and Scalice, 2015) was selected as it allowed us to combine the EPO staff's knowledge of programs, audiences and content with the expertise of an outside evaluation expert, through consultations and a qualitative rubric assessing the initial state of each product/program's evaluation. Staff then developed action plans to make incremental improvements to the evaluation of programs over time. We have found that this approach promotes the development of staff knowledge and skills regarding evaluation, provides a common language among staff, increases enthusiasm to collect and share data, encourages discussions of evaluative approaches when planning new activities, and improves each program's ability to capture the intended and unintended effects on the behaviors, attitudes, skills, interests, and/or knowledge of users/participants. We will share the initial IAM Scores for products and programs in the EPO portfolio, along with examples of the action plans for several key products and programs, and the impact that implementing those actions plans has had on our evaluations. Davis, H. & Scalice, D. (2015). Evaluate the Impact of your Education and Outreach Program Using the Quantitative Collaborative Impact Analysis

  18. Lessons learned from IRIS EPO program evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, J.; Hubenthal, M.

    2012-12-01

    Evaluating the overall impact of EPO programs that include activities ranging from formal education through broad public outreach, is a complex issue. The impact of education activities targeted at narrowly defined audiences is generally easier to quantify than the national impact of outreach activities conducted by a relatively small program. For educational activities, our approach has been to leverage the best-practices identified through research and to continuously assess the individual elements internally with the intention of making improvements based on the data generated and the existing research. By constructing our elements on the best practices identified by the research community we feel that internal formative evaluation is a valid means to determine if an activity is effective, particularly when the results are compared to similar programs. For example, effective practices of professional development are well documented in the literature. As a result, this allows us to shape our programs and our evaluations to monitor elements that have been identified as key by the educational research community. Further, such actions allow us to avoid allocating significant resources with the intention of pinning down direct causal relationships between our programs and consumers, when similar interventions (conducted by others) have already shown such relationships. Ongoing review by an EPO advisory committee also provides regular oversight of program impact. While we find internal and external formative evaluation extremely useful in shaping the program and documenting its impact, we also recognize the value of a summative evaluation process. For example, an external summative evaluation of the IRIS EPO program was conducted in 2009, followed by an external panel review, as part of the regular review of IRIS programs. We found that the most valuable part of the external evaluation was our preparation, including clarifying the goals of each of the elements of the

  19. 1994 Ergonomics Program Quality Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longbotham, L.; Miller, D.P.

    1995-06-01

    A telephone survey was conducted to evaluate the quality of service provided to the primary customers of the Corporate Ergonomics Group (CEG). One hundred clients who received services between October 1993 and June 1994 were asked questions on their expectations, implementation of ergonomic recommendations, follow-ups, time required, productivity improvements, symptom alleviation, and satisfaction. Suggestions on how processes could be improved were also solicited. In general, recommendations are being implemented, worksite evaluations are going smoothly, and customers are satisfied with the process. The CEG was pleased to learn that half of the people who implemented recommendations experienced improvements in productivity, and four out of five symptomatic customers experienced partial or complete relief. Through analysis of the data and by studying clients` suggestions for process improvement, the CEG has developed a strategy for changing and improving current procedures and practices. These plans can be found in the last section of this report.

  20. Defence Health Service Mentoring Program Evaluation 2001

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Highfield, Jane

    2002-01-01

    ...). DHS commissioned the Directorate of Strategic Personnel Planning and Research (DSPPR) to evaluate a recent Mentoring Program trial in order to assess the effectiveness and organizational value of Mentoring within DHS...

  1. 1957-2007: 50 Years of Higher Order Programming Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alen Lovrenčić

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Fifty years ago one of the greatest breakthroughs in computer programming and in the history of computers happened -- the appearance of FORTRAN, the first higher-order programming language. From that time until now hundreds of programming languages were invented, different programming paradigms were defined, all with the main goal to make computer programming easier and closer to as many people as possible. Many battles were fought among scientists as well as among developers around concepts of programming, programming languages and paradigms. It can be said that programming paradigms and programming languages were very often a trigger for many changes and improvements in computer science as well as in computer industry. Definitely, computer programming is one of the cornerstones of computer science.Today there are many tools that give a help in the process of programming, but there is still a programming tasks that can be solved only manually. Therefore, programming is still one of the most creative parts of interaction with computers.Programmers should chose programming language in accordance to task they have to solve, but very often, they chose it in accordance to their personal preferences, their beliefs and many other subjective reasons.Nevertheless, the market of programming languages can be merciless to languages as history was merciless to some people, even whole nations. Programming languages and developers get born, live and die leaving more or less tracks and successors, and not always the best survives. The history of programming languages is closely connected to the history of computers and computer science itself. Every single thing from one of them has its reflexions onto the other. This paper gives a short overview of last fifty years of computer programming and computer programming languages, but also gives many ideas that influenced other aspects of computer science. Particularly, programming paradigms are described, their

  2. Evaluating and Selecting Sport Management Undergraduate Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuneen, Jacquelyn; Sidwell, M. Joy

    1998-01-01

    States that the accelerated growth of sport management undergraduate programs that began in the 1980s has continued into the current decade. There are currently 180 sport management major programs in American colleges and universities. Describes the sports management approval process and suggests useful strategies to evaluate sport management…

  3. Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program, 1990 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deal, D.E.; Abitz, R.J.; Myers, J.; Case, J.B.; Martin, M.L.; Roggenthen, W.M.; Belski, D.S.

    1991-08-01

    The data presented in this report are the result of Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during 1990. When excavations began in 1982, small brine seepages (weeps) were observed on the walls. These brine occurrences were initially described as part of the Site Validation Program. Brine studies were formalized in 1985. The BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the WIPP. The brine chemistry is important because it assists in understanding the origin of the brine and because it may affect possible chemical reactions in the buried waste after sealing the repository. The volume of brine and the hydrologic system that drives the brine seepage also need to be understood to assess the long-term performance of the repository. After more than eight years of observations (1982--1990), no credible evidence exists to indicate that enough naturally occurring brine will seep into the WIPP excavations to be of practical concern. The detailed observations and analyses summarized herein and in previous BSEP reports confirm the evidence apparent during casual visits to the underground workings -- that the excavations are remarkably dry

  4. Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program, 1990 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deal, D.E.; Abitz, R.J.; Myers, J.; Case, J.B.; Martin, M.L.; Roggenthen, W.M. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Belski, D.S. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

    1991-08-01

    The data presented in this report are the result of Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during 1990. When excavations began in 1982, small brine seepages (weeps) were observed on the walls. These brine occurrences were initially described as part of the Site Validation Program. Brine studies were formalized in 1985. The BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the WIPP. The brine chemistry is important because it assists in understanding the origin of the brine and because it may affect possible chemical reactions in the buried waste after sealing the repository. The volume of brine and the hydrologic system that drives the brine seepage also need to be understood to assess the long-term performance of the repository. After more than eight years of observations (1982--1990), no credible evidence exists to indicate that enough naturally occurring brine will seep into the WIPP excavations to be of practical concern. The detailed observations and analyses summarized herein and in previous BSEP reports confirm the evidence apparent during casual visits to the underground workings -- that the excavations are remarkably dry.

  5. AEC sets five year nuclear safety research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    The research by the government for the establishment of means of judging the adequacy of safety measures incorporated in nuclear facilities, including setting safety standards and collecting documents of general criteria, and the research by the industry on safety measures and the promotion of safety-related technique are stated in the five year program for 1976-80 reported by subcommittees, Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). Four considerations on the research items incorporated in the program are 1) technical programs relating to the safety of nuclear facilities and the necessary criteria, 2) priority of the relevant items decided according to their impact on circumstances, urgency, the defence-indepth concept and so on, 3) consideration of all relevant data and documents collected, and research subjects necessary to quantify safety measurement, and 4) consideration of technological actualization, the capability of each research body, the budget and the time schedule. In addition, seven major themes decided on the basis of these points are 1) reactivity-initiated accident, 2) LOCA, 3) fuel behavior, 4) structural safety, 5) radioactive release, 6) statistical method of safety evaluation, and 7) seismic characteristics. The committee has deliberated the appropriate division of researches between the government and the industry. A set of tables showing the nuclear safety research plan for 1976-80 are attached. (Iwakiri, K.)

  6. Industrial Assessment Center Program Impact Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.A.

    2000-01-26

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) Program. The purpose of this program is to conduct energy, waste, and productivity assessments for small to medium-sized industrial firms. Assessments are conducted by 30 university-based industrial assessment centers. The purpose of this project was to evaluate energy and cost savings attributable to the assessments, the trained alumni, and the Websites sponsored by this program. How IAC assessments, alumni, and Web-based information may influence industrial energy efficiency decision making was also studied. It is concluded that appreciable energy and cost savings may be attributed to the IAC Program and that the IAC Program has resulted in more active and improved energy-efficiency decision making by industrial firms.

  7. Organizational Structures that Support Internal Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambur, Michael T.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter explores how the structure of large complex organizations such as Cooperative Extension affects their ability to support internal evaluation of their programs and activities. Following a literature review of organizational structure and its relation to internal evaluation capacity, the chapter presents the results of interviews with…

  8. Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) evaluation. Volume 1: Process evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandahl, L.J.; Ledbetter, M.R.; Chin, R.I.; Lewis, K.S.; Norling, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted this study for the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) Evaluation. This report documents the SERP formation and implementation process, and identifies preliminary program administration and implementation issues. The findings are based primarily on interviews with those familiar with the program, such as utilities, appliance manufacturers, and SERP administrators. These interviews occurred primarily between March and April 1995, when SERP was in the early stages of program implementation. A forthcoming report will estimate the preliminary impacts of SERP within the industry and marketplace. Both studies were funded by DOE at the request of SERP Inc., which sought a third-party evaluation of its program.

  9. Multi-Year Program Plan 2011-2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-12-01

    The Vehicle Technologies Multi-Year Program Plan, FY 2011 – 2015, outlines the scientific research and technologies developments for the five-year timeframe (beyond the FY 2010 base year) that need to be undertaken to help meet the Administration's goals for reductions in oil consumption and carbon emissions from the ground transport vehicle sector of the economy.

  10. Implications of Continuous Quality Improvement for Program Evaluation and Evaluators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Melvin M.; Pines, Edward

    1995-01-01

    Explores the implications that continuous quality improvement (CQI) programs are likely to have for evaluation. CQI, often known as total quality management, offers a structured approach to the analysis of an organization's processes and improvement that should provide advantages to evaluators once they have gained experience with the approach.…

  11. The program success story: a valuable tool for program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavinghouze, Rene; Price, Ann Webb; Smith, Kisha-Ann

    2007-10-01

    Success stories are evaluation tools that have been used by professionals across disciplines for quite some time. They are also proving to be useful in promoting health programs and their accomplishments. The increasing popularity of success stories is due to the innovative and effective way that they increase a program's visibility, while engaging potential participants, partners, and funders in public health efforts. From the community level to the federal level, program administrators are using success stories as vehicles for celebrating achievements, sharing challenges, and communicating lessons learned. Success stories are an effective means to move beyond the numbers and connect to readers-with a cause they can relate to and want to join. This article defines success stories and provides an overview of several types of story formats, how success stories can be systematically collected, and how they are used to communicate program success.

  12. Evaluating a physician leadership development program - a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throgmorton, Cheryl; Mitchell, Trey; Morley, Tom; Snyder, Marijo

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - With the extent of change in healthcare today, organizations need strong physician leaders. To compensate for the lack of physician leadership education, many organizations are sending physicians to external leadership programs or developing in-house leadership programs targeted specifically to physicians. The purpose of this paper is to outline the evaluation strategy and outcomes of the inaugural year of a Physician Leadership Academy (PLA) developed and implemented at a Michigan-based regional healthcare system. Design/methodology/approach - The authors applied the theoretical framework of Kirkpatrick's four levels of evaluation and used surveys, observations, activity tracking, and interviews to evaluate the program outcomes. The authors applied grounded theory techniques to the interview data. Findings - The program met targeted outcomes across all four levels of evaluation. Interview themes focused on the significance of increasing self-awareness, building relationships, applying new skills, and building confidence. Research limitations/implications - While only one example, this study illustrates the importance of developing the evaluation strategy as part of the program design. Qualitative research methods, often lacking from learning evaluation design, uncover rich themes of impact. The study supports how a PLA program can enhance physician learning, engagement, and relationship building throughout and after the program. Physician leaders' partnership with organization development and learning professionals yield results with impact to individuals, groups, and the organization. Originality/value - Few studies provide an in-depth review of evaluation methods and outcomes of physician leadership development programs. Healthcare organizations seeking to develop similar in-house programs may benefit applying the evaluation strategy outlined in this study.

  13. The Practice of Health Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sarah R

    2017-11-01

    The Practice of Health Program Evaluation provides an overview of the evaluation process for public health programs while diving deeper to address select advanced concepts and techniques. The book unfolds evaluation as a three-phased process consisting of identification of evaluation questions, data collection and analysis, and dissemination of results and recommendations. The text covers research design, sampling methods, as well as quantitative and qualitative approaches. Types of evaluation are also discussed, including economic assessment and systems research as relative newcomers. Aspects critical to conducting a successful evaluation regardless of type or research design are emphasized, such as stakeholder engagement, validity and reliability, and adoption of sound recommendations. The book encourages evaluators to document their approach by developing an evaluation plan, a data analysis plan, and a dissemination plan, in order to help build consensus throughout the process. The evaluative text offers a good bird's-eye view of the evaluation process, while offering guidance for evaluation experts on how to navigate political waters and advocate for their findings to help affect change.

  14. Discount method for programming language evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurtev, Svetomir; Christensen, Tommy Aagaard; Thomsen, Bent

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents work in progress on developing a Discount Method for Programming Language Evaluation inspired by the Discount Usability Evaluation method (Benyon 2010) and the Instant Data Analysis method (Kjeldskov et al. 2004). The method is intended to bridge the gap between small scale...... internal language design evaluation methods and large scale surveys and quantitative evaluation methods. The method is designed to be applicable even before a compiler or IDE is developed for a new language. To test the method, a usability evaluation experiment was carried out on the Quorum programming...... language (Stefik et al. 2016) using programmers with experience in C and C#. When comparing our results with previous studies of Quorum, most of the data was comparable though not strictly in agreement. However, the discrepancies were mainly related to the programmers pre-existing expectations...

  15. 10-year evaluation of train accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkaş, Meltem; Ay, Didem; Metin Aksu, Nalan; Günalp, Müge

    2011-09-01

    Although less frequent than automobile accidents, train accidents have a major impact on victims' lives. Records of patients older than 16 years of age admitted to the Adult Emergency Department of Hacettepe University Medical Center due to train accidents were retrospectively evaluated. 44 patients (30 males, 14 females) with a mean age of 31.8±11.4 years were included in the study. The majority of the accidents occurred during commuting hours. 37 patients were discharged, 22 of them from the emergency department. The mortality rate was 7/44 (16%). Overall mean Revised Trauma Score (RTS) was 10.5 (3 in deaths and 11.9 in survivors). In 5 patients, the cause of death was pelvic trauma leading to major vascular injury and lower limb amputation. In 1 patient, thorax and abdomen trauma and in 1 patient head injury were the causes of mortality. Primary risk factors for mortality were alcohol intoxication (100%), cardiopulmonary resuscitation on admittance (100%), recurrent suicide attempt (75%), presence of psychiatric illness (60%), and low RTS. In this study, most train accidents causing minor injuries were due to falling from the train prior to acceleration. Nevertheless, train accidents led to a mortality rate of 16% and morbidity rate of 37%. These findings draw attention to the importance of developing preventive strategies.

  16. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update - Fiscal Year 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laney, P.T.

    2002-08-31

    This Federal Geothermal Program Research Update reviews the specific objectives, status, and accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal Program for Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 2001. The information contained in this Research Update illustrates how the mission and goals of the Office of Geothermal Technologies are reflected in each R&D activity. The Geothermal Program, from its guiding principles to the most detailed research activities, is focused on expanding the use of geothermal energy.

  17. Evaluation of the Navy Master Planning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-01

    Navy planning directives, interviews with Navy planning personnel, researc " of applicable literature on planning and program evaluation, and the...master planning has absorbed the additional roles of program management and public relations marketing . The Navy planner is now deeply involved in...master planning 62conducted by NAVFAC headquarters in 1972, various Navy planning directives, a " Market Survey" of NAVFAC services and customer 63

  18. Evaluation of training programs: A pragmatic perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Canadian nuclear regulatory agency endorses the Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) as the most reliable method of providing effective, efficient training to Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) personnel. However the benefits of SAT cannot be realized unless all five phases of SAT are implemented. This is particularly true with respect to evaluation. Although each phase of SAT builds on the preceding one, the evaluation phase continuously feeds back into each of the others and also provides the means to verify the entire training programme building process. It is useful, therefore, to examine the issues relating to the what, why, who, when and how of training programme evaluation. ''What'' identifies the various aspects of the training programme to be evaluated, including the need for training, the training standard, the task list, trainer competence, test results, training results, program acceptance and numerous indicators that identify a need for evaluation. ''Why'' addresses legal and regulatory aspects, resource management, worker and public safety, worker and trainer competence and morale, and the cost/benefit of the training program. ''Who'' examines the need to involve trainers, trainees, plant subject matter experts (SMEs), and both plant and training centre supervisory and management staff. ''When'' addresses time-related concerns such as the importance of ensuring at the outset that the training program is actually needed, the necessity of responding promptly to local, national and world events, changes in legal and regulatory responsibilities, and the overriding importance of timely, routine training program evaluations. ''How'' describes the process of conducting a training program evaluation, and addresses the relationships of these five aspects of evaluation to each other. (author). 10 refs

  19. Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan Technology Validation and Market Introduction 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2008-01-01

    Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan 2008 for technology validation and market introduction, including ENERGY STAR, building energy codes, technology transfer application centers, commercial lighting initiative, EnergySmart Schools, EnergySmar

  20. The Advanced Test Reactor Strategic Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic evaluation of safety, environmental, and operational issues has been initiated at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This program, the Strategic Evaluation Program (STEP), provides an integrated review of safety and operational issues against the standards applied to licensed commercial facilities. In the review of safety issues, 18 deviations were identified which required prompt attention. Resolution of these items has been accelerated in the program. An integrated living schedule is being developed to address the remaining findings. A risk evaluation is being performed on the proposed corrective actions and these actions will then be formally ranked in order of priority based on considerations of safety and operational significance. Once the final ranking is completed, an integrated schedule will be developed, which will include considerations of availability of funding and operating schedule. 3 refs., 2 figs

  1. Louisiana Airport System Plan Five-Year Capital Improvement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-01

    The Louisiana Airport System Plan (LASP) Five-Year-Capital Improvement Program (CIP) is a development plan for all commercial service, reliever, and general aviation airports in Louisiana. It is a detailed listing of potential projects based on the a...

  2. Head Start, 4 years After Completing the Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Joo

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of the Head Start program on children's achievements in reading and math tests during their first 4 years of schooling after completing the program. Using nationally representative data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, I found large measurement error in the parental reports of Head Start attendance, which…

  3. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2003 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2003-12-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to Nevada Test Site biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2003.

  4. Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program: 1988 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deal, D.E.; Abitz, R.J.; Case, J.B.; Crawley, M.E.; Deshler, R.M.; Drez, P.E.; Givens, C.A.; King, R.B.; Myers, J.; Pietz, J.M.; Roggenthen, W.M.; Tyburski, J.R.; Belski, D.S.; Niou, S.; Wallace, M.G.

    1989-12-01

    The data presented in this report are the result of Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during 1988. These activities, which are a continuation and update of studies that began in 1982 as part of the Site Validation Program, were formalized as the BSEP in 1985 to document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation, and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the WIPP. Previous BSEP reports (Deal and Case, 1987; Deal and others, 1987) described the results of ongoing activities that monitor brine inflow into boreholes in the facility, moisture content of the Salado Formation, brine geochemistry, and brine weeps and crusts. The information provided in this report updates past work and describes progress made during the calendar year 1988. During 1988, BSEP activities focused on four major areas to describe and quantify brine activity: (1) monitoring of brine inflow parameters, e.g., measuring brines recovered from holes drilled upward from the underground drifts (upholes), downward from the underground drifts (downholes), and near-horizontal holes; (2) characterizing the brine, e.g., the geochemistry of the brine and the presence of bacteria and their possible interactions with experiments and operations; (3) characterizing formation properties associated with the occurrence of brine; e.g., determining the water content of various geologic units, examining these units in boreholes using a video camera system, and measuring their resistivity (conductivity); and (4) modeling to examine the interaction of salt deformation near the workings and brine seepage through the deforming salt. 77 refs., 48 figs., 32 tabs

  5. Framework for a National Testing and Evaluation Program ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract:The National STEPP Program seeks to improve water quality by accelerating the effective implementation and adoption of innovative stormwater management technologies. Itwill attempt to accomplish this by establishing practices through highly reliable, and cost-effective Stormwater control measures (SCM) testing, evaluation, and verification services. The program will aim to remove barriers to innovation, minimize duplicative performance evaluation needs, increase confidence that regulatory requirements are met by creating consistency among testing and evaluation protocols, and establishing equity between public domain and proprietary SCM evaluation approaches.The Environmental Technology Verification Program, established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 18 years ago, was the only national program of its kindin the stormwater sector, but is now defunct, leaving a national leadership void. The STEPP initiative was triggered in part by regulatory demands in the government and private sectors to fill this vacuum. A concerted focus and study of this matter led to the release of a Water Environment Federation (WEF) white paper entitled “Investigation into the Feasibility of a National Testing and Evaluation Program for Stormwater Products and Practices” in February 2014. During this second phase of the STEPP initiative, and with EPA support, five analogous technology evaluation programs related to both stormwater and non-stormwater were an

  6. Pretest and Posttest Results of the First KEEP Program Year. Technical Report #5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallimore, Ronald; And Others

    This report presents a pre- and posttest evaluation of the first program year of the Kamehameha Early Education Program (KEEP). Each of the 28 children in the KEEP kindergarten class received three tests: the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence (WPPSI), the Metropolitan Readiness Test (MRT), and the Standard English Repetition…

  7. Carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae 3 Years after Start of Vaccination Program, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijkerman, J.; van Gils, E.J.M.; Veenhoven, R.H.; Hak, E.; Yzerman, E.P.F.; van den Ende, A.; Wijmenga-Monsuur, A.J.; van den Dobbelsteen, G.P.J.M.; Sanders, E.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) program, we conducted a cross-sectional observational study on nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae 3 years after implementation of the program in the Netherlands. We compared pneumococcal serotypes in

  8. 45 CFR 2522.720 - How many years must my evaluation cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How many years must my evaluation cover? 2522.720 Section 2522.720 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR... Evaluating Programs: Requirements and Procedures § 2522.720 How many years must my evaluation cover? (a) If...

  9. Landlord Program multi-year program plan fiscal year 1995 WBS 7.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, C.L.

    1994-01-01

    The Landlord Program mission is to maintain, preserve, or upgrade the strategic assets of the Hanford Site to meet the overall cleanup mission. This encompasses innovative, appropriate, and cost effective general purpose infrastructure support, services, and long range strategic site planning that is the foundation for seven major Hanford programs. These programs are (1) Environmental Restoration, (2) Tank Waste Remediation System, (3) Solid/Liquid Waste Decontamination, (4) Facility Transition, (5) Spent Fuel, (6) Technology Development, and (7) the Multi-Program Laboratory. General infrastructure support consists of facilities, systems, and equipment that by design or use are not essentially dedicated to a single program mission. Facilities include laboratories, shops, warehouses, and general work space. Systems include electrical, process sewers, rail, roads, telecommunications, water, fire and emergency response, and steam supply and distribution. Funding also supports capital equipment critical to maintaining, upgrading, or operating the general infrastructure. Paramount to these objectives is compliance with all applicable laws, orders, agreements, codes, standards, best management and safety practices. The objectives for general infrastructure support are reflected in five programmatic functions, (1) Program Integration, (2) Capital Equipment, (3) Expense Funded Projects, (4) General Plant Projects, and (5) Line Items

  10. Space Discovery: Teaching with Space. Evaluation: Summer, Fall 1998 Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewell, Bob

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of the 1998 NASA-sponsored evaluation of the effectiveness of the United States Space Foundation's five-day Space Discovery Standard Graduate Course (Living and Working in Space), the five-day Space Discovery Advanced Graduate Course (Advanced Technology and Biomedical Research), the five-day introductory course Aviation and Space Basics all conducted during the summer of 1998, and the Teaching with Space two-day Inservice program. The purpose of the program is to motivate and equip K- 12 teachers to use proven student-attracting space and technology concepts to support standard curriculum. These programs support the America 2000 National Educational Goals, encouraging more students to stay in school, increase in competence, and have a better opportunity to be attracted to math and science. The 1998 research program continues the comprehensive evaluation begun in 1992, this year studying five summer five-day sessions and five Inservice programs offered during the Fall of 1998 in California, Colorado, New York, and Virginia. A comprehensive research design by Dr. Robert Ewell of Creative Solutions and Dr. Darwyn Linder of Arizona State University evaluated the effectiveness of various areas of the program and its applicability on diverse groups. Preliminary research methodology was a set of survey instruments administered after the courses, and another to be sent in April-4-5 months following the last inservice involved in this study. This year, we have departed from this evaluation design in two ways. First, the five-day programs used NASA's new EDCATS on-line system and associated survey rather than the Linder/Ewell instruments. The Inservice programs were evaluated using the previously developed survey adapted for Inservice programs. Second, we did not do a follow-on survey of the teachers after they had been in the field as we have done in the past. Therefore, this evaluation captures only the reactions of the teachers to the programs

  11. Effectiveness of a Danish early year preschool program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bente; Holm, Anders; Bremberg, Sven

    2013-01-01

    A significant number of studies indicate that early year preschool programs lead to positive long-term effects. Systematic quality improvement of early year preschool may enhance these outcomes. The ASP Program was built on this principle. In this program preschool staff are supported...... in their efforts to critically reflect on current practices and to change these. A randomized controlled study was carried out in Denmark from September 2006 to May 2008. The study encompassed 2323 children in 59 preschools in two municipalities. Children were assessed using the Strength and Difficulties...

  12. Idaho chemical programs annual technical report, fiscal year 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    The operating experience in fuel processing, waste calcining, and other waste management activities for FY 1974 is summarized. A new zirconium fuel dissolver has performed well, and the first-cycle extraction system shows near-zero losses. Technical support activities include: a flowsheet to reduce acid consumption and volume of liquid wastes in the electrolytic process; a new dissolution process for ternary oxide PWR fuel using zirconium-fluoride-nitric acid dissolvent; a study and recommendation for treatment of fuel storage basin water; progress in design and development of processes for Rover and HTGR fuels, corrosion evaluation of bins containing calcined wastes showing corrosion rates indicative of a safe 500-year or greater storage life; demonstration on a pilot-plant scale of conditions for calcination of stainless steel and Rover fuel wastes as well as commercial wastes; evaluation of equipment alternatives for a new waste calcining facility; studies related to improvements in rare gas recovery and process off-gas treatment; demonstration of stability when various high-level waste solutions are mixed; progress on postcalcination treatment of calcined waste solids (ceramic formation, incorporation in metals, and calcine-concretes); studies on removal of actinides from ICPP wastes; a conceptual design for a proposed radioactive solid-waste repackaging facility for the INEL. Significant progress is reported on the program for determination of burnup for fast breeder reactor fuels. (U.S.)

  13. Ecological responsibilities: First evaluation this year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcan, P.

    2008-01-01

    Separation and recycling of over 50% of communal waste, connecting towns and villages to the sewerage system and the closure of communal waste damps which do not meet stipulated criteria. This is only a part of the obligations which Slovakia must fulfil within the next two years in order comply with the requirements of its EU accession. Most of the deadlines have already past. Slovakia is now awaiting an evaluation of how it has done in meeting these requirements. What is already clear is that environmental obligations are a problem. The key question is who will pay for more than 30% of the related costs estimated to be 7 bill. EUR. Slovakia has three more years to meet the many technically and financially demanding standards. Structural funds that were expected to represent a major financial support are now just starting up. Already during accession negotiations it was clear that environmental issues would be the most complex ones. In Slovakia due to economic problems caused by the transformation of the economy not much attention was paid to the environment. And that was one of the reasons Slovakia negotiated transition periods for the implementation of about 70 directives and 300 legal documents. At first glance 2012 when the last of the transitions periods will end is far away. But some of the obligations have to be observed continuously. As far as air pollution is concerned, the transition period has already ended. Petrol stations must prevent any leakages of volatile material when storing fuel. Meeting EUR standards had cost more than 1 bill. Sk by the end of 2006. (authors)

  14. The Evaluation Of A Diversity Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa Fouche

    2004-11-01

    Die artikel evalueer die inhoud van ’n diversiteits-program wat ontwerp en ontwikkel is ten einde die redes waarom diversiteits-opleiding faal, aan te spreek.’n Groot maatskappy in die banksektor het die ontwikkeling geinisieer en ’n aantal senior personeellede is genader om die inhoud te evalueer. Daar is bevind dat die inhoud aan wêreldklas standaarde voldoen.

  15. Department of the Navy Supporting Data for Fiscal Year 1984 Budget Estimates Descriptive Summaries Submitted to Congress January 1983. Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy. Book 2. Tactical Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Production Releass for the Army, OPv and At, Force is in ty 1991. Production of 602 uitcrcft for the Marine Corps and May) will be completed :n tY 1998 ...Fy 1965 3. Operational Test and Evaluation (USKO) Secoad Quartet FY 1998 4. First USEC delivery Third Quarter FY 1991 5. USA/USAF/USN Delivery First...vehicular mounted loler power unite. (U) Project C0075. Tactical Mot Tranprt Vehicles: This program is to provide the optimum mix of tactical motor

  16. Program Evaluation in Cost Benefit Terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, C. Kenneth

    This paper advances a model, called the expected opportunity loss model, for curriculum evaluation. This decision-making technique utilizes subjective data by ranking courses according to their expected contributions to the primary objective of the total program. The model also utilizes objective data in the form of component costs, and differs…

  17. Teaching Program Evaluation on Interactive Television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Keith; Steinhauser, Jim; Newman, Isadore

    This paper describes a five-session course entitled "Program Evaluation," which was taught via interactive television in the summer of 2002 to 68 doctoral and master's students in 5 of 6 locations throughout New Mexico. Students received a 4-hour lecture and then participated in off-line activities directed by the instructor. Problems in distance…

  18. Behavioral patterns of environmental performance evaluation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanxin; Mauerhofer, Volker

    2016-11-01

    During the past decades numerous environmental performance evaluation programs have been developed and implemented on different geographic scales. This paper develops a taxonomy of environmental management behavioral patterns in order to provide a practical comparison tool for environmental performance evaluation programs. Ten such programs purposively selected are mapped against the identified four behavioral patterns in the form of diagnosis, negotiation, learning, and socialization and learning. Overall, we found that schemes which serve to diagnose environmental abnormalities are mainly externally imposed and have been developed as a result of technical debates concerning data sources, methodology and ranking criteria. Learning oriented scheme is featured by processes through which free exchange of ideas, mutual and adaptive learning can occur. Scheme developed by higher authority for influencing behaviors of lower levels of government has been adopted by the evaluated to signal their excellent environmental performance. The socializing and learning classified evaluation schemes have incorporated dialogue, participation, and capacity building in program design. In conclusion we consider the 'fitness for purpose' of the various schemes, the merits of our analytical model and the future possibilities of fostering capacity building in the realm of wicked environmental challenges. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Systematic evaluation program, status summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Status reports are presented on the systematic evaluation program for the Big Rock Point reactor, Dresden-1 reactor, Dresden-2 reactor, Ginna-1 reactor, Connecticut Yankee reactor, LACBWR reactor, Millstone-1 reactor, Oyster Creek-1 reactor, Palisades-1 reactor, San Onofre-1 reactor, and Rowe Yankee reactor

  20. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-07-09

    This is the May 2014 Update to the Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan, which sets forth the goals and structure of the Office. It identifies the research, development, demonstration, and deployment activities the Office will focus on over the next five years and outlines why these activities are important to meeting the energy and sustainability challenges facing the nation.

  1. 1992 Resource Program, 10 Year Plan : Draft II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-05-01

    The Resource Program is the Bonneville Power Administration's primary process for deciding how to meet future electricity resource needs, how much new resources to develop, which types of resources to acquire or option and how to go about acquiring them, and how much BPA will have to spend for these resources. Recognizing that BPA must make a long-term commitment to acquiring conservation effectively, the 1992 Resource Program outlines a 10-year plan. Draft 2 of the 1992 Resource Program provides a framework for discussing the funding levels proposed in the Programs in Perspective (PIP) process. Previous final resource programs have been released prior to the PIP process. This version of the Resource Program recognizes that the PIP discussions are an integral part of the resource decision-making process and, therefore, it will be finalized after PIP.

  2. 1992 Resource Program, 10 Year Plan : Draft II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-05-01

    The Resource Program is the Bonneville Power Administration`s primary process for deciding how to meet future electricity resource needs, how much new resources to develop, which types of resources to acquire or option and how to go about acquiring them, and how much BPA will have to spend for these resources. Recognizing that BPA must make a long-term commitment to acquiring conservation effectively, the 1992 Resource Program outlines a 10-year plan. Draft 2 of the 1992 Resource Program provides a framework for discussing the funding levels proposed in the Programs in Perspective (PIP) process. Previous final resource programs have been released prior to the PIP process. This version of the Resource Program recognizes that the PIP discussions are an integral part of the resource decision-making process and, therefore, it will be finalized after PIP.

  3. Evaluation of a workplace hemochromatosis screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stave, G M; Mignogna, J J; Powell, G S; Hunt, C M

    1999-05-01

    Hemochromatosis is a common inherited disorder of iron metabolism with significant health consequences for the employed population. Although screening for hemochromatosis has been recommended, workplace screening programs remain uncommon. In the first year of a newly initiated corporate screening program, 1968 employees were tested. The screening algorithm included measurement of serum iron and transferrin and subsequent ferritin levels in those employees with elevated iron/transferrin ratios. Thirteen percent of men and 21% of women had elevated iron/transferrin ratios. Of these, 14 men and 2 women had elevated ferritin levels. Of these 16, three had liver biopsies and all three have hemochromatosis. The cost of the screening program was $27,850. The cost per diagnosis was $9283 and the cost per year of life saved was $928. These costs compare very favorably with other common workplace screening programs. Several barriers to obtaining definitive diagnoses on all patients with a positive screening result were identified; strategies to overcome these barriers would further enhance the cost effectiveness of the program. We conclude that workplace hemochromatosis screening is highly cost effective and should be incorporated into health promotion/disease prevention programs.

  4. Ten years of Developing International Volcanology Graduate Study Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, W. I.

    2010-12-01

    In 2000 I reported at this symposium about multi-institutional graduate field trips to IAVCEI events, such as the Bali meeting and its importance in building international collegiality and awareness among the volcanology doctoral students. NSF was an enthusiastic supporter of these field sessions and this support has continued through the highly successful Pucon and Reykjavik sessions. International volcanology graduate program development began with several exchange programs. EHaz was a highly successful program (McGill, Simon Fraser, Michigan Tech, Buffalo, UNAM and Universidad de Colima) funded by the Department of Education (FIPSE) that moved students across North America where dozens of graduate students spent semesters of their study abroad and shared annual field trips and online student led graduate seminar classes. Michigan Tech’s volcanology graduate program started a Masters International program that combined Peace Corps service with hazards mitigation graduate study and students were placed by Peace Corps in countries with prominent natural hazards. The new program funded 2 year residences in foreign environments, principally in Pacific Latin America. NSF strongly supported this program from its inception, and eventually it gained NSF PIRE support. Dozens of students have initiated the 3 year program (15 completed) to date. A similar PIRE developed at UAF with a link to volcanology in the Russian Far East. One gain is the development of many socially-conscious research selections. Beginning this year transatlantic dual degree masters programs in volcanology are being offered by a consortium of US and European volcanology programs (Michigan Tech, Buffalo, Clermont Ferrand and University of Milan Bicocca), again aided by FIPSE funding. Students have dual advisors on both sides of the Atlantic and spend about half of their two year programs in Europe and half in US. Faculty also travel in the program and the four campuses are increasingly linked by

  5. Program plan, and request for reprogramming first year funds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-10

    In June of 1992, the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded assistance Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) for the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program, The first year of the program is primarily a planning year. We have aggressively pursued input into the EHAP program to begin to understand where our efforts fit within other efforts underway nationally. We have also begun some direct activities at MUSC to begin the program. Part of this report is devoted to informing DOE of what we have accomplished so far this year. In our efforts to plan, we have identified several changes in emphasis for the program. These changes affect the original plan in terms of projected milestones and budget allocations. Part of this report describes these changes and describes the proposed changes to the budget. We are not requesting additional funds for this year. Simply, we are requesting some change in allocations to budget categories. Therefore, our report to DOE is a combination status report, program plan, and request for reallocation of budget.

  6. Radioactive Waste Management Fellowship Program: Summary of program activities for calendar year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This document describes a graduate fellowship program designed to guide future scientists and engineers toward a career in high level radioactive waste management. Oak Ridge Associated Universities administers this program on behalf of 17 participating universities. The report summarizes the background and qualifications of the last year's applicants and awardees and provides examples of the distributed literature describing the program. 8 figs

  7. Solar buildings program contract summary, calendar year 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-06-07

    The mission of the US Department of Energy's Solar Buildings Program is to advance the development and widespread deployment of competitive solar thermal technologies for use in buildings. The long-term goal of the Program is to combine solar energy technologies with energy-efficient construction techniques and create cost-effective buildings that have a zero net need for fossil fuel energy on an annual basis. The Solar Buildings Program conducts research and development on solar technologies that can deliver heat, light, and hot water to residential and commercial buildings. By working closely with manufacturers in both the buildings and solar energy industries and by supporting research at universities and national laboratories, the Solar Buildings Program brings together the diverse players developing reliable and affordable solar technologies for building applications. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, New Mexico, jointly participate in the Solar Buildings Program. These two national laboratories work closely with industry researching new concepts, developing technology improvements, reducing manufacturing costs, monitoring system performance, promoting quality assurance, and identifying potential new markets. In calendar year 1999, the Solar Buildings Program focused primarily on solar hot water system research and development (R and D), US industry manufacturing assistance, and US market assistance. The Program also completed a number of other projects that were begun in earlier years. This Contract Summary describes the Program's contracted activities that were active during 1999.

  8. Boron neutron capture therapy: Brain Tumor Treatment Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griebenow, M.L.; Dorn, R.V. III; Gavin, P.R.; Spickard, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    The United States (US) Department of Energy (DOE) recently initiated a focused, multidisciplined program to evaluate Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for the treatment of brain tumors. The program, centered at the DOE/endash/Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), will develop the analytical, diagnostic and treatment tools, and the database required for BNCT technical assessment. The integrated technology will be evaluated in a spontaneously-occurring canine brain-tumor model. Successful animal studies are expected to lead to human clinical trials within four to five years. 2 refs., 3 figs

  9. Evaluation of a Hospital-Based Pneumonia Nurse Navigator Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldon, Lisa E; McDonough, Kelly; Turner, Barbara; Simmons, Leigh Ann

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a hospital-based pneumonia nurse navigator program. This study used a retrospective, formative evaluation. Data of patients admitted from January 2012 through December 2014 to a large community hospital with a primary or secondary diagnosis of pneumonia, excluding aspiration pneumonia, were used. Data included patient demographics, diagnoses, insurance coverage, core measures, average length of stay (ALOS), disposition, readmission rate, financial outcomes, and patient barriers to care were collected. Descriptive statistics and parametric testing were used to analyze data. Core measure performance was sustained at the 90th percentile 2 years after the implementation of the navigator program. The ALOS did not decrease to established benchmarks; however, the SD for ALOS decreased by nearly half after implementation of the navigator program, suggesting the program decreased the number and length of extended stays. Charges per case decreased by 21% from 2012 to 2014. Variable costs decreased by 4% over a 2-year period, which increased net profit per case by 5%. Average readmission payments increased by 8% from 2012 to 2014, and the net revenue per case increased by 8.3%. The pneumonia nurse navigator program may improve core measures, reduce ALOS, and increase net revenue. Future evaluations are necessary to substantiate these findings and optimize the cost and quality performance of navigator programs.

  10. Cyber-Evaluation: Evaluating a Distance Learning Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Denise L.

    This paper examines how the process of soliciting evaluation feedback from nonresident students in the Army Management Staff College (Virginia) program on leadership and management for civilian employees of the Army has evolved since 1995. Course design is briefly described, including the use of video-teleconferences, chat rooms, an electronic…

  11. Long-Term Implications of the Fiscal Year 2009 Future Years Defense Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Talaber, Adam; Arthur, David; Bass, Elizabeth; Bennett, Michael; Eveker, Kevin; Frisk, Daniel; Labs, Eric J; Lussier, Frances; Percy, Allison; Hall, Raymond; Newman, David; Regan, Dawn S; Schmit, Matthew; Wheelock, Jason; Kelley, Kate

    2009-01-01

    ...) has published a series of reports about its projections of the resources that might be needed over the long term to carry out the Bush Administration's plans as expressed in the Future Years Defense Program (FYDP...

  12. Economic value evaluation in disease management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnezi, Racheli; Reicher, Sima; Shani, Mordechai

    2008-05-01

    Chronic disease management has been a rapidly growing entity in the 21st century as a strategy for managing chronic illnesses in large populations. However, experience has shown that disease management programs have not been able to demonstrate their financial value. The objectives of disease management programs are to create quality benchmarks, such as principles and guidelines, and to establish a uniform set of metrics and a standardized methodology for evaluating them. In order to illuminate the essence of disease management and its components, as well as the complexity and the problematic nature of performing economic calculations of their profitability and value, we collected data from several reports that dealt with the economic intervention of disease management programs. The disease management economic evaluation is composed of a series of steps, including the following major categories: data/information technology, information generation, assessment/recommendations, actionable customer plans, and program assessment/reassessment. We demonstrate the elements necessary for economic analysis. Disease management is one of the most innovative tools in the managed care environment and is still in the process of being defined. Therefore, objectives should include the creation of quality measures, such as principles and guidelines, and the establishment of a uniform set of metrics and a standardized methodology for evaluating them.

  13. Advanced reactors transition fiscal year 1995 multi-year program plan WBS 7.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loika, E.F.

    1994-01-01

    This document describes in detail the work to be accomplished in FY-1995 and the out years for the Advanced Reactors Transition (WBS 7.3). This document describes specific milestones and funding profiles. Based upon the Fiscal Year 1995 Multi-Year Program Plan, DOE will provide authorization to perform the work outlined in the FY 1995 MYPP. Following direction given by the US Department of Energy (DOE) on December 15, 1993, Advanced Reactors Transition (ART), previously known as Advanced Reactors, will provide the planning and perform the necessary activities for placing the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) in a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition. The DOE goal is to accomplish the shutdown in approximately five years. The Advanced Reactors Transition Multi-Year Program Plan, and the supporting documents; i.e., the FFTF Shutdown Program Plan and the FFTF Shutdown Project Resource Loaded Schedule (RLS), are defined for the life of the Program. During the transition period to achieve the Shutdown end-state, the facilities and systems will continue to be maintained in a safe and environmentally sound condition. Additionally, facilities that were associated with the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) Programs, and are no longer required to support the Liquid Metal Reactor Program will be deactivated and transferred to an alternate sponsor or the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program for final disposition, as appropriate

  14. Dark Skies Awareness Programs for the International Year of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. E.; Pompea, S. M.

    2008-12-01

    The loss of a dark night sky as a natural resource is a growing concern. It impacts not only astronomical research, but also our environment in terms of ecology, health, safety, economics and energy conservation. For this reason, "Dark Skies are a Universal Resource" is a cornerstone project for the U.S. International Year of Astronomy (IYA) program in 2009. Its goal is to raise public awareness of the impact of artificial lighting on local environments by getting people involved in a variety of dark skies-related programs. These programs focus on citizen-scientist sky-brightness monitoring programs, a planetarium show, podcasting, social networking, a digital photography contest, the Good Neighbor Lighting Program, Earth Hour, National Dark Skies Week, a traveling exhibit, a video tutorial, Dark Skies Discovery Sites, Astronomy Nights in the (National) Parks, Sidewalk Astronomy, and a Quiet Skies program. Many similar programs are available internationally through the "Dark Skies Awareness" Global Cornerstone Project. Working groups for both the national and international dark skies cornerstone projects are being chaired by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). The presenters from NOAO will provide the "know-how" and the means for session participants to become community advocates in promoting Dark Skies programs as public events at their home institutions. Participants will be able to get information on jump-starting their education programs through the use of well-developed instructional materials and kits. For more information, visit http://astronomy2009.us/darkskies/ and http://www.darkskiesawareness.org/.

  15. [Resident evaluation of general surgery training programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza G, Ricardo; Danilla E, Stefan; Valdés G, Fabio; San Francisco R, Ignacio; Llanos L, Osvaldo

    2009-07-01

    The profile of the general surgeon has changed, aiming to incorporate new skills and to develop new specialties. To assess the quality of postgraduate General Surgery training programs given by Chilean universities, the satisfaction of students and their preferences after finishing the training period. A survey with multiple choice and Likert type questions was designed and applied to 77 surgery residents, corresponding to 59% of all residents of general surgery specialization programs of Chilean universities. Fifty five per cent of residents financed with their own resources the specialization program. Thirty nine percent disagreed partially or totally with the objectives and rotations of programs. The opportunity to perform surgical interventions and the support by teachers was well evaluated. However, 23% revealed teacher maltreatment. Fifty six percent performed research activities, 73% expected to continue training in a derived specialty and 69% was satisfied with the training program. Residents considered that the quality and dedication of professors and financing of programs are issues that must be improved. The opportunity to perform surgical interventions, obtaining a salary for their work and teacher support is considered of utmost importance.

  16. Oil Sands Regional Aquatics Monitoring Program (RAMP) 5 year report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawcett, K.

    2003-05-01

    This 5 year report outlined and examined the activities of the Regional Aquatics Monitoring Program (RAMP) from its introduction in 1997 up to 2001. The RAMP is a multi-stakeholder program comprised of industry and government representatives as well as members of aboriginal groups and environmental organizations. The objectives of RAMP are to monitor aquatic environments in the oil sands region in order to allow for assessment of regional trends and cumulative effects, as well as to provide baseline data against which impact predictions of recent environmental impact assessments can be verified. Scientific programs conducted as part of RAMP during the 5-year period included water quality and sediment quality analyses; fish monitoring; benthic communities monitoring; water quality and aquatic vegetation analyses of wetlands; and hydrology and climate monitoring. RAMP's programs have expanded annually in scope as a result of increased oil sands development in the region. This report provided outlines of RAMP's individual program objectives and organizational structures, as well as details of all studies conducted for each year. Data were collected for all major study areas were presented, and program methodologies for assessing and identifying trends were outlined. refs., tabs., figs

  17. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 1999 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathy A. Wills

    1999-12-01

    The Ecological and Compliance program, funded through the U. S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 1999. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites (2) desert tortoise compliance (3) ecosystem mapping (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center.

  18. SKB's program for societal research 2004-2011. An evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederberg, Olof

    2012-04-01

    This evaluation of the program of societal research that SKB conducted the years 2004-2011 has been performed on behalf of Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). The review has focused on answers to a series of questions as follows: General questions - Why was a program started? - What was SKB's purpose with the program? - Does the result mean that the objective has been achieved? - Has the program had effects (positive or negative) that were not anticipated when the purpose was formulated? - Strengths and weaknesses of the program? Questions about the implementation - How did announcement and selection procedures work? - Which forms were used for reporting results from the research projects? Questions about the continued investment in societal research - Are there such needs? - In that case, is it in SKB's interest to contribute financially to such research? - What forms might be appropriate if SKB sees interest to contribute financially to such research?

  19. [A critical evaluation of food programs in Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyá Gilardon, Enrique O

    2016-01-01

    Argentina has an over 60-year history of food programs which have received few to no evaluations, even considering the highly important epidemiological and social changes that have occurred in the target population. In this article, nationwide State-run food programs with the objective of contributing to the food security of the families in greatest need are reviewed, the nutritional situation of the target population is reassessed, and arguments for analyzing current programs using a typology based in the components of food security are proposed. A general review of the conceptions, content and reach of food programs should be carried out, in order for these programs to cease to act as mere social assistance and instead be transformed in bearers of the right to better food and nutrition.

  20. Physical activity across the curriculum: year one process evaluation results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sullivan Debra K

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical Activity Across the Curriculum (PAAC is a 3-year elementary school-based intervention to determine if increased amounts of moderate intensity physical activity performed in the classroom will diminish gains in body mass index (BMI. It is a cluster-randomized, controlled trial, involving 4905 children (2505 intervention, 2400 control. Methods We collected both qualitative and quantitative process evaluation data from 24 schools (14 intervention and 10 control, which included tracking teacher training issues, challenges and barriers to effective implementation of PAAC lessons, initial and continual use of program specified activities, and potential competing factors, which might contaminate or lessen program effects. Results Overall teacher attendance at training sessions showed exceptional reach. Teachers incorporated active lessons on most days, resulting in significantly greater student physical activity levels compared to controls (p Conclusion In the first year of the PAAC intervention, process evaluation results were instrumental in identifying successes and challenges faced by teachers when trying to modify existing academic lessons to incorporate physical activity.

  1. Planning integration FY 1995 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP)/Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for the Planning Integration Program, Work Breakdown structure (WBS) Element 1.8.2, is the primary management tool to document the technical, schedule, and cost baseline for work directed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL). As an approved document, it establishes a binding agreement between RL and the performing contractors for the work to be performed. It was prepared by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This MYPP provides a picture from fiscal year 1995 through FY 2001 for the Planning Integration Program. The MYPP provides a window of detailed information for the first three years. It also provides 'execution year' work plans. The MYPP provides summary information for the next four years, documenting the same period as the Activity Data Sheets

  2. Planning integration FY 1995 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP)/Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for the Planning Integration Program, Work Breakdown structure (WBS) Element 1.8.2, is the primary management tool to document the technical, schedule, and cost baseline for work directed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL). As an approved document, it establishes a binding agreement between RL and the performing contractors for the work to be performed. It was prepared by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This MYPP provides a picture from fiscal year 1995 through FY 2001 for the Planning Integration Program. The MYPP provides a window of detailed information for the first three years. It also provides `execution year` work plans. The MYPP provides summary information for the next four years, documenting the same period as the Activity Data Sheets.

  3. Year-End Clinic Handoffs: A National Survey of Academic Internal Medicine Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Erica; Harris, Christina; Lee, Wei Wei; Pincavage, Amber T; Ouchida, Karin; Miller, Rachel K; Chaudhry, Saima; Arora, Vineet M

    2017-06-01

    While there has been increasing emphasis and innovation nationwide in training residents in inpatient handoffs, very little is known about the practice and preparation for year-end clinic handoffs of residency outpatient continuity practices. Thus, the latter remains an identified, yet nationally unaddressed, patient safety concern. The 2014 annual Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine (APDIM) survey included seven items for assessing the current year-end clinic handoff practices of internal medicine residency programs throughout the country. Nationwide survey. All internal medicine program directors registered with APDIM. Descriptive statistics of programs and tools used to formulate a year-end handoff in the ambulatory setting, methods for evaluating the process, patient safety and quality measures incorporated within the process, and barriers to conducting year-end handoffs. Of the 361 APDIM member programs, 214 (59%) completed the Transitions of Care Year-End Clinic Handoffs section of the survey. Only 34% of respondent programs reported having a year-end ambulatory handoff system, and 4% reported assessing residents for competency in this area. The top three barriers to developing a year-end handoff system were insufficient overlap between graduating and incoming residents, inability to schedule patients with new residents in advance, and time constraints for residents, attendings, and support staff. Most internal medicine programs do not have a year-end clinic handoff system in place. Greater attention to clinic handoffs and resident assessment of this care transition is needed.

  4. Developing a hazmat incident evaluation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.L.; Kaikumba, F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that all communities are at risk of experiencing a hazardous materials incident, whether in transportation or at a fixed facility (such as petroleum refineries, oil fields, processing plants, etc.). However, many communities are unprepared to cope with this emergency. Administrators of state agencies and local response organizations often face fierce competition for tax dollars in support of their hazardous materials emergency response programs. Historically, little statistical information has been available to support their call for additional budget dollars in the areas of personnel, training, and equipment. It is difficult to plan for an emergency when you have little understanding of the risks, the frequency of incidents, the type of chemicals generally involved, and other vital information. The Illinois Hazardous Materials Incident Evaluation Program was designed to address the state and local needs, and position government and industry in a more responsive and proactive mode. The result is a program that works

  5. LUDEP: A Lung Dose Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birchall, A.; Bailey, M.R.; James, A.C.

    1990-06-01

    A Task Group of the ICRP is currently reviewing its dosimetric model for the respiratory tract with the aim of producing a more comprehensive and realistic model which can be used both for dosimetry and bioassay purposes. This in turn requires deposition, clearance, and dosimetry to be treated in a more detailed manner in than in the current model. In order to examine the practical application and radiological implications of the proposed model, a microcomputer program has been developed in a modular form so that changes can be easily included as the model develops. LUDEP (Lung Dose Evaluation Program) is a user-friendly menu-driven program which can be operated on any IBM-compatible PC. It enables the user to calculate (a) doses to each region of the respiratory tract and all other body organs, and (b) excretion rates and retention curves for bioassay purposes. 11 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  6. Addressing the academic gap between 4- and 6-year pharmacy programs in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sujin; Song, Seungyeon; Lee, Sangmi; Kwon, Kwangil; Kim, Eunyoung

    2014-10-15

    To address the academic gap (or lack of adequate training and programs) between 4- and 6-year pharmacy programs and suggest methods for reducing this gap and to evaluate pharmacists' perceptions of preceptorship. We surveyed a convenience sample of 200 community pharmacists who graduated from a 4-year program who were participating in a continuing education program for clinical pharmacy as organized by the Daejeon branch of the Korea Pharmaceutical Association in 2011. Twenty-one questions were asked about the academic gap, needs for an education program, preceptorship, and medication therapy management services. International precedents were examined through a literature review to glean ideas of how to bridge the academic gap between the 4- and 6-year programs. In total, 132 pharmacists answered the survey (return rate=66.0%). The survey findings included problems caused by the academic gap, high need for an adequate education program, low acceptability of preceptorship, and the possibility of medication therapy management services. US-based, non-traditional PharmD programs and new curriculum-support training in Japan provided examples of how the academic gap has been successfully bridged. Nationwide efforts and government support are urgently required to close the academic gap, and experiential education should be included in transitional programs for 4-year pharmacy program pharmacists.

  7. The Measurable Benefits of a Workplace Wellness Program in Canada: Results After One Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowensteyn, Ilka; Berberian, Violette; Belisle, Patrick; DaCosta, Deborah; Joseph, Lawrence; Grover, Steven A

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of an employee wellness program in Canada. A comprehensive program including web-based lifestyle challenges was evaluated with annual health screenings. Among 730 eligible employees, 688 (94%) registered for the program, 571 (78%) completed a health screening at baseline, and 314 (43%) at 1 year. Most (66%) employees tracked their activity for more than 6 weeks. At 1-year follow-up, there were significant clinical improvements in systolic blood pressure -3.4 mm Hg, and reductions in poor sleep quality (33% to 28%), high emotional stress (21% to 15%), and fatigue (11% to 6%). A positive dose-response was noted where the greatest improvements were observed among those who participated the most. The program had high employee engagement. After 1 year, the benefits included clinically important improvements in physical and mental health.

  8. Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Projects program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of the Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Projects (ENFDP) program is to provide the NRC licensing staff with data which will allow an assessment of radiation exposure during decommissioning and the implementation of ALARA techniques. The data will also provide information to determine the funding level necessary to ensure timely and safe decommissioning operations. Actual decommissioning costs, methods and radiation exposures are compared with those estimated by the Battelle-PNL and ORNL NUREGs on decommissioning. Exposure reduction techniques applied to decommissioning activities to meet ALARA objectives are described. The lessons learned concerning various decommissioning methods are evaluated

  9. Magnetic Fusion Science Fellowship program: Summary of program activities for calendar year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This report describes the 1985-1986 progress of the Magnetic Fusion Science Fellowship program (MFSF). The program was established in January of 1985 by the Office of Fusion Energy (OFE) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to encourage talented undergraduate and first-year graduate students to enter qualified graduate programs in the sciences related to fusion energy development. The program currently has twelve fellows in participating programs. Six new fellows are being appointed during each of the program's next two award cycles. Appointments are for one year and are renewable for two additional years with a three year maximum. The stipend level also continues at a $1000 a month or $12,000 a year. The program pays all tuition and fee expenses for the fellows. Another important aspect of the fellowship program is the practicum. During the practicum fellows receive three month appointments to work at DOE designated fusion science research and development centers. The practicum allows the MFSF fellows to directly participate in on-going DOE research and development programs

  10. SIMS analysis: Development and evaluation program summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groenewold, G.S.; Appelhans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1996-11-01

    This report provides an overview of the ''SIMS Analysis: Development and Evaluation Program'', which was executed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory from mid-FY-92 to the end of FY-96. It should be noted that prior to FY-1994 the name of the program was ''In-Situ SIMS Analysis''. This report will not go into exhaustive detail regarding program accomplishments, because this information is contained in annual reports which are referenced herein. In summary, the program resulted in the design and construction of an ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometer (IT-SIMS), which is capable of the rapid analysis of environmental samples for adsorbed surface contaminants. This instrument achieves efficient secondary ion desorption by use of a molecular, massive ReO 4 - primary ion particle. The instrument manages surface charge buildup using a self-discharging principle, which is compatible with the pulsed nature of the ion trap. The instrument can achieve high selectivity and sensitivity using its selective ion storage and MS/MS capability. The instrument was used for detection of tri-n-butyl phosphate, salt cake (tank cake) characterization, and toxic metal speciation studies (specifically mercury). Technology transfer was also an important component of this program. The approach that was taken toward technology transfer was that of component transfer. This resulted in transfer of data acquisition and instrument control software in FY-94, and ongoing efforts to transfer primary ion gun and detector technology to other manufacturers

  11. A Qualitative Program Evaluation of a Structured Leadership Mentoring Program at a Large Aerospace Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, Romney P.

    2011-01-01

    The researcher utilized a qualitative approach to conduct a program evaluation of the organization where he is employed. The study intended to serve as a program evaluation for the structured in-house mentoring program at a large aerospace corporation (A-Corp). This program evaluation clarified areas in which the current mentoring program is…

  12. Forty years of training program in the JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    This report is to compile the past training program of researchers, engineers and regulatory members at the NuTEC (Nuclear Technology and Education Center) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the past basic seminars for the public, in addition to advice and perspective on the future program from relevant experts, in commemoration of the forty years of the NuTEC. It covers the past five years of educational courses and seminars in utilization of radioisotopes and nuclear energy for domestic and for international training provided at Tokyo and Tokai Education Centers and covers the activity of the Asia-Pacific nuclear technology transfer, including the activity of various committees and meetings. Especially, fifty six experts and authorities have contributed to the report with positive advice and perspective on the training program in the 21st century based on their reminiscences. (author)

  13. 175 Years of Linear Programming - Minimax and Cake Topography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 7. 175 Years of Linear Programming - Minimax and Cake Topography. Vijay Chandru M R Rao. Series Article Volume 4 Issue 7 July 1999 pp 4-13. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Solar Program Overview: Fiscal Years 2002& 2003 (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-06-01

    This document describes the research activities and accomplishments of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program for fiscal years 2002 and 2003. It includes detailed accounts, charts, and photos of R&D activities in the areas of photovoltaics, concentrating solar power, and solar heating and lighting

  15. Evaluation of nonpoint-source contamination, Wisconsin: water year 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, John F.; Graczyk, D.J.; Corsi, Steven R.; Wierl, J.A.; Owens, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the watershed-management evaluation monitoring program in Wisconsin is to evaluate the effectiveness of best-management practices (BMPs) for controlling nonpoint-source pollution in rural and urban watersheds. This progress report provides a summary of the data collected by the U.S Geological Survey for the program and a discussion of the results from several different detailed analyses conducted within this program.

  16. RCM [reliability-centered maintenance] at Ginna: Preventive maintenance program optimization at year 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgar, E.C.

    1989-01-01

    The reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) program at Rochester Gas ampersand Electric Company's Ginna station is entering its second year. Of the 20 systems originally selected for evaluation, 10 are in various stages of completion, and recommendations resulting from the earliest systems studied are now being implemented. As expected, few major discoveries have been made in terms of preventive maintenance program failings or excesses. The performance of the now 20-yr-old plant has been excellent in recent years, and objectives focus more on ensuring continued high standards of safety, reliability, and economy than on maintenance program cost reduction

  17. Hanford Environmental Monitoring Program schedule for samples, analyses, and measurements for calendar year 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumer, P.J.; Price, K.R.; Eddy, P.A.; Carlile, J.M.V.

    1984-12-01

    This report provides the CY 1985 schedule of data collection for the routine Hanford Surface Environmental Monitoring and Ground-Water Monitoring Programs at the Hanford Site. The purpose is to evaluate and report the levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 5484.1. The routine sampling schedule provided herein does not include samples scheduled to be collected during FY 1985 in support of special studies, special contractor support programs, or for quality control purposes. In addition, the routine program outlined in this schedule is subject to modification during the year in response to changes in site operations, program requirements, or unusual sample results

  18. NRC systematic evaluation program: seismic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, H.A.

    1980-01-01

    The NRC Systematic Evaluation Program is currently making an assessment of the seismic design safety of 11 older nuclear power plant facilities. The general review philosophy and review criteria relative to seismic input, structural response, and equipment functionability are presented, including the rationale for the development of these guidelines considering the significant evolution of seismic design criteria since these plants were originally licensed. Technical approaches thought more realistic in light of current knowledge are utilized. Initial findings for plants designed to early seismic design procedures suggest that with minor exceptions, these plants possess adequate seismic design margins when evaluated against the intent of current criteria. However, seismic qualification of electrical equipment has been identified as a subject which requires more in-depth evaluation

  19. A framework for telehealth program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepal, Surya; Li, Jane; Jang-Jaccard, Julian; Alem, Leila

    2014-04-01

    Evaluating telehealth programs is a challenging task, yet it is the most sensible first step when embarking on a telehealth study. How can we frame and report on telehealth studies? What are the health services elements to select based on the application needs? What are the appropriate terms to use to refer to such elements? Various frameworks have been proposed in the literature to answer these questions, and each framework is defined by a set of properties covering different aspects of telehealth systems. The most common properties include application, technology, and functionality. With the proliferation of telehealth, it is important not only to understand these properties, but also to define new properties to account for a wider range of context of use and evaluation outcomes. This article presents a comprehensive framework for delivery design, implementation, and evaluation of telehealth services. We first survey existing frameworks proposed in the literature and then present our proposed comprehensive multidimensional framework for telehealth. Six key dimensions of the proposed framework include health domains, health services, delivery technologies, communication infrastructure, environment setting, and socioeconomic analysis. We define a set of example properties for each dimension. We then demonstrate how we have used our framework to evaluate telehealth programs in rural and remote Australia. A few major international studies have been also mapped to demonstrate the feasibility of the framework. The key characteristics of the framework are as follows: (a) loosely coupled and hence easy to use, (b) provides a basis for describing a wide range of telehealth programs, and (c) extensible to future developments and needs.

  20. US Geological Survey uranium and thorium resource assessment and exploration research program, fiscal year 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offield, T.W.

    1980-01-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) uranium-thorium program is continuing to emphasize multidisciplinary studies to define the settings and habitats of uranium deposits and to elucidate the processes by which the ore deposits formed. As with the uranium scene generally, some uncertainty characterizes the program's transition from FY 1980 to FY 1981. As of the beginning of the new fiscal year, a cut of 15% in base funding of the USGS uranium program has been effected by Congress. Such a cut parallels the major curtailment of the NURE program. The USGS in FY 1980 completed almost all of its commitment to the NURE program quadrangle-evaluation work, and only a relatively modest continuing involvement in the NURE world-class and intermediate-grade studies remains for FY 1981. Objectives and program scope, noteworthy results of FY 1980 research, and program activities for FY 1981 are presented in this report

  1. Nondestructive Evaluation Program: Progress in 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    The increasing cost of equipment for power generating plants and the potential increases in productivity and safety available through rapidly developing Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) technology led EPRI to initiate a Nondestructive Evaluation Program in 1974. To date, the major focus has been on light water reactor inspection problems; however, increased application to other systems is now under way. This report presents a comprehensive review of the EPRI effort in the NDE area. Most of the report consists of contractor-supplied progress reports on each current project. An organizational plan of the program is presented in overview. In addition, organization from several viewpoints is presented, e.g., in-service inspection operators, R and D personnel, and utility representatives. The report summarizes significant progress made since the previous EPRI Special Report NP-4315-SR was issued in May 1986. Section 1 contains information about the program organization, and the sections that follow contain contractor-supplied progress reports of each current project. The progress reports are grouped by plant components - pipe, pressure vessel, steam generator and boiler tubes, and turbine. In addition, Part 6 is devoted to discussions of technology transfer

  2. Impact after three years of the Swedish energy audit program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backlund, Sandra; Thollander, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    The Swedish energy audit program is a publicly financed program, mainly targeting small and medium-sized firms to help them finance energy audits. By examining suggested and implemented energy efficiency measures from the energy audits conducted in 241 firms in the program, the aim of this paper is to examine the energy efficiency implementation gap and the cost efficiency of the program. The audits show that the firms' average annual energy efficiency improvement potential is between 860 and 1270 MWh/year which corresponds to a total energy efficiency improvement potential of between 6980 and 11,130 MWh/firm. The implementation rate of the suggested energy efficiency improvement measures in the SEAP is 53%. The program has resulted in investments in energy efficiency improvements between €74,100and €113,000/firm. - Highlights: • Auditors find an energy efficiency improvement potential of 460–660 MWh/year/firm. • The implementation rate of the suggested measures is 53%. • The total cost per MWh lie between €87 and €114/MWh. • Public costs in the SEAP are €0.7–€1.3/MWh

  3. Laser Programs, the first 25 years, 1972-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    Welcome to Laser Programs. I am pleased that you can share in the excitement of 25 years of history since we began as a small program of 125 people to our current status as a world premier laser and applied science research team of over 1700 members. It is fitting that this program, which was founded on the dream of developing inertial confinement fusion technology, should celebrate this anniversary the same year that the ground is broken for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Also at the same time, we are feeling the excitement of moving forward the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) technology toward private sector use and developing many alternate scientific applications and technologies derived from our core programs. It is through the hard work of many dedicated scientists, engineers, technicians, and administrative team members that we have been able to accomplish the remarkable internationally recognized achievements highlighted here. I hope this brochure will help you enjoy the opportunity to share in the celebration and pride of our scientific accomplishments; state-of-the-art facilities; and diligent, dedicated people that together make our Laser Programs and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory the best in the world

  4. Clean Technology Evaluation & Workforce Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patricia Glaza

    2012-12-01

    The overall objective of the Clean Technology Evaluation portion of the award was to design a process to speed up the identification of new clean energy technologies and match organizations to testing and early adoption partners. The project was successful in identifying new technologies targeted to utilities and utility technology integrators, in developing a process to review and rank the new technologies, and in facilitating new partnerships for technology testing and adoption. The purpose of the Workforce Development portion of the award was to create an education outreach program for middle & high-school students focused on clean technology science and engineering. While originally targeting San Diego, California and Cambridge, Massachusetts, the scope of the program was expanded to include a major clean technology speaking series and expo as part of the USA Science & Engineering Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

  5. Hanford Site Environmental Restoration Program 1994 fiscal year work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Site Management System (SMS) guidance requires a Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP) to be prepared for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Mission Area and all related programs. This revision is a complete update to cover the FY 1994 time period. This document describes the overall ER Missions Area and provides FYWP appendices for each of the following five program areas: Remedial Action (RA); Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D); Project Management and Support (PM ampersand S); Surveillance and Maintenance (S ampersand M); and Disposal Facilities (DF)

  6. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 1998 Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtel Nevada Ecological Services

    1998-01-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U. S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 1998. Twenty-one sites for seven projects were surveyed for the presence of state or federally protected species. Three projects were in or near habitat of the threatened desert tortoise and required special clearance and transect surveys. All geospatial data collected were entered into Bechtel Nevada's Ecological Geographic Information system for use in ongoing ecosystem management of the NTS

  7. A Three-Year Reflective Writing Program as Part of Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Jessica; Kerr, Kevin; Zielenski, Christopher; Toppel, Brianna; Johnson, Lauren; McCauley, Patrina; Turner, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To implement and evaluate a 3-year reflective writing program incorporated into introductory pharmacy practice experiences (IPPEs) in the first- through third-year of a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program. Design. Reflective writing was integrated into 6 IPPE courses to develop students’ lifelong learning skills. In their writing, students were required to self-assess their performance in patient care activities, identify and describe how they would incorporate learning opportunities, and then evaluate their progress. Practitioners, faculty members, and fourth-year PharmD students served as writing preceptors. Assessment. The success of the writing program was assessed by reviewing class performance and surveying writing preceptor’s opinions regarding the student’s achievement of program objectives. Class pass rates averaged greater than 99% over the 8 years of the program and the large majority of the writing preceptors reported that student learning objectives were met. A support pool of 99 writing preceptors was created. Conclusions. A 3-year reflective writing program improved pharmacy students’ reflection and reflective writing skills. PMID:23788811

  8. Calendar Year 2009 Program Benefits for ENERGY STAR Labeled Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homan, Gregory K; Sanchez, Marla C.; Brown, Richard E.

    2010-11-15

    ENERGY STAR is a voluntary energy efficiency labeling program operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE), designed to identify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices. Since the program inception in 1992, ENERGY STAR has become a leading international brand for energy efficient products, and currently labels more than thirty products, spanning office equipment, heating, cooling and ventilation equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics, and major appliances. ENERGY STAR's central role in the development of regional, national and international energy programs necessitates an open process whereby its program achievements to date as well as projected future savings are shared with stakeholders. This report presents savings estimates from the use ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of energy, dollar, and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2009, annual forecasts for 2010 and 2011, and cumulative savings estimates for the period 1993 through 2009 and cumulative forecasts for the period 2010 through 2015. Through 2009 the program saved 9.5 Quads of primary energy and avoided the equivalent of 170 million metric tons carbon (MMTC). The forecast for the period 2009-2015 is 11.5 Quads or primary energy saved and 202 MMTC emissions avoided. The sensitivity analysis bounds the best estimate of carbon avoided between 110 MMTC and 231 MMTC (1993 to 2009) and between 130 MMTC and 285 MMTC (2010 to 2015).

  9. Evaluating Educational Programs. ERIC Digest Series Number EA 54.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beswick, Richard

    In this digest, readers are introduced to the scope of instructional program evaluation and evaluators' changing roles in school districts. A program evaluation measures outcomes based on student-attainment goals, implementation levels, and external factors such as budgetary restraints and community support. Instructional program evaluation may be…

  10. Evaluating public participation in environmental decision-making: EPA's superfund community involvement program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan Charnley; Bruce. Engelbert

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses an 8-year, ongoing project that evaluates the Environmental Protection Agency's Superfund community involvement program. The project originated as a response to the Government Performance and Results Act, which requires federal agencies to articulate program goals, and evaluate and report their progress in meeting those goals. The evaluation...

  11. KSC SBIR/STTR 2004 Program Year Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    developed by a research institution through the entrepreneurship of a small business. The STIR program is smaller in funding than the SBIR program. While the proposal is submitted by the small business concern, at least 30 percent of the funding and work must originate with the research institution. STTR Phase I projects receive up to $100K for a one-year effort, and a Phase II contract receives up to $600K for two years.

  12. Interim Reliability Evaluation Program procedures guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, D.D.; Gallup, D.R.; Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Kolb, G.J.; Stack, D.W.; Lofgren, E.; Horton, W.H.; Lobner, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    This document presents procedures for conducting analyses of a scope similar to those performed in Phase II of the Interim Reliability Evaluation Program (IREP). It documents the current state of the art in performing the plant systems analysis portion of a probabilistic risk assessment. Insights gained into managing such an analysis are discussed. Step-by-step procedures and methodological guidance constitute the major portion of the document. While not to be viewed as a cookbook, the procedures set forth the principal steps in performing an IREP analysis. Guidance for resolving the problems encountered in previous analyses is offered. Numerous examples and representative products from previous analyses clarify the discussion

  13. A computer program to evaluate optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, D.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program is used to evaluate a 25.4 cm X-ray telescope at a field angle of 20 minutes of arc by geometrical analysis. The object is regarded as a point source of electromagnetic radiation, and the optical surfaces are treated as boundary conditions in the solution of the electromagnetic wave propagation equation. The electric field distribution is then determined in the region of the image and the intensity distribution inferred. A comparison of wave analysis results and photographs taken through the telescope shows excellent agreement.

  14. Economic evaluation of a comprehensive teenage pregnancy prevention program: pilot program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Marjorie S; Ross, Joseph S; Bilodeau, Roseanne; Richter, Rosemary S; Palley, Jane E; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2009-12-01

    Previous research has suggested that comprehensive teenage pregnancy prevention programs that address sexual education and life skills development and provide academic support are effective in reducing births among enrolled teenagers. However, there have been limited data on the costs and cost effectiveness of such programs. The study used a community-based participatory research approach to develop estimates of the cost-benefit of the Pathways/Senderos Center, a comprehensive neighborhood-based program to prevent unintended pregnancies and promote positive development for adolescents. Using data from 1997-2003, an in-time intervention analysis was conducted to determine program cost-benefit while teenagers were enrolled; an extrapolation analysis was then used to estimate accrued economic benefits and cost-benefit up to age 30 years. The program operating costs totaled $3,228,152.59 and reduced the teenage childbearing rate from 94.10 to 40.00 per 1000 teenage girls, averting $52,297.84 in total societal costs, with an economic benefit to society from program participation of $2,673,153.11. Therefore, total costs to society exceeded economic benefits by $559,677.05, or $1599.08 per adolescent per year. In an extrapolation analysis, benefits to society exceed costs by $10,474.77 per adolescent per year by age 30 years on average, with social benefits outweighing total social costs by age 20.1 years. This comprehensive teenage pregnancy prevention program is estimated to provide societal economic benefits once participants are young adults, suggesting the need to expand beyond pilot demonstrations and evaluate the long-range cost effectiveness of similarly comprehensive programs when they are implemented more widely in high-risk neighborhoods.

  15. Programa de fluoración de la leche en Codegua, Chile: evaluación al tercer año The milk fluoridation program in Codegua, Chile: an evaluation after 3 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Mariño

    1999-08-01

    study community of Codegua had received fluoridated dairy products, while children in the control community of La Punta had received nonfluoridated dairy products. Three years after the program began in Codegua, the community showed a significant improvement in the indices of prevalence of caries. Over that time period, the prevalence of caries among children 3 to 6 years old declined between 40% and 60%. Among children 3 years old, the proportion of them without a history of caries increased by 74%, from 40.7% to 70.8%. Among 4-year-olds, that proportion rose by 71%, from 33.3% to 56.9%. Similar to results obtained elsewhere with programs to fluoridate drinking water, the outcomes in Codegua were achieved without any other steps by the National Program for Supplementary Feeding, such as motivational campaigns for mothers or educational efforts to encourage consumption of the program’s food products.

  16. Evolution of a multilevel framework for health program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masso, Malcolm; Quinsey, Karen; Fildes, Dave

    2017-07-01

    A well-conceived evaluation framework increases understanding of a program's goals and objectives, facilitates the identification of outcomes and can be used as a planning tool during program development. Herein we describe the origins and development of an evaluation framework that recognises that implementation is influenced by the setting in which it takes place, the individuals involved and the processes by which implementation is accomplished. The framework includes an evaluation hierarchy that focuses on outcomes for consumers, providers and the care delivery system, and is structured according to six domains: program delivery, impact, sustainability, capacity building, generalisability and dissemination. These components of the evaluation framework fit into a matrix structure, and cells within the matrix are supported by relevant evaluation tools. The development of the framework has been influenced by feedback from various stakeholders, existing knowledge of the evaluators and the literature on health promotion and implementation science. Over the years, the framework has matured and is generic enough to be useful in a wide variety of circumstances, yet specific enough to focus data collection, data analysis and the presentation of findings.

  17. Fusion safety program annual report fiscal year 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Cadwallader, L.C.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in FY 1997. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is the designated lead laboratory, and Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in FY 1979 to perform research and develop data needed to ensure safety in fusion facilities. Activities include experiments, analysis, code development and application, and other forms of research. These activities are conducted at the INEEL, different DOE laboratories, and other institutions. The technical areas covered in this report include chemical reactions and activation product release, tritium safety, risk assessment failure rate database development, and safety code development and application to fusion safety issues. Most of this work has been done in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project. Work done for ITER this year has focused on developing the needed information for the Non-site Specific Safety Report (NSSR-2)

  18. Fusion safety program annual report fiscal year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Cadwallader, L.C. [and others

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in FY 1997. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is the designated lead laboratory, and Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in FY 1979 to perform research and develop data needed to ensure safety in fusion facilities. Activities include experiments, analysis, code development and application, and other forms of research. These activities are conducted at the INEEL, different DOE laboratories, and other institutions. The technical areas covered in this report include chemical reactions and activation product release, tritium safety, risk assessment failure rate database development, and safety code development and application to fusion safety issues. Most of this work has been done in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project. Work done for ITER this year has focused on developing the needed information for the Non-site Specific Safety Report (NSSR-2).

  19. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have conducted research and development (R&D) in geothermal energy since 1971. To develop the technology needed to harness the Nation's vast geothermal resources, DOE's Office of Geothermal and Wind Technologies oversees a network of national laboratories, industrial contractors, universities, and their subcontractors. The following mission and goal statements guide the overall activities of the Office of Geothermal and Wind Technologies. This Federal Geothermal Program Research Update reviews the specific objectives, status, and accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal Program for Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 1999. The information contained in this Research Update illustrates how the mission and goals of the Office of Geothermal and Wind Technologies are reflected in each R&D activity. The Geothermal Program, from its guiding principles to the most detailed research activities, is focused on expanding the use of geothermal energy.

  20. Self–Evaluation of Distance Learning Study Program as a Part of Internal Quality Assurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radojka Krneta

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper features quality assurance of specific distance learning master study program through self-evaluation. This unique program involving e-learning as the program content, as well as delivery method, is presented in the paper from the aspects of its quality assurance. Student evaluation of this study program as a part of the internal quality assurance is performed at the end of every school year in the aim of its quality assurance. Results and conclusions of self-evaluation conducted in this school year by known SEVAQ+ evaluation tool are presented here.

  1. Fusion Safety Program annual report, fiscal year 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, D.F.; Merrill, B.J.; Herring, J.S.; Piet, S.J.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1987-02-01

    The Fusion Safety Program (FSP) has supported magnetic fusion technology for seven years, and this is the seventh annual report issued by the FSP. Program focus is identification of the magnitude and distribution of radioactive inventories in fusion reactors, and research and analysis of postulated accident scenarios that could cause the release of a portion of these inventories. Research results are used to develop improved designs that can reduce the probability and magnitude of such releases and thus improve the overall safety of fusion reactors. During FY-1985, research activities continued and participation continued on the Ignition Systems Project (ISP). This report presents the significant results of EGandG Idaho, Inc., activities and those from outside contracts, and includes a list of publications produced during the year, and activities planned for FY-1986

  2. Fusion Safety Program annual report, fiscal year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Dolan, T.J.; Herring, J.S.; McCarthy, K.A.; Merrill, B.J.; Motloch, C.G.; Petti, D.A.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in fiscal year 1994. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboratory and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL, at other DOE laboratories, and at other institutions, including the University of Wisconsin. The technical areas covered in this report include tritium safety, beryllium safety, chemical reactions and activation product release, safety aspects of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruptions, risk assessment failure rate data base development, and thermalhydraulics code development and their application to fusion safety issues. Much of this work has been done in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Also included in the report are summaries of the safety and environmental studies performed by the Fusion Safety Program for the Tokamak Physics Experiment and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and of the technical support for commercial fusion facility conceptual design studies. A major activity this year has been work to develop a DOE Technical Standard for the safety of fusion test facilities

  3. Maine Migrant Program: 1997-1998 Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazinet, Suzanne C., Ed.

    The Maine Department of Education contracts with local educational agencies to administer the Maine Migrant Education Program. The program's overall mission is to provide the support necessary for migrant children to achieve Maine's academic standards. In 1997-98, 73 local migrant programs served 9,838 students, and 63 summer programs served 1,769…

  4. 5 years of experience with a large-scale mentoring program for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinilla, Severin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present our 5-year-experience with a large-scale mentoring program for undergraduate medical students at the Ludwig Maximilians-Universität Munich (LMU. We implemented a two-tiered program with a peer-mentoring concept for preclinical students and a 1:1-mentoring concept for clinical students aided by a fully automated online-based matching algorithm. Approximately 20-30% of each student cohort participates in our voluntary mentoring program. Defining ideal program evaluation strategies, recruiting mentors from beyond the academic environment and accounting for the mentoring network reality remain challenging. We conclude that a two-tiered program is well accepted by students and faculty. In addition the online-based matching seems to be effective for large-scale mentoring programs.

  5. Conditional cash transfer impact evaluation: an evaluation of the costa rican secondary education program Avancemos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Mata

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the impact of Avancemos, a conditional cash transfer program in Costa Rica. Specifically, this paper measures the impact on student desertion for the first year of the program using a panel created with the Household Surveys for Multiple Purposes for the years 2006 and 2007, elaborated by the National Institute of Statistics and Census. Using econometric tools and quasi-experimental methodologies such as Propensity Score Matching and difference-in-differences, we find a positive impact associated to the program for desertion and reinsertion. Specifically, for between 10 and 16 percent of the students who did not leave high school, it was only due to Avancemos, meaning that without the program they would have abandoned their studies. This is why we can conclude that Avancemos had a positive impact according to its planned objectives of preventing dropouts and ensuring their reinsertion.

  6. Evaluation of Medical Education virtual Program: P3 model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Rita; Shokrpour, Nasrin; Boroumand, Maryam

    2016-10-01

    In e-learning, people get involved in a process and create the content (product) and make it available for virtual learners. The present study was carried out in order to evaluate the first virtual master program in medical education at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences according to P3 Model. This is an evaluation research study with post single group design used to determine how effective this program was. All students 60 who participated more than one year in this virtual program and 21 experts including teachers and directors participated in this evaluation project. Based on the P3 e-learning model, an evaluation tool with 5-point Likert rating scale was designed and applied to collect the descriptive data. Students reported storyboard and course design as the most desirable element of learning environment (2.30±0.76), but they declared technical support as the less desirable part (1.17±1.23). Presence of such framework in this regard and using it within the format of appropriate tools for evaluation of e-learning in universities and higher education institutes, which present e-learning curricula in the country, may contribute to implementation of the present and future e-learning curricula efficiently and guarantee its implementation in an appropriate way.

  7. Evaluation of medical education virtual program: P3 model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RITA REZAEE

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In e-learning, people get involved in a process and create the content (product and make it available for virtual learners. The present study was carried out in order to evaluate the first virtual master program in medical education at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences according to P3 Model. Methods: This is an evaluation research study with post single group design used to determine how effective this program was. All students 60 who participated more than one year in this virtual program and 21 experts including teachers and directors participated in this evaluation project. Based on the P3 e-learning model, an evaluation tool with 5-point Likert rating scale was designed and applied to collect the descriptive data. Results: Students reported storyboard and course design as the most desirable element of learning environment (2.30±0.76, but they declared technical support as the less desirable part (1.17±1.23. Conclusion: Presence of such framework in this regard and using it within the format of appropriate tools for evaluation of e-learning in universities and higher education institutes, which present e-learning curricula in the country, may contribute to implementation of the present and future e-learning curricula efficiently and guarantee its implementation in an appropriate way.

  8. Evaluation of the Health Rocks! Program: The Association of Youth Engagement with Program Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This evaluation research examined the relationship between program process and program outcome, specifically, youth engagement in the national 4-H Council Health Rocks! program and their program outcomes.  Based on program evaluation surveys completed after the program by participants, youths’ engagement in the program was associated with their gains in knowledge and skills about substance use, and personal assets related to avoiding risks.  When youth participants find a program interesting, are actively engaged in the program, and find the program staff friendly, they benefit more from the program.  Findings underscore the importance of engaging curriculum and friendly staff to the success of extension or afterschool youth programs. The evaluation method may offer an example of balancing rigor of evaluation design and feasibility of implementing an evaluation.

  9. Systematic evaluation program. Status report and initial evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    The MHB Ongoing Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) Assessment Study was initiated by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) in 1980. This MHB report is a status report and initial evaluation of SEP. The methodology and results of SEP are disscused with particular emphasis on the first two SEP plant reviews - the Palisades and R.E. Ginna nuclear power plants. The comments of cognizant persons in the NRC and the ACRS, as well as private consultants, are included herein. MHBs major findings are as follows: The SEP plant review methodology was acceptable to the NRC Commissioners, the ACRS, and the NRC Staffs consultants who evaluated the first two SEP plant reviews. A concern raised by all who commented on SEP was the absence of Three Mile Island Action Plan Items and Unresolved Safety Issues from current SEP reviews. The SEP reviews of the Palisades and R.E. Ginna plants concluded that the two plant designs were adequate with respect to a majority of safety topics. Several topics remain unresolved in both the Palisades and R.E. Ginna SEP reviews. In the case of the Ginna plant, several related topics have been grouped together in a major structural reevaluation study. In general, due to the number of unresolved and excluded topics, SEP has not at this time produced a plant safety evaluation which can be considered complete and integrated. (author)

  10. Home safe home: Evaluation of a childhood home safety program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Tanya Charyk; Clark, Andrew; Gilliland, Jason; Miller, Michael R; Edwards, Jane; Haidar, Tania; Batey, Brandon; Vogt, Kelly N; Parry, Neil G; Fraser, Douglas D; Merritt, Neil

    2016-09-01

    The London Health Sciences Centre Home Safety Program (HSP) provides safety devices, education, a safety video, and home safety checklist to all first-time parents for the reduction of childhood home injuries. The objective of this study was to evaluate the HSP for the prevention of home injuries in children up to 2 years of age. A program evaluation was performed with follow-up survey, along with an interrupted time series analysis of emergency department (ED) visits for home injuries 5 years before (2007-2013) and 2 years after (2013-2015) implementation. Spatial analysis of ED visits was undertaken to assess differences in home injury rates by dissemination areas controlling differences in socioeconomic status (i.e., income, education, and lone-parent status) at the neighborhood level. A total of 3,458 first-time parents participated in the HSP (a 74% compliance rate). Of these, 20% (n = 696) of parents responded to our questionnaire, with 94% reporting the program to be useful (median, 6; interquartile range, 2 on a 7-point Likert scale) and 81% learning new strategies for preventing home injuries. The median age of the respondent's babies were 12 months (interquartile range, 1). The home safety check list was used by 87% of respondents to identify hazards in their home, with 95% taking action to minimize the risk. The time series analysis demonstrated a significant decline in ED visits for home injuries in toddlers younger than2 years of age after HSP implementation. The declines in ED visits for home injuries remained significant over and above each socioeconomic status covariate. Removing hazards, supervision, and installing safety devices are key facilitators in the reduction of home injuries. Parents found the HSP useful to identify hazards, learn new strategies, build confidence, and provide safety products. Initial finding suggests that the program is effective in reducing home injuries in children up to 2 years of age. Therapeutic/care management study

  11. Calendar Year 2008 Program Benefits for ENERGY STAR Labeled Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homan, GregoryK; Sanchez, Marla; Brown, RichardE; Lai, Judy

    2010-08-24

    This paper presents current and projected savings for ENERGY STAR labeled products, and details the status of the model as implemented in the September 2009 spreadsheets. ENERGY STAR is a voluntary energy efficiency labeling program operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE), designed to identify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices. Since the program inception in 1992, ENERGY STAR has become a leading international brand for energy efficient products, and currently labels more than thirty products, spanning office equipment, heating, cooling and ventilation equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics, and major appliances. ENERGY STAR's central role in the development of regional, national and international energy programs necessitates an open process whereby its program achievements to date as well as projected future savings are shared with stakeholders. This report presents savings estimates for ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of energy, dollar, and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2008, annual forecasts for 2009 and 2010, and cumulative savings estimates for the period 1993 through 2008 and cumulative forecasts for the period 2009 through 2015. Through 2008 the program saved 8.8 Quads of primary energy and avoided the equivalent of 158 metric tones carbon (MtC). The forecast for the period 2009-2015 is 18.1 Quads or primary energy saved and 316 MtC emissions avoided. The sensitivity analysis bounds the best estimate of carbon avoided between 104 MtC and 213 MtC (1993 to 2008) and between 206 MtC and 444 MtC (2009 to 2015). In this report we address the following questions for ENERGY STAR labeled products: (1) How are ENERGY STAR impacts quantified; (2) What are the ENERGY STAR achievements; and (3) What are the limitations to our method?

  12. Process Evaluation for a Prison-based Substance Abuse Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staton, Michele; Leukefeld, Carl; Logan, T. K.; Purvis, Rick

    2000-01-01

    Presents findings from a process evaluation conducted in a prison-based substance abuse program in Kentucky. Discusses key components in the program, including a detailed program description, modifications in planned treatment strategies, program documentation, and perspectives of staff and clients. Findings suggest that prison-based programs have…

  13. Twenty Years of One Astronomy Teacher Professional Development - The EXES Teacher Associate Program at UT Austin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Keely; Hemenway, Mary Kay; Sneden, Chris; Lacy, John; Richter, Matthew J.; EXES Teacher Associates

    2018-01-01

    The Astronomy Department and McDonald Observatory at the University of Texas at Austin has and continues to offer a suite of different astronomy based K-12 teacher professional development programs. One of our longest running, and most successful programs, is reaching its 20th anniversary, the EXES Teacher Associate Program, which was started in 1998. The EXES Teacher Associate program features sustained and continued professional development opportunities for K-12 science and math educators. It consists of 6 times per year day-long meetings, coupled with other professional development opportunities provided at various times. In total, there are approximately 30 active members of the group currently, but more than 90 teachers have participated in this group over its 20 year history. The program has had astronomy education as its focus throughout its history, but different partnerships and collaborations with other programs have supported the group and have allowed for a variety of professional development opportunities and themes for educators to engage in. We will give an overview of this program, present evaluation data and teacher feedback related to program success and student impact, and highlight a few specific program opportunities that are unique and have been shown to be most impactful for participants.

  14. The International Heliophysical Year Education and Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabello-Soares, M.; Morrow, C.; Thompson, B.

    2006-12-01

    The International Heliophysical Year (IHY) will celebrate the 50th anniversary of the International Geophysical Year (IGY) and will continue its tradition of international research collaboration. The term "heliophysical" is an extension of the term "geophysical", where the Earth, Sun & Solar System are studied not as separate domains but through the universal processes governing the heliosphere. IHY represents a logical next-step, extending the studies into the heliosphere and thus including the drivers of geophysical change. The main goal of IHY Education and Outreach Program is to create more global access to exemplary resources in space and earth science education and public outreach. By taking advantage of the IHY organization with representatives in every nation and in the partnership with the United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative (UNBSSI), we aim to promote new international partnerships. Our goal is to assist in increasing the visibility and accessibility of exemplary programs and in the identification of formal or informal educational products that would be beneficial to improve the space and earth science knowledge in a given country; leaving a legacy of enhanced global access to resources and of world-wide connectivity between those engaged in education and public outreach efforts that are related to IHY science. Here we describe the IHY Education and Outreach Program, how to participate and the benefits in doing so. ~

  15. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2003-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have conducted research and development (R&D) in geothermal energy since 1971. To develop the technology needed to harness the Nation's vast geothermal resources, DOE's Office of Geothermal Technologies oversees a network of national laboratories, industrial contractors, universities, and their subcontractors. The goals are: (1) Double the number of States with geothermal electric power facilities to eight by 2006; (2) Reduce the levelized cost of generating geothermal power to 3-5 cents per kWh by 2007; and (3) Supply the electrical power or heat energy needs of 7 million homes and businesses in the United States by 2010. This Federal Geothermal Program Research Update reviews the specific objectives, status, and accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal Program for Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 2002. The information contained in this Research Update illustrates how the mission and goals of the Office of Geothermal Technologies are reflected in each R&D activity. The Geothermal Program, from its guiding principles to the most detailed research activities, is focused on expanding the use of geothermal energy. balanced strategy for the Geothermal Program.

  16. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-03-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have conducted research and development (R&D) in geothermal energy since 1971. To develop the technology needed to harness the Nation's vast geothermal resources, DOE's Office of Geothermal Technologies oversees a network of national laboratories, industrial contractors, universities, and their subcontractors. The following mission and goal statements guide the overall activities of the Office. The goals are: (1) Reduce the levelized cost of generating geothermal power to 3-5 cents per kWh by 2007; (2) Double the number of States with geothermal electric power facilities to eight by 2006; and (3) Supply the electrical power or heat energy needs of 7 million homes and businesses in the United States by 2010. This Federal Geothermal Program Research Update reviews the accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal Program for Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 2003. The information contained in this Research Update illustrates how the mission and goals of the Office of Geothermal Technologies are reflected in each R&D activity. The Geothermal Program, from its guiding principles to the most detailed research activities, is focused on expanding the use of geothermal energy. balanced strategy for the Geothermal Program.

  17. Sixty years of the National Food Program in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Maria NOGUEIRA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available School meals were introduced in the Brazilian political agenda by a group of scholars known as nutrition scientists' in the 1940s. In 1955, the Campanha de Merenda Escolar, the first official school food program, was stablished, and sixty years after its inception, school food in Brazil stands as a decentralised public policy, providing services to students enrolled in public schools, which involve the Brazilian federal government, twentyseven federative units, and their 5,570 municipalities. Throughout its history, school food has gone through many stages that reflect the social transformations in Brazil: from a campaign to implement school food focused on the problem of malnutrition and the ways to solve it, to the creation of a universal public policy relying on social participation and interface between other modern, democratic, and sustainable policies, establishing a strategy for promoting food and nutrition security, development, and social protection. In this article, the School Food Program is analyzed from the perspective of four basic structures that support it as public policy: the formal structure, consisting of legal milestones that regulated the program; substantive structure, referring to the public and private social actors involved; material structure, regarding the way in which Brazil sponsors the program; and finally, the symbolic structure, consisting of knowledge, values, interests, and rules that legitimatize the policy.

  18. Analysis of the Education Program Approval Process: A Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountaine, Charles A.; And Others

    A study of the education program approval process involving the Veterans Administration (VA) and the State Approving Agencies (SAAs) had the following objectives: to describe the present education program approval process; to determine time and costs associated with the education program approval process; to describe the approval process at…

  19. Evaluation of the Finnish nuclear safety research program 'SAFIR2010'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    A panel of three members has been asked by the Ministry of Employment and the Economy (MEE) to evaluate SAFIR2010, the Finnish research program on nuclear power plant safety. The program was established for the period 2007-2010 to help maintain expertise in nuclear safety, to integrate young people into the research in order to help assure the future availability of expertise, and to support international collaborations. The program is directed by a Steering Group, appointed by MEE, with representatives from all organizations involved with nuclear safety in Finland. SAFIR2010 has consisted of approximately 30 projects from year to year that fall into eight subject areas: 1. Organization and human factors 2. Automation and control room 3. Fuel and reactor physics 4. Thermal hydraulics 5. Severe accidents 6. Structural safety of reactor circuit 7. Construction safety 8. Probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) For each of these areas there are Reference Groups that provide oversight of the projects within their jurisdiction. The panel carried out its evaluation by reviewing copies of relevant documents and, during a one-week period 17-22 January 2010, meeting with key individuals. The results of the panel are provided as general conclusions, responses to questions posed by MEE, challenges and recommendations and comments on specific projects in each subject area. The general conclusions reflect the panel's view that SAFIR2010 is meeting its objectives and carrying out quality research. The questions addressed are: (a.) Are the achieved results in balance with the funding? Are the results exploited efficiently in practice? (b.) How well does the expertise cover the field? Is the entire SAFIR2010 programme balanced to all different fields in nuclear safety? Does it raise efficiently new experts? (c.) Have the 2006 evaluation results been implemented successfully into SAFIR2010 program? (d.) Challenges and recommendations. In general the panel was very positive about SAFIR

  20. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 1998 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada Ecological Services

    1998-10-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U. S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 1998. Twenty-one sites for seven projects were surveyed for the presence of state or federally protected species. Three projects were in or near habitat of the threatened desert tortoise and required special clearance and transect surveys. All geospatial data collected were entered into Bechtel Nevada's Ecological Geographic Information system for use in ongoing ecosystem management of the NTS.

  1. Solid waste programs Fiscal Year 1995 multi-year program plan/fiscal year work plan WBS 1.2.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, M.M.

    1994-09-01

    The Hanford Mission Plan, Volume 1, Site Guidance identifies the need for the Solid Waste Program to treat, store, and dispose of a wide variety of solid material types consisting of multiple radioactive and hazardous waste classes. This includes future Hanford Site activities which will generate new wastes that must be handled as cleanup activities are completed. Solid wastes are typically categorized as transuranic waste, low level waste, low level mixed waste, and hazardous waste. To meet this need the Solid Waste Program has defined its mission as the following - receive, store, treat, decontaminate, and dispose of solid radioactive and nonradioactive dangerous wastes in a safe, cost effective and environmentally compliant manner. This workbook contains the program overview, program baselines and fiscal year work plan for the Solid Waste Program

  2. Evaluation of a liaison librarian program: client and liaison perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Michele R; Cataldo, Tara Tobin; Sherwill-Navarro, Pamela; Jesano, Rae

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes a survey-based evaluation of the five-year old Liaison Librarian Program at the University of Florida. Liaison librarians, faculty, students, staff, residents, and post-doctoral associates were queried via Web-based surveys. Questions addressed client and liaison perspectives on a variety of issues, including program and service awareness and usage, client-library relations and communication, client support for the program, and liaison workload. Approximately 43% of the 323 client respondents were aware of liaison services; 72% (n = 163) of these clients had had contact with their liaison. Ninety-five percent (n = 101) of faculty and students who reported contact with their liaison supported the continuation of the program. Liaison services were used by a greater percentage of faculty than students, although they had similar patterns of usage and reported the same "traditional" services to be most important. Liaisons indicated that communications with clients had increased, the reputation of the library was enhanced, and their workloads had increased as a result of the Liaison Librarian Program. Survey results suggest that the Liaison Librarian Program has a core set of clients who use and highly value the services provided by liaisons. Recommendations addressing workload, training, marketing, and administrative support are provided.

  3. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-03-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have conducted research and development (R&D) in geothermal energy since 1971. The Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) works in partnership with industry to establish geothermal energy as an economically competitive contributor to the U.S. energy supply. Geothermal energy production, a $1.5 billion a year industry, generates electricity or provides heat for direct use applications. The technologies developed by the Geothermal Technologies Program will provide the Nation with new sources of electricity that are highly reliable and cost competitive and do not add to America's air pollution or the emission of greenhouse gases. Geothermal electricity generation is not subject to fuel price volatility and supply disruptions from changes in global energy markets. Geothermal energy systems use a domestic and renewable source of energy. The Geothermal Technologies Program develops innovative technologies to find, access, and use the Nation's geothermal resources. These efforts include emphasis on Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with continued R&D on geophysical and geochemical exploration technologies, improved drilling systems, and more efficient heat exchangers and condensers. The Geothermal Technologies Program is balanced between short-term goals of greater interest to industry, and long-term goals of importance to national energy interests. The program's research and development activities are expected to increase the number of new domestic geothermal fields, increase the success rate of geothermal well drilling, and reduce the costs of constructing and operating geothermal power plants. These improvements will increase the quantity of economically viable geothermal resources, leading in turn to an increased number of geothermal power facilities serving more energy demand. These new geothermal projects will take advantage of geothermal resources in locations where development is not currently

  4. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update - Fiscal Year 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Laney

    2005-03-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have conducted research and development (R&D) in geothermal energy since 1971. The Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) works in partnership with industry to establish geothermal energy as an economically competitive contributor to the U.S. energy supply. Geothermal energy production, a $1.5 billion a year industry, generates electricity or provides heat for direct use applications. The technologies developed by the Geothermal Technologies Program will provide the Nation with new sources of electricity that are highly reliable and cost competitive and do not add to America's air pollution or the emission of greenhouse gases. Geothermal electricity generation is not subject to fuel price volatility and supply disruptions from changes in global energy markets. Geothermal energy systems use a domestic and renewable source of energy. The Geothermal Technologies Program develops innovative technologies to find, access, and use the Nation's geothermal resources. These efforts include emphasis on Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with continued R&D on geophysical and geochemical exploration technologies, improved drilling systems, and more efficient heat exchangers and condensers. The Geothermal Technologies Program is balanced between short-term goals of greater interest to industry, and long-term goals of importance to national energy interests. The program's research and development activities are expected to increase the number of new domestic geothermal fields, increase the success rate of geothermal well drilling, and reduce the costs of constructing and operating geothermal power plants. These improvements will increase the quantity of economically viable geothermal resources, leading in turn to an increased number of geothermal power facilities serving more energy demand. These new geothermal projects will take advantage of geothermal resources in locations where development is not currently possible or

  5. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2002 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. A. Wills

    2002-12-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during fiscal year 2002. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species and important biological resources were conducted for 26 NTS projects. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 374 acres. Thirteen of the projects were in desert tortoise habitat, and 13.38 acres of desert tortoise habitat were disturbed. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed at project areas or along paved roads. Compilation of historical wildlife data continued this year in efforts to develop faunal distribution maps for the NTS. Photographs associated with the NTS ecological landform units sampled to create the NTS vegetation maps were cataloged for future retrieval and analysis. The list of sensitive plant species for which long-term population monitoring is scheduled was revised. Six vascular plants and five mosses were added to the list. Plant density estimates from ten populations of Astragalus beatleyae were collected, and eight known populations of Eriogonum concinnum were visited to assess plant and habitat status. Minimal field monitoring of western burrowing owl burrows occurred. A report relating to the ecology of the western burrowing owl on the Nevada Test Site was prepared which summarizes four years of data collected on this species

  6. Distance Education Programs in Radiation Protection- A ten year Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauvin, J. P.

    2004-01-01

    Professional development has always played a critical role in the organisation of radiation safety programs. Training programs for professionals, technologists and general workers involved in high risk trades vary according to their experience and specific functions. The key concept for effective programs consists in the proper match of the training content with the individual skills and interests of the participants. In conventional class training, unless the students constitute an homogeneous group, the teaching can not perfectly follow the specific needs of all participants and the pace of the course is kept at a sub-optimal level in order to accommodate less talented participants. Distance education with Electronic Mail, web CT, first class mail, and other communication tools has been used with success during the last decade in undergraduate, master's and doctoral programs as well as in continuing training for workers. It offers a wide range of teaching strategies and course content. Compared to conventional training, it has numerous benefits: (1) Travel costs for students and instructors are eliminated and international groups of students and professors can easily be constituted; (2) Instructors can be recruited worldwide; (3) Discussion forums can be established easily; (4) Integration of expert guests into online course discussions are possible; (5) Student online publications of projects, assignments and abstracts are current; (6) Schedules are more flexible and proctored examinations are possible. The author will present the strategies used at McGill University in the teaching of Radiation Protection to physicians and professionals ( MSc. level ) and the application of distance education methods for training large groups of workers in biomedical research centres, hospitals, power generation facilities and utilities in general. He will describe the content of the programs, the study guides, the evaluation formats, web-site references and resources, the

  7. The Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory Project. A fiscal year program (at fiscal year 2001). Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    Study on stratum science in the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) Project is planned to classify it to the following three steps to progress them by considering some differences such as construction process, subject/object/scale and so on of its survey research accompanied with it in facilities in the MIU; 1) A study step on survey forecasting from earth surface, 2) A study step accompanied with excavation of road for study, and 3) A study step using the road for study. In fiscal year 2001, a trial drilling survey at No. MIU04 hole and a long-term water pumping test in the research items at objects of a series of processes on survey, analysis and evaluation, are planned to carry out. The trial survey is planned to finish at early half of the fiscal year, and its report will be summarized after analysis and evaluation of the trial survey at the No. MIU-4 hole and comparison and evaluation with already made geological environment models. According to these results, by carrying out some investigations on an engineering plan and detailed survey and research plan at the second step, renewal of the engineering plan on the road for study from later half of fiscal year 2001 to fiscal year 2002 and preparation of a basic flow on survey/analysis/evaluation of the second step will be progressed. And, as the long-term water pumping test is planned to be carried out at later half of fiscal year 2001, so its analysis and evaluation are planned to carry continuously out to fiscal year 2002. According to these results, after fiscal year 2002, renewal of engineering plan on the road for study and preparation of detailed survey and research plan at the second step will be progressed. (G.K.)

  8. Evaluating an Enrichment Program in Early Childhood: A Multi-Methods Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aswegen, Christa; Pendergast, Donna

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the evaluation of one topic in an enrichment program designed for children in their early years of learning. The program is responsive to an increased understanding of the benefits for very young children of programs that not only take advantage of the sensitive periods for learning but that also assist parents to a take a…

  9. Is Something Better than Nothing? An Evaluation of Early Childhood Programs in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Nirmala; Sun, Jin; Pearson, Veronica; Pearson, Emma; Liu, Hongyun; Constas, Mark A.; Engle, Patrice L.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the relative effectiveness of home-based, community-based, and state-run early childhood programs across Cambodia. A total of 880 five-year-olds (55% girls) from 6 rural provinces in Cambodia attending State Preschools, Community Preschools, Home-Based Programs, or no programs were assessed twice using the Cambodian…

  10. Preventing errors in administration of parenteral drugs: the results of a four-year national patient safety program.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, C. de; Schilp, J.; Wagner, C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the implementation of a four-year national patient safety program concerning the parenteral drug administration process in the Netherlands. Methods: Structuring the preparation and administration process of parenteral drugs reduces the number of medication errors. A

  11. Fiscal year 1990 Rocky Flats Plant environmental restoration program current-year work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, T.; Waage, E.; Miller, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the FY90 Current Year Work Plan (CYWP), intended to serve as a guiding document with which the Environmental Restoration and RCRA Compliance programs will be implemented at the Rocky Flats Plant, The Current Year Work Plan document serves to provide in one single document any cross-references necessary to understand how the DOE Five Year Plan, Site Specific Plan, or any other related documents fit into the Current Year Work Plan for the Rocky Flats Environmental Restoration. The scope of this paper will compare the planned Fiscal Year 1990 environmental restoration activities to those actually achieved at the end of the fiscal year. The DOE Headquarters (HQ) issued the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER/WM) Five-Year Plan (FYP). The purpose of the FYP is to establish an agenda for compliance and cleanup against which progress will be measured. The Five Year Plan has been updated to include the Colorado Department of Health (CDH), Evironmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Department of Energy (DOE) Inter Agency Agreement Environmental Restoration activities. It addresses hazardous wastes, radioactive wastes, mixed wastes (radioactive and hazardous), and sanitary wastes. It also addresses facilities and sites contaminated with or used in the management of those wastes

  12. Analytical Services Fiscal Year 1996 Multi-year Program Plan Fiscal Year Work Plan WBS 1.5.1, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document contains the Fiscal Year 1996 Work Plan and Multi-Year Program Plan for the Analytical Services Program at the Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington. The Analytical Services Program provides vital support to the Hanford Site mission and provides technically sound, defensible, cost effective, high quality analytical chemistry data for the site programs. This report describes the goals and strategies for continuance of the Analytical Services Program through fiscal year 1996 and beyond.

  13. Analytical Services Fiscal Year 1996 Multi-year Program Plan Fiscal Year Work Plan WBS 1.5.1, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document contains the Fiscal Year 1996 Work Plan and Multi-Year Program Plan for the Analytical Services Program at the Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington. The Analytical Services Program provides vital support to the Hanford Site mission and provides technically sound, defensible, cost effective, high quality analytical chemistry data for the site programs. This report describes the goals and strategies for continuance of the Analytical Services Program through fiscal year 1996 and beyond

  14. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan. March 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwab, Amy [Bioenergy Technologies Office, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The Bioenergy Technologies Office is one of the 10 technology development offices within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy at the U.S. Department of Energy. This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) sets forth the goals and structure of the Bioenergy Technologies Office (the Office). It identifies the research, development, and demonstration (RD&D), and market transformation and crosscutting activities the Office will focus on over the next five years and outlines why these activities are important to meeting the energy and sustainability challenges facing the nation. This MYPP is intended for use as an operational guide to help the Office manage and coordinate its activities, as well as a resource to help communicate its mission and goals to stakeholders and the public.

  15. The Value in Evaluating and Communicating Program Impact: The Ohio BR&E Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daivs, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Assessing program impact can provide useful program evaluation data. It also provides a basis for program development, marketing, and justification. This article discusses recent impact evaluation efforts and findings of a long-time Extension program; referred to as Business Retention and Expansion (BR&E). How such information can be…

  16. Comprehensive care program for elderly patients over 65 years with hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Moyano, A; Fernández-Ojeda, R; Ruiz-Romero, V; García-Benítez, B; Palmero-Palmero, C; Aparicio-Santos, R

    2014-01-01

    To report the health outcomes of a multidisciplinary care program for patients over 65 years with hip fracture. We have developed a care coordination model for the comprehensive care of hip fracture patients. It establishes what, who, when, how and where orthopedists, internists, family physicians, emergency, intensive care, physiotherapists, anesthetists, nurses and workers social intervene. All elderly patients over 65 years admitted with the diagnosis of hip fracture (years 2006 to 2010) were retrospectively evaluated. One thousand episodes of hip fracture, corresponding to 956 patients, were included. Mean age was 82 years and mean stay 6.7 days. This was reduced by 1.14 days during the 5 years of the program. A total of 85.1% were operated on before 72 yours, and 91.2% during the program. Incidence of surgical site infection was 1.5%. In-hospital mortality was 4.5%, (24.2% at 12 months). Readmissions at one years was 14.9%. Independence for basic activity of daily living was achieved by 40% of the patients. This multidisciplinary care program for hip fracture patients is associated with positive health outcomes, with a high percentage of patients treated early (more than 90%), reduced mean stay (less than 7 days), incidence of surgical site infections, readmissions and inpatient mortality and at one year, as well as adequate functional recovery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. Fusion Safety Program annual report, fiscal year 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, D.F.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Herring, J.S.; Longhurst, G.R.; McCarthy, K.A.; Merrill, B.J.; Piet, S.J.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in fiscal year 1992. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboratory and EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL and in participating organizations including the Westinghouse Hanford Company at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of Wisconsin. The technical areas covered in the report include tritium safety, activation product release, reactions involving beryllium, reactions involving lithium breeding materials, safety of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruptions, risk assessment failure rate data base, and computer code development for reactor transients. Also included in the report is a summary of the safety and environmental studies performed by the INEL for the Tokamak Physics Experiments and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, the safety analysis for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor design, and the technical support for the ARIES commercial reactor design study

  18. Fusion Safety Program Annual Report, Fiscal Year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Cadwallader, L.C.

    1996-12-01

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in FY 1996. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboratory, and Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in 1979. The objective is to perform research and develop data needed to ensure safety in fusion facilities. Activities include experiments, analysis, code development and application, and other forms of research. These activities are conducted at the INEL, at other DOE laboratories, and at other institutions. Among the technical areas covered in this report are tritium safety, chemical reactions and activation product release, risk assessment failure rate database development, and safety code development and application to fusion safety issues. Most of this work has been done in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Work done for ITER this year has focused on developing the needed information for the Non- Site- Specific Safety Report (NSSR-1). A final area of activity described is development of the new DOE Technical Standards for Safety of Magnetic Fusion Facilities

  19. DOE radiological calibrations intercomparison program: Results of fiscal year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, F.M.; Roberson, P.L.; McDonald, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    The Department of Energy Radiological Calibration Intercomparison Program was initiated in January 1986, under the research portion of the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program. The program operates via the exchange of transfer standards, consisting of instrument sets and standard secondary beta sources. There are two instrument sets and the scheduled use has been staggered such that one set is available for use during each month. One set of secondary standard beta sources is available for use bimonthly. During the 1986 fiscal year, five laboratories used the instrument sets and three laboratories used the beta source set. Results were reported for all the measurements. The average and one standard deviation of the ratios of participant results to Pacific Northwest Laboratory calibration values were 1.12 +- 0.17 for gamma measurements. Those ratios for the gamma measurements varied from 0.98 to 3.06. The larger differences of results from measurements performed at two facilities were directly attributable to unfamiliarity with the intercomparison instruments. The average and one standard deviation of the ratios of participant results to PNL calibration values obtained using the secondary 90 Sr beta source was 1.02 +- 0.05, which is well within measurement uncertainties. The one participant who performed measurements using 147 Pm and 204 Tl sources obtained ratios of 0.68 and 1.11, respectively. No measurements were performed using neutron or x-ray sources

  20. Curated Collections for Educators: Five Key Papers about Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Brent; Gottlieb, Michael; Boysen-Osborn, Megan; King, Andrew; Quinn, Antonia; Krzyzaniak, Sara; Pineda, Nicolas; Yarris, Lalena M; Chan, Teresa

    2017-05-04

    The evaluation of educational programs has become an expected part of medical education. At some point, all medical educators will need to critically evaluate the programs that they deliver. However, the evaluation of educational programs requires a very different skillset than teaching. In this article, we aim to identify and summarize key papers that would be helpful for faculty members interested in exploring program evaluation. In November of 2016, the 2015-2016 Academic life in emergency medicine (ALiEM) Faculty Incubator program highlighted key papers in a discussion of program evaluation. This list of papers was augmented with suggestions by guest experts and by an open call on Twitter. This resulted in a list of 30 papers on program evaluation. Our authorship group then engaged in a process akin to a Delphi study to build consensus on the most important papers about program evaluation for medical education faculty. We present our group's top five most highly rated papers on program evaluation. We also summarize these papers with respect to their relevance to junior medical education faculty members and faculty developers. Program evaluation is challenging. The described papers will be informative for junior faculty members as they aim to design literature-informed evaluations for their educational programs.

  1. Alternative Aviation Jet Fuel Sustainability Evaluation Report Task 1 : Report Evaluating Existing Sustainability Evaluation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    This report describes how existing biofuel sustainability evaluation programs meet requirements that are under consideration or are in early phases of adoption and implementation in various US and international contexts. Biofuel sustainability evalua...

  2. Fusion Safety Program annual report, fiscal year 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, J.G.; Holland, D.F.

    1984-07-01

    The Fusion Safety Program major activities for Fiscal Year 1983 are summarized in this report. The program was initiated in FY 1979, with the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) designated lead laboratory, and EG and G Idaho, inc., named as prime contractor to implement this role. The report contains four sections: EG and G Idaho, Inc., activities at the INEL includes progress reports and portions of papers on the tritium implantation experiment, tritium control systems, tritium release from solid breeding blankets, plasma disruptions, risk assessment, transient code development, data base development, and a discussion of participation in the blanket comparison and selection study. The section outside contracts includes progress reports and portions of papers on lithium-lead reactions by Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) and the University of Wisconsin, magnet safety by the Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), risk assessment by the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) and MIT, tritium retention by the University of Virginia, and effects of plasma disruptions by MIT. A list of publications and planned fiscal year 1984 activities are also included

  3. Fusion Safety Program annual report, fiscal year 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, J.G.; Holland, D.F.

    1985-06-01

    This report summarizes the Fusion Safety Program major activities in fiscal year 1984. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboratory and EG and G Idaho, Inc., is the prime contractor for this program, which was initiated in 1979. A report section titled ''Activities at the INEL'' includes progress reports on the tritium implantation experiment, tritium blanket permeation, volatilization of reactor alloys, plasma disruptions, a comparative blanket safety assessment, transient code development, and a discussion of the INEL's participation in the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) design study. The report section titled ''Outside Contracts'' includes progress reports on tritium conversion by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), lithium-lead reactions by the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) and the University of Wisconsin, magnet safety by the Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), risk assessment by MIT, tritium retention by the University of Virginia, and activation product release by GA Technologies. A list of publications produced during the year and brief descriptions of activities planned for FY-1985 are also included

  4. Salt repository sealing materials development program: 5-year work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, L.B.

    1986-06-01

    This plan covers 5 years (fiscal years 1986 through 1990) of work in the repository sealing materials program to support design decisions and licensing activities for a salt repository. The plan covers a development activity, not a research activity. There are firm deliverables as the end points of each part of the work. The major deliverables are: development plans for code development and materials testing; seal system components models; seal system performance specifications; seal materials specifications; and seal materials properties ''handbook.'' The work described in this plan is divided into three general tasks as follows: mathematical modeling; materials studies (salt, cementitious materials, and earthen materials); and large-scale testing. Each of the sections presents an overview, status, planned activities, and summary of program milestones. This plan will be the starting point for preparing the development plans described above, but is subject to change if preparation of the work plan indicates that a different approach or sequence is preferable to achieve the ultimate goal, i.e., support of design and licensing

  5. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2000 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wills, C.A.

    2000-12-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of he Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2000. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance,(3) ecosystem mapping, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 24 NTS projects. Seventeen sites were in desert tortoise habitat, and six acres of tortoise habitat were documented as being disturbed this year. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types o n the NTS was completed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Sitewide inventories were conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, raptor nests, and mule deer. Fifty-nine of 69 known owl burrows were monitored. Forty-four of the known burrows are in disturbed habitat. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid-March to early April. A total of 45 juvenile owls was detected from eight breeding pairs. One nest burrow was detected in the Mojave Desert,one in the Great Basin Desert, and six in the Transition

  6. Evaluation of the Pilot Program for Home School and ChalleNGe Program Recruits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garcia, F

    2001-01-01

    The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999 (FY 99) directed a 5-year pilot program to treat graduates of home schools and graduates of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program holding General Education Development (GED...

  7. Initiatives in training program evaluation outside the nuclear utility industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    Training literature is reviewed, and program evaluative practices outside the nuclear utility industry are reported. The findings indicate some innovations in philosophy and practice and program evaluation, although not necessarily in the context of evaluation as a route to assessing the impact of training. Program evaluation is described in the context of the impact of training, suggesting continued efforts to accept a multivariate concept of individual and organizational performance

  8. Economic Evaluation of a Comprehensive Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Program: Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Marjorie S.; Ross, Joseph S.; Bilodeau, RoseAnne; Richter, Rosemary S.; Palley, Jane E.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous research has suggested that comprehensive teenage pregnancy prevention programs that address sexual education and life skills development and provide academic are effective in reducing births among enrolled teenagers. However, there have been limited data on costs and cost-effectiveness of such programs. Objectives To use a community-based participatory research approach, to develop estimates of the cost-benefit of the Pathways/Senderos Center, a comprehensive neighborhood-based program to prevent unintended pregnancies and promote positive development for adolescents. Methods Using data from 1997-2003, we conducted an in-time intervention analysis to determine program cost-benefit while teenagers were enrolled and then used an extrapolation analysis to estimate accyrred economibc benefits and cost-benefit up to age 30. Results The program operating costs totaled $3,228,152.59 and reduced the teenage childbearing rate from 94.10 to 40.00 per 1000 teenage females, averting $52,297.84 in total societal costs, with an economic benefit to society from program participation of $2,673,153.11. Therefore, total costs to society exceeded economic benefits by $559,677.05, or $1,599.08 per adolescent per year. In an extrapolation analysis, benefits to society exceed costs by $10,474.77 per adolescent per year by age 30 on average, with social benefits outweighing total social costs by age 20.1. Conclusions We estimate that this comprehensive teenage pregnancy prevention program would provide societal economic benefits once participants are young adults, suggesting the need to expand beyond pilot demonstrations and evaluate the long-range cost-effectiveness of similarly comprehensive programs when implemented more widely in high-risk neighborhoods. PMID:19896030

  9. A Two-Year Multidisciplinary Training Program for the Frontline Workforce in Community Treatment of Severe Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruud, Torleif; Flage, Karin Blix; Kolbjørnsrud, Ole-Bjørn; Haugen, Gunnar Brox; Sørlie, Tore

    2016-01-01

    Since 1999, a national two-year multidisciplinary onsite training program has been in operation in Norway. The program trains frontline workforce personnel who provide community treatment to people with severe mental illness. A national network of mental health workers, consumers, caregivers, and others providing or supporting psychosocial treatment and rehabilitation for people with severe mental illness has organized local onsite part-time training programs in collaboration with community mental health centers (CMHCs), municipalities, and primary care providers. CMHC and primary care staff are trained together to increase collaboration. Nationwide dissemination has continued, with new local programs established every year. Evaluations have shown that the program is successful.

  10. Evaluation of a Research Mentorship Program in Community Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploeg, Jenny; de Witt, Lorna; Hutchison, Brian; Hayward, Lynda; Grayson, Kim

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the results of a qualitative case study evaluating a research mentorship program in community care settings in Ontario, Canada. The purpose of the program was to build evaluation and research capacity among staff of community care agencies through a mentorship program. Data were collected through in-depth, semi-structured…

  11. Effective Practices for Evaluating Education and Public Outreach Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, S.

    2013-12-01

    Stephanie Baird Wilkerson, PhD Carol Haden EdD Magnolia Consulting,LLC Education and public outreach (EPO) program developers and providers seeking insights regarding effective practices for evaluating EPO activities programs benefit from understanding why evaluation is critical to the success of EPO activities and programs, what data collection methods are appropriate, and how to effectively communicate and report findings. Based on our extensive experience evaluating EPO programs, we will share lessons learned and examples of how these practices play out in actual evaluation studies. EPO program developers, providers, and evaluators must consider several factors that influence which evaluation designs and data collection methods will be most appropriate, given the nature of EPO programs. Effective evaluation practices of EPO programs take into account a program's phase of development, duration, and budget as well as a program's intended outcomes. EPO programs that are just beginning development will have different evaluation needs and priorities than will well-established programs. Effective evaluation practices consider the 'life' of a program with an evaluation design that supports a program's growth through various phases including development, revision and refinement, and completion. It would be premature and inappropriate to expect the attainment of longer-term outcomes of activities during program development phases or early stages of implementation. During program development, EPO providers should clearly define program outcomes that are feasible and appropriate given a program's scope and expected reach. In many respects, this directly relates to the amount of time, or duration, intended audiences participate in EPO programs. As program duration increases so does the likelihood that the program can achieve longer-term outcomes. When choosing which outcomes are reasonable to impact and measure, program duration should be considered. Effective evaluation

  12. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2001 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, C.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2001. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 23 NTS projects. Eleven sites were in desert tortoise habitat. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 588 acres, where 568 acres of disturbance would be off-road driving. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoise s were accidentally injured or killed at project areas. One tortoise was crushed by a vehicle on a paved road. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types on the NTS was completed and distributed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. Compilation of historical wildlife data was initiated. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Site-wide monitoring was conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, and raptor nests. Sixty-nine of 77 known owl burrows were monitored. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid March to early April. A

  13. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. A. Wills

    2001-12-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2001. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 23 NTS projects. Eleven sites were in desert tortoise habitat. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 588 acres, where 568 acres of disturbance would be off-road driving. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoise s were accidentally injured or killed at project areas. One tortoise was crushed by a vehicle on a paved road. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types on the NTS was completed and distributed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. Compilation of historical wildlife data was initiated. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Site-wide monitoring was conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, and raptor nests. Sixty-nine of 77 known owl burrows were monitored. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid March to early

  14. Program evaluation: Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership (WRAP) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    The Connecticut low income weatherization program was developed in response to a 1987 rate docket order from the Connecticut Department of Public Utility Control (DPUC) to Connecticut Light Power Co., an operating subsidiary of Northeast Utilities (NU). (Throughout this report, NU is referred to as the operator of the program.) This program, known as the Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership, or WRAP, was configured utilizing input from a collaborative group of interested parties to the docket. It was agreed that this program would be put forth by the electric utility, but would not ignore oil and gas savings (thus, it was to be fuel- blind''). The allocated cost of conservation services for each fuel source, however, should be cost effective. It was to be offered to those utility customers at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty levels, and provide a wide array of energy saving measures directed toward heating, water heating and lighting. It was felt by the collaborative group that this program would raise the level of expenditures per participant for weatherization services provided by the state, and by linking to and revising the auditing process for weatherization, would lower the audit unit cost. The program plans ranged from the offering of low-cost heating, water heating and infiltration measures, increased insulation levels, carpentry and plumbing services, to furnace or burner replacement. The program was configured to allow for very comprehensive weatherization and heating system servicing.

  15. Evaluation Of Career Guidance Program In Vocational High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martaningsih Sri Tutur

    2018-01-01

    This review of career guidance program evaluation is conducted qualitatively through surveys, interviews and leiterature studies to provide an overview of evaluation program and its relevance to the necessity. Understanding the quality, weaknesses, obstacles to service implementation, and potential utilization are expected to improve career guidance effectiveness services in vocational high school. An evaluation on the overall career guidance program, will provide feedback for ongoing improvement. Various evaluation models are available, it needs to be selected about the relevance to the career counseling program characteristics, so that evaluation feedback is more optimal.

  16. FHWA research and technology evaluation program summary report spring 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This report summarizes the 16 evaluations being conducted by the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center on behalf of FHWAs Research and Technology Program. The FHWA R&T Program furthers the Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Centers goal of...

  17. Dark Skies Awareness Programs for the International Year of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.; US IYA Dark Skies Working Group

    2009-05-01

    The arc of the Milky Way seen from a truly dark location is part of our planet's cultural and natural heritage. More than 1/5 of the world population, 2/3 of the United States population and 1/2 of the European Union population have already lost naked-eye visibility of the Milky Way. This loss, caused by light pollution, is a serious and growing issue that impacts astronomical research, the economy, ecology, energy conservation, human health, public safety and our shared ability to see the night sky. For this reason, "Dark Skies” is a cornerstone project of the International Year of Astronomy. Its goal is to raise public awareness of the impact of artificial lighting on local environments by getting people worldwide involved in a variety of programs that: 1) Teach about dark skies using new technology (e.g., an activity-based planetarium show on DVD, podcasting, social networking on Facebook and MySpace, a Second Life presence) 2) Provide thematic events on light pollution at star parties and observatory open houses (Dark Skies Discovery Sites, Nights in the (National) Parks, Sidewalk Astronomy) 3) Organize events in the arts (e.g., a photography contest) 4) Involve citizen-scientists in naked-eye and digital-meter star hunting programs (e.g., GLOBE at Night, "How Many Stars?", the Great World Wide Star Count and the radio frequency interference equivalent: "Quiet Skies") and 5) Raise awareness about the link between light pollution and public health, economic issues, ecological consequences, energy conservation, safety and security, and astronomy (e.g., The Starlight Initiative, World Night in Defense of Starlight, International Dark Sky Week, International Dark-Sky Communities, Earth Hour, The Great Switch Out, a traveling exhibit, downloadable posters and brochures). The poster will provide an update, describe how people can continue to participate, and take a look ahead at the program's sustainability. For more information, visit www.darkskiesawareness.org.

  18. Environmental restoration and waste management: Robotics technology development program: Robotics 5-year program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    In FY 1990 Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP) planning teams visited five DOE sites. These sites were selected by the Office of Technology Development to provide a needs basis for developing a 5-Year Plan. Visits to five DOE sites provided identification of needs for robotics technology development to support Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER ampersand WM) projects at those sites. Additional site visits will be conducted in the future to expand the planning basis. This volume summarizes both the results of the site visits and the needs and requirements of the priority ER ampersand WM activities at the sites, including potential needs for robotics and remote systems technology. It also discusses hazards associated with the site activities and any problems or technical uncertainties associated with dealing with the hazards in the performance of the ER ampersand WM work. Robotic or remote systems currently under development for remediation projects or waste operations are also discussed. The information in this document is organized principally by site, activity, and priority. Section 2.0, Site Needs, is based on information from the site visit reports and provides a summary which focuses on the site needs and requirements for each priority activity. Section 2.0 also records evaluations and discussions by the RTDP team following the site visit. Section 3.0, Commonality Assessment, documents similar site needs where common, or cross-cutting, robotics technology might be applied to several activities. Section 4.0 contains a summary of the site needs and requirements in tabular form. 1 tab

  19. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, J.G.

    1999-05-01

    This report reviews the specific objectives, status, and accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal Research Program for Fiscal Year 1998. The Exploration Technology research area focuses on developing instruments and techniques to discover hidden hydrothermal systems and to expose the deep portions of known systems. The Reservoir Technology research combines laboratory and analytical investigations with equipment development and field testing to establish practical tools for resource development and management for both hydrothermal and hot dry rock reservoirs. The Drilling Technology projects focus on developing improved, economic drilling and completion technology for geothermal wells. The Conversion Technology research focuses on reducing costs and improving binary conversion cycle efficiency, to permit greater use of the more abundant moderate-temperature geothermal resource, and on the development of materials that will improve the operating characteristics of many types of geothermal energy equipment. Direct use research covers the direct use of geothermal energy sources for applications in other than electrical production.

  20. Fusion Safety Program annual report: Fiscal year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, D.F.; Merrill, B.J.; Herring, J.S.; Piet, S.J.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1987-06-01

    This report summarizes the Fusion Safety Program's (FSP) major activities in fiscal year 1986. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboratory, and EG and G Idaho, Inc., is the prime contractor for FSP, which was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL and in participating facilities, including the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL), the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and the University of Wisconsin. The technical areas covered in this report include tritium safety, activation product release, reactions involving lithium breeding materials, safety of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruption, risk assessment methodology, and computer code development for reactor transients. Contributions to the Technical Planning Activity (TPA) and the ''white paper'' study by the Environmental, Safety,and Economics Committee (ESECOM) are summarized. The report also includes a summary of the safety and environmental analysis and documentation performed by the INEL for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) design project

  1. Fusion Safety Program annual report, Fiscal Year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Dolan, T.J.; Herring, J.S.; McCarthy, K.A.; Merrill, B.J.; Motloch, C.G.; Petti, D.A.

    1993-12-01

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in Fiscal Year 1993. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been designated by DOE as the lead laboratory for fusion safety, and EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., is the prime contractor for INEL operations. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL and in participating organizations, including universities and private companies. Technical areas covered in the report include tritium safety, beryllium safety, activation product release, reactions involving potential plasma-facing materials, safety of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruptions and edge physics modeling, risk assessment failure rates, computer codes for reactor transient analysis, and regulatory support. These areas include work completed in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Also included in the report are summaries of the safety and environmental studies performed at the INEL for the Tokamak Physics Experiment and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor projects at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and a summary of the technical support for the ARIES/PULSAR commercial reactor design studies

  2. Fusion Safety Program annual report: Fiscal year 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, D.F.; Herring, J.S.; Longhurst, G.R.; Lyon, R.E.; Merrill, B.J.; Piet, S.J.

    1988-02-01

    This report summarizes the Fusion Safety Program major activities in fiscal year 1987. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboraotry and EG and G Idaho, Inc., is the prime contractor for this program, which was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL and in participating laboratories including the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL), the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and the University of Wisconsin. The technical areas covered in the report include tritium safety, activation product release, reactions involving lithium breeding materials, safety of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruptions, risk assessment methodology, computer codes development for reactor transients, and fusion waste management. Also included in the report is a summary of the safety and environmental analysis and conventional facilities design performed by INEL for the Compact Ignition Tokamak design project, the safety analysis and documentation performed for the Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor design, and the technical support provided to the Environmental Safety and Economics Committee (ESECOM). 42 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Increasing team skills: an evaluation of program effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen-Webb, M L

    1985-11-01

    The need for health professionals with caring values and good communication skills is well established. To develop these skills requires building self-esteem, as is supported by the work of Carl Rogers, Maslow, and Jourard, and the development of communication skills, as is supported by Carkhuff. A six-hour developmental program was evaluated using alternate forms of the highly validated Personal Skills Map. The differences in participants' scores showed increases in self-esteem, comfort, and management skills (p less than .00), while aggression (p = .05) and deference (p less than .00) decreased. A longitudinal follow-up of participants showed that 65% continued to use the assessment tool six months to one year later. The program appears to be well suited for service settings, continuing education, and academic settings, and meets the need of a high tech, high touch era of change.

  4. Mark I containment, short term program. Safety evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    Presented is a Safety Evaluation Report (SER) prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation addressing the Short Term Program (STP) reassessment of the containment systems of operating Boiler Water Reactor (BWR) facilities with the Mark I containment system design. The information presented in this SER establishes the basis for the NRC staff's conclusion that licensed Mark I BWR facilities can continue to operate safely, without undue risk to the health and safety of the public, during an interim period of approximately two years while a methodical, comprehensive Long Term Program (LTP) is conducted. This SER also provides one of the basic foundations for the NRC staff review of the Mark I containment systems for facilities not yet licensed for operation

  5. Environmental restoration and waste management: Robotics technology development program: Robotics 5-year program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This plan covers robotics Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, activities in the Program for the next five years. These activities range from bench-scale R ampersand D to fullscale hot demonstrations at DOE sites. This plan outlines applications of existing technology to near-term needs, the development and application of enhanced technology for longer-term needs, and an initiation of advanced technology development to meet those needs beyond the five-year plan. The objective of the Robotic Technology Development (RTDP) is to develop and apply robotics technologies that will enable Environmental Restoration and Waste Management operations at DOE sites to be safer, faster and cheaper. Five priority DOE sites were visited in March 1990 to identify needs for robotics technology in ER ampersand WM operations. This 5-Year Program Plan for the RTDP detailed annual plans for robotics technology development based on identified needs. This 5-Year Program Plan discusses the overall approach to be adopted by the RTDP to aggressively develop robotics technology and contains discussions of the Program Management Plan, Site Visit and Needs Summary, Approach to Needs-Directed Technical Development, Application-Specific Technical Development, and Cross-Cutting and Advanced Technology. Integrating application-specific ER ampersand WM needs, the current state of robotics technology, and the potential benefits (in terms of faster, safer, and cheaper) of new technology, the Plan develops application-specific road maps for robotics RDDT ampersand E for the period FY 1991 through FY 1995. In addition, the Plan identifies areas where longer-term research in robotics will have a high payoff in the 5- to 20-year time frame. 12 figs

  6. Isotope Production and Distribution Program`s Fiscal Year 1997 financial statement audit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-27

    The Department of Energy Isotope Production and Distribution Program mission is to serve the national need for a reliable supply of isotope products and services for medicine, industry and research. The program produces and sells hundreds of stable and radioactive isotopes that are widely utilized by domestic and international customers. Isotopes are produced only where there is no U.S. private sector capability or other production capacity is insufficient to meet U.S. needs. The Department encourages private sector investment in new isotope production ventures and will sell or lease its existing facilities and inventories for commercial purposes. The Isotope Program reports to the Director of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology. The Isotope Program operates under a revolving fund established by the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 Energy and Water Appropriations Act and maintains financial viability by earning revenues from the sale of isotopes and services and through annual appropriations. The FY 1995 Energy and Water Appropriations Act modified predecessor acts to allow prices charged for Isotope Program products and services to be based on production costs, market value, the needs of the research community, and other factors. Although the Isotope Program functions as a business, prices set for small-volume, high-cost isotopes that are needed for research purposes may not achieve full-cost recovery. As a result, isotopes produced by the Isotope Program for research and development are priced to provide a reasonable return to the U.S. Government without discouraging their use. Commercial isotopes are sold on a cost-recovery basis. Because of its pricing structure, when selecting isotopes for production, the Isotope Program must constantly balance current isotope demand, market conditions, and societal benefits with its determination to operate at the lowest possible cost to U.S. taxpayers. Thus, this report provides a financial analysis of this situation.

  7. One-year effects of Project EX: A smoking intervention pilot program with Spanish adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espada, José P; Gonzálvez, María T; Orgilés, Mireia; Sussman, Steve

    2017-07-01

    Adolescent smoking is a major public health problem, which has led to the development of cessation programs such as Project EX. However, there is no evidence for the long-term efficacy of cessation among Spanish adolescents. This study provides a 1-year follow-up evaluation of the Project EX tobacco use cessation program among 211 smokers. The intent-to-treat 30-day smoking quit rate for the program group was 7.81 percent ( p = .04), whereas no smokers quit in the control group ( p = .02). The intervention had a significant influence on future smoking expectation, intention, motivation to quit, and overall level of 30-day smoking. Long-term outcomes of the Project EX clinic-based program are promising for adolescent smokers in Spain.

  8. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on advance science research. Result evaluation, interim evaluation, in-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Science Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the accomplishments of the research completed in Fiscal Year 2002, the accomplishments of the research started in Fiscal Year 2001, and the adequacy of the programs of the research to be started in Fiscal Year 2004 at Advanced Science Research Center of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of nine specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from May to July 2003. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 24, 2003, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on August 4, 2003. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Science Research. (author)

  9. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advance Science Research. Result evaluation, interim evaluation, in-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Science Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the accomplishments of the research completed in Fiscal Year 2001, the accomplishments of the research started in Fiscal Year 2000, and the adequacy of the programs of the research to be started in Fiscal Year 2003 at Advanced Science Research Center of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of eight specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from May to July 2002. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 4, 2002, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on August 5, 2002. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Science Research. (author)

  10. Sandia National Laboratories California Environmental Monitoring Program Annual Report for Calendar Year 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Robert C.

    2006-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Environmental Monitoring Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2005 Update program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  11. SNL/CA Environmental Planning and Ecology Annual Program Report for Calendar Year 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2005-05-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Environmental Planning and Ecology Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2005 program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Planning and Ecology Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  12. Evaluating the effectiveness of a logger safety training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jennifer L; Grushecky, Shawn T

    2006-01-01

    Logger safety training programs are rarely, if ever, evaluated as to their effectiveness in reducing injuries. Workers' compensation claim rates were used to evaluate the effectiveness of a logger safety training program, the West Virginia Loggers' Safety Initiative (LSI). There was no claim rate decline detected in the majority (67%) of companies that participated in all 4 years of the LSI. Furthermore, their rate did not differ from the rest of the WV logging industry that did not participate in the LSI. Worker turnover was significantly related to claim rates; companies with higher turnover of employees had higher claim rates. Companies using feller bunchers to harvest trees at least part of the time had a significantly lower claim rate than companies not using them. Companies that had more inspections per year had lower claim rates. High injury rates persist even in companies that receive safety training; high employee turnover may affect the efficacy of training programs. The logging industry should be encouraged to facilitate the mechanization of logging tasks, to address barriers to employee retention, and to increase the number of in-the-field performance monitoring inspections. Impact on industry There are many states whose logger safety programs include only about 4-8 hours of safe work practices training. These states may look to West Virginia's expanded training program (the LSI) as a model for their own programs. However, the LSI training may not be reaching loggers due to the delay in administering training to new employees and high levels of employee turnover. Regardless of training status, loggers' claim rates decline significantly the longer they work for a company. It may be that high injury rates in the state of West Virginia would be best addressed by finding ways to encourage and facilitate companies to become more mechanized in their harvesting practices, and to increase employee tenure. Increasing the number of yearly performance inspections

  13. Alternative Evaluation of the Agrarian Sector in Guatemala 10 Years ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Alternative Evaluation of the Agrarian Sector in Guatemala 10 Years after the ... in research and advocacy for agrarian legislation ever since the adoption of the ... conference of McGill's Institute for the Study of International Development.

  14. Independent Panel Evaluation of Dry Sludge PISA Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fondeur, F.F.

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Kirk Yeager and Mr. Marvin Banks from Energetic Material Research and Technology Center (EMRTC) evaluated the Savannah River Site (SRS) efforts in the Dry Sludge program. They evaluated four program areas: energetic material formation, stability, initiation, and propagation. The panel evaluation included a site visit (July 13, 1999 and July 14, 1999) as well as a review of various reports and presentations by researchers involved in the program

  15. Independent Panel Evaluation of Dry Sludge PISA Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F.F.

    1999-10-20

    Dr. Kirk Yeager and Mr. Marvin Banks from Energetic Material Research and Technology Center (EMRTC) evaluated the Savannah River Site (SRS) efforts in the Dry Sludge program. They evaluated four program areas: energetic material formation, stability, initiation, and propagation. The panel evaluation included a site visit (July 13, 1999 and July 14, 1999) as well as a review of various reports and presentations by researchers involved in the program.

  16. Evaluation of the Academy of Math, Science, and Engineering at Luther Burbank High School During the 1984-85 School Year. Evaluation Report No. 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacramento City Unified School District, CA.

    The Academy of Math, Science, and Engineering was established at the Luther Burbank High School of Sacramento, California as a rigorous and competitive academic alternative program. This report contains an evaluation of the second year (1984-85) of the program. Program accomplishments are reviewed in the categories of: (1) student enrollment; (2)…

  17. Department of the Navy Supporting Data for Fiscal Year 1984 Budget Estimates Descriptive Summaries Submitted to Congress January 1983. Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy. Book 1. Technology Base, Advanced Technology Development, Strategic Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    battle groups--these materials will also he of value to the Subelement: 41 Title, Biloil anMedical SciencesProgram EleueiiET: WON3I Yile Iee s esan ...in PT 1982. G. (U) WORK PI1101530 BT: In-"Walt Raval Surface Weapons Centat, Dhigren, VA; Satorn Space and Missile Center, Cocoa Beach, FL; Army

  18. Water Resources Research Grant Program project descriptions, fiscal year 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1987-01-01

    This report contains information on the 34 new projects funded by the United States Geological Survey 's Water Resources Research Grant Program in fiscal year 1987 and on 3 projects completed during the year. For the new projects, the report gives the grant number, project title, performing organization, principal investigator(s), and a project description that includes: (1) identification of water related problems and problem-solution approach (2) contribution to problem solution, (3) objectives, and (4) approach. The 34 projects include 12 in the area of groundwater quality problems, 12 in the science and technology of water quality management, 1 in climate variability and the hydrologic cycle, 4 in institutional change in water resources management, and 5 in surface water management. For the three completed projects, the report furnishes the grant number; project title; performing organization; principal investor(s); starting data; data of receipt of final report; and an abstract of the final report. Each project description provides the information needed to obtain a copy of the final report. The report contains tables showing: (1) proposals received according to area of research interest, (2) grant awards and funding according to area of research interest, (3) proposals received according to type of submitting organization, and (4) awards and funding according to type of organization. (Author 's abstract)

  19. EVALUE : a computer program for evaluating investments in forest products industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter J. Ince; Philip H. Steele

    1980-01-01

    EVALUE, a FORTRAN program, was developed to provide a framework for cash flow analysis of investment opportunities. EVALUE was designed to assist researchers in evaluating investment feasibility of new technology or new manufacturing processes. This report serves as user documentation for the EVALUE program. EVALUE is briefly described and notes on preparation of a...

  20. Fusion power research and development program. Volume IV. 5-year program, budget and milestone summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-07-01

    Budget data are given for each of the tokamak systems, mirror systems, and high density plasma systems for the years 1976 through 1982. All major facilities currently under ERDA contract are included. In addition, budget data are given for the development and technology program consisting of the following; (1) magnetic systems, (2) plasma engineering, (3) fusion reactor materials, (4) fusion systems engineering, (5) environment and safety, and (6) applied plasma physics

  1. Evaluating a Health Risk Reduction Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelberg, Daniel B.

    1981-01-01

    A health risk reduction program at Bowling Green State University (Ohio) tested the efficacy of peer education against the efficacy of returning (by mail) health questionnaire results. A peer health education program did not appear to be effective in changing student attitudes or lifestyles; however, the research methodology may not have been…

  2. Evaluating the Effectiveness of School Instrumental Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtz, Glenn

    2001-01-01

    Describes the analysis of "Strengths and Weaknesses and Opportunities and Threats" (SWOT). Discusses the study, "Gemeinhardt 4," that used the SWOT analysis to determine 13 different types of music programs. Addresses how music teachers can utilize this information. Includes other sections such as, "Possible Solution to Music Program Threats."…

  3. Evaluating Dynamic Analysis Techniques for Program Comprehension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, S.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Program comprehension is an essential part of software development and software maintenance, as software must be sufficiently understood before it can be properly modified. One of the common approaches in getting to understand a program is the study of its execution, also known as dynamic analysis.

  4. Monitoring and evaluation of green public procurement programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adell, Aure [Ecoinstitut, Barcelona (Spain); Schaefer, Bettina [Ecoinstitut, Barcelona (Spain); Ravi, Kavita [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Corry, Jenny [Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Effective procurement policies can help governments save considerable amounts of money while also reducing energy consumption. Additionally, private sector companies which purchase large numbers of energy-consuming devices can benefit from procurement policies that minimize life-cycle energy costs. Both public and private procurement programs offer opportunities to generate market-transforming demand for energy efficient appliances and lighting fixtures. In recent years, several governments have implemented policies to procure energy efficient products and services. When deploying these policies, efforts have focused on developing resources for implementation (guidelines, energy efficiency specifications for tenders, life cycle costing tools, training, etc.) rather than defining monitoring systems to track progress against the set objectives. Implementation resources are necessary to make effective policies; however, developing Monitoring and Evaluation (M and E) mechanisms are critical to ensure that the policies are effective. The purpose of this article is to provide policy makers and procurement officials with a preliminary map of existing approaches and key components to monitor Energy Efficient Procurement (EEP) programs in order to contribute to the improvement of their own systems. Case studies are used throughout the paper to illustrate promising approaches to improve the M and E of EEP programs, from the definition of the system or data collection to complementary instruments to improve both the monitoring response and program results.

  5. Development and evaluation of a leadership program for veterinary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D A; Klingborg, D J

    2001-01-01

    Leadership skills are important for many facets of professional life, but no known leadership training programs exist in North American veterinary schools. It was the purpose of this project to develop, deliver, and evaluate a leadership program for first-year veterinary students. Leadership attributes emphasized in the course included effective communication, openness to learning from others, self-awareness, commitment beyond self-interest, motivation, decision making, understanding issue complexity, and team building. The five-day course was delivered to 21 new veterinary students randomly selected just prior to their first-year orientation in the fall of 2000. Participants ranked themselves higher than non-participants in a post-course evaluation on their ability to be effective leaders. Participants reported an increase in self-confidence and a clearer understanding of their leadership roles. Participants also noted new support systems among co-participants and expressed a new ability to consider complex issues more broadly. Most reported that they frequently used enhanced skills in giving and receiving feedback and team building. Other leadership tools identified as valuable included negotiation, group dynamics, a structured approach to problem solving, time management, and an awareness of personal learning style preferences as a means to improve communication.

  6. Electric and Magnetic Fields Research and Public Information Dissemination Program annual report for fiscal year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) Research and Public Information Dissemination (RAPID) Program was authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 as a near-term effort to expand and accelerate the research needed to address the EMF issue. As required by this legislation, the EMF Interagency Committee, the National EMF Advisory Committee (NEMFAC), and the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) are providing valued input and advice for the direction of this program. With this input and advice, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) have developed and are implementing five-year program plans. Multi-year health effects research projects and related EMF measurement and exposure assessment projects are underway using funds appropriated in fiscal years 1994, 1995, and 1996 together with voluntary non-Federal contributions. The results of these research projects, along with the results of other EMF research, will be used as input to the hazard evaluation effort, which is the focus of the EMF RAPID Program. A coordinated interagency program is underway to communicate needed information on the EMF issue in a clear manner to the public and other decision makers.

  7. Ten-year survey of program directors: trends, challenges, and mentoring in prosthodontics. Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Deborah M; Kinnunen, Taru; Chang, Brian M; Wright, Robert F

    2011-10-01

    This study consisted of two parts. Part 1 was a survey of US program directors, and Part 2 reports on the survey findings distributed to the deans of US dental schools. Both surveys evaluated observations of trends in prosthodontic education. The first survey (2005) of program directors and deans was published in 2007. This second survey was conducted in 2009. The 2009 survey provided 10-year data on trends in prosthodontics as reported by program directors. A national e-mail survey of 46 program directors was used to collect enrollment data for years 1 to 3 of prosthodontics training for US and international dental school graduates, the total number of applicants and applications considered, and the trends over time of applicants to prosthodontics for US dental school graduates and for international graduates. In addition, the program directors were asked to rank 13 key factors that may have contributed to any changes in the prosthodontic applicant pool. Program directors were also asked for information on student financial incentives and whether their programs were state or federally funded, and whether their sponsoring institution was a dental school. Of the 46 program directors, 40 responded, for an 87% response rate. Respondents reported that 66% of their enrollees were graduates of US dental schools. Between 2000 and 2009 the applicant pool in prosthodontics nearly doubled, with 50% of the program directors reporting an increase in US-trained applicants, 42.5% reporting no change, and only 7.5% reporting a decrease. Using the Spearman correlation for the 10-year survey, there was a positive, statistically significant correlation that society's demand for a higher level of training and credentialing and interest in prosthodontics among dental students contributed to an increase in the number of US dental graduates applying to prosthodontic programs. Only four programs offered no financial packages to offset tuition. The remaining 36 respondents reported some

  8. The Effects of the Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Program on Targeted Life Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kevin; Elmore, R. Dwayne

    2012-01-01

    Does participation in the Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Program (WHEP) help develop life skills? 4-H members and coaches who participated in the National WHEP Contest between the years 2003-2005 and 2007-2009 were asked to complete an evaluation at the end of each contest. A portion of the evaluation asked participants and coaches to determine if…

  9. Evaluation of a Secure Laptop-Based Testing Program in an Undergraduate Nursing Program: Students' Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jinyuan; Gunter, Glenda; Tsai, Ming-Hsiu; Lim, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the many robust learning management systems, and the availability of affordable laptops, have made secure laptop-based testing a reality on many campuses. The undergraduate nursing program at the authors' university began to implement a secure laptop-based testing program in 2009, which allowed students to use their newly purchased laptops to take quizzes and tests securely in classrooms. After nearly 5 years' secure laptop-based testing program implementation, a formative evaluation, using a mixed method that has both descriptive and correlational data elements, was conducted to seek constructive feedback from students to improve the program. Evaluation data show that, overall, students (n = 166) believed the secure laptop-based testing program helps them get hands-on experience of taking examinations on the computer and gets them prepared for their computerized NCLEX-RN. Students, however, had a lot of concerns about laptop glitches and campus wireless network glitches they experienced during testing. At the same time, NCLEX-RN first-time passing rate data were analyzed using the χ2 test, and revealed no significant association between the two testing methods (paper-and-pencil testing and the secure laptop-based testing) and students' first-time NCLEX-RN passing rate. Based on the odds ratio, however, the odds of students passing NCLEX-RN the first time was 1.37 times higher if they were taught with the secure laptop-based testing method than if taught with the traditional paper-and-pencil testing method in nursing school. It was recommended to the institution that better quality of laptops needs to be provided to future students, measures needed to be taken to further stabilize the campus wireless Internet network, and there was a need to reevaluate the Laptop Initiative Program.

  10. Education Model Program on Water-Energy Research: A New STEM Graduate Program from Development through Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCay, D.; Fiorenza, P.; Lautz, L.

    2017-12-01

    More than half of Ph.D. scientists and engineers find employment in non-academic sectors. Recognizing the range of career options for graduate degree holders and the need to align graduate education with the expectations of prospective employers, the National Science Foundation (NSF) created the NSF Research Traineeship (NRT) program. To date, over 100 NRT programs have been funded. As these programs are implemented, it is important to assess their progress, successes, and challenges. This presentation describes the ongoing evaluation of one NRT program, "Education Model Program on Water-Energy Research" (or EMPOWER) at Syracuse University. Through seminars, mini-grants, professional development activities, field courses, internship opportunities, and coursework, EMPOWER's goal is to equip students with the skills needed for the range of career options in water and energy. In collaboration with an external evaluator, EMPOWER is examining the fidelity of the program to proposed goals, providing feedback to inform project improvement (formative assessment) and assessing the effectiveness of achieving program goals (summative assessment). Using a convergent parallel mixed method design, qualitative and quantitative data were collected to develop a full assessment of the first year of the program. Evaluation findings have resulted in several positive changes to the program. For example, EMPOWER students perceive themselves to have high technical skills, but the data show that the students do not believe that they have a strong professional network. Based on those findings, EMPOWER offered several professional development events focused on building one's professional network. Preliminary findings have enabled the EMPOWER leadership team to make informed decisions about the ways the program elements can be redesigned to better meet student needs, about how to the make the program more effective, and determine the program elements that may be sustained beyond the funding

  11. Remote Infrared Audible Signage (RIAS) Pilot Program : evaluation report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    This report presents evaluation findings on the Remote Infrared Audible Signage (RIAS) Pilot Program in the Puget Sound Region of Washington. The installation, demonstration and evaluation of RIAS were required by a provision in the Safe, Accountable...

  12. Hanford Site Protective Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1990 highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwell, L.L.

    1991-09-01

    The Hanford Site Protective Barrier Development Program was jointly developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to design and test an earthen cover system(s) that can be used to inhibit water infiltration; plant, animal, and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion. The joint PNL/WHC program was initiated in FY 1986. To date, research findings support the initial concepts of barrier designs for the Hanford Site. A fine-soil surface is planned to partition surface water into runoff and temporary storage. Transpiration by vegetation that grows in the fine-soil layer will return stored water to the atmosphere as will surface evaporation. A capillary break created by the interface of the fine-soil layer and coarser textured materials below will further limit the downward migration of surface water, making it available over a longer period of time for cycling to the atmosphere. Should water pass the interface, it will drain laterally through a coarse textured sand/gravel layer. Tested barrier designs appear to work adequately to prevent drainage under current and postulated wetter-climate (added precipitation) conditions. Wind and water erosion tasks are developing data to predict the extent of erosion on barrier surfaces. Data collected during the last year confirm the effectiveness of small burrowing animals in removing surface water. Water infiltrating through burrows of larger mammals was subsequently lost by natural processes. Natural analog and climate change studies are under way to provide credibility for modeling the performance of barrier designs over a long period of time and under shifts in climate. 10 refs., 30 figs

  13. Hanford Site Protective Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1990 highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, L.L. (ed.)

    1991-09-01

    The Hanford Site Protective Barrier Development Program was jointly developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to design and test an earthen cover system(s) that can be used to inhibit water infiltration; plant, animal, and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion. The joint PNL/WHC program was initiated in FY 1986. To date, research findings support the initial concepts of barrier designs for the Hanford Site. A fine-soil surface is planned to partition surface water into runoff and temporary storage. Transpiration by vegetation that grows in the fine-soil layer will return stored water to the atmosphere as will surface evaporation. A capillary break created by the interface of the fine-soil layer and coarser textured materials below will further limit the downward migration of surface water, making it available over a longer period of time for cycling to the atmosphere. Should water pass the interface, it will drain laterally through a coarse textured sand/gravel layer. Tested barrier designs appear to work adequately to prevent drainage under current and postulated wetter-climate (added precipitation) conditions. Wind and water erosion tasks are developing data to predict the extent of erosion on barrier surfaces. Data collected during the last year confirm the effectiveness of small burrowing animals in removing surface water. Water infiltrating through burrows of larger mammals was subsequently lost by natural processes. Natural analog and climate change studies are under way to provide credibility for modeling the performance of barrier designs over a long period of time and under shifts in climate. 10 refs., 30 figs.

  14. New Community Education Program on Oceans and Global Climate Change: Results from Our Pilot Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, B. C.; Wiener, C.

    2010-12-01

    Ocean FEST (Families Exploring Science Together) engages elementary school students and their parents and teachers in hands-on science. Through this evening program, we educate participants about ocean and earth science issues that are relevant to their local communities. In the process, we hope to inspire more underrepresented students, including Native Hawaiians, Pacific Islanders and girls, to pursue careers in the ocean and earth sciences. Hawaii and the Pacific Islands will be disproportionately affected by the impacts of global climate change, including rising sea levels, coastal erosion, coral reef degradation and ocean acidification. It is therefore critically important to train ocean and earth scientists within these communities. This two-hour program explores ocean properties and timely environmental topics through six hands-on science activities. Activities are designed so students can see how globally important issues (e.g., climate change and ocean acidification) have local effects (e.g., sea level rise, coastal erosion, coral bleaching) which are particularly relevant to island communities. The Ocean FEST program ends with a career component, drawing parallel between the program activities and the activities done by "real scientists" in their jobs. The take-home message is that we are all scientists, we do science every day, and we can choose to do this as a career. Ocean FEST just completed our pilot year. During the 2009-2010 academic year, we conducted 20 events, including 16 formal events held at elementary schools and 4 informal outreach events. Evaluation data were collected at all formal events. Formative feedback from adult participants (parents, teachers, administrators and volunteers) was solicited through written questionnaires. Students were invited to respond to a survey of five questions both before and after the program to see if there were any changes in content knowledge and career attitudes. In our presentation, we will present our

  15. An Assessment of Fiscal Year 2013 Beyond Yellow Ribbon Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Linking Program Implementation and Effective- ness: Lessons from a Pooled Sample of Welfare ‐to‐Work Experiments,” Journal of Policy Analysis and...Implementation of the Welfare -to-Work Grants Program, Washington D.C.: Urban Institute, 2002; Lauren Eyster, Demetra Smith RAND Observations Across Programs...for service members. For example, Indiana program staff are encouraged to outsource résumé development to Operation: Job Ready Vets, which already

  16. Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Each day, between 12 to 13 U.S. workers die as a result of a traumatic injury on the job. Investigations conducted through the FACE program allow the identification...

  17. Evaluating Education Programs: Are We Getting Anywhere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John W.

    This paper asks whether all the current attention being given to educational evaluation and all the activity going on indicates real progress in the output of evaluation and its use in the policy process. The paper reviews the brief history of educational evaluation and gives a qualified "yes" as an answer to the question, noting: significant…

  18. Geothermal Program Review XVII: proceedings. Building on 25 years of Geothermal Partnership with Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-10-01

    The US Department of Energy's Office (DOE) of Geothermal Technologies conducted its annual Program Review XVII in Berkeley, California, on May 18--20, 1999. The theme this year was "Building on 25 Years of Geothermal Partnership with Industry". In 1974, Congress enacted Public Law 93-410 which sanctioned the Geothermal Energy Coordination and Management Project, the Federal Government's initial partnering with the US geothermal industry. The annual program review provides a forum to foster this federal partnership with the US geothermal industry through the presentation of DOE-funded research papers from leaders in the field, speakers who are prominent in the industry, topical panel discussions and workshops, planning sessions, and the opportunity to exchange ideas. Speakers and researchers from both industry and DOE presented an annual update on research in progress, discussed changes in the environment and deregulated energy market, and exchanged ideas to refine the DOE Strategic Plan for research and development of geothermal resources in the new century. A panel discussion on Climate Change and environmental issues and regulations provided insight into the opportunities and challenges that geothermal project developers encounter. This year, a pilot peer review process was integrated with the program review. A team of geothermal industry experts were asked to evaluate the research in progress that was presented. The evaluation was based on the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) criteria and the goals and objectives of the Geothermal Program as set forth in the Strategic Plan. Despite the short timeframe and cursory guidance provided to both the principle investigators and the peer reviewers, the pilot process was successful. Based on post review comments by both presenters and reviewers, the process will be refined for next year's program review.

  19. Idaho Chemical programs annual technical report, fiscal year 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckham, J.A.; Bower, .R.; Struhs, R.T.

    1976-06-01

    The operating experience in fuel processing, waste calcining, and other waste management activities at the ICPP for FY 1975 is summarized. A campaign of coprocessing zirconium and aluminum fuels to recover uranium, the second electrolytic processing campaign to convert recovered and purified uranyl nitrate solution to UO 3 , and four operating periods of the Rare Gas Plant to recover 85 Kr and xenon were successfully completed, with all systems functioning well except for minor difficulties. Support activities include laboratory-scale stability studies of various waste blends; particle size distribution studies of the ICPP stack; evaluation of possible remote radiation measuring methods; tests to estimate corrosion; treatment of fuel storage basin water; progress in development of processes for Rover and HTGR fuels; laboratory testing of filters that deteriorated during the sixth waste calcining campaign; visual inspection of the primary calciner vessel; tests to determine what causes ruthenium to volatilize; various studies in support of future fluidized-bed calcining operations; other waste management activities including studies of the collection and long-term storage of 85 Kr, development of a suitable absorbent for 129 I (I 2 ); and continuing studies in support of the proposed INEL facility for treating transuranic wastes. Research programs in other areas include: determining burnup for fast breeder reactor fuels, continued study of the iodine pathway, development of a fluidized-bed heat exchanger for use with geothermal waters, and involvement in the study of the natural fossil fission reactor at the Oklo mine in Gabon, West Africa

  20. 77 FR 67439 - Fiscal Year 2013 Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... Year 2013 Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration... changes in the Public Transportation on Indian Reservations program (Tribal Transit Program) in accordance... Public Meeting: FTA will provide outreach in conjunction with the National Tribal Transportation...

  1. Design and methods for a cluster-controlled trial conducted at sixty-eight daycare facilities evaluating the impact of “JolinchenKids – Fit and Healthy in Daycare”, a program for health promotion in 3- to 6-year-old children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berit Steenbock

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevention of overweight and obesity during infancy is a highly relevant public health topic given the significant impact of childhood obesity on acute and chronic diseases, general health, and well-being in later stages of life. Apart from the family setting, daycare facilities (DFs represent a key setting for health promotion among children under the age of six years. “JolinchenKids – Fit and Healthy in Daycare” is a multi-component program promoting physical activity (PA, healthy eating, and mental well-being in 3- to 6-year-old preschoolers at DFs, originally designed by the German health insurance AOK. To evaluate program effectiveness, a cluster-controlled trial involving 68 DFs is currently conducted. The objective of this article is to describe the background, study design, and aims of this trial. Methods/design Sixty-eight DFs across Germany will be recruited to take part in the study, half of them serving as intervention DFs and half of them as delayed intervention control DFs (which receive the program upon completion of the study. At each DF, height, weight, and body composition, as well as motor skills, will be assessed in twenty 3- to 6-year-old children. Children’s eating and PA habits, and mental well-being will be assessed via parental questionnaires. A subsample of children (i.e., at 24 DFs which are randomly selected within a geographic region will be asked to wear accelerometers at their wrists to objectively measure PA over the course of seven days. To compare changes in body composition, motor skills, eating and PA habits, and mental well-being of children at intervention DFs with those observed among children at delayed intervention control DFs over one year, all measurements will take place at baseline and twelve months after the launch of the program at all DFs. Discussion This study investigates the influence of a health promotion program in the daycare setting on various outcomes

  2. Design and methods for a cluster-controlled trial conducted at sixty-eight daycare facilities evaluating the impact of "JolinchenKids - Fit and Healthy in Daycare", a program for health promotion in 3- to 6-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenbock, Berit; Zeeb, Hajo; Rach, Stefan; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Pischke, Claudia R

    2017-07-11

    The prevention of overweight and obesity during infancy is a highly relevant public health topic given the significant impact of childhood obesity on acute and chronic diseases, general health, and well-being in later stages of life. Apart from the family setting, daycare facilities (DFs) represent a key setting for health promotion among children under the age of six years. "JolinchenKids - Fit and Healthy in Daycare" is a multi-component program promoting physical activity (PA), healthy eating, and mental well-being in 3- to 6-year-old preschoolers at DFs, originally designed by the German health insurance AOK. To evaluate program effectiveness, a cluster-controlled trial involving 68 DFs is currently conducted. The objective of this article is to describe the background, study design, and aims of this trial. Sixty-eight DFs across Germany will be recruited to take part in the study, half of them serving as intervention DFs and half of them as delayed intervention control DFs (which receive the program upon completion of the study). At each DF, height, weight, and body composition, as well as motor skills, will be assessed in twenty 3- to 6-year-old children. Children's eating and PA habits, and mental well-being will be assessed via parental questionnaires. A subsample of children (i.e., at 24 DFs which are randomly selected within a geographic region) will be asked to wear accelerometers at their wrists to objectively measure PA over the course of seven days. To compare changes in body composition, motor skills, eating and PA habits, and mental well-being of children at intervention DFs with those observed among children at delayed intervention control DFs over one year, all measurements will take place at baseline and twelve months after the launch of the program at all DFs. This study investigates the influence of a health promotion program in the daycare setting on various outcomes, including body composition and objectively measured PA, in a nationwide

  3. Using program logic model analysis to evaluate and better deliver what works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megdal, Lori; Engle, Victoria; Pakenas, Larry; Albert, Scott; Peters, Jane; Jordan, Gretchen

    2005-01-01

    There is a rich history in using program theories and logic models (PT/LM) for evaluation, monitoring, and program refinement in a variety of fields, such as health care, social and education programs. The use of these tools to evaluate and improve energy efficiency programs has been growing over the last 5-7 years. This paper provides an overview of the state-of-the-art methods of logic model development, with analysis that significantly contributed to: Assessing the logic behind how the program expects to be able to meets its ultimate goals, including the 'who', the 'how', and through what mechanism. In doing so, gaps and questions that still need to be addressed can be identified. Identifying and prioritize the indicators that should be measured to evaluate the program and program theory. Determining key researchable questions that need to be answered by evaluation/research, to assess whether the mechanism assumed to cause the changes in actions, attitudes, behaviours, and business practices is workable and efficient. Also will assess the validity in the program logic and the likelihood that the program can accomplish its ultimate goals. Incorporating analysis of prior like programs and social science theories in a framework to identify opportunities for potential program refinements. The paper provides an overview of the tools, techniques and references, and uses as example the energy efficiency program analysis conducted for the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority's (NYSERDA) New York ENERGY $MART SM programs

  4. Assessing the effects of employee assistance programs: a review of employee assistance program evaluations.

    OpenAIRE

    Colantonio, A.

    1989-01-01

    Employee assistance programs have grown at a dramatic rate, yet the effectiveness of these programs has been called into question. The purpose of this paper was to assess the effectiveness of employee assistance programs (EAPs) by reviewing recently published EAP evaluations. All studies evaluating EAPs published since 1975 from peer-reviewed journals in the English language were included in this analysis. Each of the articles was assessed in the following areas: (a) program description (subj...

  5. Evaluation of a parenting skills program in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, Lee

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes participant interviews and the photovoice project of 15 young disadvantaged mothers in Pskov, Russia. The women's statements and photovoice were part of a formative evaluation of the Pskov Positive Parenting Program, designed by the University of Massachusetts Institute for Global Health (IGH) and funded by USAID. The evaluation revealed that the Program met its goal of helping the women learn sensitive caregiving behaviors. The mothers emphasized that the Program met their need for social connection. The young mothers' participation in the positive social network of the group may have been a key ingredient to the Program's success and may have implications for the design of parenting programs cross-culturally.

  6. Human Research Program: 2012 Fiscal Year Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenhauser, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Crew health and performance are critical to successful human exploration beyond low Earth orbit. Risks to health and performance include physiologic effects from radiation, hypogravity, and planetary environments, as well as unique challenges in medical treatment, human factors, and support of behavioral health. The scientists and engineers of the Human Research Program (HRP) investigate and reduce the greatest risks to human health and performance, and provide essential countermeasures and technologies for human space exploration. In its seventh year of operation, the HRP continued to refine its management architecture of evidence, risks, gaps, tasks, and deliverables. Experiments continued on the International Space Station (ISS), on the ground in analog environments that have features similar to those of spaceflight, and in laboratory environments. Data from these experiments furthered the understanding of how the space environment affects the human system. These research results contributed to scientific knowledge and technology developments that address the human health and performance risks. As shown in this report, HRP has made significant progress toward developing medical care and countermeasure systems for space exploration missions which will ultimately reduce risks to crew health and performance.

  7. The energy program: goals up to the year 1990 and projections for the year 2000 (abstract and conclusions)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The energy Program of the Mexican Government outlines its objectives, establishes its priorities and emphasizes its bonds with industry, regional development and the external sector, the macro-economic and sectional frame of reference of the Program is also given. Here the most relevant modifications to which the goals and outlooks of the industrial plan have been subjected are examined as are the changes that have occurred on the international scene and in the national economic policy. In a like manner, alternative options of economic policy are explored to establish a criteria with regard to the levels, long term sales of hydrocarbons should have abroad. This examination interrelates the aforementioned exports with the evolution in the economic structure, with the balance of payments from non-petroleum sources, and with the internal demand for hydrocarbons, and with the fuel reserve. The objectives of the program up to the year 1990 and the overall impact on the balance of energy in the country are analized. This permits an assessment of the contribution of the program in comparison with what would previsibly occur upon continuing to follow the tendencies of offer and demand. A similar question with respect to the principle kinds of energetics: nuclear energy, petroleum and gas, coal and electricity, the latter comprising the different sources in the generation of electricity, are considered. Finally, the necessary steps to implement programs of follow-up and evaluation are referred to. A supplement in the report covers the aspects of method and statistics; models used in making the projections, the results obtained from these models, estimates of the energetic potential of the country and the determination of the effective capacity to generate electricity

  8. Taiwan Teacher Preparation Program Evaluation: Some Critical Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tze-Chang

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the influences and changes of recent Taiwan teacher preparation program evaluation (TTPPE) as one of the national evaluation projects conducted by the Higher Education Evaluation and Accreditation Council of Taiwan. The main concerns are what kind of ideology is transformed through the policy by means of evaluation, and what…

  9. An Evaluation of the California Injury and Illness Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendeloff, John; Gray, Wayne B.; Haviland, Amelia M.; Main, Regan; Xia, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP) requirement has been the most frequently cited standard in California workplace health and safety inspections almost every year since it became effective in July 1991. Every workplace safety inspection must assess compliance with the IIPP. This article presents the results of an evaluation of the IIPP's effects on worker injuries in California and should inform policy both in California and in the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) program, which has made the adoption of a similar national requirement a top priority. Using data from the Workers' Compensation Information System, OSHA Data Initiative statistics, and Workers' Compensation Insurance Rating Bureau of California reports on medical and indemnity claims from single-establishment firms, the evaluation team analyzed the impact of citations for violations of the IIPP on safety performance by (1) using the number of citations as a measure of effectiveness and (2) assessing the number of establishments that were cited for noncompliance and then came into compliance. They found that enforcement of the IIPP appears to prevent injuries only when inspectors cite firms for violations of specific subsections of that standard. Eighty percent of the citations of the IIPP by the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health program are for only a different section, the one that requires employers to have a written IIPP. The specific subsections refer to the provisions that mandate surveying and fixing hazards, investigating the causes of injuries, and training employees to work safely. Because about 25 percent of all inspections cite the IIPP, citations of the specific subsections occur in about 5 percent of all inspections. In those inspections, the total recordable injury rate falls by more than 20 percent in the two years following the inspection. PMID:28083238

  10. Evaluation Methodologies for Estimating the Likelihood of Program Implementation Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Roger; Decker, Phillip J.; Kirkman, Dorothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite our best efforts as evaluators, program implementation failures abound. A wide variety of valuable methodologies have been adopted to explain and evaluate the "why" of these failures. Yet, typically these methodologies have been employed concurrently (e.g., project monitoring) or to the post-hoc assessment of program activities.…

  11. E-Basics: Online Basic Training in Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silliman, Ben

    2016-01-01

    E-Basics is an online training in program evaluation concepts and skills designed for youth development professionals, especially those working in nonformal science education. Ten hours of online training in seven modules is designed to prepare participants for mentoring and applied practice, mastery, and/or team leadership in program evaluation.…

  12. Manipulator system man-machine interface evaluation program. [technology assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, T. B.; Kirkpatrick, M.; Shields, N. L.

    1974-01-01

    Application and requirements for remote manipulator systems for future space missions were investigated. A manipulator evaluation program was established to study the effects of various systems parameters on operator performance of tasks necessary for remotely manned missions. The program and laboratory facilities are described. Evaluation criteria and philosophy are discussed.

  13. A Summer Math and Physics Program for High School Students: Student Performance and Lessons Learned in the Second Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timme, Nicholas; Baird, Michael; Bennett, Jake; Fry, Jason; Garrison, Lance; Maltese, Adam

    2013-05-01

    For the past two years, the Foundations in Physics and Mathematics (FPM) summer program has been held at Indiana University in order to fulfill two goals: provide additional physics and mathematics instruction at the high school level, and provide physics graduate students with experience and autonomy in designing curricula and teaching courses. In this paper we will detail changes made to the program for its second year and the motivation for these changes, as well as implications for future iterations of the program. We gauge the impact of the changes on student performance using pre-/post-test scores, student evaluations, and anecdotal evidence. These data show that the program has a positive impact on student knowledge and this impact was greater in magnitude in the second year of the program. We attribute this improvement primarily to the inclusion of more inquiry-driven activities. All activities, worksheets, and lesson plans used in the program are available online.

  14. Magnetic Fusion Energy Technology Fellowship Program: Summary of program activities for calendar year 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Magnetic Fusion Energy Technology Fellowship program (MFETF) for the 1985 calendar year. The MFETF program has continued to support the mission of the Office of Fusion Energy (OFE) and its Division of Development and Technology (DDT) by ensuring the availability of appropriately trained engineering manpower needed to implement the OFE/DDT magnetic fusion energy agenda. This program provides training and research opportunities to highly qualified students at DOE-designated academic, private sector, and government magnetic fusion energy institutions. The objectives of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Technology Fellowship program are: (1) to provide support for graduate study, training, and research in magnetic fusion energy technology; (2) to ensure an adequate supply of appropriately trained manpower to implement the nation's magnetic fusion energy agenda; (3) to raise the visibility of careers in magnetic fusion energy technology and to encourage students to pursue such careers; and (4) to make national magnetic fusion energy facilities available for manpower training

  15. Objective Evaluation in an Online Geographic Information System Certificate Program

    OpenAIRE

    Scott L. WALKER

    2005-01-01

    Objective Evaluation in an Online Geographic Information System Certificate Program Asst. Professor. Dr. Scott L. WALKER Texas State University-San Marcos San Marcos, Texas, USA ABSTRACT Departmental decisions regarding distance education programs can be subject to subjective decision-making processes influenced by external factors such as strong faculty opinions or pressure to increase student enrolment. This paper outlines an evaluation of a departmental distance-education program....

  16. Department of the Navy Supporting Data for Fiscal Year 1983 Budget Estimates Descriptive Summaries Submitted to Congress February 1982. Research, Development, Test & Evaluation, Navy. Book 1 of 3. Technology Base, Advanced Technology Development, Strategic Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    of pinipeds (seals and sea lions ), cetaceans (dolphins, porpoises and small whales) and elasmobranches (sharks, rays and skates) will be evaluated for...faor service use in Mlarch 1976. (U) An object r-covery system, Project QUICK FIND, using the California Sea Lion , was transferred to the Fleet In ’lay...will continue. Development of a greater depth capa- bility for the QUICKFIND Sea Lion object recovery system will be initiated. Development of thef

  17. The Lassen Astrobiology Intern Program - Concept, Implementation and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Marais, D. J.; Dueck, S. L.; Davis, H. B.; Parenteau, M. N.; Kubo, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    The program goal was to provide a hands-on astrobiology learning experience to high school students by introducing astrobiology and providing opportunities to conduct field and lab research with NASA scientists. The program sought to increase interest in interdisciplinary science, technology, engineering, math and related careers. Lassen Volcanic National Park (LVNP), Red Bluff High School and the Ames Team of the NASA Astrobiology Institute led the program. LVNP was selected because it shares aspects of volcanism with Mars and it hosts thermal springs with microbial mat communities. Students documented volcanic deposits, springs and microbial mats. They analyzed waters and sampled rocks, water and microorganisms. They cultured microorganisms and studied chemical reactions between rocks and simulated spring waters. Each student prepared a report to present data and discuss relationships between volcanic rocks and gases, spring waters and microbial mats. At a "graduation" event the students presented their findings to the Red Bluff community. They visited Ames Research Center to tour the facilities and learn about science and technology careers. To evaluate program impact, surveys were given to students after lectures, labs, fieldwork and discussions with Ames scientists. Students' work was scored using rubrics (labs, progress reports, final report, presentation). Students took pre/post tests on core astrobiology concepts. Parents, teachers, rangers, Ames staff and students completed end-of-year surveys on program impact. Several outcomes were documented. Students had a unique and highly valued learning experience with NASA scientists. They understood what scientists do through authentic scientific work, and what scientists are like as individuals. Students became knowledgeable about astrobiology and how it can be pursued in the lab and in the field. The students' interest increased markedly in astrobiology, interdisciplinary studies and science generally.

  18. Employee assistance program evaluation. Employee perceptions, awareness, and utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T

    1989-12-01

    Periodic evaluation is necessary to maintain a quality employee assistance program. This survey was undertaken to determine employee awareness of the existing EAP and their satisfaction with the program. Likewise, the survey allowed for employee input on areas of the program they had concerns with that may have caused hesitancy in further use of the program. The survey not only documents to management that the program is of value to employees and identifies areas where changes may be focused in the future to meet employee needs, but actually serves as a communication tool in itself as a reminder of the availability of the Employee Assistance Program.

  19. Postural education program for elementary school: a one-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Luis Ritter

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe objective of this study was to verify the short- and long-term effectiveness of the Elementary School Postural Program in the performance, generalization, and perception of daily school activities. The final sample consisted of 61 subjects divided into experimental (14 years ±0.93; ♀=22; ♂=10 and control group (15.38 years ±0.97; ♀=16; ♂=13, all participants attended a Brazilian public school in Porto Alegre, State of Rio Grande do Sul. The postural program included 20 sessions over a 10-week period. In each session, participants discussed and practiced routine actions that typically occurred at schools. Eight other meetings were required for the completion of the pre- and post-tests. The experimental group performed significantly better than the control group in the short-term evaluations, although there were no significant statistical differences in the long-term follow-up evaluations. The children demonstrated a good behavioral response to the postural program; nevertheless, the knowledge had not been completely mastered after a year.

  20. Toward Building a Typology for the Evaluation of Services in Family Support Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manalo, Victor; Meezan, William

    2000-01-01

    Articulates how the family support movement emerged in the last 20 years, and describes the philosophical premises, principles, and practices that currently guide it. Considers the inability of current family support program typologies to guide outcome evaluations, and introduces a typology that deconstructs family support programs into their…

  1. The Results of a Randomized Control Trial Evaluation of the SPARK Literacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Curtis J.; Christian, Michael; Rice, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of a two-year randomized control trial evaluation of the SPARK literacy program. SPARK is an early grade literacy program developed by Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee. In 2010, SPARK was awarded an Investing in Innovation (i3) Department of Education grant to further develop the…

  2. Evaluation of Three Osteoporosis Prevention Programs for Young Women: Application of the Health Belief Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lein, Donald H.; Turner, Lori; Wilroy, Jereme

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of theory-based osteoporosis prevention programs on calcium and vitamin D intakes and osteoporosis health beliefs in young women. Methods: Women (N = 152) aged 19 to 25 years were randomly assigned to one of 3 groups: a brochure group (n = 51), a computer-tailored program group…

  3. An Interactive Web-Based Program for Stepfamilies: Development and Evaluation of Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelatt, Vicky A.; Adler-Baeder, Francesca; Seeley, John R.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a family life education program for stepfamilies that is self-administered, interactive, and web-based. The program uses behavior-modeling videos to demonstrate effective couple, parenting, and stepparenting practices. A diverse sample of 300 parents/stepparents of a child aged 11-15 years were randomized into…

  4. Army Hearing Program Status Report Quarter 2 Fiscal Year 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    U.S. Army Publ ic Heal th Center Army Hearing Program Status Report Q2 FY17 Clinical Public Health and Epidemiology Directorate Army... Hearing Division General Medical: 500A July 2017 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited Army Hearing Program Status Report, Q2FY17...56               INTRODUCTION The Army Hearing Program Status Report (AHPSR) is a component of the Public Health

  5. The DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program 8 years later

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, R.; Kershisnik, R.; Taylor, T.; Grothaus, G.; Loesch, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    The DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program was implemented in 1986. Currently, the program is conducting its seventeenth performance testing session for whole body personnel dosimeters. All but two DOE laboratories have gained accreditation for their whole body personnel dosimetry systems. Several test situations which were anticipated in the early stages of DOELAP have not materialized. In addition, the testing standard for whole body personnel dosimetry systems is under review and revision. In the near future, the accreditation programs for extremity dosimetry and bioassay will be implemented. This presentation summarizes the status and anticipated direction of the DOE whole body and extremity dosimetry and bioassay laboratory accreditation program

  6. Library Program Evaluation: The AASL Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Rebecca M.

    2012-01-01

    The word "evaluation" often strikes fear in people, but the author is different. She has always been a person who thought of evaluation, in any form, as a way to make her better and help her strive for excellence. So naturally when her library supervisor announced at a meeting that they were going to do the American Association of School…

  7. Personnel neutron dosimeter evaluation and upgrade program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fix, J.J.; Brackenbush, L.W.; McDonald, J.C.; Roberson, P.L.; Holbrook, K.L.; Endres, G.W.R.; Faust, L.G.

    1983-01-01

    Evaluation of neutron dosimeters from twelve DOE laboratories involved about 2500 dosimeter irradiations at both PNL and the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) using neutrons of several energies and doses and several irradiations for good statistical analysis. The data and their analyses will be published later. The information evaluates accuracy, precision, lower dose detection, and energy response of dosimeters

  8. Evaluation Study of VTAE Wood Technics Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin State Board of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education, Madison.

    A survey of former students of the Wisconsin Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education (VTAE) wood technics programs and employers in woodworking industries was conducted during spring of 1985. General objectives were to determine job classifications, types of businesses, and relative importance of tasks or duties in various woodworking-related…

  9. High School Peer Helping: A Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgariff, Lisa; Solomon, Mindy; Zanotti, Mary; Chambliss, Catherine

    Peer helpers can act as liaisons to high school guidance departments by identifying problems, making appropriate referrals, and encouraging others to obtain professional help if necessary. An active program can help ensure that in the future students are better prepared to handle conflicts that arise within marriage, career, and family. This study…

  10. Evaluation of a Soft Skills Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoensap-Kelly, Piyawan; Broussard, Lauren; Lindsly, Mallory; Troy, Megan

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a soft skills employee training program. We examined willingness to learn and delivery methods (face-to-face vs. online) and their associations with the training outcomes in terms of learning and behavioral change. Results showed that neither participants' willingness to learn nor delivery…

  11. Program evaluation and incentives for administrators of energy efficiency programs: can evaluation solve the principal/agent problem?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumstein, Carl (Univ. of California, Energy Institute (United States))

    2009-07-01

    This paper addresses the nexus between the evaluation of energy-efficiency programs and incentive payments based on performance for program administrators in California. The paper describes problems that arise when evaluators are asked to measure program performance by answering the counterfactual question, what would have happened in the absence of the program? Then some ways of addressing these problems are examined. Key conclusions are that 1) program evaluation cannot precisely and accurately determine the counterfactual, there will always be substantial uncertainty, 2) given the current state of knowledge, the decision to tie all of the incentive to program outcomes is misguided, and 3) incentive programs should be regularly reviewed and revised so that they can be adapted to new conditions.

  12. Program evaluation and incentives for administrators of energy-efficiency programs: Can evaluation solve the principal/agent problem?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumstein, Carl, E-mail: blumstei@berkeley.ed [University of California Energy Institute, 2547 Channing Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    This paper addresses the nexus between evaluation of energy-efficiency programs and incentive payments based on performance for program administrators in California. The paper describes the problems that arise when evaluators are asked to measure program performance by answering the counterfactual question-what would have happened in the absence of the program? Then the paper examines some ways of addressing these problems. Key conclusions are (1) program evaluation cannot precisely and accurately determine the counterfactual, there will always be substantial uncertainty, (2) given the current state of knowledge, the decision to tie all incentives to program outcomes is misguided, and (3) incentive programs should be regularly reviewed and revised so that they can be adapted to new conditions.

  13. Program evaluation and incentives for administrators of energy-efficiency programs. Can evaluation solve the principal/agent problem?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumstein, Carl [University of California Energy Institute, 2547 Channing Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    This paper addresses the nexus between evaluation of energy-efficiency programs and incentive payments based on performance for program administrators in California. The paper describes the problems that arise when evaluators are asked to measure program performance by answering the counterfactual question - what would have happened in the absence of the program? Then the paper examines some ways of addressing these problems. Key conclusions are (1) program evaluation cannot precisely and accurately determine the counterfactual, there will always be substantial uncertainty, (2) given the current state of knowledge, the decision to tie all incentives to program outcomes is misguided, and (3) incentive programs should be regularly reviewed and revised so that they can be adapted to new conditions. (author)

  14. Program evaluation and incentives for administrators of energy-efficiency programs: Can evaluation solve the principal/agent problem?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumstein, Carl

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the nexus between evaluation of energy-efficiency programs and incentive payments based on performance for program administrators in California. The paper describes the problems that arise when evaluators are asked to measure program performance by answering the counterfactual question-what would have happened in the absence of the program? Then the paper examines some ways of addressing these problems. Key conclusions are (1) program evaluation cannot precisely and accurately determine the counterfactual, there will always be substantial uncertainty, (2) given the current state of knowledge, the decision to tie all incentives to program outcomes is misguided, and (3) incentive programs should be regularly reviewed and revised so that they can be adapted to new conditions.

  15. Evaluating programs that address ideological issues: ethical and practical considerations for practitioners and evaluators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Lisa D; Fagen, Michael C; Neiger, Brad L

    2014-03-01

    There are important practical and ethical considerations for organizations in conducting their own, or commissioning external, evaluations and for both practitioners and evaluators, when assessing programs built on strongly held ideological or philosophical approaches. Assessing whether programs "work" has strong political, financial, and/or moral implications, particularly when expending public dollars, and may challenge objectivity about a particular program or approach. Using a case study of the evaluation of a school-based abstinence-until-marriage program, this article discusses the challenges, lessons learned, and ethical responsibilities regarding decisions about evaluation, specifically associated with ideologically driven programs. Organizations should consider various stakeholders and views associated with their program to help identify potential pitfalls in evaluation. Once identified, the program or agency needs to carefully consider its answers to two key questions: Do they want the answer and are they willing to modify the program? Having decided to evaluate, the choice of evaluator is critical to assuring that ethical principles are maintained and potential skepticism or criticism of findings can be addressed appropriately. The relationship between program and evaluator, including agreements about ownership and eventual publication and/or promotion of data, should be addressed at the outset. Programs and organizations should consider, at the outset, their ethical responsibility when findings are not expected or desired. Ultimately, agencies, organizations, and programs have an ethical responsibility to use their data to provide health promotion programs, whether ideologically founded or not, that appropriately and effectively address the problems they seek to solve.

  16. DOE Radiological Calibrations Intercomparison Program: Results of fiscal year 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, F.M.; McDonald, J.C.

    1988-06-01

    This report presents the FY 1987 results of the radiological calibrations intercomparison program. The intercomparison operation is discussed, and the equipment is described, particularly the instrument set, the beta source set, and relevant calculations. Solutions to problems and improvements in the program are suggested, and conclusions are then introduced. 9 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs

  17. One Year Later: Beginning Teachers Revisit Their Preparation Program Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housego, Billie E.; Badali, Salvador J.

    1996-01-01

    Survey of 48 beginning teachers elicited assessment of their experiences in the elementary teacher education program at the University of British Columbia. Teachers assessed the importance of teaching particular knowledge, skills, and understandings and the program's potential and success in doing so. As in similar studies, findings indicate the…

  18. Risk-based Regulatory Evaluation Program methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuCharme, A.R.; Sanders, G.A.; Carlson, D.D.; Asselin, S.V.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of this DOE-supported Regulatory Evaluation Progrwam are to analyze and evaluate the safety importance and economic significance of existing regulatory guidance in order to assist in the improvement of the regulatory process for current generation and future design reactors. A risk-based cost-benefit methodology was developed to evaluate the safety benefit and cost of specific regulations or Standard Review Plan sections. Risk-based methods can be used in lieu of or in combination with deterministic methods in developing regulatory requirements and reaching regulatory decisions

  19. Evaluation Framework for NASA's Educational Outreach Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Rick; Booker, Angela; Linde, Charlotte; Preston, Connie

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the proposed work is to develop an evaluation framework for NASA's educational outreach efforts. We focus on public (rather than technical or scientific) dissemination efforts, specifically on Internet-based outreach sites for children.The outcome of this work is to propose both methods and criteria for evaluation, which would enable NASA to do a more analytic evaluation of its outreach efforts. The proposed framework is based on IRL's ethnographic and video-based observational methods, which allow us to analyze how these sites are actually used.

  20. Use of children's artwork to evaluate the effectiveness of a hospital preparation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C J

    1991-01-01

    Approximately 1.5 million children are hospitalized on an emergency basis per year and are not able to be fully prepared for the event due to the emergency (Azarnoff & Woody, 1981). For this reason many pre-crisis hospital preparation programs are being instituted by hospitals and pediatric nurses. This pilot study investigated the use of children's artwork to evaluate the effectiveness of a hospital preparation program. The 6 to 10 year old children attending summer school at a day care center participated in a hospital preparation program. The purpose of the program was to decrease children's anxieties and fears in the event of an emergency hospitalization.

  1. Senior Program Specialist, Evaluation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The SPS recommends appropriate methods for and facilitates the design, conduct and use ... represents the Division with other teams in the elaboration of evaluation .... manages the design and maintenance of information systems for storing, ...

  2. Program Officer, Monitoring and Evaluation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    S/he manages a quality assessment process for evaluation reports and track ... and budget information in order to contribute to an effective internal control of project ... documentary and literature reviews, and statistical and content analyses to ...

  3. Program of evaluations for nuclear data centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha Menezes Filho, A. da.

    1980-01-01

    Standard problems for evaluating basic data libraries of multigroup constant generation, and codes for calculating integral parameters existing or will exist in the near future in the advanced study division (EAV), are defined. (M.C.K.) [pt

  4. Impact of a Comprehensive Early Clinical Exposure Program for Preclinical Year Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumitra Govindarajan

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the impact of an early clinical exposure program designed to provide a wide variety (cognitive, affective and psychomotor of learning experiences for the preclinical year students. Method: One hundred and fifty preclinical students were posted in small groups to selected departments – Transfusion medicine, Catheterization lab, Simulation lab, Radiology, Neurology, Nephrology, Respiratory medicine and General surgery. Each student had atleast ten hours  of clinical exposure under this program. The program was evaluated through a series of pre and post-test questionnaires, which were designed based on the learning objectives of each session. Students who wished to participate in the program evaluation gave informed consent, took up the pre / post test and were also asked to give their written open comments about the program. Results: There was a significant increase in the post-test scores (ranging from 9.14±2.67 to 36.65±6.62 when compared to the pre-test scores (ranging from 7.94±2.31 to 28.69±6.11 for all the sessions (p value <0.001, n=144. Analysis of the open feedback showed that the program had significant impact on the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains. “Application of basic sciences in clinical practice”, “motivation to learn”, “got familiar with various specialties”, “insight about what the patient undergoes” were the themes identified from the open comments. Conclusion: The innovative use of early clinical exposure program to teach/learn clinical skills like phlebotomy and Basic Life Support had been well appreciated by the students. The present design involving a variety of learning experiences has been successful in introducing the various dimensions of medical profession like scientific, ethical, interpersonal, professional and social to the new entrants in addition to enhancing their motivation to learn. Keywords: Attitude, Learning, Simulation lab, Medical education, Curriculum

  5. Evaluation assessment of Rail Freight Transportation Research and Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-02-01

    This report presents an evaluation assessment of the Canadian Rail Freight Transportation Research and Development (R and D) Program. The assessment was to assist in preparing for an evaluation of the Program and to stimulate a better understanding of the broader issues and problems of evaluating R and D programs. In general, the objectives of the program are aimed at improving rail freight productivity, capacity, safety, cost, and the domestic and foreign competitive position of railway suppliers. This is to be acccomplished by stimulating a stronger industry commitment to R and D and inducing investment in new technology through joint federal-industry funding and participation in rail freight R and D projects. In view of the low funding levels of the Program, it is unlikely that it will have a significant direct impact upon these ultimate objectives. Impacts will likely only be achieved through the Program's ability to stimulate increased industrial R and D and investment in new technology. A model of the Program developed in the report shows that the critical linkages between the activities and objectives of the Program are the leadership or advocacy functions performed by the Program's managers and of the results of projects supported under the Program; and the processes of program planning and project selection. An assessment of the Program's structure indicates that there are no significant issues that would make the evaluation of the Program or its major components inadvisable. Twelve potential evaluation questions and the basic approaches required to address each of them are presented in the report. 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Criteria to evaluate SAT-based training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arjona, O.; Venegas, M.; Rodriguez, L.; Lopez, M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper present some coefficients of error obtained to evaluate the quality of the design development and implementation of SAT-based personnel training programs. With the attainment of these coefficients, with the use of the GESAT system, is facilitated the continuos evaluation of training programs and the main deficiencies in the design, development and implementation of training programs are obtained, through the comparison between the program features and their standards or wanted features and doing an statistics analysis of the data kept in the GESAT system

  7. Process Evaluation and Continuous Improvement in Community Youth Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer V. Trachtenberg

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A method of using process evaluation to provide improvement plans in order to promote community youth programs is described. The core elements of this method include the following: (1 collection and analysis of baseline data, (2 feedback provided to programs describing their strengths and limitations, (3 programs provided with assistance in preparing improvement plans in regard to their baseline data, and (4 follow-up evaluation assessed program changes based on their improvement plans and baseline data. A case study of an inner-city neighborhood youth center is used to demonstrate this method.

  8. Independent auto evaluation of an operative radiological protection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medrano L, M.A.; Rodriguez C, C.C.; Linares R, D.; Zarate M, N.; Zempoalteca B, R.

    2006-01-01

    The program of operative radiological protection of a nuclear power plant consists of multiple procedures and associate tasks that have as purpose the radiological protection of the workers of the power station. It is for this reason that the constant evaluation of the one it programs it is an important tool in the identification of their weaknesses (and strengths), so they can be assisted appropriately. In this work the main elements of the program of independent auto evaluation of the program of operative radiological protection of the Laguna Verde Central that has been developed and implemented by the National Institute of Nuclear Research are described. (Author)

  9. Evaluating 5 years' NIMART mentoring in South Africa's HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluating 5 years' NIMART mentoring in South Africa's HIV treatment programme: Successes, challenges and future needs. ... South African Medical Journal ... targeted mentoring was introduced; this increased the percentage of primary nurses eligible for DoH certificates of clinical competence in NIMART from 12%, ...

  10. Portland Public Schools Project Chrysalis: Year 2 Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Stephanie J.; Gabriel, Roy M.; Hahn, Karen J.; Laws, Katherine E.

    In 1994, the Chrysalis Project in Portland Public Schools received funding to prevent or delay the onset of substance abuse among a special target population: high-risk, female adolescents with a history of childhood abuse. Findings from the evaluation of the project's second year of providing assistance to these students are reported here. During…

  11. Evaluation of Clark County School District's Alternative Route to Licensure Program from the Program Participants' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, James J., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This evaluation assesses the Alternative Route to Licensure (ARL) program of the Clark County School District (CCSD), in Clark County, Nevada from the program participants' perspectives. The program was implemented to reduce teacher shortages in the school district and allow persons with non-education-related Bachelor's Degrees to obtain teaching…

  12. Failure to Return for Posttest Counseling and HIV Test Results at the Prevention and Voluntary Testing and Counseling Centers of Douala, Cameroon: An Evaluation of a Routine Five-Year Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Ngangue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the magnitude and time trends in failure to return (FTR rates and the relation between FTR and individual characteristics, tests procedures, waiting period for the results, and HIV test results among people who were screened for HIV in the prevention and voluntary testing and counseling centers (PVTCCs of six district hospitals of the city of Douala in Cameroon, between January 2009 and December 2013. It was a retrospective analysis of medical records. Among the 32,020 analyzed records, the failure to return (FTR rate was 14.3%. Overall, people aged 50 years and over, those tested between 2011 and 2012, and those tested in the PVTCC of Bonassama were less likely to return for their results. Significant factors associated with FTR included being a housewife, having a positive/undetermined/requiring confirmation result, and provider-initiated testing and counseling (PITC. There was an increasing trend for FTR in the PVTCCs of Bonassama, New-Bell, Nylon, and Cité des Palmiers. HIV testing and counseling services in Douala district hospitals must be reorganized such that individuals tested for HIV receive their results on the same day of the test. Also counselors need to better alert clients concerning the importance of returning for their test results.

  13. The Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (PSEP) at WIPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deal, D.E.; Roggenthen, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    The Permian salt beds of the WIPP facility are virtually dry. The amount of water present in the rocks exposed in the excavations that is free to migrate under pressure gradients was estimated by heating salt samples to 95 degrees C and measuring weight loss. Clear balite contains about 0.22 weight percent water and the more argillaceous units average about 0.75 percent. Measurements made since 1984 as part of the Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) indicate that small amounts of this brine can migrate into the excavations and does accumulate in the underground environment. Brine seepage into drillholes monitored since thy were drilled show that brine seepage decreases with time and that many have dried up entirely. Weeping of brine from the walls of the repository excavations also decreases after two or more years. Chemical analyses of brines shows that they are sodium-chloride saturated and magnesium-rich

  14. Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program: Phase 1 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deal, D.E.; Case, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    This interim report presents preliminary data obtained in the course of the WIPP Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program. The investigations focus on the brine present in the near-field environment around the WIPP underground workings. Although the WIPP underground workings are considered dry, small amounts of brine are present. This amount of brine is not unexpected in rocks of marine sedimentary origin. Part of that brine can and does migrate into the repository in response to pressure gradients, at essentially isothermal conditions. These small volumes of brine have little effect on the day-to-day operations, but are pervasive throughout the repository and may contribute enough moisture over a period of years to affect resaturation and repressurization after sealing and closure. Gas bubbles are observed in many of the brine occurrences. Gas is also known to exsolve from solution as the brine is poured from container to container. 68 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Defining the Benefits, Outputs, and Knowledge Elements of Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Rochelle; Perrin, Burt; McGuire, Martha; Long, Bud; Lee, Linda

    2002-01-01

    The Canadian Evaluation Society explored the benefits that can be attributed to program evaluation, the outputs necessary to achieve those benefits, and the knowledge and skills needed to produce outputs. Findings, which articulate benefits, outputs, and skills, can be used by evaluation organizations to support advocacy and professional…

  16. Evaluating the effectiveness of an online medical laboratory technician program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen-Suchy, Kara

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effectiveness of an online medical laboratory technician program in the academic preparation and development of laboratory professionals. A semi-quantitative comparative research design was used. Several factors were considered in this evaluation. Academic outcomes between online and campus medical laboratory technician (MLT) students was determined by comparing overall and categorical scores on certification exams as well as first time pass rate. Certification exam scores and first time pass rates were also compared to national norms when possible to do so. Demographic data, including age and experience were compared. Additionally, learning styles were assessed to determine if there was a correlation to overall GPA and MLT GPA and if learning styles could be used to predict successful completion of an online Associates of Applied Science. The research was conducted at an academic university located in the mountain west United States. Participants consisted of online and campus students enrolled in a Medical Laboratory Technician program that graduated with their Associate of Applied Science degree between the years 2007-2009. Results of these years were also compared to graduates from 2004-2006 in the same program. Certification performance and first time pass rates were the major outcomes measured. Age and experience were correlated. Online learning styles and GPA were also compared to successful degree completion. The researcher found no significant difference in certification performance with regard to total and categorical scores, and first time pass rates between campus and online MLT students. Online students were slightly older and had more experience working in a laboratory in some capacity. Correlation studies showed significant positive correlation between learning styles, GPA, and successful completion of an Associate of Applied Science degree. When registry scores were compared to the prior cohort of online

  17. Evaluation of integrated child development services program in rajasthan, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madan Singh Rathore

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS scheme is the largest program for promotion of maternal and child health and nutrition. Aims: The present study is aimed to evaluate ICDS program in terms of infrastructure of anganwadi centers (AWCs, characteristics of anganwadi workers (AWWs, coverage of supplementary nutrition (SN, and preschool education (PSE to the beneficiaries. Methods: A total of 39 AWCs from a rural area and 15 from the urban area were surveyed. AWWs were interviewed, and records were reviewed. Information was collected using a predesigned and pretested questionnaire. Results: In the selected AWCs, 88.9% were running in Pucca buildings, 38.9% had electricity, 35.1% had a separate kitchen, 1.8% had cooking gas, and toilets were available in 59.3% AWCs. All the AWW have received job training, 83.3% AWW have received refresher training. 38.8% AWW have received orientation training, 37% have received skill training in World Health Organization growth standards and 18.5% AWW have received skill training in mother and child health. 86.9% registered pregnant women, 90.7% registered lactating women, 72.6% registered adolescent girls were availing SN. 95.4% registered children 6 months to 3 years and 92.4% registered children 3-6 years of age were availing SN. Interruption in SN in last 6 months was seen in 22.2% AWCs. Appropriate and adequate PSE material was available in 59.2% AWCs. Conclusion: There are program gaps in the infrastructure of AWCs, training of AWW, coverage of SN, interruption in the supply of SN.

  18. Evaluating RITES, a Statewide Math and Science Partnership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, D. P.; Caulkins, J. L.; Burns, A. L.; de Oliveira, G.; Dooley, H.; Brand, S.; Veeger, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Rhode Island Technology-Enhanced Science project (RITES) is a NSF-MSP Program that seeks to improve science education by providing professional development to science teachers at the 5th through 12th grade levels. At it's heart, RITES is a complex, multifaceted project that is challenging to evaluate because of the nature of its goal: the development of a large, statewide partnership between higher education and K12 public school districts during a time when science education strategies and leadership are in flux. As a result, these difficulties often require flexibility and creativity regarding evaluation, study design and data collection. In addition, the research agenda of the project often overlaps with the evaluator's agenda, making collaboration and communication a crucial component of the project's success. In it's 5th year, RITES and it's evaluators have developed a large number of instruments, both qualitative and quantitative, to provide direction and feedback on the effectiveness of the project's activities. RITES personnel work closely with evaluators and researchers to obtain a measure of how RITES' 'theory-of-action' affects both student outcomes and teacher practice. Here we discuss measures of teacher and student content gains, student inquiry gains, and teacher implementation surveys. Using content questions based on AAAS and MOSART databases, teachers in the short courses and students in classrooms showed significant normalized learning gains with averages generally above 0.3. Students of RITES-trained teachers also outperformed their non-RITES peers on the inquiry-section of the NECAP test, and The results show, after controlling for race and economic status, a small but statistically significant increase in test scores for RITES students. Technology use in the classroom significantly increased for teachers who were 'expected implementers' where 'expected implementers' are those teachers who implemented RITES as the project was designed. This

  19. 1992-1993 Bonneville Appliance Efficiency Program: Showerhead evaluation. Volume I - report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warwick, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) provides wholesale electric power to over 100 retail distribution utilities in the Pacific Northwest. Bonneville is faced with meeting growing loads from these utilities. It acquires conservation as one means of meeting this load growth. Bonneville has offered a variety of conservation programs since 1980. Efficient showerheads have been a feature in residential conservation programs ever since. Bonneville launched the Residential Appliance Efficiency Program to focus on water-heater energy conservation opportunities in 1992. The Residential Appliance Efficiency Program consists of two parts, a water-heater efficiency program, and a hot-water efficiency program. This report evaluates the savings and costs of the first two years of the showerhead portion of the Residential Appliance Efficiency Program (the showerhead program). Although it is not a formal evaluation of the program limited to implementation or a {open_quotes}process{close_quotes} evaluation, observations about program design and implementation are included as appropriate. Results of this evaluation are limited to program participants within the Bonneville service territory.

  20. Evaluating a Graduate Professional Development Program for Informal Science Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Jeremy Paul

    This study is an examination and evaluation of the outcomes of a series of courses that I helped build to create a graduate certificate. Specifically, I wanted to evaluate whether or not the online iteration of the Informal Science Institutions Environmental Education Graduate Certificate Program truly provided the long term professional development needed to enhance the skills of the formal and informal educators participating so that they could contribute meaningfully to the improvement of science literacy in their respective communities. My role as an internal evaluator provided an extraordinary opportunity to know the intent of the learning opportunities and why they were constructed in a particular fashion. Through the combination of my skills, personal experiences both within the certificate's predecessor and as an educator, I was uniquely qualified to explore the outcomes of this program and evaluate its effectiveness in providing a long-term professional development for participants. After conducting a literature review that emphasized a need for greater scientific literacy in communities across America, it was evident that the formal education enterprise needs the support of informal educators working on the ground in myriad different settings in ways that provide science as both content and process, learning science facts and doing real science. Through a bridging of informal science educators with formal teachers, it was thought each could learn the culture of the other, making each more fluent in accessing community resources to help make these educators more collaborative and able to bridge the classroom with the outside world. This bridge promotes ongoing, lifelong learning, which in turn can help the national goal of greater scientific literacy. This study provided insight into the thinking involved in the learners' growth as they converted theory presented in course materials into practice. Through an iterative process of reviewing the course

  1. Enhancing pediatric residents’ scholar role: the development of a Scholarly Activity Guidance and Evaluation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M. Pound

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research training is essential to the development of well-rounded physicians. Although many pediatric residency programs require residents to complete a research project, it is often challenging to integrate research training into educational programs. Objective: We aimed to develop an innovative research program for pediatric residents, called the Scholarly Activity Guidance and Evaluation (SAGE program. Methods: We developed a competency-based program which establishes benchmarks for pediatric residents, while providing ongoing academic mentorship. Results: Feedback from residents and their research supervisors about the SAGE program has been positive. Preliminary evaluation data have shown that all final-year residents have met or exceeded program expectations. Conclusions: By providing residents with this supportive environment, we hope to influence their academic career paths, increase their research productivity, promote evidence-based practice, and ultimately, positively impact health outcomes.

  2. Energy Systems Studies Program annual report, fiscal year 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beller, M. (ed.)

    1976-06-01

    This is the fourth annual progress report of the Energy Systems Studies Program supported at Brookhaven National Laboratory by the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), Office of the Assistant Administrator for Planning and Analysis. The program is coordinated under the designation of a National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems (NCAES). Five working groups with specific program responsibilities are: policy analysis, economic analysis, biomedical and environmental assessment, technology assessment, and energy data and models. Future scenarios of the implementation of groups of technologies and new resources are developed. The socio-economic and environmental consequences are analyzed in detail and impact analyses are performed. Progress during FY 1976 is summarized in the following areas: energy system model development; energy-economic model development; technology assessments and support; economic analyses; and energy model data base activities. The program plan for FY 1977 is presented. (MCW)

  3. Community college: Two-year and continuing education programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, L.R.

    1989-01-01

    In response to educational needs in the waste management industry that were expressed by companies located in Oak Ridge and Knoxville, Tennessee, Roane State Community College has developed an associate degree program in environmental health technology as well as related noncredit programs offered by the Waste Management Training Center. The degree program contains three options: health physics, industrial hygiene, and waste management technologies. Roane State's involvement in these programs was a direct response to the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) model concept. This model brings together the resources of the DOE, regulatory agencies, private industry, higher education, and various contractors to resolve waste disposal and waste cleanup problems. Firms such as International Technology, Scientific Ecology Group, and Bechtel National enhanced Roane State's awareness of the nature of some of the environmental problems these and many other firms are working to resolve

  4. Coal Power Systems strategic multi-year program plans; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    2001-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE), through the Coal and Power Systems (C and PS) program, funds research to advance the scientific knowledge needed to provide new and improved energy technologies; to eliminate any detrimental environmental effects of energy production and use; and to maintain US leadership in promoting the effective use of US power technologies on an international scale. Further, the C and PS program facilitates the effective deployment of these technologies to maximize their benefits to the Nation. The following Strategic Plan describes how the C and PS program intends to meet the challenges of the National Energy Strategy to: (1) enhance American's energy security; (2) improve the environmental acceptability of energy production and use; (3) increase the competitiveness and reliability of US energy systems; and (4) ensure a robust US energy future. It is a plan based on the consensus of experts and managers from FE's program offices and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

  5. Army Hearing Program Status Report Quarter 3 Fiscal Year 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    are not being attended. Clinical Hearing Services: Clinical records review is a critical component of a quality assurance program. Army...Regulation (AR) 40-68 outlines requirements for ongoing clinical performance reviews, to include peer reviews and chart audits . The Joint Commission...Health Center. • Implement peer reviews and/or chart audits at all installations for all privileged providers. • Increase the Army Hearing Program (AHP

  6. Evaluability Assessment of a National Driver Retraining Program: Are We Evaluating in the Right Lane?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joanisse, Melanie; Stinchcombe, Arne; Yamin, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    An evaluability assessment (EA) of the 55 Alive program, a national older driver refresher course aimed at improving driving skills, was conducted. This EA adds to the evaluation literature as previous outcome evaluations neglected to explore whether this program was prepared for such assessments. A mixed-method protocol was executed across three…

  7. Calendar Year 2007 Program Benefits for ENERGY STAR Labeled Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Marla Christine; Homan, Gregory; Brown, Richard

    2008-10-31

    ENERGY STAR is a voluntary energy efficiency-labeling program operated jointly by the United States Department of Energy and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). Since the program inception in 1992, ENERGY STAR has become a leading international brand for energy efficient products. ENERGY STAR's central role in the development of regional, national, and international energy programs necessitates an open process whereby its program achievements to date as well as projected future savings are shared with committed stakeholders. Through 2007, the program saved 7.1 Quads of primary energy and avoided 128 MtC equivalent. The forecast shows that the program is expected to save 21.2 Quads of primary energy and avoid 375 MtC equivalent over the period 2008-2015. The sensitivity analysis bounds the best estimate of carbon avoided between 84 MtC and 172 MtC (1993 to 2007) and between 243 MtC and 519 MtC (2008 to 2015).

  8. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Ten-Year Program Plan Fiscal Year 2005, Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    2005-01-01

    As reflected in the U.S. ''National Energy Policy'', nuclear energy has a strong role to play in satisfying our nation's future energy security and environmental quality needs. The desirable environmental, economic, and sustainability attributes of nuclear energy give it a cornerstone position, not only in the U.S. energy portfolio, but also in the world's future energy portfolio. Accordingly, on September 20, 2002, U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham announced that, ''The United States and nine other countries have agreed to develop six Generation IV nuclear energy concepts''. The Secretary also noted that the systems are expected to ''represent significant advances in economics, safety, reliability, proliferation resistance, and waste minimization''. The six systems and their broad, worldwide research and development (R and D) needs are described in ''A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems'' (hereafter referred to as the Generation IV Roadmap). The first 10 years of required U.S. R and D contributions to achieve the goals described in the Generation IV Roadmap are outlined in this Program Plan

  9. Encouraging responses in sexual and relationship violence prevention: what program effects remain 1 year later?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Mary M; Banyard, Victoria L; Cares, Alison C; Potter, Sharyn J; Williams, Linda M; Stapleton, Jane G

    2015-01-01

    Colleges and universities are high-risk settings for sexual and relationship violence. To address these problems, institutions of higher education have implemented prevention programs, many of which train students as potential bystanders who can step in to help diffuse risky situations, identify and challenge perpetrators, and assist victims. The impact of bystander sexual and relationship violence prevention programs on long-term behavior of bystanders has remained a key unanswered question for those who seek to offer the most effective programs as well as for policy makers. In this study, the researchers experimentally evaluated the effectiveness of the Bringing in the Bystander® in-person program. Participants were 948 1st-year college students of whom 47.8% were women and 85.2% identified as White (15% also identified as Hispanic in a separate question) between the ages of 18 and 24 at two universities (one a rural, primarily residential campus and the other an urban, highly commuter campus) in the northeastern United States. To date, this is the first study to have found positive behavior changes as long-lasting as 1 year following an educational workshop focusing on engaging bystanders in preventing sexual and relationship violence. Even so, many questions remain to be answered about prevention and intervention of this type. More prospective research is needed on bystander-focused prevention of these forms of violence to help understand and better predict the complicated relationships both between and among the attitudes and behaviors related to preventing sexual and relationship violence. In this regard, we make specific recommendations for designing and evaluating programs based on our findings relating to the importance of moderators, especially two key understudied ones, readiness to help and opportunity to intervene. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Multivariate Gradient Analysis for Evaluating and Visualizing a Learning System Platform for Computer Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the application of canonical gradient analysis to evaluate and visualize student performance and acceptance of a learning system platform. The subject of evaluation is a first year BSc module for computer programming. This uses "Ceebot," an animated and immersive game-like development environment. Multivariate…

  11. Oklahoma City FILM Even Start Family Literacy Program Evaluation, 2000-2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Donna Castle; Shove, Joanie; Brickman, Sharon; Terrell, Sherry; Shields, Jane

    This report presents findings from the evaluation of the Oklahoma City Public Schools Even Start Program, also called the Family Intergenerational Literacy Model (FILM), now in its twelfth full year of operation. The evaluation focuses on the total population of adult students, preschoolers, adult graduates, and preschool graduates. The…

  12. Evaluation of a child sexual abuse prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasan-Taber, L; Tabachnick, J

    1999-10-01

    A half-million children are believed to be sexually abused each year in the United States. In 1995, the American Medical Association declared sexual assault "a silent violent epidemic." The majority of efforts to stop child sexual abuse have focused on punishing abusers and treating victims and their families; prevention programs are uncommon and rely on educating children to report sexual abuse. This case study describes the evaluation of the first public health campaign designed to target adults for prevention. A baseline assessment of attitudes, awareness, knowledge, and policies was conducted in Vermont to identify facilitators and barriers to adult prevention of child sexual abuse. These included predisposing factors (50% of Vermont residents did not know the characteristics of an abuser), enabling factors (60% of Vermont residents did not know where to refer someone who may have sexual behavior problems), and reinforcing factors (when focus group participants knew an abuser, they were less likely to take action). This process guided the intervention, which included a broad-based media campaign targeting adults; a one-to-one communications strategy that provided information to agencies working with families at risk and a toll-free helpline for adults in an abuse situation; and a systems change strategy designed to educate decision-makers and leaders. Program evaluation measures included a random-digit dial survey, focus groups, a survey of Vermont decision-makers, and other data sets. The successes and limitations of these interventions, both as strategies in themselves and as data sources for evaluation, are discussed.

  13. Vocal problems among teachers: evaluation of a preventive voice program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovo, Roberto; Galceran, Marta; Petruccelli, Joseph; Hatzopoulos, Stavros

    2007-11-01

    Vocal education programs for teachers may prevent the emergence of vocal disorders; however, only a few studies have tried to evaluate the effectiveness of these preventive programs, particularly in the long term. Two hundred and sixty-four subjects, mostly kindergarten and primary school female teachers, participated in a course on voice care, including a theoretical seminar (120 minutes) and a short voice group therapy (180 minutes, small groups of 20 subjects). For 3 months, they had to either attend the vocal ergonomics norms and, as psychological reinforcement, they had to make out a daily report of vocal abuse, or to follow the given exercises for a more efficient vocal technique, reporting on whether the time scheduled was respected or not. The effectiveness of the course was assessed in a group of 21 female teachers through a randomized controlled study. Evaluation comprehended stroboscopy, perceptual and electro-acoustical voice analysis, Voice Handicap Index, and a course benefit questionnaire. A group of 20 teachers matched for age, working years, hoarseness grade, and vocal demand served as a control group. At 3 months evaluation, participants demonstrated amelioration in the global dysphonia rates (P=0.0003), jitter (P=0.0001), shimmer (P=0.0001), MPT (P=0.0001), and VHI (P=0.0001). Twelve months after the course, the positive effects remained, although they were slightly reduced. In conclusion, a course inclusive of two lectures, a short group voice therapy, home-controlled voice exercises, and hygiene, represents a feasible and cost-effective primary prevention of voice disorders in a homogeneous and well-motivated population of teachers.

  14. An Evaluation Program for Nonprofit Recreation Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    I do not care to use it - not satisfied. I use full time daycare elsewhere. Children are not supervised well enough - need more care, e.g., diapers ...games in spring/fall. 131 F. SAILING Too hard to use. G. SWIMMING Swim classes interfere. Leave open year round. Install solar heating. H. YOUTH

  15. Evaluation of a Classwide Teaching Program for Developing Preschool Life Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Gregory P.; Heal, Nicole A.; Tiger, Jeffrey H.; Ingvarsson, Einar T.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, nonmaternal center-based child care has been linked to problem behavior in young children (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 2003). In response, a comprehensive program to promote prosocial skills was evaluated in a classroom of 16 children between the ages of 3 years and 5 years. Classroom observations were…

  16. Fiscal year 1999 Battelle performance evaluation and fee agreement; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DAVIS, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    Fiscal Year 1999 represents the third fill year utilizing a results-oriented, performance-based evaluation for the Contractor's operations and management of the DOE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (here after referred to as the Laboratory). However, this is the first year that the Contractor's fee is totally performance-based utilizing the same Critical Outcomes. This document describes the critical outcomes, objectives, performance indicators, expected levels of performance, and the basis for the evaluation of the Contractor's performance for the period October 1, 1998 through September 30, 1999, as required by Clauses entitled ''Use of Objective Standards of Performance, Self Assessment and Performance Evaluation'' and ''Performance Measures Review'' of the Contract DE-ACO6-76RL01830. Furthermore, it documents the distribution of the total available performance-based fee and the methodology set for determining the amount of fee earned by the Contractor as stipulated within the causes entitled ''Estimated Cost and Annual Fee,'' ''Total Available Fee'' and ''Allowable Costs and Fee.'' In partnership with the Contractor and other key customers, the Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters (HQ) and Richland Operations Office (RL) has defined four critical outcomes that serve as the core for the Contractor's performance-based evaluation and fee determination. The Contractor also utilizes these outcomes as a basis for overall management of the Laboratory

  17. National NIF Diagnostic Program Fiscal Year 2002 Second Quarter Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacGowan, B

    2002-01-01

    Since October 2001 the development of the facility diagnostics for NIF has been funded by the NIF Director through the National NIF Diagnostic Program (NNDP). The current emphasis of the NNDP is on diagnostics for the early NIF quad scheduled to be available for experiment commissioning in FY03. During the past six months the NNDP has set in place processes for funding diagnostics, developing requirements for diagnostics, design reviews and monthly status reporting. Those processes are described in an interim management plan for diagnostics (National NIF Diagnostic Program Interim Plan, NIF-008 13 15, April 2002) and a draft Program Execution Plan (Program Execution Plan for the National NlF Diagnostic Program, NIF-0072083, October 2001) and documents cited therein. Work has been funded at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Bechtel Nevada at Los Alamos and Santa Barbara. There are no major technical risks with the early diagnostics. The main concerns relate to integration of the diagnostics into the facility, all such issues are being worked. This report is organized to show the schedule and budget status and a summary of Change Control Board actions for the past six months. The following sections then provide short descriptions of the status of each diagnostic. Where design reviews or requirements documents are cited, the documents are available on the Diagnostics file server or on request

  18. Dosimetric evaluation program for dental radiology practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregori, B.; Milat, J.; Fernandez, J.; Micinquevich, S.; Andrieu, J.

    1992-01-01

    The preliminary results of a program undertaken to estimate the doses to patients associated with dental radiology practices in Argentine, are presented. Information collected from the search demonstrated that the Dieck and coronal techniques are the most commonly used practices, while all the examinations are performed by using a circular collimator. For both practices, the dosimetric studies were carried out on a Rando Alderson phantom. All dose measurements were made using thermoluminescent detectors LiF and Ca 2 F. In addition, a mathematical model was developed by applying the Monte Carlo method to a MIRD-V phantom. Circular and rectangular collimators were used. Absorbed dose distribution on head and neck, as well as surface dose distribution, were estimated. The comparison of the performance of both collimators shows that the use of the rectangular one allows for a dose reduction of 80%. Besides, a good correlation between the physical and mathematical models applied was found. (author)

  19. Evaluación del Programa de Intercambio de Jeringuillas en el Centro Penitenciario de Pereiro de Aguiar (Ourense: diez años de experiencia Evaluation of needle exchange program at Pereiro de Aguiar prison (Ourense, Spain: ten years of experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ferrer-Castro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Evaluar la eficacia de un programa de intercambio de jeringuillas (PIJ en una prisión para reducir la prevalencia de infecciones asociadas al uso de drogas intravenosas, y conocer la aceptación del programa por internos y funcionarios del centro penitenciario. Material y métodos: Estudio observacional con cortes transversales al inicio, 6 y 12 meses y 10 años de desarrollo del programa. Se realizaron entrevistas a los usuarios del programa y encuestas a muestras accidentales de funcionarios en los distintos cortes, y a una muestra aleatoria de internos a los 10 años. Se registraron diariamente los indicadores de actividad del programa, y se valoró la prevalencia de infección por VIH, hepatitis B y C al inicio y a los 10 años. Para el análisis estadístico utilizamos la prueba ji-cuadrado con la corrección de Yates en caso necesario. Resultados: Durante estos diez años se suministraron 15.962 jeringuillas a 429 usuarios (media de 20,2 usuarios/mes, recuperándose 11.327 (70,9%. La prevalencia de infección por VIH pasó del 21% en 1999 al 8,5% en 2009, la de VHC del 40% al 26,1% (pObjectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of NEPs in prison to reduce the prevalence of infections associated with intravenous drug use and to know more about acceptance of the program by inmates and staff. Material and methods: cross-sectional observational study at baseline, 6 and 12 months and 10 years of program development. Interviews were conducted with program users, as well as random sample surveys of officials at the various cuts, and a random sample of inmates from the centre after10 years. Activity indicators of the program were recorded continuously, and the prevalence of HIV, HBV and HCV at baseline and after 10 years was evaluated. For the statistical analysis, the chi-square test was used with the Yates correction when necessary. Results: In ten years we have supplied a total of 15,962 syringes to 429 users, (average 20.2 users

  20. An economic analysis methodology for project evaluation and programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Economic analysis is a critical component of a comprehensive project or program evaluation methodology that considers all key : quantitative and qualitative impacts of highway investments. It allows highway agencies to identify, quantify, and value t...

  1. The Nursing Leadership Institute program evaluation: a critique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havaei F

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Farinaz Havaei, Maura MacPhee School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Abstract: A theory-driven program evaluation was conducted for a nursing leadership program, as a collaborative project between university faculty, the nurses' union, the provincial Ministry of Health, and its chief nursing officers. A collaborative logic model process was used to engage stakeholders, and mixed methods approaches were used to answer evaluation questions. Despite demonstrated, successful outcomes, the leadership program was not supported with continued funding. This paper examines what happened during the evaluation process: What factors failed to sustain this program? Keywords: leadership development, theory-driven evaluation, mixed methods, collaborative logic modeling

  2. [Graduates from a postgraduate program in cardiology: are the results of almost 30 years adequate?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Luana; Cunha, Edileuza; Tavares, José Roberto; Gonçalves, Iran; Paola, Angelo A V de; Moisés, Valdir; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos

    2010-04-01

    Stricto sensu post-graduation in Brazil was implemented in 1965 to increase university professors' teaching quality and to prepare full, independent researchers. The brazilian share in ISI publications has increased significantly since then, but little information is available on postgraduate quality. To review 29 years of the postgraduate programs in cardiology at the Federal University of São Paulo and to analyze master and doctorate graduates' characteristics regarding their origin, publications and subsequent career. We developed a questionnaire to evaluate 168 postgraduates who produced 196 theses (116 master's and 80 doctorate) over the period 1975-2004 and contacted 95.9% of them. Information on publications were obtained through the usual science databases. 30% of graduates came from the North-Northeast-Central West regions and only 50% returned to their original area. Mean age at admission was 32.5 and 34.9 years old for master and doctorate students, respectively; average program duration was, respectively, 39.0 and 43.2 months and approximately 50% went through it without any grants. Thesis publications throughout these 29 years averaged 36.5% for master's and 61.9% for doctorate, but any publishing afterwards occurred in 70.2 and 90.6% of the cases. The average impact factor of the published theses was 1.3 for master's degree and 3.1 for doctorate programs with 65.5% and 87.5% of Qualis A, respectively. Currently, there are graduates in 17 states of the country and 12 have became full professors. Although the stricto sensu program, especially the master's degree program, has many areas that need improvement, they seem to be contributing to improve professional quality and the number of brazilian indexed publications.

  3. Museum nuclear science programs during the past 30 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsee, M.D.

    1990-01-01

    The American Museum of Atomic Energy was opened as a program of the Atomic Energy Commission. The name was changed in 1977 to the American Museum of Science and Energy to reflect an expanded roll of the Department of Energy. From 1954 until 1980 the museum was the base for a Traveling Exhibit Program that visited schools, state fairs, shopping centers and malls, libraries, summer camps, and science museums throughout the United States. Today the museum transfers information on the research and development of all the energy sources, the environmental impact of these sources and possible solutions to these impacts. The museum also manages an Outreach Program to area schools and coordinates several special events for student visits to the museum

  4. Secondary Education Programs in Kuwait: An Evaluation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Ghada K.; Koushki, Parviz A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper evaluates the effectiveness of the semester and the credit programs of high school education in Kuwait in terms of their graduating students' preparedness for continued and successful academic performance in programs of higher education. Students' percentile graduation rank from high school and their performances in the English, math…

  5. Evaluating Nutrition Education Programming by Using a Dietary Screener

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Jennifer; Litchfield, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Short dietary assessment instruments known as screeners have potential for use in evaluating nutrition education programming because detecting change in dietary intake can demonstrate movement toward program goals. Using screeners results in objective dietary intake data but involves less administrative time, training, and cost than other…

  6. Situated Research Design and Methodological Choices in Formative Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supovitz, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Design-based implementation research offers the opportunity to rethink the relationships between intervention, research, and situation to better attune research and evaluation to the program development process. Using a heuristic called the intervention development curve, I describe the rough trajectory that programs typically follow as they…

  7. Evaluating a Psychology Graduate Student Peer Mentoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Christina; Mullins, Morell E.

    2012-01-01

    Research on mentoring outcomes and characteristics of various types of mentoring programs in different settings is limited. The present study sampled 39 graduate students at a small Midwestern university to evaluate peer mentoring in a graduate school setting. Mentoring function and outcome relationships as well as program characteristics were…

  8. Wood Programs. Courseware Evaluation for Vocational and Technical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaylor, Robert; And Others

    This courseware evaluation rates the Wood Programs software developed by the Iowa Department of Public Instruction. (These programs--not contained in this document--include understanding board feet, wood characteristics, wood safety drill, wood dimensions, wood moisture, operating the table saw, radial arm, measurement drill, fraction drill, and…

  9. 7 CFR 3405.22 - Evaluation of program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Evaluation of program. 3405.22 Section 3405.22 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HIGHER EDUCATION CHALLENGE GRANTS PROGRAM...

  10. 38 CFR 1.15 - Standards for program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... program operates. (3) Validity. The degree of statistical validity should be assessed within the research... intent, contain a method to measure fulfillment of the objectives, ascertain the degree to which goals... the data. (f) Each program evaluation requires a systematic research design to collect the data...

  11. 24 CFR 266.115 - Program monitoring and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... AUTHORITIES HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY RISK-SHARING PROGRAM FOR INSURED AFFORDABLE MULTIFAMILY PROJECT LOANS Housing Finance Agency Requirements § 266.115 Program monitoring and evaluation. (a) HFA certifications... under this part, basic underwriting and closing information must be submitted in a format specified by...

  12. Evaluation of ADVANCE: A Nontraditional Adult Diploma Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, James

    An evaluation of Project ADVANCE (Adult Diploma Validating and Accrediting Necessary Competence and Experiences), an adult competency-based high school completion program, was conducted to determine program effectiveness, as viewed subjectively by recent graduates and present students. Personal interviews and/or questionnaires were given to 31 of…

  13. Status of beta measurement evaluation and upgrade program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swinth, K.L.

    1986-01-01

    In 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a program to evaluate and upgrade beta dosimetry capabilities at DOE and DOE-contractor facilities. The program has several elements which structure the development of improvements in beta measurement practices. In addition to Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), universities, private corporations, and other DOE facilities are involved in the research efforts

  14. Evaluation of a quality control program in radiodiagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacovenco, Alejandro; Infantosi, A.F.C.; Tauhata, L.

    1996-01-01

    A quality assurance program, implemented at the Radiologic Service of the Hospital of the Military Police in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, is evaluated. The results show a reduction around of 70% in the number of rejected films and 75% in the costs. A return to the former conditions is reported as after the discontinuation of the program

  15. 76 FR 52006 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Assisted Living Conversion Program; Fiscal Year 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ... Year 2009 Assisted Living Conversion Program Arizona Phoenix, Kivel Manor, $3,292,367, 15 units... Awards for the Assisted Living Conversion Program; Fiscal Year 2009 AGENCY: Office of the Assistant... funding under the Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for the Assisted Living Conversion Program (ALCP...

  16. Relevance Evaluation of Engineering Master's Program in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Miñán, Erick; Lavalle, Carlos; Díaz-Puente, José M.

    2012-01-01

    In a context of mass higher education, it is necessary to ensure not only quality but also the relevance of engineering master's programs, namely the appropriateness of the objectives and outcomes to the needs and interests of the program beneficiaries. After a literature review we analyzed the evaluation models of three organizations in Peru: the Board of Evaluation, Accreditation and Certification of the University Education Quality CONEAU, the Institute of Quality and Accreditation of Comp...

  17. Evaluation of the RATU2 and RETU research programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faidy, C.; Hayns, M.R.

    1998-05-01

    The report is an evaluation of the Finnish RATU2 (Structural Integrity of Nuclear Power Plants) and RETU (Reactor Safety) programs. The first generation of nuclear safety research programs were started in 1988-1990. Mid-term reviews were carried out and published in 1992. Many of the recommendations from those reviews have been implemented and they are referred to in this evaluation report

  18. CRECTJ: a computer program for compilation of evaluated nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Tsuneo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-09-01

    In order to compile evaluated nuclear data in the ENDF format, the computer program CRECTJ has been developed. CRECTJ has two versions; CRECTJ5 treats the data in the ENDF/B-IV and ENDF/B-V format, and CRECTJ6 the data in the ENDF-6 format. These programs have been frequently used to make Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (JENDL). This report describes input data and examples of CRECTJ. (author)

  19. Evaluating the High School Lunar Research Projects Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, A. J.; Shipp, S. S.; Allen, J.; Kring, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Center for Lunar Science and Exploration (CLSE), a collaboration between the Lunar and Planetary Institute and NASA's Johnson Space Center, is one of seven member teams of the NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI). In addition to research and exploration activities, the CLSE team is deeply invested in education and outreach. In support of NASA's and NLSI's objective to train the next generation of scientists, CLSE's High School Lunar Research Projects program is a conduit through which high school students can actively participate in lunar science and learn about pathways into scientific careers. The objectives of the program are to enhance 1) student views of the nature of science; 2) student attitudes toward science and science careers; and 3) student knowledge of lunar science. In its first three years, approximately 140 students and 28 teachers from across the United States have participated in the program. Before beginning their research, students undertake Moon 101, a guided-inquiry activity designed to familiarize them with lunar science and exploration. Following Moon 101, and guided by a lunar scientist mentor, teams choose a research topic, ask their own research question, and design their own research approach to direct their investigation. At the conclusion of their research, teams present their results to a panel of lunar scientists. This panel selects four posters to be presented at the annual Lunar Science Forum held at NASA Ames. The top scoring team travels to the forum to present their research. Three instruments have been developed or modified to evaluate the extent to which the High School Lunar Research Projects meets its objectives. These three instruments measure changes in student views of the nature of science, attitudes towards science and science careers, and knowledge of lunar science. Exit surveys for teachers, students, and mentors were also developed to elicit general feedback about the program and its impact. The nature of science

  20. Bringing the Incredible Years® Programs to Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster-Stratton, Carolyn; McCoy, Kathleen P.

    2015-01-01

    The Incredible Years® (IY) program series is a set of interlocking and comprehensive training programs for parents, teachers, and children. This article briefly reviews the theoretical foundations, goals, and research underlying these programs. The main purpose of the paper is to describe how the IY programs have been scaled up slowly and…